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Sample records for assignments secondary structure

  1. Protein secondary structure: category assignment and predictability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus A.; Bohr, Henrik; Brunak, Søren

    2001-01-01

    In the last decade, the prediction of protein secondary structure has been optimized using essentially one and the same assignment scheme known as DSSP. We present here a different scheme, which is more predictable. This scheme predicts directly the hydrogen bonds, which stabilize the secondary...... structures. Single sequence prediction of the new three category assignment gives an overall prediction improvement of 3.1% and 5.1%, compared to the DSSP assignment and schemes where the helix category consists of a-helix and 3(10)-helix, respectively. These results were achieved using a standard feed-forward...

  2. Protein secondary structure assignment revisited: a detailed analysis of different assignment methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Brevern Alexandre G

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of methods are now available to perform automatic assignment of periodic secondary structures from atomic coordinates, based on different characteristics of the secondary structures. In general these methods exhibit a broad consensus as to the location of most helix and strand core segments in protein structures. However the termini of the segments are often ill-defined and it is difficult to decide unambiguously which residues at the edge of the segments have to be included. In addition, there is a "twilight zone" where secondary structure segments depart significantly from the idealized models of Pauling and Corey. For these segments, one has to decide whether the observed structural variations are merely distorsions or whether they constitute a break in the secondary structure. Methods To address these problems, we have developed a method for secondary structure assignment, called KAKSI. Assignments made by KAKSI are compared with assignments given by DSSP, STRIDE, XTLSSTR, PSEA and SECSTR, as well as secondary structures found in PDB files, on 4 datasets (X-ray structures with different resolution range, NMR structures. Results A detailed comparison of KAKSI assignments with those of STRIDE and PSEA reveals that KAKSI assigns slightly longer helices and strands than STRIDE in case of one-to-one correspondence between the segments. However, KAKSI tends also to favor the assignment of several short helices when STRIDE and PSEA assign longer, kinked, helices. Helices assigned by KAKSI have geometrical characteristics close to those described in the PDB. They are more linear than helices assigned by other methods. The same tendency to split long segments is observed for strands, although less systematically. We present a number of cases of secondary structure assignments that illustrate this behavior. Conclusion Our method provides valuable assignments which favor the regularity of secondary structure segments.

  3. Toward a better understanding of structural divergences in proteins using different secondary structure assignment methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, L. F. O.

    2014-04-01

    Structural disagreements on the location and quantity of secondary structure segments comprise a current challenging problem leading to several limitations for theoretical and applied research. This paper presents 116 structural evaluations by steric and hydrophobic interactions in secondary structures within a specific template group; determines simple prediction rules that calculate 88 occurrence frequencies of large and hydrophobic residues into target intra- and inter-subgroups with structure disagreements; and utilizes 42 comparisons between the methods PROMOTIF, DSSP and STRIDE. In the stereochemical predictions inside the subgroups there are predominantly excellent and/or good success amounts with their expected values, and the disclosure of a triple molecular mechanism by residue volumetric and hydrophobic ingredients. The method comparisons show high compatibility scores between them, therefore validating their seemingly incompatible assignments. Thus, the nonconsensual ascriptions are better understood and appreciated. Furthermore, such results suggest a broad utility of our assignment method for other benchmark datasets and known methods.

  4. Sequence-specific Assignment of 1H-NMR Resonance and Determination of the Secondary Structure of Jingzhaotoxin-Ⅰ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong-Zhi ZENG; Qi ZHU; Song-Ping LIANG

    2005-01-01

    Jingzhaotoxin-Ⅰ (JZTX-Ⅰ) purified from the venom of the spider Chilobrachys jingzhao is a novel neurotoxin preferentially inhibiting cardiac sodium channel inactivation by binding to receptor site 3.The structure of this toxin in aqueous solution was investigated using 2-D 1H-NMR techniques. The complete sequence-specific assignments of proton resonance in the 1H-NMR spectra of JZTX-Ⅰ were obtained by analyzing a series of 2-D spectra, including DQF-COSY, TOCSY and NOESY spectra, in H2O and D2O. All the backbone protons except for Gln4 and more than 95% of the side-chain protons were identified by dαN,dαδ, dβN and dNN connectivities in the NOESY spectrum. These studies provide a basis for the further determination of the solution conformation of JZTX-Ⅰ. Furthermore, the secondary structure of JZTX-Ⅰ was identified from NMR data. It consists mainly of a short triple-stranded antiparallel β-sheet with Trp7-Cys9, Phe20-Lys23 and Leu28-Trp31. The characteristics of the secondary structure of JZTX-Ⅰ are similar to those of huwentoxin-Ⅰ (HWTX-Ⅰ) and hainantoxin-Ⅳ (HNTX-Ⅳ), whose structures in solution have previously been reported.

  5. Sequence-specific {sup 1}H assignment and secondary structure of the bacteriocin AS-48 cyclic peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langdon, G.M.; Bruix, M. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, C.S.I.C. (Spain); Galvez, A.; Valdivia, E.; Maqueda, M. [Universidad de Granada, Departamento de Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias (Spain); Rico, M. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, C.S.I.C. (Spain)

    1998-07-15

    The bacteriocin AS-48 is a cationic peptide (7149 Da) having a broad antimicrobial spectrum, encoded by the 68 kb conjugative plasmid pMB2 from Enterococcus faecalis S-48. It is a unique peptide since it has a cyclic structure, which is achieved by the formation of a tail-head peptide bond after ribosomal synthesis (Galvez et al., 1989; Martinez-Bueno et al., 1994; Samyn et al., 1994). Preliminary CD and calorimetric studies (data not shown) pointed towards a highly helical and very stable three dimensional structure.All the information gathered until now indicates that the target of AS-48 is the cytoplasmic membrane in which it opens channels or pores, leading to dissipation of the proton motive force and cell death, which in some cases is also followed by bacterial lysis (Galvez et al., 1991). This peptide is a suitable tool for studying protein-membrane interactions, and it also offers promising perspectives for biotechnological applications.Knowledge of the 3D structure of AS-48 is a first step in the conduct of further structure-function studies. Here we report the complete{sup 1} H NMR assignment of its proton resonances together with the resulting secondary structure pattern as prerequisites for the determination of a high-resolution 3D solution structure.

  6. Secondary structural analysis of proteins based on 13C chemical shift assignments in unresolved solid-state NMR spectra enhanced by fragmented structure database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magic-angle-spinning solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy is useful for structural analysis of non-crystalline proteins. However, the signal assignments and structural analysis are often hampered by the signal overlaps primarily due to minor structural heterogeneities, especially for uniformly-13C,15N labeled samples. To overcome this problem, we present a method for assigning 13C chemical shifts and secondary structures from unresolved two-dimensional 13C–13C MAS NMR spectra by spectral fitting, named reconstruction of spectra using protein local structures (RESPLS). The spectral fitting was conducted using databases of protein fragmented structures related to 13Cα, 13Cβ, and 13C′ chemical shifts and cross-peak intensities. The experimental 13C–13C inter- and intra-residue correlation spectra of uniformly isotope-labeled ubiquitin in the lyophilized state had a few broad peaks. The fitting analysis for these spectra provided sequence-specific Cα, Cβ, and C′ chemical shifts with an accuracy of about 1.5 ppm, which enabled the assignment of the secondary structures with an accuracy of 79 %. The structural heterogeneity of the lyophilized ubiquitin is revealed from the results. Test of RESPLS analysis for simulated spectra of five different types of proteins indicated that the method allowed the secondary structure determination with accuracy of about 80 % for the 50–200 residue proteins. These results demonstrate that the RESPLS approach expands the applicability of the NMR to non-crystalline proteins exhibiting unresolved 13C NMR spectra, such as lyophilized proteins, amyloids, membrane proteins and proteins in living cells.

  7. 1H, 15N and 13C NMR resonance assignment, secondary structure and global fold of the FMN-binding domain of human cytochrome P450

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FMN-binding domain of human NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase,corresponding to exons 3-;7, has been expressed at high level in an active form and labelled with 13C and 15N. Most of the backbone and aliphatic side-chain 1H, 15Nand 13C resonances have been assigned using heteronuclear double- and triple-resonance methods, together with a semiautomatic assignment strategy. The secondary structure as estimated from the chemical shift index and NOE connectivities consists of six α-helices and fiveβ-strands. The global fold was deduced from the long-range NOE sun ambiguously assigned in a 4D 13C-resolved HMQC-NOESY-HMQC spectrum. The fold is of the alternating α/β type, with the fiveβ-strands arranged into a parallel β-sheet. The secondary structure and global fold are very similar to those of the bacterial flavodoxins, but the FMN-binding domain has an extra short helix in place of a loop, and an extra helix at the N-terminus (leading to the membrane anchordomain in the intact P450 reductase). The experimental constraints were combined with homology modelling to obtain a structure of the FMN-bindingdomain satisfying the observed NOE constraints. Chemical shift comparisons showed that the effects of FMN binding and of FMN reduction are largely localised at the binding site

  8. Chemical shift assignments and secondary structure prediction of the C-terminal domain of the response regulator BfmR from Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Andrew L; Thompson, Richele J; Melander, Christian; Cavanagh, John

    2014-04-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative pathogen responsible for severe nocosomial infections by forming biofilms in healthcare environments. The two-domain response regulator BfmR has been shown to be the master controller for biofilm formation. Inactivation of BfmR resulted in an abolition of pili production and consequently biofilm creation. Here we report backbone and sidechain resonance assignments and secondary structure prediction for the C-terminal domain of BfmR (residues 130-238) from A. baumannii.

  9. Two- and three-dimensional sup 1 H NMR studies of a wheat phospholipid transfer protein: Sequential resonance assignments and secondary structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simorre, J.P.; Caille, A. (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Orleans (France)); Marion, D. (Laboratoire de Resonance Magnetique en Biologie et Medecine, Grenoble (France)); Marion, D. (INRA, Nantes (France)); Ptak, M. (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Orleans (France) Univ. d' Orleans (France))

    1991-12-10

    Two- and three-dimensional {sup 1}H NMR experiments have been used to sequentially assign nearly all proton resonances of the 90 residues of wheat phospholipid transfer protein. Only a few side-chain protons were not identified because of degeneracy or overlapping. The identification of spin systems and the sequential assignment were made at the same time by combining the data of the two- and three-dimensional experiments. The classical two-dimensional COSY, HOHAHA, and NOESY experiments benefit from both good resolution and high sensitivity, allowing the detection of long-range dipolar connectivities. The three-dimensional HOHAHA-NOESY experiment offers the advantage of a faster and unambiguous assignment. As a matter of fact, homonuclear three-dimensional NMR spectroscopy prove to be a very efficient method for resonance assignments of protein {sup 1}H NMR spectra which cannot be unraveled by 2D methods. An assignment strategy which overcomes most of the ambiguities has been proposed, in which each individual assignment toward the C-terminal end is supported by another in the opposite direction originating from a completely different part of the spectrum. Location of secondary structures of the phospholipid transfer protein was determined by using the method of analysis introduced here and was confirmed by {sup 3}J{sub {alpha}NH} coupling and NH exchange rates. Except for the C-terminal part, the polypeptide chain appears to be organized mainly as helical fragments connected by disulfide bridges. Further modeling will display the overall folding of the protein and should provide a better understanding of its interactions with lipids.

  10. Resonance assignments, secondary structure and 15N relaxation data of the human transcriptional coactivator hMBF1 (57-148)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishima, Masaki; Ozaki, Jun; Ikegami, Takahisa [Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Graduate School of Biological Sciences (Japan); Kabe, Yasuaki; Goto, Masahide [National Institute of Genetics, Department of Developmental Genetics (Japan); Ueda, Hitoshi; Hirose, Susumu [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Faculty of Bioscience and Biotechnology (Japan); Handa, Hiroshi [National Institute of Genetics, Department of Developmental Genetics (Japan); Shirakawa, Masahiro [Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Graduate School of Biological Sciences (Japan)

    1999-08-15

    Multiprotein bridging factor 1 (MBF1) is a transcriptional coactivator that is thought to bridge between the TATA box-binding protein (TBP) and DNA binding regulatory factors, and is conserved from yeast to human. Human MBF1 (hMBF1) can bind to TBP and to the nuclear receptor Ad4BP, and is suggested to mediate Ad4BP-dependent transcriptional activation. Here we report the resonance assignments and secondary structure of hMBF1 (57-148) that contains both TBP binding and activator binding residues. {sup 15}N relaxation data were also obtained. As a result, hMBF1 (57-148) was shown to consist of flexible N-terminal residues and a C-terminal domain. The C-terminal domain contains four helices and a conserved C-terminal region.

  11. 4-Oxalocrotonate tautomerase, a 41-kDa homohexamer: backbone and side-chain resonance assignments, solution secondary structure, and location of active site residues by heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy.

    OpenAIRE

    Stivers, J T; Abeygunawardana, C; Whitman, C. P.; Mildvan, A. S.

    1996-01-01

    4-Oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT), a homohexamer consisting of 62 residues per subunit, catalyzes the isomerization of unsaturated alpha-keto acids using Pro-1 as a general base (Stivers et al., 1996a, 1996b). We report the backbone and side-chain 1H, 15N, and 13C NMR assignments and the solution secondary structure for 4-OT using 2D and 3D homonuclear and heteronuclear NMR methods. The subunit secondary structure consists of an alpha-helix (residues 13-30), two beta-strands (beta 1, residu...

  12. Monothiodibenzoylmethane: Structural and vibrational assignments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bjarke Knud Vilster; Gorski, Alexander; Posokhov, Yevgen;

    2007-01-01

    The vibrational structure of the title compound (1,3-diphenyl-3-thioxopropane-1-one, TDBM) was studied by a variety of experimental and theoretical methods. The stable ground state configuration of TDBM was investigated by IR absorption measurements in different media, by LD polarization spectros...... to an “open”, non-chelated enethiol form (t-TCC), thereby supporting the previous conclusions by Posokhov et al. No obvious indications of the contribution of other forms to the observed spectra could be found....

  13. Unifying Temporal and Structural Credit Assignment Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agogino, Adrian K.; Tumer, Kagan

    2004-01-01

    Single-agent reinforcement learners in time-extended domains and multi-agent systems share a common dilemma known as the credit assignment problem. Multi-agent systems have the structural credit assignment problem of determining the contributions of a particular agent to a common task. Instead, time-extended single-agent systems have the temporal credit assignment problem of determining the contribution of a particular action to the quality of the full sequence of actions. Traditionally these two problems are considered different and are handled in separate ways. In this article we show how these two forms of the credit assignment problem are equivalent. In this unified frame-work, a single-agent Markov decision process can be broken down into a single-time-step multi-agent process. Furthermore we show that Monte-Carlo estimation or Q-learning (depending on whether the values of resulting actions in the episode are known at the time of learning) are equivalent to different agent utility functions in a multi-agent system. This equivalence shows how an often neglected issue in multi-agent systems is equivalent to a well-known deficiency in multi-time-step learning and lays the basis for solving time-extended multi-agent problems, where both credit assignment problems are present.

  14. Chapter V: Secondary landscape structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter deals with the secondary landscape structure of the Slovak Republic. It consists of next subchapters: (1) Land use pattern; (2) Special landscape structures; (3) Real vegetation. The secondary landscape structure consists of the elements influenced by man, created or recreated. They represent material elements with a particular spatial delimitation in the landscape. Vegetation, above all forest vegetation, is the indispensable part of the secondary landscape structure. Special space was given to the historical landscape structure

  15. Structural Encoding of Static Single Assignment Form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gal, Andreas; Probst, Christian; Franz, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Static Single Assignment (SSA) form is often used as an intermediate representation during code optimization in Java Virtual Machines. Recently, SSA has successfully been used for bytecode verification. However, constructing SSA at the code consumer is costly. SSAbased mobile code transport formats...... Java bytecode. While the resulting bytecode sequence can still be directly executed by traditional Virtual Machines, our novel VM can infer SSA form and confirm its safety with virtually no overhead....

  16. Conserved secondary structures in Aspergillus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Manson McGuire

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent evidence suggests that the number and variety of functional RNAs (ncRNAs as well as cis-acting RNA elements within mRNAs is much higher than previously thought; thus, the ability to computationally predict and analyze RNAs has taken on new importance. We have computationally studied the secondary structures in an alignment of six Aspergillus genomes. Little is known about the RNAs present in this set of fungi, and this diverse set of genomes has an optimal level of sequence conservation for observing the correlated evolution of base-pairs seen in RNAs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report the results of a whole-genome search for evolutionarily conserved secondary structures, as well as the results of clustering these predicted secondary structures by structural similarity. We find a total of 7450 predicted secondary structures, including a new predicted approximately 60 bp long hairpin motif found primarily inside introns. We find no evidence for microRNAs. Different types of genomic regions are over-represented in different classes of predicted secondary structures. Exons contain the longest motifs (primarily long, branched hairpins, 5' UTRs primarily contain groupings of short hairpins located near the start codon, and 3' UTRs contain very little secondary structure compared to other regions. There is a large concentration of short hairpins just inside the boundaries of exons. The density of predicted intronic RNAs increases with the length of introns, and the density of predicted secondary structures within mRNA coding regions increases with the number of introns in a gene. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: There are many conserved, high-confidence RNAs of unknown function in these Aspergillus genomes, as well as interesting spatial distributions of predicted secondary structures. This study increases our knowledge of secondary structure in these aspergillus organisms.

  17. The assignment of elementary school pupils to secondary school types: A correlational study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Groeneboom; J. Hoogstraten; G.J. Mellenbergh; J.P. van Santen

    1978-01-01

    Examined relationships between personality, intelligence, and achievement measures and the allocation to 1 of 6 secondary school types; Ss were 135 6th graders. Results of discriminant analyses indicated that personality scores predicted only a small portion of pupil assignment, whereas achievement

  18. Secondary Structure Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Angela G.

    2006-01-01

    Neurogenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease involve a transformation between two peptide and protein structures of alpha-helices and beta-sheets, where the peptide backbone can also participate in metal ion binding in addition to histidine residues. However, the complete absence of change in conformation of Coiled…

  19. Combined automated NOE assignment and structure calculation with CYANA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Güntert, Peter, E-mail: guentert@em.uni-frankfurt.de; Buchner, Lena [Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance, Institute of Biophysical Chemistry (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    The automated assignment of NOESY cross peaks has become a fundamental technique for NMR protein structure analysis. A widely used algorithm for this purpose is implemented in the program CYANA. It has been used for a large number of structure determinations of proteins in solution but was so far not described in full detail. In this paper we present a complete description of the CYANA implementation of automated NOESY assignment, which differs extensively from its predecessor CANDID by the use of a consistent probabilistic treatment, and we discuss its performance in the second round of the critical assessment of structure determination by NMR.

  20. Undergraduates Improve upon Published Crystal Structure in Class Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Scott; Koldewey, Philipp; Bardwell, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, 57 undergraduate students at the University of Michigan were assigned the task of solving a crystal structure, given only the electron density map of a 1.3 Å crystal structure from the electron density server, and the position of the N-terminal amino acid. To test their knowledge of amino acid chemistry, the students were not given the…

  1. Combinatorics of saturated secondary structures of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clote, P

    2006-11-01

    Following Zuker (1986), a saturated secondary structure for a given RNA sequence is a secondary structure such that no base pair can be added without violating the definition of secondary structure, e.g., without introducing a pseudoknot. In the Nussinov-Jacobson energy model (Nussinov and Jacobson, 1980), where the energy of a secondary structure is -1 times the number of base pairs, saturated secondary structures are local minima in the energy landscape, hence form kinetic traps during the folding process. Here we present recurrence relations and closed form asymptotic limits for combinatorial problems related to the number of saturated secondary structures. In addition, Python source code to compute the number of saturated secondary structures having k base pairs can be found at the web servers link of bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/.

  2. Secondary structure of synthetic oligopeptides

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez-Insua, M

    2000-01-01

    The secondary structure of three hydrophobic peptides P2, PRMo and P4 was studied by a combination of Circular Dichroism (CD), Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) and Photoinduced Electron Transfer (PET). These peptides were fluorescence labelled in the central part of the backbone and contained two modified glutamic acid residues (relative positions i, i+4): one conjugated with the fluorescence methoxynapththalene electron donor (DON) and the other with the piperidone electron acceptor (ACC). The three peptides were synthesised to study the length dependence of the switch between alpha-helix and the 3 sub 1 sub 0 -helix conformations, previously observed for peptide PRM1 (Hungerford et al., Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. Engl., 1996, 35, 326-329). The CD and FTIR data indicated that peptides P2, PRMo and P4 adopt alpha-helical conformation in organic media in the temperature range studied and no conformational switch was detected. Furthermore, a mathematical correlation was observed in the PET data, questioning the ag...

  3. Towards fully automated structure-based NMR resonance assignment of 15N-labeled proteins from automatically picked peaks

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Richard

    2011-03-01

    In NMR resonance assignment, an indispensable step in NMR protein studies, manually processed peaks from both N-labeled and C-labeled spectra are typically used as inputs. However, the use of homologous structures can allow one to use only N-labeled NMR data and avoid the added expense of using C-labeled data. We propose a novel integer programming framework for structure-based backbone resonance assignment using N-labeled data. The core consists of a pair of integer programming models: one for spin system forming and amino acid typing, and the other for backbone resonance assignment. The goal is to perform the assignment directly from spectra without any manual intervention via automatically picked peaks, which are much noisier than manually picked peaks, so methods must be error-tolerant. In the case of semi-automated/manually processed peak data, we compare our system with the Xiong-Pandurangan-Bailey- Kellogg\\'s contact replacement (CR) method, which is the most error-tolerant method for structure-based resonance assignment. Our system, on average, reduces the error rate of the CR method by five folds on their data set. In addition, by using an iterative algorithm, our system has the added capability of using the NOESY data to correct assignment errors due to errors in predicting the amino acid and secondary structure type of each spin system. On a publicly available data set for human ubiquitin, where the typing accuracy is 83%, we achieve 91% accuracy, compared to the 59% accuracy obtained without correcting for such errors. In the case of automatically picked peaks, using assignment information from yeast ubiquitin, we achieve a fully automatic assignment with 97% accuracy. To our knowledge, this is the first system that can achieve fully automatic structure-based assignment directly from spectra. This has implications in NMR protein mutant studies, where the assignment step is repeated for each mutant. © Copyright 2011, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  4. Combinatorics of locally optimal RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusy, Eric; Clote, Peter

    2014-01-01

    It is a classical result of Stein and Waterman that the asymptotic number of RNA secondary structures is 1.104366∙n-3/2∙2.618034n. Motivated by the kinetics of RNA secondary structure formation, we are interested in determining the asymptotic number of secondary structures that are locally optimal, with respect to a particular energy model. In the Nussinov energy model, where each base pair contributes -1 towards the energy of the structure, locally optimal structures are exactly the saturated structures, for which we have previously shown that asymptotically, there are 1.07427∙n-3/2∙2.35467n many saturated structures for a sequence of length n. In this paper, we consider the base stacking energy model, a mild variant of the Nussinov model, where each stacked base pair contributes -1 toward the energy of the structure. Locally optimal structures with respect to the base stacking energy model are exactly those secondary structures, whose stems cannot be extended. Such structures were first considered by Evers and Giegerich, who described a dynamic programming algorithm to enumerate all locally optimal structures. In this paper, we apply methods from enumerative combinatorics to compute the asymptotic number of such structures. Additionally, we consider analogous combinatorial problems for secondary structures with annotated single-stranded, stacking nucleotides (dangles).

  5. Pairwise amino acid secondary structural propensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemmama, Ilan E.; Chapagain, Prem P.; Gerstman, Bernard S.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the propensities for amino acids to form a specific secondary structure when they are paired with other amino acids. Our investigations use molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations, and we compare the results to those from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Proper comparison requires weighting of the MD results in a manner consistent with the relative frequency of appearance in the PDB of each possible pair of amino acids. We find that the propensity for an amino acid to assume a secondary structure varies dramatically depending on the amino acid that is before or after it in the primary sequence. This cooperative effect means that when selecting amino acids to facilitate the formation of a secondary structure in peptide engineering experiments, the adjacent amino acids must be considered. We also examine the preference for a secondary structure in bacterial proteins and compare the results to those of human proteins.

  6. Current perspectives on RNA secondary structure probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Julia; Prestwood, Liam; Lever, Andrew

    2014-08-01

    The range of roles played by structured RNAs in biological systems is vast. At the same time as we are learning more about the importance of RNA structure, recent advances in reagents, methods and technology mean that RNA secondary structural probing has become faster and more accurate. As a result, the capabilities of laboratories that already perform this type of structural analysis have increased greatly, and it has also become more widely accessible. The present review summarizes established and recently developed techniques. The information we can derive from secondary structural analysis is assessed, together with the areas in which we are likely to see exciting developments in the near future. PMID:25110033

  7. Strong Eukaryotic IRESs Have Weak Secondary Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Xuhua Xia; Martin Holcik

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objective of this work was to investigate the hypothesis that eukaryotic Internal Ribosome Entry Sites (IRES) lack secondary structure and to examine the generality of the hypothesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: IRESs of the yeast and the fruit fly are located in the 5'UTR immediately upstream of the initiation codon. The minimum folding energy (MFE) of 60 nt RNA segments immediately upstream of the initiation codons was calculated as a proxy of secondary structure stabili...

  8. Sequence-specific Assignment of 1H-NMR Resonance and Determination of the Secondary Structure of HWTX-II%虎纹捕鸟蛛毒素HWTX-II的1H-NMR信号归属和二级结构分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    舒芹; 吕善运; 顾孝诚; 梁宋平

    2001-01-01

    虎纹捕鸟蛛毒素HWTX-II是从虎纹捕鸟蛛Selenocosmia huwena的毒液中分离出的一种新型杀虫肽。应用2D-NMR技术研究该毒素分子的溶液结构特点, 通过分析水及重水DQF-COSY、COSY、TOCSY和NOESY等1H-NMR谱, 识别出HWTX-II全部37个氨基酸残基自旋体系; 通过NOESY谱中的dαN、dαδ、dβN和dNN联系完成了序列专一的谱峰归属, 确认了所有主链质子和除了Lys侧链εNH2质子外的所有侧链质子的化学位移, 为完全解析HWTX-II的溶液三维构象奠定了基础。 并且通过核磁数据分析, 确定HWTX-II的二级结构特点是含有较多的伸展构象, 尤其是C端有一个典型的双股反平行的β折叠(Trp27~Cys29和Cys34~Lys36), 分子中缺乏螺旋结构。 这些二级结构特点与已探明结构的其他蜘蛛毒素的基本相同。%Huwentoxin-II (HWTX-II) is an insecticidal peptide purified from the venom of spider Selenocosmia huwena. The structure of this toxin in solution was investigated using 2D-NMR. The complete sequence-specific assignments of proton resonance in the 1H-NMR spectra of HWTX-II were obtained by analyzing a series of 2D spectrum, including COSY, DQF-COSY, TOCSY and NOESY. All the backbone protons and side chain protons, except εNH2 protons of Lys residues, were identified by dαN, dαδ, dNN and dβN connectivities. The results provide a basis for further determination of the solution conformation of HWTX-II. Furthermore the secondary structure of HWTX-II was determined from NMR data. It contained mainly extended conformation, especially a double-stranded anti-parallel β-sheet with Trp27—Cys29 and Cys34—Lys36 at the C terminal, and it lacked helix. These characters of the secondary structure of HWTX-II were similar to those spider toxins which structure in solution had been reported.

  9. 海南捕鸟蛛毒素-Ⅰ(HNTX-Ⅰ)的1H-NMR信号归属和二级结构分析%SEQUENCE-SPECIFIC ASSIGNMENT OF 1H-NMR RESONANCE AND DETERMINATION OF THE SECONDARY STRUCTURE OF HAINANTOXIN-Ⅰ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李冬玲; 梁宋平

    2003-01-01

    Hainantoxin-Ⅰ(HNTX-Ⅰ ) is an insect blocker of voltage-gated sodium channel isolated from the venom of the Chinese bird spider Ornithoctonus hainana (early named Selenocosmia hainana). The three-dimensional conformation of HNTX- Ⅰ in aqueous solution was determined using two-dimensional 1H NMR techniques. The complete sequence-specific assignments of proton resonance in the 1H-NMR spectra of HNTX-Ⅰ were obtained by analyzing a series of 2D spectra, including double-quantum-filtered correlation spectroscopy (DQF-COSY), total correlated spectroscopy (TOCSY) and nuclear overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) in H2O and D2O. All the backbone protons and more than 96% of the side-chain protons were identified by dαN, dαN, dNN and dαδ connectivities in NOESY spectrum. Furthermore, it was found that the main element of the secondary structure of HNTX-Ⅰ is a short triple-stranded antiparallel β-sheet with Lys7-Cys9, Tyr20-Asn23 and Trp28-Val31, based on 3JNH-CαH coupling constants, sequential NOE connectivities and slowly exchanging amide protons. These characters of the secondary structure of HNTX-Ⅰ are similar to those of HWTX-Ⅰ, SHL-Ⅰ and HWTX-Ⅳ, which have known solution structures. These results provide a basis for the further determination of the solution conformation of HNTX-Ⅰ.%海南捕鸟蛛毒素-Ⅰ(HNTX-Ⅰ)是从海南捕鸟蛛(Ornithoctonus hainana)的粗毒中纯化的一种新型神经毒素.应用二维1H-NMR技术研究HNTX-Ⅰ的溶液结构特点,通过分析水和重水中的DQF-COSY、TOCSY和NOESY谱,识别出HNTX-Ⅰ全部33个氨基酸残基自旋体系;通过NOESY谱中的dαN、dβN、dNN和dαδ联系完成了序列专一的谱峰归属,从而确认了HNTX-Ⅰ所有的主链质子和大于96%的侧链质子的化学位移.并通过分析3JNH-CαH耦合常数、序列间的NOE联系以及慢氢交换质子等,确定HNTX-Ⅰ的二级结构主要是由三股反平行的β-折迭组成(Lys7-Cys9,Tyr20-Asn23和Trp28-Val31),

  10. Strong eukaryotic IRESs have weak secondary structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuhua Xia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The objective of this work was to investigate the hypothesis that eukaryotic Internal Ribosome Entry Sites (IRES lack secondary structure and to examine the generality of the hypothesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: IRESs of the yeast and the fruit fly are located in the 5'UTR immediately upstream of the initiation codon. The minimum folding energy (MFE of 60 nt RNA segments immediately upstream of the initiation codons was calculated as a proxy of secondary structure stability. MFE of the reverse complements of these 60 nt segments was also calculated. The relationship between MFE and empirically determined IRES activity was investigated to test the hypothesis that strong IRES activity is associated with weak secondary structure. We show that IRES activity in the yeast and the fruit fly correlates strongly with the structural stability, with highest IRES activity found in RNA segments that exhibit the weakest secondary structure. CONCLUSIONS: We found that a subset of eukaryotic IRESs exhibits very low secondary structure in the 5'-UTR sequences immediately upstream of the initiation codon. The consistency in results between the yeast and the fruit fly suggests a possible shared mechanism of cap-independent translation initiation that relies on an unstructured RNA segment.

  11. CSI 3.0: a web server for identifying secondary and super-secondary structure in proteins using NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafsa, Noor E; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S

    2015-07-01

    The Chemical Shift Index or CSI 3.0 (http://csi3.wishartlab.com) is a web server designed to accurately identify the location of secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains using only nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) backbone chemical shifts and their corresponding protein sequence data. Unlike earlier versions of CSI, which only identified three types of secondary structure (helix, β-strand and coil), CSI 3.0 now identifies total of 11 types of secondary and super-secondary structures, including helices, β-strands, coil regions, five common β-turns (type I, II, I', II' and VIII), β hairpins as well as interior and edge β-strands. CSI 3.0 accepts experimental NMR chemical shift data in multiple formats (NMR Star 2.1, NMR Star 3.1 and SHIFTY) and generates colorful CSI plots (bar graphs) and secondary/super-secondary structure assignments. The output can be readily used as constraints for structure determination and refinement or the images may be used for presentations and publications. CSI 3.0 uses a pipeline of several well-tested, previously published programs to identify the secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains. Comparisons with secondary and super-secondary structure assignments made via standard coordinate analysis programs such as DSSP, STRIDE and VADAR on high-resolution protein structures solved by X-ray and NMR show >90% agreement between those made with CSI 3.0.

  12. RNA Secondary Structure Analysis Using RNAstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, David H

    2014-06-17

    RNAstructure is a user-friendly program for the prediction and analysis of RNA secondary structure. It is available as a Web server, as a program with a graphical user interface, or as a set of command-line tools. The programs are available for Microsoft Windows, Macintosh OS X, or Linux. This unit provides protocols for RNA secondary structure prediction (using the Web server or the graphical user interface) and prediction of high-affinity oligonucleotide biding sites to a structured RNA target (using the graphical user interface).

  13. Enumerating secondary structures and structural moieties for circular RNAs

    CERN Document Server

    Cuesta, José A

    2016-01-01

    A quantitative characterization of the relationship between molecular sequence and structure is essential to improve our understanding of how function emerges. This particular genotype-phenotype map has been often studied in the context of RNA sequences, with the folded configurations standing as a proxy for the phenotype. Here, we count the secondary structures of circular RNAs of length $n$ and calculate the asymptotic distributions of different structural moieties, such as stems or hairpin loops, by means of symbolic combinatorics. Circular RNAs differ in essential ways from their linear counterparts. From the mathematical viewpoint, the enumeration of the corresponding secondary structures demands the use of combinatorial techniques additional to those used for linear RNAs. The asymptotic number of secondary structures for circular RNAs grows as $a^nn^{-5/2}$, with a depending on particular constraints applied to the secondary structure. The abundance of any structural moiety is normally distributed in th...

  14. General combinatorics of RNA secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Bo; Wang, Tian-ming

    2004-09-01

    The total number of RNA secondary structures of a given length with minimal hairpin loop length m(m>0) and with minimal stack length l(l>0) is computed, under the assumption that all base pairs can occur. Asymptotics are derived from the determination of recurrence relations of decomposition properties.

  15. Secondary structure of fluorescence labelled synthetic peptides

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, A S

    2000-01-01

    A series of eight synthetic oligopeptides has been prepared and their secondary structures investigated using various techniques. The project represents a continuation of an investigation into thermally induced changes in secondary structure. Following the previously reported results, the change in structure was initially thought to represent a change from an alpha-helix at low temperature to 3 sub 1 sub 0 -helix at high temperature. However, the results reported herein suggest the peptides retain an alpha-helical configuration at all temperatures studied, but that this helix can adopt at least two related forms. The difference in the structures relates to the nature of the H-bonds which may or may not involve an additional interaction from water molecules or side-chains. The peptides were encouraged to adopt a helical configuration by the inclusion of alpha- aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) residues. Also, modified forms of glutamic acid were included in the sequences. These had pendant donor (4-methoxy naphthalen...

  16. Automated assignment of NMR chemical shifts based on a known structure and 4D spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautwein, Matthias; Fredriksson, Kai; Möller, Heiko M; Exner, Thomas E

    2016-08-01

    Apart from their central role during 3D structure determination of proteins the backbone chemical shift assignment is the basis for a number of applications, like chemical shift perturbation mapping and studies on the dynamics of proteins. This assignment is not a trivial task even if a 3D protein structure is known and needs almost as much effort as the assignment for structure prediction if performed manually. We present here a new algorithm based solely on 4D [(1)H,(15)N]-HSQC-NOESY-[(1)H,(15)N]-HSQC spectra which is able to assign a large percentage of chemical shifts (73-82 %) unambiguously, demonstrated with proteins up to a size of 250 residues. For the remaining residues, a small number of possible assignments is filtered out. This is done by comparing distances in the 3D structure to restraints obtained from the peak volumes in the 4D spectrum. Using dead-end elimination, assignments are removed in which at least one of the restraints is violated. Including additional information from chemical shift predictions, a complete unambiguous assignment was obtained for Ubiquitin and 95 % of the residues were correctly assigned in the 251 residue-long N-terminal domain of enzyme I. The program including source code is available at https://github.com/thomasexner/4Dassign . PMID:27484442

  17. Effects of Verbal Event Structure on Online Thematic Role Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaia, Evie; Wilbur, Ronnie B.; Weber-Fox, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Event structure describes the relationships between general semantics ("Aktionsart") of the verb and its syntactic properties, separating verbs into two classes: telic verbs, which denote change of state events with an inherent end-point or boundary ("catch, rescue"), and atelic, which refer to homogenous activities ("tease, host"). As telic verbs…

  18. Superfamily assignments for the yeast proteome through integration of structure prediction with the gene ontology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Malmström

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the best-studied model organisms, yet the three-dimensional structure and molecular function of many yeast proteins remain unknown. Yeast proteins were parsed into 14,934 domains, and those lacking sequence similarity to proteins of known structure were folded using the Rosetta de novo structure prediction method on the World Community Grid. This structural data was integrated with process, component, and function annotations from the Saccharomyces Genome Database to assign yeast protein domains to SCOP superfamilies using a simple Bayesian approach. We have predicted the structure of 3,338 putative domains and assigned SCOP superfamily annotations to 581 of them. We have also assigned structural annotations to 7,094 predicted domains based on fold recognition and homology modeling methods. The domain predictions and structural information are available in an online database at http://rd.plos.org/10.1371_journal.pbio.0050076_01.

  19. Statistical mechanics of structural and temporal credit assignment effects on learning in neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Hiroshi; Katahira, Kentaro; Okanoya, Kazuo; Okada, Masato

    2011-05-01

    Neural networks can learn flexible input-output associations by changing their synaptic weights. The representational performance and learning dynamics of neural networks are intensively studied in several fields. Neural networks face the “credit assignment problem” in situations in which only incomplete performance evaluations are available. The credit assignment problem is that a network should assign credit or blame for its behaviors according to the contribution to the network performance. In reinforcement learning, a scalar evaluation signal is delivered to a network. The two main types of credit assignment problems in reinforcement learning are structural and temporal, that is, which parameters of the network (structural) and which past network activities (temporal) are related to an evaluation signal given from an environment. In this study, we apply statistical mechanical analysis to the learning processes in a simple neural network model to clarify the effects of two kinds of credit assignments and their interactions. Our model is based on node perturbation learning with eligibility trace. Node perturbation is a stochastic gradient learning method that can solve structural credit assignment problems by introducing a perturbation into the system output. The eligibility trace preserves the past network activities with a temporal credit to deal with the delay of an instruction signal. We show that both credit assignment effects mutually interact and the optimal time constant of the eligibility trace varies not only for the evaluation delay but also the network size.

  20. RNA secondary structure prediction using soft computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Shubhra Sankar; Pal, Sankar K

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of RNA structure is invaluable in creating new drugs and understanding genetic diseases. Several deterministic algorithms and soft computing-based techniques have been developed for more than a decade to determine the structure from a known RNA sequence. Soft computing gained importance with the need to get approximate solutions for RNA sequences by considering the issues related with kinetic effects, cotranscriptional folding, and estimation of certain energy parameters. A brief description of some of the soft computing-based techniques, developed for RNA secondary structure prediction, is presented along with their relevance. The basic concepts of RNA and its different structural elements like helix, bulge, hairpin loop, internal loop, and multiloop are described. These are followed by different methodologies, employing genetic algorithms, artificial neural networks, and fuzzy logic. The role of various metaheuristics, like simulated annealing, particle swarm optimization, ant colony optimization, and tabu search is also discussed. A relative comparison among different techniques, in predicting 12 known RNA secondary structures, is presented, as an example. Future challenging issues are then mentioned. PMID:23702539

  1. On the Variability of Neural Network Classification Measures in the Protein Secondary Structure Prediction Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Sakk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We revisit the protein secondary structure prediction problem using linear and backpropagation neural network architectures commonly applied in the literature. In this context, neural network mappings are constructed between protein training set sequences and their assigned structure classes in order to analyze the class membership of test data and associated measures of significance. We present numerical results demonstrating that classifier performance measures can vary significantly depending upon the classifier architecture and the structure class encoding technique. Furthermore, an analytic formulation is introduced in order to substantiate the observed numerical data. Finally, we analyze and discuss the ability of the neural network to accurately model fundamental attributes of protein secondary structure.

  2. Graphical analysis of NMR structural quality and interactive contact map of NOE assignments in ARIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malliavin Thérèse E

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ambiguous Restraints for Iterative Assignment (ARIA approach is widely used for NMR structure determination. It is based on simultaneously calculating structures and assigning NOE through an iterative protocol. The final solution consists of a set of conformers and a list of most probable assignments for the input NOE peak list. Results ARIA was extended with a series of graphical tools to facilitate a detailed analysis of the intermediate and final results of the ARIA protocol. These additional features provide (i an interactive contact map, serving as a tool for the analysis of assignments, and (ii graphical representations of structure quality scores and restraint statistics. The interactive contact map between residues can be clicked to obtain information about the restraints and their contributions. Profiles of quality scores are plotted along the protein sequence, and contact maps provide information of the agreement with the data on a residue pair level. Conclusion The graphical tools and outputs described here significantly extend the validation and analysis possibilities of NOE assignments given by ARIA as well as the analysis of the quality of the final structure ensemble. These tools are included in the latest version of ARIA, which is available at http://aria.pasteur.fr. The Web site also contains an installation guide, a user manual and example calculations.

  3. A Review on Eigenstructure Assignment Methods and Orthogonal Eigenstructure Control of Structural Vibrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rastgaar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a state-of-the-art review of eigenstructure assignment methods for vibration cancellation. Eigenstructure assignment techniques have been widely used during the past three decades for vibration suppression in structures, especially in large space structures. These methods work similar to mode localization in which global vibrations are managed such that they remain localized within the structure. Such localization would help reducing vibrations more effectively than other methods of vibration cancellation, by virtue of confining the vibrations close to the source of disturbance. The common objective of different methods of eigenstructure assignment is to provide controller design freedom beyond pole placement, and define appropriate shapes for the eigenvectors of the systems. These methods; however, offer a large and complex design space of options that can often overwhelm the control designer. Recent developments in orthogonal eigenstructure control offers a significant simplification of the design task while allowing some experience-based design freedom. The majority of the papers from the past three decades in structural vibration cancellation using eigenstructure assignment methods are reviewed, along with recent studies that introduce new developments in eigenstructure assignment techniques.

  4. RNA-SSPT: RNA Secondary Structure Prediction Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Freed; Mahboob, Shahid; Gulzar, Tahsin; Din, Salah U; Hanif, Tanzeela; Ahmad, Hifza; Afzal, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of RNA structure is useful for understanding evolution for both in silico and in vitro studies. Physical methods like NMR studies to predict RNA secondary structure are expensive and difficult. Computational RNA secondary structure prediction is easier. Comparative sequence analysis provides the best solution. But secondary structure prediction of a single RNA sequence is challenging. RNA-SSPT is a tool that computationally predicts secondary structure of a single RNA sequence. Most of the RNA secondary structure prediction tools do not allow pseudoknots in the structure or are unable to locate them. Nussinov dynamic programming algorithm has been implemented in RNA-SSPT. The current studies shows only energetically most favorable secondary structure is required and the algorithm modification is also available that produces base pairs to lower the total free energy of the secondary structure. For visualization of RNA secondary structure, NAVIEW in C language is used and modified in C# for tool requirement. RNA-SSPT is built in C# using Dot Net 2.0 in Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 Professional edition. The accuracy of RNA-SSPT is tested in terms of Sensitivity and Positive Predicted Value. It is a tool which serves both secondary structure prediction and secondary structure visualization purposes. PMID:24250115

  5. Structural characterization of homogalacturonan by NMR spectroscopy - assignment of reference compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bent O.; Meier, Sebastian; Duus, Jens Øllgaard;

    2008-01-01

    Complete assignment of 1H and 13C NMR of six hexagalactopyranuronic acids with varying degree and pattern of methyl esterification is reported. The NMR experiments were run at room temperature using approximately 2 mg of sample making this method convenient for studying the structure of homogalac...

  6. Structured Role Assignment and Other Techniques for Facilitating Process in Adolescent Psychotherapy Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corder, Billie F.; Whiteside, Reid

    1990-01-01

    Describes application of techniques for structuring interchange and feedback process in adolescent psychotherapy groups, including random assignment of "roles" for each member during sessions, "parent hot seat" exercises, group goal booklets, and negotiation exercises. Techniques discussed have proven helpful in ensuring effective group…

  7. Prediction of protein folding rates from simplified secondary structure alphabet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jitao T; Wang, Titi; Huang, Shanran R; Li, Xin

    2015-10-21

    Protein folding is a very complicated and highly cooperative dynamic process. However, the folding kinetics is likely to depend more on a few key structural features. Here we find that secondary structures can determine folding rates of only large, multi-state folding proteins and fails to predict those for small, two-state proteins. The importance of secondary structures for protein folding is ordered as: extended β strand > α helix > bend > turn > undefined secondary structure>310 helix > isolated β strand > π helix. Only the first three secondary structures, extended β strand, α helix and bend, can achieve a good correlation with folding rates. This suggests that the rate-limiting step of protein folding would depend upon the formation of regular secondary structures and the buckling of chain. The reduced secondary structure alphabet provides a simplified description for the machine learning applications in protein design. PMID:26247139

  8. Systematic evaluation of combined automated NOE assignment and structure calculation with CYANA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchner, Lena; Güntert, Peter, E-mail: guentert@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Institute of Biophysical Chemistry, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance, and Frankfurt Institute of Advanced Studies (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    The automated assignment of NOESY cross peaks has become a fundamental technique for NMR protein structure analysis. A widely used algorithm for this purpose is implemented in the program CYANA. It has been used for a large number of structure determinations of proteins in solution but a systematic evaluation of its performance has not yet been reported. In this paper we systematically analyze the reliability of combined automated NOESY assignment and structure calculation with CYANA under a variety of conditions on the basis of the experimental NMR data sets of ten proteins. To evaluate the robustness of the algorithm, the original high-quality experimental data sets were modified in different ways to simulate the effect of data imperfections, i.e. incomplete or erroneous chemical shift assignments, missing NOESY cross peaks, inaccurate peak positions, inaccurate peak intensities, lower dimensionality NOESY spectra, and higher tolerances for the matching of chemical shifts and peak positions. The results show that the algorithm is remarkably robust with regard to imperfections of the NOESY peak lists and the chemical shift tolerances but susceptible to lacking or erroneous resonance assignments, in particular for nuclei that are involved in many NOESY cross peaks.

  9. A novel strategy for NMR resonance assignment and protein structure determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemak, Alexander [University of Toronto, Ontario Cancer Institute and Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics (Canada); Gutmanas, Aleksandras [European Bioinformatics Institute, Protein Data Bank Europe (United Kingdom); Chitayat, Seth; Karra, Murthy [University of Toronto, Ontario Cancer Institute and Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics (Canada); Fares, Christophe [Max-Planck-Institut f. Kohlenforschung (Germany); Sunnerhagen, Maria [Linkoeping University, Division of Molecular Biotechnology, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (Sweden); Arrowsmith, Cheryl H., E-mail: carrow@uhnres.utoronto.ca [University of Toronto, Ontario Cancer Institute and Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics (Canada)

    2011-01-15

    The quality of protein structures determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is contingent on the number and quality of experimentally-derived resonance assignments, distance and angular restraints. Two key features of protein NMR data have posed challenges for the routine and automated structure determination of small to medium sized proteins; (1) spectral resolution - especially of crowded nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) spectra, and (2) the reliance on a continuous network of weak scalar couplings as part of most common assignment protocols. In order to facilitate NMR structure determination, we developed a semi-automated strategy that utilizes non-uniform sampling (NUS) and multidimensional decomposition (MDD) for optimal data collection and processing of selected, high resolution multidimensional NMR experiments, combined it with an ABACUS protocol for sequential and side chain resonance assignments, and streamlined this procedure to execute structure and refinement calculations in CYANA and CNS, respectively. Two graphical user interfaces (GUIs) were developed to facilitate efficient analysis and compilation of the data and to guide automated structure determination. This integrated method was implemented and refined on over 30 high quality structures of proteins ranging from 5.5 to 16.5 kDa in size.

  10. A novel strategy for NMR resonance assignment and protein structure determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quality of protein structures determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is contingent on the number and quality of experimentally-derived resonance assignments, distance and angular restraints. Two key features of protein NMR data have posed challenges for the routine and automated structure determination of small to medium sized proteins; (1) spectral resolution – especially of crowded nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) spectra, and (2) the reliance on a continuous network of weak scalar couplings as part of most common assignment protocols. In order to facilitate NMR structure determination, we developed a semi-automated strategy that utilizes non-uniform sampling (NUS) and multidimensional decomposition (MDD) for optimal data collection and processing of selected, high resolution multidimensional NMR experiments, combined it with an ABACUS protocol for sequential and side chain resonance assignments, and streamlined this procedure to execute structure and refinement calculations in CYANA and CNS, respectively. Two graphical user interfaces (GUIs) were developed to facilitate efficient analysis and compilation of the data and to guide automated structure determination. This integrated method was implemented and refined on over 30 high quality structures of proteins ranging from 5.5 to 16.5 kDa in size.

  11. Prediction of the Secondary Structure of HIV-1 gp120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Jens O.;

    1996-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The predicted secondary structure of gp120 compared well with data from NMR analysis of synthetic peptides from the V3 loop and the C4 region. As a first step towards modeling the tertiary structure of gp120, the predicted secondary structure may guide the design...... of future HIV sub-unit vaccine candidates....

  12. Prediction of the secondary structure of HIV-1 gp120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Lund, O; Nielsen, Jens Ole;

    1996-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The predicted secondary structure of gp120 compared well with data from NMR analysis of synthetic peptides from the V3 loop and the C4 region. As a first step towards modeling the tertiary structure of gp120, the predicted secondary structure may guide the design...... of future HIV subunit vaccine candidates....

  13. APSY-NMR for protein backbone assignment in high-throughput structural biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Samit Kumar; Serrano, Pedro; Proudfoot, Andrew; Geralt, Michael [The Scripps Research Institute, Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology (United States); Pedrini, Bill [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), SwissFEL Project (Switzerland); Herrmann, Torsten [Université de Lyon, Institut des Sciences Analytiques, Centre de RMN à Très Hauts Champs, UMR 5280 CNRS, ENS Lyon, UCB Lyon 1 (France); Wüthrich, Kurt, E-mail: wuthrich@scripps.edu [The Scripps Research Institute, Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology (United States)

    2015-01-15

    A standard set of three APSY-NMR experiments has been used in daily practice to obtain polypeptide backbone NMR assignments in globular proteins with sizes up to about 150 residues, which had been identified as targets for structure determination by the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG) under the auspices of the Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). In a representative sample of 30 proteins, initial fully automated data analysis with the software UNIO-MATCH-2014 yielded complete or partial assignments for over 90 % of the residues. For most proteins the APSY data acquisition was completed in less than 30 h. The results of the automated procedure provided a basis for efficient interactive validation and extension to near-completion of the assignments by reference to the same 3D heteronuclear-resolved [{sup 1}H,{sup 1}H]-NOESY spectra that were subsequently used for the collection of conformational constraints. High-quality structures were obtained for all 30 proteins, using the J-UNIO protocol, which includes extensive automation of NMR structure determination.

  14. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopic Analysis of Protein Secondary Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jilie KONG; Shaoning YU

    2007-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is one of the oldest and well established experimental techniques for the analysis of secondary structure of polypeptides and proteins. It is convenient, non-destructive, requires less sample preparation, and can be used under a wide variety of conditions. This review introduces the recent developments in Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy technique and its applications to protein structural studies. The experimental skills, data analysis, and correlations between the FTIR spectroscopic bands and protein secondary structure components are discussed. The applications of FTIR to the secondary structure analysis, conformational changes, structural dynamics and stability studies of proteins are also discussed.

  15. Computer-aided nucleic acid secondary structure modeling incorporating enzymatic digestion data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, G J; Gehrke, L; Roth, D A; Auron, P E

    1984-01-01

    We present a computer-aided method for determining nucleic acid secondary structure. The method utilizes a program which has the capability to filter matrix diagonal data on the basis of diagonal length, stabilization energy, and chemical and enzymatic data. The program also allows the user to assign selected regions of the structure as uniquely single-stranded or paired, and to filter out "trade-off" structures on the basis of such pairing. In order to demonstrate the utility of the program we present a preliminary secondary structure for the 3' end of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA 4 (AMV-4 RNA). This structure is based on an analysis which includes the use of in vitro partial enzymatic digestion of the RNA. Images PMID:6320093

  16. Automating unambiguous NOE data usage in NVR for NMR protein structure-based assignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmedov, Murodzhon; Çatay, Bülent; Apaydın, Mehmet Serkan

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy is an important technique that allows determining protein structure in solution. An important problem in protein structure determination using NMR spectroscopy is the mapping of peaks to corresponding amino acids, also known as the assignment problem. Structure-Based Assignment (SBA) is an approach to solve this problem using a template structure that is homologous to the target. Our previously developed approach Nuclear Vector Replacement-Binary Integer Programming (NVR-BIP) computed the optimal solution for small proteins, but was unable to solve the assignments of large proteins. NVR-Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) extended the applicability of the NVR approach for such proteins. One of the input data utilized in these approaches is the Nuclear Overhauser Effect (NOE) data. NOE is an interaction observed between two protons if the protons are located close in space. These protons could be amide protons, protons attached to the alpha-carbon atom in the backbone of the protein, or side chain protons. NVR only uses backbone protons. In this paper, we reformulate the NVR-BIP model to distinguish the type of proton in NOE data and use the corresponding proton coordinates in the extended formulation. In addition, the threshold value over interproton distances is set in a standard manner for all proteins by extracting the NOE upper bound distance information from the data. We also convert NOE intensities into distance thresholds. Our new approach thus handles the NOE data correctly and without manually determined parameters. We accordingly adapt NVR-ACO solution methodology to these changes. Computational results show that our approaches obtain optimal solutions for small proteins. For the large proteins our ant colony optimization-based approach obtains promising results. PMID:26260854

  17. The architectural network for protein secondary structure prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anindya Sundar Panja

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 25 years, the accuracy of proteins secondary structure prediction has improved substantially. Recently evolutionary information taken from the deviation of proteins in some structural family have again enhance prediction accuracy for all these residues predicted correctly is in one of the three sates helix, strands and others . The new methods developed over the past few years may be interesting in context of improvements which is achieved through combination of the existing methods. Evolutionary divergences profile posses’ adequate information to improve protein secondary structure prediction accuracy. These profiles can also able to correctly predict long stretches of identical residues in other secondary structure. This sequence structure relationship may help to help to developed tool which can efficiently predict the protein secondary structure from its amino acid sequence

  18. Unified approach to partition functions of RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundschuh, Ralf

    2014-11-01

    RNA secondary structure formation is a field of considerable biological interest as well as a model system for understanding generic properties of heteropolymer folding. This system is particularly attractive because the partition function and thus all thermodynamic properties of RNA secondary structure ensembles can be calculated numerically in polynomial time for arbitrary sequences and homopolymer models admit analytical solutions. Such solutions for many different aspects of the combinatorics of RNA secondary structure formation share the property that the final solution depends on differences of statistical weights rather than on the weights alone. Here, we present a unified approach to a large class of problems in the field of RNA secondary structure formation. We prove a generic theorem for the calculation of RNA folding partition functions. Then, we show that this approach can be applied to the study of the molten-native transition, denaturation of RNA molecules, as well as to studies of the glass phase of random RNA sequences.

  19. Dynamics in Sequence Space for RNA Secondary Structure Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthies, Marco C; Bienert, Stefan; Torda, Andrew E

    2012-10-01

    We have implemented a method for the design of RNA sequences that should fold to arbitrary secondary structures. A popular energy model allows one to take the derivative with respect to composition, which can then be interpreted as a force and used for Newtonian dynamics in sequence space. Combined with a negative design term, one can rapidly sample sequences which are compatible with a desired secondary structure via simulated annealing. Results for 360 structures were compared with those from another nucleic acid design program using measures such as the probability of the target structure and an ensemble-weighted distance to the target structure.

  20. Combinatorics of RNA Secondary Structures with Base Triples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Robert; Nebel, Markus E

    2015-07-01

    The structure of RNA has been the subject of intense research over the last decades due to its importance for the correct functioning of RNA molecules in biological processes. Hence, a large number of models for RNA folding and corresponding algorithms for structure prediction have been developed. However, previous models often only consider base pairs, although every base is capable of up to three edge-to-edge interactions with other bases. Recently, Höner zu Siederdissen et al. presented an extended model of RNA secondary structure, including base triples together with a folding algorithm-the first thermodynamics-based algorithm that allows the prediction of secondary structures with base triples. In this article, we investigate the search space processed by this new algorithm, that is, the combinatorics of extended RNA secondary structures with base triples. We present generalized definitions for structural motifs like hairpins, stems, bulges, or interior loops occurring in structures with base triples. Furthermore, we prove precise asymptotic results for the number of different structures (size of search space) and expectations for various parameters associated with structural motifs (typical shape of folding). Our analysis shows that the asymptotic number of secondary structures of size n increases exponentially to [Formula: see text] compared to the classic model by Stein and Waterman for which [Formula: see text] structures exist. A comparison with the classic model reveals large deviations in the expected structural appearance, too. The inclusion of base triples constitutes a significant refinement of the combinatorial model of RNA secondary structure, which, by our findings, is quantitatively characterized. Our results are of special theoretical interest, because a closer look at the numbers involved suggests that extended RNA secondary structures constitute a new combinatorial class not bijective with any other combinatorial objects studied so far.

  1. A method for rapid similarity analysis of RNA secondary structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Na

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Owing to the rapid expansion of RNA structure databases in recent years, efficient methods for structure comparison are in demand for function prediction and evolutionary analysis. Usually, the similarity of RNA secondary structures is evaluated based on tree models and dynamic programming algorithms. We present here a new method for the similarity analysis of RNA secondary structures. Results Three sets of real data have been used as input for the example applications. Set I includes the structures from 5S rRNAs. Set II includes the secondary structures from RNase P and RNase MRP. Set III includes the structures from 16S rRNAs. Reasonable phylogenetic trees are derived for these three sets of data by using our method. Moreover, our program runs faster as compared to some existing ones. Conclusion The famous Lempel-Ziv algorithm can efficiently extract the information on repeated patterns encoded in RNA secondary structures and makes our method an alternative to analyze the similarity of RNA secondary structures. This method will also be useful to researchers who are interested in evolutionary analysis.

  2. Combining neural networks for protein secondary structure prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Søren Kamaric

    1995-01-01

    In this paper structured neural networks are applied to the problem of predicting the secondary structure of proteins. A hierarchical approach is used where specialized neural networks are designed for each structural class and then combined using another neural network. The submodels are designed...

  3. Computing the partition function for kinetically trapped RNA secondary structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A Lorenz

    Full Text Available An RNA secondary structure is locally optimal if there is no lower energy structure that can be obtained by the addition or removal of a single base pair, where energy is defined according to the widely accepted Turner nearest neighbor model. Locally optimal structures form kinetic traps, since any evolution away from a locally optimal structure must involve energetically unfavorable folding steps. Here, we present a novel, efficient algorithm to compute the partition function over all locally optimal secondary structures of a given RNA sequence. Our software, RNAlocopt runs in O(n3 time and O(n2 space. Additionally, RNAlocopt samples a user-specified number of structures from the Boltzmann subensemble of all locally optimal structures. We apply RNAlocopt to show that (1 the number of locally optimal structures is far fewer than the total number of structures--indeed, the number of locally optimal structures approximately equal to the square root of the number of all structures, (2 the structural diversity of this subensemble may be either similar to or quite different from the structural diversity of the entire Boltzmann ensemble, a situation that depends on the type of input RNA, (3 the (modified maximum expected accuracy structure, computed by taking into account base pairing frequencies of locally optimal structures, is a more accurate prediction of the native structure than other current thermodynamics-based methods. The software RNAlocopt constitutes a technical breakthrough in our study of the folding landscape for RNA secondary structures. For the first time, locally optimal structures (kinetic traps in the Turner energy model can be rapidly generated for long RNA sequences, previously impossible with methods that involved exhaustive enumeration. Use of locally optimal structure leads to state-of-the-art secondary structure prediction, as benchmarked against methods involving the computation of minimum free energy and of maximum expected

  4. Transitions between secondary structures in isolated polyalanines

    OpenAIRE

    Calvo, Florent; Poulain, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations of gas-phase polyalanine peptides have been carried out with the Amber ff96 force field. A low-temperature structural transition takes place between the α-helix stable conformation and β-sheet structures, followed by the unfolding phase change. The transition state ensembles connect- ing the helix and sheet conformations are investigated by sampling the energy landscape along specific geometric order parameters as putative reaction coordinates, namely the electric dipo...

  5. Material properties assignment to finite element models of bone structures: a new method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zannoni, C; Mantovani, R; Viceconti, M

    1998-12-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA) is widely adopted to investigate the mechanical behaviour of bone structures. Computed tomography (CT) data are frequently used to generate FE models of bone. If properly calibrated, CT images are capable of providing accurate information about the bone morphology and tissue density. The aim of this work was to develop a special program able to read a CT data set as well as the FEA mesh generated from it, and to assign to each element of the mesh the material properties derived from the bone tissue density at the element location. The program was tested on phantom data sets and was adopted to evaluate the effects of the discrete description of the bone material properties. A three-dimensional FE model was generated automatically from a 16 bit CT data set of a distal femur acquired in vivo. The strain energy density (SED) was evaluated for each model element for increasing model complexity (number of different material cards assigned to the model). The computed SED were strongly dependent on the material mapping strategy. PMID:10223642

  6. A comparison of SNP and STR loci for delineating population structure and performing individual genetic assignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glover, Kevin A.; Hansen, Michael Møller; Lien, Sigbjørn;

    2010-01-01

    between SNP and STR data sets and variants thereof. The best 15 SNPs (30 alleles) gave a similar level of self-assignment to the best 4 STR loci (83 alleles), however, addition of further STR loci did not lead to a notable increase assignment whereas addition of up to 100 SNP loci increased assignment...... relationships at the individual and population levels....

  7. Predicting the Secondary Structure of Proteins by Cascading Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Alirezaee

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Protein Secondary Structure Prediction (PSSP is considered as a challenging task in bioinformatics and so many approaches have been proposed in the literature to solve this problem via achieving more accurate prediction results. Accurate prediction of secondary structure is a critical role in deducing tertiary structure of proteins and their functions. Among the proposed approaches to tackle this problem, Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs are considered as one of the successful tools that are widely used in this field. Recently, many efforts have been devoted to modify, improve and combine this methodology with other machine learning methods in order to get better results. In this work, we have proposed a two-stage feed forward neural network for prediction of protein secondary structures. To evaluate our approach, it is applied on RS126 dataset and its results are compared with some other NN-based methods.

  8. The 5'-3' Distance of RNA Secondary Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Hillary S W; Reidys, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Recently, Yoffe and colleagues observed that the average distances between 5'-3' ends of RNA molecules are very small and largely independent of sequence length. This observation is based on numerical computations as well as theoretical arguments maximizing certain entropy functionals....... In this article, we compute the exact distribution of 5'-3' distances of RNA secondary structures for any finite n. Furthermore, we compute the limit distribution and show that for n = 30 the exact distribution and the limit distribution are very close. Our results show that the distances of random RNA secondary...... structures are distinctively lower than those of minimum free energy structures of random RNA sequences....

  9. Protein secondary-structure description with a coarse-grained model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneller, Gerald R; Hinsen, Konrad

    2015-07-01

    A coarse-grained geometrical model for protein secondary-structure description and analysis is presented which uses only the positions of the C(α) atoms. A space curve connecting these positions by piecewise polynomial interpolation is constructed and the folding of the protein backbone is described by a succession of screw motions linking the Frenet frames at consecutive C(α) positions. Using the ASTRAL subset of the SCOPe database of protein structures, thresholds are derived for the screw parameters of secondary-structure elements and demonstrate that the latter can be reliably assigned on the basis of a C(α) model. For this purpose, a comparative study with the widely used DSSP (Define Secondary Structure of Proteins) algorithm was performed and it was shown that the parameter distribution corresponding to the ensemble of all pure C(α) structures in the RCSB Protein Data Bank matches that of the ASTRAL database. It is expected that this approach will be useful in the development of structure-refinement techniques for low-resolution data. PMID:26143913

  10. RNA secondary structure diagrams for very large molecules: RNAfdl

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecker, Nikolai; Wiegels, Tim; Torda, Andrew E.

    2013-01-01

    There are many programs that can read the secondary structure of an RNA molecule and draw a diagram, but hardly any that can cope with 10 3 bases. RNAfdl is slow but capable of producing intersection-free diagrams for ribosome-sized structures, has a graphical user interface for adjustments...

  11. NMR Methods for Characterization of RNA Secondary Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Scott D

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of RNA secondary structure is often sufficient to identify relationships between the structure of RNA and processing pathways, and the design of therapeutics. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) can identify types of nucleotide base pairs and the sequence, thus limiting possible secondary structures. Because NMR experiments, like chemical mapping, are performed in solution, not in single crystals, experiments can be initiated as soon as the biomolecule is expressed and purified. This chapter summarizes NMR methods that permit rapid identification of RNA secondary structure, information that can be used as supplements to chemical mapping, and/or as preliminary steps required for 3D structure determination. The primary aim is to provide guidelines to enable a researcher with minimal knowledge of NMR to quickly extract secondary structure information from basic datasets. Instrumental and sample considerations that can maximize data quality are discussed along with some details for optimal data acquisition and processing parameters. Approaches for identifying base pair types in both unlabeled and isotopically labeled RNA are covered. Common problems, such as missing signals and overlaps, and approaches to address them are considered. Programs under development for merging NMR data with structure prediction algorithms are briefly discussed. PMID:27665604

  12. Effect of secondary weld thermal cycle on structure and properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with structure and impact energy of weld HAZ of 10CrNi3MoV steel after secondary weld thermal cycle (t8/5=8(¨)s~120(¨)s; peak temperature Tm=750℃~1(¨)300℃). It is demonstrated that the coarse grain and structure produced by first thermal cycle keep unchanged after secondary thermal cycle above Ac1 critical temperature but below 1(¨)050(¨)℃. At the same time the low temperature impact energy decreases obviously with increasing t8/5. By metallurgical microscope and transmission electron microscope(TEM) , it is revealed that the effect of coarse grain and structure caused by secondary thermal cycle on low temperature impact energy.

