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Sample records for assigning large proteins

  1. SAGA: rapid automatic mainchain NMR assignment for large proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crippen, Gordon M., E-mail: gcrippen@umich.ed [University of Michigan, College of Pharmacy (United States); Rousaki, Aikaterini [University of Michigan, LSA Biophysics (United States); Revington, Matthew [University of Windsor, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (Canada); Zhang Yongbo [Northwestern University, Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Cell Biology (United States); Zuiderweg, Erik R. P., E-mail: zuiderwe@umich.ed [University of Michigan Medical School, Department of Biological Chemistry (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Here we describe a new algorithm for automatically determining the mainchain sequential assignment of NMR spectra for proteins. Using only the customary triple resonance experiments, assignments can be quickly found for not only small proteins having rather complete data, but also for large proteins, even when only half the residues can be assigned. The result of the calculation is not the single best assignment according to some criterion, but rather a large number of satisfactory assignments that are summarized in such a way as to help the user identify portions of the sequence that are assigned with confidence, vs. other portions where the assignment has some correlated alternatives. Thus very imperfect initial data can be used to suggest future experiments.

  2. HN(CA)N and HN(COCA)N experiments for assignment of large disordered proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiao; Yang, Daiwen, E-mail: dbsydw@nus.edu.sg [National University of Singapore, Department of Biological Sciences (Singapore)

    2013-10-15

    Two new 3D HN-based experiments are proposed for backbone assignment of large disordered proteins. The spectra obtained with the new pulse schemes are free of redundant diagonal peaks (H{sub i}N{sub i}-N{sub i}) and provide sequential correlations (H{sub i}N{sub i}-N{sub i+1} and H{sub i}N{sub i}-N{sub i-1}) not only between adjacent non-proline residues but also between non-proline and proline residues. The experiments have been demonstrated on an intrinsically disordered protein with 306 amino acids including 64 proline residues. Using the two experiments, we obtained nearly complete assignments of backbone amides and proline {sup 15}N spins except for 4 proline and 4 non-proline residues.

  3. Fast and accurate resonance assignment of small-to-large proteins by combining automated and manual approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Niklasson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The process of resonance assignment is fundamental to most NMR studies of protein structure and dynamics. Unfortunately, the manual assignment of residues is tedious and time-consuming, and can represent a significant bottleneck for further characterization. Furthermore, while automated approaches have been developed, they are often limited in their accuracy, particularly for larger proteins. Here, we address this by introducing the software COMPASS, which, by combining automated resonance assignment with manual intervention, is able to achieve accuracy approaching that from manual assignments at greatly accelerated speeds. Moreover, by including the option to compensate for isotope shift effects in deuterated proteins, COMPASS is far more accurate for larger proteins than existing automated methods. COMPASS is an open-source project licensed under GNU General Public License and is available for download from http://www.liu.se/forskning/foass/tidigare-foass/patrik-lundstrom/software?l=en. Source code and binaries for Linux, Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows are available.

  4. Fast and accurate resonance assignment of small-to-large proteins by combining automated and manual approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklasson, Markus; Ahlner, Alexandra; Andresen, Cecilia; Marsh, Joseph A; Lundström, Patrik

    2015-01-01

    The process of resonance assignment is fundamental to most NMR studies of protein structure and dynamics. Unfortunately, the manual assignment of residues is tedious and time-consuming, and can represent a significant bottleneck for further characterization. Furthermore, while automated approaches have been developed, they are often limited in their accuracy, particularly for larger proteins. Here, we address this by introducing the software COMPASS, which, by combining automated resonance assignment with manual intervention, is able to achieve accuracy approaching that from manual assignments at greatly accelerated speeds. Moreover, by including the option to compensate for isotope shift effects in deuterated proteins, COMPASS is far more accurate for larger proteins than existing automated methods. COMPASS is an open-source project licensed under GNU General Public License and is available for download from http://www.liu.se/forskning/foass/tidigare-foass/patrik-lundstrom/software?l=en. Source code and binaries for Linux, Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows are available.

  5. Five and four dimensional experiments for robust backbone resonance assignment of large intrinsically disordered proteins: application to Tau3x protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Żerko, Szymon; Byrski, Piotr; Włodarczyk-Pruszyński, Paweł; Górka, Michał [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry, Biological and Chemical Research Centre (Poland); Ledolter, Karin [University of Vienna, Department of Computational and Structural Biology, Max F. Perutz Laboratories (Austria); Masliah, Eliezer [University of California, San Diego, Departments of Neuroscience and Pathology (United States); Konrat, Robert [University of Vienna, Department of Computational and Structural Biology, Max F. Perutz Laboratories (Austria); Koźmiński, Wiktor, E-mail: kozmin@chem.uw.edu.pl [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry, Biological and Chemical Research Centre (Poland)

    2016-08-15

    New experiments dedicated for large IDPs backbone resonance assignment are presented. The most distinctive feature of all described techniques is the employment of MOCCA-XY16 mixing sequences to obtain effective magnetization transfers between carbonyl carbon backbone nuclei. The proposed 4 and 5 dimensional experiments provide a high dispersion of obtained signals making them suitable for use in the case of large IDPs (application to 354 a. a. residues of Tau protein 3x isoform is presented) as well as provide both forward and backward connectivities. What is more, connecting short chains interrupted with proline residues is also possible. All the experiments employ non-uniform sampling.

  6. Efficient protocol for backbone and side-chain assignments of large, intrinsically disordered proteins: transient secondary structure analysis of 49.2 kDa microtubule associated protein 2c

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    Novacek, Jiri; Janda, Lubomir; Dopitova, Radka; Zidek, Lukas, E-mail: lzidek@chemi.muni.cz; Sklenar, Vladimir [Masaryk University, Faculty of Science, NCBR, and CEITEC (Czech Republic)

    2013-08-15

    Microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) are abundantly present in axons and dendrites, and have been shown to play crucial role during the neuronal morphogenesis. The period of main dendritic outgrowth and synaptogenesis coincides with high expression levels of one of MAPs, the MAP2c, in rats. The MAP2c is a 49.2 kDa intrinsically disordered protein. To achieve an atomic resolution characterization of such a large protein, we have developed a protocol based on the acquisition of two five-dimensional {sup 13}C-directly detected NMR experiments. Our previously published 5D CACONCACO experiment (Novacek et al. in J Biomol NMR 50(1):1-11, 2011) provides the sequential assignment of the backbone resonances, which is not interrupted by the presence of the proline residues in the amino acid sequence. A novel 5D HC(CC-TOCSY)CACON experiment facilitates the assignment of the aliphatic side chain resonances. To streamline the data analysis, we have developed a semi-automated procedure for signal assignments. The obtained data provides the first atomic resolution insight into the conformational state of MAP2c and constitutes a model for further functional studies of MAPs.

  7. NMR assignments of sparsely labeled proteins using a genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qi; Chalmers, Gordon R; Moremen, Kelley W; Prestegard, James H

    2017-04-01

    Sparse isotopic labeling of proteins for NMR studies using single types of amino acid ((15)N or (13)C enriched) has several advantages. Resolution is enhanced by reducing numbers of resonances for large proteins, and isotopic labeling becomes economically feasible for glycoproteins that must be expressed in mammalian cells. However, without access to the traditional triple resonance strategies that require uniform isotopic labeling, NMR assignment of crosspeaks in heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) spectra is challenging. We present an alternative strategy which combines readily accessible NMR data with known protein domain structures. Based on the structures, chemical shifts are predicted, NOE cross-peak lists are generated, and residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) are calculated for each labeled site. Simulated data are then compared to measured values for a trial set of assignments and scored. A genetic algorithm uses the scores to search for an optimal pairing of HSQC crosspeaks with labeled sites. While none of the individual data types can give a definitive assignment for a particular site, their combination can in most cases. Four test proteins previously assigned using triple resonance methods and a sparsely labeled glycosylated protein, Robo1, previously assigned by manual analysis, are used to validate the method and develop a criterion for identifying sites assigned with high confidence.

  8. Protein Side-Chain Resonance Assignment and NOE Assignment Using RDC-Defined Backbones without TOCSY Data3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jianyang; Zhou, Pei; Donald, Bruce Randall

    2011-01-01

    One bottleneck in NMR structure determination lies in the laborious and time-consuming process of side-chain resonance and NOE assignments. Compared to the well-studied backbone resonance assignment problem, automated side-chain resonance and NOE assignments are relatively less explored. Most NOE assignment algorithms require nearly complete side-chain resonance assignments from a series of through-bond experiments such as HCCH-TOCSY or HCCCONH. Unfortunately, these TOCSY experiments perform poorly on large proteins. To overcome this deficiency, we present a novel algorithm, called NASCA (NOE Assignment and Side-Chain Assignment), to automate both side-chain resonance and NOE assignments and to perform high-resolution protein structure determination in the absence of any explicit through-bond experiment to facilitate side-chain resonance assignment, such as HCCH-TOCSY. After casting the assignment problem into a Markov Random Field (MRF), NASCA extends and applies combinatorial protein design algorithms to compute optimal assignments that best interpret the NMR data. The MRF captures the contact map information of the protein derived from NOESY spectra, exploits the backbone structural information determined by RDCs, and considers all possible side-chain rotamers. The complexity of the combinatorial search is reduced by using a dead-end elimination (DEE) algorithm, which prunes side-chain resonance assignments that are provably not part of the optimal solution. Then an A* search algorithm is employed to find a set of optimal side-chain resonance assignments that best fit the NMR data. These side-chain resonance assignments are then used to resolve the NOE assignment ambiguity and compute high-resolution protein structures. Tests on five proteins show that NASCA assigns resonances for more than 90% of side-chain protons, and achieves about 80% correct assignments. The final structures computed using the NOE distance restraints assigned by NASCA have backbone RMSD 0

  9. Protein secondary structure: category assignment and predictability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Claus A.; Bohr, Henrik; Brunak, Søren

    2001-01-01

    structures. Single sequence prediction of the new three category assignment gives an overall prediction improvement of 3.1% and 5.1%, compared to the DSSP assignment and schemes where the helix category consists of a-helix and 3(10)-helix, respectively. These results were achieved using a standard feed-forward...

  10. Protein secondary structure assignment revisited: a detailed analysis of different assignment methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Brevern Alexandre G

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of methods are now available to perform automatic assignment of periodic secondary structures from atomic coordinates, based on different characteristics of the secondary structures. In general these methods exhibit a broad consensus as to the location of most helix and strand core segments in protein structures. However the termini of the segments are often ill-defined and it is difficult to decide unambiguously which residues at the edge of the segments have to be included. In addition, there is a "twilight zone" where secondary structure segments depart significantly from the idealized models of Pauling and Corey. For these segments, one has to decide whether the observed structural variations are merely distorsions or whether they constitute a break in the secondary structure. Methods To address these problems, we have developed a method for secondary structure assignment, called KAKSI. Assignments made by KAKSI are compared with assignments given by DSSP, STRIDE, XTLSSTR, PSEA and SECSTR, as well as secondary structures found in PDB files, on 4 datasets (X-ray structures with different resolution range, NMR structures. Results A detailed comparison of KAKSI assignments with those of STRIDE and PSEA reveals that KAKSI assigns slightly longer helices and strands than STRIDE in case of one-to-one correspondence between the segments. However, KAKSI tends also to favor the assignment of several short helices when STRIDE and PSEA assign longer, kinked, helices. Helices assigned by KAKSI have geometrical characteristics close to those described in the PDB. They are more linear than helices assigned by other methods. The same tendency to split long segments is observed for strands, although less systematically. We present a number of cases of secondary structure assignments that illustrate this behavior. Conclusion Our method provides valuable assignments which favor the regularity of secondary structure segments.

  11. Graphical interpretation of Boolean operators for protein NMR assignments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdegem, Dries; Dijkstra, Klaas; Hanoulle, Xavier; Lippens, Guy

    We have developed a graphics based algorithm for semi-automated protein NMR assignments. Using the basic sequential triple resonance assignment strategy, the method is inspired by the Boolean operators as it applies "AND"-, "OR"- and "NOT"-like operations on planes pulled out of the classical

  12. Traffic assignment models in large-scale applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Kjær

    focuses on large-scale applications and contributes with methods to actualise the true potential of disaggregate models. To achieve this target, contributions are given to several components of traffic assignment modelling, by (i) enabling the utilisation of the increasingly available data sources...... on individual behaviour in the model specification, (ii) proposing a method to use disaggregate Revealed Preference (RP) data to estimate utility functions and provide evidence on the value of congestion and the value of reliability, (iii) providing a method to account for individual mis...... is essential in the development and validation of realistic models for large-scale applications. Nowadays, modern technology facilitates easy access to RP data and allows large-scale surveys. The resulting datasets are, however, usually very large and hence data processing is necessary to extract the pieces...

  13. Practical aspects of NMR signal assignment in larger and challenging proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frueh, Dominique P.

    2014-01-01

    NMR has matured into a technique routinely employed for studying proteins in near physiological conditions. However, applications to larger proteins are impeded by the complexity of the various correlation maps necessary to assign NMR signals. This article reviews the data analysis techniques traditionally employed for resonance assignment and describes alternative protocols necessary for overcoming challenges in large protein spectra. In particular, simultaneous analysis of multiple spectra may help overcome ambiguities or may reveal correlations in an indirect manner. Similarly, visualization of orthogonal planes in a multidimensional spectrum can provide alternative assignment procedures. We describe examples of such strategies for assignment of backbone, methyl, and nOe resonances. We describe experimental aspects of data acquisition for the related experiments and provide guidelines for preliminary studies. Focus is placed on large folded monomeric proteins and examples are provided for 37, 48, 53, and 81 kDa proteins. PMID:24534088

  14. A tracked approach for automated NMR assignments in proteins (TATAPRO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atreya, H.S.; Sahu, S.C.; Chary, K.V.R.; Govil, Girjesh [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Department of Chemical Sciences (India)

    2000-06-15

    A novel automated approach for the sequence specific NMR assignments of {sup 1}H{sup N}, {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}, {sup 13}C{sup {beta}}, {sup 13}C'/{sup 1}H{sup {alpha}} and {sup 15}N spins in proteins, using triple resonance experimental data, is presented. The algorithm, TATAPRO (Tracked AuTomated Assignments in Proteins) utilizes the protein primary sequence and peak lists from a set of triple resonance spectra which correlate {sup 1}H{sup N} and {sup 15}N chemical shifts with those of {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}, {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} and {sup 13}C'/{sup 1}H{sup {alpha}}. The information derived from such correlations is used to create a 'master{sub l}ist' consisting of all possible sets of {sup 1}H{sup N}{sub i}, {sup 15}N{sub i}, {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}{sub i}, {sup 13}C{sup {beta}}{sub i}, {sup 13}C'{sub i}/{sup 1}H{sup {alpha}}{sub i}, {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}{sub i-1}, {sup 13}C{sup {beta}}{sub i-1} and {sup 13}C'{sub i-1}/ {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}}{sub i-1} chemical shifts. On the basis of an extensive statistical analysis of {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}} and {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} chemical shift data of proteins derived from the BioMagResBank (BMRB), it is shown that the 20 amino acid residues can be grouped into eight distinct categories, each of which is assigned a unique two-digit code. Such a code is used to tag individual sets of chemical shifts in the master{sub l}ist and also to translate the protein primary sequence into an array called pps{sub a}rray. The program then uses the master{sub l}ist to search for neighbouring partners of a given amino acid residue along the polypeptide chain and sequentially assigns a maximum possible stretch of residues on either side. While doing so, each assigned residue is tracked in an array called assig{sub a}rray, with the two-digit code assigned earlier. The assig{sub a}rray is then mapped onto the pps{sub a}rray for sequence specific resonance assignment. The program has been tested using

  15. Stereospecific assignment of the asparagine and glutamine sidechain amide protons in proteins from chemical shift analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harsch, Tobias; Schneider, Philipp; Kieninger, Bärbel; Donaubauer, Harald; Kalbitzer, Hans Robert, E-mail: hans-robert.kalbitzer@biologie.uni-regensburg.de [University of Regensburg, Institute of Biophysics and Physical Biochemistry and Centre of Magnetic Resonance in Chemistry and Biomedicine (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    Side chain amide protons of asparagine and glutamine residues in random-coil peptides are characterized by large chemical shift differences and can be stereospecifically assigned on the basis of their chemical shift values only. The bimodal chemical shift distributions stored in the biological magnetic resonance data bank (BMRB) do not allow such an assignment. However, an analysis of the BMRB shows, that a substantial part of all stored stereospecific assignments is not correct. We show here that in most cases stereospecific assignment can also be done for folded proteins using an unbiased artificial chemical shift data base (UACSB). For a separation of the chemical shifts of the two amide resonance lines with differences ≥0.40 ppm for asparagine and differences ≥0.42 ppm for glutamine, the downfield shifted resonance lines can be assigned to H{sup δ21} and H{sup ε21}, respectively, at a confidence level >95%. A classifier derived from UASCB can also be used to correct the BMRB data. The program tool AssignmentChecker implemented in AUREMOL calculates the Bayesian probability for a given stereospecific assignment and automatically corrects the assignments for a given list of chemical shifts.

  16. Solving Large Quadratic|Assignment Problems in Parallel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Jens; Perregaard, Michael

    1997-01-01

    searched. Much work has been done to identify such functions for the QAP, but with limited success.Parallel processing has also been used in order to increase the size of problems solvable to optimality. The systems used have, however, often been systems with relatively few, but very powerful vector...... and recalculation of bounds between branchings when used in a parallel Branch-and-Bound algorithm. The algorithm has been implemented on a 16-processor MEIKO Computing Surface with Intel i860 processors. Computational results from the solution of a number of large QAPs, including the classical Nugent 20...

  17. Organic Chemistry YouTube Writing Assignment for Large Lecture Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Annaliese K.

    2012-01-01

    This work describes efforts to incorporate and evaluate the use of a YouTube writing assignment in large lecture classes to personalize learning and improve conceptual understanding of chemistry through peer- and self-explanation strategies. Although writing assignments can be a method to incorporate peer- and self-explanation strategies, this…

  18. Automated probabilistic method for assigning backbone resonances of (13C,15N)-labeled proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukin, Jonathan A. [Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Biological Sciences (United States); Gove, Andrew P.; Talukdar, Sarosh N. [Carnegie Mellon University, Robotics Institute (United States); Ho Chien [Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Biological Sciences (United States)

    1997-02-15

    We present a computer algorithm for the automated assignment of polypeptide backbone and 13C{beta} resonances of a protein of known primary sequence. Input to the algorithm consists of cross peaks from several 3D NMR experiments: HNCA, HN(CA)CO, HN(CA)HA,HNCACB, COCAH, HCA(CO)N, HNCO, HN(CO)CA, HN(COCA)HA, and CBCA(CO)NH. Data from these experiments performed on glutamine-binding protein are analyzed statistically using Bayes' theorem to yield objective probability scoring functions for matching chemical shifts. Such scoring is used in the first stage of the algorithm to combine cross peaks from the first five experiments to form intraresidue segments of chemical shifts{l_brace}Ni,HiN,Ci{alpha},Ci{beta},C'i{r_brace}, while the latter five are combined into interresidue segments {l_brace}Ci{alpha},Ci{beta},C'i,Ni+1,HNi+1{r_brace}. Given a tentative assignment of segments,the second stage of the procedure calculates probability scores based on the likelihood of matching the chemical shifts of each segment with (i) overlapping segments; and (ii) chemical shift distributions of the underlying amino acid type (and secondary structure, if known). This joint probability is maximized by rearranging segments using a simulated annealing program,optimized for efficiency. The automated assignment program was tested using CBCANH and CBCA(CO)NH cross peaks of the two previously assigned proteins, calmodulin and CheA.The agreement between the results of our method and the published assignments was excellent. Our algorithm was also applied to the observed cross peaks of glutamine-binding protein of Escherichia coli, yielding an assignment in excellent agreement with that obtained by time-consuming, manual methods. The chemical shift assignment procedure described here should be most useful for NMR studies of large proteins, which are now feasible with the use of pulsed-field gradients and random partial deuteration of samples.

  19. Increasing Independent Seatwork: Breaking Large Assignments into Smaller Assignments and Teaching a Student with Retardation to Recruit Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Monica A.; Cox, Elizabeth A.; Skinner, Christopher H.

    2003-01-01

    A withdrawal design was used to evaluate the effects of a multicomponent intervention on independent seatwork and student-teacher interactions in a student with mild mental retardation. During the intervention phase, long assignments were changed to multiple, briefer assignments. After completing each brief assignment, the student recruited social…

  20. Side chain NMR assignments in the membrane protein OmpX reconstituted in DHPC micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilty, Christian; Fernández, César; Wider, Gerhard; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2002-08-01

    Sequence-specific assignments have been obtained for side chain methyl resonances of Val, Leu and Ile in the outer membrane protein X (OmpX) from Escherichia coli reconstituted in 60 kDa micelles in aqueous solution. Using previously established techniques, OmpX was uniformly 2H,13C,15N-labeled with selectively protonated Val-gamma(1,2), Leu-delta(1,2) and Ile-delta1 methyl groups. The thus labeled protein was studied with the novel experiments 3D (H)C(CC)-TOCSY-(CO)-[15N,1H]-TROSY and 3D H(C)(CC)-TOCSY-(CO)-[15N,1H]-TROSY. Compared to the corresponding conventional experimental schemes, the TROSY-type experiments yielded a sensitivity gain of about 2 at 500 MHz. The overall sensitivity of the experiments was further enhanced more than two-fold by the use of a cryoprobe. Complete assignments of the proton and carbon chemical shifts were obtained for all isopropyl methyl groups of Val and Leu, as well as for the delta1-methyls of Ile. The present approach is applicable for soluble proteins or micelle-reconstituted membrane proteins in structures with overall molecular weights up to about 100 kDa, and adds to the potentialities of solution NMR for de novo structure determination as well as for functional studies, such as ligand screening with proteins in large structures.

  1. Efficient eigenvalue assignment by state and output feedback with applications for large space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannell, Eric C.; Kenny, Sean P.; Maghami, Peiman G.

    1995-03-01

    The erection and deployment of large flexible structures having thousands of degrees of freedom requires controllers based on new techniques of eigenvalue assignment that are computationally stable and more efficient. Scientists at NASA Langley Research Center have developed a novel and efficient algorithm for the eigenvalue assignment of large, time-invariant systems using full-state and output feedback. The objectives of this research were to improve upon the output feedback version of this algorithm, to produce a toolbox of MATLAB functions based on the efficient eigenvalue assignment algorithm, and to experimentally verify the algorithm and software by implementing controllers designed using the MATLAB toolbox on the phase 2 configuration of NASA Langley's controls-structures interaction evolutionary model, a laboratory model used to study space structures. Results from laboratory tests and computer simulations show that effective controllers can be designed using software based on the efficient eigenvalue assignment algorithm.

  2. Genetic assignment of large seizures of elephant ivory reveals Africa’s major poaching hotspots

    OpenAIRE

    Wasser, S. K.; Brown, L.; Mailand, C.; Mondol, S.; Clark, W.; Laurie, C.; Weir, B. S.

    2015-01-01

    Poaching of elephants is now occurring at rates that threaten African populations with extinction. Identifying the number and location of Africa’s major poaching hotspots may assist efforts to end poaching and facilitate recovery of elephant populations. We genetically assign origin to 28 large ivory seizures (≥0.5 metric tons) made between 1996 and 2014, also testing assignment accuracy. Results suggest that the major poaching hotspots in Africa may be currently concentrated in as few as two...

  3. NMR resonance assignment of selectively labeled proteins by the use of paramagnetic ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutting, Brian; Strauss, Andre; Fendrich, Gabriele; Manley, Paul W.; Jahnke, Wolfgang [Novartis Institutes of Biomedical Research (Switzerland)], E-mail: wolfgang.jahnke@pharma.novartis.com

    2004-10-15

    Selective isotopic labeling of larger proteins greatly simplifies protein NMR spectra and reduces signal overlap, but selectively labeled proteins cannot be easily assigned since the sequential assignment method is not applicable. Here we describe a strategy for resonance assignment in selectively labeled proteins. Our approach involves a spin-labeled analog of a ligand of which the three-dimensional structure in complex with the target protein is known. Other methods for introduction of the spin label are possible. The paramagnetic center causes faster relaxation of all neighboring nuclei in a distance-dependent manner. Measurement of this effect allows to deduce distances between isotopically labeled residues and the paramagnetic center which can be used for resonance assignment. The method is demonstrated for the catalytic domain of Abl kinase in complex with the inhibitor, STI571.

  4. Side chain NMR assignments in the membrane protein OmpX reconstituted in DHPC micelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilty, Christian; Fernandez, Cesar; Wider, Gerhard; Wuethrich, Kurt [Institut fuer Molekularbiologie und Biophysik, Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule Zuerich (Switzerland)], E-mail: wuthrich@mol.biol.ethz.ch

    2002-08-15

    Sequence-specific assignments have been obtained for side chain methyl resonances of Val, Leu and Ile in the outer membrane protein X (OmpX) from Escherichia colireconstituted in 60 kDa micelles in aqueous solution. Using previously established techniques, OmpX was uniformly {sup 2}H,{sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-labeled with selectively protonated Val-{gamma}{sup 1,2}, Leu-{delta}{sup 1,2}and Ile-{delta}{sup 1}methyl groups. The thus labeled protein was studied with the novel experiments 3D (H)C(CC)-TOCSY-(CO)-[{sup 15}N,{sup 1}H]-TROSY and 3D H(C)(CC)-TOCSY-(CO)-[{sup 15}N,{sup 1}H]-TROSY. Compared to the corresponding conventional experimental schemes, the TROSY-type experiments yielded a sensitivity gain of about 2 at 500 MHz. The overall sensitivity of the experiments was further enhanced more than two-fold by the use of a cryoprobe. Complete assignments of the proton and carbon chemical shifts were obtained for all isopropyl methyl groups of Val and Leu, as well as for the {delta}{sup 1}-methyls of Ile. The present approach is applicable for soluble proteins or micelle-reconstituted membrane proteins in structures with overall molecular weights up to about 100 kDa, and adds to the potentialities of solution NMR for de novostructure determination as well as for functional studies, such as ligand screening with proteins in large structures.

  5. A Temporal Domain Decomposition Algorithmic Scheme for Large-Scale Dynamic Traffic Assignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J. Nava

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents a temporal decomposition scheme for large spatial- and temporal-scale dynamic traffic assignment, in which the entire analysis period is divided into Epochs. Vehicle assignment is performed sequentially in each Epoch, thus improving the model scalability and confining the peak run-time memory requirement regardless of the total analysis period. A proposed self-turning scheme adaptively searches for the run-time-optimal Epoch setting during iterations regardless of the characteristics of the modeled network. Extensive numerical experiments confirm the promising performance of the proposed algorithmic schemes.

  6. CONSERVATION. Genetic assignment of large seizures of elephant ivory reveals Africa's major poaching hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasser, S K; Brown, L; Mailand, C; Mondol, S; Clark, W; Laurie, C; Weir, B S

    2015-07-03

    Poaching of elephants is now occurring at rates that threaten African populations with extinction. Identifying the number and location of Africa's major poaching hotspots may assist efforts to end poaching and facilitate recovery of elephant populations. We genetically assign origin to 28 large ivory seizures (≥0.5 metric tons) made between 1996 and 2014, also testing assignment accuracy. Results suggest that the major poaching hotspots in Africa may be currently concentrated in as few as two areas. Increasing law enforcement in these two hotspots could help curtail future elephant losses across Africa and disrupt this organized transnational crime. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  7. Resonance assignment of the NMR spectra of disordered proteins using a multi-objective non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yu; Fritzsching, Keith J.; Hong, Mei, E-mail: mhong@iastate.edu [Iowa State University, Department of Chemistry (United States)

    2013-10-17

    A multi-objective genetic algorithm is introduced to predict the assignment of protein solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectra with partial resonance overlap and missing peaks due to broad linewidths, molecular motion, and low sensitivity. This non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II (NSGA-II) aims to identify all possible assignments that are consistent with the spectra and to compare the relative merit of these assignments. Our approach is modeled after the recently introduced Monte-Carlo simulated-annealing (MC/SA) protocol, with the key difference that NSGA-II simultaneously optimizes multiple assignment objectives instead of searching for possible assignments based on a single composite score. The multiple objectives include maximizing the number of consistently assigned peaks between multiple spectra (“good connections”), maximizing the number of used peaks, minimizing the number of inconsistently assigned peaks between spectra (“bad connections”), and minimizing the number of assigned peaks that have no matching peaks in the other spectra (“edges”). Using six SSNMR protein chemical shift datasets with varying levels of imperfection that was introduced by peak deletion, random chemical shift changes, and manual peak picking of spectra with moderately broad linewidths, we show that the NSGA-II algorithm produces a large number of valid and good assignments rapidly. For high-quality chemical shift peak lists, NSGA-II and MC/SA perform similarly well. However, when the peak lists contain many missing peaks that are uncorrelated between different spectra and have chemical shift deviations between spectra, the modified NSGA-II produces a larger number of valid solutions than MC/SA, and is more effective at distinguishing good from mediocre assignments by avoiding the hazard of suboptimal weighting factors for the various objectives. These two advantages, namely diversity and better evaluation, lead to a higher probability of predicting the correct

  8. Coming to Grips with Ambiguity: Ion Mobility-Mass Spectrometry for Protein Quaternary Structure Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschweiler, Joseph D.; Frank, Aaron T.; Ruotolo, Brandon T.

    2017-10-01

    Multiprotein complexes are central to our understanding of cellular biology, as they play critical roles in nearly every biological process. Despite many impressive advances associated with structural characterization techniques, large and highly-dynamic protein complexes are too often refractory to analysis by conventional, high-resolution approaches. To fill this gap, ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) methods have emerged as a promising approach for characterizing the structures of challenging assemblies due in large part to the ability of these methods to characterize the composition, connectivity, and topology of large, labile complexes. In this Critical Insight, we present a series of bioinformatics studies aimed at assessing the information content of IM-MS datasets for building models of multiprotein structure. Our computational data highlights the limits of current coarse-graining approaches, and compelled us to develop an improved workflow for multiprotein topology modeling, which we benchmark against a subset of the multiprotein complexes within the PDB. This improved workflow has allowed us to ascertain both the minimal experimental restraint sets required for generation of high-confidence multiprotein topologies, and quantify the ambiguity in models where insufficient IM-MS information is available. We conclude by projecting the future of IM-MS in the context of protein quaternary structure assignment, where we predict that a more complete knowledge of the ultimate information content and ambiguity within such models will undoubtedly lead to applications for a broader array of challenging biomolecular assemblies. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Reliability of exclusively NOESY-based automated resonance assignment and structure determination of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Elena; Güntert, Peter

    2013-10-01

    Protein structure determination by NMR can in principle be speeded up both by reducing the measurement time on the NMR spectrometer and by a more efficient analysis of the spectra. Here we study the reliability of protein structure determination based on a single type of spectra, namely nuclear Overhauser effect spectroscopy (NOESY), using a fully automated procedure for the sequence-specific resonance assignment with the recently introduced FLYA algorithm, followed by combined automated NOE distance restraint assignment and structure calculation with CYANA. This NOESY-FLYA method was applied to eight proteins with 63-160 residues for which resonance assignments and solution structures had previously been determined by the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium (NESG), and unrefined and refined NOESY data sets have been made available for the Critical Assessment of Automated Structure Determination of Proteins by NMR project. Using only peak lists from three-dimensional (13)C- or (15)N-resolved NOESY spectra as input, the FLYA algorithm yielded for the eight proteins 91-98 % correct backbone and side-chain assignments if manually refined peak lists are used, and 64-96 % correct assignments based on raw peak lists. Subsequent structure calculations with CYANA then produced structures with root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) values to the manually determined reference structures of 0.8-2.0 Å if refined peak lists are used. With raw peak lists, calculations for 4 proteins converged resulting in RMSDs to the reference structure of 0.8-2.8 Å, whereas no convergence was obtained for the four other proteins (two of which did already not converge with the correct manual resonance assignments given as input). These results show that, given high-quality experimental NOESY peak lists, the chemical shift assignments can be uncovered, without any recourse to traditional through-bond type assignment experiments, to an extent that is sufficient for calculating accurate three

  10. Automated solid-state NMR resonance assignment of protein microcrystals and amyloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Elena [Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance, Institute of Biophysical Chemistry (Germany); Gath, Julia [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Habenstein, Birgit [UMR 5086 CNRS/Universite de Lyon 1, Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Proteines (France); Ravotti, Francesco; Szekely, Kathrin; Huber, Matthias [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Buchner, Lena [Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance, Institute of Biophysical Chemistry (Germany); Boeckmann, Anja, E-mail: a.bockmann@ibcp.fr [UMR 5086 CNRS/Universite de Lyon 1, Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Proteines (France); Meier, Beat H., E-mail: beme@ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Guentert, Peter, E-mail: guentert@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Goethe University Frankfurt am Main, Center for Biomolecular Magnetic Resonance, Institute of Biophysical Chemistry (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Solid-state NMR is an emerging structure determination technique for crystalline and non-crystalline protein assemblies, e.g., amyloids. Resonance assignment constitutes the first and often very time-consuming step to a structure. We present ssFLYA, a generally applicable algorithm for automatic assignment of protein solid-state NMR spectra. Application to microcrystals of ubiquitin and the Ure2 prion C-terminal domain, as well as amyloids of HET-s(218-289) and {alpha}-synuclein yielded 88-97 % correctness for the backbone and side-chain assignments that are classified as self-consistent by the algorithm, and 77-90 % correctness if also assignments classified as tentative by the algorithm are included.

  11. Automated sequence-specific protein NMR assignment using the memetic algorithm MATCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volk, Jochen [ETH Zuerich, Institut fuer Molekularbiologie und Biophysik (Switzerland); Herrmann, Torsten [Universite de Lyon, CNRS/ENS Lyon/UCB-Lyon 1 (France); Wuethrich, Kurt [ETH Zuerich, Institut fuer Molekularbiologie und Biophysik (Switzerland)], E-mail: wuthrich@mol.biol.ethz.ch

    2008-07-15

    MATCH (Memetic Algorithm and Combinatorial Optimization Heuristics) is a new memetic algorithm for automated sequence-specific polypeptide backbone NMR assignment of proteins. MATCH employs local optimization for tracing partial sequence-specific assignments within a global, population-based search environment, where the simultaneous application of local and global optimization heuristics guarantees high efficiency and robustness. MATCH thus makes combined use of the two predominant concepts in use for automated NMR assignment of proteins. Dynamic transition and inherent mutation are new techniques that enable automatic adaptation to variable quality of the experimental input data. The concept of dynamic transition is incorporated in all major building blocks of the algorithm, where it enables switching between local and global optimization heuristics at any time during the assignment process. Inherent mutation restricts the intrinsically required randomness of the evolutionary algorithm to those regions of the conformation space that are compatible with the experimental input data. Using intact and artificially deteriorated APSY-NMR input data of proteins, MATCH performed sequence-specific resonance assignment with high efficiency and robustness.

  12. Toward efficient task assignment and motion planning for large-scale underwater missions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somaiyeh MahmoudZadeh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available An autonomous underwater vehicle needs to possess a certain degree of autonomy for any particular underwater mission to fulfil the mission objectives successfully and ensure its safety in all stages of the mission in a large-scale operating field. In this article, a novel combinatorial conflict-free task assignment strategy, consisting of an interactive engagement of a local path planner and an adaptive global route planner, is introduced. The method takes advantage of the heuristic search potency of the particle swarm optimization algorithm to address the discrete nature of routing-task assignment approach and the complexity of nondeterministic polynomial-time-hard path planning problem. The proposed hybrid method is highly efficient as a consequence of its reactive guidance framework that guarantees successful completion of missions particularly in cluttered environments. To examine the performance of the method in a context of mission productivity, mission time management, and vehicle safety, a series of simulation studies are undertaken. The results of simulations declare that the proposed method is reliable and robust, particularly in dealing with uncertainties, and it can significantly enhance the level of a vehicle’s autonomy by relying on its reactive nature and capability of providing fast feasible solutions.

  13. Using Computer-Based Writing Software to Facilitate Writing Assignments in Large Political Science Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiyama, John; Watson, Wendy L.

    2014-01-01

    It is generally accepted in the literature that writing assignments, even short ones, increase both student writing ability and comprehension of the material covered in the assignments. As class enrollments increase, particularly at the introductory level, however, instructors often sacrifice writing assignments because of the difficulty in…

  14. Fast automated protein NMR data collection and assignment by ADAPT-NMR on Bruker spectrometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woonghee; Hu, Kaifeng; Tonelli, Marco; Bahrami, Arash; Neuhardt, Elizabeth; Glass, Karen C.; Markley, John L.

    2013-11-01

    ADAPT-NMR (Assignment-directed Data collection Algorithm utilizing a Probabilistic Toolkit in NMR) supports automated NMR data collection and backbone and side chain assignment for [U-13C, U-15N]-labeled proteins. Given the sequence of the protein and data for the orthogonal 2D 1H-15N and 1H-13C planes, the algorithm automatically directs the collection of tilted plane data from a variety of triple-resonance experiments so as to follow an efficient pathway toward the probabilistic assignment of 1H, 13C, and 15N signals to specific atoms in the covalent structure of the protein. Data collection and assignment calculations continue until the addition of new data no longer improves the assignment score. ADAPT-NMR was first implemented on Varian (Agilent) spectrometers [A. Bahrami, M. Tonelli, S.C. Sahu, K.K. Singarapu, H.R. Eghbalnia, J.L. Markley, PLoS One 7 (2012) e33173]. Because of broader interest in the approach, we present here a version of ADAPT-NMR for Bruker spectrometers. We have developed two AU console programs (ADAPT_ORTHO_run and ADAPT_NMR_run) that run under TOPSPIN Versions 3.0 and higher. To illustrate the performance of the algorithm on a Bruker spectrometer, we tested one protein, chlorella ubiquitin (76 amino acid residues), that had been used with the Varian version: the Bruker and Varian versions achieved the same level of assignment completeness (98% in 20 h). As a more rigorous evaluation of the Bruker version, we tested a larger protein, BRPF1 bromodomain (114 amino acid residues), which yielded an automated assignment completeness of 86% in 55 h. Both experiments were carried out on a 500 MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer equipped with a z-gradient 5 mm TCI probe. ADAPT-NMR is available at http://pine.nmrfam.wisc.edu/ADAPT-NMR in the form of pulse programs, the two AU programs, and instructions for installation and use.

  15. Complete NMR Assignment of Succinimide and Its Detection and Quantification in Peptides and Intact Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Luigi; Regl, Christof; Wildner, Sabrina; Gadermaier, Gabriele; Huber, Christian G; Cabrele, Chiara; Schubert, Mario

    2017-11-21

    Detecting and quantifying post-translational modifications (PTMs) in full-length proteins is a challenge, especially in the case of spontaneously occurring, nonenzymatic PTMs. Such a PTM is the formation of succinimide (Snn) in a protein that occurs spontaneously in prone primary sequences and leads typically to an equilibrium between Snn and its hydrolysis products isoaspartate (isoAsp) and aspartate. In order to detect these modifications in proteins by NMR spectroscopy, chemical shift assignments of reference compounds are required. We used peptide synthesis and 2D NMR spectroscopy to assign all 1 H and 13 C chemical shifts of Snn and isoAsp and found characteristic chemical shift correlations. To provide chemical shift reference data suitable for comparison with data of denatured proteins, we repeated the assignment in 7 M urea (pH 2.3) and in DMSO. Most characteristic of Snn are the two downfield shifted carbonyl chemical shifts, the chemical shift correlations of Cβ-Hβ of Snn and Cα-Hα of the succeeding residue which are clearly distinct from random coil chemical shift correlations. The characteristic 2D NMR fingerprints of Snn were used to detect and quantify this PTM in the model protein lysozyme, the biotherapeutic filgrastim, and the Fc part of immunoglobulin G1. Mass spectrometry (MS) was applied as an additional independent method. The orthogonality of the NMR and MS techniques allows cross-validation, which is especially important to search for subtle PTMs in proteins. Studying PTMs by NMR spectroscopy is a promising method to analyze proteins and peptides from natural sources, recombinant expression, or chemical synthesis.

  16. NMR resonance assignments of the human high mobility group protein HMGA1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchko, Garry W.; Ni, Shuisong; Lourette, Natacha M.; Reeves, Raymond C.; Kennedy, Michael A.

    2007-06-01

    Human HMGA1 is a 107-residue, non-histone chromatin nuclear factor with a wide sphere of influence including embryogenesis, apoptosis, differentiation, cell proliferation, and cancer development (Reeves, 2001). Because of the repetitive nature of the three DNA-binding domains, strings of glutamic acid residues at the C-terminus, and its unstructured nature in the absence of A-T rich regions of DNA and/or other proteins, backbone assignment for HMGA1 was challenging. Especially useful was the HNN experiment (Planchal et al., 2001), a set of truncated HMGA1 constructs, and some high resolution data collected at a ¹H resonance frequency of 900 MHz. Except for absolute assignment of R60 and R86, all 82 amide were assigned to cross peaks in the ¹H-¹⁵N HSQC spectrum and many of the side chain ¹³C and ¹H resonances were assigned (BMRB code xxxx). The intensity of the amide cross peaks for residues E3 – S9 and S64 – K67 were much weaker than the other amide cross peaks in the ¹H-¹⁵N HSQC spectrum suggesting that even in this unstructured protein there are regions experiencing motion different from the molecule as a whole.

  17. Direct correlation of consecutive C Prime -N groups in proteins: a method for the assignment of intrinsically disordered proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pantoja-Uceda, David; Santoro, Jorge, E-mail: jsantoro@iqfr.csic.es [CSIC, Instituto de Quimica Fisica Rocasolano (Spain)

    2013-09-15

    Two novel 3D {sup 13}C-detected experiments, hNcocaNCO and hnCOcaNCO, are proposed to facilitate the resonance assignment of intrinsically disordered proteins. The experiments correlate the {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C Prime chemical shifts of two consecutive amide moieties without involving other nuclei, thus taking advantage of the good dispersion shown by the {sup 15}N-{sup 13}C Prime correlations, even for proteins that lack a well defined tertiary structure. The new pulse sequences were successfully tested using Nupr1, an intrinsically disordered protein of 93 residues.

  18. iHADAMAC: A complementary tool for sequential resonance assignment of globular and highly disordered proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, Sophie; Plevin, Michael J.; Willbold, Dieter; Brutscher, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    An experiment, iHADAMAC, is presented that yields information on the amino-acid type of individual residues in a protein by editing the 1H- 15N correlations into seven different 2D spectra, each corresponding to a different class of amino-acid types. Amino-acid type discrimination is realized via a Hadamard encoding scheme based on four different spin manipulations as recently introduced in the context of the sequential HADAMAC experiment. Both sequential and intra-residue HADAMAC experiments yield highly complementary information that greatly facilitate resonance assignment of proteins with high frequency degeneracy, as demonstrated here for a 188-residue intrinsically disordered protein fragment of the hepatitis C virus protein NS5A.

  19. Recent excitements in protein NMR: Large proteins and biologically ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The advent of Transverse Relaxation Optimized SpectroscopY (TROSY) and perdeuteration allowed biomolecularNMR spectroscopists to overcome the size limitation barrier (~20 kDa) in de novo structure determination of proteins.The utility of these techniques was immediately demonstrated on large proteins and protein ...

  20. NMR assignments for the insertion domain of bacteriophage CUS-3 coat protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripler, Therese N; Maciejewski, Mark W; Teschke, Carolyn M; Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2015-10-01

    CUS-3 is a P22-like tailed dsDNA bacteriophage that infects Escherichia coli serotype K1. The CUS-3 coat protein, which forms the icosahedral capsid, has a conserved HK97-fold but with a non-conserved accessory domain known as the insertion domain (I-domain). Sequence alignment of the coat proteins from CUS-3 and P22 shows higher sequence similarity for the I-domains (35 %) than for the HK97-cores, suggesting the I-domains play important functional roles. The I-domain of the P22 coat protein, which has an NMR structure comprised of a six-stranded β-barrel, has been shown to govern the assembly, stability and size of the resulting capsid particles. Here, we report the (1)H, (15)N, and (13)C assignments for the I-domain from the coat protein of bacteriophage CUS-3. The secondary structure and dynamics of the CUS-3 I-domain, predicted from the assigned NMR chemical shifts, agree with those of the P22 I-domain, suggesting the CUS-3 and P22 I-domains may have similar structures and functions in capsid assembly.

  1. Influence of ¹H chemical shift assignments of the interface residues on structure determinations of homodimeric proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Jan; Kirchner, Donata K; Güntert, Peter

    2012-09-01

    Homodimeric proteins pose a difficulty for NMR structure determination because the degeneracy of the chemical shifts in the two identical monomers implies an ambiguity in all assignments of distance restraints. For homodimeric proteins, residues involved in the interface between two monomers provide essential intermolecular NOEs. The structure determination of homodimeric proteins hence relies strongly on chemical shift assignments of these interface residues. Our paper discusses the influence of the extent of (1)H chemical shift assignments of interface residues on the structure determinations of homodimeric proteins using the CYANA program. The results reveal that successful structure determinations of homodimeric proteins with automated NOE assignment depend on the percentage of assigned interface residues and that a high completeness of around 80-90% of the (1)H chemical shift assignment in the interface is needed for reliable NMR structure determinations of homodimeric proteins for which no experimental distinction between intra- and intermolecular NOEs, e.g. by filtered NOESY experiments, is available. Our results also show that RMSD and target function values are insufficient to judge the quality of homodimeric structures determined using automated NOE assignment. Structure determinations of homodimeric proteins by NMR using conventional NOESY experiments are thus possible but more challenging than for monomeric proteins. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Resonance assignment of PsbP: an extrinsic protein from photosystem II of Spinacia oleracea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathner, Adriana; Chandra, Kousik; Rathner, Petr; Horničáková, Michaela; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Kohoutová, Jaroslava; Ettrich, Rüdiger; Müller, Norbert

    2015-10-01

    PsbP (23 kDa) is an extrinsic eukaryotic protein of photosystem II found in the thylakoid membrane of higher plants and green algae. It has been proven to be indispensable for proper functioning of the oxygen evolving complex. By interaction with other extrinsic proteins (PsbQ, PsbO and PsbR), it modulates the concentration of two cofactors of the water splitting reaction, Ca(2+) and Cl(-). The crystallographic structure of PsbP from Spinacia oleracea lacks the N-terminal part as well as two inner regions which were modelled as loops. Those unresolved parts are believed to be functionally crucial for the binding of PsbP to the thylakoid membrane. In this NMR study we report (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonance assignments of the backbone and side chain atoms of the PsbP protein. Based on these data, an estimate of the secondary structure has been made. The structural motifs found fit the resolved parts of the crystallographic structure very well. In addition, the complete assignment set provides preliminary insight into the dynamic regions.

