WorldWideScience

Sample records for assignments secondary structure

  1. Protein secondary structure: category assignment and predictability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus A.; Bohr, Henrik; Brunak, Søren

    2001-01-01

    In the last decade, the prediction of protein secondary structure has been optimized using essentially one and the same assignment scheme known as DSSP. We present here a different scheme, which is more predictable. This scheme predicts directly the hydrogen bonds, which stabilize the secondary......-forward neural network with one hidden layer on a data set identical to the one used in earlier work....

  2. Protein secondary structure assignment revisited: a detailed analysis of different assignment methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Brevern Alexandre G

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of methods are now available to perform automatic assignment of periodic secondary structures from atomic coordinates, based on different characteristics of the secondary structures. In general these methods exhibit a broad consensus as to the location of most helix and strand core segments in protein structures. However the termini of the segments are often ill-defined and it is difficult to decide unambiguously which residues at the edge of the segments have to be included. In addition, there is a "twilight zone" where secondary structure segments depart significantly from the idealized models of Pauling and Corey. For these segments, one has to decide whether the observed structural variations are merely distorsions or whether they constitute a break in the secondary structure. Methods To address these problems, we have developed a method for secondary structure assignment, called KAKSI. Assignments made by KAKSI are compared with assignments given by DSSP, STRIDE, XTLSSTR, PSEA and SECSTR, as well as secondary structures found in PDB files, on 4 datasets (X-ray structures with different resolution range, NMR structures. Results A detailed comparison of KAKSI assignments with those of STRIDE and PSEA reveals that KAKSI assigns slightly longer helices and strands than STRIDE in case of one-to-one correspondence between the segments. However, KAKSI tends also to favor the assignment of several short helices when STRIDE and PSEA assign longer, kinked, helices. Helices assigned by KAKSI have geometrical characteristics close to those described in the PDB. They are more linear than helices assigned by other methods. The same tendency to split long segments is observed for strands, although less systematically. We present a number of cases of secondary structure assignments that illustrate this behavior. Conclusion Our method provides valuable assignments which favor the regularity of secondary structure segments.

  3. Toward a better understanding of structural divergences in proteins using different secondary structure assignment methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, L. F. O.

    2014-04-01

    Structural disagreements on the location and quantity of secondary structure segments comprise a current challenging problem leading to several limitations for theoretical and applied research. This paper presents 116 structural evaluations by steric and hydrophobic interactions in secondary structures within a specific template group; determines simple prediction rules that calculate 88 occurrence frequencies of large and hydrophobic residues into target intra- and inter-subgroups with structure disagreements; and utilizes 42 comparisons between the methods PROMOTIF, DSSP and STRIDE. In the stereochemical predictions inside the subgroups there are predominantly excellent and/or good success amounts with their expected values, and the disclosure of a triple molecular mechanism by residue volumetric and hydrophobic ingredients. The method comparisons show high compatibility scores between them, therefore validating their seemingly incompatible assignments. Thus, the nonconsensual ascriptions are better understood and appreciated. Furthermore, such results suggest a broad utility of our assignment method for other benchmark datasets and known methods.

  4. Resonance assignments and secondary structure of a phytocystatin from Ananas comosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irene, Deli; Chen, Bo-Jiun; Lo, Si-Hung; Liu, Ting-Hang; Tzen, Jason T-C; Chyan, Chia-Lin

    2012-04-01

    A cDNA encoding a cysteine protease inhibitor, cystatin was cloned from pineapple (Ananas comosus L.) stem. This clone was constructed into an expression vector and expressed in E. coli and purified to homogeneous. The recombinant pineapple cystatins (AcCYS) showed effectively inhibitory activity toward cysteine proteases including papain, bromelain, and cathepsin B. In order to unravel its inhibitory action from structural point of view, multidimensional heteronuclear NMR techniques were used to characterize the structure of AcCYS. The full (1)H, (15)N, and (13)C resonance assignments of AcCYS were determined. The secondary structure of AcCYS was identified by using the assigned chemical shift of (1)Hα, (13)Cα, (13)Cβ, and (13)CO through the consensus chemical shift index (CSI). The results of CSI analysis suggest 5 β-strands (residues 45-47, 84-91, 94-104, 106-117, and 123-130) and one α-helix (residues 55-73).

  5. Resonance assignments and secondary structure of apolipoprotein E C-terminal domain in DHPC micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chi-Jen; Chyan, Chia-Lin; Chen, Yi-Chen; Chang, Chi-Fon; Huang, Hsien-Bin; Lin, Ta-Hsien

    2015-04-01

    Human apolipoprotein E (apoE) has been known to play a key role in the transport of plasma cholesterol and lipoprotein metabolism. It is an apolipoprotein of 299 amino acids with a molecular mass, ~34 kDa. ApoE has three major isoforms, apoE2, apoE3, and apoE4 which differ only at residue 112 or 158. ApoE consists of two independently folded domains (N-terminal and C-terminal domain) separated by a hinge region. The N-terminal domain and C-terminal domain of apoE are responsible for the binding to receptor and to lipid, respectively. Since the high resolution structures of apoE in lipids are still unavailable to date, we therefore aim to resolve the structures in lipids by NMR. Here, we reported the resonance assignments and secondary structure distribution of the C-terminal domain of wild-type human apoE (residue 195-299) in the micelles formed by dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine. Our results may provide a novel structural model of apoE in micelles and may shed new light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the apoE related biological processes.

  6. Sequential sup 1 H NMR assignments and secondary structure of an IgG-binding domain from protein G

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lian, L.Y.; Yang, J.C.; Derrick, J.P.; Sutcliffe, M.J.; Roberts, G.C.K. (Univ. of Leicester (England)); Murphy, J.P.; Goward, C.R.; Atkinson, T. (PHLS Center for Applied Microbiology and Research, Porton Down, Salisbury (England))

    1991-06-04

    Protein G is a member of a class of cell surface bacterial proteins from Streptococcus that bind IgG with high affinity. A fragment of molecular mass 6,988, which retains IgG-binding activity, has been generated by proteolytic digestion and analyzed by {sup 1}H NMR. Two-dimenstional DQF-COSY, TOCSY, and NOESY spectra have been employed to assign the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of the peptide. Elements of regular secondary structure have been identified by using nuclear Overhauser enhancement, coupling constant, and amide proton exchange data. The secondary structure consists of a central {alpha}-helix (Ala28-Val44), flanked by two portions of {beta}-sheet (Val5-Val26 and Asp45-Lys62). This is a fundamentally different arrangement of secondary structure from that of protein A, which is made up of three consecutive {alpha}-helics in free solution. The authors conclude that the molecular mechanisms underlying the association of protein A and protein G with IgG are different.

  7. Sequence-specific Assignment of 1H-NMR Resonance and Determination of the Secondary Structure of Jingzhaotoxin-Ⅰ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong-Zhi ZENG; Qi ZHU; Song-Ping LIANG

    2005-01-01

    Jingzhaotoxin-Ⅰ (JZTX-Ⅰ) purified from the venom of the spider Chilobrachys jingzhao is a novel neurotoxin preferentially inhibiting cardiac sodium channel inactivation by binding to receptor site 3.The structure of this toxin in aqueous solution was investigated using 2-D 1H-NMR techniques. The complete sequence-specific assignments of proton resonance in the 1H-NMR spectra of JZTX-Ⅰ were obtained by analyzing a series of 2-D spectra, including DQF-COSY, TOCSY and NOESY spectra, in H2O and D2O. All the backbone protons except for Gln4 and more than 95% of the side-chain protons were identified by dαN,dαδ, dβN and dNN connectivities in the NOESY spectrum. These studies provide a basis for the further determination of the solution conformation of JZTX-Ⅰ. Furthermore, the secondary structure of JZTX-Ⅰ was identified from NMR data. It consists mainly of a short triple-stranded antiparallel β-sheet with Trp7-Cys9, Phe20-Lys23 and Leu28-Trp31. The characteristics of the secondary structure of JZTX-Ⅰ are similar to those of huwentoxin-Ⅰ (HWTX-Ⅰ) and hainantoxin-Ⅳ (HNTX-Ⅳ), whose structures in solution have previously been reported.

  8. Uncovering symmetry-breaking vector and reliability order for assigning secondary structures of proteins from atomic NMR chemical shifts in amino acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Wookyung [Pusan National University, Department of Physics, Center for Proteome Biophysics (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Woonghee; Lee, Weontae [Yonsei University, Department of Biochemistry, Structural Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics Laboratory (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Suhkmann [Pusan National University, Department of Chemistry, Biochemistry and Bio-NMR Laboratory (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Iksoo, E-mail: iksoochang@pusan.ac.kr [Pusan National University, Department of Physics, Center for Proteome Biophysics (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-12-15

    Unravelling the complex correlation between chemical shifts of {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}, {sup 13}C{sup {beta}}, {sup 13}C Prime , {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}}, {sup 15}N, {sup 1}H{sup N} atoms in amino acids of proteins from NMR experiment and local structural environments of amino acids facilitates the assignment of secondary structures of proteins. This is an important impetus for both determining the three-dimensional structure and understanding the biological function of proteins. The previous empirical correlation scores which relate chemical shifts of {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}, {sup 13}C{sup {beta}}, {sup 13}C Prime , {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}}, {sup 15}N, {sup 1}H{sup N} atoms to secondary structures resulted in progresses toward assigning secondary structures of proteins. However, the physical-mathematical framework for these was elusive partly due to both the limited and orthogonal exploration of higher-dimensional chemical shifts of hetero-nucleus and the lack of physical-mathematical understanding underlying those correlation scores. Here we present a simple multi-dimensional hetero-nuclear chemical shift score function (MDHN-CSSF) which captures systematically the salient feature of such complex correlations without any references to a random coil state of proteins. We uncover the symmetry-breaking vector and its reliability order not only for distinguishing different secondary structures of proteins but also for capturing the delicate sensitivity interplayed among chemical shifts of {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}, {sup 13}C{sup {beta}}, {sup 13}C Prime , {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}}, {sup 15}N, {sup 1}H{sup N} atoms simultaneously, which then provides a straightforward framework toward assigning secondary structures of proteins. MDHN-CSSF could correctly assign secondary structures of training (validating) proteins with the favourable (comparable) Q3 scores in comparison with those from the previous correlation scores. MDHN-CSSF provides a simple and robust strategy for the

  9. Chemical shift assignments and secondary structure prediction of the C-terminal domain of the response regulator BfmR from Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Andrew L; Thompson, Richele J; Melander, Christian; Cavanagh, John

    2014-04-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is a Gram-negative pathogen responsible for severe nocosomial infections by forming biofilms in healthcare environments. The two-domain response regulator BfmR has been shown to be the master controller for biofilm formation. Inactivation of BfmR resulted in an abolition of pili production and consequently biofilm creation. Here we report backbone and sidechain resonance assignments and secondary structure prediction for the C-terminal domain of BfmR (residues 130-238) from A. baumannii.

  10. Resonance assignments, secondary structure and 15N relaxation data of the human transcriptional coactivator hMBF1 (57-148)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishima, Masaki; Ozaki, Jun; Ikegami, Takahisa [Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Graduate School of Biological Sciences (Japan); Kabe, Yasuaki; Goto, Masahide [National Institute of Genetics, Department of Developmental Genetics (Japan); Ueda, Hitoshi; Hirose, Susumu [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Faculty of Bioscience and Biotechnology (Japan); Handa, Hiroshi [National Institute of Genetics, Department of Developmental Genetics (Japan); Shirakawa, Masahiro [Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Graduate School of Biological Sciences (Japan)

    1999-08-15

    Multiprotein bridging factor 1 (MBF1) is a transcriptional coactivator that is thought to bridge between the TATA box-binding protein (TBP) and DNA binding regulatory factors, and is conserved from yeast to human. Human MBF1 (hMBF1) can bind to TBP and to the nuclear receptor Ad4BP, and is suggested to mediate Ad4BP-dependent transcriptional activation. Here we report the resonance assignments and secondary structure of hMBF1 (57-148) that contains both TBP binding and activator binding residues. {sup 15}N relaxation data were also obtained. As a result, hMBF1 (57-148) was shown to consist of flexible N-terminal residues and a C-terminal domain. The C-terminal domain contains four helices and a conserved C-terminal region.

  11. Continuum secondary structure captures protein flexibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, C.A.F.; Palmer, A.G.; Brunak, Søren;

    2002-01-01

    The DSSP program assigns protein secondary structure to one of eight states. This discrete assignment cannot describe the continuum of thermal fluctuations. Hence, a continuous assignment is proposed. Technically, the continuum results from averaging over ten discrete DSSP assignments...... protein structure analysis, comparison, and prediction....... with different hydrogen bond thresholds. The final continuous assignment for a single NMR model successfully reflected the structural variations observed between all NMR models in the ensemble. The structural variations between NMR models were verified to correlate with thermal motion; these variations were...

  12. Monothiodibenzoylmethane: Structural and vibrational assignments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bjarke Knud Vilster; Gorski, Alexander; Posokhov, Yevgen

    2007-01-01

    The vibrational structure of the title compound (1,3-diphenyl-3-thioxopropane-1-one, TDBM) was studied by a variety of experimental and theoretical methods. The stable ground state configuration of TDBM was investigated by IR absorption measurements in different media, by LD polarization spectros......The vibrational structure of the title compound (1,3-diphenyl-3-thioxopropane-1-one, TDBM) was studied by a variety of experimental and theoretical methods. The stable ground state configuration of TDBM was investigated by IR absorption measurements in different media, by LD polarization...... spectroscopy of samples partially aligned in a stretched polymer matrix, and by Raman spectroscopy. The investigation of the metastable photoproduct of TDBM was based on the previously published spectrum of the product trapped in argon matrix (Posokhov et al., Chem. Phys. Lett. 350 (2001) 502). The observed...

  13. An ambiguity principle for assigning protein structural domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postic, Guillaume; Ghouzam, Yassine; Chebrek, Romain; Gelly, Jean-Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Ambiguity is the quality of being open to several interpretations. For an image, it arises when the contained elements can be delimited in two or more distinct ways, which may cause confusion. We postulate that it also applies to the analysis of protein three-dimensional structure, which consists in dividing the molecule into subunits called domains. Because different definitions of what constitutes a domain can be used to partition a given structure, the same protein may have different but equally valid domain annotations. However, knowledge and experience generally displace our ability to accept more than one way to decompose the structure of an object-in this case, a protein. This human bias in structure analysis is particularly harmful because it leads to ignoring potential avenues of research. We present an automated method capable of producing multiple alternative decompositions of protein structure (web server and source code available at www.dsimb.inserm.fr/sword/). Our innovative algorithm assigns structural domains through the hierarchical merging of protein units, which are evolutionarily preserved substructures that describe protein architecture at an intermediate level, between domain and secondary structure. To validate the use of these protein units for decomposing protein structures into domains, we set up an extensive benchmark made of expert annotations of structural domains and including state-of-the-art domain parsing algorithms. The relevance of our "multipartitioning" approach is shown through numerous examples of applications covering protein function, evolution, folding, and structure prediction. Finally, we introduce a measure for the structural ambiguity of protein molecules.

  14. An ambiguity principle for assigning protein structural domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postic, Guillaume; Ghouzam, Yassine; Chebrek, Romain; Gelly, Jean-Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Ambiguity is the quality of being open to several interpretations. For an image, it arises when the contained elements can be delimited in two or more distinct ways, which may cause confusion. We postulate that it also applies to the analysis of protein three-dimensional structure, which consists in dividing the molecule into subunits called domains. Because different definitions of what constitutes a domain can be used to partition a given structure, the same protein may have different but equally valid domain annotations. However, knowledge and experience generally displace our ability to accept more than one way to decompose the structure of an object—in this case, a protein. This human bias in structure analysis is particularly harmful because it leads to ignoring potential avenues of research. We present an automated method capable of producing multiple alternative decompositions of protein structure (web server and source code available at www.dsimb.inserm.fr/sword/). Our innovative algorithm assigns structural domains through the hierarchical merging of protein units, which are evolutionarily preserved substructures that describe protein architecture at an intermediate level, between domain and secondary structure. To validate the use of these protein units for decomposing protein structures into domains, we set up an extensive benchmark made of expert annotations of structural domains and including state-of-the-art domain parsing algorithms. The relevance of our “multipartitioning” approach is shown through numerous examples of applications covering protein function, evolution, folding, and structure prediction. Finally, we introduce a measure for the structural ambiguity of protein molecules. PMID:28097215

  15. Structural Encoding of Static Single Assignment Form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gal, Andreas; Probst, Christian; Franz, Michael

    2005-01-01

    have been shown to eliminate this cost by shifting SSA creation to the code producer. These new formats, however, are not backward compatible with the established Java class-file format. We propose a novel approach to transport SSA information implicitly through structural code properties of standard...

  16. Secondary Structure Switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Angela G.

    2006-01-01

    Neurogenerative diseases like Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease involve a transformation between two peptide and protein structures of alpha-helices and beta-sheets, where the peptide backbone can also participate in metal ion binding in addition to histidine residues. However, the complete absence of change in conformation of Coiled…

  17. Undergraduates Improve upon Published Crystal Structure in Class Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Scott; Koldewey, Philipp; Bardwell, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, 57 undergraduate students at the University of Michigan were assigned the task of solving a crystal structure, given only the electron density map of a 1.3 Å crystal structure from the electron density server, and the position of the N-terminal amino acid. To test their knowledge of amino acid chemistry, the students were not given the…

  18. Efficient protocol for backbone and side-chain assignments of large, intrinsically disordered proteins: transient secondary structure analysis of 49.2 kDa microtubule associated protein 2c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novacek, Jiri; Janda, Lubomir; Dopitova, Radka; Zidek, Lukas, E-mail: lzidek@chemi.muni.cz; Sklenar, Vladimir [Masaryk University, Faculty of Science, NCBR, and CEITEC (Czech Republic)

    2013-08-15

    Microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) are abundantly present in axons and dendrites, and have been shown to play crucial role during the neuronal morphogenesis. The period of main dendritic outgrowth and synaptogenesis coincides with high expression levels of one of MAPs, the MAP2c, in rats. The MAP2c is a 49.2 kDa intrinsically disordered protein. To achieve an atomic resolution characterization of such a large protein, we have developed a protocol based on the acquisition of two five-dimensional {sup 13}C-directly detected NMR experiments. Our previously published 5D CACONCACO experiment (Novacek et al. in J Biomol NMR 50(1):1-11, 2011) provides the sequential assignment of the backbone resonances, which is not interrupted by the presence of the proline residues in the amino acid sequence. A novel 5D HC(CC-TOCSY)CACON experiment facilitates the assignment of the aliphatic side chain resonances. To streamline the data analysis, we have developed a semi-automated procedure for signal assignments. The obtained data provides the first atomic resolution insight into the conformational state of MAP2c and constitutes a model for further functional studies of MAPs.

  19. Combinatorics of saturated secondary structures of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clote, P

    2006-11-01

    Following Zuker (1986), a saturated secondary structure for a given RNA sequence is a secondary structure such that no base pair can be added without violating the definition of secondary structure, e.g., without introducing a pseudoknot. In the Nussinov-Jacobson energy model (Nussinov and Jacobson, 1980), where the energy of a secondary structure is -1 times the number of base pairs, saturated secondary structures are local minima in the energy landscape, hence form kinetic traps during the folding process. Here we present recurrence relations and closed form asymptotic limits for combinatorial problems related to the number of saturated secondary structures. In addition, Python source code to compute the number of saturated secondary structures having k base pairs can be found at the web servers link of bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/.

  20. Algorithm for Predicting Protein Secondary Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Senapati, K K; Bhaumik, D

    2010-01-01

    Predicting protein structure from amino acid sequence is one of the most important unsolved problems of molecular biology and biophysics.Not only would a successful prediction algorithm be a tremendous advance in the understanding of the biochemical mechanisms of proteins, but, since such an algorithm could conceivably be used to design proteins to carry out specific functions.Prediction of the secondary structure of a protein (alpha-helix, beta-sheet, coil) is an important step towards elucidating its three dimensional structure as well as its function. In this research, we use different Hidden Markov models for protein secondary structure prediction. In this paper we have proposed an algorithm for predicting protein secondary structure. We have used Hidden Markov model with sliding window for secondary structure prediction.The secondary structure has three regular forms, for each secondary structural element we are using one Hidden Markov Model.

  1. Protein structure prediction: assembly of secondary structure elements by basin-hopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Falk; Vancea, Ioan; Kamat, Sanjay G; Strodel, Birgit

    2014-10-20

    The prediction of protein tertiary structure from primary structure remains a challenging task. One possible approach to this problem is the application of basin-hopping global optimization combined with an all-atom force field. In this work, the efficiency of basin-hopping is improved by introducing an approach that derives tertiary structures from the secondary structure assignments of individual residues. This approach is termed secondary-to-tertiary basin-hopping and benchmarked for three miniproteins: trpzip, trp-cage and ER-10. For each of the three miniproteins, the secondary-to-tertiary basin-hopping approach successfully and reliably predicts their three-dimensional structure. When it is applied to larger proteins, correctly folded structures are obtained. It can be concluded that the assembly of secondary structure elements using basin-hopping is a promising tool for de novo protein structure prediction.

  2. Secondary structure of synthetic oligopeptides

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez-Insua, M

    2000-01-01

    The secondary structure of three hydrophobic peptides P2, PRMo and P4 was studied by a combination of Circular Dichroism (CD), Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) and Photoinduced Electron Transfer (PET). These peptides were fluorescence labelled in the central part of the backbone and contained two modified glutamic acid residues (relative positions i, i+4): one conjugated with the fluorescence methoxynapththalene electron donor (DON) and the other with the piperidone electron acceptor (ACC). The three peptides were synthesised to study the length dependence of the switch between alpha-helix and the 3 sub 1 sub 0 -helix conformations, previously observed for peptide PRM1 (Hungerford et al., Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. Engl., 1996, 35, 326-329). The CD and FTIR data indicated that peptides P2, PRMo and P4 adopt alpha-helical conformation in organic media in the temperature range studied and no conformational switch was detected. Furthermore, a mathematical correlation was observed in the PET data, questioning the ag...

  3. Towards fully automated structure-based NMR resonance assignment of 15N-labeled proteins from automatically picked peaks

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Richard

    2011-03-01

    In NMR resonance assignment, an indispensable step in NMR protein studies, manually processed peaks from both N-labeled and C-labeled spectra are typically used as inputs. However, the use of homologous structures can allow one to use only N-labeled NMR data and avoid the added expense of using C-labeled data. We propose a novel integer programming framework for structure-based backbone resonance assignment using N-labeled data. The core consists of a pair of integer programming models: one for spin system forming and amino acid typing, and the other for backbone resonance assignment. The goal is to perform the assignment directly from spectra without any manual intervention via automatically picked peaks, which are much noisier than manually picked peaks, so methods must be error-tolerant. In the case of semi-automated/manually processed peak data, we compare our system with the Xiong-Pandurangan-Bailey- Kellogg\\'s contact replacement (CR) method, which is the most error-tolerant method for structure-based resonance assignment. Our system, on average, reduces the error rate of the CR method by five folds on their data set. In addition, by using an iterative algorithm, our system has the added capability of using the NOESY data to correct assignment errors due to errors in predicting the amino acid and secondary structure type of each spin system. On a publicly available data set for human ubiquitin, where the typing accuracy is 83%, we achieve 91% accuracy, compared to the 59% accuracy obtained without correcting for such errors. In the case of automatically picked peaks, using assignment information from yeast ubiquitin, we achieve a fully automatic assignment with 97% accuracy. To our knowledge, this is the first system that can achieve fully automatic structure-based assignment directly from spectra. This has implications in NMR protein mutant studies, where the assignment step is repeated for each mutant. © Copyright 2011, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  4. Prediction of protein continuum secondary structure with probabilistic models based on NMR solved structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bailey Timothy L

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The structure of proteins may change as a result of the inherent flexibility of some protein regions. We develop and explore probabilistic machine learning methods for predicting a continuum secondary structure, i.e. assigning probabilities to the conformational states of a residue. We train our methods using data derived from high-quality NMR models. Results Several probabilistic models not only successfully estimate the continuum secondary structure, but also provide a categorical output on par with models directly trained on categorical data. Importantly, models trained on the continuum secondary structure are also better than their categorical counterparts at identifying the conformational state for structurally ambivalent residues. Conclusion Cascaded probabilistic neural networks trained on the continuum secondary structure exhibit better accuracy in structurally ambivalent regions of proteins, while sustaining an overall classification accuracy on par with standard, categorical prediction methods.

  5. Combinatorics of locally optimal RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusy, Eric; Clote, Peter

    2014-01-01

    It is a classical result of Stein and Waterman that the asymptotic number of RNA secondary structures is 1.104366∙n-3/2∙2.618034n. Motivated by the kinetics of RNA secondary structure formation, we are interested in determining the asymptotic number of secondary structures that are locally optimal, with respect to a particular energy model. In the Nussinov energy model, where each base pair contributes -1 towards the energy of the structure, locally optimal structures are exactly the saturated structures, for which we have previously shown that asymptotically, there are 1.07427∙n-3/2∙2.35467n many saturated structures for a sequence of length n. In this paper, we consider the base stacking energy model, a mild variant of the Nussinov model, where each stacked base pair contributes -1 toward the energy of the structure. Locally optimal structures with respect to the base stacking energy model are exactly those secondary structures, whose stems cannot be extended. Such structures were first considered by Evers and Giegerich, who described a dynamic programming algorithm to enumerate all locally optimal structures. In this paper, we apply methods from enumerative combinatorics to compute the asymptotic number of such structures. Additionally, we consider analogous combinatorial problems for secondary structures with annotated single-stranded, stacking nucleotides (dangles).

  6. Predicting Protein Secondary Structure with Markov Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Paul; Larsen, Simon; Thomsen, Claus

    2004-01-01

    we are considering here, is to predict the secondary structure from the primary one. To this end we train a Markov model on training data and then use it to classify parts of unknown protein sequences as sheets, helices or coils. We show how to exploit the directional information contained......The primary structure of a protein is the sequence of its amino acids. The secondary structure describes structural properties of the molecule such as which parts of it form sheets, helices or coils. Spacial and other properties are described by the higher order structures. The classification task...

  7. Protein Secondary Structure Prediction Using Dynamic Programming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing ZHAO; Pei-Ming SONG; Qing FANG; Jian-Hua LUO

    2005-01-01

    In the present paper, we describe how a directed graph was constructed and then searched for the optimum path using a dynamic programming approach, based on the secondary structure propensity of the protein short sequence derived from a training data set. The protein secondary structure was thus predicted in this way. The average three-state accuracy of the algorithm used was 76.70%.

  8. Sequence-specific Assignment of 1H-NMR Resonance and Determination of the Secondary Structure of HWTX-II%虎纹捕鸟蛛毒素HWTX-II的1H-NMR信号归属和二级结构分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    舒芹; 吕善运; 顾孝诚; 梁宋平

    2001-01-01

    虎纹捕鸟蛛毒素HWTX-II是从虎纹捕鸟蛛Selenocosmia huwena的毒液中分离出的一种新型杀虫肽。应用2D-NMR技术研究该毒素分子的溶液结构特点, 通过分析水及重水DQF-COSY、COSY、TOCSY和NOESY等1H-NMR谱, 识别出HWTX-II全部37个氨基酸残基自旋体系; 通过NOESY谱中的dαN、dαδ、dβN和dNN联系完成了序列专一的谱峰归属, 确认了所有主链质子和除了Lys侧链εNH2质子外的所有侧链质子的化学位移, 为完全解析HWTX-II的溶液三维构象奠定了基础。 并且通过核磁数据分析, 确定HWTX-II的二级结构特点是含有较多的伸展构象, 尤其是C端有一个典型的双股反平行的β折叠(Trp27~Cys29和Cys34~Lys36), 分子中缺乏螺旋结构。 这些二级结构特点与已探明结构的其他蜘蛛毒素的基本相同。%Huwentoxin-II (HWTX-II) is an insecticidal peptide purified from the venom of spider Selenocosmia huwena. The structure of this toxin in solution was investigated using 2D-NMR. The complete sequence-specific assignments of proton resonance in the 1H-NMR spectra of HWTX-II were obtained by analyzing a series of 2D spectrum, including COSY, DQF-COSY, TOCSY and NOESY. All the backbone protons and side chain protons, except εNH2 protons of Lys residues, were identified by dαN, dαδ, dNN and dβN connectivities. The results provide a basis for further determination of the solution conformation of HWTX-II. Furthermore the secondary structure of HWTX-II was determined from NMR data. It contained mainly extended conformation, especially a double-stranded anti-parallel β-sheet with Trp27—Cys29 and Cys34—Lys36 at the C terminal, and it lacked helix. These characters of the secondary structure of HWTX-II were similar to those spider toxins which structure in solution had been reported.

  9. 海南捕鸟蛛毒素-Ⅰ(HNTX-Ⅰ)的1H-NMR信号归属和二级结构分析%SEQUENCE-SPECIFIC ASSIGNMENT OF 1H-NMR RESONANCE AND DETERMINATION OF THE SECONDARY STRUCTURE OF HAINANTOXIN-Ⅰ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李冬玲; 梁宋平

    2003-01-01

    Hainantoxin-Ⅰ(HNTX-Ⅰ ) is an insect blocker of voltage-gated sodium channel isolated from the venom of the Chinese bird spider Ornithoctonus hainana (early named Selenocosmia hainana). The three-dimensional conformation of HNTX- Ⅰ in aqueous solution was determined using two-dimensional 1H NMR techniques. The complete sequence-specific assignments of proton resonance in the 1H-NMR spectra of HNTX-Ⅰ were obtained by analyzing a series of 2D spectra, including double-quantum-filtered correlation spectroscopy (DQF-COSY), total correlated spectroscopy (TOCSY) and nuclear overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) in H2O and D2O. All the backbone protons and more than 96% of the side-chain protons were identified by dαN, dαN, dNN and dαδ connectivities in NOESY spectrum. Furthermore, it was found that the main element of the secondary structure of HNTX-Ⅰ is a short triple-stranded antiparallel β-sheet with Lys7-Cys9, Tyr20-Asn23 and Trp28-Val31, based on 3JNH-CαH coupling constants, sequential NOE connectivities and slowly exchanging amide protons. These characters of the secondary structure of HNTX-Ⅰ are similar to those of HWTX-Ⅰ, SHL-Ⅰ and HWTX-Ⅳ, which have known solution structures. These results provide a basis for the further determination of the solution conformation of HNTX-Ⅰ.%海南捕鸟蛛毒素-Ⅰ(HNTX-Ⅰ)是从海南捕鸟蛛(Ornithoctonus hainana)的粗毒中纯化的一种新型神经毒素.应用二维1H-NMR技术研究HNTX-Ⅰ的溶液结构特点,通过分析水和重水中的DQF-COSY、TOCSY和NOESY谱,识别出HNTX-Ⅰ全部33个氨基酸残基自旋体系;通过NOESY谱中的dαN、dβN、dNN和dαδ联系完成了序列专一的谱峰归属,从而确认了HNTX-Ⅰ所有的主链质子和大于96%的侧链质子的化学位移.并通过分析3JNH-CαH耦合常数、序列间的NOE联系以及慢氢交换质子等,确定HNTX-Ⅰ的二级结构主要是由三股反平行的β-折迭组成(Lys7-Cys9,Tyr20-Asn23和Trp28-Val31),

  10. Combinatorics of locally optimal RNA secondary structures

    CERN Document Server

    Clote, Peter

    2011-01-01

    It is a classical result of Stein and Waterman that the asymptotic number of RNA secondary structures is $1.104366 \\cdot n^{-3/2} \\cdot 2.618034^n$. To provide a better understanding of the kinetics of RNA secondary structure formation, we are interested in determining the asymptotic number of secondary structures that are {\\em locally optimal}, with respect to a particular energy model. In the Nussinov energy model, where each base pair contributes -1 towards the energy of the structure, locally optimal structures are exactly the {\\em saturated} structures, for which we have previously shown that asymptotically, there are $1.07427\\cdot n^{-3/2} \\cdot 2.35467^n$ many saturated structures for a sequence of length $n$. In this paper, we consider the {\\em base stacking energy model}, a mild variant of the Nussinov model, where each stacked base pair contributes -1 toward the energy of the structure. Locally optimal structures with respect to the base stacking energy model are exactly those secondary structures, ...

  11. Patterns in the Initial Teaching Assignments of Secondary English Teachers: Implications for Teacher Agency and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieler, Deborah; Holmes, Stephen; Wolfe, Edward W.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the teaching assignments of English teachers in 13 Mid-Atlantic high schools across five states. Data on the experience levels of 175 English teachers teaching 246 classes and surveys from 85 teacher participants were collected. Findings reveal that major agency-thwarting challenges face new English teachers: They typically are…

  12. CSI 3.0: a web server for identifying secondary and super-secondary structure in proteins using NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafsa, Noor E; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S

    2015-07-01

    The Chemical Shift Index or CSI 3.0 (http://csi3.wishartlab.com) is a web server designed to accurately identify the location of secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains using only nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) backbone chemical shifts and their corresponding protein sequence data. Unlike earlier versions of CSI, which only identified three types of secondary structure (helix, β-strand and coil), CSI 3.0 now identifies total of 11 types of secondary and super-secondary structures, including helices, β-strands, coil regions, five common β-turns (type I, II, I', II' and VIII), β hairpins as well as interior and edge β-strands. CSI 3.0 accepts experimental NMR chemical shift data in multiple formats (NMR Star 2.1, NMR Star 3.1 and SHIFTY) and generates colorful CSI plots (bar graphs) and secondary/super-secondary structure assignments. The output can be readily used as constraints for structure determination and refinement or the images may be used for presentations and publications. CSI 3.0 uses a pipeline of several well-tested, previously published programs to identify the secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains. Comparisons with secondary and super-secondary structure assignments made via standard coordinate analysis programs such as DSSP, STRIDE and VADAR on high-resolution protein structures solved by X-ray and NMR show >90% agreement between those made with CSI 3.0.

  13. Strong eukaryotic IRESs have weak secondary structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuhua Xia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The objective of this work was to investigate the hypothesis that eukaryotic Internal Ribosome Entry Sites (IRES lack secondary structure and to examine the generality of the hypothesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: IRESs of the yeast and the fruit fly are located in the 5'UTR immediately upstream of the initiation codon. The minimum folding energy (MFE of 60 nt RNA segments immediately upstream of the initiation codons was calculated as a proxy of secondary structure stability. MFE of the reverse complements of these 60 nt segments was also calculated. The relationship between MFE and empirically determined IRES activity was investigated to test the hypothesis that strong IRES activity is associated with weak secondary structure. We show that IRES activity in the yeast and the fruit fly correlates strongly with the structural stability, with highest IRES activity found in RNA segments that exhibit the weakest secondary structure. CONCLUSIONS: We found that a subset of eukaryotic IRESs exhibits very low secondary structure in the 5'-UTR sequences immediately upstream of the initiation codon. The consistency in results between the yeast and the fruit fly suggests a possible shared mechanism of cap-independent translation initiation that relies on an unstructured RNA segment.

  14. SAS-Pro: simultaneous residue assignment and structure superposition for protein structure alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shweta B; Sahinidis, Nikolaos V

    2012-01-01

    Protein structure alignment is the problem of determining an assignment between the amino-acid residues of two given proteins in a way that maximizes a measure of similarity between the two superimposed protein structures. By identifying geometric similarities, structure alignment algorithms provide critical insights into protein functional similarities. Existing structure alignment tools adopt a two-stage approach to structure alignment by decoupling and iterating between the assignment evaluation and structure superposition problems. We introduce a novel approach, SAS-Pro, which addresses the assignment evaluation and structure superposition simultaneously by formulating the alignment problem as a single bilevel optimization problem. The new formulation does not require the sequentiality constraints, thus generalizing the scope of the alignment methodology to include non-sequential protein alignments. We employ derivative-free optimization methodologies for searching for the global optimum of the highly nonlinear and non-differentiable RMSD function encountered in the proposed model. Alignments obtained with SAS-Pro have better RMSD values and larger lengths than those obtained from other alignment tools. For non-sequential alignment problems, SAS-Pro leads to alignments with high degree of similarity with known reference alignments. The source code of SAS-Pro is available for download at http://eudoxus.cheme.cmu.edu/saspro/SAS-Pro.html.

  15. RNA Secondary Structure Analysis Using RNAstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, David H

    2014-06-17

    RNAstructure is a user-friendly program for the prediction and analysis of RNA secondary structure. It is available as a Web server, as a program with a graphical user interface, or as a set of command-line tools. The programs are available for Microsoft Windows, Macintosh OS X, or Linux. This unit provides protocols for RNA secondary structure prediction (using the Web server or the graphical user interface) and prediction of high-affinity oligonucleotide biding sites to a structured RNA target (using the graphical user interface).

  16. HMM in Predicting Protein Secondary Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Jing; Shi Feng; Zou Xiu-fen; Li Yuan-xiang; Zhou Huai-bei

    2003-01-01

    We introduced a new method --duration Hidden Markov Model (dHMM) to predicate the secondary structure of Protein. In our study, we divide the basic second structure of protein into three parts: H (α-Helix), E (β-sheet) and O (others, include coil and turn). HMM is a kind of probabilistic model which more thinking of the interaction between adjacent amino acids (these interaction were represented by transmit probability), and we use genetic algorithm to determine the nodel parameters. After improving on the model and fixed on the parameters of the model, we write aprogram HMMPS. Our example shows that HMM is a nice method for protein secondary structure prediction.

  17. Enumerating secondary structures and structural moieties for circular RNAs

    CERN Document Server

    Cuesta, José A

    2016-01-01

    A quantitative characterization of the relationship between molecular sequence and structure is essential to improve our understanding of how function emerges. This particular genotype-phenotype map has been often studied in the context of RNA sequences, with the folded configurations standing as a proxy for the phenotype. Here, we count the secondary structures of circular RNAs of length $n$ and calculate the asymptotic distributions of different structural moieties, such as stems or hairpin loops, by means of symbolic combinatorics. Circular RNAs differ in essential ways from their linear counterparts. From the mathematical viewpoint, the enumeration of the corresponding secondary structures demands the use of combinatorial techniques additional to those used for linear RNAs. The asymptotic number of secondary structures for circular RNAs grows as $a^nn^{-5/2}$, with a depending on particular constraints applied to the secondary structure. The abundance of any structural moiety is normally distributed in th...

  18. General combinatorics of RNA secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Bo; Wang, Tian-ming

    2004-09-01

    The total number of RNA secondary structures of a given length with minimal hairpin loop length m(m>0) and with minimal stack length l(l>0) is computed, under the assumption that all base pairs can occur. Asymptotics are derived from the determination of recurrence relations of decomposition properties.

  19. Secondary structure of fluorescence labelled synthetic peptides

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, A S

    2000-01-01

    A series of eight synthetic oligopeptides has been prepared and their secondary structures investigated using various techniques. The project represents a continuation of an investigation into thermally induced changes in secondary structure. Following the previously reported results, the change in structure was initially thought to represent a change from an alpha-helix at low temperature to 3 sub 1 sub 0 -helix at high temperature. However, the results reported herein suggest the peptides retain an alpha-helical configuration at all temperatures studied, but that this helix can adopt at least two related forms. The difference in the structures relates to the nature of the H-bonds which may or may not involve an additional interaction from water molecules or side-chains. The peptides were encouraged to adopt a helical configuration by the inclusion of alpha- aminoisobutyric acid (Aib) residues. Also, modified forms of glutamic acid were included in the sequences. These had pendant donor (4-methoxy naphthalen...

  20. Effects of Verbal Event Structure on Online Thematic Role Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaia, Evie; Wilbur, Ronnie B.; Weber-Fox, Christine

    2012-01-01

    Event structure describes the relationships between general semantics ("Aktionsart") of the verb and its syntactic properties, separating verbs into two classes: telic verbs, which denote change of state events with an inherent end-point or boundary ("catch, rescue"), and atelic, which refer to homogenous activities ("tease, host"). As telic verbs…

  1. Superfamily assignments for the yeast proteome through integration of structure prediction with the gene ontology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Malmström

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the best-studied model organisms, yet the three-dimensional structure and molecular function of many yeast proteins remain unknown. Yeast proteins were parsed into 14,934 domains, and those lacking sequence similarity to proteins of known structure were folded using the Rosetta de novo structure prediction method on the World Community Grid. This structural data was integrated with process, component, and function annotations from the Saccharomyces Genome Database to assign yeast protein domains to SCOP superfamilies using a simple Bayesian approach. We have predicted the structure of 3,338 putative domains and assigned SCOP superfamily annotations to 581 of them. We have also assigned structural annotations to 7,094 predicted domains based on fold recognition and homology modeling methods. The domain predictions and structural information are available in an online database at http://rd.plos.org/10.1371_journal.pbio.0050076_01.

  2. Structural validation as an input into seismic depth conversion to decrease assigned structural uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totake, Yukitsugu; Butler, Robert W. H.; Bond, Clare E.

    2017-02-01

    While the interpretation of seismic reflection imagery is powerful and well established for evaluating subsurface structures it is never perfectly accurate. Structural validation techniques are widely used to geometrically test geological interpretations of seismic reflection data. Commonly these techniques are performed on depth sections converted from seismic time-based data using velocity models. Velocity model choices in seismic depth conversion have an impact on the final depth image and hence the structural geometry of interpretations. The impact of these choices in depth conversion on structural validation is rarely examined. Here we explore how multiple versions of a depth section, converted using different velocity models, influence the performance of structural validations for a fold-thrust structure from the deep water Niger Delta. The example illustrates that a range of kinematic models can validate the depth-converted profiles, regardless of the depth conversion choice and are thus poor diagnostic tools. Area-depth-strain (ADS) analysis can constrain the choice both of a kinematic model and the depth conversion, provided the seismic data allow the detachment level and excess areas to be recognised. Incorporation of ADS analysis within an interpretation-depth conversion workflow helps reduce assigned uncertainty in depth conversion, the seismic interpretation, and in the implicit geological model.

  3. NVR-BIP: Nuclear Vector Replacement using Binary Integer Programming for NMR Structure-Based Assignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apaydin, Mehmet Serkan; Çatay, Bülent; Patrick, Nicholas; Donald, Bruce R

    2011-05-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is an important experimental technique that allows one to study protein structure and dynamics in solution. An important bottleneck in NMR protein structure determination is the assignment of NMR peaks to the corresponding nuclei. Structure-based assignment (SBA) aims to solve this problem with the help of a template protein which is homologous to the target and has applications in the study of structure-activity relationship, protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions. We formulate SBA as a linear assignment problem with additional nuclear overhauser effect constraints, which can be solved within nuclear vector replacement's (NVR) framework (Langmead, C., Yan, A., Lilien, R., Wang, L. and Donald, B. (2003) A Polynomial-Time Nuclear Vector Replacement Algorithm for Automated NMR Resonance Assignments. Proc. the 7th Annual Int. Conf. Research in Computational Molecular Biology (RECOMB), Berlin, Germany, April 10-13, pp. 176-187. ACM Press, New York, NY. J. Comp. Bio., (2004), 11, pp. 277-298; Langmead, C. and Donald, B. (2004) An expectation/maximization nuclear vector replacement algorithm for automated NMR resonance assignments. J. Biomol. NMR, 29, 111-138). Our approach uses NVR's scoring function and data types and also gives the option of using CH and NH residual dipolar coupling (RDCs), instead of NH RDCs which NVR requires. We test our technique on NVR's data set as well as on four new proteins. Our results are comparable to NVR's assignment accuracy on NVR's test set, but higher on novel proteins. Our approach allows partial assignments. It is also complete and can return the optimum as well as near-optimum assignments. Furthermore, it allows us to analyze the information content of each data type and is easily extendable to accept new forms of input data, such as additional RDCs.

  4. Graphical analysis of NMR structural quality and interactive contact map of NOE assignments in ARIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malliavin Thérèse E

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ambiguous Restraints for Iterative Assignment (ARIA approach is widely used for NMR structure determination. It is based on simultaneously calculating structures and assigning NOE through an iterative protocol. The final solution consists of a set of conformers and a list of most probable assignments for the input NOE peak list. Results ARIA was extended with a series of graphical tools to facilitate a detailed analysis of the intermediate and final results of the ARIA protocol. These additional features provide (i an interactive contact map, serving as a tool for the analysis of assignments, and (ii graphical representations of structure quality scores and restraint statistics. The interactive contact map between residues can be clicked to obtain information about the restraints and their contributions. Profiles of quality scores are plotted along the protein sequence, and contact maps provide information of the agreement with the data on a residue pair level. Conclusion The graphical tools and outputs described here significantly extend the validation and analysis possibilities of NOE assignments given by ARIA as well as the analysis of the quality of the final structure ensemble. These tools are included in the latest version of ARIA, which is available at http://aria.pasteur.fr. The Web site also contains an installation guide, a user manual and example calculations.

  5. A Review on Eigenstructure Assignment Methods and Orthogonal Eigenstructure Control of Structural Vibrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rastgaar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a state-of-the-art review of eigenstructure assignment methods for vibration cancellation. Eigenstructure assignment techniques have been widely used during the past three decades for vibration suppression in structures, especially in large space structures. These methods work similar to mode localization in which global vibrations are managed such that they remain localized within the structure. Such localization would help reducing vibrations more effectively than other methods of vibration cancellation, by virtue of confining the vibrations close to the source of disturbance. The common objective of different methods of eigenstructure assignment is to provide controller design freedom beyond pole placement, and define appropriate shapes for the eigenvectors of the systems. These methods; however, offer a large and complex design space of options that can often overwhelm the control designer. Recent developments in orthogonal eigenstructure control offers a significant simplification of the design task while allowing some experience-based design freedom. The majority of the papers from the past three decades in structural vibration cancellation using eigenstructure assignment methods are reviewed, along with recent studies that introduce new developments in eigenstructure assignment techniques.

  6. Structural characterization of homogalacturonan by NMR spectroscopy - assignment of reference compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Bent O.; Meier, Sebastian; Duus, Jens Øllgaard;

    2008-01-01

    Complete assignment of 1H and 13C NMR of six hexagalactopyranuronic acids with varying degree and pattern of methyl esterification is reported. The NMR experiments were run at room temperature using approximately 2 mg of sample making this method convenient for studying the structure of homogalac......Complete assignment of 1H and 13C NMR of six hexagalactopyranuronic acids with varying degree and pattern of methyl esterification is reported. The NMR experiments were run at room temperature using approximately 2 mg of sample making this method convenient for studying the structure...

  7. RNA secondary structures, polygon dissections and clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Marsh, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    We show that the notion of induction introduced by Cassaigne, Ferenczi and Zamboni for trees of relations arising in the context of interval exchange relations can be generalised to the case of an arbitrary number of possible edge labels. We prove that the equivalence classes of its transitive closure can still be characterised via a circular order on the trees of relations in this case. We compute the cardinalities of these equivalence classes and show that the sequence of cardinalities, for a fixed number of possible edge labels, is a convolution of a Fuss-Catalan sequence. As in the original case, the equivalence classes are in bijection with a set of pseudoknot-free secondary structures arising from the study of RNA; we show that a natural subset of this set is in bijection with a set of m-clusters (in the cluster algebra sense).

  8. RNA STRAND: The RNA Secondary Structure and Statistical Analysis Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andronescu Mirela

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to access, search and analyse secondary structures of a large set of known RNA molecules is very important for deriving improved RNA energy models, for evaluating computational predictions of RNA secondary structures and for a better understanding of RNA folding. Currently there is no database that can easily provide these capabilities for almost all RNA molecules with known secondary structures. Results In this paper we describe RNA STRAND – the RNA secondary STRucture and statistical ANalysis Database, a curated database containing known secondary structures of any type and organism. Our new database provides a wide collection of known RNA secondary structures drawn from public databases, searchable and downloadable in a common format. Comprehensive statistical information on the secondary structures in our database is provided using the RNA Secondary Structure Analyser, a new tool we have developed to analyse RNA secondary structures. The information thus obtained is valuable for understanding to which extent and with which probability certain structural motifs can appear. We outline several ways in which the data provided in RNA STRAND can facilitate research on RNA structure, including the improvement of RNA energy models and evaluation of secondary structure prediction programs. In order to keep up-to-date with new RNA secondary structure experiments, we offer the necessary tools to add solved RNA secondary structures to our database and invite researchers to contribute to RNA STRAND. Conclusion RNA STRAND is a carefully assembled database of trusted RNA secondary structures, with easy on-line tools for searching, analyzing and downloading user selected entries, and is publicly available at http://www.rnasoft.ca/strand.

  9. Structural characterization of homogalacturonan by NMR spectroscopy-assignment of reference compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Bent O; Meier, Sebastian; Duus, Jens Ø; Clausen, Mads H

    2008-11-03

    Complete assignment of (1)H and (13)C NMR of six hexagalactopyranuronic acids with varying degree and pattern of methyl esterification is reported. The NMR experiments were run at room temperature using approximately 2mg of sample making this method convenient for studying the structure of homogalacturonan oligosaccharides.

  10. Analysis of Cognitive Structure Using the Linear Logistic Test Model and Quadratic Assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Diaz, Maria

    1993-01-01

    The cognitive structure of an algebra test was defined and validated using the linear logistic test model (LLTM) and quadratic assignment (QA). A 29-item test was administered to 235 ninth graders. Results suggest the benefits of applying both LLTM and QA to test construction and analysis. (SLD)

  11. Combining neural networks for protein secondary structure prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Søren Kamaric

    1995-01-01

    In this paper structured neural networks are applied to the problem of predicting the secondary structure of proteins. A hierarchical approach is used where specialized neural networks are designed for each structural class and then combined using another neural network. The submodels are designe...... is better than most secondary structure prediction methods based on single sequences even though this model contains much fewer parameters...

  12. A novel strategy for NMR resonance assignment and protein structure determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemak, Alexander [University of Toronto, Ontario Cancer Institute and Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics (Canada); Gutmanas, Aleksandras [European Bioinformatics Institute, Protein Data Bank Europe (United Kingdom); Chitayat, Seth; Karra, Murthy [University of Toronto, Ontario Cancer Institute and Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics (Canada); Fares, Christophe [Max-Planck-Institut f. Kohlenforschung (Germany); Sunnerhagen, Maria [Linkoeping University, Division of Molecular Biotechnology, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (Sweden); Arrowsmith, Cheryl H., E-mail: carrow@uhnres.utoronto.ca [University of Toronto, Ontario Cancer Institute and Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics (Canada)

    2011-01-15

    The quality of protein structures determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is contingent on the number and quality of experimentally-derived resonance assignments, distance and angular restraints. Two key features of protein NMR data have posed challenges for the routine and automated structure determination of small to medium sized proteins; (1) spectral resolution - especially of crowded nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY) spectra, and (2) the reliance on a continuous network of weak scalar couplings as part of most common assignment protocols. In order to facilitate NMR structure determination, we developed a semi-automated strategy that utilizes non-uniform sampling (NUS) and multidimensional decomposition (MDD) for optimal data collection and processing of selected, high resolution multidimensional NMR experiments, combined it with an ABACUS protocol for sequential and side chain resonance assignments, and streamlined this procedure to execute structure and refinement calculations in CYANA and CNS, respectively. Two graphical user interfaces (GUIs) were developed to facilitate efficient analysis and compilation of the data and to guide automated structure determination. This integrated method was implemented and refined on over 30 high quality structures of proteins ranging from 5.5 to 16.5 kDa in size.

  13. Prediction of the secondary structure of HIV-1 gp120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Lund, O; Nielsen, Jens Ole

    1996-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The predicted secondary structure of gp120 compared well with data from NMR analysis of synthetic peptides from the V3 loop and the C4 region. As a first step towards modeling the tertiary structure of gp120, the predicted secondary structure may guide the design......The secondary structure of HIV-1 gp120 was predicted using multiple alignment and a combination of two independent methods based on neural network and nearest-neighbor algorithms. The methods agreed on the secondary structure for 80% of the residues in BH10 gp120. Six helices were predicted in HIV...

  14. Prediction of the Secondary Structure of HIV-1 gp120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Jens O.

    1996-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The predicted secondary structure of gp120 compared well with data from NMR analysis of synthetic peptides from the V3 loop and the C4 region. As a first step towards modeling the tertiary structure of gp120, the predicted secondary structure may guide the design......The secondary structure of HIV-1 gp120 was predicted using multiple alignment and a combination of two independent methods based on neural network and nearest-neighbor algorithms. The methods agreed on the secondary structure for 80% of the residues in BH10 gp120. Six helices were predicted in HIV...

  15. APSY-NMR for protein backbone assignment in high-throughput structural biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, Samit Kumar; Serrano, Pedro; Proudfoot, Andrew; Geralt, Michael [The Scripps Research Institute, Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology (United States); Pedrini, Bill [Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), SwissFEL Project (Switzerland); Herrmann, Torsten [Université de Lyon, Institut des Sciences Analytiques, Centre de RMN à Très Hauts Champs, UMR 5280 CNRS, ENS Lyon, UCB Lyon 1 (France); Wüthrich, Kurt, E-mail: wuthrich@scripps.edu [The Scripps Research Institute, Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology (United States)

    2015-01-15

    A standard set of three APSY-NMR experiments has been used in daily practice to obtain polypeptide backbone NMR assignments in globular proteins with sizes up to about 150 residues, which had been identified as targets for structure determination by the Joint Center for Structural Genomics (JCSG) under the auspices of the Protein Structure Initiative (PSI). In a representative sample of 30 proteins, initial fully automated data analysis with the software UNIO-MATCH-2014 yielded complete or partial assignments for over 90 % of the residues. For most proteins the APSY data acquisition was completed in less than 30 h. The results of the automated procedure provided a basis for efficient interactive validation and extension to near-completion of the assignments by reference to the same 3D heteronuclear-resolved [{sup 1}H,{sup 1}H]-NOESY spectra that were subsequently used for the collection of conformational constraints. High-quality structures were obtained for all 30 proteins, using the J-UNIO protocol, which includes extensive automation of NMR structure determination.

  16. The Expected Order of Saturated RNA Secondary Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Emma Yu

    2011-01-01

    We show the expected order of RNA saturated secondary structures of size $n$ is $\\log_4n(1+O(\\frac{\\log_2n}{n}))$, if we select the saturated secondary structure uniformly at random. Furthermore, the order of saturated secondary structures is sharply concentrated around its mean. As a consequence saturated structures and structures in the traditional model behave the same with respect to the expected order. Thus we may conclude that the traditional model has already drawn the right picture and conclusions inferred from it with respect to the order (the overall shape) of a structure remain valid even if enforcing saturation (at least in expectation).

  17. Total synthesis, assignment of the relative and absolute stereochemistry, and structural reassignment of phostriecin (aka Sultriecin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Christopher P; Haq, Nadia; Boger, Dale L

    2010-02-24

    A total synthesis of phostriecin (2), previously known as sultriecin (1), its structural reassignment as a phosphate versus sulfate monoester, and the assignment of its relative and absolute stereochemistry are disclosed herein. Key elements of the work, which provided first the originally assigned sulfate monoester 1 and then the reassigned and renamed phosphate monoester 2, relied on diagnostic (1)H NMR spectroscopic properties of the natural product for the assignment of relative and absolute stereochemistry as well as the subsequent structural reassignment, and a convergent asymmetric total synthesis to provide the unequivocal authentic materials. Key steps of the synthetic approach include a Brown allylation for diastereoselective introduction of the C9 stereochemistry, an asymmetric CBS reduction to establish the lactone C5-stereochemistry, diastereoselective oxidative ring expansion of an alpha-hydroxyfuran to access the pyran lactone precursor, and single-step installation of the sensitive Z,Z,E-triene unit through a chelation-controlled cuprate addition with installation of the C11 stereochemistry. The approach allows ready access to analogues that can now be used to probe important structural features required for protein phosphatase 2A inhibition, the mechanism of action defined herein.

  18. Neural network definitions of highly predictable protein secondary structure classes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapedes, A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States); Steeg, E. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Computer Science; Farber, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-02-01

    We use two co-evolving neural networks to determine new classes of protein secondary structure which are significantly more predictable from local amino sequence than the conventional secondary structure classification. Accurate prediction of the conventional secondary structure classes: alpha helix, beta strand, and coil, from primary sequence has long been an important problem in computational molecular biology. Neural networks have been a popular method to attempt to predict these conventional secondary structure classes. Accuracy has been disappointingly low. The algorithm presented here uses neural networks to similtaneously examine both sequence and structure data, and to evolve new classes of secondary structure that can be predicted from sequence with significantly higher accuracy than the conventional classes. These new classes have both similarities to, and differences with the conventional alpha helix, beta strand and coil.

  19. Prediction of the secondary structure of HIV-1 gp120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Lund, O; Nielsen, Jens Ole

    1996-01-01

    The secondary structure of HIV-1 gp120 was predicted using multiple alignment and a combination of two independent methods based on neural network and nearest-neighbor algorithms. The methods agreed on the secondary structure for 80% of the residues in BH10 gp120. Six helices were predicted in HIV...

  20. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopic Analysis of Protein Secondary Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jilie KONG; Shaoning YU

    2007-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy is one of the oldest and well established experimental techniques for the analysis of secondary structure of polypeptides and proteins. It is convenient, non-destructive, requires less sample preparation, and can be used under a wide variety of conditions. This review introduces the recent developments in Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy technique and its applications to protein structural studies. The experimental skills, data analysis, and correlations between the FTIR spectroscopic bands and protein secondary structure components are discussed. The applications of FTIR to the secondary structure analysis, conformational changes, structural dynamics and stability studies of proteins are also discussed.

  1. A tabu search approach for the NMR protein structure-based assignment problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavuşlar, Gizem; Çatay, Bülent; Apaydın, Mehmet Serkan

    2012-01-01

    Spectroscopy is an experimental technique which exploits the magnetic properties of specific nuclei and enables the study of proteins in solution. The key bottleneck of NMR studies is to map the NMR peaks to corresponding nuclei, also known as the assignment problem. Structure-Based Assignment (SBA) is an approach to solve this computationally challenging problem by using prior information about the protein obtained from a homologous structure. NVR-BIP used the Nuclear Vector Replacement (NVR) framework to model SBA as a binary integer programming problem. In this paper, we prove that this problem is NP-hard and propose a tabu search (TS) algorithm (NVR-TS) equipped with a guided perturbation mechanism to efficiently solve it. NVR-TS uses a quadratic penalty relaxation of NVR-BIP where the violations in the Nuclear Overhauser Effect constraints are penalized in the objective function. Experimental results indicate that our algorithm finds the optimal solution on NVRBIP’s data set which consists of seven proteins with 25 templates (31 to 126 residues). Furthermore, it achieves relatively high assignment accuracies on two additional large proteins, MBP and EIN (348 and 243 residues, respectively), which NVR-BIP failed to solve. The executable and the input files are available for download at http://people.sabanciuniv.edu/catay/NVR-TS/NVR-TS.html.

  2. Secondary systems modeled as fuzzy sub-structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarp-Johansen, Niels Jacob; Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager; Lin, Y.K.

    1998-01-01

    Vibrating secondary systems attached to a primary vibrating structure (called the master structure) modify the dynamical properties of the master structure. In engineering practice the dynamical properties of the secondary systems are often very incompletely known. This uncertain knowledge may in...... the probabilistic properties of the impulse response function, say, or of the nonergodic steady state response to stationary excitation, say. The study prepares for a finite element model of a flexible master structure with a fuzzy subsystem attached to it....

  3. ncRNA consensus secondary structure derivation using grammar strings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achawanantakun, Rujira; Sun, Yanni; Takyar, Seyedeh Shohreh

    2011-04-01

    Many noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) function through both their sequences and secondary structures. Thus, secondary structure derivation is an important issue in today's RNA research. The state-of-the-art structure annotation tools are based on comparative analysis, which derives consensus structure of homologous ncRNAs. Despite promising results from existing ncRNA aligning and consensus structure derivation tools, there is a need for more efficient and accurate ncRNA secondary structure modeling and alignment methods. In this work, we introduce a consensus structure derivation approach based on grammar string, a novel ncRNA secondary structure representation that encodes an ncRNA's sequence and secondary structure in the parameter space of a context-free grammar (CFG) and a full RNA grammar including pseudoknots. Being a string defined on a special alphabet constructed from a grammar, grammar string converts ncRNA alignment into sequence alignment. We derive consensus secondary structures from hundreds of ncRNA families from BraliBase 2.1 and 25 families containing pseudoknots using grammar string alignment. Our experiments have shown that grammar string-based structure derivation competes favorably in consensus structure quality with Murlet and RNASampler. Source code and experimental data are available at http://www.cse.msu.edu/~yannisun/grammar-string.

  4. Super-secondary structures and modeling of protein folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimov, Alexander V

    2013-01-01

    A characteristic feature of the polypeptide chain is its ability to form a restricted set of commonly occurring folding units composed of two or more elements of secondary structure that are adjacent along the chain. Some of these super-secondary structures exhibit a unique handedness and a unique overall fold irrespective of whether they occur in homologous or nonhomologous proteins. Such super-secondary structures are of particular value since they can be used as starting structures in protein modeling. The larger protein folds can be obtained by stepwise addition of other secondary structural elements to the starting structures taking into account a set of simple rules inferred from known principles of protein structure.

  5. Automating unambiguous NOE data usage in NVR for NMR protein structure-based assignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmedov, Murodzhon; Çatay, Bülent; Apaydın, Mehmet Serkan

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy is an important technique that allows determining protein structure in solution. An important problem in protein structure determination using NMR spectroscopy is the mapping of peaks to corresponding amino acids, also known as the assignment problem. Structure-Based Assignment (SBA) is an approach to solve this problem using a template structure that is homologous to the target. Our previously developed approach Nuclear Vector Replacement-Binary Integer Programming (NVR-BIP) computed the optimal solution for small proteins, but was unable to solve the assignments of large proteins. NVR-Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) extended the applicability of the NVR approach for such proteins. One of the input data utilized in these approaches is the Nuclear Overhauser Effect (NOE) data. NOE is an interaction observed between two protons if the protons are located close in space. These protons could be amide protons, protons attached to the alpha-carbon atom in the backbone of the protein, or side chain protons. NVR only uses backbone protons. In this paper, we reformulate the NVR-BIP model to distinguish the type of proton in NOE data and use the corresponding proton coordinates in the extended formulation. In addition, the threshold value over interproton distances is set in a standard manner for all proteins by extracting the NOE upper bound distance information from the data. We also convert NOE intensities into distance thresholds. Our new approach thus handles the NOE data correctly and without manually determined parameters. We accordingly adapt NVR-ACO solution methodology to these changes. Computational results show that our approaches obtain optimal solutions for small proteins. For the large proteins our ant colony optimization-based approach obtains promising results.

  6. Simultaneous prediction of protein secondary structure and transmembrane spans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leman, Julia Koehler; Mueller, Ralf; Karakas, Mert; Woetzel, Nils; Meiler, Jens

    2013-07-01

    Prediction of transmembrane spans and secondary structure from the protein sequence is generally the first step in the structural characterization of (membrane) proteins. Preference of a stretch of amino acids in a protein to form secondary structure and being placed in the membrane are correlated. Nevertheless, current methods predict either secondary structure or individual transmembrane states. We introduce a method that simultaneously predicts the secondary structure and transmembrane spans from the protein sequence. This approach not only eliminates the necessity to create a consensus prediction from possibly contradicting outputs of several predictors but bears the potential to predict conformational switches, i.e., sequence regions that have a high probability to change for example from a coil conformation in solution to an α-helical transmembrane state. An artificial neural network was trained on databases of 177 membrane proteins and 6048 soluble proteins. The output is a 3 × 3 dimensional probability matrix for each residue in the sequence that combines three secondary structure types (helix, strand, coil) and three environment types (membrane core, interface, solution). The prediction accuracies are 70.3% for nine possible states, 73.2% for three-state secondary structure prediction, and 94.8% for three-state transmembrane span prediction. These accuracies are comparable to state-of-the-art predictors of secondary structure (e.g., Psipred) or transmembrane placement (e.g., OCTOPUS). The method is available as web server and for download at www.meilerlab.org.

  7. Identification of consensus RNA secondary structures using suffix arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Truong

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of a consensus RNA motif often consists in finding a conserved secondary structure with minimum free energy in an ensemble of aligned sequences. However, an alignment is often difficult to obtain without prior structural information. Thus the need for tools to automate this process. Results We present an algorithm called Seed to identify all the conserved RNA secondary structure motifs in a set of unaligned sequences. The search space is defined as the set of all the secondary structure motifs inducible from a seed sequence. A general-to-specific search allows finding all the motifs that are conserved. Suffix arrays are used to enumerate efficiently all the biological palindromes as well as for the matching of RNA secondary structure expressions. We assessed the ability of this approach to uncover known structures using four datasets. The enumeration of the motifs relies only on the secondary structure definition and conservation only, therefore allowing for the independent evaluation of scoring schemes. Twelve simple objective functions based on free energy were evaluated for their potential to discriminate native folds from the rest. Conclusion Our evaluation shows that 1 support and exclusion constraints are sufficient to make an exhaustive search of the secondary structure space feasible. 2 The search space induced from a seed sequence contains known motifs. 3 Simple objective functions, consisting of a combination of the free energy of matching sequences, can generally identify motifs with high positive predictive value and sensitivity to known motifs.