  13. Secondary systems modeled as fuzzy sub-structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp-Johansen, Niels Jacob; Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager; Lin, Y.K.

    1998-01-01

    Vibrating secondary systems attached to a primary vibrating structure (called the master structure) modify the dynamical properties of the master structure. In engineering practice the dynamical properties of the secondary systems are often very incompletely known. This uncertain knowledge may...... be combined with a model of the random distribution of the fuzzies over the structure by letting the entire system of fuzzies be characterized as a triplet of random fields over the structure. Two specific examples, a Poisson point pulse field and a Poisson square wave field, of such a triplet field...... are considered for a rigid one-degree of freedom master structure. Approximate distribution properties of the impedance, the frequency response function and other related functions of the imposed frequency are obtained by use of Winterstein approximation technique. This information can be used to determine...

  14. Protein Secondary Structure Prediction using Pattern Recognition Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.V. Nageswara Rao

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Proteins are key biological molecules with diverse functions. With newer technologies producing more data (genomics, proteomics than can be annotated manually, in silico methods of predicting their structure and thereafter their function has been christened the Holy Grail of structural bioinformatics. Successful secondary structureprediction provides a starting point for direct tertiary structure modeling; in addition it improves sequence analysis and sequence-structure binding for structure and function determination. Using machine learning and data mining process, we developed a pattern recognition technique based on statistical for predicting protein secondary structure from the component amino acid sequence. By applying this technique, a performance score of Q8=72.3% was achieved. This compares well with other established techniques, such as NN-I and GOR IV which achieved Q3 scores of 64.05% and 63.19% respectively when predictions are made on single sequence alone.

  15. Prediction algorithm for amino acid types with their secondary structure in proteins (PLATON) using chemical shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labudde, D.; Leitner, D.; Krueger, M.; Oschkinat, H. [Forschungsinstitut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (Germany)], E-mail: oschkinat@fmp-berlin.de

    2003-01-15

    The algorithm PLATON is able to assign sets of chemical shifts derived from a single residue to amino acid types with its secondary structure (amino acid species). A subsequent ranking procedure using optionally two different penalty functions yields predictions for possible amino acid species for the given set of chemical shifts. This was demonstrated in the case of the {alpha}-spectrin SH3 domain and applied to 9 further protein data sets taken from the BioMagRes database. A database consisting of reference chemical shift patterns (reference CSPs) was generated from assigned chemical shifts of proteins with known 3D-structure. This reference CSP database is used in our approach for extracting distributions of amino acid types with their most likely secondary structure elements (namely {alpha}-helix, {beta}-sheet, and coil) for single amino acids by comparison with query CSPs. Results obtained for the 10 investigated proteins indicates that the percentage of correct amino acid species in the first three positions in the ranking list, ranges from 71.4% to 93.2% for the more favorable penalty function. Where only the top result of the ranking list for these 10 proteins is considered, 36.5% to 83.1% of the amino acid species are correctly predicted. The main advantage of our approach, over other methods that rely on average chemical shift values is the ability to increase database content by incorporating newly derived CSPs, and therefore to improve PLATON's performance over time.

  16. Prediction algorithm for amino acid types with their secondary structure in proteins (PLATON) using chemical shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The algorithm PLATON is able to assign sets of chemical shifts derived from a single residue to amino acid types with its secondary structure (amino acid species). A subsequent ranking procedure using optionally two different penalty functions yields predictions for possible amino acid species for the given set of chemical shifts. This was demonstrated in the case of the α-spectrin SH3 domain and applied to 9 further protein data sets taken from the BioMagRes database. A database consisting of reference chemical shift patterns (reference CSPs) was generated from assigned chemical shifts of proteins with known 3D-structure. This reference CSP database is used in our approach for extracting distributions of amino acid types with their most likely secondary structure elements (namely α-helix, β-sheet, and coil) for single amino acids by comparison with query CSPs. Results obtained for the 10 investigated proteins indicates that the percentage of correct amino acid species in the first three positions in the ranking list, ranges from 71.4% to 93.2% for the more favorable penalty function. Where only the top result of the ranking list for these 10 proteins is considered, 36.5% to 83.1% of the amino acid species are correctly predicted. The main advantage of our approach, over other methods that rely on average chemical shift values is the ability to increase database content by incorporating newly derived CSPs, and therefore to improve PLATON's performance over time

  17. A phase transition in energy-filtered RNA secondary structures

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Hillary Siwei; Reidys, Christian

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we study the effect of energy parameters on minimum free energy (mfe) RNA secondary structures. Employing a simplified combinatorial energy model, that is only dependent on the diagram representation and that is not sequence specific, we prove the following dichotomy result. Mfe structures derived via the Turner energy parameters contain only finitely many complex irreducible substructures and just minor parameter changes produce a class of mfe-structures that contain a large nu...

  18. Collisional Line Assignments and Hyperfine Structure Interpretation in Cs2 23△1g State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan Li; Feng Xie; Li Li; Ergin H.Ahmed; A.Marjatta Lyyra

    2013-01-01

    Accurately known energy level structure of the Cs2 A1Σu+-b3IIu complex of states from a recent global de-perturbation of these states has enabled additional assignments of 140 perturbation facilitated infrared-infrared double resonance (PFIIDR) transitions to the 23/1g state from collisionally populated intermediate A1Σu+levels.Together with the 221 previously observed 23△1g←A1∑u+←X1∑g+ double resonance lines [J.Chem.Phys.128,204313(2008)],molecular constants and the Rydberg-Klein-Rees potential energy curve of the 23△1g state have been recalculated (excluding 54 perturbed levels).The centrifugal distortion constant has been determined and agrees well with the value calculated based on standard empirical formulas.The hyperfine structure of the 23/g state,which has not resolved in our sub-Doppler excitation spectra of the 23/1g state,has been interpreted with a preliminary simulation.

  19. Infrared and Raman spectra, r0 structural parameters, conformational stability, and vibrational assignment of 2-cyanoethylamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durig, James R.; Darkhalil, Ikhlas D.; Klaassen, Joshua J.

    2012-09-01

    The infrared spectra (4000-200 cm-1) of the gas and solid and the Raman spectrum (4000-40 cm-1) of the liquid have been recorded. Vibrational fundamentals have been identified for four of the possible five stable conformers and complete vibrational assignments have been made for the Gg and Gt forms where the Capital G is for Gauche for the orientation around the Csbnd C bond and the lower cases g and t for gauche and trans orientation for the amine. These forms are the two lowest energy conformers. Vibrational assignments have been supported by MP2(full)/6-31G(d) ab initio calculations to predict harmonic force constants, fundamental frequencies, infrared intensities, Raman activities, and depolarization ratios. The conformational stabilities have been predicted from ab initio calculations utilizing several different basis sets up to aug-cc-pVTZ for both MP2(full) and density functional theory calculations by the B3LYP method. The enthalpy differences between the Gg and Gt conformers was determined to be 75 cm-1 and for the Gg to Tg form 333 cm-1. The r0 structural parameters have been obtained for the two most stable conformers from predicted parameters from ab initio MP2(full)/6-311+G(d,p) calculations adjusted to fit the previously reported microwave rotational constants. The determined heavy atom structural values for the Gg [Gt] conformer are: the distances (Å) N1sbnd C2 = 1.461(3) [1.453(3)], C2sbnd C3 = 1.535(3) [1.545(3)], C3sbnd C4 = 1.466(3) [1.463(3)], C4tbnd N5 = 1.161(3) [1.161(3)] and angles (°) ∠N1C2C3 = 109.5(5) [116.0(5)], ∠C2C3C4 = 111.1(5) [111.1(5)], ∠C3C4N5 = 177.4(5) [177.0(5)]. These parameters are compared to those estimated from the microwave study. The results are discussed and compared to the corresponding properties of some similar molecules.

  20. {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N NMR assignment and solution structure of the SH3 domain of spectrin: Comparison of unrefined and refined structure sets with the crystal structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanco, Francisco J.; Ortiz, Angel R.; Serrano, Luis [European Molecular Biology Laboratory (Germany)

    1997-06-15

    The assignment of the {sup 1}H and {sup 15}Nnuclear magnetic resonance spectra of the Src-homology region 3 domain of chicken brain {alpha}-spectrin has been obtained. A set of solution structures has been determined from distance and dihedral angle restraints,which provide a reasonable representation of the protein structure in solution, as evaluated by a principal component analysis of the global pairwise root-mean-square deviation (rmsd) in a large set of structures consisting of the refined and unrefined solution structures and the crystal structure. The solution structure is well defined, with a lower degree of convergence between the structures in the loop regions than in the secondary structure elements. The average pairwise rmsd between the 15 refined solution structures is 0.71 {+-} 0.13 A for the backbone atoms and 1.43 {+-} 0.14 A for all heavy atoms. The solution structure is basically the same as the crystal structure. The average rmsd between the 15 refined solution structures and the crystal structure is 0.76 A for the backbone atoms and 1.45 {+-} 0.09 A for all heavy atoms. There are, however, small differences probably caused by intermolecular contacts in the crystal structure.

  1. Reliable resonance assignments of selected residues of proteins with known structure based on empirical NMR chemical shift prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Da-Wei; Meng, Dan; Brüschweiler, Rafael

    2015-05-01

    A robust NMR resonance assignment method is introduced for proteins whose 3D structure has previously been determined by X-ray crystallography. The goal of the method is to obtain a subset of correct assignments from a parsimonious set of 3D NMR experiments of 15N, 13C labeled proteins. Chemical shifts of sequential residue pairs are predicted from static protein structures using PPM_One, which are then compared with the corresponding experimental shifts. Globally optimized weighted matching identifies the assignments that are robust with respect to small changes in NMR cross-peak positions. The method, termed PASSPORT, is demonstrated for 4 proteins with 100-250 amino acids using 3D NHCA and a 3D CBCA(CO)NH experiments as input producing correct assignments with high reliability for 22% of the residues. The method, which works best for Gly, Ala, Ser, and Thr residues, provides assignments that serve as anchor points for additional assignments by both manual and semi-automated methods or they can be directly used for further studies, e.g. on ligand binding, protein dynamics, or post-translational modification, such as phosphorylation.

  2. Approaches to link RNA secondary structures with splicing regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plass, Mireya; Eyras, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    by facilitating or hindering the interaction with factors and small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) that regulate splicing. Moreover, the secondary structure could play a fundamental role in the splicing of yeast species, which lack many of the regulatory splicing factors present in metazoans. This chapter...

  3. JPred4: a protein secondary structure prediction server.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Cole, Christian; Procter, James; Barton, Geoffrey J

    2015-07-01

    JPred4 (http://www.compbio.dundee.ac.uk/jpred4) is the latest version of the popular JPred protein secondary structure prediction server which provides predictions by the JNet algorithm, one of the most accurate methods for secondary structure prediction. In addition to protein secondary structure, JPred also makes predictions of solvent accessibility and coiled-coil regions. The JPred service runs up to 94 000 jobs per month and has carried out over 1.5 million predictions in total for users in 179 countries. The JPred4 web server has been re-implemented in the Bootstrap framework and JavaScript to improve its design, usability and accessibility from mobile devices. JPred4 features higher accuracy, with a blind three-state (α-helix, β-strand and coil) secondary structure prediction accuracy of 82.0% while solvent accessibility prediction accuracy has been raised to 90% for residues <5% accessible. Reporting of results is enhanced both on the website and through the optional email summaries and batch submission results. Predictions are now presented in SVG format with options to view full multiple sequence alignments with and without gaps and insertions. Finally, the help-pages have been updated and tool-tips added as well as step-by-step tutorials. PMID:25883141

  4. Total synthesis and structural revision of vannusals A and B: synthesis of the originally assigned structure of vannusal B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaou, K C; Ortiz, Adrian; Zhang, Hongjun; Dagneau, Philippe; Lanver, Andreas; Jennings, Michael P; Arseniyadis, Stellios; Faraoni, Raffaella; Lizos, Dimitrios E

    2010-05-26

    The total synthesis of the originally assigned structure of vannusal B (2) and its diastereomer (d-2) are described. Initial forays into these structures with model systems revealed the viability of a metathesis-based approach and a SmI(2)-mediated strategy for the key cyclization to forge the central region of the molecule, ring C. The former approach was abandoned in favor of the latter when more functionalized substrates failed to enter the cyclization process. The successful, devised convergent strategy based on the SmI(2)-mediated ring closure utilized vinyl iodide (-)-26 and aldehyde fragment (+/-)-86 as key building blocks, whose lithium-mediated coupling led to isomeric coupling products (+)-87 and (-)-88 (as shown in Scheme 17 in the article). Intermediate (-)-88 was converted, via (-)-89 and (-)-90/(+)-91, to vannusal B structure 2 (as shown in Scheme 18 in the article), whose spectroscopic data did not match those reported for the natural product. Similarly, intermediate (+)-25, obtained through coupling of vinyl iodide (-)-26 and aldehyde (+/-)-27 (as shown in Scheme 13 in the article) was transformed via intermediates (-)-97 and (+)-98 (as shown in Scheme 19 in the article) to diastereomeric vannusal B structure (+)-d-2 (as shown in Scheme 19 in the article) which was also proven spectroscopically to be non-identical to the naturally occurring substance. These investigations led to the discovery and development of a number of new synthetic technologies that set the stage for the solution of the vannusal structural conundrum. PMID:20443561

  5. Protein secondary structure prediction using deep convolutional neural fields

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng Wang; Jian Peng; Jianzhu Ma; Jinbo Xu

    2015-01-01

    Protein secondary structure (SS) prediction is important for studying protein structure and function. When only the sequence (profile) information is used as input feature, currently the best predictors can obtain ~80% Q3 accuracy, which has not been improved in the past decade. Here we present DeepCNF (Deep Convolutional Neural Fields) for protein SS prediction. DeepCNF is a Deep Learning extension of Conditional Neural Fields (CNF), which is an integration of Conditional Random Fields (CRF)...

  6. FLAMEnGO 2.0: an enhanced fuzzy logic algorithm for structure-based assignment of methyl group resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Fa-An; Kim, Jonggul; Xia, Youlin; Milligan, Michael; Rowe, Nancy; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2014-08-01

    We present an enhanced version of the FLAMEnGO (Fuzzy Logic Assignment of Methyl Group) software, a structure-based method to assign methyl group resonances in large proteins. FLAMEnGO utilizes a fuzzy logic algorithm coupled with Monte Carlo sampling to obtain a probability-based assignment of the methyl group resonances. As an input, FLAMEnGO requires either the protein X-ray structure or an NMR structural ensemble including data such as methyl-methyl NOESY, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE), methine-methyl TOCSY data. Version 2.0 of this software (FLAMEnGO 2.0) has a user-friendly graphic interface and presents improved modules that enable the input of partial assignments and additional NMR restraints. We tested the performance of FLAMEnGO 2.0 on maltose binding protein (MBP) as well as the C-subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA-C). FLAMEnGO 2.0 can be used as a standalone method or to assist in the completion of partial resonance assignments and can be downloaded at www.chem.umn.edu/groups/veglia/forms/flamengo2-form.html.

  7. Studies on solution NMR structure of brazzein——Secondary structure and molecular scaffold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高广华; 戴继勋; 丁鸣; 王金凤; 王大成

    1999-01-01

    Brazzein is a sweet-tasting protein isolated from the fruit of West African plant Pentadiplandra brazzeana Baillon. It is the smallest and the most water-soluble sweet protein discovered so far and is highly thermostable. The proton NMR study of brazzein at 600 MHz (pH 3.5, 300 K) is presented. The complete sequence specific assignments of the individual backbone and sideehain proton resonances were achieved using through-bond and through-space eonneetivities obtained from standard two-dimensional NMR techniques. The secondary structure of brazzein contains one α-helix (residues 21—29), one short 310-helix (residues 14—17), two strands of antiparallel β-sheet (residues 34—39, 44—50) and probably a third strand (residues 5—7) near the N-terminus. A comparative analysis found that brazzein shares a so-called ’eysteine-stabilized alpha-beta’ (CSαβ) motif with scorpion neurotoxins, insect defensins and plant γ-thionins. The significance of this multi-function motif, the possible active sites an

  8. Assignments and structure determination of the catalytic domain of human fibroblast collagenase using 3D double and triple resonance NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report here the backbone 1HN, 15N, 13Cα, 13CO, and 1Hα NMR assignments for the catalytic domain of human fibroblast collagenase (HFC). Three independent assignment pathways (matching 1H, 13Cα, and 13CO resonances) were used to establish sequential connections. The connections using 13Cα resonances were obtained from HNCOCA and HNCA experiments; 13CO connections were obtained from HNCO and HNCACO experiments. The sequential proton assignment pathway was established from a 3D(1H/15N) NOESY-HSQC experiment. Amino acid typing was accomplished using 13C and 15N chemical shifts, specific labeling of 15N-Leu, and spin pattern recognition from DQF-COSY. The secondary structure was determined by analyzing the 3D (1H/15N) NOESY-HSQC. A preliminary NMR structure calculation of HFC was found to be in agreement with recent X-ray structures of human fibroblast collagenase and human neutrophil collagenase as well as similar to recent NMR structures of a highly homologous protein, stromelysin. All three helices were located; a five-stranded β-sheet (four parallel strands, one antiparallel strand) was also determined. β-Sheet regions were identified by cross-strand dαN and dNN connections and by strong intraresidue dαN correlations, and were corroborated by observing slow amide proton exchange. Chemical shift changes in a selectively 15N-labeled sample suggest that substantial structural changes occur in the active site cleft on the binding of an inhibitor

  9. STUDY ON THE SEQUENCE STRUCTURE OF SBR BY 13C- NMR METHOD Ⅰ. ASSIGNMENT FOR UNSATURATED CARBONS SPECTRA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAO Shuke; CHEN Xiaonong; HU Liping; YAN Baozhen

    1990-01-01

    The sequence structures of emulsion- processed SBR and solution- processed ( by lithium catalyst )SBR were investigated by 13C- NMR spectroscopy. Seventeen peaks within unsaturated carbon region were recorded under the adopted experimental conditions. Assignments for these peaks were made by empirical- parameter- evaluation method.

  10. Integrating chemical footprinting data into RNA secondary structure prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kourosh Zarringhalam

    Full Text Available Chemical and enzymatic footprinting experiments, such as shape (selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension, yield important information about RNA secondary structure. Indeed, since the [Formula: see text]-hydroxyl is reactive at flexible (loop regions, but unreactive at base-paired regions, shape yields quantitative data about which RNA nucleotides are base-paired. Recently, low error rates in secondary structure prediction have been reported for three RNAs of moderate size, by including base stacking pseudo-energy terms derived from shape data into the computation of minimum free energy secondary structure. Here, we describe a novel method, RNAsc (RNA soft constraints, which includes pseudo-energy terms for each nucleotide position, rather than only for base stacking positions. We prove that RNAsc is self-consistent, in the sense that the nucleotide-specific probabilities of being unpaired in the low energy Boltzmann ensemble always become more closely correlated with the input shape data after application of RNAsc. From this mathematical perspective, the secondary structure predicted by RNAsc should be 'correct', in as much as the shape data is 'correct'. We benchmark RNAsc against the previously mentioned method for eight RNAs, for which both shape data and native structures are known, to find the same accuracy in 7 out of 8 cases, and an improvement of 25% in one case. Furthermore, we present what appears to be the first direct comparison of shape data and in-line probing data, by comparing yeast asp-tRNA shape data from the literature with data from in-line probing experiments we have recently performed. With respect to several criteria, we find that shape data appear to be more robust than in-line probing data, at least in the case of asp-tRNA.

  11. A phase transition in energy-filtered RNA secondary structures

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Hillary S W

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we study the effect of energy parameters on minimum free energy (mfe) RNA secondary structures. Employing a simplified combinatorial energy model, that is only dependent on the diagram representation and that is not sequence specific, we prove the following dichotomy result. Mfe structures derived via the Turner energy parameters contain only finitely many complex irreducible substructures and just minor parameter changes produce a class of mfe-structures that contain a large number of small irreducibles. We localize the exact point where the distribution of irreducibles experiences this phase transition from a discrete limit to a central limit distribution and subsequently put our result into the context of quantifying the effect of sparsification of the folding of these respective mfe-structures. We show that the sparsification of realistic mfe-structures leads to a constant time and space reduction and that the sparsifcation of the folding of structures with modified parameters leads to a lin...

  12. Secondary Fast Magnetoacoustic Waves Trapped in Randomly Structured Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ding; Li, Bo; Walsh, Robert W.

    2016-09-01

    Fast magnetoacoustic waves are an important tool for inferring parameters of the solar atmosphere. We numerically simulate the propagation of fast wave pulses in randomly structured plasmas that mimic the highly inhomogeneous solar corona. A network of secondary waves is formed by a series of partial reflections and transmissions. These secondary waves exhibit quasi-periodicities in both time and space. Since the temporal and spatial periods are related simply through the speed of the fast wave, we quantify the properties of secondary waves by examining the dependence of the average temporal period (\\bar{p}) on the initial pulse width (w 0) and studying the density contrast ({δ }ρ ) and correlation length (L c ) that characterize the randomness of the equilibrium density profiles. For small-amplitude pulses, {δ }ρ does not alter \\bar{p} significantly. Large-amplitude pulses, on the other hand, enhance the density contrast when {δ }ρ is small but have a smoothing effect when {δ }ρ is sufficiently large. We found that \\bar{p} scales linearly with L c and that the scaling factor is larger for a narrower pulse. However, in terms of the absolute values of \\bar{p}, broader pulses generate secondary waves with longer periods, and this effect is stronger in random plasmas with shorter correlation lengths. Secondary waves carry the signatures of both the leading wave pulse and the background plasma. Our study may find applications in magnetohydrodynamic seismology by exploiting the secondary waves detected in the dimming regions after coronal mass ejections or extreme ultraviolet waves.

  13. Random generation of RNA secondary structures according to native distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nebel Markus E

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Random biological sequences are a topic of great interest in genome analysis since, according to a powerful paradigm, they represent the background noise from which the actual biological information must differentiate. Accordingly, the generation of random sequences has been investigated for a long time. Similarly, random object of a more complicated structure like RNA molecules or proteins are of interest. Results In this article, we present a new general framework for deriving algorithms for the non-uniform random generation of combinatorial objects according to the encoding and probability distribution implied by a stochastic context-free grammar. Briefly, the framework extends on the well-known recursive method for (uniform random generation and uses the popular framework of admissible specifications of combinatorial classes, introducing weighted combinatorial classes to allow for the non-uniform generation by means of unranking. This framework is used to derive an algorithm for the generation of RNA secondary structures of a given fixed size. We address the random generation of these structures according to a realistic distribution obtained from real-life data by using a very detailed context-free grammar (that models the class of RNA secondary structures by distinguishing between all known motifs in RNA structure. Compared to well-known sampling approaches used in several structure prediction tools (such as SFold ours has two major advantages: Firstly, after a preprocessing step in time O(n2 for the computation of all weighted class sizes needed, with our approach a set of m random secondary structures of a given structure size n can be computed in worst-case time complexity Om⋅n⋅ log(n while other algorithms typically have a runtime in O(m⋅n2. Secondly, our approach works with integer arithmetic only which is faster and saves us from all the discomforting details of using floating point arithmetic with

  14. Complete 1H and 13C NMR structural assignments for a group of four goyazensolide-type furanoheliangolides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four goyazensolide-type sesquiterpene lactones - lychnofolide, centratherin, goyazensolide and goyazensolide acetate - were thoroughly studied by NMR experimental techniques. 1H NMR, 13C NMR {1H}, COSY, HMQC, HMBC, J-res. and NOE experiments were performed to provide the needed structural information. Complete and unequivocal assignment, including the determination of all multiplicities, was obtained for each structure and the data collections are presented in tables (author)

  15. Complete {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR structural assignments for a group of four goyazensolide-type furanoheliangolides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Ana Carolina Ferreira; Silva, Aline Nazare; Matos, Priscilla Mendonca; Silva, Eder Henrique da; Heleno, Vladimir Constantino Gomes [Universidade de Franca, Franca, SP (Brazil). Nucleo de Pesquisas em Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Lopes, Joao Luis Callegari [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FCFRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto. Dept. de Quimica e Fisica; Sass, Daiane Cristina, E-mail: vheleno_05@yahoo.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto. Dept. de Quimica

    2012-07-01

    Four goyazensolide-type sesquiterpene lactones - lychnofolide, centratherin, goyazensolide and goyazensolide acetate - were thoroughly studied by NMR experimental techniques. {sup 1}H NMR, {sup 13}C NMR {l_brace}{sup 1}H{r_brace}, COSY, HMQC, HMBC, J-res. and NOE experiments were performed to provide the needed structural information. Complete and unequivocal assignment, including the determination of all multiplicities, was obtained for each structure and the data collections are presented in tables (author)

  16. Coating concrete secondary containment structures exposed to agrichemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broder, M.F.; Nguyen, D.T.

    1995-06-01

    Concrete has traditionally been the material of choice for building secondary containment structures because it is relatively inexpensive and has structural properties which make it ideal for supporting the loads of vehicles and large tanks. However, concrete`s chemical properties make it susceptible to corrosion by some common fertilizers. Though fairly impervious to water movement, concrete is easily penetrated by vapors and solvents. It is also prone to cracking. For these reasons, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) believes that concrete alone may not provide an effective barrier to pesticide movement and has proposed that concrete in pesticide secondary containment structures be sealed or coated to reduce its permeability. Some state secondary containment regulations require that concrete exposed to fertilizers and pesticides be sealed or protected with a coating. Lacking guidelines, some retailers have used penetrating sealants to satisfy the law, even though these products provide little protection from chemical attack nor do they prevent pesticide egress. Other retailers who have applied thick film coatings which were properly selected have had disastrous results because the application was poorly done. Consequently, much skepticism exists regarding the performance and benefit of protective coatings.

  17. A phase transition in energy-filtered RNA secondary structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Hillary Siwei; reidys, Christian

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we study the effect of energy parameters on minimum free energy (mfe) RNA secondary structures. Employing a simplified combinatorial energy model, that is only dependent on the diagram representation and that is not sequence specific, we prove the following dichotomy result. Mfe...... structures derived via the Turner energy parameters contain only finitely many complex irreducible substructures and just minor parameter changes produce a class of mfe-structures that contain a large number of small irreducibles. We localize the exact point where the distribution of irreducibles experiences...... this phase transition from a discrete limit to a central limit distribution and subsequently put our result into the context of quantifying the effect of sparsification of the folding of these respective mfe-structures. We show that the sparsification of realistic mfe-structures leads to a constant time...

  18. How well are protein structures annotated in secondary databases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rother, Kristian; Michalsky, Elke; Leser, Ulf

    2005-09-01

    We investigated to what extent Protein Data Bank (PDB) entries are annotated with second-party information based on existing cross-references between PDB and 15 other databases. We report 2 interesting findings. First, there is a clear "annotation gap" for structures less than 7 years old for secondary databases that are manually curated. Second, the examined databases overlap with each other quite well, dividing the PDB into 2 well-annotated thirds and one poorly annotated third. Both observations should be taken into account in any study depending on the selection of protein structures by their annotation.

  19. PCI-SS: MISO dynamic nonlinear protein secondary structure prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aboul-Magd Mohammed O

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the function of a protein is largely dictated by its three dimensional configuration, determining a protein's structure is of fundamental importance to biology. Here we report on a novel approach to determining the one dimensional secondary structure of proteins (distinguishing α-helices, β-strands, and non-regular structures from primary sequence data which makes use of Parallel Cascade Identification (PCI, a powerful technique from the field of nonlinear system identification. Results Using PSI-BLAST divergent evolutionary profiles as input data, dynamic nonlinear systems are built through a black-box approach to model the process of protein folding. Genetic algorithms (GAs are applied in order to optimize the architectural parameters of the PCI models. The three-state prediction problem is broken down into a combination of three binary sub-problems and protein structure classifiers are built using 2 layers of PCI classifiers. Careful construction of the optimization, training, and test datasets ensures that no homology exists between any training and testing data. A detailed comparison between PCI and 9 contemporary methods is provided over a set of 125 new protein chains guaranteed to be dissimilar to all training data. Unlike other secondary structure prediction methods, here a web service is developed to provide both human- and machine-readable interfaces to PCI-based protein secondary structure prediction. This server, called PCI-SS, is available at http://bioinf.sce.carleton.ca/PCISS. In addition to a dynamic PHP-generated web interface for humans, a Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP interface is added to permit invocation of the PCI-SS service remotely. This machine-readable interface facilitates incorporation of PCI-SS into multi-faceted systems biology analysis pipelines requiring protein secondary structure information, and greatly simplifies high-throughput analyses. XML is used to represent the input

  20. Strategies for measuring evolutionary conservation of RNA secondary structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofacker Ivo L

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolutionary conservation of RNA secondary structure is a typical feature of many functional non-coding RNAs. Since almost all of the available methods used for prediction and annotation of non-coding RNA genes rely on this evolutionary signature, accurate measures for structural conservation are essential. Results We systematically assessed the ability of various measures to detect conserved RNA structures in multiple sequence alignments. We tested three existing and eight novel strategies that are based on metrics of folding energies, metrics of single optimal structure predictions, and metrics of structure ensembles. We find that the folding energy based SCI score used in the RNAz program and a simple base-pair distance metric are by far the most accurate. The use of more complex metrics like for example tree editing does not improve performance. A variant of the SCI performed particularly well on highly conserved alignments and is thus a viable alternative when only little evolutionary information is available. Surprisingly, ensemble based methods that, in principle, could benefit from the additional information contained in sub-optimal structures, perform particularly poorly. As a general trend, we observed that methods that include a consensus structure prediction outperformed equivalent methods that only consider pairwise comparisons. Conclusion Structural conservation can be measured accurately with relatively simple and intuitive metrics. They have the potential to form the basis of future RNA gene finders, that face new challenges like finding lineage specific structures or detecting mis-aligned sequences.

  1. Gene-associated markers can assign origin in a weakly structured fish, Atlantic herring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekkevold, Dorte; Helyar, Sarah J.; Limborg, Morten T.;

    2015-01-01

    Regulations on the exploitation of populations of commercially important fish species and the ensuing consumer interest in sustainable products have increased the need to accurately identify the population of origin of fish and fish products. Although genomics-based tools have proven highly useful......, there are relatively few examples in marine fish displaying accurate origin assignment. We synthesize data for 156 single-nucleotide polymorphisms typed in 1039 herring, Clupea harengus L., spanning the Northeast Atlantic to develop a tool that allows assignment of individual herring to their regional origin. We show...... management issues. We report novel genetic evidence that herring from the Baltic Sea contribute to catches in the North Sea, and find support that western Baltic feeding aggregations mainly constitute herring from the western Baltic with contributions from the Eastern Baltic. Our study describes a general...

  2. Study of coal structure using secondary ion mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tingey, G.L.; Lytle, J.M.; Baer, D.R.; Thomas, M.T.

    1980-12-01

    Secondary-ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is examined as a tool for studying the chemical structure of coal. SIMS has potential for analysis of coal because of the following characteristics: sensitivity to chemical structure; high sensitivity to all masses; application to solids; excellent depth resolution; and reasonable spatial resolution. SIMS spectra of solid coals show differences with respect to coal rank, the spectra of high rank coal being similar to that of graphite, and the spectra of low rank coal being similar to that of wood. Some functional group analysis is also possible using SIMS. Low rank coals show a larger peak at 15 amu indicating more methyl groups than found in the higher rank coals. Fragments with two and three carbon atoms have also been examined; much larger fragments are undoubtedly present but were not evaluated in this study. Examination of these groups, which are expected to contain valuable information on coal structure, is planned for future work. It has been observed that mineral atoms present in the coal have large secondary ion yields which complicate the interpretation of the spectra. Studies on mineral-free coals and model compounds are therefore recommended to facilitate determination of organic coal structure. In addition, mass spectrometry with much greater mass resolution will aid in distinguishing between various ion species.

  3. On the NMR structure determination of a 44n RNA pseudoknot: Assignment strategies and derivation of torsion angle restraints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolk, Michael H. [University of Nijmegen, Toernooiveld, NSR Center for Molecular Structure, Design and Synthesis, Laboratory of Biophysical Chemistry (Netherlands); Wijmenga, Sybren S. [University of Umea, Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics (Sweden); Heus, Hans A.; Hilbers, Cornelis W. [University of Nijmegen, Toernooiveld, NSR Center for Molecular Structure, Design and Synthesis, Laboratory of Biophysical Chemistry (Netherlands)

    1998-10-15

    The complete T- and pseudoknotted acceptor arm of the tRNA-like structure of turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) genomic RNA has been studied by NMR spectroscopy. Resonance assignment and the gathering of restraints of the 44-mer are impeded by spectral complexity as well as by line broadening. The latter is caused by local dynamical effects in the pseudoknot domain in the molecule. These specific problems could be solved by using different field strengths and selectively {sup 13}C/{sup 15} labeled samples. Experiments for assigning the sugar spin systems were adjusted to satisfy the requirements of this system. Furthermore, the quality of the structure could be improved by determining the backbone torsion angles {beta}, {gamma} and {epsilon}, using new approaches that were tailored for use in large RNA molecules.

  4. The evolving market structures of gambling: case studies modelling the socioeconomic assignment of gaming machines in Melbourne and Sydney, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, David C; Baker, Robert G V

    2002-01-01

    The expansion of gambling industries worldwide is intertwined with the growing government dependence on gambling revenue for fiscal assignments. In Australia, electronic gaming machines (EGMs) have dominated recent gambling industry growth. As EGMs have proliferated, growing recognition has emerged that EGM distribution closely reflects levels of socioeconomic disadvantage. More machines are located in less advantaged regions. This paper analyses time-series socioeconomic distributions of EGMs in Melbourne, Australia, an immature EGM market, and then compares the findings with the mature market in Sydney. Similar findings in both cities suggest that market assignment of EGMs transcends differences in historical and legislative environments. This indicates that similar underlying structures are evident in both markets. Modelling the spatial structures of gambling markets provides an opportunity to identify regions most at risk of gambling related problems. Subsequently, policies can be formulated which ensure fiscal revenue from gambling can be better targeted towards regions likely to be most afflicted by excessive gambling-related problems.

  5. Generation of deviation parameters for amino acid singlets, doublets and triplets from three-dimensional structures of proteins and its implications for secondary structure prediction from amino acid sequences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S A Mugilan; K Veluraja

    2000-03-01

    We present a new method, secondary structure prediction by deviation parameter (SSPDP) for predicting the secondary structure of proteins from amino acid sequence. Deviation parameters (DP) for amino acid singlets, doublets and triplets were computed with respect to secondary structural elements of proteins based on the dictionary of secondary structure prediction (DSSP)-generated secondary structure for 408 selected non-homologous proteins. To the amino acid triplets which are not found in the selected dataset, a DP value of zero is assigned with respect to the secondary structural elements of proteins. The total number of parameters generated is 15,432, in the possible parameters of 25,260. Deviation parameter is complete with respect to amino acid singlets, doublets, and partially complete with respect to amino acid triplets. These generated parameters were used to predict secondary structural elements from amino acid sequence. The secondary structure predicted by our method (SSPDP) was compared with that of single sequence (NNPREDICT) and multiple sequence (PHD) methods. The average value of the percentage of prediction accuracy for α-helix by SSPDP, NNPREDICT and PHD methods was found to be 57%, 44% and 69% respectively for the proteins in the selected dataset. For -strand the prediction accuracy is found to be 69%, 21% and 53% respectively by SSPDP, NNPREDICT and PHD methods. This clearly indicates that the secondary structure prediction by our method is as good as PHD method but much better than NNPREDICT method.

  6. Secondary fast magnetoacoustic waves trapped in randomly structured plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Ding; Walsh, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    Fast magnetoacoustic wave is an important tool for inferring solar atmospheric parameters. We numerically simulate the propagation of fast wave pulses in randomly structured plasmas mimicking the highly inhomogeneous solar corona. A network of secondary waves is formed by a series of partial reflections and transmissions. These secondary waves exhibit quasi-periodicities in both time and space. Since the temporal and spatial periods are related simply through the fast wave speed, we quantify the properties of secondary waves by examining the dependence of the average temporal period ($\\bar{p}$) on the initial pulse width ($w_0$) as well as the density contrast ($\\delta_\\rho$) and correlation length ($L_c$) that characterize the randomness of the equilibrium density profiles. For small-amplitude pulses, $\\delta_\\rho$ does not alter $\\bar{p}$ significantly. Large-amplitude pulses, on the other hand, enhance the density contrast when $\\delta_\\rho$ is small but have a smoothing effect when $\\delta_\\rho$ is suffic...

  7. Secondary Structure of Rat and Human Amylin across Force Fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Quynn Hoffmann

    Full Text Available The aggregation of human amylin has been strongly implicated in the progression of Type II diabetes. This 37-residue peptide forms a variety of secondary structures, including random coils, α-helices, and β-hairpins. The balance between these structures depends on the chemical environment, making amylin an ideal candidate to examine inherent biases in force fields. Rat amylin differs from human amylin by only 6 residues; however, it does not form fibrils. Therefore it provides a useful complement to human amylin in studies of the key events along the aggregation pathway. In this work, the free energy of rat and human amylin was determined as a function of α-helix and β-hairpin content for the Gromos96 53a6, OPLS-AA/L, CHARMM22/CMAP, CHARMM22*, Amberff99sb*-ILDN, and Amberff03w force fields using advanced sampling techniques, specifically bias exchange metadynamics. This work represents a first systematic attempt to evaluate the conformations and the corresponding free energy of a large, clinically relevant disordered peptide in solution across force fields. The NMR chemical shifts of rIAPP were calculated for each of the force fields using their respective free energy maps, allowing us to quantitatively assess their predictions. We show that the predicted distribution of secondary structures is sensitive to the choice of force-field: Gromos53a6 is biased towards β-hairpins, while CHARMM22/CMAP predicts structures that are overly α-helical. OPLS-AA/L favors disordered structures. Amberff99sb*-ILDN, AmberFF03w and CHARMM22* provide the balance between secondary structures that is most consistent with available experimental data. In contrast to previous reports, our findings suggest that the equilibrium conformations of human and rat amylin are remarkably similar, but that subtle differences arise in transient alpha-helical and beta-strand containing structures that the human peptide can more readily adopt. We hypothesize that these transient

  8. Secondary Structure of Rat and Human Amylin across Force Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Kyle Quynn; McGovern, Michael; Chiu, Chi-Cheng; de Pablo, Juan J

    2015-01-01

    The aggregation of human amylin has been strongly implicated in the progression of Type II diabetes. This 37-residue peptide forms a variety of secondary structures, including random coils, α-helices, and β-hairpins. The balance between these structures depends on the chemical environment, making amylin an ideal candidate to examine inherent biases in force fields. Rat amylin differs from human amylin by only 6 residues; however, it does not form fibrils. Therefore it provides a useful complement to human amylin in studies of the key events along the aggregation pathway. In this work, the free energy of rat and human amylin was determined as a function of α-helix and β-hairpin content for the Gromos96 53a6, OPLS-AA/L, CHARMM22/CMAP, CHARMM22*, Amberff99sb*-ILDN, and Amberff03w force fields using advanced sampling techniques, specifically bias exchange metadynamics. This work represents a first systematic attempt to evaluate the conformations and the corresponding free energy of a large, clinically relevant disordered peptide in solution across force fields. The NMR chemical shifts of rIAPP were calculated for each of the force fields using their respective free energy maps, allowing us to quantitatively assess their predictions. We show that the predicted distribution of secondary structures is sensitive to the choice of force-field: Gromos53a6 is biased towards β-hairpins, while CHARMM22/CMAP predicts structures that are overly α-helical. OPLS-AA/L favors disordered structures. Amberff99sb*-ILDN, AmberFF03w and CHARMM22* provide the balance between secondary structures that is most consistent with available experimental data. In contrast to previous reports, our findings suggest that the equilibrium conformations of human and rat amylin are remarkably similar, but that subtle differences arise in transient alpha-helical and beta-strand containing structures that the human peptide can more readily adopt. We hypothesize that these transient states enable

  9. Structural Analysis of Char by Raman Spectroscopy: Improving Band Assignments through Computational Calculations from First Principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Matthew W.; Dallmeyer, Ian; Johnson, Timothy J.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; McEwen, Jean-Sabin; Espinal, Juan F.; Garcia-Perez, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the characterization of many carbon 27 species. The complex heterogeneous nature of chars and activated carbons has confounded 28 complete analysis due to the additional shoulders observed on the D-band and high intensity 29 valley between the D and G-bands. In this paper the effects of various vacancy and substitution 30 defects have been systematically analyzed via molecular modeling using density functional 31 theory (DFT) and how this is manifested in the calculated gas-phase Raman spectra. The 32 accuracy of these calculations was validated by comparison with (solid-phase) experimental 33 spectra, with a small correction factor being applied to improve the accuracy of frequency 34 predictions. The spectroscopic effects on the char species are best understood in terms of a 35 reduced symmetry as compared to a “parent” coronene molecule. Based upon the simulation 36 results, the shoulder observed in chars near 1200 cm-1 has been assigned to the totally symmetric 37 A1g vibrations of various small polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) as well as those containing 38 rings of seven or more carbons. Intensity between 1400 cm-1 and 1450 cm-1 is assigned to A1g 39 type vibrations present in small PAHs and especially those containing cyclopentane rings. 40 Finally, band intensity between 1500 cm-1 and 1550 cm-1 is ascribed to predominately E2g 41 vibrational modes in strained PAH systems. A total of ten potential bands have been assigned 42 between 1000 cm-1 and 1800 cm-1. These fitting parameters have been used to deconvolute a 43 thermoseries of cellulose chars produced by pyrolysis at 300-700 °C. The results of the 44 deconvolution show consistent growth of PAH clusters with temperature, development of non-45 benzyl rings as temperature increases and loss of oxygenated features between 400 °C and 46 600 °C

  10. RNA Secondary Structure Prediction by Using Discrete Mathematics: An Interdisciplinary Research Experience for Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Roni; Wachira, James; Nkwanta, Asamoah

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) project was on RNA secondary structure prediction by using a lattice walk approach. The lattice walk approach is a combinatorial and computational biology method used to enumerate possible secondary structures and predict RNA secondary structure from RNA sequences. The method uses…

  11. Evolutionary dynamics and optimization neutral networks as model-landscapes for RNA secondary-structure folding-landscapes

    CERN Document Server

    Först, C J; Weber, J; Forst, Christian V; Reidys, Christian; Weber, Jacqueline

    1995-01-01

    We view the folding of RNA-sequences as a map that assigns a pattern of base pairings to each sequence, known as secondary structure. These preimages can be constructed as random graphs (i.e. the neutral networks associated to the structure s). By interpreting the secondary structure as biological information we can formulate the so called Error Threshold of Shapes as an extension of Eigen's et al. concept of an error threshold in the single peak landscape. Analogue to the approach of Derrida & Peliti for a of the population on the neutral network. On the one hand this model of a single shape landscape allows the derivation of analytical results, on the other hand the concept gives rise to study various scenarios by means of simulations, e.g. the interaction of two different networks. It turns out that the intersection of two sets of compatible sequences (with respect to the pair of secondary structures) plays a key role in the search for ''fitter'' secondary structures.

  12. A phase transition in energy-filtered RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hillary S W; Reidys, Christian M

    2012-10-01

    In this article we study the effect of energy parameters on minimum free energy (mfe) RNA secondary structures. Employing a simplified combinatorial energy model that is only dependent on the diagram representation and is not sequence-specific, we prove the following dichotomy result. Mfe structures derived via the Turner energy parameters contain only finitely many complex irreducible substructures, and just minor parameter changes produce a class of mfe structures that contain a large number of small irreducibles. We localize the exact point at which the distribution of irreducibles experiences this phase transition from a discrete limit to a central limit distribution and, subsequently, put our result into the context of quantifying the effect of sparsification of the folding of these respective mfe structures. We show that the sparsification of realistic mfe structures leads to a constant time and space reduction, and that the sparsification of the folding of structures with modified parameters leads to a linear time and space reduction. We, furthermore, identify the limit distribution at the phase transition as a Rayleigh distribution.

  13. DNA secondary structures: stability and function of G-quadruplex structures

    OpenAIRE

    Bochman, Matthew L.; Paeschke, Katrin; Zakian, Virginia A.

    2012-01-01

    In addition to the canonical double helix, DNA can fold into various other inter- and intramolecular secondary structures. Although many such structures were long thought to be in vitro artefacts, bioinformatics demonstrates that DNA sequences capable of forming these structures are conserved throughout evolution, suggesting the existence of non-B-form DNA in vivo. In addition, genes whose products promote formation or resolution of these structures are found in diverse organisms, and a growi...

  14. Combining automated peak tracking in SAR by NMR with structure-based backbone assignment from 15N-NOESY

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Richard

    2012-03-21

    Background: Chemical shift mapping is an important technique in NMR-based drug screening for identifying the atoms of a target protein that potentially bind to a drug molecule upon the molecule\\'s introduction in increasing concentrations. The goal is to obtain a mapping of peaks with known residue assignment from the reference spectrum of the unbound protein to peaks with unknown assignment in the target spectrum of the bound protein. Although a series of perturbed spectra help to trace a path from reference peaks to target peaks, a one-to-one mapping generally is not possible, especially for large proteins, due to errors, such as noise peaks, missing peaks, missing but then reappearing, overlapped, and new peaks not associated with any peaks in the reference. Due to these difficulties, the mapping is typically done manually or semi-automatically, which is not efficient for high-throughput drug screening.Results: We present PeakWalker, a novel peak walking algorithm for fast-exchange systems that models the errors explicitly and performs many-to-one mapping. On the proteins: hBclXL, UbcH5B, and histone H1, it achieves an average accuracy of over 95% with less than 1.5 residues predicted per target peak. Given these mappings as input, we present PeakAssigner, a novel combined structure-based backbone resonance and NOE assignment algorithm that uses just 15N-NOESY, while avoiding TOCSY experiments and 13C-labeling, to resolve the ambiguities for a one-to-one mapping. On the three proteins, it achieves an average accuracy of 94% or better.Conclusions: Our mathematical programming approach for modeling chemical shift mapping as a graph problem, while modeling the errors directly, is potentially a time- and cost-effective first step for high-throughput drug screening based on limited NMR data and homologous 3D structures. 2012 Jang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  15. Protein Secondary Structure Prediction Using Deep Convolutional Neural Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Peng, Jian; Ma, Jianzhu; Xu, Jinbo

    2016-01-01

    Protein secondary structure (SS) prediction is important for studying protein structure and function. When only the sequence (profile) information is used as input feature, currently the best predictors can obtain ~80% Q3 accuracy, which has not been improved in the past decade. Here we present DeepCNF (Deep Convolutional Neural Fields) for protein SS prediction. DeepCNF is a Deep Learning extension of Conditional Neural Fields (CNF), which is an integration of Conditional Random Fields (CRF) and shallow neural networks. DeepCNF can model not only complex sequence-structure relationship by a deep hierarchical architecture, but also interdependency between adjacent SS labels, so it is much more powerful than CNF. Experimental results show that DeepCNF can obtain ~84% Q3 accuracy, ~85% SOV score, and ~72% Q8 accuracy, respectively, on the CASP and CAMEO test proteins, greatly outperforming currently popular predictors. As a general framework, DeepCNF can be used to predict other protein structure properties such as contact number, disorder regions, and solvent accessibility.

  16. An RNA secondary structure prediction method based on minimum and suboptimal free energy structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Haoyue; Yang, Lianping; Zhang, Xiangde

    2015-09-01

    The function of an RNA-molecule is mainly determined by its tertiary structures. And its secondary structure is an important determinant of its tertiary structure. The comparative methods usually give better results than the single-sequence methods. Based on minimum and suboptimal free energy structures, the paper presents a novel method for predicting conserved secondary structure of a group of related RNAs. In the method, the information from the known RNA structures is used as training data in a SVM (Support Vector Machine) classifier. Our method has been tested on the benchmark dataset given by Puton et al. The results show that the average sensitivity of our method is higher than that of other comparative methods such as CentroidAlifold, MXScrana, RNAalifold, and TurboFold. PMID:26100179

  17. Combining ambiguous chemical shift mapping with structure-based backbone and NOE assignment from 15N-NOESY

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Chemical shift mapping is an important technique in NMRbased drug screening for identifying the atoms of a target protein that potentially bind to a drug molecule upon the molecule\\'s introduction in increasing concentrations. The goal is to obtain a mapping of peaks with known residue assignment from the reference spectrum of the unbound protein to peaks with unknown assignment in the target spectrum of the bound protein. Although a series of perturbed spectra help to trace a path from reference peaks to target peaks, a one-to-one mapping generally is not possible, especially for large proteins, due to errors, such as noise peaks, missing peaks, missing but then reappearing, overlapped, and new peaks not associated with any peaks in the reference. Due to these difficulties, the mapping is typically done manually or semi-automatically. However, automated methods are necessary for high-throughput drug screening. We present PeakWalker, a novel peak walking algorithm for fast-exchange systems that models the errors explicitly and performs many-to-one mapping. On the proteins: hBclXL, UbcH5B, and histone H1, it achieves an average accuracy of over 95% with less than 1.5 residues predicted per target peak. Given these mappings as input, we present PeakAssigner, a novel combined structure-based backbone resonance and NOE assignment algorithm that uses just 15N-NOESY, while avoiding TOCSY experiments and 13C- labeling, to resolve the ambiguities for a one-toone mapping. On the three proteins, it achieves an average accuracy of 94% or better. Copyright © 2011 ACM.

  18. Simultaneous structural and control optimization via linear quadratic regulator eigenstructure assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becus, G. A.; Lui, C. Y.; Venkayya, V. B.; Tischler, V. A.

    1987-01-01

    A method for simultaneous structural and control design of large flexible space structures (LFSS) to reduce vibration generated by disturbances is presented. Desired natural frequencies and damping ratios for the closed loop system are achieved by using a combination of linear quadratic regulator (LQR) synthesis and numerical optimization techniques. The state and control weighing matrices (Q and R) are expressed in terms of structural parameters such as mass and stiffness. The design parameters are selected by numerical optimization so as to minimize the weight of the structure and to achieve the desired closed-loop eigenvalues. An illustrative example of the design of a two bar truss is presented.

  19. Rapid NMR screening of RNA secondary structure and binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmling, Christina; Keyhani, Sara; Sochor, Florian; Fürtig, Boris; Hengesbach, Martin; Schwalbe, Harald, E-mail: schwalbe@nmr.uni-frankfurt.de [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität, Institut für Organische Chemie und Chemische Biologie, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (BMRZ) (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Determination of RNA secondary structures by NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool e.g. to elucidate RNA folding space or functional aspects of regulatory RNA elements. However, current approaches of RNA synthesis and preparation are usually time-consuming and do not provide analysis with single nucleotide precision when applied for a large number of different RNA sequences. Here, we significantly improve the yield and 3′ end homogeneity of RNA preparation by in vitro transcription. Further, by establishing a native purification procedure with increased throughput, we provide a shortcut to study several RNA constructs simultaneously. We show that this approach yields μmol quantities of RNA with purities comparable to PAGE purification, while avoiding denaturation of the RNA.

  20. Assessing Students' Structured Programming Skills with Java: The "Blue, Berry, and Blueberry" Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xihui

    2010-01-01

    Java is an object-oriented programming language. From a software engineering perspective, object-oriented design and programming is used at the architectural design, and structured design and programming is used at the detailed design within methods. As such, structured programming skills are fundamental to more advanced object-oriented…

  1. Identification and RNA segment assignment of six structural proteins of Scylla serrata reovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yangyang; Fan, Dongyang; Zhang, Zhao; Yang, Jifang; Liu, Jingwen; Chen, Jigang

    2016-08-01

    Scylla serrata reovirus (SsRV) is one of the most prevalent viral pathogens of the mud crab (S. serrata). The virus represents an unassigned novel genus in the Reoviridae family, and contains 12 double-stranded RNA genomic segments. Previous analysis of virion proteins concluded that SsRV contains at least eight structural proteins, ranging from 25 to 160 kDa. Here, tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry and Western blotting were used to re-identify the structural proteins. The results indicate that proteins encoded by SsRV segments S1, S3, S6, S9, S11, and S12 are structural proteins.

  2. Structural assignment and catagenetic behavior of macromolecular constituents of recent and fossil natural resins. Doctoral thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Aarssen, B.G.K.

    1992-12-10

    The thesis describes the results obtained by molecular organic geochemical investigations of fossil and recent natural resins. A major constituent of these plant exudates is a polymeric substance which is resistant to degradation and is thus likely to fossilize. Time and the rise of temperature and pressure upon burial may lead to a disintegration of the polymeric structures into smaller molecules which can contribute to oil formation. The aim of the study was to assess the mechanisms of depolymerization by investigating in detail the chemical structures of resin polymers and their catagenetic products. In nature two major types of resinous polymers are known to occur: polysesquiterpenoids and polyditerpenoids. The first part of the thesis, chapters 2-8, contains the results of investigations concerning the sesquiterpenoid type polymer. Chemical structures, occurrence and origin of both the polymer and its catagenetic products are described. The second part of the thesis, chapters 9-11, deals with the structures of diterpenoid polymers.

  3. Conservation of mRNA secondary structures may filter out mutations in Escherichia coli evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Chursov, Andrey; Frishman, Dmitrij; Shneider, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Recent reports indicate that mutations in viral genomes tend to preserve RNA secondary structure, and those mutations that disrupt secondary structural elements may reduce gene expression levels, thereby serving as a functional knockout. In this article, we explore the conservation of secondary structures of mRNA coding regions, a previously unknown factor in bacterial evolution, by comparing the structural consequences of mutations in essential and nonessential Escherichia coli genes accumul...

  4. PSRna: Prediction of small RNA secondary structures based on reverse complementary folding method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Xu, Chengzhen; Wang, Lei; Liang, Hong; Feng, Weixing; Cai, Zhongxi; Wang, Ying; Cong, Wang; Liu, Yunlong

    2016-08-01

    Prediction of RNA secondary structures is an important problem in computational biology and bioinformatics, since RNA secondary structures are fundamental for functional analysis of RNA molecules. However, small RNA secondary structures are scarce and few algorithms have been specifically designed for predicting the secondary structures of small RNAs. Here we propose an algorithm named "PSRna" for predicting small-RNA secondary structures using reverse complementary folding and characteristic hairpin loops of small RNAs. Unlike traditional algorithms that usually generate multi-branch loops and 5[Formula: see text] end self-folding, PSRna first estimated the maximum number of base pairs of RNA secondary structures based on the dynamic programming algorithm and a path matrix is constructed at the same time. Second, the backtracking paths are extracted from the path matrix based on backtracking algorithm, and each backtracking path represents a secondary structure. To improve accuracy, the predicted RNA secondary structures are filtered based on their free energy, where only the secondary structure with the minimum free energy was identified as the candidate secondary structure. Our experiments on real data show that the proposed algorithm is superior to two popular methods, RNAfold and RNAstructure, in terms of sensitivity, specificity and Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC). PMID:27045556

  5. Secondary use of structured patient data: interim results of a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuokko, Riikka; Mäkelä-Bengs, Päivi; Hyppönen, Hannele; Doupi, Persephone

    2015-01-01

    In addition to patient care, EHR data are increasingly in demand for secondary purposes, e.g. administration, research and enterprise resource planning. We conducted a systematic literature review and subsequent analysis of 85 articles focusing on the secondary use of structured patient records. We grounded the analysis on how patient records have been structured, how these structures have been evaluated and what are the main results achieved from the secondary use viewpoint. We conclude that secondary use requires complete and interoperable patient records, which in turn depend on better alignment of primary and secondary users' needs and benefits. PMID:25991152

  6. Expected distance between terminal nucleotides of RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clote, Peter; Ponty, Yann; Steyaert, Jean-Marc

    2012-09-01

    In "The ends of a large RNA molecule are necessarily close", Yoffe et al. (Nucleic Acids Res 39(1):292-299, 2011) used the programs RNAfold [resp. RNAsubopt] from Vienna RNA Package to calculate the distance between 5' and 3' ends of the minimum free energy secondary structure [resp. thermal equilibrium structures] of viral and random RNA sequences. Here, the 5'-3' distance is defined to be the length of the shortest path from 5' node to 3' node in the undirected graph, whose edge set consists of edges {i, i + 1} corresponding to covalent backbone bonds and of edges {i, j} corresponding to canonical base pairs. From repeated simulations and using a heuristic theoretical argument, Yoffe et al. conclude that the 5'-3' distance is less than a fixed constant, independent of RNA sequence length. In this paper, we provide a rigorous, mathematical framework to study the expected distance from 5' to 3' ends of an RNA sequence. We present recurrence relations that precisely define the expected distance from 5' to 3' ends of an RNA sequence, both for the Turner nearest neighbor energy model, as well as for a simple homopolymer model first defined by Stein and Waterman. We implement dynamic programming algorithms to compute (rather than approximate by repeated application of Vienna RNA Package) the expected distance between 5' and 3' ends of a given RNA sequence, with respect to the Turner energy model. Using methods of analytical combinatorics, that depend on complex analysis, we prove that the asymptotic expected 5'-3' distance of length n homopolymers is approximately equal to the constant 5.47211, while the asymptotic distance is 6.771096 if hairpins have a minimum of 3 unpaired bases and the probability that any two positions can form a base pair is 1/4. Finally, we analyze the 5'-3' distance for secondary structures from the STRAND database, and conclude that the 5'-3' distance is correlated with RNA sequence length.

  7. Changes in secondary structure of gluten proteins due to emulsifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Analía V.; Ferrer, Evelina G.; Añón, María C.; Puppo, María C.

    2013-02-01

    Changes in the secondary structure of gluten proteins due to emulsifiers were analyzed by Raman Spectroscopy. The protein folding induced by 0.25% SSL (Sodium Stearoyl Lactylate) (GS0.25, Gluten + 0.25% SSL) included an increase in α-helix conformation and a decrease in β-sheet, turns and random coil. The same behavior, although in a less degree, was observed for 0.5% gluten-DATEM (Diacetyl Tartaric Acid Esters of Monoglycerides) system. The low burial of Tryptophan residues to a more hydrophobic environment and the low percentage area of the C-H stretching band for GS0.25 (Gluten + 0.25% SSL), could be related to the increased in α-helix conformation. This behavior was also confirmed by changes in stretching vibrational modes of disulfide bridges (S-S) and the low exposure of Tyrosine residues. High levels of SSL (0.5% and 1.0%) and DATEM (1.0%) led to more disordered protein structures, with different gluten networks. SSL (1.0%) formed a more disordered and opened gluten matrix than DATEM, the last one being laminar and homogeneous.

  8. Structure and molecular assignment of lactococcal phage TP901-1 baseplate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bebeacua, Cecilia; Bron, Patrick; Lai, Livia;

    2010-01-01

    lactococcal phage p2 BP, bearing only 6 RBPs, and which needs a conformational change to reach its activated state. The comparison of several Siphoviridae structures uncovers a close organization of their central BP core whereas striking differences occur at the periphery, leading to diverse mechanisms of...

  9. Using the t-distribution to improve the absolute structure assignment with likelihood calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooft, R.W.W.; Straver, L.H.; Spek, A.L.

    2010-01-01

    The previously described method for absolute structure determination [Hooft, Straver & Spek (2008). J. Appl. Cryst. 41, 96–103] assumes a Gaussian error distribution. The method is now extended to make it robust against poor data with large systematic errors with the introduction of the Student t-di

  10. An evolutionary method for learning HMM structure: prediction of protein secondary structure

    OpenAIRE

    Won Kyoung-Jae; Hamelryck Thomas; Prügel-Bennett Adam; Krogh Anders

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The prediction of the secondary structure of proteins is one of the most studied problems in bioinformatics. Despite their success in many problems of biological sequence analysis, Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) have not been used much for this problem, as the complexity of the task makes manual design of HMMs difficult. Therefore, we have developed a method for evolving the structure of HMMs automatically, using Genetic Algorithms (GAs). Results In the GA procedure, populati...

  11. Structure elucidation and complete NMR spectral assignments of four new diterpenoids from Smallantus sonchifolius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, De-Qiang; Tian, Fang; Qiu, Ying-Kun; Kang, Ting-Guo; Dong, Feng

    2008-08-01

    Four new diterpenoids, named smaditerpenic acid A-D, together with five known compounds, were isolated from the H(2)O extract of the leaves of Smallantus sonchifolius (yacon) cultivated in Liaoning, China and their structures were elucidated on the basis of one- and two-dimensional NMR (including (1)H, (13)C-NMR, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HSQC, TOCSY, HMBC, and ROESY), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), and chemical methods. PMID:18470882

  12. Can Speaker Gaze Modulate Syntactic Structuring and Thematic Role Assignment during Spoken Sentence Comprehension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoeferle, Pia; Kreysa, Helene

    2012-01-01

    During comprehension, a listener can rapidly follow a frontally seated speaker's gaze to an object before its mention, a behavior which can shorten latencies in speeded sentence verification. However, the robustness of gaze-following, its interaction with core comprehension processes such as syntactic structuring, and the persistence of its effects are unclear. In two "visual-world" eye-tracking experiments participants watched a video of a speaker, seated at an angle, describing transitive (non-depicted) actions between two of three Second Life characters on a computer screen. Sentences were in German and had either subject(NP1)-verb-object(NP2) or object(NP1)-verb-subject(NP2) structure; the speaker either shifted gaze to the NP2 character or was obscured. Several seconds later, participants verified either the sentence referents or their role relations. When participants had seen the speaker's gaze shift, they anticipated the NP2 character before its mention and earlier than when the speaker was obscured. This effect was more pronounced for SVO than OVS sentences in both tasks. Interactions of speaker gaze and sentence structure were more pervasive in role-relations verification: participants verified the role relations faster for SVO than OVS sentences, and faster when they had seen the speaker shift gaze than when the speaker was obscured. When sentence and template role-relations matched, gaze-following even eliminated the SVO-OVS response-time differences. Thus, gaze-following is robust even when the speaker is seated at an angle to the listener; it varies depending on the syntactic structure and thematic role relations conveyed by a sentence; and its effects can extend to delayed post-sentence comprehension processes. These results suggest that speaker gaze effects contribute pervasively to visual attention and comprehension processes and should thus be accommodated by accounts of situated language comprehension. PMID:23227018

  13. Investigating Resuscitation Code Assignment in the Intensive Care Unit using Structured and Unstructured Data

    OpenAIRE

    Lojun, Sharon L.; Sauper, Christina J.; Medow, Mitchell; Long, William J.; Mark, Roger G.; Barzilay, Regina

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the feasibility of using structured data (age, gender, and medical condition), and unstructured medical notes on classification accuracy for resuscitation code status. Data was extracted from the MIMICII database. Natural language processing (NLP) was used to evaluate the social section of the nurses’ progress notes. BoosTexter was used to predict the code-status using notes, age, gender, and Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS). The relative impact of features was...

  14. Amino Acid Molecular Units: Building Primary and Secondary Protein Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparecido R. Silva

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to guarantee the learning quality and suitable knowledge  use  about structural biology, it is fundamental to  exist, since the beginning of  students’ formation, the possibility of clear visualization of biomolecule structures. Nevertheless, the didactic books can only bring  schematic  drawings; even more elaborated figures and graphic computation  do not permit the necessary interaction.  The representation of three-dimensional molecular structures with ludic models, built with representative units, have supplied to the students and teachers a successfully experience to  visualize such structures and correlate them to the real molecules.  The design and applicability of the representative units were discussed with researchers and teachers before mould implementation.  In this stage  it  will be presented the  developed  kit  containing the  representative  plastic parts of the main amino acids.  The kit can demonstrate the interaction among the amino acids  functional groups  (represented by colors, shapes,  sizes and  the peptidic bonds between them  facilitating the assembly and visuali zation of the primary and secondary protein structure.  The models were designed for  Ca,  amino,  carboxyl groups  and  hydrogen. The  lateral chains have  well defined models that represent their geometrical shape.  The completed kit set  will be presented in this meeting (patent requested.  In the last phase of the project will be realized  an effective evaluation  of the kit  as a facilitative didactic tool of the teaching/learning process in the Structural Molecular Biology area.

  15. Prediction of nonregular secondary structures of proteins based on wavelet analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The secondary structures of proteins fall into two classes: regular structure and nonregular structure. Helices and sheets are termed "regular" structures because their residues have repeating main-chain torsion angles, and their backbone N-H and C-O groups are arranged in a periodic pattern of hydrogen bonding. In contrast, the remaining structures with nonrepeating backbone torsion angles are called nonregular secondary structures. In this note, we performed an extensive sequence analysis of nonregular secondary structures and showed that these nonregular parts could be effectively predicted by continuous wavelet transform.

  16. Genetic diversity, structure and individual assignment of Casta Navarra cattle: a well-differentiated fighting bull population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, A; Martin-Burriel, I; Cons, C; Reta, M; Poblador, A; Rodellar, C; Zaragoza, P

    2014-02-01

    The Casta Navarra lineage was one of the populations used to establish the fighting bull (FB) breed, and it has also been reproductively isolated from the others FBs. A total of 1284 individuals from two generations of 16 Casta Navarra herds were sampled to analyse their diversity, their genetic structure and the ability of 28 microsatellite markers to assign individuals to closely related populations. These animals were compared with closely related phylogenetic (FB) or geographical (Pirenaica and Monchina) populations. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium analysis showed that 82% of the loci had a significant heterozygote deficit as a consequence of the Wahlund effect. The average proportion of genetic variation explained by farm differences was 9% by Wright's FST index. A phylogenetic tree constructed with a neighbour-joining method based on Reynolds genetic distances and a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo clustering approach revealed clear differences between farm groups that generally corresponded to historical information and could unambiguously differentiate Casta Navarra cattle from the other populations. The percentage of animals correctly assigned to the Casta Navarra population was 91.78% for a q threshold of >0.9. Admixture was only detected in 4.45% (q < 0.8) of the cattle. These results are relevant for the maintenance and development of diversity and conservation in the Casta Navarra population.

  17. Spectral assignments and structural studies of a warfarin derivative stereoselectively formed by tandem cyclization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velayutham Pillai, M.; Rajeswari, K.; Vidhyasagar, T.