  3. PADLOC: a powerful tool to assign disulfide bond connectivities in peptides and proteins by NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, Leszek; Hui, John O; Ligutti, Joseph; Murray, Justin K; Schnier, Paul D

    2012-01-03

    The determination of the disulfide bond connectivity in a peptide or protein represents a significant challenge. It is notoriously difficult to use NMR spectroscopy to assign disulfide connectivities because NMR spectra lack direct evidence for disulfide bonds. These bonds are typically inferred from three-dimensional structure calculations, which can result in ambiguous disulfide assignment. Here, we present a new NMR based methodology, in which the disulfide connectivity is obtained by applying Bayesian rules of inference to the local topology of cysteine residues. We illustrate how this approach successfully predicts the disulfide connectivity in proteins for which crystal structures are available in the protein data bank (PDB). We also demonstrate how this methodology is used with experimental NMR data for peptides with complex disulfide topologies, including hepcidin, Kalata-B1, and μ-Conotoxin KIIIA. In the case of μ-Conotoxin KIIIA, the PADLOC connectivity (1-15,2-9,4-16) differs from previously published results; additional evidence is presented demonstrating unequivocally that this newly proposed connectivity is correct. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  4. NMR assignments for the insertion domain of bacteriophage Sf6 coat protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripler, Therese N; Teschke, Carolyn M; Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2017-04-01

    The P22 bacteriophage group is a subgroup of the λ phage supercluster, comprised of the three major sequence types Sf6, P22, and CUS-3, based on their capsid proteins. Our goal is to investigate the extent to which structure-function relationships are conserved for the viral coat proteins and I-domains in this subgroup. Sf6 is a phage that infects the human pathogen Shigella flexneri. The coat protein of Sf6 assembles into a procapsid, which further undergoes maturation during DNA packaging into an infectious virion. The Sf6 coat protein contains a genetically inserted domain, termed the I-domain, similar to the ones present in the P22 and CUS-3 coat proteins. Based on the P22 example, I-domains play important functional roles in capsid assembly, stability, viability, and size-determination. Here we report the 1H, 15N, and 13C chemical shift assignments for the I-domain of the Sf6 phage coat protein. Chemical shift-based secondary structure prediction and hydrogen-bond patterns from a long-range HNCO experiment indicate that the Sf6 I-domain adopts a 6-stranded β-barrel fold like those of P22 and CUS-3 but with important differences, including the absence of the D-loop that is critical for capsid assembly and the addition of a novel disordered loop region.

  5. Specific labeling and assignment strategies of valine methyl groups for NMR studies of high molecular weight proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mas, Guillaume; Crublet, Elodie [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS) (France); Hamelin, Olivier [CNRS (France); Gans, Pierre; Boisbouvier, Jérôme, E-mail: jerome.boisbouvier@ibs.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS) (France)

    2013-09-28

    The specific protonation of valine and leucine methyl groups in proteins is typically achieved by overexpressing proteins in M9/D{sub 2}O medium supplemented with either labeled α-ketoisovalerate for the labeling of the four prochiral methyl groups or with 2-acetolactate for the stereospecific labeling of the valine and leucine side chains. However, when these labeling schemes are applied to large protein assemblies, significant overlap between the correlations of the valine and leucine methyl groups occurs, hampering the analysis of 2D methyl-TROSY spectra. Analysis of the leucine and valine biosynthesis pathways revealed that the incorporation of labeled precursors in the leucine pathway can be inhibited by the addition of exogenous l-leucine-d{sub 10}. We exploited this property to label stereospecifically the pro-R and pro-S methyl groups of valine with minimal scrambling to the leucine residues. This new labeling protocol was applied to the 468 kDa homododecameric peptidase TET2 to decrease the complexity of its NMR spectra. All of the pro-S valine methyl resonances of TET2 were assigned by combining mutagenesis with this innovative labeling approach. The assignments were transferred to the pro-R groups using an optimally labeled sample and a set of triple resonance experiments. This improved labeling scheme enables us to overcome the main limitation of overcrowding in the NMR spectra of prochiral methyl groups, which is a prerequisite for the site-specific measurement of the structural and dynamic parameters or for the study of interactions in very large protein assemblies.

  6. A suite of solid-state NMR experiments for RNA intranucleotide resonance assignment in a 21 kDa protein-RNA complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchanka, Alexander; Simon, Bernd; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2013-09-16

    Intranucleotide resonance of the 26mer box C/D RNA in complex with the L7Ae protein were assigned by solid-state NMR (ssNMR; see picture) spectroscopy. This investigation opens the way for studying RNA in large protein-RNA complexes by ssNMR spectroscopy. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Using MUSIC and CC(CONH for Backbone Assignment of Two Medium-Sized Proteins Not Fully Accessible to Standard 3D NMR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette K. Brenner

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The backbone assignment of medium-sized proteins is rarely as straightforward as that of small proteins, and thus often requires creative solutions. Here, we describe the application of a combination of standard 3D heteronuclear methods with CC(CONH and a variety of MUltiplicity Selective In-phase Coherence transfer (MUSIC experiments. Both CC(CONH and MUSIC are, in theory, very powerful methods for the backbone assignment of proteins. Due to low sensitivity, their use has usually been linked to small proteins only. However, we found that combining CC(CONH and MUSIC experiments simplified the assignment of two challenging medium-sized proteins of 13 and 19.5 kDa, respectively. These methods are to some extent complementary to each other: CC(CONH acquired with a long isotropic mixing time can identify amino acids with large aliphatic side chains. Whereas the most sensitive MUSIC experiments identify amino acid types that cannot be detected by CC(CONH, comprising the residues with acid and amide groups, and aromatic rings in their side chains. Together these methods provide a means of identifying the majority of peaks in the 2D 15N HSQC spectrum which simplifies the backbone assignment work even for proteins, e.g., small kinases, whose standard spectra resulted in little spectral resolution and low signal intensities.

  8. Using MUSIC and CC(CO)NH for backbone assignment of two medium-sized proteins not fully accessible to standard 3D NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Annette K; Frøystein, Nils Åge

    2014-06-26

    The backbone assignment of medium-sized proteins is rarely as straightforward as that of small proteins, and thus often requires creative solutions. Here, we describe the application of a combination of standard 3D heteronuclear methods with CC(CO)NH and a variety of MUltiplicity Selective In-phase Coherence transfer (MUSIC) experiments. Both CC(CO)NH and MUSIC are, in theory, very powerful methods for the backbone assignment of proteins. Due to low sensitivity, their use has usually been linked to small proteins only. However, we found that combining CC(CO)NH and MUSIC experiments simplified the assignment of two challenging medium-sized proteins of 13 and 19.5 kDa, respectively. These methods are to some extent complementary to each other: CC(CO)NH acquired with a long isotropic mixing time can identify amino acids with large aliphatic side chains. Whereas the most sensitive MUSIC experiments identify amino acid types that cannot be detected by CC(CO)NH, comprising the residues with acid and amide groups, and aromatic rings in their side chains. Together these methods provide a means of identifying the majority of peaks in the 2D 15N HSQC spectrum which simplifies the backbone assignment work even for proteins, e.g., small kinases, whose standard spectra resulted in little spectral resolution and low signal intensities.

  9. Stereospecific assignments of the isopropyl methyl groups of the membrane protein OmpX in DHPC micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilty, Christian; Wider, Gerhard; Fernández, César; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2003-12-01

    In NMR studies of large molecular structures, the number of conformational constraints based on NOE measurements is typically limited due to the need for partial deuteration. As a consequence, when using selective protonation of peripheral methyl groups on a perdeuterated background, stereospecific assignments of the diastereotopic methyl groups of Val and Leu can have a particularly large impact on the quality of the NMR structure determination. For example, 3D 15N- and 13C-resolved [1H,1H]-NOESY spectra of the E. Coli membrane protein OmpX in mixed micelles with DHPC, which have an overall molecular weight of about 60 kDa, showed that about 50% of all obtainable NOEs involve the diastereotopic methyl groups of Val and Leu. In this paper, we used biosynthetically-directed fractional 13C labeling of OmpX and [13C,1H]-HSQC spectroscopy to obtain stereospecific methyl assignments of Val and Leu in OmpX/DHPC. For practical purposes it is of interest that this data could be obtained without use of a deuterated background, and that combinations of NMR experiments have been found for obtaining the desired information either at a 1H frequency of 500 MHz, or with significantly reduced measuring time on a high-frequency instrument.

  10. Stereospecific assignments of the isopropyl methyl groups of the membrane protein OmpX in DHPC micelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilty, Christian; Wider, Gerhard; Fernandez, Cesar; Wuethrich, Kurt [Institut fuer Molekularbiologie und Biophysik, Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule Zuerich (Switzerland)], E-mail: wuthrich@mol.biol.ethz.ch

    2003-12-15

    In NMR studies of large molecular structures, the number of conformational constraints based on NOE measurements is typically limited due to the need for partial deuteration. As a consequence, when using selective protonation of peripheral methyl groups on a perdeuterated background, stereospecific assignments of the diastereotopic methyl groups of Val and Leu can have a particularly large impact on the quality of the NMR structure determination. For example, 3D {sup 15}N- and {sup 13}C-resolved [{sup 1}H,{sup 1}H]-NOESY spectra of the E. Coli membrane protein OmpX in mixed micelles with DHPC, which have an overall molecular weight of about 60 kDa, showed that about 50% of all obtainable NOEs involve the diastereotopic methyl groups of Val and Leu. In this paper, we used biosynthetically-directed fractional {sup 13}C labeling of OmpX and [{sup 13}C,{sup 1}H]-HSQC spectroscopy to obtain stereospecific methyl assignments of Val and Leu in OmpX/DHPC. For practical purposes it is of interest that this data could be obtained without use of a deuterated background, and that combinations of NMR experiments have been found for obtaining the desired information either at a {sup 1}H frequency of 500 MHz, or with significantly reduced measuring time on a high-frequency instrument.

  11. Writing Assignments with a Metacognitive Component Enhance Learning in a Large Introductory Biology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mynlieff, Michelle; Manogaran, Anita L.; St. Maurice, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Writing assignments, including note taking and written recall, should enhance retention of knowledge, whereas analytical writing tasks with metacognitive aspects should enhance higher-order thinking. In this study, we assessed how certain writing-intensive “interventions,” such as written exam corrections and peer-reviewed writing assignments using Calibrated Peer Review and including a metacognitive component, improve student learning. We designed and tested the possible benefits of these approaches using control and experimental variables across and between our three-section introductory biology course. Based on assessment, students who corrected exam questions showed significant improvement on postexam assessment compared with their nonparticipating peers. Differences were also observed between students participating in written and discussion-based exercises. Students with low ACT scores benefited equally from written and discussion-based exam corrections, whereas students with midrange to high ACT scores benefited more from written than discussion-based exam corrections. Students scored higher on topics learned via peer-reviewed writing assignments relative to learning in an active classroom discussion or traditional lecture. However, students with low ACT scores (17–23) did not show the same benefit from peer-reviewed written essays as the other students. These changes offer significant student learning benefits with minimal additional effort by the instructors. PMID:26086661

  12. Assigning sequences to species in the absence of large interspecific differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Melanie; Golding, G Brian

    2010-07-01

    Barcoding is an initiative to define a standard fragment of DNA to be used to assign unknown sequences to existing known species groups that have been pre-identified externally (by a taxonomist). Several methods have been described that attempt to place this assignment into a Bayesian statistical framework. Here we describe an algorithm that makes use of segregating sites and we examine how well these methods perform in the absence of an interspecific 'barcoding gap'. When a barcoding gap exists, that is when the data are clearly delimited, most methods perform well. Here we have used data from the Drosophila genus because this genus includes sibling species and the species relationships within this species while complex are, arguably, better understood than in any other group. The results show that the Bayesian methods perform well even in the absence of a barcoding gap. The sequences from Drosophila are correctly identified and only when the degree of incomplete lineage sorting is extreme in simulations or within the Drosophila species, do they fail in their identifications and even then, the "correct" species has a high posterior probability. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Towards fully automated structure-based NMR resonance assignment of 15N-labeled proteins from automatically picked peaks

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Richard

    2011-03-01

    In NMR resonance assignment, an indispensable step in NMR protein studies, manually processed peaks from both N-labeled and C-labeled spectra are typically used as inputs. However, the use of homologous structures can allow one to use only N-labeled NMR data and avoid the added expense of using C-labeled data. We propose a novel integer programming framework for structure-based backbone resonance assignment using N-labeled data. The core consists of a pair of integer programming models: one for spin system forming and amino acid typing, and the other for backbone resonance assignment. The goal is to perform the assignment directly from spectra without any manual intervention via automatically picked peaks, which are much noisier than manually picked peaks, so methods must be error-tolerant. In the case of semi-automated/manually processed peak data, we compare our system with the Xiong-Pandurangan-Bailey- Kellogg\\'s contact replacement (CR) method, which is the most error-tolerant method for structure-based resonance assignment. Our system, on average, reduces the error rate of the CR method by five folds on their data set. In addition, by using an iterative algorithm, our system has the added capability of using the NOESY data to correct assignment errors due to errors in predicting the amino acid and secondary structure type of each spin system. On a publicly available data set for human ubiquitin, where the typing accuracy is 83%, we achieve 91% accuracy, compared to the 59% accuracy obtained without correcting for such errors. In the case of automatically picked peaks, using assignment information from yeast ubiquitin, we achieve a fully automatic assignment with 97% accuracy. To our knowledge, this is the first system that can achieve fully automatic structure-based assignment directly from spectra. This has implications in NMR protein mutant studies, where the assignment step is repeated for each mutant. © Copyright 2011, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  14. Recruiting Participants for Large-Scale Random Assignment Experiments in School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roschelle, Jeremy; Feng, Mingyu; Gallagher, H. Alix; Murphy, Robert; Harris, Christopher; Kamdar, Danae; Trinidad, Gucci

    2014-01-01

    Recruitment is a key challenge for researchers conducting any large school-based study. Control is needed not only over the condition participants receive, but also over how the intervention is implemented, and may include restrictions in other areas of school and classroom functioning. We report here on our experiences in recruiting participants…

  15. Net Based Examination: Small Group Tutoring, Home Assignments, and Large Group Automatic and Peer Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Karlsson

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with net based examination,tutoring and scaffolding of groups of different sizes: Firstfor very small groups, then for normal sized groups around100 students and finally for very large groups. The threedifferent methods can be applied to internationally basedcourses. Methods which support deep learning throughtutoring, scaffolding, project work and peer learning arealso mentioned.

  16. Proton and nitrogen sequential assignments and secondary structure determination of the human FK506 and rapamycin binding protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, M.K.; Michnick, S.W.; Karplus, M.; Schreiber, S.L. (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (USA))

    1991-05-14

    Sequential {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N assignments of human FKBP, a cytosolic binding protein for the immunosuppressive agents FK506 and rapamycin, are reported. A combination of homonuclear and relayed heteronuclear experiments has enabled assignment of 98 of 99 backbone amide NHs, 119 of 120 C{sup {alpha}}Hs, 97 of 99 non-proline amide {sup 15}Ns, and 375 of 412 side-chain resonances of this 107-residue protein. Long-range NOEs are used to demonstrate that FKBP has a novel folding topology consisting of a five-stranded antiparallel {beta} sheet with +3, +1, {minus}3, +1 loop connectivity.

  17. Improved formulations and an Adaptive Large Neighborhood Search heuristic for the integrated berth allocation and quay crane assignment problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iris, Cagatay; Pacino, Dario; Røpke, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on the integrated berth allocation and quay crane assignment problem in container terminals. We consider the decrease in the marginal productivity of quay cranes and the increase in handling time due to deviation from the desired position. We consider a continuous berth......, discretized in small equal-sized sections. A number of enhancements over the state-of-the-art formulation and an Adaptive Large Neighborhood Search (ALNS) heuristic are presented. Computational results reveal that the enhancements improve many of the best-known bounds, and the ALNS outperforms the state-of-the-art...

  18. 1H, 13C and 15N NMR assignments of a calcium-binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Deepshikha; Bhattacharya, Alok; Chary, Kandala V R

    2016-04-01

    We report almost complete sequence specific (1)H, (13)C and (15)N NMR assignments of a 150-residue long calmodulin-like calcium-binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica (EhCaBP6), as a prelude to its structural and functional characterization.

  19. Expressed protein ligation for a large dimeric protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karagöz, G.E.; Sinnige, T; Hsieh, O.; Rüdiger, S.G.D.

    2011-01-01

    Expressed protein ligation (EPL) is a protein engineering tool for post-translational ligation of protein or peptide fragments. This technique allows modification of specific parts of proteins, opening possibilities for incorporating probes for biophysical applications such as nuclear magnetic

  20. METHODOLOGY AND CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE GROUPS FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WEBER RA

    2009-01-16

    The Hanford Site contains 177 large underground radioactive waste storage tanks (28 double-shell tanks and 149 single-shell tanks). These tanks are categorized into one of three waste groups (A, B, and C) based on their waste and tank characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement gas release event. Assignments of waste groups to the 177 double-shell tanks and single-shell tanks, as reported in this document, are based on a Monte Carlo analysis of three criteria. The first criterion is the headspace flammable gas concentration following release of retained gas. This criterion determines whether the tank contains sufficient retained gas such that the well-mixed headspace flammable gas concentration would reach 100% of the lower flammability limit if the entire tank's retained gas were released. If the volume of retained gas is not sufficient to reach 100% of the lower flammability limit, then flammable conditions cannot be reached and the tank is classified as a waste group C tank independent of the method the gas is released. The second criterion is the energy ratio and considers whether there is sufficient supernatant on top of the saturated solids such that gas-bearing solids have the potential energy required to break up the material and release gas. Tanks that are not waste group C tanks and that have an energy ratio < 3.0 do not have sufficient potential energy to break up material and release gas and are assigned to waste group B. These tanks are considered to represent a potential induced flammable gas release hazard, but no spontaneous buoyant displacement flammable gas release hazard. Tanks that are not waste group C tanks and have an energy ratio {ge} 3.0, but that pass the third criterion (buoyancy ratio < 1.0, see below) are also assigned to waste group B. Even though the designation as

  1. METHODOLOGY AND CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE GROUPS FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FOWLER KD

    2007-12-27

    This document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 7 is the annual update of the calculations of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs. The Hanford Site contains 177 large underground radioactive waste storage tanks (28 double-shell tanks and 149 single-shell tanks). These tanks are categorized into one of three waste groups (A, B, and C) based on their waste and tank characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement gas release event. Assignments of waste groups to the 177 double-shell tanks and single-shell tanks, as reported in this document, are based on a Monte Carlo analysis of three criteria. The first criterion is the headspace flammable gas concentration following release of retained gas. This criterion determines whether the tank contains sufficient retained gas such that the well-mixed headspace flammable gas concentration would reach 100% of the lower flammability limit if the entire tank's retained gas were released. If the volume of retained gas is not sufficient to reach 100% of the lower flammability limit, then flammable conditions cannot be reached and the tank is classified as a waste group C tank independent of the method the gas is released. The second criterion is the energy ratio and considers whether there is sufficient supernatant on top of the saturated solids such that gas-bearing solids have the potential energy required to break up the material and release gas. Tanks that are not waste group C tanks and that have an energy ratio < 3.0 do not have sufficient

  2. (1)H, (15)N and (13)C resonance assignments of translationally-controlled tumor protein from photosynthetic microalga Nannochloropsis oceanica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xingzhe; Xiao, Yan; Cui, Qiu; Feng, Yingang

    2015-10-01

    Translationally-controlled tumor protein (TCTP) is a eukaryote-conserved protein with crucial roles in cellular growth. It has also been proposed that plant TCTP has functions specific to plant, while no structure of TCTP from photosynthetic organism has been reported. Nannochloropsis is a photosynthetic microalga with high yield of lipid and high-value polyunsaturated fatty acid, which is promising for biodiesel production. Study of growth-related proteins may provide new clue for improving the yield of lipid. TCTP from Nannochloropsis oceanica shares low sequence identity with structure-known TCTPs. Here we reported the NMR resonance assignments of TCTP from N. oceanica for further structural and functional studies.

  3. Reduced Dimensionality (4,3)D-hnCOCANH Experiment: An Efficient Backbone Assignment tool for NMR studies of Proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    Sequence specific resonance assignment and secondary structure determination of proteins form the basis for variety of structural and functional proteomics studies by NMR. In this context, an efficient standalone method for rapid assignment of backbone (1H, 15N, 13Ca and 13C') resonances and secondary structure determination of proteins has been presented here. Compared to currently available strategies used for the purpose, the method employs only a single reduced dimensionality (RD) experiment -(4,3)D-hnCOCANH and exploits the linear combinations of backbone (13Ca and 13C') chemical shifts to achieve a dispersion relatively better compared to those of individual chemical shifts (see the text) for efficient and rapid data analysis. Further, the experiment leads to the spectrum with direct distinction of self (intra-residue) and sequential (inter-residue) carbon correlation peaks; these appear opposite in signs and therefore can easily be discriminated without using an additional complementary experiment. On ...

  4. Luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes for sensitive fluorescent assignment of protein inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingstedt, Therése; Blechschmidt, Cristiane; Nogalska, Anna; Prokop, Stefan; Häggqvist, Bo; Danielsson, Olof; Engel, W King; Askanas, Valerie; Heppner, Frank L; Nilsson, K Peter R

    2013-03-18

    Small hydrophobic ligands identifying intracellular protein deposits are of great interest, as protein inclusion bodies are the pathological hallmark of several degenerative diseases. Here we report that fluorescent amyloid ligands, termed luminescent conjugated oligothiophenes (LCOs), rapidly and with high sensitivity detect protein inclusion bodies in skeletal muscle tissue from patients with sporadic inclusion body myositis (s-IBM). LCOs having a conjugated backbone of at least five thiophene units emitted strong fluorescence upon binding, and showed co-localization with proteins reported to accumulate in s-IBM protein inclusion bodies. Compared with conventional amyloid ligands, LCOs identified a larger fraction of immunopositive inclusion bodies. When the conjugated thiophene backbone was extended with terminal carboxyl groups, the LCO revealed striking spectral differences between distinct protein inclusion bodies. We conclude that 1) LCOs are sensitive, rapid and powerful tools for identifying protein inclusion bodies and 2) LCOs identify a wider range of protein inclusion bodies than conventional amyloid ligands. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance study of the antihypertensive and antiviral protein BDS-I from the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata: Sequential and stereospecific resonance assignment and secondary structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driscoll, P.C.; Clore, G.M.; Beress, L.; Gronenborn, A.M. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1989-03-07

    The sequential resonance assignment of the {sup 1}H NMR spectrum of the antihypertensive and antiviral protein BDS-I from the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata is presented. This is carried out with two-dimensional NMR techniques to identify through-bond and through-space (< 5{angstrom}) connectivities. Added spectral complexity arises from the fact that the sample is an approximately 1:1 mixture of two BDS-I isoproteins, (Leu-18)-BDS-I and (Phe-18)-BDS-I. Complete assignments, however, are obtained, largely due to the increased resolution and sensitivity afforded at 600 MHz. In addition, the stereospecific assignment of a large number of {beta}-methylene protons is achieved from an analysis of the pattern of {sup 3}J{sub {alpha}{beta}} coupling constants and the relative magnitudes of intraresidue NOEs involving the NH, C{sup {alpha}}H, and C{sup {beta}}H protons. Regular secondary structure elements are deduced from a qualitative interpretation of the nuclear Overhauser enhancement, {sup 3}J{sub HN{alpha}} coupling constant, and amide NH exchange data. A triple-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sheet is found to be related to that found in partially homologous sea anemone polypeptide toxins.

  6. METHODOLOGY & CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE GROUPS FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BARKER, S.A.

    2006-07-27

    Waste stored within tank farm double-shell tanks (DST) and single-shell tanks (SST) generates flammable gas (principally hydrogen) to varying degrees depending on the type, amount, geometry, and condition of the waste. The waste generates hydrogen through the radiolysis of water and organic compounds, thermolytic decomposition of organic compounds, and corrosion of a tank's carbon steel walls. Radiolysis and thermolytic decomposition also generates ammonia. Nonflammable gases, which act as dilutents (such as nitrous oxide), are also produced. Additional flammable gases (e.g., methane) are generated by chemical reactions between various degradation products of organic chemicals present in the tanks. Volatile and semi-volatile organic chemicals in tanks also produce organic vapors. The generated gases in tank waste are either released continuously to the tank headspace or are retained in the waste matrix. Retained gas may be released in a spontaneous or induced gas release event (GRE) that can significantly increase the flammable gas concentration in the tank headspace as described in RPP-7771. The document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 5 is the annual update of the methodology and calculations of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs.

  7. The Personal Response: A Novel Writing Assignment to Engage First Year Students in Large Human Biology Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moni, Roger W.; Moni, Karen B.; Poronnik, Philip

    2007-01-01

    The teaching of highly valued scientific writing skills in the first year of university is challenging. This report describes the design, implementation, and evaluation of a novel written assignment, "The Personal Response" and accompanying Peer Review, in the course, Human Biology (BIOL1015) at The University of Queensland. These assignments were…

  8. Letter to the Editor: H-1, C-13 and N-15 Assignments for the Archaeglobus fulgidis Protein AF2095.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Robert; Acton, Thomas; Chiang, Yiwen; Rajan, Paranji K.; Cort, John R.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Liu, Jinfeng; Ma, LiChung; Rost, Burkhard; Montelione, Gaetano

    2004-09-01

    targeted for structural analysis by NESG. AF2095 belongs to the Pfam family PF01981 - UPF0099, protein domain family of unknown function that has been found in yeast, archaebacteria and eubacteria. AF2095 has been assigned to NESG Cluster ID:17431, a set of fourteen protein sequences with high (> {approx}30%) sequence identity (Liu, 2004). This cluster includes proteins of human, Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, Arabidopsis, yeast, archaeal and eubacterial origin. A total of fifty-six proteins are identified when the analysis is expanded to include all available genomes. Therefore, determining the NMR solution structure of AF2095 can be leveraged to infer 3D structural information for at least an additional fifty-five proteins. Here we report the near complete 1H, 15N, 13CO, and 13C NMR assignments and secondary structure of AF2095. These data provide a basis for determining the solution structure of AF2095, for further investigation of the function of this protein and for providing representative structural and functional information for the protein domain family that includes AF2095.

  9. Chromosomal assignment of human nuclear envelope protein genes LMNA, LMNB1, and LBR by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wydner, K.L.; McNeil, J.A. [Univ. of Masssachusetts Medical Center, Worcester, MA (United States); Lin, Feng [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-05

    We have used fluorescence in situ hybridization to establish precise chromosomal localizations for three human genes encoding four different nuclear envelope proteins. Lamin A/C (LMN1, HGMW-approved symbol LMNA) mapped to 1q21.2-q21.3, with a most probable gene assignment to 1q21.3; lamin B receptor (LBR) was localized to 1q42.1; and lamin B1 (LMNB1) was mapped to the interface of bands 5q23.3-q31.1. Assignments were determined by direct placement of signals relative to high-resolution DAPI or G-bands. Comparison of these results of band positions predicted from fractional length measurements to signal placement indicated that more accurate predictions are made using Francke idiograms and that measurement strategy avoids variance due to polymorphic chromosome segments. 30 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. INGA: protein function prediction combining interaction networks, domain assignments and sequence similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesan, Damiano; Giollo, Manuel; Leonardi, Emanuela; Ferrari, Carlo; Tosatto, Silvio C E

    2015-07-01

    Identifying protein functions can be useful for numerous applications in biology. The prediction of gene ontology (GO) functional terms from sequence remains however a challenging task, as shown by the recent CAFA experiments. Here we present INGA, a web server developed to predict protein function from a combination of three orthogonal approaches. Sequence similarity and domain architecture searches are combined with protein-protein interaction network data to derive consensus predictions for GO terms using functional enrichment. The INGA server can be queried both programmatically through RESTful services and through a web interface designed for usability. The latter provides output supporting the GO term predictions with the annotating sequences. INGA is validated on the CAFA-1 data set and was recently shown to perform consistently well in the CAFA-2 blind test. The INGA web server is available from URL: http://protein.bio.unipd.it/inga. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Nano-mole scale sequential signal assignment by 1 H-detected protein solid-state NMR

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Songlin

    2015-01-01

    We present a 3D 1H-detected solid-state NMR (SSNMR) approach for main-chain signal assignments of 10-100 nmol of fully protonated proteins using ultra-fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) at ∼80 kHz by a novel spectral-editing method, which permits drastic spectral simplification. The approach offers ∼110 fold time saving over a traditional 3D 13C-detected SSNMR approach. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015.

  12. METHODOLOGY & CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TU, T.A.

    2007-01-04

    Waste stored within tank farm double-shell tanks (DST) and single-shell tanks (SST) generates flammable gas (principally hydrogen) to varying degrees depending on the type, amount, geometry, and condition of the waste. The waste generates hydrogen through the radiolysis of water and organic compounds, thermolytic decomposition of organic compounds, and corrosion of a tank's carbon steel walls. Radiolysis and thermolytic decomposition also generates ammonia. Nonflammable gases, which act as dilutents (such as nitrous oxide), are also produced. Additional flammable gases (e.g., methane) are generated by chemical reactions between various degradation products of organic chemicals present in the tanks. Volatile and semi-volatile organic chemicals in tanks also produce organic vapors. The generated gases in tank waste are either released continuously to the tank headspace or are retained in the waste matrix. Retained gas may be released in a spontaneous or induced gas release event (GRE) that can significantly increase the flammable gas concentration in the tank headspace as described in RPP-7771, Flammable Gas Safety Isme Resolution. Appendices A through I provide supporting information. The document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste and characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 6 is the annual update of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs.

  13. Oligosaccharide microarrays for high-throughput detection and specificity assignments of carbohydrate-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Shigeyuki; Feizi, Ten; Galustian, Christine; Lawson, Alexander M; Chai, Wengang

    2002-10-01

    We describe microarrays of oligosaccharides as neoglycolipids and their robust display on nitrocellulose. The arrays are obtained from glycoproteins, glycolipids, proteoglycans, polysaccharides, whole organs, or from chemically synthesized oligosaccharides. We show that carbohydrate-recognizing proteins single out their ligands not only in arrays of homogeneous oligosaccharides but also in arrays of heterogeneous oligosaccharides. Initial applications have revealed new findings, including: (i) among O-glycans in brain, a relative abundance of the Lewis(x) sequence based on N-acetyllactosamine recognized by anti-L5, and a paucity of the Lewis(x) sequence based on poly-N-acetyllactosamine recognized by anti-SSEA-1; (ii) insights into chondroitin sulfate oligosaccharides recognized by an antiserum and an antibody (CS-56) to chondroitin sulfates; and (iii) binding of the cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and the chemokine RANTES to sulfated sequences such as HNK-1, sulfo-Lewis(x), and sulfo-Lewis(a), in addition to glycosaminoglycans. The approach opens the way for discovering new carbohydrate-recognizing proteins in the proteome and for mapping the repertoire of carbohydrate recognition structures in the glycome.

  14. How do you assign persistent identifiers to extracts from large, complex, dynamic data sets that underpin scholarly publications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyborn, Lesley; Car, Nicholas; Evans, Benjamin; Klump, Jens

    2016-04-01

    Persistent identifiers in the form of a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) are becoming more mainstream, assigned at both the collection and dataset level. For static datasets, this is a relatively straight-forward matter. However, many new data collections are dynamic, with new data being appended, models and derivative products being revised with new data, or the data itself revised as processing methods are improved. Further, because data collections are becoming accessible as services, researchers can log in and dynamically create user-defined subsets for specific research projects: they also can easily mix and match data from multiple collections, each of which can have a complex history. Inevitably extracts from such dynamic data sets underpin scholarly publications, and this presents new challenges. The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) has been experiencing and making progress towards addressing these issues. The NCI is large node of the Research Data Services initiative (RDS) of the Australian Government's research infrastructure, which currently makes available over 10 PBytes of priority research collections, ranging from geosciences, geophysics, environment, and climate, through to astronomy, bioinformatics, and social sciences. Data are replicated to, or are produced at, NCI and then processed there to higher-level data products or directly analysed. Individual datasets range from multi-petabyte computational models and large volume raster arrays, down to gigabyte size, ultra-high resolution datasets. To facilitate access, maximise reuse and enable integration across the disciplines, datasets have been organized on a platform called the National Environmental Research Data Interoperability Platform (NERDIP). Combined, the NERDIP data collections form a rich and diverse asset for researchers: their co-location and standardization optimises the value of existing data, and forms a new resource to underpin data-intensive Science. New publication

  15. Selective 'unlabeling' of amino acids in fractionally 13C labeled proteins: An approach for stereospecific NMR assignments of CH3 groups in Val and Leu residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atreya, H.S.; Chary, K.V.R. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Department of Chemical Sciences (India)

    2001-03-15

    A novel methodology for stereospecific NMR assignments of methyl (CH{sub 3}) groups of Val and Leu residues in fractionally {sup 13}C-labeled proteins is presented. The approach is based on selective 'unlabeling' of specific amino acids in proteins while fractionally {sup 13}C-labeling the rest. A 2D [{sup 13}C-{sup 1}H] HSQC spectrum recorded on such a sample is devoid of peaks belonging to the 'unlabeled' amino acid residues. Such spectral simplification aids in unambiguous stereospecific assignment of diastereotopic CH{sub 3} groups in Val and Leu residues in large proteins. This methodology has been demonstrated on a 15 kDa calcium binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica (Eh-CaBP)

  16. SONAR Discovers RNA-Binding Proteins from Analysis of Large-Scale Protein-Protein Interactomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannan, Kristopher W; Jin, Wenhao; Huelga, Stephanie C; Banks, Charles A S; Gilmore, Joshua M; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Van Nostrand, Eric L; Pratt, Gabriel A; Schwinn, Marie K; Daniels, Danette L; Yeo, Gene W

    2016-10-20

    RNA metabolism is controlled by an expanding, yet incomplete, catalog of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), many of which lack characterized RNA binding domains. Approaches to expand the RBP repertoire to discover non-canonical RBPs are currently needed. Here, HaloTag fusion pull down of 12 nuclear and cytoplasmic RBPs followed by quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) demonstrates that proteins interacting with multiple RBPs in an RNA-dependent manner are enriched for RBPs. This motivated SONAR, a computational approach that predicts RNA binding activity by analyzing large-scale affinity precipitation-MS protein-protein interactomes. Without relying on sequence or structure information, SONAR identifies 1,923 human, 489 fly, and 745 yeast RBPs, including over 100 human candidate RBPs that contain zinc finger domains. Enhanced CLIP confirms RNA binding activity and identifies transcriptome-wide RNA binding sites for SONAR-predicted RBPs, revealing unexpected RNA binding activity for disease-relevant proteins and DNA binding proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A large-scale evaluation of computational protein function prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radivojac, Predrag; Clark, Wyatt T; Oron, Tal Ronnen; Schnoes, Alexandra M; Wittkop, Tobias; Sokolov, Artem; Graim, Kiley; Funk, Christopher; Verspoor, Karin; Ben-Hur, Asa; Pandey, Gaurav; Yunes, Jeffrey M; Talwalkar, Ameet S; Repo, Susanna; Souza, Michael L; Piovesan, Damiano; Casadio, Rita; Wang, Zheng; Cheng, Jianlin; Fang, Hai; Gough, Julian; Koskinen, Patrik; Törönen, Petri; Nokso-Koivisto, Jussi; Holm, Liisa; Cozzetto, Domenico; Buchan, Daniel W A; Bryson, Kevin; Jones, David T; Limaye, Bhakti; Inamdar, Harshal; Datta, Avik; Manjari, Sunitha K; Joshi, Rajendra; Chitale, Meghana; Kihara, Daisuke; Lisewski, Andreas M; Erdin, Serkan; Venner, Eric; Lichtarge, Olivier; Rentzsch, Robert; Yang, Haixuan; Romero, Alfonso E; Bhat, Prajwal; Paccanaro, Alberto; Hamp, Tobias; Kaßner, Rebecca; Seemayer, Stefan; Vicedo, Esmeralda; Schaefer, Christian; Achten, Dominik; Auer, Florian; Boehm, Ariane; Braun, Tatjana; Hecht, Maximilian; Heron, Mark; Hönigschmid, Peter; Hopf, Thomas A; Kaufmann, Stefanie; Kiening, Michael; Krompass, Denis; Landerer, Cedric; Mahlich, Yannick; Roos, Manfred; Björne, Jari; Salakoski, Tapio; Wong, Andrew; Shatkay, Hagit; Gatzmann, Fanny; Sommer, Ingolf; Wass, Mark N; Sternberg, Michael J E; Škunca, Nives; Supek, Fran; Bošnjak, Matko; Panov, Panče; Džeroski, Sašo; Šmuc, Tomislav; Kourmpetis, Yiannis A I; van Dijk, Aalt D J; ter Braak, Cajo J F; Zhou, Yuanpeng; Gong, Qingtian; Dong, Xinran; Tian, Weidong; Falda, Marco; Fontana, Paolo; Lavezzo, Enrico; Di Camillo, Barbara; Toppo, Stefano; Lan, Liang; Djuric, Nemanja; Guo, Yuhong; Vucetic, Slobodan; Bairoch, Amos; Linial, Michal; Babbitt, Patricia C; Brenner, Steven E; Orengo, Christine; Rost, Burkhard; Mooney, Sean D; Friedberg, Iddo

    2013-03-01

    Automated annotation of protein function is challenging. As the number of sequenced genomes rapidly grows, the overwhelming majority of protein products can only be annotated computationally. If computational predictions are to be relied upon, it is crucial that the accuracy of these methods be high. Here we report the results from the first large-scale community-based critical assessment of protein function annotation (CAFA) experiment. Fifty-four methods representing the state of the art for protein function prediction were evaluated on a target set of 866 proteins from 11 organisms. Two findings stand out: (i) today's best protein function prediction algorithms substantially outperform widely used first-generation methods, with large gains on all types of targets; and (ii) although the top methods perform well enough to guide experiments, there is considerable need for improvement of currently available tools.

  18. Resonance assignment of disordered protein with repetitive and overlapping sequence using combinatorial approach reveals initial structural propensities and local restrictions in the denatured state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Nikita; Kumar, Ashutosh, E-mail: askutoshk@iitb.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Department of Bioscience and Bioengineering (India)

    2016-09-15

    NMR resonance assignment of intrinsically disordered proteins poses a challenge because of the limited dispersion of amide proton chemical shifts. This becomes even more complex with the increase in the size of the system. Residue specific selective labeling/unlabeling experiments have been used to resolve the overlap, but require multiple sample preparations. Here, we demonstrate an assignment strategy requiring only a single sample of uniformly labeled {sup 13}C,{sup 15}N-protein. We have used a combinatorial approach, involving 3D-HNN, CC(CO)NH and 2D-MUSIC, which allowed us to assign a denatured centromeric protein Cse4 of 229 residues. Further, we show that even the less sensitive experiments, when used in an efficient manner can lead to the complete assignment of a complex system without the use of specialized probes in a relatively short time frame. The assignment of the amino acids discloses the presence of local structural propensities even in the denatured state accompanied by restricted motion in certain regions that provides insights into the early folding events of the protein.

  19. A large piece of a small pie: Minimum wages and unemployment benefits in an assignment model with search frictions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Gautier (Pieter); C.N. Teulings (Coen)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractMost empirical studies on the minimum wage find a spike at the minimum wage, compression of wage differentials at a large interval above the minimum wage and small employment losses. This paper offers a search model which is consistent with these facts. We consider a continuum of worker

  20. Pseudo 5D HN(C)N experiment to facilitate the assignment of backbone resonances in proteins exhibiting high backbone shift degeneracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Dinesh, E-mail: dineshcbmr@gmail.com [Centre of Biomedical Research (CBMR), SGPGIMS Campus, Raibareli Road, Lucknow 226014 (India); Raikwal, Nisha [Centre of Biomedical Research (CBMR), SGPGIMS Campus, Raibareli Road, Lucknow 226014 (India); Shukla, Vaibhav Kumar; Pandey, Himanshu; Arora, Ashish [Molecular and Structural Biology Division, CSIR, Central Drug Research Institute, Lucknow 226031 (India); Guleria, Anupam, E-mail: anuguleriaphy@gmail.com [Centre of Biomedical Research (CBMR), SGPGIMS Campus, Raibareli Road, Lucknow 226014 (India)

    2014-09-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A reduced dimensionality experiment – referred as pseudo 5D HN(C)N- is presented. • Encodes highly resolved 5D spectral information in a 3D spectrum. • Superior in terms of peak dispersion. • Facilitates assignment of crowded HSQC spectra of moderately sized proteins. • Modulated {sup 15}N chemical shifts are used to break the amide shift degeneracy. - Abstract: Assignment of protein backbone resonances is most routinely carried out using triple resonance three-dimensional NMR experiments involving amide {sup 1}H/{sup 15}N resonances. However for intrinsically unstructured proteins, alpha-helical proteins or proteins containing several disordered fragments, the assignment becomes problematic because of high-degree of backbone shift degeneracy. In this backdrop, a novel reduced-dimensionality (RD) experiment –(5, 3)D-hNCO-CANH- is presented to facilitate/validate the sequential backbone resonance assignment in such proteins. The proposed 3D NMR experiment makes use of the modulated amide {sup 15}N chemical shifts (resulting from the joint sampling along both its indirect dimensions) to resolve the ambiguity involved in connecting the neighboring amide resonances (i.e. H{sub i}N{sub i} and H{sub i−1}N{sub i−1}) for overlapping amide-NH peaks. The experiment -in combination with routine triple resonance 3D-NMR experiments involving backbone amide ({sup 1}H/{sup 15}N) and carbon ({sup 13}C{sup α}/{sup 13}C′) chemical shifts- will serve as a powerful complementary tool to achieve the nearly complete assignment of protein backbone resonances in a time efficient manner.

  1. Large cryptic internal sequence repeats in protein structures from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    [Sarani R, Udayaprakash N A, Subashini R, Mridula P, Yamane T and Sekar K 2009 Large cryptic internal sequence repeats in protein structures from Homo sapiens; J. Biosci. 34 103–112]. Keywords. Propensity; structure–function correlation; human genome; structural plasticity; three-dimensional structure; identical and.

  2. Folding of a large protein at high structural resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Benjamin T; Mayne, Leland; Hinshaw, James R; Sosnick, Tobin R; Englander, S Walter

    2013-11-19

    Kinetic folding of the large two-domain maltose binding protein (MBP; 370 residues) was studied at high structural resolution by an advanced hydrogen-exchange pulse-labeling mass-spectrometry method (HX MS). Dilution into folding conditions initiates a fast molecular collapse into a polyglobular conformation (rest of the folding process. It contains the sites of three previously reported destabilizing mutations that greatly slow folding. These results indicate that the intermediate is an obligatory step on the MBP folding pathway. MBP then folds to the native state on a longer time scale (~100 s), suggestively in more than one step, the first of which forms structure adjacent to the 7-s intermediate. These results add a large protein to the list of proteins known to fold through distinct native-like intermediates in distinct pathways.

  3. 1H, 13C and 15N NMR assignments of an unusual Ca2+-binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica in its apo form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Deepshikha; Sakuntala, Mutyala; Murmu, Aruna; Bhattacharya, Alok; Chary, Kandala V R

    2017-04-01

    We report almost complete sequence specific 1H, 13C and 15N NMR assignments of an unusual Ca2+-binding protein from Entamoeba histolytica (EhCaBP6) in its apo form as a prelude to its structural and functional characterization.

  4. Method for Rapid Protein Identification in a Large Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenli Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein identification is an integral part of proteomics research. The available tools to identify proteins in tandem mass spectrometry experiments are not optimized to face current challenges in terms of identification scale and speed owing to the exponential growth of the protein database and the accelerated generation of mass spectrometry data, as well as the demand for nonspecific digestion and post-modifications in complex-sample identification. As a result, a rapid method is required to mitigate such complexity and computation challenges. This paper thus aims to present an open method to prevent enzyme and modification specificity on a large database. This paper designed and developed a distributed program to facilitate application to computer resources. With this optimization, nearly linear speedup and real-time support are achieved on a large database with nonspecific digestion, thus enabling testing with two classical large protein databases in a 20-blade cluster. This work aids in the discovery of more significant biological results, such as modification sites, and enables the identification of more complex samples, such as metaproteomics samples.

  5. An automated system designed for large scale NMR data deposition and annotation: application to over 600 assigned chemical shift data entries to the BioMagResBank from the Riken Structural Genomics/Proteomics Initiative internal database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Naohiro; Harano, Yoko; Tochio, Naoya; Nakatani, Eiichi; Kigawa, Takanori; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Mading, Steve; Ulrich, Eldon L; Markley, John L; Akutsu, Hideo; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2012-08-01

    Biomolecular NMR chemical shift data are key information for the functional analysis of biomolecules and the development of new techniques for NMR studies utilizing chemical shift statistical information. Structural genomics projects are major contributors to the accumulation of protein chemical shift information. The management of the large quantities of NMR data generated by each project in a local database and the transfer of the data to the public databases are still formidable tasks because of the complicated nature of NMR data. Here we report an automated and efficient system developed for the deposition and annotation of a large number of data sets including (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments used for the structure determination of proteins. We have demonstrated the feasibility of our system by applying it to over 600 entries from the internal database generated by the RIKEN Structural Genomics/Proteomics Initiative (RSGI) to the public database, BioMagResBank (BMRB). We have assessed the quality of the deposited chemical shifts by comparing them with those predicted from the PDB coordinate entry for the corresponding protein. The same comparison for other matched BMRB/PDB entries deposited from 2001-2011 has been carried out and the results suggest that the RSGI entries greatly improved the quality of the BMRB database. Since the entries include chemical shifts acquired under strikingly similar experimental conditions, these NMR data can be expected to be a promising resource to improve current technologies as well as to develop new NMR methods for protein studies.

  6. Protein resonance assignment at MAS frequencies approaching 100 kHz: a quantitative comparison of J-coupling and dipolar-coupling-based transfer methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penzel, Susanne; Smith, Albert A.; Agarwal, Vipin; Hunkeler, Andreas [ETH Zürich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Org, Mai-Liis; Samoson, Ago, E-mail: ago.samoson@ttu.ee [Tallinn University of Technology, NMR Instituut, Tartu Teadus, Tehnomeedikum (Estonia); Böckmann, Anja, E-mail: a.bockmann@ibcp.fr [UMR 5086 CNRS/Université de Lyon 1, Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Protéines (France); Ernst, Matthias, E-mail: maer@ethz.ch; Meier, Beat H., E-mail: beme@ethz.ch [ETH Zürich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland)

    2015-10-15

    We discuss the optimum experimental conditions to obtain assignment spectra for solid proteins at magic-angle spinning (MAS) frequencies around 100 kHz. We present a systematic examination of the MAS dependence of the amide proton T{sub 2}′ times and a site-specific comparison of T{sub 2}′ at 93 kHz versus 60 kHz MAS frequency. A quantitative analysis of transfer efficiencies of building blocks, as they are used for typical 3D experiments, was performed. To do this, we compared dipolar-coupling and J-coupling based transfer steps. The building blocks were then combined into 3D experiments for sequential resonance assignment, where we evaluated signal-to-noise ratio and information content of the different 3D spectra in order to identify the best assignment strategy. Based on this comparison, six experiments were selected to optimally assign the model protein ubiquitin, solely using spectra acquired at 93 kHz MAS. Within 3 days of instrument time, the required spectra were recorded from which the backbone resonances have been assigned to over 96 %.

  7. Insights into Hox protein function from a large scale combinatorial analysis of protein domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Merabet

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein function is encoded within protein sequence and protein domains. However, how protein domains cooperate within a protein to modulate overall activity and how this impacts functional diversification at the molecular and organism levels remains largely unaddressed. Focusing on three domains of the central class Drosophila Hox transcription factor AbdominalA (AbdA, we used combinatorial domain mutations and most known AbdA developmental functions as biological readouts to investigate how protein domains collectively shape protein activity. The results uncover redundancy, interactivity, and multifunctionality of protein domains as salient features underlying overall AbdA protein activity, providing means to apprehend functional diversity and accounting for the robustness of Hox-controlled developmental programs. Importantly, the results highlight context-dependency in protein domain usage and interaction, allowing major modifications in domains to be tolerated without general functional loss. The non-pleoitropic effect of domain mutation suggests that protein modification may contribute more broadly to molecular changes underlying morphological diversification during evolution, so far thought to rely largely on modification in gene cis-regulatory sequences.