  8. Unified approach to partition functions of RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundschuh, Ralf

    2014-11-01

    RNA secondary structure formation is a field of considerable biological interest as well as a model system for understanding generic properties of heteropolymer folding. This system is particularly attractive because the partition function and thus all thermodynamic properties of RNA secondary structure ensembles can be calculated numerically in polynomial time for arbitrary sequences and homopolymer models admit analytical solutions. Such solutions for many different aspects of the combinatorics of RNA secondary structure formation share the property that the final solution depends on differences of statistical weights rather than on the weights alone. Here, we present a unified approach to a large class of problems in the field of RNA secondary structure formation. We prove a generic theorem for the calculation of RNA folding partition functions. Then, we show that this approach can be applied to the study of the molten-native transition, denaturation of RNA molecules, as well as to studies of the glass phase of random RNA sequences.

  9. Dynamics in Sequence Space for RNA Secondary Structure Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthies, Marco C; Bienert, Stefan; Torda, Andrew E

    2012-10-01

    We have implemented a method for the design of RNA sequences that should fold to arbitrary secondary structures. A popular energy model allows one to take the derivative with respect to composition, which can then be interpreted as a force and used for Newtonian dynamics in sequence space. Combined with a negative design term, one can rapidly sample sequences which are compatible with a desired secondary structure via simulated annealing. Results for 360 structures were compared with those from another nucleic acid design program using measures such as the probability of the target structure and an ensemble-weighted distance to the target structure.

  10. On the Structure of Cooperative and Competitive Solutions for a Generalized Assignment Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Pablo Arribillaga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study cooperative and competitive solutions for a many-to-many generalization of Shapley and Shubik’s (1971 assignment game. We consider the Core, three other notions of group stability, and two alternative definitions of competitive equilibrium. We show that (i each group stable set is closely related to the Core of certain games defined using a proper notion of blocking and (ii each group stable set contains the set of payoff vectors associated with the two definitions of competitive equilibrium. We also show that all six solutions maintain a strictly nested structure. Moreover, each solution can be identified with a set of matrices of (discriminated prices which indicate how gains from trade are distributed among buyers and sellers. In all cases such matrices arise as solutions of a system of linear inequalities. Hence, all six solutions have the same properties from a structural and computational point of view.

  11. Combinatorics of RNA Secondary Structures with Base Triples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Robert; Nebel, Markus E

    2015-07-01

    The structure of RNA has been the subject of intense research over the last decades due to its importance for the correct functioning of RNA molecules in biological processes. Hence, a large number of models for RNA folding and corresponding algorithms for structure prediction have been developed. However, previous models often only consider base pairs, although every base is capable of up to three edge-to-edge interactions with other bases. Recently, Höner zu Siederdissen et al. presented an extended model of RNA secondary structure, including base triples together with a folding algorithm-the first thermodynamics-based algorithm that allows the prediction of secondary structures with base triples. In this article, we investigate the search space processed by this new algorithm, that is, the combinatorics of extended RNA secondary structures with base triples. We present generalized definitions for structural motifs like hairpins, stems, bulges, or interior loops occurring in structures with base triples. Furthermore, we prove precise asymptotic results for the number of different structures (size of search space) and expectations for various parameters associated with structural motifs (typical shape of folding). Our analysis shows that the asymptotic number of secondary structures of size n increases exponentially to [Formula: see text] compared to the classic model by Stein and Waterman for which [Formula: see text] structures exist. A comparison with the classic model reveals large deviations in the expected structural appearance, too. The inclusion of base triples constitutes a significant refinement of the combinatorial model of RNA secondary structure, which, by our findings, is quantitatively characterized. Our results are of special theoretical interest, because a closer look at the numbers involved suggests that extended RNA secondary structures constitute a new combinatorial class not bijective with any other combinatorial objects studied so far.

  12. A method for rapid similarity analysis of RNA secondary structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Na

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Owing to the rapid expansion of RNA structure databases in recent years, efficient methods for structure comparison are in demand for function prediction and evolutionary analysis. Usually, the similarity of RNA secondary structures is evaluated based on tree models and dynamic programming algorithms. We present here a new method for the similarity analysis of RNA secondary structures. Results Three sets of real data have been used as input for the example applications. Set I includes the structures from 5S rRNAs. Set II includes the secondary structures from RNase P and RNase MRP. Set III includes the structures from 16S rRNAs. Reasonable phylogenetic trees are derived for these three sets of data by using our method. Moreover, our program runs faster as compared to some existing ones. Conclusion The famous Lempel-Ziv algorithm can efficiently extract the information on repeated patterns encoded in RNA secondary structures and makes our method an alternative to analyze the similarity of RNA secondary structures. This method will also be useful to researchers who are interested in evolutionary analysis.

  13. The four ingredients of single-sequence RNA secondary structure prediction. A unifying perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Elena

    2013-07-01

    Any method for RNA secondary structure prediction is determined by four ingredients. The architecture is the choice of features implemented by the model (such as stacked basepairs, loop length distributions, etc.). The architecture determines the number of parameters in the model. The scoring scheme is the nature of those parameters (whether thermodynamic, probabilistic, or weights). The parameterization stands for the specific values assigned to the parameters. These three ingredients are referred to as "the model." The fourth ingredient is the folding algorithms used to predict plausible secondary structures given the model and the sequence of a structural RNA. Here, I make several unifying observations drawn from looking at more than 40 years of methods for RNA secondary structure prediction in the light of this classification. As a final observation, there seems to be a performance ceiling that affects all methods with complex architectures, a ceiling that impacts all scoring schemes with remarkable similarity. This suggests that modeling RNA secondary structure by using intrinsic sequence-based plausible "foldability" will require the incorporation of other forms of information in order to constrain the folding space and to improve prediction accuracy. This could give an advantage to probabilistic scoring systems since a probabilistic framework is a natural platform to incorporate different sources of information into one single inference problem.

  14. Computing the partition function for kinetically trapped RNA secondary structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A Lorenz

    Full Text Available An RNA secondary structure is locally optimal if there is no lower energy structure that can be obtained by the addition or removal of a single base pair, where energy is defined according to the widely accepted Turner nearest neighbor model. Locally optimal structures form kinetic traps, since any evolution away from a locally optimal structure must involve energetically unfavorable folding steps. Here, we present a novel, efficient algorithm to compute the partition function over all locally optimal secondary structures of a given RNA sequence. Our software, RNAlocopt runs in O(n3 time and O(n2 space. Additionally, RNAlocopt samples a user-specified number of structures from the Boltzmann subensemble of all locally optimal structures. We apply RNAlocopt to show that (1 the number of locally optimal structures is far fewer than the total number of structures--indeed, the number of locally optimal structures approximately equal to the square root of the number of all structures, (2 the structural diversity of this subensemble may be either similar to or quite different from the structural diversity of the entire Boltzmann ensemble, a situation that depends on the type of input RNA, (3 the (modified maximum expected accuracy structure, computed by taking into account base pairing frequencies of locally optimal structures, is a more accurate prediction of the native structure than other current thermodynamics-based methods. The software RNAlocopt constitutes a technical breakthrough in our study of the folding landscape for RNA secondary structures. For the first time, locally optimal structures (kinetic traps in the Turner energy model can be rapidly generated for long RNA sequences, previously impossible with methods that involved exhaustive enumeration. Use of locally optimal structure leads to state-of-the-art secondary structure prediction, as benchmarked against methods involving the computation of minimum free energy and of maximum expected

  15. Infrared and Raman spectra, adjusted r0 structural parameters, and vibrational assignment of isopropyl isocyanide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Dattatray K.; Klaassen, Joshua J.; Panikar, Savitha S.; Durig, James R.

    2014-09-01

    Infrared spectra (3200-220 cm-1) of gaseous and Raman spectra (3200-40 cm-1) of liquid isopropyl isocyanide ((CH3)2CHNC) have been recorded. By utilizing the microwave rotational constants combined with the structural parameters predicted from MP2(full)/6-311+G(d,p) calculations, adjusted r0 parameters have been obtained for isopropyl isocyanide. The heavy atom distances in Å are: r (C1tbnd N2) = 1.176(3), r (N2sbnd C3) = 1.437(3), r (C3sbnd C4,5) = 1.525(5) and the angles in (°) are ∠C1N2C3 = 178.6(5); ∠N2C3C4,5 = 109.4(5); ∠C4C3C5 = 113.0(5). A complete vibrational assignment is proposed for isopropyl isocyanide based on infrared band contours, relative intensities, depolarization values, and group frequencies. The vibrational assignments were supported by normal coordinate calculation utilizing the force constants from ab inito MP2(full)/6-31G(d). The results are discussed and compared to those obtained for some similar molecules.

  16. Predicting RNA secondary structures from sequence and probing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ronny; Wolfinger, Michael T; Tanzer, Andrea; Hofacker, Ivo L

    2016-07-01

    RNA secondary structures have proven essential for understanding the regulatory functions performed by RNA such as microRNAs, bacterial small RNAs, or riboswitches. This success is in part due to the availability of efficient computational methods for predicting RNA secondary structures. Recent advances focus on dealing with the inherent uncertainty of prediction by considering the ensemble of possible structures rather than the single most stable one. Moreover, the advent of high-throughput structural probing has spurred the development of computational methods that incorporate such experimental data as auxiliary information.

  17. An optimization approach for minimum norm and robust partial quadratic eigenvalue assignment problems for vibrating structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahma, Sanjoy; Datta, Biswa

    2009-07-01

    The partial quadratic eigenvalue assignment problem (PQEVAP) concerns the reassignment of a small number of undesirable eigenvalues of a quadratic matrix pencil, while leaving the remaining large number of eigenvalues and the corresponding eigenvectors unchanged. The problem arises in controlling undesirable resonance in vibrating structures and in stabilizing control systems. The solution of this problem requires computations of a pair of feedback matrices. For practical effectiveness, these feedback matrices must be computed in such a way that their norms and the condition number of the closed-loop eigenvector matrix are as small as possible. These considerations give rise to the minimum norm partial quadratic eigenvalue assignment problem (MNPQEVAP) and the robust partial quadratic eigenvalue assignment problem (RPQEVAP), respectively. In this paper we propose new optimization based algorithms for solving these problems. The problems are solved directly in a second-order setting without resorting to a standard first-order formulation so as to avoid the inversion of a possibly ill-conditioned matrix and the loss of exploitable structures of the original model. The algorithms require the knowledge of only the open-loop eigenvalues to be replaced and their corresponding eigenvectors. The remaining open-loop eigenvalues and their corresponding eigenvectors are kept unchanged. The invariance of the large number of eigenvalues and eigenvectors under feedback is guaranteed by a proven mathematical result. Furthermore, the gradient formulas needed to solve the problems by using the quasi-Newton optimization technique employed are computed in terms of the known quantities only. Above all, the proposed methods do not require the reduction of the model order or the order of the controller, even when the underlying finite element model has a very large degree of freedom. These attractive features, coupled with minimal computational requirements, such as solutions of small

  18. Scaffolding students’ assignments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slot, Marie Falkesgaard

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses scaffolding in typical student assignments in mother tongue learning materials in upper secondary education in Denmark and the United Kingdom. It has been determined that assignments do not have sufficient scaffolding end features to help pupils understand concepts and build...... objects. The article presents the results of empirical research on tasks given in Danish and British learning materials. This work is based on a further development of my PhD thesis: “Learning materials in the subject of Danish” (Slot 2010). The main focus is how cognitive models (and subsidiary explicit...... learning goals) can help students structure their argumentative and communica-tive learning processes, and how various multimodal representations can give more open-ended learning possibilities for collaboration. The article presents a short introduction of the skills for 21st century learning and defines...

  19. Principles for Predicting RNA Secondary Structure Design Difficulty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson-Lee, Jeff; Fisker, Eli; Kosaraju, Vineet; Wu, Michelle; Kong, Justin; Lee, Jeehyung; Lee, Minjae; Zada, Mathew; Treuille, Adrien; Das, Rhiju

    2016-02-27

    Designing RNAs that form specific secondary structures is enabling better understanding and control of living systems through RNA-guided silencing, genome editing and protein organization. Little is known, however, about which RNA secondary structures might be tractable for downstream sequence design, increasing the time and expense of design efforts due to inefficient secondary structure choices. Here, we present insights into specific structural features that increase the difficulty of finding sequences that fold into a target RNA secondary structure, summarizing the design efforts of tens of thousands of human participants and three automated algorithms (RNAInverse, INFO-RNA and RNA-SSD) in the Eterna massive open laboratory. Subsequent tests through three independent RNA design algorithms (NUPACK, DSS-Opt and MODENA) confirmed the hypothesized importance of several features in determining design difficulty, including sequence length, mean stem length, symmetry and specific difficult-to-design motifs such as zigzags. Based on these results, we have compiled an Eterna100 benchmark of 100 secondary structure design challenges that span a large range in design difficulty to help test future efforts. Our in silico results suggest new routes for improving computational RNA design methods and for extending these insights to assess "designability" of single RNA structures, as well as of switches for in vitro and in vivo applications.

  20. Structured Observation Component. Secondary Teacher Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Michael L.; Keen, Phyllis A.

    A format is presented for use of student teachers in structuring their classroom observation techniques. Fifteen classroom and school activities are listed with a comprehensive questionnaire accompanying each. These questionnaires guide the student on what behaviors to observe and suggest objective and subjective responses to these behaviors to be…

  1. The 5'-3' Distance of RNA Secondary Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Hillary S W; Reidys, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Recently, Yoffe and colleagues observed that the average distances between 5'-3' ends of RNA molecules are very small and largely independent of sequence length. This observation is based on numerical computations as well as theoretical arguments maximizing certain entropy functionals....... In this article, we compute the exact distribution of 5'-3' distances of RNA secondary structures for any finite n. Furthermore, we compute the limit distribution and show that for n = 30 the exact distribution and the limit distribution are very close. Our results show that the distances of random RNA secondary...... structures are distinctively lower than those of minimum free energy structures of random RNA sequences....

  2. RNA secondary structure diagrams for very large molecules: RNAfdl

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecker, Nikolai; Wiegels, Tim; Torda, Andrew E.

    2013-01-01

    There are many programs that can read the secondary structure of an RNA molecule and draw a diagram, but hardly any that can cope with 10 3 bases. RNAfdl is slow but capable of producing intersection-free diagrams for ribosome-sized structures, has a graphical user interface for adjustments...

  3. Selection acts on DNA secondary structures to decrease transcriptional mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Hoede

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Single-stranded DNA is more subject to mutation than double stranded. During transcription, DNA is transiently single stranded and therefore subject to higher mutagenesis. However, if local intra-strand secondary structures are formed, some bases will be paired and therefore less sensitive to mutation than unpaired bases. Using complete genome sequences of Escherichia coli, we show that local intra-strand secondary structures can, as a consequence, be used to define an index of transcription-driven mutability. At gene level, we show that natural selection has favoured a reduced transcription-driven mutagenesis via the higher than expected frequency of occurrence of intra-strand secondary structures. Such selection is stronger in highly expressed genes and suggests a sequence-dependent way to control mutation rates and a novel form of selection affecting the evolution of synonymous mutations.

  4. Effect of secondary weld thermal cycle on structure and properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with structure and impact energy of weld HAZ of 10CrNi3MoV steel after secondary weld thermal cycle (t8/5=8(¨)s~120(¨)s; peak temperature Tm=750℃~1(¨)300℃). It is demonstrated that the coarse grain and structure produced by first thermal cycle keep unchanged after secondary thermal cycle above Ac1 critical temperature but below 1(¨)050(¨)℃. At the same time the low temperature impact energy decreases obviously with increasing t8/5. By metallurgical microscope and transmission electron microscope(TEM) , it is revealed that the effect of coarse grain and structure caused by secondary thermal cycle on low temperature impact energy.

  5. Prediction algorithm for amino acid types with their secondary structure in proteins (PLATON) using chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labudde, D; Leitner, D; Krüger, M; Oschkinat, H

    2003-01-01

    The algorithm PLATON is able to assign sets of chemical shifts derived from a single residue to amino acid types with its secondary structure (amino acid species). A subsequent ranking procedure using optionally two different penalty functions yields predictions for possible amino acid species for the given set of chemical shifts. This was demonstrated in the case of the alpha-spectrin SH3 domain and applied to 9 further protein data sets taken from the BioMagRes database. A database consisting of reference chemical shift patterns (reference CSPs) was generated from assigned chemical shifts of proteins with known 3D-structure. This reference CSP database is used in our approach for extracting distributions of amino acid types with their most likely secondary structure elements (namely alpha-helix, beta-sheet, and coil) for single amino acids by comparison with query CSPs. Results obtained for the 10 investigated proteins indicates that the percentage of correct amino acid species in the first three positions in the ranking list, ranges from 71.4% to 93.2% for the more favorable penalty function. Where only the top result of the ranking list for these 10 proteins is considered, 36.5% to 83.1% of the amino acid species are correctly predicted. The main advantage of our approach, over other methods that rely on average chemical shift values is the ability to increase database content by incorporating newly derived CSPs, and therefore to improve PLATON's performance over time.

  6. Approaches to link RNA secondary structures with splicing regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plass, Mireya; Eyras, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    by facilitating or hindering the interaction with factors and small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) that regulate splicing. Moreover, the secondary structure could play a fundamental role in the splicing of yeast species, which lack many of the regulatory splicing factors present in metazoans. This chapter......In higher eukaryotes, alternative splicing is usually regulated by protein factors, which bind to the pre-mRNA and affect the recognition of splicing signals. There is recent evidence that the secondary structure of the pre-mRNA may also play an important role in this process, either...

  7. Study and prediction of secondary structure for membrane proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amirova, Svetlana R.; Milchevsky, Juri V.; Filatov, Ivan V.; Esipova, Natalia G.; Tumanyan, Vladimir G.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present a novel approach to membrane protein secondary structure prediction based on the statistical stepwise discriminant analysis method. A new aspect of our approach is the possibility to derive physical -chemical properties that may affect the formation of membrane protein secon

  8. Microwave, r{sub 0} structural parameters, conformational stability and vibrational assignment of cyclopropylcyanosilane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durig, James R., E-mail: durigj@umkc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Guirgis, Gamil A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, College of Charleston, Charleston, SC 29424 (United States); Sawant, Dattatray K. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Seifert, Nathan A. [Department of Chemistry , University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Deodhar, Bhushan S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Pate, Brooks H. [Department of Chemistry , University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Panikar, Savitha S.; Groner, Peter [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Overby, Jason S.; Askarian, Sahand M. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, College of Charleston, Charleston, SC 29424 (United States)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • The most stable cis conformer has been identified from microwave spectra. • Enthalpy difference has been determined between the two forms. • Adjusted r{sub 0} structures were obtained for cis and gauche form. • Ab initio calculations were performed for the two conformers. - Abstract: The FT-microwave spectrum (6000–19,800 MHz) of cyclopropylcyanosilane, c-C{sub 3}H{sub 5}SiH{sub 2}CN has been recorded and 773 transitions for the {sup 28}Si, {sup 29}Si, {sup 30}Si, {sup 13}C and {sup 15}N isotopomers have been assigned for cis and gauche conformers. Infrared spectra (3200–220 cm{sup −1}) of gas and Raman spectra (3200–40 cm{sup −1}) of the liquid have been recorded as well as the variable temperature (−60 to −100 °C) studies of the infrared spectra of the sample dissolved in liquid xenon. The enthalpy difference between the conformers in xenon solutions has been determined to be 123 ± 13 cm{sup −1} (1.47 ± 0.16 kJ mol{sup −1}) with the cis conformer as the more stable form. Approximately 48 ± 2% of the cis form is present at ambient temperature. By utilizing the microwave rotational constants of six isotopomers for cis and seven isotopomers for gauche combined with the structural parameters predicted from MP2(full)/6-311+G(d,p) calculations, adjusted r{sub 0} parameters have been obtained for both conformers.

  9. FLAMEnGO 2.0: an enhanced fuzzy logic algorithm for structure-based assignment of methyl group resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Fa-An; Kim, Jonggul; Xia, Youlin; Milligan, Michael; Rowe, Nancy; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2014-08-01

    We present an enhanced version of the FLAMEnGO (Fuzzy Logic Assignment of Methyl Group) software, a structure-based method to assign methyl group resonances in large proteins. FLAMEnGO utilizes a fuzzy logic algorithm coupled with Monte Carlo sampling to obtain a probability-based assignment of the methyl group resonances. As an input, FLAMEnGO requires either the protein X-ray structure or an NMR structural ensemble including data such as methyl-methyl NOESY, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE), methine-methyl TOCSY data. Version 2.0 of this software (FLAMEnGO 2.0) has a user-friendly graphic interface and presents improved modules that enable the input of partial assignments and additional NMR restraints. We tested the performance of FLAMEnGO 2.0 on maltose binding protein (MBP) as well as the C-subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA-C). FLAMEnGO 2.0 can be used as a standalone method or to assist in the completion of partial resonance assignments and can be downloaded at www.chem.umn.edu/groups/veglia/forms/flamengo2-form.html.

  10. Protein secondary structure prediction using deep convolutional neural fields

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng Wang; Jian Peng; Jianzhu Ma; Jinbo Xu

    2015-01-01

    Protein secondary structure (SS) prediction is important for studying protein structure and function. When only the sequence (profile) information is used as input feature, currently the best predictors can obtain ~80% Q3 accuracy, which has not been improved in the past decade. Here we present DeepCNF (Deep Convolutional Neural Fields) for protein SS prediction. DeepCNF is a Deep Learning extension of Conditional Neural Fields (CNF), which is an integration of Conditional Random Fields (CRF)...

  11. Protein secondary structure analysis with a coarse-grained model

    OpenAIRE

    Kneller, Gerald R.; Hinsen, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a geometrical model for protein secondary structure analysis which uses only the positions of the $C_{\\alpha}$-atoms. We construct a space curve connecting these positions by piecewise polynomial interpolation and describe the folding of the protein backbone by a succession of screw motions linking the Frenet frames at consecutive $C_{\\alpha}$-positions. Using the ASTRAL subset of the SCOPe data base of protein structures, we derive thresholds for the screw parameters of se...

  12. Studies on solution NMR structure of brazzein——Secondary structure and molecular scaffold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高广华; 戴继勋; 丁鸣; 王金凤; 王大成

    1999-01-01

    Brazzein is a sweet-tasting protein isolated from the fruit of West African plant Pentadiplandra brazzeana Baillon. It is the smallest and the most water-soluble sweet protein discovered so far and is highly thermostable. The proton NMR study of brazzein at 600 MHz (pH 3.5, 300 K) is presented. The complete sequence specific assignments of the individual backbone and sideehain proton resonances were achieved using through-bond and through-space eonneetivities obtained from standard two-dimensional NMR techniques. The secondary structure of brazzein contains one α-helix (residues 21—29), one short 310-helix (residues 14—17), two strands of antiparallel β-sheet (residues 34—39, 44—50) and probably a third strand (residues 5—7) near the N-terminus. A comparative analysis found that brazzein shares a so-called ’eysteine-stabilized alpha-beta’ (CSαβ) motif with scorpion neurotoxins, insect defensins and plant γ-thionins. The significance of this multi-function motif, the possible active sites an

  13. NMR assignment of structural motifs in intact β-limit dextrin and its α-amylase degradation products in situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Bent O; Meier, Sebastian; Duus, Jens Ø

    2012-10-01

    An increasingly detailed and realistic view of biological processes often hinges on atomic-level characterization of biomacromolecules and of the processes they are involved in, preferably under near-physiological conditions. Structure, degradation, and synthesis of glucose storage polymers have been studied for decades with a range of analytical tools, but the detailed in situ analysis has remained an analytical challenge. Here, we report the NMR assignment of different structural motifs in the β-limit dextrin from lintnerized maize starch as a branched α-glucan model system for starch, which is depleted of repetitive α-(1→4) glycosidic bonds at non-reducing ends but has the α-(1→6) branch points intact. By NMR spectroscopy at 18.7T magnetic field, we assign 12 discernible α-glucopyranosyl spin systems and identify them with different structural motifs. Amylolysis of the β-limit dextrin is directly followed by real-time NMR spectroscopy and four major cleavage products are identified and assigned to different branch point structures. Overall, these NMR assignments facilitate in situ assays under realistic conditions of substrate competition, transglycosylation, and product inhibition and shed light on chemical shift tendencies in different structural motifs of branched α-glucans.

  14. The 5'-3' distance of RNA secondary structures

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Hillary S W

    2011-01-01

    Recently Yoffe {\\it et al.} \\citep{Yoffe} observed that the average distances between 5'-3' ends of RNA molecules are very small and largely independent of sequence length. This observation is based on numerical computations as well as theoretical arguments maximizing certain entropy functionals. In this paper we compute the exact distribution of 5'-3' distances of RNA secondary structures for any finite $n$. We furthermore compute the limit distribution and show that already for $n=30$ the exact distribution and the limit distribution are very close. Our results show that the distances of random RNA secondary structures are distinctively lower than those of minimum free energy structures of random RNA sequences.

  15. Investigations of Protein Structure and Function Using the Scientific Literature: An Assignment for an Undergraduate Cell Physiology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulnix, Amy B.

    2003-01-01

    Undergraduate biology curricula are being modified to model and teach the activities of scientists better. The assignment described here, one that investigates protein structure and function, was designed for use in a sophomore-level cell physiology course at Earlham College. Students work in small groups to read and present in poster format on…

  16. Prediction of RNA Secondary Structure Based on Particle Swarm Optimization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yuan-ning; DONG Hao; ZHANG Hao; WANG Gang; LI Zhi; CHEN Hui-ling

    2011-01-01

    A novel method for the prediction of RNA secondary structure was proposed based on the particle swarm optimization(PSO). PSO is known to be effective in solving many different types of optimization problems and known for being able to approximate the global optimal results in the solution space. We designed an efficient objective function according to the minimum free energy, the number of selected stems and the average length of selected stems. We calculated how many legal stems there were in the sequence, and selected some of them to obtain an optimal result using PSO in the right of the objective function. A method based on the improved particle swarm optimization(IPSO) was proposed to predict RNA secondary structure, which consisted of three stages. The first stage was applied to e ncoding the source sequences, and to exploring all the legal stems. Then, a set of encoded stems were created in order to prepare input data for the second stage. In the second stage, IPSO was responsible for structure selection. At last, the optimal result was obtained from the secondary structures selected via IPSO. Nine sequences from the comparative RNA website were selected for the evaluation of the proposed method. Compared with other six methods, the proposed method decreased the complexity and enhanced the sensitivity and specificity on the basis of the experiment results.

  17. A phase transition in energy-filtered RNA secondary structures

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Hillary S W

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we study the effect of energy parameters on minimum free energy (mfe) RNA secondary structures. Employing a simplified combinatorial energy model, that is only dependent on the diagram representation and that is not sequence specific, we prove the following dichotomy result. Mfe structures derived via the Turner energy parameters contain only finitely many complex irreducible substructures and just minor parameter changes produce a class of mfe-structures that contain a large number of small irreducibles. We localize the exact point where the distribution of irreducibles experiences this phase transition from a discrete limit to a central limit distribution and subsequently put our result into the context of quantifying the effect of sparsification of the folding of these respective mfe-structures. We show that the sparsification of realistic mfe-structures leads to a constant time and space reduction and that the sparsifcation of the folding of structures with modified parameters leads to a lin...

  18. Complete {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR structural assignments for a group of four goyazensolide-type furanoheliangolides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Ana Carolina Ferreira; Silva, Aline Nazare; Matos, Priscilla Mendonca; Silva, Eder Henrique da; Heleno, Vladimir Constantino Gomes [Universidade de Franca, Franca, SP (Brazil). Nucleo de Pesquisas em Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Lopes, Joao Luis Callegari [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FCFRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto. Dept. de Quimica e Fisica; Sass, Daiane Cristina, E-mail: vheleno_05@yahoo.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras de Ribeirao Preto. Dept. de Quimica

    2012-07-01

    Four goyazensolide-type sesquiterpene lactones - lychnofolide, centratherin, goyazensolide and goyazensolide acetate - were thoroughly studied by NMR experimental techniques. {sup 1}H NMR, {sup 13}C NMR {l_brace}{sup 1}H{r_brace}, COSY, HMQC, HMBC, J-res. and NOE experiments were performed to provide the needed structural information. Complete and unequivocal assignment, including the determination of all multiplicities, was obtained for each structure and the data collections are presented in tables (author)

  19. Using Circular Dichroism Spectra to Estimate Protein Secondary Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenfield, N.

    2006-01-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) is an excellent tool for rapid determination of the secondary structure and folding properties of proteins that have been obtained using recombinant techniques or purified from tissues. The most widely used applications of protein CD are to determine whether an expressed, purified protein is folded, or if a mutation affects its conformation or stability. In addition, it can be used to study protein interactions. This protocol details the basic steps of obtaining and interpreting CD data and methods for analyzing spectra to estimate the secondary structural composition of proteins. CD has the advantage that it is that measurements may be made on multiple samples containing 20 {mu}g or less of proteins in physiological buffers in a few hours. However, it does not give the residue-specific information that can be obtained by X-ray crystallography or NMR.

  20. Random generation of RNA secondary structures according to native distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nebel Markus E

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Random biological sequences are a topic of great interest in genome analysis since, according to a powerful paradigm, they represent the background noise from which the actual biological information must differentiate. Accordingly, the generation of random sequences has been investigated for a long time. Similarly, random object of a more complicated structure like RNA molecules or proteins are of interest. Results In this article, we present a new general framework for deriving algorithms for the non-uniform random generation of combinatorial objects according to the encoding and probability distribution implied by a stochastic context-free grammar. Briefly, the framework extends on the well-known recursive method for (uniform random generation and uses the popular framework of admissible specifications of combinatorial classes, introducing weighted combinatorial classes to allow for the non-uniform generation by means of unranking. This framework is used to derive an algorithm for the generation of RNA secondary structures of a given fixed size. We address the random generation of these structures according to a realistic distribution obtained from real-life data by using a very detailed context-free grammar (that models the class of RNA secondary structures by distinguishing between all known motifs in RNA structure. Compared to well-known sampling approaches used in several structure prediction tools (such as SFold ours has two major advantages: Firstly, after a preprocessing step in time O(n2 for the computation of all weighted class sizes needed, with our approach a set of m random secondary structures of a given structure size n can be computed in worst-case time complexity Om⋅n⋅ log(n while other algorithms typically have a runtime in O(m⋅n2. Secondly, our approach works with integer arithmetic only which is faster and saves us from all the discomforting details of using floating point arithmetic with

  1. Secondary Fast Magnetoacoustic Waves Trapped in Randomly Structured Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ding; Li, Bo; Walsh, Robert W.

    2016-09-01

    Fast magnetoacoustic waves are an important tool for inferring parameters of the solar atmosphere. We numerically simulate the propagation of fast wave pulses in randomly structured plasmas that mimic the highly inhomogeneous solar corona. A network of secondary waves is formed by a series of partial reflections and transmissions. These secondary waves exhibit quasi-periodicities in both time and space. Since the temporal and spatial periods are related simply through the speed of the fast wave, we quantify the properties of secondary waves by examining the dependence of the average temporal period (\\bar{p}) on the initial pulse width (w 0) and studying the density contrast ({δ }ρ ) and correlation length (L c ) that characterize the randomness of the equilibrium density profiles. For small-amplitude pulses, {δ }ρ does not alter \\bar{p} significantly. Large-amplitude pulses, on the other hand, enhance the density contrast when {δ }ρ is small but have a smoothing effect when {δ }ρ is sufficiently large. We found that \\bar{p} scales linearly with L c and that the scaling factor is larger for a narrower pulse. However, in terms of the absolute values of \\bar{p}, broader pulses generate secondary waves with longer periods, and this effect is stronger in random plasmas with shorter correlation lengths. Secondary waves carry the signatures of both the leading wave pulse and the background plasma. Our study may find applications in magnetohydrodynamic seismology by exploiting the secondary waves detected in the dimming regions after coronal mass ejections or extreme ultraviolet waves.

  2. STUDYING THE SECONDARY STRUCTURE OF ACCESSION NUMBER USING CETD MATRIX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamika Dutta

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper, we have tried to analyze about the Secondary Structure of nucleotide sequences of rice. The data have been collected from NCBI (National Centre for Biotechnology Information using Nucleotide as data base. All the programs were developed using R programming language using “sequinr” package. Here, we have used CETD matrix method to study the prediction. The conclusions are drawn accordingly.

  3. Secondary Privatisation: The Evolution of Ownership Structures of Privatised Enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara Blaszczyk; Richard Woodward

    2001-01-01

    This summary was prepared and edited by Barbara Blaszczyk and Richard Woodward of CASE - the Center for Social and Economic Research. In the project whose results are presented here, our team investigated the phenomenon of "secondary privatisation" (that is, the post-privatisation evolution of the ownership structures established as the result of initial privatisation) in three transition economies (the Czech Republic, Poland and Slovenia) in the years 1995-1999. Our research covered companie...

  4. The quadratic assignment problem is easy for Robinsonian matrices with Toeplitz structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laurent, M.; Seminaroti, M.

    2014-01-01

    We present a new polynomially solvable case of the Quadratic Assignment Problem in Koopmans-Beckman form QAP(A,B), by showing that the identity permutation is optimal when A and B are respectively a Robinson similarity and dissimilarity matrix and one of A or B is a Toeplitz matrix. A Robinson (dis)

  5. Coating concrete secondary containment structures exposed to agrichemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broder, M.F.; Nguyen, D.T.

    1995-06-01

    Concrete has traditionally been the material of choice for building secondary containment structures because it is relatively inexpensive and has structural properties which make it ideal for supporting the loads of vehicles and large tanks. However, concrete`s chemical properties make it susceptible to corrosion by some common fertilizers. Though fairly impervious to water movement, concrete is easily penetrated by vapors and solvents. It is also prone to cracking. For these reasons, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) believes that concrete alone may not provide an effective barrier to pesticide movement and has proposed that concrete in pesticide secondary containment structures be sealed or coated to reduce its permeability. Some state secondary containment regulations require that concrete exposed to fertilizers and pesticides be sealed or protected with a coating. Lacking guidelines, some retailers have used penetrating sealants to satisfy the law, even though these products provide little protection from chemical attack nor do they prevent pesticide egress. Other retailers who have applied thick film coatings which were properly selected have had disastrous results because the application was poorly done. Consequently, much skepticism exists regarding the performance and benefit of protective coatings.

  6. A phase transition in energy-filtered RNA secondary structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Hillary Siwei; reidys, Christian

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we study the effect of energy parameters on minimum free energy (mfe) RNA secondary structures. Employing a simplified combinatorial energy model, that is only dependent on the diagram representation and that is not sequence specific, we prove the following dichotomy result. Mfe...... structures derived via the Turner energy parameters contain only finitely many complex irreducible substructures and just minor parameter changes produce a class of mfe-structures that contain a large number of small irreducibles. We localize the exact point where the distribution of irreducibles experiences...... this phase transition from a discrete limit to a central limit distribution and subsequently put our result into the context of quantifying the effect of sparsification of the folding of these respective mfe-structures. We show that the sparsification of realistic mfe-structures leads to a constant time...

  7. How well are protein structures annotated in secondary databases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rother, Kristian; Michalsky, Elke; Leser, Ulf

    2005-09-01

    We investigated to what extent Protein Data Bank (PDB) entries are annotated with second-party information based on existing cross-references between PDB and 15 other databases. We report 2 interesting findings. First, there is a clear "annotation gap" for structures less than 7 years old for secondary databases that are manually curated. Second, the examined databases overlap with each other quite well, dividing the PDB into 2 well-annotated thirds and one poorly annotated third. Both observations should be taken into account in any study depending on the selection of protein structures by their annotation.

  8. Evolutionary rate variation and RNA secondary structure prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, B; Andersen, E S; Damgaard, Christian Kroun

    2004-01-01

    Predicting RNA secondary structure using evolutionary history can be carried out by using an alignment of related RNA sequences with conserved structure. Accurately determining evolutionary substitution rates for base pairs and single stranded nucleotides is a concern for methods based on this type...... by applying rates derived from tRNA and rRNA to the prediction of the much more rapidly evolving 5'-region of HIV-1. We find that the HIV-1 prediction is in agreement with experimental data, even though the relative evolutionary rate between A and G is significantly increased, both in stem and loop regions...

  9. Statistical mechanics of secondary structures formed by random RNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundschuh, R; Hwa, T

    2002-03-01

    The formation of secondary structures by a random RNA sequence is studied as a model system for the sequence-structure problem omnipresent in biopolymers. Several toy energy models are introduced to allow detailed analytical and numerical studies. First, a two-replica calculation is performed. By mapping the two-replica problem to the denaturation of a single homogeneous RNA molecule in six-dimensional embedding space, we show that sequence disorder is perturbatively irrelevant, i.e., an RNA molecule with weak sequence disorder is in a molten phase where many secondary structures with comparable total energy coexist. A numerical study of various models at high temperature reproduces behaviors characteristic of the molten phase. On the other hand, a scaling argument based on the external statistics of rare regions can be constructed to show that the low-temperature phase is unstable to sequence disorder. We performed a detailed numerical study of the low-temperature phase using the droplet theory as a guide, and characterized the statistics of large-scale, low-energy excitations of the secondary structures from the ground state structure. We find the excitation energy to grow very slowly (i.e., logarithmically) with the length scale of the excitation, suggesting the existence of a marginal glass phase. The transition between the low-temperature glass phase and the high-temperature molten phase is also characterized numerically. It is revealed by a change in the coefficient of the logarithmic excitation energy, from being disorder dominated to being entropy dominated.

  10. Gene-associated markers can assign origin in a weakly structured fish, Atlantic herring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekkevold, Dorte; Helyar, Sarah J.; Limborg, Morten T.;

    2015-01-01

    Regulations on the exploitation of populations of commercially important fish species and the ensuing consumer interest in sustainable products have increased the need to accurately identify the population of origin of fish and fish products. Although genomics-based tools have proven highly useful......, there are relatively few examples in marine fish displaying accurate origin assignment. We synthesize data for 156 single-nucleotide polymorphisms typed in 1039 herring, Clupea harengus L., spanning the Northeast Atlantic to develop a tool that allows assignment of individual herring to their regional origin. We show...... management issues. We report novel genetic evidence that herring from the Baltic Sea contribute to catches in the North Sea, and find support that western Baltic feeding aggregations mainly constitute herring from the western Baltic with contributions from the Eastern Baltic. Our study describes a general...

  11. Computational RNA secondary structure design: empirical complexity and improved methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Condon Anne

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigate the empirical complexity of the RNA secondary structure design problem, that is, the scaling of the typical difficulty of the design task for various classes of RNA structures as the size of the target structure is increased. The purpose of this work is to understand better the factors that make RNA structures hard to design for existing, high-performance algorithms. Such understanding provides the basis for improving the performance of one of the best algorithms for this problem, RNA-SSD, and for characterising its limitations. Results To gain insights into the practical complexity of the problem, we present a scaling analysis on random and biologically motivated structures using an improved version of the RNA-SSD algorithm, and also the RNAinverse algorithm from the Vienna package. Since primary structure constraints are relevant for designing RNA structures, we also investigate the correlation between the number and the location of the primary structure constraints when designing structures and the performance of the RNA-SSD algorithm. The scaling analysis on random and biologically motivated structures supports the hypothesis that the running time of both algorithms scales polynomially with the size of the structure. We also found that the algorithms are in general faster when constraints are placed only on paired bases in the structure. Furthermore, we prove that, according to the standard thermodynamic model, for some structures that the RNA-SSD algorithm was unable to design, there exists no sequence whose minimum free energy structure is the target structure. Conclusion Our analysis helps to better understand the strengths and limitations of both the RNA-SSD and RNAinverse algorithms, and suggests ways in which the performance of these algorithms can be further improved.

  12. Strategies for measuring evolutionary conservation of RNA secondary structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofacker Ivo L

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolutionary conservation of RNA secondary structure is a typical feature of many functional non-coding RNAs. Since almost all of the available methods used for prediction and annotation of non-coding RNA genes rely on this evolutionary signature, accurate measures for structural conservation are essential. Results We systematically assessed the ability of various measures to detect conserved RNA structures in multiple sequence alignments. We tested three existing and eight novel strategies that are based on metrics of folding energies, metrics of single optimal structure predictions, and metrics of structure ensembles. We find that the folding energy based SCI score used in the RNAz program and a simple base-pair distance metric are by far the most accurate. The use of more complex metrics like for example tree editing does not improve performance. A variant of the SCI performed particularly well on highly conserved alignments and is thus a viable alternative when only little evolutionary information is available. Surprisingly, ensemble based methods that, in principle, could benefit from the additional information contained in sub-optimal structures, perform particularly poorly. As a general trend, we observed that methods that include a consensus structure prediction outperformed equivalent methods that only consider pairwise comparisons. Conclusion Structural conservation can be measured accurately with relatively simple and intuitive metrics. They have the potential to form the basis of future RNA gene finders, that face new challenges like finding lineage specific structures or detecting mis-aligned sequences.

  13. PCI-SS: MISO dynamic nonlinear protein secondary structure prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aboul-Magd Mohammed O

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the function of a protein is largely dictated by its three dimensional configuration, determining a protein's structure is of fundamental importance to biology. Here we report on a novel approach to determining the one dimensional secondary structure of proteins (distinguishing α-helices, β-strands, and non-regular structures from primary sequence data which makes use of Parallel Cascade Identification (PCI, a powerful technique from the field of nonlinear system identification. Results Using PSI-BLAST divergent evolutionary profiles as input data, dynamic nonlinear systems are built through a black-box approach to model the process of protein folding. Genetic algorithms (GAs are applied in order to optimize the architectural parameters of the PCI models. The three-state prediction problem is broken down into a combination of three binary sub-problems and protein structure classifiers are built using 2 layers of PCI classifiers. Careful construction of the optimization, training, and test datasets ensures that no homology exists between any training and testing data. A detailed comparison between PCI and 9 contemporary methods is provided over a set of 125 new protein chains guaranteed to be dissimilar to all training data. Unlike other secondary structure prediction methods, here a web service is developed to provide both human- and machine-readable interfaces to PCI-based protein secondary structure prediction. This server, called PCI-SS, is available at http://bioinf.sce.carleton.ca/PCISS. In addition to a dynamic PHP-generated web interface for humans, a Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP interface is added to permit invocation of the PCI-SS service remotely. This machine-readable interface facilitates incorporation of PCI-SS into multi-faceted systems biology analysis pipelines requiring protein secondary structure information, and greatly simplifies high-throughput analyses. XML is used to represent the input

  14. The evolving market structures of gambling: case studies modelling the socioeconomic assignment of gaming machines in Melbourne and Sydney, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, David C; Baker, Robert G V

    2002-01-01

    The expansion of gambling industries worldwide is intertwined with the growing government dependence on gambling revenue for fiscal assignments. In Australia, electronic gaming machines (EGMs) have dominated recent gambling industry growth. As EGMs have proliferated, growing recognition has emerged that EGM distribution closely reflects levels of socioeconomic disadvantage. More machines are located in less advantaged regions. This paper analyses time-series socioeconomic distributions of EGMs in Melbourne, Australia, an immature EGM market, and then compares the findings with the mature market in Sydney. Similar findings in both cities suggest that market assignment of EGMs transcends differences in historical and legislative environments. This indicates that similar underlying structures are evident in both markets. Modelling the spatial structures of gambling markets provides an opportunity to identify regions most at risk of gambling related problems. Subsequently, policies can be formulated which ensure fiscal revenue from gambling can be better targeted towards regions likely to be most afflicted by excessive gambling-related problems.

  15. Study of coal structure using secondary ion mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tingey, G.L.; Lytle, J.M.; Baer, D.R.; Thomas, M.T.

    1980-12-01

    Secondary-ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) is examined as a tool for studying the chemical structure of coal. SIMS has potential for analysis of coal because of the following characteristics: sensitivity to chemical structure; high sensitivity to all masses; application to solids; excellent depth resolution; and reasonable spatial resolution. SIMS spectra of solid coals show differences with respect to coal rank, the spectra of high rank coal being similar to that of graphite, and the spectra of low rank coal being similar to that of wood. Some functional group analysis is also possible using SIMS. Low rank coals show a larger peak at 15 amu indicating more methyl groups than found in the higher rank coals. Fragments with two and three carbon atoms have also been examined; much larger fragments are undoubtedly present but were not evaluated in this study. Examination of these groups, which are expected to contain valuable information on coal structure, is planned for future work. It has been observed that mineral atoms present in the coal have large secondary ion yields which complicate the interpretation of the spectra. Studies on mineral-free coals and model compounds are therefore recommended to facilitate determination of organic coal structure. In addition, mass spectrometry with much greater mass resolution will aid in distinguishing between various ion species.

  16. Generation of deviation parameters for amino acid singlets, doublets and triplets from three-dimensional structures of proteins and its implications for secondary structure prediction from amino acid sequences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S A Mugilan; K Veluraja

    2000-03-01

    We present a new method, secondary structure prediction by deviation parameter (SSPDP) for predicting the secondary structure of proteins from amino acid sequence. Deviation parameters (DP) for amino acid singlets, doublets and triplets were computed with respect to secondary structural elements of proteins based on the dictionary of secondary structure prediction (DSSP)-generated secondary structure for 408 selected non-homologous proteins. To the amino acid triplets which are not found in the selected dataset, a DP value of zero is assigned with respect to the secondary structural elements of proteins. The total number of parameters generated is 15,432, in the possible parameters of 25,260. Deviation parameter is complete with respect to amino acid singlets, doublets, and partially complete with respect to amino acid triplets. These generated parameters were used to predict secondary structural elements from amino acid sequence. The secondary structure predicted by our method (SSPDP) was compared with that of single sequence (NNPREDICT) and multiple sequence (PHD) methods. The average value of the percentage of prediction accuracy for α-helix by SSPDP, NNPREDICT and PHD methods was found to be 57%, 44% and 69% respectively for the proteins in the selected dataset. For -strand the prediction accuracy is found to be 69%, 21% and 53% respectively by SSPDP, NNPREDICT and PHD methods. This clearly indicates that the secondary structure prediction by our method is as good as PHD method but much better than NNPREDICT method.

  17. GTfold: Enabling parallel RNA secondary structure prediction on multi-core desktops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swenson, M Shel; Anderson, Joshua; Ash, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Accurate and efficient RNA secondary structure prediction remains an important open problem in computational molecular biology. Historically, advances in computing technology have enabled faster and more accurate RNA secondary structure predictions. Previous parallelized prediction programs achie...

  18. NMR study of non-structural proteins--part I: (1)H, (13)C, (15)N backbone and side-chain resonance assignment of macro domain from Mayaro virus (MAYV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melekis, Efstathios; Tsika, Aikaterini C; Lichière, Julie; Chasapis, Christos T; Margiolaki, Irene; Papageorgiou, Nicolas; Coutard, Bruno; Bentrop, Detlef; Spyroulias, Georgios A

    2015-04-01

    Macro domains are ADP-ribose-binding modules present in all eukaryotic organisms, bacteria and archaea. They are also found in non-structural proteins of several positive strand RNA viruses such as alphaviruses. Here, we report the high yield expression and preliminary structural analysis through solution NMR spectroscopy of the macro domain from New World Mayaro Alphavirus. The recombinant protein was well-folded and in a monomeric state. An almost complete sequence-specific assignment of its (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonances was obtained and its secondary structure determined by TALOS+.

  19. Structural analysis of char by Raman spectroscopy: Improving band assignments through computational calculations from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Matthew W.; Dallmeyer, Ian; Johnson, Timothy J.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; McEwen, Jean-Sabin; Espinal, Juan F.; Garcia-Perez, Manuel

    2016-04-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the characterization of many carbon 27 species. The complex heterogeneous nature of chars and activated carbons has confounded 28 complete analysis due to the additional shoulders observed on the D-band and high intensity 29 valley between the D and G-bands. In this paper the effects of various vacancy and substitution 30 defects have been systematically analyzed via molecular modeling using density functional 31 theory (DFT) and how this is manifested in the calculated gas-phase Raman spectra. The 32 accuracy of these calculations was validated by comparison with (solid-phase) experimental 33 spectra, with a small correction factor being applied to improve the accuracy of frequency 34 predictions. The spectroscopic effects on the char species are best understood in terms of a 35 reduced symmetry as compared to a “parent” coronene molecule. Based upon the simulation 36 results, the shoulder observed in chars near 1200 cm-1 has been assigned to the totally symmetric 37 A1g vibrations of various small polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) as well as those containing 38 rings of seven or more carbons. Intensity between 1400 cm-1 and 1450 cm-1 is assigned to A1g 39 type vibrations present in small PAHs and especially those containing cyclopentane rings. 40 Finally, band intensity between 1500 cm-1 and 1550 cm-1 is ascribed to predominately E2g 41 vibrational modes in strained PAH systems. A total of ten potential bands have been assigned 42 between 1000 cm-1 and 1800 cm-1. These fitting parameters have been used to deconvolute a 43 thermoseries of cellulose chars produced by pyrolysis at 300-700 °C. The results of the 44 deconvolution show consistent growth of PAH clusters with temperature, development of non-45 benzyl rings as temperature increases and loss of oxygenated features between 400 °C and 46 600 °C

  20. Secondary fast magnetoacoustic waves trapped in randomly structured plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Ding; Walsh, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    Fast magnetoacoustic wave is an important tool for inferring solar atmospheric parameters. We numerically simulate the propagation of fast wave pulses in randomly structured plasmas mimicking the highly inhomogeneous solar corona. A network of secondary waves is formed by a series of partial reflections and transmissions. These secondary waves exhibit quasi-periodicities in both time and space. Since the temporal and spatial periods are related simply through the fast wave speed, we quantify the properties of secondary waves by examining the dependence of the average temporal period ($\\bar{p}$) on the initial pulse width ($w_0$) as well as the density contrast ($\\delta_\\rho$) and correlation length ($L_c$) that characterize the randomness of the equilibrium density profiles. For small-amplitude pulses, $\\delta_\\rho$ does not alter $\\bar{p}$ significantly. Large-amplitude pulses, on the other hand, enhance the density contrast when $\\delta_\\rho$ is small but have a smoothing effect when $\\delta_\\rho$ is suffic...

  1. Secondary Structure of Rat and Human Amylin across Force Fields.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Quynn Hoffmann

    Full Text Available The aggregation of human amylin has been strongly implicated in the progression of Type II diabetes. This 37-residue peptide forms a variety of secondary structures, including random coils, α-helices, and β-hairpins. The balance between these structures depends on the chemical environment, making amylin an ideal candidate to examine inherent biases in force fields. Rat amylin differs from human amylin by only 6 residues; however, it does not form fibrils. Therefore it provides a useful complement to human amylin in studies of the key events along the aggregation pathway. In this work, the free energy of rat and human amylin was determined as a function of α-helix and β-hairpin content for the Gromos96 53a6, OPLS-AA/L, CHARMM22/CMAP, CHARMM22*, Amberff99sb*-ILDN, and Amberff03w force fields using advanced sampling techniques, specifically bias exchange metadynamics. This work represents a first systematic attempt to evaluate the conformations and the corresponding free energy of a large, clinically relevant disordered peptide in solution across force fields. The NMR chemical shifts of rIAPP were calculated for each of the force fields using their respective free energy maps, allowing us to quantitatively assess their predictions. We show that the predicted distribution of secondary structures is sensitive to the choice of force-field: Gromos53a6 is biased towards β-hairpins, while CHARMM22/CMAP predicts structures that are overly α-helical. OPLS-AA/L favors disordered structures. Amberff99sb*-ILDN, AmberFF03w and CHARMM22* provide the balance between secondary structures that is most consistent with available experimental data. In contrast to previous reports, our findings suggest that the equilibrium conformations of human and rat amylin are remarkably similar, but that subtle differences arise in transient alpha-helical and beta-strand containing structures that the human peptide can more readily adopt. We hypothesize that these transient

  2. An analysis of the secondary structure of spider spidroins I and II belonging to different species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ragulina, LE; Makeev, VY; Esipova, NG; Tumanyan, VG; Vlasov, PK; Bogush, VG; Debabov, VG

    2004-01-01

    We have analyzed the secondary structure of spidroin proteins of I and II types, related to spiders of different species. We used standard methods of secondary structure prediction NNPREDICT and JPRED and also analyzed the occurrences of oligopeptides with a preferred secondary structure with the he

  3. RNA Secondary Structure Prediction by Using Discrete Mathematics: An Interdisciplinary Research Experience for Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Roni; Wachira, James; Nkwanta, Asamoah

    2010-01-01

    The focus of this Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) project was on RNA secondary structure prediction by using a lattice walk approach. The lattice walk approach is a combinatorial and computational biology method used to enumerate possible secondary structures and predict RNA secondary structure from RNA sequences. The method uses…

  4. Evolutionary dynamics and optimization neutral networks as model-landscapes for RNA secondary-structure folding-landscapes

    CERN Document Server

    Först, C J; Weber, J; Forst, Christian V; Reidys, Christian; Weber, Jacqueline

    1995-01-01

    We view the folding of RNA-sequences as a map that assigns a pattern of base pairings to each sequence, known as secondary structure. These preimages can be constructed as random graphs (i.e. the neutral networks associated to the structure s). By interpreting the secondary structure as biological information we can formulate the so called Error Threshold of Shapes as an extension of Eigen's et al. concept of an error threshold in the single peak landscape. Analogue to the approach of Derrida & Peliti for a of the population on the neutral network. On the one hand this model of a single shape landscape allows the derivation of analytical results, on the other hand the concept gives rise to study various scenarios by means of simulations, e.g. the interaction of two different networks. It turns out that the intersection of two sets of compatible sequences (with respect to the pair of secondary structures) plays a key role in the search for ''fitter'' secondary structures.

  5. A phase transition in energy-filtered RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hillary S W; Reidys, Christian M

    2012-10-01

    In this article we study the effect of energy parameters on minimum free energy (mfe) RNA secondary structures. Employing a simplified combinatorial energy model that is only dependent on the diagram representation and is not sequence-specific, we prove the following dichotomy result. Mfe structures derived via the Turner energy parameters contain only finitely many complex irreducible substructures, and just minor parameter changes produce a class of mfe structures that contain a large number of small irreducibles. We localize the exact point at which the distribution of irreducibles experiences this phase transition from a discrete limit to a central limit distribution and, subsequently, put our result into the context of quantifying the effect of sparsification of the folding of these respective mfe structures. We show that the sparsification of realistic mfe structures leads to a constant time and space reduction, and that the sparsification of the folding of structures with modified parameters leads to a linear time and space reduction. We, furthermore, identify the limit distribution at the phase transition as a Rayleigh distribution.

  6. Structural assignment of 6-oxy purine derivatives through computational modeling, synthesis, X-ray diffraction, and spectroscopic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinyun; Chen, Xi; Yang, Guang-Fu; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2010-05-27

    6-Oxy purine derivatives have been considered as potential therapeutic agents in various drug discovery efforts reported in the literature. However, the structural assignment of this important class of compounds has been controversial concerning the specific position of a hydrogen atom in the structure. To theoretically determine the most favorable type of tautomeric form of 6-oxy purine derivatives, we have carried out first-principles electronic structure calculations on the possible tautomeric forms (A, B, and C) and their relative stability of four representative 6-oxy purine derivatives (compounds 1-4). The computational results in both the gas phase and aqueous solution clearly reveal that the most favorable type of tautomeric form of these compounds is A, in which a hydrogen atom bonds with the N1 atom on the purine ring. To examine the computational results, one of the 6-oxy purine derivatives (i.e., compound 4) has been synthesized and its structure has been characterized by X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic analysis. All of the obtained computational and experimental data are consistent with the conclusion that the 6-oxy purine derivative exists in tautomer A. The conclusive structural assignment reported here is expected to be valuable for future computational studies on 6-oxy purine derivative binding with proteins and for computational drug design involving this type of compounds.

  7. Viscoelastic phenomenology based structure assignment for closed-loop vibration control of a beam with sensors and actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadiraja, G. K.; Mahapatra, D. Roy

    2009-03-01

    In this paper we incorporate a novel approach to synthesize a class of closed-loop feedback control, based on the variational structure assignment. Properties of a viscoelastic system are used to design an active feedback controller for an undamped structural system with distributed sensor, actuator and controller. Wave dispersion properties of onedimensional beam system have been studied. Efficiency of the chosen viscoelastic model in enhancing damping and stability properties of one-dimensional viscoelastic bar have been analyzed. The variational structure is projected on a solution space of a closed-loop system involving a weakly damped structure with distributed sensor and actuator with controller. These assign the phenomenology based internal strain rate damping parameter of a viscoelastic system to the usual elastic structure but with active control. In the formulation a model of cantilever beam with non-collocated actuator and sensor has been considered. The formulation leads to the matrix identification problem of two dynamic stiffness matrices. The method has been simplified to obtain control system gains for the free vibration control of a cantilever beam system with collocated actuator-sensor, using quadratic optimal control and pole-placement methods.

  8. Combining automated peak tracking in SAR by NMR with structure-based backbone assignment from 15N-NOESY

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Richard

    2012-03-21

    Background: Chemical shift mapping is an important technique in NMR-based drug screening for identifying the atoms of a target protein that potentially bind to a drug molecule upon the molecule\\'s introduction in increasing concentrations. The goal is to obtain a mapping of peaks with known residue assignment from the reference spectrum of the unbound protein to peaks with unknown assignment in the target spectrum of the bound protein. Although a series of perturbed spectra help to trace a path from reference peaks to target peaks, a one-to-one mapping generally is not possible, especially for large proteins, due to errors, such as noise peaks, missing peaks, missing but then reappearing, overlapped, and new peaks not associated with any peaks in the reference. Due to these difficulties, the mapping is typically done manually or semi-automatically, which is not efficient for high-throughput drug screening.Results: We present PeakWalker, a novel peak walking algorithm for fast-exchange systems that models the errors explicitly and performs many-to-one mapping. On the proteins: hBclXL, UbcH5B, and histone H1, it achieves an average accuracy of over 95% with less than 1.5 residues predicted per target peak. Given these mappings as input, we present PeakAssigner, a novel combined structure-based backbone resonance and NOE assignment algorithm that uses just 15N-NOESY, while avoiding TOCSY experiments and 13C-labeling, to resolve the ambiguities for a one-to-one mapping. On the three proteins, it achieves an average accuracy of 94% or better.Conclusions: Our mathematical programming approach for modeling chemical shift mapping as a graph problem, while modeling the errors directly, is potentially a time- and cost-effective first step for high-throughput drug screening based on limited NMR data and homologous 3D structures. 2012 Jang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  9. Protein secondary structure prediction using NMR chemical shift data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuzhong; Alipanahi, Babak; Li, Shuai Cheng; Li, Ming

    2010-10-01

    Accurate determination of protein secondary structure from the chemical shift information is a key step for NMR tertiary structure determination. Relatively few work has been done on this subject. There needs to be a systematic investigation of algorithms that are (a) robust for large datasets; (b) easily extendable to (the dynamic) new databases; and (c) approaching to the limit of accuracy. We introduce new approaches using k-nearest neighbor algorithm to do the basic prediction and use the BCJR algorithm to smooth the predictions and combine different predictions from chemical shifts and based on sequence information only. Our new system, SUCCES, improves the accuracy of all existing methods on a large dataset of 805 proteins (at 86% Q(3) accuracy and at 92.6% accuracy when the boundary residues are ignored), and it is easily extendable to any new dataset without requiring any new training. The software is publicly available at http://monod.uwaterloo.ca/nmr/succes.

  10. Incorporating secondary structural features into sequence information for predicting protein structural class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Bo; Peng, Ting; Chen, Haowen; Lin, Yaping

    2013-10-01

    Knowledge of structural classes is applied in numerous important predictive tasks that address structural and functional features of proteins, although the prediction accuracy of the protein structural classes is not high. In this study, 45 different features were rationally designed to model the differences between protein structural classes, among which, 30 of them reflect the combined protein sequence information. In terms of correlation function, the protein sequence can be converted to a digital signal sequence, from which we can generate 20 discrete Fourier spectrum numbers. According to the segments of amino with different characteristics occurring in protein sequences, the frequencies of the 10 kinds of segments of amino acid (motifs) in protein are calculated. Other features include the secondary structural information :10 features were proposed to model the strong adjacent correlations in the secondary structural elements and capture the long-range spatial interactions between secondary structures, other 5 features were designed to differentiate α/β from α+β classes , which is a major problem of the existing algorithm. The methods were proposed based on a large set of low-identity sequences for which secondary structure is predicted from their sequence (based on PSI-PRED). By means of this method, the overall prediction accuracy of four benchmark datasets were all improved. Especially for the dataset FC699, 25PDB and D1189 which are 1.26%, 1% and 0.85% higher than the best previous method respectively.

  11. The Effect of Same-Gender Teacher Assignment on Student Achievement in the Elementary and Secondary Grades: Evidence from Panel Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Marcus A.; Haight, Robert C.; Swaim, Thomas T.; Pickering, Katarzyna A.

    2013-01-01

    We utilize information from a rich administrative panel dataset following the universe of test-taking public school students in Florida over a period of five years to estimate the relationship between same-gender teacher assignment and student achievement. We estimate how a student's achievement changes as he/she is assigned to teachers of…

  12. Combining ambiguous chemical shift mapping with structure-based backbone and NOE assignment from 15N-NOESY

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Chemical shift mapping is an important technique in NMRbased drug screening for identifying the atoms of a target protein that potentially bind to a drug molecule upon the molecule\\'s introduction in increasing concentrations. The goal is to obtain a mapping of peaks with known residue assignment from the reference spectrum of the unbound protein to peaks with unknown assignment in the target spectrum of the bound protein. Although a series of perturbed spectra help to trace a path from reference peaks to target peaks, a one-to-one mapping generally is not possible, especially for large proteins, due to errors, such as noise peaks, missing peaks, missing but then reappearing, overlapped, and new peaks not associated with any peaks in the reference. Due to these difficulties, the mapping is typically done manually or semi-automatically. However, automated methods are necessary for high-throughput drug screening. We present PeakWalker, a novel peak walking algorithm for fast-exchange systems that models the errors explicitly and performs many-to-one mapping. On the proteins: hBclXL, UbcH5B, and histone H1, it achieves an average accuracy of over 95% with less than 1.5 residues predicted per target peak. Given these mappings as input, we present PeakAssigner, a novel combined structure-based backbone resonance and NOE assignment algorithm that uses just 15N-NOESY, while avoiding TOCSY experiments and 13C- labeling, to resolve the ambiguities for a one-toone mapping. On the three proteins, it achieves an average accuracy of 94% or better. Copyright © 2011 ACM.

  13. Protein Secondary Structure Prediction Using Deep Convolutional Neural Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Peng, Jian; Ma, Jianzhu; Xu, Jinbo

    2016-01-01

    Protein secondary structure (SS) prediction is important for studying protein structure and function. When only the sequence (profile) information is used as input feature, currently the best predictors can obtain ~80% Q3 accuracy, which has not been improved in the past decade. Here we present DeepCNF (Deep Convolutional Neural Fields) for protein SS prediction. DeepCNF is a Deep Learning extension of Conditional Neural Fields (CNF), which is an integration of Conditional Random Fields (CRF) and shallow neural networks. DeepCNF can model not only complex sequence-structure relationship by a deep hierarchical architecture, but also interdependency between adjacent SS labels, so it is much more powerful than CNF. Experimental results show that DeepCNF can obtain ~84% Q3 accuracy, ~85% SOV score, and ~72% Q8 accuracy, respectively, on the CASP and CAMEO test proteins, greatly outperforming currently popular predictors. As a general framework, DeepCNF can be used to predict other protein structure properties such as contact number, disorder regions, and solvent accessibility.

  14. An RNA secondary structure prediction method based on minimum and suboptimal free energy structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Haoyue; Yang, Lianping; Zhang, Xiangde

    2015-09-07

    The function of an RNA-molecule is mainly determined by its tertiary structures. And its secondary structure is an important determinant of its tertiary structure. The comparative methods usually give better results than the single-sequence methods. Based on minimum and suboptimal free energy structures, the paper presents a novel method for predicting conserved secondary structure of a group of related RNAs. In the method, the information from the known RNA structures is used as training data in a SVM (Support Vector Machine) classifier. Our method has been tested on the benchmark dataset given by Puton et al. The results show that the average sensitivity of our method is higher than that of other comparative methods such as CentroidAlifold, MXScrana, RNAalifold, and TurboFold.