    2015-11-01

    The structural elucidation of a Mannich condensation product of rac-Warfarin with benzaldehyde and methyl amine was carried out using IR, Mass, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, 1H-1H COSY, 1H-13C COSY, DEPT-135, HMBC, NOESY spectra and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Formation of a new pyran ring via a tandem cyclization in the presence of methyl amine was observed. The optimized geometry and HOMO-LUMO energy gap along with other important physical parameters were found by Gaussian 09 program using HF 6-31G (d, p) and B3YLP/DFT 6-31G (d, p) level of theory. The preferred conformation of the piperidine ring in solution state was found to be chair from the NMR spectra. Single crystal X-ray diffraction and optimized geometry (by theoretical study) also confirms the chair conformation in the solid state.

  18. 浅探初中新型英语作业的设计%The Design of New Types of English Assignment in Secondary School

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐景萍

    2011-01-01

    This article elaborated the exploration and the attempt which was done to the form of English assignment in the junior middle school under the background of new curriculum teaching material.It strengthens the effect of English assignment from three aspects in order to improve students' language general abilities.%本文阐述了新课程教材背景下,对初中英语作业形式改革所做的探索和尝试。从三方面着手,加强作业的功效,提高学生语言运用的能力。

  19. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Assisted Prediction of Secondary Structure for RNA: Incorporation of Direction-Dependent Chemical Shift Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jonathan L; Bellaousov, Stanislav; Tubbs, Jason D; Kennedy, Scott D; Lopez, Michael J; Mathews, David H; Turner, Douglas H

    2015-11-17

    Knowledge of RNA structure is necessary to determine structure-function relationships and to facilitate design of potential therapeutics. RNA secondary structure prediction can be improved by applying constraints from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments to a dynamic programming algorithm. Imino proton walks from NOESY spectra reveal double-stranded regions. Chemical shifts of protons in GH1, UH3, and UH5 of GU pairs, UH3, UH5, and AH2 of AU pairs, and GH1 of GC pairs were analyzed to identify constraints for the 5' to 3' directionality of base pairs in helices. The 5' to 3' directionality constraints were incorporated into an NMR-assisted prediction of secondary structure (NAPSS-CS) program. When it was tested on 18 structures, including nine pseudoknots, the sensitivity and positive predictive value were improved relative to those of three unrestrained programs. The prediction accuracy for the pseudoknots improved the most. The program also facilitates assignment of chemical shifts to individual nucleotides, a necessary step for determining three-dimensional structure.

  20. Enhanced functional and structural domain assignments using remote similarity detection procedures for proteins encoded in the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Seema Namboori; Natasha Mhatre; Sentivel Sujatha; Narayanaswamy Srinivasan; Shashi Bhushan Pandit

    2004-09-01

    The sequencing of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) H37Rv genome has facilitated deeper insights into the biology of MTB, yet the functions of many MTB proteins are unknown. We have used sensitive profile-based search procedures to assign functional and structural domains to infer functions of gene products encoded in MTB. These domain assignments have been made using a compendium of sequence and structural domain families. Functions are predicted for 78% of the encoded gene products. For 69% of these, functions can be inferred by domain assignments. The functions for the rest are deduced from their homology to proteins of known function. Superfamily relationships between families of unknown and known structures have increased structural information by ∼ 11%. Remote similarity detection methods have enabled domain assignments for 1325 ‘hypothetical proteins’. The most populated families in MTB are involved in lipid metabolism, entry and survival of the bacillus in host. Interestingly, for 353 proteins, which we refer to as MTB-specific, no homologues have been identified. Numerous, previously unannotated, hypothetical proteins have been assigned domains and some of these could perhaps be the possible chemotherapeutic targets. MTB-specific proteins might include factors responsible for virulence. Importantly, these assignments could be valuable for experimental endeavors. The detailed results are publicly available at http://hodgkin.mbu.iisc.ernet.in/∼dots.

  1. Energy profile and secondary structure impact shRNA efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Xiao

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference (RNAi is a cellular mechanism in which a short/small double stranded RNA induces the degradation of its sequence specific target mRNA, leading to specific gene silencing. Since its discovery, RNAi has become a powerful biological technique for gene function studies and drug discovery. The very first requirement of applying RNAi is to design functional small interfering RNA (siRNA that can uniquely induce the degradation of the targeted mRNA. It has been shown that many functional synthetic siRNAs share some common characteristics, such as GC content limitation and free energy preferences at both terminals, etc. Results Our three-phase algorithm was developed to design siRNA on a whole-genome scale based on those identified characteristics of functional siRNA. When this algorithm was applied to design short hairpin RNA (shRNA, the validated success rate of shRNAs was over 70%, which was almost double the rate reported for TRC library. This indicates that the designs of siRNA and shRNA may share the same concerns. Further analysis of the shRNA dataset of 444 designs reveals that the high free energy states of the two terminals have the largest positive impact on the shRNA efficacy. Enforcing these energy characteristics of both terminals can further improve the shRNA design success rate to 83.1%. We also found that functional shRNAs have less probability for their 3' terminals to be involved in mRNA secondary structure formation. Conclusion Functional shRNAs prefer high free energy states at both terminals. High free energy states of the two terminals were found to be the largest positive impact factor on shRNA efficacy. In addition, the accessibility of the 3' terminal is another key factor to shRNA efficacy.

  2. Sucrose prevents protein fibrillation through compaction of the tertiary structure but hardly affects the secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrela, Nídia; Franquelim, Henri G; Lopes, Carlos; Tavares, Evandro; Macedo, Joana A; Christiansen, Gunna; Otzen, Daniel E; Melo, Eduardo P

    2015-11-01

    Amyloid fibers, implicated in a wide range of diseases, are formed when proteins misfold and stick together in long rope-like structures. As a natural mechanism, osmolytes can be used to modulate protein aggregation pathways with no interference with other cellular functions. The osmolyte sucrose delays fibrillation of the ribosomal protein S6 leading to softer and less shaped-defined fibrils. The molecular mechanism used by sucrose to delay S6 fibrillation was studied based on the two-state unfolding kinetics of the secondary and tertiary structures. It was concluded that the delay in S6 fibrillation results from stabilization and compaction of the slightly expanded tertiary native structure formed under fibrillation conditions. Interestingly, this compaction extends to almost all S6 tertiary structure but hardly affects its secondary structure. The part of the S6 tertiary structure that suffered more compaction by sucrose is known to be the first part to unfold, indicating that the native S6 has entered the unfolding pathway under fibrillation conditions.

  3. Institutional structures of the flexible assignment of personnel between enterprises: An economic comparison of Temporary Agency Work, Interim Management and Consulting

    OpenAIRE

    Alewell, Dorothea; Bähring, Katrin; Thommes, Kirsten

    2005-01-01

    Temporary Agency Work, Interim Management and Consulting are three versions of the flexible assignment of personnel between enterprises, which are - with regard to their basic economic structure - more or less similar, but which are organised under thoroughly different contractual and legal regulations in Germany and in three more or less differentiated segments of the market. The paper aims at comparing these forms of flexible personnel assignment under empirical and institutional aspects fr...

  4. 英语作业设计对英语学习动机影响的实证研究%The Motivating Function of English Assignment for the English Learning of the Students in Secondary Vocational Schools

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟义清

    2014-01-01

    With an empirical method, the writer, from the perspective of English assignment, explored the possibilities and effectiveness of improving the English learning motivation of the students in secondary vocational schools. The results showed that well-designed assignment according to some theories and principles could improve the students’ extrinsic and intrinsic motivations and their English learning autonomy as well.%本文采取实证的方法,从英语作业设计的角度,探索提高中职生英语学习动机的可能性和有效性。研究结果表明,依据一定的理论、原则,精心为学生设计的作业,可以提高中职生英语学习的外在动机、内在动机和努力学习的程度。

  5. Evaluation of the information content of RNA structure mapping data for secondary structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarrier, Scott; Martin, Joshua S; Davis-Neulander, Lauren; Beauregard, Arthur; Laederach, Alain

    2010-06-01

    Structure mapping experiments (using probes such as dimethyl sulfate [DMS], kethoxal, and T1 and V1 RNases) are used to determine the secondary structures of RNA molecules. The process is iterative, combining the results of several probes with constrained minimum free-energy calculations to produce a model of the structure. We aim to evaluate whether particular probes provide more structural information, and specifically, how noise in the data affects the predictions. Our approach involves generating "decoy" RNA structures (using the sFold Boltzmann sampling procedure) and evaluating whether we are able to identify the correct structure from this ensemble of structures. We show that with perfect information, we are always able to identify the optimal structure for five RNAs of known structure. We then collected orthogonal structure mapping data (DMS and RNase T1 digest) under several solution conditions using our high-throughput capillary automated footprinting analysis (CAFA) technique on two group I introns of known structure. Analysis of these data reveals the error rates in the data under optimal (low salt) and suboptimal solution conditions (high MgCl(2)). We show that despite these errors, our computational approach is less sensitive to experimental noise than traditional constraint-based structure prediction algorithms. Finally, we propose a novel approach for visualizing the interaction of chemical and enzymatic mapping data with RNA structure. We project the data onto the first two dimensions of a multidimensional scaling of the sFold-generated decoy structures. We are able to directly visualize the structural information content of structure mapping data and reconcile multiple data sets. PMID:20413617

  6. Mathematical and Biological Modelling of RNA Secondary Structure and Its Effects on Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Hughes

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary structures within the 5′ untranslated regions of messenger RNAs can have profound effects on the efficiency of translation of their messages and thereby on gene expression. Consequently they can act as important regulatory motifs in both physiological and pathological settings. Current approaches to predicting the secondary structure of these RNA sequences find the structure with the global-minimum free energy. However, since RNA folds progressively from the 5′ end when synthesised or released from the translational machinery, this may not be the most probable structure. We discuss secondary structure prediction based on local-minimisation of free energy with thermodynamic fluctuations as nucleotides are added to the 3′ end and show that these can result in different secondary structures. We also discuss approaches for studying the extent of the translational inhibition specified by structures within the 5′ untranslated region.

  7. Structure-Based Alignment and Consensus Secondary Structures for Three HIV-Related RNA Genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Lavender

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available HIV and related primate lentiviruses possess single-stranded RNA genomes. Multiple regions of these genomes participate in critical steps in the viral replication cycle, and the functions of many RNA elements are dependent on the formation of defined structures. The structures of these elements are still not fully understood, and additional functional elements likely exist that have not been identified. In this work, we compared three full-length HIV-related viral genomes: HIV-1NL4-3, SIVcpz, and SIVmac (the latter two strains are progenitors for all HIV-1 and HIV-2 strains, respectively. Model-free RNA structure comparisons were performed using whole-genome structure information experimentally derived from nucleotide-resolution SHAPE reactivities. Consensus secondary structures were constructed for strongly correlated regions by taking into account both SHAPE probing structural data and nucleotide covariation information from structure-based alignments. In these consensus models, all known functional RNA elements were recapitulated with high accuracy. In addition, we identified multiple previously unannotated structural elements in the HIV-1 genome likely to function in translation, splicing and other replication cycle processes; these are compelling targets for future functional analyses. The structure-informed alignment strategy developed here will be broadly useful for efficient RNA motif discovery.

  8. Deciphering the shape and deformation of secondary structures through local conformation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camproux Anne-Claude

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein deformation has been extensively analysed through global methods based on RMSD, torsion angles and Principal Components Analysis calculations. Here we use a local approach, able to distinguish among the different backbone conformations within loops, α-helices and β-strands, to address the question of secondary structures' shape variation within proteins and deformation at interface upon complexation. Results Using a structural alphabet, we translated the 3 D structures of large sets of protein-protein complexes into sequences of structural letters. The shape of the secondary structures can be assessed by the structural letters that modeled them in the structural sequences. The distribution analysis of the structural letters in the three protein compartments (surface, core and interface reveals that secondary structures tend to adopt preferential conformations that differ among the compartments. The local description of secondary structures highlights that curved conformations are preferred on the surface while straight ones are preferred in the core. Interfaces display a mixture of local conformations either preferred in core or surface. The analysis of the structural letters transition occurring between protein-bound and unbound conformations shows that the deformation of secondary structure is tightly linked to the compartment preference of the local conformations. Conclusion The conformation of secondary structures can be further analysed and detailed thanks to a structural alphabet which allows a better description of protein surface, core and interface in terms of secondary structures' shape and deformation. Induced-fit modification tendencies described here should be valuable information to identify and characterize regions under strong structural constraints for functional reasons.

  9. cDNA, deduced polypeptide structure and chromosomal assignment of human pulmonary surfactant proteolipid, SPL(pVal)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In hyaline membrane disease of premature infants, lack of surfactant leads to pulmonary atelectasis and respiratory distress. Hydrophobic surfactant proteins of M/sub r/ = 5000-14,000 have been isolated from mammalian surfactants which enhance the rate of spreading and the surface tension lowering properties of phospholipids during dynamic compression. The authors have characterized the amino-terminal amino acid sequence of pulmonary proteolipids from ether/ethanol extracts of bovine, canine, and human surfactant. Two distinct peptides were identified and termed SPL(pVal) and SPL(Phe). An oligonucleotide probe based on the valine-rich amino-terminal amino acid sequence of SPL(pVal) was utilized to isolate cDNA and genomic DNA encoding the human protein, termed surfactant proteolipid SPL(pVal) on the basis of its unique polyvaline domain. The primary structure of a precursor protein of 20,870 daltons, containing the SPL(pVal) peptide, was deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the cDNAs. Hybrid-arrested translation and immunoprecipitation of labeled translation products of human mRNA demonstrated a precursor protein, the active hydrophobic peptide being produced by proteolytic processing. Two classes of cDNAs encoding SPL(pVal) were identified. Human SPL(pVal) mRNA was more abundant in the adult than in fetal lung. The SPL(pVal) gene locus was assigned to chromosome 8

  10. Molecular structure and vibrational bands and 13C chemical shift assignments of both enmein-type diterpenoids by DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Wu, Yi fang; Wang, Xue liang

    2014-01-01

    We report here theoretical and experimental studies on the molecular structure and vibrational and NMR spectra of both natural enmein type diterpenoids molecule (6, 7-seco-ent-kaurenes enmein type), isolated from the leaves of Isodon japonica (Burm.f.) Hara var. galaucocalyx (maxin) Hara. The optimized geometry, total energy, NMR chemical shifts and vibrational wavenumbers of epinodosinol and epinodosin have been determined using B3LYP method with 6-311G (d,p) basis set. A complete vibrational assignment is provided for the observed IR spectra of studied compounds. The calculated wavenumbers and 13C c.s. are in an excellent agreement with the experimental values. Quantum chemical calculations at the B3LYP/6-311G (d,p) level of theory have been carried out on studied compounds to obtain a set of molecular electronic properties (MEP,HOMO, LUMO and gap energies ΔEg). Electrostatic potential surfaces have been mapped over the electron density isosurfaces to obtain information about the size, shape, charge density distribution and chemical reactivity of the molecules.

  11. Raman and infrared spectra, structure, vibrational assignment, normal coordinate analysis, and ab initio calculations of trifluoromethyl isocyanate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durig, J. R.; Guirgis, G. A.; Eltayeb, S.

    1994-07-01

    The Raman (2500 to 30 cm -1) and infrared (2500 to 60 cm 1) spectra of gaseous and solid trifluoromethyl isocyanate, CF 3NCO, have been recorded. The Raman spectrum of the liquid has also been obtained and qualitative depolarization ratios have been measured. The CNC bend has been observed in the low-frequency Raman spectrum of the gas at 130 cm -1 as a relatively strong line which is split in the spectrum of the solid. However, the CF 3 torsional mode was not observed. The infrared spectrum of CF 3NCO dissolved in liquid xenon was also obtained and the observed spectrum indicates a very small barrier to internal rotation. With the exception of the torsion, a complete assignment of the vibrational fundamentals is proposed. The structural parameters, force constants, and vibrational frequencies have been determined from ab initio calculations utilizing a variety of basis sets and the theoretical results are compared to the experimental values when appropriate. These results have been compared with the corresponding quantities obtained for some similar molecules.

  12. A seqlet-based maximum entropy Markov approach for protein secondary structure prediction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG; Qiwen; WANG; Xiaolong; LIN; Lei; GUAN; Yi

    2005-01-01

    A novel method for predicting the secondary structures of proteins from amino acid sequence has been presented. The protein secondary structure seqlets that are analogous to the words in natural language have been extracted. These seqlets will capture the relationship between amino acid sequence and the secondary structures of proteins and further form the protein secondary structure dictionary. To be elaborate, the dictionary is organism-specific. Protein secondary structure prediction is formulated as an integrated word segmentation and part of speech tagging problem. The word-lattice is used to represent the results of the word segmentation and the maximum entropy model is used to calculate the probability of a seqlet tagged as a certain secondary structure type. The method is markovian in the seqlets, permitting efficient exact calculation of the posterior probability distribution over all possible word segmentations and their tags by viterbi algorithm. The optimal segmentations and their tags are computed as the results of protein secondary structure prediction. The method is applied to predict the secondary structures of proteins of four organisms respectively and compared with the PHD method. The results show that the performance of this method is higher than that of PHD by about 3.9% Q3 accuracy and 4.6% SOV accuracy. Combining with the local similarity protein sequences that are obtained by BLAST can give better prediction. The method is also tested on the 50 CASP5 target proteins with Q3 accuracy 78.9% and SOV accuracy 77.1%. A web server for protein secondary structure prediction has been constructed which is available at http://www.insun. hit. edu. cn: 81/demos/biology/index.html.

  13. Toward the solution structure of human insulin: Sequential 2D 1H NMR assignment of a des-pentapeptide analogue and comparison with crystal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2D 1H NMR studies are presented of des-pentapeptide-insulin, an analogue of human insulin lacking the C-terminal five residues of the B chain. Removal of these residues, which are not required for function, is shown to reduce conformational broadening previously described in the spectrum of intact insulin. This difference presumably reflects more rapid internal motions in the fragment, which lead to more complete averaging of chemical shifts on the NMR time scale. Sequential 1H NMR assignment and preliminary structural analysis demonstrate retention in solution of the three α-helices observed in the crystal state and the relative orientation of the receptor-binding surfaces. These studies provide a foundation for determining the solution structure of insulin

  14. Toward the solution structure of human insulin: Sequential 2D sup 1 H NMR assignment of a des-pentapeptide analogue and comparison with crystal structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hua, Q.; Weiss, M.A. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA) Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (USA))

    1990-11-01

    2D {sup 1}H NMR studies are presented of des-pentapeptide-insulin, an analogue of human insulin lacking the C-terminal five residues of the B chain. Removal of these residues, which are not required for function, is shown to reduce conformational broadening previously described in the spectrum of intact insulin. This difference presumably reflects more rapid internal motions in the fragment, which lead to more complete averaging of chemical shifts on the NMR time scale. Sequential {sup 1}H NMR assignment and preliminary structural analysis demonstrate retention in solution of the three {alpha}-helices observed in the crystal state and the relative orientation of the receptor-binding surfaces. These studies provide a foundation for determining the solution structure of insulin.

  15. Non-B DNA Secondary Structures and Their Resolution by RecQ Helicases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Sharma

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the canonical B-form structure first described by Watson and Crick, DNA can adopt a number of alternative structures. These non-B-form DNA secondary structures form spontaneously on tracts of repeat sequences that are abundant in genomes. In addition, structured forms of DNA with intrastrand pairing may arise on single-stranded DNA produced transiently during various cellular processes. Such secondary structures have a range of biological functions but also induce genetic instability. Increasing evidence suggests that genomic instabilities induced by non-B DNA secondary structures result in predisposition to diseases. Secondary DNA structures also represent a new class of molecular targets for DNA-interactive compounds that might be useful for targeting telomeres and transcriptional control. The equilibrium between the duplex DNA and formation of multistranded non-B-form structures is partly dependent upon the helicases that unwind (resolve these alternate DNA structures. With special focus on tetraplex, triplex, and cruciform, this paper summarizes the incidence of non-B DNA structures and their association with genomic instability and emphasizes the roles of RecQ-like DNA helicases in genome maintenance by resolution of DNA secondary structures. In future, RecQ helicases are anticipated to be additional molecular targets for cancer chemotherapeutics.

  16. An evolutionary method for learning HMM structure: prediction of protein secondary structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Kyoung-Jae

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prediction of the secondary structure of proteins is one of the most studied problems in bioinformatics. Despite their success in many problems of biological sequence analysis, Hidden Markov Models (HMMs have not been used much for this problem, as the complexity of the task makes manual design of HMMs difficult. Therefore, we have developed a method for evolving the structure of HMMs automatically, using Genetic Algorithms (GAs. Results In the GA procedure, populations of HMMs are assembled from biologically meaningful building blocks. Mutation and crossover operators were designed to explore the space of such Block-HMMs. After each step of the GA, the standard HMM estimation algorithm (the Baum-Welch algorithm was used to update model parameters. The final HMM captures several features of protein sequence and structure, with its own HMM grammar. In contrast to neural network based predictors, the evolved HMM also calculates the probabilities associated with the predictions. We carefully examined the performance of the HMM based predictor, both under the multiple- and single-sequence condition. Conclusion We have shown that the proposed evolutionary method can automatically design the topology of HMMs. The method reads the grammar of protein sequences and converts it into the grammar of an HMM. It improved previously suggested evolutionary methods and increased the prediction quality. Especially, it shows good performance under the single-sequence condition and provides probabilistic information on the prediction result. The protein secondary structure predictor using HMMs (P.S.HMM is on-line available http://www.binf.ku.dk/~won/pshmm.htm. It runs under the single-sequence condition.

  17. A secondary copulatory structure in a female insect: a clasp for a nuptial meal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwynne, Darryl T.

    2002-03-01

    Secondary copulatory structures are well-known in male dragonflies and spiders. Here I report a secondary copulatory organ in female ground weta, Hemiandrus pallitarsis (Ensifera, Orthoptera - crickets and allies). The organ, located on the underside of the abdomen, appears to secure the male's genitalia during the transfer of a spermatophylax nuptial meal to this location, an area quite separate from the female's primary copulatory structures, where the sperm ampulla is attached.

  18. Conservation of mRNA secondary structures may filter out mutations in Escherichia coli evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chursov, Andrey; Frishman, Dmitrij; Shneider, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    Recent reports indicate that mutations in viral genomes tend to preserve RNA secondary structure, and those mutations that disrupt secondary structural elements may reduce gene expression levels, thereby serving as a functional knockout. In this article, we explore the conservation of secondary structures of mRNA coding regions, a previously unknown factor in bacterial evolution, by comparing the structural consequences of mutations in essential and nonessential Escherichia coli genes accumulated over 40 000 generations in the course of the 'long-term evolution experiment'. We monitored the extent to which mutations influence minimum free energy (MFE) values, assuming that a substantial change in MFE is indicative of structural perturbation. Our principal finding is that purifying selection tends to eliminate those mutations in essential genes that lead to greater changes of MFE values and, therefore, may be more disruptive for the corresponding mRNA secondary structures. This effect implies that synonymous mutations disrupting mRNA secondary structures may directly affect the fitness of the organism. These results demonstrate that the need to maintain intact mRNA structures imposes additional evolutionary constraints on bacterial genomes, which go beyond preservation of structure and function of the encoded proteins.

  19. 4SALE – A tool for synchronous RNA sequence and secondary structure alignment and editing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schultz Jörg

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In sequence analysis the multiple alignment builds the fundament of all proceeding analyses. Errors in an alignment could strongly influence all succeeding analyses and therefore could lead to wrong predictions. Hand-crafted and hand-improved alignments are necessary and meanwhile good common practice. For RNA sequences often the primary sequence as well as a secondary structure consensus is well known, e.g., the cloverleaf structure of the t-RNA. Recently, some alignment editors are proposed that are able to include and model both kinds of information. However, with the advent of a large amount of reliable RNA sequences together with their solved secondary structures (available from e.g. the ITS2 Database, we are faced with the problem to handle sequences and their associated secondary structures synchronously. Results 4SALE fills this gap. The application allows a fast sequence and synchronous secondary structure alignment for large data sets and for the first time synchronous manual editing of aligned sequences and their secondary structures. This study describes an algorithm for the synchronous alignment of sequences and their associated secondary structures as well as the main features of 4SALE used for further analyses and editing. 4SALE builds an optimal and unique starting point for every RNA sequence and structure analysis. Conclusion 4SALE, which provides an user-friendly and intuitive interface, is a comprehensive toolbox for RNA analysis based on sequence and secondary structure information. The program connects sequence and structure databases like the ITS2 Database to phylogeny programs as for example the CBCAnalyzer. 4SALE is written in JAVA and therefore platform independent. The software is freely available and distributed from the website at http://4sale.bioapps.biozentrum.uni-wuerzburg.de

  20. Training set reduction methods for protein secondary structure prediction in single-sequence condition

    OpenAIRE

    Aydın, Zafer; AYDIN, Zafer; Altunbaşak, Yücel; Altunbasak, Yucel; Pakatcı, Kemal İsa; Pakatci, Kemal Isa; Erdoğan, Hakan; Erdogan, Hakan

    2007-01-01

    Orphan proteins are characterized by the lack of significant sequence similarity to database proteins. To infer the functional properties of the orphans, more elaborate techniques that utilize structural information are required. In this regard, the protein structure prediction gains considerable importance. Secondary structure prediction algorithms designed for orphan proteins (also known as single-sequence algorithms) cannot utilize multiple alignments or alignment prof...

  1. Microwave, infrared and Raman spectra, r0 structural parameters, ab initio calculations and vibrational assignment of 1-fluoro-1-silacyclopentane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durig, James R; Panikar, Savitha S; Obenchain, Daniel A; Bills, Brandon J; Lohan, Patrick M; Peebles, Rebecca A; Peebles, Sean A; Groner, Peter; Guirgis, Gamil A; Johnston, Michael D

    2012-01-28

    The microwave spectrum (6500-18 ,500 MHz) of 1-fluoro-1-silacyclopentane, c-C(4)H(8)SiHF has been recorded and 87 transitions for the (28)Si, (29)Si, (30)Si, and (13)C isotopomers have been assigned for a single conformer. Infrared spectra (3050-350 cm(-1)) of the gas and solid and Raman spectrum (3100-40 cm(-1)) of the liquid have also been recorded. The vibrational data indicate the presence of a single conformer with no symmetry which is consistent with the twist form. Ab initio calculations with a variety of basis sets up to MP2(full)/aug-cc-pVTZ predict the envelope-axial and envelope-equatorial conformers to be saddle points with nearly the same energies but much lower energy than the planar conformer. By utilizing the microwave rotational constants for seven isotopomers ((28)Si, (29)Si, (30)Si, and four (13)C) combined with the structural parameters predicted from the MP2(full)/6-311+G(d,p) calculations, adjusted r(0) structural parameters have been obtained for the twist conformer. The heavy atom distances in Å are: r(0)(SiC(2)) = 1.875(3); r(0)(SiC(3)) = 1.872(3); r(0)(C(2)C(4)) = 1.549(3); r(0)(C(3)C(5)) = 1.547(3); r(0)(C(4)C(5)) = 1.542(3); r(0)(SiF) = 1.598(3) and the angles in degrees are: [angle]CSiC = 96.7(5); [angle]SiC(2)C(4) = 103.6(5); [angle]SiC(3)C(5) = 102.9(5); [angle]C(2)C(4)C(5) = 108.4(5); [angle]C(3)C(5)C(4) = 108.1(5); [angle]F(6)Si(1)C(2) = 110.7(5); [angle]F(6)Si(1)C(3) = 111.6(5). The heavy atom ring parameters are compared to the corresponding r(s) parameters. Normal coordinate calculations with scaled force constants from MP2(full)/6-31G(d) calculations were carried out to predict the fundamental vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities, Raman activities, depolarization values, and infrared band contours. These experimental and theoretical results are compared to the corresponding quantities of some other five-membered rings.

  2. Knowledge base and neural network approach for protein secondary structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Maulika S; Mazumdar, Himanshu S

    2014-11-21

    Protein structure prediction is of great relevance given the abundant genomic and proteomic data generated by the genome sequencing projects. Protein secondary structure prediction is addressed as a sub task in determining the protein tertiary structure and function. In this paper, a novel algorithm, KB-PROSSP-NN, which is a combination of knowledge base and modeling of the exceptions in the knowledge base using neural networks for protein secondary structure prediction (PSSP), is proposed. The knowledge base is derived from a proteomic sequence-structure database and consists of the statistics of association between the 5-residue words and corresponding secondary structure. The predicted results obtained using knowledge base are refined with a Backpropogation neural network algorithm. Neural net models the exceptions of the knowledge base. The Q3 accuracy of 90% and 82% is achieved on the RS126 and CB396 test sets respectively which suggest improvement over existing state of art methods.

  3. GC content around splice sites affects splicing through pre-mRNA secondary structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Liang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing increases protein diversity by generating multiple transcript isoforms from a single gene through different combinations of exons or through different selections of splice sites. It has been reported that RNA secondary structures are involved in alternative splicing. Here we perform a genomic study of RNA secondary structures around splice sites in humans (Homo sapiens, mice (Mus musculus, fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster, and nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans to further investigate this phenomenon. Results We observe that GC content around splice sites is closely associated with the splice site usage in multiple species. RNA secondary structure is the possible explanation, because the structural stability difference among alternative splice sites, constitutive splice sites, and skipped splice sites can be explained by the GC content difference. Alternative splice sites tend to be GC-enriched and exhibit more stable RNA secondary structures in all of the considered species. In humans and mice, splice sites of first exons and long exons tend to be GC-enriched and hence form more stable structures, indicating the special role of RNA secondary structures in promoter proximal splicing events and the splicing of long exons. In addition, GC-enriched exon-intron junctions tend to be overrepresented in tissue-specific alternative splice sites, indicating the functional consequence of the GC effect. Compared with regions far from splice sites and decoy splice sites, real splice sites are GC-enriched. We also found that the GC-content effect is much stronger than the nucleotide-order effect to form stable secondary structures. Conclusion All of these results indicate that GC content is related to splice site usage and it may mediate the splicing process through RNA secondary structures.

  4. Inflatable Habitat with Integrated Primary and Secondary Structure Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Paragon Space Development Corp (Paragon) and Thin Red Line Aerospace (TRLA) proposes to explore the utilization of inflatable structures by designing a habitation...

  5. Embedded Learning Strategy Instruction: Story-Structure Pedagogy in Heterogeneous Secondary Literature Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggella-Luby, Michael; Schumaker, Jean S.; Deshler, Donald D.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of using the Embedded Story-Structure (ESS) Routine in a literature course were investigated. A heterogeneous group of 79 ninth graders, including 14 students with LD, were randomly assigned to one of two conditions, with instruction occurring in groups of 12 to 14 students in general education literature classes over a nine-day…

  6. Secondary structures of proteins from the 30S subunit of the Escherichia coli ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzionara, M; Robinson, S M; Wittmann-Liebold, B

    1977-08-01

    The secondary structures of the proteins S4, S6, S8, S9, S12, S13, S15, S16, S18, S20 and S21 from the subunit of the E. coli ribosome were predicted according to four different methods. From the resultant diagrams indicating regions of helix, turn, extended structure and random coil, average values for the respective secondary structures could be calculated for each protein. Using the known relative distances for residues in the helical, turn and sheet or allowed random conformations, estimates are made of the maximum possible lengths of the proteins in order to correlate these with results obtained from antibody binding studies to the 30S subunit as determined by electron microscopy. The influence of amino acid changes on the predicted secondary structures of proteins from a few selected mutants was studied. The altered residues tend to be structurally conservative or to induce only minimal local changes.

  7. STUDY ON THE SEQUENCE STRUCTURE OF SBR BY 13C- NMR METHOD Ⅱ . PEAK ASSIGNMENT FOR ALIPHATIC CARBONS SPECTRA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAO Shuke; CHEN Xiaonong; HU Liping; YAN Baozhen

    1990-01-01

    The study on 13C-NMR spectra of aliphatic carbon region of emulsion-processed and solution-processed ( by lithium catalyst ) SBR was carried out. The assignments for more than thirty odd peaks observed experimentally were made by using " corresponding analysis " method, combined with the empirical parameters reported in literature. The peak intensities were calculated based on Bernoullian statistic assumption.

  8. Balanced input-output assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawronski, W.; Hadaegh, F. Y.

    1989-01-01

    Actuator/sensor locations and balanced representations of linear systems are considered for a given set of controllability and observability grammians. The case of equally controlled and observed states is given special attention. The assignability of grammians is examined, and the conditions for their existence are presented, along with several algorithms for their determination. Although an arbitrary positive semidefinite matrix is not always assignable, the identity grammian is shown to be always assignable. The results are extended to the case of flexible structures.

  9. Evolutionary rate variation and RNA secondary structure prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, B.; Andersen, E.S.; Damgaard, C.;

    2004-01-01

    . In addition we obtained an alignment of the 5' HIV-1 region that is more consistent with the structure than that currently in the database. We added randomized noise to the original values of the rates to investigate the stability of predictions to rate matrix deviations. We find that changes within a fairly...

  10. POPULATION STRUCTURE OF Ocotea puberula IN A SECONDARY AND A PRIMARY MIXED FOREST IN MISIONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Lucia Caldato

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the population structure of Ocotea puberula (Nees et Mart. Nees (Lauraceae, in a secondary and a primary forests Northeast of Misiones in Argentina, at 26º 15¢ S and 54º 15¢ W. Two permanent sampling plots of 3 hectares each were installed in the secondary and primary forest, respectively. Each sampling plot was divided into 75 subplots of 20 x 20 m. In each subplot all individuals of Ocotea puberula equal or greater than 20 cm of height were measured. The structure of size and spatial distribution was surveyed. Ocotea puberula was a secondary species, with a high number of individuals of natural regeneration in the secondary forest, and only adult trees in the primary forest. The species presented a clustered pattern of spatial distribution in both forests.

  11. FTIR Analysis of Protein Secondary Structure in Cheddar Cheese during Ripening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Fang; LIU Ai-ping; REN Fa-zheng; ZHANG Xiao-ying; Stephanie Clark; ZHANG Lu-da; GUO Hui-yuan

    2011-01-01

    Proteolysis is one of the most important biochemical reactions during cheese ripening. Studies on the secondary structure of proteins during ripening would be helpful for characterizing protein changes for assessing cheese quality. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), with self-deconvolution, second derivative analysis and band curve-fitting, was used to characterize the secondary structure of proteins in Cheddar cheese during ripening. The spectra of the amide I region showed great similarity, while the relative contents of the secondary structures underwent a series of changes. As ripening progressed, the α-helix content decreased and the β-sheet content increased. This structural shift was attributed to the strengthening of hydrogen bonds that resulted from hydrolysis of caseins. In summary, FTIR could provide the basis for rapid characterization of cheese that is undergoing ripening.

  12. Evolving stochastic context-free grammars for RNA secondary structure prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, James WJ; Tataru, Paula Cristina; Stains, Joe;

    2012-01-01

    Background Stochastic Context-Free Grammars (SCFGs) were applied successfully to RNA secondary structure prediction in the early 90s, and used in combination with comparative methods in the late 90s. The set of SCFGs potentially useful for RNA secondary structure prediction is very large, but a few...... intuitively designed grammars have remained dominant. In this paper we investigate two automatic search techniques for effective grammars - exhaustive search for very compact grammars and an evolutionary algorithm to find larger grammars. We also examine whether grammar ambiguity is as problematic...... to structure prediction as has been previously suggested. Results These search techniques were applied to predict RNA secondary structure on a maximal data set and revealed new and interesting grammars, though none are dramatically better than classic grammars. In general, results showed that many grammars...

  13. Use of electrophoretic mobility to determine the secondary structure of a small antisense RNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Jacques, J P; Susskind, M M

    1991-01-01

    Natural antisense RNAs have stem-loop (hairpin) secondary structures that are important for their function. The sar antisense RNA of phage P22 is unusual: the 3' half of the molecule forms an extensive stem-loop, but potential structures for the 5' half are not predicted to be thermodynamically stable. We devised a novel method to determine the secondary structure of sar RNA by examining the electrophoretic mobility on non-denaturing gels of numerous sar mutants. The results show that the wil...

  14. Use of secondary structural information and C-C distance restraints to model protein structures with MODELLER

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Boojala V B Reddy; Yiannis N Kaznessis

    2007-08-01

    Protein secondary structure predictions and amino acid long range contact map predictions from primary sequence of proteins have been explored to aid in modelling protein tertiary structures. In order to evaluate the usefulness of secondary structure and 3D-residue contact prediction methods to model protein structures we have used the known Q3 (alpha-helix, beta-strands and irregular turns/loops) secondary structure information, along with residue-residue contact information as restraints for MODELLER. We present here results of our modelling studies on 30 best resolved single domain protein structures of varied lengths. The results shows that it is very difficult to obtain useful models even with 100% accurate secondary structure predictions and accurate residue contact predictions for up to 30% of residues in a sequence. The best models that we obtained for proteins of lengths 37, 70, 118, 136 and 193 amino acid residues are of RMSDs 4.17, 5.27, 9.12, 7.89 and 9.69, respectively. The results show that one can obtain better models for the proteins which have high percent of alpha-helix content. This analysis further shows that MODELLER restrain optimization program can be useful only if we have truly homologous structure(s) as a template where it derives numerous restraints, almost identical to the templates used. This analysis also clearly indicates that even if we satisfy several true residue-residue contact distances, up to 30% of their sequence length with fully known secondary structural information, we end up predicting model structures much distant from their corresponding native structures.

  15. RNA-PAIRS: RNA probabilistic assignment of imino resonance shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrami, Arash; Clos, Lawrence J.; Markley, John L.; Butcher, Samuel E. [National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison (United States); Eghbalnia, Hamid R., E-mail: eghbalhd@uc.edu [University of Cincinnati, Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology (United States)

    2012-04-15

    The significant biological role of RNA has further highlighted the need for improving the accuracy, efficiency and the reach of methods for investigating RNA structure and function. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is vital to furthering the goals of RNA structural biology because of its distinctive capabilities. However, the dispersion pattern in the NMR spectra of RNA makes automated resonance assignment, a key step in NMR investigation of biomolecules, remarkably challenging. Herein we present RNA Probabilistic Assignment of Imino Resonance Shifts (RNA-PAIRS), a method for the automated assignment of RNA imino resonances with synchronized verification and correction of predicted secondary structure. RNA-PAIRS represents an advance in modeling the assignment paradigm because it seeds the probabilistic network for assignment with experimental NMR data, and predicted RNA secondary structure, simultaneously and from the start. Subsequently, RNA-PAIRS sets in motion a dynamic network that reverberates between predictions and experimental evidence in order to reconcile and rectify resonance assignments and secondary structure information. The procedure is halted when assignments and base-parings are deemed to be most consistent with observed crosspeaks. The current implementation of RNA-PAIRS uses an initial peak list derived from proton-nitrogen heteronuclear multiple quantum correlation ({sup 1}H-{sup 15}N 2D HMQC) and proton-proton nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-{sup 1}H 2D NOESY) experiments. We have evaluated the performance of RNA-PAIRS by using it to analyze NMR datasets from 26 previously studied RNAs, including a 111-nucleotide complex. For moderately sized RNA molecules, and over a range of comparatively complex structural motifs, the average assignment accuracy exceeds 90%, while the average base pair prediction accuracy exceeded 93%. RNA-PAIRS yielded accurate assignments and base pairings consistent with imino

  16. FTIR Characterization of the Secondary Structure of Insulin Encapsulated within Liposome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGXuan; HUANGLi-xin; NIESong-qing; QIXian-rong; ZHANGQiang

    2003-01-01

    Aim:To determine the secondary structure of insulin encapsulated within liposome.Methods:The secondary structure of native insulin,mixture of insulin with liposome(sample I) and insulin encapsulated within liposome(sample Ⅱ) were determined by FTIR(Fourier Transform Infrared) spectroscopy.Results:The secondary structure of insulin encspsulated within liposome(Ⅱ) are similar with the secondary structure of native insulin.The difference existed in the amount of α-helices (from 36% of insulin to 31% of sample Ⅱ)and β-sheet(from 48% of insulin to 51% of sample Ⅱ).The content of α-helices and β-sheet of insulin in sample I was found to be very close to that of sample Ⅱ.The results revealed that the insulin encapsulated within liposome possibly spread on the surface of liposome,without inserting into the liposome membrane.Coclusion:The secondary structure of insulin encapsulated within liposome is similar with the native insulin.

  17. Structuring Free-text Microbiology Culture Reports For Secondary Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Wen-wai; Evans, Heather L.; Yetisgen, Meliha

    2015-01-01

    Microbiology lab culture reports are a frequently used diagnostic tool for clinical providers. However, their incorporation into clinical surveillance applications and evidence-based medicine can be severely hindered by the free-text nature of these reports. In this work, we (1) created a microbiology culture template to structure free-text microbiology reports, (2) generated an annotated microbiology report corpus, and (3) built a microbiology information extraction system. Specifically, we combined rule-based, hybrid, and statistical techniques to extract microbiology entities and fill templates for structuring data. System performances were favorable, with entity f1-score 0.889 and relation f1-score 0.795. We plan to incorporate these extractions as features for our ongoing ventilator-associated pneumonia surveillance project, though this tool can be used as an upstream process in other applications. Our newly created corpus includes 1442 unique gram stain and culture microbiology reports generated from a cohort of 715 patients at the University of Washington Medical Facilities. PMID:26306288

  18. A Reference Database for Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy Covering Fold and Secondary Structure Space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Circular Dichroism (CD) spectroscopy is a long-established technique for studying protein secondary structures in solution. Empirical analyses of CD data rely on the availability of reference datasets comprised of far-UV CD spectra of proteins whose crystal structures have been determined. This article reports on the creation of a new reference dataset which effectively covers both secondary structure and fold space, and uses the higher information content available in synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) spectra to more accurately predict secondary structure than has been possible with existing reference datasets. It also examines the effects of wavelength range, structural redundancy and different means of categorizing secondary structures on the accuracy of the analyses. In addition, it describes a novel use of hierarchical cluster analyses to identify protein relatedness based on spectral properties alone. The databases are shown to be applicable in both conventional CD and SRCD spectroscopic analyses of proteins. Hence, by combining new bioinformatics and biophysical methods, a database has been produced that should have wide applicability as a tool for structural molecular biology

  19. Dynamics of beta and proliferating cell nuclear antigen sliding clamps in traversing DNA secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, N; Hurwitz, J; O'Donnell, M

    2000-01-14

    Chromosomal replicases of cellular organisms utilize a ring shaped protein that encircles DNA as a mobile tether for high processivity in DNA synthesis. These "sliding clamps" have sufficiently large linear diameters to encircle duplex DNA and are perhaps even large enough to slide over certain DNA secondary structural elements. This report examines the Escherichia coli beta and human proliferating cell nuclear antigen clamps for their ability to slide over various DNA secondary structures. The results show that these clamps are capable of traversing a 13-nucleotide ssDNA loop, a 4-base pair stem-loop, a 4-nucleotide 5' tail, and a 15-mer bubble within the duplex. However, upon increasing the size of these structures (20-nucleotide loop, 12-base pair stem-loop, 28-nucleotide 5' tail, and 20-nucleotide bubble) the sliding motion of the beta and proliferating cell nuclear antigen over these elements is halted. Studies of the E. coli replicase, DNA polymerase III holoenzyme, in chain elongation with the beta clamp demonstrate that upon encounter with an oligonucleotide annealed in its path, it traverses the duplex and resumes synthesis on the 3' terminus of the oligonucleotide. This sliding and resumption of synthesis occurs even when the oligonucleotide contains a secondary structure element, provided the beta clamp can traverse the structure. However, upon encounter with a downstream oligonucleotide containing a large internal secondary structure, the holoenzyme clears the obstacle by strand displacing the oligonucleotide from the template. Implications of these protein dynamics to DNA transactions are discussed. PMID:10625694

  20. Predicting RNA Secondary Structure Using Profile Stochastic Context-Free Grammars and Phylogenic Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Yong Fang; Zhi-Gang Luo; Zheng-Hua Wang

    2008-01-01

    Stochastic context-free grammars (SCFGs) have been applied to predicting RNA secondary structure. The prediction of RNA secondary structure can be facilitated by incorporating with comparative sequence analysis. However,most of existing SCFG-based methods lack explicit phylogenic analysis of homologous RNA sequences, which is probably the reason why these methods are not ideal in practical application. Hence, we present a new SCFG-based method by integrating phylogenic analysis with the newly defined profile SCFG. The method can be summarized as: 1) we define a new profile SCFG, M, to depict consensus secondary structure of multiple RNA sequence alignment; 2) we introduce two distinct hidden Markov models, λ and λ', to perform phylogenic analysis of homologous RNA sequences. Here, λ is for non-structural regions of the sequence and λ' is for structural regions of the sequence; 3) we mergeλ and λ' in to M todevise a combined model for prediction of RNA secondary structure. We tested our method on data sets constructed from the Rfam database. The sensitivity and specificity of our method are more accurate than those of the predictions by Pfold.

  1. RNAmutants: a web server to explore the mutational landscape of RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldispühl, Jerome; Devadas, Srinivas; Berger, Bonnie; Clote, Peter

    2009-07-01

    The history and mechanism of molecular evolution in DNA have been greatly elucidated by contributions from genetics, probability theory and bioinformatics--indeed, mathematical developments such as Kimura's neutral theory, Kingman's coalescent theory and efficient software such as BLAST, ClustalW, Phylip, etc., provide the foundation for modern population genetics. In contrast to DNA, the function of most noncoding RNA depends on tertiary structure, experimentally known to be largely determined by secondary structure, for which dynamic programming can efficiently compute the minimum free energy secondary structure. For this reason, understanding the effect of pointwise mutations in RNA secondary structure could reveal fundamental properties of structural RNA molecules and improve our understanding of molecular evolution of RNA. The web server RNAmutants provides several efficient tools to compute the ensemble of low-energy secondary structures for all k-mutants of a given RNA sequence, where k is bounded by a user-specified upper bound. As we have previously shown, these tools can be used to predict putative deleterious mutations and to analyze regulatory sequences from the hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency genomes. Web server is available at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/RNAmutants/, and downloadable binaries at http://rnamutants.csail.mit.edu/.

  2. CompaRNA: a server for continuous benchmarking of automated methods for RNA secondary structure prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Puton, T.; Kozlowski, L. P.; Rother, K. M.; Bujnicki, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a continuous benchmarking approach for the assessment of RNA secondary structure prediction methods implemented in the CompaRNA web server. As of 3 October 2012, the performance of 28 single-sequence and 13 comparative methods has been evaluated on RNA sequences/structures released weekly by the Protein Data Bank. We also provide a static benchmark generated on RNA 2D structures derived from the RNAstrand database. Benchmarks on both data sets offer insight into the relative perfor...

  3. Artificial Intelligence in Prediction of Secondary Protein Structure Using CB513 Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdagic, Zikrija; Purisevic, Elvir; Omanovic, Samir; Coralic, Zlatan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we describe CB513 a non-redundant dataset, suitable for development of algorithms for prediction of secondary protein structure. A program was made in Borland Delphi for transforming data from our dataset to make it suitable for learning of neural network for prediction of secondary protein structure implemented in MATLAB Neural-Network Toolbox. Learning (training and testing) of neural network is researched with different sizes of windows, different number of neurons in the hidden layer and different number of training epochs, while using dataset CB513. PMID:21347158

  4. FASTR: A novel data format for concomitant representation of RNA sequence and secondary structure information

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tungadri Bose; Anirban Dutta; Mohammed Mh; Hemang Gandhi; Sharmila S Mande

    2015-09-01

    Given the importance of RNA secondary structures in defining their biological role, it would be convenient for researchers seeking RNA data if both sequence and structural information pertaining to RNA molecules are made available together. Current nucleotide data repositories archive only RNA sequence data. Furthermore, storage formats which can frugally represent RNA sequence as well as structure data in a single file, are currently unavailable. This article proposes a novel storage format, `FASTR’, for concomitant representation of RNA sequence and structure. The storage efficiency of the proposed FASTR format has been evaluated using RNA data from various microorganisms. Results indicate that the size of FASTR formatted files (containing both RNA sequence as well as structure information) are equivalent to that of FASTA-format files, which contain only RNA sequence information. RNA secondary structure is typically represented using a combination of a string of nucleotide characters along with the corresponding dot-bracket notation indicating structural attributes. `FASTR’ – the novel storage format proposed in the present study enables a frugal representation of both RNA sequence and structural information in the form of a single string. In spite of having a relatively smaller storage footprint, the resultant `fastr’ string(s) retain all sequence as well as secondary structural information that could be stored using a dot-bracket notation. An implementation of the `FASTR’ methodology is available for download at http://metagenomics.atc.tcs.com/compression/fastr.

  5. RNACompress: Grammar-based compression and informational complexity measurement of RNA secondary structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chun

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the rapid emergence of RNA databases and newly identified non-coding RNAs, an efficient compression algorithm for RNA sequence and structural information is needed for the storage and analysis of such data. Although several algorithms for compressing DNA sequences have been proposed, none of them are suitable for the compression of RNA sequences with their secondary structures simultaneously. This kind of compression not only facilitates the maintenance of RNA data, but also supplies a novel way to measure the informational complexity of RNA structural data, raising the possibility of studying the relationship between the functional activities of RNA structures and their complexities, as well as various structural properties of RNA based on compression. Results RNACompress employs an efficient grammar-based model to compress RNA sequences and their secondary structures. The main goals of this algorithm are two fold: (1 present a robust and effective way for RNA structural data compression; (2 design a suitable model to represent RNA secondary structure as well as derive the informational complexity of the structural data based on compression. Our extensive tests have shown that RNACompress achieves a universally better compression ratio compared with other sequence-specific or common text-specific compression algorithms, such as Gencompress, winrar and gzip. Moreover, a test of the activities of distinct GTP-binding RNAs (aptamers compared with their structural complexity shows that our defined informational complexity can be used to describe how complexity varies with activity. These results lead to an objective means of comparing the functional properties of heteropolymers from the information perspective. Conclusion A universal algorithm for the compression of RNA secondary structure as well as the evaluation of its informational complexity is discussed in this paper. We have developed RNACompress, as a useful tool

  6. Active control of structural vibration with on-line secondary path modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Tiejun; GU Zhongquan

    2004-01-01

    An active control strategy with on-line secondary path modeling is proposed and applied in active control of helicopter structural vibration. Computer simulations of the secondary path modeling performance demonstrate the superiorities of the active control strategy. A 2-input 4-output active control simulation for a helicopter model is performed and great reduction of structural vibration is achieved. 2-input 2-output and 2-input 4-output experimental studies of structural vibration control for a free-free beam are also carried out in laboratory to simulate a flying helicopter. The experimental results also show better reduction of the structural vibration, which verifies that the proposed method is effective and practical in structural vibration reduction.

  7. Secondary structure models of the 3′ untranslated regions of diverse R2 RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    RUSCHAK, AMY M.; MATHEWS, DAVID H.; BIBILLO, ARKADIUSZ; SPINELLI, SHERRY L.; CHILDS, JESSICA L.; EICKBUSH, THOMAS H.; TURNER, DOUGLAS H.

    2004-01-01

    The RNA structure of the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of the R2 retrotransposable element is recognized by the R2-encoded reverse transcriptase in a reaction called target primed reverse transcription (TPRT). To provide insight into structure–function relationships important for TPRT, we have created alignments that reveal the secondary structure for 22 Drosophila and five silkmoth 3′ UTR R2 sequences. In addition, free energy minimization has been used to predict the secondary structure for the 3′ UTR R2 RNA of Forficula auricularia. The predicted structures for Bombyx mori and F. auricularia are consistent with chemical modification data obtained with β-ethoxy-α-ketobutyraldehyde (kethoxal), dimethyl sulfate, and 1-cyclohexyl-3-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide metho-p-toluene sulfonate. The structures appear to have common helices that are likely important for function. PMID:15146081

  8. New insights from cluster analysis methods for RNA secondary structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Emily; Heitsch, Christine

    2016-05-01

    A widening gap exists between the best practices for RNA secondary structure prediction developed by computational researchers and the methods used in practice by experimentalists. Minimum free energy predictions, although broadly used, are outperformed by methods which sample from the Boltzmann distribution and data mine the results. In particular, moving beyond the single structure prediction paradigm yields substantial gains in accuracy. Furthermore, the largest improvements in accuracy and precision come from viewing secondary structures not at the base pair level but at lower granularity/higher abstraction. This suggests that random errors affecting precision and systematic ones affecting accuracy are both reduced by this 'fuzzier' view of secondary structures. Thus experimentalists who are willing to adopt a more rigorous, multilayered approach to secondary structure prediction by iterating through these levels of granularity will be much better able to capture fundamental aspects of RNA base pairing. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:278-294. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1334 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  9. A Noninvasive Magnetic Stimulator Utilizing Secondary Ferrite Cores and Resonant Structures for Field Enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Pradhan, Raunaq

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, secondary ferrite cores and resonant structures have been used for field enhancement. The tissue was placed between the double square source coil and the secondary ferrite core. Resonant coils were added which aided in modulating the electric field in the tissue. The field distribution in the tissue was measured using electromagnetic simulations and ex-vivo measurements with tissue. Calculations involve the use of finite element analysis (Ansoft HFSS) to represent the electrical properties of the physical structure. The setup was compared to a conventional design in which the secondary ferrite cores were absent. It was found that the induced electric field could be increased by 122%, when ferrite cores were placed below the tissue at 450 kHz source frequency. The induced electric field was found to be localized in the tissue, verified using ex-vivo experiments. This preliminary study maybe further extended to establish the verified proposed concept with different complicated body parts modelled...

  10. RAD genotyping reveals fine-scale genetic structuring and provides powerful population assignment in a widely distributed marine species, the American lobster (Homarus americanus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benestan, Laura; Gosselin, Thierry; Perrier, Charles; Sainte-Marie, Bernard; Rochette, Rémy; Bernatchez, Louis

    2015-07-01

    Deciphering genetic structure and inferring connectivity in marine species have been challenging due to weak genetic differentiation and limited resolution offered by traditional genotypic methods. The main goal of this study was to assess how a population genomics framework could help delineate the genetic structure of the American lobster (Homarus americanus) throughout much of the species' range and increase the assignment success of individuals to their location of origin. We genotyped 10 156 filtered SNPs using RAD sequencing to delineate genetic structure and perform population assignment for 586 American lobsters collected in 17 locations distributed across a large portion of the species' natural distribution range. Our results revealed the existence of a hierarchical genetic structure, first separating lobsters from the northern and southern part of the range (FCT  = 0.0011; P-value = 0.0002) and then revealing a total of 11 genetically distinguishable populations (mean FST  = 0.00185; CI: 0.0007-0.0021, P-value genetic structure. We discuss the implications of these findings for the conservation and management of highly connected marine species, particularly regarding the geographic scale of demographic independence.

  11. Bioinformatics approaches for structural and functional analysis of proteins in secondary metabolism in Withania somnifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchita; Singh, Swati; Sharma, Ashok

    2014-11-01

    Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha) is an affluent storehouse of large number of pharmacologically active secondary metabolites known as withanolides. These secondary metabolites are produced by withanolide biosynthetic pathway. Very less information is available on structural and functional aspects of enzymes involved in withanolides biosynthetic pathways of Withiana somnifera. We therefore performed a bioinformatics analysis to look at functional and structural properties of these important enzymes. The pathway enzymes taken for this study were 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, 1-Deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase, 1-Deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate reductase, farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase, squalene synthase, squalene epoxidase, and cycloartenol synthase. The prediction of secondary structure was performed for basic structural information. Three-dimensional structures for these enzymes were predicted. The physico-chemical properties such as pI, AI, GRAVY and instability index were also studied. The current information will provide a platform to know the structural attributes responsible for the function of these protein until experimental structures become available.

  12. Microwave and infrared spectra, adjusted r0 structural parameters, conformational stabilities, vibrational assignments, and theoretical calculations of cyclobutylcarboxylic acid chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, Joshua J; Darkhalil, Ikhlas D; Deodhar, Bhushan S; Gounev, Todor K; Gurusinghe, Ranil M; Tubergen, Michael J; Groner, Peter; Durig, James R

    2013-08-01

    The FT-microwave spectrum of cyclobutylcarboxylic acid chloride, c-C4H7C(O)Cl, has been recorded and 153 transitions for the (35)Cl and (37)Cl isotopologues have been assigned for the gauche-equatorial (g-Eq) conformation. The ground state rotational constants were determined for (35)Cl [(37)Cl]: A = 4349.8429(25) [4322.0555(56)] MHz, B = 1414.8032(25) [1384.5058(25)] MHz, and C = 1148.2411(25) [1126.3546(25)] MHz. From these rotational constants and ab initio predicted parameters, adjusted r0 parameters are reported with distances (Å) rCα-C = 1.491(4), rC═O = 1.193(3), rCα-Cβ = 1.553(4), rCα-Cβ' = 1.540(4), rCγ-Cβ = 1.547(4), rCγ-Cβ' = 1.546(4), rC-Cl = 1.801(3) and angles (deg) τCγCβCβ'Cα = 30.9(5). Variable temperature (-70 to -100 °C) infrared spectra (4000 to 400 cm(-1)) were recorded in liquid xenon and the g-Eq conformer was determined the most stable form, with enthalpy differences of 91 ± 9 cm(-1) (1.09 ± 0.11 kJ/mol) for the gauche-axial (g-Ax) form and 173 ± 17 cm(-1) (2.07 ± 0.20 kJ/mol) for the trans-equatorial (t-Eq) conformer. The relative amounts at ambient temperature are 54% g-Eq, 35 ± 1% g-Ax, and 12 ± 1% t-Eq forms. Vibrational assignments have been provided for the three conformers and theoretical calculations were carried out. The results are discussed and compared to corresponding properties of related molecules.

  13. Tropical rain-forest matrix quality affects bat assemblage structure in secondary forest patches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vleut, I.; Levy-Tacher, I.; Galindo-Gonzalez, J.; Boer, de W.F.; Ramirez-Marcial, N.

    2012-01-01

    We studied Phyllostomidae bat assemblage structure in patches of secondary forest dominated by the pioneer tree Ochroma pyramidale, largely (.85%) or partially (,35%) surrounded by a matrix of tropical rain forest, to test 3 hypotheses: the highest bat diversity and richness is observed in the matri

  14. Secondary School Students' Understanding of Mathematical Induction: Structural Characteristics and the Process of Proof Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla, Marina; Potari, Despina; Spyrou, Panagiotis

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the meaning students attribute to the structure of mathematical induction (MI) and the process of proof construction using mathematical induction in the context of a geometric recursion problem. Two hundred and thirteen 17-year-old students of an upper secondary school in Greece participated in the study. Students'…

  15. Teachers Working in Collaborative Structures: A Case Study of a Secondary School in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, David Hagen

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on a study that explores collaborative structures of shared decision-making in an urban secondary school in the USA. The data in the study came from unstructured interviews with 20 teachers, the principal, the assistant principal, a counsellor and 10 students. The interviews took place over a three-week period in June of 2001…

  16. Secondary flow structure in a model curved artery: 3D morphology and circulation budget analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we examined the rate of change of circulation within control regions encompassing the large-scale vortical structures associated with secondary flows, i.e. deformed Dean-, Lyne- and Wall-type (D-L-W) vortices at planar cross-sections in a 180° curved artery model (curvature ratio, 1/7). Magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments were performed independently, under the same physiological inflow conditions (Womersley number, 4.2) and using Newtonian blood-analog fluids. The MRV-technique performed at Stanford University produced phase-averaged, three-dimensional velocity fields. Secondary flow field comparisons of MRV-data to PIV-data at various cross-sectional planes and inflow phases were made. A wavelet-decomposition-based approach was implemented to characterize various secondary flow morphologies. We hypothesize that the persistence and decay of arterial secondary flow vortices is intrinsically related to the influence of the out-of-plane flow, tilting, in-plane convection and diffusion-related factors within the control regions. Evaluation of these factors will elucidate secondary flow structures in arterial hemodynamics. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number CBET-0828903, and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE). The MRV data were acquired at Stanford University in collaboration with Christopher Elkins and John Eaton.

  17. Secondary structures of rRNAs from all three domains of life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton S Petrov

    Full Text Available Accurate secondary structures are important for understanding ribosomes, which are extremely large and highly complex. Using 3D structures of ribosomes as input, we have revised and corrected traditional secondary (2° structures of rRNAs. We identify helices by specific geometric and molecular interaction criteria, not by co-variation. The structural approach allows us to incorporate non-canonical base pairs on parity with Watson-Crick base pairs. The resulting rRNA 2° structures are up-to-date and consistent with three-dimensional structures, and are information-rich. These 2° structures are relatively simple to understand and are amenable to reproduction and modification by end-users. The 2° structures made available here broadly sample the phylogenetic tree and are mapped with a variety of data related to molecular interactions and geometry, phylogeny and evolution. We have generated 2° structures for both large subunit (LSU 23S/28S and small subunit (SSU 16S/18S rRNAs of Escherichia coli, Thermus thermophilus, Haloarcula marismortui (LSU rRNA only, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, and Homo sapiens. We provide high-resolution editable versions of the 2° structures in several file formats. For the SSU rRNA, the 2° structures use an intuitive representation of the central pseudoknot where base triples are presented as pairs of base pairs. Both LSU and SSU secondary maps are available (http://apollo.chemistry.gatech.edu/RibosomeGallery. Mapping of data onto 2° structures was performed on the RiboVision server (http://apollo.chemistry.gatech.edu/RiboVision.

  18. A Deep Learning Network Approach to ab initio Protein Secondary Structure Prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Spencer, Matt; Eickholt, Jesse; Cheng, Jianlin

    2014-01-01

    Ab initio protein secondary structure (SS) predictions are utilized to generate tertiary structure predictions, which are increasingly demanded due to the rapid discovery of proteins. Although recent developments have slightly exceeded previous methods of SS prediction, accuracy has stagnated around 80% and many wonder if prediction cannot be advanced beyond this ceiling. Disciplines that have traditionally employed neural networks are experimenting with novel deep learning techniques in atte...

  19. Louse (Insecta : Phthiraptera) mitochondrial 12S rRNA secondary structure is highly variable

    OpenAIRE

    Page, R.D.M.; Cruickshank, R.; Johnson, K P

    2002-01-01

    Lice are ectoparasitic insects hosted by birds and mammals. Mitochondrial 12S rRNA sequences obtained from lice show considerable length variation and are very difficult to align. We show that the louse 12S rRNA domain III secondary structure displays considerable variation compared to other insects, in both the shape and number of stems and loops. Phylogenetic trees constructed from tree edit distances between louse 12S rRNA structures do not closely resemble trees constructed from sequence ...

  20. Analysis of energy-based algorithms for RNA secondary structure prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Hajiaghayi Monir; Condon Anne; Hoos Holger H

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background RNA molecules play critical roles in the cells of organisms, including roles in gene regulation, catalysis, and synthesis of proteins. Since RNA function depends in large part on its folded structures, much effort has been invested in developing accurate methods for prediction of RNA secondary structure from the base sequence. Minimum free energy (MFE) predictions are widely used, based on nearest neighbor thermodynamic parameters of Mathews, Turner et al. or those of Andr...

  1. Minimum-Free-Energy Distribution of RNA Secondary Structures: Entropic and Thermodynamic Properties of Rare Events

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfsheimer, S; Hartmann, A. K.

    2008-01-01

    We study the distribution of the minimum free energy (MFE) for the Turner model of pseudoknot free RNA secondary structures over ensembles of random RNA sequences. In particular, we are interested in those rare and intermediate events of unexpected low MFEs. Generalized ensemble Markov-chain Monte Carlo methods allow us to explore the rare-event tail of the MFE distribution down to probabilities like $10^{-70}$ and to study the relationship between the sequence entropy and structural properti...

  2. Two-dimensional NMR and photo-CIDNP studies of the insulin monomer: Assignment of aromatic resonances with application to protein folding, structure, and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aromatic 1H NMR resonances of the insulin monomer are assigned at 500 MHz by comparative studies of chemically modified and genetically altered variants, including a mutant insulin (PheB25 → Leu) associated with diabetes mellitus. The two histidines, three phenylalanines, and four tyrosines are observed to be in distinct local environments; their assignment provides sensitive markers for studies of tertiary structure, protein dynamics, and protein folding. The environments of the tyrosine residues have also been investigated by photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) and analyzed in relation to packing constrains in the crystal structures of insulin. Dimerization involving specific B-chain interactions is observed with increasing protein concentration and is shown to depend on temperature, pH, and solvent composition. The differences between proinsulin and mini-proinsulin suggest a structural mechanism for the observation that the fully reduced B29-A1 analogue folds more efficiently than proinsulin to form the correct pattern of disulfide bonds. These results are discussed in relation to molecular mechanics calculations of insulin based on the available crystal structures

  3. Two-dimensional NMR and photo-CIDNP studies of the insulin monomer: Assignment of aromatic resonances with application to protein folding, structure, and dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, M.A.; Shoelson, S.E. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA) Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston (USA)); Nguyen, D.T.; O' Shea, E.; Karplus, M. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (USA)); Khait, I.; Neuringer, L.J. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (USA)); Inouye, K. (Shionogi and Co., Ltd., Osaka (Japan)); Frank, B.H.; Beckage, M. (Eli Lilly and Co., Indianapolis, IN (USA))

    1989-12-12

    The aromatic {sup 1}H NMR resonances of the insulin monomer are assigned at 500 MHz by comparative studies of chemically modified and genetically altered variants, including a mutant insulin (PheB25 {yields} Leu) associated with diabetes mellitus. The two histidines, three phenylalanines, and four tyrosines are observed to be in distinct local environments; their assignment provides sensitive markers for studies of tertiary structure, protein dynamics, and protein folding. The environments of the tyrosine residues have also been investigated by photochemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (photo-CIDNP) and analyzed in relation to packing constrains in the crystal structures of insulin. Dimerization involving specific B-chain interactions is observed with increasing protein concentration and is shown to depend on temperature, pH, and solvent composition. The differences between proinsulin and mini-proinsulin suggest a structural mechanism for the observation that the fully reduced B29-A1 analogue folds more efficiently than proinsulin to form the correct pattern of disulfide bonds. These results are discussed in relation to molecular mechanics calculations of insulin based on the available crystal structures.