  8. Insights into Hox protein function from a large scale combinatorial analysis of protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merabet, Samir; Litim-Mecheri, Isma; Karlsson, Daniel; Dixit, Richa; Saadaoui, Mehdi; Monier, Bruno; Brun, Christine; Thor, Stefan; Vijayraghavan, K; Perrin, Laurent; Pradel, Jacques; Graba, Yacine

    2011-10-01

    Protein function is encoded within protein sequence and protein domains. However, how protein domains cooperate within a protein to modulate overall activity and how this impacts functional diversification at the molecular and organism levels remains largely unaddressed. Focusing on three domains of the central class Drosophila Hox transcription factor AbdominalA (AbdA), we used combinatorial domain mutations and most known AbdA developmental functions as biological readouts to investigate how protein domains collectively shape protein activity. The results uncover redundancy, interactivity, and multifunctionality of protein domains as salient features underlying overall AbdA protein activity, providing means to apprehend functional diversity and accounting for the robustness of Hox-controlled developmental programs. Importantly, the results highlight context-dependency in protein domain usage and interaction, allowing major modifications in domains to be tolerated without general functional loss. The non-pleoitropic effect of domain mutation suggests that protein modification may contribute more broadly to molecular changes underlying morphological diversification during evolution, so far thought to rely largely on modification in gene cis-regulatory sequences.

  9. Uncovering symmetry-breaking vector and reliability order for assigning secondary structures of proteins from atomic NMR chemical shifts in amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wookyung; Lee, Woonghee; Lee, Weontae; Kim, Suhkmann; Chang, Iksoo

    2011-12-01

    Unravelling the complex correlation between chemical shifts of (13) C (α), (13) C (β), (13) C', (1) H (α), (15) N, (1) H ( N ) atoms in amino acids of proteins from NMR experiment and local structural environments of amino acids facilitates the assignment of secondary structures of proteins. This is an important impetus for both determining the three-dimensional structure and understanding the biological function of proteins. The previous empirical correlation scores which relate chemical shifts of (13) C (α), (13) C (β), (13) C', (1) H (α), (15) N, (1) H ( N ) atoms to secondary structures resulted in progresses toward assigning secondary structures of proteins. However, the physical-mathematical framework for these was elusive partly due to both the limited and orthogonal exploration of higher-dimensional chemical shifts of hetero-nucleus and the lack of physical-mathematical understanding underlying those correlation scores. Here we present a simple multi-dimensional hetero-nuclear chemical shift score function (MDHN-CSSF) which captures systematically the salient feature of such complex correlations without any references to a random coil state of proteins. We uncover the symmetry-breaking vector and its reliability order not only for distinguishing different secondary structures of proteins but also for capturing the delicate sensitivity interplayed among chemical shifts of (13) C (α), (13) C (β), (13) C', (1) H (α), (15) N, (1) H ( N ) atoms simultaneously, which then provides a straightforward framework toward assigning secondary structures of proteins. MDHN-CSSF could correctly assign secondary structures of training (validating) proteins with the favourable (comparable) Q3 scores in comparison with those from the previous correlation scores. MDHN-CSSF provides a simple and robust strategy for the systematic assignment of secondary structures of proteins and would facilitate the de novo determination of three-dimensional structures

  10. Complex protein nanopatterns over large areas via colloidal lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Stine H; Pedersen, Gitte Albinus; Ogaki, Ryosuke

    2013-01-01

    The patterning of biomolecules at the nanoscale provides a powerful method to investigate cellular adhesion processes. A novel method for patterning is presented that is based on colloidal monolayer templating combined with multiple and angled deposition steps. Patterns of gold and SiO2 layers...... matrix proteins (vitronectin) or cellular ligands (the extracellular domain of E-cadherin) in the nanopatterns, whereas the selective poly(l-lysine)–poly(ethylene glycol) functionalization of the SiO2 matrix renders it protein repellent. Cell studies, as a proof of principle, demonstrate the potential...... are used to generate complex protein nanopatterns over large areas. Simple circular patches or more complex ring structures are produced in addition to hierarchical patterns of smaller patches. The gold regions are modified through alkanethiol chemistry, which enables the preparation of extracellular...

  11. Countercurrent tangential chromatography for large-scale protein purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkazh, Oleg; Kanani, Dharmesh; Barth, Morgan; Long, Matthew; Hussain, Daniar; Zydney, Andrew L

    2011-03-01

    Recent advances in cell culture technology have created significant pressure on the downstream purification process, leading to a "downstream bottleneck" in the production of recombinant therapeutic proteins for the treatment of cancer, genetic disorders, and cardiovascular disease. Countercurrent tangential chromatography overcomes many of the limitations of conventional column chromatography by having the resin (in the form of a slurry) flow through a series of static mixers and hollow fiber membrane modules. The buffers used in the binding, washing, and elution steps flow countercurrent to the resin, enabling high-resolution separations while reducing the amount of buffer needed for protein purification. The results obtained in this study provide the first experimental demonstration of the feasibility of using countercurrent tangential chromatography for the separation of a model protein mixture containing bovine serum albumin and myoglobin using a commercially available anion exchange resin. Batch uptake/desorption experiments were used in combination with critical flux data for the hollow fiber filters to design the countercurrent tangential chromatography system. A two-stage batch separation yielded the purified target protein at >99% purity with 94% recovery. The results clearly demonstrate the potential of using countercurrent tangential chromatography for the large-scale purification of therapeutic proteins. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Predicting protein functions from redundancies in large-scale protein interaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Manoj Pratim; Liang, Shoudan

    2003-01-01

    Interpreting data from large-scale protein interaction experiments has been a challenging task because of the widespread presence of random false positives. Here, we present a network-based statistical algorithm that overcomes this difficulty and allows us to derive functions of unannotated proteins from large-scale interaction data. Our algorithm uses the insight that if two proteins share significantly larger number of common interaction partners than random, they have close functional associations. Analysis of publicly available data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals >2,800 reliable functional associations, 29% of which involve at least one unannotated protein. By further analyzing these associations, we derive tentative functions for 81 unannotated proteins with high certainty. Our method is not overly sensitive to the false positives present in the data. Even after adding 50% randomly generated interactions to the measured data set, we are able to recover almost all (approximately 89%) of the original associations.

  13. 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignment of the N-terminal domainof Mason-Pfizer monkey virus capsid protein, CA 1-140

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macek, Pavel; Žídek, L.; Rumlová, Michaela; Pichová, Iva; Sklenář, V.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 1 (2008), s. 43-45 ISSN 1874-2718 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC545; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06030; GA MŠk 1M0508 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : nmr * assignment * capsid protein Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.015, year: 2008

  14. NMR assignments of actin depolymerizing factor (ADF) like UNC-60A and cofilin like UNC-60B proteins of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Vaibhav Kumar; Kabra, Ashish; Yadav, Rahul; Ono, Shoichiro; Kumar, Dinesh; Arora, Ashish

    2015-10-01

    The actin filament dynamics in nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, is regulated by differential activity of two proteins UNC-60A and UNC-60B. UNC-60A exhibits strong pointed end depolymerization on C. elegans actin (Ce-actin), strong inhibition of polymerization, strong monomer sequestering activity, weak severing activity, and low affinity for F-actin binding, while UNC-60B exhibits strong pointed end depolymerization on rabbit muscle actin, strong severing activity, and high affinity for F-actin binding. Structural characterization of these proteins will help to understand (1) molecular mechanism of actin dynamics regulation and (2) the differential activity of these proteins. Here, we report (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N chemical shift assignments of these two proteins as determined by heteronuclear NMR experiments (at pH 6.5 and temperature 298 K).

  15. Rate matrices for analyzing large families of protein sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devauchelle, C; Grossmann, A; Hénaut, A; Holschneider, M; Monnerot, M; Risler, J L; Torrésani, B

    2001-01-01

    We propose and study a new approach for the analysis of families of protein sequences. This method is related to the LogDet distances used in phylogenetic reconstructions; it can be viewed as an attempt to embed these distances into a multidimensional framework. The proposed method starts by associating a Markov matrix to each pairwise alignment deduced from a given multiple alignment. The central objects under consideration here are matrix-valued logarithms L of these Markov matrices, which exist under conditions that are compatible with fairly large divergence between the sequences. These logarithms allow us to compare data from a family of aligned proteins with simple models (in particular, continuous reversible Markov models) and to test the adequacy of such models. If one neglects fluctuations arising from the finite length of sequences, any continuous reversible Markov model with a single rate matrix Q over an arbitrary tree predicts that all the observed matrices L are multiples of Q. Our method exploits this fact, without relying on any tree estimation. We test this prediction on a family of proteins encoded by the mitochondrial genome of 26 multicellular animals, which include vertebrates, arthropods, echinoderms, molluscs, and nematodes. A principal component analysis of the observed matrices L shows that a single rate model can be used as a rough approximation to the data, but that systematic deviations from any such model are unmistakable and related to the evolutionary history of the species under consideration.

  16. Comprehensive large-scale assessment of intrinsic protein disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Ian; Giollo, Manuel; Di Domenico, Tomás; Ferrari, Carlo; Zimmermann, Olav; Tosatto, Silvio C E

    2015-01-15

    Intrinsically disordered regions are key for the function of numerous proteins. Due to the difficulties in experimental disorder characterization, many computational predictors have been developed with various disorder flavors. Their performance is generally measured on small sets mainly from experimentally solved structures, e.g. Protein Data Bank (PDB) chains. MobiDB has only recently started to collect disorder annotations from multiple experimental structures. MobiDB annotates disorder for UniProt sequences, allowing us to conduct the first large-scale assessment of fast disorder predictors on 25 833 different sequences with X-ray crystallographic structures. In addition to a comprehensive ranking of predictors, this analysis produced the following interesting observations. (i) The predictors cluster according to their disorder definition, with a consensus giving more confidence. (ii) Previous assessments appear over-reliant on data annotated at the PDB chain level and performance is lower on entire UniProt sequences. (iii) Long disordered regions are harder to predict. (iv) Depending on the structural and functional types of the proteins, differences in prediction performance of up to 10% are observed. The datasets are available from Web site at URL: http://mobidb.bio.unipd.it/lsd. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. A proton nuclear magnetic resonance study of the antihypertensive and antiviral protein BDS-I from the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata: sequential and stereospecific resonance assignment and secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, P C; Clore, G M; Beress, L; Gronenborn, A M

    1989-03-07

    The sequential resonance assignment of the 1H NMR spectrum of the antihypertensive and antiviral protein BDS-I from the sea anemone Anemonia sulcata is presented. This is carried out with two-dimensional NMR techniques to identify through-bond and through-space (less than 5 A) connectivities. Added spectral complexity arises from the fact that the sample is an approximately 1:1 mixture of two BDS-I isoproteins, (Leu-18)-BDS-I and (Phe-18)-BDS-I. Complete assignments, however, are obtained, largely due to the increased resolution and sensitivity afforded at 600 MHz. In addition, the stereospecific assignment of a large number of beta-methylene protons is achieved from an analysis of the pattern of 3J alpha beta coupling constants and the relative magnitudes of intraresidue NOEs involving the NH, C alpha H, and C beta H protons. Regular secondary structure elements are deduced from a qualitative interpretation of the nuclear Overhauser enhancement, 3JHN alpha coupling constant, and amide NH exchange data. A triple-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet is found to be related to that found in partially homologous sea anemone polypeptide toxins.

  18. Amino-acid residue association models for large scale protein-protein interaction prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Raghuraj; Tun, Kyaw; Lakshminarayanan, Samavedham; Dhar, Pawan K

    2009-01-01

    The computational prediction of protein-protein interactions (PPI) is an essential complement to direct experimental evidence. Traditional approaches rely on less available or computationally predicted surface properties, show database-specific performances and are computationally expensive for large-scale datasets. Several sensitivity and specificity issues remain. Here, we report a novel method based on 'Amino-acid Residue Associations' (ARA) among interacting proteins which utilizes the accurate and easily available primary sequence. Large scale PPI datasets for six model species (from E. coli to human) were studied. The ARA method shows up to 73%sensitivity and 78% specificity. Furthermore, the method performs remarkably well in terms of stability and generalizability. The performance of ARA method benchmarked against existing prediction techniques shows performance improvement upto 25%. Ability of ARA method to predict PPI across species and across databases is also demonstrated. Overall, the ARA method provides a significant improvement over existing ones in correctly identifying large scale protein-protein interactions,irrespective of the data resource, network size or organism. The MATLAB code for ARA approach will be made available upon request.

  19. Prediction of Protein-Protein Interacting Sites: How to Bridge Molecular Events to Large Scale Protein Interaction Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, Lisa; Martelli, Pier Luigi; Rossi, Ivan; Fariselli, Piero; Casadio, Rita

    Most of the cellular functions are the result of the concerted action of protein complexes forming pathways and networks. For this reason, efforts were devoted to the study of protein-protein interactions. Large-scale experiments on whole genomes allowed the identification of interacting protein pairs. However residues involved in the interaction are generally not known and the majority of the interactions still lack a structural characterization. A crucial step towards the deciphering of the interaction mechanism of proteins is the recognition of their interacting surfaces, particularly in those structures for which also the most recent interaction network resources do not contain information. To this purpose, we developed a neural network-based method that is able to characterize protein complexes, by predicting amino acid residues that mediate the interactions. All the Protein Data Bank (PDB) chains, both in the unbound and in the complexed form, are predicted and the results are stored in a database of interaction surfaces (http://gpcr.biocomp.unibo.it/zenpatches). Finally, we performed a survey on the different computational methods for protein-protein interaction prediction and on their training/testing sets in order to highlight the most informative properties of protein interfaces.

  20. Improving the performance of DomainDiscovery of protein domain boundary assignment using inter-domain linker index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zomaya Albert Y

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge of protein domain boundaries is critical for the characterisation and understanding of protein function. The ability to identify domains without the knowledge of the structure – by using sequence information only – is an essential step in many types of protein analyses. In this present study, we demonstrate that the performance of DomainDiscovery is improved significantly by including the inter-domain linker index value for domain identification from sequence-based information. Improved DomainDiscovery uses a Support Vector Machine (SVM approach and a unique training dataset built on the principle of consensus among experts in defining domains in protein structure. The SVM was trained using a PSSM (Position Specific Scoring Matrix, secondary structure, solvent accessibility information and inter-domain linker index to detect possible domain boundaries for a target sequence. Results Improved DomainDiscovery is compared with other methods by benchmarking against a structurally non-redundant dataset and also CASP5 targets. Improved DomainDiscovery achieves 70% accuracy for domain boundary identification in multi-domains proteins. Conclusion Improved DomainDiscovery compares favourably to the performance of other methods and excels in the identification of domain boundaries for multi-domain proteins as a result of introducing support vector machine with benchmark_2 dataset.

  1. Chlorina and viridis mutants of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) allow assignment of long-wavelength chlorophyll forms to individual Lhca proteins of photosystem I in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoetzel, J; Bossmann, B; Grimme, L H

    1998-10-09

    The isolated subcomplex LHCI-730 of plant photosystem I (PSI) chlorophyll (Chl) alb binding antenna is a heterodimer of Lhca1 and Lhca4 and has a 77 K fluorescence emission peak at 730 nm (F730). Recently, three Chl spectral forms with 77 K fluorescence emission peaks at 720 nm, 730 nm and 742 nm were identified in native PSI. In an attempt to assign the two longest wavelength emission maxima to peripheral PSI antenna proteins, we performed 77 K fluorescence emission spectroscopy on intact leaves of chlorina and viridis mutants from barley which lack individual LHCI-730 proteins. This approach indicates that F732 is found only in Lhca1 and F742 only in Lhca4, when these proteins are associated with the PSI reaction centre.

  2. 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments for the protein coded by gene locus BB0938 of Bordetella bronchiseptica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Paolo; Ramelot, Theresa A.; Xiao, Rong; Ho, Chi K.; Ma, LiChung; Acton, Thomas; Kennedy, Michael A.; Montelione, Gaetano

    2005-11-01

    The product of gene locus BB0938 from Bordetella bronchiseptica (Swiss-Prot ID: Q7WNU7-BORBR; NESG target ID: BoR11; Wunderlich et al., 2004; Pfam ID: PF03476) is a 128-residue protein of unknown function. This broadly conserved protein family is found in eubacteria and eukaryotes. Using triple resonance NMR techniques, we have determined 98% of backbone and 94% of side chain 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments. The chemical shift and 3J(HN?Ha) scalar coupling data reveal a b topology with a seven-residue helical insert, ??????????. BMRB deposit with accession number 6693. Reference: Wunderlich et al. (2004) Proteins, 56, 181?187.

  3. 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments for Escherichia coli ytfP, a member of the broadly conserved UPF0131 protein domain family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aramini, James M.; Swapna, G.V.T.; Huang, Yuanpeng; Rajan, Paranji K.; Xiao, Rong; Shastry, Ritu; Acton, Thomas; Cort, John R.; Kennedy, Michael A.; Montelione, Gaetano

    2005-11-01

    Protein ytfP from Escherichia coli (Swiss-Prot ID: YTFP-ECOLI; NESG target ID: ER111; Wunderlich et al., 2004) is a 113-residue member of the UPF0131 protein family (Pfam ID: PF03674) of unknown function. This domain family is found in organisms from all three kingdoms, archaea, eubacteria and eukaryotes. Using triple resonance NMR techniques, we have determined 97% of backbone and 91% of side chain 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments. The chemical shift and 3J(HN?Ha) scalar coupling data reveal a mixed a/b topology,????????. BMRB deposit with Accession No. 6448. Reference: Wunderlich et al. (2004) Proteins, 56, 181?187.

  4. Large-scale identification of human cerebrovascular proteins: Inter-tissue and intracerebral vascular protein diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Jung Lee

    Full Text Available The human cerebrovascular system is responsible for regulating demand-dependent perfusion and maintaining the blood-brain barrier (BBB. In addition, defects in the human cerebrovasculature lead to stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage, vascular malformations, and vascular cognitive impairment. The objective of this study was to discover new proteins of the human cerebrovascular system using expression data from the Human Protein Atlas, a large-scale project which allows public access to immunohistochemical analysis of human tissues. We screened 20,158 proteins in the HPA and identified 346 expression patterns correlating to blood vessels in human brain. Independent experiments showed that 51/52 of these distributions could be experimentally replicated across different brain samples. Some proteins (40% demonstrated endothelial cell (EC-enriched expression, while others were expressed primarily in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC; 18%; 39% of these proteins were expressed in both cell types. Most brain EC markers were tissue oligospecific; that is, they were expressed in endothelia in an average of 4.8 out of 9 organs examined. Although most markers expressed in endothelial cells of the brain were present in all cerebral capillaries, a significant number (21% were expressed only in a fraction of brain capillaries within each brain sample. Among proteins found in cerebral VSMC, virtually all were also expressed in peripheral VSMC and in non-vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC. Only one was potentially brain specific: VHL (Von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor. HRC (histidine rich calcium binding protein and VHL were restricted to VSMC and not found in non-vascular tissues such as uterus or gut. In conclusion, we define a set of brain vascular proteins that could be relevant to understanding the unique physiology and pathophysiology of the human cerebrovasculature. This set of proteins defines inter-organ molecular differences in the vasculature and

  5. Reduced Dimensionality tailored HN(C)N Pulse Sequences for Efficient Backbone Resonance Assignment of Proteins through Rapid Identification of Sequential HSQC peaks

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    Two novel reduced dimensionality (RD) experiments -(4,3)D-hNCOcaNH and (4,3)D-hNcoCANH- have been presented here to facilitate the backbone resonance assignment of proteins both in terms of its accuracy and speed. The experiments basically represent an improvisation of previously reported HN(C)N experiment [Panchal et. al., J. Biomol. NMR. (2002), 20 (2), 135-147] and exploit the simple reduced dimensionality NMR concept [Szyperski et. al. (2002), Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99(12), 8009-8014] to achieve (a) higher dispersion and resolution along the co-evolved F1 dimension and (b) rapid identification of sequential HSQC peaks on its F2(15N)- F3(1H) planes. The current implementation is based on the fact that the linear combination of 15N and 13CO/13Ca chemical shifts offers relatively better dispersion and randomness compared to the individual chemical shifts; thus enables the assignment of crowded HSQC spectra by resolving the ambiguities generally encountered in HNCN based assignment protocol because of ...

  6. Molecular characterization and chromosomal assignment of equine cartilage derived retinoic acid sensitive protein (CD-RAP)/melanoma inhibitory activity (MIA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Lise Charlotte; Mata, Xavier; Thomsen, Preben Dybdahl

    2008-01-01

    Cartilage-derived retinoic acid sensitive protein (CD-RAP) also known as melanoma inhibitory activity (MIA) has already been established as a marker for chondrocyte differentiation and a number of cancerous condition sin humans. Studies have also shown that CD-RAP/MIA is a potential marker of joint...... to the human gene is 90% for the translated region. The upstream sequence includes regulatory elements and putative transcription factor binding sites previously described in the human and murine promoter regions. The deduced amino acid sequence consists of 130 aa including a signal peptide of 23 aa, and has...... a 91% identity to the human protein. Using radiation hybrid mapping, the CD-RAP/MIA gene was localized to the p arm of equine chromosome 10 (ECA10p), which is in accordance with prediction based on the current human-equine comparative map. Gene expression studies showed expression of CD-RAP/MIA m...

  7. Resonance assignment of As-p18, a fatty acid binding protein secreted by developing larvae of the parasitic nematode Ascaris suum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez-Shimabukuro, Marina; Rey-Burusco, M Florencia; Cooper, Alan; Kennedy, Malcolm W; Córsico, Betina; Smith, Brian O

    2014-04-01

    As-p18 is produced and secreted by larvae of the parasitic nematode Ascaris suum as they develop within their eggs. The protein is a member of the fatty acid binding protein (FABP) family found in a wide range of eukaryotes, but is distinctive in that it is secreted from the synthesizing cell and has predicted additional structural features not previously seen in other FABPs. As-p18 and similar proteins found only in nematodes have therefore been designated 'nemFABPs'. Sequence-specific (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments were established for the 155 amino acid recombinant protein (18.3 kDa) in complex with oleic acid, using a series of three-dimensional triple-resonance heteronuclear NMR experiments. The secondary structure of As-p18 is predicted to be very similar to other FABPs, but the protein has extended loops that have not been observed in other FABPs whose structures have so far been solved.

  8. Large-scale protein-protein interactions detection by integrating big biosensing data with computational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Zhu-Hong; Li, Shuai; Gao, Xin; Luo, Xin; Ji, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are the basis of biological functions, and studying these interactions on a molecular level is of crucial importance for understanding the functionality of a living cell. During the past decade, biosensors have emerged as an important tool for the high-throughput identification of proteins and their interactions. However, the high-throughput experimental methods for identifying PPIs are both time-consuming and expensive. On the other hand, high-throughput PPI data are often associated with high false-positive and high false-negative rates. Targeting at these problems, we propose a method for PPI detection by integrating biosensor-based PPI data with a novel computational model. This method was developed based on the algorithm of extreme learning machine combined with a novel representation of protein sequence descriptor. When performed on the large-scale human protein interaction dataset, the proposed method achieved 84.8% prediction accuracy with 84.08% sensitivity at the specificity of 85.53%. We conducted more extensive experiments to compare the proposed method with the state-of-the-art techniques, support vector machine. The achieved results demonstrate that our approach is very promising for detecting new PPIs, and it can be a helpful supplement for biosensor-based PPI data detection.

  9. Large-Scale Protein-Protein Interactions Detection by Integrating Big Biosensing Data with Computational Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu-Hong You

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions are the basis of biological functions, and studying these interactions on a molecular level is of crucial importance for understanding the functionality of a living cell. During the past decade, biosensors have emerged as an important tool for the high-throughput identification of proteins and their interactions. However, the high-throughput experimental methods for identifying PPIs are both time-consuming and expensive. On the other hand, high-throughput PPI data are often associated with high false-positive and high false-negative rates. Targeting at these problems, we propose a method for PPI detection by integrating biosensor-based PPI data with a novel computational model. This method was developed based on the algorithm of extreme learning machine combined with a novel representation of protein sequence descriptor. When performed on the large-scale human protein interaction dataset, the proposed method achieved 84.8% prediction accuracy with 84.08% sensitivity at the specificity of 85.53%. We conducted more extensive experiments to compare the proposed method with the state-of-the-art techniques, support vector machine. The achieved results demonstrate that our approach is very promising for detecting new PPIs, and it can be a helpful supplement for biosensor-based PPI data detection.

  10. Mass spectrometry allows direct identification of proteins in large genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Küster, B; Mortensen, Peter V.; Andersen, Jens S.

    2001-01-01

    Proteome projects seek to provide systematic functional analysis of the genes uncovered by genome sequencing initiatives. Mass spectrometric protein identification is a key requirement in these studies but to date, database searching tools rely on the availability of protein sequences derived fro...... genome and allows identification, mapping, cloning and assistance in gene prediction of any protein for which minimal mass spectrometric information can be obtained. Several novel proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana and human have been discovered in this way....

  11. Large-scale crystallization of proteins for purification and formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekmat, Dariusch

    2015-07-01

    Since about 170 years, salts were used to create supersaturated solutions and crystallize proteins. The dehydrating effect of salts as well as their kosmotropic or chaotropic character was revealed. Even the suitability of organic solvents for crystallization was already recognized. Interestingly, what was performed during the early times is still practiced today. A lot of effort was put into understanding the underlying physico-chemical interaction mechanisms leading to protein crystallization. However, it was understood that already the solvation of proteins is a highly complex process not to mention the intricate interrelation of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions taking place. Although many basic questions are still unanswered, preparative protein crystallization was attempted as illustrated in the presented case studies. Due to the highly variable nature of crystallization, individual design of the crystallization process is needed in every single case. It was shown that preparative crystallization from impure protein solutions as a capture step is possible after applying adequate pre-treatment procedures like precipitation or extraction. Protein crystallization can replace one or more chromatography steps. It was further shown that crystallization can serve as an attractive alternative means for formulation of therapeutic proteins. Crystalline proteins can offer enhanced purity and enable highly concentrated doses of the active ingredient. Easy scalability of the proposed protein crystallization processes was shown using the maximum local energy dissipation as a suitable scale-up criterion. Molecular modeling and target-oriented protein engineering may allow protein crystallization to become part of a platform purification process in the near future.

  12. Automated amino acid side-chain NMR assignment of proteins using {sup 13}C- and {sup 15}N-resolved 3D [{sup 1}H,{sup 1}H]-NOESY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiorito, Francesco [Institut fuer Molekularbiologie und Biophysik, ETH Zuerich (Switzerland); Herrmann, Torsten [Universite de Lyon, CNRS/ENS Lyon/UCB Lyon-1, Centre Europeen de RMN a Tres Hauts Champs de Lyon (France); Damberger, Fred F.; Wuethrich, Kurt [Institut fuer Molekularbiologie und Biophysik, ETH Zuerich (Switzerland)], E-mail: kw@mol.biol.ethz.ch

    2008-09-15

    ASCAN is a new algorithm for automatic sequence-specific NMR assignment of amino acid side-chains in proteins, which uses as input the primary structure of the protein, chemical shift lists of {sup 1}H{sup N}, {sup 15}N, {sup 13}C{sup {alpha}}, {sup 13}C{sup {beta}} and possibly {sup 1}H{sup {alpha}} from the previous polypeptide backbone assignment, and one or several 3D {sup 13}C- or {sup 15}N-resolved [{sup 1}H,{sup 1}H]-NOESY spectra. ASCAN has also been laid out for the use of TOCSY-type data sets as supplementary input. The program assigns new resonances based on comparison of the NMR signals expected from the chemical structure with the experimentally observed NOESY peak patterns. The core parts of the algorithm are a procedure for generating expected peak positions, which is based on variable combinations of assigned and unassigned resonances that arise for the different amino acid types during the assignment procedure, and a corresponding set of acceptance criteria for assignments based on the NMR experiments used. Expected patterns of NOESY cross peaks involving unassigned resonances are generated using the list of previously assigned resonances, and tentative chemical shift values for the unassigned signals taken from the BMRB statistics for globular proteins. Use of this approach with the 101-amino acid residue protein FimD(25-125) resulted in 84% of the hydrogen atoms and their covalently bound heavy atoms being assigned with a correctness rate of 90%. Use of these side-chain assignments as input for automated NOE assignment and structure calculation with the ATNOS/CANDID/DYANA program suite yielded structure bundles of comparable quality, in terms of precision and accuracy of the atomic coordinates, as those of a reference structure determined with interactive assignment procedures. A rationale for the high quality of the ASCAN-based structure determination results from an analysis of the distribution of the assigned side chains, which revealed near

  13. Two New Tools for Glycopeptide Analysis Researchers: A Glycopeptide Decoy Generator and a Large Data Set of Assigned CID Spectra of Glycopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakbub, Jude C; Su, Xiaomeng; Zhu, Zhikai; Patabandige, Milani W; Hua, David; Go, Eden P; Desaire, Heather

    2017-08-04

    The glycopeptide analysis field is tightly constrained by a lack of effective tools that translate mass spectrometry data into meaningful chemical information, and perhaps the most challenging aspect of building effective glycopeptide analysis software is designing an accurate scoring algorithm for MS/MS data. We provide the glycoproteomics community with two tools to address this challenge. The first tool, a curated set of 100 expert-assigned CID spectra of glycopeptides, contains a diverse set of spectra from a variety of glycan types; the second tool, Glycopeptide Decoy Generator, is a new software application that generates glycopeptide decoys de novo. We developed these tools so that emerging methods of assigning glycopeptides' CID spectra could be rigorously tested. Software developers or those interested in developing skills in expert (manual) analysis can use these tools to facilitate their work. We demonstrate the tools' utility in assessing the quality of one particular glycopeptide software package, GlycoPep Grader, which assigns glycopeptides to CID spectra. We first acquired the set of 100 expert assigned CID spectra; then, we used the Decoy Generator (described herein) to generate 20 decoys per target glycopeptide. The assigned spectra and decoys were used to test the accuracy of GlycoPep Grader's scoring algorithm; new strengths and weaknesses were identified in the algorithm using this approach. Both newly developed tools are freely available. The software can be downloaded at http://glycopro.chem.ku.edu/GPJ.jar.

  14. A large-scale evaluation of computational protein function prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radivojac, P.; Clark, W.T.; Oron, T.R.; Schnoes, A.M.; Wittkop, T.; Kourmpetis, Y.A.I.; Dijk, van A.D.J.; Friedberg, I.

    2013-01-01

    Automated annotation of protein function is challenging. As the number of sequenced genomes rapidly grows, the overwhelming majority of protein products can only be annotated computationally. If computational predictions are to be relied upon, it is crucial that the accuracy of these methods be

  15. In silico analysis of large microbial surface proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Fátima; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the longest predicted proteins encoded in complete microbial genomes. They could be separated into two main classes: non-ribosomal peptide synthetases involved in secondary metabolism and surface proteins, many of them with a predicted or experimentally observed role in bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation. Such proteins, generally showing a repetitive structure, are widespread among prokaryotes and can be grouped into several different families based on sequence alignment, characteristics and predicted motifs. This classification may help in the characterization of newly described adhesins. The results of this study indicate that cell-cell interactions and biofilm formation are common events in the microbial world and take place via similar molecular mechanisms.

  16. Redundancies in Large-scale Protein Interaction Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Samanta, Manoj Pratim; Liang, Shoudan

    2003-01-01

    Understanding functional associations among genes discovered in sequencing projects is a key issue in post-genomic biology. However, reliable interpretation of the protein interaction data has been difficult. In this work, we show that if two proteins share significantly larger number of common interaction partners than random, they have close functional associations. Analysis of publicly available data from Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveals more than 2800 reliable functional associations, 29%...

  17. Expression of large hepatitis B envelope protein mutants using a new expression vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korec, E; Gerlich, W H

    1992-01-01

    Aminoterminal deletion mutants of the gene encoding the large hepatitis B surface protein were expressed in COS cells using a new expression vector. The truncated protein showed the same intracellular retention like the wild type protein. The findings show that the secretion block of the protein is not due to its aminoterminal myristylation.

  18. Chaperonin Structure - The Large Multi-Subunit Protein Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Roterman

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The multi sub-unit protein structure representing the chaperonins group is analyzed with respect to its hydrophobicity distribution. The proteins of this group assist protein folding supported by ATP. The specific axial symmetry GroEL structure (two rings of seven units stacked back to back - 524 aa each and the GroES (single ring of seven units - 97 aa each polypeptide chains are analyzed using the hydrophobicity distribution expressed as excess/deficiency all over the molecule to search for structure-to-function relationships. The empirically observed distribution of hydrophobic residues is confronted with the theoretical one representing the idealized hydrophobic core with hydrophilic residues exposure on the surface. The observed discrepancy between these two distributions seems to be aim-oriented, determining the structure-to-function relation. The hydrophobic force field structure generated by the chaperonin capsule is presented. Its possible influence on substrate folding is suggested.

  19. Large scale purification of rapeseed proteins (Brassica napus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bérot, S; Compoint, J P; Larré, C; Malabat, C; Guéguen, J

    2005-04-15

    Rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) cruciferin (12S globulin), napin (2S albumin) and lipid transfer proteins (LTP) were purified at a multi-g scale. The procedure developed was simple, rather fast and resolutive; it permitted the recovery of these proteins with a good yield, such as 40% for cruciferin and 18% for napin. Nanofiltration eliminated the major phenolic compounds. The remaining protein fraction was fractionated by cation exchange chromatography (CEC) on a streamline SP-XL column in alkaline conditions. The unbound neutral cruciferin was polished by size exclusion chromatography. The alkaline napin isoforms and LTP, adsorbed on the beads, were eluted as a whole fraction and further separated by an other CEC step at acidic pH. Napins were polished by hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC). The fractions were characterized by reverse phase HPLC, electrophoresis, N-terminal sequencing and mass spectrometry. All the fractions contained less than 5% of impurities.

  20. [P53 protein in adenocarcinoma of the large intestine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluszkiewicz, P; Pawłowska-Wakowicz, B; Cybulski, M; Berbeć, H

    1997-01-01

    P53 gen mutations play significant role in neoplastic transformation of colorectal mucosa. We investigated p53 immunostaining in 80 cases of spontaneous human colorectal adenocarcinomas (with monoclonal DO7 antibody and LSAB+ kit). We found positive, nuclear p53 immunostaining in 64% of nonmucinous adenocarcinoma tissues and in 19% of mucinous adenocarcinomas tissues. P53 protein deposits were most often found in colorectal adenocarcinomas localised in rectum (66.67%) and in advanced (Dukes C, D) colorectal adenocarcinomas (59.38%) as well. There was no statistical significance between the p53 positive immunostaining and the histological differentiation of the colorectal adenocarcinomas. The overall survival of patients with tumours positive for p53 protein was significantly shorter than that of patients with colorectal cancers negative for p53 protein. We conclude that p53 immunohistochemical analysis may be treated as a supplementary prognostic marker for patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma, especially it may be useful for adjuvant therapy selection.

  1. Large-scale biophysical evaluation of protein PEGylation effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vernet, Erik; Popa, Gina; Pozdnyakova, Irina

    2016-01-01

    of PEGylation on the thermal stability of a protein based on data generated by circular dichroism (CD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), or differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF). In addition, DSF was validated as a fast and inexpensive screening method for thermal unfolding studies of PEGylated...

  2. Characterization of oligopeptide patterns in large protein sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persson Bengt

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent sequencing projects and the growth of sequence data banks enable oligopeptide patterns to be characterized on a genome or kingdom level. Several studies have focused on kingdom or habitat classifications based on the abundance of short peptide patterns. There have also been efforts at local structural prediction based on short sequence motifs. Oligopeptide patterns undoubtedly carry valuable information content. Therefore, it is important to characterize these informational peptide patterns to shed light on possible new applications and the pitfalls implicit in neglecting bias in peptide patterns. Results We have studied four classes of pentapeptide patterns (designated POP, NEP, ORP and URP in the kingdoms archaea, bacteria and eukaryotes. POP are highly abundant patterns statistically not expected to exist; NEP are patterns that do not exist but are statistically expected to; ORP are patterns unique to a kingdom; and URP are patterns excluded from a kingdom. We used two data sources: the de facto standard of protein knowledge Swiss-Prot, and a set of 386 completely sequenced genomes. For each class of peptides we looked at the 100 most extreme and found both known and unknown sequence features. Most of the known sequence motifs can be explained on the basis of the protein families from which they originate. Conclusion We find an inherent bias of certain oligopeptide patterns in naturally occurring proteins that cannot be explained solely on the basis of residue distribution in single proteins, kingdoms or databases. We see three predominant categories of patterns: (i patterns widespread in a kingdom such as those originating from respiratory chain-associated proteins and translation machinery; (ii proteins with structurally and/or functionally favored patterns, which have not yet been ascribed this role; (iii multicopy species-specific retrotransposons, only found in the genome set. These categories will affect the

  3. BACHSCORE. A tool for evaluating efficiently and reliably the quality of large sets of protein structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarti, E.; Zamuner, S.; Cossio, P.; Laio, A.; Seno, F.; Trovato, A.

    2013-12-01

    In protein structure prediction it is of crucial importance, especially at the refinement stage, to score efficiently large sets of models by selecting the ones that are closest to the native state. We here present a new computational tool, BACHSCORE, that allows its users to rank different structural models of the same protein according to their quality, evaluated by using the BACH++ (Bayesian Analysis Conformation Hunt) scoring function. The original BACH statistical potential was already shown to discriminate with very good reliability the protein native state in large sets of misfolded models of the same protein. BACH++ features a novel upgrade in the solvation potential of the scoring function, now computed by adapting the LCPO (Linear Combination of Pairwise Orbitals) algorithm. This change further enhances the already good performance of the scoring function. BACHSCORE can be accessed directly through the web server: bachserver.pd.infn.it. Catalogue identifier: AEQD_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEQD_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 130159 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 24 687 455 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++. Computer: Any computer capable of running an executable produced by a g++ compiler (4.6.3 version). Operating system: Linux, Unix OS-es. RAM: 1 073 741 824 bytes Classification: 3. Nature of problem: Evaluate the quality of a protein structural model, taking into account the possible “a priori” knowledge of a reference primary sequence that may be different from the amino-acid sequence of the model; the native protein structure should be recognized as the best model. Solution method: The contact potential scores the occurrence of any given type of residue pair in 5 possible

  4. Sequence-specific ¹H, ¹³C and ¹⁵N NMR assignments of Cyclophilin A like protein from Piriformospora indica involved in salt stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Dipesh Kumar; Bhatt, Harshesh; Johri, Atul; Tuteja, Narendra; Bhavesh, Neel Sarovar

    2013-10-01

    Cyclophilins are omnipresent proteins found in eukaryotes and prokaryotes, with presence in cytoplasm as well as in nucleus. Primary role of Cyclophilins is of peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase, a molecular chaperon action. Here, we report sequence-specific (1)H, (13)C and (15)N resonance assignments for a Cyclophilin A like protein from Piriformospora indica. This protein is up-regulated during salt stress conditions.

  5. SVM ensemble based transfer learning for large-scale membrane proteins discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Suyu

    2014-01-07

    Membrane proteins play important roles in molecular trans-membrane transport, ligand-receptor recognition, cell-cell interaction, enzyme catalysis, host immune defense response and infectious disease pathways. Up to present, discriminating membrane proteins remains a challenging problem from the viewpoints of biological experimental determination and computational modeling. This work presents SVM ensemble based transfer learning model for membrane proteins discrimination (SVM-TLM). To reduce the data constraints on computational modeling, this method investigates the effectiveness of transferring the homolog knowledge to the target membrane proteins under the framework of probability weighted ensemble learning. As compared to multiple kernel learning based transfer learning model, the method takes the advantages of sparseness based SVM optimization on large data, thus more computationally efficient for large protein data analysis. The experiments on large membrane protein benchmark dataset show that SVM-TLM achieves significantly better cross validation performance than the baseline model. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Expression of hepatitis B virus large envelope protein in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korec, E; Korcová, J; Palková, Z; Vondrejs, V; Korínek, V; Reinis, M; Bichko, V V; Hlozánek, I

    1989-01-01

    The gene coding for hepatitis B large envelope protein was cloned under the lac promoter in bacterial vector pUC-8 and under the ADH1 promoter in yeast expression shuttle vector pVT103-U, and expression of HBsAg in bacteria and yeast was determined. The strongest expression of large envelope protein was obtained after transformation of the protease-deficient yeast strain BJ1991. The recombinant large envelope protein did not form complex 22-nm particles and was not secreted into medium.

  7. Fast Genome-Wide Functional Annotation through Orthology Assignment by eggNOG-Mapper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huerta-Cepas, Jaime; Forslund, Kristoffer; Coelho, Luis Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Orthology assignment is ideally suited for functional inference. However, because predicting orthology is computationally intensive at large scale, and most pipelines are relatively inaccessible (e.g., new assignments only available through database updates), less precise homology-based functional...... protein by 15%. Compared with InterProScan, eggNOG-mapper achieved similar proteome coverage and precision while predicting, on average, 41 more terms per protein and increasing the rate of experimentally validated terms recovered over total term assignments per protein by 35%. EggNOG-mapper predictions...

  8. Sequence-specific {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N resonance assignments for intestinal fatty-acid-binding protein complexed with palmitate (15.4 kDA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodsdon, M.E.; Toner, J.J.; Cistola, D.P. [Washington Univ. School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Intestinal fatty-acid-binding protein (I-FABP) belongs to a family of soluble, cytoplasmic proteins that are thought to function in the intracellular transport and trafficking of polar lipids. Individual members of this protein family have distinct specificities and affinities for fatty acids, cholesterol, bile salts, and retinoids. We are comparing several retinol- and fatty-acid-binding proteins from intestine in order to define the factors that control molecular recognition in this family of proteins. We have established sequential resonance assignments for uniformly {sup 13}C/{sup 15}N-enriched I-FABP complexed with perdeuterated palmitate at pH7.2 and 37{degrees}C. The assignment strategy was similar to that introduced for calmodulin. We employed seven three-dimensional NMR experiments to establish scalar couplings between backbone and sidechain atoms. Backbone atoms were correlated using triple-resonance HNCO, HNCA, TOCSY-HMQC, HCACO, and HCA(CO)N experiments. Sidechain atoms were correlated using CC-TOCSY, HCCH-TOCSY, and TOCSY-HMQC. The correlations of peaks between three-dimensional spectra were established in a computer-assisted manner using NMR COMPASS (Molecular Simulations, Inc.) Using this approach, {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 15}N resonance assignments have been established for 120 of the 131 residues of I-FABP. For 18 residues, amide {sup 1}H and {sup 15}N resonances were unobservable, apparently because of the rapid exchange of amide protons with bulk water at pH 7.2. The missing amide protons correspond to distinct amino acid patterns in the protein sequence, which will be discussed. During the assignment process, several sources of ambiguity in spin correlations were observed. To overcome this ambiguity, the additional inter-residue correlations often observed in the HNCA experiment were used as cross-checks for the sequential backbone assignments.

  9. Large-scale analysis of phosphorylation site occupancy in eukaryotic proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rao, R Shyama Prasad; Møller, Ian Max

    2012-01-01

    in proteins is currently lacking. We have therefore analyzed the occurrence and occupancy of phosphorylated sites (~ 100,281) in a large set of eukaryotic proteins (~ 22,995). Phosphorylation probability was found to be much higher in both the  termini of protein sequences and this is much pronounced...... maximum randomness. An analysis of phosphorylation motifs indicated that just 40 motifs and a much lower number of associated kinases might account for nearly 50% of the known phosphorylations in eukaryotic proteins. Our results provide a broad picture of the phosphorylation sites in eukaryotic proteins....

  10. ¹H, ¹⁵N and ¹³C Backbone resonance assignments of a conformational mutant of the adhesion protein ∆-Bd37 from Babesia divergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthe, Philippe; Murciano, Brice; Schetters, Theo; Gorenflot, André; Delbecq, Stephane; Roumestand, Christian

    2013-10-01

    We report here the resonance assignment of EDK-∆-Bd37, conformational mutant potentially displaying the "open" conformation of Bd37, a 25 kDa surface protein from the Apicomplexa parasite Babesia divergens that could undergo drastic conformational changes during erythrocyte invasion.

  11. Characterization of the Conjugation Pattern in Large Polysaccharide-Protein Conjugates by NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntini, Stefano; Balducci, Evita; Cerofolini, Linda; Ravera, Enrico; Fragai, Marco; Berti, Francesco; Luchinat, Claudio

    2017-10-10

    Carbohydrate-based vaccines are among the safest and most effective vaccines and represent potent tools for prevention of life-threatening bacterial infectious diseases, like meningitis and pneumonia. The chemical conjugation of a weak antigen to protein as a source of T-cell epitopes generates a glycoconjugate vaccine that results more immunogenic. Several methods have been used so far to characterize the resulting polysaccharide-protein conjugates. However, a reduced number of methodologies has been proposed for measuring the degree of saccharide conjugation at the possible protein sites. Here we show that detailed information on large proteins conjugated with large polysaccharides can be achieved by a combination of solution and solid-state NMR spectroscopy. As a test case, a large protein assembly, l-asparaginase II, has been conjugated with Neisseria meningitidis serogroup C capsular polysaccharide and the pattern and degree of conjugation were determined. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Fast large-scale clustering of protein structures using Gauss integrals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Tim; Borg, Mikael; Boomsma, Wouter; Røgen, Peter; Hamelryck, Thomas

    2012-02-15

    Clustering protein structures is an important task in structural bioinformatics. De novo structure prediction, for example, often involves a clustering step for finding the best prediction. Other applications include assigning proteins to fold families and analyzing molecular dynamics trajectories. We present Pleiades, a novel approach to clustering protein structures with a rigorous mathematical underpinning. The method approximates clustering based on the root mean square deviation by first mapping structures to Gauss integral vectors--which were introduced by Røgen and co-workers--and subsequently performing K-means clustering. Compared to current methods, Pleiades dramatically improves on the time needed to perform clustering, and can cluster a significantly larger number of structures, while providing state-of-the-art results. The number of low energy structures generated in a typical folding study, which is in the order of 50,000 structures, can be clustered within seconds to minutes.

  13. BioPlex Display: An Interactive Suite for Large-Scale AP-MS Protein-Protein Interaction Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweppe, Devin K; Huttlin, Edward L; Harper, J Wade; Gygi, Steven P

    2018-01-05

    The development of large-scale data sets requires a new means to display and disseminate research studies to large audiences. Knowledge of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks has become a principle interest of many groups within the field of proteomics. At the confluence of technologies, such as cross-linking mass spectrometry, yeast two-hybrid, protein cofractionation, and affinity purification mass spectrometry (AP-MS), detection of PPIs can uncover novel biological inferences at a high-throughput. Thus new platforms to provide community access to large data sets are necessary. To this end, we have developed a web application that enables exploration and dissemination of the growing BioPlex interaction network. BioPlex is a large-scale interactome data set based on AP-MS of baits from the human ORFeome. The latest BioPlex data set release (BioPlex 2.0) contains 56 553 interactions from 5891 AP-MS experiments. To improve community access to this vast compendium of interactions, we developed BioPlex Display, which integrates individual protein querying, access to empirical data, and on-the-fly annotation of networks within an easy-to-use and mobile web application. BioPlex Display enables rapid acquisition of data from BioPlex and development of hypotheses based on protein interactions.