  15. Assessing Students' Structured Programming Skills with Java: The "Blue, Berry, and Blueberry" Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xihui

    2010-01-01

    Java is an object-oriented programming language. From a software engineering perspective, object-oriented design and programming is used at the architectural design, and structured design and programming is used at the detailed design within methods. As such, structured programming skills are fundamental to more advanced object-oriented…

  16. Automated Assignment of MS/MS Cleavable Cross-Links in Protein 3D-Structure Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götze, Michael; Pettelkau, Jens; Fritzsche, Romy; Ihling, Christian H.; Schäfer, Mathias; Sinz, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    CID-MS/MS cleavable cross-linkers hold an enormous potential for an automated analysis of cross-linked products, which is essential for conducting structural proteomics studies. The created characteristic fragment ion patterns can easily be used for an automated assignment and discrimination of cross-linked products. To date, there are only a few software solutions available that make use of these properties, but none allows for an automated analysis of cleavable cross-linked products. The MeroX software fills this gap and presents a powerful tool for protein 3D-structure analysis in combination with MS/MS cleavable cross-linkers. We show that MeroX allows an automatic screening of characteristic fragment ions, considering static and variable peptide modifications, and effectively scores different types of cross-links. No manual input is required for a correct assignment of cross-links and false discovery rates are calculated. The self-explanatory graphical user interface of MeroX provides easy access for an automated cross-link search platform that is compatible with commonly used data file formats, enabling analysis of data originating from different instruments. The combination of an MS/MS cleavable cross-linker with a dedicated software tool for data analysis provides an automated workflow for 3D-structure analysis of proteins. MeroX is available at www.StavroX.com .

  17. A new hybrid coding for protein secondary structure prediction based on primary structure similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhong; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Shunpu; Zhang, Qifeng; Wu, Wuming

    2017-03-16

    The coding pattern of protein can greatly affect the prediction accuracy of protein secondary structure. In this paper, a novel hybrid coding method based on the physicochemical properties of amino acids and tendency factors is proposed for the prediction of protein secondary structure. The principal component analysis (PCA) is first applied to the physicochemical properties of amino acids to construct a 3-bit-code, and then the 3 tendency factors of amino acids are calculated to generate another 3-bit-code. Two 3-bit-codes are fused to form a novel hybrid 6-bit-code. Furthermore, we make a geometry-based similarity comparison of the protein primary structure between the reference set and the test set before the secondary structure prediction. We finally use the support vector machine (SVM) to predict those amino acids which are not detected by the primary structure similarity comparison. Experimental results show that our method achieves a satisfactory improvement in accuracy in the prediction of protein secondary structure.

  18. Rapid NMR screening of RNA secondary structure and binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmling, Christina; Keyhani, Sara; Sochor, Florian; Fürtig, Boris; Hengesbach, Martin; Schwalbe, Harald, E-mail: schwalbe@nmr.uni-frankfurt.de [Johann Wolfgang Goethe-Universität, Institut für Organische Chemie und Chemische Biologie, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance (BMRZ) (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Determination of RNA secondary structures by NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool e.g. to elucidate RNA folding space or functional aspects of regulatory RNA elements. However, current approaches of RNA synthesis and preparation are usually time-consuming and do not provide analysis with single nucleotide precision when applied for a large number of different RNA sequences. Here, we significantly improve the yield and 3′ end homogeneity of RNA preparation by in vitro transcription. Further, by establishing a native purification procedure with increased throughput, we provide a shortcut to study several RNA constructs simultaneously. We show that this approach yields μmol quantities of RNA with purities comparable to PAGE purification, while avoiding denaturation of the RNA.

  19. Identification and RNA segment assignment of six structural proteins of Scylla serrata reovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yangyang; Fan, Dongyang; Zhang, Zhao; Yang, Jifang; Liu, Jingwen; Chen, Jigang

    2016-08-01

    Scylla serrata reovirus (SsRV) is one of the most prevalent viral pathogens of the mud crab (S. serrata). The virus represents an unassigned novel genus in the Reoviridae family, and contains 12 double-stranded RNA genomic segments. Previous analysis of virion proteins concluded that SsRV contains at least eight structural proteins, ranging from 25 to 160 kDa. Here, tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry and Western blotting were used to re-identify the structural proteins. The results indicate that proteins encoded by SsRV segments S1, S3, S6, S9, S11, and S12 are structural proteins.

  20. Strong epistatic selection on the RNA secondary structure of HIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Assis

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A key question in evolutionary genomics is how populations navigate the adaptive landscape in the presence of epistasis, or interactions among loci. This problem can be directly addressed by studying the evolution of RNA secondary structures, for which there is constraint to maintain pairing between Watson-Crick (WC sites. Replacement of a nucleotide at one site of a WC pair reduces fitness by disrupting binding, which can be restored via a compensatory replacement at the interacting site. Here, I present the first genome-scale analysis of epistasis on the RNA secondary structure of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1. Comparison of polymorphism frequencies at ancestrally conserved sites reveals that selection against replacements is ∼ 2.7 times stronger at WC than at non-WC sites, such that nearly 50% of constraint can be attributed to epistasis. However, almost all epistatic constraint is due to selection against conversions of WC pairs to unpaired (UP nucleotides, whereas conversions to GU wobbles are only slightly deleterious. This disparity is also evident in pairs with second-site compensatory replacements; conversions from UP nucleotides to WC pairs increase median fitness by ∼ 4.2%, whereas conversions from GU wobbles to WC pairs only increase median fitness by ∼ 0.3%. Moreover, second-site replacements that convert UP nucleotides to GU wobbles also increase median fitness by ∼ 4%, indicating that such replacements are nearly as compensatory as those that restore WC pairing. Thus, WC peaks of the HIV-1 epistatic adaptive landscape are connected by high GU ridges, enabling the viral population to rapidly explore distant peaks without traversing deep UP valleys.

  1. Structurally Coloured Secondary Particles Composed of Black and White Colloidal Particles

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the colourful secondary particles formed by controlling the aggregation states of colloidal silica particles and the enhancement of the structural colouration of the secondary particles caused by adding black particles. We obtained glossy, partially structurally coloured secondary particles in the absence of NaCl, but matte, whitish secondary particles were obtained in the presence of NaCl. When a small amount of carbon black was incorporated into both types of seconda...

  2. PSRna: Prediction of small RNA secondary structures based on reverse complementary folding method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Xu, Chengzhen; Wang, Lei; Liang, Hong; Feng, Weixing; Cai, Zhongxi; Wang, Ying; Cong, Wang; Liu, Yunlong

    2016-08-01

    Prediction of RNA secondary structures is an important problem in computational biology and bioinformatics, since RNA secondary structures are fundamental for functional analysis of RNA molecules. However, small RNA secondary structures are scarce and few algorithms have been specifically designed for predicting the secondary structures of small RNAs. Here we propose an algorithm named "PSRna" for predicting small-RNA secondary structures using reverse complementary folding and characteristic hairpin loops of small RNAs. Unlike traditional algorithms that usually generate multi-branch loops and 5[Formula: see text] end self-folding, PSRna first estimated the maximum number of base pairs of RNA secondary structures based on the dynamic programming algorithm and a path matrix is constructed at the same time. Second, the backtracking paths are extracted from the path matrix based on backtracking algorithm, and each backtracking path represents a secondary structure. To improve accuracy, the predicted RNA secondary structures are filtered based on their free energy, where only the secondary structure with the minimum free energy was identified as the candidate secondary structure. Our experiments on real data show that the proposed algorithm is superior to two popular methods, RNAfold and RNAstructure, in terms of sensitivity, specificity and Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC).

  3. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments and second structure information of Fag s 1: Fagales allergen from Fagus sylvatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, A H; Asam, C; Batista, A; Almeida, F C L; Wallner, M; Ferreira, F; Valente, A P

    2016-04-01

    Fagales allergens belonging to the Bet v 1 family account responsible for the majority of spring pollinosis in the temperate climate zones in the Northern hemisphere. Among them, Fag s 1 from beech pollen is an important trigger of Fagales pollen associated allergic reactions. The protein shares high similarity with birch pollen Bet v 1, the best-characterized member of this allergen family. Of note, recent work on Bet v 1 and its homologues found in Fagales pollen demonstrated that not all allergenic members of this family have the capacity to induce allergic sensitization. Fag s 1 was shown to bind pre-existing IgE antibodies most likely primarily directed against other members of this multi-allergen family. Therefore, it is especially interesting to compare the structures of Bet v 1-like pollen allergens, which have the potential to induce allergic sensitization with allergens that are mainly cross-reactive. This in the end will help to identify allergy eliciting molecular pattern on Bet v 1-like allergens. In this work, we report the (1)H, (15)N and (13)C NMR assignment of beech pollen Fag s 1 as well as the secondary structure information based on backbone chemical shifts.

  4. Structure and chromosome assignment of the murine p36 (calpactin I heavy chain) gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amiquel, P; Kristensen, Torsten; D'Eustachio, P;

    1990-01-01

    p36 is a major substrate of both viral and growth factor receptor associated protein kinases. This protein has recently been named calpactin I heavy chain since it is the large subunit of a Ca2(+)-dependent phospholipid and actin binding heterotetramer. The primary structure of p36 has been deter...

  5. Expected distance between terminal nucleotides of RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clote, Peter; Ponty, Yann; Steyaert, Jean-Marc

    2012-09-01

    In "The ends of a large RNA molecule are necessarily close", Yoffe et al. (Nucleic Acids Res 39(1):292-299, 2011) used the programs RNAfold [resp. RNAsubopt] from Vienna RNA Package to calculate the distance between 5' and 3' ends of the minimum free energy secondary structure [resp. thermal equilibrium structures] of viral and random RNA sequences. Here, the 5'-3' distance is defined to be the length of the shortest path from 5' node to 3' node in the undirected graph, whose edge set consists of edges {i, i + 1} corresponding to covalent backbone bonds and of edges {i, j} corresponding to canonical base pairs. From repeated simulations and using a heuristic theoretical argument, Yoffe et al. conclude that the 5'-3' distance is less than a fixed constant, independent of RNA sequence length. In this paper, we provide a rigorous, mathematical framework to study the expected distance from 5' to 3' ends of an RNA sequence. We present recurrence relations that precisely define the expected distance from 5' to 3' ends of an RNA sequence, both for the Turner nearest neighbor energy model, as well as for a simple homopolymer model first defined by Stein and Waterman. We implement dynamic programming algorithms to compute (rather than approximate by repeated application of Vienna RNA Package) the expected distance between 5' and 3' ends of a given RNA sequence, with respect to the Turner energy model. Using methods of analytical combinatorics, that depend on complex analysis, we prove that the asymptotic expected 5'-3' distance of length n homopolymers is approximately equal to the constant 5.47211, while the asymptotic distance is 6.771096 if hairpins have a minimum of 3 unpaired bases and the probability that any two positions can form a base pair is 1/4. Finally, we analyze the 5'-3' distance for secondary structures from the STRAND database, and conclude that the 5'-3' distance is correlated with RNA sequence length.

  6. My Favorite Assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Robert E.; Johnson, Jack E.

    1982-01-01

    Presents two assignments that show (1) how George Orwell's "Politics and the English Language" can be applied to business writing and (2) how structured student-teacher conferences can generate enthusiasm for oral expression in a business communication course. (AEA)

  7. Changes in secondary structure of gluten proteins due to emulsifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Analía V.; Ferrer, Evelina G.; Añón, María C.; Puppo, María C.

    2013-02-01

    Changes in the secondary structure of gluten proteins due to emulsifiers were analyzed by Raman Spectroscopy. The protein folding induced by 0.25% SSL (Sodium Stearoyl Lactylate) (GS0.25, Gluten + 0.25% SSL) included an increase in α-helix conformation and a decrease in β-sheet, turns and random coil. The same behavior, although in a less degree, was observed for 0.5% gluten-DATEM (Diacetyl Tartaric Acid Esters of Monoglycerides) system. The low burial of Tryptophan residues to a more hydrophobic environment and the low percentage area of the C-H stretching band for GS0.25 (Gluten + 0.25% SSL), could be related to the increased in α-helix conformation. This behavior was also confirmed by changes in stretching vibrational modes of disulfide bridges (S-S) and the low exposure of Tyrosine residues. High levels of SSL (0.5% and 1.0%) and DATEM (1.0%) led to more disordered protein structures, with different gluten networks. SSL (1.0%) formed a more disordered and opened gluten matrix than DATEM, the last one being laminar and homogeneous.

  8. Sequential NMR resonance assignment and structure determination of the Kunitz-type inhibitor domain of the Alzheimer's beta-amyloid precursor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heald, S L; Tilton, R F; Hammond, L J; Lee, A; Bayney, R M; Kamarck, M E; Ramabhadran, T V; Dreyer, R N; Davis, G; Unterbeck, A

    1991-10-29

    Certain precursor proteins (APP751 and APP770) of the amyloid beta-protein (AP) present in Alzheimer's disease contain a Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor domain (APPI). In this study, the domain is obtained as a functional inhibitor through both recombinant (APPIr) and synthetic (APPIs) methodologies, and the solution structure of APPI is determined by 1H 2D NMR techniques. Complete sequence-specific resonance assignments (except for P13 and G37 NH) for both APPIr and APPIs are achieved using standard procedures. Ambiguities arising from degeneracies in the NMR resonances are resolved by varying sample conditions. Qualitative interpretation of short- and long-range NOEs reveals secondary structural features similar to those extensively documented by NMR for bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI). A more rigorous interpretation of the NOESY spectra yields NOE-derived interresidue distance restraints which are used in conjunction with dynamic simulated annealing to generate a family of APPI structures. Within this family, the beta-sheet and helical regions are in good agreement with the crystal structure of BPTI, whereas portions of the protease-binding loops deviate from those in BPTI. These deviations are consistent with those recently described in the crystal structure of APPI (Hynes et al., 1990). Also supported in the NMR study is the hydrophobic patch in the protease-binding domain created by side chain-side chain NOE contacts between M17 and F34. In addition, the NMR spectra indicate that the rotation of the W21 ring in APPI is hindered, unlike Y21 in BPTI, showing a greater than 90% preference for one orientation in the hydrophobic groove.

  9. Amino Acid Molecular Units: Building Primary and Secondary Protein Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparecido R. Silva

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to guarantee the learning quality and suitable knowledge  use  about structural biology, it is fundamental to  exist, since the beginning of  students’ formation, the possibility of clear visualization of biomolecule structures. Nevertheless, the didactic books can only bring  schematic  drawings; even more elaborated figures and graphic computation  do not permit the necessary interaction.  The representation of three-dimensional molecular structures with ludic models, built with representative units, have supplied to the students and teachers a successfully experience to  visualize such structures and correlate them to the real molecules.  The design and applicability of the representative units were discussed with researchers and teachers before mould implementation.  In this stage  it  will be presented the  developed  kit  containing the  representative  plastic parts of the main amino acids.  The kit can demonstrate the interaction among the amino acids  functional groups  (represented by colors, shapes,  sizes and  the peptidic bonds between them  facilitating the assembly and visuali zation of the primary and secondary protein structure.  The models were designed for  Ca,  amino,  carboxyl groups  and  hydrogen. The  lateral chains have  well defined models that represent their geometrical shape.  The completed kit set  will be presented in this meeting (patent requested.  In the last phase of the project will be realized  an effective evaluation  of the kit  as a facilitative didactic tool of the teaching/learning process in the Structural Molecular Biology area.

  10. Genetic diversity, structure and individual assignment of Casta Navarra cattle: a well-differentiated fighting bull population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, A; Martin-Burriel, I; Cons, C; Reta, M; Poblador, A; Rodellar, C; Zaragoza, P

    2014-02-01

    The Casta Navarra lineage was one of the populations used to establish the fighting bull (FB) breed, and it has also been reproductively isolated from the others FBs. A total of 1284 individuals from two generations of 16 Casta Navarra herds were sampled to analyse their diversity, their genetic structure and the ability of 28 microsatellite markers to assign individuals to closely related populations. These animals were compared with closely related phylogenetic (FB) or geographical (Pirenaica and Monchina) populations. Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium analysis showed that 82% of the loci had a significant heterozygote deficit as a consequence of the Wahlund effect. The average proportion of genetic variation explained by farm differences was 9% by Wright's FST index. A phylogenetic tree constructed with a neighbour-joining method based on Reynolds genetic distances and a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo clustering approach revealed clear differences between farm groups that generally corresponded to historical information and could unambiguously differentiate Casta Navarra cattle from the other populations. The percentage of animals correctly assigned to the Casta Navarra population was 91.78% for a q threshold of >0.9. Admixture was only detected in 4.45% (q < 0.8) of the cattle. These results are relevant for the maintenance and development of diversity and conservation in the Casta Navarra population.

  11. Spectral assignments and structural studies of a warfarin derivative stereoselectively formed by tandem cyclization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velayutham Pillai, M.; Rajeswari, K.; Vidhyasagar, T.

    2015-11-01

    The structural elucidation of a Mannich condensation product of rac-Warfarin with benzaldehyde and methyl amine was carried out using IR, Mass, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, 1H-1H COSY, 1H-13C COSY, DEPT-135, HMBC, NOESY spectra and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Formation of a new pyran ring via a tandem cyclization in the presence of methyl amine was observed. The optimized geometry and HOMO-LUMO energy gap along with other important physical parameters were found by Gaussian 09 program using HF 6-31G (d, p) and B3YLP/DFT 6-31G (d, p) level of theory. The preferred conformation of the piperidine ring in solution state was found to be chair from the NMR spectra. Single crystal X-ray diffraction and optimized geometry (by theoretical study) also confirms the chair conformation in the solid state.

  12. Prediction of nonregular secondary structures of proteins based on wavelet analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The secondary structures of proteins fall into two classes: regular structure and nonregular structure. Helices and sheets are termed "regular" structures because their residues have repeating main-chain torsion angles, and their backbone N-H and C-O groups are arranged in a periodic pattern of hydrogen bonding. In contrast, the remaining structures with nonrepeating backbone torsion angles are called nonregular secondary structures. In this note, we performed an extensive sequence analysis of nonregular secondary structures and showed that these nonregular parts could be effectively predicted by continuous wavelet transform.

  13. 浅探初中新型英语作业的设计%The Design of New Types of English Assignment in Secondary School

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐景萍

    2011-01-01

    This article elaborated the exploration and the attempt which was done to the form of English assignment in the junior middle school under the background of new curriculum teaching material.It strengthens the effect of English assignment from three aspects in order to improve students' language general abilities.%本文阐述了新课程教材背景下,对初中英语作业形式改革所做的探索和尝试。从三方面着手,加强作业的功效,提高学生语言运用的能力。

  14. Avocado sunblotch viroid: primary sequence and proposed secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons, R H

    1981-01-01

    The sequence of the 247 nucleotide residues of the single strand circular RNA of avocado sunblotch viroid (ASBV) was determined using partial enzymic cleavage methods on overlapping viroid fragments obtained by partial ribonuclease digestion followed by 32p-labelling in vitro at their 5'-ends. ASBV is much smaller than potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTV; 359 residues) and chrysanthemum stunt viroid (CSV; 356 residues). A secondary structure model for ASBV is proposed and contains 67% of its residues base paired. In contrast to the extensive (69%) sequence homology of CSV with PSTV, only 18% of the ASBV sequence is homologous to PSTV and CSV. There are eight potential polypeptide translation products with chain lengths from 4 to 63 amino acid residues coded for by the plus (infectious) strand and four potential translation products (2 to 60 residues) coded for by the minus strand. An improved method is described for the synthesis of gamma-32p-ATP of high specific activity. PMID:7322921

  15. VITAL NMR: Using Chemical Shift Derived Secondary Structure Information for a Limited Set of Amino Acids to Assess Homology Model Accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brothers, Michael C [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Nesbitt, Anna E [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Hallock, Michael J [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Rupasinghe, Sanjeewa [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Tang, Ming [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Harris, Jason B [ORNL; Baudry, Jerome Y [ORNL; Schuler, Mary A [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Rienstra, Chad M [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

    2011-01-01

    Homology modeling is a powerful tool for predicting protein structures, whose success depends on obtaining a reasonable alignment between a given structural template and the protein sequence being analyzed. In order to leverage greater predictive power for proteins with few structural templates, we have developed a method to rank homology models based upon their compliance to secondary structure derived from experimental solid-state NMR (SSNMR) data. Such data is obtainable in a rapid manner by simple SSNMR experiments (e.g., (13)C-(13)C 2D correlation spectra). To test our homology model scoring procedure for various amino acid labeling schemes, we generated a library of 7,474 homology models for 22 protein targets culled from the TALOS+/SPARTA+ training set of protein structures. Using subsets of amino acids that are plausibly assigned by SSNMR, we discovered that pairs of the residues Val, Ile, Thr, Ala and Leu (VITAL) emulate an ideal dataset where all residues are site specifically assigned. Scoring the models with a predicted VITAL site-specific dataset and calculating secondary structure with the Chemical Shift Index resulted in a Pearson correlation coefficient (-0.75) commensurate to the control (-0.77), where secondary structure was scored site specifically for all amino acids (ALL 20) using STRIDE. This method promises to accelerate structure procurement by SSNMR for proteins with unknown folds through guiding the selection of remotely homologous protein templates and assessing model quality.

  16. VITAL NMR: using chemical shift derived secondary structure information for a limited set of amino acids to assess homology model accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brothers, Michael C.; Nesbitt, Anna E.; Hallock, Michael J. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Chemistry (United States); Rupasinghe, Sanjeewa G. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology (United States); Tang Ming [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Chemistry (United States); Harris, Jason; Baudry, Jerome [University of Tennessee, Department of Biochemistry, Cellular and Molecular Biology (United States); Schuler, Mary A. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology (United States); Rienstra, Chad M., E-mail: rienstra@illinois.edu [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2012-01-15

    Homology modeling is a powerful tool for predicting protein structures, whose success depends on obtaining a reasonable alignment between a given structural template and the protein sequence being analyzed. In order to leverage greater predictive power for proteins with few structural templates, we have developed a method to rank homology models based upon their compliance to secondary structure derived from experimental solid-state NMR (SSNMR) data. Such data is obtainable in a rapid manner by simple SSNMR experiments (e.g., {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C 2D correlation spectra). To test our homology model scoring procedure for various amino acid labeling schemes, we generated a library of 7,474 homology models for 22 protein targets culled from the TALOS+/SPARTA+ training set of protein structures. Using subsets of amino acids that are plausibly assigned by SSNMR, we discovered that pairs of the residues Val, Ile, Thr, Ala and Leu (VITAL) emulate an ideal dataset where all residues are site specifically assigned. Scoring the models with a predicted VITAL site-specific dataset and calculating secondary structure with the Chemical Shift Index resulted in a Pearson correlation coefficient (-0.75) commensurate to the control (-0.77), where secondary structure was scored site specifically for all amino acids (ALL 20) using STRIDE. This method promises to accelerate structure procurement by SSNMR for proteins with unknown folds through guiding the selection of remotely homologous protein templates and assessing model quality.

  17. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance-Assisted Prediction of Secondary Structure for RNA: Incorporation of Direction-Dependent Chemical Shift Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jonathan L; Bellaousov, Stanislav; Tubbs, Jason D; Kennedy, Scott D; Lopez, Michael J; Mathews, David H; Turner, Douglas H

    2015-11-17

    Knowledge of RNA structure is necessary to determine structure-function relationships and to facilitate design of potential therapeutics. RNA secondary structure prediction can be improved by applying constraints from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments to a dynamic programming algorithm. Imino proton walks from NOESY spectra reveal double-stranded regions. Chemical shifts of protons in GH1, UH3, and UH5 of GU pairs, UH3, UH5, and AH2 of AU pairs, and GH1 of GC pairs were analyzed to identify constraints for the 5' to 3' directionality of base pairs in helices. The 5' to 3' directionality constraints were incorporated into an NMR-assisted prediction of secondary structure (NAPSS-CS) program. When it was tested on 18 structures, including nine pseudoknots, the sensitivity and positive predictive value were improved relative to those of three unrestrained programs. The prediction accuracy for the pseudoknots improved the most. The program also facilitates assignment of chemical shifts to individual nucleotides, a necessary step for determining three-dimensional structure.

  18. Enhanced functional and structural domain assignments using remote similarity detection procedures for proteins encoded in the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Seema Namboori; Natasha Mhatre; Sentivel Sujatha; Narayanaswamy Srinivasan; Shashi Bhushan Pandit

    2004-09-01

    The sequencing of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) H37Rv genome has facilitated deeper insights into the biology of MTB, yet the functions of many MTB proteins are unknown. We have used sensitive profile-based search procedures to assign functional and structural domains to infer functions of gene products encoded in MTB. These domain assignments have been made using a compendium of sequence and structural domain families. Functions are predicted for 78% of the encoded gene products. For 69% of these, functions can be inferred by domain assignments. The functions for the rest are deduced from their homology to proteins of known function. Superfamily relationships between families of unknown and known structures have increased structural information by ∼ 11%. Remote similarity detection methods have enabled domain assignments for 1325 ‘hypothetical proteins’. The most populated families in MTB are involved in lipid metabolism, entry and survival of the bacillus in host. Interestingly, for 353 proteins, which we refer to as MTB-specific, no homologues have been identified. Numerous, previously unannotated, hypothetical proteins have been assigned domains and some of these could perhaps be the possible chemotherapeutic targets. MTB-specific proteins might include factors responsible for virulence. Importantly, these assignments could be valuable for experimental endeavors. The detailed results are publicly available at http://hodgkin.mbu.iisc.ernet.in/∼dots.

  19. SVM-based method for protein structural class prediction using secondary structural content and structural information of amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Tabrez Anwar Shamim; Nagarajaram, Hampapathalu Adimurthy

    2011-08-01

    The knowledge collated from the known protein structures has revealed that the proteins are usually folded into the four structural classes: all-α, all-β, α/β and α + β. A number of methods have been proposed to predict the protein's structural class from its primary structure; however, it has been observed that these methods fail or perform poorly in the cases of distantly related sequences. In this paper, we propose a new method for protein structural class prediction using low homology (twilight-zone) protein sequences dataset. Since protein structural class prediction is a typical classification problem, we have developed a Support Vector Machine (SVM)-based method for protein structural class prediction that uses features derived from the predicted secondary structure and predicted burial information of amino acid residues. The examination of different individual as well as feature combinations revealed that the combination of secondary structural content, secondary structural and solvent accessibility state frequencies of amino acids gave rise to the best leave-one-out cross-validation accuracy of ~81% which is comparable to the best accuracy reported in the literature so far.

  20. Characterizing the secondary protein structure of black widow dragline silk using solid-state NMR and X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Janelle E; Sampath, Sujatha; Butler, Emily; Kim, Jihyun; Henning, Robert W; Holland, Gregory P; Yarger, Jeffery L

    2013-10-14

    This study provides a detailed secondary structural characterization of major ampullate dragline silk from Latrodectus hesperus (black widow) spiders. X-ray diffraction results show that the structure of black widow major ampullate silk fibers is comprised of stacked β-sheet nanocrystallites oriented parallel to the fiber axis and an amorphous region with oriented (anisotropic) and isotropic components. The combination of two-dimensional (2D) (13)C-(13)C through-space and through-bond solid-state NMR experiments provide chemical shifts that are used to determine detailed information about the amino acid motif secondary structure in black widow spider dragline silk. Individual amino acids are incorporated into different repetitive motifs that make up the majority of this protein-based biopolymer. From the solid-state NMR measurements, we assign distinct secondary conformations to each repetitive amino acid motif and, hence, to the amino acids that make up the motifs. Specifically, alanine is incorporated in β-sheet (poly(Alan) and poly(Gly-Ala)), 3(1)-helix (poly(Gly-Gly-Xaa), and α-helix (poly(Gln-Gln-Ala-Tyr)) components. Glycine is determined to be in β-sheet (poly(Gly-Ala)) and 3(1)-helical (poly(Gly-Gly-X(aa))) regions, while serine is present in β-sheet (poly(Gly-Ala-Ser)), 3(1)-helix (poly(Gly-Gly-Ser)), and β-turn (poly(Gly-Pro-Ser)) structures. These various motif-specific secondary structural elements are quantitatively correlated to the primary amino acid sequence of major ampullate spidroin 1 and 2 (MaSp1 and MaSp2) and are shown to form a self-consistent model for black widow dragline silk.

  1. Energy profile and secondary structure impact shRNA efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Xiao

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA interference (RNAi is a cellular mechanism in which a short/small double stranded RNA induces the degradation of its sequence specific target mRNA, leading to specific gene silencing. Since its discovery, RNAi has become a powerful biological technique for gene function studies and drug discovery. The very first requirement of applying RNAi is to design functional small interfering RNA (siRNA that can uniquely induce the degradation of the targeted mRNA. It has been shown that many functional synthetic siRNAs share some common characteristics, such as GC content limitation and free energy preferences at both terminals, etc. Results Our three-phase algorithm was developed to design siRNA on a whole-genome scale based on those identified characteristics of functional siRNA. When this algorithm was applied to design short hairpin RNA (shRNA, the validated success rate of shRNAs was over 70%, which was almost double the rate reported for TRC library. This indicates that the designs of siRNA and shRNA may share the same concerns. Further analysis of the shRNA dataset of 444 designs reveals that the high free energy states of the two terminals have the largest positive impact on the shRNA efficacy. Enforcing these energy characteristics of both terminals can further improve the shRNA design success rate to 83.1%. We also found that functional shRNAs have less probability for their 3' terminals to be involved in mRNA secondary structure formation. Conclusion Functional shRNAs prefer high free energy states at both terminals. High free energy states of the two terminals were found to be the largest positive impact factor on shRNA efficacy. In addition, the accessibility of the 3' terminal is another key factor to shRNA efficacy.

  2. 英语作业设计对英语学习动机影响的实证研究%The Motivating Function of English Assignment for the English Learning of the Students in Secondary Vocational Schools

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟义清

    2014-01-01

    With an empirical method, the writer, from the perspective of English assignment, explored the possibilities and effectiveness of improving the English learning motivation of the students in secondary vocational schools. The results showed that well-designed assignment according to some theories and principles could improve the students’ extrinsic and intrinsic motivations and their English learning autonomy as well.%本文采取实证的方法,从英语作业设计的角度,探索提高中职生英语学习动机的可能性和有效性。研究结果表明,依据一定的理论、原则,精心为学生设计的作业,可以提高中职生英语学习的外在动机、内在动机和努力学习的程度。

  3. Sucrose prevents protein fibrillation through compaction of the tertiary structure but hardly affects the secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrela, Nídia; Franquelim, Henri G; Lopes, Carlos; Tavares, Evandro; Macedo, Joana A; Christiansen, Gunna; Otzen, Daniel E; Melo, Eduardo P

    2015-11-01

    Amyloid fibers, implicated in a wide range of diseases, are formed when proteins misfold and stick together in long rope-like structures. As a natural mechanism, osmolytes can be used to modulate protein aggregation pathways with no interference with other cellular functions. The osmolyte sucrose delays fibrillation of the ribosomal protein S6 leading to softer and less shaped-defined fibrils. The molecular mechanism used by sucrose to delay S6 fibrillation was studied based on the two-state unfolding kinetics of the secondary and tertiary structures. It was concluded that the delay in S6 fibrillation results from stabilization and compaction of the slightly expanded tertiary native structure formed under fibrillation conditions. Interestingly, this compaction extends to almost all S6 tertiary structure but hardly affects its secondary structure. The part of the S6 tertiary structure that suffered more compaction by sucrose is known to be the first part to unfold, indicating that the native S6 has entered the unfolding pathway under fibrillation conditions.

  4. Circular-dichroic properties and secondary structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa soluble cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tordi, M G; Silvestrini, M C; Colosimo, A; Provencher, S; Brunori, M

    1984-03-15

    The c.d. spectra of Pseudomonas aeruginosa cytochrome c oxidase in the oxidized state and the reduced state are reported in the visible- and u.v. absorption regions. In the visible region the comparison between the spectra of reduced cytochrome c oxidase and ferrocytochrome c-551 allows the identification of the c.d. bands mainly due to the d1 haem chromophore in cytochrome c oxidase. In the near-u.v. region the assignment of some of the observed peaks to the haem groups and to the aromatic amino acid residues is proposed. A careful analysis of the data in the far-u.v. region leads to the determination of the relative amounts of alpha-helix and beta-sheet in the enzyme, giving for the first time a picture of its secondary structure. A significant difference in this respect between the reduced and the oxidized species is observed and discussed in the light of similar conclusions reported by other workers.

  5. Large-scale analysis of secondary structure changes in proteins suggests a role for disorder-to-order transitions in nucleotide binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Adi; Ofran, Yanay; Kliger, Yossef

    2010-02-01

    Conformational changes in proteins often involve secondary structure transitions. Such transitions can be divided into two types: disorder-to-order changes, in which a disordered segment acquires an ordered secondary structure (e.g., disorder to alpha-helix, disorder to beta-strand), and order-to-order changes, where a segment switches from one ordered secondary structure to another (e.g., alpha-helix to beta-strand, alpha-helix to turn). In this study, we explore the distribution of these transitions in the proteome. Using a comprehensive, yet highly conservative method, we compared solved three-dimensional structures of identical protein sequences, looking for differences in the secondary structures with which they were assigned. Protein chains in which such secondary structure transitions were detected, were classified into two sets according to the type of transition that is involved (disorder-to-order or order-to-order), allowing us to characterize each set by examining enrichment of gene ontology terms. The results reveal that the disorder-to-order set is significantly enriched with nucleotide binding proteins, whereas the order-to-order set is more diverse. Remarkably, further examination reveals that >22% of the purine nucleotide binding proteins include segments which undergo disorder-to-order transitions, suggesting that such transitions play an important role in this process.

  6. Mathematical and Biological Modelling of RNA Secondary Structure and Its Effects on Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Hughes

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary structures within the 5′ untranslated regions of messenger RNAs can have profound effects on the efficiency of translation of their messages and thereby on gene expression. Consequently they can act as important regulatory motifs in both physiological and pathological settings. Current approaches to predicting the secondary structure of these RNA sequences find the structure with the global-minimum free energy. However, since RNA folds progressively from the 5′ end when synthesised or released from the translational machinery, this may not be the most probable structure. We discuss secondary structure prediction based on local-minimisation of free energy with thermodynamic fluctuations as nucleotides are added to the 3′ end and show that these can result in different secondary structures. We also discuss approaches for studying the extent of the translational inhibition specified by structures within the 5′ untranslated region.

  7. A novel predictor for protein structural class based on integrated information of the secondary structure sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lichao; Zhao, Xiqiang; Kong, Liang; Liu, Shuxia

    2014-08-01

    The structural class has become one of the most important features for characterizing the overall folding type of a protein and played important roles in many aspects of protein research. At present, it is still a challenging problem to accurately predict protein structural class for low-similarity sequences. In this study, an 18-dimensional integrated feature vector is proposed by fusing the information about content and position of the predicted secondary structure elements. The consistently high accuracies of jackknife and 10-fold cross-validation tests on different low-similarity benchmark datasets show that the proposed method is reliable and stable. Comparison of our results with other methods demonstrates that our method is an effective computational tool for protein structural class prediction, especially for low-similarity sequences.

  8. RAD genotyping reveals fine-scale genetic structuring and provides powerful population assignment in a widely distributed marine species, the American lobster (Homarus americanus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benestan, Laura; Gosselin, Thierry; Perrier, Charles; Sainte-Marie, Bernard; Rochette, Rémy; Bernatchez, Louis

    2015-07-01

    Deciphering genetic structure and inferring connectivity in marine species have been challenging due to weak genetic differentiation and limited resolution offered by traditional genotypic methods. The main goal of this study was to assess how a population genomics framework could help delineate the genetic structure of the American lobster (Homarus americanus) throughout much of the species' range and increase the assignment success of individuals to their location of origin. We genotyped 10 156 filtered SNPs using RAD sequencing to delineate genetic structure and perform population assignment for 586 American lobsters collected in 17 locations distributed across a large portion of the species' natural distribution range. Our results revealed the existence of a hierarchical genetic structure, first separating lobsters from the northern and southern part of the range (FCT  = 0.0011; P-value = 0.0002) and then revealing a total of 11 genetically distinguishable populations (mean FST  = 0.00185; CI: 0.0007-0.0021, P-value < 0.0002), providing strong evidence for weak, albeit fine-scale population structuring within each region. A resampling procedure showed that assignment success was highest with a subset of 3000 SNPs having the highest FST . Applying Anderson's (Molecular Ecology Resources, 2010, 10, 701) method to avoid 'high-grading bias', 94.2% and 80.8% of individuals were correctly assigned to their region and location of origin, respectively. Lastly, we showed that assignment success was positively associated with sample size. These results demonstrate that using a large number of SNPs improves fine-scale population structure delineation and population assignment success in a context of weak genetic structure. We discuss the implications of these findings for the conservation and management of highly connected marine species, particularly regarding the geographic scale of demographic independence.

  9. A comparative method for finding and folding RNA secondary structures within protein-coding regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Meyer, Irmtraud Margret; Forsberg, Roald;

    2004-01-01

    that RNA-DECODER's parameters can be automatically trained to successfully fold known secondary structures within the HCV genome. We scan the genomes of HCV and polio virus for conserved secondary-structure elements, and analyze performance as a function of available evolutionary information. On known...... secondary structures, RNA-DECODER shows a sensitivity similar to the programs MFOLD, PFOLD and RNAALIFOLD. When scanning the entire genomes of HCV and polio virus for structure elements, RNA-DECODER's results indicate a markedly higher specificity than MFOLD, PFOLD and RNAALIFOLD....

  10. Minimum norm partial quadratic eigenvalue assignment with time delay in vibrating structures using the receptance and the system matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zheng-Jian; Chen, Mei-Xiang; Datta, Biswa Nath

    2013-02-01

    The partial quadratic eigenvalue assignment problem (PQEAP) is to compute a pair of feedback matrices such that a small number of unwanted eigenvalues in a structure are reassigned to suitable locations while keeping the remaining large number of eigenvalues and the associated eigenvectors unchanged. The problem arises in active vibration control of structures. For real-life applications, it is not enough just to compute the feedback matrices. They should be computed in such a way that both closed-loop eigenvalue sensitivity and feedback norms are as small as possible. Also, for practical effectiveness, the time-delay between the measurement of the state and implementation of the feedback controller should be considered while solving the PQEAP. These problems are usually solved using only system matrices and do not necessarily take advantage of the receptances which are available by measurements. In this paper, we propose hybrid methods, combining the system matrices and measured receptances, for solutions of the multi-input PQEAP and the minimum-norm PQEAP, both for systems with and without time-delay. These hybrid methods are more efficient than the standard methods which only use the system matrices and not the receptances. These hybrid methods also offer several other computational advantages over the standard methods. Our results generalize the recent work by Ram et al. [Partial pole placement with time delay in structures using the receptance and the system matrices, Linear Algebra and its Applications 434 (2011) 1689-1696]. The results of numerical experiments demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  11. A probabilistic model for secondary structure prediction from protein chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechelke, Martin; Habeck, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Protein chemical shifts encode detailed structural information that is difficult and computationally costly to describe at a fundamental level. Statistical and machine learning approaches have been used to infer correlations between chemical shifts and secondary structure from experimental chemical shifts. These methods range from simple statistics such as the chemical shift index to complex methods using neural networks. Notwithstanding their higher accuracy, more complex approaches tend to obscure the relationship between secondary structure and chemical shift and often involve many parameters that need to be trained. We present hidden Markov models (HMMs) with Gaussian emission probabilities to model the dependence between protein chemical shifts and secondary structure. The continuous emission probabilities are modeled as conditional probabilities for a given amino acid and secondary structure type. Using these distributions as outputs of first- and second-order HMMs, we achieve a prediction accuracy of 82.3%, which is competitive with existing methods for predicting secondary structure from protein chemical shifts. Incorporation of sequence-based secondary structure prediction into our HMM improves the prediction accuracy to 84.0%. Our findings suggest that an HMM with correlated Gaussian distributions conditioned on the secondary structure provides an adequate generative model of chemical shifts.

  12. Deciphering the shape and deformation of secondary structures through local conformation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camproux Anne-Claude

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein deformation has been extensively analysed through global methods based on RMSD, torsion angles and Principal Components Analysis calculations. Here we use a local approach, able to distinguish among the different backbone conformations within loops, α-helices and β-strands, to address the question of secondary structures' shape variation within proteins and deformation at interface upon complexation. Results Using a structural alphabet, we translated the 3 D structures of large sets of protein-protein complexes into sequences of structural letters. The shape of the secondary structures can be assessed by the structural letters that modeled them in the structural sequences. The distribution analysis of the structural letters in the three protein compartments (surface, core and interface reveals that secondary structures tend to adopt preferential conformations that differ among the compartments. The local description of secondary structures highlights that curved conformations are preferred on the surface while straight ones are preferred in the core. Interfaces display a mixture of local conformations either preferred in core or surface. The analysis of the structural letters transition occurring between protein-bound and unbound conformations shows that the deformation of secondary structure is tightly linked to the compartment preference of the local conformations. Conclusion The conformation of secondary structures can be further analysed and detailed thanks to a structural alphabet which allows a better description of protein surface, core and interface in terms of secondary structures' shape and deformation. Induced-fit modification tendencies described here should be valuable information to identify and characterize regions under strong structural constraints for functional reasons.

  13. Evolving stochastic context-free grammars for RNA secondary structure prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anderson, James WJ; Tataru, Paula Cristina; Stains, Joe

    2012-01-01

    to structure prediction as has been previously suggested. Results These search techniques were applied to predict RNA secondary structure on a maximal data set and revealed new and interesting grammars, though none are dramatically better than classic grammars. In general, results showed that many grammars......Background Stochastic Context-Free Grammars (SCFGs) were applied successfully to RNA secondary structure prediction in the early 90s, and used in combination with comparative methods in the late 90s. The set of SCFGs potentially useful for RNA secondary structure prediction is very large, but a few...... with quite different structure could have very similar predictive ability. Many ambiguous grammars were found which were at least as effective as the best current unambiguous grammars. Conclusions Overall the method of evolving SCFGs for RNA secondary structure prediction proved effective in finding many...

  14. Structural responses of secondary lining of high-speed railway tunnel excavated in loess ground

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Dingli; Fang, Qian; Li, Pengfei; Wong, Louis

    2013-01-01

    To systematically study the mechanical properties and structural responses of the secondary lining for high-speed railway tunnels excavated in loess ground, on-site monitoring was performed to measure the contact pressure between the primary lining and secondary lining. It is found that the contact pressure reaches its first peak value when the tunnel formwork carriage is removed. The load acting on secondary lining is in the form of deformation pressure, which is different from the loose pre...

  15. A seqlet-based maximum entropy Markov approach for protein secondary structure prediction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG; Qiwen; WANG; Xiaolong; LIN; Lei; GUAN; Yi

    2005-01-01

    A novel method for predicting the secondary structures of proteins from amino acid sequence has been presented. The protein secondary structure seqlets that are analogous to the words in natural language have been extracted. These seqlets will capture the relationship between amino acid sequence and the secondary structures of proteins and further form the protein secondary structure dictionary. To be elaborate, the dictionary is organism-specific. Protein secondary structure prediction is formulated as an integrated word segmentation and part of speech tagging problem. The word-lattice is used to represent the results of the word segmentation and the maximum entropy model is used to calculate the probability of a seqlet tagged as a certain secondary structure type. The method is markovian in the seqlets, permitting efficient exact calculation of the posterior probability distribution over all possible word segmentations and their tags by viterbi algorithm. The optimal segmentations and their tags are computed as the results of protein secondary structure prediction. The method is applied to predict the secondary structures of proteins of four organisms respectively and compared with the PHD method. The results show that the performance of this method is higher than that of PHD by about 3.9% Q3 accuracy and 4.6% SOV accuracy. Combining with the local similarity protein sequences that are obtained by BLAST can give better prediction. The method is also tested on the 50 CASP5 target proteins with Q3 accuracy 78.9% and SOV accuracy 77.1%. A web server for protein secondary structure prediction has been constructed which is available at http://www.insun. hit. edu. cn: 81/demos/biology/index.html.

  16. The Structure of Secondary School Teacher Job Satisfaction and Its Relationship with Attrition and Work Enthusiasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiqi, Chen

    2007-01-01

    This study used the results of a questionnaire survey of 230 secondary school teachers to analyze the factors constituting job satisfaction and its effects on teacher attrition and work enthusiasm. The results show that (a) the structure of secondary school teacher job satisfaction is made up of ten components and is consistent with the model put…

  17. Testing Mediation Using Multiple Regression and Structural Equation Modeling Analyses in Secondary Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Spencer D.

    2011-01-01

    Mediation analysis in child and adolescent development research is possible using large secondary data sets. This article provides an overview of two statistical methods commonly used to test mediated effects in secondary analysis: multiple regression and structural equation modeling (SEM). Two empirical studies are presented to illustrate the…

  18. Comparative analysis of mt LSU rRNA secondary structures of Odonates: structural variability and phylogenetic signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misof, B; Fleck, G

    2003-12-01

    Secondary structures of the most conserved part of the mt 16S rRNA gene, domains IV and V, have been recently analysed in a comparative study. However, full secondary structures of the mt LSU rRNA molecule are published for only a few insect species. The present study presents full secondary structures of domains I, II, IV and V of Odonates and one representative of mayflies, Ephemera sp. The reconstructions are based on a comparative approach and minimal consensus structures derived from sequence alignments. The inferred structures exhibit remarkable similarities to the published Drosophila melanogaster model, which increases confidence in these structures. Structural variance within Odonates is homoplastic, and neighbour-joining trees based on tree edit distances do not correspond to any of the phylogenetically expected patterns. However, despite homoplastic quantitative structural variation, many similarities between Odonates and Ephemera sp. suggest promising character sets for higher order insect systematics that merit further investigations.

  19. Improving protein structural class prediction using novel combined sequence information and predicted secondary structural features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qi; Wu, Li; Li, Lihua

    2011-12-01

    Protein structural class prediction solely from protein sequences is a challenging problem in bioinformatics. Numerous efficient methods have been proposed for protein structural class prediction, but challenges remain. Using novel combined sequence information coupled with predicted secondary structural features (PSSF), we proposed a novel scheme to improve prediction of protein structural classes. Given an amino acid sequence, we first transformed it into a reduced amino acid sequence and calculated its word frequencies and word position features to combine novel sequence information. Then we added the PSSF to the combine sequence information to predict protein structural classes. The proposed method was tested on four benchmark datasets in low homology and achieved the overall prediction accuracies of 83.1%, 87.0%, 94.5%, and 85.2%, respectively. The comparison with existing methods demonstrates that the overall improvements range from 2.3% to 27.5%, which indicates that the proposed method is more efficient, especially for low-homology amino acid sequences.

  20. The Influence of RNA Secondary Structure on the Efficiency of siRNA Silencing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Ying; GUI Jian-bin; CHEN Zhao-xue

    2015-01-01

    In the application of RNAi technology, it is an essential step to design siRNA applicable to target gene. At present, there are many researches and conclusions on siRNA design. This paper aims to the influences of mRNA secondary structure or siRNA antisense-strand secondary structure on siRNA silence efficiency. The paper also discusses the problems and sets out further insights in the research.

  1. Lyophilization-induced reversible changes in the secondary structure of proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    Griebenow, K; Klibanov, A M

    1995-01-01

    Changes in the secondary structure of some dozen different proteins upon lyophilization of their aqueous solutions have been investigated by means of Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy in the amide III band region. Dehydration markedly (but reversibly) alters the secondary structure of all the proteins studied, as revealed by both the quantitative analysis of the second derivative spectra and the Gaussian curve fitting of the original infrared spectra. Lyophilization substantially increa...

  2. Microwave, infrared and Raman spectra, r0 structural parameters, ab initio calculations and vibrational assignment of 1-fluoro-1-silacyclopentane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durig, James R; Panikar, Savitha S; Obenchain, Daniel A; Bills, Brandon J; Lohan, Patrick M; Peebles, Rebecca A; Peebles, Sean A; Groner, Peter; Guirgis, Gamil A; Johnston, Michael D

    2012-01-28

    The microwave spectrum (6500-18 ,500 MHz) of 1-fluoro-1-silacyclopentane, c-C(4)H(8)SiHF has been recorded and 87 transitions for the (28)Si, (29)Si, (30)Si, and (13)C isotopomers have been assigned for a single conformer. Infrared spectra (3050-350 cm(-1)) of the gas and solid and Raman spectrum (3100-40 cm(-1)) of the liquid have also been recorded. The vibrational data indicate the presence of a single conformer with no symmetry which is consistent with the twist form. Ab initio calculations with a variety of basis sets up to MP2(full)/aug-cc-pVTZ predict the envelope-axial and envelope-equatorial conformers to be saddle points with nearly the same energies but much lower energy than the planar conformer. By utilizing the microwave rotational constants for seven isotopomers ((28)Si, (29)Si, (30)Si, and four (13)C) combined with the structural parameters predicted from the MP2(full)/6-311+G(d,p) calculations, adjusted r(0) structural parameters have been obtained for the twist conformer. The heavy atom distances in Å are: r(0)(SiC(2)) = 1.875(3); r(0)(SiC(3)) = 1.872(3); r(0)(C(2)C(4)) = 1.549(3); r(0)(C(3)C(5)) = 1.547(3); r(0)(C(4)C(5)) = 1.542(3); r(0)(SiF) = 1.598(3) and the angles in degrees are: [angle]CSiC = 96.7(5); [angle]SiC(2)C(4) = 103.6(5); [angle]SiC(3)C(5) = 102.9(5); [angle]C(2)C(4)C(5) = 108.4(5); [angle]C(3)C(5)C(4) = 108.1(5); [angle]F(6)Si(1)C(2) = 110.7(5); [angle]F(6)Si(1)C(3) = 111.6(5). The heavy atom ring parameters are compared to the corresponding r(s) parameters. Normal coordinate calculations with scaled force constants from MP2(full)/6-31G(d) calculations were carried out to predict the fundamental vibrational frequencies, infrared intensities, Raman activities, depolarization values, and infrared band contours. These experimental and theoretical results are compared to the corresponding quantities of some other five-membered rings.

  3. Conservation of mRNA secondary structures may filter out mutations in Escherichia coli evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chursov, Andrey; Frishman, Dmitrij; Shneider, Alexander

    2013-09-01

    Recent reports indicate that mutations in viral genomes tend to preserve RNA secondary structure, and those mutations that disrupt secondary structural elements may reduce gene expression levels, thereby serving as a functional knockout. In this article, we explore the conservation of secondary structures of mRNA coding regions, a previously unknown factor in bacterial evolution, by comparing the structural consequences of mutations in essential and nonessential Escherichia coli genes accumulated over 40 000 generations in the course of the 'long-term evolution experiment'. We monitored the extent to which mutations influence minimum free energy (MFE) values, assuming that a substantial change in MFE is indicative of structural perturbation. Our principal finding is that purifying selection tends to eliminate those mutations in essential genes that lead to greater changes of MFE values and, therefore, may be more disruptive for the corresponding mRNA secondary structures. This effect implies that synonymous mutations disrupting mRNA secondary structures may directly affect the fitness of the organism. These results demonstrate that the need to maintain intact mRNA structures imposes additional evolutionary constraints on bacterial genomes, which go beyond preservation of structure and function of the encoded proteins.

  4. 4SALE – A tool for synchronous RNA sequence and secondary structure alignment and editing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schultz Jörg

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In sequence analysis the multiple alignment builds the fundament of all proceeding analyses. Errors in an alignment could strongly influence all succeeding analyses and therefore could lead to wrong predictions. Hand-crafted and hand-improved alignments are necessary and meanwhile good common practice. For RNA sequences often the primary sequence as well as a secondary structure consensus is well known, e.g., the cloverleaf structure of the t-RNA. Recently, some alignment editors are proposed that are able to include and model both kinds of information. However, with the advent of a large amount of reliable RNA sequences together with their solved secondary structures (available from e.g. the ITS2 Database, we are faced with the problem to handle sequences and their associated secondary structures synchronously. Results 4SALE fills this gap. The application allows a fast sequence and synchronous secondary structure alignment for large data sets and for the first time synchronous manual editing of aligned sequences and their secondary structures. This study describes an algorithm for the synchronous alignment of sequences and their associated secondary structures as well as the main features of 4SALE used for further analyses and editing. 4SALE builds an optimal and unique starting point for every RNA sequence and structure analysis. Conclusion 4SALE, which provides an user-friendly and intuitive interface, is a comprehensive toolbox for RNA analysis based on sequence and secondary structure information. The program connects sequence and structure databases like the ITS2 Database to phylogeny programs as for example the CBCAnalyzer. 4SALE is written in JAVA and therefore platform independent. The software is freely available and distributed from the website at http://4sale.bioapps.biozentrum.uni-wuerzburg.de

  5. Training set reduction methods for protein secondary structure prediction in single-sequence condition

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Orphan proteins are characterized by the lack of significant sequence similarity to database proteins. To infer the functional properties of the orphans, more elaborate techniques that utilize structural information are required. In this regard, the protein structure prediction gains considerable importance. Secondary structure prediction algorithms designed for orphan proteins (also known as single-sequence algorithms) cannot utilize multiple alignments or alignment prof...

  6. Knowledge base and neural network approach for protein secondary structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Maulika S; Mazumdar, Himanshu S

    2014-11-21

    Protein structure prediction is of great relevance given the abundant genomic and proteomic data generated by the genome sequencing projects. Protein secondary structure prediction is addressed as a sub task in determining the protein tertiary structure and function. In this paper, a novel algorithm, KB-PROSSP-NN, which is a combination of knowledge base and modeling of the exceptions in the knowledge base using neural networks for protein secondary structure prediction (PSSP), is proposed. The knowledge base is derived from a proteomic sequence-structure database and consists of the statistics of association between the 5-residue words and corresponding secondary structure. The predicted results obtained using knowledge base are refined with a Backpropogation neural network algorithm. Neural net models the exceptions of the knowledge base. The Q3 accuracy of 90% and 82% is achieved on the RS126 and CB396 test sets respectively which suggest improvement over existing state of art methods.

  7. Secondary Structure across the Bacterial Transcriptome Reveals Versatile Roles in mRNA Regulation and Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Del Campo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Messenger RNA acts as an informational molecule between DNA and translating ribosomes. Emerging evidence places mRNA in central cellular processes beyond its major function as informational entity. Although individual examples show that specific structural features of mRNA regulate translation and transcript stability, their role and function throughout the bacterial transcriptome remains unknown. Combining three sequencing approaches to provide a high resolution view of global mRNA secondary structure, translation efficiency and mRNA abundance, we unraveled structural features in E. coli mRNA with implications in translation and mRNA degradation. A poorly structured site upstream of the coding sequence serves as an additional unspecific binding site of the ribosomes and the degree of its secondary structure propensity negatively correlates with gene expression. Secondary structures within coding sequences are highly dynamic and influence translation only within a very small subset of positions. A secondary structure upstream of the stop codon is enriched in genes terminated by UAA codon with likely implications in translation termination. The global analysis further substantiates a common recognition signature of RNase E to initiate endonucleolytic cleavage. This work determines for the first time the E. coli RNA structurome, highlighting the contribution of mRNA secondary structure as a direct effector of a variety of processes, including translation and mRNA degradation.

  8. Secondary Structure across the Bacterial Transcriptome Reveals Versatile Roles in mRNA Regulation and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Campo, Cristian; Bartholomäus, Alexander; Fedyunin, Ivan; Ignatova, Zoya

    2015-10-01

    Messenger RNA acts as an informational molecule between DNA and translating ribosomes. Emerging evidence places mRNA in central cellular processes beyond its major function as informational entity. Although individual examples show that specific structural features of mRNA regulate translation and transcript stability, their role and function throughout the bacterial transcriptome remains unknown. Combining three sequencing approaches to provide a high resolution view of global mRNA secondary structure, translation efficiency and mRNA abundance, we unraveled structural features in E. coli mRNA with implications in translation and mRNA degradation. A poorly structured site upstream of the coding sequence serves as an additional unspecific binding site of the ribosomes and the degree of its secondary structure propensity negatively correlates with gene expression. Secondary structures within coding sequences are highly dynamic and influence translation only within a very small subset of positions. A secondary structure upstream of the stop codon is enriched in genes terminated by UAA codon with likely implications in translation termination. The global analysis further substantiates a common recognition signature of RNase E to initiate endonucleolytic cleavage. This work determines for the first time the E. coli RNA structurome, highlighting the contribution of mRNA secondary structure as a direct effector of a variety of processes, including translation and mRNA degradation.

  9. GC content around splice sites affects splicing through pre-mRNA secondary structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Liang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing increases protein diversity by generating multiple transcript isoforms from a single gene through different combinations of exons or through different selections of splice sites. It has been reported that RNA secondary structures are involved in alternative splicing. Here we perform a genomic study of RNA secondary structures around splice sites in humans (Homo sapiens, mice (Mus musculus, fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster, and nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans to further investigate this phenomenon. Results We observe that GC content around splice sites is closely associated with the splice site usage in multiple species. RNA secondary structure is the possible explanation, because the structural stability difference among alternative splice sites, constitutive splice sites, and skipped splice sites can be explained by the GC content difference. Alternative splice sites tend to be GC-enriched and exhibit more stable RNA secondary structures in all of the considered species. In humans and mice, splice sites of first exons and long exons tend to be GC-enriched and hence form more stable structures, indicating the special role of RNA secondary structures in promoter proximal splicing events and the splicing of long exons. In addition, GC-enriched exon-intron junctions tend to be overrepresented in tissue-specific alternative splice sites, indicating the functional consequence of the GC effect. Compared with regions far from splice sites and decoy splice sites, real splice sites are GC-enriched. We also found that the GC-content effect is much stronger than the nucleotide-order effect to form stable secondary structures. Conclusion All of these results indicate that GC content is related to splice site usage and it may mediate the splicing process through RNA secondary structures.

  10. Structuring Asynchronous Discussion Groups: Comparing Scripting by Assigning Roles with Regulation by Cross-Age Peer Tutors

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Wever, Bram; Van Keer, Hilde; Schellens, Tammy; Valcke, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The present study focuses on comparing the impact of role assignment and cross-age peer tutors on students' level of knowledge construction in 15 asynchronous discussion groups of nine students each in a first-year university course (N=135). Content analysis was applied to analyse the level of knowledge construction in students' online postings.…

  11. Inflatable Habitat with Integrated Primary and Secondary Structure Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Paragon Space Development Corp (Paragon) and Thin Red Line Aerospace (TRLA) proposes to explore the utilization of inflatable structures by designing a habitation...

  12. Secondary Structure Adopted by the Gly-Gly-X Repetitive Regions of Dragline Spider Silk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey M. Gray

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Solid-state NMR and molecular dynamics (MD simulations are presented to help elucidate the molecular secondary structure of poly(Gly-Gly-X, which is one of the most common structural repetitive motifs found in orb-weaving dragline spider silk proteins. The combination of NMR and computational experiments provides insight into the molecular secondary structure of poly(Gly-Gly-X segments and provides further support that these regions are disordered and primarily non-β-sheet. Furthermore, the combination of NMR and MD simulations illustrate the possibility for several secondary structural elements in the poly(Gly-Gly-X regions of dragline silks, including β-turns, 310-helicies, and coil structures with a negligible population of α-helix observed.

  13. Secondary structures of proteins from the 30S subunit of the Escherichia coli ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzionara, M; Robinson, S M; Wittmann-Liebold, B

    1977-08-01

    The secondary structures of the proteins S4, S6, S8, S9, S12, S13, S15, S16, S18, S20 and S21 from the subunit of the E. coli ribosome were predicted according to four different methods. From the resultant diagrams indicating regions of helix, turn, extended structure and random coil, average values for the respective secondary structures could be calculated for each protein. Using the known relative distances for residues in the helical, turn and sheet or allowed random conformations, estimates are made of the maximum possible lengths of the proteins in order to correlate these with results obtained from antibody binding studies to the 30S subunit as determined by electron microscopy. The influence of amino acid changes on the predicted secondary structures of proteins from a few selected mutants was studied. The altered residues tend to be structurally conservative or to induce only minimal local changes.

  14. Embedded Learning Strategy Instruction: Story-Structure Pedagogy in Heterogeneous Secondary Literature Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggella-Luby, Michael; Schumaker, Jean S.; Deshler, Donald D.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of using the Embedded Story-Structure (ESS) Routine in a literature course were investigated. A heterogeneous group of 79 ninth graders, including 14 students with LD, were randomly assigned to one of two conditions, with instruction occurring in groups of 12 to 14 students in general education literature classes over a nine-day…

  15. Balanced input-output assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawronski, W.; Hadaegh, F. Y.

    1989-01-01

    Actuator/sensor locations and balanced representations of linear systems are considered for a given set of controllability and observability grammians. The case of equally controlled and observed states is given special attention. The assignability of grammians is examined, and the conditions for their existence are presented, along with several algorithms for their determination. Although an arbitrary positive semidefinite matrix is not always assignable, the identity grammian is shown to be always assignable. The results are extended to the case of flexible structures.

  16. Protein Structure Determination by Assembling Super-Secondary Structure Motifs Using Pseudocontact Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilla, Kala Bharath; Otting, Gottfried; Huber, Thomas

    2017-03-07

    Computational and nuclear magnetic resonance hybrid approaches provide efficient tools for 3D structure determination of small proteins, but currently available algorithms struggle to perform with larger proteins. Here we demonstrate a new computational algorithm that assembles the 3D structure of a protein from its constituent super-secondary structural motifs (Smotifs) with the help of pseudocontact shift (PCS) restraints for backbone amide protons, where the PCSs are produced from different metal centers. The algorithm, DINGO-PCS (3D assembly of Individual Smotifs to Near-native Geometry as Orchestrated by PCSs), employs the PCSs to recognize, orient, and assemble the constituent Smotifs of the target protein without any other experimental data or computational force fields. Using a universal Smotif database, the DINGO-PCS algorithm exhaustively enumerates any given Smotif. We benchmarked the program against ten different protein targets ranging from 100 to 220 residues with different topologies. For nine of these targets, the method was able to identify near-native Smotifs.

  17. Argumentation in Secondary School Students' Structured and Unstructured Chat Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Timo; Marttunen, Miika; Laurinen, Leena

    2012-01-01

    Joint construction of new knowledge demands that persons can express their statements in a convincing way and explore other people's arguments constructively. For this reason, more knowledge on different means to support collaborative argumentation is needed. This study clarifies whether structured interaction supports students' critical and…

  18. Can Computationally Designed Protein Sequences Improve Secondary Structure Prediction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Army...1997) using a significantly larger database of known structures than previously reported in the literature. Methods In this work, the Astral SCOP 1.75

  19. FTIR Analysis of Protein Secondary Structure in Cheddar Cheese during Ripening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Fang; LIU Ai-ping; REN Fa-zheng; ZHANG Xiao-ying; Stephanie Clark; ZHANG Lu-da; GUO Hui-yuan

    2011-01-01

    Proteolysis is one of the most important biochemical reactions during cheese ripening. Studies on the secondary structure of proteins during ripening would be helpful for characterizing protein changes for assessing cheese quality. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), with self-deconvolution, second derivative analysis and band curve-fitting, was used to characterize the secondary structure of proteins in Cheddar cheese during ripening. The spectra of the amide I region showed great similarity, while the relative contents of the secondary structures underwent a series of changes. As ripening progressed, the α-helix content decreased and the β-sheet content increased. This structural shift was attributed to the strengthening of hydrogen bonds that resulted from hydrolysis of caseins. In summary, FTIR could provide the basis for rapid characterization of cheese that is undergoing ripening.

  20. Charge-Induced Unzipping of Isolated Proteins to a Defined Secondary Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Flórez, Ana Isabel; Mucha, Eike; Ahn, Doo-Sik; Gewinner, Sandy; Schöllkopf, Wieland; Pagel, Kevin; von Helden, Gert

    2016-03-01

    Here we present a combined experimental and theoretical study on the secondary structure of isolated proteins as a function of charge state. In infrared spectra of the proteins ubiquitin and cytochrome c, amide I (C=O stretch) and amide II (N-H bend) bands can be found at positions that are typical for condensed-phase proteins. For high charge states a new band appears, substantially red-shifted from the amide II band observed at lower charge states. The observations are interpreted in terms of Coulomb-driven transitions in secondary structures from mostly helical to extended C5 -type hydrogen-bonded structures. Support for this interpretation comes from simple energy considerations as well as from quantum chemical calculations on model peptides. This transition in secondary structure is most likely universal for isolated proteins that occur in mass spectrometric experiments.

  1. Use of secondary structural information and C-C distance restraints to model protein structures with MODELLER

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Boojala V B Reddy; Yiannis N Kaznessis

    2007-08-01

    Protein secondary structure predictions and amino acid long range contact map predictions from primary sequence of proteins have been explored to aid in modelling protein tertiary structures. In order to evaluate the usefulness of secondary structure and 3D-residue contact prediction methods to model protein structures we have used the known Q3 (alpha-helix, beta-strands and irregular turns/loops) secondary structure information, along with residue-residue contact information as restraints for MODELLER. We present here results of our modelling studies on 30 best resolved single domain protein structures of varied lengths. The results shows that it is very difficult to obtain useful models even with 100% accurate secondary structure predictions and accurate residue contact predictions for up to 30% of residues in a sequence. The best models that we obtained for proteins of lengths 37, 70, 118, 136 and 193 amino acid residues are of RMSDs 4.17, 5.27, 9.12, 7.89 and 9.69, respectively. The results show that one can obtain better models for the proteins which have high percent of alpha-helix content. This analysis further shows that MODELLER restrain optimization program can be useful only if we have truly homologous structure(s) as a template where it derives numerous restraints, almost identical to the templates used. This analysis also clearly indicates that even if we satisfy several true residue-residue contact distances, up to 30% of their sequence length with fully known secondary structural information, we end up predicting model structures much distant from their corresponding native structures.