  4. A permutation based simulated annealing algorithm to predict pseudoknotted RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Herbert H; Wiese, Kay C

    2015-01-01

    Pseudoknots are RNA tertiary structures which perform essential biological functions. This paper discusses SARNA-Predict-pk, a RNA pseudoknotted secondary structure prediction algorithm based on Simulated Annealing (SA). The research presented here extends previous work of SARNA-Predict and further examines the effect of the new algorithm to include prediction of RNA secondary structure with pseudoknots. An evaluation of the performance of SARNA-Predict-pk in terms of prediction accuracy is made via comparison with several state-of-the-art prediction algorithms using 20 individual known structures from seven RNA classes. We measured the sensitivity and specificity of nine prediction algorithms. Three of these are dynamic programming algorithms: Pseudoknot (pknotsRE), NUPACK, and pknotsRG-mfe. One is using the statistical clustering approach: Sfold and the other five are heuristic algorithms: SARNA-Predict-pk, ILM, STAR, IPknot and HotKnots algorithms. The results presented in this paper demonstrate that SARNA-Predict-pk can out-perform other state-of-the-art algorithms in terms of prediction accuracy. This supports the use of the proposed method on pseudoknotted RNA secondary structure prediction of other known structures. PMID:26558299

  5. The Relationship between Secondary Structure and Biodegradation Behavior of Silk Fibroin Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongpei Hu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Silk fibroin has a unique and useful combination of properties, including good biocompatibility and excellent mechanical performance. These features provided early clues to the utility of regenerated silk fibroin as a scaffold/matrix for tissue engineering. The silk fibroin scaffolds used for tissue engineering should degrade at a rate that matches the tissue growth rate. The relationship between secondary structure and biodegradation behavior of silk fibroin scaffolds was investigated in this study. Scaffolds with different secondary structure were prepared by controlling the freezing temperature and by treatment with carbodiimide or ethanol. The quantitative proportions of each secondary structure were obtained by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and each sample was then degraded in vitro with collagenase IA for 18 days. The results show that a high content of β-sheet structure leads to a low degradation rate. The random coil region in the silk fibroin material is degraded, whereas the crystal region remains stable and the amount of β-sheet structure increases during incubation. The results demonstrate that it is possible to control the degradation rate of a silk fibroin scaffold by controlling the content of β-sheet structure.

  6. Applying Thymine Isostere 2,4-Difluoro-5-Methylbenzene as a NMR Assignment Tool and Probe of Homopyrimidine/Homopurine Tract Structural Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinson, Robert G; Miller, Jennifer T; Kahn, Jason D; Le Grice, Stuart F J; Marino, John P

    2016-01-01

    Proton assignment of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of homopyrimidine/homopurine tract oligonucleotides becomes extremely challenging with increasing helical length due to severe cross-peak overlap. As an alternative to the more standard practice of (15)N and (13)C labeling of oligonucleotides, here, we describe a method for assignment of highly redundant DNA sequences that uses single-site substitution of the thymine isostere 2,4-difluoro-5-methylbenzene (dF). The impact of this approach in facilitating the assignment of intractable spectra and analyzing oligonucleotide structure and dynamics is demonstrated using A-tract and TATA box DNA and two polypurine tract-containing RNA:DNA hybrids derived from HIV-1 and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae long-terminal repeat-containing retrotransposon Ty3. Only resonances proximal to the site of dF substitution exhibit sizable chemical shift changes, providing spectral dispersion while still allowing chemical shift mapping of resonances from unaffected residues distal to the site of modification directly back to the unmodified sequence. It is further illustrated that dF incorporation can subtly alter the conformation and dynamics of homopyrimidine/homopurine tract oligonucleotides, and how these NMR observations can be correlated, in the cases of the TATA box DNA, with modulation in the TATA box-binding protein interaction using an orthogonal gel assay.

  7. An Adaptive Defect Weighted Sampling Algorithm to Design Pseudoknotted RNA Secondary Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandi, Kasra; Butler, Gregory; Kharma, Nawwaf

    2016-01-01

    Computational design of RNA sequences that fold into targeted secondary structures has many applications in biomedicine, nanotechnology and synthetic biology. An RNA molecule is made of different types of secondary structure elements and an important RNA element named pseudoknot plays a key role in stabilizing the functional form of the molecule. However, due to the computational complexities associated with characterizing pseudoknotted RNA structures, most of the existing RNA sequence designer algorithms generally ignore this important structural element and therefore limit their applications. In this paper we present a new algorithm to design RNA sequences for pseudoknotted secondary structures. We use NUPACK as the folding algorithm to compute the equilibrium characteristics of the pseudoknotted RNAs, and describe a new adaptive defect weighted sampling algorithm named Enzymer to design low ensemble defect RNA sequences for targeted secondary structures including pseudoknots. We used a biological data set of 201 pseudoknotted structures from the Pseudobase library to benchmark the performance of our algorithm. We compared the quality characteristics of the RNA sequences we designed by Enzymer with the results obtained from the state of the art MODENA and antaRNA. Our results show our method succeeds more frequently than MODENA and antaRNA do, and generates sequences that have lower ensemble defect, lower probability defect and higher thermostability. Finally by using Enzymer and by constraining the design to a naturally occurring and highly conserved Hammerhead motif, we designed 8 sequences for a pseudoknotted cis-acting Hammerhead ribozyme. Enzymer is available for download at https://bitbucket.org/casraz/enzymer. PMID:27499762

  8. Study on Red Coat Color Gene and Prediction of the Secondary Structure in Chinese Holstein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the melanocortin-1-receptor (MC1R) gone was studied with the help of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), in which the protein structure in Chinese Holstein was predicted, and the molecular mechanism of the red coat color was investigated. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed to genotype the individuals. The bioinformatics and biotechnology softwares were used to predict the secondary structure of MC1R. The results showed that the EE genotype was the dominant genotype in Chinese Holstein Black and White herd, whereas, it was ee in Chinese Holstein Red and White herd. The secondary structure of the mutational MCIR protein was changed and the deletion mutation caused an earlier termination in translation, which led to the formation of the red coat color. The allele E was mainly associated with the black coat color, whereas, e was associated with red.

  9. A contribution to understanding the structure of amphivasal secondary bundles in monocotyledons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Jura-Morawiec

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Secondary growth of monocotyledonous plants is connected with the activity of the monocot cambium that accumulates most of the derivatives inner to the cambial cylinder. These derivatives differentiate into (a secondary bundles with the amphivasal arrangement, i.e. xylem composed of tracheids surrounds the phloem cells and (b the parenchymatous secondary conjunctive tissue in which the bundles are embedded. The amphivasal secondary bundles differ in the arrangement of xylem cells as visible on single cross sections through the secondary body of the monocots. Apart from the bundles with typical ring of tracheids also the bundles where tracheids do not quite surround the phloem are present. We aimed to elucidate the cross sectional anatomy of the amphivasal secondary bundles with the use of the serial sectioning method which allowed us to follow very precisely the bundle structure along its length. The studies were carried out with the samples of secondary tissues collected from the stem of Dracaena draco L. growing in the greenhouses of the Polish Academy of Sciences Botanical Garden – CBDC in Powsin and the Adam Mickiewicz University Botanical Garden. The material was fixed in a mixture of glycerol and ethanol (1:1; v/v, dehydrated stepwise with graded ethanol series and finally embedded in epon resin. Afterwards, the material was sectioned with microtome into continuous series of thin (3 μm sections, stained with PAS/toluidine blue and examined under the light microscope. The results, described in details in Jura‑Morawiec & Wiland-Szymańska (2014, revealed novel facts about tracheids arrangement. Each amphivasal bundle is composed of sectors where tracheids form a ring as well as of such where tracheids are separated by vascular parenchyma cells. We hypothesize that strands of vascular parenchyma cells locally separating the tracheids enable radial transport of assimilates from sieve elements of the bundle towards the sink tissues, e

  10. A Dynamic Programming Algorithm for Finding the Optimal Placement of a Secondary Structure Topology in Cryo-EM Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Abhishek; Ranjan, Desh; Zubair, Mohammad; He, Jing

    2015-09-01

    The determination of secondary structure topology is a critical step in deriving the atomic structures from the protein density maps obtained from electron cryomicroscopy technique. This step often relies on matching the secondary structure traces detected from the protein density map to the secondary structure sequence segments predicted from the amino acid sequence. Due to inaccuracies in both sources of information, a pool of possible secondary structure positions needs to be sampled. One way to approach the problem is to first derive a small number of possible topologies using existing matching algorithms, and then find the optimal placement for each possible topology. We present a dynamic programming method of Θ(Nq(2)h) to find the optimal placement for a secondary structure topology. We show that our algorithm requires significantly less computational time than the brute force method that is in the order of Θ(q(N) h).

  11. Variability in automated assignment of NOESY spectra and three-dimensional structure determination: A test case on three small disulfide-bonded proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three independent runs of automatic assignment and structure calculations were performed on three small proteins, calcicludine from the venom of the green mamba Dendroaspis angusticeps, κ-conotoxin PVIIA from the purple cone Conus purpurascens and HsTX1, a short scorpion toxin from the venom of Heterometrus spinnifer. At the end of all the runs, the number of cross peaks which remained unassigned (0.6%, 1.4% and 2% for calcicludine, κ-conotoxin and HsTX1, respectively), as well as the number of constraints which were rejected as producing systematic violations (2.7%, 1.0%, and 1.4% for calcicludine, κ-conotoxin and HsTX1, respectively) were low. The conformation of the initial model used in the procedure (linear model or constructed by homology) has no influence on the final structures. Mainly two parameters control the procedure: the chemical shift tolerance and the cut-off distance. Independent runs of structure calculations, using the same parameters, yield structures for which the rmsd between averaged structures and the rmsd around each averaged structure were of the same order of magnitude. A different cut-off distance and a different chemical shift tolerance yield rmsd values on final average structures which did not differ more than 0.5 A compared to the rmsd obtained around the averaged structure for each calculation. These results show that the procedure is robust when applied to such a small disulfide-bonded protein

  12. Self-Efficacy, School Resources, Job Stressors and Burnout among Spanish Primary and Secondary School Teachers: A Structural Equation Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betoret, Fernando Domenech

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between school resources, teacher self-efficacy, potential multi-level stressors and teacher burnout using structural equation modelling. The causal structure for primary and secondary school teachers was also examined. The sample was composed of 724 primary and secondary Spanish school teachers. The changes…

  13. Minimum-free-energy distribution of RNA secondary structures: Entropic and thermodynamic properties of rare events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfsheimer, S.; Hartmann, A. K.

    2010-08-01

    We study the distribution of the minimum free energy (MFE) for the Turner model of pseudoknot free RNA secondary structures over ensembles of random RNA sequences. In particular, we are interested in those rare and intermediate events of unexpected low MFEs. Generalized ensemble Markov-chain Monte Carlo methods allow us to explore the rare-event tail of the MFE distribution down to probabilities such as 10-70 and to study the relationship between the sequence entropy and structural properties for sequence ensembles with fixed MFEs. Entropic and structural properties of those ensembles are compared with natural RNA of the same reduced MFE ( z score).

  14. Prediction of RNA secondary structures: from theory to models and real molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Peter

    2006-05-01

    RNA secondary structures are derived from RNA sequences, which are strings built form the natural four letter nucleotide alphabet, {AUGC}. These coarse-grained structures, in turn, are tantamount to constrained strings over a three letter alphabet. Hence, the secondary structures are discrete objects and the number of sequences always exceeds the number of structures. The sequences built from two letter alphabets form perfect structures when the nucleotides can form a base pair, as is the case with {GC} or {AU}, but the relation between the sequences and structures differs strongly from the four letter alphabet. A comprehensive theory of RNA structure is presented, which is based on the concepts of sequence space and shape space, being a space of structures. It sets the stage for modelling processes in ensembles of RNA molecules like evolutionary optimization or kinetic folding as dynamical phenomena guided by mappings between the two spaces. The number of minimum free energy (mfe) structures is always smaller than the number of sequences, even for two letter alphabets. Folding of RNA molecules into mfe energy structures constitutes a non-invertible mapping from sequence space onto shape space. The preimage of a structure in sequence space is defined as its neutral network. Similarly the set of suboptimal structures is the preimage of a sequence in shape space. This set represents the conformation space of a given sequence. The evolutionary optimization of structures in populations is a process taking place in sequence space, whereas kinetic folding occurs in molecular ensembles that optimize free energy in conformation space. Efficient folding algorithms based on dynamic programming are available for the prediction of secondary structures for given sequences. The inverse problem, the computation of sequences for predefined structures, is an important tool for the design of RNA molecules with tailored properties. Simultaneous folding or cofolding of two or more RNA

  15. On the structure and dynamics of secondary n-alkyl cations

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, Allan L. L.; Bučko, Tomáš; Hafner, Jürgen

    2009-09-01

    A variety of computational studies was undertaken to examine and establish the relative importance of open versus closed structures for unbranched secondary n-alkyl cations. First, the PW91 level of density functional theory was used to optimize over 20 minimum-energy structures of sec-pentyl, sec-hexyl, and sec-heptyl ions, demonstrating that closed structures are more stable than open ones on the potential energy surface (PES). Second, PW91 was used with a theoretical Andersen thermostat to perform a molecular dynamics simulation (150 ps) of C9H19+ at a typical catalytic temperature of 800 K, demonstrating that the structure preference is inverted on the free-energy surface. Third, both quantum (rigid-rotor/harmonic oscillator) and classical partition functions were used to demonstrate that the simulated structure-opening at catalytic temperatures is due to the floppiness of the open forms, which improves its free energy by both lowering its zero-point vibrational energy and increasing its molecular entropy. The particular conformer of the preferred open form (at 800 K) is dependent on length of alkyl ion, with pentyl ions preferring syn/anti structures but longer ions preferring open-clinal ones. These results, plus an additional set of PES optimized structures from an alternative level of theory (MP2/6-31G(d,p)), are used to discuss the likely nature of secondary n-alkyl ions.

  16. Computational Approaches for determination of Most Probable RNA Secondary Structure Using Different Thermodynamics Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binod Kumar,

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Many bioinformatics studies require the analysis of RNA structures. More specifically, extensive work is done to elaborate efficient algorithms able to predict the 2-D folding structures of RNA. The core of RNA structure is a dynamic programming algorithm to predict RNA secondary structures from sequence based on the principle of minimizing free energy. In this paper the thermodynamic data have been used for RNA predictions. In this paper the free energy inimization and the partition function code has been used to predictinternal loops of any size in O (N3 time. The free energy table for multibranch loops has been used by Dynalign. Base pair probabilities have been determined by the partition function calculation. Parameters controlling the prediction of suboptimal structures are Max % Energy Difference and Max Number of Structures. The foldmodule provides the basic implementation of RNA secondary structure prediction. A Dynalign dot plot, a separate dot plot is generated foreach of the two sequences involved. OligoScreen calculates the unimolecular and bimolecular folding free energies for a set of RNA oligonucleotides.

  17. Small-angle X-ray scattering: a bridge between RNA secondary structures and three-dimensional topological structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Xianyang [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., NCI Small Angle X-ray Scattering Core Facility; Stagno, Jason R. [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., Protein-Nucleic Acid Interaction Section, Structural Biophysics Lab.; Bhandari, Yuba R. [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., Protein-Nucleic Acid Interaction Section, Structural Biophysics Lab.; Zuo, Xiaobing [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS); Wang, Yun-Xing [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., NCI Small Angle X-ray Scattering Core Facility; National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., Protein-Nucleic Acid Interaction Section, Structural Biophysics Lab.

    2015-02-01

    Whereas the structures of small to medium-sized well folded RNA molecules often can be determined by either X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy, obtaining structural information for large RNAs using experimental, computational, or combined approaches remains a major interest and challenge. RNA is very sensitive to small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) due to high electron density along phosphate-sugar backbones, whose scattering contribution dominates SAXS intensity. For this reason, SAXS is particularly useful in obtaining global RNA structural information that outlines backbone topologies and, therefore, molecular envelopes. Such information is extremely valuable in bridging the gap between the secondary structures and three-dimensional topological structures of RNAmolecules, particularly those that have proven difficult to study using other structuredetermination methods. Here we review published results of RNA topological structures derived from SAXS data or in combination with other experimental data, as well as details on RNA sample preparation for SAXS experiments.

  18. Sequence and secondary structure of the mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene of Ixodes scapularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowetz, Chantel N; Chilton, Neil B

    2015-02-01

    The complete DNA sequences and secondary structure of the mitochondrial (mt) 16S ribosomal (r) RNA gene were determined for six Ixodes scapularis adults. There were 44 variable nucleotide positions in the 1252 bp sequence alignment. Most (95%) nucleotide alterations did not affect the integrity of the secondary structure of the gene because they either occurred at unpaired positions or represented compensatory changes that maintained the base pairing in helices. A large proportion (75%) of the intraspecific variation in DNA sequence occurred within Domains I, II and VI of the 16S gene. Therefore, several regions within this gene may be highly informative for studies of the population genetics and phylogeography of I. scapularis, a major vector of pathogens of humans and domestic animals in North America.

  19. Compensatory mutations cause excess of antagonistic epistasis in RNA secondary structure folding

    CERN Document Server

    Wilke, C O; Adami, C; Wilke, Claus O; Lenski, Richard E; Adami, Christoph

    2003-01-01

    Background: The rate at which fitness declines as an organism's genome accumulates random mutations is an important variable in several evolutionary theories. At an intuitive level, it might seem natural that random mutations should tend to interact synergistically, such that the rate of mean fitness decline accelerates as the number of random mutations is increased. However, in a number of recent studies, a prevalence of antagonistic epistasis (the tendency of multiple mutations to have a mitigating rather than reinforcing effect) has been observed. Results: We studied in silico the net amount and form of epistatic interactions in RNA secondary structure folding by measuring the fraction of neutral mutants as a function of mutational distance d. We found a clear prevalence of antagonistic epistasis in RNA secondary structure folding. By relating the fraction of neutral mutants at distance d to the average neutrality at distance d, we showed that this prevalence derives from the existence of many compensatory...

  20. Analysis of the secondary structure of a protein's N-terminal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floare, C. G.; Bogdan, M.; Horovitz, O.; Mocanu, A.; Tomoaia-Cotisel, M.

    2009-08-01

    The major protein component from aleurone cells of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), PACB, is related to 7S globulins present in other cereals and to the vicilin-type 7S globulins of legumes and cotton seed. It contains 4 subunits of about 20, 25, 40 and 50 kDa molecular weights. The N-terminal sequence of 16 amino acids (over 260 atoms) in the protein was previously determined, and our aim is the prediction of its secondary structure. The empirical Chou-Fasman method was applied in an improved version as well as the empirical DSC method (discrimination of protein secondary structure class) with quite similar results. A molecular dynamics simulation was also performed, using the FF99SB forcefield within AMBER version 9.0. Solvation effects were incorporated using the Born model. The results are compared and a 3D model is proposed.

  1. Analysis of the secondary structure of a protein's N-terminal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floare, C G; Bogdan, M [National Institute for R and D of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Horovitz, O; Mocanu, A; Tomoaia-Cotisel, M, E-mail: calin.floare@itim-cj.r [Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Department of Physical Chemistry, 11 Arany Janos, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2009-08-01

    The major protein component from aleurone cells of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), PACB, is related to 7S globulins present in other cereals and to the vicilin-type 7S globulins of legumes and cotton seed. It contains 4 subunits of about 20, 25, 40 and 50 kDa molecular weights. The N-terminal sequence of 16 amino acids (over 260 atoms) in the protein was previously determined, and our aim is the prediction of its secondary structure. The empirical Chou-Fasman method was applied in an improved version as well as the empirical DSC method (discrimination of protein secondary structure class) with quite similar results. A molecular dynamics simulation was also performed, using the FF99SB forcefield within AMBER version 9.0. Solvation effects were incorporated using the Born model. The results are compared and a 3D model is proposed.

  2. Protein secondary structure prediction for a single-sequence using hidden semi-Markov models

    OpenAIRE

    Borodovsky Mark; Altunbasak Yucel; Aydin Zafer

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The accuracy of protein secondary structure prediction has been improving steadily towards the 88% estimated theoretical limit. There are two types of prediction algorithms: Single-sequence prediction algorithms imply that information about other (homologous) proteins is not available, while algorithms of the second type imply that information about homologous proteins is available, and use it intensively. The single-sequence algorithms could make an important contribution...

  3. A generalized threading model using integer programming that allows for secondary structure element deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellrott, Kyle; Guo, Jun-tao; Olman, Victor; Xu, Ying

    2006-01-01

    Integer programming is a combinatorial optimization method that has been successfully applied to the protein threading problem. We seek to expand the model optimized by this technique to allow for a more accurate description of protein threading. We have developed and implemented an expanded model of integer programming that has the capability to model secondary structure element deletion, which was not possible in previous version of integer programming based optimization. PMID:17503397

  4. The constant region affects antigen binding of antibodies to DNA by altering secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yumin; Janda, Alena; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Casadevall, Arturo; Putterman, Chaim

    2013-11-01

    We previously demonstrated an important role of the constant region in the pathogenicity of anti-DNA antibodies. To determine the mechanisms by which the constant region affects autoantibody binding, a panel of isotype-switch variants (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b) was generated from the murine PL9-11 IgG3 autoantibody. The affinity of the PL9-11 antibody panel for histone was measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Tryptophan fluorescence was used to determine wavelength shifts of the antibody panel upon binding to DNA and histone. Finally, circular dichroism spectroscopy was used to measure changes in secondary structure. SPR analysis revealed significant differences in histone binding affinity between members of the PL9-11 panel. The wavelength shifts of tryptophan fluorescence emission were found to be dependent on the antibody isotype, while circular dichroism analysis determined that changes in antibody secondary structure content differed between isotypes upon antigen binding. Thus, the antigen binding affinity is dependent on the particular constant region expressed. Moreover, the effects of antibody binding to antigen were also constant region dependent. Alteration of secondary structures influenced by constant regions may explain differences in fine specificity of anti-DNA antibodies between antibodies with similar variable regions, as well as cross-reactivity of anti-DNA antibodies with non-DNA antigens.

  5. 13C direct detected COCO-TOCSY: A tool for sequence specific assignment and structure determination in protonless NMR experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balayssac, Stéphane; Jiménez, Beatriz; Piccioli, Mario

    2006-10-01

    A novel experiment is proposed to provide inter-residue sequential correlations among carbonyl spins in 13C detected, protonless NMR experiments. The COCO-TOCSY experiment connects, in proteins, two carbonyls separated from each other by three, four or even five bonds. The quantitative analysis provides structural information on backbone dihedral angles ϕ as well as on the side chain dihedral angles of Asx and Glx residues. This is the first dihedral angle constraint that can be obtained via a protonless approach. About 75% of backbone carbonyls in Calbindin D 9K, a 75 aminoacid dicalcium protein, could be sequentially connected via a COCO-TOCSY spectrum. 49 3J values were measured and related to backbone ϕ angles. Structural information can be extended to the side chain orientation of aminoacids containing carbonyl groups. Additionally, long range homonuclear coupling constants, 4JCC and 5JCC, could be measured. This constitutes an unprecedented case for proteins of medium and small size.

  6. Reaction of psoralen with RNA: specificity and use as a probe for secondary-structure analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, J.F.

    1982-09-01

    A variety of techniques has been used to study how psoralen and its derivatives react with RNA. This information has then been used to analyze the secondary structure of different ribosomal RNAs. Paper electrophoresis at pH 3.5 and 8.8 and HPLC has been used to get high-resolution separation of RNA-psoralen adducts. The separated adducts have been analyzed and shown to be primarily uridine adducts with the psoralen reacted at the furan end. The stereochemistry of the major adducts was determined by NMR. The effect of structural transitions on the number and type of adducts was found for several polymers. The effect of psoralen structure on cross linking ability was analyzed. Charged derivatives formed monoadducts very efficiently but did not produce the level of crosslinking obtainable with lower levels of reaction with uncharged derivatives. Secondary structure analysis of D. melanogaster 5S RNA yielded two definite and two tentative crosslinks which support the generally accepted models for 5S structure. Analysis of E. coli 16S RNA by gel techniques yielded 13 cross-links. Evidence is also presented for an interaction between eukaryotic mRNA (5' cap structure) and 18S RNA (hypermodified base am psi) which serves a function analogous to the Shine-Dalgarno sequence in pro karyotes.

  7. Compensatory evolution of a precursor messenger RNA secondary structure in the Drosophila melanogaster Adh gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Stephan, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Evidence for the evolutionary maintenance of a hairpin structure possibly involved in intron processing had been found in intron 1 of the alcohol dehydrogenase gene (Adh) in diverse Drosophila species. In this study, the putative hairpin structure was evaluated systematically in Drosophila melanogaster by elimination of either side of the stem using site-directed mutagenesis. The effects of these mutations and the compensatory double mutant on intron splicing efficiency and ADH protein production were assayed in Drosophila melanogaster Schneider L2 cells and germ-line transformed adult flies. Mutations that disrupt the putative hairpin structure right upstream of the intron branch point were found to cause a significant reduction in both splicing efficiency and ADH protein production. In contrast, the compensatory double mutant that restores the putative hairpin structure was indistinguishable from the WT in both splicing efficiency and ADH level. It was also observed by mutational analysis that a more stable secondary structure (with a longer stem) in this intron decreases both splicing efficiency and ADH protein production. Implications for RNA secondary structure and intron evolution are discussed. PMID:12972637

  8. On correlation between protein secondary structure, backbone bond angles, and side-chain orientations

    CERN Document Server

    Lundgren, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the fine structure of the sp3 hybridized covalent bond geometry that governs the tetrahedral architecture around the central C$_\\alpha$ carbon of a protein backbone, and for this we develop new visualization techniques to analyze high resolution X-ray structures in Protein Data Bank. We observe that there is a correlation between the deformations of the ideal tetrahedral symmetry and the local secondary structure of the protein. We propose a universal coarse grained energy function to describe the ensuing side-chain geometry in terms of the C$_\\beta$ carbon orientations. The energy function can model the side-chain geometry with a sub-atomic precision. As an example we construct the C$_\\alpha$-C$_\\beta$ structure of HP35 chicken villin headpiece. We obtain a configuration that deviates less than 0.4 \\.A in root-mean-square distance from the experimental X-ray structure.

  9. Protein secondary structure prediction for a single-sequence using hidden semi-Markov models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borodovsky Mark

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The accuracy of protein secondary structure prediction has been improving steadily towards the 88% estimated theoretical limit. There are two types of prediction algorithms: Single-sequence prediction algorithms imply that information about other (homologous proteins is not available, while algorithms of the second type imply that information about homologous proteins is available, and use it intensively. The single-sequence algorithms could make an important contribution to studies of proteins with no detected homologs, however the accuracy of protein secondary structure prediction from a single-sequence is not as high as when the additional evolutionary information is present. Results In this paper, we further refine and extend the hidden semi-Markov model (HSMM initially considered in the BSPSS algorithm. We introduce an improved residue dependency model by considering the patterns of statistically significant amino acid correlation at structural segment borders. We also derive models that specialize on different sections of the dependency structure and incorporate them into HSMM. In addition, we implement an iterative training method to refine estimates of HSMM parameters. The three-state-per-residue accuracy and other accuracy measures of the new method, IPSSP, are shown to be comparable or better than ones for BSPSS as well as for PSIPRED, tested under the single-sequence condition. Conclusions We have shown that new dependency models and training methods bring further improvements to single-sequence protein secondary structure prediction. The results are obtained under cross-validation conditions using a dataset with no pair of sequences having significant sequence similarity. As new sequences are added to the database it is possible to augment the dependency structure and obtain even higher accuracy. Current and future advances should contribute to the improvement of function prediction for orphan proteins inscrutable

  10. Sheath structure in plasma with two species of positive ions and secondary electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao-Yun, Zhao; Nong, Xiang; Jing, Ou; De-Hui, Li; Bin-Bin, Lin

    2016-02-01

    The properties of a collisionless plasma sheath are investigated by using a fluid model in which two species of positive ions and secondary electrons are taken into account. It is shown that the positive ion speeds at the sheath edge increase with secondary electron emission (SEE) coefficient, and the sheath structure is affected by the interplay between the two species of positive ions and secondary electrons. The critical SEE coefficients and the sheath widths depend strongly on the positive ion charge number, mass and concentration in the cases with and without SEE. In addition, ion kinetic energy flux to the wall and the impact of positive ion species on secondary electron density at the sheath edge are also discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11475220 and 11405208), the Program of Fusion Reactor Physics and Digital Tokamak with the CAS “One-Three-Five” Strategic Planning, the National ITER Program of China (Grant No. 2015GB101003), and the Higher Education Natural Science Research Project of Anhui Province, China (Grant No. 2015KJ009).

  11. DNA secondary structures are associated with recombination in major Plasmodium falciparum variable surface antigen gene families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Adam F.; Lavstsen, Thomas; Rask, Thomas Salhøj;

    2014-01-01

    -erythrocyte membrane protein 1 structural domains. The recombinogenic potential of these 50-mers is not parasite-specific because these sequences also induce recombination when transferred to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetic cross data suggest that DNA secondary structures (DSS) act as inducers...... of recombination during DNA replication in P. falciparum sexual stages, and that these DSS-regulated genetic exchanges generate functional and diverse P. falciparum adhesion antigens. DSS-induced recombination may represent a common mechanism for optimizing the evolvability of virulence gene families in pathogens....

  12. Exploiting the Past and the Future in Protein Secondary Structure Prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldi, Pierre; Brunak, Søren; Frasconi, P;

    1999-01-01

    predictions based on variable ranges of dependencies. These architectures extend recurrent neural networks, introducing non-causal bidirectional dynamics to capture both upstream and downstream information. The prediction algorithm is completed by the use of mixtures of estimators that leverage evolutionary......Motivation: Predicting the secondary structure of a protein (alpha-helix, beta-sheet, coil) is an important step towards elucidating its three-dimensional structure, as well as its function. Presently, the best predictors are based on machine learning approaches, in particular neural network...

  13. Three-chain insulin analogs demonstrate the importance of insulin secondary structure to bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fangzhou; Chabenne, Joseph R; Gelfanov, Vasily M; Mayer, John P; DiMarchi, Richard D

    2015-03-01

    This report describes the chemical synthesis and biological characterization of novel three-chain insulin analogs with a destabilized secondary structure. The analogs, obtained by chemical synthesis via a single-chain precursor and selective enzymatic digestion, were used to investigate the role of the highly conserved 'insulin fold'. Biological characterization through in vitro biochemical signaling showed extremely low activity at each insulin receptor when compared with native insulin. We conclude that the 'insulin fold' is a structural foundation that supports insulin biological action.

  14. Prediction of Spontaneous Protein Deamidation from Sequence-Derived Secondary Structure and Intrinsic Disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Ramiro Lorenzo

    Full Text Available Asparagine residues in proteins undergo spontaneous deamidation, a post-translational modification that may act as a molecular clock for the regulation of protein function and turnover. Asparagine deamidation is modulated by protein local sequence, secondary structure and hydrogen bonding. We present NGOME, an algorithm able to predict non-enzymatic deamidation of internal asparagine residues in proteins in the absence of structural data, using sequence-based predictions of secondary structure and intrinsic disorder. Compared to previous algorithms, NGOME does not require three-dimensional structures yet yields better predictions than available sequence-only methods. Four case studies of specific proteins show how NGOME may help the user identify deamidation-prone asparagine residues, often related to protein gain of function, protein degradation or protein misfolding in pathological processes. A fifth case study applies NGOME at a proteomic scale and unveils a correlation between asparagine deamidation and protein degradation in yeast. NGOME is freely available as a webserver at the National EMBnet node Argentina, URL: http://www.embnet.qb.fcen.uba.ar/ in the subpage "Protein and nucleic acid structure and sequence analysis".

  15. Assignment of near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of metalloporphyrins by means of time-dependent density-functional calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Norman; Fink, Rainer; Hieringer, Wolfgang

    2010-08-01

    The C 1s and N 1s near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of three prototype tetraphenyl porphyrin (TPP) molecules are discussed in the framework of a combined experimental and theoretical study. We employ time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) to compute the NEXAFS spectra of the open- and closed-shell metalloporphyrins CoTPP and ZnTPP as well as the free-base 2HTPP in realistic nonplanar conformations. Using Becke's well-known half-and-half hybrid functional, the computed core excitation spectra are mostly in good agreement with the experimental data in the low-energy region below the appropriate ionization threshold. To make these calculations feasible, we apply a new, simple scheme based on TDDFT using a modified single-particle input spectrum. This scheme is very easy to implement in standard codes and allows one to compute core excitation spectra at a similar cost as ordinary UV/vis spectra even for larger molecules. We employ these calculations for a detailed assignment of the NEXAFS spectra including subtle shifts in certain peaks of the N 1s spectra, which depend on the central coordination of the TPP ligand. We furthermore assign the observed NEXAFS resonances to the individual molecular subunits of the investigated TPP molecules.

  16. Perturbation-induced secondary flow structures due to fractured stents in arterial curvatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulusu, Kartik V.; Popma, Christopher; Penna, Leanne; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2012-11-01

    An in vitro experimental investigation of secondary flow structures was performed downstream of a model stent that embodied a ``Type-IV'' stent fracture, i.e. complete transverse fracture of elements and element displacement (of 3 diameters). One part of the fractured stent was located in the curved region of a test section comprised of a 180-degree bent tube, and the velocity field measured with PIV. Secondary flow morphologies downstream of the stent were identified with a continuous wavelet transform (CWT) algorithm (PIVlet 1.2) using a 2D Ricker wavelet. A comparison of wavelet transformed vorticity fields of fractured and unfractured model stents is presented under physiological inflow conditions. During systolic deceleration, a breakdown in symmetry of vortical structures occurred with the unfractured stent, but not with the fractured model stent. Potential mechanisms to explain the differences in secondary flow morphologies include redirection of vorticity from the meridional plane of the bend to the normal plane and diffusion of vorticity. Supported by the National Science Foundation, Grant No. CBET-0828903 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE).

  17. Secondary structure prediction of protein constructs using random incremental truncation and vacuum-ultraviolet CD spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Pukáncsik, M; Matsuo, K; Gekko, K; Hart, D; Kézsmárki, I; Vértessy, B G

    2014-01-01

    A novel uracil-DNA degrading protein factor (termed UDE) was identified in Drosophila melanogaster with no significant structural and functional homology to other uracil-DNA binding or processing factors. Determination of the 3D structure of UDE will be a true breakthrough in description of the molecular mechanism of action of UDE catalysis, as well as in general uracil-recognition and nuclease action. The revolutionary ESPRIT technology was applied to the novel protein UDE to overcome problems in identifying soluble expressing constructs given the absence of precise information on domain content and arrangement. Nine specimen from the created numerous truncated constructs of UDE were choosen to dechiper structural and functional relationships. VUVCD with neural network was performed to define the secondary structure content and location of UDE and its truncated variants. The quantitative analysis demonstrated exclusive {\\alpha}-helical content for the full-length protein, which is preserved in the truncated ...

  18. Teaching the foundations of quantum mechanics in secondary school: a proposed conceptual structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de los Angeles Fanaro

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is part of a doctoral thesis that investigates Basic Quantum Mechanics (QM teaching in high school. A Conceptual Structure of Reference (CSR based on the Path Integral Method of Feynman (1965 was rebuilt and a Proposed Conceptual Structure for Teaching (PCST (Otero, 2006, 2007 the basics of Quantum Mechanics at secondary school was designed, analysed and carried out. This PCST does not follow the historical route and it is complementary to the canonical formalism. The concepts: probability distribution, quantum system, x(t alternative, amplitude of probability, sum of probability amplitude, action, Planck's constant, and classic-quantum transition were rebuilt with the students. Mathematical formalism was avoided by using simulation software assistance. The Proposed Conceptual Structure for Teaching (PCST is described and some results from the test carried out by the class group are discussed. This information allows the analysis of the Conceptual Structure Effectively Reconstructed (CSER to be initiated with the students.

  19. An Algorithm for Finding Conserved Secondary Structure Motifs in Unaligned RNA Sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giulio Pavesi; Giancarlo Mauri; Graziano Pesole

    2004-01-01

    Several experiments and observations have revealed the fact that small local distinct structural features in RNA molecules are correlated with their biological function, for example, in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Thus, finding similar structural features in a set of RNA sequences known to play the same biological function could provide substantial information concerning which parts of the sequences are responsible for the function itself. Unfortunately, finding common structural elements in RNA molecules is a very challenging task, even if limited to secondary structure. The main difficulty lies in the fact that in nearly all the cases the structure of the molecules is unknown, has to be somehow predicted, and that sequences with little or no similarity can fold into similar structures. Although they differ in some details, the approaches proposed so far are usually based on the preliminary alignment of the sequences and attempt to predict common structures (either local or global, or for some selected regions) for the aligned sequences. These methods give good results when sequence and structure similarity are very high, but function less well when similarity is limited to small and local elements, like single stem-loop motifs. Instead of aligning the sequences, the algorithm we present directly searches for regions of the sequences that can fold into similar structures, where the degree of similarity can be defined by the user. Any information concerning sequence similarity in the motifs can be used either as a search constraint, or a posteriori, by post-processing the output. The search for the regions sharing structural similarity is implemented with the affix tree, a novel text-indexing structure that significantly accelerates the search for patterns having a symmetric layout, such as those forming stem-loop structures. Tests based on experimentally known structures have shown that the algorithm is able to identify functional motifs in

  20. Synthesis and Photoluminescence of Three Europium (Ⅲ) Ternary Complexes with New Secondary Ligands of Different Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁继兵; 李嘉航; 梁万里; 苏树江; 石建新; 龚孟濂

    2004-01-01

    Three new 1,10-phenanthroline derivatives, dipyrido (3,2-f: 2,3-h) quinoxaline (DPQN), imidazo (5,6-f)-(1,10)-phenanthroline (IP) and 3-phenyl-imidazo (5,6-f)-(1,10)-phenanthroline (PIP) were designed and synthesized as a secondary ligand to coordinate with europium (Ⅲ) ion while dibenzoylmethane (DBM) was used as the first ligand. The compositions of the ligands and the europium (Ⅲ) ternary complexes were confirmed by elementary analysis, IR and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The UV-visible absorption spectra, thermal stability, photoluminescence spectra, quantum yield and fluorescence life time of the Eu(Ⅲ) complexes were investigated. The effect of the structure of the secondary ligand on the photoluminescence of the complexes was discussed. The results show that the synthesized Eu(Ⅲ) complexes are good red-emitiing materials for potential application in fabrication of organic electroluminescence devices.

  1. Polymorphism, population structure, and multivariate relationships among secondary traits in open-pollinated corn heterotic groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah A. Jaradat

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Plant, ear and kernel traits directly or indirectly associated with grain yield in corn (Zea mays L. have been suggested as “secondary” traits to select for larger grain yield, especially in open-pollinated corn varieties and their hybrids. Polymorphism, population structure, and multivariate relationships among 34 secondary traits and their impact on grain yield were quantified in 46 open-pollinated varietal hybrids within eight maternal heterotic groups. Large levels of polymorphism and population differentiation especially for reproductive traits, and above-average values for diversity indices, frequency of desirable trait variants, and population differentiation were found for almost all secondary traits. Maternal heterotic groups were identified as potential sources of desirable variants of single or multiple traits appropriate for adaptation to short-growing seasons, low-input farming and adverse environmental condition.

  2. The effect of structural disorder on the secondary electron emission of graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, L. A.; Larciprete, R.; Cimino, R.

    2016-09-01

    The dependance of the secondary electron yield (SEY) on the degree of crystallinity of graphite has been investigated during the amorphization of a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) samples by means of Ar+ bombardment. Photoemission and Raman spectroscopies were used to follow the structural damage while the SEY curves were measured from very low energies up to 1000 eV. We found that the increase of lattice defects lowers the contribution of the π electrons in the valence band and loss spectra and smears out the intense modulations in the low energy secondary electron yield (LE-SEY) curve. Raman spectroscopy results showed that ion induced lattice amorphization is confined in a near-surface layer. The evolution of SEY curves was observed with the progressive Ar+ dosage after crystal damage as due to the modification of the electronic transport properties within the damaged near surface layer.

  3. Crumple: a method for complete enumeration of all possible pseudoknot-free RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleckley, Samuel; Stone, Jonathan W; Schroeder, Susan J

    2012-01-01

    The diverse landscape of RNA conformational space includes many canyons and crevices that are distant from the lowest minimum free energy valley and remain unexplored by traditional RNA structure prediction methods. A complete description of the entire RNA folding landscape can facilitate identification of biologically important conformations. The Crumple algorithm rapidly enumerates all possible non-pseudoknotted structures for an RNA sequence without consideration of thermodynamics while filtering the output with experimental data. The Crumple algorithm provides an alternative approach to traditional free energy minimization programs for RNA secondary structure prediction. A complete computation of all non-pseudoknotted secondary structures can reveal structures that would not be predicted by methods that sample the RNA folding landscape based on thermodynamic predictions. The free energy minimization approach is often successful but is limited by not considering RNA tertiary and protein interactions and the possibility that kinetics rather than thermodynamics determines the functional RNA fold. Efficient parallel computing and filters based on experimental data make practical the complete enumeration of all non-pseudoknotted structures. Efficient parallel computing for Crumple is implemented in a ring graph approach. Filters for experimental data include constraints from chemical probing of solvent accessibility, enzymatic cleavage of paired or unpaired nucleotides, phylogenetic covariation, and the minimum number and lengths of helices determined from crystallography or cryo-electron microscopy. The minimum number and length of helices has a significant effect on reducing conformational space. Pairing constraints reduce conformational space more than single nucleotide constraints. Examples with Alfalfa Mosaic Virus RNA and Trypanosome brucei guide RNA demonstrate the importance of evaluating all possible structures when pseduoknots, RNA-protein interactions

  4. Crumple: a method for complete enumeration of all possible pseudoknot-free RNA secondary structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Bleckley

    Full Text Available The diverse landscape of RNA conformational space includes many canyons and crevices that are distant from the lowest minimum free energy valley and remain unexplored by traditional RNA structure prediction methods. A complete description of the entire RNA folding landscape can facilitate identification of biologically important conformations. The Crumple algorithm rapidly enumerates all possible non-pseudoknotted structures for an RNA sequence without consideration of thermodynamics while filtering the output with experimental data. The Crumple algorithm provides an alternative approach to traditional free energy minimization programs for RNA secondary structure prediction. A complete computation of all non-pseudoknotted secondary structures can reveal structures that would not be predicted by methods that sample the RNA folding landscape based on thermodynamic predictions. The free energy minimization approach is often successful but is limited by not considering RNA tertiary and protein interactions and the possibility that kinetics rather than thermodynamics determines the functional RNA fold. Efficient parallel computing and filters based on experimental data make practical the complete enumeration of all non-pseudoknotted structures. Efficient parallel computing for Crumple is implemented in a ring graph approach. Filters for experimental data include constraints from chemical probing of solvent accessibility, enzymatic cleavage of paired or unpaired nucleotides, phylogenetic covariation, and the minimum number and lengths of helices determined from crystallography or cryo-electron microscopy. The minimum number and length of helices has a significant effect on reducing conformational space. Pairing constraints reduce conformational space more than single nucleotide constraints. Examples with Alfalfa Mosaic Virus RNA and Trypanosome brucei guide RNA demonstrate the importance of evaluating all possible structures when pseduoknots, RNA

  5. Structural effects of liana presence in secondary tropical dry forests using ground LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Azofeifa, A.; Portillo-Quintero, C.; Durán, S. M.

    2015-10-01

    Lianas, woody vines, are a key component of tropical forest because they may reduce carbon storage potential. Lianas are increasing in density and biomass in tropical forests, but it is unknown what the potential consequences of these increases are for forest dynamics. Lianas may proliferate in disturbed areas, such as regenerating forests, but little is known about the role of lianas in secondary succession. In this study, we evaluated the potential of the ground LiDAR to detect differences in the vertical structure of stands of different ages with and without lianas in tropical dry forests. Specifically, we used a terrestrial laser scanner called VEGNET to assess whether liana presence influences the vertical signature of stands of different ages, and whether successional trajectories as detected by the VEGNET could be altered by liana presence. We deployed the VEGNET ground LiDAR system in 15 secondary forests of different ages early (21 years old since land abandonment), intermediate (32-35 years old) and late stages (> 80 years old) with and without lianas. We compared laser-derived vegetation components such as Plant Area Index (PAI), plant area volume density (PAVD), and the radius of gyration (RG) across forest stands between liana and no-liana treatments. In general forest stands without lianas show a clearer distinction of vertical strata and the vertical height of accumulated PAVD. A significant increase of PAI was found from intermediate to late stages in stands without lianas, but in stands where lianas were present there was not a significant trend. This suggests that lianas may be influencing successional trajectories in secondary forests, and these effects can be captured by terrestrial laser scanners such as the VEGNET. This research contributes to estimate the potential effects of lianas in secondary dry forests and highlight the role of ground LiDAR to monitor structural changes in tropical forests due to liana presence.

  6. Structure and vibrational assignment of the enol form of 1,1,1-trifluoro-2,4-pentanedione

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahedi-Tabrizi, Mansoureh; Tayyari, Fariba; Moosavi-Tekyeh, Zainab; Jalali, Alireza; Tayyari, Sayyed Faramarz

    2006-10-01

    Molecular structure of 1,1,1-trifluoro-pentane-2,4-dione, known as trifluoro-acetylacetone (TFAA), has been investigated by means of Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations and the results were compared with those of acetylacetone (AA) and hexafluoro-acetylacetone (HFAA). The harmonic vibrational frequencies of both stable cis-enol forms were calculated at B3LYP level of theory using 6-31G** and 6-311++G** basis sets. We also calculated the anharmonic frequencies at B3LYP/6-31G** level of theory for both stable cis-enol isomers. The calculated frequencies, Raman and IR intensities, and depolarization ratios were compared with the experimental results. The energy difference between the two stable cis-enol forms, calculated at B3LYP/6-311++G**, is only 5.89 kJ/mol. The observed vibrational frequencies and Raman and IR intensities are in excellent agreement with the corresponding values calculated for the most stable conformation, 2TFAA. According to the theoretical calculations, the hydrogen bond strength for the most stable conformer is 57 kJ/mol, about 9.5 kJ/mol less than that of AA and about 14.5 kJ/mol more than that of HFAA. These hydrogen bond strengths are consistent with the frequency shifts for OH/OD stretching and OH/OD out-of-plane bending modes upon substitution of CH 3 groups with CF 3 groups. By comparing the vibrational spectra of both theoretical and experimental data, it was concluded that 2TFAA is the dominant isomer.

  7. Incorporating chemical modification constraints into a dynamic programming algorithm for prediction of RNA secondary structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, David H.; Disney, Matthew D.; Childs, Jessica L.; Schroeder, Susan J.; Zuker, Michael; Turner, Douglas H.

    2004-01-01

    A dynamic programming algorithm for prediction of RNA secondary structure has been revised to accommodate folding constraints determined by chemical modification and to include free energy increments for coaxial stacking of helices when they are either adjacent or separated by a single mismatch. Furthermore, free energy parameters are revised to account for recent experimental results for terminal mismatches and hairpin, bulge, internal, and multibranch loops. To demonstrate the applicability of this method, in vivo modification was performed on 5S rRNA in both Escherichia coli and Candida albicans with 1-cyclohexyl-3-(2-morpholinoethyl) carbodiimide metho-p-toluene sulfonate, dimethyl sulfate, and kethoxal. The percentage of known base pairs in the predicted structure increased from 26.3% to 86.8% for the E. coli sequence by using modification constraints. For C. albicans, the accuracy remained 87.5% both with and without modification data. On average, for these sequences and a set of 14 sequences with known secondary structure and chemical modification data taken from the literature, accuracy improves from 67% to 76%. This enhancement primarily reflects improvement for three sequences that are predicted with <40% accuracy on the basis of energetics alone. For these sequences, inclusion of chemical modification constraints improves the average accuracy from 28% to 78%. For the 11 sequences with <6% pseudoknotted base pairs, structures predicted with constraints from chemical modification contain on average 84% of known canonical base pairs. PMID:15123812

  8. Effective stiffness and formation of secondary structures in a protein-like model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škrbić, Tatjana; Hoang, Trinh X; Giacometti, Achille

    2016-08-28

    We use Wang-Landau and replica exchange techniques to study the effect of an increasing stiffness on the formation of secondary structures in protein-like systems. Two possible models are considered. In both models, a polymer chain is formed by tethered beads where non-consecutive backbone beads attract each other via a square-well potential representing the tendency of the chain to fold. In addition, smaller hard spheres are attached to each non-terminal backbone bead along the direction normal to the chain to mimic the steric hindrance of side chains in real proteins. The two models, however, differ in the way bending rigidity is enforced. In the first model, partial overlap between consecutive beads is allowed. This reduces the possible bending angle between consecutive bonds thus producing an effective entropic stiffness that competes with a short-range attraction, and leads to the formation of secondary structures characteristic of proteins. We discuss the low-temperature phase diagram as a function of increasing interpenetration and find a transition from a planar, beta-like structure, to helical shape. In the second model, an energetic stiffness is explicitly introduced by imposing an infinitely large energy penalty for bending above a critical angle between consecutive bonds, and no penalty below it. The low-temperature phase of this model does not show any sign of protein-like secondary structures. At intermediate temperatures, however, where the chain is still in the coil conformation but stiffness is significant, we find the two models to predict a quite similar dependence of the persistence length as a function of the stiffness. This behaviour is rationalized in terms of a simple geometrical mapping between the two models. Finally, we discuss the effect of shrinking side chains to zero and find the above mapping to still hold true. PMID:27586943

  9. The Interplay between Adolescent Needs and Secondary School Structures: Fostering Developmentally Responsive Middle and High School Environments across the Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerbrock, Cheryl R.; Kiefer, Sarah M.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the developmental responsiveness of secondary school environments may be an important factor in supporting students as they make the transition from one school to the next. Students' needs may or may not be met depending on the nature of the fit between their basic and developmental needs and secondary school structures at the…

  10. Protein secondary structure appears to be robust under in silico evolution while protein disorder appears not to be.

    KAUST Repository

    Schaefer, Christian

    2010-01-16

    MOTIVATION: The mutation of amino acids often impacts protein function and structure. Mutations without negative effect sustain evolutionary pressure. We study a particular aspect of structural robustness with respect to mutations: regular protein secondary structure and natively unstructured (intrinsically disordered) regions. Is the formation of regular secondary structure an intrinsic feature of amino acid sequences, or is it a feature that is lost upon mutation and is maintained by evolution against the odds? Similarly, is disorder an intrinsic sequence feature or is it difficult to maintain? To tackle these questions, we in silico mutated native protein sequences into random sequence-like ensembles and monitored the change in predicted secondary structure and disorder. RESULTS: We established that by our coarse-grained measures for change, predictions and observations were similar, suggesting that our results were not biased by prediction mistakes. Changes in secondary structure and disorder predictions were linearly proportional to the change in sequence. Surprisingly, neither the content nor the length distribution for the predicted secondary structure changed substantially. Regions with long disorder behaved differently in that significantly fewer such regions were predicted after a few mutation steps. Our findings suggest that the formation of regular secondary structure is an intrinsic feature of random amino acid sequences, while the formation of long-disordered regions is not an intrinsic feature of proteins with disordered regions. Put differently, helices and strands appear to be maintained easily by evolution, whereas maintaining disordered regions appears difficult. Neutral mutations with respect to disorder are therefore very unlikely.

  11. Multithreaded comparative RNA secondary structure prediction using stochastic context-free grammars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Værum Morten

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prediction of the structure of large RNAs remains a particular challenge in bioinformatics, due to the computational complexity and low levels of accuracy of state-of-the-art algorithms. The pfold model couples a stochastic context-free grammar to phylogenetic analysis for a high accuracy in predictions, but the time complexity of the algorithm and underflow errors have prevented its use for long alignments. Here we present PPfold, a multithreaded version of pfold, which is capable of predicting the structure of large RNA alignments accurately on practical timescales. Results We have distributed both the phylogenetic calculations and the inside-outside algorithm in PPfold, resulting in a significant reduction of runtime on multicore machines. We have addressed the floating-point underflow problems of pfold by implementing an extended-exponent datatype, enabling PPfold to be used for large-scale RNA structure predictions. We have also improved the user interface and portability: alongside standalone executable and Java source code of the program, PPfold is also available as a free plugin to the CLC Workbenches. We have evaluated the accuracy of PPfold using BRaliBase I tests, and demonstrated its practical use by predicting the secondary structure of an alignment of 24 complete HIV-1 genomes in 65 minutes on an 8-core machine and identifying several known structural elements in the prediction. Conclusions PPfold is the first parallelized comparative RNA structure prediction algorithm to date. Based on the pfold model, PPfold is capable of fast, high-quality predictions of large RNA secondary structures, such as the genomes of RNA viruses or long genomic transcripts. The techniques used in the parallelization of this algorithm may be of general applicability to other bioinformatics algorithms.

  12. Mechanical properties of amyloid-like fibrils defined by secondary structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolini, C.; Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Wang, C.; Besenbacher, F.; Dong, M.

    2015-04-01

    Amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils represent a generic class of highly ordered nanostructures that are implicated in some of the most fatal neurodegenerative diseases. On the other hand, amyloids, by possessing outstanding mechanical robustness, have also been successfully employed as functional biomaterials. For these reasons, physical and chemical factors driving fibril self-assembly and morphology are extensively studied - among these parameters, the secondary structures and the pH have been revealed to be crucial, since a variation in pH changes the fibril morphology and net chirality during protein aggregation. It is important to quantify the mechanical properties of these fibrils in order to help the design of effective strategies for treating diseases related to the presence of amyloid fibrils. In this work, we show that by changing pH the mechanical properties of amyloid-like fibrils vary as well. In particular, we reveal that these mechanical properties are strongly related to the content of secondary structures. We analysed and estimated the Young's modulus (E) by comparing the persistence length (Lp) - measured from the observation of TEM images by using statistical mechanics arguments - with the mechanical information provided by peak force quantitative nanomechanical property mapping (PF-QNM). The secondary structure content and the chirality are investigated by means of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SR-CD). Results arising from this study could be fruitfully used as a protocol to investigate other medical or engineering relevant peptide fibrils.Amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils represent a generic class of highly ordered nanostructures that are implicated in some of the most fatal neurodegenerative diseases. On the other hand, amyloids, by possessing outstanding mechanical robustness, have also been successfully employed as functional biomaterials. For these reasons, physical and chemical factors driving fibril self-assembly and morphology

  13. A Novel Framework Based on ACO and PSO for RNA Secondary Structure Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of RNA structure is a useful process for creating new drugs and understanding genetic diseases. In this paper, we proposed a particle swarm optimization (PSO and ant colony optimization (ACO based framework (PAF for RNA secondary structure prediction. PAF consists of crucial stem searching (CSS and global sequence building (GSB. In CSS, a modified ACO (MACO is used to search the crucial stems, and then a set of stems are generated. In GSB, we used a modified PSO (MPSO to construct all the stems in one sequence. We evaluated the performance of PAF on ten sequences, which have length from 122 to 1494. We also compared the performance of PAF with the results obtained from six existing well-known methods, SARNA-Predict, RnaPredict, ACRNA, PSOfold, IPSO, and mfold. The comparison results show that PAF could not only predict structures with higher accuracy rate but also find crucial stems.

  14. In Silico Analysis of β-Galactosidases Primary and Secondary Structure in relation to Temperature Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available β-D-Galactosidases (EC 3.2.1.23 hydrolyze the terminal nonreducing β-D-galactose residues in β-D-galactosides and are ubiquitously present in all life forms including extremophiles. Eighteen microbial β-galactosidase protein sequences, six each from psychrophilic, mesophilic, and thermophilic microbes, were analyzed. Primary structure reveals alanine, glycine, serine, and arginine to be higher in psychrophilic β-galactosidases whereas valine, glutamine, glutamic acid, phenylalanine, threonine, and tyrosine are found to be statistically preferred by thermophilic β-galactosidases. Cold active β-galactosidase has a strong preference towards tiny and small amino acids, whereas high temperature inhabitants had higher content of basic and aromatic amino acids. Thermophilic β-galactosidases have higher percentage of α-helix region responsible for temperature tolerance while cold loving β-galactosidases had higher percentage of sheet and coil region. Secondary structure analysis revealed that charged and aromatic amino acids were significant for sheet region of thermophiles. Alanine was found to be significant and high in the helix region of psychrophiles and valine counters in thermophilic β-galactosidase. Coil region of cold active β-galactosidase has higher content of tiny amino acids which explains their high catalytic efficiency over their counterparts from thermal habitat. The present study has revealed the preference or prevalence of certain amino acids in primary and secondary structure of psychrophilic, mesophilic, and thermophilic β-galactosidase.

  15. Secondary Structure Preferences of Mn2+ Binding Sites in Bacterial Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Aleksandrovna Khrustaleva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 3D structures of proteins with coordinated Mn2+ ions from bacteria with low, average, and high genomic GC-content have been analyzed (149 PDB files were used. Major Mn2+ binders are aspartic acid (6.82% of Asp residues, histidine (14.76% of His residues, and glutamic acid (3.51% of Glu residues. We found out that the motif of secondary structure “beta strand-major binder-random coil” is overrepresented around all the three major Mn2+ binders. That motif may be followed by either alpha helix or beta strand. Beta strands near Mn2+ binding residues should be stable because they are enriched by such beta formers as valine and isoleucine, as well as by specific combinations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acid residues characteristic to beta sheet. In the group of proteins from GC-rich bacteria glutamic acid residues situated in alpha helices frequently coordinate Mn2+ ions, probably, because of the decrease of Lys usage under the influence of mutational GC-pressure. On the other hand, the percentage of Mn2+ sites with at least one amino acid in the “beta strand-major binder-random coil” motif of secondary structure (77.88% does not depend on genomic GC-content.

  16. Effects of high hydrostatic pressure on secondary structure and emulsifying behavior of sweet potato protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmood Khan, Nasir; Mu, Tai-Hua; Sun, Hong-Nan; Zhang, Miao; Chen, Jing-Wang

    2015-04-01

    In this study, secondary structures of sweet potato protein (SPP) after high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) treatment (200-600 MPa) were evaluated and emulsifying properties of emulsions with HHP-treated SPP solutions in different pH values (3, 6, and 9) were investigated. Circular dichroism analysis confirmed the modification of the SPP secondary structure. Surface hydrophobicity increased at pH 3 and decreased at 6 and 9. Emulsifying activity index at pH 6 increased with an increase in pressure, whereas emulsifying stability index increased at pH 6 and 9. Oil droplet sizes decreased, while volume frequency distribution of the smaller droplets increased at pH 3 and 6 with the HHP treatment. Emulsion viscosity increased at pH 6 and 9 and pseudo-plastic flow behaviors were not altered for all emulsions produced with HHP-treated SPP. These results suggested that HHP could modify the SPP structure for better emulsifying properties, which could increase the use of SPP emulsion in the food industry.

  17. Interplay between desolvation and secondary structure in mediating cosolvent and temperature induced alpha-synuclein aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, V. L.; Webb, W. W.; Eliezer, D.

    2012-10-01

    Both increased temperature and moderate concentrations of fluorinated alcohols enhance aggregation of the Parkinson's disease-associated protein α-synuclein (αS). Here, we investigate the secondary structural rearrangements induced by heating and trifluoroethanol [TFE]. At low TFE concentrations, CD spectra feature a negative peak characteristic of disordered polypeptides near 200 nm and a slight shoulder around 220 nm suggesting some polyproline-II content. Upon heating, these peaks weaken, while a weak negative signal develops at 222 nm. At high TFE concentrations, the spectra show distinct minima at 208 and 222 nm, indicative of considerable α-helical structure, which diminish upon heating. We observe a crossover between the low-TFE and high-TFE behavior near 15% TFE, where we previously showed that a partially helical intermediate is populated. We postulate that the protein is well solvated by water at low TFE concentrations and by TFE at high TFE concentrations, but may become desolvated at the crossover point. We discuss the potential roles and interplay of desolvation and helical secondary structure in driving αS aggregation.

  18. A quantitative analysis of secondary RNA structure using domination based parameters on trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Yue

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has become increasingly apparent that a comprehensive database of RNA motifs is essential in order to achieve new goals in genomic and proteomic research. Secondary RNA structures have frequently been represented by various modeling methods as graph-theoretic trees. Using graph theory as a modeling tool allows the vast resources of graphical invariants to be utilized to numerically identify secondary RNA motifs. The domination number of a graph is a graphical invariant that is sensitive to even a slight change in the structure of a tree. The invariants selected in this study are variations of the domination number of a graph. These graphical invariants are partitioned into two classes, and we define two parameters based on each of these classes. These parameters are calculated for all small order trees and a statistical analysis of the resulting data is conducted to determine if the values of these parameters can be utilized to identify which trees of orders seven and eight are RNA-like in structure. Results The statistical analysis shows that the domination based parameters correctly distinguish between the trees that represent native structures and those that are not likely candidates to represent RNA. Some of the trees previously identified as candidate structures are found to be "very" RNA like, while others are not, thereby refining the space of structures likely to be found as representing secondary RNA structure. Conclusion Search algorithms are available that mine nucleotide sequence databases. However, the number of motifs identified can be quite large, making a further search for similar motif computationally difficult. Much of the work in the bioinformatics arena is toward the development of better algorithms to address the computational problem. This work, on the other hand, uses mathematical descriptors to more clearly characterize the RNA motifs and thereby reduce the corresponding search space. These

  19. 5-Azacytidine and RNA secondary structure increase the retrovirus mutation rate.

    OpenAIRE

    Pathak, V K; Temin, H M

    1992-01-01

    A broad spectrum of mutations occurs at a high rate during a single round of retrovirus replication (V.K. Pathak and H. M. Temin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 87:6019-6023, 1990). We have now determined that this high rate of spontaneous mutation can be further increased by 5-azacytidine (AZC) treatment or by regions of potential RNA secondary structure. We found a 13-fold increase in the mutation rate after AZC treatment of retrovirus-producing cells and target cells. The AZC-induced substitut...

  20. Altered features in the secondary structure of Vicia faba 5.8s rRNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Nazar, R N; Wildeman, A G

    1981-01-01

    We have re-examined the nucleotide sequence of Vicia faba (broad bean) 5.8S rRNA using partial chemical degradation and a new approach to high temperature (65-80 degrees C) sequencing gels. The results indicate that the secondary structure was not completely disrupted in previous studies (Tanaka, Y., Dyer, T.A. and Brownlee, G.G. (1980) Nucleic Acid Res. 8, 1259-1272) and explain ambiguities between the nucleotide sequence and T1 ribonuclease digests. Despite this revision, estimates in the s...

  1. A comparative method for finding and folding RNA secondary structures within protein-coding regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Meyer, Irmtraud Margret; Forsberg, Roald;

    2004-01-01

    , and evidence is accumulating that this phenomenon may also be found in Eukaryotes. We here present the first comparative method, called RNA-DECODER, which explicitly takes the known protein-coding context of an RNA-sequence alignment into account in order to predict evolutionarily conserved secondary......-structure elements, which may span both coding and non-coding regions. RNA-DECODER employs a stochastic context-free grammar together with a set of carefully devised phylogenetic substitution-models, which can disentangle and evaluate the different kinds of overlapping evolutionary constraints which arise. We show...

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of secondary electron images for real sample structures in scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P; Wang, H Y; Li, Y G; Mao, S F; Ding, Z J

    2012-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation methods for the study of electron beam interaction with solids have been mostly concerned with specimens of simple geometry. In this article, we propose a simulation algorithm for treating arbitrary complex structures in a real sample. The method is based on a finite element triangular mesh modeling of sample geometry and a space subdivision for accelerating simulation. Simulation of secondary electron image in scanning electron microscopy has been performed for gold particles on a carbon substrate. Comparison of the simulation result with an experiment image confirms that this method is effective to model complex morphology of a real sample.

  3. Immunohistochemical features of the granulation tissue structure in the primary and secondary apical periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gritsenko P.I.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background The search of criteria of differential enzymatic activity of cyclooxygenase-2 and matrix metalloproteinases immunocompetent cells of granulomas in the primary and secondary apical periodontitis (AP provides information about the features of lesions of periodontal stromal component, and it can be used as the basis for future therapeutic intervention. Objective. The purpose of this study was to compare the qualitative and quantitative characteristics of the cellular composition of granulation tissue, which formed during primary and secondary apical periodontitis; comparison of morphological characteristics of the structure apical granuloma with immunohistochemical indicators of markers expression of cluster of differentiation CD3, CD4, CD8, CD68, CD138, CD20 and cyclooxygenase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase 9. Methods. The study included 59 patients aged 18 to 50 years with apical periodontitis. Patients were divided into 2 clinical group: 1 – with primary periodontitis and 2 – with secondary periodontitis. For morphological studies using peryapikalnoyi granulation tissue biopsies. Results. Significant differences were found for the fractions of CD4+ T helper cells (p=0,034, r=0,321, CD20+ mature B lymphocytes (p=0,001, r=0,671, CD68+ macrophages (p=0,011, r=0,684 and CD138+ plasma cells (p=0,002, r=0,645. And, also likely decrease in the ratio of CD4+/CD8+ (p=0,002, r=0,645, by reducing the fraction of CD4+ T-helper cells, against reducing the number of leukocytes, expression of MMP-9 (p=0,04, r=0,302 and COX-2 (p=0,013, r=0,321 with secondary apical periodontitis, compared to the primary periodontitis. Conclusion. Disease progression and the beginning of the destruction of bone tissue with the formation of granulation tissue is the result of abnormal immune responses, III and IV type hypersensitivity reactions, with the formation of immune granulomas. Citation: Gritsenko PI, Samojlenko AV, Shpon’ka IS, Poslavska

  4. Microwave, infrared, and Raman spectra, structural parameters, vibrational assignments and theoretical calculations of 1,1,3,3-tetrafluoro-1,3-disilacyclopentane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pate, Brooks H.; Seifert, Nathan A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Guirgis, Gamil A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, College of Charleston, Charleston, SC 29424 (United States); Deodhar, Bhushan S.; Klaassen, Joshua J.; Darkhalil, Ikhlas D. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Crow, Joseph A. [Department of Physics, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Wyatt, Justin K.; Dukes, Horace W. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, College of Charleston, Charleston, SC 29424 (United States); Durig, James R., E-mail: durigj@umkc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States)

    2013-04-18

    Highlights: • Structural parameters have been determined for the stable twist conformer. • Rotational constants for the six isotopologues for the twist conformer were determined from the microwave spectra. • Vibrational assignments are given for the molecule. • Ab intio and density functional theory calculations have been carried out for all possible conformers. - Abstract: The FT-microwave spectrum of 1,1,3,3-tetrafluoro-1,3-disilacyclopentane (c-C{sub 3}H{sub 6}Si{sub 2}F{sub 4}) has been recorded and 339 transitions for 6 isotopologues have been assigned for the twist conformation. The ground state rotational constants were determined with values for the normal species: A = 2102.74026(68), B = 751.34319(32), C = 736.51478(31). Adjusted r{sub 0} parameters are reported with distances (Å): rC{sub α}–Si = 1.859(2), rSi–C{sub β} = 1.864(2), rSi–F{sub 1} = 1.583(3), rSi–F{sub 2} = 1.578(3), and rC{sub β}–C{sub β} = 1.559(3), and angles (°): ∠SiC{sub α}Si = 102.8(3), ∠C{sub α}SiC{sub β} = 104.3(3), ∠SiC{sub β}C{sub β′} = 106.6(3), τC{sub β}SiC{sub α}Si = 10.7(3), and τ SiC{sub β}C{sub β′}Si = 40.8(3). The conformational stabilities have been predicted from ab initio calculations utilizing several various basis sets. Vibrational assignments have been provided for the observed bands for the twist conformer which are supported by ab initio calculations to predict harmonic force constants, vibrational wavenumbers, infrared intensities, Raman activities and depolarization ratios. The results are discussed and compared to the corresponding properties of some related molecules.