  14. Development and implementation of an algorithm for detection of protein complexes in large interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanaya Shigehiko

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After complete sequencing of a number of genomes the focus has now turned to proteomics. Advanced proteomics technologies such as two-hybrid assay, mass spectrometry etc. are producing huge data sets of protein-protein interactions which can be portrayed as networks, and one of the burning issues is to find protein complexes in such networks. The enormous size of protein-protein interaction (PPI networks warrants development of efficient computational methods for extraction of significant complexes. Results This paper presents an algorithm for detection of protein complexes in large interaction networks. In a PPI network, a node represents a protein and an edge represents an interaction. The input to the algorithm is the associated matrix of an interaction network and the outputs are protein complexes. The complexes are determined by way of finding clusters, i. e. the densely connected regions in the network. We also show and analyze some protein complexes generated by the proposed algorithm from typical PPI networks of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A comparison between a PPI and a random network is also performed in the context of the proposed algorithm. Conclusion The proposed algorithm makes it possible to detect clusters of proteins in PPI networks which mostly represent molecular biological functional units. Therefore, protein complexes determined solely based on interaction data can help us to predict the functions of proteins, and they are also useful to understand and explain certain biological processes.

  15. Nano-Mole Scale Side-Chain Signal Assignment by 1H-Detected Protein Solid-State NMR by Ultra-Fast Magic-Angle Spinning and Stereo-Array Isotope Labeling

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Songlin

    2015-04-09

    We present a general approach in 1H-detected 13C solid-state NMR (SSNMR) for side-chain signal assignments of 10-50 nmol quantities of proteins using a combination of a high magnetic field, ultra-fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) at ~80 kHz, and stereo-array-isotope-labeled (SAIL) proteins [Kainosho M. et al., Nature 440, 52–57, 2006]. First, we demonstrate that 1H indirect detection improves the sensitivity and resolution of 13C SSNMR of SAIL proteins for side-chain assignments in the ultra-fast MAS condition. 1H-detected SSNMR was performed for micro-crystalline ubiquitin (~55 nmol or ~0.5mg) that was SAIL-labeled at seven isoleucine (Ile) residues. Sensitivity was dramatically improved by 1H-detected 2D 1H/13C SSNMR by factors of 5.4-9.7 and 2.1-5.0, respectively, over 13C-detected 2D 1H/13C SSNMR and 1D 13C CPMAS, demonstrating that 2D 1H-detected SSNMR offers not only additional resolution but also sensitivity advantage over 1D 13C detection for the first time. High 1H resolution for the SAIL-labeled side-chain residues offered reasonable resolution even in the 2D data. A 1H-detected 3D 13C/13C/1H experiment on SAIL-ubiquitin provided nearly complete 1H and 13C assignments for seven Ile residues only within ~2.5 h. The results demonstrate the feasibility of side-chain signal assignment in this approach for as little as 10 nmol of a protein sample within ~3 days. The approach is likely applicable to a variety of proteins of biological interest without any requirements of highly efficient protein expression systems.

  16. Isothermal chemical denaturation of large proteins: Path-dependence and irreversibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wafer, Lucas; Kloczewiak, Marek; Polleck, Sharon M; Luo, Yin

    2017-12-15

    State functions (e.g., ΔG) are path independent and quantitatively describe the equilibrium states of a thermodynamic system. Isothermal chemical denaturation (ICD) is often used to extrapolate state function parameters for protein unfolding in native buffer conditions. The approach is prudent when the unfolding/refolding processes are path independent and reversible, but may lead to erroneous results if the processes are not reversible. The reversibility was demonstrated in several early studies for smaller proteins, but was assumed in some reports for large proteins with complex structures. In this work, the unfolding/refolding of several proteins were systematically studied using an automated ICD instrument. It is shown that: (i) the apparent unfolding mechanism and conformational stability of large proteins can be denaturant-dependent, (ii) equilibration times for large proteins are non-trivial and may introduce significant error into calculations of ΔG, (iii) fluorescence emission spectroscopy may not correspond to other methods, such as circular dichroism, when used to measure protein unfolding, and (iv) irreversible unfolding and hysteresis can occur in the absence of aggregation. These results suggest that thorough confirmation of the state functions by, for example, performing refolding experiments or using additional denaturants, is needed when quantitatively studying the thermodynamics of protein unfolding using ICD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. "C.R.E.A.T.E."-ing Unique Primary-Source Research Paper Assignments for a Pleasure and Pain Course Teaching Neuroscientific Principles in a Large General Education Undergraduate Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnar, Richard J; Rotella, Francis M; Loiacono, Ilyssa; Coke, Tricia; Olsson, Kerstin; Barrientos, Alicia; Blachorsky, Lauren; Warshaw, Deena; Buras, Agata; Sanchez, Ciara M; Azad, Raihana; Stellar, James R

    2016-01-01

    A large (250 registrants) General Education lecture course, Pleasure and Pain, presented basic neuroscience principles as they related to animal and human models of pleasure and pain by weaving basic findings related to food and drug addiction and analgesic states with human studies examining empathy, social neuroscience and neuroeconomics. In its first four years, the course grade was based on weighted scores from two multiple-choice exams and a five-page review of three unique peer-reviewed research articles. Although well-registered and well-received, 18% of the students received Incomplete grades, primarily due to failing to submit the paper that went largely unresolved and eventually resulted in a failing grade. To rectify this issue, a modified version of the C.R.E.A.T.E. (Consider, Read, Elucidate hypotheses, Analyze and interpret data, Think of the next Experiment) method replaced the paper with eight structured assignments focusing on an initial general-topic article, the introduction-methods, and results-discussion of each of three related peer-review neuroscience-related articles, and a final summary. Compliance in completing these assignments was very high, resulting in only 11 INC grades out of 228 students. Thus, use of the C.R.E.A.T.E. method reduced the percentage of problematic INC grades from 18% to 4.8%, a 73% decline, without changing the overall grade distribution. Other analyses suggested the students achieved a deeper understanding of the scientific process using the C.R.E.A.T.E. method relative to the original term paper assignment.

  18. “C.R.E.A.T.E.”-ing Unique Primary-Source Research Paper Assignments for a Pleasure and Pain Course Teaching Neuroscientific Principles in a Large General Education Undergraduate Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnar, Richard J.; Rotella, Francis M.; Loiacono, Ilyssa; Coke, Tricia; Olsson, Kerstin; Barrientos, Alicia; Blachorsky, Lauren; Warshaw, Deena; Buras, Agata; Sanchez, Ciara M.; Azad, Raihana; Stellar, James R.

    2016-01-01

    A large (250 registrants) General Education lecture course, Pleasure and Pain, presented basic neuroscience principles as they related to animal and human models of pleasure and pain by weaving basic findings related to food and drug addiction and analgesic states with human studies examining empathy, social neuroscience and neuroeconomics. In its first four years, the course grade was based on weighted scores from two multiple-choice exams and a five-page review of three unique peer-reviewed research articles. Although well-registered and well-received, 18% of the students received Incomplete grades, primarily due to failing to submit the paper that went largely unresolved and eventually resulted in a failing grade. To rectify this issue, a modified version of the C.R.E.A.T.E. (Consider, Read, Elucidate hypotheses, Analyze and interpret data, Think of the next Experiment) method replaced the paper with eight structured assignments focusing on an initial general-topic article, the introduction-methods, and results-discussion of each of three related peer-review neuroscience-related articles, and a final summary. Compliance in completing these assignments was very high, resulting in only 11 INC grades out of 228 students. Thus, use of the C.R.E.A.T.E. method reduced the percentage of problematic INC grades from 18% to 4.8%, a 73% decline, without changing the overall grade distribution. Other analyses suggested the students achieved a deeper understanding of the scientific process using the C.R.E.A.T.E. method relative to the original term paper assignment. PMID:27385918

  19. Crystallization of the Large Membrane Protein Complex Photosystem I in a Microfluidic Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Bahige G.; Kupitz, Christopher; Fromme, Petra; Ros, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Traditional macroscale protein crystallization is accomplished non-trivially by exploring a range of protein concentrations and buffers in solution until a suitable combination is attained. This methodology is time consuming and resource intensive, hindering protein structure determination. Even more difficulties arise when crystallizing large membrane protein complexes such as photosystem I (PSI) due to their large unit cells dominated by solvent and complex characteristics that call for even stricter buffer requirements. Structure determination techniques tailored for these ‘difficult to crystallize’ proteins such as femtosecond nanocrystallography are being developed, yet still need specific crystal characteristics. Here, we demonstrate a simple and robust method to screen protein crystallization conditions at low ionic strength in a microfluidic device. This is realized in one microfluidic experiment using low sample amounts, unlike traditional methods where each solution condition is set up separately. Second harmonic generation microscopy via Second Order Nonlinear Imaging of Chiral Crystals (SONICC) was applied for the detection of nanometer and micrometer sized PSI crystals within microchannels. To develop a crystallization phase diagram, crystals imaged with SONICC at specific channel locations were correlated to protein and salt concentrations determined by numerical simulations of the time-dependent diffusion process along the channel. Our method demonstrated that a portion of the PSI crystallization phase diagram could be reconstructed in excellent agreement with crystallization conditions determined by traditional methods. We postulate that this approach could be utilized to efficiently study and optimize crystallization conditions for a wide range of proteins that are poorly understood to date. PMID:24191698

  20. Internal organization of large protein families: relationship between the sequence, structure and function based clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiao-hui; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Wooley, John; Godzik, Adam

    2011-01-01

    The protein universe can be organized in families that group proteins sharing common ancestry. Such families display variable levels of structural and functional divergence, from homogenous families, where all members have the same function and very similar structure, to very divergent families, where large variations in function and structure are observed. For practical purposes of structure and function prediction, it would be beneficial to identify sub-groups of proteins with highly similar structures (iso-structural) and/or functions (iso-functional) within divergent protein families. We compared three algorithms in their ability to cluster large protein families and discuss whether any of these methods could reliably identify such iso-structural or iso-functional groups. We show that clustering using profile-sequence and profile-profile comparison methods closely reproduces clusters based on similarities between 3D structures or clusters of proteins with similar biological functions. In contrast, the still commonly used sequence-based methods with fixed thresholds result in vast overestimates of structural and functional diversity in protein families. As a result, these methods also overestimate the number of protein structures that have to be determined to fully characterize structural space of such families. The fact that one can build reliable models based on apparently distantly related templates is crucial for extracting maximal amount of information from new sequencing projects. PMID:21671455

  1. Productive response of Duroc x Large White and Commercial Hybrid x Large White crosses fed high and low protein diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Fabro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Thirty five Duroc x Large White (DUxLW and 43 Commercial Hybrid x Large White (CHxLW were fed two diets differing for the content of crude protein (CP, with the aim to evaluate the effects of these diets on growth, carcass and thigh traits. Pigs were allotted to two groups and fed high protein (HP and low protein (LP diet. Within each dietary group, 3 diets were formulated, for the initial phase of growth (from 79 to 112 days, 17.3% and 15.4% CP as fed basis for the HP and LP diet, respectively, for the intermediated phase of growth (from 113 to 196 days, 15.1% and 13.7% CP as fed basis for the HP and LP diet, respectively and for the finishing period (from 197 to 272 days, 13.4% and 11.4% CP as fed basis for the HP and LP diet, respectively. HP diets were supplemented with Lysine, LP were supplemented also with Methionine and Threonine. Pigs were slaughtered at nine months of age. Body weight (BW, average daily gain, total feed intake and feed conversion ratio were not affected by diet. Carcass weight, thigh weight, backfat and lean thickness and lean percentage (Fat-O-Meater, FOM were not affected by dietary treatments, whilst backfat thickness and FOM were significantly higher (P<0.01 in DUxLW and CHxLW pigs genotype respectively. A reduction of about 15% (12% to 17% of the dietary CP recommended by nutritional requirements does not affect the main productive performances and carcass characteristics of pigs slaughtered at around 160 kg of BW.

  2. Large-Scale Discovery and Characterization of Protein Regulatory Motifs in Eukaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieber, Daniel S.; Elemento, Olivier; Tavazoie, Saeed

    2010-01-01

    The increasing ability to generate large-scale, quantitative proteomic data has brought with it the challenge of analyzing such data to discover the sequence elements that underlie systems-level protein behavior. Here we show that short, linear protein motifs can be efficiently recovered from proteome-scale datasets such as sub-cellular localization, molecular function, half-life, and protein abundance data using an information theoretic approach. Using this approach, we have identified many known protein motifs, such as phosphorylation sites and localization signals, and discovered a large number of candidate elements. We estimate that ∼80% of these are novel predictions in that they do not match a known motif in both sequence and biological context, suggesting that post-translational regulation of protein behavior is still largely unexplored. These predicted motifs, many of which display preferential association with specific biological pathways and non-random positioning in the linear protein sequence, provide focused hypotheses for experimental validation. PMID:21206902

  3. Large protein as a potential target for use in rabies diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Katz, I S; Dias, M H; Lima, I F; Chaves, L B; Ribeiro, O G; Scheffer, K C; Iwai, L K

    Rabies is a zoonotic viral disease that remains a serious threat to public health worldwide. The rabies lyssavirus (RABV) genome encodes five structural proteins, multifunctional and significant for pathogenicity. The large protein (L) presents well-conserved genomic regions, which may be a good alternative to generate informative datasets for development of new methods for rabies diagnosis. This paper describes the development of a technique for the identification of L protein in several RABV strains from different hosts, demonstrating that MS-based proteomics is a potential method for antigen identification and a good alternative for rabies diagnosis.

  4. Large-scale Epstein-Barr virus EBNA1 protein purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duellman, Sarah J; Burgess, Richard R

    2009-02-01

    The protein-DNA and protein-protein interactions of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1) are known to play an important role in the many functions of this viral protein. Large quantities of pure EBNA1 protein would be useful in biochemical assays to elucidate such interactions. In particular, the crystal structure of the full-length protein would be important to show possible regions of interaction and/or post-translational modification. Recently, we described a novel approach to overexpress and purify EBNA1 from Escherichia coli; however, it is not ideal for large-scale production of EBNA1. We were able to optimize this protocol by (1) adding a polyethyleneimine precipitation step prior to Ni-NTA chromatography to reduce complexity of the sample and remove nucleic acid, (2) optimizing the Ni-NTA gradient to further separate EBNA1 from impurities, and (3) concluding with a MonoS cation-exchange chromatography step to further purify and concentrate EBNA1. We were able to recover 10-mg quantities of pure EBNA1 protein.

  5. Automated assignment of NMR chemical shifts based on a known structure and 4D spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trautwein, Matthias; Fredriksson, Kai [Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Institute of Pharmacy (Germany); Möller, Heiko M. [University of Potsdam, Institute of Chemistry (Germany); Exner, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.exner@uni-konstanz.de [Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Institute of Pharmacy (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    Apart from their central role during 3D structure determination of proteins the backbone chemical shift assignment is the basis for a number of applications, like chemical shift perturbation mapping and studies on the dynamics of proteins. This assignment is not a trivial task even if a 3D protein structure is known and needs almost as much effort as the assignment for structure prediction if performed manually. We present here a new algorithm based solely on 4D [{sup 1}H,{sup 15}N]-HSQC-NOESY-[{sup 1}H,{sup 15}N]-HSQC spectra which is able to assign a large percentage of chemical shifts (73–82 %) unambiguously, demonstrated with proteins up to a size of 250 residues. For the remaining residues, a small number of possible assignments is filtered out. This is done by comparing distances in the 3D structure to restraints obtained from the peak volumes in the 4D spectrum. Using dead-end elimination, assignments are removed in which at least one of the restraints is violated. Including additional information from chemical shift predictions, a complete unambiguous assignment was obtained for Ubiquitin and 95 % of the residues were correctly assigned in the 251 residue-long N-terminal domain of enzyme I. The program including source code is available at https://github.com/thomasexner/4Dassign https://github.com/thomasexner/4Dassign .

  6. rRNA maturation in yeast cells depleted of large ribosomal subunit proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Pöll

    Full Text Available The structural constituents of the large eukaryotic ribosomal subunit are 3 ribosomal RNAs, namely the 25S, 5.8S and 5S rRNA and about 46 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins. They assemble and mature in a highly dynamic process that involves more than 150 proteins and 70 small RNAs. Ribosome biogenesis starts in the nucleolus, continues in the nucleoplasm and is completed after nucleo-cytoplasmic translocation of the subunits in the cytoplasm. In this work we created 26 yeast strains, each of which conditionally expresses one of the large ribosomal subunit (LSU proteins. In vivo depletion of the analysed LSU r-proteins was lethal and led to destabilisation and degradation of the LSU and/or its precursors. Detailed steady state and metabolic pulse labelling analyses of rRNA precursors in these mutant strains showed that LSU r-proteins can be grouped according to their requirement for efficient progression of different steps of large ribosomal subunit maturation. Comparative analyses of the observed phenotypes and the nature of r-protein-rRNA interactions as predicted by current atomic LSU structure models led us to discuss working hypotheses on i how individual r-proteins control the productive processing of the major 5' end of 5.8S rRNA precursors by exonucleases Rat1p and Xrn1p, and ii the nature of structural characteristics of nascent LSUs that are required for cytoplasmic accumulation of nascent subunits but are nonessential for most of the nuclear LSU pre-rRNA processing events.

  7. Combination of Bcl-2 and MYC protein expression improves high-risk stratification in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang J

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Jing Wang,* Min Zhou,* Jing-Yan Xu,* Bing Chen, Jian OuyangDepartment of Hematology, The Affiliated Drum Tower Hospital of Nanjing University Medical School, Nanjing, Jiangsu, People’s Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this work and should be considered as cofirst authorsPurpose: To evaluate whether the addition of two biological markers (MYC and BCL-2 protein overexpression improves the stratification of high-risk patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL.Method: Seven risk factors were identified at diagnosis, and a maximum of 7 points were assigned to each patient. The patients were classified according to four risk groups: low (0–1, low-intermediate (2–3, high-intermediate (4, and high (5–7. Only high-risk patients with DLBCL were included in this analysis. We retrospectively examined 20 cases from 2008 to 2013 at the Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital.Results: The median expression of MYC protein was 60%, and 17 of 20 (65% evaluable cases overexpressed MYC. The median expression of BCL-2 protein was also 60%. Eighteen of 20 (90% evaluable cases showed BCL-2 overexpression. Additionally, 12 out of 20 cases (60% demonstrated coexpression of MYC and BCL-2 proteins. The percentages of overall survival and progression-free survival at the median follow-up time (36 months were 33.3%±16.1% and 16.9%±13.5%, respectively. By comparison, nine, four, and 20 patients were classified as high risk based on the International Prognostic Index (IPI, National Comprehensive Cancer Network(NCCN-IPI, and revised IPI criteria, respectively. According to the IPI and NCCN-IPI stratification, the risk groups demonstrated closely overlapping survival curves. In addition, four out of 20 cases were identified as low-intermediate risk according to the NCCN-IPI criteria.Conclusion: The addition of MYC and BCL-2 protein expression to the IPI could identify a subset of DLBCL patients with high-risk clinicopathological characteristics and

  8. Genetics of single-cell protein abundance variation in large yeast populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Frank W.; Treusch, Sebastian; Shockley, Arthur H.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Kruglyak, Leonid

    2014-02-01

    Variation among individuals arises in part from differences in DNA sequences, but the genetic basis for variation in most traits, including common diseases, remains only partly understood. Many DNA variants influence phenotypes by altering the expression level of one or several genes. The effects of such variants can be detected as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL). Traditional eQTL mapping requires large-scale genotype and gene expression data for each individual in the study sample, which limits sample sizes to hundreds of individuals in both humans and model organisms and reduces statistical power. Consequently, many eQTL are probably missed, especially those with smaller effects. Furthermore, most studies use messenger RNA rather than protein abundance as the measure of gene expression. Studies that have used mass-spectrometry proteomics reported unexpected differences between eQTL and protein QTL (pQTL) for the same genes, but these studies have been even more limited in scope. Here we introduce a powerful method for identifying genetic loci that influence protein expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We measure single-cell protein abundance through the use of green fluorescent protein tags in very large populations of genetically variable cells, and use pooled sequencing to compare allele frequencies across the genome in thousands of individuals with high versus low protein abundance. We applied this method to 160 genes and detected many more loci per gene than previous studies. We also observed closer correspondence between loci that influence protein abundance and loci that influence mRNA abundance of a given gene. Most loci that we detected were clustered in `hotspots' that influence multiple proteins, and some hotspots were found to influence more than half of the proteins that we examined. The variants that underlie these hotspots have profound effects on the gene regulatory network and provide insights into genetic variation in cell

  9. Scaffolding students’ assignments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slot, Marie Falkesgaard

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses scaffolding in typical student assignments in mother tongue learning materials in upper secondary education in Denmark and the United Kingdom. It has been determined that assignments do not have sufficient scaffolding end features to help pupils understand concepts and build...

  10. Enhanced functional and structural domain assignments using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    biology of MTB, yet the functions of many MTB proteins are unknown. We have used sensitive profile-based search procedures to assign functional and structural domains to infer functions of gene products encoded in. MTB. These domain assignments have been made using a compendium of sequence and structural ...

  11. Probing the flexibility of large conformational changes in protein structures through local perturbations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosco K Ho

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Protein conformational changes and dynamic behavior are fundamental for such processes as catalysis, regulation, and substrate recognition. Although protein dynamics have been successfully explored in computer simulation, there is an intermediate-scale of motions that has proven difficult to simulate - the motion of individual segments or domains that move independently of the body the protein. Here, we introduce a molecular-dynamics perturbation method, the Rotamerically Induced Perturbation (RIP, which can generate large, coherent motions of structural elements in picoseconds by applying large torsional perturbations to individual sidechains. Despite the large-scale motions, secondary structure elements remain intact without the need for applying backbone positional restraints. Owing to its computational efficiency, RIP can be applied to every residue in a protein, producing a global map of deformability. This map is remarkably sparse, with the dominant sites of deformation generally found on the protein surface. The global map can be used to identify loops and helices that are less tightly bound to the protein and thus are likely sites of dynamic modulation that may have important functional consequences. Additionally, they identify individual residues that have the potential to drive large-scale coherent conformational change. Applying RIP to two well-studied proteins, Dihdydrofolate Reductase and Triosephosphate Isomerase, which possess functionally-relevant mobile loops that fluctuate on the microsecond/millisecond timescale, the RIP deformation map identifies and recapitulates the flexibility of these elements. In contrast, the RIP deformation map of alpha-lytic protease, a kinetically stable protein, results in a map with no significant deformations. In the N-terminal domain of HSP90, the RIP deformation map clearly identifies the ligand-binding lid as a highly flexible region capable of large conformational changes. In the Estrogen

  12. Characterisation of silent and active genes for a variable large protein of Borrelia recurrentis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scragg Ian G

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We report the characterisation of the variable large protein (vlp gene expressed by clinical isolate A1 of Borrelia recurrentis; the agent of the life-threatening disease louse-borne relapsing fever. Methods The major vlp protein of this isolate was characterised and a DNA probe created. Use of this together with standard molecular methods was used to determine the location of the vlp1B. recurrentis A1 gene in both this and other isolates. Results This isolate was found to carry silent and expressed copies of the vlp1B. recurrentis A1 gene on plasmids of 54 kbp and 24 kbp respectively, whereas a different isolate, A17, had only the silent vlp1B. recurrentis A17 on a 54 kbp plasmid. Silent and expressed vlp1 have identical mature protein coding regions but have different 5' regions, both containing different potential lipoprotein leader sequences. Only one form of vlp1 is transcribed in the A1 isolate of B. recurrentis, yet both 5' upstream sequences of this vlp1 gene possess features of bacterial promoters. Conclusion Taken together these results suggest that antigenic variation in B. recurrentis may result from recombination of variable large and small protein genes at the junction between lipoprotein leader sequence and mature protein coding region. However, this hypothetical model needs to be validated by further identification of expressed and silent variant protein genes in other B. recurrentis isolates.

  13. hnCOcaNH and hncoCANH pulse sequences for rapid and unambiguous backbone assignment in (13C, 15N) labeled proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Reddy, Jithender G; Hosur, Ramakrishna V

    2010-09-01

    Time-saving in data acquisition is a major thrust of NMR pulse sequence development in the context of structural proteomics research. The conventional HNCA and HN(CA)CO pulse sequences, routinely used for sequential backbone assignment, have the limitation that they cannot distinguish inter- and intra-residue correlations. In order to remove this ambiguity, one has to record HNCO and HN(CO)CA or sequential HNCA experiments which provide unambiguous information of sequential correlations. However, this almost doubles the experimental time. Besides, they require repeated scanning through the (15)N planes to search for the matching peaks along the carbon dimension. In this background, we present here two pulse sequences, termed as hncoCANH and hnCOcaNH that lead to spectra equivalent to HNCA and HN(CA)CO spectra, respectively, but with direct distinction of inter- and intra-residue peaks; these occur with opposite signs in the new experiments. The two pulse sequences have been derived by simple modification of the previously described HN(C)N pulse sequence [Panchal et al., J. Biomol. NMR 20 (2001) 135-147] to frequency-label (13)C(alpha) or (13)C' instead of (15)N during the t(1) period. Like HN(C)N, these spectra also exhibit special patterns of self and sequential peaks around glycines and prolines, which enable direct identification of certain triplets of residues and thus provide internal checks during the sequential assignment walk. The spectra enable rapid and unambiguous assignment of H(N), (15)N and (13)C(alpha) (or (13)C') in a single experiment, and thus would be of great value in high-throughput structural proteomics. (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Detecting remote evolutionary relationships among proteins by large-scale semantic embedding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iain Melvin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Virtually every molecular biologist has searched a protein or DNA sequence database to find sequences that are evolutionarily related to a given query. Pairwise sequence comparison methods--i.e., measures of similarity between query and target sequences--provide the engine for sequence database search and have been the subject of 30 years of computational research. For the difficult problem of detecting remote evolutionary relationships between protein sequences, the most successful pairwise comparison methods involve building local models (e.g., profile hidden Markov models of protein sequences. However, recent work in massive data domains like web search and natural language processing demonstrate the advantage of exploiting the global structure of the data space. Motivated by this work, we present a large-scale algorithm called ProtEmbed, which learns an embedding of protein sequences into a low-dimensional "semantic space." Evolutionarily related proteins are embedded in close proximity, and additional pieces of evidence, such as 3D structural similarity or class labels, can be incorporated into the learning process. We find that ProtEmbed achieves superior accuracy to widely used pairwise sequence methods like PSI-BLAST and HHSearch for remote homology detection; it also outperforms our previous RankProp algorithm, which incorporates global structure in the form of a protein similarity network. Finally, the ProtEmbed embedding space can be visualized, both at the global level and local to a given query, yielding intuition about the structure of protein sequence space.

  15. Rbfox Proteins Regulate Splicing as Part of a Large Multiprotein Complex LASR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damianov, Andrey; Ying, Yi; Lin, Chia-Ho; Lee, Ji-Ann; Tran, Diana; Vashisht, Ajay A; Bahrami-Samani, Emad; Xing, Yi; Martin, Kelsey C; Wohlschlegel, James A; Black, Douglas L

    2016-04-21

    Rbfox proteins control alternative splicing and posttranscriptional regulation in mammalian brain and are implicated in neurological disease. These proteins recognize the RNA sequence (U)GCAUG, but their structures and diverse roles imply a variety of protein-protein interactions. We find that nuclear Rbfox proteins are bound within a large assembly of splicing regulators (LASR), a multimeric complex containing the proteins hnRNP M, hnRNP H, hnRNP C, Matrin3, NF110/NFAR-2, NF45, and DDX5, all approximately equimolar to Rbfox. We show that splicing repression mediated by hnRNP M is stimulated by Rbfox. Virtually all the intron-bound Rbfox is associated with LASR, and hnRNP M motifs are enriched adjacent to Rbfox crosslinking sites in vivo. These findings demonstrate that Rbfox proteins bind RNA with a defined set of cofactors and affect a broader set of exons than previously recognized. The function of this multimeric LASR complex has implications for deciphering the regulatory codes controlling splicing networks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Large-scale analysis of intrinsic disorder flavors and associated functions in the protein sequence universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necci, Marco; Piovesan, Damiano; Tosatto, Silvio C E

    2016-12-01

    Intrinsic disorder (ID) in proteins has been extensively described for the last decade; a large-scale classification of ID in proteins is mostly missing. Here, we provide an extensive analysis of ID in the protein universe on the UniProt database derived from sequence-based predictions in MobiDB. Almost half the sequences contain an ID region of at least five residues. About 9% of proteins have a long ID region of over 20 residues which are more abundant in Eukaryotic organisms and most frequently cover less than 20% of the sequence. A small subset of about 67,000 (out of over 80 million) proteins is fully disordered and mostly found in Viruses. Most proteins have only one ID, with short ID evenly distributed along the sequence and long ID overrepresented in the center. The charged residue composition of Das and Pappu was used to classify ID proteins by structural propensities and corresponding functional enrichment. Swollen Coils seem to be used mainly as structural components and in biosynthesis in both Prokaryotes and Eukaryotes. In Bacteria, they are confined in the nucleoid and in Viruses provide DNA binding function. Coils & Hairpins seem to be specialized in ribosome binding and methylation activities. Globules & Tadpoles bind antigens in Eukaryotes but are involved in killing other organisms and cytolysis in Bacteria. The Undefined class is used by Bacteria to bind toxic substances and mediate transport and movement between and within organisms in Viruses. Fully disordered proteins behave similarly, but are enriched for glycine residues and extracellular structures. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  17. Accounting for large amplitude protein deformation during in silico macromolecular docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastard, Karine; Saladin, Adrien; Prévost, Chantal

    2011-02-22

    Rapid progress of theoretical methods and computer calculation resources has turned in silico methods into a conceivable tool to predict the 3D structure of macromolecular assemblages, starting from the structure of their separate elements. Still, some classes of complexes represent a real challenge for macromolecular docking methods. In these complexes, protein parts like loops or domains undergo large amplitude deformations upon association, thus remodeling the surface accessible to the partner protein or DNA. We discuss the problems linked with managing such rearrangements in docking methods and we review strategies that are presently being explored, as well as their limitations and success.

  18. Accounting for Large Amplitude Protein Deformation during in Silico Macromolecular Docking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chantal Prévost

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Rapid progress of theoretical methods and computer calculation resources has turned in silico methods into a conceivable tool to predict the 3D structure of macromolecular assemblages, starting from the structure of their separate elements. Still, some classes of complexes represent a real challenge for macromolecular docking methods. In these complexes, protein parts like loops or domains undergo large amplitude deformations upon association, thus remodeling the surface accessible to the partner protein or DNA.We discuss the problems linked with managing such rearrangements in docking methods and we review strategies that are presently being explored, as well as their limitations and success.

  19. Historical WBAN ID Assignments

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — 4"x6" index cards represent the first written assignments of Weather Bureau Army Navy (WBAN) station identifier numbers by the National Climatic Data Center....

  20. My Favorite Assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Robert E.; Johnson, Jack E.

    1982-01-01

    Presents two assignments that show (1) how George Orwell's "Politics and the English Language" can be applied to business writing and (2) how structured student-teacher conferences can generate enthusiasm for oral expression in a business communication course. (AEA)

  1. Large-scale proteomic identification of S100 proteins in breast cancer tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cancemi Patrizia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Attempts to reduce morbidity and mortality in breast cancer is based on efforts to identify novel biomarkers to support prognosis and therapeutic choices. The present study has focussed on S100 proteins as a potentially promising group of markers in cancer development and progression. One reason of interest in this family of proteins is because the majority of the S100 genes are clustered on a region of human chromosome 1q21 that is prone to genomic rearrangements. Moreover, there is increasing evidence that S100 proteins are often up-regulated in many cancers, including breast, and this is frequently associated with tumour progression. Methods Samples of breast cancer tissues were obtained during surgical intervention, according to the bioethical recommendations, and cryo-preserved until used. Tissue extracts were submitted to proteomic preparations for 2D-IPG. Protein identification was performed by N-terminal sequencing and/or peptide mass finger printing. Results The majority of the detected S100 proteins were absent, or present at very low levels, in the non-tumoral tissues adjacent to the primary tumor. This finding strengthens the role of S100 proteins as putative biomarkers. The proteomic screening of 100 cryo-preserved breast cancer tissues showed that some proteins were ubiquitously expressed in almost all patients while others appeared more sporadic. Most, if not all, of the detected S100 members appeared reciprocally correlated. Finally, from the perspective of biomarkers establishment, a promising finding was the observation that patients which developed distant metastases after a three year follow-up showed a general tendency of higher S100 protein expression, compared to the disease-free group. Conclusions This article reports for the first time the comparative proteomic screening of several S100 protein members among a large group of breast cancer patients. The results obtained strongly support the hypothesis

  2. Large-scale proteomic identification of S100 proteins in breast cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancemi, Patrizia; Di Cara, Gianluca; Albanese, Nadia Ninfa; Costantini, Francesca; Marabeti, Maria Rita; Musso, Rosa; Lupo, Carmelo; Roz, Elena; Pucci-Minafra, Ida

    2010-09-03

    Attempts to reduce morbidity and mortality in breast cancer is based on efforts to identify novel biomarkers to support prognosis and therapeutic choices. The present study has focussed on S100 proteins as a potentially promising group of markers in cancer development and progression. One reason of interest in this family of proteins is because the majority of the S100 genes are clustered on a region of human chromosome 1q21 that is prone to genomic rearrangements. Moreover, there is increasing evidence that S100 proteins are often up-regulated in many cancers, including breast, and this is frequently associated with tumour progression. Samples of breast cancer tissues were obtained during surgical intervention, according to the bioethical recommendations, and cryo-preserved until used. Tissue extracts were submitted to proteomic preparations for 2D-IPG. Protein identification was performed by N-terminal sequencing and/or peptide mass finger printing. The majority of the detected S100 proteins were absent, or present at very low levels, in the non-tumoral tissues adjacent to the primary tumor. This finding strengthens the role of S100 proteins as putative biomarkers. The proteomic screening of 100 cryo-preserved breast cancer tissues showed that some proteins were ubiquitously expressed in almost all patients while others appeared more sporadic. Most, if not all, of the detected S100 members appeared reciprocally correlated. Finally, from the perspective of biomarkers establishment, a promising finding was the observation that patients which developed distant metastases after a three year follow-up showed a general tendency of higher S100 protein expression, compared to the disease-free group. This article reports for the first time the comparative proteomic screening of several S100 protein members among a large group of breast cancer patients. The results obtained strongly support the hypothesis that a significant deregulation of multiple S100 protein members is

  3. Exploring the composition of protein-ligand binding sites on a large scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nickolay A Khazanov

    Full Text Available The residue composition of a ligand binding site determines the interactions available for diffusion-mediated ligand binding, and understanding general composition of these sites is of great importance if we are to gain insight into the functional diversity of the proteome. Many structure-based drug design methods utilize such heuristic information for improving prediction or characterization of ligand-binding sites in proteins of unknown function. The Binding MOAD database if one of the largest curated sets of protein-ligand complexes, and provides a source of diverse, high-quality data for establishing general trends of residue composition from currently available protein structures. We present an analysis of 3,295 non-redundant proteins with 9,114 non-redundant binding sites to identify residues over-represented in binding regions versus the rest of the protein surface. The Binding MOAD database delineates biologically-relevant "valid" ligands from "invalid" small-molecule ligands bound to the protein. Invalids are present in the crystallization medium and serve no known biological function. Contacts are found to differ between these classes of ligands, indicating that residue composition of biologically relevant binding sites is distinct not only from the rest of the protein surface, but also from surface regions capable of opportunistic binding of non-functional small molecules. To confirm these trends, we perform a rigorous analysis of the variation of residue propensity with respect to the size of the dataset and the content bias inherent in structure sets obtained from a large protein structure database. The optimal size of the dataset for establishing general trends of residue propensities, as well as strategies for assessing the significance of such trends, are suggested for future studies of binding-site composition.

  4. ALADYN: a web server for aligning proteins by matching their large-scale motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potestio, R; Aleksiev, T; Pontiggia, F; Cozzini, S; Micheletti, C

    2010-07-01

    The ALADYN web server aligns pairs of protein structures by comparing their internal dynamics and detecting regions that sustain similar large-scale movements. The latter often accompany functional conformational changes in proteins and enzymes. The ALADYN dynamics-based alignment can therefore highlight functionally-oriented correspondences that could be more elusive to sequence- or structure-based comparisons. The ALADYN server takes the structure files of the two proteins as input. The optimal relative positioning of the molecules is found by maximizing the similarity of the pattern of structural fluctuations which are calculated via an elastic network model. The resulting alignment is presented via an interactive graphical Java applet and is accompanied by a number of quantitative indicators and downloadable data files. The ALADYN web server is freely accessible at the http://aladyn.escience-lab.org address.

  5. Improving Protein Detection Confidence Using SWATH-Mass Spectrometry with Large Peptide Reference Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jemma X; Pascovici, Dana; Ignjatovic, Vera; Song, Xiaomin; Krisp, Christoph; Molloy, Mark P

    2017-10-01

    Protein quantification using data-independent acquisition methods such as SWATH-MS most commonly relies on spectral matching to a reference MS/MS assay library. To enable deep proteome coverage and efficient use of existing data, in silico approaches have been described to use archived or publicly available large reference spectral libraries for spectral matching. Since implicit in the use of larger libraries is the increasing likelihood of false-discoveries, new workflows are needed to ensure high confidence in protein matching under these conditions. We present a workflow which introduces a range of filters and thresholds aimed at increasing confidence that the resulting proteins are reliably detected and their quantitation is consistent and reproducible. We demonstrated the workflow using extended libraries with SWATH data from human plasma samples and yeast-spiked human K562 cell lysate digest. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Postgraduate diploma collaborative assignment: Implications for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Business groups remained intact across various diplomas and large focus areas, which would act as a pivot for the major group assignments, were forged using scenarios from three core courses. Each general topic thus included at least three separate yet complementary portfolio assignments that differed in genre, ...

  7. Accelerating large-scale protein structure alignments with graphics processing units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pang Bin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-scale protein structure alignment, an indispensable tool to structural bioinformatics, poses a tremendous challenge on computational resources. To ensure structure alignment accuracy and efficiency, efforts have been made to parallelize traditional alignment algorithms in grid environments. However, these solutions are costly and of limited accessibility. Others trade alignment quality for speedup by using high-level characteristics of structure fragments for structure comparisons. Findings We present ppsAlign, a parallel protein structure Alignment framework designed and optimized to exploit the parallelism of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs. As a general-purpose GPU platform, ppsAlign could take many concurrent methods, such as TM-align and Fr-TM-align, into the parallelized algorithm design. We evaluated ppsAlign on an NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPU card, and compared it with existing software solutions running on an AMD dual-core CPU. We observed a 36-fold speedup over TM-align, a 65-fold speedup over Fr-TM-align, and a 40-fold speedup over MAMMOTH. Conclusions ppsAlign is a high-performance protein structure alignment tool designed to tackle the computational complexity issues from protein structural data. The solution presented in this paper allows large-scale structure comparisons to be performed using massive parallel computing power of GPU.

  8. FLEET ASSIGNMENT MODELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the airline scheduling process and methods of its modeling. This article describes the main stages of airline scheduling process (scheduling, fleet assignment, revenue management, operations, their features and interactions. The main part of scheduling process is fleet assignment. The optimal solution of the fleet assignment problem enables airlines to increase their incomes up to 3 % due to quality improving of connections and execution of the planned number of flights operated by less number of aircraft than usual or planned earlier. Fleet assignment of scheduling process is examined and Conventional Leg-Based Fleet Assignment Model is analyzed. Finally strong and weak aspects of the model (SWOT are released and applied. The article gives a critical analysis of FAM model, with the purpose of identi- fying possible options and constraints of its use (for example, in cases of short-term and long-term planning, changing the schedule or replacing the aircraft, as well as possible ways to improve the model.

  9. Large-scale identification of odorant-binding proteins and chemosensory proteins from expressed sequence tags in insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Insect odorant binding proteins (OBPs) and chemosensory proteins (CSPs) play an important role in chemical communication of insects. Gene discovery of these proteins is a time-consuming task. In recent years, expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of many insect species have accumulated, thus providing a useful resource for gene discovery. Results We have developed a computational pipeline to identify OBP and CSP genes from insect ESTs. In total, 752,841 insect ESTs were examined from 54 species covering eight Orders of Insecta. From these ESTs, 142 OBPs and 177 CSPs were identified, of which 117 OBPs and 129 CSPs are new. The complete open reading frames (ORFs) of 88 OBPs and 123 CSPs were obtained by electronic elongation. We randomly chose 26 OBPs from eight species of insects, and 21 CSPs from four species for RT-PCR validation. Twenty two OBPs and 16 CSPs were confirmed by RT-PCR, proving the efficiency and reliability of the algorithm. Together with all family members obtained from the NCBI (OBPs) or the UniProtKB (CSPs), 850 OBPs and 237 CSPs were analyzed for their structural characteristics and evolutionary relationship. Conclusions A large number of new OBPs and CSPs were found, providing the basis for deeper understanding of these proteins. In addition, the conserved motif and evolutionary analysis provide some new insights into the evolution of insect OBPs and CSPs. Motif pattern fine-tune the functions of OBPs and CSPs, leading to the minor difference in binding sex pheromone or plant volatiles in different insect Orders. PMID:20034407

  10. Large-scale identification of odorant-binding proteins and chemosensory proteins from expressed sequence tags in insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Yong-Jun

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insect odorant binding proteins (OBPs and chemosensory proteins (CSPs play an important role in chemical communication of insects. Gene discovery of these proteins is a time-consuming task. In recent years, expressed sequence tags (ESTs of many insect species have accumulated, thus providing a useful resource for gene discovery. Results We have developed a computational pipeline to identify OBP and CSP genes from insect ESTs. In total, 752,841 insect ESTs were examined from 54 species covering eight Orders of Insecta. From these ESTs, 142 OBPs and 177 CSPs were identified, of which 117 OBPs and 129 CSPs are new. The complete open reading frames (ORFs of 88 OBPs and 123 CSPs were obtained by electronic elongation. We randomly chose 26 OBPs from eight species of insects, and 21 CSPs from four species for RT-PCR validation. Twenty two OBPs and 16 CSPs were confirmed by RT-PCR, proving the efficiency and reliability of the algorithm. Together with all family members obtained from the NCBI (OBPs or the UniProtKB (CSPs, 850 OBPs and 237 CSPs were analyzed for their structural characteristics and evolutionary relationship. Conclusions A large number of new OBPs and CSPs were found, providing the basis for deeper understanding of these proteins. In addition, the conserved motif and evolutionary analysis provide some new insights into the evolution of insect OBPs and CSPs. Motif pattern fine-tune the functions of OBPs and CSPs, leading to the minor difference in binding sex pheromone or plant volatiles in different insect Orders.

  11. Effects of dietary restriction followed by high dietary energy or protein on compensatory growth of Ashanti Black × Large White crossbred weaner pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addah, Weseh; Dzewu, Reuben Rudolph Kafui; Alenyorege, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The study determined the effect of re-alimenting dietary protein or energy on compensatory growth. Eighteen Ashanti Black × Large White crossbred weaner pigs (7.5 ± 0.30 kg) were randomly assigned to one of three dietary treatments in a completely randomized design resulting in three replicate pens per treatment (n = 3) and two pigs per pen. In the first treatment, pigs were fed ad libitum a diet containing 12.0 MJ/kg of metabolizable energy (ME) and 14.4% crude protein (CP) (maintenance diet) for 56 days. In the second and third dietary treatments, pigs were fed the maintenance diet for the initial 28 days and then switched to a high protein (17.4% dry matter (DM) CP; protein) or high (14.0 MJ/kg DM; energy) diet for the rest of the 28-day period. Dry matter intake and growth performance were similar (P ≥ 0.52) among treatments during the first 28 days of restrictive feeding, but pigs re-alimented with the protein diet achieved superior (P = 0.004) DM intake, average daily gain (ADG), and feed efficiency than those fed the maintenance diet or re-alimented with the energy diet in the re-alimentation period. At the end of the entire 56-day period, pigs re-alimented with the protein diet had higher (P ≥ 0.01) live weight gains and ADG compared with those fed the maintenance diet or re-alimented with the energy diet, but DM intake was similar (P = 0.66) among treatments. It was concluded that re-alimentation with protein rather than energy can improve compensatory growth of Ashanti Black × Large White crossbred weaner pigs.

  12. Random Cell Identifiers Assignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Bestak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite integration of advanced functions that enable Femto Access Points (FAPs to be deployed in a plug-and-play manner, the femtocell concept still cause several opened issues to be resolved. One of them represents an assignment of Physical Cell Identifiers (PCIs to FAPs. This paper analyses a random based assignment algorithm in LTE systems operating in diverse femtocell scenarios. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated by comparing the number of confusions for various femtocell densities, PCI ranges and knowledge of vicinity. Simulation results show that better knowledge of vicinity can significantly reduce the number of confusions events.

  13. Task assignment and coaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dominguez-Martinez, S.

    2009-01-01

    An important task of a manager is to motivate her subordinates. One way in which a manager can give incentives to junior employees is through the assignment of tasks. How a manager allocates tasks in an organization, provides information to the junior employees about his ability. Without coaching

  14. Rapamycin-binding FKBP25 associates with diverse proteins that form large intracellular entities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galat, Andrzej, E-mail: galat@dsvidf.cea.fr; Thai, Robert

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • The hFKBP25 interacts with diverse components of macromolecular entities. • We show that the endogenous human FKBP25 is bound to polyribosomes. • The endogenous hFKBP25 co-immunoprecipitated with nucleosomal proteins. • FKBP25 could induce conformational switch in macromolecular complexes. - Abstract: In this paper, we show some evidence that a member of the FK506-binding proteins, FKBP25 is associated to diverse components that are part of several different intracellular large-molecular mass entities. The FKBP25 is a high-affinity rapamycin-binding immunophilin, which has nuclear translocation signals present in its PPIase domain but it was detected both in the cytoplasm compartment and in the nuclear proteome. Analyses of antiFKBP25-immunoprecipitated proteins have revealed that the endogenous FKBP25 is associated to the core histones of the nucleosome, and with several proteins forming spliceosomal complexes and ribosomal subunits. Using polyclonal antiFKBP25 we have detected FKBP25 associated with polyribosomes. Added RNAs or 0.5 M NaCl release FKBP25 that was associated with the polyribosomes indicating that the immunophilin has an intrinsic capacity to form complexes with polyribonucleotides via its charged surface patches. Rapamycin or FK506 treatments of the polyribosomes isolated from porcine brain, HeLa and K568 cells caused a residual release of the endogenous FKBP25, which suggests that the immunophilin also binds to some proteins via its PPIase cavity. Our proteomics study indicates that the nuclear pool of the FKBP25 targets various nuclear proteins that are crucial for packaging of DNA, chromatin remodeling and pre-mRNA splicing whereas the cytosolic pool of this immunophilin is bound to some components of the ribosome.