  2. Exploiting the Past and the Future in Protein Secondary Structure Prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldi, Pierre; Brunak, Søren; Frasconi, P;

    1999-01-01

    Motivation: Predicting the secondary structure of a protein (alpha-helix, beta-sheet, coil) is an important step towards elucidating its three-dimensional structure, as well as its function. Presently, the best predictors are based on machine learning approaches, in particular neural network arch...

  3. Secondary Structure Predictions for Long RNA Sequences Based on Inversion Excursions and MapReduce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehdego, Daniel T; Zhang, Boyu; Kodimala, Vikram K R; Johnson, Kyle L; Taufer, Michela; Leung, Ming-Ying

    2013-05-01

    Secondary structures of ribonucleic acid (RNA) molecules play important roles in many biological processes including gene expression and regulation. Experimental observations and computing limitations suggest that we can approach the secondary structure prediction problem for long RNA sequences by segmenting them into shorter chunks, predicting the secondary structures of each chunk individually using existing prediction programs, and then assembling the results to give the structure of the original sequence. The selection of cutting points is a crucial component of the segmenting step. Noting that stem-loops and pseudoknots always contain an inversion, i.e., a stretch of nucleotides followed closely by its inverse complementary sequence, we developed two cutting methods for segmenting long RNA sequences based on inversion excursions: the centered and optimized method. Each step of searching for inversions, chunking, and predictions can be performed in parallel. In this paper we use a MapReduce framework, i.e., Hadoop, to extensively explore meaningful inversion stem lengths and gap sizes for the segmentation and identify correlations between chunking methods and prediction accuracy. We show that for a set of long RNA sequences in the RFAM database, whose secondary structures are known to contain pseudoknots, our approach predicts secondary structures more accurately than methods that do not segment the sequence, when the latter predictions are possible computationally. We also show that, as sequences exceed certain lengths, some programs cannot computationally predict pseudoknots while our chunking methods can. Overall, our predicted structures still retain the accuracy level of the original prediction programs when compared with known experimental secondary structure.

  4. FTIR Characterization of the Secondary Structure of Insulin Encapsulated within Liposome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGXuan; HUANGLi-xin; NIESong-qing; QIXian-rong; ZHANGQiang

    2003-01-01

    Aim:To determine the secondary structure of insulin encapsulated within liposome.Methods:The secondary structure of native insulin,mixture of insulin with liposome(sample I) and insulin encapsulated within liposome(sample Ⅱ) were determined by FTIR(Fourier Transform Infrared) spectroscopy.Results:The secondary structure of insulin encspsulated within liposome(Ⅱ) are similar with the secondary structure of native insulin.The difference existed in the amount of α-helices (from 36% of insulin to 31% of sample Ⅱ)and β-sheet(from 48% of insulin to 51% of sample Ⅱ).The content of α-helices and β-sheet of insulin in sample I was found to be very close to that of sample Ⅱ.The results revealed that the insulin encapsulated within liposome possibly spread on the surface of liposome,without inserting into the liposome membrane.Coclusion:The secondary structure of insulin encapsulated within liposome is similar with the native insulin.

  5. Regulatory Impact of RNA Secondary Structure across the Arabidopsis Transcriptome[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fan; Zheng, Qi; Vandivier, Lee E.; Willmann, Matthew R.; Chen, Ying; Gregory, Brian D.

    2012-01-01

    The secondary structure of an RNA molecule plays an integral role in its maturation, regulation, and function. However, the global influence of this feature on plant gene expression is still largely unclear. Here, we use a high-throughput, sequencing-based, structure-mapping approach in conjunction with transcriptome-wide sequencing of rRNA-depleted (RNA sequencing), small RNA, and ribosome-bound RNA populations to investigate the impact of RNA secondary structure on gene expression regulation in Arabidopsis thaliana. From this analysis, we find that highly unpaired and paired RNAs are strongly correlated with euchromatic and heterochromatic epigenetic histone modifications, respectively, providing evidence that secondary structure is necessary for these RNA-mediated posttranscriptional regulatory pathways. Additionally, we uncover key structural patterns across protein-coding transcripts that indicate RNA folding demarcates regions of protein translation and likely affects microRNA-mediated regulation of mRNAs in this model plant. We further reveal that RNA folding is significantly anticorrelated with overall transcript abundance, which is often due to the increased propensity of highly structured mRNAs to be degraded and/or processed into small RNAs. Finally, we find that secondary structure affects mRNA translation, suggesting that this feature regulates plant gene expression at multiple levels. These findings provide a global assessment of RNA folding and its significant regulatory effects in a plant transcriptome. PMID:23150631

  6. The Electronic Structure and Secondary Pyroelectric Properties of Lithium Tetraborate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Dowben

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We review the pyroelectric properties and electronic structure of Li2B4O7(110 and Li2B4O7(100 surfaces. There is evidence for a pyroelectric current along the [110] direction of stoichiometric Li2B4O7 so that the pyroelectric coefficient is nonzero but roughly 103 smaller than along the [001] direction of spontaneous polarization. Abrupt decreases in the pyroelectric coefficient along the [110] direction can be correlated with anomalies in the elastic stiffness  contributing to the concept that the pyroelectric coefficient is not simply a vector but has qualities of a tensor, as expected. The time dependent surface photovoltaic charging suggests that surface charging is dependent on crystal orientation and doping, as well as temperature.

  7. Bayesian segmental models with multiple sequence alignment profiles for protein secondary structure and contact map prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wei; Ghahramani, Zoubin; Podtelezhnikov, Alexei; Wild, David L

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a segmental semi-Markov model (SSMM) for protein secondary structure prediction which incorporates multiple sequence alignment profiles with the purpose of improving the predictive performance. The segmental model is a generalization of the hidden Markov model where a hidden state generates segments of various length and secondary structure type. A novel parameterized model is proposed for the likelihood function that explicitly represents multiple sequence alignment profiles to capture the segmental conformation. Numerical results on benchmark data sets show that incorporating the profiles results in substantial improvements and the generalization performance is promising. By incorporating the information from long range interactions in beta-sheets, this model is also capable of carrying out inference on contact maps. This is an important advantage of probabilistic generative models over the traditional discriminative approach to protein secondary structure prediction. The Web server of our algorithm and supplementary materials are available at http://public.kgi.edu/-wild/bsm.html.

  8. [Effects of high pulsed electric field on the secondary and tertiary structure of lipoxygenase].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Kui; Hu, Xiao-Song; Wu, Ji-Hong; Chen, Fang; Liao, Xiao-Jun

    2009-03-01

    The effect of pulsed electric field (PEF) on the secondary and tertiary structure of lipoxygenase (LOX) in a buffer solution was analyzed using far UV-circular dichroism (CD) and fluorescence spectrophotometry, respectively. The secondary and tertiary structure of LOX changed after PEF treatment. The CD spectra of LOX also changed, with the intensity of two negative peaks and the content of alpha-helix significantly decreased (p electric field strength. The fluorescence intensity of LOX increased, and the relative fluorescence intensity of the two characteristic peaks of LOX emission spectra at 337 nm and 583 nm also showed a good linear correlation with the electric field strength. These results showed that the activity inactivation of LOX may be due to the alteration in secondary structure, and both had a good relation.

  9. Bayesian Inference using Neural Net Likelihood Models for Protein Secondary Structure Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Gon Kim

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Several techniques such as Neural Networks, Genetic Algorithms, Decision Trees and other statistical or heuristic methods have been used to approach the complex non-linear task of predicting Alpha-helicies, Beta-sheets and Turns of a proteins secondary structure in the past. This project introduces a new machine learning method by using an offline trained Multilayered Perceptrons (MLP as the likelihood models within a Bayesian Inference framework to predict secondary structures proteins. Varying window sizes are used to extract neighboring amino acid information and passed back and forth between the Neural Net models and the Bayesian Inference process until there is a convergence of the posterior secondary structure probability.

  10. ITS2 Secondary Structure Improves Discrimination between Medicinal "Mu Tong" Species when Using DNA Barcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Yuan, Yuan; Yang, Shuo; Huang, Jianjun; Huang, Luqi

    2015-01-01

    DNA barcoding is a promising species identification method, but it has proved difficult to find a standardized DNA marker in plant. Although the ITS/ITS2 RNA transcript has been proposed as the core barcode for seed plants, it has been criticized for being too conserved in some species to provide enough information or too variable in some species to align it within the different taxa ranks. We selected 30 individuals, representing 16 species and four families, to explore whether ITS2 can successfully resolve species in terms of secondary structure. Secondary structure was predicted using Mfold software and sequence-structure was aligned by MARNA. RNAstat software transformed the secondary structures into 28 symbol code data for maximum parsimony (MP) analysis. The results showed that the ITS2 structures in our samples had a common four-helix folding type with some shared motifs. This conserved structure facilitated the alignment of ambiguous sequences from divergent families. The structure alignment yielded a MP tree, in which most topological relationships were congruent with the tree constructed using nucleotide sequence data. When the data was combined, we obtained a well-resolved and highly supported phylogeny, in which individuals of a same species were clustered together into a monophyletic group. As a result, the different species that are often referred to as the herb "Mu tong" were successfully identified using short fragments of 250 bp ITS2 sequences, together with their secondary structure. Thus our analysis strengthens the potential of ITS2 as a promising DNA barcode because it incorporates valuable secondary structure information that will help improve discrimination between species.

  11. ITS2 Secondary Structure Improves Discrimination between Medicinal "Mu Tong" Species when Using DNA Barcoding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    Full Text Available DNA barcoding is a promising species identification method, but it has proved difficult to find a standardized DNA marker in plant. Although the ITS/ITS2 RNA transcript has been proposed as the core barcode for seed plants, it has been criticized for being too conserved in some species to provide enough information or too variable in some species to align it within the different taxa ranks. We selected 30 individuals, representing 16 species and four families, to explore whether ITS2 can successfully resolve species in terms of secondary structure. Secondary structure was predicted using Mfold software and sequence-structure was aligned by MARNA. RNAstat software transformed the secondary structures into 28 symbol code data for maximum parsimony (MP analysis. The results showed that the ITS2 structures in our samples had a common four-helix folding type with some shared motifs. This conserved structure facilitated the alignment of ambiguous sequences from divergent families. The structure alignment yielded a MP tree, in which most topological relationships were congruent with the tree constructed using nucleotide sequence data. When the data was combined, we obtained a well-resolved and highly supported phylogeny, in which individuals of a same species were clustered together into a monophyletic group. As a result, the different species that are often referred to as the herb "Mu tong" were successfully identified using short fragments of 250 bp ITS2 sequences, together with their secondary structure. Thus our analysis strengthens the potential of ITS2 as a promising DNA barcode because it incorporates valuable secondary structure information that will help improve discrimination between species.

  12. CompaRNA: a server for continuous benchmarking of automated methods for RNA secondary structure prediction

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We present a continuous benchmarking approach for the assessment of RNA secondary structure prediction methods implemented in the CompaRNA web server. As of 3 October 2012, the performance of 28 single-sequence and 13 comparative methods has been evaluated on RNA sequences/structures released weekly by the Protein Data Bank. We also provide a static benchmark generated on RNA 2D structures derived from the RNAstrand database. Benchmarks on both data sets offer insight into the relative perfor...

  13. RNAmutants: a web server to explore the mutational landscape of RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldispühl, Jerome; Devadas, Srinivas; Berger, Bonnie; Clote, Peter

    2009-07-01

    The history and mechanism of molecular evolution in DNA have been greatly elucidated by contributions from genetics, probability theory and bioinformatics--indeed, mathematical developments such as Kimura's neutral theory, Kingman's coalescent theory and efficient software such as BLAST, ClustalW, Phylip, etc., provide the foundation for modern population genetics. In contrast to DNA, the function of most noncoding RNA depends on tertiary structure, experimentally known to be largely determined by secondary structure, for which dynamic programming can efficiently compute the minimum free energy secondary structure. For this reason, understanding the effect of pointwise mutations in RNA secondary structure could reveal fundamental properties of structural RNA molecules and improve our understanding of molecular evolution of RNA. The web server RNAmutants provides several efficient tools to compute the ensemble of low-energy secondary structures for all k-mutants of a given RNA sequence, where k is bounded by a user-specified upper bound. As we have previously shown, these tools can be used to predict putative deleterious mutations and to analyze regulatory sequences from the hepatitis C and human immunodeficiency genomes. Web server is available at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/RNAmutants/, and downloadable binaries at http://rnamutants.csail.mit.edu/.

  14. Predicting RNA Secondary Structure Using Profile Stochastic Context-Free Grammars and Phylogenic Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Yong Fang; Zhi-Gang Luo; Zheng-Hua Wang

    2008-01-01

    Stochastic context-free grammars (SCFGs) have been applied to predicting RNA secondary structure. The prediction of RNA secondary structure can be facilitated by incorporating with comparative sequence analysis. However,most of existing SCFG-based methods lack explicit phylogenic analysis of homologous RNA sequences, which is probably the reason why these methods are not ideal in practical application. Hence, we present a new SCFG-based method by integrating phylogenic analysis with the newly defined profile SCFG. The method can be summarized as: 1) we define a new profile SCFG, M, to depict consensus secondary structure of multiple RNA sequence alignment; 2) we introduce two distinct hidden Markov models, λ and λ', to perform phylogenic analysis of homologous RNA sequences. Here, λ is for non-structural regions of the sequence and λ' is for structural regions of the sequence; 3) we mergeλ and λ' in to M todevise a combined model for prediction of RNA secondary structure. We tested our method on data sets constructed from the Rfam database. The sensitivity and specificity of our method are more accurate than those of the predictions by Pfold.

  15. Artificial Intelligence in Prediction of Secondary Protein Structure Using CB513 Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avdagic, Zikrija; Purisevic, Elvir; Omanovic, Samir; Coralic, Zlatan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we describe CB513 a non-redundant dataset, suitable for development of algorithms for prediction of secondary protein structure. A program was made in Borland Delphi for transforming data from our dataset to make it suitable for learning of neural network for prediction of secondary protein structure implemented in MATLAB Neural-Network Toolbox. Learning (training and testing) of neural network is researched with different sizes of windows, different number of neurons in the hidden layer and different number of training epochs, while using dataset CB513. PMID:21347158

  16. Web-Beagle: a web server for the alignment of RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattei, Eugenio; Pietrosanto, Marco; Ferrè, Fabrizio; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela

    2015-07-01

    Web-Beagle (http://beagle.bio.uniroma2.it) is a web server for the pairwise global or local alignment of RNA secondary structures. The server exploits a new encoding for RNA secondary structure and a substitution matrix of RNA structural elements to perform RNA structural alignments. The web server allows the user to compute up to 10 000 alignments in a single run, taking as input sets of RNA sequences and structures or primary sequences alone. In the latter case, the server computes the secondary structure prediction for the RNAs on-the-fly using RNAfold (free energy minimization). The user can also compare a set of input RNAs to one of five pre-compiled RNA datasets including lncRNAs and 3' UTRs. All types of comparison produce in output the pairwise alignments along with structural similarity and statistical significance measures for each resulting alignment. A graphical color-coded representation of the alignments allows the user to easily identify structural similarities between RNAs. Web-Beagle can be used for finding structurally related regions in two or more RNAs, for the identification of homologous regions or for functional annotation. Benchmark tests show that Web-Beagle has lower computational complexity, running time and better performances than other available methods.

  17. FASTR: A novel data format for concomitant representation of RNA sequence and secondary structure information

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tungadri Bose; Anirban Dutta; Mohammed Mh; Hemang Gandhi; Sharmila S Mande

    2015-09-01

    Given the importance of RNA secondary structures in defining their biological role, it would be convenient for researchers seeking RNA data if both sequence and structural information pertaining to RNA molecules are made available together. Current nucleotide data repositories archive only RNA sequence data. Furthermore, storage formats which can frugally represent RNA sequence as well as structure data in a single file, are currently unavailable. This article proposes a novel storage format, `FASTR’, for concomitant representation of RNA sequence and structure. The storage efficiency of the proposed FASTR format has been evaluated using RNA data from various microorganisms. Results indicate that the size of FASTR formatted files (containing both RNA sequence as well as structure information) are equivalent to that of FASTA-format files, which contain only RNA sequence information. RNA secondary structure is typically represented using a combination of a string of nucleotide characters along with the corresponding dot-bracket notation indicating structural attributes. `FASTR’ – the novel storage format proposed in the present study enables a frugal representation of both RNA sequence and structural information in the form of a single string. In spite of having a relatively smaller storage footprint, the resultant `fastr’ string(s) retain all sequence as well as secondary structural information that could be stored using a dot-bracket notation. An implementation of the `FASTR’ methodology is available for download at http://metagenomics.atc.tcs.com/compression/fastr.

  18. RNACompress: Grammar-based compression and informational complexity measurement of RNA secondary structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chun

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the rapid emergence of RNA databases and newly identified non-coding RNAs, an efficient compression algorithm for RNA sequence and structural information is needed for the storage and analysis of such data. Although several algorithms for compressing DNA sequences have been proposed, none of them are suitable for the compression of RNA sequences with their secondary structures simultaneously. This kind of compression not only facilitates the maintenance of RNA data, but also supplies a novel way to measure the informational complexity of RNA structural data, raising the possibility of studying the relationship between the functional activities of RNA structures and their complexities, as well as various structural properties of RNA based on compression. Results RNACompress employs an efficient grammar-based model to compress RNA sequences and their secondary structures. The main goals of this algorithm are two fold: (1 present a robust and effective way for RNA structural data compression; (2 design a suitable model to represent RNA secondary structure as well as derive the informational complexity of the structural data based on compression. Our extensive tests have shown that RNACompress achieves a universally better compression ratio compared with other sequence-specific or common text-specific compression algorithms, such as Gencompress, winrar and gzip. Moreover, a test of the activities of distinct GTP-binding RNAs (aptamers compared with their structural complexity shows that our defined informational complexity can be used to describe how complexity varies with activity. These results lead to an objective means of comparing the functional properties of heteropolymers from the information perspective. Conclusion A universal algorithm for the compression of RNA secondary structure as well as the evaluation of its informational complexity is discussed in this paper. We have developed RNACompress, as a useful tool

  19. "Parallel factor analysis of multi-excitation ultraviolet resonance Raman spectra for protein secondary structure determination".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshokoya, Olayinka O; JiJi, Renee D

    2015-09-10

    Protein secondary structural analysis is important for understanding the relationship between protein structure and function, or more importantly how changes in structure relate to loss of function. The structurally sensitive protein vibrational modes (amide I, II, III and S) in deep-ultraviolet resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectra resulting from the backbone C-O and N-H vibrations make DUVRR a potentially powerful tool for studying secondary structure changes. Experimental studies reveal that the position and intensity of the four amide modes in DUVRR spectra of proteins are largely correlated with the varying fractions of α-helix, β-sheet and disordered structural content of proteins. Employing multivariate calibration methods and DUVRR spectra of globular proteins with varying structural compositions, the secondary structure of a protein with unknown structure can be predicted. A disadvantage of multivariate calibration methods is the requirement of known concentration or spectral profiles. Second-order curve resolution methods, such as parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), do not have such a requirement due to the "second-order advantage." An exceptional feature of DUVRR spectroscopy is that DUVRR spectra are linearly dependent on both excitation wavelength and secondary structure composition. Thus, higher order data can be created by combining protein DUVRR spectra of several proteins collected at multiple excitation wavelengths to give multi-excitation ultraviolet resonance Raman data (ME-UVRR). PARAFAC has been used to analyze ME-UVRR data of nine proteins to resolve the pure spectral, excitation and compositional profiles. A three factor model with non-negativity constraints produced three unique factors that were correlated with the relative abundance of helical, β-sheet and poly-proline II dihedral angles. This is the first empirical evidence that the typically resolved "disordered" spectrum represents the better defined poly-proline II type structure.

  20. Secondary structure models of the 3′ untranslated regions of diverse R2 RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    RUSCHAK, AMY M.; MATHEWS, DAVID H.; BIBILLO, ARKADIUSZ; SPINELLI, SHERRY L.; CHILDS, JESSICA L.; EICKBUSH, THOMAS H.; TURNER, DOUGLAS H.

    2004-01-01

    The RNA structure of the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of the R2 retrotransposable element is recognized by the R2-encoded reverse transcriptase in a reaction called target primed reverse transcription (TPRT). To provide insight into structure–function relationships important for TPRT, we have created alignments that reveal the secondary structure for 22 Drosophila and five silkmoth 3′ UTR R2 sequences. In addition, free energy minimization has been used to predict the secondary structure for the 3′ UTR R2 RNA of Forficula auricularia. The predicted structures for Bombyx mori and F. auricularia are consistent with chemical modification data obtained with β-ethoxy-α-ketobutyraldehyde (kethoxal), dimethyl sulfate, and 1-cyclohexyl-3-(2-morpholinoethyl)carbodiimide metho-p-toluene sulfonate. The structures appear to have common helices that are likely important for function. PMID:15146081

  1. FTIR study of secondary structure of bovine serum albumin and ovalbumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrosimova, K. V.; Shulenina, O. V.; Paston, S. V.

    2016-11-01

    Proteins structure is the critical factor for their functioning. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy provides a possibility to obtain information about secondary structure of proteins in different states and also in a whole biological samples. Infrared spectra of egg white from the untreated and hard-boiled hen's egg, and also of chicken ovalbumin and bovine serum albumin in lyophilic form and in aqueous solution were studied. Lyophilization of investigated globular proteins is accompanied by the decrease of a-helix structures and the increase in amount of intermolecular β-sheets. Analysis of infrared spectrum of egg white allowed to make an estimation of OVA secondary structure and to observe α-to-β structural transformation as a result of the heat denaturation.

  2. Active control of structural vibration with on-line secondary path modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Tiejun; GU Zhongquan

    2004-01-01

    An active control strategy with on-line secondary path modeling is proposed and applied in active control of helicopter structural vibration. Computer simulations of the secondary path modeling performance demonstrate the superiorities of the active control strategy. A 2-input 4-output active control simulation for a helicopter model is performed and great reduction of structural vibration is achieved. 2-input 2-output and 2-input 4-output experimental studies of structural vibration control for a free-free beam are also carried out in laboratory to simulate a flying helicopter. The experimental results also show better reduction of the structural vibration, which verifies that the proposed method is effective and practical in structural vibration reduction.

  3. New insights from cluster analysis methods for RNA secondary structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Emily; Heitsch, Christine

    2016-05-01

    A widening gap exists between the best practices for RNA secondary structure prediction developed by computational researchers and the methods used in practice by experimentalists. Minimum free energy predictions, although broadly used, are outperformed by methods which sample from the Boltzmann distribution and data mine the results. In particular, moving beyond the single structure prediction paradigm yields substantial gains in accuracy. Furthermore, the largest improvements in accuracy and precision come from viewing secondary structures not at the base pair level but at lower granularity/higher abstraction. This suggests that random errors affecting precision and systematic ones affecting accuracy are both reduced by this 'fuzzier' view of secondary structures. Thus experimentalists who are willing to adopt a more rigorous, multilayered approach to secondary structure prediction by iterating through these levels of granularity will be much better able to capture fundamental aspects of RNA base pairing. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:278-294. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1334 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  4. Arabidopsis mRNA secondary structure correlates with protein function and domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandivier, Lee E.; Li, Fan; Zheng, Qi; Willmann, Matthew R.; Chen, Ying; Gregory, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    RNAs fold into intricate structures that are determined by specific base pairing interactions encoded within their primary sequences. Recently, a number of transcriptome-wide studies have suggested that RNA secondary structure is a potent cis-acting regulator of numerous post-transcriptional processes in viruses and eukaryotes. However, the need for experimentally-based structure determination methods has not been well addressed. Here, we show that the regulatory significance of Arabidopsis RNA secondary structure is revealed specifically through high-throughput, sequencing-based, structure mapping data, not by computational prediction. Additionally, we find that transcripts with similar levels of secondary structure in their UTRs (5' or 3') or CDS tend to encode proteins with coherent functions. Finally, we reveal that portions of mRNAs encoding predicted protein domains are significantly more structured than those specifying inter-domain regions. In total, our findings show the utility of high-throughput, sequencing-based, structure-mapping approaches and suggest that mRNA folding regulates protein maturation and function. PMID:23603972

  5. Robust, integrated computational control of NMR experiments to achieve optimal assignment by ADAPT-NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Arash; Tonelli, Marco; Sahu, Sarata C; Singarapu, Kiran K; Eghbalnia, Hamid R; Markley, John L

    2012-01-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) represents a groundbreaking prototype for automated protein structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. With a [(13)C,(15)N]-labeled protein sample loaded into the NMR spectrometer, ADAPT-NMR delivers complete backbone resonance assignments and secondary structure in an optimal fashion without human intervention. ADAPT-NMR achieves this by implementing a strategy in which the goal of optimal assignment in each step determines the subsequent step by analyzing the current sum of available data. ADAPT-NMR is the first iterative and fully automated approach designed specifically for the optimal assignment of proteins with fast data collection as a byproduct of this goal. ADAPT-NMR evaluates the current spectral information, and uses a goal-directed objective function to select the optimal next data collection step(s) and then directs the NMR spectrometer to collect the selected data set. ADAPT-NMR extracts peak positions from the newly collected data and uses this information in updating the analysis resonance assignments and secondary structure. The goal-directed objective function then defines the next data collection step. The procedure continues until the collected data support comprehensive peak identification, resonance assignments at the desired level of completeness, and protein secondary structure. We present test cases in which ADAPT-NMR achieved results in two days or less that would have taken two months or more by manual approaches.

  6. Robust, integrated computational control of NMR experiments to achieve optimal assignment by ADAPT-NMR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Bahrami

    Full Text Available ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR represents a groundbreaking prototype for automated protein structure determination by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. With a [(13C,(15N]-labeled protein sample loaded into the NMR spectrometer, ADAPT-NMR delivers complete backbone resonance assignments and secondary structure in an optimal fashion without human intervention. ADAPT-NMR achieves this by implementing a strategy in which the goal of optimal assignment in each step determines the subsequent step by analyzing the current sum of available data. ADAPT-NMR is the first iterative and fully automated approach designed specifically for the optimal assignment of proteins with fast data collection as a byproduct of this goal. ADAPT-NMR evaluates the current spectral information, and uses a goal-directed objective function to select the optimal next data collection step(s and then directs the NMR spectrometer to collect the selected data set. ADAPT-NMR extracts peak positions from the newly collected data and uses this information in updating the analysis resonance assignments and secondary structure. The goal-directed objective function then defines the next data collection step. The procedure continues until the collected data support comprehensive peak identification, resonance assignments at the desired level of completeness, and protein secondary structure. We present test cases in which ADAPT-NMR achieved results in two days or less that would have taken two months or more by manual approaches.

  7. Protein Secondary Structure Determination by Constrained Single-Particle Cryo-Electron Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Bartesaghi, Alberto; Lecumberry, Federico; Sapiro, Guillermo; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2012-01-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is a powerful technique for 3D structure determination of protein complexes by averaging information from individual molecular images. The resolutions that can be achieved with single-particle cryo-EM are frequently limited by inaccuracies in assigning molecular orientations based solely on 2D projection images. Tomographic data collection schemes, however, provide powerful constraints that can be used to more accurately determine molecular orientations nece...

  8. Description and recognition of regular and distorted secondary structures in proteins using the automated protein structure analysis method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranganathan, Sushilee; Izotov, Dmitry; Kraka, Elfi; Cremer, Dieter

    2009-08-01

    The Automated Protein Structure Analysis (APSA) method, which describes the protein backbone as a smooth line in three-dimensional space and characterizes it by curvature kappa and torsion tau as a function of arc length s, was applied on 77 proteins to determine all secondary structural units via specific kappa(s) and tau(s) patterns. A total of 533 alpha-helices and 644 beta-strands were recognized by APSA, whereas DSSP gives 536 and 651 units, respectively. Kinks and distortions were quantified and the boundaries (entry and exit) of secondary structures were classified. Similarity between proteins can be easily quantified using APSA, as was demonstrated for the roll architecture of proteins ubiquitin and spinach ferridoxin. A twenty-by-twenty comparison of all alpha domains showed that the curvature-torsion patterns generated by APSA provide an accurate and meaningful similarity measurement for secondary, super secondary, and tertiary protein structure. APSA is shown to accurately reflect the conformation of the backbone effectively reducing three-dimensional structure information to two-dimensional representations that are easy to interpret and understand.

  9. [Establishment of industry promotion technology system in Chinese medicine secondary exploitation based on "component structure theory"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xu-Dong; Feng, Liang; Zhang, Ming-Hua; Gu, Jun-Fei; Jia, Xiao-Bin

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of the secondary exploitation of Chinese medicine is to improve the quality of Chinese medicine products, enhance core competitiveness, for better use in clinical practice, and more effectively solve the patient suffering. Herbs, extraction, separation, refreshing, preparation and quality control are all involved in the industry promotion of Chinese medicine secondary exploitation of industrial production. The Chinese medicine quality improvement and industry promotion could be realized with the whole process of process optimization, quality control, overall processes improvement. Based on the "component structure theory", "multi-dimensional structure & process dynamic quality control system" and systematic and holistic character of Chinese medicine, impacts of whole process were discussed. Technology systems of Chinese medicine industry promotion was built to provide theoretical basis for improving the quality and efficacy of the secondary development of traditional Chinese medicine products.

  10. A Noninvasive Magnetic Stimulator Utilizing Secondary Ferrite Cores and Resonant Structures for Field Enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Pradhan, Raunaq

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, secondary ferrite cores and resonant structures have been used for field enhancement. The tissue was placed between the double square source coil and the secondary ferrite core. Resonant coils were added which aided in modulating the electric field in the tissue. The field distribution in the tissue was measured using electromagnetic simulations and ex-vivo measurements with tissue. Calculations involve the use of finite element analysis (Ansoft HFSS) to represent the electrical properties of the physical structure. The setup was compared to a conventional design in which the secondary ferrite cores were absent. It was found that the induced electric field could be increased by 122%, when ferrite cores were placed below the tissue at 450 kHz source frequency. The induced electric field was found to be localized in the tissue, verified using ex-vivo experiments. This preliminary study maybe further extended to establish the verified proposed concept with different complicated body parts modelled...

  11. Microwave and infrared spectra, adjusted r0 structural parameters, conformational stabilities, vibrational assignments, and theoretical calculations of cyclobutylcarboxylic acid chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, Joshua J; Darkhalil, Ikhlas D; Deodhar, Bhushan S; Gounev, Todor K; Gurusinghe, Ranil M; Tubergen, Michael J; Groner, Peter; Durig, James R

    2013-08-01

    The FT-microwave spectrum of cyclobutylcarboxylic acid chloride, c-C4H7C(O)Cl, has been recorded and 153 transitions for the (35)Cl and (37)Cl isotopologues have been assigned for the gauche-equatorial (g-Eq) conformation. The ground state rotational constants were determined for (35)Cl [(37)Cl]: A = 4349.8429(25) [4322.0555(56)] MHz, B = 1414.8032(25) [1384.5058(25)] MHz, and C = 1148.2411(25) [1126.3546(25)] MHz. From these rotational constants and ab initio predicted parameters, adjusted r0 parameters are reported with distances (Å) rCα-C = 1.491(4), rC═O = 1.193(3), rCα-Cβ = 1.553(4), rCα-Cβ' = 1.540(4), rCγ-Cβ = 1.547(4), rCγ-Cβ' = 1.546(4), rC-Cl = 1.801(3) and angles (deg) τCγCβCβ'Cα = 30.9(5). Variable temperature (-70 to -100 °C) infrared spectra (4000 to 400 cm(-1)) were recorded in liquid xenon and the g-Eq conformer was determined the most stable form, with enthalpy differences of 91 ± 9 cm(-1) (1.09 ± 0.11 kJ/mol) for the gauche-axial (g-Ax) form and 173 ± 17 cm(-1) (2.07 ± 0.20 kJ/mol) for the trans-equatorial (t-Eq) conformer. The relative amounts at ambient temperature are 54% g-Eq, 35 ± 1% g-Ax, and 12 ± 1% t-Eq forms. Vibrational assignments have been provided for the three conformers and theoretical calculations were carried out. The results are discussed and compared to corresponding properties of related molecules.

  12. Prediction of protein secondary structure from circular dichroism using theoretically derived spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis-Jeune, Caroline; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A; Perez-Iratxeta, Carol

    2012-02-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) is a spectroscopic technique commonly used to investigate the structure of proteins. Major secondary structure types, alpha-helices and beta-strands, produce distinctive CD spectra. Thus, by comparing the CD spectrum of a protein of interest to a reference set consisting of CD spectra of proteins of known structure, predictive methods can estimate the secondary structure of the protein. Currently available methods, including K2D2, use such experimental CD reference sets, which are very small in size when compared to the number of tertiary structures available in the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Conversely, given a PDB structure, it is possible to predict a theoretical CD spectrum from it. The methodological framework for this calculation was established long ago but only recently a convenient implementation called DichroCalc has been developed. In this study, we set to determine whether theoretically derived spectra could be used as reference set for accurate CD based predictions of secondary structure. We used DichroCalc to calculate the theoretical CD spectra of a nonredundant set of structures representing most proteins in the PDB, and applied a straightforward approach for predicting protein secondary structure content using these theoretical CD spectra as reference set. We show that this method improves the predictions, particularly for the wavelength interval between 200 and 240 nm and for beta-strand content. We have implemented this method, called K2D3, in a publicly accessible web server at http://www. ogic.ca/projects/k2d3.

  13. Prediction of protein secondary structure using probability based features and a hybrid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanty, Pradip; Pal, Nikhil R; Mudi, Rajani K

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we propose some co-occurrence probability-based features for prediction of protein secondary structure. The features are extracted using occurrence/nonoccurrence of secondary structures in the protein sequences. We explore two types of features: position-specific (based on position of amino acid on fragments of protein sequences) as well as position-independent (independent of amino acid position on fragments of protein sequences). We use a hybrid system, NEUROSVM, consisting of neural networks and support vector machines for classification of secondary structures. We propose two schemes NSVMps and NSVM for protein secondary structure prediction. The NSVMps uses position-specific probability-based features and NEUROSVM classifier whereas NSVM uses the same classifier with position-independent probability-based features. The proposed method falls in the single-sequence category of methods because it does not use any sequence profile information such as position specific scoring matrices (PSSM) derived from PSI-BLAST. Two widely used datasets RS126 and CB513 are used in the experiments. The results obtained using the proposed features and NEUROSVM classifier are better than most of the existing single-sequence prediction methods. Most importantly, the results using NSVMps that are obtained using lower dimensional features, are comparable to those by other existing methods. The NSVMps and NSVM are finally tested on target proteins of the critical assessment of protein structure prediction experiment-9 (CASP9). A larger dataset is used to compare the performance of the proposed methods with that of two recent single-sequence prediction methods. We also investigate the impact of presence of different amino acid residues (in protein sequences) that are responsible for the formation of different secondary structures.

  14. RNA secondary structure modeling at consistent high accuracy using differential SHAPE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Greggory M; Leonard, Christopher W; Weeks, Kevin M

    2014-06-01

    RNA secondary structure modeling is a challenging problem, and recent successes have raised the standards for accuracy, consistency, and tractability. Large increases in accuracy have been achieved by including data on reactivity toward chemical probes: Incorporation of 1M7 SHAPE reactivity data into an mfold-class algorithm results in median accuracies for base pair prediction that exceed 90%. However, a few RNA structures are modeled with significantly lower accuracy. Here, we show that incorporating differential reactivities from the NMIA and 1M6 reagents--which detect noncanonical and tertiary interactions--into prediction algorithms results in highly accurate secondary structure models for RNAs that were previously shown to be difficult to model. For these RNAs, 93% of accepted canonical base pairs were recovered in SHAPE-directed models. Discrepancies between accepted and modeled structures were small and appear to reflect genuine structural differences. Three-reagent SHAPE-directed modeling scales concisely to structurally complex RNAs to resolve the in-solution secondary structure analysis problem for many classes of RNA.

  15. Bioinformatics approaches for structural and functional analysis of proteins in secondary metabolism in Withania somnifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchita; Singh, Swati; Sharma, Ashok

    2014-11-01

    Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha) is an affluent storehouse of large number of pharmacologically active secondary metabolites known as withanolides. These secondary metabolites are produced by withanolide biosynthetic pathway. Very less information is available on structural and functional aspects of enzymes involved in withanolides biosynthetic pathways of Withiana somnifera. We therefore performed a bioinformatics analysis to look at functional and structural properties of these important enzymes. The pathway enzymes taken for this study were 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, 1-Deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase, 1-Deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate reductase, farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase, squalene synthase, squalene epoxidase, and cycloartenol synthase. The prediction of secondary structure was performed for basic structural information. Three-dimensional structures for these enzymes were predicted. The physico-chemical properties such as pI, AI, GRAVY and instability index were also studied. The current information will provide a platform to know the structural attributes responsible for the function of these protein until experimental structures become available.

  16. Teachers Working in Collaborative Structures: A Case Study of a Secondary School in the USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, David Hagen

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on a study that explores collaborative structures of shared decision-making in an urban secondary school in the USA. The data in the study came from unstructured interviews with 20 teachers, the principal, the assistant principal, a counsellor and 10 students. The interviews took place over a three-week period in June of 2001…

  17. The Turn of the Screw: An Exercise in Protein Secondary Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikaart, Michael

    2011-01-01

    An exercise using simple paper strips to illustrate protein helical and sheet secondary structures is presented. Drawing on the rich historical context of the use of physical models in protein biochemistry by early practitioners, in particular Linus Pauling, the purpose of this activity is to cultivate in students a hands-on, intuitive sense of…

  18. Signatures of beta-sheet secondary structures in linear and two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheatum, CM; Tokmakoff, A; Knoester, J

    2004-01-01

    Using idealized models for parallel and antiparallel beta sheets, we calculate the linear and two-dimensional infrared spectra of the amide I vibration as a function of size and secondary structure. The model assumes transition-dipole coupling between the amide I oscillators in the sheet and account

  19. Amide I'-II' 2D IR spectroscopy provides enhanced protein secondary structural sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deflores, Lauren P; Ganim, Ziad; Nicodemus, Rebecca A; Tokmakoff, Andrei

    2009-03-11

    We demonstrate how multimode 2D IR spectroscopy of the protein amide I' and II' vibrations can be used to distinguish protein secondary structure. Polarization-dependent amide I'-II' 2D IR experiments on poly-l-lysine in the beta-sheet, alpha-helix, and random coil conformations show that a combination of amide I' and II' diagonal and cross peaks can effectively distinguish between secondary structural content, where amide I' infrared spectroscopy alone cannot. The enhanced sensitivity arises from frequency and amplitude correlations between amide II' and amide I' spectra that reflect the symmetry of secondary structures. 2D IR surfaces are used to parametrize an excitonic model for the amide I'-II' manifold suitable to predict protein amide I'-II' spectra. This model reveals that the dominant vibrational interaction contributing to this sensitivity is a combination of negative amide II'-II' through-bond coupling and amide I'-II' coupling within the peptide unit. The empirically determined amide II'-II' couplings do not significantly vary with secondary structure: -8.5 cm(-1) for the beta sheet, -8.7 cm(-1) for the alpha helix, and -5 cm(-1) for the coil.

  20. Tropical rain-forest matrix quality affects bat assemblage structure in secondary forest patches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vleut, I.; Levy-Tacher, I.; Galindo-Gonzalez, J.; Boer, de W.F.; Ramirez-Marcial, N.

    2012-01-01

    We studied Phyllostomidae bat assemblage structure in patches of secondary forest dominated by the pioneer tree Ochroma pyramidale, largely (.85%) or partially (,35%) surrounded by a matrix of tropical rain forest, to test 3 hypotheses: the highest bat diversity and richness is observed in the matri

  1. Secondary School Students' Understanding of Mathematical Induction: Structural Characteristics and the Process of Proof Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palla, Marina; Potari, Despina; Spyrou, Panagiotis

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the meaning students attribute to the structure of mathematical induction (MI) and the process of proof construction using mathematical induction in the context of a geometric recursion problem. Two hundred and thirteen 17-year-old students of an upper secondary school in Greece participated in the study. Students'…

  2. A possible contribution of mRNA secondary structure to translation initiation efficiency in Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guchte, Maarten van de; Lende, Ted van der; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerard

    1991-01-01

    Gene expression signals derived from Lactococcus lactis were linked to lacZ-fused genes with different 5'-nucleotide sequences. Computer predictions of mRNA secondary structure were combined with lacZ expression studies to direct base-substitutions that could possibly influence gene expression. Muta

  3. Secondary structure of prokaryotic 5S ribosomal ribonucleic acids: a study with ribonucleases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Douthwaite, S; Garrett, R A

    1981-01-01

    , we were able to distinguish between primary and secondary cutting positions and also to establish the relative degree of cutting. The data reveal the predicted similarities of the higher order structure in the two RNAs but also demonstrate a few significant differences. The data also provide direct...

  4. [Conserved motifs in the primary and secondary ITS1 structures in bryophytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milyutina, I A; Ignatov, M S

    2015-01-01

    A study of the ITS1 nucleotide sequences of 1000 moss species of 62 families, 11 liverwort species from five orders, and one hornwort Anthoceros agrestis identified five highly conserved motifs (CM1-CM5), which are presumably involved in pre-rRNA processing. Although the ITS1 sequences substantially differ in length and the extent of divergence, the conserved motifs are found in all of them. ITS1 secondary structures were constructed for 76 mosses, and main regularities at conserved motif positioning were observed. The positions of processing sites in the ITS1 secondary structure of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were found to be similar to the positions of the conserved motifs in the ITS1 secondary structures of mosses and liverworts. In addition, a potential hairpin formation in the putative secondary structure of a pre-rRNA fragment was considered for the region between ITS1 CM4-CM5 and a highly conserved region between hairpins 49 and 50 (H49 and H50) of the 18S rRNA.

  5. Secondary flow structure in a model curved artery: 3D morphology and circulation budget analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we examined the rate of change of circulation within control regions encompassing the large-scale vortical structures associated with secondary flows, i.e. deformed Dean-, Lyne- and Wall-type (D-L-W) vortices at planar cross-sections in a 180° curved artery model (curvature ratio, 1/7). Magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) experiments were performed independently, under the same physiological inflow conditions (Womersley number, 4.2) and using Newtonian blood-analog fluids. The MRV-technique performed at Stanford University produced phase-averaged, three-dimensional velocity fields. Secondary flow field comparisons of MRV-data to PIV-data at various cross-sectional planes and inflow phases were made. A wavelet-decomposition-based approach was implemented to characterize various secondary flow morphologies. We hypothesize that the persistence and decay of arterial secondary flow vortices is intrinsically related to the influence of the out-of-plane flow, tilting, in-plane convection and diffusion-related factors within the control regions. Evaluation of these factors will elucidate secondary flow structures in arterial hemodynamics. Supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number CBET-0828903, and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE). The MRV data were acquired at Stanford University in collaboration with Christopher Elkins and John Eaton.

  6. mRNA secondary structures fold sequentially but exchange rapidly in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth M Mahen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available RNAs adopt defined structures to perform biological activities, and conformational transitions among alternative structures are critical to virtually all RNA-mediated processes ranging from metabolite-activation of bacterial riboswitches to pre-mRNA splicing and viral replication in eukaryotes. Mechanistic analysis of an RNA folding reaction in a biological context is challenging because many steps usually intervene between assembly of a functional RNA structure and execution of a biological function. We developed a system to probe mechanisms of secondary structure folding and exchange directly in vivo using self-cleavage to monitor competition between mutually exclusive structures that promote or inhibit ribozyme assembly. In previous work, upstream structures were more effective than downstream structures in blocking ribozyme assembly during transcription in vitro, consistent with a sequential folding mechanism. However, upstream and downstream structures blocked ribozyme assembly equally well in vivo, suggesting that intracellular folding outcomes reflect thermodynamic equilibration or that annealing of contiguous sequences is favored kinetically. We have extended these studies to learn when, if ever, thermodynamic stability becomes an impediment to rapid equilibration among alternative RNA structures in vivo. We find that a narrow thermodynamic threshold determines whether kinetics or thermodynamics govern RNA folding outcomes in vivo. mRNA secondary structures fold sequentially in vivo, but exchange between adjacent secondary structures is much faster in vivo than it is in vitro. Previous work showed that simple base-paired RNA helices dissociate at similar rates in vivo and in vitro so exchange between adjacent structures must occur through a different mechanism, one that likely involves facilitation of branch migration by proteins associated with nascent transcripts.

  7. Secondary structures of rRNAs from all three domains of life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton S Petrov

    Full Text Available Accurate secondary structures are important for understanding ribosomes, which are extremely large and highly complex. Using 3D structures of ribosomes as input, we have revised and corrected traditional secondary (2° structures of rRNAs. We identify helices by specific geometric and molecular interaction criteria, not by co-variation. The structural approach allows us to incorporate non-canonical base pairs on parity with Watson-Crick base pairs. The resulting rRNA 2° structures are up-to-date and consistent with three-dimensional structures, and are information-rich. These 2° structures are relatively simple to understand and are amenable to reproduction and modification by end-users. The 2° structures made available here broadly sample the phylogenetic tree and are mapped with a variety of data related to molecular interactions and geometry, phylogeny and evolution. We have generated 2° structures for both large subunit (LSU 23S/28S and small subunit (SSU 16S/18S rRNAs of Escherichia coli, Thermus thermophilus, Haloarcula marismortui (LSU rRNA only, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, and Homo sapiens. We provide high-resolution editable versions of the 2° structures in several file formats. For the SSU rRNA, the 2° structures use an intuitive representation of the central pseudoknot where base triples are presented as pairs of base pairs. Both LSU and SSU secondary maps are available (http://apollo.chemistry.gatech.edu/RibosomeGallery. Mapping of data onto 2° structures was performed on the RiboVision server (http://apollo.chemistry.gatech.edu/RiboVision.

  8. Single-molecule reconstruction of oligonucleotide secondary structure by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyne, Alice; Thompson, Ruth; Leung, Carl; Roy, Debdulal; Hoogenboom, Bart W

    2014-08-27

    Based on soft-touch atomic force microscopy, a method is described to reconstruct the secondary structure of single extended biomolecules, without the need for crystallization. The method is tested by accurately reproducing the dimensions of the B-DNA crystal structure. Importantly, intramolecular variations in groove depth of the DNA double helix are resolved, which would be inaccessible for methods that rely on ensemble-averaging.

  9. Dynamics of translation by single ribosomes through mRNA secondary structures

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Chunlai; Zhang, Haibo; Broitman, Steven L.; Reiche, Michael; Farrell, Ian; Cooperman, Barry S.; Goldman, Yale E.

    2013-01-01

    During protein synthesis, the ribosome translates nucleotide triplets in single-stranded mRNA into polypeptide sequences. Strong downstream mRNA secondary (2°) structures, which must be unfolded for translation, can slow or even halt protein synthesis. Here we employ single molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer to determine reaction rates for specific steps within the elongation cycle as the Escherichia coli ribosome encounters stem loop or pseudoknot mRNA 2° structures. Downstream ...

  10. Applying Thymine Isostere 2,4-Difluoro-5-Methylbenzene as a NMR Assignment Tool and Probe of Homopyrimidine/Homopurine Tract Structural Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinson, Robert G; Miller, Jennifer T; Kahn, Jason D; Le Grice, Stuart F J; Marino, John P

    2016-01-01

    Proton assignment of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of homopyrimidine/homopurine tract oligonucleotides becomes extremely challenging with increasing helical length due to severe cross-peak overlap. As an alternative to the more standard practice of (15)N and (13)C labeling of oligonucleotides, here, we describe a method for assignment of highly redundant DNA sequences that uses single-site substitution of the thymine isostere 2,4-difluoro-5-methylbenzene (dF). The impact of this approach in facilitating the assignment of intractable spectra and analyzing oligonucleotide structure and dynamics is demonstrated using A-tract and TATA box DNA and two polypurine tract-containing RNA:DNA hybrids derived from HIV-1 and the Saccharomyces cerevisiae long-terminal repeat-containing retrotransposon Ty3. Only resonances proximal to the site of dF substitution exhibit sizable chemical shift changes, providing spectral dispersion while still allowing chemical shift mapping of resonances from unaffected residues distal to the site of modification directly back to the unmodified sequence. It is further illustrated that dF incorporation can subtly alter the conformation and dynamics of homopyrimidine/homopurine tract oligonucleotides, and how these NMR observations can be correlated, in the cases of the TATA box DNA, with modulation in the TATA box-binding protein interaction using an orthogonal gel assay.

  11. The Relationship between Secondary Structure and Biodegradation Behavior of Silk Fibroin Scaffolds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongpei Hu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Silk fibroin has a unique and useful combination of properties, including good biocompatibility and excellent mechanical performance. These features provided early clues to the utility of regenerated silk fibroin as a scaffold/matrix for tissue engineering. The silk fibroin scaffolds used for tissue engineering should degrade at a rate that matches the tissue growth rate. The relationship between secondary structure and biodegradation behavior of silk fibroin scaffolds was investigated in this study. Scaffolds with different secondary structure were prepared by controlling the freezing temperature and by treatment with carbodiimide or ethanol. The quantitative proportions of each secondary structure were obtained by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and each sample was then degraded in vitro with collagenase IA for 18 days. The results show that a high content of β-sheet structure leads to a low degradation rate. The random coil region in the silk fibroin material is degraded, whereas the crystal region remains stable and the amount of β-sheet structure increases during incubation. The results demonstrate that it is possible to control the degradation rate of a silk fibroin scaffold by controlling the content of β-sheet structure.

  12. Evaluation of several lightweight stochastic context-free grammars for RNA secondary structure prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy Sean R

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA secondary structure prediction methods based on probabilistic modeling can be developed using stochastic context-free grammars (SCFGs. Such methods can readily combine different sources of information that can be expressed probabilistically, such as an evolutionary model of comparative RNA sequence analysis and a biophysical model of structure plausibility. However, the number of free parameters in an integrated model for consensus RNA structure prediction can become untenable if the underlying SCFG design is too complex. Thus a key question is, what small, simple SCFG designs perform best for RNA secondary structure prediction? Results Nine different small SCFGs were implemented to explore the tradeoffs between model complexity and prediction accuracy. Each model was tested for single sequence structure prediction accuracy on a benchmark set of RNA secondary structures. Conclusions Four SCFG designs had prediction accuracies near the performance of current energy minimization programs. One of these designs, introduced by Knudsen and Hein in their PFOLD algorithm, has only 21 free parameters and is significantly simpler than the others.

  13. Secondary Structure Transition and Critical Stress for a Model of Spider Silk Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesa, Tristan; Perry, Carole C; Buehler, Markus J

    2016-02-08

    Spiders spin their silk from an aqueous solution to a solid fiber in ambient conditions. However, to date, the assembly mechanism in the spider silk gland has not been satisfactorily explained. In this paper, we use molecular dynamics simulations to model Nephila clavipes MaSp1 dragline silk formation under shear flow and determine the secondary structure transitions leading to the experimentally observed fiber structures. While no experiments are performed on the silk fiber itself, insights from this polypeptide model can be transferred to the fiber scale. The novelty of this study lies in the calculation of the shear stress (300-700 MPa) required for fiber formation and identification of the amino acid residues involved in the transition. This is the first time that the shear stress has been quantified in connection with a secondary structure transition. By study of molecules containing varying numbers of contiguous MaSp1 repeats, we determine that the smallest molecule size giving rise to a "silk-like" structure contains six polyalanine repeats. Through a probability analysis of the secondary structure, we identify specific amino acids that transition from α-helix to β-sheet. In addition to portions of the polyalanine section, these amino acids include glycine, leucine, and glutamine. The stability of β-sheet structures appears to arise from a close proximity in space of helices in the initial spidroin state. Our results are in agreement with the forces exerted by spiders in the silking process and the experimentally determined global secondary structure of spidroin and pulled MaSp1 silk. Our study emphasizes the role of shear in the assembly process of silk and can guide the design of microfluidic devices that attempt to mimic the natural spinning process and predict molecular requirements for the next generation of silk-based functional materials.

  14. Study on Red Coat Color Gene and Prediction of the Secondary Structure in Chinese Holstein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the melanocortin-1-receptor (MC1R) gone was studied with the help of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), in which the protein structure in Chinese Holstein was predicted, and the molecular mechanism of the red coat color was investigated. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was performed to genotype the individuals. The bioinformatics and biotechnology softwares were used to predict the secondary structure of MC1R. The results showed that the EE genotype was the dominant genotype in Chinese Holstein Black and White herd, whereas, it was ee in Chinese Holstein Red and White herd. The secondary structure of the mutational MCIR protein was changed and the deletion mutation caused an earlier termination in translation, which led to the formation of the red coat color. The allele E was mainly associated with the black coat color, whereas, e was associated with red.

  15. Shark myelin basic protein: amino acid sequence, secondary structure, and self-association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, T J; Atkins, A R; Warren, J A; Auton, W P; Smith, R

    1990-09-01

    Myelin basic protein (MBP) from the Whaler shark (Carcharhinus obscurus) has been purified from acid extracts of a chloroform/methanol pellet from whole brains. The amino acid sequence of the majority of the protein has been determined and compared with the sequences of other MBPs. The shark protein has only 44% homology with the bovine protein, but, in common with other MBPs, it has basic residues distributed throughout the sequence and no extensive segments that are predicted to have an ordered secondary structure in solution. Shark MBP lacks the triproline sequence previously postulated to form a hairpin bend in the molecule. The region containing the putative consensus sequence for encephalitogenicity in the guinea pig contains several substitutions, thus accounting for the lack of activity of the shark protein. Studies of the secondary structure and self-association have shown that shark MBP possesses solution properties similar to those of the bovine protein, despite the extensive differences in primary structure.

  16. A Dynamic Programming Algorithm for Finding the Optimal Placement of a Secondary Structure Topology in Cryo-EM Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Abhishek; Ranjan, Desh; Zubair, Mohammad; He, Jing

    2015-09-01

    The determination of secondary structure topology is a critical step in deriving the atomic structures from the protein density maps obtained from electron cryomicroscopy technique. This step often relies on matching the secondary structure traces detected from the protein density map to the secondary structure sequence segments predicted from the amino acid sequence. Due to inaccuracies in both sources of information, a pool of possible secondary structure positions needs to be sampled. One way to approach the problem is to first derive a small number of possible topologies using existing matching algorithms, and then find the optimal placement for each possible topology. We present a dynamic programming method of Θ(Nq(2)h) to find the optimal placement for a secondary structure topology. We show that our algorithm requires significantly less computational time than the brute force method that is in the order of Θ(q(N) h).

  17. Training set reduction methods for protein secondary structure prediction in single-sequence condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Zafer; Altunbasak, Yucel; Pakatci, Isa Kemal; Erdogan, Hakan

    2007-01-01

    Orphan proteins are characterized by the lack of significant sequence similarity to database proteins. To infer the functional properties of the orphans, more elaborate techniques that utilize structural information are required. In this regard, the protein structure prediction gains considerable importance. Secondary structure prediction algorithms designed for orphan proteins (also known as single-sequence algorithms) cannot utilize multiple alignments or alignment profiles, which are derived from similar proteins. This is a limiting factor for the prediction accuracy. One way to improve the performance of a single-sequence algorithm is to perform re-training. In this approach, first, the models used by the algorithm are trained by a representative set of proteins and a secondary structure prediction is computed. Then, using a distance measure, the original training set is refined by removing proteins that are dissimilar to the given protein. This step is followed by the re-estimation of the model parameters and the prediction of the secondary structure. In this paper, we compare training set reduction methods that are used to re-train the hidden semi-Markov models employed by the IPSSP algorithm [1]. We found that the composition based reduction method has the highest performance compared to the alignment based and the Chou-Fasman based reduction methods. In addition, threshold-based reduction performed better than the reduction technique that selects the first 80% of the dataset proteins.

  18. Using maximum entropy model to predict protein secondary structure with single sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yong-Sheng; Zhang, Tong-Liang; Gu, Quan; Zhao, Pei-Ying; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2009-01-01

    Prediction of protein secondary structure is somewhat reminiscent of the efforts by many previous investigators but yet still worthy of revisiting it owing to its importance in protein science. Several studies indicate that the knowledge of protein structural classes can provide useful information towards the determination of protein secondary structure. Particularly, the performance of prediction algorithms developed recently have been improved rapidly by incorporating homologous multiple sequences alignment information. Unfortunately, this kind of information is not available for a significant amount of proteins. In view of this, it is necessary to develop the method based on the query protein sequence alone, the so-called single-sequence method. Here, we propose a novel single-sequence approach which is featured by that various kinds of contextual information are taken into account, and that a maximum entropy model classifier is used as the prediction engine. As a demonstration, cross-validation tests have been performed by the new method on datasets containing proteins from different structural classes, and the results thus obtained are quite promising, indicating that the new method may become an useful tool in protein science or at least play a complementary role to the existing protein secondary structure prediction methods.

  19. Intergenic regions of Borrelia plasmids contain phylogenetically conserved RNA secondary structure motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delihas Nicholas

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Borrelia species are unusual in that they contain a large number of linear and circular plasmids. Many of these plasmids have long intergenic regions. These regions have many fragmented genes, repeated sequences and appear to be in a state of flux, but they may serve as reservoirs for evolutionary change and/or maintain stable motifs such as small RNA genes. Results In an in silico study, intergenic regions of Borrelia plasmids were scanned for phylogenetically conserved stem loop structures that may represent functional units at the RNA level. Five repeat sequences were found that could fold into stable RNA-type stem loop structures, three of which are closely linked to protein genes, one of which is a member of the Borrelia lipoprotein_1 super family genes and another is the complement regulator-acquiring surface protein_1 (CRASP-1 family. Modeled secondary structures of repeat sequences display numerous base-pair compensatory changes in stem regions, including C-G→A-U transversions when orthologous sequences are compared. Base-pair compensatory changes constitute strong evidence for phylogenetic conservation of secondary structure. Conclusion Intergenic regions of Borrelia species carry evolutionarily stable RNA secondary structure motifs. Of major interest is that some motifs are associated with protein genes that show large sequence variability. The cell may conserve these RNA motifs whereas allow a large flux in amino acid sequence, possibly to create new virulence factors but with associated RNA motifs intact.

  20. ITS2 secondary structure for species circumscription: case study in southern African Strychnos L. (Loganiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebowale, Adekunle; Lamb, Jennifer; Nicholas, Ashley; Naidoo, Yougasphree

    2016-12-01

    Recently developed computational tools in ITS2 sequence-structure phylogenetics are improving tree robustness by exploitation of the added information content of the secondary structure. Despite this strength, however, their adoption for species-level clarifications in angiosperms has been slow. We investigate the utility of combining ITS2 sequence and secondary structure to separate species of southern African Strychnos, and assess correlation between compensatory base changes (CBCs) and currently recognised species boundaries. Combined phylogenetic analysis of sequence and secondary structure datasets performed better, in terms of robustness and species resolution, than analysis involving primary sequences only, achieving 100 and 88.2 % taxa discriminations respectively. Further, the Strychnos madagascariensis complex is well-resolved by sequence-structure phylogenetic analysis. The 17 Strychnos species corresponded to 14 ITS2 CBC clades. Four of the five taxa in section Densiflorae belong to a single CBC clade, whose members tend to form natural hybrids. Our finding supports the application of ITS2 as a complementary barcoding marker for species identification. It also highlights the potential of comparative studies of ITS2 CBC features among prospective parental pairs in breeding experiments as a rapid proxy for cross compatibility assessment. This could save valuable time in crop improvement. Patterns of CBC evolution and species boundaries in Strychnos suggests a positive correlation. We conclude that the CBC pattern coupled with observed ITS2 sequence paraphyly in section Densiflorae points to a speciation work-in-progress.

  1. Rigidity of poly-L-glutamic acid scaffolds: Influence of secondary and supramolecular structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickels, Jonathan D; Perticaroli, Stefania; Ehlers, Georg; Feygenson, Mikhail; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2015-09-01

    Poly-l-glutamic acid (PGA) is a widely used biomaterial, with applications ranging from drug delivery and biological glues to food products and as a tissue engineering scaffold. A biodegradable material with flexible conjugation functional groups, tunable secondary structure, and mechanical properties, PGA has potential as a tunable matrix material in mechanobiology. Recent studies in proteins connecting dynamics, nanometer length scale rigidity, and secondary structure suggest a new point of view from which to analyze and develop this promising material. We have characterized the structure, topology, and rigidity properties of PGA prepared with different molecular weights and secondary structures through various techniques including scanning electron microscopy, FTIR, light, and neutron scattering spectroscopy. On the length scale of a few nanometers, rigidity is determined by hydrogen bonding interactions in the presence of neutral species and by electrostatic interactions when the polypeptide is negatively charged. When probed over hundreds of nanometers, the rigidity of these materials is modified by long range intermolecular interactions that are introduced by the supramolecular structure.

  2. A contribution to understanding the structure of amphivasal secondary bundles in monocotyledons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Jura-Morawiec

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Secondary growth of monocotyledonous plants is connected with the activity of the monocot cambium that accumulates most of the derivatives inner to the cambial cylinder. These derivatives differentiate into (a secondary bundles with the amphivasal arrangement, i.e. xylem composed of tracheids surrounds the phloem cells and (b the parenchymatous secondary conjunctive tissue in which the bundles are embedded. The amphivasal secondary bundles differ in the arrangement of xylem cells as visible on single cross sections through the secondary body of the monocots. Apart from the bundles with typical ring of tracheids also the bundles where tracheids do not quite surround the phloem are present. We aimed to elucidate the cross sectional anatomy of the amphivasal secondary bundles with the use of the serial sectioning method which allowed us to follow very precisely the bundle structure along its length. The studies were carried out with the samples of secondary tissues collected from the stem of Dracaena draco L. growing in the greenhouses of the Polish Academy of Sciences Botanical Garden – CBDC in Powsin and the Adam Mickiewicz University Botanical Garden. The material was fixed in a mixture of glycerol and ethanol (1:1; v/v, dehydrated stepwise with graded ethanol series and finally embedded in epon resin. Afterwards, the material was sectioned with microtome into continuous series of thin (3 μm sections, stained with PAS/toluidine blue and examined under the light microscope. The results, described in details in Jura‑Morawiec & Wiland-Szymańska (2014, revealed novel facts about tracheids arrangement. Each amphivasal bundle is composed of sectors where tracheids form a ring as well as of such where tracheids are separated by vascular parenchyma cells. We hypothesize that strands of vascular parenchyma cells locally separating the tracheids enable radial transport of assimilates from sieve elements of the bundle towards the sink tissues, e

  3. Variability in automated assignment of NOESY spectra and three-dimensional structure determination: A test case on three small disulfide-bonded proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savarin, Philippe; Zinn-Justin, Sophie; Gilquin, Bernard [CEA-Saclay, Departement d' Ingenierie et d' Etudes des Proteines (Bat. 152) (France)

    2001-01-15

    Three independent runs of automatic assignment and structure calculations were performed on three small proteins, calcicludine from the venom of the green mamba Dendroaspis angusticeps, {kappa}-conotoxin PVIIA from the purple cone Conus purpurascens and HsTX1, a short scorpion toxin from the venom of Heterometrus spinnifer. At the end of all the runs, the number of cross peaks which remained unassigned (0.6%, 1.4% and 2% for calcicludine, {kappa}-conotoxin and HsTX1, respectively), as well as the number of constraints which were rejected as producing systematic violations (2.7%, 1.0%, and 1.4% for calcicludine, {kappa}-conotoxin and HsTX1, respectively) were low. The conformation of the initial model used in the procedure (linear model or constructed by homology) has no influence on the final structures. Mainly two parameters control the procedure: the chemical shift tolerance and the cut-off distance. Independent runs of structure calculations, using the same parameters, yield structures for which the rmsd between averaged structures and the rmsd around each averaged structure were of the same order of magnitude. A different cut-off distance and a different chemical shift tolerance yield rmsd values on final average structures which did not differ more than 0.5 A compared to the rmsd obtained around the averaged structure for each calculation. These results show that the procedure is robust when applied to such a small disulfide-bonded protein.

  4. Stereospecific assignments in proteins using exact NOEs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orts, Julien; Vögeli, Beat; Riek, Roland, E-mail: roland.riek@phys.chem.ethz.ch [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Laboratory of Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Güntert, Peter, E-mail: guentert@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance, Institute of Biophysical Chemistry (Germany)

    2013-10-18

    Recently developed methods to measure distances in proteins with high accuracy by “exact” nuclear Overhauser effects (eNOEs) make it possible to determine stereospecific assignments, which are particularly important to fully exploit the accuracy of the eNOE distance measurements. Stereospecific assignments are determined by comparing the eNOE-derived distances to protein structure bundles calculated without stereospecific assignments, or an independently determined crystal structure. The absolute and relative CYANA target function difference upon swapping the stereospecific assignment of a diastereotopic group yields the respective stereospecific assignment. We applied the method to the eNOE data set that has recently been obtained for the third immunoglobulin-binding domain of protein G (GB3). The 884 eNOEs provide relevant data for 47 of the total of 75 diastereotopic groups. Stereospecific assignments could be established for 45 diastereotopic groups (96 %) using the X-ray structure, or for 27 diastereotopic groups (57 %) using structures calculated with the eNOE data set without stereospecific assignments, all of which are in agreement with those determined previously. The latter case is relevant for structure determinations based on eNOEs. The accuracy of the eNOE distance measurements is crucial for making stereospecific assignments because applying the same method to the traditional NOE data set for GB3 with imprecise upper distance bounds yields only 13 correct stereospecific assignments using the X-ray structure or 2 correct stereospecific assignments using NMR structures calculated without stereospecific assignments.