  5. Secondary Airflow Structure around Clustered Shrubs and Its Significance for Vegetated Dune Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wanyin; Dong, Zhibao; Qian, Guangqiang; Lu, Junfeng

    2016-04-01

    Shrubs have an important significance in aeolian processes due to their disturbance of the local airflow. In the formation of vegetated dunes, there is an iterative interaction between shrub geometry, the structure of the secondary airflow, and the interaction between neighboring shrubs. Understanding the dynamics of vegetated dunes thus requires an insight into the airflow fields around shrubs. Based on aerodynamic and aeolian sand physics theory, this project measured the complex secondary flow field and aeolian sand deposition pattern around single and cluster shrubs with varied densities (i.e., 0.05, 0.08, 0.15, 0.20) and gap ratios (the ratio of the gap spacing between the shrub models to the center-to-center distance for the shrub models, ranged from 1.1 to 1.8 with side-by-side arrangement and 1.2 to 4.3 with tandem arrangement) using the particle image velocimetry system through wind tunnle simulation. The relationship between the secondary airflow structure and the shrub's porosity and arrangement was analyzed quantitatively. Research results revealed that porosity (density) is the key parameter to affect the flow patterns around single shrub. Compared to solid obstacles, bleed flow through the shrubs has great influence on the secondary airflow patterns around itself. Under cluster modes, the distance between two adjacent shrubs has great influence on flow field structures around them. The flow patterns around two side-by-side arranged shrubs can be classified into three kinds of modes, that is: single-bluff-body, biased flow pattern and parallel vortex streets. The flow patterns around two tandem arranged shrubs can be classified into three regimes, that is: the extended body regime, reattachment regime and co-shedding regime. The "shadow zone" with low velocity in the lee of shrubs is the optimal position for sand deposition, but its form, size and orientation would varied with the shrub porosity and gap ratio between them. With the increase of the gap

  6. Secondary structural analysis of the carboxyl-terminal domain from different connexin isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnol, Gaëlle; Al-Mugotir, Mona; Kopanic, Jennifer L; Zach, Sydney; Li, Hanjun; Trease, Andrew J; Stauch, Kelly L; Grosely, Rosslyn; Cervantes, Matthew; Sorgen, Paul L

    2016-03-01

    The connexin carboxyl-terminal (CxCT) domain plays a role in the trafficking, localization, and turnover of gap junction channels, as well as the level of gap junction intercellular communication via numerous post-translational modifications and protein-protein interactions. As a key player in the regulation of gap junctions, the CT presents itself as a target for manipulation intended to modify function. Specific to intrinsically disordered proteins, identifying residues whose secondary structure can be manipulated will be critical toward unlocking the therapeutic potential of the CxCT domain. To accomplish this goal, we used biophysical methods to characterize CxCT domains attached to their fourth transmembrane domain (TM4). Circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance were complementary in demonstrating the connexin isoforms that form the greatest amount of α-helical structure in their CT domain (Cx45 > Cx43 > Cx32 > Cx50 > Cx37 ≈ Cx40 ≈ Cx26). Studies compared the influence of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol, pH, phosphorylation, and mutations (Cx32, X-linked Charcot-Marie Tooth disease; Cx26, hearing loss) on the TM4-CxCT structure. While pH modestly influences the CT structure, a major structural change was associated with phosphomimetic substitutions. Since most connexin CT domains are phosphorylated throughout their life cycle, studies of phospho-TM4-CxCT isoforms will be critical toward understanding the role that structure plays in regulating gap junction function. PMID:26542351

  7. Structural stability, NH 2 inversion and vibrational assignments of 2,4,6-trichloroaniline and 2,3,5,6-tetrachloroaniline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Hassan M.; Förner, Wolfgang; Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A.

    2009-12-01

    The structural stability of aniline, 2,4,6-trichloroaniline and 2,3,5,6-tetrachloroaniline was investigated by DFT-B3LYP and ab initio MP2 and MP4(SDQ) calculations with the 6-311G∗∗ basis set. From the calculations the three molecules were predicted to exist predominantly in a symmetric near-planar structure. The NH 2 inversion barrier was estimated from the MP2/6-311G∗∗ level of theory to be about 9.6 kJ/mol for aniline, 5.9 kJ/mol for the trichloro and 4.6 kJ/mol for the tetrachloro derivatives. The line intensities of the ring breathing and the C sbnd Cl stretching modes were shown to have a great dependence on the number of chlorine atoms on the benzene ring. The relative change in Raman line intensity of the C sbnd Cl stretching mode was explained on the basis of the inductive effect of the chlorine atoms on the benzene ring. The vibrational frequencies were computed at the DFT-B3LYP level and the infrared and Raman spectra for each molecule were calculated. Complete vibrational assignments were made on the basis of normal coordinate analyses and potential energy distributions for the two chloroanilines.

  8. A complete assignment of the vibrational spectra of 2-furoic acid based on the structures of the more stable monomer and dimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghalla, Houcine; Issaoui, Noureddine; Castillo, María Victoria; Brandán, Silvia Antonia; Flakus, Henryk T.

    2014-03-01

    The structural and vibrational properties of cyclic dimer of 2-furoic acid (2FA) were predicted by combining the available experimental infrared and Raman spectra in the solid phase and ab initio calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) with Pople's basis sets. The calculations show that there are two cyclic dimers for the title molecule that have been theoretically determined in the gas phase, and that only one of them, cis conformer, is present in the solid phase. The complete assignment of the 66 normal vibrational modes for the cis cyclic dimer was performed using the Pulay's Scaled Quantum Mechanics Force Field (SQMFF) methodology. Four strong bands in the infrared spectrum at 1583, 1427, 1126 and 887 cm-1 and the group of bands in the Raman spectrum at 1464, 1452, 1147, 1030, 885, 873, 848, 715 and 590 cm-1 are characteristic of the dimeric form of 2FA in the solid phase. In this work, the calculated structural and vibrational properties of both dimeric species were analyzed and compared between them. In addition, three types of atomic charges, bond orders, possible charge transfer, topological properties of the furan rings, Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) and Atoms in Molecules (AIM) theory calculations were employed to study the stabilities and intermolecular interactions of the both dimers of 2FA.

  9. Evolutionary conservation of sequence and secondary structures inCRISPR repeats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunin, Victor; Sorek, Rotem; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2006-09-01

    Clustered Regularly Interspaced Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) are a novel class of direct repeats, separated by unique spacer sequences of similar length, that are present in {approx}40% of bacterial and all archaeal genomes analyzed to date. More than 40 gene families, called CRISPR-associated sequences (CAS), appear in conjunction with these repeats and are thought to be involved in the propagation and functioning of CRISPRs. It has been proposed that the CRISPR/CAS system samples, maintains a record of, and inactivates invasive DNA that the cell has encountered, and therefore constitutes a prokaryotic analog of an immune system. Here we analyze CRISPR repeats identified in 195 microbial genomes and show that they can be organized into multiple clusters based on sequence similarity. All individual repeats in any given cluster were inferred to form characteristic RNA secondary structure, ranging from non-existent to pronounced. Stable secondary structures included G:U base pairs and exhibited multiple compensatory base changes in the stem region, indicating evolutionary conservation and functional importance. We also show that the repeat-based classification corresponds to, and expands upon, a previously reported CAS gene-based classification including specific relationships between CRISPR and CAS subtypes.

  10. Influence of microenvironment and liposomal formulation on secondary structure and bilayer interaction of lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witoonsaridsilp, Wasu; Panyarachun, Busaba; Sarisuta, Narong; Müller-Goymann, Christel C

    2010-02-01

    The conformation of peptide and protein drugs in various microenvironments and the interaction with drug carriers such as liposomes are of considerable interest. In this study the influence of microenvironments such as pH, salt concentration, and surface charge on the secondary structure of a model protein, lysozyme, either in solution or entrapped in liposomes with various molar ratios of phosphatidylcholine (PC):cholesterol (Chol) was investigated. It was found that entrapment efficiency was more pronounced in negatively charged liposomes than in non-charged liposomes, which was independent of Chol content and pH of hydration medium. The occurrence of aggregation, decrease in zeta potential, and alteration of 31P NMR chemical shift of negatively charged lysozyme liposomes compared to blank liposomes suggested that the electrostatic interaction plays a major role in protein-lipid binding. Addition of sodium chloride could impair the neutralizing ability of positively charged lysozyme on negatively charged membrane via chloride counterion binding. Neither lysozyme in various buffer solutions with sodium chloride nor that entrapped in liposomes showed any significant change in their secondary structures. However, significant decrease in alpha-helical content of lysozyme in non-charged liposomes at higher pH and salt concentrations was discovered. PMID:19880295

  11. 18S rRNA secondary structure and phylogenetic position of Peloridiidae (Insecta, hemiptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouvrard, D; Campbell, B C; Bourgoin, T; Chan, K L

    2000-09-01

    A secondary structure model for 18S rRNA of peloridiids, relict insects with a present-day circumantarctic distribution, is constructed using comparative sequence analysis, thermodynamic folding, a consensus method using 18S rRNA models of other taxa, and support of helices based on compensatory substitutions. Results show that probable in vivo configuration of 18S rRNA is not predictable using current free-energy models to fold the entire molecule concurrently. This suggests that refinements in free-energy minimization algorithms are needed. Molecular phylogenetic datasets were created using 18S rRNA nucleotide alignments produced by CLUSTAL and rigorous interpretation of homologous position based on certain secondary substructures. Phylogenetic analysis of a hemipteran data matrix of 18S rDNA sequences placed peloridiids sister to Heteroptera. Resolution of affiliations between the three main euhemipteran lineages was unresolved. The peloridiid 18S RNA model presented here provides the most accurate template to date for aligning homologous nucleotides of hemipteran taxa. Using folded 18S rRNA to infer homology of character as morpho-molecular structures or nucleotides and scoring particular sites or substructures is discussed. PMID:10991793

  12. Nucleotide sequence of a crustacean 18S ribosomal RNA gene and secondary structure of eukaryotic small subunit ribosomal RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelles, L; Fang, B L; Volckaert, G; Vandenberghe, A; De Wachter, R

    1984-12-11

    The primary structure of the gene for 18 S rRNA of the crustacean Artemia salina was determined. The sequence has been aligned with 13 other small ribosomal subunit RNA sequences of eukaryotic, archaebacterial, eubacterial, chloroplastic and plant mitochondrial origin. Secondary structure models for these RNAs were derived on the basis of previously proposed models and additional comparative evidence found in the alignment. Although there is a general similarity in the secondary structure models for eukaryotes and prokaryotes, the evidence seems to indicate a different topology in a central area of the structures.

  13. An evolutionary method for learning HMM structure: prediction of protein secondary structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Won, Kyoung-Jae; Hamelryck, Thomas; Prügel-Bennett, Adam;

    2007-01-01

    Therefore, we have developed a method for evolving the structure of HMMs automatically, using Genetic Algorithms (GAs). RESULTS: In the GA procedure, populations of HMMs are assembled from biologically meaningful building blocks. Mutation and crossover operators were designed to explore the space...... evolved HMM also calculates the probabilities associated with the predictions. We carefully examined the performance of the HMM based predictor, both under the multiple- and single-sequence...

  14. Secondary Structure Prediction of Protein Constructs Using Random Incremental Truncation and Vacuum-Ultraviolet CD Spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Pukáncsik

    Full Text Available A novel uracil-DNA degrading protein factor (termed UDE was identified in Drosophila melanogaster with no significant structural and functional homology to other uracil-DNA binding or processing factors. Determination of the 3D structure of UDE is excepted to provide key information on the description of the molecular mechanism of action of UDE catalysis, as well as in general uracil-recognition and nuclease action. Towards this long-term aim, the random library ESPRIT technology was applied to the novel protein UDE to overcome problems in identifying soluble expressing constructs given the absence of precise information on domain content and arrangement. Nine constructs of UDE were chosen to decipher structural and functional relationships. Vacuum ultraviolet circular dichroism (VUVCD spectroscopy was performed to define the secondary structure content and location within UDE and its truncated variants. The quantitative analysis demonstrated exclusive α-helical content for the full-length protein, which is preserved in the truncated constructs. Arrangement of α-helical bundles within the truncated protein segments suggested new domain boundaries which differ from the conserved motifs determined by sequence-based alignment of UDE homologues. Here we demonstrate that the combination of ESPRIT and VUVCD spectroscopy provides a new structural description of UDE and confirms that the truncated constructs are useful for further detailed functional studies.

  15. Predicting protein folding pathways at the mesoscopic level based on native interactions between secondary structure elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sze Sing-Hoi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since experimental determination of protein folding pathways remains difficult, computational techniques are often used to simulate protein folding. Most current techniques to predict protein folding pathways are computationally intensive and are suitable only for small proteins. Results By assuming that the native structure of a protein is known and representing each intermediate conformation as a collection of fully folded structures in which each of them contains a set of interacting secondary structure elements, we show that it is possible to significantly reduce the conformation space while still being able to predict the most energetically favorable folding pathway of large proteins with hundreds of residues at the mesoscopic level, including the pig muscle phosphoglycerate kinase with 416 residues. The model is detailed enough to distinguish between different folding pathways of structurally very similar proteins, including the streptococcal protein G and the peptostreptococcal protein L. The model is also able to recognize the differences between the folding pathways of protein G and its two structurally similar variants NuG1 and NuG2, which are even harder to distinguish. We show that this strategy can produce accurate predictions on many other proteins with experimentally determined intermediate folding states. Conclusion Our technique is efficient enough to predict folding pathways for both large and small proteins at the mesoscopic level. Such a strategy is often the only feasible choice for large proteins. A software program implementing this strategy (SSFold is available at http://faculty.cs.tamu.edu/shsze/ssfold.

  16. Secondary Structure Prediction of Protein Constructs Using Random Incremental Truncation and Vacuum-Ultraviolet CD Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukáncsik, Mária; Orbán, Ágnes; Nagy, Kinga; Matsuo, Koichi; Gekko, Kunihiko; Maurin, Damien; Hart, Darren; Kézsmárki, István; Vertessy, Beata G.

    2016-01-01

    A novel uracil-DNA degrading protein factor (termed UDE) was identified in Drosophila melanogaster with no significant structural and functional homology to other uracil-DNA binding or processing factors. Determination of the 3D structure of UDE is excepted to provide key information on the description of the molecular mechanism of action of UDE catalysis, as well as in general uracil-recognition and nuclease action. Towards this long-term aim, the random library ESPRIT technology was applied to the novel protein UDE to overcome problems in identifying soluble expressing constructs given the absence of precise information on domain content and arrangement. Nine constructs of UDE were chosen to decipher structural and functional relationships. Vacuum ultraviolet circular dichroism (VUVCD) spectroscopy was performed to define the secondary structure content and location within UDE and its truncated variants. The quantitative analysis demonstrated exclusive α-helical content for the full-length protein, which is preserved in the truncated constructs. Arrangement of α-helical bundles within the truncated protein segments suggested new domain boundaries which differ from the conserved motifs determined by sequence-based alignment of UDE homologues. Here we demonstrate that the combination of ESPRIT and VUVCD spectroscopy provides a new structural description of UDE and confirms that the truncated constructs are useful for further detailed functional studies. PMID:27273007

  17. Short Oligonucleotides Aligned in Stretched Humid Matrix: Secondary DNA Structure in Poly(vinyl alcohol) Environment

    KAUST Repository

    Hanczyc, Piotr

    2012-04-24

    We report that short, synthetic, double- as well as single-stranded DNA can be aligned in stretched humid poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) matrix, and the secondary structure (nucleobase orientation) can be characterized with linear dichroism (LD) spectroscopy. Oligonucleotides of lengths varying between 10 (3.4 nm) and 60 bases (20.4 nm) were investigated with respect to structural properties in the gel-like polymer environment. The DNA conformation as a function of relative humidity reveals a strong dependence of helical structure of DNA on PVA hydration level, results of relevance for nanotechnical studies of DNA-based supramolecular systems. Also, the PVA gel could provide possibilities to test models for nucleic acid interactions and distribution in cell contexts, including structural stability of genetic material in the cell and PVA-packaging for gene delivery. A method by which duplex oligonucleotides, with sequences designed to provide specific binding sites, become amenable to polarized-light spectroscopy opens up new possibilities for studying structure in DNA complexes with small adduct molecules as well as proteins. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  18. Scaffolding students’ assignments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slot, Marie Falkesgaard

    2013-01-01

    , on the shoulders of linguistics research, results of “assignment-didactics” as a useful but also very tentative term in the context of the assessment of design principles for the design of assignments. Based on empirical studies, I discuss cognition, multi-modality and collaboration as crucial types of scaffolding...

  19. 5-Azacytidine and RNA secondary structure increase the retrovirus mutation rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, V K; Temin, H M

    1992-01-01

    A broad spectrum of mutations occurs at a high rate during a single round of retrovirus replication (V.K. Pathak and H. M. Temin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 87:6019-6023, 1990). We have now determined that this high rate of spontaneous mutation can be further increased by 5-azacytidine (AZC) treatment or by regions of potential RNA secondary structure. We found a 13-fold increase in the mutation rate after AZC treatment of retrovirus-producing cells and target cells. The AZC-induced substitutions were located at the same target sites as previously identified spontaneous substitutions. The concordance of the AZC-induced and spontaneous substitutions indicates the presence of reverse transcription "pause sites," where the growing point is error prone. An analysis of nucleotides that neighbored substitutions revealed that transversions occur primarily by transient template misalignment, whereas transitions occur primarily by misincorporation. We also introduced a 34-bp potential stem-loop structure as an in-frame insertion within a lacZ alpha gene that was inserted in the long terminal repeat (LTR) U3 region and determined whether this potential secondary structure increased the rate of retrovirus mutations. We found a threefold increase in the retrovirus mutation rate. Fifty-seven of 96 mutations were deletions associated with the potential stem-loop. We also determined that these deletion mutations occurred primarily during minus-strand DNA synthesis by comparing the frequencies of mutations in recovered provirus plasmids containing both LTRs and in provirus plasmids containing only one LTR. PMID:1373201

  20. R2R - software to speed the depiction of aesthetic consensus RNA secondary structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weinberg Zasha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With continuing identification of novel structured noncoding RNAs, there is an increasing need to create schematic diagrams showing the consensus features of these molecules. RNA structural diagrams are typically made either with general-purpose drawing programs like Adobe Illustrator, or with automated or interactive programs specific to RNA. Unfortunately, the use of applications like Illustrator is extremely time consuming, while existing RNA-specific programs produce figures that are useful, but usually not of the same aesthetic quality as those produced at great cost in Illustrator. Additionally, most existing RNA-specific applications are designed for drawing single RNA molecules, not consensus diagrams. Results We created R2R, a computer program that facilitates the generation of aesthetic and readable drawings of RNA consensus diagrams in a fraction of the time required with general-purpose drawing programs. Since the inference of a consensus RNA structure typically requires a multiple-sequence alignment, the R2R user annotates the alignment with commands directing the layout and annotation of the RNA. R2R creates SVG or PDF output that can be imported into Adobe Illustrator, Inkscape or CorelDRAW. R2R can be used to create consensus sequence and secondary structure models for novel RNA structures or to revise models when new representatives for known RNA classes become available. Although R2R does not currently have a graphical user interface, it has proven useful in our efforts to create 100 schematic models of distinct noncoding RNA classes. Conclusions R2R makes it possible to obtain high-quality drawings of the consensus sequence and structural models of many diverse RNA structures with a more practical amount of effort. R2R software is available at http://breaker.research.yale.edu/R2R and as an Additional file.

  1. Combining sequence-based prediction methods and circular dichroism and infrared spectroscopic data to improve protein secondary structure determinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lees Jonathan G

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of sequence-based methods exist for protein secondary structure prediction. Protein secondary structures can also be determined experimentally from circular dichroism, and infrared spectroscopic data using empirical analysis methods. It has been proposed that comparable accuracy can be obtained from sequence-based predictions as from these biophysical measurements. Here we have examined the secondary structure determination accuracies of sequence prediction methods with the empirically determined values from the spectroscopic data on datasets of proteins for which both crystal structures and spectroscopic data are available. Results In this study we show that the sequence prediction methods have accuracies nearly comparable to those of spectroscopic methods. However, we also demonstrate that combining the spectroscopic and sequences techniques produces significant overall improvements in secondary structure determinations. In addition, combining the extra information content available from synchrotron radiation circular dichroism data with sequence methods also shows improvements. Conclusion Combining sequence prediction with experimentally determined spectroscopic methods for protein secondary structure content significantly enhances the accuracy of the overall results obtained.

  2. Impact of Microscale and Pilot-Scale Freeze-Drying on Protein Secondary Structures: Sucrose Formulations of Lysozyme and Catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Björn-Hendrik; Leskinen, Jari T T; Molnár, Ferdinand; Ketolainen, Jarkko

    2015-11-01

    Microscale (MS) freeze-drying offers rapid process cycles for early-stage formulation development. The effects of the MS approach on the secondary structures of two model proteins, lysozyme and catalase, were compared with pilot-scale (PS) vial freeze-drying. The secondary structures were assessed by attenuated total reflection Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. Formulations were made with increasing sucrose-protein ratios. Freeze-drying protocols involved regular cooling without thermal treatment and annealing with MS and PS equipment, and cooling rate variations with the MS. Principal component analysis of smoothed second-derivative amide I spectra revealed sucrose-protein ratio-dependent shifts toward α-helical structures. Transferability of sucrose-protein formulations from MS to PS vial freeze-drying was evidenced at regular cooling rates. Local differences in protein secondary structures between the bottom and top of sucrose-catalase samples could be detected at the sucrose-catalase ratios of 1 and 2, this being related to the initial filling height and ice crystal morphology. Annealing revealed temperature, protein, formulation, and sample location-dependent effects influencing surface morphology at the top, or causing protein secondary structure perturbation at the bottom. With the MS approach, protein secondary structure differences at different cooling rates could be detected for sucrose-lysozyme samples at the sucrose-lysozyme ratio of 1.

  3. Assignment of the stereochemistry and anomeric configuration of structurally informative product ions derived from disaccharides: infrared photodissociation of glycosyl-glycolaldehydes in the negative ion mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendiak, Brad; Fang, Tammy T

    2010-11-01

    Using mass spectrometry in the negative ion mode, m/z 221 ions are frequently observed as product ion substructures derived from reducing disaccharides having 2, 4, or 6 linkages. The ions have been shown to be glycosyl-glycolaldehydes. All 16 stereochemical variants of their pyranosides were prepared and evaluated by infrared photodissociation, in addition to HexNAc-glycolaldehyde variants (m/z 262) of 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-d-glucose and 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-d-galactose. The stereochemistry and anomeric configuration of these ions were differentiated in the gas phase using a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance spectrometer with infrared multiphoton dissociation at 10.6 μm. Results were compared to those obtained by collision-induced dissociation. In some cases, differentiation was far preferable using infrared photodissociation; in others, collision-induced dissociation was preferred. Using an instrument that interfaced a linear trap with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance spectrometer, either dissociation technique could be used to optimally discriminate between isomers. With infrared photodissociation, spectral differences were highly statistically significant, even between pairs of isomers having spectra that appeared to be visually somewhat similar (pions). Comparisons among different instruments suggest that physical standards of the stereochemical variants of these ions will be required for their detailed structural assignments in unknowns, as some variation was observed among instruments, both using infrared photodissociation and collision-induced dissociation.

  4. Secondary structure and 3D homology modeling of swine leukocyte antigen class 2 (SLA-2) molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng-Shan; Xu, Chong-bo; Long, Yi-hou; Xia, Chun

    2009-01-01

    No information to date is available to elucidate the structure of swine leukocyte antigen class I (SLA-I) molecule which is comprised by a heavy chain of SLA-I non-covalently associated with a light chain, beta(2)-microglobulin (beta(2)m) proteins. Presently, one of SLA-I gene SLA-2 and beta(2)m gene were expressed as soluble maltose binding proteins (MBP-proteins) in a pMAL-p2X/Escherichia coli TB1 system and identified by western blotting with anti-MBP polyclonal antibodies. The expressed proteins MBP-SLA-2 and MBP-beta(2)m were purified on amylose affinity columns followed by DEAE-Sepharose. The purified products were cleaved by Factor Xa, respectively, and the interest of proteins SLA-2 and beta(2)m were purified on amylose affinity columns followed by separation from MBP on DEAE-Sepharose. The secondary structures of SLA-2 and beta(2)m were analyzed by circular dichroism (CD) spectrophotometry. The three-dimensional (3D) structure of their peptide-binding domain (PBD) was modeled-based sequence homology. The content of the alpha-helix, beta-sheet, turn, and random coil in the SLA-2 protein were 76, 95, 36, and 67aa, respectively. In the 98aa of beta(2)m, the contents of the alpha-helix, beta-sheet, turn, and random coil were 0, 45, 8, and 45aa, respectively. The SLA-2 protein displayed a typical alpha-helix structure while beta(2)m protein displayed a typical beta-sheet structure. Homology modeling of the SLA-2 and beta(2)m proteins demonstrated similarities with the structure of human and mouse MHC (major histocompatibility complex) class I proteins.

  5. Factors that Affect Mathematics-Science (MS) Scores in the Secondary Education Institutional Exam: An Application of Structural Equation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Mustafa

    2009-01-01

    Discovering what determines students' success in the Secondary Education Institutional Exam is very important to parents and it is also critical for students, teachers, directors, and researchers. Research was carried out by studying the related literature and structural equation modeling techniques. A structural model was created that consisted…

  6. A Morphologically Structured Model for Mycelial Growth and Secondary Metabolite Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘刚; 徐志南; 岑沛霖

    2000-01-01

    A morphologically structured model is proposed to describe the batch fermentation of lovastatin according to the growth kinetics of filamentous microorganisms. Three kinds of hyphae are considered in the model:actively growing hyphae, non-growing hyphae and deactivated hyphae. Furthermore, actively growing hyphae consist of three morphological compartments: apical compartment which gives rise to hyphal tip extension; subapical compartment which is related to hyphal branching; and hyphal compartment which is only responsible for secondary metabolite formation. The kinetics of mycelial growth mechanism is summarized and applied in modeling lovastatin fermentation. A Michaelis-Menten kinetic model with substrate inhibition is proposed for product formation. As expected, the model simulations fit well with experimental data obtained either from a laboratory scale 10 L fermenter or from a vilot-vlant scale fermenter.

  7. Prot-2S: a new python web tool for protein secondary structure studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, Cristian R; Magalhães, Alexandre L

    2009-01-01

    Prot-2S is a bioinformatics web application devised to analyse the protein chain secondary structures (2S) (http:/ /www.requimte.pt:8080/Prot-2S/). The tool is built on the RCSB Protein Data Bank PDB and DSSP application/files and includes calculation/graphical display of amino acid propensities in 2S motifs based on any user amino acid classification/code (for any particular protein chain list). The interface can calculate the 2S composition, display the 2S subsequences and search for DSSP non-standard residues and for pairs/triplets/quadruplets (amino acid patterns in 2S motifs). This work presents some Prot-2S applications showing its usefulness in protein research and as an e-learning tool as well. PMID:19640828

  8. Effect of Secondary Cooling Conditions on Solidification Structure and Central Macrosegregation in Continuously Cast High-Carbon Rectangular Billet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jie; Chen, Weiqing

    2015-10-01

    Solidification structures of high carbon rectangular billet with a size of 180 mm × 240 mm in different secondary cooling conditions were simulated using cellular automaton-finite element (CAFE) coupling model. The adequacy of the model was compared with the simulated and the actual macrostructures of 82B steel. Effects of the secondary cooling water intensity on solidification structures including the equiaxed grain ratio and the equiaxed grain compactness were discussed. It was shown that the equiaxed grain ratio and the equiaxed grain compactness changed in the opposite direction at different secondary cooling water intensities. Increasing the secondary cooling water intensity from 0.9 or 1.1 to 1.3 L/kg could improve the equiaxed grain compactness and decrease the equiaxed grain ratio. Besides, the industrial test was conducted to investigate the effect of different secondary cooling water intensities on the center carbon macrosegregation of 82B steel. The optimum secondary cooling water intensity was 0.9 L/kg, while the center carbon segregation degree was 1.10. The relationship between solidification structure and center carbon segregation was discussed based on the simulation results and the industrial test.

  9. The secondary structure of echistatin from 1H-NMR, circular-dichroism and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saudek, V; Atkinson, R A; Lepage, P; Pelton, J T

    1991-12-01

    Detailed biophysical studies have been carried out on echistatin, a member of the disintegrin family of small, cysteine-rich, RGD-containing proteins, isolated from the venom of the saw-scaled viper Echis carinatus. Analysis of circular-dichroism spectra indicates that, at 20 degrees C, echistatin contains no alpha-helix but contains mostly beta-turns and beta-sheet. Two isobestic points are observed as the temperature is raised, the conformational changes associated with that observed between 40 degrees C and 72 degrees C being irreversible. Raman spectra also indicate considerable beta-turn and beta-sheet (20%) structure and an absence of alpha-helical structure. Three of the four disulphide bridges are shown to be in an all-gauche conformation, while the fourth adopts a trans-gauche-gauche conformation. The 1H-NMR spectrum of echistatin has been almost fully assigned. A single conformation was observed at 27 degrees C with the four proline residues adopting only the trans conformation. A large number of backbone amide protons were found to exchange slowly, but no segments of the backbone were found to be in either alpha-helical or beta-sheet conformation. A number of turns could be characterised. An irregular beta-hairpin contains the RGD sequence in a mobile loop at its tip. Two of the four disulphide cross-links have been identified from the NMR spectra. The data presented in this paper will serve to define the structure of echistatin more closely in subsequent studies. PMID:1761037

  10. The RNAsnp web server: predicting SNP effects on local RNA secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabarinathan, Radhakrishnan; Tafer, Hakim; Seemann, Stefan E; Hofacker, Ivo L; Stadler, Peter F; Gorodkin, Jan

    2013-07-01

    The function of many non-coding RNA genes and cis-regulatory elements of messenger RNA largely depends on the structure, which is in turn determined by their sequence. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and other mutations may disrupt the RNA structure, interfere with the molecular function and hence cause a phenotypic effect. RNAsnp is an efficient method to predict the effect of SNPs on local RNA secondary structure based on the RNA folding algorithms implemented in the Vienna RNA package. The SNP effects are quantified in terms of empirical P-values, which, for computational efficiency, are derived from extensive pre-computed tables of distributions of substitution effects as a function of gene length and GC content. Here, we present a web service that not only provides an interface for RNAsnp but also features a graphical output representation. In addition, the web server is connected to a local mirror of the UCSC genome browser database that enables the users to select the genomic sequences for analysis and visualize the results directly in the UCSC genome browser. The RNAsnp web server is freely available at: http://rth.dk/resources/rnasnp/.

  11. Interaction Of Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticles With Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Modifies Secondary And Tertiary Protein Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Hakeim Hussein K

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate nanoparticles (CaPNP have good biocompatibility and bioactivity inside human body. In this study, the interaction between CaPNP and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG was analyzed to determine the changes in the protein structure in the presence of CaPNP and the quantity of protein adsorbed on the CaPNP surface. The results showed a significant adsorption of hCG on the CaPNP nanoparticle surface. The optimal fit was achieved using the Sips isotherm equation with a maximum adsorption capacity of 68.23 µg/mg. The thermodynamic parameters, including ∆H° and ∆G°, of the adsorption process are positive, whereas ∆S° is negative. The circular dichroism results of the adsorption of hCG on CaPNP showed the changes in its secondary structure; such changes include the decomposition of α-helix strand and the increase in β-pleated sheet and random coil percentages. Fluorescence study indicated minimal changes in the tertiary structure near the microenvironment of the aromatic amino acids such as tyrosine and phenyl alanine caused by the interaction forces between the CaPNP and hCG protein. The desorption process showed that the quantity of the hCG desorbed significantly increases as temperature increases, which indicates the weak forces between hCG and the surface.

  12. Resolving detailed molecular structures in complex organic mixtures and modeling their secondary organic aerosol formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman-Rendall, Kevin A. S.; Zhuang, Yang R.; Amirav, Aviv; Chan, Arthur W. H.

    2016-03-01

    Characterization of unresolved complex mixtures (UCMs) remains an ongoing challenge towards developing detailed and accurate inputs for modeling secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Traditional techniques based on gas chromatography/electron impact-mass spectrometry induce excessive fragmentation, making it difficult to speciate and quantify isomers precisely. The goal of this study is to identify individual organic isomers by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with supersonic molecular beam (SMB-GC/MS, also known as GC/MS with Cold EI) and to incorporate speciated isomers into an SOA model that accounts for the specific structures elucidated. Two samples containing atmospherically relevant UCMs are analyzed. The relative isomer distributions exhibit remarkably consistent trends across a wide range of carbon numbers. Constitutional isomers of different alkanes are speciated and individually quantified as linear, branched - for the first time by position of branching - multiply branched, or unsaturated - by degree of ring substitution and number of rings. Relative amounts of exact molecular structures are used as input parameters in an SOA box model to study the effects of molecular structures on SOA yields and volatility evolution. Highly substituted cyclic, mono-substituted cyclic, and linear species have the highest SOA yields while branched alkanes formed the least SOA. The rate of functionalization of a representative UCM is found to be in agreement with current volatility basis set (VBS) parameterizations based on detailed knowledge of composition and known oxidation mechanisms, confirming the validity of VBS parameters currently used in air quality models.

  13. Historical WBAN ID Assignments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — 4"x6" index cards represent the first written assignments of Weather Bureau Army Navy (WBAN) station identifier numbers by the National Climatic Data Center....

  14. The secondary and aggregation structural changes of BSA induced by trivalent chromium: A biophysical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Mingmao [Institute of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Technology, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002, Fujian (China); Liu, Yan, E-mail: liuyan@fjirsm.ac.cn [The State Key Lab of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002, Fujian (China); Cao, Huan [Institute of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Technology, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002, Fujian (China); Song, Ling [The State Key Lab of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002, Fujian (China); Zhang, Qiqing, E-mail: zhangqiq@126.com [Institute of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Technology, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002, Fujian (China)

    2015-02-15

    Trivalent chromium Cr(III), which was originally considered to be innocuous as a nutriment, has been suspected to induce some abnormalities in human body recently. In the present work, the effects of Cr(III) on the structural state of BSA were comprehensively investigated through a series of appropriate methods in combination, including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), circular dichroism (CD), UV–vis absorption, synchronous fluorescence, fluorescence lifetime analysis, resonance light scattering (RLS), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and excitation–emission matrix spectroscopy (EEMS) methods. XPS accurately described the binding activity of Cr(III) with protein C, N and O atoms. The structural analysis according to FTIR and CD methods showed that the Cr(III) binding altered BSA conformation with a major reduction of α-helix. RLS and DLS analyses demonstrated that the presence of Cr(III) with low concentration could induce the aggregation structural changes of BSA. UV–vis absorption, EEMS and synchronous fluorescence suggested that the interaction between Cr(III) and BSA induced a slight unfolding of the polypeptide backbone and altered the microenvironments of Trp and Tyr residues in BSA. This research is helpful for understanding the structure-function relationship involved in metal ion-protein bioconjugate process. - Highlights: • The effect of Cr(III) on the conformational state of BSA was comprehensively studied. • XPS described the binding activity of Cr(III) with protein C, N and O atoms. • FTIR and CD data revealed secondary structural alteration in BSA. • Cr(III) complexation induced microenvironmental changes of Trp and Tyr. • RLS, DLS and EEMS presented the aggregational states of Cr(III)–BSA complex.

  15. The secondary and aggregation structural changes of BSA induced by trivalent chromium: A biophysical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivalent chromium Cr(III), which was originally considered to be innocuous as a nutriment, has been suspected to induce some abnormalities in human body recently. In the present work, the effects of Cr(III) on the structural state of BSA were comprehensively investigated through a series of appropriate methods in combination, including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), circular dichroism (CD), UV–vis absorption, synchronous fluorescence, fluorescence lifetime analysis, resonance light scattering (RLS), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and excitation–emission matrix spectroscopy (EEMS) methods. XPS accurately described the binding activity of Cr(III) with protein C, N and O atoms. The structural analysis according to FTIR and CD methods showed that the Cr(III) binding altered BSA conformation with a major reduction of α-helix. RLS and DLS analyses demonstrated that the presence of Cr(III) with low concentration could induce the aggregation structural changes of BSA. UV–vis absorption, EEMS and synchronous fluorescence suggested that the interaction between Cr(III) and BSA induced a slight unfolding of the polypeptide backbone and altered the microenvironments of Trp and Tyr residues in BSA. This research is helpful for understanding the structure-function relationship involved in metal ion-protein bioconjugate process. - Highlights: • The effect of Cr(III) on the conformational state of BSA was comprehensively studied. • XPS described the binding activity of Cr(III) with protein C, N and O atoms. • FTIR and CD data revealed secondary structural alteration in BSA. • Cr(III) complexation induced microenvironmental changes of Trp and Tyr. • RLS, DLS and EEMS presented the aggregational states of Cr(III)–BSA complex

  16. 42 CFR 433.146 - Rights assigned; assignment method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rights assigned; assignment method. 433.146 Section 433.146 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Assignment of Rights to Benefits § 433.146 Rights assigned; assignment method. (a) Except as specified...

  17. Improving prediction of secondary structure, local backbone angles, and solvent accessible surface area of proteins by iterative deep learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Rhys; Paliwal, Kuldip; Lyons, James; Dehzangi, Abdollah; Sharma, Alok; Wang, Jihua; Sattar, Abdul; Yang, Yuedong; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2015-01-01

    Direct prediction of protein structure from sequence is a challenging problem. An effective approach is to break it up into independent sub-problems. These sub-problems such as prediction of protein secondary structure can then be solved independently. In a previous study, we found that an iterative use of predicted secondary structure and backbone torsion angles can further improve secondary structure and torsion angle prediction. In this study, we expand the iterative features to include solvent accessible surface area and backbone angles and dihedrals based on Cα atoms. By using a deep learning neural network in three iterations, we achieved 82% accuracy for secondary structure prediction, 0.76 for the correlation coefficient between predicted and actual solvent accessible surface area, 19° and 30° for mean absolute errors of backbone φ and ψ angles, respectively, and 8° and 32° for mean absolute errors of Cα-based θ and τ angles, respectively, for an independent test dataset of 1199 proteins. The accuracy of the method is slightly lower for 72 CASP 11 targets but much higher than those of model structures from current state-of-the-art techniques. This suggests the potentially beneficial use of these predicted properties for model assessment and ranking.

  18. Deciphering the structure of isomeric oligosaccharides in a complex mixture by tandem mass spectrometry: Photon activation with vacuum ultra-violet brings unique information and enables definitive structure assignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropartz, David, E-mail: David.Ropartz@nantes.inra.fr [INRA, UR1268 Biopolymers Interactions Assemblies, F-44316 Nantes (France); Lemoine, Jérôme [Institut des Sciences Analytiques, UMR 5280, Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Giuliani, Alexandre [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, F-91190 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); UAR 1008 CEPIA, INRA, F-44316 Nantes (France); Bittebière, Yann [INRA, UR1268 Biopolymers Interactions Assemblies, F-44316 Nantes (France); Enjalbert, Quentin [Institut des Sciences Analytiques, UMR 5280, Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Institut Lumière Matière, UMR5306, Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR5306, Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Ralet, Marie-Christine; Rogniaux, Hélène [INRA, UR1268 Biopolymers Interactions Assemblies, F-44316 Nantes (France)

    2014-01-07

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •A complex mixture of methylated oligogalacturonans was fractionated by IP-RP-UHPLC. •Synchrotron-radiation in VUV range was used as an activation process for tandem MS. •VUV activation brought rich structural information compared to LE-CAD. •Resolution of more than 35 structures, including isomers, was successfully completed. -- Abstract: Carbohydrates have a wide variety of structures whose complexity and heterogeneity challenge the field of analytical chemistry. Tandem mass spectrometry, with its remarkable sensitivity and high information content, provides key advantages to addressing the structural elucidation of polysaccharides. Yet, classical fragmentation by collision-activated dissociation (CAD) in many cases fails to reach a comprehensive structural determination, especially when isomers have to be differentiated. In this work, for the first time, vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) synchrotron radiation is used as the activation process in tandem mass spectrometry of large oligosaccharides. Compared to low energy CAD (LE-CAD), photon activated dissociation brought more straightforward and valuable structural information. The outstanding feature was that complete series of informative ions were produced, with only minor neutral losses. Moreover, systematic fragmentation rules could be drawn thus facilitating the definitive assignments of fragment identities. As a result, most of the structures present in a complex mixture of oligogalacturonans could be comprehensively resolved, including many isomers differing in the position of methyl groups along the galacturonic acid backbone.

  19. Protein-associated water and secondary structure effect removal of blood proteins from metallic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Gaurav; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J; Belfort, Georges

    2011-03-01

    Removing adsorbed protein from metals has significant health and industrial consequences. There are numerous protein-adsorption studies using model self-assembled monolayers or polymeric substrates but hardly any high-resolution measurements of adsorption and removal of proteins on industrially relevant transition metals. Surgeons and ship owners desire clean metal surfaces to reduce transmission of disease via surgical instruments and minimize surface fouling (to reduce friction and corrosion), respectively. A major finding of this work is that, besides hydrophobic interaction adhesion energy, water content in an adsorbed protein layer and secondary structure of proteins determined the access and hence ability to remove adsorbed proteins from metal surfaces with a strong alkaline-surfactant solution (NaOH and 5 mg/mL SDS in PBS at pH 11). This is demonstrated with three blood proteins (bovine serum albumin, immunoglobulin, and fibrinogen) and four transition metal substrates and stainless steel (platinum (Pt), gold (Au), tungsten (W), titanium (Ti), and 316 grade stainless steel (SS)). All the metallic substrates were checked for chemical contaminations like carbon and sulfur and were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). While Pt and Au surfaces were oxide-free (fairly inert elements), W, Ti, and SS substrates were associated with native oxide. Difference measurements between a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR) provided a measure of the water content in the protein-adsorbed layers. Hydrophobic adhesion forces, obtained with atomic force microscopy, between the proteins and the metals correlated with the amount of the adsorbed protein-water complex. Thus, the amount of protein adsorbed decreased with Pt, Au, W, Ti and SS, in this order. Neither sessile contact angle nor surface roughness of the metal substrates was useful as predictors here. All three globular proteins

  20. Protein-associated water and secondary structure effect removal of blood proteins from metallic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Gaurav; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J; Belfort, Georges

    2011-03-01

    Removing adsorbed protein from metals has significant health and industrial consequences. There are numerous protein-adsorption studies using model self-assembled monolayers or polymeric substrates but hardly any high-resolution measurements of adsorption and removal of proteins on industrially relevant transition metals. Surgeons and ship owners desire clean metal surfaces to reduce transmission of disease via surgical instruments and minimize surface fouling (to reduce friction and corrosion), respectively. A major finding of this work is that, besides hydrophobic interaction adhesion energy, water content in an adsorbed protein layer and secondary structure of proteins determined the access and hence ability to remove adsorbed proteins from metal surfaces with a strong alkaline-surfactant solution (NaOH and 5 mg/mL SDS in PBS at pH 11). This is demonstrated with three blood proteins (bovine serum albumin, immunoglobulin, and fibrinogen) and four transition metal substrates and stainless steel (platinum (Pt), gold (Au), tungsten (W), titanium (Ti), and 316 grade stainless steel (SS)). All the metallic substrates were checked for chemical contaminations like carbon and sulfur and were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). While Pt and Au surfaces were oxide-free (fairly inert elements), W, Ti, and SS substrates were associated with native oxide. Difference measurements between a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR) provided a measure of the water content in the protein-adsorbed layers. Hydrophobic adhesion forces, obtained with atomic force microscopy, between the proteins and the metals correlated with the amount of the adsorbed protein-water complex. Thus, the amount of protein adsorbed decreased with Pt, Au, W, Ti and SS, in this order. Neither sessile contact angle nor surface roughness of the metal substrates was useful as predictors here. All three globular proteins

  1. Upper mantle velocity structure beneath Italy from direct and secondary P-wave teleseismic tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. De Gori

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available High-quality teleseismic data digitally recorded by the National Seismic Network during 1988-1995 have been analysed to tomographically reconstruct the aspherical velocity structure of the upper mantle beneath the Italian region. To improve the quality and the reliability of the tomographic images, both direct (P, PKPdf and secondary (pP,sP,PcP,PP,PKPbc,PKPab travel-time data were used in the inversion. Over 7000 relative residuals were computed with respect to the IASP91 Earth velocity model and inverted using a modified version of the ACH technique. Incorporation of data of secondary phases resulted in a significant improvement of the sampling of the target volume and of the spatial resolution of the heterogeneous zones. The tomographic images show that most of the lateral variations in the velocity field are confined in the first ~250 km of depth. Strong low velocity anomalies are found beneath the Po plain, Tuscany and Eastern Sicily in the depth range between 35 and 85 km. High velocity anomalies dominate the upper mantle beneath the Central-Western Alps, Northern-Central Apennines and Southern Tyrrhenian sea at lithospheric depths between 85 and 150 km. At greater depth, positive anomalies are still observed below the northernmost part of the Apenninic chain and Southern Tyrrhenian sea. Deeper anomalies present in the 3D velocity model computed by inverting only the first arrivals dataset, generally appear less pronounced in the new tomographic reconstructions. We interpret this as the result of the ray sampling improvement on the reduction of the vertical smearing effects.

  2. Pentacyclic triterpenoids of Mentha villosa: structural identification and {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C resonance assignments; Triterpenoides pentaciclicos de Mentha villosa: identificacao estrutural e atribuicao dos deslocamentos quimicos dos atomos de hidrogenio e carbono

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monte, Francisco J. Queiroz; Oliveira, Eliete F. de [Ceara Univ., Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Organica e Inorganica; Braz Filho, Raimundo [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense, Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil). Setor de Quimica de Produtos Naturais

    2001-08-01

    The structures of seven oleanene and ursene triterpenoids (1-7) isolated from aerial parts of Mentha villosa were identified. In addition, the complete {sup 1} H and {sup 13} C resonance assignments of these triterpenoids were accomplished using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic experiments. (author)

  3. Prediction of protein secondary structure based on residue pair types and conformational states using dynamic programming algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Mehdi; Parto, Sahar; Arab, Shahriar; Ranjbar, Bijan

    2005-06-20

    We have used a statistical approach for protein secondary structure prediction based on information theory and simultaneously taking into consideration pairwise residue types and conformational states. Since the prediction of residue secondary structure by one residue window sliding make ambiguity in state prediction, we used a dynamic programming algorithm to find the path with maximum score. A score system for residue pairs in particular conformations is derived for adjacent neighbors up to ten residue apart in sequence. The three state overall per-residue accuracy, Q3, of this method in a jackknife test with dataset created from PDBSELECT is more than 70%. PMID:15936021

  4. A Deep Learning Network Approach to ab initio Protein Secondary Structure Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Matt; Eickholt, Jesse; Jianlin Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Ab initio protein secondary structure (SS) predictions are utilized to generate tertiary structure predictions, which are increasingly demanded due to the rapid discovery of proteins. Although recent developments have slightly exceeded previous methods of SS prediction, accuracy has stagnated around 80 percent and many wonder if prediction cannot be advanced beyond this ceiling. Disciplines that have traditionally employed neural networks are experimenting with novel deep learning techniques in attempts to stimulate progress. Since neural networks have historically played an important role in SS prediction, we wanted to determine whether deep learning could contribute to the advancement of this field as well. We developed an SS predictor that makes use of the position-specific scoring matrix generated by PSI-BLAST and deep learning network architectures, which we call DNSS. Graphical processing units and CUDA software optimize the deep network architecture and efficiently train the deep networks. Optimal parameters for the training process were determined, and a workflow comprising three separately trained deep networks was constructed in order to make refined predictions. This deep learning network approach was used to predict SS for a fully independent test dataset of 198 proteins, achieving a Q3 accuracy of 80.7 percent and a Sov accuracy of 74.2 percent.

  5. Bimane fluorescence scanning suggests secondary structure near the S3-S4 linker of BK channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenova, Nina P; Abarca-Heidemann, Karin; Loranc, Eva; Rothberg, Brad S

    2009-04-17

    Gating of large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BK or maxi-K channels) is controlled by a Ca(2+)-sensor, formed by the channel cytoplasmic C-terminal domain, and a voltage sensor, formed by its S0-S4 transmembrane helices. Here we analyze structural properties of a portion of the BK channel voltage sensing domain, the S3-S4 linker, using fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy. Single residues in the S3-S4 linker region were substituted with cysteine, and the cysteine-substituted mutants were expressed in CHO cells and covalently labeled with the sulfhydryl-reactive fluorophore monobromo-trimethylammonio-bimane (qBBr). qBBr fluorescence is quenched by tryptophan and, to a lesser extent, tyrosine side chains. We found that qBBr fluorescence in several of the labeled cysteine-substituted channels shows position-specific quenching, as indicated by increase of the brief lifetime component of the qBBr fluorescence decay. Quenching was reduced with the mutation W203F (in the S4 segment), suggesting that Trp-203 acts as a quenching group. Our results suggest a working hypothesis for the secondary structure of the BK channel S3-S4 region, and places residues Leu-204, Gly-205, and Leu-206 within the extracellular end of the S4 helix.

  6. Enzyme stability, thermodynamics and secondary structures of α-amylase as probed by the CD spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikani, B A; Singh, S P

    2015-11-01

    An amylase of a thermophilic bacterium, Bacillus sp. TSSC-3 (GenBank Number, EU710557) isolated from the Tulsi Shyam hot spring reservoir (Gujarat, India) was purified to the homogeneity in a single step on phenyl sepharose 6FF. The molecular weight of the enzyme was 25kD, while the temperature and pH optima for the enzyme catalysis were 80°C and 7, respectively. The purified enzyme was highly thermostable with broad pH stability and displayed remarkable resistance against surfactants, chelators, urea, guanidine HCl and various solvents as well. The stability and changes in the secondary structure of the enzyme under various extreme conditions were determined by the circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The stability trends and the changes in the α-helices and β-sheets were analyzed by Mean Residual Ellipticity (MRE) and K2D3. The CD data confirmed the structural stability of the enzyme under various harsh conditions, yet it indicated reduced α-helix content and increased β-sheets upon denaturation. The thermodynamic parameters; deactivation rate constant, half-life, changes in entropy, enthalpy, activation energy and Gibb's free energy indicated that the enzyme-substrate reactions were highly stable. The overall profile of the enzyme: high thermostability, alkalitolerance, calcium independent nature, dextrose equivalent values and resistance against chemical denaturants, solvents and surfactants suggest its commercial applications.

  7. The Secondary Structure of Heated Whey Protein and Its Hydrolysates Antigenicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANGZhi-hua; ZHU Jun; WU Wei-jing; WANG Fang; RENFa-zheng; ZHANG Lu-daa; GUOHui-yuan

    2011-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FFIR) and circular dichroism (CD) were used to investigate the conformational changes of heated whey protein (WP) and the corresponding changes in the hydrolysates immunoreactivity were determined by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).Results showed that the contents of α- helix and β-sheet of WP did not decrease much under mild heating conditions and the antigenicity was relatively high; when the heating intensity increased (70 ℃ for 25 min or 75 ℃ for 20 min),the content of α- helix and β-sheet decreased to the minimum,so was the antigenicity; However,when the WP was heated at even higher temperature and for a longer time,the β-sheet associated with protein aggregation begun to increase and the antigenicity increased correspondingly.It was concluded that the conformations of heated WP and the antigenicity of its hydrolysates are related and the optimum structure for decreasing the hydrolysates antigeniity is the least content of α-helix and β-sheet.Establishing the elationship between the WP secondary structure and WP hydrolysates antigenicity is significant to supply the reference for antigenicity reduction by enzymolysis.

  8. Content-Related Knowledge of Biology Teachers from Secondary Schools: Structure and learning opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Großschedl, Jörg; Mahler, Daniela; Kleickmann, Thilo; Harms, Ute

    2014-09-01

    Teachers' content-related knowledge is a key factor influencing the learning progress of students. Different models of content-related knowledge have been proposed by educational researchers; most of them take into account three categories: content knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge, and curricular knowledge. As there is no consensus about the empirical separability (i.e. empirical structure) of content-related knowledge yet, a total of 134 biology teachers from secondary schools completed three tests which were to capture each of the three categories of content-related knowledge. The empirical structure of content-related knowledge was analyzed by Rasch analysis, which suggests content-related knowledge to be composed of (1) content knowledge, (2) pedagogical content knowledge, and (3) curricular knowledge. Pedagogical content knowledge and curricular knowledge are highly related (rlatent = .70). The latent correlations between content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge (rlatent = .48)-and curricular knowledge, respectively (rlatent = .35)-are moderate to low (all ps pedagogical content knowledge, and curricular knowledge acquisition. Our results show that an in-depth training in teacher education, professional development, and teacher self-study are positively related to particular categories of content-related knowledge. Furthermore, our results indicate that teaching experience is negatively related to curricular knowledge, compared to no significant relationship with content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge.

  9. A Deep Learning Network Approach to ab initio Protein Secondary Structure Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Matt; Eickholt, Jesse; Cheng, Jianlin

    2014-01-01

    Ab initio protein secondary structure (SS) predictions are utilized to generate tertiary structure predictions, which are increasingly demanded due to the rapid discovery of proteins. Although recent developments have slightly exceeded previous methods of SS prediction, accuracy has stagnated around 80% and many wonder if prediction cannot be advanced beyond this ceiling. Disciplines that have traditionally employed neural networks are experimenting with novel deep learning techniques in attempts to stimulate progress. Since neural networks have historically played an important role in SS prediction, we wanted to determine whether deep learning could contribute to the advancement of this field as well. We developed an SS predictor that makes use of the position-specific scoring matrix generated by PSI-BLAST and deep learning network architectures, which we call DNSS. Graphical processing units and CUDA software optimize the deep network architecture and efficiently train the deep networks. Optimal parameters for the training process were determined, and a workflow comprising three separately trained deep networks was constructed in order to make refined predictions. This deep learning network approach was used to predict SS for a fully independent test data set of 198 proteins, achieving a Q3 accuracy of 80.7% and a Sov accuracy of 74.2%. PMID:25750595

  10. Synthesis and characterization of nitroaromatic peptoids: fine tuning peptoid secondary structure through monomer position and functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Sarah A; Luechapanichkul, Rinrada; Blackwell, Helen E

    2009-02-20

    N-substituted glycine oligomers, or peptoids, have emerged as an important class of foldamers for the study of biomolecular interactions and for potential use as therapeutic agents. However, the design of peptoids with well-defined conformations a priori remains a formidable challenge. New approaches are required to address this problem, and the systematic study of the role of individual monomer units in the global peptoid folding process represents one strategy. Here, we report our efforts toward this approach through the design, synthesis, and characterization of peptoids containing nitroaromatic monomer units. This work required the synthesis of a new chiral amine building block, (S)-1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethanamine (s2ne), which could be readily installed into peptoids using standard solid-phase peptoid synthesis techniques. We designed a series of peptoid nonamers that allowed us to probe the effects of this relatively electron-deficient and sterically encumbered alpha-chiral side chain on peptoid structure, namely, the peptoid threaded loop and helix. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of the peptoids revealed that the nitroaromatic monomer has a significant effect on peptoid secondary structure. Specifically, the threaded loop structure was disrupted in a nonamer containing alternating N-(S)-1-phenylethylglycine (Nspe) and Ns2ne monomers, and the major conformation was helical instead. Indeed, placement of a single Ns2ne at the N-terminal position of (Nspe)(9) resulted in a destabilized form of the threaded loop structure relative to the homononamer (Nspe)(9). Conversely, we observed that incorporation of N-(S)-1-(4-nitrophenyl)ethylglycine (Nsnp, a p-nitro monomer) at the N-terminal position stabilized the threaded loop structure relative to (Nspe)(9). Additional experiments revealed that nitroaromatic side chains can influence peptoid nonamer folding by modulating the strength of key intramolecular hydrogen bonds in the peptoid threaded loop structure. Steric

  11. Residual structure of Streptococcus mutans biofilm following complete disinfection favors secondary bacterial adhesion and biofilm re-development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Ohsumi

    Full Text Available Chemical disinfection of oral biofilms often leaves biofilm structures intact. This study aimed to examine whether the residual structure promotes secondary bacterial adhesion. Streptococcus mutans biofilms generated on resin-composite disks in a rotating disc reactor were disinfected completely with 70% isopropyl alcohol, and were again cultured in the same reactor after resupplying with the same bacterial solution. Specimens were subjected to fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy, viable cell counts and PCR-Invader assay in order to observe and quantify secondarily adhered cells. Fluorescence microscopic analysis, particularly after longitudinal cryosectioning, demonstrated stratified patterns of viable cells on the disinfected biofilm structure. Viable cell counts of test specimens were significantly higher than those of controls, and increased according to the amount of residual structure and culture period. Linear regression analysis exhibited a high correlation between viable and total cell counts. It was concluded that disinfected biofilm structures favored secondary bacterial adhesion.

  12. Random Cell Identifiers Assignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Bestak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite integration of advanced functions that enable Femto Access Points (FAPs to be deployed in a plug-and-play manner, the femtocell concept still cause several opened issues to be resolved. One of them represents an assignment of Physical Cell Identifiers (PCIs to FAPs. This paper analyses a random based assignment algorithm in LTE systems operating in diverse femtocell scenarios. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated by comparing the number of confusions for various femtocell densities, PCI ranges and knowledge of vicinity. Simulation results show that better knowledge of vicinity can significantly reduce the number of confusions events.

  13. Secondary structure and phylogenetic utility of the ribosomal large subunit (28S) in monogeneans of the genus Thaparocleidus and Bifurcohaptor (Monogenea: Dactylogyridae)

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhary, Anshu; SINGH, HRIDAYA SHANKER

    2012-01-01

    Present communication deals with secondary structure of 28S rDNA of two already known species of monogeneans viz., Bifurcohaptor indicus and Thaparocleidus parvulus parasitizing gill filaments of a freshwater fish, Mystus vittatus for phylogenetic inference. Secondary structure data are best used as accessory taxonomic characters as their phylogenetic resolving power and confidence in validity. Secondary structure of the 28S rDNA transcript could provide information for identifying homologous...

  14. Maximizing Expected Base Pair Accuracy in RNA Secondary Structure Prediction by Joining Stochastic Context-Free Grammars Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahira M. Habashy

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The identification of RNA secondary structures has been among the most exciting recent developments in biology and medical science. Prediction of RNA secondary structure is a fundamental problem in computational structural biology. For several decades, free energy minimization has been the most popular method for prediction from a single sequence. It is based on a set of empirical free energy change parameters derived from experiments using a nearest-neighbor model. Accurate prediction of RNA secondary structure from the base sequence is an unsolved computational challenge. The accuracy of predictions made by free energy minimization is limited by the quality of the energy parameters in the underlying free energy model. More recently, stochastic context-free grammars (SCFGs have emerged as an alternative probabilistic methodology for modeling RNA structure. Unlike physics-based methods, which rely on thousands of experimentally -measured thermodynamic parameters, SCFGs use fully-automated statistical learning algorithms to derive model parameters. This paper proposes a new algorithm that computes base pairing pattern for RNA molecule. Complex internal structures in RNA are fully taken into account. It supports the calculation of stochastic context-free grammars (SCFGs, and equilibrium concentrations of duplex structures. This new algorithm is compared with dynamic programming benchmark mfold and algorithms (Tfold, and MaxExpect. The results showed that the proposed algorithm achieved better performance with respect to sensitivity and positive predictive value.

  15. Observed lesson structure during the first year of secondary education : Exploration of change and link with academic engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maulana, Ridwan; Opdenakker, Marie-Christine; Stroet, Kim; Bosker, Roel

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates whether lesson structure (LS) matters and which components are important for academic engagement during the first grade of secondary education. Data from videoed lessons of 10 Dutch and 12 Indonesian teachers analyzed using an observation protocol show that six LS components

  16. Effect of Programmed Instruction on Students' Attitude towards Structure of the Atom and the Periodic Table among Kenyan Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangila, M. J.; Martin, W.; Ronald, M.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effect of Programmed Instruction on students' attitude towards Structure of the Atom and the Periodic Table (SAPT) among mixed (co-educational) secondary schools of Butere district, Kakamega county, Kenya. The quasi-experimental research design was adopted, using the nonrandomized Solomon four-group as a model. The sample…

  17. DNA secondary structure of the released strand stimulates WRN helicase action on forked duplexes without coordinate action of WRN exonuclease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Byungchan, E-mail: bbccahn@mail.ulsan.ac.kr [Department of Life Sciences, University of Ulsan, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Bohr, Vilhelm A. [Laboratory of Molecular Gerontology, Biomedical Research Center, National Institute on Aging, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} In this study, we investigated the effect of a DNA secondary structure on the two WRN activities. {yields} We found that a DNA secondary structure of the displaced strand during unwinding stimulates WRN helicase without coordinate action of WRN exonuclease. {yields} These results imply that WRN helicase and exonuclease activities can act independently. -- Abstract: Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive premature aging disorder characterized by aging-related phenotypes and genomic instability. WS is caused by mutations in a gene encoding a nuclear protein, Werner syndrome protein (WRN), a member of the RecQ helicase family, that interestingly possesses both helicase and exonuclease activities. Previous studies have shown that the two activities act in concert on a single substrate. We investigated the effect of a DNA secondary structure on the two WRN activities and found that a DNA secondary structure of the displaced strand during unwinding stimulates WRN helicase without coordinate action of WRN exonuclease. These results imply that WRN helicase and exonuclease activities can act independently, and we propose that the uncoordinated action may be relevant to the in vivo activity of WRN.

  18. Genomic mid-range inhomogeneity correlates with an abundance of RNA secondary structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Jun

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomes possess different levels of non-randomness, in particular, an inhomogeneity in their nucleotide composition. Inhomogeneity is manifest from the short-range where neighboring nucleotides influence the choice of base at a site, to the long-range, commonly known as isochores, where a particular base composition can span millions of nucleotides. A separate genomic issue that has yet to be thoroughly elucidated is the role that RNA secondary structure (SS plays in gene expression. Results We present novel data and approaches that show that a mid-range inhomogeneity (~30 to 1000 nt not only exists in mammalian genomes but is also significantly associated with strong RNA SS. A whole-genome bioinformatics investigation of local SS in a set of 11,315 non-redundant human pre-mRNA sequences has been carried out. Four distinct components of these molecules (5'-UTRs, exons, introns and 3'-UTRs were considered separately, since they differ in overall nucleotide composition, sequence motifs and periodicities. For each pre-mRNA component, the abundance of strong local SS ( Conclusion We demonstrate that the excess of strong local SS in pre-mRNAs is linked to the little explored phenomenon of genomic mid-range inhomogeneity (MRI. MRI is an interdependence between nucleotide choice and base composition over a distance of 20–1000 nt. Additionally, we have created a public computational resource to support further study of genomic MRI.

  19. Comparative Genome Structure, Secondary Metabolite, and Effector Coding Capacity across Cochliobolus Pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condon, Bradford J.; Leng, Yueqiang; Wu, Dongliang; Bushley, Kathryn E.; Ohm, Robin A.; Otillar, Robert; Martin, Joel; Schackwitz, Wendy; Grimwood, Jane; MohdZainudin, NurAinlzzati; Xue, Chunsheng; Wang, Rui; Manning, Viola A.; Dhillon, Braham; Tu, Zheng Jin; Steffenson, Brian J.; Salamov, Asaf; Sun, Hui; Lowry, Steve; LaButti, Kurt; Han, James; Copeland, Alex; Lindquist, Erika; Barry, Kerrie; Schmutz, Jeremy; Baker, Scott E.; Ciuffetti, Lynda M.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Zhong, Shaobin; Turgeon, B. Gillian

    2013-01-24

    The genomes of five Cochliobolus heterostrophus strains, two Cochliobolus sativus strains, three additional Cochliobolus species (Cochliobolus victoriae, Cochliobolus carbonum, Cochliobolus miyabeanus), and closely related Setosphaeria turcica were sequenced at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI). The datasets were used to identify SNPs between strains and species, unique genomic regions, core secondary metabolism genes, and small secreted protein (SSP) candidate effector encoding genes with a view towards pinpointing structural elements and gene content associated with specificity of these closely related fungi to different cereal hosts. Whole-genome alignment shows that three to five of each genome differs between strains of the same species, while a quarter of each genome differs between species. On average, SNP counts among field isolates of the same C. heterostrophus species are more than 25 higher than those between inbred lines and 50 lower than SNPs between Cochliobolus species. The suites of nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), polyketide synthase (PKS), and SSP encoding genes are astoundingly diverse among species but remarkably conserved among isolates of the same species, whether inbred or field strains, except for defining examples that map to unique genomic regions. Functional analysis of several strain-unique PKSs and NRPSs reveal a strong correlation with a role in virulence.