  15. Neandertals' large lower thorax may represent adaptation to high protein diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Dor, Miki; Gopher, Avi; Barkai, Ran

    2016-07-01

    Humans are limited in their capacity to convert protein into energy. We present a hypothesis that a "bell" shaped thorax and a wide pelvis evolved in Neandertals, at least in part, as an adaptation to a high protein diet. A high protein diet created a need to house an enlarged liver and urinary system in a wider lower trunk. To test the hypothesis, we applied a model developed to identify points of nutritional stress. A ratio of obligatory dietary fat to total animal fat and protein sourced calories is calculated based on various known and estimated parameters. Stress is identified when the obligatory dietary fat ratio is higher than fat content ratios in available prey. The model predicts that during glacial winters, when carbohydrates weren't available, 74%-85% of Neandertals' caloric intake would have had to come from animal fat. Large animals contain around 50% fat calories, and their fat content is diminished during winter, so a significant stressful dietary fat deficit was identified by the model. This deficit could potentially be ameliorated by an increased capability to convert protein into energy. Given that high protein consumption is associated with larger liver and kidneys in animal models, it appears likely that the enlarged inferior section of the Neandertals thorax and possibly, in part, also his wide pelvis, represented an adaptation to provide encasement for those enlarged organs. Behavioral and evolutionary implications of the hypothesis are also discussed. Am J Phys Anthropol 160:367-378, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Thermal motion in proteins: Large effects on the time-averaged interaction energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goethe, Martin, E-mail: martingoethe@ub.edu; Rubi, J. Miguel [Departament de Física Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Fita, Ignacio [Institut de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona, Baldiri Reixac 10, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-03-15

    As a consequence of thermal motion, inter-atomic distances in proteins fluctuate strongly around their average values, and hence, also interaction energies (i.e. the pair-potentials evaluated at the fluctuating distances) are not constant in time but exhibit pronounced fluctuations. These fluctuations cause that time-averaged interaction energies do generally not coincide with the energy values obtained by evaluating the pair-potentials at the average distances. More precisely, time-averaged interaction energies behave typically smoother in terms of the average distance than the corresponding pair-potentials. This averaging effect is referred to as the thermal smoothing effect. Here, we estimate the strength of the thermal smoothing effect on the Lennard-Jones pair-potential for globular proteins at ambient conditions using x-ray diffraction and simulation data of a representative set of proteins. For specific atom species, we find a significant smoothing effect where the time-averaged interaction energy of a single atom pair can differ by various tens of cal/mol from the Lennard-Jones potential at the average distance. Importantly, we observe a dependency of the effect on the local environment of the involved atoms. The effect is typically weaker for bulky backbone atoms in beta sheets than for side-chain atoms belonging to other secondary structure on the surface of the protein. The results of this work have important practical implications for protein software relying on free energy expressions. We show that the accuracy of free energy expressions can largely be increased by introducing environment specific Lennard-Jones parameters accounting for the fact that the typical thermal motion of protein atoms depends strongly on their local environment.

  17. Utility of inline milk fat and protein ratio to diagnose subclinical ketosis and to assign propylene glycol treatment in lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Nicholas T; Peña, Gustavo; Risco, Carlos; Barbosa, Carolina C; Vieira-Neto, Achilles; Galvão, Klibs N

    2015-08-01

    The objective was to identify a fat-to-protein ratio (FPR) cut-off to diagnose subclinical ketosis (SCK) and to evaluate the effect of propylene glycol (PPG) treatment of cows with high FPR. The optimized cut-off was > 1.42; sensitivity (Se) = 92%; specificity (Sp) = 65%. A cut-off > 1.5 was selected for the PPG trial for balanced Se-Sp. Fat-to-protein ratio cut-offs > 1.25, 1.35, 1.50, 1.60, and 1.70 resulted in Se-Sp of 100% to 49%, 96% to 59%, 75% to 78%, 33% to 90%, and 8% to 96%, respectively. The proportions of cows with FPR > 1.25, 1.35, 1.42, 1.50, 1.60, and 1.70 were 60%, 50%, 44%, 30%, 14%, and 6%, respectively. Incidences of clinical ketosis and milk yield were similar between cows that received 400 mL of PPG (n = 34) and control cows (n = 38). Prevalence of SCK at enrollment was 29.2%; therefore, FPR > 1.5 is not indicated for treatment. Lower cut-offs should be used for screening.

  18. Understanding the physical properties controlling protein crystallization based on analysis of large-scale experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, W. Nicholson; Chen, Yang; Handelman, Samuel K.; Neely, Helen; Manor, Philip; Karlin, Richard; Nair, Rajesh; Liu, Jinfeng; Baran, Michael; Everett, John; Tong, Saichiu N.; Forouhar, Farhad; Swaminathan, Swarup S.; Acton, Thomas; Xiao, Rong; Luft, Joseph R.; Lauricella, Angela; DeTitta, George T.; Rost, Burkhard; Montelione, Gaetano T.; Hunt, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Crystallization has proven to be the most significant bottleneck to high-throughput protein structure determination using diffraction methods. We have used the large-scale, systematically generated experimental results of the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium to characterize the biophysical properties that control protein crystallization. Datamining of crystallization results combined with explicit folding studies lead to the conclusion that crystallization propensity is controlled primarily by the prevalence of well-ordered surface epitopes capable of mediating interprotein interactions and is not strongly influenced by overall thermodynamic stability. These analyses identify specific sequence features correlating with crystallization propensity that can be used to estimate the crystallization probability of a given construct. Analyses of entire predicted proteomes demonstrate substantial differences in the bulk amino acid sequence properties of human versus eubacterial proteins that reflect likely differences in their biophysical properties including crystallization propensity. Finally, our thermodynamic measurements enable critical evaluation of previous claims regarding correlations between protein stability and bulk sequence properties, which generally are not supported by our dataset. PMID:19079241

  19. On the accuracy of protein determination in large biological samples by prompt gamma neutron activation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasviki, K.; Stamatelatos, I. E.; Yannakopoulou, E.; Papadopoulou, P.; Kalef-Ezra, J.

    2007-10-01

    A prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) facility has been developed for the determination of nitrogen and thus total protein in large volume biological samples or the whole body of small animals. In the present work, the accuracy of nitrogen determination by PGNAA in phantoms of known composition as well as in four raw ground meat samples of about 1 kg mass was examined. Dumas combustion and Kjeldahl techniques were also used for the assessment of nitrogen concentration in the meat samples. No statistically significant differences were found between the concentrations assessed by the three techniques. The results of this work demonstrate the applicability of PGNAA for the assessment of total protein in biological samples of 0.25-1.5 kg mass, such as a meat sample or the body of small animal even in vivo with an equivalent radiation dose of about 40 mSv.

  20. A new strategy for identification of N-glycosylated proteins and unambiguous assignment of their glycosylation sites using HILIC enrichment and partial deglycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hägglund, Per; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Elortza, Felix

    2004-01-01

    Characterization of glycoproteins using mass spectrometry ranges from determination of carbohydrate-protein linkages to the full characterization of all glycan structures attached to each glycosylation site. In a novel approach to identify N-glycosylation sites in complex biological samples, we...... performed an enrichment of glycosylated peptides through hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) followed by partial deglycosylation using a combination of endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidases (EC 3.2.1.96). After hydrolysis with these enzymes, a single N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) residue...... on a mixture of known glycoproteins, and subsequently the method was applied to samples of human plasma obtained by lectin chromatography followed by 1D gel-electrophoresis for determination of 62 glycosylation sites in 37 glycoproteins....

  1. Biodegradable Magnetic Silica@Iron Oxide Nanovectors with Ultra-Large Mesopores for High Protein Loading, Magnetothermal Release, and Delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Omar, Haneen

    2016-11-29

    The delivery of large cargos of diameter above 15 nm for biomedical applications has proved challenging since it requires biocompatible, stably-loaded, and biodegradable nanomaterials. In this study, we describe the design of biodegradable silica-iron oxide hybrid nanovectors with large mesopores for large protein delivery in cancer cells. The mesopores of the nanomaterials spanned from 20 to 60 nm in diameter and post-functionalization allowed the electrostatic immobilization of large proteins (e.g. mTFP-Ferritin, ~ 534 kDa). Half of the content of the nanovectors was based with iron oxide nanophases which allowed the rapid biodegradation of the carrier in fetal bovine serum and a magnetic responsiveness. The nanovectors released large protein cargos in aqueous solution under acidic pH or magnetic stimuli. The delivery of large proteins was then autonomously achieved in cancer cells via the silica-iron oxide nanovectors, which is thus a promising for biomedical applications.

  2. In various protein complexes, disordered protomers have large per-residue surface areas and area of protein-, DNA- and RNA-binding interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhonghua; Hu, Gang; Yang, Jianyi; Peng, Zhenling; Uversky, Vladimir N; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2015-09-14

    We provide first large scale analysis of the peculiarities of surface areas of 5658 dissimilar (below 50% sequence similarity) proteins with known 3D-structures that bind to proteins, DNA or RNAs. We show here that area of the protein surface is highly correlated with the protein length. The size of the interface surface is only modestly correlated with the protein size, except for RNA-binding proteins where larger proteins are characterized by larger interfaces. Disordered proteins with disordered interfaces are characterized by significantly larger per-residue areas of their surfaces and interfaces when compared to the structured proteins. These result are applicable for proteins involved in interaction with DNA, RNA, and proteins and suggest that disordered proteins and binding regions are less compact and more likely to assume extended shape. We demonstrate that disordered protein binding residues in the interfaces of disordered proteins drive the increase in the per residue area of these interfaces. Our results can be used to predict in silico whether a given protomer from the DNA, RNA or protein complex is likely to be disordered in its unbound form. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Visualisation and graph-theoretic analysis of a large-scale protein structural interactome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrington Richard

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-scale protein interaction maps provide a new, global perspective with which to analyse protein function. PSIMAP, the Protein Structural Interactome Map, is a database of all the structurally observed interactions between superfamilies of protein domains with known three-dimensional structure in the PDB. PSIMAP incorporates both functional and evolutionary information into a single network. Results We present a global analysis of PSIMAP using several distinct network measures relating to centrality, interactivity, fault-tolerance, and taxonomic diversity. We found the following results: Centrality: we show that the center and barycenter of PSIMAP do not coincide, and that the superfamilies forming the barycenter relate to very general functions, while those constituting the center relate to enzymatic activity. Interactivity: we identify the P-loop and immunoglobulin superfamilies as the most highly interactive. We successfully use connectivity and cluster index, which characterise the connectivity of a superfamily's neighbourhood, to discover superfamilies of complex I and II. This is particularly significant as the structure of complex I is not yet solved. Taxonomic diversity: we found that highly interactive superfamilies are in general taxonomically very diverse and are thus amongst the oldest. Fault-tolerance: we found that the network is very robust as for the majority of superfamilies removal from the network will not break up the network. Conclusions Overall, we can single out the P-loop containing nucleotide triphosphate hydrolases superfamily as it is the most highly connected and has the highest taxonomic diversity. In addition, this superfamily has the highest interaction rank, is the barycenter of the network (it has the shortest average path to every other superfamily in the network, and is an articulation vertex, whose removal will disconnect the network. More generally, we conclude that the graph

  4. Gain weighted eigenspace assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, John B.; Andrisani, Dominick, II

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the development of the gain weighted eigenspace assignment methodology. This provides a designer with a systematic methodology for trading off eigenvector placement versus gain magnitudes, while still maintaining desired closed-loop eigenvalue locations. This is accomplished by forming a cost function composed of a scalar measure of error between desired and achievable eigenvectors and a scalar measure of gain magnitude, determining analytical expressions for the gradients, and solving for the optimal solution by numerical iteration. For this development the scalar measure of gain magnitude is chosen to be a weighted sum of the squares of all the individual elements of the feedback gain matrix. An example is presented to demonstrate the method. In this example, solutions yielding achievable eigenvectors close to the desired eigenvectors are obtained with significant reductions in gain magnitude compared to a solution obtained using a previously developed eigenspace (eigenstructure) assignment method.

  5. Assignment of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) gene(s) to human chromosome 2 in rodent-human somatic cell hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbschleb-Voogt, E; Grzeschik, K H; Pearson, P L; Meera Khan, P

    1981-01-01

    The experiments reported in this paper indicate that the expression of human adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) in the human-rodent somatic cell hybrids is influenced by the state of confluency of the cells and the background rodent genome. Thus, the complement of the L-cell derived A9 or B82 mouse parent apparently prevents the expression of human ADCP in the interspecific somatic cell hybrids. In the a3, E36, or RAG hybrids the human ADCP expression was not prevented by the rodent genome and was found to be proportional to the degree of confluency of the cell in the culture as in the case of primary human fibroblasts. An analysis of human chromosomes, chromosome specific enzyme markers, and ADCP in a panel of rodent-human somatic cell hybrids optimally maintained and harvested at full confluency has shown that the expression of human ADCP in the mouse (RAG)-human as well as in the hamster (E36 or a3)-human hybrids is determined by a gene(s) in human chromosome 2 and that neither chromosome 6 nor any other of the chromosomes of man carry any gene(s) involved in the formation of human ADCP at least in the Chinese hamster-human hybrids. A series of rodent-human hybrid clones exhibiting a mitotic separation of IDH1 and MDH1 indicated that ADCP is most probably situated between corresponding loci in human chromosome 2.

  6. Assignment Tracking Android Application

    OpenAIRE

    Akanni, Feranmi Timothy

    2016-01-01

    One of the common ways of checking that knowledge is impacted into students at every level of education is by giving various tasks to students and part of the responsibilities of the teacher is to give assignments to students and check the solution provided by the students. Increase in technology development involves a number of mobile applications that are being developed and released on a daily basis, out of which Android operating application is one of the dominant mobile application. T...

  7. Task assignment and coaching

    OpenAIRE

    Dominguez-Martinez, S.

    2009-01-01

    An important task of a manager is to motivate her subordinates. One way in which a manager can give incentives to junior employees is through the assignment of tasks. How a manager allocates tasks in an organization, provides information to the junior employees about his ability. Without coaching from a manager, the junior employee only has information about his past performance. Based on his past performance, a talented junior who has performed a difficult task sometimes decides to leave the...

  8. Frustration, specific sequence dependence, and nonlinearity in large-amplitude fluctuations of allosteric proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenfei; Wolynes, Peter G; Takada, Shoji

    2011-03-01

    Proteins have often evolved sequences so as to acquire the ability for regulation via allosteric conformational change. Here we investigate how allosteric dynamics is designed through sequences with nonlinear interaction features. First, for 71 allosteric proteins of which two, open and closed, structures are available, a statistical survey of interactions using an all-atom model with effective solvation shows that those residue contact interactions specific to one of the two states are significantly weaker than are the contact interactions shared by the two states. This interaction feature indicates there is underlying sequence design to facilitate conformational change. Second, based on the energy landscape theory, we implement these interaction features into a new atomic-interaction-based coarse-grained model via a multiscale simulation protocol (AICG). The AICG model outperforms standard coarse-grained models for predictions of the native-state mean fluctuations and of the conformational change direction. Third, using the new model for adenylate kinase, we show that intrinsic fluctuations in one state contain rare and large-amplitude motions nearly reaching the other state. Such large-amplitude motions are realized partly by sequence specificity and partly by the nonlinear nature of contact interactions, leading to cracking. Both features enhance conformational transition rates.

  9. mBeRFP, an improved large stokes shift red fluorescent protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yang

    Full Text Available Herein, we describe the generation of a monomeric large Stokes shift (LSS red fluorescent protein, mBeRFP, with excitation and emission peaks at 446 and 615 nm, respectively. Compared with two previously reported LSS-RFPs (mKeima and LSS-mKate2, mBeRFP is approximately three times brighter. In addition, mBeRFP is characterized by improved photostability, rapid maturation, an extended lifetime, and a monomeric nature. Additionally, mBeRFP can be paired with the Alexa 647 dye as a FRET donor to detect caspase 3 activity. This FRET pair has an extremely dynamic range and a large Förster radius (approximately 6.5 nm. To demonstrate the applicability of mBeRFP for imaging in living cells, we performed dual-color imaging of mBeRFP and CFP simultaneously excited by a single excitation source, and we demonstrated that these fluorescent proteins allow the clear visualization of the dynamics of Bax during cancer cell apoptosis. Thus, mBeRFP appears to be particularly useful for cellular imaging applications.

  10. The pepATTRACT web server for blind, large-scale peptide-protein docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Sjoerd J; Rey, Julien; Schindler, Christina E M; Zacharias, Martin; Tuffery, Pierre

    2017-04-29

    Peptide-protein interactions are ubiquitous in the cell and form an important part of the interactome. Computational docking methods can complement experimental characterization of these complexes, but current protocols are not applicable on the proteome scale. pepATTRACT is a novel docking protocol that is fully blind, i.e. it does not require any information about the binding site. In various stages of its development, pepATTRACT has participated in CAPRI, making successful predictions for five out of seven protein-peptide targets. Its performance is similar or better than state-of-the-art local docking protocols that do require binding site information. Here we present a novel web server that carries out the rigid-body stage of pepATTRACT. On the peptiDB benchmark, the web server generates a correct model in the top 50 in 34% of the cases. Compared to the full pepATTRACT protocol, this leads to some loss of performance, but the computation time is reduced from ∼18 h to ∼10 min. Combined with the fact that it is fully blind, this makes the web server well-suited for large-scale in silico protein-peptide docking experiments. The rigid-body pepATTRACT server is freely available at http://bioserv.rpbs.univ-paris-diderot.fr/services/pepATTRACT. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Protein Data Bank Japan (PDBj): updated user interfaces, resource description framework, analysis tools for large structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinjo, Akira R; Bekker, Gert-Jan; Suzuki, Hirofumi; Tsuchiya, Yuko; Kawabata, Takeshi; Ikegawa, Yasuyo; Nakamura, Haruki

    2017-01-04

    The Protein Data Bank Japan (PDBj, http://pdbj.org), a member of the worldwide Protein Data Bank (wwPDB), accepts and processes the deposited data of experimentally determined macromolecular structures. While maintaining the archive in collaboration with other wwPDB partners, PDBj also provides a wide range of services and tools for analyzing structures and functions of proteins. We herein outline the updated web user interfaces together with RESTful web services and the backend relational database that support the former. To enhance the interoperability of the PDB data, we have previously developed PDB/RDF, PDB data in the Resource Description Framework (RDF) format, which is now a wwPDB standard called wwPDB/RDF. We have enhanced the connectivity of the wwPDB/RDF data by incorporating various external data resources. Services for searching, comparing and analyzing the ever-increasing large structures determined by hybrid methods are also described. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Efficiency of Adaptive Temperature-Based Replica Exchange for Sampling Large-Scale Protein Conformational Transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weihong; Chen, Jianhan

    2013-06-11

    Temperature-based replica exchange (RE) is now considered a principal technique for enhanced sampling of protein conformations. It is also recognized that existence of sharp cooperative transitions (such as protein folding/unfolding) can lead to temperature exchange bottlenecks and significantly reduce the sampling efficiency. Here, we revisit two adaptive temperature-based RE protocols, namely, exchange equalization (EE) and current maximization (CM), that were previously examined using atomistic simulations (Lee and Olson, J. Chem. Physics2011, 134, 24111). Both protocols aim to overcome exchange bottlenecks by adaptively adjusting the simulation temperatures, either to achieve uniform exchange rates (in EE) or to maximize temperature diffusion (CM). By designing a realistic yet computationally tractable coarse-grained protein model, one can sample many reversible folding/unfolding transitions using conventional constant temperature molecular dynamics (MD), standard REMD, EE-REMD, and CM-REMD. This allows rigorous evaluation of the sampling efficiency, by directly comparing the rates of folding/unfolding transitions and convergence of various thermodynamic properties of interest. The results demonstrate that both EE and CM can indeed enhance temperature diffusion compared to standard RE, by ∼3- and over 10-fold, respectively. Surprisingly, the rates of reversible folding/unfolding transitions are similar in all three RE protocols. The convergence rates of several key thermodynamic properties, including the folding stability and various 1D and 2D free energy surfaces, are also similar. Therefore, the efficiency of RE protocols does not appear to be limited by temperature diffusion, but by the inherent rates of spontaneous large-scale conformational rearrangements. This is particularly true considering that virtually all RE simulations of proteins in practice involve exchange attempt frequencies (∼ps(-1)) that are several orders of magnitude faster than the

  13. On the Bicriterion Multi Modal Assignment Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Roed; Nielsen, L.R.; Andersen, K.A.

    2005-01-01

    We consider the bicriterion multi modal assignment problem which is a new generalization of the classical linear assignment problem. A two-phase solution method using an effective ranking scheme is presented. The algorithm is valid for generating all nondominated criterion points or an approximat......We consider the bicriterion multi modal assignment problem which is a new generalization of the classical linear assignment problem. A two-phase solution method using an effective ranking scheme is presented. The algorithm is valid for generating all nondominated criterion points...... or an approximation. Extensive computational results are conducted on a large library of test instances to test the performance of the algorithm and to identify hard test instances. Also, test results of the algorithm applied to the bicriterion assignment problem is given. Here our algorithm outperforms all...

  14. Development of a plastic embedding method for large-volume and fluorescent-protein-expressing tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongqin Yang

    Full Text Available Fluorescent proteins serve as important biomarkers for visualizing both subcellular organelles in living cells and structural and functional details in large-volume tissues or organs. However, current techniques for plastic embedding are limited in their ability to preserve fluorescence while remaining suitable for micro-optical sectioning tomography of large-volume samples. In this study, we quantitatively evaluated the fluorescence preservation and penetration time of several commonly used resins in a Thy1-eYFP-H transgenic whole mouse brain, including glycol methacrylate (GMA, LR White, hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA and Unicryl. We found that HMPA embedding doubled the eYFP fluorescence intensity but required long durations of incubation for whole brain penetration. GMA, Unicryl and LR White each penetrated the brain rapidly but also led to variable quenching of eYFP fluorescence. Among the fast-penetrating resins, GMA preserved fluorescence better than LR White and Unicryl. We found that we could optimize the GMA formulation by reducing the polymerization temperature, removing 4-methoxyphenol and adjusting the pH of the resin solution to be alkaline. By optimizing the GMA formulation, we increased percentage of eYFP fluorescence preservation in GMA-embedded brains nearly two-fold. These results suggest that modified GMA is suitable for embedding large-volume tissues such as whole mouse brain and provide a novel approach for visualizing brain-wide networks.

  15. A simple and traceless solid phase method simplifies the assembly of large peptides and the access to challenging proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollivier, N; Desmet, R; Drobecq, H; Blanpain, A; Boll, E; Leclercq, B; Mougel, A; Vicogne, J; Melnyk, O

    2017-08-01

    Chemical protein synthesis gives access to well-defined native or modified proteins that are useful for studying protein structure and function. The majority of proteins synthesized up to now have been produced using native chemical ligation (NCL) in solution. Although there are significant advantages to assembling large peptides or proteins by solid phase ligation, reports of such approaches are rare. We report a novel solid phase method for protein synthesis which relies on the chemistry of the acetoacetyl group and ketoxime ligation for the attachment of the peptide to the solid support, and on a tandem transoximation/rearrangement process for the detachment of the target protein. Importantly, we show that the combination of solid phase and solution ligation techniques facilitates the production of a challenging and biologically active protein made of 180 amino acids. We show also that the solid phase method enables the purification of complex peptide segments through a chemoselective solid phase capture/release approach.

  16. Glycoproteins and Glycosylation Site Assignments in Cereal seed Proteomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dedvisitsakul, Plaipol

    aleurone layer and 47 glycoproteins were identified. Sequence homology search against allergen database reveals that many glycoproteins identified from wheat and barley share similarity with known food allergens and may therefore be targets in search of novel allergens from wheat flour........ Glycosylation is one of the most common PTMs of protein that is involved in many physiological functions and biological pathways. The aim of this Ph.D. project is mainly to screen and identify N-glycosylated proteins from barley and wheat. A HILIC-based glycopeptide enrichment technqiue was first developed...... by supplementing cotton wool with ZIC-HILIC in a microcolumn (called ZIC-cotton). This approach reduced co-enrichment of non-glycosylated peptides and allowed glycoppeptide identification from large protein mixtures. It was applied for glycoprotein identification and glycosylation site assignment in wheat albumin...

  17. Large scale identification and categorization of protein sequences using structured logistic regression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørn P Pedersen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Structured Logistic Regression (SLR is a newly developed machine learning tool first proposed in the context of text categorization. Current availability of extensive protein sequence databases calls for an automated method to reliably classify sequences and SLR seems well-suited for this task. The classification of P-type ATPases, a large family of ATP-driven membrane pumps transporting essential cations, was selected as a test-case that would generate important biological information as well as provide a proof-of-concept for the application of SLR to a large scale bioinformatics problem. RESULTS: Using SLR, we have built classifiers to identify and automatically categorize P-type ATPases into one of 11 pre-defined classes. The SLR-classifiers are compared to a Hidden Markov Model approach and shown to be highly accurate and scalable. Representing the bulk of currently known sequences, we analysed 9.3 million sequences in the UniProtKB and attempted to classify a large number of P-type ATPases. To examine the distribution of pumps on organisms, we also applied SLR to 1,123 complete genomes from the Entrez genome database. Finally, we analysed the predicted membrane topology of the identified P-type ATPases. CONCLUSIONS: Using the SLR-based classification tool we are able to run a large scale study of P-type ATPases. This study provides proof-of-concept for the application of SLR to a bioinformatics problem and the analysis of P-type ATPases pinpoints new and interesting targets for further biochemical characterization and structural analysis.

  18. Large-scale identification of potential drug targets based on the topological features of human protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhan-Chao; Zhong, Wen-Qian; Liu, Zhi-Qing; Huang, Meng-Hua; Xie, Yun; Dai, Zong; Zou, Xiao-Yong

    2015-04-29

    Identifying potential drug target proteins is a crucial step in the process of drug discovery and plays a key role in the study of the molecular mechanisms of disease. Based on the fact that the majority of proteins exert their functions through interacting with each other, we propose a method to recognize target proteins by using the human protein-protein interaction network and graph theory. In the network, vertexes and edges are weighted by using the confidence scores of interactions and descriptors of protein primary structure, respectively. The novel network topological features are defined and employed to characterize protein using existing databases. A widely used minimum redundancy maximum relevance and random forests algorithm are utilized to select the optimal feature subset and construct model for the identification of potential drug target proteins at the proteome scale. The accuracies of training set and test set are 89.55% and 85.23%. Using the constructed model, 2127 potential drug target proteins have been recognized and 156 drug target proteins have been validated in the database of drug target. In addition, some new drug target proteins can be considered as targets for treating diseases of mucopolysaccharidosis, non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, Bernard-Soulier syndrome and pseudo-von Willebrand, etc. It is anticipated that the proposed method may became a powerful high-throughput virtual screening tool of drug target. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Survey of large protein complexes D. vulgaris reveals great structural diversity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, B.-G.; Dong, M.; Liu, H.; Camp, L.; Geller, J.; Singer, M.; Hazen, T. C.; Choi, M.; Witkowska, H. E.; Ball, D. A.; Typke, D.; Downing, K. H.; Shatsky, M.; Brenner, S. E.; Chandonia, J.-M.; Biggin, M. D.; Glaeser, R. M.

    2009-08-15

    An unbiased survey has been made of the stable, most abundant multi-protein complexes in Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH) that are larger than Mr {approx} 400 k. The quaternary structures for 8 of the 16 complexes purified during this work were determined by single-particle reconstruction of negatively stained specimens, a success rate {approx}10 times greater than that of previous 'proteomic' screens. In addition, the subunit compositions and stoichiometries of the remaining complexes were determined by biochemical methods. Our data show that the structures of only two of these large complexes, out of the 13 in this set that have recognizable functions, can be modeled with confidence based on the structures of known homologs. These results indicate that there is significantly greater variability in the way that homologous prokaryotic macromolecular complexes are assembled than has generally been appreciated. As a consequence, we suggest that relying solely on previously determined quaternary structures for homologous proteins may not be sufficient to properly understand their role in another cell of interest.

  20. Characterizing detergent mediated reconstitution of viral protein M2 in large unilamellar vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyre, Mariel; Grossman, Carl; Crouch, Catherine; Howard, Kathleen

    2015-03-01

    Influenza M2 is a model membrane protein whose function is to induce curvature and vesicle formation in the process of viral infection. To study embedded M2 in synthetic phospholipid vesicles (large unilamellar vesicles or LUVs), a concentration of detergent and buffer is optimized to balance protein solubility, proteolipid concentration, and LUV stability. Adding detergent also causes the LUVs to partially disassemble and form micelles, which warrants detergent removal to restore LUV integrity. We explore methods of measuring the coexistence of detergent micelles and LUVs to track the different phases of the system as detergent is removed. A combination of Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy, Dynamic Light Scattering, and chemical analysis are used to measure the properties of this system. With detergent/LUV number densities as high as 5 we find coexistence of micelles and LUVs at 50% to 60%. As the detergent is removed, the micelle concentration drops to lower than 30% while detergent levels drop to nearly zero. These results may indicate a polydispersed LUV size distribution after detergent mediated reconstitution. Supported by HHMI and Swarthmore College.

  1. Large Variation in Detection of Histidine-Rich Protein 2 in Plasmodium falciparum Isolates from Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pava, Zuleima; Echeverry, Diego F.; Díaz, Gustavo; Murillo, Claribel

    2010-01-01

    Most rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) available use histidine-rich protein 2 (HRP2) as a target. However, it has been reported that sequence variations of this protein affects its sensitivity. Currently, there is insufficient evidence for HRP2 variability in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from Colombia and its relationship with RDT performance. To determine possible geographic differences and their effects on the performance of RDTs, 22 blood samples from patients with P. falciparum malaria from Tumaco and Buenaventura, Colombia were assessed by measurement of HRP2 concentration by an HRP2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, RDTs, and thick blood smear. Statistical analysis showed an association between RDT performance and HRP2 concentrations. No significant difference was found between locations. A large variation of antigen concentration in samples was found at same parasitemia. In contrast to previously reports, there was no correlation between initial parasitemia and HRP2 concentration. Our results indicate that antigen quantity should be studied more carefully because the sensitivity of the RDT is affected more by antigen concentration than by parasitemia. PMID:20889875

  2. Protein-peptide molecular docking with large-scale conformational changes: the p53-MDM2 interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Maciej Pawel Ciemny; Aleksander Debinski; Marta Paczkowska; Andrzej Kolinski; Mateusz Kurcinski; Sebastian Kmiecik

    2016-01-01

    Protein-peptide interactions are often associated with large-scale conformational changes that are difficult to study either by classical molecular modeling or by experiment. Recently, we have developed the CABS-dock method for flexible protein-peptide docking that enables large-scale rearrangements of the protein chain. In this study, we use CABS-dock to investigate the binding of the p53-MDM2 complex, an element of the cell cycle regulation system crucial for anti-cancer drug design. Experi...

  3. Large-scale analysis of secondary structure changes in proteins suggests a role for disorder-to-order transitions in nucleotide binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Adi; Ofran, Yanay; Kliger, Yossef

    2010-02-01

    Conformational changes in proteins often involve secondary structure transitions. Such transitions can be divided into two types: disorder-to-order changes, in which a disordered segment acquires an ordered secondary structure (e.g., disorder to alpha-helix, disorder to beta-strand), and order-to-order changes, where a segment switches from one ordered secondary structure to another (e.g., alpha-helix to beta-strand, alpha-helix to turn). In this study, we explore the distribution of these transitions in the proteome. Using a comprehensive, yet highly conservative method, we compared solved three-dimensional structures of identical protein sequences, looking for differences in the secondary structures with which they were assigned. Protein chains in which such secondary structure transitions were detected, were classified into two sets according to the type of transition that is involved (disorder-to-order or order-to-order), allowing us to characterize each set by examining enrichment of gene ontology terms. The results reveal that the disorder-to-order set is significantly enriched with nucleotide binding proteins, whereas the order-to-order set is more diverse. Remarkably, further examination reveals that >22% of the purine nucleotide binding proteins include segments which undergo disorder-to-order transitions, suggesting that such transitions play an important role in this process. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Enhanced functional and structural domain assignments using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The sequencing of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) H37Rv genome has facilitated deeper insights into the biology of MTB, yet the functions of many MTB proteins are unknown. We have used sensitive profile-based search procedures to assign functional and structural domains to infer functions of gene products ...

  5. A casein-kinase-2-related protein kinase is tightly associated with the large T antigen of simian virus 40

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Götz, C; Koenig, M G; Issinger, O G

    1995-01-01

    The simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen is a multifunctional protein involved in SV40 cell transformation and lytic virus infection. Some of its activities are regulated by interaction with cellular proteins and/or by phosphorylation of T antigen by various protein kinases. In this study, we...... of T antigen by the associated kinase is reduced whereas a p34cdc2-kinase-specific peptide has no influence. In addition, the T-antigen-associated protein kinase can use GTP and ATP as phosphate donors. These properties together with the observation that immunopurified T antigen can be phosphorylated...

  6. Job Assignments under Moral Hazard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Alexander; Nafziger, Julia

    Inefficient job assignments are usually explained with incomplete information about employees' abilities or contractual imperfections. We show that inefficient assignments arise even without uncertainty about the employee's ability and with complete contracts. Building on this result we provide...

  7. Spatiotemporal multistage consensus clustering in molecular dynamics studies of large proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenn, Michael; Ribarics, Reiner; Ilieva, Nevena; Cibena, Michael; Karch, Rudolf; Schreiner, Wolfgang

    2016-04-26

    The aim of this work is to find semi-rigid domains within large proteins as reference structures for fitting molecular dynamics trajectories. We propose an algorithm, multistage consensus clustering, MCC, based on minimum variation of distances between pairs of Cα-atoms as target function. The whole dataset (trajectory) is split into sub-segments. For a given sub-segment, spatial clustering is repeatedly started from different random seeds, and we adopt the specific spatial clustering with minimum target function: the process described so far is stage 1 of MCC. Then, in stage 2, the results of spatial clustering are consolidated, to arrive at domains stable over the whole dataset. We found that MCC is robust regarding the choice of parameters and yields relevant information on functional domains of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) studied in this paper: the α-helices and β-floor of the protein (MHC) proved to be most flexible and did not contribute to clusters of significant size. Three alleles of the MHC, each in complex with ABCD3 peptide and LC13 T-cell receptor (TCR), yielded different patterns of motion. Those alleles causing immunological allo-reactions showed distinct correlations of motion between parts of the peptide, the binding cleft and the complementary determining regions (CDR)-loops of the TCR. Multistage consensus clustering reflected functional differences between MHC alleles and yields a methodological basis to increase sensitivity of functional analyses of bio-molecules. Due to the generality of approach, MCC is prone to lend itself as a potent tool also for the analysis of other kinds of big data.

  8. istar: a web platform for large-scale protein-ligand docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongjian; Leung, Kwong-Sak; Ballester, Pedro J; Wong, Man-Hon

    2014-01-01

    Protein-ligand docking is a key computational method in the design of starting points for the drug discovery process. We are motivated by the desire to automate large-scale docking using our popular docking engine idock and thus have developed a publicly-accessible web platform called istar. Without tedious software installation, users can submit jobs using our website. Our istar website supports 1) filtering ligands by desired molecular properties and previewing the number of ligands to dock, 2) monitoring job progress in real time, and 3) visualizing ligand conformations and outputting free energy and ligand efficiency predicted by idock, binding affinity predicted by RF-Score, putative hydrogen bonds, and supplier information for easy purchase, three useful features commonly lacked on other online docking platforms like DOCK Blaster or iScreen. We have collected 17,224,424 ligands from the All Clean subset of the ZINC database, and revamped our docking engine idock to version 2.0, further improving docking speed and accuracy, and integrating RF-Score as an alternative rescoring function. To compare idock 2.0 with the state-of-the-art AutoDock Vina 1.1.2, we have carried out a rescoring benchmark and a redocking benchmark on the 2,897 and 343 protein-ligand complexes of PDBbind v2012 refined set and CSAR NRC HiQ Set 24Sept2010 respectively, and an execution time benchmark on 12 diverse proteins and 3,000 ligands of different molecular weight. Results show that, under various scenarios, idock achieves comparable success rates while outperforming AutoDock Vina in terms of docking speed by at least 8.69 times and at most 37.51 times. When evaluated on the PDBbind v2012 core set, our istar platform combining with RF-Score manages to reproduce Pearson's correlation coefficient and Spearman's correlation coefficient of as high as 0.855 and 0.859 respectively between the experimental binding affinity and the predicted binding affinity of the docked conformation. istar

  9. An approach to improve kernel-based Protein-Protein Interaction extraction by learning from large-scale network data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lishuang; Guo, Rui; Jiang, Zhenchao; Huang, Degen

    2015-07-15

    Protein-Protein Interaction extraction (PPIe) from biomedical literatures is an important task in biomedical text mining and has achieved desirable results on the annotated datasets. However, the traditional machine learning methods on PPIe suffer badly from vocabulary gap and data sparseness, which weakens classification performance. In this work, an approach capturing external information from the web-based data is introduced to address these problems and boost the existing methods. The approach involves three kinds of word representation techniques: distributed representation, vector clustering and Brown clusters. Experimental results show that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art methods on five publicly available corpora. Our code and data are available at: http://chaoslog.com/improving-kernel-based-protein-protein-interaction-extraction-by-unsupervised-word-representation-codes-and-data.html. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mutations at protein-protein interfaces: Small changes over big surfaces have large impacts on human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubb, Harry C; Pandurangan, Arun P; Turner, Meghan A; Ochoa-Montaño, Bernardo; Blundell, Tom L; Ascher, David B

    2017-09-01

    Many essential biological processes including cell regulation and signalling are mediated through the assembly of protein complexes. Changes to protein-protein interaction (PPI) interfaces can affect the formation of multiprotein complexes, and consequently lead to disruptions in interconnected networks of PPIs within and between cells, further leading to phenotypic changes as functional interactions are created or disrupted. Mutations altering PPIs have been linked to the development of genetic diseases including cancer and rare Mendelian diseases, and to the development of drug resistance. The importance of these protein mutations has led to the development of many resources for understanding and predicting their effects. We propose that a better understanding of how these mutations affect the structure, function, and formation of multiprotein complexes provides novel opportunities for tackling them, including the development of small-molecule drugs targeted specifically to mutated PPIs. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Protein-peptide molecular docking with large-scale conformational changes: the p53-MDM2 interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciemny, Maciej Pawel; Debinski, Aleksander; Paczkowska, Marta; Kolinski, Andrzej; Kurcinski, Mateusz; Kmiecik, Sebastian

    2016-12-01

    Protein-peptide interactions are often associated with large-scale conformational changes that are difficult to study either by classical molecular modeling or by experiment. Recently, we have developed the CABS-dock method for flexible protein-peptide docking that enables large-scale rearrangements of the protein chain. In this study, we use CABS-dock to investigate the binding of the p53-MDM2 complex, an element of the cell cycle regulation system crucial for anti-cancer drug design. Experimental data suggest that p53-MDM2 binding is affected by significant rearrangements of a lid region - the N-terminal highly flexible MDM2 fragment; however, the details are not clear. The large size of the highly flexible MDM2 fragments makes p53-MDM2 intractable for exhaustive binding dynamics studies using atomistic models. We performed extensive dynamics simulations using the CABS-dock method, including large-scale structural rearrangements of MDM2 flexible regions. Without a priori knowledge of the p53 peptide structure or its binding site, we obtained near-native models of the p53-MDM2 complex. The simulation results match well the experimental data and provide new insights into the possible role of the lid fragment in p53 binding. The presented case study demonstrates that CABS-dock methodology opens up new opportunities for protein-peptide docking with large-scale changes of the protein receptor structure.

  12. The pepATTRACT web server for blind, large-scale peptide–protein docking

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Sjoerd J.; Rey, Julien; Schindler, Christina E. M.; Zacharias, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Peptide–protein interactions are ubiquitous in the cell and form an important part of the interactome. Computational docking methods can complement experimental characterization of these complexes, but current protocols are not applicable on the proteome scale. pepATTRACT is a novel docking protocol that is fully blind, i.e. it does not require any information about the binding site. In various stages of its development, pepATTRACT has participated in CAPRI, making successful predictions for five out of seven protein–peptide targets. Its performance is similar or better than state-of-the-art local docking protocols that do require binding site information. Here we present a novel web server that carries out the rigid-body stage of pepATTRACT. On the peptiDB benchmark, the web server generates a correct model in the top 50 in 34% of the cases. Compared to the full pepATTRACT protocol, this leads to some loss of performance, but the computation time is reduced from ∼18 h to ∼10 min. Combined with the fact that it is fully blind, this makes the web server well-suited for large-scale in silico protein–peptide docking experiments. The rigid-body pepATTRACT server is freely available at http://bioserv.rpbs.univ-paris-diderot.fr/services/pepATTRACT. PMID:28460116

  13. ProteoMix: an integrated and flexible system for interactively analyzing large numbers of protein sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikayama, Eisuke; Kurotani, Atsushi; Kuroda, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2004-11-01

    ProteoMix is a suite of JAVA programs for identifying, annotating and predicting regions of interest in large sets of amino acid sequences, according to systematic and consistent criteria. It is based on two concepts (1) the integration of results from different sequence analysis tools increases the prediction reliability; and (2) the integration protocol is critical and needs to be easily adaptable in a case-by-case manner. ProteoMix was designed to analyze simultaneously multiple protein sequences using several bioinformatics tools, merge the results of the analyses using logical functions and display them on an integrated viewer. In addition, new sequences can be added seamlessly to an analysis performed on an initial set of sequences. ProteoMix has a modular design, and bioinformatics tools are run on remote servers accessed using the Internet Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP), ensuring the swift implementation of additional tools. ProteoMix has a user-friendly interactive graphical user interface environment and runs on PCs with Microsoft OS. ProteoMix is freely available for academic users at http://bio.gsc.riken.jp/ProteoMix/

  14. Interactive Assignments for Online Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pam Lowry

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Students can experience first hand through interactive assignments what is involved in teaching an online course. Most students develop a whole new appreciation for the student learning process. Faculty are beginning to realize that online instruction is more than a series of readings posted to a course management system. This paper summarizes the faculty member's instructional strategies involved when creating student interaction assignments. The paper also summarizes the assignments, discussion board, and trends in education from the student's perspective. In summary, it concludes with the faculty's overall perspective concerning these assignments and how the assignments could be more effective for the student.

  15. A workflow for absolute quantitation of large therapeutic proteins in biological samples at intact level using LC-HRMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Wenying; Kang, Lijuan; Burton, Lyle; Weng, Naidong

    2016-08-01

    The commonly used LC-MS workflow to quantify protein therapeutics in biological samples is 'bottom-up' approach. In this study, the aim is to establish 'top-down' approach for absolute quantitation of therapeutic antibodies or proteins of similar sizes in biological samples at intact level. Using a recombinant human monoclonal antibody as the model molecule, we present a workflow to measure large therapeutic proteins in plasma at intact level based on deconvoluted high-resolution MS (HRMS) peaks. A novel MultiQuant™ software function was developed to automatically deconvolute the peaks and process the data. The workflow showed satisfying performance. This is a proof of concept study demonstrating the feasibility of bioanalysis of large therapeutic proteins at intact level using LC-HRMS.

  16. Folding 19 proteins to their native state and stability of large proteins from a coarse-grained model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Abhijeet; Travesset, Alex

    2014-03-01

    We develop an intermediate resolution model, where the backbone is modeled with atomic resolution but the side chain with a single bead, by extending our previous model (Proteins (2013) DOI: 10.1002/prot.24269) to properly include proline, preproline residues and backbone rigidity. Starting from random configurations, the model properly folds 19 proteins (including a mutant 2A3D sequence) into native states containing β sheet, α helix, and mixed α/β. As a further test, the stability of H-RAS (a 169 residue protein, critical in many signaling pathways) is investigated: The protein is stable, with excellent agreement with experimental B-factors. Despite that proteins containing only α helices fold to their native state at lower backbone rigidity, and other limitations, which we discuss thoroughly, the model provides a reliable description of the dynamics as compared with all atom simulations, but does not constrain secondary structures as it is typically the case in more coarse-grained models. Further implications are described. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Incentivized optimal advert assignment via utility decomposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kelly, F.; Key, P.; Walton, N.

    2014-01-01

    We consider a large-scale Ad-auction where adverts are assigned over a potentially infinite number of searches. We capture the intrinsic asymmetries in information between advertisers, the advert platform and the space of searches: advertisers know and can optimize the average performance of their

  18. Backbone and sidechain 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments of the human brain-type fatty acid binding protein (FABP7) in its apo form and the holo forms binding to DHA, oleic acid, linoleic acid and elaidic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oeemig, Jesper S; Jørgensen, Mathilde L; Hansen, Mikka S

    2009-01-01

    In this manuscript, we present the backbone and side chain assignments of human brain-type fatty acid binding protein, also known as FABP7, in its apo form and in four different holo forms, bound to DHA, oleic acid, linoleic acid and elaidic acid.......In this manuscript, we present the backbone and side chain assignments of human brain-type fatty acid binding protein, also known as FABP7, in its apo form and in four different holo forms, bound to DHA, oleic acid, linoleic acid and elaidic acid....

  19. Influence of fermentable carbohydrates or protein on large intestinal and urinary metabolomic profiles in piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, R; Neumann, K; Kröger, S; Richter, J F; Wang, J; Martin, L; Bindelle, J; Htoo, J K; Vahjen, V; Van Kessel, A G; Zentek, J

    2012-12-01

    It was recently shown that variations in the ratio of dietary fermentable carbohydrates (fCHO) and fermentable protein (fCP) differentially affect large intestinal microbial ecology and the mucosal response. Here we investigated the use of mass spectrometry to profile changes in metabolite composition in colon and urine associated with variation in dietary fCHO and fCP composition and mucosal physiology. Thirty-two weaned piglets were fed 4 diets in a 2 × 2 factorial design with low fCP and low fCHO, low fCP and high fCHO, high fCP and low fCHO, and high fCP and high fCHO. After 21 to 23 d, all pigs were euthanized and colon digesta and urine metabolite profiles were obtained by mass spectrometry. Analysis of mass spectra by partial least squares approach indicated a clustering of both colonic and urinary profiles for each pig by feeding group. Metabolite identification and annotation using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) metabolic pathways revealed increased abundance of metabolites associated with arachidonic acid metabolism in colon of pigs fed a high concentration of fCP irrespective of dietary fCHO. Urinary metabolites did not show as clear patterns. Mass spectrometry can effectively differentiate metabolite profiles in colon contents and urine associated with changes in dietary composition. Whether metabolite profiling is an effective tool to identify specific metabolites (biomarkers) or metabolite profiles associated with gut function and integrity needs further elucidation.