  5. Self-Efficacy, School Resources, Job Stressors and Burnout among Spanish Primary and Secondary School Teachers: A Structural Equation Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betoret, Fernando Domenech

    2009-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between school resources, teacher self-efficacy, potential multi-level stressors and teacher burnout using structural equation modelling. The causal structure for primary and secondary school teachers was also examined. The sample was composed of 724 primary and secondary Spanish school teachers. The changes…

  6. Minimum-free-energy distribution of RNA secondary structures: Entropic and thermodynamic properties of rare events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfsheimer, S.; Hartmann, A. K.

    2010-08-01

    We study the distribution of the minimum free energy (MFE) for the Turner model of pseudoknot free RNA secondary structures over ensembles of random RNA sequences. In particular, we are interested in those rare and intermediate events of unexpected low MFEs. Generalized ensemble Markov-chain Monte Carlo methods allow us to explore the rare-event tail of the MFE distribution down to probabilities such as 10-70 and to study the relationship between the sequence entropy and structural properties for sequence ensembles with fixed MFEs. Entropic and structural properties of those ensembles are compared with natural RNA of the same reduced MFE ( z score).

  7. Prediction of RNA secondary structures: from theory to models and real molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Peter

    2006-05-01

    RNA secondary structures are derived from RNA sequences, which are strings built form the natural four letter nucleotide alphabet, {AUGC}. These coarse-grained structures, in turn, are tantamount to constrained strings over a three letter alphabet. Hence, the secondary structures are discrete objects and the number of sequences always exceeds the number of structures. The sequences built from two letter alphabets form perfect structures when the nucleotides can form a base pair, as is the case with {GC} or {AU}, but the relation between the sequences and structures differs strongly from the four letter alphabet. A comprehensive theory of RNA structure is presented, which is based on the concepts of sequence space and shape space, being a space of structures. It sets the stage for modelling processes in ensembles of RNA molecules like evolutionary optimization or kinetic folding as dynamical phenomena guided by mappings between the two spaces. The number of minimum free energy (mfe) structures is always smaller than the number of sequences, even for two letter alphabets. Folding of RNA molecules into mfe energy structures constitutes a non-invertible mapping from sequence space onto shape space. The preimage of a structure in sequence space is defined as its neutral network. Similarly the set of suboptimal structures is the preimage of a sequence in shape space. This set represents the conformation space of a given sequence. The evolutionary optimization of structures in populations is a process taking place in sequence space, whereas kinetic folding occurs in molecular ensembles that optimize free energy in conformation space. Efficient folding algorithms based on dynamic programming are available for the prediction of secondary structures for given sequences. The inverse problem, the computation of sequences for predefined structures, is an important tool for the design of RNA molecules with tailored properties. Simultaneous folding or cofolding of two or more RNA

  8. Secondary Structure Analysis of Native Cellulose by Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Coarse-Grained Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuai Wu; Hai-yi Zhan; Hong-ming Wang; Yan Ju

    2012-01-01

    The secondary structure of different Ⅰβ cellulose was analyzed by a molecular dynamics simulation with MARTINI coarse-grained force field,where each chain of the cellulose includes 40 D-glucoses units.Calculation gives a satisfied description about the secondary structure of the cellulose.As the chain number increasing,the cellulose becomes the form of a helix,with the diameter of screw growing and spiral rising.Interestingly,the celluloses with chain number N of 4,6,24 and 36 do show right-hand twisting.On the contrast,the celluloses with N of 8,12,16 chains are left-hand twisting.These simulations indicate that the cellulose with chain number larger than 36 will break down to two parts.Besides,the result indicates that 36-chains cellulose model is the most stable among all models.Furthermore,the Lennard-Jones potential determines the secondary structure.In addition,an equation was set up to analyze the twisting structure.

  9. Use of tiling array data and RNA secondary structure predictions to identify noncoding RNA genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weile, Christian; Gardner, Paul P; Hedegaard, Mads M

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Within the last decade a large number of noncoding RNA genes have been identified, but this may only be the tip of the iceberg. Using comparative genomics a large number of sequences that have signals concordant with conserved RNA secondary structures have been discovered in the human...... genome. Moreover, genome wide transcription profiling with tiling arrays indicate that the majority of the genome is transcribed. RESULTS: We have combined tiling array data with genome wide structural RNA predictions to search for novel noncoding and structural RNA genes that are expressed in the human...... of 3 of the hairpin structures and 3 out of 9 high covariance structures in SK-N-AS cells. CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrate that many human noncoding, structured and conserved RNA genes remain to be discovered and that tissue specific tiling array data can be used in combination with computational...

  10. Small-angle X-ray scattering: a bridge between RNA secondary structures and three-dimensional topological structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Xianyang [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., NCI Small Angle X-ray Scattering Core Facility; Stagno, Jason R. [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., Protein-Nucleic Acid Interaction Section, Structural Biophysics Lab.; Bhandari, Yuba R. [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., Protein-Nucleic Acid Interaction Section, Structural Biophysics Lab.; Zuo, Xiaobing [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS); Wang, Yun-Xing [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., NCI Small Angle X-ray Scattering Core Facility; National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Cancer Inst., Protein-Nucleic Acid Interaction Section, Structural Biophysics Lab.

    2015-02-01

    Whereas the structures of small to medium-sized well folded RNA molecules often can be determined by either X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy, obtaining structural information for large RNAs using experimental, computational, or combined approaches remains a major interest and challenge. RNA is very sensitive to small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) due to high electron density along phosphate-sugar backbones, whose scattering contribution dominates SAXS intensity. For this reason, SAXS is particularly useful in obtaining global RNA structural information that outlines backbone topologies and, therefore, molecular envelopes. Such information is extremely valuable in bridging the gap between the secondary structures and three-dimensional topological structures of RNAmolecules, particularly those that have proven difficult to study using other structuredetermination methods. Here we review published results of RNA topological structures derived from SAXS data or in combination with other experimental data, as well as details on RNA sample preparation for SAXS experiments.

  11. Sequence and secondary structure of the mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene of Ixodes scapularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakowetz, Chantel N; Chilton, Neil B

    2015-02-01

    The complete DNA sequences and secondary structure of the mitochondrial (mt) 16S ribosomal (r) RNA gene were determined for six Ixodes scapularis adults. There were 44 variable nucleotide positions in the 1252 bp sequence alignment. Most (95%) nucleotide alterations did not affect the integrity of the secondary structure of the gene because they either occurred at unpaired positions or represented compensatory changes that maintained the base pairing in helices. A large proportion (75%) of the intraspecific variation in DNA sequence occurred within Domains I, II and VI of the 16S gene. Therefore, several regions within this gene may be highly informative for studies of the population genetics and phylogeography of I. scapularis, a major vector of pathogens of humans and domestic animals in North America.

  12. Analysis of the secondary structure of a protein's N-terminal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floare, C. G.; Bogdan, M.; Horovitz, O.; Mocanu, A.; Tomoaia-Cotisel, M.

    2009-08-01

    The major protein component from aleurone cells of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), PACB, is related to 7S globulins present in other cereals and to the vicilin-type 7S globulins of legumes and cotton seed. It contains 4 subunits of about 20, 25, 40 and 50 kDa molecular weights. The N-terminal sequence of 16 amino acids (over 260 atoms) in the protein was previously determined, and our aim is the prediction of its secondary structure. The empirical Chou-Fasman method was applied in an improved version as well as the empirical DSC method (discrimination of protein secondary structure class) with quite similar results. A molecular dynamics simulation was also performed, using the FF99SB forcefield within AMBER version 9.0. Solvation effects were incorporated using the Born model. The results are compared and a 3D model is proposed.

  13. Analysis of the secondary structure of a protein's N-terminal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Floare, C G; Bogdan, M [National Institute for R and D of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Horovitz, O; Mocanu, A; Tomoaia-Cotisel, M, E-mail: calin.floare@itim-cj.r [Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Department of Physical Chemistry, 11 Arany Janos, 400028 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2009-08-01

    The major protein component from aleurone cells of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), PACB, is related to 7S globulins present in other cereals and to the vicilin-type 7S globulins of legumes and cotton seed. It contains 4 subunits of about 20, 25, 40 and 50 kDa molecular weights. The N-terminal sequence of 16 amino acids (over 260 atoms) in the protein was previously determined, and our aim is the prediction of its secondary structure. The empirical Chou-Fasman method was applied in an improved version as well as the empirical DSC method (discrimination of protein secondary structure class) with quite similar results. A molecular dynamics simulation was also performed, using the FF99SB forcefield within AMBER version 9.0. Solvation effects were incorporated using the Born model. The results are compared and a 3D model is proposed.

  14. Protein secondary structure prediction for a single-sequence using hidden semi-Markov models

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background The accuracy of protein secondary structure prediction has been improving steadily towards the 88% estimated theoretical limit. There are two types of prediction algorithms: Single-sequence prediction algorithms imply that information about other (homologous) proteins is not available, while algorithms of the second type imply that information about homologous proteins is available, and use it intensively. The single-sequence algorithms could make an important contribution...

  15. Role of RNA secondary structure in emergence of compartment specific hepatitis B virus immune escape variants

    OpenAIRE

    Datta, Sibnarayan; Chakravarty, Runu

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the role of subgenotype specific RNA secondary structure in the compartment specific selection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) immune escape mutations. METHODS This study was based on the analysis of the specific observation of HBV subgenotype A1 in the serum/plasma, while subgenotype A2 with G145R mutation in the peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs). Genetic variability found among the two subgenotypes was used for prediction and comparison of the full length pregenomic RNA (pgRN...

  16. Effect of pressure on secondary structure of proteins under ultra high pressure liquid chromatographic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Alexey; LoBrutto, Rosario; Karpinski, Paul

    2013-11-29

    There are several spectroscopic techniques such as IR and CD, that allow for analyzing protein secondary structure in solution. However, a majority of these techniques require using purified protein, concentrated enough in the solution, to produce a relevant spectrum. Fundamental principles for the usage of reversed-phase ultra high pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) as an alternative technique to study protein secondary structures in solution were investigated. Several "model" proteins, as well as several small ionizable and neutral molecules, were used for these studies. The studies were conducted with UHPLC in isocratic mode, using premixed mobile phases at constant flow rate and temperature. The pressure was modified by a backpressure regulator from about 6000psi to about 12,000psi. It was found that when using a mobile phase composition at which proteins were fully denatured (loss of alpha-helix secondary structure), the retention factors of the proteins increased upon pressure increase in the same manner as non-proteins. When using a mobile phase composition in which proteins were not fully denatured, it was observed that the retention factors of the proteins displayed a much steeper (by one order of magnitude) increase in retention upon pressure increase. It was concluded that in a mobile phase in which the protein is not initially fully denatured, the increase of pressure may facilitate the folding back of the protein to its native state (alpha-helix secondary structure). The impact of different mobile phase compositions on the denaturation of the proteins was studied using CD (Circular Dichroism). Moreover, the effect of flow rate on retention of proteins and small molecules was studied at constant pressure on the different pore size silicas and the impact of internal frictional heating was evaluated.

  17. Dynamics of translation by single ribosomes through mRNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunlai; Zhang, Haibo; Broitman, Steven L; Reiche, Michael; Farrell, Ian; Cooperman, Barry S; Goldman, Yale E

    2013-05-01

    During protein synthesis, the ribosome translates nucleotide triplets in single-stranded mRNA into polypeptide sequences. Strong downstream mRNA secondary structures, which must be unfolded for translation, can slow or even halt protein synthesis. Here we used single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer to determine reaction rates for specific steps within the elongation cycle as the Escherichia coli ribosome encounters stem-loop or pseudoknot mRNA secondary structures. Downstream stem-loops containing 100% GC base pairs decrease the rates of both tRNA translocation within the ribosome and deacylated tRNA dissociation from the ribosomal exit site (E site). Downstream stem-loops or pseudoknots containing both GC and AU pairs also decrease the rate of tRNA dissociation, but they have little effect on tRNA translocation rate. Thus, somewhat unexpectedly, unfolding of mRNA secondary structures is more closely coupled to E-site tRNA dissociation than to tRNA translocation.

  18. The constant region affects antigen binding of antibodies to DNA by altering secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yumin; Janda, Alena; Eryilmaz, Ertan; Casadevall, Arturo; Putterman, Chaim

    2013-11-01

    We previously demonstrated an important role of the constant region in the pathogenicity of anti-DNA antibodies. To determine the mechanisms by which the constant region affects autoantibody binding, a panel of isotype-switch variants (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b) was generated from the murine PL9-11 IgG3 autoantibody. The affinity of the PL9-11 antibody panel for histone was measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Tryptophan fluorescence was used to determine wavelength shifts of the antibody panel upon binding to DNA and histone. Finally, circular dichroism spectroscopy was used to measure changes in secondary structure. SPR analysis revealed significant differences in histone binding affinity between members of the PL9-11 panel. The wavelength shifts of tryptophan fluorescence emission were found to be dependent on the antibody isotype, while circular dichroism analysis determined that changes in antibody secondary structure content differed between isotypes upon antigen binding. Thus, the antigen binding affinity is dependent on the particular constant region expressed. Moreover, the effects of antibody binding to antigen were also constant region dependent. Alteration of secondary structures influenced by constant regions may explain differences in fine specificity of anti-DNA antibodies between antibodies with similar variable regions, as well as cross-reactivity of anti-DNA antibodies with non-DNA antigens.

  19. SVM-PB-Pred: SVM based protein block prediction method using sequence profiles and secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, V; Parthasarathy, S

    2014-01-01

    We developed a support vector machine based web server called SVM-PB-Pred, to predict the Protein Block for any given amino acid sequence. The input features of SVM-PB-Pred include i) sequence profiles (PSSM) and ii) actual secondary structures (SS) from DSSP method or predicted secondary structures from NPS@ and GOR4 methods. There were three combined input features PSSM+SS(DSSP), PSSM+SS(NPS@) and PSSM+SS(GOR4) used to test and train the SVM models. Similarly, four datasets RS90, DB433, LI1264 and SP1577 were used to develop the SVM models. These four SVM models developed were tested using three different benchmarking tests namely; (i) self consistency, (ii) seven fold cross validation test and (iii) independent case test. The maximum possible prediction accuracy of ~70% was observed in self consistency test for the SVM models of both LI1264 and SP1577 datasets, where PSSM+SS(DSSP) input features was used to test. The prediction accuracies were reduced to ~53% for PSSM+SS(NPS@) and ~43% for PSSM+SS(GOR4) in independent case test, for the SVM models of above two same datasets. Using our method, it is possible to predict the protein block letters for any query protein sequence with ~53% accuracy, when the SP1577 dataset and predicted secondary structure from NPS@ server were used. The SVM-PB-Pred server can be freely accessed through http://bioinfo.bdu.ac.in/~svmpbpred.

  20. Compensatory evolution of a precursor messenger RNA secondary structure in the Drosophila melanogaster Adh gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Stephan, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Evidence for the evolutionary maintenance of a hairpin structure possibly involved in intron processing had been found in intron 1 of the alcohol dehydrogenase gene (Adh) in diverse Drosophila species. In this study, the putative hairpin structure was evaluated systematically in Drosophila melanogaster by elimination of either side of the stem using site-directed mutagenesis. The effects of these mutations and the compensatory double mutant on intron splicing efficiency and ADH protein production were assayed in Drosophila melanogaster Schneider L2 cells and germ-line transformed adult flies. Mutations that disrupt the putative hairpin structure right upstream of the intron branch point were found to cause a significant reduction in both splicing efficiency and ADH protein production. In contrast, the compensatory double mutant that restores the putative hairpin structure was indistinguishable from the WT in both splicing efficiency and ADH level. It was also observed by mutational analysis that a more stable secondary structure (with a longer stem) in this intron decreases both splicing efficiency and ADH protein production. Implications for RNA secondary structure and intron evolution are discussed. PMID:12972637

  1. Reaction of psoralen with RNA: specificity and use as a probe for secondary-structure analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, J.F.

    1982-09-01

    A variety of techniques has been used to study how psoralen and its derivatives react with RNA. This information has then been used to analyze the secondary structure of different ribosomal RNAs. Paper electrophoresis at pH 3.5 and 8.8 and HPLC has been used to get high-resolution separation of RNA-psoralen adducts. The separated adducts have been analyzed and shown to be primarily uridine adducts with the psoralen reacted at the furan end. The stereochemistry of the major adducts was determined by NMR. The effect of structural transitions on the number and type of adducts was found for several polymers. The effect of psoralen structure on cross linking ability was analyzed. Charged derivatives formed monoadducts very efficiently but did not produce the level of crosslinking obtainable with lower levels of reaction with uncharged derivatives. Secondary structure analysis of D. melanogaster 5S RNA yielded two definite and two tentative crosslinks which support the generally accepted models for 5S structure. Analysis of E. coli 16S RNA by gel techniques yielded 13 cross-links. Evidence is also presented for an interaction between eukaryotic mRNA (5' cap structure) and 18S RNA (hypermodified base am psi) which serves a function analogous to the Shine-Dalgarno sequence in pro karyotes.

  2. On correlation between protein secondary structure, backbone bond angles, and side-chain orientations

    CERN Document Server

    Lundgren, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the fine structure of the sp3 hybridized covalent bond geometry that governs the tetrahedral architecture around the central C$_\\alpha$ carbon of a protein backbone, and for this we develop new visualization techniques to analyze high resolution X-ray structures in Protein Data Bank. We observe that there is a correlation between the deformations of the ideal tetrahedral symmetry and the local secondary structure of the protein. We propose a universal coarse grained energy function to describe the ensuing side-chain geometry in terms of the C$_\\beta$ carbon orientations. The energy function can model the side-chain geometry with a sub-atomic precision. As an example we construct the C$_\\alpha$-C$_\\beta$ structure of HP35 chicken villin headpiece. We obtain a configuration that deviates less than 0.4 \\.A in root-mean-square distance from the experimental X-ray structure.

  3. Sheath structure in plasma with two species of positive ions and secondary electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao-Yun, Zhao; Nong, Xiang; Jing, Ou; De-Hui, Li; Bin-Bin, Lin

    2016-02-01

    The properties of a collisionless plasma sheath are investigated by using a fluid model in which two species of positive ions and secondary electrons are taken into account. It is shown that the positive ion speeds at the sheath edge increase with secondary electron emission (SEE) coefficient, and the sheath structure is affected by the interplay between the two species of positive ions and secondary electrons. The critical SEE coefficients and the sheath widths depend strongly on the positive ion charge number, mass and concentration in the cases with and without SEE. In addition, ion kinetic energy flux to the wall and the impact of positive ion species on secondary electron density at the sheath edge are also discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11475220 and 11405208), the Program of Fusion Reactor Physics and Digital Tokamak with the CAS “One-Three-Five” Strategic Planning, the National ITER Program of China (Grant No. 2015GB101003), and the Higher Education Natural Science Research Project of Anhui Province, China (Grant No. 2015KJ009).

  4. Comparing two K-category assignments by a K-category correlation coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodkin, J

    2004-12-01

    Predicted assignments of biological sequences are often evaluated by Matthews correlation coefficient. However, Matthews correlation coefficient applies only to cases where the assignments belong to two categories, and cases with more than two categories are often artificially forced into two categories by considering what belongs and what does not belong to one of the categories, leading to the loss of information. Here, an extended correlation coefficient that applies to K-categories is proposed, and this measure is shown to be highly applicable for evaluating prediction of RNA secondary structure in cases where some predicted pairs go into the category "unknown" due to lack of reliability in predicted pairs or unpaired residues. Hence, predicting base pairs of RNA secondary structure can be a three-category problem. The measure is further shown to be well in agreement with existing performance measures used for ranking protein secondary structure predictions. Server and software is available at http://rk.kvl.dk/.

  5. Natural abundance 15N NMR assignments delineate structural differences between intact and reactive-site hydrolyzed Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthi, R; Nemmers, S; Tobias, B

    1992-06-15

    15N NMR assignments were made to the backbone amide nitrogen atoms at natural isotopic abundance of intact and reactive-site (Arg5-Ile6) hydrolyzed Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III (CMTI-III and CMTI-III*, respectively) by means of 2D proton-detected heteronuclear single bond chemical shift correlation (HSBC) spectroscopy, utilizing the previously made sequence-specific 1H NMR assignments (Krishnamoorthi et al. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 898-904). Comparison of the 15N chemical shifts of the two forms of the inhibitor molecule revealed significant changes not only for residues located near the reactive-site region, but also for those distantly located. Residues Cys3, Arg5, Leu7, Met8, Cys10, Cys16, Glu19, His25, Tyr27, Cys28 and Gly29 showed significant chemical shift changes ranging from 0.3 to 6.1 ppm, thus indicating structural perturbations that were transmitted throughout the molecule. These findings confirm the earlier conclusions based on 1H NMR investigations.

  6. Two-dimensional dynamics of a free molecular chain with a secondary structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zolotaryuk, Alexander; Christiansen, Peter Leth; Savin, A.V.

    1996-01-01

    A simple two-dimensional (2D) model of an isolated (free) molecular chain with primary and secondary structures has been suggested and investigated both analytically and numerically. This model can be considered as the simplest generalization of the well-known Fermi-Pasta-Ulam model...... of an anharmonic chain in order to include transverse degrees of freedom of the chain molecules. Both the structures are provided by the first- and second-neighbor intermolecular bonds, respectively, resulting in a regular zig-zag (''20 helix'') chain on a plane. The set of two coupled nonlinear field equations...

  7. Three-chain insulin analogs demonstrate the importance of insulin secondary structure to bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fangzhou; Chabenne, Joseph R; Gelfanov, Vasily M; Mayer, John P; DiMarchi, Richard D

    2015-03-01

    This report describes the chemical synthesis and biological characterization of novel three-chain insulin analogs with a destabilized secondary structure. The analogs, obtained by chemical synthesis via a single-chain precursor and selective enzymatic digestion, were used to investigate the role of the highly conserved 'insulin fold'. Biological characterization through in vitro biochemical signaling showed extremely low activity at each insulin receptor when compared with native insulin. We conclude that the 'insulin fold' is a structural foundation that supports insulin biological action.

  8. Simultaneous Analysis of Secondary Structure and Light Scattering from Circular Dichroism Titrations: Application to Vectofusin-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeer, Louic S.; Marquette, Arnaud; Schoup, Michel; Fenard, David; Galy, Anne; Bechinger, Burkhard

    2016-12-01

    Circular Dichroism data are often decomposed into their constituent spectra to quantify the secondary structure of peptides or proteins but the estimation of the secondary structure content fails when light scattering leads to spectral distortion. If peptide-induced liposome self-association occurs, subtracting control curves cannot correct for this. We show that if the cause of the light scattering is independent from the peptide structural changes, the CD spectra can be corrected using principal component analysis (PCA). The light scattering itself is analysed and found to be in good agreement with backscattering experiments. This method therefore allows to simultaneously follow structural changes related to peptide-liposome binding as well as peptide induced liposome self-association. We apply this method to study the structural changes and liposome binding of vectofusin-1, a transduction enhancing peptide used in lentivirus based gene therapy. Vectofusin-1 binds to POPC/POPS liposomes, causing a reversal of the negative liposome charge at high peptide concentrations. When the peptide charges exactly neutralise the lipid charges on both leaflets reversible liposome self-association occurs. These results are in good agreement with biological observations and provide further insight into the conditions required for efficent transduction enhancement.

  9. Regenerated silk fibroin films with controllable nanostructure size and secondary structure for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Juan; Zhang, Bin; Shi, Lijun; Zhong, Jian; Zhu, Jun; Yan, Juan; Wang, Ping; Cao, Chuanbao; He, Dannong

    2014-12-24

    The ability of drug release from SF materials was governed largely by their secondary structure. It is known that the breakage degree of the peptide chain during the silk fibroin (SF) dissolution can affect the structure, property, and applications of SF materials. To deeply understand this effect, we designed a reaction system based on CaCl2/H2O/C2H5OH ternary solvent with different ethanol content to obtain the regenerated SF films with different morphologies and secondary structures. The results showed that the globule-like nanostructure was observed in all regenerated SF films, and their size decreased significantly with reducing the ethanol content in the solvent. Correspondingly, the β-sheet structure content of the SF films increased. In addition, the contact angle and the elongation ratio increased, and water absorption decreased significantly with decreasing the ethanol content in the solvent. The accumulated release percents of doxorubicin from these SF films were significantly different with increasing the time. With smaller nanostructure size and more β-sheet content, the SF films had a slower drug release at the beginning. This study indicated the importance of the ethanol content in the solvent in controlling the structure and properties of the regenerated SF films, which would improve the application of SF in drug delivery.

  10. Prediction of Spontaneous Protein Deamidation from Sequence-Derived Secondary Structure and Intrinsic Disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Ramiro Lorenzo

    Full Text Available Asparagine residues in proteins undergo spontaneous deamidation, a post-translational modification that may act as a molecular clock for the regulation of protein function and turnover. Asparagine deamidation is modulated by protein local sequence, secondary structure and hydrogen bonding. We present NGOME, an algorithm able to predict non-enzymatic deamidation of internal asparagine residues in proteins in the absence of structural data, using sequence-based predictions of secondary structure and intrinsic disorder. Compared to previous algorithms, NGOME does not require three-dimensional structures yet yields better predictions than available sequence-only methods. Four case studies of specific proteins show how NGOME may help the user identify deamidation-prone asparagine residues, often related to protein gain of function, protein degradation or protein misfolding in pathological processes. A fifth case study applies NGOME at a proteomic scale and unveils a correlation between asparagine deamidation and protein degradation in yeast. NGOME is freely available as a webserver at the National EMBnet node Argentina, URL: http://www.embnet.qb.fcen.uba.ar/ in the subpage "Protein and nucleic acid structure and sequence analysis".

  11. CompaRNA: a server for continuous benchmarking of automated methods for RNA secondary structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puton, Tomasz; Kozlowski, Lukasz P; Rother, Kristian M; Bujnicki, Janusz M

    2013-04-01

    We present a continuous benchmarking approach for the assessment of RNA secondary structure prediction methods implemented in the CompaRNA web server. As of 3 October 2012, the performance of 28 single-sequence and 13 comparative methods has been evaluated on RNA sequences/structures released weekly by the Protein Data Bank. We also provide a static benchmark generated on RNA 2D structures derived from the RNAstrand database. Benchmarks on both data sets offer insight into the relative performance of RNA secondary structure prediction methods on RNAs of different size and with respect to different types of structure. According to our tests, on the average, the most accurate predictions obtained by a comparative approach are generated by CentroidAlifold, MXScarna, RNAalifold and TurboFold. On the average, the most accurate predictions obtained by single-sequence analyses are generated by CentroidFold, ContextFold and IPknot. The best comparative methods typically outperform the best single-sequence methods if an alignment of homologous RNA sequences is available. This article presents the results of our benchmarks as of 3 October 2012, whereas the rankings presented online are continuously updated. We will gladly include new prediction methods and new measures of accuracy in the new editions of CompaRNA benchmarks.

  12. Molecular structure and vibrational and chemical shift assignments of 3'-chloro-4-dimethylamino azobenzene by DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toy, Mehmet; Tanak, Hasan

    2016-01-05

    In the present work, a combined experimental and theoretical study on ground state molecular structure, spectroscopic and nonlinear optical properties of azo compound 3'-chloro-4-dimethlamino azobenzene are reported. The molecular geometry, vibrational wavenumbers and the first order hyperpolarizability of the title compound were calculated with the help of density functional theory computations. The optimized geometric parameters obtained by using DFT (B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)) show good agreement with the experimental data. The vibrational transitions were identified based on the recorded FT-IR spectra in the range of 4000-400cm(-1) for solid state. The (1)H isotropic chemical shifts with respect to TMS were also calculated using the gauge independent atomic orbital (GIAO) method and compared with the experimental data. Using the TD-DFT method, electronic absorption spectra of the title compound have been predicted, and good agreement is determined with the experimental ones. To investigate the NLO properties of the title compound, the polarizability and the first hyperpolarizability were calculated using the density functional B3LYP method with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. According to results, the title compound exhibits non-zero first hyperpolarizability value revealing second order NLO behavior. In addition, DFT calculations of the title compound, molecular electrostatic potential and frontier molecular orbitals were also performed at 6-311++G(d,p) level of theory.

  13. Perturbation-induced secondary flow structures due to fractured stents in arterial curvatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulusu, Kartik V.; Popma, Christopher; Penna, Leanne; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2012-11-01

    An in vitro experimental investigation of secondary flow structures was performed downstream of a model stent that embodied a ``Type-IV'' stent fracture, i.e. complete transverse fracture of elements and element displacement (of 3 diameters). One part of the fractured stent was located in the curved region of a test section comprised of a 180-degree bent tube, and the velocity field measured with PIV. Secondary flow morphologies downstream of the stent were identified with a continuous wavelet transform (CWT) algorithm (PIVlet 1.2) using a 2D Ricker wavelet. A comparison of wavelet transformed vorticity fields of fractured and unfractured model stents is presented under physiological inflow conditions. During systolic deceleration, a breakdown in symmetry of vortical structures occurred with the unfractured stent, but not with the fractured model stent. Potential mechanisms to explain the differences in secondary flow morphologies include redirection of vorticity from the meridional plane of the bend to the normal plane and diffusion of vorticity. Supported by the National Science Foundation, Grant No. CBET-0828903 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE).

  14. [Characterization of 5S rRNA gene sequence and secondary structure in gymnosperms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhan-Lin; Zhang, Da-Ming; Wang, Xiao-Ru

    2003-01-01

    In higher plants the primary and the secondary structures of 5S ribosomal RNA gene are considered highly conservative. Little is known about the 5S rRNA gene structure, organization and variation in gyimnosperms. In this study we analyzed sequence and structure variation of 5S rRNA gene in Pinus through cloning and sequencing multiple copies of 5S rDNA repeats from individual trees of five pines, P. bungeana, P. tabulaeformis, P. yunnanensis, P. massoniana and P. densata. Pinus bungeana is from the subgenus Strobus while the other four are from the subgenus Pinus (diploxylon pines). Our results revealed variations in both primary and secondary structure among copies of 5S rDNA within individual genomes and between species. 5S rRNA gene in Pinus is 120 bp long in most of the 122 clones we sequenced except for one or two deletions in three clones. Among these clones 50 unique sequences were identified and they were shared by different pine species. Our sequences were compared to 13 sequences each representing a different gymnosperm species, and to six sequences representing both angiosperm monocots and dicots. Average sequence similarity was 97.1% among Pinus species and 94.3% between Pinus and other gymnosperms. Between gymnosperms and angiosperms the sequence similarity decreased to 88.1%. Similar to other molecular data, significant sequence divergence was found between the two Pinus subgenera. The 5S gene tree (neighbor-joining tree) grouped the four diploxylon pines together and separated them distinctly from P. bungeana. Comparison of sequence divergence within individuals and between species suggested that concerted evolution has been very weak especially after the divergence of the four diploxylon pines. The phylogenetic information contained in the 5S rRNA gene is limited due to its shorter length and the difficulties in identifying orthologous and paralogous copies of rDNA multigene family further complicate its phylogenetic application. Pinus densata is a

  15. Teaching the foundations of quantum mechanics in secondary school: a proposed conceptual structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de los Angeles Fanaro

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is part of a doctoral thesis that investigates Basic Quantum Mechanics (QM teaching in high school. A Conceptual Structure of Reference (CSR based on the Path Integral Method of Feynman (1965 was rebuilt and a Proposed Conceptual Structure for Teaching (PCST (Otero, 2006, 2007 the basics of Quantum Mechanics at secondary school was designed, analysed and carried out. This PCST does not follow the historical route and it is complementary to the canonical formalism. The concepts: probability distribution, quantum system, x(t alternative, amplitude of probability, sum of probability amplitude, action, Planck's constant, and classic-quantum transition were rebuilt with the students. Mathematical formalism was avoided by using simulation software assistance. The Proposed Conceptual Structure for Teaching (PCST is described and some results from the test carried out by the class group are discussed. This information allows the analysis of the Conceptual Structure Effectively Reconstructed (CSER to be initiated with the students.

  16. Secondary structure prediction of protein constructs using random incremental truncation and vacuum-ultraviolet CD spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Pukáncsik, M; Matsuo, K; Gekko, K; Hart, D; Kézsmárki, I; Vértessy, B G

    2014-01-01

    A novel uracil-DNA degrading protein factor (termed UDE) was identified in Drosophila melanogaster with no significant structural and functional homology to other uracil-DNA binding or processing factors. Determination of the 3D structure of UDE will be a true breakthrough in description of the molecular mechanism of action of UDE catalysis, as well as in general uracil-recognition and nuclease action. The revolutionary ESPRIT technology was applied to the novel protein UDE to overcome problems in identifying soluble expressing constructs given the absence of precise information on domain content and arrangement. Nine specimen from the created numerous truncated constructs of UDE were choosen to dechiper structural and functional relationships. VUVCD with neural network was performed to define the secondary structure content and location of UDE and its truncated variants. The quantitative analysis demonstrated exclusive {\\alpha}-helical content for the full-length protein, which is preserved in the truncated ...

  17. Studies on aggregation-propensities and secondary structural transformations of proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Li-Na; GAO Yong-Guang; ZHANG Feng; LI Hong-Tao; HU Hong-Yu; HU Jun

    2005-01-01

    The insoluble and fibrillar aggregates of some proteins are thought to be the pathological cause of neurodegenerative diseases. The aggregation-propensities of different types of proteins were investigated by Thioflavine T fluorescence assay and atomic force microscopy imaging. Then, the structural transformations of the proteins from aqueous state to solid state were studied by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The results indicate that proteins of different secondary structure show variations in their aggregation-propensities, together with their various structural transformations from aqueous state to solid state. Our studies imply that the structural transformation of proteins from solution to solid state is closely associated with their aggregation-propensities, which will provide insight into the molecular mechanism of protein aggregation in neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. An Algorithm for Finding Conserved Secondary Structure Motifs in Unaligned RNA Sequences

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giulio Pavesi; Giancarlo Mauri; Graziano Pesole

    2004-01-01

    Several experiments and observations have revealed the fact that small local distinct structural features in RNA molecules are correlated with their biological function, for example, in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Thus, finding similar structural features in a set of RNA sequences known to play the same biological function could provide substantial information concerning which parts of the sequences are responsible for the function itself. Unfortunately, finding common structural elements in RNA molecules is a very challenging task, even if limited to secondary structure. The main difficulty lies in the fact that in nearly all the cases the structure of the molecules is unknown, has to be somehow predicted, and that sequences with little or no similarity can fold into similar structures. Although they differ in some details, the approaches proposed so far are usually based on the preliminary alignment of the sequences and attempt to predict common structures (either local or global, or for some selected regions) for the aligned sequences. These methods give good results when sequence and structure similarity are very high, but function less well when similarity is limited to small and local elements, like single stem-loop motifs. Instead of aligning the sequences, the algorithm we present directly searches for regions of the sequences that can fold into similar structures, where the degree of similarity can be defined by the user. Any information concerning sequence similarity in the motifs can be used either as a search constraint, or a posteriori, by post-processing the output. The search for the regions sharing structural similarity is implemented with the affix tree, a novel text-indexing structure that significantly accelerates the search for patterns having a symmetric layout, such as those forming stem-loop structures. Tests based on experimentally known structures have shown that the algorithm is able to identify functional motifs in

  19. The effect of structural disorder on the secondary electron emission of graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. A. Gonzalez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The dependance of the secondary electron yield (SEY on the degree of crystallinity of graphite has been investigated during the amorphization of a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG samples by means of Ar+ bombardment. Photoemission and Raman spectroscopies were used to follow the structural damage while the SEY curves were measured from very low energies up to 1000 eV. We found that the increase of lattice defects lowers the contribution of the π electrons in the valence band and loss spectra and smears out the intense modulations in the low energy secondary electron yield (LE-SEY curve. Raman spectroscopy results showed that ion induced lattice amorphization is confined in a near-surface layer. The evolution of SEY curves was observed with the progressive Ar+ dosage after crystal damage as due to the modification of the electronic transport properties within the damaged near surface layer.

  20. The effect of structural disorder on the secondary electron emission of graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, L. A.; Larciprete, R.; Cimino, R.

    2016-09-01

    The dependance of the secondary electron yield (SEY) on the degree of crystallinity of graphite has been investigated during the amorphization of a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) samples by means of Ar+ bombardment. Photoemission and Raman spectroscopies were used to follow the structural damage while the SEY curves were measured from very low energies up to 1000 eV. We found that the increase of lattice defects lowers the contribution of the π electrons in the valence band and loss spectra and smears out the intense modulations in the low energy secondary electron yield (LE-SEY) curve. Raman spectroscopy results showed that ion induced lattice amorphization is confined in a near-surface layer. The evolution of SEY curves was observed with the progressive Ar+ dosage after crystal damage as due to the modification of the electronic transport properties within the damaged near surface layer.

  1. Synthesis and Photoluminescence of Three Europium (Ⅲ) Ternary Complexes with New Secondary Ligands of Different Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁继兵; 李嘉航; 梁万里; 苏树江; 石建新; 龚孟濂

    2004-01-01

    Three new 1,10-phenanthroline derivatives, dipyrido (3,2-f: 2,3-h) quinoxaline (DPQN), imidazo (5,6-f)-(1,10)-phenanthroline (IP) and 3-phenyl-imidazo (5,6-f)-(1,10)-phenanthroline (PIP) were designed and synthesized as a secondary ligand to coordinate with europium (Ⅲ) ion while dibenzoylmethane (DBM) was used as the first ligand. The compositions of the ligands and the europium (Ⅲ) ternary complexes were confirmed by elementary analysis, IR and 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The UV-visible absorption spectra, thermal stability, photoluminescence spectra, quantum yield and fluorescence life time of the Eu(Ⅲ) complexes were investigated. The effect of the structure of the secondary ligand on the photoluminescence of the complexes was discussed. The results show that the synthesized Eu(Ⅲ) complexes are good red-emitiing materials for potential application in fabrication of organic electroluminescence devices.

  2. In situ protein secondary structure determination in ice: Raman spectroscopy-based process analytical tool for frozen storage of biopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessl, Ulrich; Leitgeb, Stefan; Pieters, Sigrid; De Beer, Thomas; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2014-08-01

    A Raman spectroscopy-based method for in situ monitoring of secondary structural composition of proteins during frozen and thawed storage was developed. A set of reference proteins with different α-helix and β-sheet compositions was used for calibration and validation in a chemometric approach. Reference secondary structures were quantified with circular dichroism spectroscopy in the liquid state. Partial least squares regression models were established that enable estimation of secondary structure content from Raman spectra. Quantitative secondary structure determination in ice was accomplished for the first time and correlation with existing (qualitative) protein structural data from the frozen state was achieved. The method can be used in the presence of common stabilizing agents and is applicable in an industrial freezer setup. Raman spectroscopy represents a powerful, noninvasive, and flexibly applicable tool for protein stability monitoring during frozen storage.

  3. Incorporating chemical modification constraints into a dynamic programming algorithm for prediction of RNA secondary structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, David H.; Disney, Matthew D.; Childs, Jessica L.; Schroeder, Susan J.; Zuker, Michael; Turner, Douglas H.

    2004-01-01

    A dynamic programming algorithm for prediction of RNA secondary structure has been revised to accommodate folding constraints determined by chemical modification and to include free energy increments for coaxial stacking of helices when they are either adjacent or separated by a single mismatch. Furthermore, free energy parameters are revised to account for recent experimental results for terminal mismatches and hairpin, bulge, internal, and multibranch loops. To demonstrate the applicability of this method, in vivo modification was performed on 5S rRNA in both Escherichia coli and Candida albicans with 1-cyclohexyl-3-(2-morpholinoethyl) carbodiimide metho-p-toluene sulfonate, dimethyl sulfate, and kethoxal. The percentage of known base pairs in the predicted structure increased from 26.3% to 86.8% for the E. coli sequence by using modification constraints. For C. albicans, the accuracy remained 87.5% both with and without modification data. On average, for these sequences and a set of 14 sequences with known secondary structure and chemical modification data taken from the literature, accuracy improves from 67% to 76%. This enhancement primarily reflects improvement for three sequences that are predicted with <40% accuracy on the basis of energetics alone. For these sequences, inclusion of chemical modification constraints improves the average accuracy from 28% to 78%. For the 11 sequences with <6% pseudoknotted base pairs, structures predicted with constraints from chemical modification contain on average 84% of known canonical base pairs. PMID:15123812

  4. Effective stiffness and formation of secondary structures in a protein-like model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škrbić, Tatjana; Hoang, Trinh X.; Giacometti, Achille

    2016-08-01

    We use Wang-Landau and replica exchange techniques to study the effect of an increasing stiffness on the formation of secondary structures in protein-like systems. Two possible models are considered. In both models, a polymer chain is formed by tethered beads where non-consecutive backbone beads attract each other via a square-well potential representing the tendency of the chain to fold. In addition, smaller hard spheres are attached to each non-terminal backbone bead along the direction normal to the chain to mimic the steric hindrance of side chains in real proteins. The two models, however, differ in the way bending rigidity is enforced. In the first model, partial overlap between consecutive beads is allowed. This reduces the possible bending angle between consecutive bonds thus producing an effective entropic stiffness that competes with a short-range attraction, and leads to the formation of secondary structures characteristic of proteins. We discuss the low-temperature phase diagram as a function of increasing interpenetration and find a transition from a planar, beta-like structure, to helical shape. In the second model, an energetic stiffness is explicitly introduced by imposing an infinitely large energy penalty for bending above a critical angle between consecutive bonds, and no penalty below it. The low-temperature phase of this model does not show any sign of protein-like secondary structures. At intermediate temperatures, however, where the chain is still in the coil conformation but stiffness is significant, we find the two models to predict a quite similar dependence of the persistence length as a function of the stiffness. This behaviour is rationalized in terms of a simple geometrical mapping between the two models. Finally, we discuss the effect of shrinking side chains to zero and find the above mapping to still hold true.

  5. Conflicting selection pressures on synonymous codon use in yeast suggest selection on mRNA secondary structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoletzki Nina

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic mRNAs often contain secondary structures in their untranslated regions that are involved in expression regulation. Whether secondary structures in the protein coding regions are of functional importance remains unclear: laboratory studies suggest stable secondary structures within the protein coding sequence interfere with translation, while several bioinformatic studies indicate stable mRNA structures are more frequent than expected. Results In contrast to several studies testing for unexpected structural stabilities, I directly compare the selective constraint of sites that differ in their structural importance. I.e. for each nucleotide, I identify whether it is paired with another nucleotide, or unpaired, in the predicted secondary structure. I assume paired sites are more important for the predicted secondary structure than unpaired sites. I look at protein coding yeast sequences and use optimal codons and synonymous substitutions to test for structural constraints. As expected under selection for secondary structures, paired sites experience higher constraint than unpaired sites, i.e. significantly lower numbers of conserved optimal codons and consistently lower numbers of synonymous substitutions. This is true for structures predicted by different algorithms. Conclusion The results of this study are consistent with purifying selection on mRNA secondary structures in yeast protein coding sequences and suggest their biological importance. One should be aware, however, that accuracy of structure prediction is unknown for mRNAs and interrelated selective forces may contribute as well. Note that if selection pressures alternative to translational selection affect synonymous (and optimal codon use, this may lead to under- or over-estimates of selective strength on optimal codon use depending on strength and direction of translational selection.

  6. Fourier transform infrared spectra studies of protein in reverse micelles: effect of AOT/isooctane on the secondary structure of alpha-chymotrypsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Q; Liu, H; Chen, J

    1994-06-12

    The amide I region Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of alpha-chymotrypsin have been studied in deuterium oxide (D2O) solution and also in reverse micellar solution of AOT/isooctane. The Fourier second derivative was applied to all spectra, revealing that the amide I band of alpha-chymotrypsin in D2O and in reverse micellar solution consists of nine components. The band frequencies are assigned to alpha-helix, beta-sheet, random and turn structure. The second derivative spectra of alpha-chymotrypsin have been shifted in the reverse micellar solution of AOT/isooctane in comparison with its spectra in D2O. This shift has also changed the intensity of each band. Through accurate measurement of the band intensities, the relative amount of different structure of alpha-chymotrypsin can be estimated. The comparison of the calculated results obtained in D2O with those obtained in reverse micellar solution provides the possibility to analyze the effect of reverse micellar solution of AOT/isooctane on the secondary structure of alpha-chymotrypsin. The results indicate that the reverse micellar solution has decreased the amount of alpha-helix and beta-sheet structure and increased the amount of random and turn structure in alpha-chymotrypsin. The increase of the amount of random structure might loosen the structure of alpha-chymotrypsin and change the activity of the enzyme.

  7. Protein secondary structure appears to be robust under in silico evolution while protein disorder appears not to be.

    KAUST Repository

    Schaefer, Christian

    2010-01-16

    MOTIVATION: The mutation of amino acids often impacts protein function and structure. Mutations without negative effect sustain evolutionary pressure. We study a particular aspect of structural robustness with respect to mutations: regular protein secondary structure and natively unstructured (intrinsically disordered) regions. Is the formation of regular secondary structure an intrinsic feature of amino acid sequences, or is it a feature that is lost upon mutation and is maintained by evolution against the odds? Similarly, is disorder an intrinsic sequence feature or is it difficult to maintain? To tackle these questions, we in silico mutated native protein sequences into random sequence-like ensembles and monitored the change in predicted secondary structure and disorder. RESULTS: We established that by our coarse-grained measures for change, predictions and observations were similar, suggesting that our results were not biased by prediction mistakes. Changes in secondary structure and disorder predictions were linearly proportional to the change in sequence. Surprisingly, neither the content nor the length distribution for the predicted secondary structure changed substantially. Regions with long disorder behaved differently in that significantly fewer such regions were predicted after a few mutation steps. Our findings suggest that the formation of regular secondary structure is an intrinsic feature of random amino acid sequences, while the formation of long-disordered regions is not an intrinsic feature of proteins with disordered regions. Put differently, helices and strands appear to be maintained easily by evolution, whereas maintaining disordered regions appears difficult. Neutral mutations with respect to disorder are therefore very unlikely.

  8. Multithreaded comparative RNA secondary structure prediction using stochastic context-free grammars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Værum Morten

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prediction of the structure of large RNAs remains a particular challenge in bioinformatics, due to the computational complexity and low levels of accuracy of state-of-the-art algorithms. The pfold model couples a stochastic context-free grammar to phylogenetic analysis for a high accuracy in predictions, but the time complexity of the algorithm and underflow errors have prevented its use for long alignments. Here we present PPfold, a multithreaded version of pfold, which is capable of predicting the structure of large RNA alignments accurately on practical timescales. Results We have distributed both the phylogenetic calculations and the inside-outside algorithm in PPfold, resulting in a significant reduction of runtime on multicore machines. We have addressed the floating-point underflow problems of pfold by implementing an extended-exponent datatype, enabling PPfold to be used for large-scale RNA structure predictions. We have also improved the user interface and portability: alongside standalone executable and Java source code of the program, PPfold is also available as a free plugin to the CLC Workbenches. We have evaluated the accuracy of PPfold using BRaliBase I tests, and demonstrated its practical use by predicting the secondary structure of an alignment of 24 complete HIV-1 genomes in 65 minutes on an 8-core machine and identifying several known structural elements in the prediction. Conclusions PPfold is the first parallelized comparative RNA structure prediction algorithm to date. Based on the pfold model, PPfold is capable of fast, high-quality predictions of large RNA secondary structures, such as the genomes of RNA viruses or long genomic transcripts. The techniques used in the parallelization of this algorithm may be of general applicability to other bioinformatics algorithms.

  9. Mechanical properties of amyloid-like fibrils defined by secondary structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolini, C.; Jones, N. C.; Hoffmann, S. V.; Wang, C.; Besenbacher, F.; Dong, M.

    2015-04-01

    Amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils represent a generic class of highly ordered nanostructures that are implicated in some of the most fatal neurodegenerative diseases. On the other hand, amyloids, by possessing outstanding mechanical robustness, have also been successfully employed as functional biomaterials. For these reasons, physical and chemical factors driving fibril self-assembly and morphology are extensively studied - among these parameters, the secondary structures and the pH have been revealed to be crucial, since a variation in pH changes the fibril morphology and net chirality during protein aggregation. It is important to quantify the mechanical properties of these fibrils in order to help the design of effective strategies for treating diseases related to the presence of amyloid fibrils. In this work, we show that by changing pH the mechanical properties of amyloid-like fibrils vary as well. In particular, we reveal that these mechanical properties are strongly related to the content of secondary structures. We analysed and estimated the Young's modulus (E) by comparing the persistence length (Lp) - measured from the observation of TEM images by using statistical mechanics arguments - with the mechanical information provided by peak force quantitative nanomechanical property mapping (PF-QNM). The secondary structure content and the chirality are investigated by means of synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SR-CD). Results arising from this study could be fruitfully used as a protocol to investigate other medical or engineering relevant peptide fibrils.Amyloid and amyloid-like fibrils represent a generic class of highly ordered nanostructures that are implicated in some of the most fatal neurodegenerative diseases. On the other hand, amyloids, by possessing outstanding mechanical robustness, have also been successfully employed as functional biomaterials. For these reasons, physical and chemical factors driving fibril self-assembly and morphology

  10. Rigidity, Secondary Structure, and the Universality of the Boson Peak in Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perticaroli, Stefania; Nickels, Jonathan D.; Ehlers, Georg; Sokolov, Alexei P.

    2014-01-01

    Complementary neutron- and light-scattering results on nine proteins and amino acids reveal the role of rigidity and secondary structure in determining the time- and lengthscales of low-frequency collective vibrational dynamics in proteins. These dynamics manifest in a spectral feature, known as the boson peak (BP), which is common to all disordered materials. We demonstrate that BP position scales systematically with structural motifs, reflecting local rigidity: disordered proteins appear softer than α-helical proteins; which are softer than β-sheet proteins. Our analysis also reveals a universal spectral shape of the BP in proteins and amino acid mixtures; superimposable on the shape observed in typical glasses. Uniformity in the underlying physical mechanism, independent of the specific chemical composition, connects the BP vibrations to nanometer-scale heterogeneities, providing an experimental benchmark for coarse-grained simulations, structure/rigidity relationships, and engineering of proteins for novel applications. PMID:24940784

  11. Microwave, infrared, and Raman spectra, structural parameters, vibrational assignments and theoretical calculations of 1,1,3,3-tetrafluoro-1,3-disilacyclopentane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pate, Brooks H.; Seifert, Nathan A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Guirgis, Gamil A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, College of Charleston, Charleston, SC 29424 (United States); Deodhar, Bhushan S.; Klaassen, Joshua J.; Darkhalil, Ikhlas D. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Crow, Joseph A. [Department of Physics, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Wyatt, Justin K.; Dukes, Horace W. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, College of Charleston, Charleston, SC 29424 (United States); Durig, James R., E-mail: durigj@umkc.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States)

    2013-04-18

    Highlights: • Structural parameters have been determined for the stable twist conformer. • Rotational constants for the six isotopologues for the twist conformer were determined from the microwave spectra. • Vibrational assignments are given for the molecule. • Ab intio and density functional theory calculations have been carried out for all possible conformers. - Abstract: The FT-microwave spectrum of 1,1,3,3-tetrafluoro-1,3-disilacyclopentane (c-C{sub 3}H{sub 6}Si{sub 2}F{sub 4}) has been recorded and 339 transitions for 6 isotopologues have been assigned for the twist conformation. The ground state rotational constants were determined with values for the normal species: A = 2102.74026(68), B = 751.34319(32), C = 736.51478(31). Adjusted r{sub 0} parameters are reported with distances (Å): rC{sub α}–Si = 1.859(2), rSi–C{sub β} = 1.864(2), rSi–F{sub 1} = 1.583(3), rSi–F{sub 2} = 1.578(3), and rC{sub β}–C{sub β} = 1.559(3), and angles (°): ∠SiC{sub α}Si = 102.8(3), ∠C{sub α}SiC{sub β} = 104.3(3), ∠SiC{sub β}C{sub β′} = 106.6(3), τC{sub β}SiC{sub α}Si = 10.7(3), and τ SiC{sub β}C{sub β′}Si = 40.8(3). The conformational stabilities have been predicted from ab initio calculations utilizing several various basis sets. Vibrational assignments have been provided for the observed bands for the twist conformer which are supported by ab initio calculations to predict harmonic force constants, vibrational wavenumbers, infrared intensities, Raman activities and depolarization ratios. The results are discussed and compared to the corresponding properties of some related molecules.

  12. Interplay between desolvation and secondary structure in mediating cosolvent and temperature induced alpha-synuclein aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, V. L.; Webb, W. W.; Eliezer, D.

    2012-10-01

    Both increased temperature and moderate concentrations of fluorinated alcohols enhance aggregation of the Parkinson's disease-associated protein α-synuclein (αS). Here, we investigate the secondary structural rearrangements induced by heating and trifluoroethanol [TFE]. At low TFE concentrations, CD spectra feature a negative peak characteristic of disordered polypeptides near 200 nm and a slight shoulder around 220 nm suggesting some polyproline-II content. Upon heating, these peaks weaken, while a weak negative signal develops at 222 nm. At high TFE concentrations, the spectra show distinct minima at 208 and 222 nm, indicative of considerable α-helical structure, which diminish upon heating. We observe a crossover between the low-TFE and high-TFE behavior near 15% TFE, where we previously showed that a partially helical intermediate is populated. We postulate that the protein is well solvated by water at low TFE concentrations and by TFE at high TFE concentrations, but may become desolvated at the crossover point. We discuss the potential roles and interplay of desolvation and helical secondary structure in driving αS aggregation.

  13. AFM observation of silk fibroin on mica substrates: morphologies reflecting the secondary structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Kazushi; Tsuboi, Yasuyuki; Itaya, Akira

    2003-09-01

    Bombyx mori silk fibroin was fixed on mica substrates by cast of aqueous fibroin solutions, and the microscopic morphologies of the samples were revealed by means of atomic force microscopy. By adjusting the method used to prepare the solution, we succeeded in forming quasi-2-dimensional thin films in which a network of fibroin molecules developed over the substrate. The film network consisted of fibroin in a random coil structure. The morphology of the network changed after thermal or methanol treatments, which are known to convert the secondary structure of fibroin from the random coil to the {beta}-sheet type. In both of these cases, the network morphology disappeared and characteristic island-like morphologies appeared. On the other hand, temporally evolving gelation occurred in a fibroin solution due to the formation of {beta}-sheet crystals. Such islands were also observable in a specimen prepared by the cast of the gel-containing solution. Based on these results, it was concluded that the islands consist of {beta}-sheet crystals. Of particular interest is the observation that all of the islands had a common thickness value of 1.3 nm. These morphologies are discussed in terms of the secondary structure of fibroin.

  14. In Silico Analysis of β-Galactosidases Primary and Secondary Structure in relation to Temperature Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available β-D-Galactosidases (EC 3.2.1.23 hydrolyze the terminal nonreducing β-D-galactose residues in β-D-galactosides and are ubiquitously present in all life forms including extremophiles. Eighteen microbial β-galactosidase protein sequences, six each from psychrophilic, mesophilic, and thermophilic microbes, were analyzed. Primary structure reveals alanine, glycine, serine, and arginine to be higher in psychrophilic β-galactosidases whereas valine, glutamine, glutamic acid, phenylalanine, threonine, and tyrosine are found to be statistically preferred by thermophilic β-galactosidases. Cold active β-galactosidase has a strong preference towards tiny and small amino acids, whereas high temperature inhabitants had higher content of basic and aromatic amino acids. Thermophilic β-galactosidases have higher percentage of α-helix region responsible for temperature tolerance while cold loving β-galactosidases had higher percentage of sheet and coil region. Secondary structure analysis revealed that charged and aromatic amino acids were significant for sheet region of thermophiles. Alanine was found to be significant and high in the helix region of psychrophiles and valine counters in thermophilic β-galactosidase. Coil region of cold active β-galactosidase has higher content of tiny amino acids which explains their high catalytic efficiency over their counterparts from thermal habitat. The present study has revealed the preference or prevalence of certain amino acids in primary and secondary structure of psychrophilic, mesophilic, and thermophilic β-galactosidase.

  15. Secondary Structure Preferences of Mn2+ Binding Sites in Bacterial Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana Aleksandrovna Khrustaleva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available 3D structures of proteins with coordinated Mn2+ ions from bacteria with low, average, and high genomic GC-content have been analyzed (149 PDB files were used. Major Mn2+ binders are aspartic acid (6.82% of Asp residues, histidine (14.76% of His residues, and glutamic acid (3.51% of Glu residues. We found out that the motif of secondary structure “beta strand-major binder-random coil” is overrepresented around all the three major Mn2+ binders. That motif may be followed by either alpha helix or beta strand. Beta strands near Mn2+ binding residues should be stable because they are enriched by such beta formers as valine and isoleucine, as well as by specific combinations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acid residues characteristic to beta sheet. In the group of proteins from GC-rich bacteria glutamic acid residues situated in alpha helices frequently coordinate Mn2+ ions, probably, because of the decrease of Lys usage under the influence of mutational GC-pressure. On the other hand, the percentage of Mn2+ sites with at least one amino acid in the “beta strand-major binder-random coil” motif of secondary structure (77.88% does not depend on genomic GC-content.

  16. A quantitative analysis of secondary RNA structure using domination based parameters on trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Yue

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has become increasingly apparent that a comprehensive database of RNA motifs is essential in order to achieve new goals in genomic and proteomic research. Secondary RNA structures have frequently been represented by various modeling methods as graph-theoretic trees. Using graph theory as a modeling tool allows the vast resources of graphical invariants to be utilized to numerically identify secondary RNA motifs. The domination number of a graph is a graphical invariant that is sensitive to even a slight change in the structure of a tree. The invariants selected in this study are variations of the domination number of a graph. These graphical invariants are partitioned into two classes, and we define two parameters based on each of these classes. These parameters are calculated for all small order trees and a statistical analysis of the resulting data is conducted to determine if the values of these parameters can be utilized to identify which trees of orders seven and eight are RNA-like in structure. Results The statistical analysis shows that the domination based parameters correctly distinguish between the trees that represent native structures and those that are not likely candidates to represent RNA. Some of the trees previously identified as candidate structures are found to be "very" RNA like, while others are not, thereby refining the space of structures likely to be found as representing secondary RNA structure. Conclusion Search algorithms are available that mine nucleotide sequence databases. However, the number of motifs identified can be quite large, making a further search for similar motif computationally difficult. Much of the work in the bioinformatics arena is toward the development of better algorithms to address the computational problem. This work, on the other hand, uses mathematical descriptors to more clearly characterize the RNA motifs and thereby reduce the corresponding search space. These

  17. Structured role orientation and academic self-concept in the secondary school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moir, J; Todman, J

    1989-06-01

    Gordon's (1978) School Environment Preference Survey (SEPS) and Cohen's (1976) six-item adaptation of the Brookover (1967) Self-Concept of Academic Ability Scale were administered to 25 pupils in each of the first four years in a Scottish secondary school. The correlations obtained provide support for Gordon's (1971) hypothesis that pupils with a high degree of structured role orientation, as measured by the SEPS, lack confidence in their academic ability. In addition, there was a decrease in SEPS scores and an increase in academic self-concept over successive year levels.

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of secondary electron images for real sample structures in scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P; Wang, H Y; Li, Y G; Mao, S F; Ding, Z J

    2012-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation methods for the study of electron beam interaction with solids have been mostly concerned with specimens of simple geometry. In this article, we propose a simulation algorithm for treating arbitrary complex structures in a real sample. The method is based on a finite element triangular mesh modeling of sample geometry and a space subdivision for accelerating simulation. Simulation of secondary electron image in scanning electron microscopy has been performed for gold particles on a carbon substrate. Comparison of the simulation result with an experiment image confirms that this method is effective to model complex morphology of a real sample.

  19. THE ARCHITECTURE OF A SPECIFIC CHIP FOR RNA SECONDARY STRUCTURE PREDICTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xinchun; Zhang Peiheng; Sun Ninghui

    2005-01-01

    The architecture of a BioAccel (internal code) chip for RNA secondary structure prediction is described in the letter. The system is based on a BioBus (internal code), whose distinguishing features are: Two separated control and data channels, and a slave-associated arbitration scheme. Two reference systems based on the AMBA AHB bus and Coreconnect bus are introduced to evaluate the performance of the system. The simulation results are attractive.The average communication bandwidth of the chip is increased at severalfold, and the read and write latencies are reduced about 40 percent.

  20. Population structure and secondary production of Siriella clausii, a dominant detritus feeding mysid in Posidonia oceanica meadows (W Mediterranean Sea)

    OpenAIRE

    Barberá Cebrián, Carmen; Sanchez-Jerez, Pablo; Sorbe, Jean Claude

    2013-01-01

    Temporal trends in abundance, demographic structure of the population and secondary production of Siriella clausii were studied at three different sectors of Posidonia oceanica meadows in the SE Iberian Peninsula, with different levels of habitat complexity. Secondary production was calculated through three methods widely employed in marine invertebrates: the Hynes method (based on demographic structure data) and models by Morin-Bourassa and Brey (based on biomass data). This filter/grazer an...

  1. A complete assignment of the vibrational spectra of 2-furoic acid based on the structures of the more stable monomer and dimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghalla, Houcine; Issaoui, Noureddine; Castillo, María Victoria; Brandán, Silvia Antonia; Flakus, Henryk T.

    2014-03-01

    The structural and vibrational properties of cyclic dimer of 2-furoic acid (2FA) were predicted by combining the available experimental infrared and Raman spectra in the solid phase and ab initio calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) with Pople's basis sets. The calculations show that there are two cyclic dimers for the title molecule that have been theoretically determined in the gas phase, and that only one of them, cis conformer, is present in the solid phase. The complete assignment of the 66 normal vibrational modes for the cis cyclic dimer was performed using the Pulay's Scaled Quantum Mechanics Force Field (SQMFF) methodology. Four strong bands in the infrared spectrum at 1583, 1427, 1126 and 887 cm-1 and the group of bands in the Raman spectrum at 1464, 1452, 1147, 1030, 885, 873, 848, 715 and 590 cm-1 are characteristic of the dimeric form of 2FA in the solid phase. In this work, the calculated structural and vibrational properties of both dimeric species were analyzed and compared between them. In addition, three types of atomic charges, bond orders, possible charge transfer, topological properties of the furan rings, Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) and Atoms in Molecules (AIM) theory calculations were employed to study the stabilities and intermolecular interactions of the both dimers of 2FA.

  2. Vibrational assignment and structure of trinuclear oxo-centered of basic formate iron(III) and chromium(III) complexes: a density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiana, Samaneh; Yazdanbakhsh, Mohammad; Jamialahmadi, Mina; Tayyari, Sayyed Faramarz

    2014-09-15

    [Fe3O(OOCH)6(H2O)3]OOCH·HCOOH, and [Cr3O(OOCH)6(H2O)3]OOCH·2.5HNO3 were synthesized and the molecular structure and vibrational assignments of their cations were investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The harmonic vibrational frequencies of [Fe3O(OOCH)6(H2O)3]+ and [Cr3O(OOCH)6(H2O)3]+ were obtained at the UB3LYP level using a series of basis sets. The topological properties of the charge distribution of both cations in their ground states are discussed in detail by means of natural bond orbital (NBO) theory and of [Fe3O(OOCH)6(H2O)3]+ by the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (AIM). The calculated geometrical parameters and vibrational frequencies were compared with the experimental results. The scaled theoretical frequencies and the structural parameters were found to be in good agreement with the experimental data.

  3. Modeling the influence of alkane molecular structure on secondary organic aerosol formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aumont, Bernard; Camredon, Marie; Mouchel-Vallon, Camille; La, Stéphanie; Ouzebidour, Farida; Valorso, Richard; Lee-Taylor, Julia; Madronich, Sasha

    2013-01-01

    Secondary Organic Aerosols (SOA) production and ageing is a multigenerational oxidation process involving the formation of successive organic compounds with higher oxidation degree and lower vapor pressure. Intermediate Volatility Organic Compounds (IVOC) emitted to the atmosphere are expected to be a substantial source of SOA. These emitted IVOC constitute a complex mixture including linear, branched and cyclic alkanes. The explicit gas-phase oxidation mechanisms are here generated for various linear and branched C10-C22 alkanes using the GECKO-A (Generator for Explicit Chemistry and Kinetics of Organics in the Atmosphere) and SOA formation is investigated for various homologous series. Simulation results show that both the size and the branching of the carbon skeleton are dominant factors driving the SOA yield. However, branching appears to be of secondary importance for the particle oxidation state and composition. The effect of alkane molecular structure on SOA yields appears to be consistent with recent laboratory observations. The simulated SOA composition shows, however, an unexpected major contribution from multifunctional organic nitrates. Most SOA contributors simulated for the oxidation of the various homologous series are far too reduced to be categorized as highly oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA). On a carbon basis, the OOA yields never exceeded 10% regardless of carbon chain length, molecular structure or ageing time. This version of the model appears clearly unable to explain a large production of OOA from alkane precursors.