  20. My Favorite Assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Margaret; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Contains seven brief articles which offer assignments designed to help students perform job searches, write job application letters, answer difficult questions, write letters of resignation, alleviate fears of public speaking, use the interview effectively in the business communication, and develop listening skills. (PRA)

  1. Structure changes and succession dynamic of the natural secondary forest after severe fire interference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bin-fan; LIU Guang-ju; WANG Zhi-cheng

    2009-01-01

    The structure and dynamic succession law of natural secondary forest after severe fire interference in recent 20 years were studied by adopting the method of deducing time series from the spatial sequence of vegetation in Heihe region, Heilongjiang, China. Two typical and widely distributed forest types in the study area, namely forest type A and forest type B, were selected as study subjects. Forest type A is pure broadleaf forest or broadleaf mixed forest mainly composing of superior Betula platyphylla and Populus davidiana in the area with gradient 25°. Species richness, vegetation coverage, important value, and similarity index of community in different layers (Herb, shrub, small tree, and arbor layers) were investigated and analyzed for the two typical forests. The results show that after fire interference, the species richness and coverage in each layer in forest type A were higher than that in forest type B. Both for forest type A and B, with elapse of post-fire years, the species richness and coverage of herbs and shrubs showed a decline tendency, while those of arbor layer present a rising tendency. Through comparison of the important values of species in each layer and analysis of community structure changes, the dynamic process of post-fire vegetation succession for forest type A and B was separately determined. Post-fire 80 years' succession tendency of forest type A is B. platyphylla and Larix gmelinii mixed forest. Its shrub layer is mainly composed of Corylus heterophylla and Vaccinium uliginosum, and herb layer is dominated by Carex tristachya, Athyrium multidentatum, and Pyrola incarnate; whereas, the post-fire 80 years' succession of forest type B is Q. mongolica and B. davurica mixed forest. Its shrub layer is mainly composed of lespedeza bicolar and corylus heterophylla and herb layer is dominated by Carex tristachya, Asparagus densiflorus, and Hemerocallis minor.

  2. Fold classification based on secondary structure – how much is gained by including loop topology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przytycka Teresa

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been proposed that secondary structure information can be used to classify (to some extend protein folds. Since this method utilizes very limited information about the protein structure, it is not surprising that it has a higher error rate than the approaches that use full 3D fold description. On the other hand, the comparing of 3D protein structures is computing intensive. This raises the question to what extend the error rate can be decreased with each new source of information, especially if the new information can still be used with simple alignment algorithms. We consider the question whether the information about closed loops can improve the accuracy of this approach. While the answer appears to be obvious, we had to overcome two challenges. First, how to code and to compare topological information in such a way that local alignment of strings will properly identify similar structures. Second, how to properly measure the effect of new information in a large data sample. We investigate alternative ways of computing and presenting this information. Results We used the set of beta proteins with at most 30% pairwise identity to test the approach; local alignment scores were used to build a tree of clusters which was evaluated using a new log-odd cluster scoring function. In particular, we derive a closed formula for the probability of obtaining a given score by chance.Parameters of local alignment function were optimized using a genetic algorithm. Of 81 folds that had more than one representative in our data set, log-odds scores registered significantly better clustering in 27 cases and significantly worse in 6 cases, and small differences in the remaining cases. Various notions of the significant change or average change were considered and tried, and the results were all pointing in the same direction. Conclusion We found that, on average, properly presented information about the loop topology improves noticeably

  3. RNAspa: a shortest path approach for comparative prediction of the secondary structure of ncRNA molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaeli Shulamit

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, RNA molecules that are not translated into proteins (ncRNAs have drawn a great deal of attention, as they were shown to be involved in many cellular functions. One of the most important computational problems regarding ncRNA is to predict the secondary structure of a molecule from its sequence. In particular, we attempted to predict the secondary structure for a set of unaligned ncRNA molecules that are taken from the same family, and thus presumably have a similar structure. Results We developed the RNAspa program, which comparatively predicts the secondary structure for a set of ncRNA molecules in linear time in the number of molecules. We observed that in a list of several hundred suboptimal minimal free energy (MFE predictions, as provided by the RNAsubopt program of the Vienna package, it is likely that at least one suggested structure would be similar to the true, correct one. The suboptimal solutions of each molecule are represented as a layer of vertices in a graph. The shortest path in this graph is the basis for structural predictions for the molecule. We also show that RNA secondary structures can be compared very rapidly by a simple string Edit-Distance algorithm with a minimal loss of accuracy. We show that this approach allows us to more deeply explore the suboptimal structure space. Conclusion The algorithm was tested on three datasets which include several ncRNA families taken from the Rfam database. These datasets allowed for comparison of the algorithm with other methods. In these tests, RNAspa performed better than four other programs.

  4. Neural Network Based on GA-BP Algorithm and its Application in the Protein Secondary Structure Prediction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yang; LI Kai-yang

    2006-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of genetic algorithm and BP algorithm are introduced. A neural network based on GA-BP algorithm is proposed and applied in the prediction of protein secondary structure, which combines the advantages of BP and GA. The prediction and training on the neural network are made respectively based on 4 structure classifications of protein so as to get higher rate of predication-the highest prediction rate 75.65%, the average prediction rate 65.04%.

  5. Probing secondary structures of end-capped tripeptide, BOC–Phe–Aib–Leu–OMe by combined study of infrared spectroscopy and quantum chemistry calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Our analysis reveals two secondary structures of BOC–Phe–Aib–Leu–OMe in CCl4 solution, which are largely different from that present in solid crystal of the tripeptide. The figure shows the curve fitting of the amide-I spectral profile of the tripeptide in 0.006 M CCl4 solution at room temperature by voigt band shapes (right). Set 1 (green) corresponds to the amide-I transitions of secondary structure-1, and Set 2 (blue) corresponds to similar transitions of secondary structure-2. Highlights: ► Probed secondary structures of BOC–Phe–Aib–Leu–OMe in CCl4 solution and solid state. ► FTIR spectroscopy and quantum chemistry computations are used in the study. ► Study reveals largely different secondary structures in solid and solution phases. ► A β-turn structure in solid crystal, whereas the solution contains γ-turns. - Abstract: We report conformational analysis of an end-protected tripeptide, BOC–Phe–Aib–Leu–OMe in CCl4 solution and solid crystal at room temperature by infrared spectroscopy and quantum chemistry calculation. The measured spectra in those physical conditions appear different, which has been attributed to different secondary structures of the peptide in the two phases. Our analysis reveals that the peptide has only one secondary structure in the crystal, but in the solution there are two different secondary structures. While the spectrum in solution shows excellent correspondence with the superposition of predicted spectra of the two most favored gas-phase secondary structures, the spectrum of crystal shows best correspondence with the predicted spectrum of a relatively higher energy (∼6 kcal/mol) secondary structure. However, the latter in crystal can gain maximum stability by intermolecular hydrogen bonding. The secondary structure of the peptide in crystal that we have deduced agrees nicely with the one suggested by X-ray crystallographic study.

  6. Protein side-chain resonance assignment and NOE assignment using RDC-defined backbones without TOCSY data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Jianyang [Duke University, Department of Computer Science (United States); Zhou Pei [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Biochemistry (United States); Donald, Bruce Randall [Duke University, Department of Computer Science (United States)

    2011-08-15

    One bottleneck in NMR structure determination lies in the laborious and time-consuming process of side-chain resonance and NOE assignments. Compared to the well-studied backbone resonance assignment problem, automated side-chain resonance and NOE assignments are relatively less explored. Most NOE assignment algorithms require nearly complete side-chain resonance assignments from a series of through-bond experiments such as HCCH-TOCSY or HCCCONH. Unfortunately, these TOCSY experiments perform poorly on large proteins. To overcome this deficiency, we present a novel algorithm, called Nasca (NOE Assignment and Side-Chain Assignment), to automate both side-chain resonance and NOE assignments and to perform high-resolution protein structure determination in the absence of any explicit through-bond experiment to facilitate side-chain resonance assignment, such as HCCH-TOCSY. After casting the assignment problem into a Markov Random Field (MRF), Nasca extends and applies combinatorial protein design algorithms to compute optimal assignments that best interpret the NMR data. The MRF captures the contact map information of the protein derived from NOESY spectra, exploits the backbone structural information determined by RDCs, and considers all possible side-chain rotamers. The complexity of the combinatorial search is reduced by using a dead-end elimination (DEE) algorithm, which prunes side-chain resonance assignments that are provably not part of the optimal solution. Then an A* search algorithm is employed to find a set of optimal side-chain resonance assignments that best fit the NMR data. These side-chain resonance assignments are then used to resolve the NOE assignment ambiguity and compute high-resolution protein structures. Tests on five proteins show that Nasca assigns resonances for more than 90% of side-chain protons, and achieves about 80% correct assignments. The final structures computed using the NOE distance restraints assigned by Nasca have backbone RMSD 0

  7. Analysis of energy-based algorithms for RNA secondary structure prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajiaghayi Monir

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA molecules play critical roles in the cells of organisms, including roles in gene regulation, catalysis, and synthesis of proteins. Since RNA function depends in large part on its folded structures, much effort has been invested in developing accurate methods for prediction of RNA secondary structure from the base sequence. Minimum free energy (MFE predictions are widely used, based on nearest neighbor thermodynamic parameters of Mathews, Turner et al. or those of Andronescu et al. Some recently proposed alternatives that leverage partition function calculations find the structure with maximum expected accuracy (MEA or pseudo-expected accuracy (pseudo-MEA methods. Advances in prediction methods are typically benchmarked using sensitivity, positive predictive value and their harmonic mean, namely F-measure, on datasets of known reference structures. Since such benchmarks document progress in improving accuracy of computational prediction methods, it is important to understand how measures of accuracy vary as a function of the reference datasets and whether advances in algorithms or thermodynamic parameters yield statistically significant improvements. Our work advances such understanding for the MFE and (pseudo-MEA-based methods, with respect to the latest datasets and energy parameters. Results We present three main findings. First, using the bootstrap percentile method, we show that the average F-measure accuracy of the MFE and (pseudo-MEA-based algorithms, as measured on our largest datasets with over 2000 RNAs from diverse families, is a reliable estimate (within a 2% range with high confidence of the accuracy of a population of RNA molecules represented by this set. However, average accuracy on smaller classes of RNAs such as a class of 89 Group I introns used previously in benchmarking algorithm accuracy is not reliable enough to draw meaningful conclusions about the relative merits of the MFE and MEA-based algorithms

  8. Crystal Structure of a Bacterial Topoisomerase IB in Complex with DNA Reveals a Secondary DNA Binding Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, Asmita; Yakovleva, Lyudmila; Shuman, Stewart; Mondragón, Alfonso (NWU); (SKI)

    2010-10-22

    Type IB DNA topoisomerases (TopIB) are monomeric enzymes that relax supercoils by cleaving and resealing one strand of duplex DNA within a protein clamp that embraces a {approx}21 DNA segment. A longstanding conundrum concerns the capacity of TopIB enzymes to stabilize intramolecular duplex DNA crossovers and form protein-DNA synaptic filaments. Here we report a structure of Deinococcus radiodurans TopIB in complex with a 12 bp duplex DNA that demonstrates a secondary DNA binding site located on the surface of the C-terminal domain. It comprises a distinctive interface with one strand of the DNA duplex and is conserved in all TopIB enzymes. Modeling of a TopIB with both DNA sites suggests that the secondary site could account for DNA crossover binding, nucleation of DNA synapsis, and generation of a filamentous plectoneme. Mutations of the secondary site eliminate synaptic plectoneme formation without affecting DNA cleavage or supercoil relaxation.

  9. Efficiency of paramagnetism-based constraints to determine the spatial arrangement of {alpha}-helical secondary structure elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertini, Ivano [University of Florence, CERM and Department of Chemistry (Italy)], E-mail: bertini@cerm.unifi.it; Longinetti, Marco [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Agraria e Forestale (Italy); Luchinat, Claudio; Parigi, Giacomo [University of Florence, CERM and Department of Agricultural Biotechnology (Italy); Sgheri, Luca [Istituto di Analisi Globale ed Applicazioni (CNR) (Italy)

    2002-02-15

    A computational approach has been developed to assess the power of paramagnetism-based backbone constraints with respect to the determination of the tertiary structure, once the secondary structure elements are known. This is part of the general assessment of paramagnetism-based constraints which are known to be relevant when used in conjunction with all classical constraints. The paramagnetism-based constraints here investigated are the pseudocontact shifts, the residual dipolar couplings due to self-orientation of the metalloprotein in high magnetic fields, and the cross correlation between dipolar relaxation and Curie relaxation. The relative constraints are generated by back-calculation from a known structure. The elements of secondary structure are supposed to be obtained from chemical shift index. The problem of the reciprocal orientation of the helices is addressed. It is shown that the correct fold can be obtained depending on the length of the {alpha}-helical stretches with respect to the length of the non helical segments connecting the {alpha}-helices. For example, the correct fold is straightforwardly obtained for the four-helix bundle protein cytochrome b{sub 562}, while the double EF-hand motif of calbindin D{sub 9k} is hardly obtained without ambiguity. In cases like calbindin D{sub 9k}, the availability of datasets from different metal ions is helpful, whereas less important is the location of the metal ion with respect to the secondary structure elements.

  10. Prediction of beta-turns at over 80% accuracy based on an ensemble of predicted secondary structures and multiple alignments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurgan Lukasz

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background β-turn is a secondary protein structure type that plays significant role in protein folding, stability, and molecular recognition. To date, several methods for prediction of β-turns from protein sequences were developed, but they are characterized by relatively poor prediction quality. The novelty of the proposed sequence-based β-turn predictor stems from the usage of a window based information extracted from four predicted three-state secondary structures, which together with a selected set of position specific scoring matrix (PSSM values serve as an input to the support vector machine (SVM predictor. Results We show that (1 all four predicted secondary structures are useful; (2 the most useful information extracted from the predicted secondary structure includes the structure of the predicted residue, secondary structure content in a window around the predicted residue, and features that indicate whether the predicted residue is inside a secondary structure segment; (3 the PSSM values of Asn, Asp, Gly, Ile, Leu, Met, Pro, and Val were among the top ranked features, which corroborates with recent studies. The Asn, Asp, Gly, and Pro indicate potential β-turns, while the remaining four amino acids are useful to predict non-β-turns. Empirical evaluation using three nonredundant datasets shows favorable Qtotal, Qpredicted and MCC values when compared with over a dozen of modern competing methods. Our method is the first to break the 80% Qtotal barrier and achieves Qtotal = 80.9%, MCC = 0.47, and Qpredicted higher by over 6% when compared with the second best method. We use feature selection to reduce the dimensionality of the feature vector used as the input for the proposed prediction method. The applied feature set is smaller by 86, 62 and 37% when compared with the second and two third-best (with respect to MCC competing methods, respectively. Conclusion Experiments show that the proposed method constitutes an

  11. Secondary Structures of Ubiquitin Ions Soft-Landed onto Self-Assembled Monolayer Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Qichi; Laskin, Julia

    2016-06-09

    The secondary structures of multiply charged ubiquitin ions soft-landed onto self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces were studied using in situ infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS). Two charge states of ubiquitin, 5+ and 13+, were mass selected separately from a mixture of different charge states produced by electrospray ionization (ESI). The low 5+ charge state represents a native-like folded state of ubiquitin, while the high 13+ charge state assumes an extended, almost linear conformation. Each of the two charge states was soft-landed onto a CH3- and COOH-terminated SAM of alkylthiols on gold (HSAM and COOH-SAM). HSAM is a hydrophobic surface known to stabilize helical conformations of soft-landed protonated peptides, whereas COOH-SAM is a hydrophilic surface that preferentially stabilizes β-sheet conformations. IRRAS spectra of the soft-landed ubiquitin ions were acquired as a function of time during and after ion soft-landing. Similar to smaller peptide ions, helical conformations of ubiquitin are found to be more abundant on HSAM, while the relative abundance of β-sheet conformations increases on COOH-SAM. The initial charge state of ubiquitin also has a pronounced effect on its conformation on the surface. Specifically, on both surfaces, a higher relative abundance of helical conformations and lower relative abundance of β-sheet conformations is observed for the 13+ charge state compared to the 5+ charge state. Time-resolved experiments indicate that the α-helical band in the spectrum of the 13+ charge state slowly increases with time on the HSAM surface and decreases in the spectrum of the 13+ charge state on COOH-SAM. These results further support the preference of the hydrophobic HSAM surface toward helical conformations and demonstrate that soft-landed protein ions may undergo slow conformational changes during and after deposition.

  12. Predicting the redox state and secondary structure of cysteine residues using multi-dimensional classification analysis of NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching-Cheng; Lai, Wen-Chung; Chuang, Woei-Jer

    2016-09-01

    A tool for predicting the redox state and secondary structure of cysteine residues using multi-dimensional analyses of different combinations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts has been developed. A data set of cysteine [Formula: see text], (13)C(α), (13)C(β), (1)H(α), (1)H(N), and (15)N(H) chemical shifts was created, classified according to redox state and secondary structure, using a library of 540 re-referenced BioMagResBank (BMRB) entries. Multi-dimensional analyses of three, four, five, and six chemical shifts were used to derive rules for predicting the structural states of cysteine residues. The results from 60 BMRB entries containing 122 cysteines showed that four-dimensional analysis of the C(α), C(β), H(α), and N(H) chemical shifts had the highest prediction accuracy of 100 and 95.9 % for the redox state and secondary structure, respectively. The prediction of secondary structure using 3D, 5D, and 6D analyses had the accuracy of ~90 %, suggesting that H(N) and [Formula: see text] chemical shifts may be noisy and made the discrimination worse. A web server (6DCSi) was established to enable users to submit NMR chemical shifts, either in BMRB or key-in formats, for prediction. 6DCSi displays predictions using sets of 3, 4, 5, and 6 chemical shifts, which shows their consistency and allows users to draw their own conclusions. This web-based tool can be used to rapidly obtain structural information regarding cysteine residues directly from experimental NMR data.

  13. PSP_MCSVM: brainstorming consensus prediction of protein secondary structures using two-stage multiclass support vector machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Piyali; Basu, Subhadip; Kundu, Mahantapas; Nasipuri, Mita; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2011-09-01

    Secondary structure prediction is a crucial task for understanding the variety of protein structures and performed biological functions. Prediction of secondary structures for new proteins using their amino acid sequences is of fundamental importance in bioinformatics. We propose a novel technique to predict protein secondary structures based on position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMs) and physico-chemical properties of amino acids. It is a two stage approach involving multiclass support vector machines (SVMs) as classifiers for three different structural conformations, viz., helix, sheet and coil. In the first stage, PSSMs obtained from PSI-BLAST and five specially selected physicochemical properties of amino acids are fed into SVMs as features for sequence-to-structure prediction. Confidence values for forming helix, sheet and coil that are obtained from the first stage SVM are then used in the second stage SVM for performing structure-to-structure prediction. The two-stage cascaded classifiers (PSP_MCSVM) are trained with proteins from RS126 dataset. The classifiers are finally tested on target proteins of critical assessment of protein structure prediction experiment-9 (CASP9). PSP_MCSVM with brainstorming consensus procedure performs better than the prediction servers like Predator, DSC, SIMPA96, for randomly selected proteins from CASP9 targets. The overall performance is found to be comparable with the current state-of-the art. PSP_MCSVM source code, train-test datasets and supplementary files are available freely in public domain at: http://sysbio.icm.edu.pl/secstruct and http://code.google.com/p/cmater-bioinfo/

  14. A cell-compatible PEO-PPO-PEO (Pluronic®)-based hydrogel stabilized through secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Sydney; Lin, Ji-Yu; Cheng, Ming-Huei; Wu, Chih-Wei; Chu, I-Ming

    2016-12-01

    Pluronic F-127 (PF127) is a thermosensitive polymer that has been widely recognized as a potential candidate for various bio-applications. However, in hydrogel form, its rapid disintegration and inhospitality toward cells have significantly limited its usage. As a means to increase the integrity and cell compatibility of a PF127 hydrogel, we propose the introduction of stabilizing secondary structures to the gel network by the addition of secondary structure-forming oligo-alanine and oligo-phenylalanine. Results indicate that increasing the oligo(peptides) attached to PF127 led to a significant decrease in the gelation concentration and temperature. A selected oligo(peptide)-modified PF127 was capable of forming a stable hydrogel network at 5% and suffered only 20% weight loss after 7days of incubation in media. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed comparably more interconnected morphology in modified hydrogels which may be attributed to the presence of secondary structures, as verified by circular dichroism (CD) and Fourier-transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provided insights into the extensive interactions at the micelle core, which is the key to altered gelation behavior. Furthermore, modified hydrogels maintained structural integrity within culturing media and supported the proliferation of encapsulated chondrocytes. In addition, in vivo residence time was extended to well beyond 2weeks after oligo(peptide) modification, thereby broadening the application scope of the PF127 hydrogel to encompass long-term drug delivery and cell culturing. PMID:27612731

  15. Phylogenetic conservation of RNA secondary and tertiary structure in the trpEDCFBA operon leader transcript in Bacillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaak, Janell E; Babitzke, Paul; Bevilacqua, Philip C

    2003-12-01

    Expression of the trpEDCFBA operon of Bacillus subtilis is regulated by transcription attenuation and translation control mechanisms. We recently determined that the B. subtilis trp leader readthrough transcript can adopt a Mg(2+)-dependent tertiary structure that appears to interfere with TRAP-mediated translation control of trpE. In the present study, sequence comparisons to trp leaders from three other Bacillus sp. were made, suggesting that RNA secondary and tertiary structures are phylogenetically conserved. To test this hypothesis, experiments were carried out with the trp leader transcript from Bacillus stearothermophilus. Structure mapping experiments confirmed the predicted secondary structure. Native gel experiments identified a faster mobility species in the presence of Mg(2+), suggesting that a Mg(2+)-dependent tertiary structure forms. Mg(2+)-dependent protection of residues within the first five triplet repeats of the TRAP binding target and a pyrimidine-rich internal loop were observed, consistent with tertiary structure formation between these regions. Structure mapping in the presence of a competitor DNA oligonucleotide allowed the interacting partners to be identified as a single-stranded portion of the purine-rich TRAP binding target and the large downstream pyrimidine-rich internal loop. Thermal denaturation experiments revealed a Mg(2+)- and pH-dependent unfolding transition that was absent for a transcript missing the first five triplet repeats. The stability of several mutant transcripts allowed a large portion of the base-pairing register for the tertiary interaction to be determined. These data indicate that RNA secondary and tertiary structures involved in TRAP-mediated translation control are conserved in at least four Bacillus species. PMID:14624006

  16. Optimisation of the mRNA secondary structure to improve the expression of interleukin-24 (IL-24) in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Chaogang; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Jian; Sun, Aiyou; Wei, Dongzhi; Yang, Shengli

    2014-08-01

    Interleukin-24 (IL-24) is a novel cytokine selectively inhibiting proliferation of cancer cells but with little effect on normal cells. However, IL-24 is difficult to express in Escherichia coli. In this study, we optimised the secondary structure of the translation initiation region using computational approach to obtain non-fusion recombinant IL-24 (nrIL-24). The Gibbs free energy of the region was decreased from -22 to -9.07 kcal mol(-1), potentially promoting a loose secondary structure formation and improving the translation initiation efficiency. As a result, the expression of nrIL-24 was increased to 26 % of the total cellular protein from being barely initially detectable. nrIL-24 showed a concentration-dependent inhibition of A375 cells but had little effect on normal human cells. These results demonstrate that this method in increasing nrIL-24 expression is effective and efficient.

  17. Intrusive growth of primary and secondary phloem fibres in hemp stem determines fibre-bundle formation and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snegireva, Anastasia; Chernova, Tatyana; Ageeva, Marina; Lev-Yadun, Simcha; Gorshkova, Tatyana

    2015-01-01

    Plant fibres-cells with important mechanical functions and a widely used raw material-are usually identified in microscopic sections only after reaching a significant length or after developing a thickened cell wall. We characterized the early developmental stages of hemp (Cannabis sativa) stem phloem fibres, both primary (originating from the procambium) and secondary (originating in the cambium), when they still had only a primary cell wall. We gave a major emphasis to the role of intrusive elongation, the specific type of plant cell growth by which fibres commonly attain large cell length. We could identify primary phloem fibres at a distance of only 1.2-1.5 mm from the shoot apical meristem when they grew symplastically with the surrounding tissues. Half a millimeter further downwards along the stem, fibres began their intrusive elongation, which led to a sharp increase in fibre numbers visible within the stem cross-sections. The intrusive elongation of primary phloem fibres was completed within the several distal centimetres of the growing stem, before the onset of their secondary cell wall formation. The formation of secondary phloem fibres started long after the beginning of secondary xylem formation. Our data indicate that only a small portion of the fusiform cambial initials (<10 %) give rise directly or via their derivatives to secondary phloem fibres. The key determinant of final bundle structure, both for primary and secondary phloem fibres, is intrusive growth. Through bi-directional elongation, fibres join other fibres initiated individually in other stem levels, thus forming the bundles. Our results provide the specific developmental basis for further biochemical and molecular-genetic studies of phloem fibre development in hemp, but may be applied to many other species. PMID:26019229

  18. Forest structure and species diversity of secondary forest after cultivation in relation to various sources at lower northern Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    C. Podong; R. Poolsiri

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the characteristic of structure, species composition and species diversity in secondary mixed deciduous forest at Thung Salaeng Luang National Park, Lower North of Thailand. This vertical stratification of the tree canopy can affect the growth of young trees on the ground surface, especially that of saplings and seedlings. Ground species can establish themselves very quickly when the light intensity is high enough and especially when the light can pene...

  19. INFLUENCE OF MOLECULAR STRUCTURES OF SECONDARY AMINE TERMINATED POLY(ESTER-AMINE)S ON THE CURING PERFORMANCE WITH EPOXY RESIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Five secondary amine terminated poly(ester-amine)s (defined as PEA) with controlled molecular structures were synthesized through reacting excessive piperazine with phthalicdiglycol diacrylate (PDDA) and 1,1,1-trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA) at a constant secondary amine/acrylate group ratio of 1.5/1 and at different PDDA/TMPTA molar ratios.Both IR and 1H-NMR spectra indicated that all acrylate groups were consumed in the reaction, based on which the structural parameters were calculated from the 1H-NMR spectra. With decreasing PDDA/TMPTA ratio, the content of secondary amine, degree of branching, molecular weight, Tg and Td increased accordingly. These polymers were further used as both crosslinkers and flexibilizers for a linear epoxy resin E51 to form cured films under ambient condition, The gel content,relative hardness and Tg of the resulting films increased as PEA molecules changed from linear to highly branching structures. Due to the flexibility of PEA molecules, all the films possessed excellent mechanical performance.

  20. Secondary structure analysis of ITS2 in the rDNA of three Indian paramphistomid species found in local livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shylla, Jollin A; Ghatani, Sudeep; Chatterjee, Anupam; Tandon, Veena

    2011-04-01

    Of paramphistomid trematodes, three species viz., Homalogaster paloniae, Calicophoron calicophorum and Orthocoelium streptocoelium are commonly prevalent in bovine hosts in Northeast India. The aim of the present study was to genetically characterise these species using rDNA second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) so as to supplement the morphological criteria substantiated by molecular findings. The annotated ITS2 region from H. paloniae, C. calicophorum and O. streptocoelium were found to be 289 bp, 288 bp and 288 bp long, respectively. On comparison, the Indian isolates of the three species were observed to have a maximum identity of 99% with each of their respective counterparts from Japan. The secondary structure models were inferred using minimum free energy modelling algorithms. The paramphistomes displayed the typical four helix ITS2 secondary structure and differed from each other due to minor nucleotide differences. The consensus ITS2 secondary structure model revealed the presence of conservative motifs GACGAGGGUG and GCGGUAGAGUC in helix III. Monophyly is well supported for a clade consisting of the Japanese and Indian paramphistomes with significant bootstrap values.

  1. External cavity-quantum cascade laser infrared spectroscopy for secondary structure analysis of proteins at low concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaighofer, Andreas; Alcaráz, Mirta R.; Araman, Can; Goicoechea, Héctor; Lendl, Bernhard

    2016-09-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy are analytical techniques employed for the analysis of protein secondary structure. The use of CD spectroscopy is limited to low protein concentrations (5 mg ml-1). Here we introduce a quantum cascade laser (QCL)-based IR transmission setup for analysis of protein and polypeptide secondary structure at concentrations as low as 0.25 mg ml-1 in deuterated buffer solution. We present dynamic QCL-IR spectra of the temperature-induced α-helix to β-sheet transition of poly-L-lysine. The concentration dependence of the α-β transition temperature between 0.25 and 10 mg ml-1 was investigated by QCL-IR, FTIR and CD spectroscopy. By using QCL-IR spectroscopy it is possible to perform IR spectroscopic analysis in the same concentration range as CD spectroscopy, thus enabling a combined analysis of biomolecules secondary structure by CD and IR spectroscopy.

  2. Reduced Dimensionality (4,3)D-hnCOCANH Experiment: An Efficient Backbone Assignment tool for NMR studies of Proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    Sequence specific resonance assignment and secondary structure determination of proteins form the basis for variety of structural and functional proteomics studies by NMR. In this context, an efficient standalone method for rapid assignment of backbone (1H, 15N, 13Ca and 13C') resonances and secondary structure determination of proteins has been presented here. Compared to currently available strategies used for the purpose, the method employs only a single reduced dimensionality (RD) experiment -(4,3)D-hnCOCANH and exploits the linear combinations of backbone (13Ca and 13C') chemical shifts to achieve a dispersion relatively better compared to those of individual chemical shifts (see the text) for efficient and rapid data analysis. Further, the experiment leads to the spectrum with direct distinction of self (intra-residue) and sequential (inter-residue) carbon correlation peaks; these appear opposite in signs and therefore can easily be discriminated without using an additional complementary experiment. On ...

  3. The effects of various alcohols on the secondary structural integrity of melittin, TH-10Aox, and Tc1 by molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-Hua; Liu, Hsuan-Liang

    2006-03-01

    In this study, molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to investigate the effects of various alcohols on the structural integrity of three peptides: melittin with 2 α-helices, TH-10Aox with 3 β-strands, and Tc1 with 1 α-helix and 2 β-strands. The results reveal that the secondary structural integrity of these peptides increased with decreasing dielectric constant of the solvent, indicating that there is a positive correlation between the number of carbon atoms in alcohols and the stability of the secondary structures. In addition, TFE enhanced the secondary structural stability of these peptides to a greater extent than the other alcohols.

  4. Depletion of phosphatidylglycerol head-group induces changes in oxygen evolution and protein secondary structures of photosystemⅡ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The techniques of oxygen electrode polarography and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were employed to explore the roles of polar head-group of phosphatidylglycerol (PG) molecules in the functional and structural aspects of photosystemⅡ(PSⅡ) through enzymatic approach. It was shown that the depletion of PG by treatment of phospholipase C (PLC) on PSⅡ particles caused the inhibition of oxygen evolving activity in PSⅡ. This effect also gave rise to changes in the protein secondary structures of PSⅡ, that is, an increase in α-helical conformation which is compensated by the loss of β-strand structures. It revealed that the head-group of PG molecules plays an important structural role in the maintenance of normal structure of PSⅡ proteins, which is required to maintain the appropriate physiological activity of the PSⅡ complex such as the oxygen evolving activity. It is suggested that there most probably exist hydrogen-bonding interactions between PG molecules and PSⅡ proteins.

  5. Primary and secondary structure of 5.8S rRNA from the silkgland of Bombyx mori.

    OpenAIRE

    Fujiwara, H.; Kawata, Y.; H. Ishikawa

    1982-01-01

    Nucleotide sequence of 5.8S rRNA of the silkworm, Bombyx mori has been determined by gel sequencing methods. The 5.8S rRNA was the longest so far reported, with the 5'-terminal sequence several nucleotides longer than those of the other organisms. Upon constructing the secondary structure in accordance with the "burp gun" model (12), the Bombyx 5.8S rRNA formed a wide-open "muzzle" due to several unpaired bases at the ends. The overall structure also appeared less stable with less G . C pairs...

  6. Rapid analysis of protein backbone resonance assignments using cryogenic probes, a distributed Linux-based computing architecture, and an integrated set of spectral analysis tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monleón, Daniel; Colson, Kimberly; Moseley, Hunter N B; Anklin, Clemens; Oswald, Robert; Szyperski, Thomas; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2002-01-01

    Rapid data collection, spectral referencing, processing by time domain deconvolution, peak picking and editing, and assignment of NMR spectra are necessary components of any efficient integrated system for protein NMR structure analysis. We have developed a set of software tools designated AutoProc, AutoPeak, and AutoAssign, which function together with the data processing and peak-picking programs NMRPipe and Sparky, to provide an integrated software system for rapid analysis of protein backbone resonance assignments. In this paper we demonstrate that these tools, together with high-sensitivity triple resonance NMR cryoprobes for data collection and a Linux-based computer cluster architecture, can be combined to provide nearly complete backbone resonance assignments and secondary structures (based on chemical shift data) for a 59-residue protein in less than 30 hours of data collection and processing time. In this optimum case of a small protein providing excellent spectra, extensive backbone resonance assignments could also be obtained using less than 6 hours of data collection and processing time. These results demonstrate the feasibility of high throughput triple resonance NMR for determining resonance assignments and secondary structures of small proteins, and the potential for applying NMR in large scale structural proteomics projects.

  7. Determining the Secondary Structure of Membrane Proteins and Peptides Via Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lishan; Mayo, Daniel J.; Sahu, Indra D.; Zhou, Andy; Zhang, Rongfu; McCarrick, Robert M.; Lorigan, Gary A.

    2016-01-01

    Revealing detailed structural and dynamic information of membrane embedded or associated proteins is challenging due to their hydrophobic nature which makes NMR and X-ray crystallographic studies challenging or impossible. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has emerged as a powerful technique to provide essential structural and dynamic information for membrane proteins with no size limitations in membrane systems which mimic their natural lipid bilayer environment. Therefore, tremendous efforts have been devoted toward the development and application of EPR spectroscopic techniques to study the structure of biological systems such as membrane proteins and peptides. This chapter introduces a novel approach established and developed in the Lorigan lab to investigate membrane protein and peptide local secondary structures utilizing the pulsed EPR technique electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy. Detailed sample preparation strategies in model membrane protein systems and the experimental setup are described. Also, the ability of this approach to identify local secondary structure of membrane proteins and peptides with unprecedented efficiency is demonstrated in model systems. Finally, applications and further developments of this ESEEM approach for probing larger size membrane proteins produced by over-expression systems are discussed. PMID:26477255

  8. Simulation of unsteady state performance of a secondary air system by the 1D-3D-Structure coupled method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Li, Peng; Li, Yulong

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes the calculation method for unsteady state conditions in the secondary air systems in gas turbines. The 1D-3D-Structure coupled method was applied. A 1D code was used to model the standard components that have typical geometric characteristics. Their flow and heat transfer were described by empirical correlations based on experimental data or CFD calculations. A 3D code was used to model the non-standard components that cannot be described by typical geometric languages, while a finite element analysis was carried out to compute the structural deformation and heat conduction at certain important positions. These codes were coupled through their interfaces. Thus, the changes in heat transfer and structure and their interactions caused by exterior disturbances can be reflected. The results of the coupling method in an unsteady state showed an apparent deviation from the existing data, while the results in the steady state were highly consistent with the existing data. The difference in the results in the unsteady state was caused primarily by structural deformation that cannot be predicted by the 1D method. Thus, in order to obtain the unsteady state performance of a secondary air system more accurately and efficiently, the 1D-3D-Structure coupled method should be used.

  9. Job Assignments under Moral Hazard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Alexander; Nafziger, Julia

    Inefficient job assignments are usually explained with incomplete information about employees' abilities or contractual imperfections. We show that inefficient assignments arise even without uncertainty about the employee's ability and with complete contracts. Building on this result we provide...

  10. Effects of Linker Length and Transient Secondary Structure Elements in the Intrinsically Disordered Notch RAM Region on Notch Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, Kathryn P; Johnson, Scott E; Hatem, Christine L; Majumdar, Ananya; Barrick, Doug

    2015-11-01

    Formation of the bivalent interaction between the Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and the transcription factor CBF-1/RBP-j, Su(H), Lag-1 (CSL) is a key event in Notch signaling because it switches Notch-responsive genes from a repressed state to an activated state. Interaction of the intrinsically disordered RBP-j-associated molecule (RAM) region of NICD with CSL is thought to both disrupt binding of corepressor proteins to CSL and anchor NICD to CSL, promoting interaction of the ankyrin domain of NICD with CSL through an effective concentration mechanism. To quantify the role of disorder in the RAM linker region on the effective concentration enhancement of Notch transcriptional activation, we measured the effects of linker length variation on activation. The resulting activation profile has general features of a worm-like chain model for effective concentration. However, deviations from the model for short sequence deletions suggest that RAM contains sequence-specific structural elements that may be important for activation. Structural characterization of the RAM linker with sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation and NMR spectroscopy reveals that the linker is compact and contains three transient helices and two extended and dynamic regions. To test if these secondary structure elements are important for activation, we made sequence substitutions to change the secondary structure propensities of these elements and measured transcriptional activation of the resulting variants. Substitutions to two of these nonrandom elements (helix 2, extended region 1) have effects on activation, but these effects do not depend on the nature of the substituting residues. Thus, the primary sequences of these elements, but not their secondary structures, are influencing signaling.

  11. Statistically significant dependence of the Xaa-Pro peptide bond conformation on secondary structure and amino acid sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leitner Dietmar

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A reliable prediction of the Xaa-Pro peptide bond conformation would be a useful tool for many protein structure calculation methods. We have analyzed the Protein Data Bank and show that the combined use of sequential and structural information has a predictive value for the assessment of the cis versus trans peptide bond conformation of Xaa-Pro within proteins. For the analysis of the data sets different statistical methods such as the calculation of the Chou-Fasman parameters and occurrence matrices were used. Furthermore we analyzed the relationship between the relative solvent accessibility and the relative occurrence of prolines in the cis and in the trans conformation. Results One of the main results of the statistical investigations is the ranking of the secondary structure and sequence information with respect to the prediction of the Xaa-Pro peptide bond conformation. We observed a significant impact of secondary structure information on the occurrence of the Xaa-Pro peptide bond conformation, while the sequence information of amino acids neighboring proline is of little predictive value for the conformation of this bond. Conclusion In this work, we present an extensive analysis of the occurrence of the cis and trans proline conformation in proteins. Based on the data set, we derived patterns and rules for a possible prediction of the proline conformation. Upon adoption of the Chou-Fasman parameters, we are able to derive statistically relevant correlations between the secondary structure of amino acid fragments and the Xaa-Pro peptide bond conformation.

  12. Secondary Plant Products Causing Photosensitization in Grazing Herbivores: Their Structure, Activity and Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane C. Quinn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Photosensitivity in animals is defined as a severe dermatitis that results from a heightened reactivity of skin cells and associated dermal tissues upon their exposure to sunlight, following ingestion or contact with UV reactive secondary plant products. Photosensitivity occurs in animal cells as a reaction that is mediated by a light absorbing molecule, specifically in this case a plant-produced metabolite that is heterocyclic or polyphenolic. In sensitive animals, this reaction is most severe in non-pigmented skin which has the least protection from UV or visible light exposure. Photosensitization in a biological system such as the epidermis is an oxidative or other chemical change in a molecule in response to light-induced excitation of endogenous or exogenously-delivered molecules within the tissue. Photo-oxidation can also occur in the plant itself, resulting in the generation of reactive oxygen species, free radical damage and eventual DNA degradation. Similar cellular changes occur in affected herbivores and are associated with an accumulation of photodynamic molecules in the affected dermal tissues or circulatory system of the herbivore. Recent advances in our ability to identify and detect secondary products at trace levels in the plant and surrounding environment, or in organisms that ingest plants, have provided additional evidence for the role of secondary metabolites in photosensitization of grazing herbivores. This review outlines the role of unique secondary products produced by higher plants in the animal photosensitization process, describes their chemistry and localization in the plant as well as impacts of the environment upon their production, discusses their direct and indirect effects on associated animal systems and presents several examples of well-characterized plant photosensitization in animal systems.

  13. Membrane topology of the sodium ion-dependent citrate carrier of Klebsiella pneumoniae - Evidence for a new structural class of secondary transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanGeest, M; Lolkema, JS

    1996-01-01

    The predicted secondary structure model of the sodium ion-dependent citrate carrier of Klebsiella pneumoniae (CitS) presents the la-transmembrane helix motif observed for many secondary transporters, Biochemical evidence presented in this paper is not consistent with this model. N-terminal and C-ter

  14. Membrane Topology of the Sodium Ion-dependent Citrate Carrier of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Evidence for a New Structural Class of Secondary Transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geest, Marleen van; Lolkema, Juke S.

    1996-01-01

    The predicted secondary structure model of the sodium ion-dependent citrate carrier of Klebsiella pneumoniae (CitS) presents the 12-transmembrane helix motif observed for many secondary transporters. Biochemical evidence presented in this paper is not consistent with this model. N-terminal and C-ter

  15. Interactive Assignments for Online Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pam Lowry

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Students can experience first hand through interactive assignments what is involved in teaching an online course. Most students develop a whole new appreciation for the student learning process. Faculty are beginning to realize that online instruction is more than a series of readings posted to a course management system. This paper summarizes the faculty member's instructional strategies involved when creating student interaction assignments. The paper also summarizes the assignments, discussion board, and trends in education from the student's perspective. In summary, it concludes with the faculty's overall perspective concerning these assignments and how the assignments could be more effective for the student.

  16. Spectral editing of two-dimensional magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectra for protein resonance assignment and structure determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several techniques for spectral editing of 2D 13C–13C correlation NMR of proteins are introduced. They greatly reduce the spectral overlap for five common amino acid types, thus simplifying spectral assignment and conformational analysis. The carboxyl (COO) signals of glutamate and aspartate are selected by suppressing the overlapping amide N–CO peaks through 13C–15N dipolar dephasing. The sidechain methine (CH) signals of valine, lecuine, and isoleucine are separated from the overlapping methylene (CH2) signals of long-chain amino acids using a multiple-quantum dipolar transfer technique. Both the COO and CH selection methods take advantage of improved dipolar dephasing by asymmetric rotational-echo double resonance (REDOR), where every other π-pulse is shifted from the center of a rotor period tr by about 0.15 tr. This asymmetry produces a deeper minimum in the REDOR dephasing curve and enables complete suppression of the undesired signals of immobile segments. Residual signals of mobile sidechains are positively identified by dynamics editing using recoupled 13C–1H dipolar dephasing. In all three experiments, the signals of carbons within a three-bond distance from the selected carbons are detected in the second spectral dimension via 13C spin exchange. The efficiencies of these spectral editing techniques range from 60 % for the COO and dynamic selection experiments to 25 % for the CH selection experiment, and are demonstrated on well-characterized model proteins GB1 and ubiquitin.

  17. Synonymous codon usage in different protein secondary structural classes of human genes: Implication for increased non-randomness of GC3 rich genes towards protein stability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pamela Mukhopadhyay; Surajit Basak; Tapash Chandra Ghosh

    2007-08-01

    The relationship between the synonymous codon usage and different protein secondary structural classes were investigated using 401 Homo sapiens proteins extracted from Protein Data Bank (PDB). A simple Chi-square test was used to assess the significance of deviation of the observed and expected frequencies of 59 codons at the level of individual synonymous families in the four different protein secondary structural classes. It was observed that synonymous codon families show non-randomness in codon usage in four different secondary structural classes. However, when the genes were classified according to their GC3 levels there was an increase in non-randomness in high GC3 group of genes. The non-randomness in codon usage was further tested among the same protein secondary structures belonging to four different protein folding classes of high GC3 group of genes. The results show that in each of the protein secondary structural unit there exist some synonymous family that shows class specific codonusage pattern. Moreover, there is an increased non-random behaviour of synonymous codons in sheet structure of all secondary structural classes in high GC3 group of genes. Biological implications of these results have been discussed.

  18. New recombinant cyclohexylamine oxidase variants for deracemization of secondary amines by orthogonally assaying designed mutants with structurally diverse substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangyue; Yao, Peiyuan; Cong, Peiqian; Ren, Jie; Wang, Lei; Feng, Jinhui; Lau, Peter C. K.; Wu, Qiaqing; Zhu, Dunming

    2016-05-01

    To further expand the substrate range of the cyclohexylamine oxidase (CHAO) from Brevibacterium oxydans, a library of diverse mutants was created and assayed toward a group of structurally diverse substrates. Among them, mutants T198A and M226A exhibited enhanced activity relative to wt CHAO for most (S)-enantiomers of primary amines and some secondary amines. While mutants T198I, L199I, L199F, M226I and M226T were more active than wt CHAO toward the primary amines, mutants T198F, L199T, Y321A, Y321T, Y321I and Y321F enhanced the enzyme activity toward the secondary amines. In particular, mutant Y321I displayed an enhanced catalytic efficiency toward 1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8-octahydroisoquinoline (13). Whereas a double mutant, Y321I/M226T, acted on (S)-N-(prop-2-yn-1-yl)-2, 3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-amine [(S)-8]. Since (R)-8 is an irreversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase and (S)-13 is an intermediate of dextromethorphan, a cough suppressant drug, deracemizations of 8 and 13 were carried out with crude enzyme extracts of the respective mutants. This resulted in 51% and 78% isolated yields of (R)-8 and (S)-13, respectively, each with high enantiomeric excess (93% and 99% ee). The results demonstrated the application potential of the evolved CHAO mutants in drug synthesis requiring chiral secondary amines.

  19. STRUCTURE OF THE INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER RIBBON FROM SECONDARY CHARGE-EXCHANGE AT THE SOLAR–INTERSTELLAR INTERFACE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zirnstein, E. J.; McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States); Heerikhuisen, J., E-mail: ezirnstein@swri.edu, E-mail: dmccomas@swri.edu, E-mail: jacob.heerikhuisen@uah.edu [Department of Space Science and Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    In 2009, the Interstellar Boundary Explorer discovered a bright “ribbon” of energetic neutral atom (ENA) flux in the energy range ≤0.4–6 keV, encircling a large portion of the sky. This observation was not previously predicted by any models or theories, and since its discovery, it has been the subject of numerous studies of its origin and properties. One of the most studied mechanisms for its creation is the “secondary ENA” process. Here, solar wind ions, neutralized by charge-exchange with interstellar atoms, propagate outside the heliopause; experience two charge-exchange events in the dense outer heliosheath; and then propagate back inside the heliosphere, preferentially in the direction perpendicular to the local interstellar magnetic field. This process has been extensively analyzed using state-of-the-art modeling and simulation techniques, but it has been difficult to visualize. In this Letter, we show the three-dimensional structure of the source of the ribbon, providing a physical picture of the spatial and energy scales over which the secondary ENA process occurs. These results help us understand how the ribbon is generated and further supports a secondary ENA process as the leading ribbon source mechanism.

  20. Electronic Structures and Alloying Behaviors of Ferrite Phases in High Co-Ni Secondary Hardened Martensitic Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@The electronic structure of ferrite (tempered martensite phase) in high Co-Ni secondary hardened martensitic steel has been investigated. The local density of states (LDOS) of alloying elements in the steel displays the relationship between solid solubility and the shape of the LDOS. The bond order integral (BOI) between atoms in the steel shows that the directional bonding of the p orbital of Si or C leads to the brittleness of the steel. At last, ∑BOI between atoms demonstrate that C, Co, Mn, Cr, Mo, Si strengthen the alloyed steel through solid-solution effects.

  1. ITS2 secondary structure improves phylogeny estimation in a radiation of blue butterflies of the subgenus Agrodiaetus (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae: Polyommatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Matthias

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current molecular phylogenetic studies of Lepidoptera and most other arthropods are predominantly based on mitochondrial genes and a limited number of nuclear genes. The nuclear genes, however, generally do not provide sufficient information for young radiations. ITS2 , which has proven to be an excellent nuclear marker for similarly aged radiations in other organisms like fungi and plants, is only rarely used for phylogeny estimation in arthropods, although universal primers exist. This is partly due to difficulties in the alignment of ITS2 sequences in more distant taxa. The present study uses ITS2 secondary structure information to elucidate the phylogeny of a species-rich young radiation of arthropods, the butterfly subgenus Agrodiaetus. One aim is to evaluate the efficiency of ITS2 to resolve the phylogeny of the subgenus in comparison with COI , the most important mitochondrial marker in arthropods. Furthermore, we assess the use of compensatory base changes in ITS2 for the delimitation of species and discuss the prospects of ITS2 as a nuclear marker for barcoding studies. Results In the butterfly family Lycaenidae, ITS2 secondary structure enabled us to successfully align sequences of different subtribes in Polyommatini and produce a Profile Neighbour Joining tree of this tribe, the resolution of which is comparable to phylogenetic trees obtained with COI+COII . The subgenus Agrodiaetus comprises 6 major clades which are in agreement with COI analyses. A dispersal-vicariance analysis (DIVA traced the origin of most Agrodiaetus clades to separate biogeographical areas in the region encompassing Eastern Anatolia, Transcaucasia and Iran. Conclusions With the inclusion of secondary structure information, ITS2 appears to be a suitable nuclear marker to infer the phylogeny of young radiations, as well as more distantly related genera within a diverse arthropod family. Its phylogenetic signal is comparable to the

  2. Spectral editing of two-dimensional magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectra for protein resonance assignment and structure determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt-Rohr, K.; Fritzsching, K. J.; Liao, S. Y.; Hong Mei, E-mail: mhong@iastate.edu [Iowa State University, Department of Chemistry and Ames Laboratory (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Several techniques for spectral editing of 2D {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C correlation NMR of proteins are introduced. They greatly reduce the spectral overlap for five common amino acid types, thus simplifying spectral assignment and conformational analysis. The carboxyl (COO) signals of glutamate and aspartate are selected by suppressing the overlapping amide N-CO peaks through {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N dipolar dephasing. The sidechain methine (CH) signals of valine, lecuine, and isoleucine are separated from the overlapping methylene (CH{sub 2}) signals of long-chain amino acids using a multiple-quantum dipolar transfer technique. Both the COO and CH selection methods take advantage of improved dipolar dephasing by asymmetric rotational-echo double resonance (REDOR), where every other {pi}-pulse is shifted from the center of a rotor period t{sub r} by about 0.15 t{sub r}. This asymmetry produces a deeper minimum in the REDOR dephasing curve and enables complete suppression of the undesired signals of immobile segments. Residual signals of mobile sidechains are positively identified by dynamics editing using recoupled {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H dipolar dephasing. In all three experiments, the signals of carbons within a three-bond distance from the selected carbons are detected in the second spectral dimension via {sup 13}C spin exchange. The efficiencies of these spectral editing techniques range from 60 % for the COO and dynamic selection experiments to 25 % for the CH selection experiment, and are demonstrated on well-characterized model proteins GB1 and ubiquitin.

  3. Forest structure and species diversity of secondary forest after cultivation in relation to various sources at lower northern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Podong

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the characteristic of structure, species composition and species diversity in secondary mixed deciduous forest at Thung Salaeng Luang National Park, Lower North of Thailand. This vertical stratification of the tree canopy can affect the growth of young trees on the ground surface, especially that of saplings and seedlings. Ground species can establish themselves very quickly when the light intensity is high enough and especially when the light can penetrate directly to the ground during gap formation. The data of tree individuals have served to give insight into the stand density, basal area, and frequency number of DBH class ranges. There were a large number of DBH class ranges but there were low DBH values. The species composition of secondary mixed deciduous forest is low rich and diversity but that is high density. The comparison between secondary mixed deciduous forest at Thung Salaeng Luang National Park and other forest is tree density higher than other forest but number of species is similarity or lower. The dominant species of trees were Haldina cordifolia, Albizia odoratissima and Lagerstroemia duperreana. The IVI values of trees were 132.91, 17.78 and 14.22, respectively. Species diversity compared to other forests,The Fisher's, Shannon-Wiener's index and Simpson's index in these studies are found to be lower than other forests. The size class distribution of trees in secondary mixed deciduous forest is shown to be on L-shape curve, which is high abundance of small trees.

  4. Evaluation of the suitability of free-energy minimization using nearest-neighbor energy parameters for RNA secondary structure prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cobaugh Christian W

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A detailed understanding of an RNA's correct secondary and tertiary structure is crucial to understanding its function and mechanism in the cell. Free energy minimization with energy parameters based on the nearest-neighbor model and comparative analysis are the primary methods for predicting an RNA's secondary structure from its sequence. Version 3.1 of Mfold has been available since 1999. This version contains an expanded sequence dependence of energy parameters and the ability to incorporate coaxial stacking into free energy calculations. We test Mfold 3.1 by performing the largest and most phylogenetically diverse comparison of rRNA and tRNA structures predicted by comparative analysis and Mfold, and we use the results of our tests on 16S and 23S rRNA sequences to assess the improvement between Mfold 2.3 and Mfold 3.1. Results The average prediction accuracy for a 16S or 23S rRNA sequence with Mfold 3.1 is 41%, while the prediction accuracies for the majority of 16S and 23S rRNA structures tested are between 20% and 60%, with some having less than 20% prediction accuracy. The average prediction accuracy was 71% for 5S rRNA and 69% for tRNA. The majority of the 5S rRNA and tRNA sequences have prediction accuracies greater than 60%. The prediction accuracy of 16S rRNA base-pairs decreases exponentially as the number of nucleotides intervening between the 5' and 3' halves of the base-pair increases. Conclusion Our analysis indicates that the current set of nearest-neighbor energy parameters in conjunction with the Mfold folding algorithm are unable to consistently and reliably predict an RNA's correct secondary structure. For 16S or 23S rRNA structure prediction, Mfold 3.1 offers little improvement over Mfold 2.3. However, the nearest-neighbor energy parameters do work well for shorter RNA sequences such as tRNA or 5S rRNA, or for larger rRNAs when the contact distance between the base-pairs is less than 100 nucleotides.

  5. A regime map for secondary flow structures under physiological and multi-harmonic inflow through a bent tube model for curved arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Shannon M.; Caldwell, Kirin; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2012-11-01

    Secondary flow structures are known to affect wall shear stress, which is closely related to atherogenesis and drug particle deposition. A regime map provides a framework to examine phase-wise variations in secondary flow structures under physiological and multi-harmonic inflow waveforms under conditions of a fixed Womersley number (4.2) and curvature ratio (1/7). Experimental PIV data were acquired at the 90-degree location in a 180-degree curved test section of a bent tube model for curved arteries using a blood analog working fluid. Coherent structure detection was performed using a continuous wavelet transform algorithm (PIVlet 1.2) and further analysis was carried out by grouping similar secondary flow structures at a fixed secondary Reynolds numbers. Phase-locked, planar vorticity fields over one period of inflow waveform revealed size, structure and strength similarities in secondary flow morphologies during the acceleration and deceleration phases. The utility of the new regime map lies in the a priori identification of pulsatile secondary flow structures, eliminating the need for exhaustive experimentation or computing, requiring only flow rate measurements that are easily acquired under clinical conditions. Supported by the National Science Foundation, Grant No. CBET-0828903 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE).

  6. Stand structural diversity rather than species diversity enhances aboveground carbon storage in secondary subtropical forests in Eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Arshad; Yan, En-Rong; Chen, Han Y. H.; Chang, Scott X.; Zhao, Yan-Tao; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Ming-Shan

    2016-08-01

    Stand structural diversity, typically characterized by variances in tree diameter at breast height (DBH) and total height, plays a critical role in influencing aboveground carbon (C) storage. However, few studies have considered the multivariate relationships of aboveground C storage with stand age, stand structural diversity, and species diversity in natural forests. In this study, aboveground C storage, stand age, tree species, DBH and height diversity indices, were determined across 80 subtropical forest plots in Eastern China. We employed structural equation modelling (SEM) to test for the direct and indirect effects of stand structural diversity, species diversity, and stand age on aboveground C storage. The three final SEMs with different directions for the path between species diversity and stand structural diversity had a similar goodness of fit to the data. They accounted for 82 % of the variation in aboveground C storage, 55-59 % of the variation in stand structural diversity, and 0.1 to 9 % of the variation in species diversity. Stand age demonstrated strong positive total effects, including a positive direct effect (β = 0.41), and a positive indirect effect via stand structural diversity (β = 0.41) on aboveground C storage. Stand structural diversity had a positive direct effect on aboveground C storage (β = 0.56), whereas there was little total effect of species diversity as it had a negative direct association with, but had a positive indirect effect, via stand structural diversity, on aboveground C storage. The negligible total effect of species diversity on aboveground C storage in the forests under study may have been attributable to competitive exclusion with high aboveground biomass, or a historical logging preference for productive species. Our analyses suggested that stand structural diversity was a major determinant for variations in aboveground C storage in the secondary subtropical forests in Eastern China. Hence, maintaining tree DBH and

  7. Carbon Policy and Technical Change: Market Structure, Increasing Returns, and Secondary Benefits. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peretto, P.; Smith, V. K.

    2001-11-19

    An economic evaluation of the impact of policies intended to control emissions of CO{sub 2} and other ''greenhouse gases'' (GHGS) depends on the net costs of these controls and their distribution throughout the production sectors of developed and developing economics. The answers derived from appraisals of these net costs, in turn, stem from what is assumed about the timing of the controls, the pace of technological change, and any short-term secondary benefits from their control. There have only been a few serious attempts to estimate the economic benefits from the policies associated with such long run outcomes. All of the approaches to date have made fairly strong assumptions or relied on contingent valuation estimates of hypothetical situations.

  8. Mineral Association Changes the Secondary Structure and Dynamics of Murine Amelogenin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, J. X.; Xu, Y. S.; Buchko, G. W.; Shaw, W. J.

    2013-10-15

    Biomineralization proteins, present during the formation of hard tissues including bones, teeth, egg shells and nacre, result in the exquisite structures and properties of the resulting materials.[1] The structure of these proteins is often implicated in the control of the mineral properties, however very little structural data is available for the bulk of these proteins due to the difficulty in determining structures of immobilized proteins. Solid-state NMR is uniquely suited to the study of the structure of proteins bound to surfaces, demonstrated with the structural and orientation insights provided for the hydroxyapatite mineralization proteins statherin and the amelogenin, LRAP.[2] While these data are some of the only structural data available for this important class of protein, the experiments are often expensive and time consuming, due to the need to prepare and measure samples with isolated spin pairs, and are limited to a size of ~60 residues. In this work, we utilized a combination of 1D and recent 2D[3] solid-state NMR techniques along with a sparsely labelled sample to characterize the structure and dynamics of potential HAP binding residues of the 180 residue enamel protein, amelogenin. Amelogenin nanospheres and mineral bound amelogenin were investigated and a shift from unstructured to β-sheet structure was observed, along with a decrease in protein flexibility. This work provides the first molecular level structure and dynamic information of full-length amelogenin on the surface of hydroxyapatite (HAP) and within nanospheres, and demonstrates the ability to evaluate structural characteristics of large biomineralization proteins bound to their physiologically relevant surface. The research was performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a facility operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy, with a portion of it performed at the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user

  9. Dopamine agonist suppression of rapid-eye-movement sleep is secondary to sleep suppression mediated via limbic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of pergolide, a direct dopamine receptor agonist, on sleep and wakefulness, motor behavior and 3H-spiperone specific binding in limbic structures and striatum in rats was studied. The results show that pergolide induced a biphasic dose effect, with high doses increasing wakefulness and suppressing sleep while low dose decreased wakefulness, but increased sleep. It was shown that pergolide-induced sleep suppression was blocked by α-glupenthixol and pimozide, two dopamine receptor antagonists. It was further shown that pergolide merely delayed the rebound resulting from rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep deprivation, that dopamine receptors stimulation had no direct effect on the period, phase or amplitude of the circadian rhythm of REM sleep propensity and that there was no alteration in the coupling of REM sleep episodes with S2 episodes. Rapid-eye-movement sleep deprivation resulted in increased sensitivity to the pergolide-induced wakefulness stimulation and sleep suppression and pergolide-induced motor behaviors of locomotion and head bobbing. 3H-spiperone specific binding to dopamine receptors was shown to be altered by REM sleep deprivation in the subcortical limbic structures. It is concluded that the REM sleep suppressing action of dopamine receptor stimulation is secondary to sleep suppression per se and not secondary to a unique effect on the REM sleep. Further, it is suggested that the wakefulness stimulating action of dopamine receptor agonists is mediated by activation of the dopamine receptors in the terminal areas of the mesolimbocortical dopamine projection system

  10. Community structure, life histories and secondary production of stoneflies in two small mountain streams with different degree of forest cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Beracko

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Our study examines community structure and nymphal biology (life cycles and secondary production of stoneflies in two adjacent mountain streams with different degree of forest cover in the Prosiečanka River Basin (Chočské Vrchy Mts., West Carpathians. One of the streams has non-forested catchment, converted to meadows and pastures, while the other one has catchment with 60% covered by spruce forest. Differences in forest cover and in thermal regime of the streams were reflected by the difference of stonefly communities at their structural and functional level. Species Nemoura cinerea and Leuctra aurita created stonefly assemblage in non-forested stream, whereas Nemoura cinerea also occurred in naturally forested stream together with species Leuctra armata, Leuctra nigra, Leuctra prima, Siphonoperla neglecta and Arcynopteryx dichroa. All examined species had maximally annual life cycle and in eudominant species Nemoura cinerea one month shift was found in nymphal hatching and adult emergence between streams. Total secondary production of stoneflies in undisturbed stream (126.46 mg DW m-2 y-1 was more than two times higher than the production in non-forested stream (47.39 mg DW m-2 y-1. 

  11. Evolving Networks with Nonlinear Assignment of Weight

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Chao; TANG Yi

    2006-01-01

    We propose a weighted evolving network model in which the underlying topological structure is still driven by the degree according to the preferential attachment rule while the weight assigned to the newly established edges is dependent on the degree in a nonlinear form. By varying the parameter α that controls the function determining the assignment of weight, a wide variety of power-law behaviours of the total weight distributions as well as the diversity of the weight distributions of edges are displayed. Variation of correlation and heterogeneity in the network is illustrated as well.

  12. Optimal Estimation Retrievals of the Atmospheric Structure and Composition of HD 189733b from Secondary Eclipse Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Jae-Min; Irwin, Patrick G J

    2011-01-01

    Recent spectroscopic observations of transiting hot Jupiters have permitted the derivation of the thermal structure and molecular abundances of H2O, CO2, CO, and CH4 in these extreme atmospheres. Here, for the first time, we apply the technique of optimal estimation to determine the thermal structure and composition of an exoplanet by solving the inverse problem. The development of a suite of radiative transfer and retrieval tools for exoplanet atmospheres is described, building upon a retrieval algorithm which is extensively used in the study of our own solar system. First, we discuss the plausibility of detection of different molecules in the dayside atmosphere of HD 189733b and the best-fitting spectrum retrieved from all publicly available sets of secondary eclipse observations between 1.45 and 24 {\\mu}m. Additionally, we use contribution functions to assess the vertical sensitivity of the emission spectrum to temperatures and molecular composition. Over the altitudes probed by the contribution functions,...

  13. Optimization of antisense drug design againstconservative local motif in simulant secondary structures of HER-2 mRNA and QSAR analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGShuan-Ping; SONGSan-Tai; TANGZhong-Ming; SONGHai-Feng

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the role of mRNA secondary structure stability in antisense drug design and obtain better antisensecandidates against neu/HER-2/erbB-2 mRNA than previous report. METHODS: Program RNAstructure wasutilized to simulate the secondary structures of HER-2 mRNA. Then 21 antisense phosphorothioateoligodeoxynucleotides (S-ODN) targeting different parts of secondary structural motif were designed. HA4 wasset as positive control. Mean 50 % inhibitory effects (IC50) of S-ODN on proliferations of SK-BR-3 breast cancercells were evaluated. The expression of target mRNA was detected by RT-PCR. The multiple regression andquantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis was preformed by SPSS software. RESULTS: Oneoptimal and two suboptimal secondary structures of target mRNA were obtained. Nine out of 11 S-ODN againstcompletely conservative local motif (LM) (conservative among all simulant secondary structures) got lower orsimilar IC50 values compared with HA4. On the other hand, 2 out of 3 S-ODN against relatively conservative LM(conservative between any two simulant secondary structures) got lower or similar IC50 values compared withHA4. Only 2 out of 5 S-ODN targeting variable LM (variable among different predicted secondary structures) hadacceptable activities. Average IC50 of S-ODN against completely conservative LM was significantly lower than thatof S-ODN against diverse LM. QSAR analysis suggested that stability, base number of bulge loops, and target freeenergies △G°T were statistically significant. In the multiple regression, R was 0.967, P=0.005. CONCLUSION:Antisense drug design against conservative LM was helpful for improving the positive rate. Several S-ODN candidates better than positive control were screened.