  20. The homologous recombination protein RAD51D protects the genome from large deletions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reh, Wade A; Nairn, Rodney S; Lowery, Megan P; Vasquez, Karen M

    2017-02-28

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway that protects the genome from chromosomal instability. RAD51 mediator proteins (i.e. paralogs) are critical for efficient HR in mammalian cells. However, how HR-deficient cells process DSBs is not clear. Here, we utilized a loss-of-function HR-reporter substrate to simultaneously monitor HR-mediated gene conversion and non-conservative mutation events. The assay is designed around a heteroallelic duplication of the Aprt gene at its endogenous locus in isogenic Chinese hamster ovary cell lines. We found that RAD51D-deficient cells had a reduced capacity for HR-mediated gene conversion both spontaneously and in response to I-SceI-induced DSBs. Further, RAD51D-deficiency shifted DSB repair toward highly deleterious single-strand annealing (SSA) and end-joining processes that led to the loss of large chromosomal segments surrounding site-specific DSBs at an exceptionally high frequency. Deletions in the proximity of the break were due to a non-homologous end-joining pathway, while larger deletions were processed via a SSA pathway. Overall, our data revealed that, in addition to leading to chromosomal abnormalities, RAD51D-deficiency resulted in a high frequency of deletions advancing our understanding of how a RAD51 paralog is involved in maintaining genomic stability and how its deficiency may predispose cells to tumorigenesis. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  1. Nile Red fluorescence spectrum decomposition enables rapid screening of large protein aggregates in complex biopharmaceutical formulations like influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Ziya; Akkoc, Senem; Neeleman, Ronald; Haines, Jonathan; Kayser, Veysel

    2017-05-25

    The extensive presence of large (high molecular weight) protein aggregates in biopharmaceutical formulations is a concern for formulation stability and possibly safety. Tests to screen large aggregate content in such bioformulations are therefore needed for rapid and reliable quality control in industrial settings. Herein, non-commercial seasonal influenza split-virus vaccine samples, produced using various strains and extracted from selected industrial processing steps, were used as model complex bioformulations. Orthogonal characterization through transmission electron microscopy, UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence emission spectroscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography and single-radial immunodiffusion revealed that large, amorphous protein aggregates are formed after virus splitting and their presence is linked mainly, albeit not only, to surfactant (Triton X-100) content in a sample. Importantly, the presence of large virus aggregates in purified whole virus samples and large protein aggregates in vaccine samples was found to correlate with broadening/shouldering in Nile Red fluorescence spectra. Accordingly, decomposition of Nile Red spectra into components allowed the development of a novel, rapid, reliable and user-friendly test with high-throughput potential for screening large aggregate content in influenza split-virus vaccines. The test can be adapted for screening other complex biopharmaceutical formulations, provided relevant controls are done for informed decomposition of fluorescence spectra into their components. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The bicriterion multimodal assignment problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Roed; Nielsen, Lars Relund; Andersen, Kim Allan

    2008-01-01

    We consider the bicriterion multimodal assignment problem, which is a new generalization of the classical linear assignment problem. A two-phase solution method using an effective ranking scheme is presented. The algorithm is valid for generating all nondominated criterion points or an approximat......We consider the bicriterion multimodal assignment problem, which is a new generalization of the classical linear assignment problem. A two-phase solution method using an effective ranking scheme is presented. The algorithm is valid for generating all nondominated criterion points...

  3. Machine Learning-based Classification of Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma Patients by Their Protein Expression Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeb, Sally J; Tyanova, Stefka; Hummel, Michael; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Cox, Juergen; Mann, Matthias

    2015-11-01

    Characterization of tumors at the molecular level has improved our knowledge of cancer causation and progression. Proteomic analysis of their signaling pathways promises to enhance our understanding of cancer aberrations at the functional level, but this requires accurate and robust tools. Here, we develop a state of the art quantitative mass spectrometric pipeline to characterize formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues of patients with closely related subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. We combined a super-SILAC approach with label-free quantification (hybrid LFQ) to address situations where the protein is absent in the super-SILAC standard but present in the patient samples. Shotgun proteomic analysis on a quadrupole Orbitrap quantified almost 9,000 tumor proteins in 20 patients. The quantitative accuracy of our approach allowed the segregation of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients according to their cell of origin using both their global protein expression patterns and the 55-protein signature obtained previously from patient-derived cell lines (Deeb, S. J., D'Souza, R. C., Cox, J., Schmidt-Supprian, M., and Mann, M. (2012) Mol. Cell. Proteomics 11, 77-89). Expression levels of individual segregation-driving proteins as well as categories such as extracellular matrix proteins behaved consistently with known trends between the subtypes. We used machine learning (support vector machines) to extract candidate proteins with the highest segregating power. A panel of four proteins (PALD1, MME, TNFAIP8, and TBC1D4) is predicted to classify patients with low error rates. Highly ranked proteins from the support vector analysis revealed differential expression of core signaling molecules between the subtypes, elucidating aspects of their pathobiology. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Graph-based methods for large-scale protein classification and orthology inference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuzniar, A.

    2009-01-01

    The quest for understanding how proteins evolve and function has been a prominent and costly human endeavor. With advances in genomics and use of bioinformatics tools, the diversity of proteins in present day genomes can now be studied more efficiently than ever before. This thesis describes

  5. The consistency of large concerted motions in proteins in molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, B.L.; van Aalten, D.M.F.; Amadei, A; Berendsen, H.J.C.

    1996-01-01

    A detailed investigation is presented into the effect of limited sampling time and small changes in the force field on molecular dynamics simulations of a protein. Thirteen independent simulations of the B1 IgG-binding domain of streptococcal protein G were performed, with small changes in the

  6. Prognostic value of anemia and C-reactive protein levels in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adams, Hugo J A; De Klerk, John M H; Fijnheer, Rob; Heggelman, Ben G F; Dubois, Stefan V.; Nievelstein, Rutger A J; Kwee, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prognostic value of pretreatment anemia, pretreatment elevated C-reactive protein (CRP) levels, and 6-month posttreatment anemia in patients with newly diagnosed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) treated with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin, Oncovin, and

  7. Fast and Accurate Protein False Discovery Rates on Large-Scale Proteomics Data Sets with Percolator 3.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    The, Matthew; MacCoss, Michael J.; Noble, William S.; Käll, Lukas

    2016-11-01

    Percolator is a widely used software tool that increases yield in shotgun proteomics experiments and assigns reliable statistical confidence measures, such as q values and posterior error probabilities, to peptides and peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs) from such experiments. Percolator's processing speed has been sufficient for typical data sets consisting of hundreds of thousands of PSMs. With our new scalable approach, we can now also analyze millions of PSMs in a matter of minutes on a commodity computer. Furthermore, with the increasing awareness for the need for reliable statistics on the protein level, we compared several easy-to-understand protein inference methods and implemented the best-performing method—grouping proteins by their corresponding sets of theoretical peptides and then considering only the best-scoring peptide for each protein—in the Percolator package. We used Percolator 3.0 to analyze the data from a recent study of the draft human proteome containing 25 million spectra (PM:24870542). The source code and Ubuntu, Windows, MacOS, and Fedora binary packages are available from http://percolator.ms/ under an Apache 2.0 license.

  8. Bioadsorption of proteins on large mesocage-shaped mesoporous alumina monoliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Safty, Sherif A; Shenashen, M A; Khairy, M

    2013-03-01

    With the remarkable progress in the field of gene technology, proteins have gained an important function in the field of disease diagnosis and treatment. Protein bioadsorption has drawn increasing attention partly because of the promising advances for diagnostic assays, sensors, separations, and gene technology. Mesocage alumina has a cage-type structure with high surface area and pore volume, exhibiting superior capabilities for protein adsorption. In this study, we report the size-selective adsorption/removal of virtual proteins having different shapes, sizes, functions, and properties, including insulin, HopPmaL domain, lysozyme, galectin-3, β-lactoglobulin, α-1-antitrypsin, α-amylase, and myosin in aqueous water using mesocage alumina. The mesoporous alumina monoliths have unique morphology and physical properties and enhanced protein adsorption characteristics in terms of sample loading capacity and quantity, thereby ensuring a higher concentration of proteins, interior pore diffusivity, and encapsulation in a short period. Thermodynamic analysis shows that protein adsorption on mesocage alumina monoliths is favorable and spontaneous. Theoretical models have been studied to investigate the major driving forces to achieve the most optimal performance of protein adsorption. The development of ultra- or micrometer-scale morphology composed of mesocage-shaped mesoporous monoliths or alumina network clusters can be effectively used to encapsulate the macromolecules into the interior cage cavities, which can greatly assist in other potentials for biomedical applications. Furthermore, the adsorption of a single protein from mixtures based on size- and shape-selective separation can open up new ways to produce micro-objects that suit a given protein encapsulation design. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The large zinc finger protein ZAS3 is a critical modulator of osteoclastogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujun Liu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Mice deficient in the large zinc finger protein, ZAS3, show postnatal increase in bone mass suggesting that ZAS3 is critical in the regulation of bone homeostasis. Although ZAS3 has been shown to inhibit osteoblast differentiation, its role on osteoclastogenesis has not been determined. In this report we demonstrated the role of ZAS3 in bone resorption by examining the signaling mechanisms involved in osteoclastogenesis.Comparison of adult wild-type and ZAS3 knockout (ZAS3-/- mice showed that ZAS3 deficiency led to thicker bones that are more resistant to mechanical fracture. Additionally, ZAS3-/- bones showed fewer osteoclasts and inefficient M-CSF/sRANKL-mediated osteoclastogenesis ex vivo. Utilizing RAW 264.7 pre-osteoclasts, we demonstrated that overexpression of ZAS3 promoted osteoclastogenesis and the expression of crucial osteoclastic molecules, including phospho-p38, c-Jun, NFATc1, TRAP and CTSK. Contrarily, ZAS3 silencing by siRNA inhibited osteoclastogenesis. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that ZAS3 associated with TRAF6, the major receptor associated molecule in RANK signaling. Furthermore, EMSA suggested that nuclear ZAS3 could regulate transcription by binding to gene regulatory elements.Collectively, the data suggested a novel role of ZAS3 as a positive regulator of osteoclast differentiation. ZAS3 deficiency caused increased bone mass, at least in part due to decreased osteoclast formation and bone resorption. These functions of ZAS3 were mediated via activation of multiple intracellular targets. In the cytoplasmic compartment, ZAS3 associated with TRAF6 to control NF-kB and MAP kinase signaling cascades. Nuclear ZAS3 acted as a transcriptional regulator for osteoclast-associated genes. Additionally, ZAS3 activated NFATc1 required for the integration of RANK signaling in the terminal differentiation of osteoclasts. Thus, ZAS3 was a crucial molecule in osteoclast differentiation, which might potentially serve as a

  10. Large-scale identification of human protein function using topological features of interaction network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhanchao; Liu, Zhiqing; Zhong, Wenqian; Huang, Menghua; Wu, Na; Xie, Yun; Dai, Zong; Zou, Xiaoyong

    2016-11-01

    The annotation of protein function is a vital step to elucidate the essence of life at a molecular level, and it is also meritorious in biomedical and pharmaceutical industry. Developments of sequencing technology result in constant expansion of the gap between the number of the known sequences and their functions. Therefore, it is indispensable to develop a computational method for the annotation of protein function. Herein, a novel method is proposed to identify protein function based on the weighted human protein-protein interaction network and graph theory. The network topology features with local and global information are presented to characterise proteins. The minimum redundancy maximum relevance algorithm is used to select 227 optimized feature subsets and support vector machine technique is utilized to build the prediction models. The performance of current method is assessed through 10-fold cross-validation test, and the range of accuracies is from 67.63% to 100%. Comparing with other annotation methods, the proposed way possesses a 50% improvement in the predictive accuracy. Generally, such network topology features provide insights into the relationship between protein functions and network architectures. The source code of Matlab is freely available on request from the authors.

  11. Maize (Zea mays)-derived bovine trypsin: characterization of the first large-scale, commercial protein product from transgenic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Susan L; Mayor, Jocelyne M; Bailey, Michele R; Barker, Donna K; Love, Robert T; Lane, Jeffrey R; Delaney, Donna E; McComas-Wagner, Janet M; Mallubhotla, Hanuman D; Hood, Elizabeth E; Dangott, Lawrence J; Tichy, Shane E; Howard, John A

    2003-10-01

    Bovine trypsin (EC 3.4.21.4) is an enzyme that is widely used for commercial purposes to digest or process other proteins, including some therapeutic proteins. The biopharmaceutical industry is trying to eliminate animal-derived proteins from manufacturing processes due to the possible contamination of these products by human pathogens. Recombinant trypsin has been produced in a number of systems, including cell culture, bacteria and yeast. To date, these expression systems have not produced trypsin on a scale sufficient to fulfill the need of biopharmaceutical manufacturers where kilogram quantities are often required. The present paper describes commercial-level production of trypsin in transgenic maize (Zea mays) and its physical and functional characterization. This protease, the first enzyme to be produced on a large-scale using transgenic plant technology, is functionally equivalent to native bovine pancreatic trypsin. The availability of this reagent should allow for the replacement of animal-derived trypsin in the processing of pharmaceutical proteins.

  12. Oncogenic human papillomavirus E6 proteins target the discs large tumour suppressor for proteasome-mediated degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiol, D; Kühne, C; Glaunsinger, B; Lee, S S; Javier, R; Banks, L

    1999-09-30

    Previous studies have shown that the oncogenic HPV E6 proteins form a complex with the human homologue of the Drosophila tumour suppressor protein, discs large (Dlg). This is mediated by the carboxy terminus of the E6 proteins and involves recognition of at least one PDZ domain of Dlg. This region of E6 is not conserved amongst E6 proteins from the low risk papillomavirus types and, hence, binding of HPV E6 proteins to Dlg correlates with the oncogenic potential of these viruses. We have performed studies to investigate the consequences of the interaction between E6 and Dlg. Mutational analysis of both the HPV18 E6 and Dlg proteins has further defined the regions of E6 and Dlg necessary for complex formation. Strikingly, co-expression of wild type HPV18 E6 with Dlg in vitro or in vivo results in a dramatic decrease in the amount of Dlg protein, whereas mutants of E6 which fail to complex with Dlg have minimal effect on Dlg protein levels. The oncogenic HPV16 E6 also decreased the Dlg levels, but this was not observed with the low risk HPV11 E6 protein. Moreover, a region within the first 544 amino acids of Dlg containing the three PDZ domains confers susceptibility to E6 mediated degradation. Finally, treatment of cells with a proteasome inhibitor overrides the capacity of E6 to degrade Dlg. These results demonstrate that Dlg is targeted by high risk HPV E6 proteins for proteasome mediated degradation.

  13. Production of large quantities of isotopically labeled protein in Pichia pastoris by fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Matthew J.; Komives, Elizabeth A. [University of California, San Diego, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry (United States)

    1999-02-15

    Heterologous expression in Pichia pastoris has many of the advantages of eukaryotic expression, proper folding and disulfide bond formation, glycosylation, and secretion. Contrary to other eukaryotic systems, protein production from P.pastoris occurs in simple minimal defined media making this system attractive for production of labeled proteins for NMR analysis. P.pastoris is therefore the expression system of choice for NMR of proteins that cannot be refolded from inclusion bodies or that require post-translational modifications for proper folding or function. The yield of expressed proteins from P.pastoris depends critically on growth conditions, and attainment of high cell densities by fermentation has been shown to improve protein yields by 10-100-fold. Unfortunately, the cost of the isotopically enriched fermentation media components, particularly 15NH4OH, is prohibitively high. We report fermentation methods that allow for both 15N- labeling from (15NH4)2SO4 and 13C-labeling from 13C-glucose or 13C-glycerol of proteins produced in Pichia pastoris. Expression of an 83 amino acid fragment of thrombomodulin with two N-linked glycosylation sites shows that fermentation is more cost effective than shake flask growth for isotopic enrichment.

  14. Large scale clustering of protein sequences with FORCE -A layout based heuristic for weighted cluster editing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baumbach Jan

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detecting groups of functionally related proteins from their amino acid sequence alone has been a long-standing challenge in computational genome research. Several clustering approaches, following different strategies, have been published to attack this problem. Today, new sequencing technologies provide huge amounts of sequence data that has to be efficiently clustered with constant or increased accuracy, at increased speed. Results We advocate that the model of weighted cluster editing, also known as transitive graph projection is well-suited to protein clustering. We present the FORCE heuristic that is based on transitive graph projection and clusters arbitrary sets of objects, given pairwise similarity measures. In particular, we apply FORCE to the problem of protein clustering and show that it outperforms the most popular existing clustering tools (Spectral clustering, TribeMCL, GeneRAGE, Hierarchical clustering, and Affinity Propagation. Furthermore, we show that FORCE is able to handle huge datasets by calculating clusters for all 192 187 prokaryotic protein sequences (66 organisms obtained from the COG database. Finally, FORCE is integrated into the corynebacterial reference database CoryneRegNet. Conclusion FORCE is an applicable alternative to existing clustering algorithms. Its theoretical foundation, weighted cluster editing, can outperform other clustering paradigms on protein homology clustering. FORCE is open source and implemented in Java. The software, including the source code, the clustering results for COG and CoryneRegNet, and all evaluation datasets are available at http://gi.cebitec.uni-bielefeld.de/comet/force/.

  15. Large scale clustering of protein sequences with FORCE -A layout based heuristic for weighted cluster editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittkop, Tobias; Baumbach, Jan; Lobo, Francisco P; Rahmann, Sven

    2007-10-17

    Detecting groups of functionally related proteins from their amino acid sequence alone has been a long-standing challenge in computational genome research. Several clustering approaches, following different strategies, have been published to attack this problem. Today, new sequencing technologies provide huge amounts of sequence data that has to be efficiently clustered with constant or increased accuracy, at increased speed. We advocate that the model of weighted cluster editing, also known as transitive graph projection is well-suited to protein clustering. We present the FORCE heuristic that is based on transitive graph projection and clusters arbitrary sets of objects, given pairwise similarity measures. In particular, we apply FORCE to the problem of protein clustering and show that it outperforms the most popular existing clustering tools (Spectral clustering, TribeMCL, GeneRAGE, Hierarchical clustering, and Affinity Propagation). Furthermore, we show that FORCE is able to handle huge datasets by calculating clusters for all 192 187 prokaryotic protein sequences (66 organisms) obtained from the COG database. Finally, FORCE is integrated into the corynebacterial reference database CoryneRegNet. FORCE is an applicable alternative to existing clustering algorithms. Its theoretical foundation, weighted cluster editing, can outperform other clustering paradigms on protein homology clustering. FORCE is open source and implemented in Java. The software, including the source code, the clustering results for COG and CoryneRegNet, and all evaluation datasets are available at http://gi.cebitec.uni-bielefeld.de/comet/force/.

  16. Single-Molecule Analysis of Protein Large-Amplitude Conformational Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haw

    2011-03-01

    Proteins have evolved to harness thermal fluctuations, rather than frustrated by them, to carry out chemical transformations and mechanical work. What are, then, the operation and design principles of protein machines? To frame the problem in a tractable way, several basic questions have been formulated to guide the experimental design: (a) How many conformational states can a protein sample on the functionally important timescale? (b) What are the inter-conversion rates between states? (c) How do ligand binding or interactions with other proteins modulate the motions? (d) What are the structural basis of flexibility and its underlying molecular mechanics? Guided by this framework, we have studied protein tyrosine phosphatase B, PtpB, from M. tuberculosis (a virulence factor of tuberculosis and a potential drug target) and adenylate kinase, AK, from E. coli (a ubiquitous energy-balancing enzyme in cells). These domain movements have been followed in real time on their respective catalytic timescales using high-resolution single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) spectroscopy. It is shown quantitatively that both PtpB and AK are capable of dynamically sampling two distinct states that correlate well with those observed by x-ray crystallography. Integrating these microscopic dynamics into macroscopic kinetics allows us to place the experimentally measured free-energy landscape in the context of enzymatic turnovers.

  17. Large scale identification and categorization of protein sequences using structured logistic regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bjørn Panella; Ifrim, Georgiana; Liboriussen, Poul

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Structured Logistic Regression (SLR) is a newly developed machine learning tool first proposed in the context of text categorization. Current availability of extensive protein sequence databases calls for an automated method to reliably classify sequences and SLR seems well...

  18. Game theory and traffic assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Traffic assignment is used to determine the number of users on roadway links in a network. While this problem has : been widely studied in transportation literature, its use of the concept of equilibrium has attracted considerable interest : in the f...

  19. An Assignment Sequence for Underprepared Writers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, Kristi

    2000-01-01

    Presents a sequenced writing assignment on shopping to aid basic writers. Describes a writing assignment focused around online and mail-order shopping. Notes steps in preparing for the assignment, the sequence, and discusses responses to the assignments. (SC)

  20. Strategy-Proof Stochastic Assignment

    OpenAIRE

    Erdil, A.

    2013-01-01

    I study strategy-proof assignment mechanisms where the agents reveal their preference rankings over the available objects. A stochastic mechanism returns lotteries over deterministic assignments, and mechanisms are compared according to first-order stochastic dominance. I show that non-wasteful strategy-proof mechanisms are not dominated by strategy-proof mechanisms, however nonwastefulness is highly restrictive when the mechanism involves randomization. In fact, the Random Priority mechanism...

  1. FLAMEnGO 2.0: an enhanced fuzzy logic algorithm for structure-based assignment of methyl group resonances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Fa-An; Kim, Jonggul; Xia, Youlin; Milligan, Michael; Rowe, Nancy; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2014-08-01

    We present an enhanced version of the FLAMEnGO (Fuzzy Logic Assignment of Methyl Group) software, a structure-based method to assign methyl group resonances in large proteins. FLAMEnGO utilizes a fuzzy logic algorithm coupled with Monte Carlo sampling to obtain a probability-based assignment of the methyl group resonances. As an input, FLAMEnGO requires either the protein X-ray structure or an NMR structural ensemble including data such as methyl-methyl NOESY, paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE), methine-methyl TOCSY data. Version 2.0 of this software (FLAMEnGO 2.0) has a user-friendly graphic interface and presents improved modules that enable the input of partial assignments and additional NMR restraints. We tested the performance of FLAMEnGO 2.0 on maltose binding protein (MBP) as well as the C-subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA-C). FLAMEnGO 2.0 can be used as a standalone method or to assist in the completion of partial resonance assignments and can be downloaded at www.chem.umn.edu/groups/veglia/forms/flamengo2-form.html. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Dynamics of Membrane Proteins within Synthetic Polymer Membranes with Large Hydrophobic Mismatch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itel, Fabian; Najer, Adrian; Palivan, Cornelia G; Meier, Wolfgang

    2015-06-10

    The functioning of biological membrane proteins (MPs) within synthetic block copolymer membranes is an intriguing phenomenon that is believed to offer great potential for applications in life and medical sciences and engineering. The question why biological MPs are able to function in this completely artificial environment is still unresolved by any experimental data. Here, we have analyzed the lateral diffusion properties of different sized MPs within poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-containing amphiphilic block copolymer membranes of membrane thicknesses between 9 and 13 nm, which results in a hydrophobic mismatch between the membrane thickness and the size of the proteins of 3.3-7.1 nm (3.5-5 times). We show that the high flexibility of PDMS, which provides membrane fluidities similar to phospholipid bilayers, is the key-factor for MP incorporation.

  3. CASP10-BCL::Fold efficiently samples topologies of large proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, Sten; Putnam, Daniel K; Fischer, Axel W; Kohlmann, Tim; Weiner, Brian E; Meiler, Jens

    2015-03-01

    During CASP10 in summer 2012, we tested BCL::Fold for prediction of free modeling (FM) and template-based modeling (TBM) targets. BCL::Fold assembles the tertiary structure of a protein from predicted secondary structure elements (SSEs) omitting more flexible loop regions early on. This approach enables the sampling of conformational space for larger proteins with more complex topologies. In preparation of CASP11, we analyzed the quality of CASP10 models throughout the prediction pipeline to understand BCL::Fold's ability to sample the native topology, identify native-like models by scoring and/or clustering approaches, and our ability to add loop regions and side chains to initial SSE-only models. The standout observation is that BCL::Fold sampled topologies with a GDT_TS score > 33% for 12 of 18 and with a topology score > 0.8 for 11 of 18 test cases de novo. Despite the sampling success of BCL::Fold, significant challenges still exist in clustering and loop generation stages of the pipeline. The clustering approach employed for model selection often failed to identify the most native-like assembly of SSEs for further refinement and submission. It was also observed that for some β-strand proteins model refinement failed as β-strands were not properly aligned to form hydrogen bonds removing otherwise accurate models from the pool. Further, BCL::Fold samples frequently non-natural topologies that require loop regions to pass through the center of the protein. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Pseudocontact Shift-Driven Iterative Resampling for 3D Structure Determinations of Large Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilla, Kala Bharath; Otting, Gottfried; Huber, Thomas

    2016-01-29

    Pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) induced by paramagnetic lanthanides produce pronounced effects in nuclear magnetic resonance spectra, which are easily measured and which deliver valuable long-range structure restraints. Even sparse PCS data greatly enhance the success rate of 3D (3-dimensional) structure predictions of proteins by the modeling program Rosetta. The present work extends this approach to 3D structures of larger proteins, comprising more than 200 residues, which are difficult to model by Rosetta without additional experimental restraints. The new algorithm improves the fragment assembly method of Rosetta by utilizing PCSs generated from paramagnetic lanthanide ions attached at four different sites as the only experimental restraints. The sparse PCS data are utilized at multiple stages, to identify native-like local structures, to rank the best structural models and to rebuild the fragment libraries. The fragment libraries are refined iteratively until convergence. The PCS-driven iterative resampling algorithm is strictly data dependent and shown to generate accurate models for a benchmark set of eight different proteins, ranging from 100 to 220 residues, using solely PCSs of backbone amide protons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Scaffolding Assignments and Activities for Undergraduate Research Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Sarah; Justwan, Florian

    2018-01-01

    This article details assignments and lessons created for and tested in research methods courses at two different universities, a large state school and a small liberal arts college. Each assignment or activity utilized scaffolding. Students were asked to push beyond their comfort zone while utilizing concrete and/or creative examples,…

  6. Understanding Protein Synthesis: A Role-Play Approach in Large Undergraduate Human Anatomy and Physiology Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturges, Diana; Maurer, Trent W.; Cole, Oladipo

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of role play in a large undergraduate science class. The targeted population consisted of 298 students enrolled in 2 sections of an undergraduate Human Anatomy and Physiology course taught by the same instructor. The section engaged in the role-play activity served as the study group, whereas the section…

  7. Curli functional amyloid systems are phylogenetically widespread and display large diversity in operon and protein structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morten S Dueholm

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli and a few other members of the Enterobacteriales can produce functional amyloids known as curli. These extracellular fibrils are involved in biofilm formation and studies have shown that they may act as virulence factors during infections. It is not known whether curli fibrils are restricted to the Enterobacteriales or if they are phylogenetically widespread. The growing number of genome-sequenced bacteria spanning many phylogenetic groups allows a reliable bioinformatic investigation of the phylogenetic diversity of the curli system. Here we show that the curli system is phylogenetically much more widespread than initially assumed, spanning at least four phyla. Curli fibrils may consequently be encountered frequently in environmental as well as pathogenic biofilms, which was supported by identification of curli genes in public metagenomes from a diverse range of habitats. Identification and comparison of curli subunit (CsgA/B homologs show that these proteins allow a high degree of freedom in their primary protein structure, although a modular structure of tightly spaced repeat regions containing conserved glutamine, asparagine and glycine residues has to be preserved. In addition, a high degree of variability within the operon structure of curli subunits between bacterial taxa suggests that the curli fibrils might have evolved to fulfill specific functions. Variations in the genetic organization of curli genes are also seen among different bacterial genera. This suggests that some genera may utilize alternative regulatory pathways for curli expression. Comparison of phylogenetic trees of Csg proteins and the 16S rRNA genes of the corresponding bacteria showed remarkably similar overall topography, suggesting that horizontal gene transfer is a minor player in the spreading of the curli system.

  8. Fast large-scale clustering of protein structures using Gauss integrals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Tim; Borg, Mikael; Boomsma, Wouter

    2011-01-01

    trajectories. Results: We present Pleiades, a novel approach to clustering protein structures with a rigorous mathematical underpinning. The method approximates clustering based on the root mean square deviation by rst mapping structures to Gauss integral vectors – which were introduced by Røgen and co......-workers – and subsequently performing K-means clustering. Conclusions: Compared to current methods, Pleiades dramatically improves on the time needed to perform clustering, and can cluster a signicantly larger number of structures, while providing state-ofthe- art results. The number of low energy structures generated...

  9. Alternative Assignment Incentive Pay Formats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    300 dollars there was a 52% increase in applications and a 115 % increase in fill rates. This is extremely important to the Navy because it “suggest...Congress.” E-mail to Michael.T.Jones@navy.mil. 01 April 2005. 7. Nimon , W. R. and Hall, D. R. “An Experimental Analysis of the Relative Efficiency of...Scores (60 + 55 = 115 ). Accordingly, Bidder 1 is assigned to Job 1, Bidder 2 is unassigned, and Bidder 3 is assigned to Job 2. Payout in the

  10. Sarcospan: a small protein with large potential for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purification of the proteins associated with dystrophin, the gene product responsible for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, led to the discovery of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex. Sarcospan, a 25-kDa transmembrane protein, was the last component to be identified and its function in skeletal muscle has been elusive. This review will focus on progress over the last decade revealing that sarcospan is an important regulator of muscle cell adhesion, strength, and regeneration. Investigations using several transgenic mouse models demonstrate that overexpression of sarcospan in the mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy ameliorates pathology and restores muscle cell binding to laminin. Sarcospan improves cell surface expression of the dystrophin- and utrophin-glycoprotein complexes as well as α7β1 integrin, which are the three major laminin-binding complexes in muscle. Utrophin and α7β1 integrin compensate for the loss of dystrophin and the finding that sarcospan increases their abundance at the extra-synaptic sarcolemma supports the use of sarcospan as a therapeutic target. Newly discovered phenotypes in sarcospan-deficient mice, including a reduction in specific force output and increased drop in force in the diaphragm muscle, result from decreased utrophin and dystrophin expression and further reveal sarcospan’s role in determining abundance of these complexes. Dystrophin protein levels and the specific force output of the diaphragm muscle are further reduced upon genetic removal of α7 integrin (Itga7) in SSPN-deficient mice, demonstrating that interactions between integrin and sarcospan are critical for maintenance of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex and force production of the diaphragm muscle. Sarcospan is a major regulator of Akt signaling pathways and sarcospan-deficiency significantly impairs muscle regeneration, a process that is dependent on Akt activation. Intriguingly, sarcospan regulates glycosylation of a specific subpopulation of

  11. Backbone Assignment of the MALT1 Paracaspase by Solution NMR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Unnerståle

    Full Text Available Mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma translocation protein 1 (MALT1 is a unique paracaspase protein whose protease activity mediates oncogenic NF-κB signalling in activated B cell-like diffuse large B cell lymphomas (ABC-DLBCLs. ABC-DLBCLs are aggressive lymphomas with high resistance to current chemotherapies. Low survival rate among patients emphasizes the urgent need for alternative treatment options. The characterization of the MALT1 will be an essential tool for developing new target-directed drugs against MALT1 dependent disorders. As the first step in the atomic-level NMR studies of the system, here we report, the (15N/(13C/(1H backbone assignment of the apo form of the MALT1 paracaspase region together with the third immunoglobulin-like (Ig3 domain, 44 kDa, by high resolution NMR. In addition, the non-uniform sampling (NUS based targeted acquisition procedure is evaluated as a mean of decreasing acquisition and analysis time for larger proteins.

  12. Tightly bound DNA-protein complexes representing stable attachment sites of large DNA loops to components of the matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patriotis, C; Djondjurov, L

    1989-09-01

    This study describes tightly bound DNA-protein complexes in DNA of matrices isolated from Friend erythroleukemia cells. When after radio-iodination of the associated proteins, such DNA is electrophoresed on agarose and the gel is subsequently subjected to autoradiography, the protein components of three or four complexes are visualized. Their two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis revealed that each possesses a simple but specific polypeptide composition, including a set of five non-histone proteins, characteristic for the matrix, and the core histones H3 and H4. Since the polypeptides dissociate from DNA by treatment with SDS, it is suggested that the linkage is not covalent. Reassociation and hybridization analysis of the DNA of the complexes indicated that it is enriched in highly repetitive, satellite sequences. The latter were found to be, to a great extent, similar to sequences localized at the base of large, dehistonized DNA loops obtained by high-salt extraction of isolated nuclei. Further experiments emphasized the complete conservation of this type of attachment throughout erythroid differentiation of Friend cells. It is proposed that the complexes represent attachment sites of basic, 30-100-kbp loop units of DNA.

  13. Mining Large Scale Tandem Mass Spectrometry Data for Protein Modifications Using Spectral Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horlacher, Oliver; Lisacek, Frederique; Müller, Markus

    2016-03-04

    Experimental improvements in post-translational modification (PTM) detection by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has allowed the identification of vast numbers of PTMs. Open modification searches (OMSs) of MS/MS data, which do not require prior knowledge of the modifications present in the sample, further increased the diversity of detected PTMs. Despite much effort, there is still a lack of functional annotation of PTMs. One possibility to narrow the annotation gap is to mine MS/MS data deposited in public repositories and to correlate the PTM presence with biological meta-information attached to the data. Since the data volume can be quite substantial and contain tens of millions of MS/MS spectra, the data mining tools must be able to cope with big data. Here, we present two tools, Liberator and MzMod, which are built using the MzJava class library and the Apache Spark large scale computing framework. Liberator builds large MS/MS spectrum libraries, and MzMod searches them in an OMS mode. We applied these tools to a recently published set of 25 million spectra from 30 human tissues and present tissue specific PTMs. We also compared the results to the ones obtained with the OMS tool MODa and the search engine X!Tandem.

  14. The Crystal Structure of Bacteriophage HK97 gp6: Defining a Large Family of Head-Tail Connector Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardarelli, Lia; Lam, Robert; Tuite, Ashleigh; Baker, Lindsay A; Sadowski, Paul D; Radford, Devon R; Rubinstein, John L; Battaile, Kevin P; Chirgadze, Nickolay; Maxwell, Karen L; Davidson, Alan R [UHN; (Toronto); (HWMRI)

    2011-11-23

    The final step in the morphogenesis of long-tailed double-stranded DNA bacteriophages is the joining of the DNA-filled head to the tail. The connector is a specialized structure of the head that serves as the interface for tail attachment and the point of egress for DNA from the head during infection. Here, we report the determination of a 2.1 Å crystal structure of gp6 of bacteriophage HK97. Through structural comparisons, functional studies, and bioinformatic analysis, gp6 has been determined to be a component of the connector of phage HK97 that is evolutionarily related to gp15, a well-characterized connector component of bacteriophage SPP1. Whereas the structure of gp15 was solved in a monomeric form, gp6 crystallized as an oligomeric ring with the dimensions expected for a connector protein. Although this ring is composed of 13 subunits, which does not match the symmetry of the connector within the phage, sequence conservation and modeling of this structure into the cryo-electron microscopy density of the SPP1 connector indicate that this oligomeric structure represents the arrangement of gp6 subunits within the mature phage particle. Through sequence searches and genomic position analysis, we determined that gp6 is a member of a large family of connector proteins that are present in long-tailed phages. We have also identified gp7 of HK97 as a homologue of gp16 of phage SPP1, which is the second component of the connector of this phage. These proteins are members of another large protein family involved in connector assembly.

  15. Annotation and analysis of a large cuticular protein family with the R&R Consensus in Anopheles gambiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Ningjia

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The most abundant family of insect cuticular proteins, the CPR family, is recognized by the R&R Consensus, a domain of about 64 amino acids that binds to chitin and is present throughout arthropods. Several species have now been shown to have more than 100 CPR genes, inviting speculation as to the functional importance of this large number and diversity. Results We have identified 156 genes in Anopheles gambiae that code for putative cuticular proteins in this CPR family, over 1% of the total number of predicted genes in this species. Annotation was verified using several criteria including identification of TATA boxes, INRs, and DPEs plus support from proteomic and gene expression analyses. Two previously recognized CPR classes, RR-1 and RR-2, form separate, well-supported clades with the exception of a small set of genes with long branches whose relationships are poorly resolved. Several of these outliers have clear orthologs in other species. Although both clades are under purifying selection, the RR-1 variant of the R&R Consensus is evolving at twice the rate of the RR-2 variant and is structurally more labile. In contrast, the regions flanking the R&R Consensus have diversified in amino-acid composition to a much greater extent in RR-2 genes compared with RR-1 genes. Many genes are found in compact tandem arrays that may include similar or dissimilar genes but always include just one of the two classes. Tandem arrays of RR-2 genes frequently contain subsets of genes coding for highly similar proteins (sequence clusters. Properties of the proteins indicated that each cluster may serve a distinct function in the cuticle. Conclusion The complete annotation of this large gene family provides insight on the mechanisms of gene family evolution and clues about the need for so many CPR genes. These data also should assist annotation of other Anopheles genes.

  16. Assigning agents to a line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Moreno-Ternero, Juan D.; Østerdal, Lars Peter Raahave

    2014-01-01

    minimizing modification of the classic random priority method to solve this class of problems. We also provide some logical relations in our setting among standard axioms in the literature on assignment problems, and explore the robustness of our results to several extensions of our setting....

  17. High throughput flow cytometry based yeast two-hybrid array approach for large-scale analysis of protein-protein interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Carter, Mark B.; Edwards, Bruce S.; Cai, Hong; Sklar, Larry A.

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of protein-protein-interactions is a key focus of proteomics efforts. The yeast two-hybrid system has been the most commonly used method in genome-wide searches for protein interaction partners. However, the throughput of the current yeast two-hybrid array approach is hampered by the involvement of the time-consuming LacZ assay and/or the incompatibility of liquid handling automation due to the requirement for selection of colonies/diploids on agar plates. To facilitate large-scale yeast two-hybrid assays, we report a novel array approach by coupling a GFP reporter based yeast two-hybrid system with high throughput flow cytometry that enables the processing of a 96 well plate in as little as 3 minutes. In this approach, the yEGFP reporter has been established in both AH109 (MATa) and Y187 (MATα) reporter cells. It not only allows the generation of two copies of GFP reporter genes in diploid cells, but also allows the convenient determination of self-activators generated from both bait and prey constructs by flow cytometry. We demonstrate a Y2H array assay procedure that is carried out completely in liquid media in 96-well plates by mating bait and prey cells in liquid YPD media, selecting the diploids containing positive interaction pairs in selective media and analyzing the GFP reporter directly by flow cytometry. We have evaluated this flow cytometry based array procedure by showing that the interaction of the positive control pair P53/T is able to be reproducibly detected at 72 hrs post-mating compared to the negative control pairs. We conclude that our flow cytometry based yeast two-hybrid approach is robust, convenient, quantitative, and is amenable to large-scale analysis using liquid-handling automation. PMID:21954189

  18. Identification of Antithrombin-Modulating Genes. Role of LARGE, a Gene Encoding a Bifunctional Glycosyltransferase, in the Secretion of Proteins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Morena-Barrio, María Eugenia; Buil, Alfonso; Antón, Ana Isabel; Martínez-Martínez, Irene; Miñano, Antonia; Gutiérrez-Gallego, Ricardo; Navarro-Fernández, José; Aguila, Sonia; Souto, Juan Carlos; Vicente, Vicente; Soria, José Manuel; Corral, Javier

    2013-01-01

    The haemostatic relevance of antithrombin together with the low genetic variability of SERPINC1, and the high heritability of plasma levels encourage the search for modulating genes. We used a hypothesis-free approach to identify these genes, evaluating associations between plasma antithrombin and 307,984 polymorphisms in the GAIT study (352 individuals from 21 Spanish families). Despite no SNP reaching the genome wide significance threshold, we verified milder positive associations in 307 blood donors from a different cohort. This validation study suggested LARGE, a gene encoding a protein with xylosyltransferase and glucuronyltransferase activities that forms heparin-like linear polysaccharides, as a potential modulator of antithrombin based on the significant association of one SNPs, rs762057, with anti-FXa activity, particularly after adjustment for age, sex and SERPINC1 rs2227589 genotype, all factors influencing antithrombin levels (p = 0.02). Additional results sustained this association. LARGE silencing inHepG2 and HEK-EBNA cells did not affect SERPINC1 mRNA levels but significantly reduced the secretion of antithrombin with moderate intracellular retention. Milder effects were observed on α1-antitrypsin, prothrombin and transferrin. Our study suggests LARGE as the first known modifier of plasma antithrombin, and proposes a new role for LARGE in modulating extracellular secretion of certain glycoproteins. PMID:23705025

  19. Large-Scale Quantitative Assessment of Binding Preferences in Protein-Nucleic Acid Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubec, Dávid; Hostas, Jirí; Laskowski, Roman A; Hobza, Pavel; Vondrásek, Jirí

    2015-04-14

    The growing number of high-quality experimental (X-ray, NMR) structures of protein–DNA complexes has sufficient enough information to assess whether universal rules governing the DNA sequence recognition process apply. While previous studies have investigated the relative abundance of various modes of amino acid–base contacts (van der Waals contacts, hydrogen bonds), relatively little is known about the energetics of these noncovalent interactions. In the present study, we have performed the first large-scale quantitative assessment of binding preferences in protein–DNA complexes by calculating the interaction energies in all 80 possible amino acid–DNA base combinations. We found that several mutual amino acid–base orientations featuring bidentate hydrogen bonds capable of unambiguous one-to-one recognition correspond to unique minima in the potential energy space of the amino acid–base pairs. A clustering algorithm revealed that these contacts form a spatially well-defined group offering relatively little conformational freedom. Various molecular mechanics force field and DFT-D ab initio calculations were performed, yielding similar results.

  20. Understanding protein synthesis: a role-play approach in large undergraduate human anatomy and physiology classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturges, Diana; Maurer, Trent W; Cole, Oladipo

    2009-06-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of role play in a large undergraduate science class. The targeted population consisted of 298 students enrolled in 2 sections of an undergraduate Human Anatomy and Physiology course taught by the same instructor. The section engaged in the role-play activity served as the study group, whereas the section presented with a traditional lecture served as the control group. A pretest/posttest assessment and a survey were administered to both sections and used in data analysis. In addition, overall test scores and item analysis were examined. The analysis revealed that participants in both groups improved significantly from pretest to posttest, but there were no significant differences between the groups in posttest scores. Neither group showed a significant change from posttest to the exam. However, there was a moderate positive effect on engagement and satisfaction survey questions from being in the study group (based on 255 total surveys returned by both groups). The role-play activity was at least as effective as the lecture in terms of student performance on the above-mentioned assessments. In addition, it proved successful in engaging students in the learning process and increasing their satisfaction.

  1. Relationship between C-reactive protein and stroke: a large prospective community based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfang Liu

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that C-reactive protein (CRP was associated with risk of stroke. There were few studies in Asian population, or on stroke subtypes other than ischemic stroke. We thus investigated the relationship between CRP and the risks of all stroke and its subtypes in a Chinese adult population.In the current study, we included 90,517 Chinese adults free of stroke and myocardial infarction at baseline (June 2006 to October 2007 in analyses. Strokes were classified as ischemic stroke (IS, intracranial heamorrhage (ICH and subarachnoid heamorrhage (SAH. High-sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP were categorized into three groups: 3 mg/L. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate the association between hs-CRP concentrations and all stroke, as well as its subtypes.During a median follow-up time of 49 months, we documented 1,472 incident stroke cases. Of which 1,049 (71.3% were IS, 383 (26.0% were ICH, and 40 (2.7% were SAH. After multivariate adjustment, hs-CRP concentrations ≥1 mg/L were associated with increased risks of all stroke (hs-CRP 1-3 mg/L: hazard ratio (HR 1.17, 95% confidential interval (CI 1.03-1.33; hs-CRP>3 mg/L: HR 1.25, 95% CI 1.07-1.46 and IS (hs-CRP 1-3 mg/L: HR 1.17, 95% CI 1.01-1.36; hs-CRP>3 mg/L: HR 1.33, 95% CI 1.11-1.60, but not with ICH and SAH. Subgroup analyses showed that higher hs-CRP concentration was more prone to be a risk factor for all stroke and IS in non-fatal stroke, male and hypertensive participants.We found that higher hs-CRP concentrations were associated with a higher risk of IS, particularly for non-fatal stroke, male and hypertensive subjects. In contrast, we did not observe significant associations between hs-CRP and ICH/SAH.

  2. Genomic organization and reproductive regulation of a large lipid transfer protein in the varroa mite, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, A R; Shirk, P D; Duehl, A J; Donohue, K V; Grozinger, C M; Evans, J D; Teal, P E A

    2013-10-01

    The complete genomic region and corresponding transcript of the most abundant protein in phoretic varroa mites, Varroa destructor (Anderson & Trueman), were sequenced and have homology with acarine hemelipoglycoproteins and the large lipid transfer protein (LLTP) super family. The genomic sequence of VdLLTP included 14 introns and the mature transcript coded for a predicted polypeptide of 1575 amino acid residues. VdLLTP shared a minimum of 25% sequence identity with acarine LLTPs. Phylogenetic assessment showed VdLLTP was most closely related to Metaseiulus occidentalis vitellogenin and LLTP proteins of ticks; however, no heme binding by VdLLTP was detected. Analysis of lipids associated with VdLLTP showed that it was a carrier for free and esterified C12 -C22 fatty acids from triglycerides, diacylglycerides and monoacylglycerides. Additionally, cholesterol and β-sitosterol were found as cholesterol esters linked to common fatty acids. Transcript levels of VdLLTP were 42 and 310 times higher in phoretic female mites when compared with males and quiescent deutonymphs, respectively. Coincident with initiation of the reproductive phase, VdLLTP transcript levels declined to a third of those in phoretic female mites. VdLLTP functions as an important lipid transporter and should provide a significant RNA interference target for assessing the control of varroa mites. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  3. Fleet Assignment Using Collective Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, Nicolas E.; Bieniawski, Stefan R.; Kroo, Ilan M.; Wolpert, David H.

    2004-01-01

    Product distribution theory is a new collective intelligence-based framework for analyzing and controlling distributed systems. Its usefulness in distributed stochastic optimization is illustrated here through an airline fleet assignment problem. This problem involves the allocation of aircraft to a set of flights legs in order to meet passenger demand, while satisfying a variety of linear and non-linear constraints. Over the course of the day, the routing of each aircraft is determined in order to minimize the number of required flights for a given fleet. The associated flow continuity and aircraft count constraints have led researchers to focus on obtaining quasi-optimal solutions, especially at larger scales. In this paper, the authors propose the application of this new stochastic optimization algorithm to a non-linear objective cold start fleet assignment problem. Results show that the optimizer can successfully solve such highly-constrained problems (130 variables, 184 constraints).

  4. Who benefits from homework assignments?

    OpenAIRE

    Rønning, Marte

    2008-01-01

    Abstract: Using Dutch data on pupils in elementary school this paper is the first empirical study that analyzes whether assigning homework has an heterogeneous impact on pupil achievement. Addressing potential biases that arise from unobserved school quality, pupil selection by exploiting different methods, I find that the test score gap is larger in classes where everybody gets homework than in classes where nobody gets homework. More precisely pupils belonging to the upper part of the so...

  5. Plasmodium vivax merozoite surface protein PvMSP-3 beta is radically polymorphic through mutation and large insertions and deletions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner, Julian C; Huber, Curtis S; Feldman, Dmitry; Ingravallo, Paul; Galinski, Mary R; Barnwell, John W

    2004-12-01

    Plasmodium vivax causes the majority of malaria outside of sub-Saharan Africa and is an important burden for affected countries. The recent spread of drug-resistant P. vivax strains in these countries has led to renewed pressure for the development of a P. vivax vaccine. The complex life cycle of P. vivax presents many potential vaccine targets, but among the most promising candidates are subunits of the surface coat that surrounds the merozoite, the parasite stage that infects erythrocytes and initiates much of the pathology of malaria. Although the genes for several constituents of the P. vivax surface coat have now been cloned and sequenced, little is known about the extent to which these proteins vary between populations, an important consideration in vaccine development. The merozoite surface protein MSP-3beta is a member of a family of related merozoite surface proteins, all of which contain a central alanine-rich domain that is predicted to form a coiled-coil tertiary structure. We have sequenced the PvMSP-3 beta gene from P. vivax isolates originating in Central and South America, Asia and the Pacific. In this first assessment of PvMSP-3 beta variation between populations, we discovered widespread and significant diversity, mostly within the alanine-rich central region. We observed frequent differences in PvMSP-3 beta gene size, caused by the insertion and/or deletion of several large sequence blocks, as well as numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms and smaller scale insertions and deletions. Despite this high level of sequence diversity, certain physical properties of the encoded protein are maintained, particularly the ability to form coiled-coil tertiary structures, suggesting that although PvMSP-3 beta varies widely, it is under functional constraints. The implications for PvMSP-3 beta function and vaccine development are discussed.