  4. Perturbation of the Secondary Structure of the Scrapie Prion Protein Under Conditions that Alter Infectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasset, Maria; Baldwin, Michael A.; Fletterick, Robert J.; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    1993-01-01

    Limited proteolysis of the scrapie prion protein (PrPSc) generates PrP 27-30, which polymerizes into amyloid. By attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, PrP 27-30 polymers contained 54% β-sheet, 25% α-helix, 10% turns, and 11% random coil; dispersion into detergent-lipid-protein-complexes preserved infectivity and secondary structure. Almost 60% of the β-sheet was low-frequency infrared-absorbing, reflecting intermolecular aggregation. Decreased low-frequency β-sheet and increased turn content were found after SDS/PAGE, which disassembled the amyloid polymers, denatured PrP 27-30, and diminished scrapie infectivity. Acid-induced transitions were reversible, whereas alkali produced an irreversible transition centered at pH 10 under conditions that diminished infectivity. Whether PrPSc synthesis involves a transition in the secondary structure of one or more domains of the cellular prion protein from α-helical, random coil, or turn into β-sheet remains to be established.

  5. Population genetic structure and secondary endosymbionts of Q Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) from Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagkarakou, A; Mouton, L; Kristoffersen, J B; Dokianakis, E; Grispou, M; Bourtzis, K

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the molecular diversity of the major agricultural pest Bemisia tabaci and of its associated secondary endosymbionts in Greece. Analyzing mitochondrial DNA, we found that the Q1 (=Q west) is predominant. We used eight microsatellite polymorphic markers to study the genetic structure of 37 populations from mainland and insular Greece, collected on different host species from outdoor and protected crops as well as from non-cultivated plants. In some cases, gene flow was found to be low even between populations separated by just a few kilometres. Bayesian analysis identified two main genetic groups, the first encompassing populations from south Crete and the second composed of populations from north Crete, two other Aegean islands and mainland Greece. Genetic differentiation was not correlated with different host plant species or habitat, or greenhouse versus open environment populations. Gene flow significantly decreased with geographic distance, but no isolation by distance existed when only the samples from mainland Greece or only the samples from Crete were considered. The secondary symbionts Wolbachia and Hamiltonella were present at high frequencies while Arsenophonus, Cardinium and Rickettsia were absent from Greek populations. Multilocus sequence typing of Wolbachia identified two Wolbachia strains. These two strains were found together in most of the populations studied but never in the same host individual. Their role on the observed population structure is discussed.

  6. Examining the dimensional structure models of secondary traumatic stress based on DSM-5 symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordeno, Imelu G; Go, Geraldine P; Yangson-Serondo, April

    2017-02-01

    Latent factor structure of Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS) has been examined using Diagnostic Statistic Manual-IV (DSM-IV)'s Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) nomenclature. With the advent of Diagnostic Statistic Manual-5 (DSM-5), there is an impending need to reexamine STS using DSM-5 symptoms in light of the most updated PTSD models in the literature. The study investigated and determined the best fitted PTSD models using DSM-5 PTSD criteria symptoms. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted to examine model fit using the Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale in 241 registered and practicing Filipino nurses (166 females and 75 males) who worked in the Philippines and gave direct nursing services to patients. Based on multiple fit indices, the results showed the 7-factor hybrid model, comprising of intrusion, avoidance, negative affect, anhedonia, externalizing behavior, anxious arousal, and dysphoric arousal factors has excellent fit to STS. This model asserts that: (1) hyperarousal criterion needs to be divided into anxious and dysphoric arousal factors; (2) symptoms characterizing negative and positive affect need to be separated to two separate factors, and; (3) a new factor would categorize externalized, self-initiated impulse and control-deficit behaviors. Comparison of nested and non-nested models showed Hybrid model to have superior fit over other models. The specificity of the symptom structure of STS based on DSM-5 PTSD criteria suggests having more specific interventions addressing the more elaborate symptom-groupings that would alleviate the condition of nurses exposed to STS on a daily basis.

  7. Evolutionary conservation of sequence and secondary structures inCRISPR repeats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunin, Victor; Sorek, Rotem; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2006-09-01

    Clustered Regularly Interspaced Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) are a novel class of direct repeats, separated by unique spacer sequences of similar length, that are present in {approx}40% of bacterial and all archaeal genomes analyzed to date. More than 40 gene families, called CRISPR-associated sequences (CAS), appear in conjunction with these repeats and are thought to be involved in the propagation and functioning of CRISPRs. It has been proposed that the CRISPR/CAS system samples, maintains a record of, and inactivates invasive DNA that the cell has encountered, and therefore constitutes a prokaryotic analog of an immune system. Here we analyze CRISPR repeats identified in 195 microbial genomes and show that they can be organized into multiple clusters based on sequence similarity. All individual repeats in any given cluster were inferred to form characteristic RNA secondary structure, ranging from non-existent to pronounced. Stable secondary structures included G:U base pairs and exhibited multiple compensatory base changes in the stem region, indicating evolutionary conservation and functional importance. We also show that the repeat-based classification corresponds to, and expands upon, a previously reported CAS gene-based classification including specific relationships between CRISPR and CAS subtypes.

  8. [Spatial structural characteristics of natural Populus davidiana - Betula platyphylla secondary forest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Fang-Li; Yu, Xin-Xiao; Song, Si-Ming; Zhao, Yang

    2011-11-01

    This paper analyzed the spatial structural characteristics of natural Populus davidiana - Betula platyphylla secondary forest in a 4 hm2 plot of Mulan Paddock, based on the diameter distribution and the spatial structure parameters mingling degree, neighborhood comparison, and angle index. In the forest, the diameter distribution of the stands presented as an inverse 'J' curve, the average mingling degree was 0.4, with the individuals at weak and zero mingling degree reached 51.6%, and the average mingling degree of P. davidiana and B. platyphylla was 0.25 and 0.39, respectively. The neighborhood comparison based on the diameter at breast height (DBH) and tree height was almost the same, suggesting that the P. davidiana and B. platyphylla were in the transition state from subdominant to middle. The horizontal distribution pattern had a close relation to the minimum measured DBH, being clustered when the DBH was > or = 1 cm and or = 6 cm.

  9. DNA secondary structures are associated with recombination in major Plasmodium falciparum variable surface antigen gene families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Adam F.; Lavstsen, Thomas; Rask, Thomas Salhøj

    2014-01-01

    -wide recombination hotspots in var genes, we show that during the parasite’s sexual stages, ectopic recombination between isogenous var paralogs occurs near low folding free energy DNA 50-mers and that these sequences are heavily concentrated at the boundaries of regions encoding individual Plasmodium falciparum......-erythrocyte membrane protein 1 structural domains. The recombinogenic potential of these 50-mers is not parasite-specific because these sequences also induce recombination when transferred to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Genetic cross data suggest that DNA secondary structures (DSS) act as inducers...... of recombination during DNA replication in P. falciparum sexual stages, and that these DSS-regulated genetic exchanges generate functional and diverse P. falciparum adhesion antigens. DSS-induced recombination may represent a common mechanism for optimizing the evolvability of virulence gene families in pathogens....

  10. Protein secondary structure determination by constrained single-particle cryo-electron tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartesaghi, Alberto; Lecumberry, Federico; Sapiro, Guillermo; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2012-12-05

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is a powerful technique for 3D structure determination of protein complexes by averaging information from individual molecular images. The resolutions that can be achieved with single-particle cryo-EM are frequently limited by inaccuracies in assigning molecular orientations based solely on 2D projection images. Tomographic data collection schemes, however, provide powerful constraints that can be used to more accurately determine molecular orientations necessary for 3D reconstruction. Here, we propose "constrained single-particle tomography" as a general strategy for 3D structure determination in cryo-EM. A key component of our approach is the effective use of images recorded in tilt series to extract high-resolution information and correct for the contrast transfer function. By incorporating geometric constraints into the refinement to improve orientational accuracy of images, we reduce model bias and overrefinement artifacts and demonstrate that protein structures can be determined at resolutions of ∼8 Å starting from low-dose tomographic tilt series.

  11. Nucleotide sequence of a crustacean 18S ribosomal RNA gene and secondary structure of eukaryotic small subunit ribosomal RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelles, L; Fang, B L; Volckaert, G; Vandenberghe, A; De Wachter, R

    1984-12-11

    The primary structure of the gene for 18 S rRNA of the crustacean Artemia salina was determined. The sequence has been aligned with 13 other small ribosomal subunit RNA sequences of eukaryotic, archaebacterial, eubacterial, chloroplastic and plant mitochondrial origin. Secondary structure models for these RNAs were derived on the basis of previously proposed models and additional comparative evidence found in the alignment. Although there is a general similarity in the secondary structure models for eukaryotes and prokaryotes, the evidence seems to indicate a different topology in a central area of the structures.

  12. Short Oligonucleotides Aligned in Stretched Humid Matrix: Secondary DNA Structure in Poly(vinyl alcohol) Environment

    KAUST Repository

    Hanczyc, Piotr

    2012-04-24

    We report that short, synthetic, double- as well as single-stranded DNA can be aligned in stretched humid poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) matrix, and the secondary structure (nucleobase orientation) can be characterized with linear dichroism (LD) spectroscopy. Oligonucleotides of lengths varying between 10 (3.4 nm) and 60 bases (20.4 nm) were investigated with respect to structural properties in the gel-like polymer environment. The DNA conformation as a function of relative humidity reveals a strong dependence of helical structure of DNA on PVA hydration level, results of relevance for nanotechnical studies of DNA-based supramolecular systems. Also, the PVA gel could provide possibilities to test models for nucleic acid interactions and distribution in cell contexts, including structural stability of genetic material in the cell and PVA-packaging for gene delivery. A method by which duplex oligonucleotides, with sequences designed to provide specific binding sites, become amenable to polarized-light spectroscopy opens up new possibilities for studying structure in DNA complexes with small adduct molecules as well as proteins. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  13. Predicting protein folding pathways at the mesoscopic level based on native interactions between secondary structure elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sze Sing-Hoi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since experimental determination of protein folding pathways remains difficult, computational techniques are often used to simulate protein folding. Most current techniques to predict protein folding pathways are computationally intensive and are suitable only for small proteins. Results By assuming that the native structure of a protein is known and representing each intermediate conformation as a collection of fully folded structures in which each of them contains a set of interacting secondary structure elements, we show that it is possible to significantly reduce the conformation space while still being able to predict the most energetically favorable folding pathway of large proteins with hundreds of residues at the mesoscopic level, including the pig muscle phosphoglycerate kinase with 416 residues. The model is detailed enough to distinguish between different folding pathways of structurally very similar proteins, including the streptococcal protein G and the peptostreptococcal protein L. The model is also able to recognize the differences between the folding pathways of protein G and its two structurally similar variants NuG1 and NuG2, which are even harder to distinguish. We show that this strategy can produce accurate predictions on many other proteins with experimentally determined intermediate folding states. Conclusion Our technique is efficient enough to predict folding pathways for both large and small proteins at the mesoscopic level. Such a strategy is often the only feasible choice for large proteins. A software program implementing this strategy (SSFold is available at http://faculty.cs.tamu.edu/shsze/ssfold.

  14. An evolutionary method for learning HMM structure: prediction of protein secondary structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Won, Kyoung-Jae; Hamelryck, Thomas; Prügel-Bennett, Adam;

    2007-01-01

    Therefore, we have developed a method for evolving the structure of HMMs automatically, using Genetic Algorithms (GAs). RESULTS: In the GA procedure, populations of HMMs are assembled from biologically meaningful building blocks. Mutation and crossover operators were designed to explore the space...... HMM also calculates the probabilities associated with the predictions. We carefully examined the performance of the HMM based predictor, both under the multiple- and single-sequence...

  15. Assignment of the stereochemistry and anomeric configuration of structurally informative product ions derived from disaccharides: infrared photodissociation of glycosyl-glycolaldehydes in the negative ion mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendiak, Brad; Fang, Tammy T

    2010-11-01

    Using mass spectrometry in the negative ion mode, m/z 221 ions are frequently observed as product ion substructures derived from reducing disaccharides having 2, 4, or 6 linkages. The ions have been shown to be glycosyl-glycolaldehydes. All 16 stereochemical variants of their pyranosides were prepared and evaluated by infrared photodissociation, in addition to HexNAc-glycolaldehyde variants (m/z 262) of 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-d-glucose and 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-d-galactose. The stereochemistry and anomeric configuration of these ions were differentiated in the gas phase using a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance spectrometer with infrared multiphoton dissociation at 10.6 μm. Results were compared to those obtained by collision-induced dissociation. In some cases, differentiation was far preferable using infrared photodissociation; in others, collision-induced dissociation was preferred. Using an instrument that interfaced a linear trap with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance spectrometer, either dissociation technique could be used to optimally discriminate between isomers. With infrared photodissociation, spectral differences were highly statistically significant, even between pairs of isomers having spectra that appeared to be visually somewhat similar (pions). Comparisons among different instruments suggest that physical standards of the stereochemical variants of these ions will be required for their detailed structural assignments in unknowns, as some variation was observed among instruments, both using infrared photodissociation and collision-induced dissociation.

  16. Plant secondary metabolite-induced shifts in bacterial community structure and degradative ability in contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlik, Ondrej; Musilova, Lucie; Ridl, Jakub; Hroudova, Miluse; Vlcek, Cestmir; Koubek, Jiri; Holeckova, Marcela; Mackova, Martina; Macek, Tomas

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate how selected natural compounds (naringin, caffeic acid, and limonene) induce shifts in both bacterial community structure and degradative activity in long-term polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated soil and how these changes correlate with changes in chlorobiphenyl degradation capacity. In order to address this issue, we have integrated analytical methods of determining PCB degradation with pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene tag-encoded amplicons and DNA-stable isotope probing (SIP). Our model system was set in laboratory microcosms with PCB-contaminated soil, which was enriched for 8 weeks with the suspensions of flavonoid naringin, terpene limonene, and phenolic caffeic acid. Our results show that application of selected plant secondary metabolites resulted in bacterial community structure far different from the control one (no natural compound amendment). The community in soil treated with caffeic acid is almost solely represented by Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia (together over 99 %). Treatment with naringin resulted in an enrichment of Firmicutes to the exclusion of Acidobacteria and Verrucomicrobia. SIP was applied in order to identify populations actively participating in 4-chlorobiphenyl catabolism. We observed that naringin and limonene in soil foster mainly populations of Hydrogenophaga spp., caffeic acid Burkholderia spp. and Pseudoxanthomonas spp. None of these populations were detected among 4-chlorobiphenyl utilizers in non-amended soil. Similarly, the degradation of individual PCB congeners was influenced by the addition of different plant compounds. Residual content of PCBs was lowest after treating the soil with naringin. Addition of caffeic acid resulted in comparable decrease of total PCBs with non-amended soil; however, higher substituted congeners were more degraded after caffeic acid treatment compared to all other treatments. Finally, it appears that plant secondary metabolites

  17. Impact of Microscale and Pilot-Scale Freeze-Drying on Protein Secondary Structures: Sucrose Formulations of Lysozyme and Catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Björn-Hendrik; Leskinen, Jari T T; Molnár, Ferdinand; Ketolainen, Jarkko

    2015-11-01

    Microscale (MS) freeze-drying offers rapid process cycles for early-stage formulation development. The effects of the MS approach on the secondary structures of two model proteins, lysozyme and catalase, were compared with pilot-scale (PS) vial freeze-drying. The secondary structures were assessed by attenuated total reflection Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. Formulations were made with increasing sucrose-protein ratios. Freeze-drying protocols involved regular cooling without thermal treatment and annealing with MS and PS equipment, and cooling rate variations with the MS. Principal component analysis of smoothed second-derivative amide I spectra revealed sucrose-protein ratio-dependent shifts toward α-helical structures. Transferability of sucrose-protein formulations from MS to PS vial freeze-drying was evidenced at regular cooling rates. Local differences in protein secondary structures between the bottom and top of sucrose-catalase samples could be detected at the sucrose-catalase ratios of 1 and 2, this being related to the initial filling height and ice crystal morphology. Annealing revealed temperature, protein, formulation, and sample location-dependent effects influencing surface morphology at the top, or causing protein secondary structure perturbation at the bottom. With the MS approach, protein secondary structure differences at different cooling rates could be detected for sucrose-lysozyme samples at the sucrose-lysozyme ratio of 1.

  18. R2R - software to speed the depiction of aesthetic consensus RNA secondary structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weinberg Zasha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With continuing identification of novel structured noncoding RNAs, there is an increasing need to create schematic diagrams showing the consensus features of these molecules. RNA structural diagrams are typically made either with general-purpose drawing programs like Adobe Illustrator, or with automated or interactive programs specific to RNA. Unfortunately, the use of applications like Illustrator is extremely time consuming, while existing RNA-specific programs produce figures that are useful, but usually not of the same aesthetic quality as those produced at great cost in Illustrator. Additionally, most existing RNA-specific applications are designed for drawing single RNA molecules, not consensus diagrams. Results We created R2R, a computer program that facilitates the generation of aesthetic and readable drawings of RNA consensus diagrams in a fraction of the time required with general-purpose drawing programs. Since the inference of a consensus RNA structure typically requires a multiple-sequence alignment, the R2R user annotates the alignment with commands directing the layout and annotation of the RNA. R2R creates SVG or PDF output that can be imported into Adobe Illustrator, Inkscape or CorelDRAW. R2R can be used to create consensus sequence and secondary structure models for novel RNA structures or to revise models when new representatives for known RNA classes become available. Although R2R does not currently have a graphical user interface, it has proven useful in our efforts to create 100 schematic models of distinct noncoding RNA classes. Conclusions R2R makes it possible to obtain high-quality drawings of the consensus sequence and structural models of many diverse RNA structures with a more practical amount of effort. R2R software is available at http://breaker.research.yale.edu/R2R and as an Additional file.

  19. A comparative study of structures and structural transitions of secondary transporters with the LeuT fold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, Gunnar

    2013-03-01

    Secondary active transporters from several protein families share a core of two five-helix inverted repeats that has become known as the LeuT fold. The known high-resolution protein structures with this fold were analyzed by structural superposition of the core transmembrane domains (TMDs). Three angle parameters derived from the mean TMD axes correlate with accessibility of the central binding site from the outside or inside. Structural transitions between distinct conformations were analyzed for four proteins in terms of changes in relative TMD arrangement and in internal conformation of TMDs. Collectively moving groups of TMDs were found to be correlated in the covariance matrix of elastic network models. The main features of the structural transitions can be reproduced with the 5 % slowest normal modes of anisotropic elastic network models. These results support the rocking bundle model for the major conformational change between the outward- and inward-facing states of the protein and point to an important role for the independently moving last TMDs of each repeat in occluding access to the central binding site. Occlusion is also supported by flexing of some individual TMDs in the collectively moving bundle and hash motifs.

  20. Historical WBAN ID Assignments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — 4"x6" index cards represent the first written assignments of Weather Bureau Army Navy (WBAN) station identifier numbers by the National Climatic Data Center....

  1. Secondary structure and 3D homology modeling of swine leukocyte antigen class 2 (SLA-2) molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Feng-Shan; Xu, Chong-bo; Long, Yi-hou; Xia, Chun

    2009-01-01

    No information to date is available to elucidate the structure of swine leukocyte antigen class I (SLA-I) molecule which is comprised by a heavy chain of SLA-I non-covalently associated with a light chain, beta(2)-microglobulin (beta(2)m) proteins. Presently, one of SLA-I gene SLA-2 and beta(2)m gene were expressed as soluble maltose binding proteins (MBP-proteins) in a pMAL-p2X/Escherichia coli TB1 system and identified by western blotting with anti-MBP polyclonal antibodies. The expressed proteins MBP-SLA-2 and MBP-beta(2)m were purified on amylose affinity columns followed by DEAE-Sepharose. The purified products were cleaved by Factor Xa, respectively, and the interest of proteins SLA-2 and beta(2)m were purified on amylose affinity columns followed by separation from MBP on DEAE-Sepharose. The secondary structures of SLA-2 and beta(2)m were analyzed by circular dichroism (CD) spectrophotometry. The three-dimensional (3D) structure of their peptide-binding domain (PBD) was modeled-based sequence homology. The content of the alpha-helix, beta-sheet, turn, and random coil in the SLA-2 protein were 76, 95, 36, and 67aa, respectively. In the 98aa of beta(2)m, the contents of the alpha-helix, beta-sheet, turn, and random coil were 0, 45, 8, and 45aa, respectively. The SLA-2 protein displayed a typical alpha-helix structure while beta(2)m protein displayed a typical beta-sheet structure. Homology modeling of the SLA-2 and beta(2)m proteins demonstrated similarities with the structure of human and mouse MHC (major histocompatibility complex) class I proteins.

  2. A Morphologically Structured Model for Mycelial Growth and Secondary Metabolite Formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘刚; 徐志南; 岑沛霖

    2000-01-01

    A morphologically structured model is proposed to describe the batch fermentation of lovastatin according to the growth kinetics of filamentous microorganisms. Three kinds of hyphae are considered in the model:actively growing hyphae, non-growing hyphae and deactivated hyphae. Furthermore, actively growing hyphae consist of three morphological compartments: apical compartment which gives rise to hyphal tip extension; subapical compartment which is related to hyphal branching; and hyphal compartment which is only responsible for secondary metabolite formation. The kinetics of mycelial growth mechanism is summarized and applied in modeling lovastatin fermentation. A Michaelis-Menten kinetic model with substrate inhibition is proposed for product formation. As expected, the model simulations fit well with experimental data obtained either from a laboratory scale 10 L fermenter or from a vilot-vlant scale fermenter.

  3. Erratum Study on the secondary structure and bioactivities of Luffaculin 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ming-Huang; SHI Xiao-Li; YE Xiao-Ming; XIE Jie-Ming; ZHAO Rong; RAO Ping-Fang; WANG Zi-Ren

    2005-01-01

    The N-terminal sequence of Luffaculin 1 was determined to be Asp-Val-Ser-Phe-Ser- . The CD spectrum of Luffaculin 1 indicated that Luffaculin 1 contains the 37.1%α-helix , 33.4% β-sheet,and 29.5% random coil. N-glycosidase activity of Luffaculin 1 against animal rRNA is observed. The anti-tumor activity of Luffaculin 1 on cell strains B16, MGC, Bel were determined,giving IC50 of 1.78×10-7mol/L,2.11×10-7mol/L,and 4.21×10-7mol/L,respectively. We also discussed the N-terminal sequences, secondary structures, and bioactivities of Luffaculin 1 against Trichosanthin.

  4. Relationship between protein structure and geometrical constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Hansen, Jan; Brunak, Søren;

    1996-01-01

    We evaluate to what extent the structure of proteins can be deduced from incomplete knowledge of disulfide bridges, surface assignments, secondary structure assignments, and additional distance constraints. A cost function taking such constraints into account was used to obtain protein structures...... using a simple minimization algorithm. For small proteins, the approximate structure could be obtained using one additional distance constraint for each amino acid in the protein. We also studied the effect of using predicted secondary structure and surface assignments. The constraints used...... in this approach typically may be obtained from low-resolution experimental data. When using a cost function based on distances, half of the resulting structures will be mirrored, because the resulting structure and its mirror image will have the same cost. The secondary structure assignments were therefore...

  5. Relationship between protein structure and geometrical constrains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Hansen, Jan; Brunak, Søren;

    1996-01-01

    We evaluate to what extent the structure of proteins can be deduced from incomplete knowledge of disulfide bridges, surface assignments, secondary structure assignments, and additional distance constraints. A cost function taking such constraints into account was used to obtain protein structures...... using a simple minimization algorithm. For small proteins, the approximate structure could be obtained using one additional distance constraint for each amino acid in the protein. We also studied the effect of using predicted secondary structure and surface assignments. The constraints used...... in this approach typically may be obtained from low-resolution experimental data. When using a cost function based on distances, half of the resulting structures will be mirrored, because the resulting structure and its mirror image will have the same cost. The secondary structure assignments were therefore...

  6. Effects of Individualized Assignments on Biology Achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Philip L.

    1983-01-01

    Compared detailed (favoring field dependence and induction) and nondetailed (favoring field dependence and deduction) assignments on biology achievement of grade 10 male students (N=95) over a seven-month period. Detailed assignments, employing pictorial and verbal block diagrams and high structure, significantly enhanced learning among some…

  7. Protein secondary structure and orientation in silk as revealed by Raman spectromicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Thierry; Rousseau, Marie-Eve; Pézolet, Michel

    2007-04-15

    Taking advantage of recent advances in polarized Raman microspectroscopy, and based on a rational decomposition of the amide I band, the conformation and orientation of proteins have been determined for cocoon silks of the silkworms Bombyx mori and Samia cynthia ricini and dragline silks of the spiders Nephila clavipes and Nephila edulis. This study distinguished between band components due to beta-sheets, beta-turns, 3(1)-helices, and unordered structure for the four fibers. For B. mori, the beta-sheet content is 50%, which matches the proportion of residues that form the GAGAGS fibroin motifs. For the Nephila dragline and S. c. ricini cocoon, the beta-sheet content (36-37% and 45%, respectively) is higher than the proportion of residues that belong to polyalanine blocks (18% and 42%, respectively), showing that adjacent GGA motifs are incorporated into the beta-sheets. Nephila spidroins contain fewer beta-sheets and more flexible secondary structures than silkworm fibroins. The amorphous polypeptide chains are preferentially aligned parallel to the fiber direction, although their level of orientation is much lower than that of beta-sheets. Overall, the results show that the four silks exhibit a common molecular organization, with mixtures of different amounts of beta-sheets and flexible structures, which are organized with specific orientation levels.

  8. Interaction Of Calcium Phosphate Nanoparticles With Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Modifies Secondary And Tertiary Protein Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Hakeim Hussein K

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate nanoparticles (CaPNP have good biocompatibility and bioactivity inside human body. In this study, the interaction between CaPNP and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG was analyzed to determine the changes in the protein structure in the presence of CaPNP and the quantity of protein adsorbed on the CaPNP surface. The results showed a significant adsorption of hCG on the CaPNP nanoparticle surface. The optimal fit was achieved using the Sips isotherm equation with a maximum adsorption capacity of 68.23 µg/mg. The thermodynamic parameters, including ∆H° and ∆G°, of the adsorption process are positive, whereas ∆S° is negative. The circular dichroism results of the adsorption of hCG on CaPNP showed the changes in its secondary structure; such changes include the decomposition of α-helix strand and the increase in β-pleated sheet and random coil percentages. Fluorescence study indicated minimal changes in the tertiary structure near the microenvironment of the aromatic amino acids such as tyrosine and phenyl alanine caused by the interaction forces between the CaPNP and hCG protein. The desorption process showed that the quantity of the hCG desorbed significantly increases as temperature increases, which indicates the weak forces between hCG and the surface.

  9. The RNAsnp web server: predicting SNP effects on local RNA secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabarinathan, Radhakrishnan; Tafer, Hakim; Seemann, Stefan E; Hofacker, Ivo L; Stadler, Peter F; Gorodkin, Jan

    2013-07-01

    The function of many non-coding RNA genes and cis-regulatory elements of messenger RNA largely depends on the structure, which is in turn determined by their sequence. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and other mutations may disrupt the RNA structure, interfere with the molecular function and hence cause a phenotypic effect. RNAsnp is an efficient method to predict the effect of SNPs on local RNA secondary structure based on the RNA folding algorithms implemented in the Vienna RNA package. The SNP effects are quantified in terms of empirical P-values, which, for computational efficiency, are derived from extensive pre-computed tables of distributions of substitution effects as a function of gene length and GC content. Here, we present a web service that not only provides an interface for RNAsnp but also features a graphical output representation. In addition, the web server is connected to a local mirror of the UCSC genome browser database that enables the users to select the genomic sequences for analysis and visualize the results directly in the UCSC genome browser. The RNAsnp web server is freely available at: http://rth.dk/resources/rnasnp/.

  10. Role of loops connecting secondary structure elements in the stabilization of proteins isolated from thermophilic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasco, Nicole; Esposito, Luciana; De Simone, Alfonso; Vitagliano, Luigi

    2013-07-01

    It has been recently discovered that the connection of secondary structure elements (ββ-unit, βα- and αβ-units) in proteins follows quite stringent principles regarding the chirality and the orientation of the structural units (Koga et al., Nature 2012;491:222-227). By exploiting these rules, a number of protein scaffolds endowed with a remarkable thermal stability have been designed (Koga et al., Nature 2012;491:222-227). By using structural databases of proteins isolated from either mesophilic or thermophilic organisms, we here investigate the influence of supersecondary associations on the thermal stability of natural proteins. Our results suggest that β-hairpins of proteins from thermophilic organisms are very frequently characterized by shortenings of the loops. Interestingly, this shortening leads to states that display a very strong preference for the most common connectivity of the strands observed in native protein hairpins. The abundance of selective states in these proteins suggests that they may achieve a high stability by adopting a strategy aimed to reduce the possible conformations of the unfolded ensemble. In this scenario, our data indicate that the shortening is effective if it increases the adherence to these rules. We also show that this mechanism may operate in the stabilization of well-known protein folds (thioredoxin and RNase A). These findings suggest that future investigations aimed at defining mechanism of protein stabilization should also consider these effects.

  11. How a spatial arrangement of secondary structure elements is dispersed in the universe of protein folds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shintaro Minami

    Full Text Available It has been known that topologically different proteins of the same class sometimes share the same spatial arrangement of secondary structure elements (SSEs. However, the frequency by which topologically different structures share the same spatial arrangement of SSEs is unclear. It is important to estimate this frequency because it provides both a deeper understanding of the geometry of protein folds and a valuable suggestion for predicting protein structures with novel folds. Here we clarified the frequency with which protein folds share the same SSE packing arrangement with other folds, the types of spatial arrangement of SSEs that are frequently observed across different folds, and the diversity of protein folds that share the same spatial arrangement of SSEs with a given fold, using a protein structure alignment program MICAN, which we have been developing. By performing comprehensive structural comparison of SCOP fold representatives, we found that approximately 80% of protein folds share the same spatial arrangement of SSEs with other folds. We also observed that many protein pairs that share the same spatial arrangement of SSEs belong to the different classes, often with an opposing N- to C-terminal direction of the polypeptide chain. The most frequently observed spatial arrangement of SSEs was the 2-layer α/β packing arrangement and it was dispersed among as many as 27% of SCOP fold representatives. These results suggest that the same spatial arrangements of SSEs are adopted by a wide variety of different folds and that the spatial arrangement of SSEs is highly robust against the N- to C-terminal direction of the polypeptide chain.

  12. The secondary and aggregation structural changes of BSA induced by trivalent chromium: A biophysical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Mingmao [Institute of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Technology, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002, Fujian (China); Liu, Yan, E-mail: liuyan@fjirsm.ac.cn [The State Key Lab of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002, Fujian (China); Cao, Huan [Institute of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Technology, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002, Fujian (China); Song, Ling [The State Key Lab of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou 350002, Fujian (China); Zhang, Qiqing, E-mail: zhangqiq@126.com [Institute of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Technology, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002, Fujian (China)

    2015-02-15

    Trivalent chromium Cr(III), which was originally considered to be innocuous as a nutriment, has been suspected to induce some abnormalities in human body recently. In the present work, the effects of Cr(III) on the structural state of BSA were comprehensively investigated through a series of appropriate methods in combination, including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), circular dichroism (CD), UV–vis absorption, synchronous fluorescence, fluorescence lifetime analysis, resonance light scattering (RLS), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and excitation–emission matrix spectroscopy (EEMS) methods. XPS accurately described the binding activity of Cr(III) with protein C, N and O atoms. The structural analysis according to FTIR and CD methods showed that the Cr(III) binding altered BSA conformation with a major reduction of α-helix. RLS and DLS analyses demonstrated that the presence of Cr(III) with low concentration could induce the aggregation structural changes of BSA. UV–vis absorption, EEMS and synchronous fluorescence suggested that the interaction between Cr(III) and BSA induced a slight unfolding of the polypeptide backbone and altered the microenvironments of Trp and Tyr residues in BSA. This research is helpful for understanding the structure-function relationship involved in metal ion-protein bioconjugate process. - Highlights: • The effect of Cr(III) on the conformational state of BSA was comprehensively studied. • XPS described the binding activity of Cr(III) with protein C, N and O atoms. • FTIR and CD data revealed secondary structural alteration in BSA. • Cr(III) complexation induced microenvironmental changes of Trp and Tyr. • RLS, DLS and EEMS presented the aggregational states of Cr(III)–BSA complex.

  13. Identification of novel DNA repair proteins via primary sequence, secondary structure, and homology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akutsu Tatsuya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA repair is the general term for the collection of critical mechanisms which repair many forms of DNA damage such as methylation or ionizing radiation. DNA repair has mainly been studied in experimental and clinical situations, and relatively few information-based approaches to new extracting DNA repair knowledge exist. As a first step, automatic detection of DNA repair proteins in genomes via informatics techniques is desirable; however, there are many forms of DNA repair and it is not a straightforward process to identify and classify repair proteins with a single optimal method. We perform a study of the ability of homology and machine learning-based methods to identify and classify DNA repair proteins, as well as scan vertebrate genomes for the presence of novel repair proteins. Combinations of primary sequence polypeptide frequency, secondary structure, and homology information are used as feature information for input to a Support Vector Machine (SVM. Results We identify that SVM techniques are capable of identifying portions of DNA repair protein datasets without admitting false positives; at low levels of false positive tolerance, homology can also identify and classify proteins with good performance. Secondary structure information provides improved performance compared to using primary structure alone. Furthermore, we observe that machine learning methods incorporating homology information perform best when data is filtered by some clustering technique. Analysis by applying these methodologies to the scanning of multiple vertebrate genomes confirms a positive correlation between the size of a genome and the number of DNA repair protein transcripts it is likely to contain, and simultaneously suggests that all organisms have a non-zero minimum number of repair genes. In addition, the scan result clusters several organisms' repair abilities in an evolutionarily consistent fashion. Analysis also identifies several

  14. 42 CFR 433.146 - Rights assigned; assignment method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rights assigned; assignment method. 433.146 Section 433.146 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Assignment of Rights to Benefits § 433.146 Rights assigned; assignment method. (a) Except as specified...

  15. Deciphering the structure of isomeric oligosaccharides in a complex mixture by tandem mass spectrometry: Photon activation with vacuum ultra-violet brings unique information and enables definitive structure assignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropartz, David, E-mail: David.Ropartz@nantes.inra.fr [INRA, UR1268 Biopolymers Interactions Assemblies, F-44316 Nantes (France); Lemoine, Jérôme [Institut des Sciences Analytiques, UMR 5280, Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Giuliani, Alexandre [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, F-91190 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); UAR 1008 CEPIA, INRA, F-44316 Nantes (France); Bittebière, Yann [INRA, UR1268 Biopolymers Interactions Assemblies, F-44316 Nantes (France); Enjalbert, Quentin [Institut des Sciences Analytiques, UMR 5280, Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Institut Lumière Matière, UMR5306, Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Antoine, Rodolphe; Dugourd, Philippe [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR5306, Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Ralet, Marie-Christine; Rogniaux, Hélène [INRA, UR1268 Biopolymers Interactions Assemblies, F-44316 Nantes (France)

    2014-01-07

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •A complex mixture of methylated oligogalacturonans was fractionated by IP-RP-UHPLC. •Synchrotron-radiation in VUV range was used as an activation process for tandem MS. •VUV activation brought rich structural information compared to LE-CAD. •Resolution of more than 35 structures, including isomers, was successfully completed. -- Abstract: Carbohydrates have a wide variety of structures whose complexity and heterogeneity challenge the field of analytical chemistry. Tandem mass spectrometry, with its remarkable sensitivity and high information content, provides key advantages to addressing the structural elucidation of polysaccharides. Yet, classical fragmentation by collision-activated dissociation (CAD) in many cases fails to reach a comprehensive structural determination, especially when isomers have to be differentiated. In this work, for the first time, vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) synchrotron radiation is used as the activation process in tandem mass spectrometry of large oligosaccharides. Compared to low energy CAD (LE-CAD), photon activated dissociation brought more straightforward and valuable structural information. The outstanding feature was that complete series of informative ions were produced, with only minor neutral losses. Moreover, systematic fragmentation rules could be drawn thus facilitating the definitive assignments of fragment identities. As a result, most of the structures present in a complex mixture of oligogalacturonans could be comprehensively resolved, including many isomers differing in the position of methyl groups along the galacturonic acid backbone.

  16. Human neuromodulator SLURP-1: bacterial expression, binding to muscle-type nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, secondary structure, and conformational heterogeneity in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulepko, M A; Lyukmanova, E N; Paramonov, A S; Lobas, A A; Shenkarev, Z O; Kasheverov, I E; Dolgikh, D A; Tsetlin, V I; Arseniev, A S; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2013-02-01

    Human protein SLURP-1 is an endogenous neuromodulator belonging to the Ly-6/uPAR family and acting on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. In the present work, the gene of SLURP-1 was expressed in E. coli. The bacterial systems engineered for SLURP-1 expression as fused with thioredoxin and secretion with leader peptide STII failed in the production of milligram quantities of the protein. The SLURP-1 was produced with high-yield in the form of inclusion bodies, and different methods of the protein refolding were tested. Milligram quantities of recombinant SLURP-1 and its (15)N-labeled analog were obtained. The recombinant SLURP-1 competed with (125)I-α-bungarotoxin for binding to muscle-type Torpedo californica nAChR at micromolar concentrations, indicating a partial overlap in the binding sites for SLURP-1 and α-neurotoxins on the receptor surface. NMR study revealed conformational heterogeneity of SLURP-1 in aqueous solution, which was associated with cis-trans isomerization of the Tyr39-Pro40 peptide bond. The two structural forms of the protein have almost equal population in aqueous solution, and exchange process between them takes place with characteristic time of about 4 ms. Almost complete (1)H and (15)N resonance assignment was obtained for both structural forms of SLURP-1. The secondary structure of SLURP-1 involves two antiparallel β-sheets formed from five β-strands and closely resembles those of three-finger snake neurotoxins.

  17. Pentacyclic triterpenoids of Mentha villosa: structural identification and {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C resonance assignments; Triterpenoides pentaciclicos de Mentha villosa: identificacao estrutural e atribuicao dos deslocamentos quimicos dos atomos de hidrogenio e carbono

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monte, Francisco J. Queiroz; Oliveira, Eliete F. de [Ceara Univ., Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Organica e Inorganica; Braz Filho, Raimundo [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense, Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil). Setor de Quimica de Produtos Naturais

    2001-08-01

    The structures of seven oleanene and ursene triterpenoids (1-7) isolated from aerial parts of Mentha villosa were identified. In addition, the complete {sup 1} H and {sup 13} C resonance assignments of these triterpenoids were accomplished using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic experiments. (author)

  18. Improving prediction of secondary structure, local backbone angles, and solvent accessible surface area of proteins by iterative deep learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Rhys; Paliwal, Kuldip; Lyons, James; Dehzangi, Abdollah; Sharma, Alok; Wang, Jihua; Sattar, Abdul; Yang, Yuedong; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2015-01-01

    Direct prediction of protein structure from sequence is a challenging problem. An effective approach is to break it up into independent sub-problems. These sub-problems such as prediction of protein secondary structure can then be solved independently. In a previous study, we found that an iterative use of predicted secondary structure and backbone torsion angles can further improve secondary structure and torsion angle prediction. In this study, we expand the iterative features to include solvent accessible surface area and backbone angles and dihedrals based on Cα atoms. By using a deep learning neural network in three iterations, we achieved 82% accuracy for secondary structure prediction, 0.76 for the correlation coefficient between predicted and actual solvent accessible surface area, 19° and 30° for mean absolute errors of backbone φ and ψ angles, respectively, and 8° and 32° for mean absolute errors of Cα-based θ and τ angles, respectively, for an independent test dataset of 1199 proteins. The accuracy of the method is slightly lower for 72 CASP 11 targets but much higher than those of model structures from current state-of-the-art techniques. This suggests the potentially beneficial use of these predicted properties for model assessment and ranking.

  19. Secondary structure and zinc ligation of human recombinant short-form stromelysin by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooley, P R; Johnson, B A; Marcy, A I; Cuca, G C; Salowe, S P; Hagmann, W K; Esser, C K; Springer, J P

    1993-12-07

    Stromelysin-1, a member of the matrix metalloendoprotease family, is a zinc protease involved in the degradation of connective tissue in the extracellular matrix. As a step toward determining the structure of this protein, multidimensional heteronuclear NMR experiments have been applied to an inhibited truncated form of human stromelysin-1. Extensive 1H, 13C, and 15N sequential assignments have been obtained with a combination of three- and four-dimensional experiments. On the basis of sequential and short-range NOEs and 13C alpha chemical shifts, two helices have been delineated, spanning residues Asp-111 to Val-127 and Leu-195 to Ser-206. A third helix spanning residues Asp-238 to Gly-247 is characterized by sequential NOEs and 13C alpha chemical shifts, but not short-range NOEs. The lack of the latter NOEs suggests that this helix is either distorted or mobile. Similarly, sequential and interstrand NOEs and 13C alpha chemical shifts characterize a four-stranded beta-sheet with three parallel strands (Arg-100 to Ile-101, Ile-142 to Ala-147, Asp-177 to Asp-181) and one antiparallel strand (Ala-165 to Tyr-168). Two zinc sites have been identified in stromelysin [Salowe et al. (1992) Biochemistry 31, 4535-4540]. The NMR spectral properties, including chemical shift, pH dependence, and proton coupling of the imidazole nitrogens of six histidine residues (151, 166, 179, 201, 205, and 211), invariant in the matrix metalloendoprotease family, suggest that these residues are zinc ligands. NOE data indicate that these histidines form two clusters: one ligates the catalytic zinc (His-201, -205, and -211), and the other ligates a structural zinc (His-151, -166, and -179). Heteronuclear multiple quantum correlated spectra and specific labeling experiments indicate His-151, -179, -201, -205, and -211 are in the N delta 1H tautomer and His-166 is in the N epsilon 2H tautomer.

  20. Protein-associated water and secondary structure effect removal of blood proteins from metallic substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Gaurav; Zhang, Fuming; Linhardt, Robert J; Belfort, Georges

    2011-03-01

    Removing adsorbed protein from metals has significant health and industrial consequences. There are numerous protein-adsorption studies using model self-assembled monolayers or polymeric substrates but hardly any high-resolution measurements of adsorption and removal of proteins on industrially relevant transition metals. Surgeons and ship owners desire clean metal surfaces to reduce transmission of disease via surgical instruments and minimize surface fouling (to reduce friction and corrosion), respectively. A major finding of this work is that, besides hydrophobic interaction adhesion energy, water content in an adsorbed protein layer and secondary structure of proteins determined the access and hence ability to remove adsorbed proteins from metal surfaces with a strong alkaline-surfactant solution (NaOH and 5 mg/mL SDS in PBS at pH 11). This is demonstrated with three blood proteins (bovine serum albumin, immunoglobulin, and fibrinogen) and four transition metal substrates and stainless steel (platinum (Pt), gold (Au), tungsten (W), titanium (Ti), and 316 grade stainless steel (SS)). All the metallic substrates were checked for chemical contaminations like carbon and sulfur and were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). While Pt and Au surfaces were oxide-free (fairly inert elements), W, Ti, and SS substrates were associated with native oxide. Difference measurements between a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR) provided a measure of the water content in the protein-adsorbed layers. Hydrophobic adhesion forces, obtained with atomic force microscopy, between the proteins and the metals correlated with the amount of the adsorbed protein-water complex. Thus, the amount of protein adsorbed decreased with Pt, Au, W, Ti and SS, in this order. Neither sessile contact angle nor surface roughness of the metal substrates was useful as predictors here. All three globular proteins

  1. A Deep Learning Network Approach to ab initio Protein Secondary Structure Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Matt; Eickholt, Jesse; Jianlin Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Ab initio protein secondary structure (SS) predictions are utilized to generate tertiary structure predictions, which are increasingly demanded due to the rapid discovery of proteins. Although recent developments have slightly exceeded previous methods of SS prediction, accuracy has stagnated around 80 percent and many wonder if prediction cannot be advanced beyond this ceiling. Disciplines that have traditionally employed neural networks are experimenting with novel deep learning techniques in attempts to stimulate progress. Since neural networks have historically played an important role in SS prediction, we wanted to determine whether deep learning could contribute to the advancement of this field as well. We developed an SS predictor that makes use of the position-specific scoring matrix generated by PSI-BLAST and deep learning network architectures, which we call DNSS. Graphical processing units and CUDA software optimize the deep network architecture and efficiently train the deep networks. Optimal parameters for the training process were determined, and a workflow comprising three separately trained deep networks was constructed in order to make refined predictions. This deep learning network approach was used to predict SS for a fully independent test dataset of 198 proteins, achieving a Q3 accuracy of 80.7 percent and a Sov accuracy of 74.2 percent.

  2. Bimane fluorescence scanning suggests secondary structure near the S3-S4 linker of BK channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenova, Nina P; Abarca-Heidemann, Karin; Loranc, Eva; Rothberg, Brad S

    2009-04-17

    Gating of large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BK or maxi-K channels) is controlled by a Ca(2+)-sensor, formed by the channel cytoplasmic C-terminal domain, and a voltage sensor, formed by its S0-S4 transmembrane helices. Here we analyze structural properties of a portion of the BK channel voltage sensing domain, the S3-S4 linker, using fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy. Single residues in the S3-S4 linker region were substituted with cysteine, and the cysteine-substituted mutants were expressed in CHO cells and covalently labeled with the sulfhydryl-reactive fluorophore monobromo-trimethylammonio-bimane (qBBr). qBBr fluorescence is quenched by tryptophan and, to a lesser extent, tyrosine side chains. We found that qBBr fluorescence in several of the labeled cysteine-substituted channels shows position-specific quenching, as indicated by increase of the brief lifetime component of the qBBr fluorescence decay. Quenching was reduced with the mutation W203F (in the S4 segment), suggesting that Trp-203 acts as a quenching group. Our results suggest a working hypothesis for the secondary structure of the BK channel S3-S4 region, and places residues Leu-204, Gly-205, and Leu-206 within the extracellular end of the S4 helix.

  3. The Secondary Structure of Heated Whey Protein and Its Hydrolysates Antigenicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANGZhi-hua; ZHU Jun; WU Wei-jing; WANG Fang; RENFa-zheng; ZHANG Lu-daa; GUOHui-yuan

    2011-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FFIR) and circular dichroism (CD) were used to investigate the conformational changes of heated whey protein (WP) and the corresponding changes in the hydrolysates immunoreactivity were determined by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA).Results showed that the contents of α- helix and β-sheet of WP did not decrease much under mild heating conditions and the antigenicity was relatively high; when the heating intensity increased (70 ℃ for 25 min or 75 ℃ for 20 min),the content of α- helix and β-sheet decreased to the minimum,so was the antigenicity; However,when the WP was heated at even higher temperature and for a longer time,the β-sheet associated with protein aggregation begun to increase and the antigenicity increased correspondingly.It was concluded that the conformations of heated WP and the antigenicity of its hydrolysates are related and the optimum structure for decreasing the hydrolysates antigeniity is the least content of α-helix and β-sheet.Establishing the elationship between the WP secondary structure and WP hydrolysates antigenicity is significant to supply the reference for antigenicity reduction by enzymolysis.

  4. Enzyme stability, thermodynamics and secondary structures of α-amylase as probed by the CD spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikani, B A; Singh, S P

    2015-11-01

    An amylase of a thermophilic bacterium, Bacillus sp. TSSC-3 (GenBank Number, EU710557) isolated from the Tulsi Shyam hot spring reservoir (Gujarat, India) was purified to the homogeneity in a single step on phenyl sepharose 6FF. The molecular weight of the enzyme was 25kD, while the temperature and pH optima for the enzyme catalysis were 80°C and 7, respectively. The purified enzyme was highly thermostable with broad pH stability and displayed remarkable resistance against surfactants, chelators, urea, guanidine HCl and various solvents as well. The stability and changes in the secondary structure of the enzyme under various extreme conditions were determined by the circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The stability trends and the changes in the α-helices and β-sheets were analyzed by Mean Residual Ellipticity (MRE) and K2D3. The CD data confirmed the structural stability of the enzyme under various harsh conditions, yet it indicated reduced α-helix content and increased β-sheets upon denaturation. The thermodynamic parameters; deactivation rate constant, half-life, changes in entropy, enthalpy, activation energy and Gibb's free energy indicated that the enzyme-substrate reactions were highly stable. The overall profile of the enzyme: high thermostability, alkalitolerance, calcium independent nature, dextrose equivalent values and resistance against chemical denaturants, solvents and surfactants suggest its commercial applications.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of nitroaromatic peptoids: fine tuning peptoid secondary structure through monomer position and functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Sarah A; Luechapanichkul, Rinrada; Blackwell, Helen E

    2009-02-20

    N-substituted glycine oligomers, or peptoids, have emerged as an important class of foldamers for the study of biomolecular interactions and for potential use as therapeutic agents. However, the design of peptoids with well-defined conformations a priori remains a formidable challenge. New approaches are required to address this problem, and the systematic study of the role of individual monomer units in the global peptoid folding process represents one strategy. Here, we report our efforts toward this approach through the design, synthesis, and characterization of peptoids containing nitroaromatic monomer units. This work required the synthesis of a new chiral amine building block, (S)-1-(2-nitrophenyl)ethanamine (s2ne), which could be readily installed into peptoids using standard solid-phase peptoid synthesis techniques. We designed a series of peptoid nonamers that allowed us to probe the effects of this relatively electron-deficient and sterically encumbered alpha-chiral side chain on peptoid structure, namely, the peptoid threaded loop and helix. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of the peptoids revealed that the nitroaromatic monomer has a significant effect on peptoid secondary structure. Specifically, the threaded loop structure was disrupted in a nonamer containing alternating N-(S)-1-phenylethylglycine (Nspe) and Ns2ne monomers, and the major conformation was helical instead. Indeed, placement of a single Ns2ne at the N-terminal position of (Nspe)(9) resulted in a destabilized form of the threaded loop structure relative to the homononamer (Nspe)(9). Conversely, we observed that incorporation of N-(S)-1-(4-nitrophenyl)ethylglycine (Nsnp, a p-nitro monomer) at the N-terminal position stabilized the threaded loop structure relative to (Nspe)(9). Additional experiments revealed that nitroaromatic side chains can influence peptoid nonamer folding by modulating the strength of key intramolecular hydrogen bonds in the peptoid threaded loop structure. Steric

  6. Random Cell Identifiers Assignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Bestak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite integration of advanced functions that enable Femto Access Points (FAPs to be deployed in a plug-and-play manner, the femtocell concept still cause several opened issues to be resolved. One of them represents an assignment of Physical Cell Identifiers (PCIs to FAPs. This paper analyses a random based assignment algorithm in LTE systems operating in diverse femtocell scenarios. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated by comparing the number of confusions for various femtocell densities, PCI ranges and knowledge of vicinity. Simulation results show that better knowledge of vicinity can significantly reduce the number of confusions events.

  7. NR 512 All Assignments

    OpenAIRE

    Laynebaril1

    2017-01-01

     NR 512 All Assignments Click Link Below To Buy: http://hwcampus.com/shop/nr-512-assignments/ Or Visit www.hwcampus.com   NR512 Week 4 Scavenger Hunt Latest 2017 W4_NR512 Second Life (SL) Scavenger Hunt Work Sheet Student Name: Dorinda Ezell Avatar Name: Dvezellnr512 INSTRUCTIONS Instructions: 1. As you complete the Scavenger Hunt, please write your answers to the questions on this worksheet. 2. Save it as a MS Word document in the following format: ...

  8. Residual structure of Streptococcus mutans biofilm following complete disinfection favors secondary bacterial adhesion and biofilm re-development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya Ohsumi

    Full Text Available Chemical disinfection of oral biofilms often leaves biofilm structures intact. This study aimed to examine whether the residual structure promotes secondary bacterial adhesion. Streptococcus mutans biofilms generated on resin-composite disks in a rotating disc reactor were disinfected completely with 70% isopropyl alcohol, and were again cultured in the same reactor after resupplying with the same bacterial solution. Specimens were subjected to fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscopy, viable cell counts and PCR-Invader assay in order to observe and quantify secondarily adhered cells. Fluorescence microscopic analysis, particularly after longitudinal cryosectioning, demonstrated stratified patterns of viable cells on the disinfected biofilm structure. Viable cell counts of test specimens were significantly higher than those of controls, and increased according to the amount of residual structure and culture period. Linear regression analysis exhibited a high correlation between viable and total cell counts. It was concluded that disinfected biofilm structures favored secondary bacterial adhesion.

  9. Analysis of the secondary structure of mitochondrial LSU rRNA of Peruvian land snails (Orthalicidae: Gastropoda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Ramirez Ramirez

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The alignment of ribosomal genes is difficult due to insertion and deletion events of nucleotides, making the alignment ambiguous. This can be overcome by using information from the secondary structure of ribosomal genes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of the secondary structure in improving the alignment of the 16S rRNA gene in land snails of the family Orthalicidae. We assessed 10 Orthalicid species (five genera. Total DNA was isolated and the partial 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced using internal primers. The sequences were aligned with ClustalX and manually corrected, in DCSE format, using the 16S rRNA secondary structure of Albinaria caerulea (Pulmonata: Clausiliidae. The sequences obtained ranged from 323 to 345 bp corresponding to parts of both domains IV and V of the 16S rRNA gene. The secondary structure was recovered by homology using RnaViz 2.0. Most stems are conserved, and in general the loops are more variable. The compensatory mutations in stems are related to maintenance of the structure. The absence of a bulge-stem-loop in domain V places the family Orthalicidae within the Heterobranchia.

  10. Trade-offs between tRNA abundance and mRNA secondary structure support smoothing of translation elongation rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorochowski, Thomas E.; Ignatova, Zoya; Bovenberg, Roel A.L.; Roubos, Johannes A.

    2015-01-01

    Translation of protein from mRNA is a complex multi-step process that occurs at a non-uniform rate. Variability in ribosome speed along an mRNA enables refinement of the proteome and plays a critical role in protein biogenesis. Detailed single protein studies have found both tRNA abundance and mRNA secondary structure as key modulators of translation elongation rate, but recent genome-wide ribosome profiling experiments have not observed significant influence of either on translation efficiency. Here we provide evidence that this results from an inherent trade-off between these factors. We find codons pairing to high-abundance tRNAs are preferentially used in regions of high secondary structure content, while codons read by significantly less abundant tRNAs are located in lowly structured regions. By considering long stretches of high and low mRNA secondary structure in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli and comparing them to randomized-gene models and experimental expression data, we were able to distinguish clear selective pressures and increased protein expression for specific codon choices. The trade-off between secondary structure and tRNA-concentration based codon choice allows for compensation of their independent effects on translation, helping to smooth overall translational speed and reducing the chance of potentially detrimental points of excessively slow or fast ribosome movement. PMID:25765653

  11. Teaching Through Interactions in Secondary School Classrooms: Revisiting the Factor Structure and Practical Application of the Classroom Assessment Scoring System–Secondary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafen, Christopher A.; Hamre, Bridget K.; Allen, Joseph P.; Bell, Courtney A.; Gitomer, Drew H.; Pianta, Robert C.

    2017-01-01

    Valid measurement of how students’ experiences in secondary school classrooms lead to gains in learning requires a developmental approach to conceptualizing classroom processes. This article presents a potentially useful theoretical model, the Teaching Through Interactions framework, which posits teacher-student interactions as a central driver for student learning and that teacher-student interactions can be organized into three major domains. Results from 1,482 classrooms provide evidence for distinct emotional, organizational, and instructional domains of teacher-student interaction. It also appears that a three-factor structure is a better fit to observational data than alternative one- and two-domain models of teacher-student classroom interactions, and that the three-domain structure is generalizable from 6th through 12th grade. Implications for practitioners, stakeholders, and researchers are discussed.

  12. Task assignment and coaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dominguez-Martinez, S.

    2009-01-01

    An important task of a manager is to motivate her subordinates. One way in which a manager can give incentives to junior employees is through the assignment of tasks. How a manager allocates tasks in an organization, provides information to the junior employees about his ability. Without coaching fr

  13. Projection Structure by Single-Particle Electron Microscopy of Secondary Transport Proteins GItT, Cits, and GltS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moscicka, Katarzyna B.; Krupnik, Tomasz; Boekema, Egbert J.; Lolkema, Juke S.; Mościcka, Katarzyna B.

    2009-01-01

    The structure of three secondary transporter proteins, GltT of Bacillus stearothermophilus, CitS of Klebsiella pneumoniae, and GltS of Escherichia coli, was studied. The proteins were purified to homogeneity ill detergent solution by Ni(2+)-NTA affinity chromatography, and the complexes were determi

  14. Effect of Programmed Instruction on Students' Attitude towards Structure of the Atom and the Periodic Table among Kenyan Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangila, M. J.; Martin, W.; Ronald, M.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effect of Programmed Instruction on students' attitude towards Structure of the Atom and the Periodic Table (SAPT) among mixed (co-educational) secondary schools of Butere district, Kakamega county, Kenya. The quasi-experimental research design was adopted, using the nonrandomized Solomon four-group as a model. The sample…

  15. Observed lesson structure during the first year of secondary education : Exploration of change and link with academic engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maulana, Ridwan; Opdenakker, Marie-Christine; Stroet, Kim; Bosker, Roel

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates whether lesson structure (LS) matters and which components are important for academic engagement during the first grade of secondary education. Data from videoed lessons of 10 Dutch and 12 Indonesian teachers analyzed using an observation protocol show that six LS components

  16. A POSSIBLE CONTRIBUTION OF MESSENGER-RNA SECONDARY STRUCTURE TO TRANSLATION INITIATION EFFICIENCY IN LACTOCOCCUS-LACTIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDEGUCHTE, M; VANDERLENDE, T; KOK, J; VENEMA, G

    1991-01-01

    Gene expression signals derived from Lactococcus lactis were linked to lacZ-fused genes with different 5'-nucleotide sequences. Computer predictions of mRNA secondary structure were combined with lacZ expression studies to direct base-substitutions that could possibly influence gene expression. Muta

  17. DNA secondary structure of the released strand stimulates WRN helicase action on forked duplexes without coordinate action of WRN exonuclease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Byungchan, E-mail: bbccahn@mail.ulsan.ac.kr [Department of Life Sciences, University of Ulsan, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Bohr, Vilhelm A. [Laboratory of Molecular Gerontology, Biomedical Research Center, National Institute on Aging, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} In this study, we investigated the effect of a DNA secondary structure on the two WRN activities. {yields} We found that a DNA secondary structure of the displaced strand during unwinding stimulates WRN helicase without coordinate action of WRN exonuclease. {yields} These results imply that WRN helicase and exonuclease activities can act independently. -- Abstract: Werner syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive premature aging disorder characterized by aging-related phenotypes and genomic instability. WS is caused by mutations in a gene encoding a nuclear protein, Werner syndrome protein (WRN), a member of the RecQ helicase family, that interestingly possesses both helicase and exonuclease activities. Previous studies have shown that the two activities act in concert on a single substrate. We investigated the effect of a DNA secondary structure on the two WRN activities and found that a DNA secondary structure of the displaced strand during unwinding stimulates WRN helicase without coordinate action of WRN exonuclease. These results imply that WRN helicase and exonuclease activities can act independently, and we propose that the uncoordinated action may be relevant to the in vivo activity of WRN.

  18. Genomic mid-range inhomogeneity correlates with an abundance of RNA secondary structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Jun

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomes possess different levels of non-randomness, in particular, an inhomogeneity in their nucleotide composition. Inhomogeneity is manifest from the short-range where neighboring nucleotides influence the choice of base at a site, to the long-range, commonly known as isochores, where a particular base composition can span millions of nucleotides. A separate genomic issue that has yet to be thoroughly elucidated is the role that RNA secondary structure (SS plays in gene expression. Results We present novel data and approaches that show that a mid-range inhomogeneity (~30 to 1000 nt not only exists in mammalian genomes but is also significantly associated with strong RNA SS. A whole-genome bioinformatics investigation of local SS in a set of 11,315 non-redundant human pre-mRNA sequences has been carried out. Four distinct components of these molecules (5'-UTRs, exons, introns and 3'-UTRs were considered separately, since they differ in overall nucleotide composition, sequence motifs and periodicities. For each pre-mRNA component, the abundance of strong local SS ( Conclusion We demonstrate that the excess of strong local SS in pre-mRNAs is linked to the little explored phenomenon of genomic mid-range inhomogeneity (MRI. MRI is an interdependence between nucleotide choice and base composition over a distance of 20–1000 nt. Additionally, we have created a public computational resource to support further study of genomic MRI.

  19. Comparative Genome Structure, Secondary Metabolite, and Effector Coding Capacity across Cochliobolus Pathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condon, Bradford J.; Leng, Yueqiang; Wu, Dongliang; Bushley, Kathryn E.; Ohm, Robin A.; Otillar, Robert; Martin, Joel; Schackwitz, Wendy; Grimwood, Jane; MohdZainudin, NurAinlzzati; Xue, Chunsheng; Wang, Rui; Manning, Viola A.; Dhillon, Braham; Tu, Zheng Jin; Steffenson, Brian J.; Salamov, Asaf; Sun, Hui; Lowry, Steve; LaButti, Kurt; Han, James; Copeland, Alex; Lindquist, Erika; Barry, Kerrie; Schmutz, Jeremy; Baker, Scott E.; Ciuffetti, Lynda M.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Zhong, Shaobin; Turgeon, B. Gillian

    2013-01-24

    The genomes of five Cochliobolus heterostrophus strains, two Cochliobolus sativus strains, three additional Cochliobolus species (Cochliobolus victoriae, Cochliobolus carbonum, Cochliobolus miyabeanus), and closely related Setosphaeria turcica were sequenced at the Joint Genome Institute (JGI). The datasets were used to identify SNPs between strains and species, unique genomic regions, core secondary metabolism genes, and small secreted protein (SSP) candidate effector encoding genes with a view towards pinpointing structural elements and gene content associated with specificity of these closely related fungi to different cereal hosts. Whole-genome alignment shows that three to five of each genome differs between strains of the same species, while a quarter of each genome differs between species. On average, SNP counts among field isolates of the same C. heterostrophus species are more than 25 higher than those between inbred lines and 50 lower than SNPs between Cochliobolus species. The suites of nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), polyketide synthase (PKS), and SSP encoding genes are astoundingly diverse among species but remarkably conserved among isolates of the same species, whether inbred or field strains, except for defining examples that map to unique genomic regions. Functional analysis of several strain-unique PKSs and NRPSs reveal a strong correlation with a role in virulence.

  20. Flammability of self-extinguishing kenaf/ABS nanoclays composite for aircraft secondary structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunakaran, S.; Majid, D. L.; Mohd Tawil, M. L.

    2016-10-01

    This study investigates the flammability properties of kenaf fiber reinforced acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) with nanoclays composites. Natural fiber is one of the potential materials to be used with thermoplastic as a composite due to its attractive properties such as lightweight and strong. In this paper, flammability properties of this material are evaluated through Underwriters Laboratory 94 Horizontal Burning (UL94 HB), which has been conducted for both controlled and uncontrolled conditions, smoke density and limiting oxygen index tests (LOI). These flammability tests are in compliance with the Federal Aviation Regulation (FAR) requirement. The results from UL94 HB and smoke density tests show that the presence of nanoclays with effective composition of kenaf fiber reinforced ABS has enhanced the burning characteristics of the material by hindering propagation of flame spread over the surface of the material through char formation. Consequently, this decreases the burning rate and produces low amount of smoke during burning. On contrary, through LOI test, this material requires less oxygen to burn when exposed to fire, which hinders the enhancement of burning characteristics. This is due to burning mechanism exhibited by nanoclays that catalyzes barrier formation and flame propagation rate over the surface of the biocomposite material. Overall, these experimental results suggest that this biocomposite material is capable of self-extinguishing and possesses effective fire extinction. The observed novel synergism from the result obtained is promising to be implemented in secondary structures of aircraft with significant benefits such as cost-effective, lightweight and biodegradable self-extinguishing biocomposite.

  1. Fine-grained parallelism accelerating for RNA secondary structure prediction with pseudoknots based on FPGA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Fei; Jin, Guoqing

    2014-06-01

    PKNOTS is a most famous benchmark program and has been widely used to predict RNA secondary structure including pseudoknots. It adopts the standard four-dimensional (4D) dynamic programming (DP) method and is the basis of many variants and improved algorithms. Unfortunately, the O(N(6)) computing requirements and complicated data dependency greatly limits the usefulness of PKNOTS package with the explosion in gene database size. In this paper, we present a fine-grained parallel PKNOTS package and prototype system for accelerating RNA folding application based on FPGA chip. We adopted a series of storage optimization strategies to resolve the "Memory Wall" problem. We aggressively exploit parallel computing strategies to improve computational efficiency. We also propose several methods that collectively reduce the storage requirements for FPGA on-chip memory. To the best of our knowledge, our design is the first FPGA implementation for accelerating 4D DP problem for RNA folding application including pseudoknots. The experimental results show a factor of more than 50x average speedup over the PKNOTS-1.08 software running on a PC platform with Intel Core2 Q9400 Quad CPU for input RNA sequences. However, the power consumption of our FPGA accelerator is only about 50% of the general-purpose micro-processors.