  14. The relationship between third-codon position nucleotide content, codon bias, mRNA secondary structure and gene expression in the drosophilid alcohol dehydrogenase genes Adh and Adhr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlini, D B; Chen, Y; Stephan, W

    2001-01-01

    To gain insights into the relationship between codon bias, mRNA secondary structure, third-codon position nucleotide distribution, and gene expression, we predicted secondary structures in two related drosophilid genes, Adh and Adhr, which differ in degree of codon bias and level of gene expression. Individual structural elements (helices) were inferred using the comparative method. For each gene, four types of randomization simulations were performed to maintain/remove codon bias and/or to maintain or alter third-codon position nucleotide composition (N3). In the weakly expressed, weakly biased gene Adhr, the potential for secondary structure formation was found to be much stronger than in the highly expressed, highly biased gene Adh. This is consistent with the observation of approximately equal G and C percentages in Adhr ( approximately 31% across species), whereas in Adh the N3 distribution is shifted toward C (42% across species). Perturbing the N3 distribution to approximately equal amounts of A, G, C, and T increases the potential for secondary structure formation in Adh, but decreases it in Adhr. On the other hand, simulations that reduce codon bias without changing N3 content indicate that codon bias per se has only a weak effect on the formation of secondary structures. These results suggest that, for these two drosophilid genes, secondary structure is a relatively independent, negative regulator of gene expression. Whereas the degree of codon bias is positively correlated with level of gene expression, strong individual secondary structural elements may be selected for to retard mRNA translation and to decrease gene expression. PMID:11606539

  15. RNAsnp: efficient detection of local RNA secondary structure changes induced by SNPs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radhakrishnan, Sabarinathan; Tafer, Hakim; Seemann, Ernst Stefan;

    2013-01-01

    Structural characteristics are essential for the functioning of many noncoding RNAs and cis-regulatory elements of mRNAs. SNPs may disrupt these structures, interfere with their molecular function, and hence cause a phenotypic effect. RNA folding algorithms can provide detailed insights into stru......Structural characteristics are essential for the functioning of many noncoding RNAs and cis-regulatory elements of mRNAs. SNPs may disrupt these structures, interfere with their molecular function, and hence cause a phenotypic effect. RNA folding algorithms can provide detailed insights...... into structural effects of SNPs. The global measures employed so far suffer from limited accuracy of folding programs on large RNAs and are computationally too demanding for genome-wide applications. Here, we present a strategy that focuses on the local regions of maximal structural change between mutant and wild...... precomputed tables of the distribution of SNP effects as function of length and GC content. RNAsnp thus achieves both a noise reduction and speed-up of several orders of magnitude over shuffling-based approaches. On a data set comprising 501 SNPs associated with human-inherited diseases, we predict 54 to have...

  16. Fast collapse but slow formation of secondary structure elements in the refolding transition of E. coli adenylate kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, V; Amir, D; Kahana, E; Haas, E

    2005-09-23

    The various models proposed for protein folding transition differ in their order of appearance of the basic steps during this process. In this study, steady state and time-resolved dynamic non-radiative excitation energy transfer (FRET and trFRET) combined with site specific labeling experiments were applied in order to characterize the initial transient ensemble of Escherichia coli adenylate kinase (AK) molecules upon shifting conditions from those favoring denaturation to refolding and from folding to denaturing. Three sets of labeled AK mutants were prepared, which were designed to probe the equilibrium and transient distributions of intramolecular segmental end-to-end distances. A 176 residue section (residues 28-203), which spans most of the 214 residue molecule, and two short secondary structure chain segments including an alpha-helix (residues 169-188) and a predominantly beta-strand region (residues 188-203), were labeled. Upon fast change of conditions from denaturing to folding, the end-to-end distance of the 176 residue chain section showed an immediate collapse to a mean value of 26 A. Under the same conditions, the two short secondary structure elements did not respond to this shift within the first ten milliseconds, and retained the characteristics of a fully unfolded state. Within the first 10 ms after changes of the solvent from folding to denaturing, only minor changes were observed at the local environments of residues 203 and 169. The response of these same local environments to the shift of conditions from denaturing to folding occurred within the dead time of the mixing device. Thus, the response of the CORE domain of AK to fast transfer from folding to unfolding conditions is slow at all three conformational levels that were probed, and for at least a few milliseconds the ensemble of folded molecules is maintained under unfolding conditions. A different order of the changes was observed upon initiation of refolding. The AK molecules undergo

  17. 76 FR 55880 - Recording Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-09

    ..., depending on the date they were recorded. The public may also search patent and trademark assignment... United States Patent and Trademark Office Recording Assignments ACTION: Proposed collection; comment request. SUMMARY: The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), as part of its continuing...

  18. Assigning agents to a line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Moreno-Ternero, Juan D.; Østerdal, Lars Peter Raahave

    2014-01-01

    We consider the problem of assigning agents to slots on a line, where only one agent can be served at a slot and each agent prefers to be served as close as possible to his target. Our focus is on aggregate gap minimizing methods, i.e., those that minimize the total gap between targets and assigned...

  19. Dynamic changes in the secondary structure of ECE-1 and XCE account for their different substrate specificities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ul-Haq Zaheer

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X-converting enzyme (XCE involved in nervous control of respiration, is a member of the M13 family of zinc peptidases, for which no natural substrate has been identified yet. In contrast, it’s well characterized homologue endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1 showed broad substrate specificity and acts as endopeptidase as well as dipeptidase. To explore the structural differences between XCE and ECE-1, homology model of XCE was built using the complex structure of ECE-1 with phosphoramidon (pdb-id: 3DWB as template. Phosphoramidon was docked into the binding site of XCE whereas phosphate oxygen of the inhibitor was used as water molecule to design the apo forms of both enzymes. Molecular dynamics simulation of both enzymes was performed to analyze the dynamic nature of their active site residues in the absence and presence of the inhibitor. Results Homology model of XCE explained the role of non-conserved residues of its S2’ subsite. Molecular dynamics (MD simulations identified the flexible transitions of F149/I150, N566/N571, W714/W719, and R145/R723 residues of ECE-1/XCE for the strong binding of the inhibitor. Secondary structure calculations using DSSP method reveals the folding of R145/R723 residue of ECE-1/XCE into β-sheet structure while unfolding of the S2’ subsite residues in aECE-1 and sustained compact folding of that of aXCE. The results evaluated are in good agreement with available experimental data, thus providing detailed molecular models which can explain the structural and specificities differences between both zinc peptidases. Conclusions Secondary structure changes of both enzymes during the simulation time revealed the importance of β-sheet structure of R145/R723 for its binding with the terminal carboxylate group of the inhibitor. Unfolding of the α-helix comprising the S2’ subsite residues in aECE-1 correlate well with its endopeptidase activity while their compact folding in aXCE may

  20. Molecular evolution of rDNA in early diverging Metazoa: First comparative analysis and phylogenetic application of complete SSU rRNA secondary structures in Porifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wörheide Gert

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cytoplasmic ribosomal small subunit (SSU, 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA is the most frequently-used gene for molecular phylogenetic studies. However, information regarding its secondary structure is neglected in most phylogenetic analyses. Incorporation of this information is essential in order to apply specific rRNA evolutionary models to overcome the problem of co-evolution of paired sites, which violates the basic assumption of the independent evolution of sites made by most phylogenetic methods. Information about secondary structure also supports the process of aligning rRNA sequences across taxa. Both aspects have been shown to increase the accuracy of phylogenetic reconstructions within various taxa. Here, we explore SSU rRNA secondary structures from the three extant classes of Phylum Porifera (Grant, 1836, a pivotal, but largely unresolved taxon of early branching Metazoa. This is the first phylogenetic study of poriferan SSU rRNA data to date that includes detailed comparative secondary structure information for all three sponge classes. Results We found base compositional and structural differences in SSU rRNA among Demospongiae, Hexactinellida (glass sponges and Calcarea (calcareous sponges. We showed that analyses of primary rRNA sequences, including secondary structure-specific evolutionary models, in combination with reconstruction of the evolution of unusual structural features, reveal a substantial amount of additional information. Of special note was the finding that the gene tree topologies of marine haplosclerid demosponges, which are inconsistent with the current morphology-based classification, are supported by our reconstructed evolution of secondary structure features. Therefore, these features can provide alternative support for sequence-based topologies and give insights into the evolution of the molecule itself. To encourage and facilitate the application of rRNA models in phylogenetics of early

  1. Secondary structure, a missing component of sequence-based minimotif definitions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P Sargeant

    Full Text Available Minimotifs are short contiguous segments of proteins that have a known biological function. The hundreds of thousands of minimotifs discovered thus far are an important part of the theoretical understanding of the specificity of protein-protein interactions, posttranslational modifications, and signal transduction that occur in cells. However, a longstanding problem is that the different abstractions of the sequence definitions do not accurately capture the specificity, despite decades of effort by many labs. We present evidence that structure is an essential component of minimotif specificity, yet is not used in minimotif definitions. Our analysis of several known minimotifs as case studies, analysis of occurrences of minimotifs in structured and disordered regions of proteins, and review of the literature support a new model for minimotif definitions that includes sequence, structure, and function.

  2. Extending DFT-based genetic algorithms by atom-to-place re-assignment via perturbation theory: A systematic and unbiased approach to structures of mixed-metallic clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy surfaces of metal clusters usually show a large variety of local minima. For homo-metallic species the energetically lowest can be found reliably with genetic algorithms, in combination with density functional theory without system-specific parameters. For mixed-metallic clusters this is much more difficult, as for a given arrangement of nuclei one has to find additionally the best of many possibilities of assigning different metal types to the individual positions. In the framework of electronic structure methods this second issue is treatable at comparably low cost at least for elements with similar atomic number by means of first-order perturbation theory, as shown previously [F. Weigend, C. Schrodt, and R. Ahlrichs, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 10380 (2004)]. In the present contribution the extension of a genetic algorithm with the re-assignment of atom types to atom sites is proposed and tested for the search of the global minima of PtHf12 and [LaPb7Bi7]4−. For both cases the (putative) global minimum is reliably found with the extended technique, which is not the case for the “pure” genetic algorithm

  3. Examining the effects of structured dialogue grounded in socioculturalism as a tool to facilitate professional development in secondary science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Antoinette S.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of professional development characterized by teacher facilitated learning activities as a way to improve teaching practices and learning outcomes. In this study, teachers were provided opportunities to facilitate their own learning by investigating ways to consistently foster the desired learning outcomes for urban students over the course of three semesters. During the first semester, teachers focused on improving test scores and student motivation. By the third semester, teachers opted to extend time for students to complete assignments, and focused on sharing strategies that worked for students. Second, students of teachers who participated in the study group format using the structured dialogue approach demonstrated dramatic gains on the standardized content assessment in chemistry and integrated coordinated science (ICS) over three years. In chemistry, the percent of students scoring at far below basic decreased by 24%, and the percentage of students who scored basic increased 21%. In ICS, the percentage of students that scored far below basic decreased by 14% and the percent of students who scored basic increased 14%. The research findings suggest that using structured dialogue to facilitate teacher discourse in a way that is conducive to establishing positive discourse about student learning and rigorous pedagogy are key factors in improving teachers' ability to foster high academic outcomes from urban students.

  4. Projection structure of the secondary citrate/sodium symporter CitS at 6 Å resolution by electron crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebbel, Fabian; Kurz, Mareike; Grütter, Markus G; Stahlberg, Henning

    2012-04-20

    CitS from Klebsiella pneumoniae acts as a secondary symporter of citrate and sodium ions across the inner membrane of the host. The protein is the best characterized member of the 2-hydroxycarboxylate transporter family, while no experimental structural information at sub-nanometer resolution is available on this class of membrane proteins. Here, we applied electron crystallography to two-dimensional crystals of CitS. Carbon-film-adsorbed tubular two-dimensional crystals were studied by cryo-electron microscopy, producing the 6-Å-resolution projection structure of the membrane-embedded protein. In the p22(1)2(1)-symmetrized projection map, the predicted dimeric structure is clearly visible. Each monomeric unit can tentatively be interpreted as being composed of 11 transmembrane α-helices. In projection, CitS shows a high degree of structural similarity to NhaP1, the Na(+)/H(+) antiporter of Methanococcus jannaschii. We discuss possible locations for the dimer interface and models for the helical arrangements and domain organizations of the symporter based on existing models.

  5. Impact of molecular structure on secondary organic aerosol formation from aromatic hydrocarbon photooxidation under low-NOx conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lijie; Tang, Ping; Nakao, Shunsuke; Cocker, David R., III

    2016-08-01

    The molecular structure of volatile organic compounds determines their oxidation pathway, directly impacting secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. This study comprehensively investigates the impact of molecular structure on SOA formation from the photooxidation of 12 different eight- to nine-carbon aromatic hydrocarbons under low-NOx conditions. The effects of the alkyl substitute number, location, carbon chain length and branching structure on the photooxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons are demonstrated by analyzing SOA yield, chemical composition and physical properties. Aromatic hydrocarbons, categorized into five groups, show a yield order of ortho (o-xylene and o-ethyltoluene) > one substitute (ethylbenzene, propylbenzene and isopropylbenzene) > meta (m-xylene and m-ethyltoluene) > three substitute (trimethylbenzenes) > para (p-xylene and p-ethyltoluene). SOA yields of aromatic hydrocarbon photooxidation do not monotonically decrease when increasing alkyl substitute number. The ortho position promotes SOA formation while the para position suppresses aromatic oxidation and SOA formation. Observed SOA chemical composition and volatility confirm that higher yield is associated with further oxidation. SOA chemical composition also suggests that aromatic oxidation increases with increasing alkyl substitute chain length and branching structure. Further, carbon dilution conjecture developed by Li et al. (2016) is extended in this study to serve as a standard method to determine the extent of oxidation of an alkyl-substituted aromatic hydrocarbon.

  6. Novel sequence variations in LAMA2 and SGCG genes modulating cis-acting regulatory elements and RNA secondary structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfa Siala

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we detected new sequence variations in LAMA2 and SGCG genes in 5 ethnic populations, and analysed their effect on enhancer composition and mRNA structure. PCR amplification and DNA sequencing were performed and followed by bioinformatics analyses using ESEfinder as well as MFOLD software. We found 3 novel sequence variations in the LAMA2 (c.3174+22_23insAT and c.6085 +12delA and SGCG (c.*102A/C genes. These variations were present in 210 tested healthy controls from Tunisian, Moroccan, Algerian, Lebanese and French populations suggesting that they represent novel polymorphisms within LAMA2 and SGCG genes sequences. ESEfinder showed that the c.*102A/C substitution created a new exon splicing enhancer in the 3'UTR of SGCG genes, whereas the c.6085 +12delA deletion was situated in the base pairing region between LAMA2 mRNA and the U1snRNA spliceosomal components. The RNA structure analyses showed that both variations modulated RNA secondary structure. Our results are suggestive of correlations between mRNA folding and the recruitment of spliceosomal components mediating splicing, including SR proteins. The contribution of common sequence variations to mRNA structural and functional diversity will contribute to a better study of gene expression.

  7. Membrane interaction and secondary structure of de novo designed arginine-and tryptophan peptides with dual function

    KAUST Repository

    Rydberg, Hanna A.

    2012-10-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides and antimicrobial peptides are two classes of positively charged membrane active peptides with several properties in common. The challenge is to combine knowledge about the membrane interaction mechanisms and structural properties of the two classes to design peptides with membrane-specific actions, useful either as transporters of cargo or as antibacterial substances. Membrane active peptides are commonly rich in arginine and tryptophan. We have previously designed a series of arg/trp peptides and investigated how the position and number of tryptophans affect cellular uptake. Here we explore the antimicrobial properties and the interaction with lipid model membranes of these peptides, using minimal inhibitory concentrations assay (MIC), circular dichroism (CD) and linear dichroism (LD). The results show that the arg/trp peptides inhibit the growth of the two gram positive strains Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus pyogenes, with some individual variations depending on the position of the tryptophans. No inhibition of the gram negative strains Proteus mirabilis or Pseudomonas aeruginosa was noticed. CD indicated that when bound to lipid vesicles one of the peptides forms an α-helical like structure, whereas the other five exhibited rather random coiled structures. LD indicated that all six peptides were somehow aligned parallel with the membrane surface. Our results do not reveal any obvious connection between membrane interaction and antimicrobial effect for the studied peptides. By contrast cell-penetrating properties can be coupled to both the secondary structure and the degree of order of the peptides. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

  8. An updated 18S rRNA phylogeny of tunicates based on mixture and secondary structure models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenkar Noa

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tunicates have been recently revealed to be the closest living relatives of vertebrates. Yet, with more than 2500 described species, details of their evolutionary history are still obscure. From a molecular point of view, tunicate phylogenetic relationships have been mostly studied based on analyses of 18S rRNA sequences, which indicate several major clades at odds with the traditional class-level arrangements. Nonetheless, substantial uncertainty remains about the phylogenetic relationships and taxonomic status of key groups such as the Aplousobranchia, Appendicularia, and Thaliacea. Results Thirty new complete 18S rRNA sequences were acquired from previously unsampled tunicate species, with special focus on groups presenting high evolutionary rate. The updated 18S rRNA dataset has been aligned with respect to the constraint on homology imposed by the rRNA secondary structure. A probabilistic framework of phylogenetic reconstruction was adopted to accommodate the particular evolutionary dynamics of this ribosomal marker. Detailed Bayesian analyses were conducted under the non-parametric CAT mixture model accounting for site-specific heterogeneity of the evolutionary process, and under RNA-specific doublet models accommodating the occurrence of compensatory substitutions in stem regions. Our results support the division of tunicates into three major clades: 1 Phlebobranchia + Thaliacea + Aplousobranchia, 2 Appendicularia, and 3 Stolidobranchia, but the position of Appendicularia could not be firmly resolved. Our study additionally reveals that most Aplousobranchia evolve at extremely high rates involving changes in secondary structure of their 18S rRNA, with the exception of the family Clavelinidae, which appears to be slowly evolving. This extreme rate heterogeneity precluded resolving with certainty the exact phylogenetic placement of Aplousobranchia. Finally, the best fitting secondary-structure and CAT-mixture models

  9. Use of tiling array data and RNA secondary structure predictions to identify noncoding RNA genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weile, Christian; Gardner, Paul P; Hedegaard, Mads M;

    2007-01-01

    neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-AS. Using this strategy, we identify thousands of human candidate RNA genes. To further verify the expression of these genes, we focused on candidate genes that had a stable hairpin structures or a high level of covariance. Using northern blotting, we verify the expression of 2 out...

  10. Secondary structure of prokaryotic 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acids: a study with ribonucleases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douthwaite, S; Garrett, R A

    1981-01-01

    The structures of 5S ribosomal RNAs from Escherichia coli and Bacillus stearothermophilus were examined by using ribonucleases A, T1, and T2 and a double helix specific cobra venom ribonuclease. By using both 5' and 3'-32P-end labeling methods and selecting for digested but intact 5S RNA molecule...

  11. An RNA secondary structure bias for non-homologous reverse transcriptase-mediated deletions in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duch, Mogens; Carrasco, Maria L; Jespersen, Thomas;

    2004-01-01

    result from template switching during first-strand cDNA synthesis and that the choice of acceptor sites for non-homologous recombination are guided by non-paired regions. Our results may have implications for recombination events taking place within structured regions of retroviral RNA genomes......, especially in the absence of longer stretches of sequence similarity....

  12. Improving the Keyboarding Composition Skills of Secondary Business Education Students through a Structured Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Gay E.

    A practicum was designed to improve students' manual keyboarding composition skill. A program was developed to integrate the other requisite skills of well-written composition, accurate punctuation and grammar, and fastidious proofreading in a structured, progressive plan. The 25 students in the Typing I Business Fundamentals class, a keyboarding…

  13. An Assignment Sequence for Underprepared Writers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, Kristi

    2000-01-01

    Presents a sequenced writing assignment on shopping to aid basic writers. Describes a writing assignment focused around online and mail-order shopping. Notes steps in preparing for the assignment, the sequence, and discusses responses to the assignments. (SC)

  14. Effects of Secondary Plant Metabolites on Microbial Populations: Changes in Community Structure and Metabolic Activity in Contaminated Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musilova, Lucie; Ridl, Jakub; Polivkova, Marketa; Macek, Tomas; Uhlik, Ondrej

    2016-01-01

    Secondary plant metabolites (SPMEs) play an important role in plant survival in the environment and serve to establish ecological relationships between plants and other organisms. Communication between plants and microorganisms via SPMEs contained in root exudates or derived from litter decomposition is an example of this phenomenon. In this review, the general aspects of rhizodeposition together with the significance of terpenes and phenolic compounds are discussed in detail. We focus specifically on the effect of SPMEs on microbial community structure and metabolic activity in environments contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Furthermore, a section is devoted to a complex effect of plants and/or their metabolites contained in litter on bioremediation of contaminated sites. New insights are introduced from a study evaluating the effects of SPMEs derived during decomposition of grapefruit peel, lemon peel, and pears on bacterial communities and their ability to degrade PCBs in a long-term contaminated soil. The presented review supports the “secondary compound hypothesis” and demonstrates the potential of SPMEs for increasing the effectiveness of bioremediation processes. PMID:27483244

  15. Effects of Secondary Plant Metabolites on Microbial Populations: Changes in Community Structure and Metabolic Activity in Contaminated Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musilova, Lucie; Ridl, Jakub; Polivkova, Marketa; Macek, Tomas; Uhlik, Ondrej

    2016-01-01

    Secondary plant metabolites (SPMEs) play an important role in plant survival in the environment and serve to establish ecological relationships between plants and other organisms. Communication between plants and microorganisms via SPMEs contained in root exudates or derived from litter decomposition is an example of this phenomenon. In this review, the general aspects of rhizodeposition together with the significance of terpenes and phenolic compounds are discussed in detail. We focus specifically on the effect of SPMEs on microbial community structure and metabolic activity in environments contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Furthermore, a section is devoted to a complex effect of plants and/or their metabolites contained in litter on bioremediation of contaminated sites. New insights are introduced from a study evaluating the effects of SPMEs derived during decomposition of grapefruit peel, lemon peel, and pears on bacterial communities and their ability to degrade PCBs in a long-term contaminated soil. The presented review supports the "secondary compound hypothesis" and demonstrates the potential of SPMEs for increasing the effectiveness of bioremediation processes. PMID:27483244

  16. Feasibility Study on Nano-structured Coatings to Mitigate Flow-accelerated Corrosion in Secondary System of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There have been many efforts to mitigate FAC through the adoption of the advanced and modified water chemistries such as optimized dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration and temperature. However, these mitigation techniques pose certain challenges relating to the compatibility of new water chemistries with the steam generator, the thermal efficiency of the secondary side, etc. In this context, nano-particle reinforced electroless nickel plating (NP ENP) could help solve the FAC issues in secondary pipe systems. This does not require modification of water chemistry or structural materials, and hence, its application is reasonable and time-saving compared to previous FAC mitigation techniques. The main parameters of FAC are known as electrochemical reaction at the interface, dissolution of magnetite and ferrous ions due to concentration gradient between carbon steels and water and wear due to a fast-flowing fluid. High-temperature corrosion characteristics of the both coatings have potential as FAC barrier for carbon steel. Feasibility study will be carried out with FAC simulation experiments

  17. Secondary structure and phylogenetic utility of the ribosomal large subunit (28S) in monogeneans of the genus Thaparocleidus and Bifurcohaptor (Monogenea: Dactylogyridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Anshu; Singh, Hridaya Shanker

    2013-04-01

    Present communication deals with secondary structure of 28S rDNA of two already known species of monogeneans viz., Bifurcohaptor indicus and Thaparocleidus parvulus parasitizing gill filaments of a freshwater fish, Mystus vittatus for phylogenetic inference. Secondary structure data are best used as accessory taxonomic characters as their phylogenetic resolving power and confidence in validity. Secondary structure of the 28S rDNA transcript could provide information for identifying homologous nucleotide characters, useful for cladistic inference of relationships. Such structure data could be used as taxonomic character. The study supports that species-level sequence variability renders 28S sequence as a unique window for examining the behavior of fast evolving, non-coding DNA sequences. Apart from this it also confirms that molecular similarity present in various species could be host-induced. PMID:24431545

  18. Membrane Topology of the Sodium Ion-dependent Citrate Carrier of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Evidence for a New Structural Class of Secondary Transporters

    OpenAIRE

    Geest, Marleen van; Lolkema, Juke S.

    1996-01-01

    The predicted secondary structure model of the sodium ion-dependent citrate carrier of Klebsiella pneumoniae (CitS) presents the 12-transmembrane helix motif observed for many secondary transporters. Biochemical evidence presented in this paper is not consistent with this model. N-terminal and C-terminal fusions of CitS with the biotin acceptor domain of the oxaloacetate decarboxylase of K. pneumoniae catalyze citrate transport, showing the correct folding of the CitS part of the fusion prote...

  19. Integrated assignment and path planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphey, Robert A.

    2005-11-01

    A surge of interest in unmanned systems has exposed many new and challenging research problems across many fields of engineering and mathematics. These systems have the potential of transforming our society by replacing dangerous and dirty jobs with networks of moving machines. This vision is fundamentally separate from the modern view of robotics in that sophisticated behavior is realizable not by increasing individual vehicle complexity, but instead through collaborative teaming that relies on collective perception, abstraction, decision making, and manipulation. Obvious examples where collective robotics will make an impact include planetary exploration, space structure assembly, remote and undersea mining, hazardous material handling and clean-up, and search and rescue. Nonetheless, the phenomenon driving this technology trend is the increasing reliance of the US military on unmanned vehicles, specifically, aircraft. Only a few years ago, following years of resistance to the use of unmanned systems, the military and civilian leadership in the United States reversed itself and have recently demonstrated surprisingly broad acceptance of increasingly pervasive use of unmanned platforms in defense surveillance, and even attack. However, as rapidly as unmanned systems have gained acceptance, the defense research community has discovered the technical pitfalls that lie ahead, especially for operating collective groups of unmanned platforms. A great deal of talent and energy has been devoted to solving these technical problems, which tend to fall into two categories: resource allocation of vehicles to objectives, and path planning of vehicle trajectories. An extensive amount of research has been conducted in each direction, yet, surprisingly, very little work has considered the integrated problem of assignment and path planning. This dissertation presents a framework for studying integrated assignment and path planning and then moves on to suggest an exact

  20. Evaluating the accuracy of SHAPE-directed RNA secondary structure predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sükösd, Zsuzsanna; Swenson, M Shel; Kjems, Jørgen; Heitsch, Christine E

    2013-03-01

    Recent advances in RNA structure determination include using data from high-throughput probing experiments to improve thermodynamic prediction accuracy. We evaluate the extent and nature of improvements in data-directed predictions for a diverse set of 16S/18S ribosomal sequences using a stochastic model of experimental SHAPE data. The average accuracy for 1000 data-directed predictions always improves over the original minimum free energy (MFE) structure. However, the amount of improvement varies with the sequence, exhibiting a correlation with MFE accuracy. Further analysis of this correlation shows that accurate MFE base pairs are typically preserved in a data-directed prediction, whereas inaccurate ones are not. Thus, the positive predictive value of common base pairs is consistently higher than the directed prediction accuracy. Finally, we confirm sequence dependencies in the directability of thermodynamic predictions and investigate the potential for greater accuracy improvements in the worst performing test sequence.

  1. RNA secondary structure mediates alternative 3'ss selection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plass, Mireya; Codony-Servat, Carles; Ferreira, Pedro Gabriel;

    2012-01-01

    that sequence and structure properties of the pre-mRNA could explain the selection of 3' splice sites (ss) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this work, we extend our previous observations to build a computational classifier that explains most of the annotated 3'ss in the CDS and 5' UTR of this organism. Moreover......, we show that the same rules can explain the selection of alternative 3'ss. Experimental validation of a number of predicted alternative 3'ss shows that their usage is low compared to annotated 3'ss. The majority of these alternative 3'ss introduce premature termination codons (PTCs), suggesting...... selection in yeast mediated by the pre-mRNA structure, which can be responsive to external cues, like temperature, and is possibly related to the control of gene expression....

  2. Structure of Velocity Distribution of Sheath-Accelerated Secondary Electrons in Asymmetric RF-DC Discharge

    CERN Document Server

    Khrabrov, Alexander V; Ventzek, Peter L G; Ranjan, Alok; Chen, Lee

    2015-01-01

    The ballistic population is thought to be responsible for alleviating the electron shading effect and the notching of the photoresist layer. We have performed test-particle simulations where the features in the EVDF of electrons impacting the RF electrode are fully resolved at all energies. An analytic model has been developed to predict existence of peaked and step-like structures in the EVDF.

  3. Controlling Secondary Structures of Bio-Polymers with Hydrogen-Like Bonding

    OpenAIRE

    J. Krawczyk; Owczarek, A. L.; Prellberg, T.; Rechnitzer, A.

    2007-01-01

    We present results for a lattice model of bio-polymers where the type of $\\beta$-sheet formation can be controlled by different types of hydrogen bonds depending on the relative orientation of close segments of the polymer. Tuning these different interaction strengths leads to low-temperature structures with different types of orientational order. We perform simulations of this model and so present the phase diagram, ascertaining the nature of the phases and the order of the transitions betwe...

  4. Effect of principal and secondary ligands on the electronic structures and spectra of a series of ruthenium(II complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yanli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A DFT(density functional theory/TDDFT(time-dependent density functional theory investigation is performed to study the ground-state geometries, electronic structures, and absorption spectra of twelve ruthenium(II thiosemicarbazone complexes [Ru(CO(C(Ln], where Ln=derivatives of dibasic tetradentate Schiff-base ligand and X=AsPh3/PPh3/Py. The ground-state geometries are optimized at the B3LYP/6-31G(d-LANL2DZ level, and the spectra are simulated by means of TD-B3LYP/6-31G(d-LANL2DZ method on the basis of the optimized geometries. The influence of principal and secondary ligands (Ln and X on transition characters and absorption peak positions is evaluated.

  5. Effect of low energy N+ ion beam implantation on the secondary structure and activity of α-amylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samples of the α-amylase were treated with 1015-1016 ions/cm2 of 20 keV N+. The secondary structure of the ion-implanted α-amylase was studied by circular dichroism, and activity change of the α-amylase was analyzed. The results showed that in the dose range under investigation, the N+ implantation affected the relative contents of α-helix, β-sheet, β-turn and random coil of the α-amylase, but no significant differences were found between the samples implanted to different doses. The activity of the N+-implanted α-amylase changed, with a relationship between the activity increase and the conformation change. (authors)

  6. Sources of Information for Stress Assignment in Reading Greek

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protopapas, Athanassios; Gerakaki, Svetlana; Alexandri, Stella

    2007-01-01

    To assign lexical stress when reading, the Greek reader can potentially rely on lexical information (knowledge of the word), visual-orthographic information (processing of the written diacritic), or a default metrical strategy (penultimate stress pattern). Previous studies with secondary education children have shown strong lexical effects on…

  7. Interconnection of salt-induced hydrophobic compaction and secondary structure formation depends on solution conditions: revisiting early events of protein folding at single molecule resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Shubhasis; Chattopadhyay, Krishnananda

    2012-03-30

    What happens in the early stage of protein folding remains an interesting unsolved problem. Rapid kinetics measurements with cytochrome c using submillisecond continuous flow mixing devices suggest simultaneous formation of a compact collapsed state and secondary structure. These data seem to indicate that collapse formation is guided by specific short and long range interactions (heteropolymer collapse). A contrasting interpretation also has been proposed, which suggests that the collapse formation is rapid, nonspecific, and a trivial solvent related compaction, which could as well be observed by a homopolymer (homopolymer collapse). We address this controversy using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), which enables us to monitor the salt-induced compaction accompanying collapse formation and the associated time constant directly at single molecule resolution. In addition, we follow the formation of secondary structure using far UV CD. The data presented here suggest that both these models (homopolymer and heteropolymer) could be applicable depending on the solution conditions. For example, the formation of secondary structure and compact state is not simultaneous in aqueous buffer. In aqueous buffer, formation of the compact state occurs through a two-state co-operative transition following heteropolymer formalism, whereas secondary structure formation takes place gradually. In contrast, in the presence of urea, a compaction of the protein radius occurs gradually over an extended range of salt concentration following homopolymer formalism. The salt-induced compaction and the formation of secondary structure take place simultaneously in the presence of urea.

  8. Seismic velocity structure and event relocation in Kazakhstan from secondary P phases. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinn, H.R.; Thurber, C.H.

    1992-12-31

    Three-component seismic data from a set of presumed explosions recorded by stations at Bayanaul and karkaralinsk in Kazakhstan were analyzed in order to model the crustal structure of the region and to examine the use of the arrival times of secondary P phases, primarily PmP, in regional event location. Polarization analysis aided in the identification of the secondary phases. Low-pass filtered data (4-Hz corner) from the first 5 to 10 sec of 13 presumed explosions were modeled with the reflectivity method. The two chemical explosions in 1987 provided a check on accuracy, as their locations and origin times are accurately known. A good fit to the arrival times and amplitudes in the first 5 sec of the P wave (Pn, Pg, and PmP) was obtained in the epicentral distance range of 100 to 300 km. Beyond 300 km, the simple layered model was not adequate to model the PmP arrival. The crustal P-wave velocity model were derived has an upper crustal velocity increasing fairly rapidly from 4.5 km/sec near the surface to 6.5 km/sec at 15-km depth, then increasing more slowly to 7.05 km/ sec at 50-km depth. The observed difference in the arrival times of the phases Pg, PmP, and Pn in the range between 100- and 250-km distance required a relatively sharp transition at the crust mantle boundary. The model is generally similar to previous estimates of P velocity structure in the region, though with a gentler gradient in the upper crust and a steeper gradient in the lower crust.

  9. Dopamine agonist suppression of rapid-eye-movement sleep is secondary to sleep suppression mediated via limbic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miletich, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of pergolide, a direct dopamine receptor agonist, on sleep and wakefulness, motor behavior and /sup 3/H-spiperone specific binding in limbic structures and striatum in rats was studied. The results show that pergolide induced a biphasic dose effect, with high doses increasing wakefulness and suppressing sleep while low dose decreased wakefulness, but increased sleep. It was shown that pergolide-induced sleep suppression was blocked by ..cap alpha..-glupenthixol and pimozide, two dopamine receptor antagonists. It was further shown that pergolide merely delayed the rebound resulting from rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep deprivation, that dopamine receptors stimulation had no direct effect on the period, phase or amplitude of the circadian rhythm of REM sleep propensity and that there was no alteration in the coupling of REM sleep episodes with S/sub 2/ episodes. Rapid-eye-movement sleep deprivation resulted in increased sensitivity to the pergolide-induced wakefulness stimulation and sleep suppression and pergolide-induced motor behaviors of locomotion and head bobbing. /sup 3/H-spiperone specific binding to dopamine receptors was shown to be altered by REM sleep deprivation in the subcortical limbic structures. It is concluded that the REM sleep suppressing action of dopamine receptor stimulation is secondary to sleep suppression per se and not secondary to a unique effect on the REM sleep. Further, it is suggested that the wakefulness stimulating action of dopamine receptor agonists is mediated by activation of the dopamine receptors in the terminal areas of the mesolimbocortical dopamine projection system.

  10. Detection and alignment of 3D domain swapping proteins using angle-distance image-based secondary structural matching techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Han Chu

    Full Text Available This work presents a novel detection method for three-dimensional domain swapping (DS, a mechanism for forming protein quaternary structures that can be visualized as if monomers had "opened" their "closed" structures and exchanged the opened portion to form intertwined oligomers. Since the first report of DS in the mid 1990s, an increasing number of identified cases has led to the postulation that DS might occur in a protein with an unconstrained terminus under appropriate conditions. DS may play important roles in the molecular evolution and functional regulation of proteins and the formation of depositions in Alzheimer's and prion diseases. Moreover, it is promising for designing auto-assembling biomaterials. Despite the increasing interest in DS, related bioinformatics methods are rarely available. Owing to a dramatic conformational difference between the monomeric/closed and oligomeric/open forms, conventional structural comparison methods are inadequate for detecting DS. Hence, there is also a lack of comprehensive datasets for studying DS. Based on angle-distance (A-D image transformations of secondary structural elements (SSEs, specific patterns within A-D images can be recognized and classified for structural similarities. In this work, a matching algorithm to extract corresponding SSE pairs from A-D images and a novel DS score have been designed and demonstrated to be applicable to the detection of DS relationships. The Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC and sensitivity of the proposed DS-detecting method were higher than 0.81 even when the sequence identities of the proteins examined were lower than 10%. On average, the alignment percentage and root-mean-square distance (RMSD computed by the proposed method were 90% and 1.8Å for a set of 1,211 DS-related pairs of proteins. The performances of structural alignments remain high and stable for DS-related homologs with less than 10% sequence identities. In addition, the quality of its

  11. Detection and alignment of 3D domain swapping proteins using angle-distance image-based secondary structural matching techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chia-Han; Lo, Wei-Cheng; Wang, Hsin-Wei; Hsu, Yen-Chu; Hwang, Jenn-Kang; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Pai, Tun-Wen; Tang, Chuan Yi

    2010-10-14

    This work presents a novel detection method for three-dimensional domain swapping (DS), a mechanism for forming protein quaternary structures that can be visualized as if monomers had "opened" their "closed" structures and exchanged the opened portion to form intertwined oligomers. Since the first report of DS in the mid 1990s, an increasing number of identified cases has led to the postulation that DS might occur in a protein with an unconstrained terminus under appropriate conditions. DS may play important roles in the molecular evolution and functional regulation of proteins and the formation of depositions in Alzheimer's and prion diseases. Moreover, it is promising for designing auto-assembling biomaterials. Despite the increasing interest in DS, related bioinformatics methods are rarely available. Owing to a dramatic conformational difference between the monomeric/closed and oligomeric/open forms, conventional structural comparison methods are inadequate for detecting DS. Hence, there is also a lack of comprehensive datasets for studying DS. Based on angle-distance (A-D) image transformations of secondary structural elements (SSEs), specific patterns within A-D images can be recognized and classified for structural similarities. In this work, a matching algorithm to extract corresponding SSE pairs from A-D images and a novel DS score have been designed and demonstrated to be applicable to the detection of DS relationships. The Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) and sensitivity of the proposed DS-detecting method were higher than 0.81 even when the sequence identities of the proteins examined were lower than 10%. On average, the alignment percentage and root-mean-square distance (RMSD) computed by the proposed method were 90% and 1.8Å for a set of 1,211 DS-related pairs of proteins. The performances of structural alignments remain high and stable for DS-related homologs with less than 10% sequence identities. In addition, the quality of its hinge loop

  12. Secondary School Students' LLL Competencies, and Their Relation with Classroom Structure and Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Julia; Lüftenegger, Marko; Bergsmann, Evelyn; Spiel, Christiane; Schober, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    There is a strong urge to foster lifelong learning (LLL) competencies with its key components - motivation and self-regulated learning - from early on in the education system. School in general is presently not considered to be successful in systematically imparting motivation and self-regulated learning strategies. There is strong evidence that decisive motivational determinants decrease the longer students stay in school. At present, the central sources of information about the situation in Austria are international monitoring studies, which only examine selected aspects of specific target groups, and their interpretability concerning mean values is constricted due to cultural differences. Thus, it is important to conduct additional and more differentiated national surveys of the actual state. This is why this study aimed at answering the following questions: (1) how well are Austrian students equipped for the future, in terms of their lifelong learning competencies, (2) can perceived classroom structure predict students' LLL, and (3) is there a correlation of students' LLL with their achievement in the school subjects math and German language. 5366 students (52.1% female) from 36 Austrian schools took part in the online-questionnaire (mean age 15.35 years, SD = 2.45), which measured their perceived LLL competencies in the subjects math and German language, their perceived classroom structure and their achievement. Results showed that the great majority of Austrian students - independent from domain and sex - know and are able to apply cognitive as well as metacognitive learning strategies. With regard to motivation the picture is less satisfactory: whilst students' self-efficacy is not the problem, there is a lack of interest in the school subjects and they often report to follow performance approach goals. Classroom structure positively predicted students' goals, interest, self-efficacy and learning strategies. Self-efficacy, performance approach goals, meta

  13. Genetic diversity and population structure of the secondary symbiont of tsetse flies, Sodalis glossinidius, in sleeping sickness foci in Cameroon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oumarou Farikou

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have shown substantial differences in Sodalis glossinidius and trypanosome infection rates between Glossina palpalis palpalis populations from two Cameroonian foci of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT, Bipindi and Campo. We hypothesized that the geographical isolation of the two foci may have induced independent evolution in the two areas, resulting in the diversification of symbiont genotypes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test this hypothesis, we investigated the symbiont genetic structure using the allelic size variation at four specific microsatellite loci. Classical analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA and differentiation statistics revealed that most of the genetic diversity was observed among individuals within populations and frequent haplotypes were shared between populations. The structure of genetic diversity varied at different geographical scales, with almost no differentiation within the Campo HAT focus and a low but significant differentiation between the Campo and Bipindi HAT foci. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The data provided new information on the genetic diversity of the secondary symbiont population revealing mild structuring. Possible interactions between S. glossinidius subpopulations and Glossina species that could favor tsetse fly infections by a given trypanosome species should be further investigated.

  14. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of the Secondary Symbiont of Tsetse Flies, Sodalis glossinidius, in Sleeping Sickness Foci in Cameroon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farikou, Oumarou; Thevenon, Sophie; Njiokou, Flobert; Allal, François; Cuny, Gérard; Geiger, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown substantial differences in Sodalis glossinidius and trypanosome infection rates between Glossina palpalis palpalis populations from two Cameroonian foci of human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), Bipindi and Campo. We hypothesized that the geographical isolation of the two foci may have induced independent evolution in the two areas, resulting in the diversification of symbiont genotypes. Methodology/Principal Findings To test this hypothesis, we investigated the symbiont genetic structure using the allelic size variation at four specific microsatellite loci. Classical analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) and differentiation statistics revealed that most of the genetic diversity was observed among individuals within populations and frequent haplotypes were shared between populations. The structure of genetic diversity varied at different geographical scales, with almost no differentiation within the Campo HAT focus and a low but significant differentiation between the Campo and Bipindi HAT foci. Conclusions/Significance The data provided new information on the genetic diversity of the secondary symbiont population revealing mild structuring. Possible interactions between S. glossinidius subpopulations and Glossina species that could favor tsetse fly infections by a given trypanosome species should be further investigated. PMID:21886849

  15. Development of a Cell-penetrating Peptide that Exhibits Responsive Changes in its Secondary Structure in the Cellular Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Hiroko; Kato, Takuma; Oba, Makoto; Misawa, Takashi; Hattori, Takayuki; Ohoka, Nobumichi; Tanaka, Masakazu; Naito, Mikihiko; Kurihara, Masaaki; Demizu, Yosuke

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) are received a lot of attention as an intracellular delivery tool for hydrophilic molecules such as drugs, proteins, and DNAs. We designed and synthesized nona-arginine analogues 1-5 [FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg-l-Arg-l-Pro)3-(Gly)3-NH2 (1), FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg-l-Arg-l-Pro(NH2))3-(Gly)3-NH2 (2), FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg-l-Arg-l-Pro(Gu))3-(Gly)3-NH2 (3), FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg)2-(l-Pro(Gu))2-(l-Arg)4-l-Pro(Gu)-(Gly)3-NH2 (4), and FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg)6-(l-Pro(Gu))3-(Gly)3-NH2 (5)] containing l-proline (l-Pro) or cationic proline derivatives (l-Pro(NH2) and l-Pro(Gu)), and investigated their cell-penetrating abilities. Interestingly, only peptide 3 having the side-chain guanidinyl l-Pro(Gu) exhibited a secondary structural change in cellular environment. Specifically, peptide 3 formed a random structure in hydrophilic conditions, whereas it formed a helical structure under amphipathic conditions. Furthermore, during cellular permeability tests, peptide 3 demonstrated greater cell-penetrating activity than other peptides and effectively transported plasmid DNA into HeLa cells. Thus, l-Pro(Gu)-containing peptide 3 may be a useful candidate as a gene delivery carrier. PMID:27609319

  16. Development of a Cell-penetrating Peptide that Exhibits Responsive Changes in its Secondary Structure in the Cellular Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Hiroko; Kato, Takuma; Oba, Makoto; Misawa, Takashi; Hattori, Takayuki; Ohoka, Nobumichi; Tanaka, Masakazu; Naito, Mikihiko; Kurihara, Masaaki; Demizu, Yosuke

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) are received a lot of attention as an intracellular delivery tool for hydrophilic molecules such as drugs, proteins, and DNAs. We designed and synthesized nona-arginine analogues 1–5 [FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg-l-Arg-l-Pro)3-(Gly)3-NH2 (1), FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg-l-Arg-l-ProNH2)3-(Gly)3-NH2 (2), FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg-l-Arg-l-ProGu)3-(Gly)3-NH2 (3), FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg)2-(l-ProGu)2-(l-Arg)4-l-ProGu-(Gly)3-NH2 (4), and FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg)6-(l-ProGu)3-(Gly)3-NH2 (5)] containing l-proline (l-Pro) or cationic proline derivatives (l-ProNH2 and l-ProGu), and investigated their cell-penetrating abilities. Interestingly, only peptide 3 having the side-chain guanidinyl l-ProGu exhibited a secondary structural change in cellular environment. Specifically, peptide 3 formed a random structure in hydrophilic conditions, whereas it formed a helical structure under amphipathic conditions. Furthermore, during cellular permeability tests, peptide 3 demonstrated greater cell-penetrating activity than other peptides and effectively transported plasmid DNA into HeLa cells. Thus, l-ProGu-containing peptide 3 may be a useful candidate as a gene delivery carrier. PMID:27609319

  17. Secondary and quaternary structures of the (+)-pinoresinol-forming dirigent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halls, Steven C; Lewis, Norman G

    2002-07-30

    The (+)-pinoresinol-forming dirigent protein is the first protein capable of stereoselectively coupling two coniferyl alcohol derived radical species, in this case to give the 8-8' linked (+)-pinoresinol. Only dimeric cross-linked dirigent protein structures were isolated when 1-ethyl-3-[3-(dimethylamino)-propyl]carbodiimide was used as cross-linking agent, whereas the associated oxidase, presumed to generate the corresponding free radical substrate, was not detected. Native Forsythia intermedia dirigent protein isoforms were additionally subjected to MALDI-TOF and ESI-MS analyses, which established the presence of both monomeric masses of 23-25 kDa and dimeric dirigent protein species ranging from 46 to 49 kDa. Analytical ultracentrifugation, sedimentation velocity, and sedimentation equilibrium analyses of the native dirigent protein in open solution confirmed further its dimeric nature as well as a propensity to aggregate, with the latter being dependent upon both temperature and solution ionic strength. Circular dichroism analysis suggested that the dirigent protein was primarily composed of beta-sheet and loop structures.

  18. Study of bioengineered zebra fish olfactory receptor 131-2: receptor purification and secondary structure analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwong-Joo Leck

    Full Text Available How fishes are able to detect trace molecules in large bodies of water is not understood. It is plausible that they use olfactory receptors to detect water-soluble compounds. How the zebra fish Danio Rerio, an organism with only 98 functional olfactory receptors, is able to selectively detect and recognize numerous compounds in water remains a puzzling phenomenon. We are interested in studying the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of olfaction in fish. Here, we report on the study of a bioengineered zebra fish olfactory receptor OR131-2, affinity-purified from a HEK293S tetracycline-inducible system. This receptor was expressed and translocated to the cell plasma membrane as revealed by confocal microscopy. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that the purified zebra fish receptor folded into an α-helical structure, as observed for other G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs. Our study shows that it is possible to produce viable quantities of the zebra fish olfactory receptor. This will not only enable detailed structural and functional analyses, but also aid in the design of biosensor devices in order to detect water-soluble metabolites or its intermediates, which are associated with human health.

  19. The effect of Berberine on the secondary structure of human serum albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; He, WenYing; Tian, Jianniao; Tang, Jianghong; Hu, Zhide; Chen, Xingguo

    2005-05-01

    The presence of several high affinity binding sites on human serum albumin (HSA) makes it a possible target for many drugs. This study is designed to examine the effect of Berberine (an ancient Chinese drug used for antimicrobial, antiplasmodial, antidiarrheal and cardiovascular) on the solution structure of HSA using fluorescence, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic methods. The fluorescence spectroscopic results show that the fluorescence intensity of HSA was significantly decreased in the presence of Berberine. The Scatchard's plots indicated that the binding of Berberine to HSA at 296, 303, 318 K is characterized by one binding site with the binding constant is 4.071(±0.128)×10 4, 3.741(±0.089)×10 4, 3.454(±0.110)×10 4 M -1, respectively. The protein conformation is altered (FT-IR and CD data) with reductions of α-helices from 54 to 47% for free HSA to 45-32% and with increases of turn structure5% for free HSA to 18% in the presence of Berberine. The binding process was exothermic, enthalpy driven and spontaneous, as indicated by the thermodynamic analyses, Berberine bound to HSA was mainly based on hydrophobic interaction and electrostatic interaction cannot be excluded from the binding. Furthermore, the displace experiments indicate that Berberine can bind to the subdomain IIA, that is, high affinity site (site II).

  20. Ner protein of phage Mu: Assignments using {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strzelecka, T.; Gronenborn, A.M.; Clore, G.M. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The Ner protein is a small (74-amino acid) DNA-binding protein that regulates a switch between the lysogenic and lytic stages of phage Mu. It inhibits expression of the C repressor gene and down-regulates its own expression. Two-dimensional NMR experiments on uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled protein provided most of the backbone and some of the sidechain proton assignments. The secondary structure determination using two-dimensional NOESY experiments showed that Ner consists of five {alpha}-helices. However, because most of the sidechain protons could not be assigned, the full structure was not determined. Using uniformly {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled Ner and a set of three-dimensional experiments, we were able to assign all of the backbone and 98% of the sidechain protons. In particular, the CBCANH and CBCA(CO)NH experiments were used to sequentially assign the C{alpha} and C{beta} resonances; the HCCH-CTOCSY and HCCH-COSY were used to assign sidechain carbon and proton resonances.

  1. Job Assignment with Multivariate Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Brilon, Stefanie

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes the job assignment problem faced by a firm when workers' skills are distributed along several dimensions and jobs require different skills to varying extent. I derive optimal assignment rules with and without slot constraints, and show that under certain circumstances workers may get promoted although in their new job they are expected to be less productive than in their old job. This can be interpreted as a version of the Peter Principle which states that workers get prom...

  2. Two-dimensional dynamics of a free molecular chain with a secondary structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zolotaryuk, Alexander; Christiansen, Peter Leth; Savin, A.V.

    1996-01-01

    with respect to the longitudinal and transverse displacements of the chain molecules has been derived. Two types of stable (nontopological) soliton solutions which describe either (i) a supersonic solitary wave of longitudinal stretching accompanied by transverse slendering or, as in the 1D model, (ii...... of an anharmonic chain in order to include transverse degrees of freedom of the chain molecules. Both the structures are provided by the first- and second-neighbor intermolecular bonds, respectively, resulting in a regular zig-zag (''20 helix'') chain on a plane. The set of two coupled nonlinear field equations......) supersonic pulses of longitudinal compression propagating together with localized transverse thickening (bulge) have been found. Some peculiar stability properties of these two-component soliton solutions have been discovered by using numerical techniques developed in this paper....

  3. RNA Secondary Structure Modulates FMRP's Bi-Functional Role in the MicroRNA Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Phillip; Ceman, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs act by post-transcriptionally regulating the gene expression of 30%-60% of mammalian genomes. MicroRNAs are key regulators in all cellular processes, though the mechanism by which the cell activates or represses microRNA-mediated translational regulation is poorly understood. In this review, we discuss the RNA binding protein Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) and its role in microRNA-mediated translational regulation. Historically, FMRP is known to function as a translational suppressor. However, emerging data suggests that FMRP has both an agonistic and antagonistic role in regulating microRNA-mediated translational suppression. This bi-functional role is dependent on FMRP's interaction with the RNA helicase Moloney leukemia virus 10 (MOV10), which modifies the structural landscape of bound mRNA, therefore facilitating or inhibiting its association with the RNA-Induced Silencing Complex. PMID:27338369

  4. Secondary structure of double-stranded DNA under stretching: Elucidation of the stretched form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almost two decades ago, measurements of force versus extension on isolated double-stranded DNA molecules revealed a force plateau. This unusual stretching phenomenon in DNA suggests that the long molecules may be extended from the usual B form into a new conformation. Different models have been proposed to describe the nature of DNA in its stretched form, S-DNA. Using atomic force microscopy combined with a molecular combing method, we identified the structure of λ-phage DNA for different stretching values. We provide strong evidence for the existence of a first-order transition between B form and S form. Beyond a certain extension of the natural length, DNA molecules adopt a new double-helix conformation characterized by a diameter of 1.2 nm and a helical pitch of18 nm.

  5. What an rRNA secondary structure tells about phylogeny of fungi in Ascomycota with emphasis on evolution of major types of ascus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ying Zhuang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: RNA secondary structure is highly conserved throughout evolution. The higher order structure is fundamental in establishing important structure-function relationships. Nucleotide sequences from ribosomal RNA (rRNA genes have made a great contribution to our understanding of Ascomycota phylogeny. However, filling the gaps between molecular phylogeny and morphological assumptions based on ascus dehiscence modes and type of fruitbodies at the higher level classification of the phylum remains an unfulfilled task faced by mycologists. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We selected some major groups of Ascomycota to view their phylogenetic relationships based on analyses of rRNA secondary structure. Using rRNA secondary structural information, here, we converted nucleotide sequences into the structure ones over a 20-symbol code. Our structural analyses together with ancestral character state reconstruction produced reasonable phylogenetic position for the class Geoglossomycetes as opposed to the classic nucleotide analyses. Judging from the secondary structure analyses with consideration of mode of ascus dehiscence and the ability of forming fruitbodies, we draw a clear picture of a possible evolutionary route for fungal asci and some major groups of fungi in Ascomycota. The secondary structure trees show a more reasonable phylogenetic position for the class Geoglossomycetes. CONCLUSIONS: Our results illustrate that asci lacking of any dehiscence mechanism represent the most primitive type. Passing through the operculate and Orbilia-type asci, bitunicate asci occurred. The evolution came to the most advanced inoperculate type. The ascus-producing fungi might be derived from groups lacking of the capacity to form fruitbodies, and then evolved multiple times. The apothecial type of fruitbodies represents the ancestral state, and the ostiolar type is advanced. The class Geoglossomycetes is closely related to Leotiomycetes and Sordariomycetes

  6. ZAP: a distributed channel assignment algorithm for cognitive radio networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munaretto Anelise

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We propose ZAP, an algorithm for the distributed channel assignment in cognitive radio (CR networks. CRs are capable of identifying underutilized licensed bands of the spectrum, allowing their reuse by secondary users without interfering with primary users. In this context, efficient channel assignment is challenging as ideally it must be simple, incur acceptable communication overhead, provide timely response, and be adaptive to accommodate frequent changes in the network. Another challenge is the optimization of network capacity through interference minimization. In contrast to related work, ZAP addresses these challenges with a fully distributed approach based only on local (neighborhood knowledge, while significantly reducing computational costs and the number of messages required for channel assignment. Simulations confirm the efficiency of ZAP in terms of (i the performance tradeoff between different metrics and (ii the fast achievement of a suitable assignment solution regardless of network size and density.

  7. Light interaction with microroughened surfaces based on nuclear microfilters and secondary metallic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolyanskii, A. S.; Briskman, Boris A.; Kolesnikova, V. V.; Kolninov, O. V.; Lazorenko-Manevich, R. M.; Bozadzhiev, L. L.

    2004-10-01

    Optical properties of the modern kinds of nano/microstructure materials - nuclear microfilters (NM) and their metallic replica (so called "needle structures" (NS)) are studied in visible as well as in IR region. The materials are produced from PolyEthylene Terephtalate (PET) film irradiated by accelerated Xe ions as well as by actinoids. The transparence of the ion-irradiated PET films decreases and the reflection increases with the duration of chemical treatment. The interference fringe pattern (IFP) becomes diffuse and weak at the final stages of the etching process. An intense diffraction background (DB) appears in the IR-spectra. A correlation between IFP and DB change and evoked by micropore formation the PET film mass losses is established. DB spectral form can be described by ~λ-2 law at initial stages of the etching and by standard Raleigh law (~λ-4) at the end of the process. The optical properties of the NS prepared from copper and nickel on the base of the same NM are investigated. In both cases development of the surface roughness results in suppression of the "mirror-like" component in the reflected light. A phenomenon of the surface-enhanced IR scattering is discovered for Cu-NS. Possible applications of such nano/microstructure materials in optics are discussed.

  8. Infrared and circular dichroism spectroscopic characterisation of secondary structure components of a water treatment coagulant protein extracted from Moringa oleifera seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwaambwa, H M; Maikokera, R

    2008-06-15

    The secondary structure of a water treatment coagulant protein extracted from Moringa oleifera (MO) seeds has been investigated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in the dried state, and by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The FTIR and CD spectra indicate that the secondary structure of the protein is dominated by alpha-helix. The FTIR spectrum recorded two distinct and strong absorption bands at 1656 cm(-1) and 1542 cm(-1), in the usual range of absorption of helices of proteins. The CD spectrum showed the shape of mainly alpha-helical secondary structure (estimated to be 58+/-4%) characteristic of negative ellipticity bands near 222 nm and 208 nm and a positive band at 192 nm. The beta-sheet structure composition was estimated to be 10+/-3% whereas unordered structures were around 33%. Changes in solution pH affected the protein secondary structure significantly only at pH values above 10, as indicated by CD spectra, whereas ionic strength had minimal effect. CD data also showed that sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) interacts with the coagulant protein and modifies the protein conformation. The surfactant-induced conformational change of the coagulant protein was confirmed by quenching of tryptophan fluorescence of the protein. PMID:18296034

  9. Osmolality and Non-Structural Carbohydrate Composition in the Secondary Phloem of Trees across a Latitudinal Gradient in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintunen, Anna; Paljakka, Teemu; Jyske, Tuula; Peltoniemi, Mikko; Sterck, Frank; von Arx, Georg; Cochard, Hervé; Copini, Paul; Caldeira, Maria C; Delzon, Sylvain; Gebauer, Roman; Grönlund, Leila; Kiorapostolou, Natasa; Lechthaler, Silvia; Lobo-do-Vale, Raquel; Peters, Richard L; Petit, Giai; Prendin, Angela L; Salmon, Yann; Steppe, Kathy; Urban, Josef; Roig Juan, Sílvia; Robert, Elisabeth M R; Hölttä, Teemu

    2016-01-01

    Phloem osmolality and its components are involved in basic cell metabolism, cell growth, and in various physiological processes including the ability of living cells to withstand drought and frost. Osmolality and sugar composition responses to environmental stresses have been extensively studied for leaves, but less for the secondary phloem of plant stems and branches. Leaf osmotic concentration and the share of pinitol and raffinose among soluble sugars increase with increasing drought or cold stress, and osmotic concentration is adjusted with osmoregulation. We hypothesize that similar responses occur in the secondary phloem of branches. We collected living bark samples from branches of adult Pinus sylvestris, Picea abies, Betula pendula and Populus tremula trees across Europe, from boreal Northern Finland to Mediterranean Portugal. In all studied species, the observed variation in phloem osmolality was mainly driven by variation in phloem water content, while tissue solute content was rather constant across regions. Osmoregulation, in which osmolality is controlled by variable tissue solute content, was stronger for Betula and Populus in comparison to the evergreen conifers. Osmolality was lowest in mid-latitude region, and from there increased by 37% toward northern Europe and 38% toward southern Europe due to low phloem water content in these regions. The ratio of raffinose to all soluble sugars was negligible at mid-latitudes and increased toward north and south, reflecting its role in cold and drought tolerance. For pinitol, another sugar known for contributing to stress tolerance, no such latitudinal pattern was observed. The proportion of sucrose was remarkably low and that of hexoses (i.e., glucose and fructose) high at mid-latitudes. The ratio of starch to all non-structural carbohydrates increased toward the northern latitudes in agreement with the build-up of osmotically inactive C reservoir that can be converted into soluble sugars during winter

  10. Osmolality and non-structural carbohydrate composition in the secondary phloem of trees across a latitudinal gradient in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eLintunen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Phloem osmolality and its components are involved in basic cell metabolism, cell growth, and in various physiological processes including the ability of living cells to withstand drought and frost. Osmolality and sugar composition responses to environmental stresses have been extensively studied for leaves, but less for the secondary phloem of plant stems and branches. Leaf osmotic concentration and the share of pinitol and raffinose among soluble sugars increase with increasing drought or cold stress, and osmotic concentration is adjusted with osmoregulation. We hypothesize that similar responses occur in the secondary phloem of branches. We collected living bark samples from branches of adult Pinus sylvestris, Picea abies, Betula pendula and Populus tremula trees across Europe, from boreal Northern Finland to Mediterranean Portugal. In all studied species, the observed variation in phloem osmolality was mainly driven by variation in phloem water content, while tissue solute content was rather constant across regions. Osmoregulation, in which osmolality is controlled by variable tissue solute content, was stronger for Betula and Populus in comparison to the evergreen conifers. Osmolality was lowest in mid-latitude region, and from there increased by 37% towards northern Europe and 38% towards southern Europe due to low phloem water content in these regions. The ratio of raffinose to all soluble sugars was negligible at mid-latitudes and increased towards north and south, reflecting its role in cold and drought tolerance. For pinitol, another sugar known for contributing to stress tolerance, no such latitudinal pattern was observed. The proportion of sucrose was remarkably low and that of hexoses (i.e. glucose and fructose high at mid-latitudes. The ratio of starch to all non-structural carbohydrates increased towards the northern latitudes in agreement with the build-up of osmotically inactive C reservoir that can be converted into soluble

  11. The influence of secondary processing on the structural relaxation dynamics of fluticasone propionate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depasquale, Roberto; Lee, Sau L; Saluja, Bhawana; Shur, Jagdeep; Price, Robert

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated the structural relaxation of micronized fluticasone propionate (FP) under different lagering conditions and its influence on aerodynamic particle size distribution (APSD) of binary and tertiary carrier-based dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulations. Micronized FP was lagered under low humidity (LH 25 C, 33% RH [relative humidity]), high humidity (HH 25°C, 75% RH) for 30, 60, and 90 days, respectively, and high temperature (HT 60°C, 44% RH) for 14 days. Physicochemical, surface interfacial properties via cohesive-adhesive balance (CAB) measurements and amorphous disorder levels of the FP samples were characterized. Particle size, surface area, and rugosity suggested minimal morphological changes of the lagered FP samples, with the exception of the 90-day HH (HH90) sample. HH90 FP samples appeared to undergo surface reconstruction with a reduction in surface rugosity. LH and HH lagering reduced the levels of amorphous content over 90-day exposure, which influenced the CAB measurements with lactose monohydrate and salmeterol xinafoate (SX). CAB analysis suggested that LH and HH lagering led to different interfacial interactions with lactose monohydrate but an increasing adhesive affinity with SX. HT lagering led to no detectable levels of the amorphous disorder, resulting in an increase in the adhesive interaction with lactose monohydrate. APSD analysis suggested that the fine particle mass of FP and SX was affected by the lagering of the FP. In conclusion, environmental conditions during the lagering of FP may have a profound effect on physicochemical and interfacial properties as well as product performance of binary and tertiary carrier-based DPI formulations. PMID:25398478

  12. Microsatellite diversity and genetic structure among common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) landraces in Brazil, a secondary center of diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burle, Marília Lobo; Fonseca, Jaime Roberto; Kami, James A; Gepts, Paul

    2010-09-01

    Brazil is the largest producer and consumer of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), which is the most important source of human dietary protein in that country. This study assessed the genetic diversity and the structure of a sample of 279 geo-referenced common bean landraces from Brazil, using molecular markers. Sixty-seven microsatellite markers spread over the 11 linkage groups of the common bean genome, as well as Phaseolin, PvTFL1y, APA and four SCAR markers were used. As expected, the sample showed lower genetic diversity compared to the diversity in the primary center of diversification. Andean and Mesoamerican gene pools were both present but the latter gene pool was four times more frequent than the former. The two gene pools could be clearly distinguished; limited admixture was observed between these groups. The Mesoamerican group consisted of two sub-populations, with a high level of admixture between them leading to a large proportion of stabilized hybrids not observed in the centers of domestication. Thus, Brazil can be considered a secondary center of diversification of common bean. A high degree of genome-wide multilocus associations even among unlinked loci was observed, confirming the high level of structure in the sample and suggesting that association mapping should be conducted in separate Andean and Mesoamerican Brazilian samples. PMID:20502861

  13. Toward non-Newtonian effects on secondary flow structures in a 180 degree bent tube model for curved arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wyk, Stevin; Prahl Wittberg, Lisa; Fuchs, Laszlo; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the development of vortical flow structures of blood like fluids in a 180 degree tube bend, analogous to the aortic arch. Cardiovascular diseases are localized to regions of curvature in the arterial tree. The pathology of atherogenesis is widely considered an inflammatory response, hypothesized to be modulated by the interplay between Wall Shear Stress (WSS) variations and particulate transport mechanisms from the bulk fluid core to the near wall. The WSS is determined by the local flow characteristics as well as the rheological properties of the blood, which in turn are dependent on the bulk secondary flows. In this work, the time dependent fluid flow under various physiological flow conditions are investigated both experimentally and numerically. A Newtonian blood analog fluid model is considered in both studies to validate both methods and thereby study flow structure development during steady as well as pulsatile conditions. Particle image velocimetry (2C - 2D PIV) is used to acquire velocity field data from an acrylic tube bend. The numerical study is extended to consider the non-Newtonian properties of blood according to an empirical model to identify the relative importance of the non-Newtonian behavior. The studies show complex Dean and Lyne vortex interaction that are enhanced with increasing peak Reynolds numbers.

  14. Correlation of MFOLD-predicted DNA secondary structures with separation patterns obtained by capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism (CE-SSCP) analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavac, Damjan; Potocnik, Uros; Podpecnik, Darja; Zizek, Teofil; Smerkolj, Sava; Ravnik-Glavac, Metka

    2002-04-01

    We have studied 57 different mutations within three beta-globin gene promoter fragments with sizes 52 bp, 77 bp, and 193 bp by fluorescent capillary electrophoresis CE-SSCP analysis. For each mutation and wild type, energetically most-favorable predicted secondary structures were calculated for sense and antisense strands using the MFOLD DNA-folding algorithm in order to investigate if any correlation exists between predicted DNA structures and actual CE migration time shifts. The overall CE-SSCP detection rate was 100% for all mutations in three studied DNA fragments. For shorter 52 bp and 77 bp DNA fragments we obtained a positive correlation between the migration time shifts and difference in free energy values of predicted secondary structures at all temperatures. For longer 193 bp beta-globin gene fragments with 46 mutations MFOLD predicted different secondary structures for 89% of mutated strands at 25 degrees C and 40 degrees C. However, the magnitude of the mobility shifts did not necessarily correlate with their secondary structures and free energy values except for the sense strand at 40 degrees C where this correlation was statistically significant (r = 0.312, p = 0.033). Results of this study provided more direct insight into the mechanism of CE-SSCP and showed that MFOLD prediction could be helpful in making decisions about the running temperatures and in prediction of CE-SSCP data patterns, especially for shorter (50-100 bp) DNA fragments.