  6. Multiobjective Gate Assignment Based on Passenger Walking Distance and Fairness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Passenger walking distance is an important index of the airport service quality. How to shorten the walking distance and balance the airlines' service quality is the focus of much research on airport gate assignment problems. According to the problems of airport passenger service quality, an optimization gate assignment model is established. The gate assignment model is based on minimizing the total walking distance of all passengers and balancing the average walking distance of passengers among different airlines. Lingo is used in the simulation of a large airport gate assignment. Test results show that the optimization model can reduce the average walking distance of passenger effectively, improve the number of flights assigned to gate, balance airline service quality, and enhance the overall service level of airports and airlines. The model provides reference for the airport gate preassignment.

  7. A Statistical Programme Assignment Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosholm, Michael; Staghøj, Jonas; Svarer, Michael

    When treatment effects of active labour market programmes are heterogeneous in an observable way  across the population, the allocation of the unemployed into different programmes becomes a particularly  important issue. In this paper, we present a statistical model designed to improve the present...... duration of unemployment spells may result if a statistical programme assignment model is introduced. We discuss several issues regarding the  plementation of such a system, especially the interplay between the statistical model and  case workers....

  8. An algorithm for ranking assignments using reoptimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Christian Roed; Nielsen, Lars Relund; Andersen, Kim Allan

    2008-01-01

    We consider the problem of ranking assignments according to cost in the classical linear assignment problem. An algorithm partitioning the set of possible assignments, as suggested by Murty, is presented where, for each partition, the optimal assignment is calculated using a new reoptimization...... technique. Computational results for the new algorithm are presented...

  9. Calibrated peer review assignments for the earth sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, J.A.; Wang, V.Z.; Cervato, C.; Ridky, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    Calibrated Peer Review ??? (CPR), a web-based instructional tool developed as part of the National Science Foundation reform initiatives in undergraduate science education, allows instructors to incorporate multiple writing assignments in large courses without overwhelming the instructor. This study reports successful implementation of CPR in a large, introductory geology course and student learning of geoscience content. For each CPR assignment in this study, students studied web-based and paper resources, wrote an essay, and reviewed seven essays (three from the instructor, three from peers, and their own) on the topic. Although many students expressed negative attitudes and concerns, particularly about the peer review process of this innovative instructional approach, they also recognized the learning potential of completing CPR assignments. Comparing instruction on earthquakes and plate boundaries using a CPR assignment vs. an instructional video lecture and homework essay with extensive instructor feedback, students mastered more content via CPR instruction.

  10. Large-scale analysis of in Vivo phosphorylated membrane proteins by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nühse, Thomas S; Stensballe, Allan; Jensen, Ole N

    2003-01-01

    Global analyses of protein phosphorylation require specific enrichment methods because of the typically low abundance of phosphoproteins. To date, immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) for phosphopeptides has shown great promise for large-scale studies, but has a reputation for poor...... specificity. We investigated the potential of IMAC in combination with capillary liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry for the identification of plasma membrane phosphoproteins of Arabidopsis. Without chemical modification of peptides, over 75% pure phosphopeptides were isolated from...... plasma membrane digests and detected and sequenced by mass spectrometry. We present a scheme for two-dimensional peptide separation using strong anion exchange chromatography prior to IMAC that both decreases the complexity of IMAC-purified phosphopeptides and yields a far greater coverage...

  11. Ensiled and dry cassava leaves, and sweet potato vines as a protein source in diets for growing Vietnamese large white Mong Cai pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, T.H.L.; Le, N.G.; Verstegen, M.W.A.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of replacing 70% of the protein from fish meal by protein from ensiled or dry cassava leaves and sweet potato vines on the performance and carcass characters of growing F1 (Large White¿Mong Cai) pigs in Central Vietnam. Twenty-five crossbred

  12. Classifying proteins into functional groups based on all-versus-all BLAST of 10 million proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolker, Natali; Higdon, Roger; Broomall, William; Stanberry, Larissa; Welch, Dean; Lu, Wei; Haynes, Winston; Barga, Roger; Kolker, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    To address the monumental challenge of assigning function to millions of sequenced proteins, we completed the first of a kind all-versus-all sequence alignments using BLAST for 9.9 million proteins in the UniRef100 database. Microsoft Windows Azure produced over 3 billion filtered records in 6 days using 475 eight-core virtual machines. Protein classification into functional groups was then performed using Hive and custom jars implemented on top of Apache Hadoop utilizing the MapReduce paradigm. First, using the Clusters of Orthologous Genes (COG) database, a length normalized bit score (LNBS) was determined to be the best similarity measure for classification of proteins. LNBS achieved sensitivity and specificity of 98% each. Second, out of 5.1 million bacterial proteins, about two-thirds were assigned to significantly extended COG groups, encompassing 30 times more assigned proteins. Third, the remaining proteins were classified into protein functional groups using an innovative implementation of a single-linkage algorithm on an in-house Hadoop compute cluster. This implementation significantly reduces the run time for nonindexed queries and optimizes efficient clustering on a large scale. The performance was also verified on Amazon Elastic MapReduce. This clustering assigned nearly 2 million proteins to approximately half a million different functional groups. A similar approach was applied to classify 2.8 million eukaryotic sequences resulting in over 1 million proteins being assign to existing KOG groups and the remainder clustered into 100,000 functional groups.

  13. MYC Protein-positive Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma Features an Activated B-Cell Receptor Signal Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Ge; Jiang, Xiang-Nan; Liu, Ze-Bing; Zhou, Xiao-Yan; Li, Xiao-Qiu

    2017-04-01

    Components of the B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling pathway represent promising therapeutic targets in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and other B-cell malignancies. MYC, a transcriptional factor and oncoprotein, is overexpressed in a fraction of DLBCL and indicates poor prognosis and aggressive clinical course when treated with rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP). However, BCR signaling status in MYC-positive DLBCL cases and the potential efficacy of BCR signal inhibitors in treating this aggressive disease are unknown. To further elucidate the BCR signaling pathway in MYC-positive DLBCL, we analyzed the levels of BCR-associated genes according to MYC gene status, detected phosphorylated protein with primary DLBCL samples, and estimated the patient survival with MYC expression. In addition, we manipulated MYC gene expression and tested its effects on BCR signaling in vitro. We found that CD19, SYK, and BLK were highly expressed in DLBCL with MYC gene overexpression. MYC-positive DLBCL had higher levels of pSYK and pBLK, but only pSYK level correlated with patient survival. The in vitro studies demonstrated that overexpression of the MYC gene augmented BCR signaling, whereas MYC gene knockdown attenuated BCR signaling. Thus, MYC protein-positive DLBCL features highly activated BCR signaling and may represent a potential candidate for BCR inhibitor therapy.

  14. Out-and-back {sup 13}C-{sup 13}C scalar transfers in protein resonance assignment by proton-detected solid-state NMR under ultra-fast MAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbet-Massin, Emeline; Pell, Andrew J. [University of Lyon, CNRS/ENS Lyon/UCB Lyon 1, Centre de RMN a Tres Hauts Champs (France); Jaudzems, Kristaps [Latvian Institute of Organic Synthesis (Latvia); Franks, W. Trent; Retel, Joren S. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (Germany); Kotelovica, Svetlana; Akopjana, Inara; Tars, Kaspars [Biomedical Research and Study Center (Latvia); Emsley, Lyndon [University of Lyon, CNRS/ENS Lyon/UCB Lyon 1, Centre de RMN a Tres Hauts Champs (France); Oschkinat, Hartmut [Leibniz-Institut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie (Germany); Lesage, Anne; Pintacuda, Guido, E-mail: guido.pintacuda@ens-lyon.fr [University of Lyon, CNRS/ENS Lyon/UCB Lyon 1, Centre de RMN a Tres Hauts Champs (France)

    2013-08-15

    We present here {sup 1}H-detected triple-resonance H/N/C experiments that incorporate CO-CA and CA-CB out-and-back scalar-transfer blocks optimized for robust resonance assignment in biosolids under ultra-fast magic-angle spinning (MAS). The first experiment, (H)(CO)CA(CO)NH, yields {sup 1}H-detected inter-residue correlations, in which we record the chemical shifts of the CA spins in the first indirect dimension while during the scalar-transfer delays the coherences are present only on the longer-lived CO spins. The second experiment, (H)(CA)CB(CA)NH, correlates the side-chain CB chemical shifts with the NH of the same residue. These high sensitivity experiments are demonstrated on both fully-protonated and 100 %-H{sup N} back-protonated perdeuterated microcrystalline samples of Acinetobacter phage 205 (AP205) capsids at 60 kHz MAS.

  15. Large-scale proteomic analysis of the grapevine leaf apoplastic fluid reveals mainly stress-related proteins and cell wall modifying enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaunois, Bertrand; Colby, Thomas; Belloy, Nicolas; Conreux, Alexandra; Harzen, Anne; Baillieul, Fabienne; Clément, Christophe; Schmidt, Jürgen; Jeandet, Philippe; Cordelier, Sylvain

    2013-02-08

    The extracellular space or apoplast forms a path through the whole plant and acts as an interface with the environment. The apoplast is composed of plant cell wall and space within which apoplastic fluid provides a means of delivering molecules and facilitates intercellular communications. However, the apoplastic fluid extraction from in planta systems remains challenging and this is particularly true for grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.), a worldwide-cultivated fruit plant. Large-scale proteomic analysis reveals the protein content of the grapevine leaf apoplastic fluid and the free interactive proteome map considerably facilitates the study of the grapevine proteome. To obtain a snapshot of the grapevine apoplastic fluid proteome, a vacuum-infiltration-centrifugation method was optimized to collect the apoplastic fluid from non-challenged grapevine leaves. Soluble apoplastic protein patterns were then compared to whole leaf soluble protein profiles by 2D-PAGE analyses. Subsequent MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry of tryptically digested protein spots was used to identify proteins. This large-scale proteomic analysis established a well-defined proteomic map of whole leaf and leaf apoplastic soluble proteins, with 223 and 177 analyzed spots, respectively. All data arising from proteomic, MS and MS/MS analyses were deposited in the public database world-2DPAGE. Prediction tools revealed a high proportion of (i) classical secreted proteins but also of non-classical secreted proteins namely Leaderless Secreted Proteins (LSPs) in the apoplastic protein content and (ii) proteins potentially involved in stress reactions and/or in cell wall metabolism. This approach provides free online interactive reference maps annotating a large number of soluble proteins of the whole leaf and the apoplastic fluid of grapevine leaf. To our knowledge, this is the first detailed proteome study of grapevine apoplastic fluid providing a comprehensive overview of the most abundant proteins

  16. NMR assignments of the N-terminal domain of Nephila clavipes spidroin 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnham, Stuart; Gaines, William A; Duggan, Brendan M; Marcotte, William R; Hennig, Mirko

    2011-10-01

    The building blocks of spider dragline silk are two fibrous proteins secreted from the major ampullate gland named spidroins 1 and 2 (MaSp1, MaSp2). These proteins consist of a large central domain composed of approximately 100 tandem copies of a 35-40 amino acid repeat sequence. Non-repetitive N and C-terminal domains, of which the C-terminal domain has been implicated to transition from soluble and insoluble states during spinning, flank the repetitive core. The N-terminal domain until recently has been largely unknown due to difficulties in cloning and expression. Here, we report nearly complete assignment for all (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N resonances in the 14 kDa N-terminal domain of major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1-N) of the golden orb-web spider Nephila clavipes.

  17. EGCG in Green Tea Induces Aggregation of HMGB1 Protein through Large Conformational Changes with Polarized Charge Redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xuan-Yu; Li, Baoyu; Liu, Shengtang; Kang, Hongsuk; Zhao, Lin; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-02-01

    As a major effective component in green tea, (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG)’s potential benefits to human health have been widely investigated. Recent experimental evidences indicate that EGCG can induce the aggregation of HMGB1 protein, a late mediator of inflammation, which subsequently stimulates the autophagic degradation and thus provides protection from lethal endotoxemia and sepsis. In this study, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to explore the underlying molecular mechanism of this aggregation of HMGB1 facilitated by EGCG. Our simulation results reveal that EGCG firmly binds to HMGB1 near Cys106, which supports previous preliminary experimental evidence. A large HMGB1 conformational change is observed, where Box A and Box B, two homogenous domains of HMGB1, are repositioned and packed together by EGCG. This new HMGB1 conformation has large molecular polarity and distinctive electrostatic potential surface. We suggest that the highly polarized charge distribution leads to the aggregation of HMGB1, which differs from the previous hypothesis that two HMGB1 monomers are linked by the dimer of EGCG. Possible aggregating modes have also been investigated with potential of mean force (PMF) calculations. Finally, we conclude that the conformation induced by EGCG is more aggregation-prone with higher binding free energies as compared to those without EGCG.

  18. The XChemExplorer graphical workflow tool for routine or large-scale protein-ligand structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krojer, Tobias; Talon, Romain; Pearce, Nicholas; Collins, Patrick; Douangamath, Alice; Brandao-Neto, Jose; Dias, Alexandre; Marsden, Brian; von Delft, Frank

    2017-03-01

    XChemExplorer (XCE) is a data-management and workflow tool to support large-scale simultaneous analysis of protein-ligand complexes during structure-based ligand discovery (SBLD). The user interfaces of established crystallographic software packages such as CCP4 [Winn et al. (2011), Acta Cryst. D67, 235-242] or PHENIX [Adams et al. (2010), Acta Cryst. D66, 213-221] have entrenched the paradigm that a `project' is concerned with solving one structure. This does not hold for SBLD, where many almost identical structures need to be solved and analysed quickly in one batch of work. Functionality to track progress and annotate structures is essential. XCE provides an intuitive graphical user interface which guides the user from data processing, initial map calculation, ligand identification and refinement up until data dissemination. It provides multiple entry points depending on the need of each project, enables batch processing of multiple data sets and records metadata, progress and annotations in an SQLite database. XCE is freely available and works on any Linux and Mac OS X system, and the only dependency is to have the latest version of CCP4 installed. The design and usage of this tool are described here, and its usefulness is demonstrated in the context of fragment-screening campaigns at the Diamond Light Source. It is routinely used to analyse projects comprising 1000 data sets or more, and therefore scales well to even very large ligand-design projects.

  19. Assignment of the human gene for pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPPA) to 9q33.1 by fluorescence in situ hybridization to mitotic and meiotic chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silahtaroglu, A N; Tümer, Z; Kristensen, Torsten

    1993-01-01

    Low levels of pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPPA) during the first trimester has been suggested as a biochemical indicator of pregnancies with aneuploid fetuses. Furthermore, the complete absence of PAPPA in pregnancies associated with Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CL) has suggested a cau...

  20. The Random Quadratic Assignment Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Gerald; Shao, Jia; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2011-11-01

    The quadratic assignment problem, QAP, is one of the most difficult of all combinatorial optimization problems. Here, we use an abbreviated application of the statistical mechanics replica method to study the asymptotic behavior of instances in which the entries of at least one of the two matrices that specify the problem are chosen from a random distribution P. Surprisingly, the QAP has not been studied before using the replica method despite the fact that the QAP was first proposed over 50 years ago and the replica method was developed over 30 years ago. We find simple forms for C min and C max , the costs of the minimal and maximum solutions respectively. Notable features of our results are the symmetry of the results for C min and C max and their dependence on P only through its mean and standard deviation, independent of the details of P.

  1. Characterisation of adipocyte-derived extracellular vesicle subtypes identifies distinct protein and lipid signatures for large and small extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durcin, Maëva; Fleury, Audrey; Taillebois, Emiliane; Hilairet, Grégory; Krupova, Zuzana; Henry, Céline; Truchet, Sandrine; Trötzmüller, Martin; Köfeler, Harald; Mabilleau, Guillaume; Hue, Olivier; Andriantsitohaina, Ramaroson; Martin, Patrice; Le Lay, Soazig

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are biological vectors that can modulate the metabolism of target cells by conveying signalling proteins and genomic material. The level of EVs in plasma is significantly increased in cardiometabolic diseases associated with obesity, suggesting their possible participation in the development of metabolic dysfunction. With regard to the poor definition of adipocyte-derived EVs, the purpose of this study was to characterise both qualitatively and quantitatively EVs subpopulations secreted by fat cells. Adipocyte-derived EVs were isolated by differential centrifugation of conditioned media collected from 3T3-L1 adipocytes cultured for 24 h in serum-free conditions. Based on morphological and biochemical properties, as well as quantification of secreted EVs, we distinguished two subpopulations of adipocyte-derived EVs, namely small extracellular vesicles (sEVs) and large extracellular vesicles (lEVs). Proteomic analyses revealed that lEVs and sEVs exhibit specific protein signatures, allowing us not only to define novel markers of each population, but also to predict their biological functions. Despite similar phospholipid patterns, the comparative lipidomic analysis performed on these EV subclasses revealed a specific cholesterol enrichment of the sEV population, whereas lEVs were characterised by high amounts of externalised phosphatidylserine. Enhanced secretion of lEVs and sEVs is achievable following exposure to different biological stimuli related to the chronic low-grade inflammation state associated with obesity. Finally, we demonstrate the ability of primary murine adipocytes to secrete sEVs and lEVs, which display physical and biological characteristics similar to those described for 3T3-L1. Our study provides additional information and elements to define EV subtypes based on the characterisation of adipocyte-derived EV populations. It also underscores the need to distinguish EV subpopulations, through a combination of multiple

  2. Large scale free energy calculations for blind predictions of protein-ligand binding: the D3R Grand Challenge 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Nanjie; Flynn, William F; Xia, Junchao; Vijayan, R S K; Zhang, Baofeng; He, Peng; Mentes, Ahmet; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M

    2016-09-01

    We describe binding free energy calculations in the D3R Grand Challenge 2015 for blind prediction of the binding affinities of 180 ligands to Hsp90. The present D3R challenge was built around experimental datasets involving Heat shock protein (Hsp) 90, an ATP-dependent molecular chaperone which is an important anticancer drug target. The Hsp90 ATP binding site is known to be a challenging target for accurate calculations of ligand binding affinities because of the ligand-dependent conformational changes in the binding site, the presence of ordered waters and the broad chemical diversity of ligands that can bind at this site. Our primary focus here is to distinguish binders from nonbinders. Large scale absolute binding free energy calculations that cover over 3000 protein-ligand complexes were performed using the BEDAM method starting from docked structures generated by Glide docking. Although the ligand dataset in this study resembles an intermediate to late stage lead optimization project while the BEDAM method is mainly developed for early stage virtual screening of hit molecules, the BEDAM binding free energy scoring has resulted in a moderate enrichment of ligand screening against this challenging drug target. Results show that, using a statistical mechanics based free energy method like BEDAM starting from docked poses offers better enrichment than classical docking scoring functions and rescoring methods like Prime MM-GBSA for the Hsp90 data set in this blind challenge. Importantly, among the three methods tested here, only the mean value of the BEDAM binding free energy scores is able to separate the large group of binders from the small group of nonbinders with a gap of 2.4 kcal/mol. None of the three methods that we have tested provided accurate ranking of the affinities of the 147 active compounds. We discuss the possible sources of errors in the binding free energy calculations. The study suggests that BEDAM can be used strategically to discriminate

  3. Assignment Choice, Effort, and Assignment Completion: Does Work Ethic Predict Those Who Choose Higher-Effort Assignments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhurst, John T.; Fleisher, Matthew S.; Skinner, Christopher H.; Woehr, David J.; Hawthorn-Embree, Meredith L.

    2011-01-01

    After completing the Multidimensional Work-Ethic Profile (MWEP), 98 college students were given a 20-problem math computation assignment and instructed to stop working on the assignment after completing 10 problems. Next, they were allowed to choose to finish either the partially completed assignment that had 10 problems remaining or a new…

  4. Combining ambiguous chemical shift mapping with structure-based backbone and NOE assignment from 15N-NOESY

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Chemical shift mapping is an important technique in NMRbased drug screening for identifying the atoms of a target protein that potentially bind to a drug molecule upon the molecule\\'s introduction in increasing concentrations. The goal is to obtain a mapping of peaks with known residue assignment from the reference spectrum of the unbound protein to peaks with unknown assignment in the target spectrum of the bound protein. Although a series of perturbed spectra help to trace a path from reference peaks to target peaks, a one-to-one mapping generally is not possible, especially for large proteins, due to errors, such as noise peaks, missing peaks, missing but then reappearing, overlapped, and new peaks not associated with any peaks in the reference. Due to these difficulties, the mapping is typically done manually or semi-automatically. However, automated methods are necessary for high-throughput drug screening. We present PeakWalker, a novel peak walking algorithm for fast-exchange systems that models the errors explicitly and performs many-to-one mapping. On the proteins: hBclXL, UbcH5B, and histone H1, it achieves an average accuracy of over 95% with less than 1.5 residues predicted per target peak. Given these mappings as input, we present PeakAssigner, a novel combined structure-based backbone resonance and NOE assignment algorithm that uses just 15N-NOESY, while avoiding TOCSY experiments and 13C- labeling, to resolve the ambiguities for a one-toone mapping. On the three proteins, it achieves an average accuracy of 94% or better. Copyright © 2011 ACM.

  5. Combining automated peak tracking in SAR by NMR with structure-based backbone assignment from 15N-NOESY

    KAUST Repository

    Jang, Richard

    2012-03-21

    Background: Chemical shift mapping is an important technique in NMR-based drug screening for identifying the atoms of a target protein that potentially bind to a drug molecule upon the molecule\\'s introduction in increasing concentrations. The goal is to obtain a mapping of peaks with known residue assignment from the reference spectrum of the unbound protein to peaks with unknown assignment in the target spectrum of the bound protein. Although a series of perturbed spectra help to trace a path from reference peaks to target peaks, a one-to-one mapping generally is not possible, especially for large proteins, due to errors, such as noise peaks, missing peaks, missing but then reappearing, overlapped, and new peaks not associated with any peaks in the reference. Due to these difficulties, the mapping is typically done manually or semi-automatically, which is not efficient for high-throughput drug screening.Results: We present PeakWalker, a novel peak walking algorithm for fast-exchange systems that models the errors explicitly and performs many-to-one mapping. On the proteins: hBclXL, UbcH5B, and histone H1, it achieves an average accuracy of over 95% with less than 1.5 residues predicted per target peak. Given these mappings as input, we present PeakAssigner, a novel combined structure-based backbone resonance and NOE assignment algorithm that uses just 15N-NOESY, while avoiding TOCSY experiments and 13C-labeling, to resolve the ambiguities for a one-to-one mapping. On the three proteins, it achieves an average accuracy of 94% or better.Conclusions: Our mathematical programming approach for modeling chemical shift mapping as a graph problem, while modeling the errors directly, is potentially a time- and cost-effective first step for high-throughput drug screening based on limited NMR data and homologous 3D structures. 2012 Jang et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  6. Integrated assignment and path planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphey, Robert A.

    2005-11-01

    A surge of interest in unmanned systems has exposed many new and challenging research problems across many fields of engineering and mathematics. These systems have the potential of transforming our society by replacing dangerous and dirty jobs with networks of moving machines. This vision is fundamentally separate from the modern view of robotics in that sophisticated behavior is realizable not by increasing individual vehicle complexity, but instead through collaborative teaming that relies on collective perception, abstraction, decision making, and manipulation. Obvious examples where collective robotics will make an impact include planetary exploration, space structure assembly, remote and undersea mining, hazardous material handling and clean-up, and search and rescue. Nonetheless, the phenomenon driving this technology trend is the increasing reliance of the US military on unmanned vehicles, specifically, aircraft. Only a few years ago, following years of resistance to the use of unmanned systems, the military and civilian leadership in the United States reversed itself and have recently demonstrated surprisingly broad acceptance of increasingly pervasive use of unmanned platforms in defense surveillance, and even attack. However, as rapidly as unmanned systems have gained acceptance, the defense research community has discovered the technical pitfalls that lie ahead, especially for operating collective groups of unmanned platforms. A great deal of talent and energy has been devoted to solving these technical problems, which tend to fall into two categories: resource allocation of vehicles to objectives, and path planning of vehicle trajectories. An extensive amount of research has been conducted in each direction, yet, surprisingly, very little work has considered the integrated problem of assignment and path planning. This dissertation presents a framework for studying integrated assignment and path planning and then moves on to suggest an exact

  7. Chromosome-wise Protein Interaction Patterns and Their Impact on Functional Implications of Large-Scale Genomic Aberrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Isa Kristina; Weinhold, Nils; Belling, Kirstine González-Izarzugaza

    2017-01-01

    Gene copy-number changes influence phenotypes through gene-dosage alteration and subsequent changes of protein complex stoichiometry. Human trisomies where gene copy numbers are increased uniformly over entire chromosomes provide generic cases for studying these relationships. In most trisomies......, gene and protein level alterations have fatal consequences. We used genome-wide protein-protein interaction data to identify chromosome-specific patterns of protein interactions. We found that some chromosomes encode proteins that interact infrequently with each other, chromosome 21 in particular. We...

  8. Managing voluntary turnover through challenging assignments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preenen, P.T.Y.; de Pater, I.E.; van Vianen, A.E.M.; Keijzer, L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines employees’ challenging assignments as manageable means to reduce turnover intentions, job search behaviors, and voluntary turnover. Results indicate that challenging assignments are negatively related to turnover intentions and job search behaviors and that these relationships

  9. Managing voluntary turnover through challenging assignments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preenen, P.T.Y.; Pater, I.E. de; Vianen, A.E.M. van; Keijzer, L.

    2011-01-01

    This study examines employees' challenging assignments as manageable means to reduce turnover intentions, job search behaviors, and voluntary turnover. Results indicate that challenging assignments are negatively related to turnover intentions and job search behaviors and that these relationships

  10. Assigning historic responsibility for extreme weather events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Friederike E. L.; Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Fuglestvedt, Jan S.; Berntsen, Terje; Allen, Myles R.

    2017-11-01

    Recent scientific advances make it possible to assign extreme events to human-induced climate change and historical emissions. These developments allow losses and damage associated with such events to be assigned country-level responsibility.

  11. Sp17 Protein Expression and Major Histocompatibility Class I and II Epitope Presentation in Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Ait-Tahar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Improved therapies are urgently needed for patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL. Success using immune checkpoint inhibitors and chimeric antigen receptor T cell technology has fuelled demand for validated cancer epitopes. Immunogenic cancer testis antigens (CTAs, with their widespread expression in many tumours but highly restricted normal tissue distribution, represent attractive immunotherapeutic targets that may improve treatment options for DLBCL and other malignancies. Sperm protein 17 (Sp17, a CTA reported to be immunogenic in ovarian cancer and myeloma patients, is expressed in DLBCL. The aim of the present study was to investigate Sp17 epitope presentation via the presence of a cytotoxic T cell (CTL and a CD4 T-helper (Th response in DLBCL patients. A significant γ-interferon CTL response was detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 13/31 DLBCL patients following short-term cell stimulation with two novel HLA-A⁎0201 peptides and one previously reported HLA-A⁎0101-restricted nine-mer Sp17 peptide. No significant responses were detected in the HLA-A⁎0201-negative DLBCL patients or four healthy subjects. A novel immunogenic 20-mer CD4 Th Sp17 peptide was detected in 8/17 DLBCL patients. This is the first report of a CTL and a CD4 Th response to Sp17 in DLBCL and supports Sp17 as a potential immunotherapeutic target for DLBCL.

  12. [The study on significance of detecting the hepatitis B virus large proteins in public health physical examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Guo-Shao; Jiang, Xing-Xiang; Chen, Jin-Kun; Cao, Dong-Qing; Zhao, Dan-Yan; Jian, Ming-Zhi; Zhang, Yi

    2011-06-01

    It was to explore the application of the hepatitis B virus large proteins (HBV-LP) in public health physical examination through clinical testing of HBV-LP in Catering practitioners, students and soldiers of New requisition etc. 709 samples of HBV infection people were collected in public health physical examination and all collected samples were detected. ELISA was used to detect HBV serum markers (HBV-M) and HBV-LP. Real-time PCR was applied to detect quantity of HBV DNA. (1) The detectable results of HBV-LP and HBV DNA were no statistical significance in 709 samples. (2) The detectable results of HBV-LP and HBV DNA were also no statistical significance in different models of HBV infection patients. The values of chi2 and P were respectively 2.67, 0.60, 0.00 and 0.10, 0.44, 1.00. S/A of HBV-LP and the copies of HBV-DNA had a positive relationship (r = 0.959, P health physical examination. HBV-LP may be worth using widely in physical examination.

  13. Discovery of Tamoxifen and N-Desmethyl Tamoxifen Protein Targets in MCF-7 Cells Using Large-Scale Protein Folding and Stability Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogburn, Ryenne N; Jin, Lorrain; Meng, He; Fitzgerald, Michael C

    2017-11-03

    The proteins in an MCF-7 cell line were probed for tamoxifen (TAM) and n-desmethyl tamoxifen (NDT) induced stability changes using the Stability of Proteins from Rates of Oxidation (SPROX) technique in combination with two different quantitative proteomics strategies, including one based on SILAC and one based on isobaric mass tags. Over 1000 proteins were assayed for TAM- and NDT-induced protein stability changes, and a total of 163 and 200 protein hits were identified in the TAM and NDT studies, respectively. A subset of 27 high-confidence protein hits were reproducibly identified with both proteomics strategies and/or with multiple peptide probes. One-third of the high-confidence hits have previously established experimental links to the estrogen receptor, and nearly all of the high-confidence hits have established links to breast cancer. One high-confidence protein hit that has known estrogen receptor binding properties, Y-box binding protein 1 (YBX1), was further validated as a direct binding target of TAM using both the SPROX and pulse proteolysis techniques. Proteins with TAM- and/or NDT-induced expression level changes were also identified in the SILAC-SPROX experiments. These proteins with expression level changes included only a small fraction of those with TAM- and/or NDT-induced stability changes.

  14. Assigning Homework to Couples and Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattilio, Frank M.; Dickson, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Homework assignments, or "out-of-session assignments," have gained popularity among couple and family therapists due to their potential to solidify the work achieved during the course of therapy and to help clients take responsibility for their own change. Homework assignments also serve as a testing ground in therapy to determine what works and…

  15. Sudden Assignment: Teach Prekindergarten Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pautz, Mary P.; Persellin, Diane; Anderson, Jill K.; Sims, Wendy L.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses various methods for music teachers to adjust and prepare themselves for teaching prekindergarten students. Provides the two-track approach for teaching these younger students where the students work in large-group circle time experiences and also have opportunities to explore music on their own; singing, listening, moving, and playing…

  16. A Method for Large-Scale Screening of Random Sequence Libraries to Determine the Function of Unstructured Regions from Essential Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millau, Jean-François; Guillemette, Benoit; Gaudreau, Luc

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter we present a method allowing the screening of random sequences to discover essential aspects of unstructured protein regions in yeast. The approach can be applied to any protein with unstructured peptide sequences for which functions are difficult to decipher, for example the N-terminal tails of histones. The protocol first describes the building and preparation of a large library of random peptides in fusion with a protein of interest. Recent technical advances in oligonucleotide synthesis allow the construction of long random sequences up to 35 residues long. The protocol details the screening of the library in yeast for sequences that can functionally replace an unstructured domain in an essential protein in vivo. Our method typically identifies sequences that, while being totally different from the wild type, retain essential features allowing yeast to live. This collection of proteins with functional synthetic sequences can subsequently be used in phenotypic tests or genetic screens in order to discover genetic interaction.

  17. Hereditary deficiency of protein C or protein S confers increased risk of arterial thromboembolic events at a young age - Results from a large family cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmoodi, Bakhtawar K.; Brouwer, Jan-Leendert P.; Veeger, Nic J. G. M.; van der Meer, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Background-Whether hereditary protein S, protein C, or antithrombin deficiency is associated with arterial thromboembolism (ATE) and whether history of venous thromboembolism in these subjects predisposes them to subsequent ATE have yet to be determined. Methods and Results-On the basis of pedigree

  18. Hereditary deficiency of protein C or protein S confers increased risk of arterial thromboembolic events at a young age: results from a large family cohort study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahmoodi, B.K.; Brouwer, J.L.; Veeger, N.J.; Meer, J.W.M. van der

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Whether hereditary protein S, protein C, or antithrombin deficiency is associated with arterial thromboembolism (ATE) and whether history of venous thromboembolism in these subjects predisposes them to subsequent ATE have yet to be determined. METHODS AND RESULTS: On the basis of

  19. Maternal Diabetes, Large-for-Gestational-Age Births, and First Trimester Pregnancy-Associated Plasma Protein-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, George; Bleicher, Kerrin; Han, Xuguang; McShane, Monika; Chan, Yuk Fun; Bartlett, Amanda; White, Chris; Lau, Sue Mei

    2015-06-01

    Maternal pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A) is measured at nuchal translucency scanning to assess the risk of fetal chromosomal disorders. The aim of this study was to examine whether PAPP-A might also be a predictor of gestational diabetes (GDM), type 2 diabetes (T2D), or large-for-gestational-age (LGA) births. PAPP-A levels were measured in serum from 1664 women at their 10-14-week nuchal translucency scan at a tertiary referral hospital. Maternal diabetes was categorized as T2D, "early GDM" (GDM diagnosed PAPP-A multiples of the median (MoM), maternal diabetes, and LGA was examined with multivariate regression models. PAPP-A MoM was significantly lower in women with T2D and women who developed GDM than in nondiabetic women. PAPP-A MoM was 41.3% lower in T2D, 22.6% lower in early GDM, and 8.6% lower in late GDM. Women in the lowest quartile of PAPP-A MoM were 2.7 times more likely to have early GDM (odds ratio [OR], 2.74; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-6.1) compared with the highest quartile. Birth weight had a positive linear association with PAPP-A MoM. Women in the highest PAPP-A MoM quartile were twice as likely to have an LGA baby (OR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.39-3.46; P = .0007). Routinely tested first-trimester PAPP-A is a novel biomarker for maternal diabetes and LGA. PAPP-A decreased with increasing severity of maternal diabetes. Although this cannot infer causality, low PAPP-A may help identify women at risk of GDM, and high PAPP-A may help identify pregnancies at risk of LGA.

  20. The Werner syndrome protein promotes CAG/CTG repeat stability by resolving large (CAG)(n)/(CTG)(n) hairpins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Nelson L S; Hou, Caixia; Zhang, Tianyi; Yuan, Fenghua; Machwe, Amrita; Huang, Jian; Orren, David K; Gu, Liya; Li, Guo-Min

    2012-08-31

    Expansion of CAG/CTG repeats causes certain neurological and neurodegenerative disorders, and the formation and subsequent persistence of stable DNA hairpins within these repeats are believed to contribute to CAG/CTG repeat instability. Human cells possess a DNA hairpin repair (HPR) pathway, which removes various (CAG)(n) and (CTG)(n) hairpins in a nick-directed and strand-specific manner. Interestingly, this HPR system processes a (CTG)(n) hairpin on the template DNA strand much less efficiently than a (CAG)(n) hairpin on the same strand (Hou, C., Chan, N. L., Gu, L., and Li, G. M. (2009) Incision-dependent and error-free repair of (CAG)(n)/(CTG)(n) hairpins in human cell extracts. Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 16, 869-875), suggesting the involvement of an additional component for (CTG)(n) HPR. To identify this activity, a functional in vitro HPR assay was used to screen partially purified HeLa nuclear fractions for their ability to stimulate (CTG)(n) HPR. We demonstrate here that the stimulating activity is the Werner syndrome protein (WRN). Although WRN contains both a 3'→5' helicase activity and a 3'→5' exonuclease activity, the stimulating activity was found to be the helicase activity, as a WRN helicase mutant failed to enhance (CTG)(n) HPR. Consistently, WRN efficiently unwound large (CTG)(n) hairpins and promoted DNA polymerase δ-catalyzed DNA synthesis using a (CTG)(n) hairpin as a template. We, therefore, conclude that WRN stimulates (CTG)(n) HPR on the template DNA strand by resolving the hairpin so that it can be efficiently used as a template for repair or replicative synthesis.

  1. The Werner Syndrome Protein Promotes CAG/CTG Repeat Stability by Resolving Large (CAG)n/(CTG)n Hairpins*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Nelson L. S.; Hou, Caixia; Zhang, Tianyi; Yuan, Fenghua; Machwe, Amrita; Huang, Jian; Orren, David K.; Gu, Liya; Li, Guo-Min

    2012-01-01

    Expansion of CAG/CTG repeats causes certain neurological and neurodegenerative disorders, and the formation and subsequent persistence of stable DNA hairpins within these repeats are believed to contribute to CAG/CTG repeat instability. Human cells possess a DNA hairpin repair (HPR) pathway, which removes various (CAG)n and (CTG)n hairpins in a nick-directed and strand-specific manner. Interestingly, this HPR system processes a (CTG)n hairpin on the template DNA strand much less efficiently than a (CAG)n hairpin on the same strand (Hou, C., Chan, N. L., Gu, L., and Li, G. M. (2009) Incision-dependent and error-free repair of (CAG)n/(CTG)n hairpins in human cell extracts. Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 16, 869–875), suggesting the involvement of an additional component for (CTG)n HPR. To identify this activity, a functional in vitro HPR assay was used to screen partially purified HeLa nuclear fractions for their ability to stimulate (CTG)n HPR. We demonstrate here that the stimulating activity is the Werner syndrome protein (WRN). Although WRN contains both a 3′→5′ helicase activity and a 3′→5′ exonuclease activity, the stimulating activity was found to be the helicase activity, as a WRN helicase mutant failed to enhance (CTG)n HPR. Consistently, WRN efficiently unwound large (CTG)n hairpins and promoted DNA polymerase δ-catalyzed DNA synthesis using a (CTG)n hairpin as a template. We, therefore, conclude that WRN stimulates (CTG)n HPR on the template DNA strand by resolving the hairpin so that it can be efficiently used as a template for repair or replicative synthesis. PMID:22787159

  2. Large-scale inference of protein tissue origin in gram-positive sepsis plasma using quantitative targeted proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmström, Erik; Kilsgård, Ola; Hauri, Simon; Smeds, Emanuel; Herwald, Heiko; Malmström, Lars; Malmström, Johan

    2016-01-06

    The plasma proteome is highly dynamic and variable, composed of proteins derived from surrounding tissues and cells. To investigate the complex processes that control the composition of the plasma proteome, we developed a mass spectrometry-based proteomics strategy to infer the origin of proteins detected in murine plasma. The strategy relies on the construction of a comprehensive protein tissue atlas from cells and highly vascularized organs using shotgun mass spectrometry. The protein tissue atlas was transformed to a spectral library for highly reproducible quantification of tissue-specific proteins directly in plasma using SWATH-like data-independent mass spectrometry analysis. We show that the method can determine drastic changes of tissue-specific protein profiles in blood plasma from mouse animal models with sepsis. The strategy can be extended to several other species advancing our understanding of the complex processes that contribute to the plasma proteome dynamics.

  3. Setting up a large set of protein-ligand PDB complexes for the development and validation of knowledge-based docking algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diago, Luis A; Morell, Persy; Aguilera, Longendri; Moreno, Ernesto

    2007-08-25

    The number of algorithms available to predict ligand-protein interactions is large and ever-increasing. The number of test cases used to validate these methods is usually small and problem dependent. Recently, several databases have been released for further understanding of protein-ligand interactions, having the Protein Data Bank as backend support. Nevertheless, it appears to be difficult to test docking methods on a large variety of complexes. In this paper we report the development of a new database of protein-ligand complexes tailored for testing of docking algorithms. Using a new definition of molecular contact, small ligands contained in the 2005 PDB edition were identified and processed. The database was enriched in molecular properties. In particular, an automated typing of ligand atoms was performed. A filtering procedure was applied to select a non-redundant dataset of complexes. Data mining was performed to obtain information on the frequencies of different types of atomic contacts. Docking simulations were run with the program DOCK. We compiled a large database of small ligand-protein complexes, enriched with different calculated properties, that currently contains more than 6000 non-redundant structures. As an example to demonstrate the value of the new database, we derived a new set of chemical matching rules to be used in the context of the program DOCK, based on contact frequencies between ligand atoms and points representing the protein surface, and proved their enhanced efficiency with respect to the default set of rules included in that program. The new database constitutes a valuable resource for the development of knowledge-based docking algorithms and for testing docking programs on large sets of protein-ligand complexes. The new chemical matching rules proposed in this work significantly increase the success rate in DOCKing simulations. The database developed in this work is available at http://cimlcsext.cim.sld.cu:8080/screeningbrowser/.

  4. Setting up a large set of protein-ligand PDB complexes for the development and validation of knowledge-based docking algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguilera Longendri

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of algorithms available to predict ligand-protein interactions is large and ever-increasing. The number of test cases used to validate these methods is usually small and problem dependent. Recently, several databases have been released for further understanding of protein-ligand interactions, having the Protein Data Bank as backend support. Nevertheless, it appears to be difficult to test docking methods on a large variety of complexes. In this paper we report the development of a new database of protein-ligand complexes tailored for testing of docking algorithms. Methods Using a new definition of molecular contact, small ligands contained in the 2005 PDB edition were identified and processed. The database was enriched in molecular properties. In particular, an automated typing of ligand atoms was performed. A filtering procedure was applied to select a non-redundant dataset of complexes. Data mining was performed to obtain information on the frequencies of different types of atomic contacts. Docking simulations were run with the program DOCK. Results We compiled a large database of small ligand-protein complexes, enriched with different calculated properties, that currently contains more than 6000 non-redundant structures. As an example to demonstrate the value of the new database, we derived a new set of chemical matching rules to be used in the context of the program DOCK, based on contact frequencies between ligand atoms and points representing the protein surface, and proved their enhanced efficiency with respect to the default set of rules included in that program. Conclusion The new database constitutes a valuable resource for the development of knowledge-based docking algorithms and for testing docking programs on large sets of protein-ligand complexes. The new chemical matching rules proposed in this work significantly increase the success rate in DOCKing simulations. The database developed in this work is

  5. Evaluating an Earlybird Scheme: Encouraging Early Assignment Writing and Revising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsworth, Kerrie; Kauter, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    It is widely suggested that feedback on assignments is useful to students' learning, however, little research has examined how this feedback may be provided in large classes or the actual effects of such a scheme. We designed and implemented a voluntary "earlybird scheme" that provided detailed feedback to undergraduate Business students on a…

  6. Using Clouds for MapReduce Measurement Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabkin, Ariel; Reiss, Charles; Katz, Randy; Patterson, David

    2013-01-01

    We describe our experiences teaching MapReduce in a large undergraduate lecture course using public cloud services and the standard Hadoop API. Using the standard API, students directly experienced the quality of industrial big-data tools. Using the cloud, every student could carry out scalability benchmarking assignments on realistic hardware,…

  7. SKU assignment to unidirectional picking lines using correlations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Once all the orders for a wave are completed a new mutually exclusive set of SKUs are brought to the picking line for a new wave. SKUs which dier only in size classication, for example small, medium and large shirts, are grouped together into distributions (DBNs) and must be picked in the same wave. The assignment of ...

  8. Bandit-Inspired Memetic Algorithms for Solving Quadratic Assignment Problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puglierin, Francesco; Drugan, Madalina M.; Wiering, Marco

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we propose a novel algorithm called the Bandit-Inspired Memetic Algorithm (BIMA) and we have applied it to solve different large instances of the Quadratic Assignment Problem (QAP). Like other memetic algorithms, BIMA makes use of local search and a population of solutions. The novelty

  9. BCL::Fold - De Novo Prediction of Complex and Large Protein Topologies by Assembly of Secondary Structure Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakaş, Mert; Woetzel, Nils; Staritzbichler, Rene; Alexander, Nathan; Weiner, Brian E.; Meiler, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Computational de novo protein structure prediction is limited to small proteins of simple topology. The present work explores an approach to extend beyond the current limitations through assembling protein topologies from idealized α-helices and β-strands. The algorithm performs a Monte Carlo Metropolis simulated annealing folding simulation. It optimizes a knowledge-based potential that analyzes radius of gyration, β-strand pairing, secondary structure element (SSE) packing, amino acid pair distance, amino acid environment, contact order, secondary structure prediction agreement and loop closure. Discontinuation of the protein chain favors sampling of non-local contacts and thereby creation of complex protein topologies. The folding simulation is accelerated through exclusion of flexible loop regions further reducing the size of the conformational search space. The algorithm is benchmarked on 66 proteins with lengths between 83 and 293 amino acids. For 61 out of these proteins, the best SSE-only models obtained have an RMSD100 below 8.0 Å and recover more than 20% of the native contacts. The algorithm assembles protein topologies with up to 215 residues and a relative contact order of 0.46. The method is tailored to be used in conjunction with low-resolution or sparse experimental data sets which often provide restraints for regions of defined secondary structure. PMID:23173050

  10. An Inquiry into Protein Structure and Genetic Disease: Introducing Undergraduates to Bioinformatics in a Large Introductory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarski, April E.; Elgin, Sarah C. R.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.

    2005-01-01

    This inquiry-based lab is designed around genetic diseases with a focus on protein structure and function. To allow students to work on their own investigatory projects, 10 projects on 10 different proteins were developed. Students are grouped in sections of 20 and work in pairs on each of the projects. To begin their investigation, students are…

  11. A tissue-specific protein purification approach in Caenorhabditis elegans identifies novel interaction partners of DLG-1/Discs large.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waaijers, S.; Munoz, J.; Berends, C.; Ramalho, J.J.; Goerdayal, S.S.; Low, T.Y.; Zoumaro-Djayoon, A.D.; Hoffmann, M.; Koorman, T.; Tas, R.P.; Harterink, M.; Seelk, S.; Kerver, J.; Hoogenraad, C.C.; Bossinger, O.; Tursun, B.; Heuvel, S. van den; Heck, A.J.R. van; Boxem, M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry (AP/MS) is a widely used approach to identify protein interactions and complexes. In multicellular organisms, the accurate identification of protein complexes by AP/MS is complicated by the potential heterogeneity of complexes in

  12. A Novel Active-Learning Protein Purification Exercise for Large-Enrollment Introductory Biochemistry Courses Using the CHROM Web Applet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrette-Ng, Isabelle H.; Usher, Ken C.

    2013-01-01

    The CHROM Web applet has been used to create a new active-learning exercise in which students design a purification scheme for a recombinant protein using ion-exchange chromatography (IEC). To successfully complete the exercise, students are challenged to apply elementary concepts from acid-base chemistry as well as protein and amino acid…

  13. Genus-specific protein binding to the large clusters of DNA repeats (short regularly spaced repeats) present in Sulfolobus genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Xu; Brügger, Kim; Shen, Biao

    2003-01-01

    that are identical in sequence to one of the repeat variants in the S. solfataricus chromosome. Repeats from the pNOB8 cluster were amplified and tested for protein binding with cell extracts from S. solfataricus. A 17.5-kDa SRSR-binding protein was purified from the cell extracts and sequenced. The protein is N...... terminally modified and corresponds to SSO454, an open reading frame of previously unassigned function. It binds specifically to DNA fragments carrying double and single repeat sequences, binding on one side of the repeat structure, and producing an opening of the opposite side of the DNA structure. It also...... with a helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif. Although this putative motif is shared by other archaeal proteins, orthologs of SSO454 were only detected in species within the Sulfolobus genus and in the closely related Acidianus genus. We infer that the genus-specific protein induces an opening of the structure...