  2. Line-Based Object Recognition using Hausdorff Distance: From Range Images to Molecular Secondary Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, C; Pascucci, V

    2004-12-13

    Object recognition algorithms are fundamental tools in automatic matching of geometric shapes within a background scene. Many approaches have been proposed in the past to solve the object recognition problem. Two of the key aspects that distinguish them in terms of their practical usability are: (i) the type of input model description and (ii) the comparison criteria used. In this paper we introduce a novel scheme for 3D object recognition based on line segment representation of the input shapes and comparison using the Hausdor distance. This choice of model representation provides the flexibility to apply the scheme in different application areas. We define several variants of the Hausdor distance to compare the models within the framework of well defined metric spaces. We present a matching algorithm that efficiently finds a pattern in a 3D scene. The algorithm approximates a minimization procedure of the Hausdor distance. The output error due to the approximation is guaranteed to be within a known constant bound. Practical results are presented for two classes of objects: (i) polyhedral shapes extracted from segmented range images and (ii) secondary structures of large molecules. In both cases the use of our approximate algorithm allows to match correctly the pattern in the background while achieving the efficiency necessary for practical use of the scheme. In particular the performance is improved substantially with minor degradation of the quality of the matching.

  3. Secondary Structure of Holo-Enzyme and Apo-Enzyme of Aminoacylase Using CD and FTIR Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张艳; 陈培榕; 何飚; 周海梦

    1994-01-01

    Aminoacylase is a dimeric metal enzyme containing one Zn2+-ion per subunit of active site.It is essential for the activity of enzyme.Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy has been used for the studyon the secondary structure of holo-enzyme and ago-enzyme of aminoaeylase from pig kidney.Resolution en-hancement of the amide I secondary structure-sensitive overlapped component bands has been achieved bymeans of the Fourier self-deconvolution and the Fourier derivation.The effect of Zn2+-ion on the secondarystructure of aminoacylase was observed clearly.After the removal of Zn2+in aminoacylase,the extent of theordered structure was decreased markedly.It suggests that the conformation st or near the active site ofaminoacylase contains more ordered structures,and the presence of Zn2+helps to keep the conformation ofthe active site required for the catalysis of the enzyme.

  4. Ebola virus RNA editing depends on the primary editing site sequence and an upstream secondary structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masfique Mehedi

    Full Text Available Ebolavirus (EBOV, the causative agent of a severe hemorrhagic fever and a biosafety level 4 pathogen, increases its genome coding capacity by producing multiple transcripts encoding for structural and nonstructural glycoproteins from a single gene. This is achieved through RNA editing, during which non-template adenosine residues are incorporated into the EBOV mRNAs at an editing site encoding for 7 adenosine residues. However, the mechanism of EBOV RNA editing is currently not understood. In this study, we report for the first time that minigenomes containing the glycoprotein gene editing site can undergo RNA editing, thereby eliminating the requirement for a biosafety level 4 laboratory to study EBOV RNA editing. Using a newly developed dual-reporter minigenome, we have characterized the mechanism of EBOV RNA editing, and have identified cis-acting sequences that are required for editing, located between 9 nt upstream and 9 nt downstream of the editing site. Moreover, we show that a secondary structure in the upstream cis-acting sequence plays an important role in RNA editing. EBOV RNA editing is glycoprotein gene-specific, as a stretch encoding for 7 adenosine residues located in the viral polymerase gene did not serve as an editing site, most likely due to an absence of the necessary cis-acting sequences. Finally, the EBOV protein VP30 was identified as a trans-acting factor for RNA editing, constituting a novel function for this protein. Overall, our results provide novel insights into the RNA editing mechanism of EBOV, further understanding of which might result in novel intervention strategies against this viral pathogen.

  5. Structure changes and succession dynamic of the natural secondary forest after severe fire interference

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bin-fan; LIU Guang-ju; WANG Zhi-cheng

    2009-01-01

    The structure and dynamic succession law of natural secondary forest after severe fire interference in recent 20 years were studied by adopting the method of deducing time series from the spatial sequence of vegetation in Heihe region, Heilongjiang, China. Two typical and widely distributed forest types in the study area, namely forest type A and forest type B, were selected as study subjects. Forest type A is pure broadleaf forest or broadleaf mixed forest mainly composing of superior Betula platyphylla and Populus davidiana in the area with gradient 25°. Species richness, vegetation coverage, important value, and similarity index of community in different layers (Herb, shrub, small tree, and arbor layers) were investigated and analyzed for the two typical forests. The results show that after fire interference, the species richness and coverage in each layer in forest type A were higher than that in forest type B. Both for forest type A and B, with elapse of post-fire years, the species richness and coverage of herbs and shrubs showed a decline tendency, while those of arbor layer present a rising tendency. Through comparison of the important values of species in each layer and analysis of community structure changes, the dynamic process of post-fire vegetation succession for forest type A and B was separately determined. Post-fire 80 years' succession tendency of forest type A is B. platyphylla and Larix gmelinii mixed forest. Its shrub layer is mainly composed of Corylus heterophylla and Vaccinium uliginosum, and herb layer is dominated by Carex tristachya, Athyrium multidentatum, and Pyrola incarnate; whereas, the post-fire 80 years' succession of forest type B is Q. mongolica and B. davurica mixed forest. Its shrub layer is mainly composed of lespedeza bicolar and corylus heterophylla and herb layer is dominated by Carex tristachya, Asparagus densiflorus, and Hemerocallis minor.

  6. Neural Network Based on GA-BP Algorithm and its Application in the Protein Secondary Structure Prediction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yang; LI Kai-yang

    2006-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of genetic algorithm and BP algorithm are introduced. A neural network based on GA-BP algorithm is proposed and applied in the prediction of protein secondary structure, which combines the advantages of BP and GA. The prediction and training on the neural network are made respectively based on 4 structure classifications of protein so as to get higher rate of predication-the highest prediction rate 75.65%, the average prediction rate 65.04%.

  7. RNAspa: a shortest path approach for comparative prediction of the secondary structure of ncRNA molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaeli Shulamit

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, RNA molecules that are not translated into proteins (ncRNAs have drawn a great deal of attention, as they were shown to be involved in many cellular functions. One of the most important computational problems regarding ncRNA is to predict the secondary structure of a molecule from its sequence. In particular, we attempted to predict the secondary structure for a set of unaligned ncRNA molecules that are taken from the same family, and thus presumably have a similar structure. Results We developed the RNAspa program, which comparatively predicts the secondary structure for a set of ncRNA molecules in linear time in the number of molecules. We observed that in a list of several hundred suboptimal minimal free energy (MFE predictions, as provided by the RNAsubopt program of the Vienna package, it is likely that at least one suggested structure would be similar to the true, correct one. The suboptimal solutions of each molecule are represented as a layer of vertices in a graph. The shortest path in this graph is the basis for structural predictions for the molecule. We also show that RNA secondary structures can be compared very rapidly by a simple string Edit-Distance algorithm with a minimal loss of accuracy. We show that this approach allows us to more deeply explore the suboptimal structure space. Conclusion The algorithm was tested on three datasets which include several ncRNA families taken from the Rfam database. These datasets allowed for comparison of the algorithm with other methods. In these tests, RNAspa performed better than four other programs.

  8. Fold classification based on secondary structure – how much is gained by including loop topology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przytycka Teresa

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been proposed that secondary structure information can be used to classify (to some extend protein folds. Since this method utilizes very limited information about the protein structure, it is not surprising that it has a higher error rate than the approaches that use full 3D fold description. On the other hand, the comparing of 3D protein structures is computing intensive. This raises the question to what extend the error rate can be decreased with each new source of information, especially if the new information can still be used with simple alignment algorithms. We consider the question whether the information about closed loops can improve the accuracy of this approach. While the answer appears to be obvious, we had to overcome two challenges. First, how to code and to compare topological information in such a way that local alignment of strings will properly identify similar structures. Second, how to properly measure the effect of new information in a large data sample. We investigate alternative ways of computing and presenting this information. Results We used the set of beta proteins with at most 30% pairwise identity to test the approach; local alignment scores were used to build a tree of clusters which was evaluated using a new log-odd cluster scoring function. In particular, we derive a closed formula for the probability of obtaining a given score by chance.Parameters of local alignment function were optimized using a genetic algorithm. Of 81 folds that had more than one representative in our data set, log-odds scores registered significantly better clustering in 27 cases and significantly worse in 6 cases, and small differences in the remaining cases. Various notions of the significant change or average change were considered and tried, and the results were all pointing in the same direction. Conclusion We found that, on average, properly presented information about the loop topology improves noticeably

  9. A range of complex probabilistic models for RNA secondary structure prediction that includes the nearest-neighbor model and more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Elena; Lang, Raymond; Eddy, Sean R

    2012-02-01

    The standard approach for single-sequence RNA secondary structure prediction uses a nearest-neighbor thermodynamic model with several thousand experimentally determined energy parameters. An attractive alternative is to use statistical approaches with parameters estimated from growing databases of structural RNAs. Good results have been reported for discriminative statistical methods using complex nearest-neighbor models, including CONTRAfold, Simfold, and ContextFold. Little work has been reported on generative probabilistic models (stochastic context-free grammars [SCFGs]) of comparable complexity, although probabilistic models are generally easier to train and to use. To explore a range of probabilistic models of increasing complexity, and to directly compare probabilistic, thermodynamic, and discriminative approaches, we created TORNADO, a computational tool that can parse a wide spectrum of RNA grammar architectures (including the standard nearest-neighbor model and more) using a generalized super-grammar that can be parameterized with probabilities, energies, or arbitrary scores. By using TORNADO, we find that probabilistic nearest-neighbor models perform comparably to (but not significantly better than) discriminative methods. We find that complex statistical models are prone to overfitting RNA structure and that evaluations should use structurally nonhomologous training and test data sets. Overfitting has affected at least one published method (ContextFold). The most important barrier to improving statistical approaches for RNA secondary structure prediction is the lack of diversity of well-curated single-sequence RNA secondary structures in current RNA databases.

  10. Analysis of energy-based algorithms for RNA secondary structure prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajiaghayi Monir

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA molecules play critical roles in the cells of organisms, including roles in gene regulation, catalysis, and synthesis of proteins. Since RNA function depends in large part on its folded structures, much effort has been invested in developing accurate methods for prediction of RNA secondary structure from the base sequence. Minimum free energy (MFE predictions are widely used, based on nearest neighbor thermodynamic parameters of Mathews, Turner et al. or those of Andronescu et al. Some recently proposed alternatives that leverage partition function calculations find the structure with maximum expected accuracy (MEA or pseudo-expected accuracy (pseudo-MEA methods. Advances in prediction methods are typically benchmarked using sensitivity, positive predictive value and their harmonic mean, namely F-measure, on datasets of known reference structures. Since such benchmarks document progress in improving accuracy of computational prediction methods, it is important to understand how measures of accuracy vary as a function of the reference datasets and whether advances in algorithms or thermodynamic parameters yield statistically significant improvements. Our work advances such understanding for the MFE and (pseudo-MEA-based methods, with respect to the latest datasets and energy parameters. Results We present three main findings. First, using the bootstrap percentile method, we show that the average F-measure accuracy of the MFE and (pseudo-MEA-based algorithms, as measured on our largest datasets with over 2000 RNAs from diverse families, is a reliable estimate (within a 2% range with high confidence of the accuracy of a population of RNA molecules represented by this set. However, average accuracy on smaller classes of RNAs such as a class of 89 Group I introns used previously in benchmarking algorithm accuracy is not reliable enough to draw meaningful conclusions about the relative merits of the MFE and MEA-based algorithms

  11. Efficiency of paramagnetism-based constraints to determine the spatial arrangement of {alpha}-helical secondary structure elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertini, Ivano [University of Florence, CERM and Department of Chemistry (Italy)], E-mail: bertini@cerm.unifi.it; Longinetti, Marco [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Agraria e Forestale (Italy); Luchinat, Claudio; Parigi, Giacomo [University of Florence, CERM and Department of Agricultural Biotechnology (Italy); Sgheri, Luca [Istituto di Analisi Globale ed Applicazioni (CNR) (Italy)

    2002-02-15

    A computational approach has been developed to assess the power of paramagnetism-based backbone constraints with respect to the determination of the tertiary structure, once the secondary structure elements are known. This is part of the general assessment of paramagnetism-based constraints which are known to be relevant when used in conjunction with all classical constraints. The paramagnetism-based constraints here investigated are the pseudocontact shifts, the residual dipolar couplings due to self-orientation of the metalloprotein in high magnetic fields, and the cross correlation between dipolar relaxation and Curie relaxation. The relative constraints are generated by back-calculation from a known structure. The elements of secondary structure are supposed to be obtained from chemical shift index. The problem of the reciprocal orientation of the helices is addressed. It is shown that the correct fold can be obtained depending on the length of the {alpha}-helical stretches with respect to the length of the non helical segments connecting the {alpha}-helices. For example, the correct fold is straightforwardly obtained for the four-helix bundle protein cytochrome b{sub 562}, while the double EF-hand motif of calbindin D{sub 9k} is hardly obtained without ambiguity. In cases like calbindin D{sub 9k}, the availability of datasets from different metal ions is helpful, whereas less important is the location of the metal ion with respect to the secondary structure elements.

  12. Predicting the redox state and secondary structure of cysteine residues using multi-dimensional classification analysis of NMR chemical shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching-Cheng; Lai, Wen-Chung; Chuang, Woei-Jer

    2016-09-01

    A tool for predicting the redox state and secondary structure of cysteine residues using multi-dimensional analyses of different combinations of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts has been developed. A data set of cysteine [Formula: see text], (13)C(α), (13)C(β), (1)H(α), (1)H(N), and (15)N(H) chemical shifts was created, classified according to redox state and secondary structure, using a library of 540 re-referenced BioMagResBank (BMRB) entries. Multi-dimensional analyses of three, four, five, and six chemical shifts were used to derive rules for predicting the structural states of cysteine residues. The results from 60 BMRB entries containing 122 cysteines showed that four-dimensional analysis of the C(α), C(β), H(α), and N(H) chemical shifts had the highest prediction accuracy of 100 and 95.9 % for the redox state and secondary structure, respectively. The prediction of secondary structure using 3D, 5D, and 6D analyses had the accuracy of ~90 %, suggesting that H(N) and [Formula: see text] chemical shifts may be noisy and made the discrimination worse. A web server (6DCSi) was established to enable users to submit NMR chemical shifts, either in BMRB or key-in formats, for prediction. 6DCSi displays predictions using sets of 3, 4, 5, and 6 chemical shifts, which shows their consistency and allows users to draw their own conclusions. This web-based tool can be used to rapidly obtain structural information regarding cysteine residues directly from experimental NMR data.

  13. Secondary Structures of Ubiquitin Ions Soft-Landed onto Self-Assembled Monolayer Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Qichi; Laskin, Julia

    2016-06-09

    The secondary structures of multiply charged ubiquitin ions soft-landed onto self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces were studied using in situ infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS). Two charge states of ubiquitin, 5+ and 13+, were mass selected separately from a mixture of different charge states produced by electrospray ionization (ESI). The low 5+ charge state represents a native-like folded state of ubiquitin, while the high 13+ charge state assumes an extended, almost linear conformation. Each of the two charge states was soft-landed onto a CH3- and COOH-terminated SAM of alkylthiols on gold (HSAM and COOH-SAM). HSAM is a hydrophobic surface known to stabilize helical conformations of soft-landed protonated peptides, whereas COOH-SAM is a hydrophilic surface that preferentially stabilizes β-sheet conformations. IRRAS spectra of the soft-landed ubiquitin ions were acquired as a function of time during and after ion soft-landing. Similar to smaller peptide ions, helical conformations of ubiquitin are found to be more abundant on HSAM, while the relative abundance of β-sheet conformations increases on COOH-SAM. The initial charge state of ubiquitin also has a pronounced effect on its conformation on the surface. Specifically, on both surfaces, a higher relative abundance of helical conformations and lower relative abundance of β-sheet conformations is observed for the 13+ charge state compared to the 5+ charge state. Time-resolved experiments indicate that the α-helical band in the spectrum of the 13+ charge state slowly increases with time on the HSAM surface and decreases in the spectrum of the 13+ charge state on COOH-SAM. These results further support the preference of the hydrophobic HSAM surface toward helical conformations and demonstrate that soft-landed protein ions may undergo slow conformational changes during and after deposition.

  14. Purification and the Secondary Structure of Fucoidanase from Fusarium sp. LD8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Qianqian

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The fucoidanase from Fusarium sp. (LD8 was obtained by solid-state fermentation. The fermented solid medium was extracted by citric acid buffer, and the extracts were precipitated by acetone and purified by Sephadex G-100 successively. The results showed that the specific fucoidanase activity of purified enzyme was 22.7-fold than that of the crude enzyme. The recovery of the enzyme was 23.9%. The purified enzyme gave a single band on SDS-PAGE gel, and the molecular weight of fucoidanase was about 64 kDa. The isoelectric point of the enzyme was 4.5. The enzyme properties were also studied. The results showed that the optimum temperature and pH were 60°C and 6.0, respectively; the temperature of half inactivation was 50°C, and the most stable pH for the enzyme was 6.0. KM, and the Vmax  of the enzyme was 8.9 mg·L−1 and 2.02 mg·min−1·mL−1 by using fucoidan from Fucus vesiculosus as substrate. The compositions of the secondary structure of fucoidanase were estimated by FTIR, the second derivative spectra, and the curve-fitting analysis of the amide I bands in their spectra. The results showed that β-sheet was the dominant component (58.6% and α-helix was the least (12%; the content of β-turn and random coil were 15.39% and 14.5%, respectively.

  15. Spectral analysis of the conformation of polyadenosine diphosphoribose. Evidence indicating secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minaga, T; Kun, E

    1983-01-25

    Based on boronic acid chromatography, a rapid method was developed for the purification of polyadenosine diphosphoribose oligomers of various chain lengths. Polyadenosine diphosphoribose oligomers obtained by the new method were distinguished on the basis of spectral criteria. The purity of polyadenosine diphosphoribose was determined by high performance liquid chromatography, which is a highly sensitive method for the detection of contamination by nucleotides derived from other nucleic acids. The A280/A260 ratio, which has been used in the past as one of the criteria of purity of oligomers, was found to be an unsuitable index of purity because it significantly varied as a function of temperature or ionic strength, exhibiting characteristics of temperature- and ionic strength-dependent hypochromicity. Hypochromicity was highly significant at 260 nm but not at 280 nm. The A280/A260 ratio showed a correlation with the oligomer chain length, significantly diminishing below a chain length of 9 adenosine diphosphoribose units, with concomitant loss of hypochromicity. The increase in A280/A260 ratio above a chain length of nine was small and gradual. Circular dichroism of long, medium, and short oligomers was determined at varying temperatures (5-72 degrees C). For long chains, a temperature-dependent change of the major negative theta value and a red shift occurred from 249.5 to 267.5 nm. With medium chain length oligomers, there was no decrease in the theta value at 249.5 nm, only a red shift. In the case of short chain oligomers the major negative theta value was at 267.5 nm and its position was temperature-independent with only a small temperature-related decrease in size. At 72 degrees C, the different patterns of circular dichroism of the three groups of oligomers of differing chain lengths became indistinguishable. These results were interpreted to indicate a significant secondary structure of polyadenosine diphosphoribose of long chain length.

  16. PSP_MCSVM: brainstorming consensus prediction of protein secondary structures using two-stage multiclass support vector machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Piyali; Basu, Subhadip; Kundu, Mahantapas; Nasipuri, Mita; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2011-09-01

    Secondary structure prediction is a crucial task for understanding the variety of protein structures and performed biological functions. Prediction of secondary structures for new proteins using their amino acid sequences is of fundamental importance in bioinformatics. We propose a novel technique to predict protein secondary structures based on position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMs) and physico-chemical properties of amino acids. It is a two stage approach involving multiclass support vector machines (SVMs) as classifiers for three different structural conformations, viz., helix, sheet and coil. In the first stage, PSSMs obtained from PSI-BLAST and five specially selected physicochemical properties of amino acids are fed into SVMs as features for sequence-to-structure prediction. Confidence values for forming helix, sheet and coil that are obtained from the first stage SVM are then used in the second stage SVM for performing structure-to-structure prediction. The two-stage cascaded classifiers (PSP_MCSVM) are trained with proteins from RS126 dataset. The classifiers are finally tested on target proteins of critical assessment of protein structure prediction experiment-9 (CASP9). PSP_MCSVM with brainstorming consensus procedure performs better than the prediction servers like Predator, DSC, SIMPA96, for randomly selected proteins from CASP9 targets. The overall performance is found to be comparable with the current state-of-the art. PSP_MCSVM source code, train-test datasets and supplementary files are available freely in public domain at: http://sysbio.icm.edu.pl/secstruct and http://code.google.com/p/cmater-bioinfo/

  17. Secondary structure conservation of the stem-loop IV sub-domain of internal ribosomal entry sites in human rhinovirus clinical isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hak Kim

    2015-12-01

    Conclusions: This study showed that the IRES secondary structures of a large number of reference and clinical HRVs were highly conserved, with several compensatory substitutions. It is expected that these results will facilitate investigations into HRV function based on IRES secondary structures.

  18. Exploring the effect of side-chain substitutions upon the secondary structure preferences of β-peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhixiong; van Gunsteren, Wilfred F

    2011-11-10

    The ability to design well-folding β-peptides with a specific biological activity requires detailed insight into the relationship between the β-amino acid sequence and the dominant three-dimensional structure of such a peptide. To this end, secondary structure preferences of two sets of 16 β-peptides were investigated by means of one-step perturbation using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. For each set of peptides, two reference-state simulations and one perturbed-state simulation were carried out to predict the secondary structure preferences for the other 15 peptides. The results show that the substitution of a methyl group in the third or fourth residue stabilizes the left-handed 3(14)-helix over the right-handed 2.7(10/12)-helix for the set of hexapeptides A; for the set of heptapeptides B, having methyl substitutions at both β- and α-carbon positions of the fourth or fifth residue stabilizes the left-handed 3(14)-helix over the right-handed 2.5(12)-helix. Not only the side-chain substitution pattern but also the side-chain composition affects the relative stability of different secondary structures. The approach described here may be of use in peptide design with an eye to obtaining peptides with particular folds and biological activities.

  19. Identification of protein secondary structures by laser induced autofluorescence: A study of urea and GnHCl induced protein denaturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddaramaiah, Manjunath; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu; Rao, Bola Sadashiva Satish; Roy, Suparna; Chandra, Subhash; Mahato, Krishna Kishore

    2017-03-01

    In the present study an attempt has been made to interrogate the bulk secondary structures of some selected proteins (BSA, HSA, lysozyme, trypsin and ribonuclease A) under urea and GnHCl denaturation using laser induced autofluorescence. The proteins were treated with different concentrations of urea (3 M, 6 M, 9 M) and GnHCl (2 M, 4 M, 6 M) and the corresponding steady state autofluorescence spectra were recorded at 281 nm pulsed laser excitations. The recorded fluorescence spectra of proteins were then interpreted based on the existing PDB structures of the proteins and the Trp solvent accessibility (calculated using "Scratch protein predictor" at 30% threshold). Further, the influence of rigidity and conformation of the indole ring (caused by protein secondary structures) on the intrinsic fluorescence properties of proteins were also evaluated using fluorescence of ANS-HSA complexes, CD spectroscopy as well as with trypsin digestion experiments. The outcomes obtained clearly demonstrated GnHCl preferably disrupt helix as compared to the beta β-sheets whereas, urea found was more effective in disrupting β-sheets as compared to the helices. The other way round the proteins which have shown detectable change in the intrinsic fluorescence at lower concentrations of GnHCl were rich in helices whereas, the proteins which showed detectable change in the intrinsic fluorescence at lower concentrations of urea were rich in β-sheets. Since high salt concentrations like GnHCl and urea interfere in the secondary structure analysis by circular dichroism Spectrometry, the present method of analyzing secondary structures using laser induced autofluorescence will be highly advantageous over existing tools for the same.

  20. Optimisation of the mRNA secondary structure to improve the expression of interleukin-24 (IL-24) in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Chaogang; Wang, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Jian; Sun, Aiyou; Wei, Dongzhi; Yang, Shengli

    2014-08-01

    Interleukin-24 (IL-24) is a novel cytokine selectively inhibiting proliferation of cancer cells but with little effect on normal cells. However, IL-24 is difficult to express in Escherichia coli. In this study, we optimised the secondary structure of the translation initiation region using computational approach to obtain non-fusion recombinant IL-24 (nrIL-24). The Gibbs free energy of the region was decreased from -22 to -9.07 kcal mol(-1), potentially promoting a loose secondary structure formation and improving the translation initiation efficiency. As a result, the expression of nrIL-24 was increased to 26 % of the total cellular protein from being barely initially detectable. nrIL-24 showed a concentration-dependent inhibition of A375 cells but had little effect on normal human cells. These results demonstrate that this method in increasing nrIL-24 expression is effective and efficient.

  1. Reduced Dimensionality (4,3)D-hnCOCANH Experiment: An Efficient Backbone Assignment tool for NMR studies of Proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    Sequence specific resonance assignment and secondary structure determination of proteins form the basis for variety of structural and functional proteomics studies by NMR. In this context, an efficient standalone method for rapid assignment of backbone (1H, 15N, 13Ca and 13C') resonances and secondary structure determination of proteins has been presented here. Compared to currently available strategies used for the purpose, the method employs only a single reduced dimensionality (RD) experiment -(4,3)D-hnCOCANH and exploits the linear combinations of backbone (13Ca and 13C') chemical shifts to achieve a dispersion relatively better compared to those of individual chemical shifts (see the text) for efficient and rapid data analysis. Further, the experiment leads to the spectrum with direct distinction of self (intra-residue) and sequential (inter-residue) carbon correlation peaks; these appear opposite in signs and therefore can easily be discriminated without using an additional complementary experiment. On ...

  2. Sensitive and label-free biosensing of RNA with predicted secondary structures by a triplex affinity capture method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrascosa, Laura G.; Gómez-Montes, S.; Aviñó, A.; Nadal, A.; Pla, M.; Eritja, R.; Lechuga, L. M.

    2012-01-01

    A novel biosensing approach for the label-free detection of nucleic acid sequences of short and large lengths has been implemented, with special emphasis on targeting RNA sequences with secondary structures. The approach is based on selecting 8-aminoadenine-modified parallel-stranded DNA tail-clamps as affinity bioreceptors. These receptors have the ability of creating a stable triplex-stranded helix at neutral pH upon hybridization with the nucleic acid target. A surface plasmon resonance biosensor has been used for the detection. With this strategy, we have detected short DNA sequences (32-mer) and purified RNA (103-mer) at the femtomol level in a few minutes in an easy and level-free way. This approach is particularly suitable for the detection of RNA molecules with predicted secondary structures, reaching a limit of detection of 50 fmol without any label or amplification steps. Our methodology has shown a marked enhancement for the detection (18% for short DNA and 54% for RNA), when compared with the conventional duplex approach, highlighting the large difficulty of the duplex approach to detect nucleic acid sequences, especially those exhibiting stable secondary structures. We believe that our strategy could be of great interest to the RNA field. PMID:22241768

  3. INFLUENCE OF MOLECULAR STRUCTURES OF SECONDARY AMINE TERMINATED POLY(ESTER-AMINE)S ON THE CURING PERFORMANCE WITH EPOXY RESIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Five secondary amine terminated poly(ester-amine)s (defined as PEA) with controlled molecular structures were synthesized through reacting excessive piperazine with phthalicdiglycol diacrylate (PDDA) and 1,1,1-trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA) at a constant secondary amine/acrylate group ratio of 1.5/1 and at different PDDA/TMPTA molar ratios.Both IR and 1H-NMR spectra indicated that all acrylate groups were consumed in the reaction, based on which the structural parameters were calculated from the 1H-NMR spectra. With decreasing PDDA/TMPTA ratio, the content of secondary amine, degree of branching, molecular weight, Tg and Td increased accordingly. These polymers were further used as both crosslinkers and flexibilizers for a linear epoxy resin E51 to form cured films under ambient condition, The gel content,relative hardness and Tg of the resulting films increased as PEA molecules changed from linear to highly branching structures. Due to the flexibility of PEA molecules, all the films possessed excellent mechanical performance.

  4. Secondary structure analysis of ITS2 in the rDNA of three Indian paramphistomid species found in local livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shylla, Jollin A; Ghatani, Sudeep; Chatterjee, Anupam; Tandon, Veena

    2011-04-01

    Of paramphistomid trematodes, three species viz., Homalogaster paloniae, Calicophoron calicophorum and Orthocoelium streptocoelium are commonly prevalent in bovine hosts in Northeast India. The aim of the present study was to genetically characterise these species using rDNA second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) so as to supplement the morphological criteria substantiated by molecular findings. The annotated ITS2 region from H. paloniae, C. calicophorum and O. streptocoelium were found to be 289 bp, 288 bp and 288 bp long, respectively. On comparison, the Indian isolates of the three species were observed to have a maximum identity of 99% with each of their respective counterparts from Japan. The secondary structure models were inferred using minimum free energy modelling algorithms. The paramphistomes displayed the typical four helix ITS2 secondary structure and differed from each other due to minor nucleotide differences. The consensus ITS2 secondary structure model revealed the presence of conservative motifs GACGAGGGUG and GCGGUAGAGUC in helix III. Monophyly is well supported for a clade consisting of the Japanese and Indian paramphistomes with significant bootstrap values.

  5. External cavity-quantum cascade laser infrared spectroscopy for secondary structure analysis of proteins at low concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaighofer, Andreas; Alcaráz, Mirta R.; Araman, Can; Goicoechea, Héctor; Lendl, Bernhard

    2016-09-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy are analytical techniques employed for the analysis of protein secondary structure. The use of CD spectroscopy is limited to low protein concentrations (5 mg ml-1). Here we introduce a quantum cascade laser (QCL)-based IR transmission setup for analysis of protein and polypeptide secondary structure at concentrations as low as 0.25 mg ml-1 in deuterated buffer solution. We present dynamic QCL-IR spectra of the temperature-induced α-helix to β-sheet transition of poly-L-lysine. The concentration dependence of the α-β transition temperature between 0.25 and 10 mg ml-1 was investigated by QCL-IR, FTIR and CD spectroscopy. By using QCL-IR spectroscopy it is possible to perform IR spectroscopic analysis in the same concentration range as CD spectroscopy, thus enabling a combined analysis of biomolecules secondary structure by CD and IR spectroscopy.

  6. Depletion of phosphatidylglycerol head-group induces changes in oxygen evolution and protein secondary structures of photosystemⅡ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The techniques of oxygen electrode polarography and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were employed to explore the roles of polar head-group of phosphatidylglycerol (PG) molecules in the functional and structural aspects of photosystemⅡ(PSⅡ) through enzymatic approach. It was shown that the depletion of PG by treatment of phospholipase C (PLC) on PSⅡ particles caused the inhibition of oxygen evolving activity in PSⅡ. This effect also gave rise to changes in the protein secondary structures of PSⅡ, that is, an increase in α-helical conformation which is compensated by the loss of β-strand structures. It revealed that the head-group of PG molecules plays an important structural role in the maintenance of normal structure of PSⅡ proteins, which is required to maintain the appropriate physiological activity of the PSⅡ complex such as the oxygen evolving activity. It is suggested that there most probably exist hydrogen-bonding interactions between PG molecules and PSⅡ proteins.

  7. Rapid analysis of protein backbone resonance assignments using cryogenic probes, a distributed Linux-based computing architecture, and an integrated set of spectral analysis tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monleón, Daniel; Colson, Kimberly; Moseley, Hunter N B; Anklin, Clemens; Oswald, Robert; Szyperski, Thomas; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2002-01-01

    Rapid data collection, spectral referencing, processing by time domain deconvolution, peak picking and editing, and assignment of NMR spectra are necessary components of any efficient integrated system for protein NMR structure analysis. We have developed a set of software tools designated AutoProc, AutoPeak, and AutoAssign, which function together with the data processing and peak-picking programs NMRPipe and Sparky, to provide an integrated software system for rapid analysis of protein backbone resonance assignments. In this paper we demonstrate that these tools, together with high-sensitivity triple resonance NMR cryoprobes for data collection and a Linux-based computer cluster architecture, can be combined to provide nearly complete backbone resonance assignments and secondary structures (based on chemical shift data) for a 59-residue protein in less than 30 hours of data collection and processing time. In this optimum case of a small protein providing excellent spectra, extensive backbone resonance assignments could also be obtained using less than 6 hours of data collection and processing time. These results demonstrate the feasibility of high throughput triple resonance NMR for determining resonance assignments and secondary structures of small proteins, and the potential for applying NMR in large scale structural proteomics projects.

  8. Job Assignments under Moral Hazard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Alexander; Nafziger, Julia

    Inefficient job assignments are usually explained with incomplete information about employees' abilities or contractual imperfections. We show that inefficient assignments arise even without uncertainty about the employee's ability and with complete contracts. Building on this result we provide a...

  9. Secondary School Teachers' Pedagogic Practices when Teaching Mixed and Structured Ability Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallam, Susan; Ireson, Judith

    2005-01-01

    Internationally and historically in the UK, considerable research has been undertaken regarding teachers' pedagogical practices when working with high or low ability classes. Latterly, in the UK, research has focused on pedagogical practices in mixed ability classes. This paper aims to compare secondary school teachers' pedagogical practices in…

  10. [Characteristics of soil macrofaunal community structure in secondary forest and forest plantations in western Qinling Mountains of Northwest China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ji-Liang; Cao, Jing; Li, Shi-Jie; Pan, Chun-Lin; Pan, Cheng-Chen

    2012-09-01

    Long-term disturbance of human beings on secondary forest ecosystem would have profound impacts on belowground ecological processes, whereas the community structure and functional diversity of soil fauna would be sensitive to the changes of belowground ecological processes, with significance as an indicator of the changes. In this study, the method of hand-sorting was adopted to investigate the density of soil macrofaunal community in a secondary forest and the Pinus tabulaeformis, Larix kaempferi, Picea abie, and Picea asperata plantations of nearly 30 years old in Xiaolongshan forest area of western Qinling Mountains, and the PCA ordination and one-way ANOVA analysis were applied to analyze the community structure and trophic group composition of soil macrofauna in the five forest types. In the P. tabulaeformis and L. kaempferi plantations, the density of soil macrofaunal community was 3.0 and 2.1 times of that in the secondary forest, respectively, and the consumers/decomposers ratio of the community was obviously higher than that in the secondary forest. Among the plantations, P. tabulaeformis and L. kaempferi plantations had a significantly higher consumers/decomposers ratio of soil macrofaunal community than P. abies and P. asperata plantations. There was an obvious difference in community structure of soil macrofauna among the four plantations. The density of soil macrofaunal community in P. tabulaeformis and L. kaempferi plantations was 3.5 and 2.1 times higher than that in P. asperata plantation, respectively, whereas the group richness of soil macrofaunal community in P. tabulaeformis plantation was 1.5 times of that in P. abies and P. asperata plantations.

  11. Determining the Secondary Structure of Membrane Proteins and Peptides Via Electron Spin Echo Envelope Modulation (ESEEM) Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lishan; Mayo, Daniel J.; Sahu, Indra D.; Zhou, Andy; Zhang, Rongfu; McCarrick, Robert M.; Lorigan, Gary A.

    2016-01-01

    Revealing detailed structural and dynamic information of membrane embedded or associated proteins is challenging due to their hydrophobic nature which makes NMR and X-ray crystallographic studies challenging or impossible. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has emerged as a powerful technique to provide essential structural and dynamic information for membrane proteins with no size limitations in membrane systems which mimic their natural lipid bilayer environment. Therefore, tremendous efforts have been devoted toward the development and application of EPR spectroscopic techniques to study the structure of biological systems such as membrane proteins and peptides. This chapter introduces a novel approach established and developed in the Lorigan lab to investigate membrane protein and peptide local secondary structures utilizing the pulsed EPR technique electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) spectroscopy. Detailed sample preparation strategies in model membrane protein systems and the experimental setup are described. Also, the ability of this approach to identify local secondary structure of membrane proteins and peptides with unprecedented efficiency is demonstrated in model systems. Finally, applications and further developments of this ESEEM approach for probing larger size membrane proteins produced by over-expression systems are discussed. PMID:26477255

  12. Simulation of unsteady state performance of a secondary air system by the 1D-3D-Structure coupled method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Li, Peng; Li, Yulong

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes the calculation method for unsteady state conditions in the secondary air systems in gas turbines. The 1D-3D-Structure coupled method was applied. A 1D code was used to model the standard components that have typical geometric characteristics. Their flow and heat transfer were described by empirical correlations based on experimental data or CFD calculations. A 3D code was used to model the non-standard components that cannot be described by typical geometric languages, while a finite element analysis was carried out to compute the structural deformation and heat conduction at certain important positions. These codes were coupled through their interfaces. Thus, the changes in heat transfer and structure and their interactions caused by exterior disturbances can be reflected. The results of the coupling method in an unsteady state showed an apparent deviation from the existing data, while the results in the steady state were highly consistent with the existing data. The difference in the results in the unsteady state was caused primarily by structural deformation that cannot be predicted by the 1D method. Thus, in order to obtain the unsteady state performance of a secondary air system more accurately and efficiently, the 1D-3D-Structure coupled method should be used.

  13. Statistically significant dependence of the Xaa-Pro peptide bond conformation on secondary structure and amino acid sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leitner Dietmar

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A reliable prediction of the Xaa-Pro peptide bond conformation would be a useful tool for many protein structure calculation methods. We have analyzed the Protein Data Bank and show that the combined use of sequential and structural information has a predictive value for the assessment of the cis versus trans peptide bond conformation of Xaa-Pro within proteins. For the analysis of the data sets different statistical methods such as the calculation of the Chou-Fasman parameters and occurrence matrices were used. Furthermore we analyzed the relationship between the relative solvent accessibility and the relative occurrence of prolines in the cis and in the trans conformation. Results One of the main results of the statistical investigations is the ranking of the secondary structure and sequence information with respect to the prediction of the Xaa-Pro peptide bond conformation. We observed a significant impact of secondary structure information on the occurrence of the Xaa-Pro peptide bond conformation, while the sequence information of amino acids neighboring proline is of little predictive value for the conformation of this bond. Conclusion In this work, we present an extensive analysis of the occurrence of the cis and trans proline conformation in proteins. Based on the data set, we derived patterns and rules for a possible prediction of the proline conformation. Upon adoption of the Chou-Fasman parameters, we are able to derive statistically relevant correlations between the secondary structure of amino acid fragments and the Xaa-Pro peptide bond conformation.

  14. Effects of Linker Length and Transient Secondary Structure Elements in the Intrinsically Disordered Notch RAM Region on Notch Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, Kathryn P; Johnson, Scott E; Hatem, Christine L; Majumdar, Ananya; Barrick, Doug

    2015-11-01

    Formation of the bivalent interaction between the Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and the transcription factor CBF-1/RBP-j, Su(H), Lag-1 (CSL) is a key event in Notch signaling because it switches Notch-responsive genes from a repressed state to an activated state. Interaction of the intrinsically disordered RBP-j-associated molecule (RAM) region of NICD with CSL is thought to both disrupt binding of corepressor proteins to CSL and anchor NICD to CSL, promoting interaction of the ankyrin domain of NICD with CSL through an effective concentration mechanism. To quantify the role of disorder in the RAM linker region on the effective concentration enhancement of Notch transcriptional activation, we measured the effects of linker length variation on activation. The resulting activation profile has general features of a worm-like chain model for effective concentration. However, deviations from the model for short sequence deletions suggest that RAM contains sequence-specific structural elements that may be important for activation. Structural characterization of the RAM linker with sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation and NMR spectroscopy reveals that the linker is compact and contains three transient helices and two extended and dynamic regions. To test if these secondary structure elements are important for activation, we made sequence substitutions to change the secondary structure propensities of these elements and measured transcriptional activation of the resulting variants. Substitutions to two of these nonrandom elements (helix 2, extended region 1) have effects on activation, but these effects do not depend on the nature of the substituting residues. Thus, the primary sequences of these elements, but not their secondary structures, are influencing signaling.

  15. Interactive Assignments for Online Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pam Lowry

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Students can experience first hand through interactive assignments what is involved in teaching an online course. Most students develop a whole new appreciation for the student learning process. Faculty are beginning to realize that online instruction is more than a series of readings posted to a course management system. This paper summarizes the faculty member's instructional strategies involved when creating student interaction assignments. The paper also summarizes the assignments, discussion board, and trends in education from the student's perspective. In summary, it concludes with the faculty's overall perspective concerning these assignments and how the assignments could be more effective for the student.

  16. Secondary Plant Products Causing Photosensitization in Grazing Herbivores: Their Structure, Activity and Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane C. Quinn

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Photosensitivity in animals is defined as a severe dermatitis that results from a heightened reactivity of skin cells and associated dermal tissues upon their exposure to sunlight, following ingestion or contact with UV reactive secondary plant products. Photosensitivity occurs in animal cells as a reaction that is mediated by a light absorbing molecule, specifically in this case a plant-produced metabolite that is heterocyclic or polyphenolic. In sensitive animals, this reaction is most severe in non-pigmented skin which has the least protection from UV or visible light exposure. Photosensitization in a biological system such as the epidermis is an oxidative or other chemical change in a molecule in response to light-induced excitation of endogenous or exogenously-delivered molecules within the tissue. Photo-oxidation can also occur in the plant itself, resulting in the generation of reactive oxygen species, free radical damage and eventual DNA degradation. Similar cellular changes occur in affected herbivores and are associated with an accumulation of photodynamic molecules in the affected dermal tissues or circulatory system of the herbivore. Recent advances in our ability to identify and detect secondary products at trace levels in the plant and surrounding environment, or in organisms that ingest plants, have provided additional evidence for the role of secondary metabolites in photosensitization of grazing herbivores. This review outlines the role of unique secondary products produced by higher plants in the animal photosensitization process, describes their chemistry and localization in the plant as well as impacts of the environment upon their production, discusses their direct and indirect effects on associated animal systems and presents several examples of well-characterized plant photosensitization in animal systems.

  17. Effects of Cylindrical Charge Geometry and Secondary Combustion Reactions on the Internal Blast Loading of Reinforced Concrete Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Matthew A. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2005-05-01

    An understanding of the detonation phenomenon and airblast behavior for cylindrical high-explosive charges is essential in developing predictive capabilities for tests and scenarios involving these charge geometries. Internal tests on reinforced concrete structures allowed for the analysis of cylindrical charges and the effect of secondary reactions occurring in confined structures. The pressure profiles that occur close to a cylindrical explosive charge are strongly dependent on the length-to-diameter ratio (L/D) of the charge. This study presents a comparison of finite-element code models (i.e., AUTODYN) to empirical methods for predicting airblast behavior from cylindrical charges. Current finite element analysis (FEA) and blast prediction codes fail to account for the effects of secondary reactions (fireballs) that occur with underoxidized explosives. Theoretical models were developed for TNT and validated against literature. These models were then applied to PBX 9501 for predictions of the spherical fireball diameter and time duration. The following relationships for PBX 9501 were derived from this analysis (units of ft, lb, s). Comparison of centrally located equivalent weight charges using cylindrical and spherical geometries showed that the average impulse on the interior of the structure is ~3%–5% higher for the spherical charge. Circular regions of high impulse that occur along the axial direction of the cylindrical charge must be considered when analyzing structural response.

  18. Membrane topology of the sodium ion-dependent citrate carrier of Klebsiella pneumoniae - Evidence for a new structural class of secondary transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanGeest, M; Lolkema, JS

    1996-01-01

    The predicted secondary structure model of the sodium ion-dependent citrate carrier of Klebsiella pneumoniae (CitS) presents the la-transmembrane helix motif observed for many secondary transporters, Biochemical evidence presented in this paper is not consistent with this model. N-terminal and C-ter

  19. Membrane Topology of the Sodium Ion-dependent Citrate Carrier of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Evidence for a New Structural Class of Secondary Transporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geest, Marleen van; Lolkema, Juke S.

    1996-01-01

    The predicted secondary structure model of the sodium ion-dependent citrate carrier of Klebsiella pneumoniae (CitS) presents the 12-transmembrane helix motif observed for many secondary transporters. Biochemical evidence presented in this paper is not consistent with this model. N-terminal and C-ter

  20. Curriculum Reform and Supporting Structures at Schools: Challenges for Life Skills Planning for Secondary School Students in China (with Particular Reference to Hong Kong)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John Chi-Kin

    2017-01-01

    Demand has risen for the introduction of career education in senior secondary schooling to enhance students' transition from study to work. Against such a background, this paper aims to discuss the curriculum reforms and supporting structures in schools and to explore the challenges of life skills planning for secondary school students in China…

  1. The secondary structure and the thermal unfolding parameters of the S-layer protein from Lactobacillus salivarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lighezan, Liliana; Georgieva, Ralitsa; Neagu, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    Surface layer (S-layer) proteins have been identified in the cell envelope of many organisms, such as bacteria and archaea. They self-assemble, forming monomolecular crystalline arrays. Isolated S-layer proteins are able to recrystallize into regular lattices, which proved useful in biotechnology. Here we investigate the structure and thermal unfolding of the S-layer protein isolated from Lactobacillus salivarius 16 strain of human origin. Using circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and the software CDSSTR from DICHROWEB, CONTINLL from CDPro, as well as CDNN, we assess the fractions of the protein's secondary structural elements at temperatures ranging between 10 and 90 °C, and predict the tertiary class of the protein. To study the thermal unfolding of the protein, we analyze the temperature dependence of the CD signal in the far- and near-UV domains. Fitting the experimental data by two- and three-state models of thermal unfolding, we infer the midpoint temperatures, the temperature dependence of the changes in Gibbs free energy, enthalpy, and entropy of the unfolding transitions in standard conditions, and the temperature dependence of the equilibrium constant. We also estimate the changes in heat capacity at constant pressure in standard conditions. The results indicate that the thermal unfolding of the S-layer protein from L. salivarius is highly cooperative, since changes in the secondary and tertiary structures occur simultaneously. The thermodynamic analysis predicts a "cold" transition, at about -3 °C, of both the secondary and tertiary structures. Our findings may be important for the use of S-layer proteins in biotechnology and in biomedical applications.

  2. Identification and removal of proteins that co-purify with infectious prion protein improves the analysis of its secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Roger A; Timmes, Andrew G; Wilmarth, Phillip A; Safronetz, David; Priola, Suzette A

    2011-10-01

    Prion diseases are neurodegenerative disorders associated with the accumulation of an abnormal isoform of the mammalian prion protein (PrP). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) has previously been used to show that the conformation of aggregated, infectious PrP (PrP(Sc) ) varies between prion strains and these unique conformations may determine strain-specific disease phenotypes. However, the relative amounts of α-helix, β-sheet and other secondary structures have not always been consistent between studies, suggesting that other proteins might be confounding the analysis of PrP(Sc) secondary structure. We have used FTIR and LC-MS/MS to analyze enriched PrP(Sc) from mouse and hamster prion strains both before and after the removal of protein contaminants that commonly co-purify with PrP(Sc) . Our data show that non-PrP proteins do contribute to absorbances that have been associated with α-helical, loop, turn and β-sheet structures attributed to PrP(Sc) . The major contaminant, the α-helical protein ferritin, absorbs strongly at 1652 cm(-1) in the FTIR spectrum associated with PrP(Sc) . However, even the removal of more than 99% of the ferritin from PrP(Sc) did not completely abolish absorbance at 1652 cm(-1) . Our results show that contaminating proteins alter the FTIR spectrum attributed to PrP(Sc) and suggest that the α-helical, loop/turn and β-sheet secondary structure that remains following their removal are derived from PrP(Sc) itself.

  3. Accurate prediction of protein structural classes by incorporating predicted secondary structure information into the general form of Chou's pseudo amino acid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Liang; Zhang, Lichao; Lv, Jinfeng

    2014-03-07

    Extracting good representation from protein sequence is fundamental for protein structural classes prediction tasks. In this paper, we propose a novel and powerful method to predict protein structural classes based on the predicted secondary structure information. At the feature extraction stage, a 13-dimensional feature vector is extracted to characterize general contents and spatial arrangements of the secondary structural elements of a given protein sequence. Specially, four segment-level features are designed to elevate discriminative ability for proteins from the α/β and α+β classes. After the features are extracted, a multi-class non-linear support vector machine classifier is used to implement protein structural classes prediction. We report extensive experiments comparing the proposed method to the state-of-the-art in protein structural classes prediction on three widely used low-similarity benchmark datasets: FC699, 1189 and 640. Our method achieves competitive performance on prediction accuracies, especially for the overall prediction accuracies which have exceeded the best reported results on all of the three datasets.

  4. Spectral editing of two-dimensional magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectra for protein resonance assignment and structure determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt-Rohr, K.; Fritzsching, K. J.; Liao, S. Y.; Hong Mei, E-mail: mhong@iastate.edu [Iowa State University, Department of Chemistry and Ames Laboratory (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Several techniques for spectral editing of 2D {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C correlation NMR of proteins are introduced. They greatly reduce the spectral overlap for five common amino acid types, thus simplifying spectral assignment and conformational analysis. The carboxyl (COO) signals of glutamate and aspartate are selected by suppressing the overlapping amide N-CO peaks through {sup 13}C-{sup 15}N dipolar dephasing. The sidechain methine (CH) signals of valine, lecuine, and isoleucine are separated from the overlapping methylene (CH{sub 2}) signals of long-chain amino acids using a multiple-quantum dipolar transfer technique. Both the COO and CH selection methods take advantage of improved dipolar dephasing by asymmetric rotational-echo double resonance (REDOR), where every other {pi}-pulse is shifted from the center of a rotor period t{sub r} by about 0.15 t{sub r}. This asymmetry produces a deeper minimum in the REDOR dephasing curve and enables complete suppression of the undesired signals of immobile segments. Residual signals of mobile sidechains are positively identified by dynamics editing using recoupled {sup 13}C-{sup 1}H dipolar dephasing. In all three experiments, the signals of carbons within a three-bond distance from the selected carbons are detected in the second spectral dimension via {sup 13}C spin exchange. The efficiencies of these spectral editing techniques range from 60 % for the COO and dynamic selection experiments to 25 % for the CH selection experiment, and are demonstrated on well-characterized model proteins GB1 and ubiquitin.

  5. Synonymous codon usage in different protein secondary structural classes of human genes: Implication for increased non-randomness of GC3 rich genes towards protein stability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pamela Mukhopadhyay; Surajit Basak; Tapash Chandra Ghosh

    2007-08-01

    The relationship between the synonymous codon usage and different protein secondary structural classes were investigated using 401 Homo sapiens proteins extracted from Protein Data Bank (PDB). A simple Chi-square test was used to assess the significance of deviation of the observed and expected frequencies of 59 codons at the level of individual synonymous families in the four different protein secondary structural classes. It was observed that synonymous codon families show non-randomness in codon usage in four different secondary structural classes. However, when the genes were classified according to their GC3 levels there was an increase in non-randomness in high GC3 group of genes. The non-randomness in codon usage was further tested among the same protein secondary structures belonging to four different protein folding classes of high GC3 group of genes. The results show that in each of the protein secondary structural unit there exist some synonymous family that shows class specific codonusage pattern. Moreover, there is an increased non-random behaviour of synonymous codons in sheet structure of all secondary structural classes in high GC3 group of genes. Biological implications of these results have been discussed.

  6. New recombinant cyclohexylamine oxidase variants for deracemization of secondary amines by orthogonally assaying designed mutants with structurally diverse substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangyue; Yao, Peiyuan; Cong, Peiqian; Ren, Jie; Wang, Lei; Feng, Jinhui; Lau, Peter C. K.; Wu, Qiaqing; Zhu, Dunming

    2016-05-01

    To further expand the substrate range of the cyclohexylamine oxidase (CHAO) from Brevibacterium oxydans, a library of diverse mutants was created and assayed toward a group of structurally diverse substrates. Among them, mutants T198A and M226A exhibited enhanced activity relative to wt CHAO for most (S)-enantiomers of primary amines and some secondary amines. While mutants T198I, L199I, L199F, M226I and M226T were more active than wt CHAO toward the primary amines, mutants T198F, L199T, Y321A, Y321T, Y321I and Y321F enhanced the enzyme activity toward the secondary amines. In particular, mutant Y321I displayed an enhanced catalytic efficiency toward 1-(4-methoxybenzyl)-1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8-octahydroisoquinoline (13). Whereas a double mutant, Y321I/M226T, acted on (S)-N-(prop-2-yn-1-yl)-2, 3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-amine [(S)-8]. Since (R)-8 is an irreversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase and (S)-13 is an intermediate of dextromethorphan, a cough suppressant drug, deracemizations of 8 and 13 were carried out with crude enzyme extracts of the respective mutants. This resulted in 51% and 78% isolated yields of (R)-8 and (S)-13, respectively, each with high enantiomeric excess (93% and 99% ee). The results demonstrated the application potential of the evolved CHAO mutants in drug synthesis requiring chiral secondary amines.

  7. STRUCTURE OF THE INTERSTELLAR BOUNDARY EXPLORER RIBBON FROM SECONDARY CHARGE-EXCHANGE AT THE SOLAR–INTERSTELLAR INTERFACE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zirnstein, E. J.; McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, TX 78228 (United States); Heerikhuisen, J., E-mail: ezirnstein@swri.edu, E-mail: dmccomas@swri.edu, E-mail: jacob.heerikhuisen@uah.edu [Department of Space Science and Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    In 2009, the Interstellar Boundary Explorer discovered a bright “ribbon” of energetic neutral atom (ENA) flux in the energy range ≤0.4–6 keV, encircling a large portion of the sky. This observation was not previously predicted by any models or theories, and since its discovery, it has been the subject of numerous studies of its origin and properties. One of the most studied mechanisms for its creation is the “secondary ENA” process. Here, solar wind ions, neutralized by charge-exchange with interstellar atoms, propagate outside the heliopause; experience two charge-exchange events in the dense outer heliosheath; and then propagate back inside the heliosphere, preferentially in the direction perpendicular to the local interstellar magnetic field. This process has been extensively analyzed using state-of-the-art modeling and simulation techniques, but it has been difficult to visualize. In this Letter, we show the three-dimensional structure of the source of the ribbon, providing a physical picture of the spatial and energy scales over which the secondary ENA process occurs. These results help us understand how the ribbon is generated and further supports a secondary ENA process as the leading ribbon source mechanism.

  8. Population structure and secondary production of Siriella clausii, a dominant detritus feeding mysid in Posidonia oceanica meadows (W Mediterranean Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberá, Carmen; Sanchez-Jerez, Pablo; Sorbe, Jean Claude

    2013-10-01

    Temporal trends in abundance, demographic structure of the population and secondary production of Siriella clausii were studied at three different sectors of Posidonia oceanica meadows in the SE Iberian Peninsula, with different levels of habitat complexity. Secondary production was calculated through three methods widely employed in marine invertebrates: the Hynes method (based on demographic structure data) and models by Morin-Bourassa and Brey (based on biomass data). This filter/grazer and detritus feeder is the most abundant mysid in P. oceanica seagrass meadows in the Mediterranean. The population structure was similar in the three sectors, but the temporal pattern of abundance was different, at times even opposite. This pattern may be related to the aggregated spatial distribution, metapopulation dynamics or stochastic factors, but other potential factors could be involved, such as habitat features or predation rates. The values of production oscillated between 25 and 60 mgAFDW/m2/year, depending on the calculation method that was applied, and showed differences between sites and seagrass complexity. The present values are intermediate between those characterising highly productive systems, such as estuaries, and systems of limited productivity (bathyal habitats). Compared to other peracarids, mysid production is greater than that of isopods and less than amphipod production. This is possibly related to the life cycle and reproductive strategies. Detritus feeders such as S. clausii may play an important trophic role due their capacity to use as food the biomass associated to detritus, which constitutes larges reservoirs of carbon derived from seagrass primary production.

  9. Effect of peptide secondary structure on adsorption and adsorbed film properties on end-grafted polyethylene oxide layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binazadeh, M; Zeng, H; Unsworth, L D

    2014-01-01

    Poly-l-lysine (PLL), in α-helix or β-sheet configuration, was used as a model peptide for investigating the effect of secondary structures on adsorption events to poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) modified surfaces formed using θ solvents. Circular dichroism results showed that the secondary structure of PLL persisted upon adsorption to Au and PEO modified Au surfaces. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was used to characterize the chemisorbed PEO layer in different solvents (θ and good solvents), as well as the sequential adsorption of PLL in different secondary structures (α-helix or β-sheet). QCM-D results suggest that chemisorption of PEO 750 and 2000 from θ solutions led to brushes 3.8 ± 0.1 and 4.5 ± 0.1 nm thick with layer viscosities of 9.2 ± 0.8 and 4.8 ± 0.5 cP, respectively. The average number of H2O per ethylene oxides, while in θ solvent, was determined as ~0.9 and ~1.2 for the PEO 750 and 2000 layers, respectively. Upon immersion in good solvent (as used for PLL adsorption experiments), the number of H2O per ethylene oxides increased to ~1.5 and ~2.0 for PEO 750 and 2000 films, respectively. PLL adsorbed masses for α-helix and β-sheet on Au sensors was 231 ± 5 and 1087 ± 14 ng cm(-2), with layer viscosities of 2.3 ± 0.1 and 1.2 ± 0.1 cP, respectively; suggesting that the α-helix layer was more rigid, despite a smaller adsorbed mass, than that of β-sheet layers. The PEO 750 layer reduced PLL adsorbed amounts to ~10 and 12% of that on Au for α-helices and β-sheets respectively. The PLL adsorbed mass to PEO 2000 layers dropped to ~12% and 4% of that on Au, for α-helix and β-sheet respectively. No significant differences existed for the viscosities of adsorbed α-helix and β-sheet PLL on PEO surfaces. These results provide new insights into the fundamental understanding of the effects of secondary structures of peptides and proteins on their surface adsorption.

  10. ITS2 secondary structure improves phylogeny estimation in a radiation of blue butterflies of the subgenus Agrodiaetus (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae: Polyommatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Matthias

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current molecular phylogenetic studies of Lepidoptera and most other arthropods are predominantly based on mitochondrial genes and a limited number of nuclear genes. The nuclear genes, however, generally do not provide sufficient information for young radiations. ITS2 , which has proven to be an excellent nuclear marker for similarly aged radiations in other organisms like fungi and plants, is only rarely used for phylogeny estimation in arthropods, although universal primers exist. This is partly due to difficulties in the alignment of ITS2 sequences in more distant taxa. The present study uses ITS2 secondary structure information to elucidate the phylogeny of a species-rich young radiation of arthropods, the butterfly subgenus Agrodiaetus. One aim is to evaluate the efficiency of ITS2 to resolve the phylogeny of the subgenus in comparison with COI , the most important mitochondrial marker in arthropods. Furthermore, we assess the use of compensatory base changes in ITS2 for the delimitation of species and discuss the prospects of ITS2 as a nuclear marker for barcoding studies. Results In the butterfly family Lycaenidae, ITS2 secondary structure enabled us to successfully align sequences of different subtribes in Polyommatini and produce a Profile Neighbour Joining tree of this tribe, the resolution of which is comparable to phylogenetic trees obtained with COI+COII . The subgenus Agrodiaetus comprises 6 major clades which are in agreement with COI analyses. A dispersal-vicariance analysis (DIVA traced the origin of most Agrodiaetus clades to separate biogeographical areas in the region encompassing Eastern Anatolia, Transcaucasia and Iran. Conclusions With the inclusion of secondary structure information, ITS2 appears to be a suitable nuclear marker to infer the phylogeny of young radiations, as well as more distantly related genera within a diverse arthropod family. Its phylogenetic signal is comparable to the

  11. Electronic Structures and Alloying Behaviors of Ferrite Phases in High Co-Ni Secondary Hardened Martensitic Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@The electronic structure of ferrite (tempered martensite phase) in high Co-Ni secondary hardened martensitic steel has been investigated. The local density of states (LDOS) of alloying elements in the steel displays the relationship between solid solubility and the shape of the LDOS. The bond order integral (BOI) between atoms in the steel shows that the directional bonding of the p orbital of Si or C leads to the brittleness of the steel. At last, ∑BOI between atoms demonstrate that C, Co, Mn, Cr, Mo, Si strengthen the alloyed steel through solid-solution effects.

  12. Optimizing Marine Security Guard Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Bangkok , Thailand East Asia and Pacific 18 4 Fort Lauderdale, Florida Western Hemisphere - South 13 5 Frankfurt, Germany Western Europe and Scandinavia 15...2008). Each 7 stationing plan satisfies a myriad of unit requirements, such as building and land availability. Similarly, each assignment solution...optimize the assignment of enlisted Marines to billets. EAM-GLOBAL seeks to assign the best Marine-billet fit while balancing staffing shortages

  13. Prediction of protein domain structural class based on secondary structure contentsby BP neural networks with a competitive layer%基于蛋白质二级结构内容的域结构类预测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫化军; 章毅

    2004-01-01

    In this paper,the problem of prediction of protein/domain structural class based on their secondary structure contents has been investigated via BP neural networks (Multiple Layer perceptron with Back-Propogation algorithm) plus a competitive layer.By embedding a competitive layer into the network,the prediction accuracy can be significantly improved.With a small training set and a simple network architecture,a high prediction accuracy has been achieved,i.e.,self-consistence accuracy 97.62%,jack-knife test accuracy 97.62% and extrapolating accuracy 90.74% on average.It is believed that the neural networks of this paper can provide a more appropriate protein/domain structural class assignment criterion with a complete classification attribute vector and a bigger and more representative training set built up.%运用加入竞争层的BP网络,研究了基于蛋白质二级结构内容的域结构类预测问题.在BP网络中嵌入一竞争,层显著提高了网络预测性能.仅使用了一个小的训练集和简单的网络结构,获得了很高的预测精度:自支持精度97.62%,jack-knife测试精度97.62%,及平均外推精度90.74%.在建立更完备的域结构类特征向量和更有代表性的训练集的基础上,所述方法将为蛋白质域结构分类领域提供新的分类基准.

  14. Evaluation of the suitability of free-energy minimization using nearest-neighbor energy parameters for RNA secondary structure prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cobaugh Christian W

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A detailed understanding of an RNA's correct secondary and tertiary structure is crucial to understanding its function and mechanism in the cell. Free energy minimization with energy parameters based on the nearest-neighbor model and comparative analysis are the primary methods for predicting an RNA's secondary structure from its sequence. Version 3.1 of Mfold has been available since 1999. This version contains an expanded sequence dependence of energy parameters and the ability to incorporate coaxial stacking into free energy calculations. We test Mfold 3.1 by performing the largest and most phylogenetically diverse comparison of rRNA and tRNA structures predicted by comparative analysis and Mfold, and we use the results of our tests on 16S and 23S rRNA sequences to assess the improvement between Mfold 2.3 and Mfold 3.1. Results The average prediction accuracy for a 16S or 23S rRNA sequence with Mfold 3.1 is 41%, while the prediction accuracies for the majority of 16S and 23S rRNA structures tested are between 20% and 60%, with some having less than 20% prediction accuracy. The average prediction accuracy was 71% for 5S rRNA and 69% for tRNA. The majority of the 5S rRNA and tRNA sequences have prediction accuracies greater than 60%. The prediction accuracy of 16S rRNA base-pairs decreases exponentially as the number of nucleotides intervening between the 5' and 3' halves of the base-pair increases. Conclusion Our analysis indicates that the current set of nearest-neighbor energy parameters in conjunction with the Mfold folding algorithm are unable to consistently and reliably predict an RNA's correct secondary structure. For 16S or 23S rRNA structure prediction, Mfold 3.1 offers little improvement over Mfold 2.3. However, the nearest-neighbor energy parameters do work well for shorter RNA sequences such as tRNA or 5S rRNA, or for larger rRNAs when the contact distance between the base-pairs is less than 100 nucleotides.

  15. A regime map for secondary flow structures under physiological and multi-harmonic inflow through a bent tube model for curved arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Shannon M.; Caldwell, Kirin; Bulusu, Kartik V.; Plesniak, Michael W.

    2012-11-01

    Secondary flow structures are known to affect wall shear stress, which is closely related to atherogenesis and drug particle deposition. A regime map provides a framework to examine phase-wise variations in secondary flow structures under physiological and multi-harmonic inflow waveforms under conditions of a fixed Womersley number (4.2) and curvature ratio (1/7). Experimental PIV data were acquired at the 90-degree location in a 180-degree curved test section of a bent tube model for curved arteries using a blood analog working fluid. Coherent structure detection was performed using a continuous wavelet transform algorithm (PIVlet 1.2) and further analysis was carried out by grouping similar secondary flow structures at a fixed secondary Reynolds numbers. Phase-locked, planar vorticity fields over one period of inflow waveform revealed size, structure and strength similarities in secondary flow morphologies during the acceleration and deceleration phases. The utility of the new regime map lies in the a priori identification of pulsatile secondary flow structures, eliminating the need for exhaustive experimentation or computing, requiring only flow rate measurements that are easily acquired under clinical conditions. Supported by the National Science Foundation, Grant No. CBET-0828903 and GW Center for Biomimetics and Bioinspired Engineering (COBRE).