  15. Protein Secondary Structures (α-helix and β-sheet) at a Cellular Level and Protein Fractions in Relation to Rumen Degradation Behaviours of Protein: A New Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studying the secondary structure of proteins leads to an understanding of the components that make up a whole protein, and such an understanding of the structure of the whole protein is often vital to understanding its digestive behaviour and nutritive value in animals. The main protein secondary structures are the α-helix and β-sheet. The percentage of these two structures in protein secondary structures influences protein nutritive value, quality and digestive behaviour. A high percentage of β-sheet structure may partly cause a low access to gastrointestinal digestive enzymes, which results in a low protein value. The objectives of the present study were to use advanced synchrotron-based Fourier transform IR (S-FTIR) microspectroscopy as a new approach to reveal the molecular chemistry of the protein secondary structures of feed tissues affected by heat-processing within intact tissue at a cellular level, and to quantify protein secondary structures using multicomponent peak modelling Gaussian and Lorentzian methods, in relation to protein digestive behaviours and nutritive value in the rumen, which was determined using the Cornell Net Carbohydrate Protein System. The synchrotron-based molecular chemistry research experiment was performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory, US Department of Energy. The results showed that, with S-FTIR microspectroscopy, the molecular chemistry, ultrastructural chemical make-up and nutritive characteristics could be revealed at a high ultraspatial resolution (∼10 μm). S-FTIR microspectroscopy revealed that the secondary structure of protein differed between raw and roasted golden flaxseeds in terms of the percentages and ratio of α-helixes and β-sheets in the mid-IR range at the cellular level. By using multicomponent peak modelling, the results show that the roasting reduced (P <0.05) the percentage of α-helixes (from 47.1% to 36.1%: S-FTIR absorption intensity), increased the

  16. Protein Secondary Structures (alpha-helix and beta-sheet) at a Cellular Levle and Protein Fractions in Relation to Rumen Degradation Behaviours of Protein: A New Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu,P.

    2007-01-01

    Studying the secondary structure of proteins leads to an understanding of the components that make up a whole protein, and such an understanding of the structure of the whole protein is often vital to understanding its digestive behaviour and nutritive value in animals. The main protein secondary structures are the {alpha}-helix and {beta}-sheet. The percentage of these two structures in protein secondary structures influences protein nutritive value, quality and digestive behaviour. A high percentage of {beta}-sheet structure may partly cause a low access to gastrointestinal digestive enzymes, which results in a low protein value. The objectives of the present study were to use advanced synchrotron-based Fourier transform IR (S-FTIR) microspectroscopy as a new approach to reveal the molecular chemistry of the protein secondary structures of feed tissues affected by heat-processing within intact tissue at a cellular level, and to quantify protein secondary structures using multicomponent peak modelling Gaussian and Lorentzian methods, in relation to protein digestive behaviours and nutritive value in the rumen, which was determined using the Cornell Net Carbohydrate Protein System. The synchrotron-based molecular chemistry research experiment was performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory, US Department of Energy. The results showed that, with S-FTIR microspectroscopy, the molecular chemistry, ultrastructural chemical make-up and nutritive characteristics could be revealed at a high ultraspatial resolution ({approx}10 {mu}m). S-FTIR microspectroscopy revealed that the secondary structure of protein differed between raw and roasted golden flaxseeds in terms of the percentages and ratio of {alpha}-helixes and {beta}-sheets in the mid-IR range at the cellular level. By using multicomponent peak modelling, the results show that the roasting reduced (P <0.05) the percentage of {alpha}-helixes (from 47.1% to 36.1%: S

  17. Structure of the velocity distribution of sheath-accelerated secondary electrons in an asymmetric RF-dc discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrabrov, Alexander V.; Kaganovich, Igor D.; Ventzek, Peter L. G.; Ranjan, Alok; Chen, Lee

    2015-10-01

    Low-pressure capacitively-coupled discharges with additional dc bias applied to a separate electrode are utilized in plasma-assisted etching for semiconductor device manufacturing. Measurements of the electron velocity distribution function (EVDF) of the flux impinging on the wafer, as well as in the plasma bulk, show a thermal population and additional peaks within a broad range of energies. That range extends from the thermal level up to the value for the ‘ballistic’ peak, corresponding to the bias potential. The non-thermal electron flux has been correlated to alleviating the electron shading effect and providing etch-resistance properties to masking photoresist layers. ‘Middle-energy peak electrons’ at energies of several hundred eV may provide an additional sustaining mechanism for the discharge. These features in the electron velocity (or energy) distribution functions are possibly caused by secondary electrons emitted from the electrodes and interacting with two high-voltage sheaths: a stationary sheath at the dc electrode and an oscillating self-biased sheath at the powered electrode. Since at those energies the mean free path for large-angle scattering (momentum relaxation length) is comparable to, or exceeds the size of the discharge gap, these ‘ballistic’ electrons will not be fully scattered by the background gas as they traverse the inter-electrode space. We have performed test-particle simulations in which the features in the EVDF of electrons impacting the RF electrode are fully resolved at all energies. An analytical model has been developed to predict existence of peaked and step-like structures in the EVDF. Those features can be explained by analyzing the kinematics of electron trajectories in the discharge gap. Step-like structures in the EVDF near the powered electrode appear due to accumulation of electrons emitted from the dc electrode within a portion of the RF cycle, and their subsequent release. Trapping occurs when the RF

  18. Secondary flow structures in the presence of Type-IV stent fractures through a bent tube model for curved arteries: Effect of circulation thresholding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Shadman; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2013-11-01

    A common treatment for atherosclerosis is the opening of narrowed arteries resulting from obstructive lesions by angioplasty and stent implantation to restore unrestricted blood flow. ``Type-IV'' stent fractures involve complete transverse, linear fracture of stent struts, along with displacement of the stent fragments. Experimental data pertaining to secondary flows in the presence of stents that underwent ``Type-IV'' fractures in a bent artery model under physiological inflow conditions were obtained through a two-component, two-dimensional (2C-2D) PIV technique. Concomitant stent-induced flow perturbations result in secondary flow structures with complex, multi-scale morphologies and varying size-strength characteristics. Ultimately, these flow structures may have a role to play in restenosis and progression of atherosclerotic plaque. Vortex circulation thresholds were established with the goal of resolving and tracking iso-circulation secondary flow vortical structures and their morphological changes. This allowed for a parametric evaluation and quantitative representation of secondary flow structures undergoing deformation and spatial reorganization. Supported by NSF Grant No. CBET- 0828903 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering.

  19. Preparation, Purification, and Secondary Structure Determination of Bacillus Circulans Xylanase. A Molecular Laboratory Incorporating Aspects of Molecular Biology, Biochemistry, and Biophysical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Sal; Gentile, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    A project module designed for biochemistry or cellular and molecular biology student which involves determining the secondary structure of Bacillus circulans xylanase (BCX) by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy under conditions that compromise its stabilizing intramolecular forces is described. The lab model enhanced students knowledge of the…

  20. The influence of the binding of low molecular weight surfactants on the thermal stability and secondary structure of IgG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, AWP; Norde, W

    2000-01-01

    The effect of low molecular weight surfactants on the thermal stability of immunoglobulin G is studied by differential scanning calorimetry. The corresponding change in the secondary structure is investigated using circular dichroism spectroscopy and the rate of aggregate formation, both in the pres

  1. 基于禁忌遗传算法的RNA二级结构预测%RNA Secondary Structure Prediction Based on Tabu Genetic Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘勇国; 朱婵; 晏华

    2011-01-01

    生物RNA二级结构预测是生物信息学领域的一个重要研究问题.近来,研究人员提出应用元启发式算法来预测RNA二级结构.该文提出基于禁忌遗传算法的RNA二级结构预测方法(TGARNA),给出茎区相容性检测改进方法,保留最长茎区构造茎区相容个体,以改善种群性能;同时将禁忌搜索融入遗传操作以防止近亲繁殖,保持种群多样性.仿真实验表明TGARNA算法能够有效预测RNA级结构.%RNA secondary structure prediction is an important problem in the research field of bioinformatics. Recently, researchers applied metaheuristics to predict RNA secondary structure. In this article, a new predicting method called tabu genetic algorithm based RNA secondary structure prediction (TGARNA) is developed. In the TGARNA algorithm, an improved method for testing the compatibility of stems is given to improve the performance of the population. In addition, tabu search is integrated into genetic operations to prevent inbreeding and maintain a high level of population diversity. Computer simulations show that the proposed approach is effective for predicting RNA secondary structure.

  2. Metal compound-mediated hydrolytic cleavage of oxidized insulin B chain: Regioselectivity and influence of peptide secondary structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗雪梅; 何卫江; 张宇; 郭子建; 朱龙根

    2000-01-01

    The interaction of oxidized insulin B chain (B) with cis-[Pd-(en) Cl2] (en= ethylendiamine), cis-[Pd-(dtco-3-OH)Cl2](dtc o-3-OH= dithiacyclooctan-3-ol) and CuCl2 was studied by electrospray mass spectrometry. It is discovered that the binding of Pd(Ⅱ) complexes and the sites of cleavage are highly dependent on the secondary structure and local e nvironment of B. The hydrolytic cleavage of denatured B by Pd (Ⅱ) complexes was monitored by HPLC. The reaction is regioselective and follows first order kinetics with half-life of 4.8 days at 40°C. Two a mide bonds, i.e. at Leu6-Cys7 and at Gly8-Ser9, which are close to the two potential Pd(Ⅱ) binding sites His5 and His10, are selectively cleaved. In the case of Cu(Ⅱ) ion as promoter, only one cleavage site was observed which is located at Gly8-Ser9 bond. These results provide improved understanding on the deign of artificial metallopeptidase.

  3. Protective spin-labeled fluorenes maintain amyloid beta peptide in small oligomers and limit transitions in secondary structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altman, Robin [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine; Ly, Sonny [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States). Physical and Life Science Directorate; Hilt, Silvia [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine; Petrlova, Jitka [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine; Maezawa, Izumi [Univ. of California Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States). MIND Inst. and Dept. of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine; Kálai, Tamás [Univ. of Pecs (Hungary). Inst. of Organic and Medicinal Chemistry; Hideg, Kálmán [Univ. of Pecs (Hungary). Inst. of Organic and Medicinal Chemistry; Jin, Lee-Way [Univ. of California Davis, Sacramento, CA (United States). MIND Inst. and Dept. of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine; Laurence, Ted A. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine; Voss, John C. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is characterized by the presence of extracellular plaques comprised of amyloid beta (Aβ) peptides. Soluble oligomers of the Aβ peptide underlie a cascade of neuronal loss and dysfunction associated with Alzheimer's disease. Single particle analyses of Aβ oligomers in solution by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) were used to provide real-time descriptions of how spin-labeled fluorenes (SLFs; bi-functional small molecules that block the toxicity of Aβ) prevent and disrupt oligomeric assemblies of Aβ in solution. The FCS results, combined with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and circular dichroism spectroscopy, demonstrate SLFs can inhibit the growth of Aβ oligomers and disrupt existing oligomers while retaining Aβ in a largely disordered state. Furthermore, while the ability of SLF to block Aβ toxicity correlates with a reduction in oligomer size, our results suggest the conformation of Aβ within the oligomer determines the toxicity of the species. Attenuation of Aβ toxicity, which has been associated primarily with the soluble oligomeric form, can be achieved through redistribution of the peptides into smaller oligomers and arrest of the fractional increase in beta secondary structure.

  4. Structural Incorporation of Uranium into Iron Oxides: A Competitive Secondary Sequestration Pathway Mediated by Fe(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, M. S.; Lezama-Pacheco, J. S.; Nico, P. S.; Bargar, J.; Fendorf, S.

    2011-12-01

    Uranium retention and sequestration pathways determine the long-term fate of this important contaminant in soils and sediments. Direct, enzymatic U reduction and subsequent precipitation of UO2 is one potential sequestration pathway, but indirect U transformations can also occur as a result of reactions with microbially-generated Fe(II). Here we explored uranium retention mechanisms active during abiotic reduction of U(VI) by aqueous Fe(II), in the presence of ferrihydrite, in Ca and carbonate-bearing solutions. Ferrihydrite transformation and U reduction were studied in batch incubations containing Ca (0 and 4 mM), carbonate (3.8 mM), ferrihydrite (~180 mg/L), Fe(II) (0.3 mM), and a range of concentrations of uranyl (1 to 170 μM). Uranium retention pathways were differentiated using extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction. At U concentrations >50 μM, U(VI) reduction to U(IV) and subsequent precipitation of UO2 was a dominant sequestration pathway. At lower U concentrations (1-10 μM), UO2 precipitation was not observed and incorporation into goethite, the secondary transformation product of ferrihydrite, was dominant. For groundwaters having micromolar U(VI) concentrations, U incorporation into ferrihydrite transformation products via microbially-produced Fe(II) may be an important sequestration process.

  5. Resonant loading of aircraft secondary structure panels for use with thermoelastic stress analysis and digital image correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Rachael C.; Dulieu-Barton, Janice M.; Quinn, S.

    2015-03-01

    Thermoelastic stress analysis (TSA) is an established active thermographic approach which uses the thermoelastic effect to correlate the temperature change that occurs as a material is subjected to elastic cyclic loading to the sum of the principal stresses on the surface of the component. Digital image correlation (DIC) tracks features on the surface of a material to establish a displacement field of a component subjected to load, which can then be used to calculate the strain field. The application of both DIC and TSA on a composite plate representative of aircraft secondary structure subject to resonant frequency loading using a portable loading device, i.e. `remote loading' is described. Laboratory based loading for TSA and DIC is typically imparted using a test machine, however in the current work a vibration loading system is used which is able to excite the component of interest at resonant frequency which enables TSA and DIC to be carried out. The accuracy of the measurements made under remote loading of both of the optical techniques applied is discussed. The data are compared to extract complimentary information from the two techniques. This work forms a step towards a combined strain based non-destructive evaluation procedure able to identify and quantify the effect of defects more fully, particularly when examining component performance in service applications.

  6. ¹H, ¹³C and ¹⁵N resonance assignment of the soluble form of the lipid-modified Azurin from Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nóbrega, Cláudia S; Matzapetakis, Manolis; Pauleta, Sofia R

    2013-10-01

    Lipid-modified azurin (Laz) from Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a type 1 copper protein proposed to be the electron donor to several enzymes involved in the resistance mechanism to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Here we report the backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of Laz in the reduced form, which has been complete at 97%. The predicted secondary structure indicates that this protein belongs to the azurin subfamily of type 1 copper proteins. PMID:23070845

  7. MicroRNA prediction using a fixed-order Markov model based on the secondary structure pattern.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Shen

    Full Text Available Predicting miRNAs is an arduous task, due to the diversity of the precursors and complexity of enzyme processes. Although several prediction approaches have reached impressive performances, few of them could achieve a full-function recognition of mature miRNA directly from the candidate hairpins across species. Therefore, researchers continue to seek a more powerful model close to biological recognition to miRNA structure. In this report, we describe a novel miRNA prediction algorithm, known as FOMmiR, using a fixed-order Markov model based on the secondary structural pattern. For a training dataset containing 809 human pre-miRNAs and 6441 human pseudo-miRNA hairpins, the model's parameters were defined and evaluated. The results showed that FOMmiR reached 91% accuracy on the human dataset through 5-fold cross-validation. Moreover, for the independent test datasets, the FOMmiR presented an outstanding prediction in human and other species including vertebrates, Drosophila, worms and viruses, even plants, in contrast to the well-known algorithms and models. Especially, the FOMmiR was not only able to distinguish the miRNA precursors from the hairpins, but also locate the position and strand of the mature miRNA. Therefore, this study provides a new generation of miRNA prediction algorithm, which successfully realizes a full-function recognition of the mature miRNAs directly from the hairpin sequences. And it presents a new understanding of the biological recognition based on the strongest signal's location detected by FOMmiR, which might be closely associated with the enzyme cleavage mechanism during the miRNA maturation.

  8. Probabilistic analysis of power assignments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, de Maurits; Manthey, Bodo

    2014-01-01

    A fundamental problem for wireless ad hoc networks is the assignment of suitable transmission powers to the wireless devices such that the resulting communication graph is connected. The goal is to minimize the total transmit power in order to maximize the life-time of the network. Our aim is a prob

  9. Who Benefits from Homework Assignments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronning, Marte

    2011-01-01

    Using Dutch data on pupils in elementary school this paper is the first empirical study to analyze whether assigning homework has a heterogeneous impact on pupil achievement. Addressing potential biases by using a difference-in-difference approach, I find that the test score gap is larger in classes where everybody gets homework than in classes…

  10. Experimental Investigation of Secondary Flow Structures Downstream of a Model Type IV Stent Failure in a 180° Curved Artery Test Section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulusu, Kartik V; Plesniak, Michael W

    2016-01-01

    The arterial network in the human vasculature comprises of ubiquitously present blood vessels with complex geometries (branches, curvatures and tortuosity). Secondary flow structures are vortical flow patterns that occur in curved arteries due to the combined action of centrifugal forces, adverse pressure gradients and inflow characteristics. Such flow morphologies are greatly affected by pulsatility and multiple harmonics of physiological inflow conditions and vary greatly in size-strength-shape characteristics compared to non-physiological (steady and oscillatory) flows (1 - 7). Secondary flow structures may ultimately influence the wall shear stress and exposure time of blood-borne particles toward progression of atherosclerosis, restenosis, sensitization of platelets and thrombosis (4 - 6, 8 - 13). Therefore, the ability to detect and characterize these structures under laboratory-controlled conditions is precursor to further clinical investigations. A common surgical treatment to atherosclerosis is stent implantation, to open up stenosed arteries for unobstructed blood flow. But the concomitant flow perturbations due to stent installations result in multi-scale secondary flow morphologies (4 - 6). Progressively higher order complexities such as asymmetry and loss in coherence can be induced by ensuing stent failures vis-à-vis those under unperturbed flows (5). These stent failures have been classified as "Types I-to-IV" based on failure considerations and clinical severity (14). This study presents a protocol for the experimental investigation of the complex secondary flow structures due to complete transverse stent fracture and linear displacement of fractured parts ("Type IV") in a curved artery model. The experimental method involves the implementation of particle image velocimetry (2C-2D PIV) techniques with an archetypal carotid artery inflow waveform, a refractive index matched blood-analog working fluid for phase-averaged measurements (15 - 18

  11. A simple system for the identification of fluorescent dyes capable of reporting differences in secondary structure and hydrophobicity among amyloidogenic protein oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Emma

    2012-02-01

    Thioflavin T and Congo Red are fluorescent dyes that are commonly used to identify the presence of amyloid structures, ordered protein aggregates. Despite the ubiquity of their use, little is known about their mechanism of interaction with amyloid fibrils, or whether other dyes, whose photophysics indicate that they may be more responsive to differences in macromolecular secondary structure and hydrophobicity, would be better suited to the identification of pathologically relevant oligomeric species in amyloid diseases. In order to systematically address this question, we have designed a strategy that discretely introduces differences in secondary structure and hydrophobicity amidst otherwise identical polyamino acids. This strategy will enable us to quantify and compare the affinities of Thioflavin T, Congo Red, and other, incompletely explored, fluorescent dyes for different secondary structural elements and hydrophobic motifs. With this information, we will identify dyes that give the most robust and quantitative information about structural differences among the complex population of oligomeric species present along an aggregation pathway between soluble monomers and amyloid fibrils, and correlate the resulting structural information with differential oligomeric toxicity.

  12. Application of secondary and residual stresses to the assessment of the structural integrity of nuclear power-generating plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnox nuclear power stations were built in the 1960s to design codes that, in general, required weldments to be subject to a post-weld heat treatment to remove residual stresses. Implicit in this was the assumption that the heat treatment reduced the stresses significantly such that as stated in the codes 'stresses caused by fabrication and welding are practically annulled'. However, it has since been realised that the stresses remaining, although small, could still be significant when incorporated into the subsequently developed failure avoidance methodologies such as R6. Moreover, either at the time of construction or during the operating life, repairs are undertaken to remove manufacturing or service-induced defects. These repairs can be put into service with or without a post-weld heat treatment. As a consequence of a paucity of data for the two- and three-dimensional distribution of the magnitude of these stresses, extremely conservative values of stresses have been adopted to ensure that the plant is secure against the design intent throughout the service life. In this paper, the requirements of the failure-avoidance methodology R6 Revision 4 are briefly reviewed with respect to the categorisation of secondary and residual stresses and the application of the three approaches for determining the as-welded residual stress distribution at room temperature. These three levels comprise, Level 1, simple estimates, Level 2, bounding profiles, and Level 3, detailed evaluation. Examples are presented where knowledge of the residual stresses has been an important component of the overall integrity assessment. The first relates to multi-pass weldments in superheater headers fabricated from a ferritic steel and the second to the weldments in the standpipes, both at Magnox power stations with concrete pressure vessels. Although in these cases the weldments had been subject to a post-weld heat treatment, the remaining residual stresses presented a significant challenge to

  13. Fleet Assignment Using Collective Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, Nicolas E.; Bieniawski, Stefan R.; Kroo, Ilan M.; Wolpert, David H.

    2004-01-01

    Product distribution theory is a new collective intelligence-based framework for analyzing and controlling distributed systems. Its usefulness in distributed stochastic optimization is illustrated here through an airline fleet assignment problem. This problem involves the allocation of aircraft to a set of flights legs in order to meet passenger demand, while satisfying a variety of linear and non-linear constraints. Over the course of the day, the routing of each aircraft is determined in order to minimize the number of required flights for a given fleet. The associated flow continuity and aircraft count constraints have led researchers to focus on obtaining quasi-optimal solutions, especially at larger scales. In this paper, the authors propose the application of this new stochastic optimization algorithm to a non-linear objective cold start fleet assignment problem. Results show that the optimizer can successfully solve such highly-constrained problems (130 variables, 184 constraints).

  14. Who benefits from homework assignments?

    OpenAIRE

    Rønning, Marte

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: Using Dutch data on pupils in elementary school this paper is the first empirical study that analyzes whether assigning homework has an heterogeneous impact on pupil achievement. Addressing potential biases that arise from unobserved school quality, pupil selection by exploiting different methods, I find that the test score gap is larger in classes where everybody gets homework than in classes where nobody gets homework. More precisely pupils belonging to the upper part of the so...

  15. A New Approach to Pointer Analysis for Assignments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Bo; ZANG Binyu; LI Jing; ZHU Chuanqi

    2001-01-01

    Pointer analysis is a technique to identify at compile-time the po tential values of the pointer expressions in a program, which promises significant benefits for optimizing and parallelizing compilers. In this paper, a new approach to pointer analysis for assignments is presented. In this approach, assignments are clas sified into three categories: pointer assignments, structure (union) assignments and normal assignments which don't affect the point-to information. Pointer analyses for these three kinds of assignments respectively make up the integrated algorithm. When analyzing a pointer assignment, a new method called expression expansion is used to calculate both the left targets and the right targets. The integration of recursive data structure analysis into pointer analysis is a significant originality of this paper, which uniforms the pointer analysis for heap variables and the pointer analysis for stack variables. This algorithm is implemented in Agassiz, an analyzing tool for C programs developed by Institute of Parallel Processing, Fudan University. Its accuracy and effectiveness are illustrated by experimental data.

  16. Assignment of phycocyanobilin in HMPT using triple resonance experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röben, Marco; Schmieder, Peter

    2011-09-01

    A complete assignment of all resonances of a small organic molecule is a prerequisite for a structure determination using NMR spectroscopy. This is conventionally obtained using a well-established strategy based on COSY, HMQC and HMBC spectra. In case of phycocyanobilin (PCB) in HMPT this strategy was unsuccessful due to the symmetry of the molecule and extreme signal overlap. Since (13)C and (15)N labeled material was available, an alternative strategy for resonance assignment was used. Triple resonance experiments derived from experiments conventionally performed for proteins are sensitive and easy to analyze. Their application led to a complete and unambiguous assignment using three types of experiments. PMID:21815209

  17. An efficient method for the prediction of deleterious multiple-point mutations in the secondary structure of RNAs using suboptimal folding solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barash Danny

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNAmute is an interactive Java application which, given an RNA sequence, calculates the secondary structure of all single point mutations and organizes them into categories according to their similarity to the predicted structure of the wild type. The secondary structure predictions are performed using the Vienna RNA package. A more efficient implementation of RNAmute is needed, however, to extend from the case of single point mutations to the general case of multiple point mutations, which may often be desired for computational predictions alongside mutagenesis experiments. But analyzing multiple point mutations, a process that requires traversing all possible mutations, becomes highly expensive since the running time is O(nm for a sequence of length n with m-point mutations. Using Vienna's RNAsubopt, we present a method that selects only those mutations, based on stability considerations, which are likely to be conformational rearranging. The approach is best examined using the dot plot representation for RNA secondary structure. Results Using RNAsubopt, the suboptimal solutions for a given wild-type sequence are calculated once. Then, specific mutations are selected that are most likely to cause a conformational rearrangement. For an RNA sequence of about 100 nts and 3-point mutations (n = 100, m = 3, for example, the proposed method reduces the running time from several hours or even days to several minutes, thus enabling the practical application of RNAmute to the analysis of multiple-point mutations. Conclusion A highly efficient addition to RNAmute that is as user friendly as the original application but that facilitates the practical analysis of multiple-point mutations is presented. Such an extension can now be exploited prior to site-directed mutagenesis experiments by virologists, for example, who investigate the change of function in an RNA virus via mutations that disrupt important motifs in its secondary

  18. Triterpenóides pentacíclicos de Mentha villosa: identificação estrutural e atribuição dos deslocamentos químicos dos átomos de hidrogênio e carbono Pentacyclic triterpenoids of Mentha villosa: structural identification and ¹H and 13C resonance assignments

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco J. Queiroz Monte; Eliete F. de Oliveira; Raimundo Braz Filho

    2001-01-01

    The structures of seven oleanene and ursene triterpenoids (1-7) isolated from aerial parts of Mentha villosa were identified. In addition, the complete ¹H and 13C resonance assignments of these triterpenoids were accomplished using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic experiments.

  19. NMR assignments of the N-terminal domain of Ogataea polymorpha telomerase reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polshakov, Vladimir I; Petrova, Olga A; Parfenova, Yulia Yu; Efimov, Sergey V; Klochkov, Vladimir V; Zvereva, Maria I; Dontsova, Olga A

    2016-04-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme that adds telomeric DNA fragments to the ends of chromosomes. This enzyme is the focus of substantial attention, both because its structure and mechanism of action are still poorly studied, and because of its pivotal roles in aging and cellular proliferation. The use of telomerase as a potential target for the design of new anticancer drugs is also of great interest. The catalytic protein subunit of telomerase (TERT) contains an N-terminal domain (TEN) that is essential for activity and processivity. Elucidation of the structure and dynamics of TEN in solution is important for understanding the molecular mechanism of telomerase activity and for the design of new telomerase inhibitors. To approach this problem, in this study we report the (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N chemical shift assignments of TEN from Ogataea polymorpha. Analysis of the assigned chemical shifts allowed us to identify secondary structures and protein regions potentially involved in interaction with other participants of the telomerase catalytic cycle. PMID:26721464

  20. A Statistical Programme Assignment Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosholm, Michael; Staghøj, Jonas; Svarer, Michael

    When treatment effects of active labour market programmes are heterogeneous in an observable way  across the population, the allocation of the unemployed into different programmes becomes a particularly  important issue. In this paper, we present a statistical model designed to improve the present...... duration of unemployment spells may result if a statistical programme assignment model is introduced. We discuss several issues regarding the  plementation of such a system, especially the interplay between the statistical model and  case workers....

  1. Secondary structure and feature of mitochondrial tRNA genes of the Ussurian tube-nosed bat Murina ussuriensis (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Kwang Bae Yoon; Yung Chul Park

    2015-01-01

    The complete mitogenome (NC_021119) of the Ussurian tube-nosed bat Murina ussuriensis (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae) was annotated and characterized in our recent publication (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/NC_021119). Here we provide additional information on methods in detail for obtaining the complete sequence of M. ussuriensis mitogenome. In addition, we describe characteristics of 22 tRNA genes and secondary structure and feature of 22 tRNAs of M. ussuriensis mitogenome.

  2. Molecular evolution of rDNA in early diverging Metazoa: First comparative analysis and phylogenetic application of complete SSU rRNA secondary structures in Porifera

    OpenAIRE

    Wörheide Gert; Erpenbeck Dirk; Voigt Oliver

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The cytoplasmic ribosomal small subunit (SSU, 18S) ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is the most frequently-used gene for molecular phylogenetic studies. However, information regarding its secondary structure is neglected in most phylogenetic analyses. Incorporation of this information is essential in order to apply specific rRNA evolutionary models to overcome the problem of co-evolution of paired sites, which violates the basic assumption of the independent evolution of sites made by...

  3. Secondary structure and feature of mitochondrial tRNA genes of the Ussurian tube-nosed bat Murina ussuriensis (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang Bae Yoon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The complete mitogenome (NC_021119 of the Ussurian tube-nosed bat Murina ussuriensis (Chiroptera: Vespertilionidae was annotated and characterized in our recent publication (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/nuccore/NC_021119. Here we provide additional information on methods in detail for obtaining the complete sequence of M. ussuriensis mitogenome. In addition, we describe characteristics of 22 tRNA genes and secondary structure and feature of 22 tRNAs of M. ussuriensis mitogenome.

  4. Effect of micro-structural modifier on the morphology of silicon rich secondary phase and strain hardening behavior of eutectic Al-Si alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansoor, M.; Salam, I.; Tauqir, A.

    2016-08-01

    Eutectic Al-Si alloys find their applications in moderate to severe tribological conditions, for example: pistons, casings of high speed pumps and slide sleeves. The higher hardness, so the better tribological properties, are originated by the formation of a silicon rich secondary phase, however, the morphology of the secondary phase drastically influence the toughness of the alloy. Microstructural modifiers are used to control the toughness which modifies the Si rich secondary phase into dispersed spherical structure instead of needle-like network. In the present study, a mixture of chemical fluxes was used to modify the Si phase. The alloy was cast into a sand mold and characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, hardness testing and tensile testing. It was found that the morphology of the Si phase was altered to acicular structure due to the modification process. In comparison, the un-modified alloy contained Si phase in needle-like structure. The effect of modifier was also pronounced on the mechanical properties, where increase of 50% in yield strength, 56% in tensile strength and 200% in elongation occurred. A discernable raise in strain hardening component indicated the improved strain harden ability and formability of the modified alloy.

  5. Detection of multi-scale secondary flow structures using anisotropic 2D Ricker wavelets in a bent tube model for curved arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesniak, Daniel H.; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2012-11-01

    Interpretation of complex flow patterns observed in this study of a model curved artery required characterization of multiple, low-circulation secondary flow structures that were observed during the late systolic deceleration and diastolic phases under physiological inflow conditions. Phase-locked, planar vorticity PIV data were acquired at various cross-sectional locations of the 180-degree bent tube model. High circulation, deformed Dean- and Lyne-type vortices were observed during early stages of deceleration, while several smaller scale, highly deformed, low-circulation vortical patterns appeared in the core and near-wall regions during late systolic deceleration and diastolic phases. Due to the multiplicity of vortical scales and shapes, anisotropic 2D Ricker wavelets were used for coherent structure detection in a continuous wavelet transform algorithm (PIVlet 1.2). Our bio-inspired study is geared towards understanding whether optimizing the shape of the wavelet kernel will enable better resolution of several low-circulation, multi-scale secondary flow morphologies and whether new insights into the dynamics of arterial secondary flow structures can accordingly be gained. Supported by the National Science Foundation, Grant No. CBET-0828903 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE).

  6. Signs of Selection in Synonymous Sites of the Mitochondrial Cytochrome b Gene of Baikal Oilfish (Comephoridae by mRNA Secondary Structure Alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika I. Teterina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies over the past decade have shown a significant role of synonymous mutations in posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression, which is particularly associated with messenger RNA (mRNA secondary structure alterations. Most studies focused on prokaryote genomes and the nuclear genomes of eukaryotes while little is known about the regulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA gene expression. This paper reveals signs of selection in synonymous sites of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene (Cytb of Baikal oilfish or golomyankas (Comephoridae directed towards altering the secondary structure of the mRNA and probably altering the character of mtDNA gene expression. Our findings are based on comparisons of intraspecific genetic variation patterns of small golomyanka (Comephorus dybowski and two genetic groups of big golomyanka (Comephorus dybowskii. Two approaches were used: (i analysis of the distribution of synonymous mutations between weak-AT (W and strong-GC (S nucleotides within species and groups in accordance with mutation directions from central to peripheral haplotypes and (ii approaches based on the predicted mRNA secondary structure.

  7. Performance of a neural-network-based determination of amino acid class and secondary structure from 1H-15N NMR data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A neural network which can determine both amino acid class and secondary structure using NMR data from 15N-labeled proteins is described. We have included nitrogen chemical shifts,3JHNHα coupling constants, α-proton chemical shifts, and side-chain proton chemical shifts as input to a three-layer feed-forward network. The network was trained with 456 spin systems from several proteins containing various types of secondary structure, and tested on human ubiquitin, which has no sequence homology with any of the proteins in the training set. A very limited set of data,representative of those from a TOCSY-HSQC and HNHA experiment, was used.Nevertheless, in 60% of the spin systems the correct amino acid class was among the top two choices given by the network, while in 96% of the spin systems the secondary structure was correctly identified. The performance of this network clearly shows the potential of the neural network algorithm in the automation of NMR spectral analysis

  8. Secondary structure analyses of the nuclear rRNA internal transcribed spacers and assessment of its phylogenetic utility across the Brassicaceae (mustards).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edger, Patrick P; Tang, Michelle; Bird, Kevin A; Mayfield, Dustin R; Conant, Gavin; Mummenhoff, Klaus; Koch, Marcus A; Pires, J Chris

    2014-01-01

    The internal transcribed spacers of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene cluster, termed ITS1 and ITS2, are the most frequently used nuclear markers for phylogenetic analyses across many eukaryotic groups including most plant families. The reasons for the popularity of these markers include: 1.) Ease of amplification due to high copy number of the gene clusters, 2.) Available cost-effective methods and highly conserved primers, 3.) Rapidly evolving markers (i.e. variable between closely related species), and 4.) The assumption (and/or treatment) that these sequences are non-functional, neutrally evolving phylogenetic markers. Here, our analyses of ITS1 and ITS2 for 50 species suggest that both sequences are instead under selective constraints to preserve proper secondary structure, likely to maintain complete self-splicing functions, and thus are not neutrally-evolving phylogenetic markers. Our results indicate the majority of sequence sites are co-evolving with other positions to form proper secondary structure, which has implications for phylogenetic inference. We also found that the lowest energy state and total number of possible alternate secondary structures are highly significantly different between ITS regions and random sequences with an identical overall length and Guanine-Cytosine (GC) content. Lastly, we review recent evidence highlighting some additional problematic issues with using these regions as the sole markers for phylogenetic studies, and thus strongly recommend additional markers and cost-effective approaches for future studies to estimate phylogenetic relationships. PMID:24984034

  9. Secondary structure analyses of the nuclear rRNA internal transcribed spacers and assessment of its phylogenetic utility across the Brassicaceae (mustards.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick P Edger

    Full Text Available The internal transcribed spacers of the nuclear ribosomal RNA gene cluster, termed ITS1 and ITS2, are the most frequently used nuclear markers for phylogenetic analyses across many eukaryotic groups including most plant families. The reasons for the popularity of these markers include: 1. Ease of amplification due to high copy number of the gene clusters, 2. Available cost-effective methods and highly conserved primers, 3. Rapidly evolving markers (i.e. variable between closely related species, and 4. The assumption (and/or treatment that these sequences are non-functional, neutrally evolving phylogenetic markers. Here, our analyses of ITS1 and ITS2 for 50 species suggest that both sequences are instead under selective constraints to preserve proper secondary structure, likely to maintain complete self-splicing functions, and thus are not neutrally-evolving phylogenetic markers. Our results indicate the majority of sequence sites are co-evolving with other positions to form proper secondary structure, which has implications for phylogenetic inference. We also found that the lowest energy state and total number of possible alternate secondary structures are highly significantly different between ITS regions and random sequences with an identical overall length and Guanine-Cytosine (GC content. Lastly, we review recent evidence highlighting some additional problematic issues with using these regions as the sole markers for phylogenetic studies, and thus strongly recommend additional markers and cost-effective approaches for future studies to estimate phylogenetic relationships.

  10. Moving beyond "Bookish Knowledge": Using Film-Based Assignments to Promote Deep Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Joann S.; Autry, Linda; Moe, Jeffry

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates the effectiveness of a film-based assignment given to adult learners in a graduate-level group counseling class. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with four students; data analysis suggested film-based assignments may promote deep approaches to learning (DALs). Participants indicated the assignment helped them…

  11. An Implementation of Active Learning: Assessing the Effectiveness of the Team Infomercial Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, Alexei V.; Milter, Richard G.

    2010-01-01

    This article examines the effectiveness of the team infomercial assignment as an active learning tool in undergraduate courses. The structure and three phases of the team infomercial assignment, as well as student evaluations and feedback, are presented. We investigated student experiences working on the team infomercial assignment, the common…

  12. Wholeness and primary and secondary food structure effects on in vitro digestion patterns determine nutritionally distinct carbohydrate fractions in cereal foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Suman; Monro, John

    2012-12-01

    Starchy foods of differing structure, including bakery products, breakfast cereals, pastas, and pulses were digested in vitro. Bakery products and processed breakfast cereals with little resilient structure yielded large amounts of rapidly available carbohydrate (RAC), less slowly digested starch (SDS) and little inaccessible digestible starch (IDS) (70:22:8%). Partially processed grains, such as rolled oats contained an increased proportion of SDS (55:38:7%). Pastas, being dense starch structures digested more gradually to completion by superficial erosion, yielding approximately equal proportions of RAC and SDS but little IDS (43:52:4%). Pulses, which retained their cellular morphology, digested more linearly yielding a lower proportion of RAC, a larger proportion of SDS and more IDS (9:69:22%). Preservation of native "primary" structure, and use of processing to create "secondary" structure, are both means by which wholeness, in the sense of intactness, can be used to influence carbohydrate digestion to make foods of lower glycaemic impact.

  13. Effect of freeze-drying, cryoprotectants and storage conditions on the stability of secondary structure of insulin-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Sandra; Fonte, Pedro; Costa, Ana; Andrade, José; Seabra, Vítor; Ferreira, Domingos; Reis, Salette; Sarmento, Bruno

    2013-11-18

    This study aims to monitor the secondary structure behaviour of insulin when it is encapsulated into solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN), under the influence of several critical processing parameters. Insulin was used as a therapeutic protein model. Physicochemical properties of insulin-loaded SLN (Ins-SLN) were assessed, with special focus on the insulin secondary structure after its encapsulation into SLN and after freeze-drying using different cryoprotectants (glucose, fructose and sorbitol). Additionally, a 6-month stability study was performed to evaluate the maintenance of insulin secondary structure over time at different storage conditions (4 °C/60% RH, 25 °C/60% RH, 40 °C/75% RH). Ins-SLN were successfully produced with a mean and narrow particle size around 400 nm, zeta potential around -13 mV, an insulin association efficiency of 84%. Physical-chemical properties of SLN were maintained after freeze-drying. FTIR results showed that encapsulated insulin maintained a native-like structure in a degree of similarity around 92% after production, and 84% after freeze-drying. After 6 months, freeze-dried Ins-SLN without cryoprotectant stored at 40 °C/75% RH presented the same degree of structure preservation and morphology. Results revealed that insulin structure can be significantly protected by SLN matrix itself, without a cryoprotectant agent, even using a non-optimized freeze-drying process, and under the harsher storage conditions. Multivariable experimental settled the process parameters to fit with the desired product quality attributes regarding protein and nanoparticle stability.

  14. Intrusive growth of primary and secondary phloem fibres in hemp stem determines fibre-bundle formation and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snegireva, Anastasia; Chernova, Tatyana; Ageeva, Marina; Lev-Yadun, Simcha; Gorshkova, Tatyana

    2015-05-27

    Plant fibres-cells with important mechanical functions and a widely used raw material-are usually identified in microscopic sections only after reaching a significant length or after developing a thickened cell wall. We characterized the early developmental stages of hemp (Cannabis sativa) stem phloem fibres, both primary (originating from the procambium) and secondary (originating in the cambium), when they still had only a primary cell wall. We gave a major emphasis to the role of intrusive elongation, the specific type of plant cell growth by which fibres commonly attain large cell length. We could identify primary phloem fibres at a distance of only 1.2-1.5 mm from the shoot apical meristem when they grew symplastically with the surrounding tissues. Half a millimeter further downwards along the stem, fibres began their intrusive elongation, which led to a sharp increase in fibre numbers visible within the stem cross-sections. The intrusive elongation of primary phloem fibres was completed within the several distal centimetres of the growing stem, before the onset of their secondary cell wall formation. The formation of secondary phloem fibres started long after the beginning of secondary xylem formation. Our data indicate that only a small portion of the fusiform cambial initials (hemp, but may be applied to many other species.

  15. Cellular biopolymers and molecular structure of a secondary pulp and paper mill sludge verified by spectroscopy and chemical extraction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edalatmanesh, Maryam; Sain, Mohini; Liss, Steven N

    2010-01-01

    For proper treatment, recycling, or disposal of the pulp and paper mill secondary sludge qualitative and quantitative determination of its characteristics are necessary. Chemical extraction, quantitative characterization, and spectroscopic experiments have been performed to determine the molecular composition and chemical functionality of a pulp and paper mill secondary sludge. In order to extract the low-molecular-weight substances, soxhlet extraction with polar and non-polar solvents was performed where most of the target substances (17±1.3%.) were extracted after 2 hours. Over time, this extraction followed a first-order kinetics. Fiber analyses have shown 12±3% lignin, 28±3% cellulose, and 12±4% hemicelluloses content. The ash content was about 17±0.5%. In this work, 7 and 16% intra- and extracellular polymeric substances, respectively, were extracted from the secondary sludge. EPS and mixture of intra- and extracellular biopolymers have shown similar chemical functionalities. These analyses confirmed that the paper secondary sludge consisted mainly of wood fiber, i.e. lignocellulosic substances, along with proteins and polysaccharides originated from microorganisms. PMID:21123914

  16. The Weight of History: Structures, Patterns and Legacies of Secondary Education in the British Isles, c.1200-c.1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, William

    2011-01-01

    This article serves as context for the other papers in this special issue, all of which deal with developments in UK secondary education since c.1980. The paper comprises a review of selected impulses and imperatives that saw the substantial legacy of medieval and humanist schooling in Britain re-shaped, during the period c.1830-c.1980, into the…

  17. [Secondary hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yuichi; Shibata, Hirotaka

    2015-11-01

    Hypertension is a common disease and a crucial predisposing factor of cardiovascular diseases. Approximately 10% of hypertensive patients are secondary hypertension, a pathogenetic factor of which can be identified. Secondary hypertension consists of endocrine, renal, and other diseases. Primary aldosteronism, Cushing's syndrome, pheochromocytoma, hyperthyroidism, and hypothyroidism result in endocrine hypertension. Renal parenchymal hypertension and renovascular hypertension result in renal hypertension. Other diseases such as obstructive sleep apnea syndrome are also very prevalent in secondary hypertension. It is very crucial to find and treat secondary hypertension at earlier stages since most secondary hypertension is curable or can be dramatically improved by specific treatment. One should keep in mind that screening of secondary hypertension should be done at least once in a daily clinical practice. PMID:26619670

  18. Assignment Choice, Effort, and Assignment Completion: Does Work Ethic Predict Those Who Choose Higher-Effort Assignments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhurst, John T.; Fleisher, Matthew S.; Skinner, Christopher H.; Woehr, David J.; Hawthorn-Embree, Meredith L.

    2011-01-01

    After completing the Multidimensional Work-Ethic Profile (MWEP), 98 college students were given a 20-problem math computation assignment and instructed to stop working on the assignment after completing 10 problems. Next, they were allowed to choose to finish either the partially completed assignment that had 10 problems remaining or a new…

  19. A New Approach to Pointer Analysis for Assignments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄波; 臧斌宇; 等

    2001-01-01

    Pointer analysis is a technique to identify at copile-time the potential values of the pointer expressions in a program,which promises significant benefits for optimzing and parallelizing complilers.In this paper,a new approach to pointer analysis for assignments is presented.In this approach,assignments are classified into three categories:pointer assignments,structure(union)assignents and normal assignments which don't affect the point-to information.Pointer analyses for these three kinds of assignments respectively make up the integrated algorithm.When analyzing a pointer assigemtn.a new method called expression expansion is used to calculate both the left targets and the right targets.The integration of recursive data structure analysis into pointer analysis is a significant originality of this paper,which uniforms the pointer analysis for heap variables and the pointer analysis for stack variables.This algorithm is implemented in Agassiz,an analyzing tool for C programs developed by Institute of Parallel Processing,Fudan University,Its accuracy and effectiveness are illustrated by experimental data.

  20. More General Optimal Offset Assignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Mallach

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript presents exact approaches to the general offset assignment problem arising in the address code generation phase of compilers for application-specific processors. First, integer programming models for architecture-dependent and theoretically motivated special cases of the problem are established. Then, these models are extended to provide the first widely applicable formulations for the most general problem setting, supporting processors with several address registers and complex addressing capabilities. Existing heuristics are similarly extended and practical applicability of the proposed methods is demonstrated by experimental evaluation using an established and large benchmark set. The experiments allow us to study the impact of exploiting more complex memory addressing capabilities on the address computation costs of real-world programs. We also show how to integrate operand reordering techniques for commutative instructions into existing solution approaches.

  1. Effects of essential oil treatments on the secondary protein structure of Vicia faba: A mid-infrared spectroscopic study supported by two-dimensional correlation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecozzi, Mauro; Sturchio, Elena

    2015-02-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of essential oil treatments on the secondary protein structure of the Vicia faba roots, a bioindicator plant, in order to obtain information for the potential allelopathic uses of these oils as alternative to the use of pesticides in agriculture. We tested two mixtures of essential oils consisting of Tween 20-emulsions of tea tree oil (TTO) and Tween 20-emulsion of Clove and Rosemary (GARROM) essential oils respectively at three different oil concentrations each. The molecular modifications caused in Vicia faba by exposure to oil emulsions were investigated by FTIR spectroscopy in diffuse reflectance (DRIFT) mode. We considered the specific Amide I, Amide II and Amide VI bands by ordinary and second derivative spectroscopy and the results showed that both Tween 20-emulsion of GARROM and Tween 20-emulsion of TTO oils cause transitions among the secondary (α-helix, β-sheet and β-turn) structures with in addition the appearance of random coil structures in exposed samples. The Amide VI bands, placed between 500 and 600 cm-1, confirmed the structural transitions observed for the Amide I bands. In addition we observed the presence of a protein oxidation effect for TTO treated samples, oxidation which resulted negligible instead for the GARROM oil samples. At last, FTIR spectra were also submitted to two-dimensional correlation analysis (2DCORR) and double two-dimensional correlation analysis (D2DCORR); the results confirmed the different effects caused by the two typologies of essential oils on the secondary protein structures of Vicia faba roots.

  2. Effect of the carbohydrate moiety on the secondary structure of beta 2-glycoprotein. I. Implications for the biosynthesis and folding of glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, M T; Watzlawick, H; Putnam, F W; Schmid, K; Brossmer, R

    1990-07-01

    By use of six highly purified exoglycosidases with well-defined specificity, the oligosaccharide units of human plasma beta 2-glycoprotein I (beta 2I) were modified by sequential enzymatic degradation. The released monosaccharides (NeuAc, Gal, GlcNAc, and Man) were quantified, and the carbohydrate compositions of the resulting glycoprotein (gp) derivatives were determined. The gp was found to be both partially sialylated and galactosylated. These findings which are in agreement with earlier reports suggest that the carbohydrate moiety of beta 2I possesses more bi- than tri-antennas, probably three of the former and two of the latter carbohydrate units. Circular dichroic (CD) spectra of native beta 2I and its derivatives were measured in aqueous buffer and 2-chloroethanol (2-CE). Analysis of these spectra for elements of secondary structure showed beta 2I and most of the derivatives to contain predominantly beta-sheet and beta-turn structures. The lack of alpha-helical structures in aqueous buffer was noted. Removal of a large portion of the carbohydrate moiety did not alter the CD spectra or secondary structure of beta 2I in either aqueous buffer or in 2-CE. However, after enzymatic removal of approximately 96% of the carbohydrate moiety, large significant changes in the spectra and secondary structures were observed. In aqueous buffer a shift in the wavelength minimum occurred, accompanied by an increase in the magnitude of the molar ellipticity and the amount of beta-turn, with a reduction in random coil. One-third of the amino acids which were originally in random coil conformation assumed beta-turns after removal of 96% of the carbohydrate moiety.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Extensive de novo solid-state NMR assignments of the 33 kDa C-terminal domain of the Ure2 prion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the de novo resonance assignments for the crystalline 33 kDa C-terminal domain of the Ure2 prion using an optimized set of five 3D solid-state NMR spectra. We obtained, using a single uniformly 13C, 15N labeled protein sample, sequential chemical-shift information for 74% of the N, Cα, Cβ triples, and for 80% of further side-chain resonances for these spin systems. We describe the procedures and protocols devised, and discuss possibilities and limitations of the assignment of this largest protein assigned today by solid-state NMR, and for which no solution-state NMR shifts were available. A comparison of the NMR chemical shifts with crystallographic data reveals that regions with high crystallographic B-factors are particularly difficult to assign. While the secondary structure elements derived from the chemical shift data correspond mainly to those present in the X-ray crystal structure, we detect an additional helical element and structural variability in the protein crystal, most probably originating from the different molecules in the asymmetric unit, with the observation of doubled resonances in several parts, including entire stretches, of the protein. Our results provide the point of departure towards an atomic-resolution structural analysis of the C-terminal Ure2p domain in the context of the full-length prion fibrils.

  4. Extensive de novo solid-state NMR assignments of the 33 kDa C-terminal domain of the Ure2 prion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habenstein, Birgit [UMR 5086 CNRS/Universite de Lyon 1, Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Proteines (France); Wasmer, Christian [Harvard Medical School (United States); Bousset, Luc; Sourigues, Yannick [UPR 3082 CNRS, Laboratoire d' Enzymologie et Biochimie Structurales (France); Schuetz, Anne [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Loquet, Antoine [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry (Germany); Meier, Beat H., E-mail: beme@ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Melki, Ronald, E-mail: melki@lebs.cnrs-gif.fr [UPR 3082 CNRS, Laboratoire d' Enzymologie et Biochimie Structurales (France); Boeckmann, Anja, E-mail: a.bockmann@ibcp.fr [UMR 5086 CNRS/Universite de Lyon 1, Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Proteines (France)

    2011-11-15

    We present the de novo resonance assignments for the crystalline 33 kDa C-terminal domain of the Ure2 prion using an optimized set of five 3D solid-state NMR spectra. We obtained, using a single uniformly {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeled protein sample, sequential chemical-shift information for 74% of the N, C{alpha}, C{beta} triples, and for 80% of further side-chain resonances for these spin systems. We describe the procedures and protocols devised, and discuss possibilities and limitations of the assignment of this largest protein assigned today by solid-state NMR, and for which no solution-state NMR shifts were available. A comparison of the NMR chemical shifts with crystallographic data reveals that regions with high crystallographic B-factors are particularly difficult to assign. While the secondary structure elements derived from the chemical shift data correspond mainly to those present in the X-ray crystal structure, we detect an additional helical element and structural variability in the protein crystal, most probably originating from the different molecules in the asymmetric unit, with the observation of doubled resonances in several parts, including entire stretches, of the protein. Our results provide the point of departure towards an atomic-resolution structural analysis of the C-terminal Ure2p domain in the context of the full-length prion fibrils.

  5. Managing voluntary turnover through challenging assignments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preenen, P.T.Y.; Pater, I.E. de; Vianen, A.E.M. van; Keijzer, L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines employees' challenging assignments as manageable means to reduce turnover intentions, job search behaviors, and voluntary turnover. Results indicate that challenging assignments are negatively related to turnover intentions and job search behaviors and that these relationships ar

  6. DNATCO: assignment of DNA conformers at dnatco.org.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Černý, Jiří; Božíková, Paulína; Schneider, Bohdan

    2016-07-01

    The web service DNATCO (dnatco.org) classifies local conformations of DNA molecules beyond their traditional sorting to A, B and Z DNA forms. DNATCO provides an interface to robust algorithms assigning conformation classes called NTC: to dinucleotides extracted from DNA-containing structures uploaded in PDB format version 3.1 or above. The assigned dinucleotide NTC: classes are further grouped into DNA structural alphabet NTA: , to the best of our knowledge the first DNA structural alphabet. The results are presented at two levels: in the form of user friendly visualization and analysis of the assignment, and in the form of a downloadable, more detailed table for further analysis offline. The website is free and open to all users and there is no login requirement. PMID:27150812

  7. Solving multiconstraint assignment problems using learning automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Geir; Oommen, B John

    2010-02-01

    This paper considers the NP-hard problem of object assignment with respect to multiple constraints: assigning a set of elements (or objects) into mutually exclusive classes (or groups), where the elements which are "similar" to each other are hopefully located in the same class. The literature reports solutions in which the similarity constraint consists of a single index that is inappropriate for the type of multiconstraint problems considered here and where the constraints could simultaneously be contradictory. This feature, where we permit possibly contradictory constraints, distinguishes this paper from the state of the art. Indeed, we are aware of no learning automata (or other heuristic) solutions which solve this problem in its most general setting. Such a scenario is illustrated with the static mapping problem, which consists of distributing the processes of a parallel application onto a set of computing nodes. This is a classical and yet very important problem within the areas of parallel computing, grid computing, and cloud computing. We have developed four learning-automata (LA)-based algorithms to solve this problem: First, a fixed-structure stochastic automata algorithm is presented, where the processes try to form pairs to go onto the same node. This algorithm solves the problem, although it requires some centralized coordination. As it is desirable to avoid centralized control, we subsequently present three different variable-structure stochastic automata (VSSA) algorithms, which have superior partitioning properties in certain settings, although they forfeit some of the scalability features of the fixed-structure algorithm. All three VSSA algorithms model the processes as automata having first the hosting nodes as possible actions; second, the processes as possible actions; and, third, attempting to estimate the process communication digraph prior to probabilistically mapping the processes. This paper, which, we believe, comprehensively reports the

  8. RNA二级结构预测及其在分子分类研究中的应用%Prediction and Application of RNA Secondary Structure in the Study of Molecular Taxonomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨泽民; 谢数涛; 章群; 张俊彬

    2012-01-01

    文中通过比较RNA二级结构与一级结构和三维结构的差异,说明了RNA二级结构用于系统发育和分子分类研究的优点,并介绍了目前构建RNA二级结构的常用方法以及各种方法的优缺点,并对用于RNA二级结构折叠的软件作了简单介绍.最后从4个方面详细阐述了RNA二级结构在分子分类研究中的应用,即:RNA二级结构应用于分子分类研究的理论和方法;应用RNA二级结构分类与形态分类的区别;三种RNA二级结构在分子分类中的研究现状;RNA二级结构对序列信息的校正与补充.%Through comparing the differences among the RNA secondary, primary and tertiary structures, the advantages of RNA secondary structure in the phylogenesis and molecular taxonomy were illustrated. The common methods of designing RNA secondary structure, as well as their strongpoints and shortcomings were discussed, the software adopted in the folding of RNA secondary structure was briefly introduced. Finally the application of RNA secondary structure in molecular taxonomy research was analyzed from four aspects, including the applied theory and methods of RNA secondary structure, the differences between taxonomic classification and RNA secondary structure classification, the research progress on the application of three RNA secondary structures in molecular taxonomy, and the amending and supplement of sequence information by RNA secondary structure.

  9. 5 CFR 870.901 - Assignments permitted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' GROUP LIFE INSURANCE PROGRAM Assignments of Life Insurance § 870.901..., and compensationers. (2) An individual may assign ownership of all life insurance under this part... Benefit before assigning the remainder of his/her insurance, the amount of Basic insurance does...

  10. 7 CFR 1437.104 - Assigned production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Assigned production. 1437.104 Section 1437.104... Determining Yield Coverage Using Actual Production History § 1437.104 Assigned production. (a) When determining losses under this section, assigned production will be used to offset the loss of production...

  11. Lexical Stress Assignment in Italian Developmental Dyslexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paizi, Despina; Zoccolotti, Pierluigi; Burani, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Stress assignment to Italian polysyllabic words is unpredictable, because stress is neither marked nor predicted by rule. Stress assignment, especially to low frequency words, has been reported to be a function of stress dominance and stress neighbourhood. Two experiments investigate stress assignment in sixth-grade, skilled and dyslexic, readers.…

  12. Proteolytically-induced changes of secondary structural protein conformation of bovine serum albumin monitored by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and UV-circular dichroism spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güler, Günnur; Vorob'ev, Mikhail M.; Vogel, Vitali; Mäntele, Werner

    2016-05-01

    Enzymatically-induced degradation of bovine serum albumin (BSA) by serine proteases (trypsin and α-chymotrypsin) in various concentrations was monitored by means of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and ultraviolet circular dichroism (UV-CD) spectroscopy. In this study, the applicability of both spectroscopies to monitor the proteolysis process in real time has been proven, by tracking the spectral changes together with secondary structure analysis of BSA as proteolysis proceeds. On the basis of the FTIR spectra and the changes in the amide I band region, we suggest the progression of proteolysis process via conversion of α-helices (1654 cm- 1) into unordered structures and an increase in the concentration of free carboxylates (absorption of 1593 and 1402 cm- 1). For the first time, the correlation between the degree of hydrolysis and the concentration of carboxylic groups measured by FTIR spectroscopy was revealed as well. The far UV-CD spectra together with their secondary structure analysis suggest that the α-helical content decreases concomitant with an increase in the unordered structure. Both spectroscopic techniques also demonstrate that there are similar but less spectral changes of BSA for the trypsin attack than for α-chymotrypsin although the substrate/enzyme ratio is taken the same.

  13. 低同源性蛋白质结构预测%Low Homologous Protein Structure Prediction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    倪立生; 毛凤楼; 韩玉真; 来鲁华

    2001-01-01

    The development of human genome project calls for more rapid and accurate protein structure prediction method to assign the structure and function of gene products. Threading has been proved to be successful in protein fold assignment,although difficulties remain for low homologous sequences. We have developed a method for solving the sequence rearrangement problem in threading. By reshuffling secondary elements,protein structures with the same spatial arrangement of secondary structures but different connections can be predicted. This method has been proved to be useful in fold recognition for proteins of different evolutionary origin and converge to the same fold.

  14. Computational Assignment of Chemical Shifts for Protein Residues

    CERN Document Server

    Bratholm, Lars A

    2013-01-01

    Fast and accurate protein structure prediction is one of the major challenges in structural biology, biotechnology and molecular biomedicine. These fields require 3D protein structures for rational design of proteins with improved or novel properties. X-ray crystallography is the most common approach even with its low success rate, but lately NMR based approaches have gained popularity. The general approach involves a set of distance restraints used to guide a structure prediction, but simple NMR triple-resonance experiments often provide enough structural information to predict the structure of small proteins. Previous protein folding simulations that have utilised experimental data have weighted the experimental data and physical force field terms more or less arbitrarily, and the method is thus not generally applicable to new proteins. Furthermore a complete and near error-free assignment of chemical shifts obtained by the NMR experiments is needed, due to the static, or deterministic, assignment. In this ...

  15. THE FACTOR STRUCTURE OF MOTOR SKILLS AND KNOWLEDGE OF THE FEMALE STUDENTS OF THE FIRST YEAR OF SECONDARY SCHOOL

    OpenAIRE

    Said Hasanbegovic; Mirela Osmanovic

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine the latent space of motor skills and knowledge of the female students of the first year of secondary school. This study included 120 girls, and it was conducted at the end of the school year, after the realization of the regular physical education classes. According to nine tests aimed to evaluate motor skills and 16 more to assess motor knowledge, factors that define the latent space of motor skills of the test group were isolated by factor analysis, ...

  16. Chemical and structural characterisation of DGEBA-based epoxies by time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) as a preliminary to polymer interphase characterisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passlack, Sven; Brodyanski, Alexander; Bock, Wolfgang; Kopnarski, Michael; Presser, Melanie; Geiss, Paul Ludwig; Possart, Gunnar; Steinmann, Paul

    2009-04-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) has become a powerful tool in the field of surface analysis since it provides information about the top few monolayers of a sample, i.e. on the chemical composition of the sample surface. Thus, the general question arises whether a surface-sensitive technique like ToF-SIMS would be appropriate to detect systematic chemical and/or structural changes in organic bulk polymers caused by varying a chemical content of the initial components or by tracking, e.g. curing processes in such materials. It is shown that careful sample preparation and the use of multivariate methods permit the quantitative acquisition of chemical and structural information about bulk polymers from the secondary ion signals. The hardener concentration and a cross-linking coefficient in diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A based epoxies were determined by ToF-SIMS measurements on samples with different resin to hardener ratio and varying curing time. In future work, we will use the developed method to investigate the local composition of adhesively bonded joints. In particular, the mapping of the chemical and structural properties in the so-called interphase will then be of interest.

  17. Association of BMPR-1B and GDF9 genes polymorphisms and secondary protein structure changes with reproduction traits in Mehraban ewes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoli, R; Zamani, P; Deljou, A; Rezvan, H

    2013-07-25

    BMPR-1B and GDF9 genes are well known due to their important effects on litter size and mechanisms controlling ovulation rate in sheep. In the present study, polymorphisms of BMPR-1B gene exon 8 and GDF9 gene exon 1 were detected by single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and DNA sequencing methods in 100 Mehraban ewes. The PCR reaction forced to amplify 140 and 380-bp fragments of BMPR-1B and GDF9 genes, respectively. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPS) were identified in two different SSCP patterns of BMPR-1B gene (CC and CA genotypes) that deduced one amino acid exchange. Also, two SNPS were identified in three different SSCP patterns of GDF9 gene (AA, AG and GG genotypes) that deduced one amino acid exchanges. Two different secondary structures of protein were predicted for BMPR-1B exon 8, but the secondary protein structures predicted for GDF9 exon 1 were similar together. The evaluation of the associations between the SSCP patterns and the protein structure changes with reproduction traits showed that BMPR-1B exon 8 genotypes have significant effects on some of reproduction traits but the GDF9 genotypes did not have any significant effect. The CA genotype of BMPR-1B exon 8 had a significant positive effect on reproduction performance and could be considered as an important and new mutation, affecting the ewes reproduction performance. Marker assisted selection using BMPR-IB gene could be noticed to improve the reproduction traits in Mehraban sheep.

  18. Analysis on secondary stress of primary member of UHV transmission tower structure%特高压输电钢管塔主材次应力分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    帅群; 邓洪洲; 李琳; 施菁华

    2012-01-01

    In order to study the secondary stress of the primary member of UHV transmission tower structure,the course of 1 000 kV UHV transmission tower full-scale test was carried out,and the secondary stress was measured by test.Based on methods of finite element numerical analysis,the distribution of secondary stress and the influences on tower-SZ2U behavior of total structure were analyzed.Both of the finite beam-link elements considering and not considering the stiffness of the gusset plate were established.The difference of the two calculations was compared,and the analytical results were compared with the full-scale test.The accurate finite element model of the tower leg joint was established in order to investigate the force transfer mechanism and the performance and failure pattern under the secondary moment.The result indicates: it is the tower leg member that is influenced by the secondary stress most.The maximum secondary stress ratio measured by test is 45%.The result of calculation model considering the stiffness of the gusset plate is in better agreement with the experiment result.The secondary effect of the towers’ leg not only has relation with slenderness ratio,but also has relation with the angles of primary members and auxiliary members.The failure pattern of the tower leg joint under the secondary moment is local bucking at the pressure side above the ring plate.%为了研究特高压输电钢管塔的主材次应力问题,对1 000 kV特高压输电钢管塔SZ2U进行真型试验,实测主材次应力;通过有限元分析,得出主材次应力的分布规律及影响因素;分别建立考虑有无节点板刚度的有限元梁杆单元模型,并与实测结果进行比较;对塔脚节点建立精细化有限元模型,考察次弯矩作用下节点的受力性能和破坏模式。研究结果表明:对SZ2U塔次应力影响最大的位置在塔脚主材处,实测最大次应力比(弯曲应力占轴力应力的百分比)达到45%;采用考虑

  19. An Investigation of the Partial-Assignment Completion Effect on Students' Assignment Choice Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorn-Embree, Meredith L.; Skinner, Christopher H.; Parkhurst, John; Conley, Elisha

    2011-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the partial assignment completion effect. Seventh-grade students were given a math assignment. After working for 5 min, they were interrupted and their partially completed assignments were collected. About 20 min later, students were given their partially completed assignment and a new, control assignment…

  20. Non-universal spectra of ultra-high energy cosmic ray primaries and secondaries in a structured universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigl, Guenter [APC, AstroParticules et Cosmologie, 10, rue Alice Domon et Leonie Duquet, 75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France)]|[GReCO, Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, C.N.R.S., 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2007-07-01

    Analytical calculations of extra-galactic cosmic ray spectra above {approx} 10{sup 17} eV are often performed assuming continuous source distributions, giving rise to spectra that depend little on the propagation mode, be it rectilinear or diffusive. We perform trajectory simulations for proton primaries in the probably more realistic case of discrete sources with a density of {approx} 10{sup -5} Mpc{sup -3}. We find two considerable non-universal effects that depend on source distributions and magnetic fields: First, the primary extra-galactic cosmic ray flux can become strongly suppressed below a few 10{sup 18} eV due to partial confinement in magnetic fields surrounding sources. Second, the secondary photon to primary cosmic ray flux ratio between {approx_equal} 3 x 10{sup 18} eV and {approx_equal} 10{sup 20} eV decreases with decreasing source density and increasing magnetization. As a consequence, in acceleration scenarios for the origin of highest energy cosmic rays the fraction of secondary photons may be difficult to detect even for experiments such as Pierre Auger. The cosmogenic neutrino flux does not significantly depend on source density and magnetization. (author)