  16. Modeling proteins using a super-secondary structure library and NMR chemical shift information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Vilas; Vallat, Brinda K; Dybas, Joseph M; Fiser, Andras

    2013-06-04

    A remaining challenge in protein modeling is to predict structures for sequences with no sequence similarity to any experimentally solved structure. Based on earlier observations, the library of protein backbone supersecondary structure motifs (Smotifs) saturated about a decade ago. Therefore, it should be possible to build any structure from a combination of existing Smotifs with the help of limited experimental data that are sufficient to relate the backbone conformations of Smotifs between target proteins and known structures. Here, we present a hybrid modeling algorithm that relies on an exhaustive Smotif library and on nuclear magnetic resonance chemical shift patterns without any input of primary sequence information. In a test of 102 proteins, the algorithm delivered 90 homology-model-quality models, among them 24 high-quality ones, and a topologically correct solution for almost all cases. The current approach opens a venue to address the modeling of larger protein structures for which chemical shifts are available.

  17. Stand structural diversity rather than species diversity enhances aboveground carbon storage in secondary subtropical forests in Eastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Arshad; Yan, En-Rong; Chen, Han Y. H.; Chang, Scott X.; Zhao, Yan-Tao; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Ming-Shan

    2016-08-01

    Stand structural diversity, typically characterized by variances in tree diameter at breast height (DBH) and total height, plays a critical role in influencing aboveground carbon (C) storage. However, few studies have considered the multivariate relationships of aboveground C storage with stand age, stand structural diversity, and species diversity in natural forests. In this study, aboveground C storage, stand age, tree species, DBH and height diversity indices, were determined across 80 subtropical forest plots in Eastern China. We employed structural equation modelling (SEM) to test for the direct and indirect effects of stand structural diversity, species diversity, and stand age on aboveground C storage. The three final SEMs with different directions for the path between species diversity and stand structural diversity had a similar goodness of fit to the data. They accounted for 82 % of the variation in aboveground C storage, 55-59 % of the variation in stand structural diversity, and 0.1 to 9 % of the variation in species diversity. Stand age demonstrated strong positive total effects, including a positive direct effect (β = 0.41), and a positive indirect effect via stand structural diversity (β = 0.41) on aboveground C storage. Stand structural diversity had a positive direct effect on aboveground C storage (β = 0.56), whereas there was little total effect of species diversity as it had a negative direct association with, but had a positive indirect effect, via stand structural diversity, on aboveground C storage. The negligible total effect of species diversity on aboveground C storage in the forests under study may have been attributable to competitive exclusion with high aboveground biomass, or a historical logging preference for productive species. Our analyses suggested that stand structural diversity was a major determinant for variations in aboveground C storage in the secondary subtropical forests in Eastern China. Hence, maintaining tree DBH and

  18. Evolving Networks with Nonlinear Assignment of Weight

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Chao; TANG Yi

    2006-01-01

    We propose a weighted evolving network model in which the underlying topological structure is still driven by the degree according to the preferential attachment rule while the weight assigned to the newly established edges is dependent on the degree in a nonlinear form. By varying the parameter α that controls the function determining the assignment of weight, a wide variety of power-law behaviours of the total weight distributions as well as the diversity of the weight distributions of edges are displayed. Variation of correlation and heterogeneity in the network is illustrated as well.

  19. Structural analysis of pyridine-imino boronic esters involving secondary interactions on solid state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Portillo, Paola; Arenaza-Corona, Antonino; Hernández-Ahuactzi, Irán F.; Barba, Victor

    2017-04-01

    Twelve boronic esters (1a-1l) synthesized from 4-halo- substituted arylboronic acids (halo = F, Cl, Br, I and CF3) with 2-amino-2- alkyl (H, Me) -1,3-propanediol in presence of (3- or 4)-pyridine carboxaldehyde are described. A solvent mixture toluene/methanol 1:4 ratio was used. All compounds include both donor/acceptor functional groups, which are the necessary elements to self-assembly of the molecular species. Several secondary interactions as I⋯N, Br⋯Br, Br⋯B, F⋯B, Csbnd H⋯N, Csbnd H⋯O, Br⋯π and Csbnd H⋯π support the 1D and 2D polymeric frameworks in solid state. The coordination of the nitrogen atom from the pyridine moiety with the boron atom was not observed in either solution or solid state.

  20. Carbon Policy and Technical Change: Market Structure, Increasing Returns, and Secondary Benefits. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peretto, P.; Smith, V. K.

    2001-11-19

    An economic evaluation of the impact of policies intended to control emissions of CO{sub 2} and other ''greenhouse gases'' (GHGS) depends on the net costs of these controls and their distribution throughout the production sectors of developed and developing economics. The answers derived from appraisals of these net costs, in turn, stem from what is assumed about the timing of the controls, the pace of technological change, and any short-term secondary benefits from their control. There have only been a few serious attempts to estimate the economic benefits from the policies associated with such long run outcomes. All of the approaches to date have made fairly strong assumptions or relied on contingent valuation estimates of hypothetical situations.

  1. Mineral Association Changes the Secondary Structure and Dynamics of Murine Amelogenin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, J. X.; Xu, Y. S.; Buchko, G. W.; Shaw, W. J.

    2013-10-15

    Biomineralization proteins, present during the formation of hard tissues including bones, teeth, egg shells and nacre, result in the exquisite structures and properties of the resulting materials.[1] The structure of these proteins is often implicated in the control of the mineral properties, however very little structural data is available for the bulk of these proteins due to the difficulty in determining structures of immobilized proteins. Solid-state NMR is uniquely suited to the study of the structure of proteins bound to surfaces, demonstrated with the structural and orientation insights provided for the hydroxyapatite mineralization proteins statherin and the amelogenin, LRAP.[2] While these data are some of the only structural data available for this important class of protein, the experiments are often expensive and time consuming, due to the need to prepare and measure samples with isolated spin pairs, and are limited to a size of ~60 residues. In this work, we utilized a combination of 1D and recent 2D[3] solid-state NMR techniques along with a sparsely labelled sample to characterize the structure and dynamics of potential HAP binding residues of the 180 residue enamel protein, amelogenin. Amelogenin nanospheres and mineral bound amelogenin were investigated and a shift from unstructured to β-sheet structure was observed, along with a decrease in protein flexibility. This work provides the first molecular level structure and dynamic information of full-length amelogenin on the surface of hydroxyapatite (HAP) and within nanospheres, and demonstrates the ability to evaluate structural characteristics of large biomineralization proteins bound to their physiologically relevant surface. The research was performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), a facility operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy, with a portion of it performed at the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user

  2. Influence of bovine serum albumin on the secondary structure of interferon alpha 2b as determined by far UV circular dichroism spectropolarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Michael J W; Nemr, Kayla; Hefford, Mary A

    2010-03-01

    Many therapeutic biologics are formulated with excipients, including the protein excipient human serum albumin (HSA), to increase stability and prevent protein aggregation and adsorption onto glass vials. One biologic formulated with albumin is interferon alpha-2b (IFN alpha-2b). As is the case with other therapeutic biologics, the increased structural complexity of IFN alpha-2b compared to a small molecule drug requires that both the correct chemical structure (amino acid sequence) and also the correct secondary and tertiary structures (3 dimensional fold) be verified to assure safety and efficacy. Although numerous techniques are available to assess a biologic's primary, secondary and tertiary structures, difficulties arise when assessing higher order structure in the presence of protein excipients. In these studies far UV circular dichroism spectropolarimetry (far UV-CD) was used to determine the secondary structure of IFN alpha-2b in the presence of a protein excipient (bovine serum albumin, BSA). We demonstrated that the secondary structure of IFN alpha-2b remains mostly unchanged at a variety of BSA to IFN alpha-2b protein ratios. A significant difference in alpha helix and beta sheet content was noted when the BSA to IFN alpha-2b ratio was 5:1 (w/w), suggesting a potential conformational change in IFN alpha-2b secondary structure when BSA is in molar excess.

  3. ¹H, ¹³C and ¹⁵N resonance assignments and second structure information of Gad m 1: a β-parvalbumin allergen from Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, A H; Ackerbauer, D; Kostadinova, M; Bublin, M; Ferreira, F; Almeida, F C L; Breiteneder, H; Valente, A P

    2013-10-01

    Gad m 1 is the major allergen from Atlantic cod. It belongs to β-parvalbumin protein family and is characterized by the presence of two calcium-binding sites so called EF-hand motifs. β-Parvalbumins such as Gad m 1 are the most important fish allergens and their high cross-reactivity is the cause of the observed polysensitization to various fish species in allergic patients. Despite extensive efforts, the complete elucidation of β-parvalbumin-IgE complexes has not been achieved yet. Allergen structural studies are essential for the development of novel immunotherapy strategies, including vaccination with hypoallergenic derivatives and chimeric molecules. Here, we report for the first time the NMR study of a β-parvalbumin: Gad m 1. This report includes: (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments of Gad m 1 as well as the second structure information based on the (13)C chemical shifts.

  4. Novel Secondary Structure of Calcitonin in Solid State as Revealed by Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU,Hai-Ning(杜海宁); DING,Jin-Guo(丁金国); CUI,Da-Fu(崔大敷); HU,Hong-Yu(胡红雨)

    2002-01-01

    The solid-state circular dichroic study reveals that salmon calcitonin presents a typical α-helical structure while human calcitonin appears to form a β-sheet in solid state, although both of them adopt random coil structures in aqueous solution.

  5. Community structure, life histories and secondary production of stoneflies in two small mountain streams with different degree of forest cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Beracko

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Our study examines community structure and nymphal biology (life cycles and secondary production of stoneflies in two adjacent mountain streams with different degree of forest cover in the Prosiečanka River Basin (Chočské Vrchy Mts., West Carpathians. One of the streams has non-forested catchment, converted to meadows and pastures, while the other one has catchment with 60% covered by spruce forest. Differences in forest cover and in thermal regime of the streams were reflected by the difference of stonefly communities at their structural and functional level. Species Nemoura cinerea and Leuctra aurita created stonefly assemblage in non-forested stream, whereas Nemoura cinerea also occurred in naturally forested stream together with species Leuctra armata, Leuctra nigra, Leuctra prima, Siphonoperla neglecta and Arcynopteryx dichroa. All examined species had maximally annual life cycle and in eudominant species Nemoura cinerea one month shift was found in nymphal hatching and adult emergence between streams. Total secondary production of stoneflies in undisturbed stream (126.46 mg DW m-2 y-1 was more than two times higher than the production in non-forested stream (47.39 mg DW m-2 y-1. 

  6. New twist in the theories on the secondary structure dependence and hydration effect of the vibrational properties of peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, Hajime

    2016-12-01

    The present paper deals with two aspects in relation to the secondary structure dependence and hydration effect of the vibrational properties of peptides. One is the dependence of the vibrational frequencies and IR intensities of the amide I and II modes on the angular position of hydrating water. Although we have vague expectation for a stretching mode that the frequency becomes lower as the hydrogen bond becomes stronger, the result of the present theoretical calculations on the amide I mode strongly contradicts it. It is shown that we can rationalize this situation by considering the scalar and vector components of the frequency shifts separately. The other is the secondary structure dependence of the IR intensity of the amide II mode. It is enhanced more than twice for the C5 conformation, while it is reduced to about 0.7 times for the α-helix conformation. It is shown from the analysis of the electron density derivatives that the former arises from the inter-peptide charge flux, while the latter arises from the electrostatic polarization effect.

  7. Disassembly intermediates of RbsD protein remain oligomeric despite the loss of an intact secondary structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Many proteins exist as homo-oligomers in living organisms wherein the change of oligomeric status apparently serves as an effective means for modulating their biological activities. We have previously reported that the homo-decameric RbsD from Escherichia coli undergoes stepwise disassembly and non-stepwise reassembly. Here the structural status of the urea-induced RbsD disassembly intermediates was examined, mainly using urea-containing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and chemical cross-linking. Such intermediates were found to remain oligomeric while losing their intact secondary structures. Such disassembly intermediates were able to effectively refold when the concentration of the urea denaturant was reduced to a lower level, or to refold/reassemble into the native decamers when urea was completely removed, as detected by non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. These novel observations strongly suggest that the assembly of oligomeric proteins may occur before the completion of subunit folding.

  8. Optimizations of force-field parameters for protein systems with the secondary-structure stability and instability

    CERN Document Server

    Sakae, Yoshitake

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel method for refining force-field parameters of protein systems. In this method, the agreement of the secondary-structure stability and instability between the protein conformations obtained by experiments and those obtained by molecular dynamics simulations is used as a criterion for the optimization of force-field parameters. As an example of the applications of the present method, we refined the force-field parameter set of the AMBER ff99SB force field by searching the torsion-energy parameter spaces of $\\psi$ (N-C$^{\\alpha}$-C-N) and $\\zeta$ (C$^{\\beta}$-C$^{\\alpha}$-C-N) of the backbone dihedral angles. We then performed folding simulations of $\\alpha$-helical and $\\beta$-hairpin peptides, using the optimized force field. The results showed that the new force-field parameters gave structures more consistent with the experimental implications than the original AMBER ff99SB force field.

  9. Navy Force Structure: Sustainable Plan and Comprehensive Assessment Needed to Mitigate Long-Term Risks to Ships Assigned to Overseas Homeports

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    surface combatant tailored for land attack and littoral warfare. The Navy plans to build three of these ships and estimates initial operating...homeported in Rota, Spain; however, it has not determined how—or whether—it will apply a more sustainable schedule to its 36 surface and amphibious ships...NAVY FORCE STRUCTURE Sustainable Plan and Comprehensive Assessment Needed to Mitigate Long-Term Risks to Ships

  10. 2D-RNA-coupling numbers: a new computational chemistry approach to link secondary structure topology with biological function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Agüero-Chapin, Guillermín; Varona, Javier; Molina, Reinaldo; Delogu, Giovanna; Santana, Lourdes; Uriarte, Eugenio; Podda, Gianni

    2007-04-30

    Methods for prediction of proteins, DNA, or RNA function and mapping it onto sequence often rely on bioinformatics alignment approach instead of chemical structure. Consequently, it is interesting to develop computational chemistry approaches based on molecular descriptors. In this sense, many researchers used sequence-coupling numbers and our group extended them to 2D proteins representations. However, no coupling numbers have been reported for 2D-RNA topology graphs, which are highly branched and contain useful information. Here, we use a computational chemistry scheme: (a) transforming sequences into RNA secondary structures, (b) defining and calculating new 2D-RNA-coupling numbers, (c) seek a structure-function model, and (d) map biological function onto the folded RNA. We studied as example 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidases known as ACO, which control fruit ripening having importance for biotechnology industry. First, we calculated tau(k)(2D-RNA) values to a set of 90-folded RNAs, including 28 transcripts of ACO and control sequences. Afterwards, we compared the classification performance of 10 different classifiers implemented in the software WEKA. In particular, the logistic equation ACO = 23.8 . tau(1)(2D-RNA) + 41.4 predicts ACOs with 98.9%, 98.0%, and 97.8% of accuracy in training, leave-one-out and 10-fold cross-validation, respectively. Afterwards, with this equation we predict ACO function to a sequence isolated in this work from Coffea arabica (GenBank accession DQ218452). The tau(1)(2D-RNA) also favorably compare with other descriptors. This equation allows us to map the codification of ACO activity on different mRNA topology features. The present computational-chemistry approach is general and could be extended to connect RNA secondary structure topology to other functions.

  11. Peripheral vagus nerve stimulation significantly affects lipid composition and protein secondary structure within dopamine-related brain regions in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surowka, Artur Dawid; Krygowska-Wajs, Anna; Ziomber, Agata; Thor, Piotr; Chrobak, Adrian Andrzej; Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, Magdalena

    2015-06-01

    Recent immunohistochemical studies point to the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve as the point of departure of initial changes which are related to the gradual pathological developments in the dopaminergic system. In the light of current investigations, it is likely that biochemical changes within the peripheral nervous system may influence the physiology of the dopaminergic system, suggesting a putative role for it in the development of neurodegenerative disorders. By using Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy, coupled with statistical analysis, we examined the effect of chronic, unilateral electrical vagus nerve stimulation on changes in lipid composition and in protein secondary structure within dopamine-related brain structures in rats. It was found that the chronic vagal nerve stimulation strongly affects the chain length of fatty acids within the ventral tegmental area, nucleus accumbens, substantia nigra, striatum, dorsal motor nucleus of vagus and the motor cortex. In particular, the level of lipid unsaturation was found significantly increasing in the ventral tegmental area, substantia nigra and motor cortex as a result of vagal nerve stimulation. When it comes to changes in protein secondary structure, we could see that the mesolimbic, mesocortical and nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways are particularly affected by vagus nerve stimulation. This is due to the co-occurrence of statistically significant changes in the content of non-ordered structure components, alpha helices, beta sheets, and the total area of Amide I. Macromolecular changes caused by peripheral vagus nerve stimulation may highlight a potential connection between the gastrointestinal system and the central nervous system in rat during the development of neurodegenerative disorders.

  12. The relationship between third-codon position nucleotide content, codon bias, mRNA secondary structure and gene expression in the drosophilid alcohol dehydrogenase genes Adh and Adhr.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlini, D B; Chen, Y; Stephan, W

    2001-01-01

    To gain insights into the relationship between codon bias, mRNA secondary structure, third-codon position nucleotide distribution, and gene expression, we predicted secondary structures in two related drosophilid genes, Adh and Adhr, which differ in degree of codon bias and level of gene expression. Individual structural elements (helices) were inferred using the comparative method. For each gene, four types of randomization simulations were performed to maintain/remove codon bias and/or to maintain or alter third-codon position nucleotide composition (N3). In the weakly expressed, weakly biased gene Adhr, the potential for secondary structure formation was found to be much stronger than in the highly expressed, highly biased gene Adh. This is consistent with the observation of approximately equal G and C percentages in Adhr ( approximately 31% across species), whereas in Adh the N3 distribution is shifted toward C (42% across species). Perturbing the N3 distribution to approximately equal amounts of A, G, C, and T increases the potential for secondary structure formation in Adh, but decreases it in Adhr. On the other hand, simulations that reduce codon bias without changing N3 content indicate that codon bias per se has only a weak effect on the formation of secondary structures. These results suggest that, for these two drosophilid genes, secondary structure is a relatively independent, negative regulator of gene expression. Whereas the degree of codon bias is positively correlated with level of gene expression, strong individual secondary structural elements may be selected for to retard mRNA translation and to decrease gene expression. PMID:11606539

  13. Optimization of antisense drug design againstconservative local motif in simulant secondary structures of HER-2 mRNA and QSAR analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGShuan-Ping; SONGSan-Tai; TANGZhong-Ming; SONGHai-Feng

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the role of mRNA secondary structure stability in antisense drug design and obtain better antisensecandidates against neu/HER-2/erbB-2 mRNA than previous report. METHODS: Program RNAstructure wasutilized to simulate the secondary structures of HER-2 mRNA. Then 21 antisense phosphorothioateoligodeoxynucleotides (S-ODN) targeting different parts of secondary structural motif were designed. HA4 wasset as positive control. Mean 50 % inhibitory effects (IC50) of S-ODN on proliferations of SK-BR-3 breast cancercells were evaluated. The expression of target mRNA was detected by RT-PCR. The multiple regression andquantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis was preformed by SPSS software. RESULTS: Oneoptimal and two suboptimal secondary structures of target mRNA were obtained. Nine out of 11 S-ODN againstcompletely conservative local motif (LM) (conservative among all simulant secondary structures) got lower orsimilar IC50 values compared with HA4. On the other hand, 2 out of 3 S-ODN against relatively conservative LM(conservative between any two simulant secondary structures) got lower or similar IC50 values compared withHA4. Only 2 out of 5 S-ODN targeting variable LM (variable among different predicted secondary structures) hadacceptable activities. Average IC50 of S-ODN against completely conservative LM was significantly lower than thatof S-ODN against diverse LM. QSAR analysis suggested that stability, base number of bulge loops, and target freeenergies △G°T were statistically significant. In the multiple regression, R was 0.967, P=0.005. CONCLUSION:Antisense drug design against conservative LM was helpful for improving the positive rate. Several S-ODN candidates better than positive control were screened.

  14. Dynamic changes in the secondary structure of ECE-1 and XCE account for their different substrate specificities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ul-Haq Zaheer

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X-converting enzyme (XCE involved in nervous control of respiration, is a member of the M13 family of zinc peptidases, for which no natural substrate has been identified yet. In contrast, it’s well characterized homologue endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1 showed broad substrate specificity and acts as endopeptidase as well as dipeptidase. To explore the structural differences between XCE and ECE-1, homology model of XCE was built using the complex structure of ECE-1 with phosphoramidon (pdb-id: 3DWB as template. Phosphoramidon was docked into the binding site of XCE whereas phosphate oxygen of the inhibitor was used as water molecule to design the apo forms of both enzymes. Molecular dynamics simulation of both enzymes was performed to analyze the dynamic nature of their active site residues in the absence and presence of the inhibitor. Results Homology model of XCE explained the role of non-conserved residues of its S2’ subsite. Molecular dynamics (MD simulations identified the flexible transitions of F149/I150, N566/N571, W714/W719, and R145/R723 residues of ECE-1/XCE for the strong binding of the inhibitor. Secondary structure calculations using DSSP method reveals the folding of R145/R723 residue of ECE-1/XCE into β-sheet structure while unfolding of the S2’ subsite residues in aECE-1 and sustained compact folding of that of aXCE. The results evaluated are in good agreement with available experimental data, thus providing detailed molecular models which can explain the structural and specificities differences between both zinc peptidases. Conclusions Secondary structure changes of both enzymes during the simulation time revealed the importance of β-sheet structure of R145/R723 for its binding with the terminal carboxylate group of the inhibitor. Unfolding of the α-helix comprising the S2’ subsite residues in aECE-1 correlate well with its endopeptidase activity while their compact folding in aXCE may

  15. Backbone resonance assignments of the micro-RNA precursor binding region of human TRBP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Matthieu P M H; Plevin, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    TAR-RNA binding protein (TRBP) is a multidomain human protein involved in micro-RNA (miRNA) biogenesis. TRBP is a component of both the Dicer complex, which processes precursor miRNAs, and the RNA-induced silencing complex-loading complex. In addition, TRBP is implicated in the human immunodeficiency virus replication cycle and interferon-protein kinase R activity. TRBP contains 3 double-stranded RNA binding domains the first two of which have been shown to interact with miRNA precursors. Here we present the backbone resonance assignments and secondary structure of residues 19-228 of human TRBP2.

  16. Extending DFT-based genetic algorithms by atom-to-place re-assignment via perturbation theory: A systematic and unbiased approach to structures of mixed-metallic clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigend, Florian, E-mail: florian.weigend@kit.edu [Institut für Physikalische Chemie, Abteilung für Theoretische Chemie, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Fritz-Haber-Weg 2, 76131 Karlsruhe, Germany and Institut für Nanotechnologie, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-10-07

    Energy surfaces of metal clusters usually show a large variety of local minima. For homo-metallic species the energetically lowest can be found reliably with genetic algorithms, in combination with density functional theory without system-specific parameters. For mixed-metallic clusters this is much more difficult, as for a given arrangement of nuclei one has to find additionally the best of many possibilities of assigning different metal types to the individual positions. In the framework of electronic structure methods this second issue is treatable at comparably low cost at least for elements with similar atomic number by means of first-order perturbation theory, as shown previously [F. Weigend, C. Schrodt, and R. Ahlrichs, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 10380 (2004)]. In the present contribution the extension of a genetic algorithm with the re-assignment of atom types to atom sites is proposed and tested for the search of the global minima of PtHf{sub 12} and [LaPb{sub 7}Bi{sub 7}]{sup 4−}. For both cases the (putative) global minimum is reliably found with the extended technique, which is not the case for the “pure” genetic algorithm.

  17. Extending DFT-based genetic algorithms by atom-to-place re-assignment via perturbation theory: a systematic and unbiased approach to structures of mixed-metallic clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigend, Florian

    2014-10-07

    Energy surfaces of metal clusters usually show a large variety of local minima. For homo-metallic species the energetically lowest can be found reliably with genetic algorithms, in combination with density functional theory without system-specific parameters. For mixed-metallic clusters this is much more difficult, as for a given arrangement of nuclei one has to find additionally the best of many possibilities of assigning different metal types to the individual positions. In the framework of electronic structure methods this second issue is treatable at comparably low cost at least for elements with similar atomic number by means of first-order perturbation theory, as shown previously [F. Weigend, C. Schrodt, and R. Ahlrichs, J. Chem. Phys. 121, 10380 (2004)]. In the present contribution the extension of a genetic algorithm with the re-assignment of atom types to atom sites is proposed and tested for the search of the global minima of PtHf12 and [LaPb7Bi7](4-). For both cases the (putative) global minimum is reliably found with the extended technique, which is not the case for the "pure" genetic algorithm.

  18. Molecular evolution of rDNA in early diverging Metazoa: First comparative analysis and phylogenetic application of complete SSU rRNA secondary structures in Porifera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wörheide Gert

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cytoplasmic ribosomal small subunit (SSU, 18S ribosomal RNA (rRNA is the most frequently-used gene for molecular phylogenetic studies. However, information regarding its secondary structure is neglected in most phylogenetic analyses. Incorporation of this information is essential in order to apply specific rRNA evolutionary models to overcome the problem of co-evolution of paired sites, which violates the basic assumption of the independent evolution of sites made by most phylogenetic methods. Information about secondary structure also supports the process of aligning rRNA sequences across taxa. Both aspects have been shown to increase the accuracy of phylogenetic reconstructions within various taxa. Here, we explore SSU rRNA secondary structures from the three extant classes of Phylum Porifera (Grant, 1836, a pivotal, but largely unresolved taxon of early branching Metazoa. This is the first phylogenetic study of poriferan SSU rRNA data to date that includes detailed comparative secondary structure information for all three sponge classes. Results We found base compositional and structural differences in SSU rRNA among Demospongiae, Hexactinellida (glass sponges and Calcarea (calcareous sponges. We showed that analyses of primary rRNA sequences, including secondary structure-specific evolutionary models, in combination with reconstruction of the evolution of unusual structural features, reveal a substantial amount of additional information. Of special note was the finding that the gene tree topologies of marine haplosclerid demosponges, which are inconsistent with the current morphology-based classification, are supported by our reconstructed evolution of secondary structure features. Therefore, these features can provide alternative support for sequence-based topologies and give insights into the evolution of the molecule itself. To encourage and facilitate the application of rRNA models in phylogenetics of early

  19. Secondary structure of the rRNA ITS2 region reveals key evolutionary patterns in acroporid corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Annette W; van Oppen, Madeleine J H

    2008-10-01

    This study investigates the ribosomal RNA transcript secondary structure in corals as confirmed by compensatory base changes in Isopora/Acropora species. These species are unique versus all other corals in the absence of a eukaryote-wide conserved structural component, the helix III in internal transcriber spacer (ITS) 2, and their variability in the 5.8S-LSU helix basal to ITS2, a helix with pairings identical among all other scleractinian corals. Furthermore, Isopora/Acropora individuals display at least two, and as many as three, ITS sequence isotypes in their genome which appear to be capable of function. From consideration of the conserved elements in ITS2 and flanking regions, it appears that there are three major groups within the IsoporaAcropora lineage: the Isopora + Acropora "longi" group, the large group including Caribbean Acropora + the Acropora "carib" types plus the bulk of the Indo-Pacific Acropora species, and the remaining enigmatic "pseudo" group found in the Pacific. Interbreeding is possible among Caribbean A. palmata and A. cervicornis and among some species of Indo-Pacific Acropora. Recombinant ITS sequences are obvious among these latter, such that morphology (as represented by species name) does not correlate with common ITS sequence. The combination of characters revealed by RNA secondary structure analyses suggests a recent past/current history of interbreeding among the Indo-Pacific Acropora species and a shared ancestry of some of these with the Caribbean Acropora. The unusual absence of helix III of ITS2 of Isopora/Acropora species may have some causative role in the equally unusual instability in the 5.8S-LSU helix basal to ITS2 of this species complex.

  20. Novel evolutionary lineages revealed in the Chaetothyriales (fungi based on multigene phylogenetic analyses and comparison of its secondary structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Réblová

    Full Text Available Cyphellophora and Phialophora (Chaetothyriales, Pezizomycota comprise species known from skin infections of humans and animals and from a variety of environmental sources. These fungi were studied based on the comparison of cultural and morphological features and phylogenetic analyses of five nuclear loci, i.e., internal transcribed spacer rDNA operon (ITS, large and small subunit nuclear ribosomal DNA (nuc28S rDNA, nuc18S rDNA, β-tubulin, DNA replication licensing factor (mcm7 and second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (rpb2. Phylogenetic results were supported by comparative analysis of ITS1 and ITS2 secondary structure of representatives of the Chaetothyriales and the identification of substitutions among the taxa analyzed. Base pairs with non-conserved, co-evolving nucleotides that maintain base pairing in the RNA transcript and unique evolutionary motifs in the ITS2 that characterize whole clades or individual taxa were mapped on predicted secondary structure models. Morphological characteristics, structural data and phylogenetic analyses of three datasets, i.e., ITS, ITS-β-tubulin and 28S-18S-rpb2-mcm7, define a robust clade containing eight species of Cyphellophora (including the type and six species of Phialophora. These taxa are now accommodated in the Cyphellophoraceae, a novel evolutionary lineage within the Chaetothyriales. Cyphellophora is emended and expanded to encompass species with both septate and nonseptate conidia formed on discrete, intercalary, terminal or lateral phialides. Six new combinations in Cyphellophora are proposed and a dichotomous key to species accepted in the genus is provided. Cyphellophora eugeniae and C. hylomeconis, which grouped in the Chaetothyriaceae, represent another novel lineage and are introduced as the type species of separate genera.

  1. ATR-FT/IR study on the interactions between gliadins and dextrin and their effects on protein secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secundo, Francesco; Guerrieri, Nicoletta

    2005-03-09

    The effects of heat treatment and dextrin addition on the secondary structure of gliadins were investigated by means of attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FT/IR). Gliadins and gliadin/dextrin mixtures (before and after thermal treatment) were prepared as a dried protein film on the ATR-FT/IR zinc selenide cell plate and equilibrated at a water activity (a(w)) of 0.06. The results show that gliadins undergo conformational changes upon thermal treatment both in the absence and in the presence of dextrin. In particular, in the thermally treated gliadins, the decrease of the band at around 1651 cm(-)(1) and the increase of the bands at around 1628 and 1690 cm(-)(1) suggest a loss of alpha-helix structure and a higher content of protein aggregates. The same trend was observed in the presence of dextrin. Concerning the interactions between gliadins and dextrin, gliadin/dextrin mixtures show variations in the amide I region compared to native gliadins (e.g., an increase of the band at 1645 cm(-)(1) and the absence of the band at around 1668 cm(-)(1)) that might be due to hydrogen bond formation between gliadins and dextrin. It was also found that the spectrum of gliadin/dextrin mixtures was less affected by the hydration state than that of native gliadins, as observed from the differential spectra obtained by subtraction of the spectrum obtained at a(w) = 0.06 (driest condition tested) from the spectrum of the sample equilibrated at a(w) = 0.84. This could be due to the fact that C=O and N-H groups of gliadins are engaged to form hydrogen bonds with the hydroxyl groups of dextrin, and so they are not perturbed by the presence of water molecules. Finally, water activity effects on the secondary structure of gliadins are also discussed.

  2. Secondary structure, a missing component of sequence-based minimotif definitions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P Sargeant

    Full Text Available Minimotifs are short contiguous segments of proteins that have a known biological function. The hundreds of thousands of minimotifs discovered thus far are an important part of the theoretical understanding of the specificity of protein-protein interactions, posttranslational modifications, and signal transduction that occur in cells. However, a longstanding problem is that the different abstractions of the sequence definitions do not accurately capture the specificity, despite decades of effort by many labs. We present evidence that structure is an essential component of minimotif specificity, yet is not used in minimotif definitions. Our analysis of several known minimotifs as case studies, analysis of occurrences of minimotifs in structured and disordered regions of proteins, and review of the literature support a new model for minimotif definitions that includes sequence, structure, and function.

  3. CHSalign: A Web Server That Builds upon Junction-Explorer and RNAJAG for Pairwise Alignment of RNA Secondary Structures with Coaxial Helical Stacking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Hua

    Full Text Available RNA junctions are important structural elements of RNA molecules. They are formed when three or more helices come together in three-dimensional space. Recent studies have focused on the annotation and prediction of coaxial helical stacking (CHS motifs within junctions. Here we exploit such predictions to develop an efficient alignment tool to handle RNA secondary structures with CHS motifs. Specifically, we build upon our Junction-Explorer software for predicting coaxial stacking and RNAJAG for modelling junction topologies as tree graphs to incorporate constrained tree matching and dynamic programming algorithms into a new method, called CHSalign, for aligning the secondary structures of RNA molecules containing CHS motifs. Thus, CHSalign is intended to be an efficient alignment tool for RNAs containing similar junctions. Experimental results based on thousands of alignments demonstrate that CHSalign can align two RNA secondary structures containing CHS motifs more accurately than other RNA secondary structure alignment tools. CHSalign yields a high score when aligning two RNA secondary structures with similar CHS motifs or helical arrangement patterns, and a low score otherwise. This new method has been implemented in a web server, and the program is also made freely available, at http://bioinformatics.njit.edu/CHSalign/.

  4. Examining the effects of structured dialogue grounded in socioculturalism as a tool to facilitate professional development in secondary science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linton, Antoinette S.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of professional development characterized by teacher facilitated learning activities as a way to improve teaching practices and learning outcomes. In this study, teachers were provided opportunities to facilitate their own learning by investigating ways to consistently foster the desired learning outcomes for urban students over the course of three semesters. During the first semester, teachers focused on improving test scores and student motivation. By the third semester, teachers opted to extend time for students to complete assignments, and focused on sharing strategies that worked for students. Second, students of teachers who participated in the study group format using the structured dialogue approach demonstrated dramatic gains on the standardized content assessment in chemistry and integrated coordinated science (ICS) over three years. In chemistry, the percent of students scoring at far below basic decreased by 24%, and the percentage of students who scored basic increased 21%. In ICS, the percentage of students that scored far below basic decreased by 14% and the percent of students who scored basic increased 14%. The research findings suggest that using structured dialogue to facilitate teacher discourse in a way that is conducive to establishing positive discourse about student learning and rigorous pedagogy are key factors in improving teachers' ability to foster high academic outcomes from urban students.

  5. Projection structure of the secondary citrate/sodium symporter CitS at 6 Å resolution by electron crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebbel, Fabian; Kurz, Mareike; Grütter, Markus G; Stahlberg, Henning

    2012-04-20

    CitS from Klebsiella pneumoniae acts as a secondary symporter of citrate and sodium ions across the inner membrane of the host. The protein is the best characterized member of the 2-hydroxycarboxylate transporter family, while no experimental structural information at sub-nanometer resolution is available on this class of membrane proteins. Here, we applied electron crystallography to two-dimensional crystals of CitS. Carbon-film-adsorbed tubular two-dimensional crystals were studied by cryo-electron microscopy, producing the 6-Å-resolution projection structure of the membrane-embedded protein. In the p22(1)2(1)-symmetrized projection map, the predicted dimeric structure is clearly visible. Each monomeric unit can tentatively be interpreted as being composed of 11 transmembrane α-helices. In projection, CitS shows a high degree of structural similarity to NhaP1, the Na(+)/H(+) antiporter of Methanococcus jannaschii. We discuss possible locations for the dimer interface and models for the helical arrangements and domain organizations of the symporter based on existing models.

  6. Membrane interaction and secondary structure of de novo designed arginine-and tryptophan peptides with dual function

    KAUST Repository

    Rydberg, Hanna A.

    2012-10-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides and antimicrobial peptides are two classes of positively charged membrane active peptides with several properties in common. The challenge is to combine knowledge about the membrane interaction mechanisms and structural properties of the two classes to design peptides with membrane-specific actions, useful either as transporters of cargo or as antibacterial substances. Membrane active peptides are commonly rich in arginine and tryptophan. We have previously designed a series of arg/trp peptides and investigated how the position and number of tryptophans affect cellular uptake. Here we explore the antimicrobial properties and the interaction with lipid model membranes of these peptides, using minimal inhibitory concentrations assay (MIC), circular dichroism (CD) and linear dichroism (LD). The results show that the arg/trp peptides inhibit the growth of the two gram positive strains Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus pyogenes, with some individual variations depending on the position of the tryptophans. No inhibition of the gram negative strains Proteus mirabilis or Pseudomonas aeruginosa was noticed. CD indicated that when bound to lipid vesicles one of the peptides forms an α-helical like structure, whereas the other five exhibited rather random coiled structures. LD indicated that all six peptides were somehow aligned parallel with the membrane surface. Our results do not reveal any obvious connection between membrane interaction and antimicrobial effect for the studied peptides. By contrast cell-penetrating properties can be coupled to both the secondary structure and the degree of order of the peptides. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.

  7. Novel sequence variations in LAMA2 and SGCG genes modulating cis-acting regulatory elements and RNA secondary structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfa Siala

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we detected new sequence variations in LAMA2 and SGCG genes in 5 ethnic populations, and analysed their effect on enhancer composition and mRNA structure. PCR amplification and DNA sequencing were performed and followed by bioinformatics analyses using ESEfinder as well as MFOLD software. We found 3 novel sequence variations in the LAMA2 (c.3174+22_23insAT and c.6085 +12delA and SGCG (c.*102A/C genes. These variations were present in 210 tested healthy controls from Tunisian, Moroccan, Algerian, Lebanese and French populations suggesting that they represent novel polymorphisms within LAMA2 and SGCG genes sequences. ESEfinder showed that the c.*102A/C substitution created a new exon splicing enhancer in the 3'UTR of SGCG genes, whereas the c.6085 +12delA deletion was situated in the base pairing region between LAMA2 mRNA and the U1snRNA spliceosomal components. The RNA structure analyses showed that both variations modulated RNA secondary structure. Our results are suggestive of correlations between mRNA folding and the recruitment of spliceosomal components mediating splicing, including SR proteins. The contribution of common sequence variations to mRNA structural and functional diversity will contribute to a better study of gene expression.

  8. Secondary structure, dynamics, and architecture of the p7 membrane protein from hepatitis C virus by NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Gabriel A; Opella, Stanley J

    2011-06-01

    P7 is a small membrane protein that is essential for the infectivity of hepatitis C virus. Solution-state NMR experiments on p7 in DHPC micelles, including hydrogen/deuterium exchange, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement and bicelle 'q-titration,' demonstrate that the protein has a range of dynamic properties and distinct structural segments. These data along with residual dipolar couplings yield a secondary structure model of p7. We were able to confirm previous proposals that the protein has two transmembrane segments with a short interhelical loop containing the two basic residues K33 and R35. The 63-amino acid protein has a remarkably complex structure made up of seven identifiable sections, four of which are helical segments with different tilt angles and dynamics. A solid-state NMR two-dimensional separated local field spectrum of p7 aligned in phospholipid bilayers provided the tilt angles of two of these segments. A preliminary structural model of p7 derived from these NMR data is presented.

  9. An updated 18S rRNA phylogeny of tunicates based on mixture and secondary structure models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenkar Noa

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tunicates have been recently revealed to be the closest living relatives of vertebrates. Yet, with more than 2500 described species, details of their evolutionary history are still obscure. From a molecular point of view, tunicate phylogenetic relationships have been mostly studied based on analyses of 18S rRNA sequences, which indicate several major clades at odds with the traditional class-level arrangements. Nonetheless, substantial uncertainty remains about the phylogenetic relationships and taxonomic status of key groups such as the Aplousobranchia, Appendicularia, and Thaliacea. Results Thirty new complete 18S rRNA sequences were acquired from previously unsampled tunicate species, with special focus on groups presenting high evolutionary rate. The updated 18S rRNA dataset has been aligned with respect to the constraint on homology imposed by the rRNA secondary structure. A probabilistic framework of phylogenetic reconstruction was adopted to accommodate the particular evolutionary dynamics of this ribosomal marker. Detailed Bayesian analyses were conducted under the non-parametric CAT mixture model accounting for site-specific heterogeneity of the evolutionary process, and under RNA-specific doublet models accommodating the occurrence of compensatory substitutions in stem regions. Our results support the division of tunicates into three major clades: 1 Phlebobranchia + Thaliacea + Aplousobranchia, 2 Appendicularia, and 3 Stolidobranchia, but the position of Appendicularia could not be firmly resolved. Our study additionally reveals that most Aplousobranchia evolve at extremely high rates involving changes in secondary structure of their 18S rRNA, with the exception of the family Clavelinidae, which appears to be slowly evolving. This extreme rate heterogeneity precluded resolving with certainty the exact phylogenetic placement of Aplousobranchia. Finally, the best fitting secondary-structure and CAT-mixture models

  10. Integrated assignment and path planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphey, Robert A.

    2005-11-01

    A surge of interest in unmanned systems has exposed many new and challenging research problems across many fields of engineering and mathematics. These systems have the potential of transforming our society by replacing dangerous and dirty jobs with networks of moving machines. This vision is fundamentally separate from the modern view of robotics in that sophisticated behavior is realizable not by increasing individual vehicle complexity, but instead through collaborative teaming that relies on collective perception, abstraction, decision making, and manipulation. Obvious examples where collective robotics will make an impact include planetary exploration, space structure assembly, remote and undersea mining, hazardous material handling and clean-up, and search and rescue. Nonetheless, the phenomenon driving this technology trend is the increasing reliance of the US military on unmanned vehicles, specifically, aircraft. Only a few years ago, following years of resistance to the use of unmanned systems, the military and civilian leadership in the United States reversed itself and have recently demonstrated surprisingly broad acceptance of increasingly pervasive use of unmanned platforms in defense surveillance, and even attack. However, as rapidly as unmanned systems have gained acceptance, the defense research community has discovered the technical pitfalls that lie ahead, especially for operating collective groups of unmanned platforms. A great deal of talent and energy has been devoted to solving these technical problems, which tend to fall into two categories: resource allocation of vehicles to objectives, and path planning of vehicle trajectories. An extensive amount of research has been conducted in each direction, yet, surprisingly, very little work has considered the integrated problem of assignment and path planning. This dissertation presents a framework for studying integrated assignment and path planning and then moves on to suggest an exact

  11. Feasibility Study on Nano-structured Coatings to Mitigate Flow-accelerated Corrosion in Secondary System of Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seunghyun; Kim, Jeong Won; Kim, Ji Hyun [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Banyeon-ri, Eonyang-eup, Ulju-gun, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    There have been many efforts to mitigate FAC through the adoption of the advanced and modified water chemistries such as optimized dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration and temperature. However, these mitigation techniques pose certain challenges relating to the compatibility of new water chemistries with the steam generator, the thermal efficiency of the secondary side, etc. In this context, nano-particle reinforced electroless nickel plating (NP ENP) could help solve the FAC issues in secondary pipe systems. This does not require modification of water chemistry or structural materials, and hence, its application is reasonable and time-saving compared to previous FAC mitigation techniques. The main parameters of FAC are known as electrochemical reaction at the interface, dissolution of magnetite and ferrous ions due to concentration gradient between carbon steels and water and wear due to a fast-flowing fluid. High-temperature corrosion characteristics of the both coatings have potential as FAC barrier for carbon steel. Feasibility study will be carried out with FAC simulation experiments.

  12. Effects of Secondary Plant Metabolites on Microbial Populations: Changes in Community Structure and Metabolic Activity in Contaminated Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musilova, Lucie; Ridl, Jakub; Polivkova, Marketa; Macek, Tomas; Uhlik, Ondrej

    2016-01-01

    Secondary plant metabolites (SPMEs) play an important role in plant survival in the environment and serve to establish ecological relationships between plants and other organisms. Communication between plants and microorganisms via SPMEs contained in root exudates or derived from litter decomposition is an example of this phenomenon. In this review, the general aspects of rhizodeposition together with the significance of terpenes and phenolic compounds are discussed in detail. We focus specifically on the effect of SPMEs on microbial community structure and metabolic activity in environments contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Furthermore, a section is devoted to a complex effect of plants and/or their metabolites contained in litter on bioremediation of contaminated sites. New insights are introduced from a study evaluating the effects of SPMEs derived during decomposition of grapefruit peel, lemon peel, and pears on bacterial communities and their ability to degrade PCBs in a long-term contaminated soil. The presented review supports the “secondary compound hypothesis” and demonstrates the potential of SPMEs for increasing the effectiveness of bioremediation processes. PMID:27483244

  13. Adsorption of fibrinogen on a biomedical-grade stainless steel 316LVM surface: a PM-IRRAS study of the adsorption thermodynamics, kinetics and secondary structure changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desroches, Marie-Josee; Omanovic, Sasha

    2008-05-14

    Polarization-modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) was employed to investigate the interaction of serum protein fibrinogen with a biomedical-grade 316LVM stainless steel surface, in terms of the adsorption thermodynamics, kinetics and secondary structure changes of the protein. Apparent Gibbs energy of adsorption values indicated a highly spontaneous and strong adsorption of fibrinogen onto the surface. The kinetics of fibrinogen adsorption were successfully modeled using a pseudo first-order kinetic model. Deconvolution of the amide I bands indicated that the adsorption of fibrinogen on 316LVM results in significant changes in the protein's secondary structure that occur predominantly within the first minute of adsorption. Among the investigated structures, the alpha-helix structure undergoes the smallest changes, while the beta-sheet and beta-turns structures undergo significant changes. It was shown that lateral interactions between the adsorbed molecules do not play a role in controlling the secondary structure changes. An increase in temperature induced changes in the secondary structure of the protein, characterized by a loss of the alpha-helical content and its transformation into the beta-turns structure.

  14. Synthesis, Characterization, and Secondary Structure Determination of a Silk-Inspired, Self-Assembling Peptide: A Laboratory Exercise for Organic and Biochemistry Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, Tyler J.; Fry, Melany M.; Murphy, Amanda R.

    2014-01-01

    This laboratory experiment gives upper-division organic or biochemistry undergraduate students a comprehensive look at the synthesis, chemical characterization, self-assembly, and secondary structure determination of small, N-acylated peptides inspired by the protein structure of silkworm silk. All experiments can be completed in one 4 h lab…

  15. Evaluating the accuracy of SHAPE-directed RNA secondary structure predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sükösd, Zsuzsanna; Swenson, M Shel; Kjems, Jørgen; Heitsch, Christine E

    2013-03-01

    Recent advances in RNA structure determination include using data from high-throughput probing experiments to improve thermodynamic prediction accuracy. We evaluate the extent and nature of improvements in data-directed predictions for a diverse set of 16S/18S ribosomal sequences using a stochastic model of experimental SHAPE data. The average accuracy for 1000 data-directed predictions always improves over the original minimum free energy (MFE) structure. However, the amount of improvement varies with the sequence, exhibiting a correlation with MFE accuracy. Further analysis of this correlation shows that accurate MFE base pairs are typically preserved in a data-directed prediction, whereas inaccurate ones are not. Thus, the positive predictive value of common base pairs is consistently higher than the directed prediction accuracy. Finally, we confirm sequence dependencies in the directability of thermodynamic predictions and investigate the potential for greater accuracy improvements in the worst performing test sequence.

  16. Goadsporin, a chemical substance which promotes secondary metabolism and Morphogenesis in streptomycetes. II. Structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igarashi, Y; Kan, Y; Fujii, K; Fujita, T; Harada, K; Naoki, H; Tabata, H; Onaka, H; Furumai, T

    2001-12-01

    The structure of goadsporin was determined by using spectroscopic techniques. NMR analysis revealed that goadsporin consists of 19 amino acids, two of which are dehydroalanines (Deala), and six of which are cyclized to oxazoles (Oxz) and thiazoles (Thz) by dehydrative cyclization and dehydrogenation from serine, threonine and cysteine. NMR analysis established seven partial structures, and their sequence was determined by CID-MS/MS. Negative mode FAB-MS/MS gave product ions arising from charge-remote fragmentation that allowed determination of the sequence of the amino acid components as AcNH-Ala-MeOxz-Val-Deala-MeOxz-Ile-Leu-Thz-Ser-Gly-Gly-MeOxz-Leu-Deala-Oxz-Ala-Gly-Thz-Val-OH. The chiral amino acids were determined by the advanced Marfey's method to have L-configurations.

  17. Protein Secondary Structure and Orientation in Silk as Revealed by Raman Spectromicroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Lefèvre, Thierry; Rousseau, Marie-Eve; Pézolet, Michel

    2007-01-01

    Taking advantage of recent advances in polarized Raman microspectroscopy, and based on a rational decomposition of the amide I band, the conformation and orientation of proteins have been determined for cocoon silks of the silkworms Bombyx mori and Samia cynthia ricini and dragline silks of the spiders Nephila clavipes and Nephila edulis. This study distinguished between band components due to β-sheets, β-turns, 31-helices, and unordered structure for the four fibers. For B. mori, the β-sheet...

  18. Structure of Velocity Distribution of Sheath-Accelerated Secondary Electrons in Asymmetric RF-DC Discharge

    CERN Document Server

    Khrabrov, Alexander V; Ventzek, Peter L G; Ranjan, Alok; Chen, Lee

    2015-01-01

    The ballistic population is thought to be responsible for alleviating the electron shading effect and the notching of the photoresist layer. We have performed test-particle simulations where the features in the EVDF of electrons impacting the RF electrode are fully resolved at all energies. An analytic model has been developed to predict existence of peaked and step-like structures in the EVDF.

  19. Attenuation and modulation of mRNA secondary structure in a feedback control system regulating SV40 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloni, Y; Hay, N

    1983-05-01

    Alternative secondary structures can be predicted for the initial 94 nucleotides synthesized from the major transcription initiation site of SV40 late RNA: a transcription-termination conformation results in the production of aborted RNA and a readthrough conformation leads to the synthesis of the primary SV40 late RNA. In the cytoplasm similar alternative conformations can be predicted for the initial nucleotides at the 5' ends o both the major 16S and 19S late mRNAs. In one of these alternative conformations the AUG initiation codon of the leader protein (agnoprotein) is sequestered and not available for ribosome binding. In the alternative conformation the same AUG is accessible for ribosome binding. We suggest that these mutually exclusive conformations are fundamental elements in a transcription and translation feedback control mechanism regulating the synthesis of 16S and 19S mRNA in the nucleus and the translation of their encoded proteins in the cytoplasm.

  20. Compensation for secondary uncertainty in electro-hydraulic servo system by gain adaptive sliding mode variable structure control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG You-wang; GUI Wei-hua

    2008-01-01

    Based on consideration of the differential relations between the immeasurable variables and measurable variables in electro-hydraulic servo system, adaptive dynamic recurrent fuzzy neural networks(ADRFNNs) were employed to identify the primary uncertainty and the mathematic model of the system was turned into an equivalent linear model with terms of secondary uncertainty. At the same time, gain adaptive sliding mode variable structure control(GASMVSC) was employed to synthesize the control effort. The results show that the unrealization problem caused by some system's immeasurable state variables in traditional fuzzy neural networks(TFNN) taking all state variables as its inputs is overcome. On the other hand, the identification by the ADRFNNs online with high accuracy and the adaptive function of the correction term's gain in the GASMVSC make the system possess strong robustness and improved steady accuracy, and the chattering phenomenon of the control effort is also suppressed effectively.

  1. Interconnection of salt-induced hydrophobic compaction and secondary structure formation depends on solution conditions: revisiting early events of protein folding at single molecule resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldar, Shubhasis; Chattopadhyay, Krishnananda

    2012-03-30

    What happens in the early stage of protein folding remains an interesting unsolved problem. Rapid kinetics measurements with cytochrome c using submillisecond continuous flow mixing devices suggest simultaneous formation of a compact collapsed state and secondary structure. These data seem to indicate that collapse formation is guided by specific short and long range interactions (heteropolymer collapse). A contrasting interpretation also has been proposed, which suggests that the collapse formation is rapid, nonspecific, and a trivial solvent related compaction, which could as well be observed by a homopolymer (homopolymer collapse). We address this controversy using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), which enables us to monitor the salt-induced compaction accompanying collapse formation and the associated time constant directly at single molecule resolution. In addition, we follow the formation of secondary structure using far UV CD. The data presented here suggest that both these models (homopolymer and heteropolymer) could be applicable depending on the solution conditions. For example, the formation of secondary structure and compact state is not simultaneous in aqueous buffer. In aqueous buffer, formation of the compact state occurs through a two-state co-operative transition following heteropolymer formalism, whereas secondary structure formation takes place gradually. In contrast, in the presence of urea, a compaction of the protein radius occurs gradually over an extended range of salt concentration following homopolymer formalism. The salt-induced compaction and the formation of secondary structure take place simultaneously in the presence of urea.

  2. Detection and alignment of 3D domain swapping proteins using angle-distance image-based secondary structural matching techniques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Han Chu

    Full Text Available This work presents a novel detection method for three-dimensional domain swapping (DS, a mechanism for forming protein quaternary structures that can be visualized as if monomers had "opened" their "closed" structures and exchanged the opened portion to form intertwined oligomers. Since the first report of DS in the mid 1990s, an increasing number of identified cases has led to the postulation that DS might occur in a protein with an unconstrained terminus under appropriate conditions. DS may play important roles in the molecular evolution and functional regulation of proteins and the formation of depositions in Alzheimer's and prion diseases. Moreover, it is promising for designing auto-assembling biomaterials. Despite the increasing interest in DS, related bioinformatics methods are rarely available. Owing to a dramatic conformational difference between the monomeric/closed and oligomeric/open forms, conventional structural comparison methods are inadequate for detecting DS. Hence, there is also a lack of comprehensive datasets for studying DS. Based on angle-distance (A-D image transformations of secondary structural elements (SSEs, specific patterns within A-D images can be recognized and classified for structural similarities. In this work, a matching algorithm to extract corresponding SSE pairs from A-D images and a novel DS score have been designed and demonstrated to be applicable to the detection of DS relationships. The Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC and sensitivity of the proposed DS-detecting method were higher than 0.81 even when the sequence identities of the proteins examined were lower than 10%. On average, the alignment percentage and root-mean-square distance (RMSD computed by the proposed method were 90% and 1.8Å for a set of 1,211 DS-related pairs of proteins. The performances of structural alignments remain high and stable for DS-related homologs with less than 10% sequence identities. In addition, the quality of its

  3. Detection and alignment of 3D domain swapping proteins using angle-distance image-based secondary structural matching techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chia-Han; Lo, Wei-Cheng; Wang, Hsin-Wei; Hsu, Yen-Chu; Hwang, Jenn-Kang; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Pai, Tun-Wen; Tang, Chuan Yi

    2010-10-14

    This work presents a novel detection method for three-dimensional domain swapping (DS), a mechanism for forming protein quaternary structures that can be visualized as if monomers had "opened" their "closed" structures and exchanged the opened portion to form intertwined oligomers. Since the first report of DS in the mid 1990s, an increasing number of identified cases has led to the postulation that DS might occur in a protein with an unconstrained terminus under appropriate conditions. DS may play important roles in the molecular evolution and functional regulation of proteins and the formation of depositions in Alzheimer's and prion diseases. Moreover, it is promising for designing auto-assembling biomaterials. Despite the increasing interest in DS, related bioinformatics methods are rarely available. Owing to a dramatic conformational difference between the monomeric/closed and oligomeric/open forms, conventional structural comparison methods are inadequate for detecting DS. Hence, there is also a lack of comprehensive datasets for studying DS. Based on angle-distance (A-D) image transformations of secondary structural elements (SSEs), specific patterns within A-D images can be recognized and classified for structural similarities. In this work, a matching algorithm to extract corresponding SSE pairs from A-D images and a novel DS score have been designed and demonstrated to be applicable to the detection of DS relationships. The Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) and sensitivity of the proposed DS-detecting method were higher than 0.81 even when the sequence identities of the proteins examined were lower than 10%. On average, the alignment percentage and root-mean-square distance (RMSD) computed by the proposed method were 90% and 1.8Å for a set of 1,211 DS-related pairs of proteins. The performances of structural alignments remain high and stable for DS-related homologs with less than 10% sequence identities. In addition, the quality of its hinge loop

  4. Dopamine agonist suppression of rapid-eye-movement sleep is secondary to sleep suppression mediated via limbic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miletich, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of pergolide, a direct dopamine receptor agonist, on sleep and wakefulness, motor behavior and /sup 3/H-spiperone specific binding in limbic structures and striatum in rats was studied. The results show that pergolide induced a biphasic dose effect, with high doses increasing wakefulness and suppressing sleep while low dose decreased wakefulness, but increased sleep. It was shown that pergolide-induced sleep suppression was blocked by ..cap alpha..-glupenthixol and pimozide, two dopamine receptor antagonists. It was further shown that pergolide merely delayed the rebound resulting from rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep deprivation, that dopamine receptors stimulation had no direct effect on the period, phase or amplitude of the circadian rhythm of REM sleep propensity and that there was no alteration in the coupling of REM sleep episodes with S/sub 2/ episodes. Rapid-eye-movement sleep deprivation resulted in increased sensitivity to the pergolide-induced wakefulness stimulation and sleep suppression and pergolide-induced motor behaviors of locomotion and head bobbing. /sup 3/H-spiperone specific binding to dopamine receptors was shown to be altered by REM sleep deprivation in the subcortical limbic structures. It is concluded that the REM sleep suppressing action of dopamine receptor stimulation is secondary to sleep suppression per se and not secondary to a unique effect on the REM sleep. Further, it is suggested that the wakefulness stimulating action of dopamine receptor agonists is mediated by activation of the dopamine receptors in the terminal areas of the mesolimbocortical dopamine projection system.

  5. Ner protein of phage Mu: Assignments using {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strzelecka, T.; Gronenborn, A.M.; Clore, G.M. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1994-12-01

    The Ner protein is a small (74-amino acid) DNA-binding protein that regulates a switch between the lysogenic and lytic stages of phage Mu. It inhibits expression of the C repressor gene and down-regulates its own expression. Two-dimensional NMR experiments on uniformly {sup 15}N-labeled protein provided most of the backbone and some of the sidechain proton assignments. The secondary structure determination using two-dimensional NOESY experiments showed that Ner consists of five {alpha}-helices. However, because most of the sidechain protons could not be assigned, the full structure was not determined. Using uniformly {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-labeled Ner and a set of three-dimensional experiments, we were able to assign all of the backbone and 98% of the sidechain protons. In particular, the CBCANH and CBCA(CO)NH experiments were used to sequentially assign the C{alpha} and C{beta} resonances; the HCCH-CTOCSY and HCCH-COSY were used to assign sidechain carbon and proton resonances.

  6. Job assignment with multivariate skills

    OpenAIRE

    Brilon, Stefanie

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyzes the job assignment problem faced by a firm when workers’ skills are distributed along several dimensions and jobs require different skills to varying extent. I derive optimal assignment rules with and without slot constraints, and show that under certain circumstances workers may get promoted although in their new job they are expected to be less productive than in their old job. This can be interpreted as a version of the Peter Principle which states that workers get prom...

  7. Development of a Cell-penetrating Peptide that Exhibits Responsive Changes in its Secondary Structure in the Cellular Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Hiroko; Kato, Takuma; Oba, Makoto; Misawa, Takashi; Hattori, Takayuki; Ohoka, Nobumichi; Tanaka, Masakazu; Naito, Mikihiko; Kurihara, Masaaki; Demizu, Yosuke

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) are received a lot of attention as an intracellular delivery tool for hydrophilic molecules such as drugs, proteins, and DNAs. We designed and synthesized nona-arginine analogues 1–5 [FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg-l-Arg-l-Pro)3-(Gly)3-NH2 (1), FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg-l-Arg-l-ProNH2)3-(Gly)3-NH2 (2), FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg-l-Arg-l-ProGu)3-(Gly)3-NH2 (3), FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg)2-(l-ProGu)2-(l-Arg)4-l-ProGu-(Gly)3-NH2 (4), and FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg)6-(l-ProGu)3-(Gly)3-NH2 (5)] containing l-proline (l-Pro) or cationic proline derivatives (l-ProNH2 and l-ProGu), and investigated their cell-penetrating abilities. Interestingly, only peptide 3 having the side-chain guanidinyl l-ProGu exhibited a secondary structural change in cellular environment. Specifically, peptide 3 formed a random structure in hydrophilic conditions, whereas it formed a helical structure under amphipathic conditions. Furthermore, during cellular permeability tests, peptide 3 demonstrated greater cell-penetrating activity than other peptides and effectively transported plasmid DNA into HeLa cells. Thus, l-ProGu-containing peptide 3 may be a useful candidate as a gene delivery carrier. PMID:27609319

  8. Secondary school students' LLL competencies, and their relation with classroom structure and achievement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia eKlug

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a strong urge to foster lifelong learning (LLL competencies with its key components - motivation and self-regulated learning - from early on in the education system. School in general is presently not considered to be successful in systematically imparting motivation and self-regulated learning strategies. There is strong evidence that decisive motivational determinants decrease the longer students stay in school. At present, the central sources of information about the situation in Austria are international monitoring studies, which only examine selected aspects of specific target groups, and their interpretability concerning mean values is constricted due to cultural differences. Thus, it is important to conduct additional and more differentiated national surveys of the actual state. This is why this study aimed at answering the following questions: (1 how well are Austrian students equipped for the future, in terms of their lifelong learning competencies, (2 can perceived classroom structure predict students’ LLL, and (3 is there a correlation of students’ LLL with their achievement in the school subjects math and German language. 5366 students (52.1% female from Thirty-six Austrian schools took part in the online-questionnaire (mean age 15.35 years, SD=2.45, which measured their perceived LLL competencies in the subjects math and German language, their perceived classroom structure and their achievement. Results showed that the great majority of Austrian students – independent from domain and sex - know and are able to apply cognitive as well as metacognitive learning strategies. With regard to motivation the picture is less satisfactory: whilst students’ self-efficacy is not the problem, there is a lack of interest in the school subjects and they often report to follow performance approach goals. Classroom structure positively predicted students’ goals, interest, self-efficacy and learning strategies. Self

  9. Identification and classification of conserved RNA secondary structures in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Bejerano, Gill; Siepel, Adam

    2006-01-01

    for identifying functional RNAs encoded in the human genome and used it to survey an eight-way genome-wide alignment of the human, chimpanzee, mouse, rat, dog, chicken, zebra-fish, and puffer-fish genomes for deeply conserved functional RNAs. At a loose threshold for acceptance, this search resulted in a set...... of 48,479 candidate RNA structures. This screen finds a large number of known functional RNAs, including 195 miRNAs, 62 histone 3'UTR stem loops, and various types of known genetic recoding elements. Among the highest-scoring new predictions are 169 new miRNA candidates, as well as new candidate...

  10. Study of bioengineered zebra fish olfactory receptor 131-2: receptor purification and secondary structure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leck, Kwong-Joo; Zhang, Shuguang; Hauser, Charlotte A E

    2010-11-25

    How fishes are able to detect trace molecules in large bodies of water is not understood. It is plausible that they use olfactory receptors to detect water-soluble compounds. How the zebra fish Danio Rerio, an organism with only 98 functional olfactory receptors, is able to selectively detect and recognize numerous compounds in water remains a puzzling phenomenon. We are interested in studying the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of olfaction in fish. Here, we report on the study of a bioengineered zebra fish olfactory receptor OR131-2, affinity-purified from a HEK293S tetracycline-inducible system. This receptor was expressed and translocated to the cell plasma membrane as revealed by confocal microscopy. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that the purified zebra fish receptor folded into an α-helical structure, as observed for other G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Our study shows that it is possible to produce viable quantities of the zebra fish olfactory receptor. This will not only enable detailed structural and functional analyses, but also aid in the design of biosensor devices in order to detect water-soluble metabolites or its intermediates, which are associated with human health.

  11. Study of bioengineered zebra fish olfactory receptor 131-2: receptor purification and secondary structure analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwong-Joo Leck

    Full Text Available How fishes are able to detect trace molecules in large bodies of water is not understood. It is plausible that they use olfactory receptors to detect water-soluble compounds. How the zebra fish Danio Rerio, an organism with only 98 functional olfactory receptors, is able to selectively detect and recognize numerous compounds in water remains a puzzling phenomenon. We are interested in studying the biochemical and molecular mechanisms of olfaction in fish. Here, we report on the study of a bioengineered zebra fish olfactory receptor OR131-2, affinity-purified from a HEK293S tetracycline-inducible system. This receptor was expressed and translocated to the cell plasma membrane as revealed by confocal microscopy. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that the purified zebra fish receptor folded into an α-helical structure, as observed for other G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs. Our study shows that it is possible to produce viable quantities of the zebra fish olfactory receptor. This will not only enable detailed structural and functional analyses, but also aid in the design of biosensor devices in