  14. Library-Based Assignments That Enrich the Business Communication Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemstra, Kathleen M.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews the benefits of library work (and some cautions) before describing four assignments that exploit library resources: a business report assignment; a professional journal assignment; a style manual format assignment; and an international business communication assignment. (SG)

  15. INDEXING WORKSHOP: HOW TO ASSIGN KEYWORDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternberg, Virginia

    1979-09-01

    You have heard about issues surrounding indexing and retrieval of nuclear records and automation and micrographics of these records. Now we are going to get each of you involved in indexing and assigning keywords. The first part of this hands-on workshop will be a very basic, elementary step-by-step introduction, concentrating on how to assign keywords. It is a workshop for beginners, People who have never done it before. It is planned to demonstrate what an analyst has to do to index and assign keywords to a document. Then I will take some pages of a report and demonstrate how I choose keywords for it. Then each of you will have a chance to do the same thing with similar pages from another report. Then we will discuss the variations ln the keywords you individually assigned. There are many systems that can be used. In this particular workshop we will cover only a system of building your own keyword listing as you index your documents. We will be discussing keywords or descriptors or subject words, but first I want to point out a few other critical points about indexing. When developing an indexing project the most important thing to do first lS decide what elements you want to retrieve by. Whether you go into a large computer retrieval system or a small three-by-five card system, you have to decide in advance what you want to retrieve. Then you can go on from there. If you only need to search by equipment number or by purchase order or by contract number, then you can use a very simple retrieval system. But if you want to be able to retrieve a record by any combination of elements, then you have to consistently input these into your system. For example, if you want to be able to ask for the drawings of the piping in the secondary cooling system, level 3, manufactured by a certain vendor, then you must have put the information into the index by a retrieval file point, in advance. I want to stress that the time spent in deciding what has to be retrievable is never

  16. Ran GTPase-activating protein 1 is a therapeutic target in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kung-Chao Chang

    Full Text Available Lymphoma-specific biomarkers contribute to therapeutic strategies and the study of tumorigenesis. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL is the most common type of malignant lymphoma. However, only 50% of patients experience long-term survival after current treatment; therefore, developing novel therapeutic strategies is warranted. Comparative proteomic analysis of two DLBCL lines with a B-lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL showed differential expression of Ran GTPase-activating protein 1 (RanGAP1 between them, which was confirmed using immunoblotting. Immunostaining showed that the majority of DLBCLs (92%, 46/50 were RanGAP1(+, while reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (n = 12 was RanGAP1(+ predominantly in germinal centers. RanGAP1 was also highly expressed in other B-cell lymphomas (BCL, n = 180 with brisk mitotic activity (B-lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukemia: 93%, and Burkitt lymphoma: 95% or cell-cycle dysregulation (mantle cell lymphoma: 83%, and Hodgkin's lymphoma 91%. Interestingly, serum RanGAP1 level was higher in patients with high-grade BCL (1.71 ± 2.28 ng/mL, n = 62 than in low-grade BCL (0.75 ± 2.12 ng/mL, n = 52 and healthy controls (0.55 ± 1.58 ng/mL, n = 75 (high-grade BCL vs. low-grade BCL, p = 0.002; high-grade BCL vs. control, p < 0.001, Mann-Whitney U test. In vitro, RNA interference of RanGAP1 showed no effect on LCL but enhanced DLBCL cell death (41% vs. 60%; p = 0.035 and cell-cycle arrest (G0/G1: 39% vs. 49%, G2/M: 19.0% vs. 7.5%; p = 0.030 along with decreased expression of TPX2 and Aurora kinases, the central regulators of mitotic cell division. Furthermore, ON 01910.Na (Estybon, a multikinase inhibitor induced cell death, mitotic cell arrest, and hyperphosphorylation of RanGAP1 in DLBCL cell lines but no effects in normal B and T cells. Therefore, RanGAP1 is a promising marker and therapeutic target for aggressive B-cell lymphoma, especially DLBCL.

  17. Low HIP1R mRNA and protein expression are associated with worse survival in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients treated with R-CHOP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, K. K.; Ch'ng, E. S.; Loo, S. K.

    2015-01-01

    .05) in a microarray-profiled DLBCL dataset At the protein level examined by immunohistochemistry, HIP1R expression at 30% cut-off was associated with GCB-DLBCL molecular subtype (P = 0.0004; n = 42), and predictive of OS (P = 0.0006) and PFS (P = 0.0230) in de novo DLBCL patients treated with R-CHOP (n = 73). Cases......Huntingtin-interacting protein 1-related (HIP1R) is an endocytic protein involved in receptor trafficking, including regulating cell surface expression of receptor tyrosine kinases. We have previously shown that low HIP1R protein expression was associated with poorer survival in diffuse large B...... with high FOXP1 and low HIP1R expression frequency (FOXP1(hi)/HIP1R(lo) phenotype) exhibited poorer OS (P = 0.0038) and PFS (P = 0.0134). Multivariate analysis showed that HIP1R...

  18. Dietary Protein Intake and Coronary Heart Disease in a Large Community Based Cohort: Results from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haring, Bernhard; Gronroos, Noelle; Nettleton, Jennifer A.; Wyler von Ballmoos, Moritz C.; Selvin, Elizabeth; Alonso, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Background Prospective data examining the relationship between dietary protein intake and incident coronary heart disease (CHD) are inconclusive. Most evidence is derived from homogenous populations such as health professionals. Large community-based analyses in more diverse samples are lacking. Methods We studied the association of protein type and major dietary protein sources and risk for incident CHD in 12,066 middle-aged adults (aged 45–64 at baseline, 1987–1989) from four U.S. communities enrolled in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study who were free of diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease at baseline. Dietary protein intake was assessed at baseline and after 6 years of follow-up by food frequency questionnaire. Our primary outcome was adjudicated coronary heart disease events or deaths with following up through December 31, 2010. Cox proportional hazard models with multivariable adjustment were used for statistical analyses. Results During a median follow-up of 22 years, there were 1,147 CHD events. In multivariable analyses total, animal and vegetable protein were not associated with an increased risk for CHD before or after adjustment. In food group analyses of major dietary protein sources, protein intake from red and processed meat, dairy products, fish, nuts, eggs, and legumes were not significantly associated with CHD risk. The hazard ratios [with 95% confidence intervals] for risk of CHD across quintiles of protein from poultry were 1.00 [ref], 0.83 [0.70–0.99], 0.93 [0.75–1.15], 0.88 [0.73–1.06], 0.79 [0.64–0.98], P for trend  = 0.16). Replacement analyses evaluating the association of substituting one source of dietary protein for another or of decreasing protein intake at the expense of carbohydrates or total fats did not show any statistically significant association with CHD risk. Conclusion Based on a large community cohort we found no overall relationship between protein type and major dietary protein

  19. Dietary protein intake and coronary heart disease in a large community based cohort: results from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC study [corrected].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernhard Haring

    Full Text Available Prospective data examining the relationship between dietary protein intake and incident coronary heart disease (CHD are inconclusive. Most evidence is derived from homogenous populations such as health professionals. Large community-based analyses in more diverse samples are lacking.We studied the association of protein type and major dietary protein sources and risk for incident CHD in 12,066 middle-aged adults (aged 45-64 at baseline, 1987-1989 from four U.S. communities enrolled in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC Study who were free of diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease at baseline. Dietary protein intake was assessed at baseline and after 6 years of follow-up by food frequency questionnaire. Our primary outcome was adjudicated coronary heart disease events or deaths with following up through December 31, 2010. Cox proportional hazard models with multivariable adjustment were used for statistical analyses.During a median follow-up of 22 years, there were 1,147 CHD events. In multivariable analyses total, animal and vegetable protein were not associated with an increased risk for CHD before or after adjustment. In food group analyses of major dietary protein sources, protein intake from red and processed meat, dairy products, fish, nuts, eggs, and legumes were not significantly associated with CHD risk. The hazard ratios [with 95% confidence intervals] for risk of CHD across quintiles of protein from poultry were 1.00 [ref], 0.83 [0.70-0.99], 0.93 [0.75-1.15], 0.88 [0.73-1.06], 0.79 [0.64-0.98], P for trend  = 0.16. Replacement analyses evaluating the association of substituting one source of dietary protein for another or of decreasing protein intake at the expense of carbohydrates or total fats did not show any statistically significant association with CHD risk.Based on a large community cohort we found no overall relationship between protein type and major dietary protein sources and risk for CHD.

  20. Unconditioned commercial embryo culture media contain a large variety of non-declared proteins: a comprehensive proteomics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyrlund, Thomas F; Kirkegaard, Kirstine; Poulsen, Ebbe Toftgaard; Sanggaard, Kristian W; Hindkjær, Johnny J; Kjems, Jørgen; Enghild, Jan J; Ingerslev, Hans Jakob

    2014-11-01

    Which non-declared proteins (proteins not listed on the composition list of the product data sheet) are present in unconditioned commercial embryo culture media? A total of 110 non-declared proteins were identified in unconditioned media and between 6 and 8 of these were quantifiable and therefore represent the majority of the total protein in the media samples. There are no data in the literature on what non-declared proteins are present in unconditioned (fresh media in which no embryos have been cultured) commercial embryo media. The following eight commercial embryo culture media were included in this study: G-1 PLUS and G-2 PLUS G5 Series from Vitrolife, Sydney IVF Cleavage Medium and Sydney IVF Blastocyst Medium from Cook Medical and EmbryoAssist, BlastAssist, Sequential Cleav and Sequential Blast from ORIGIO. Two batches were analyzed from each of the Sydney IVF media and one batch from each of the other media. All embryo culture media are supplemented by the manufacturers with purified human serum albumin (HSA 5 mg/ml). The purified HSA (HSA-solution from Vitrolife) and the recombinant human albumin supplement (G-MM from Vitrolife) were also analyzed. For protein quantification, media samples were in-solution digested with trypsin and analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). For in-depth protein identification, media were albumin depleted, dialyzed and concentrated before sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The gel was cut into 14 slices followed by in-gel trypsin digestion, and analysis by LC-MS/MS. Proteins were further investigated using gene ontology (GO) terms analysis. Using advanced mass spectrometry and high confidence criteria for accepting proteins (P media when the albumin is added. GO analysis showed that many of these proteins have roles in defence pathways, for example 18 were associated with the innate immune response and 17 with inflammatory responses. Eight proteins have been reported

  1. Single-Molecule Methods for the Large-Scale Characterization of Expression Levels and Protein-Protein Interactions in Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Shimon; Michalet, Xavier

    2008-10-01

    This project has demonstrated a new approach to localize binding sites of proteins regulating gene expression (also known as transcription factors) on the genome of bacteria. Knowledge of the precise binding site(s) of a specific transcription factor helps determining its role in the cell cycle and by extension provides further understanding of the mechanisms at play in the organism. The approach entails labeling transcription factors (or any other DNA-binding protein of interest) with quantum dots, a new class of very bright fluorescent probes, which allow detection of individual molecules with a simple microscope. Detection is then followed with very accurate localization of the probe (with nanometer resolution) with respect to specific parts of the DNA or other proteins bound to the DNA. We have confirmed the precision of our measurement using another technique based on atomic force microscopy, which provides a nanometer-resolution topographic picture of a sample. Quantum dots and DNA are readily observable (and distinguishable) in the atomic force microscope, and can be simultaneously observed by fluorescence microscopy, allowing a direct comparison of the two methods. Precise nanometer-localization of protein binding sites using fluorescent quantum dots is thus a direct and visual method for physical mapping of transcription factor binding sites on whole genomes.

  2. Lupin (Lupinus albus) protein isolate (L-ISO) has adequate nutritional value and reduces large intestinal weight in rats after restricted and ad libitum feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caligari, Silvia; Chiesa, Giulia; Johnson, Stuart K; Camisassi, Davide; Gilio, Donatella; Marchesi, Marta; Parolini, Cinzia; Rubio, Luis A; Sirtori, Cesare R

    2006-01-01

    A protein isolate from white lupin (Lupinus albus; L-ISO) has potential as a novel human food ingredient, but its nutritional effects are unknown. We evaluated protein quality and effects on body composition in rats of isoenergic diets of L-ISO, lactalbumin, or casein with both restricted (10-day) and ad libitum (28-day)intake. The diets were equivalent in protein per se, but supplementation was used to balance essential amino acid levels. In both studies, the rats consumed similar amounts of each diet, and no effect of diet on the gain:feed ratio was observed--though gain:N ratio and net protein utilization were slightly lower for the L-ISO diet. Lower large intestinal weights after the L-ISO than after the lactalbumin diet were observed in both studies. The L-ISO diet resulted in lowered body fat percentage in the 10-day study but in an elevated level in the 28-day study. Liver composition (DNA, RNA, glycogen, and fat) and plasma levels of some amino acids (His, Thr, Ala, Pro, Tyr, Val and Met) were affected by diet, but no effects on plasma lipid, glucose, or uric acid were observed. The L-ISO diet did not affect feed intake and has adequate nutritional quality in rats whilst modifying large intestinal weight in a potentially beneficial manner--suggesting potential for this protein in human nutrition. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Eliminating the six N-terminal amino acids of the caspase 3 large subunit improved production of a biologically active IL2-Caspase3 chimeric protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glantz, Yitav; Sabag, Ofra; Lichtenstein, Michal; Grodzovski, Inna; Lorberboum-Galski, Haya

    2012-01-01

    Designing a chimeric protein and developing a procedure for its stable production as a biologically active protein, are key steps in its potential application to clinical trails. IL2-Caspase3 chimeric protein designed to target activated T lymphocytes was found to be a promising molecule for targeted treatment, however was found to be difficult to produce as a biological active molecule. Thus, we designed a new version of the molecule, IL2-Caspase3s, in which six amino acids (aa 29-34) from the N-terminus of the large subunit of caspase 3 were excluded. Repeated expressions, productions, and partial purifications of the IL2-Caspase3s yielded reproducible batches with consistent results. We found that IL2-Caspase3s causes cell death in a specific, dose-, and time-dependent manner. Cell death due to IL2-Caspase3s is caused by apoptosis. This improved and biologically stable IL2-Caspase3s chimeric protein may be developed in the future for clinical trails as a promising therapy for several pathologies involving activated T-cells. Moreover, this truncated caspase 3 sequence, lacking the N-terminal six amino acids of its large subunit, may be used in other caspase 3-based chimeric proteins targeted against various human diseases, using the appropriate targeting moiety. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  4. The Assessment of Students by Formal Assignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassey, Michael

    New Zealand universities have been examining the possibilities of abolishing end-of-year examinations and placing more importance on coursework. This monograph offers the alternative of assessing students by formal assignments. The formal assignment system has 4 essential characteristics which distinguish it from other methods of assessment. (1) A…

  5. Integrating Online Assignments Checking in Introductory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pundak, David; Shacham, Miri; Herscovitz, Orit

    2013-01-01

    Web technology offers lecturers the option of checking students' assignments online. Several systems have evolved to deliver personal assignments to each student in a multi-participant course. These systems provide students with immediate feedback, allowing them to correct erroneous answers and referring them to relevant literary sources that can…

  6. Assigning Elementary Pupils to Their Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, David H.

    1987-01-01

    Examines variation in the methods used to assign students to classrooms and teachers in a small but highly diversified sample of elementary schools. Gives explicit attention to parental influence on pupil assignments as well as to effects of having an unusually incompetent or excellent teacher at a particular grade level. (NH)

  7. Frequency assignment for satellite multilevel SCPC systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Yuk-Hong; Skellern, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    A method for searching the frequency assignment for satellite multilevel SCPC systems is proposed based on the method for the case of equal carrier systems. The quality of assignment improves significantly on published results. The method requires only very short computations times.

  8. Gapminder: An AP Human Geography Lab Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Kenneth H.

    2012-01-01

    This lesson is designed as a lab assignment for Advanced Placement (AP) Human Geography students wherein they use the popular Gapminder web site to compare levels of development in countries from different world regions. For this lesson, it is important for the teacher to practice with Gapminder before giving the assignment to students. (Contains…

  9. Detecting Plagiarism in MS Access Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anil

    2013-01-01

    Assurance of individual effort from students in computer-based assignments is a challenge. Due to digitization, students can easily use a copy of their friend's work and submit it as their own. Plagiarism in assignments puts students who cheat at par with those who work honestly and this compromises the learning evaluation process. Using a…

  10. Large-scale experimental studies show unexpected amino acid effects on protein expression and solubility in vivo in E. coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The biochemical and physical factors controlling protein expression level and solubility in vivo remain incompletely characterized. To gain insight into the primary sequence features influencing these outcomes, we performed statistical analyses of results from the high-throughput protein-production pipeline of the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium. Proteins expressed in E. coli and consistently purified were scored independently for expression and solubility levels. These parameters nonetheless show a very strong positive correlation. We used logistic regressions to determine whether they are systematically influenced by fractional amino acid composition or several bulk sequence parameters including hydrophobicity, sidechain entropy, electrostatic charge, and predicted backbone disorder. Decreasing hydrophobicity correlates with higher expression and solubility levels, but this correlation apparently derives solely from the beneficial effect of three charged amino acids, at least for bacterial proteins. In fact, the three most hydrophobic residues showed very different correlations with solubility level. Leu showed the strongest negative correlation among amino acids, while Ile showed a slightly positive correlation in most data segments. Several other amino acids also had unexpected effects. Notably, Arg correlated with decreased expression and, most surprisingly, solubility of bacterial proteins, an effect only partially attributable to rare codons. However, rare codons did significantly reduce expression despite use of a codon-enhanced strain. Additional analyses suggest that positively but not negatively charged amino acids may reduce translation efficiency in E. coli irrespective of codon usage. While some observed effects may reflect indirect evolutionary correlations, others may reflect basic physicochemical phenomena. We used these results to construct and validate predictors of expression and solubility levels and overall protein usability, and we

  11. Wildlife forensic science: A review of genetic geographic origin assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Rob; Linacre, Adrian

    2015-09-01

    Wildlife forensic science has become a key means of enforcing legislation surrounding the illegal trade in protected and endangered species. A relatively new dimension to this area of forensic science is to determine the geographic origin of a seized sample. This review focuses on DNA testing, which relies on assignment of an unknown sample to its genetic population of origin. Key examples of this are the trade in timber, fish and ivory and these are used only to illustrate the large number of species for which this type of testing is potentially available. The role of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers is discussed, alongside a comparison of neutral markers with those exhibiting signatures of selection, which potentially offer much higher levels of assignment power to address specific questions. A review of assignment tests is presented along with detailed methods for evaluating error rates and considerations for marker selection. The availability and quality of reference data are of paramount importance to support assignment applications and ensure reliability of any conclusions drawn. The genetic methods discussed have been developed initially as investigative tools but comment is made regarding their use in courts. The potential to compliment DNA markers with elemental assays for greater assignment power is considered and finally recommendations are made for the future of this type of testing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Reciprocal expression of the endocytic protein HIP1R and its repressor FOXP1 predicts outcome in R-CHOP-treated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, K K; Gascoyne, D M; Brown, P J

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified autoantibodies to the endocytic-associated protein Huntingtin-interacting protein 1-related (HIP1R) in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) patients. HIP1R regulates internalization of cell surface receptors via endocytosis, a process relevant to many therapeutic...... strategies including CD20 targeting with rituximab. In this study, we characterized HIP1R expression patterns, investigated a mechanism of transcriptional regulation and its clinical relevance in DLBCL patients treated with immunochemotherapy (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine...... and prednisone, R-CHOP). HIP1R was preferentially expressed in germinal center B-cell-like DLBCL (P...

  13. Using Magnets and Classroom Flipping to Promote Student Engagement and Learning about Protein Translation in a Large Microbiology Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Lynn McLean

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted within the education community that active learning is superior to traditional lecturing alone. Many science educators, however, are reluctant to give up classroom time for activities because they fear that they will not have time to cover as much content. Classroom flipping has been gaining momentum in higher education as one way to engage students in the classroom while still exposing students to the same volume of course content. The activity presented here demonstrates how flipping one lecture period can be used in conjunction with an engaging in-class activity to teach a concept that is often difficult for students to learn through lecture alone. Specifically, we asked students to view a lecture video on bacterial protein translation before coming to class. We then used the classroom period to conduct a hands-on activity that allowed students to interact with magnetic pieces representing the components of protein translation to generate a protein from a given piece of DNA. Survey data showed that students liked the flipped classroom format associated with this activity, but they would not want every class flipped, and they perceived that the hands-on protein translation activity helped them to learn the material. Preliminary summative assessment data showed that this activity may have been useful in helping students to achieve the fundamental learning outcome that students will be able to translate a protein from a given piece of bacterial DNA.

  14. Identification and characterization of subfamily-specific signatures in a large protein superfamily by a hidden Markov model approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikura Mitsuhiko

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most profile and motif databases strive to classify protein sequences into a broad spectrum of protein families. The next step of such database studies should include the development of classification systems capable of distinguishing between subfamilies within a structurally and functionally diverse superfamily. This would be helpful in elucidating sequence-structure-function relationships of proteins. Results Here, we present a method to diagnose sequences into subfamilies by employing hidden Markov models (HMMs to find windows of residues that are distinct among subfamilies (called signatures. The method starts with a multiple sequence alignment (MSA of the subfamily. Then, we build a HMM database representing all sliding windows of the MSA of a fixed size. Finally, we construct a HMM histogram of the matches of each sliding window in the entire superfamily. To illustrate the efficacy of the method, we have applied the analysis to find subfamily signatures in two well-studied superfamilies: the cadherin and the EF-hand protein superfamilies. As a corollary, the HMM histograms of the analyzed subfamilies revealed information about their Ca2+ binding sites and loops. Conclusions The method is used to create HMM databases to diagnose subfamilies of protein superfamilies that complement broad profile and motif databases such as BLOCKS, PROSITE, Pfam, SMART, PRINTS and InterPro.

  15. Sequence-engineered mRNA Without Chemical Nucleoside Modifications Enables an Effective Protein Therapy in Large Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thess, Andreas; Grund, Stefanie; Mui, Barbara L; Hope, Michael J; Baumhof, Patrick; Fotin-Mleczek, Mariola; Schlake, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Being a transient carrier of genetic information, mRNA could be a versatile, flexible, and safe means for protein therapies. While recent findings highlight the enormous therapeutic potential of mRNA, evidence that mRNA-based protein therapies are feasible beyond small animals such as mice is still lacking. Previous studies imply that mRNA therapeutics require chemical nucleoside modifications to obtain sufficient protein expression and avoid activation of the innate immune system. Here we show that chemically unmodified mRNA can achieve those goals as well by applying sequence-engineered molecules. Using erythropoietin (EPO) driven production of red blood cells as the biological model, engineered Epo mRNA elicited meaningful physiological responses from mice to nonhuman primates. Even in pigs of about 20 kg in weight, a single adequate dose of engineered mRNA encapsulated in lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) induced high systemic Epo levels and strong physiological effects. Our results demonstrate that sequence-engineered mRNA has the potential to revolutionize human protein therapies. PMID:26050989

  16. Chromosome-wise Protein Interaction Patterns and Their Impact on Functional Implications of Large-Scale Genomic Aberrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirk, Isa Kristina; Weinhold, Nils; Belling, Kirstine González-Izarzugaza

    2017-01-01

    Gene copy-number changes influence phenotypes through gene-dosage alteration and subsequent changes of protein complex stoichiometry. Human trisomies where gene copy numbers are increased uniformly over entire chromosomes provide generic cases for studying these relationships. In most trisomies, ...

  17. On the relationship between gluten protein composition of wheat flours and large-deformation properties of their doughs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sliwinski, E.L.; Kolster, P.; Prins, A.; Vliet, van T.

    2004-01-01

    Six European and two Canadian wheat cultivars selected according to their different performance in baked cereal products. The gluten protein composition of the respective flours was studied and related to the rheological and fracture properties of optimally mixed flour doughs tested in uniaxial

  18. Constrained Task Assignment and Scheduling On Networks of Arbitrary Topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Justin Patrick

    This dissertation develops a framework to address centralized and distributed constrained task assignment and task scheduling problems. This framework is used to prove properties of these problems that can be exploited, develop effective solution algorithms, and to prove important properties such as correctness, completeness and optimality. The centralized task assignment and task scheduling problem treated here is expressed as a vehicle routing problem with the goal of optimizing mission time subject to mission constraints on task precedence and agent capability. The algorithm developed to solve this problem is able to coordinate vehicle (agent) timing for task completion. This class of problems is NP-hard and analytical guarantees on solution quality are often unavailable. This dissertation develops a technique for determining solution quality that can be used on a large class of problems and does not rely on traditional analytical guarantees. For distributed problems several agents must communicate to collectively solve a distributed task assignment and task scheduling problem. The distributed task assignment and task scheduling algorithms developed here allow for the optimization of constrained military missions in situations where the communication network may be incomplete and only locally known. Two problems are developed. The distributed task assignment problem incorporates communication constraints that must be satisfied; this is the Communication-Constrained Distributed Assignment Problem. A novel distributed assignment algorithm, the Stochastic Bidding Algorithm, solves this problem. The algorithm is correct, probabilistically complete, and has linear average-case time complexity. The distributed task scheduling problem addressed here is to minimize mission time subject to arbitrary predicate mission constraints; this is the Minimum-time Arbitrarily-constrained Distributed Scheduling Problem. The Optimal Distributed Non-sequential Backtracking Algorithm

  19. The Assignment Game : The Reduced Game

    OpenAIRE

    Guillermo OWEN

    1992-01-01

    Let v be an assignment game. For a given reference payoff vector (x; y), and a coalition S, bargaining within the coalition can be represented by either the reduced game or the derived game. It is known that the reduced game need not be an assignment game (in fact, it need not be super additive) while the derived game is another assignment game, with modified reservation prices. We prove that, when the reference vector is in the core of the game, the derived game is the super additive cover o...

  20. Potential of mean force between a large solute and a biomolecular complex: A model analysis on protein flux through chaperonin system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Ken-ich; Oshima, Hiraku; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2011-11-01

    Insertion of a large solute into an even larger vessel comprising biopolymers followed by release of the same solute from it is one of the important functions sustaining life. As a typical example, an unfolded protein is inserted into a chaperonin from bulk aqueous solution, a cochaperonin acting as a lid is attached to the chaperonin rim and the protein folds into its native structure within the closed cavity, the cochaperonin is detached after the folding is finished, and the folded protein is released back to the bulk solution. On the basis of the experimental observations manifesting that the basic aspects of the protein flux through the chaperonin system is independent of the chaperonin, cochaperonin, and protein species, we adopt a simple model system with which we can cover the whole cycle of the protein flux. We calculate the spatial distribution of the solvent-mediated potential of mean force (PMF) between a spherical solute and a cylindrical vessel or vessel/lid complex. The calculation is performed using the three-dimensional integral equation theory, and the PMF is decomposed into energetic and entropic components. We argue that an unfolded protein with a larger excluded volume (EV) and weak hydrophobicity is entropically inserted into the chaperonin cavity and constrained within a small space almost in its center. The switch from insertion to release is achieved by decreasing the EV and turning the protein surface hydrophilic in the folding process. For this release, in which the energetic component is a requisite, the feature that the chaperonin inner surface in the absence of the cochaperonin is not hydrophilic plays essential roles. On the other hand, the inner surface of the chaperonin/cochaperonin complex is hydrophilic, and the protein is energetically repelled from it: The protein remains constrained within the small space mentioned above without contacting the inner surface for correct folding. The structural and inner-surface properties of the

  1. Amino acid Alphabet Size in Protein Evolution Experiments: Better to Search a Small library Thoroughly or a Large Library Sparsely?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    We compare the results obtained from searching a smaller library thoroughly versus searching a more diverse, larger library sparsely. We study protein evolution with reduced amino acid alphabets, by simulating directed evolution experiments at three different alphabet sizes: 20, 5 and 2. We employ a physical model for evolution, the generalized NK model, that has proved successful in modeling protein evolution, antibody evolution, and T cell selection. We find that antibodies with higher affinity are found by searching a library with a larger alphabet sparsely than by searching a smaller library thoroughly, even with well-designed reduced libraries. We find ranked amino acid usage frequencies in agreement with observations of the CDR-H3 variable region of human antibodies. PMID:18375453

  2. Seamless bead to microarray screening: rapid identification of the highest affinity protein ligands from large combinatorial libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astle, John M; Simpson, Levi S; Huang, Yong; Reddy, M Muralidhar; Wilson, Rosemary; Connell, Steven; Wilson, Johnnie; Kodadek, Thomas

    2010-01-29

    Several approaches have been developed for screening combinatorial libraries or collections of synthetic molecules for agonists or antagonists of protein function, each with its own advantages and limitations. In this report, we describe an experimental platform that seamlessly couples massively parallel bead-based screening of one-bead one-compound combinatorial libraries with microarray-based quantitative comparisons of the binding affinities of the many hits isolated from the bead library. Combined with other technical improvements, this technique allows the rapid identification of the best protein ligands in combinatorial libraries containing millions of compounds without the need for labor-intensive resynthesis of the hits. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Large-scale FMO-MP3 calculations on the surface proteins of influenza virus, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Yuji; Yamashita, Katsumi; Fukuzawa, Kaori; Takematsu, Kazutomo; Watanabe, Hirofumi; Taguchi, Naoki; Okiyama, Yoshio; Tsuboi, Misako; Nakano, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Shigenori

    2010-06-01

    Two proteins on the influenza virus surface have been well known. One is hemagglutinin (HA) associated with the infection to cells. The fragment molecular orbital (FMO) calculations were performed on a complex consisting of HA trimer and two Fab-fragments at the third-order Møller-Plesset perturbation (MP3) level. The numbers of residues and 6-31G basis functions were 2351 and 201276, and thus a massively parallel-vector computer was utilized to accelerate the processing. This FMO-MP3 job was completed in 5.8 h with 1024 processors. Another protein is neuraminidase (NA) involved in the escape from infected cells. The FMO-MP3 calculation was also applied to analyze the interactions between oseltamivir and surrounding residues in pharmacophore.

  4. Using selenomethionyl derivatives to assign sequence in low-resolution structures of the AP2 clathrin adaptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Bernard T; Graham, Stephen C; Owen, David J

    2016-03-01

    Selenomethionine incorporation is a powerful technique for assigning sequence to regions of electron density at low resolution. Genetic introduction of methionine point mutations and the subsequent preparation and crystallization of selenomethionyl derivatives permits unambiguous sequence assignment by enabling the placement of the anomalous scatterers (Se atoms) thus introduced. Here, the use of this approach in the assignment of sequence in a part of the AP2 clathrin adaptor complex that is responsible for clathrin binding is described. AP2 plays a pivotal role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, a tightly regulated process in which cell-surface transmembrane proteins are internalized from the plasma membrane by incorporation into lipid-enclosed transport vesicles. AP2 binds cargo destined for internalization and recruits clathrin, a large trimeric protein that helps to deform the membrane to produce the transport vesicle. By selenomethionine labelling of point mutants, it was shown that the clathrin-binding site is buried within a deep cleft of the AP2 complex. A membrane-stimulated conformational change in AP2 releases the clathrin-binding site from autoinhibition, thereby linking clathrin recruitment to membrane localization.

  5. One precursor, three apolipoproteins: the relationship between two crustacean lipoproteins, the large discoidal lipoprotein and the high density lipoprotein/β-glucan binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieb, Stefanie; Roth, Ziv; Dal Magro, Christina; Fischer, Sabine; Butz, Eric; Sagi, Amir; Khalaila, Isam; Lieb, Bernhard; Schenk, Sven; Hoeger, Ulrich

    2014-12-01

    The novel discoidal lipoprotein (dLp) recently detected in the crayfish, differs from other crustacean lipoproteins in its large size, apoprotein composition and high lipid binding capacity, We identified the dLp sequence by transcriptome analyses of the hepatopancreas and mass spectrometry. Further de novo assembly of the NGS data followed by BLAST searches using the sequence of the high density lipoprotein/1-glucan binding protein (HDL-BGBP) of Astacus leptodactylus as query revealed a putative precursor molecule with an open reading frame of 14.7 kb and a deduced primary structure of 4889 amino acids. The presence of an N-terminal lipid bind- ing domain and a DUF 1943 domain suggests the relationship with the large lipid transfer proteins. Two-putative dibasic furin cleavage sites were identified bordering the sequence of the HDL-BGBP. When subjected to mass spectroscopic analyses, tryptic peptides of the large apoprotein of dLp matched the N-terminal part of the precursor, while the peptides obtained for its small apoprotein matched the C-terminal part. Repeating the analysis in the prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii revealed a similar protein with identical domain architecture suggesting that our findings do not represent an isolated instance. Our results indicate that the above three apolipoproteins (i.e HDL-BGBP and both the large and the small subunit of dLp) are translated as a large precursor. Cleavage at the furin type sites releases two subunits forming a heterodimeric dLP particle, while the remaining part forms an HDL-BGBP whose relationship with other lipoproteins as well as specific functions are yet to be elucidated.

  6. PatentMatrix: an automated tool to survey patents related to large sets of genes or proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Rinaldis Emanuele

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of patents associated with genes and proteins and the amount of information contained in each patent often present a real obstacle to the rapid evaluation of the novelty of findings associated to genes from an intellectual property (IP perspective. This assessment, normally carried out by expert patent professionals, can therefore become cumbersome and time consuming. Here we present PatentMatrix, a novel software tool for the automated analysis of patent sequence text entries. Methods and Results PatentMatrix is written in the Awk language and requires installation of the Derwent GENESEQ™ patent sequence database under the sequence retrieval system SRS. The software works by taking as input two files: i a list of genes or proteins with the associated GENESEQ™ patent sequence accession numbers ii a list of keywords describing the research context of interest (e.g. 'lung', 'cancer', 'therapeutics', 'diagnostics'. The GENESEQ™ database is interrogated through the SRS system and each patent entry of interest is screened for the occurrence of user-defined keywords. Moreover, the software extracts the basic information useful for a preliminary assessment of the IP coverage of each patent from the GENESEQ™ database. As output, two tab-delimited files are generated which provide the user with a detailed and an aggregated view of the results. An example is given where the IP position of five genes is evaluated in the context of 'development of antibodies for cancer treatment' Conclusion PatentMatrix allows a rapid survey of patents associated with genes or proteins in a particular area of interest as defined by keywords. It can be efficiently used to evaluate the IP-related novelty of scientific findings and to rank genes or proteins according to their IP position.

  7. A benchmark for protein dynamics: Ribonuclease A measured by neutron scattering in a large wavevector-energy transfer range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Kathleen [Institut Laue Langevin, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Department of Membrane Biochemistry, Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Am Klopferspitz 18, D-82152 Martinsried (Germany); Caronna, Chiara [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, B.P. 220, 38043 Grenoble (France); Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche ed Astronomiche, Universita di Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, 90123, Palermo (Italy); Fouquet, Peter [Institut Laue Langevin, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Haussler, Wolfgang [Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II), 85747 Garching (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E21, Lichtenbergstrasse 1, 85747 Garching (Germany); Natali, Francesca [INFM-CNR OGG and CRS-SOFT, c/o ILL, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, BP 156-38042, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Ollivier, Jacques [Institut Laue Langevin, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Orecchini, Andrea [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Perugia, Via Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy); CNR-INFM CRS SOFT c/o Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita La Sapienza, p.le Aldo Moro 4, 00185 Roma (Italy); Plazanet, Marie [European Laboratory for Non-Linear Spectroscopy, University of Florence, Via N. Carrara 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); CNR-INFM CRS SOFT c/o Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita La Sapienza, p.le Aldo Moro 4, 00185 Roma (Italy); Zaccai, Giuseppe [Institut Laue Langevin, BP 156, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)], E-mail: zaccai@ill.fr

    2008-04-18

    The dynamics of Ribonuclease A was explored in the full range of time and length-scales accessible by neutron spectroscopy, on time-of-flight, backscattering and spin-echo spectrometers. Samples were examined in dry and hydrated powder forms and in concentrated and dilute solutions. The aim of the study was an experimental characterisation of the full variety of protein dynamics arising from stabilisation forces. The results provide a benchmark against which other sample dynamics can be compared.

  8. Dynamic traffic assignment : genetic algorithms approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Real-time route guidance is a promising approach to alleviating congestion on the nations highways. A dynamic traffic assignment model is central to the development of guidance strategies. The artificial intelligence technique of genetic algorithm...

  9. Homework assignments in couple and family therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattilio, Frank M

    2002-05-01

    Homework has been cited as an integral part of a number of theoretical orientations and therapy formats; unfortunately, very little has been written about its use with couples and families. This is despite the fact that many couple and family therapists espouse the use of homework or out-of-session assignments in order to help the effects of therapy jell. This article reviews some of the empirical literature on homework assignments and their effectiveness in the domain of therapy for families and couples. It also highlights the effectiveness of and the need for out-of-session assignments in treatment. A case illustration is used to demonstrate how homework assignments may be used as a significant change agent in couple and family treatment. Copyright 2002 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Mouse microsomal triglyceride transfer protein large subunit: cDNA cloning, tissue-specific expression, and chromosomal localization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamuta, Makoto; Chang, Benny Hung-Junn; Hoogeveen, R. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-15

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) catalyzes the transfer of triglyceride, cholesteryl ester, and phospholipid between membranes. It is essential for the secretion of apolipoprotein B from the cell. Mutations in MTP are a major cause of abetalipoproteinemia. The mouse is a popular animal model for lipoprotein metabolism. We have cloned and sequenced mouse MTP cDNA. The DNA-deduced amino acid sequence indicates that mouse protein shows 93, 86, and 83% sequence indicates that mouse MTP contains 894 amino acids; the mouse protein shows 93, 86, and 83% sequence identity to the hamster, human, and bovine sequences, respectively. Northern blot analysis indicates that mouse MTP mRNA is expressed at high levels in the small intestine and at substantially lower levels in the liver and that it is not detectable in six other tissues examined. The mouse MTP gene has been localized to the distal region of chromosome 3 by Southern blots of interspecific backcross panels using progeny derived from matings of (C57BL/6J x SPRET/Ei)F1 x SPRET/Ei. Comparison of MTP sequences from human, bovine, hamster, and mouse indicates that the C-terminal region of MTP is better conserved than its N-terminal region. 21 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Apoptosis induction by the dual-action DNA- and protein-reactive antitumor drug irofulven is largely Bcl-2-independent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzig, Maryanne C S; Trevino, Alex V; Liang, Huiyun; Salinas, Richard; Waters, Stephen J; MacDonald, John R; Woynarowska, Barbara A; Woynarowski, Jan M

    2003-02-15

    The overexpression of Bcl-2 is implicated in the resistance of cancer cells to apoptosis. This study explored the potential of irofulven (hydroxymethylacylfulvene, HMAF, MGI 114, NSC 683863), a novel DNA- and protein-reactive anticancer drug, to overcome the anti-apoptotic properties of Bcl-2 in HeLa cells with controlled Bcl-2 overexpression. Irofulven treatment resulted in rapid (12hr) dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential, phosphatidylserine externalization, and apoptotic DNA fragmentation, with progressive changes after 24hr. Bcl-2 overexpression caused marginal or partial inhibition of these effects after treatment times ranging from 12 to 48hr. Both Bcl-2-dependent and -independent responses to irofulven were abrogated by a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor. Despite the somewhat decreased apoptotic indices, cell growth inhibition by irofulven was unaffected by Bcl-2 status. In comparison, Bcl-2 overexpression drastically reduced apoptotic DNA fragmentation by etoposide, acting via topoisomerase II-mediated DNA damage, but had no effect on apoptotic DNA fragmentation by helenalin A, which reacts with proteins but not DNA. Irofulven retains its pro-apoptotic and growth inhibitory potential in cell lines that have naturally high Bcl-2 expression. Collectively, the results implicate multiple mechanisms of apoptosis induction by irofulven, which may differ in time course and Bcl-2 dependence. It is possible that the sustained ability of irofulven to induce profound apoptosis and to block cell growth despite Bcl-2 overexpression may be related to its dual reactivity with both DNA and proteins.

  12. Application of a Dynamic Programming Algorithm for Weapon Target Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    responsible for its safe custody. UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Application of a Dynamic Programming Algorithm for Weapon Target Assignment...the technique used. As a precaution , such techniques are generally referred to as suboptimal. As mentioned above, an exact solution can only be...Skovde, Sweden, 2010. [5] K. C. Jha, “Very Large-Scale Neighborhood Search Heuristics for Combinatorial Optimization Problems,” University of Florida

  13. Project Assignments When Budget Padding Taints Resource Allocation

    OpenAIRE

    Anil Arya; Brian Mittendorf

    2006-01-01

    This paper shows that rotation programs can be an effective response to concerns of employee budget padding. Rotation programs naturally create a "portfolio" of assignments for each manager, and the resulting diversification can reduce the downside of resource rationing. In particular, the production versus rents trade-off linked with adverse selection problems can be more efficiently carried out when the firm faces two managers with average information advantages, rather than one with a larg...

  14. Combining cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) and cross-linking mass spectrometry (CX-MS) for structural elucidation of large protein assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Carla; Urlaub, Henning

    2017-10-01

    Determining the structures of, and gaining insight into, the function of large protein complexes at the molecular or atomic level has become a key part of modern structural biology. Electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM) can solve structures of highly dynamic macromolecular complexes that are not feasible with other structural techniques like X-ray of crystallized proteins (protein complexes) or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of proteins (protein complexes) in solution. To resolve the regions that are less well defined in cryo-EM images, cross-linking coupled with mass spectrometry (CX-MS) provides valuable information on the proximity between amino-acid residues as distance constraints for homology or de novo modelling. The CX-MS strategy involves covalent linkage, with chemical cross-linkers, of residues close to each other in three-dimensional space and identifying these connections by mass spectrometry. In this article, we summarise the advances of CX-MS and its integration with cryo-EM for structural reconstruction. We further evaluate a number of important examples of structure determination that followed this combinatorial strategy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. On pole structure assignment in linear systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Loiseau, J.-J.; Zagalak, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 7 (2009), s. 1179-1192 ISSN 0020-7179 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA102/07/1596 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : linear systems * linear state feedback * pole structure assignment Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory Impact factor: 1.124, year: 2009 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2009/AS/zagalak-on pole structure assignment in linear systems.pdf

  16. Economic benefit assignment in environmental cost allocation

    OpenAIRE

    Collins C. Ngwakwe

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to suggest a model to reward a dirty product which has the potential to offer sales promotion services to other clean products in a multiple product firm. The paper suggests a model economic benefit assignment (eba) for apportionment of direct waste costs where a polluting product offers a sales promotion benefit to other clean products of the same company, which proposes that benefiting products should be assigned a proportion of the direct waste cost of the polluting product...

  17. Identification and Characterization of a Large Protein Essential for Degradation of the Crystalline Region of Cellulose by Cytophaga hutchinsonii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sen; Zhao, Dong; Bai, Xinfeng; Zhang, Weican; Lu, Xuemei

    2017-01-01

    Cytophaga hutchinsonii is a Gram-negative bacterium that can efficiently degrade crystalline cellulose by a unique mechanism different from the free cellulase or cellulosome strategy. In this study, chu_3220, encoding the hypothetical protein CHU_3220 (205 kDa), was identified by insertional mutation and gene deletion as the first gene essential for degradation of the crystalline region but not the amorphous region of cellulose by C. hutchinsonii A chu_3220 deletion mutant was defective in the degradation of crystalline cellulose and increased the degree of crystallinity of Avicel PH101 but could still degrade amorphous cellulose completely. CHU_3220 was found to be located on the outer surface of the outer membrane and could bind to cellulose. It contains 15 PbH1 domains and a C-terminal domain (CHU_C) that was proved to be critical for the localization of CHU_3220 on the cell surface and the function of CHU_3220 in crystalline cellulose degradation. Moreover, the degradation of crystalline cellulose was intact-cell dependent and inhibited by NaN3 Further study showed that chu_3220 was induced by cellulose and that the endoglucanase activity on the cell surface was significantly reduced without chu_3220 Real-time PCR revealed that the transcription of most genes encoding endoglucanases located on the cell surface was decreased in the chu_3220 deletion mutant, indicating that chu_3220 might also play a role in the regulation of the expression of some endoglucanases. Cytophaga hutchinsonii could efficiently degrade crystalline cellulose with a unique mechanism without cellulosomes and free cellulases. It lacks proteins that are thought to play important roles in disruption of the crystalline region of cellulose, including exoglucanases, lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases, expansins, expansin-like proteins, or swollenins, and most of its endoglucanases lack carbohydrate binding modules. The mechanism of the degradation of crystalline cellulose is still unknown. In

  18. Large-scale analysis of protein expression changes in human keratinocytes immortalized by human papilloma virus type 16 E6 and E7 oncogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnouk Hilal

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with high-risk type human papilloma viruses (HPVs is associated with cervical carcinomas and with a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Viral E6 and E7 oncogenes cooperate to achieve cell immortalization by a mechanism that is not yet fully understood. Here, human keratinocytes were immortalized by long-term expression of HPV type 16 E6 or E7 oncoproteins, or both. Proteomic profiling was used to compare expression levels for 741 discrete protein features. Results Six replicate measurements were performed for each group using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE. The median within-group coefficient of variation was 19–21%. Significance of between-group differences was tested based on Significance Analysis of Microarray and fold change. Expression of 170 (23% of the protein features changed significantly in immortalized cells compared to primary keratinocytes. Most of these changes were qualitatively similar in cells immortalized by E6, E7, or E6/7 expression, indicating convergence on a common phenotype, but fifteen proteins (~2% were outliers in this regulatory pattern. Ten demonstrated opposite regulation in E6- and E7-expressing cells, including the cell cycle regulator p16INK4a; the carbohydrate binding protein Galectin-7; two differentially migrating forms of the intermediate filament protein Cytokeratin-7; HSPA1A (Hsp70-1; and five unidentified proteins. Five others had a pattern of expression that suggested cooperativity between the co-expressed oncoproteins. Two of these were identified as forms of the small heat shock protein HSPB1 (Hsp27. Conclusion This large-scale analysis provides a framework for understanding the cooperation between E6 and E7 oncoproteins in HPV-driven carcinogenesis.

  19. Competitive Traffic Assignment in Road Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krylatov Alexander Y.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently in-vehicle route guidance and information systems are rapidly developing. Such systems are expected to reduce congestion in an urban traffic area. This social benefit is believed to be reached by imposing the route choices on the network users that lead to the system optimum traffic assignment. However, guidance service could be offered by different competitive business companies. Then route choices of different mutually independent groups of users may reject traffic assignment from the system optimum state. In this paper, a game theoretic approach is shown to be very efficient to formalize competitive traffic assignment problem with various groups of users in the form of non-cooperative network game with the Nash equilibrium search. The relationships between the Wardrop’s system optimum associated with the traffic assignment problem and the Nash equilibrium associated with the competitive traffic assignment problem are investigated. Moreover, some related aspects of the Nash equilibrium and the Wardrop’s user equilibrium assignments are also discussed.

  20. Optimal carrier frequency assignments for a two-carrier-level SCPS system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, X. T.; Forsey, R. J.

    A two-carrier-level SCPC system may occur in a star network where one master station (hub) with large G/T communicates with many remote stations with small G/T via one satellite transponder. By properly assigning the frequencies of carriers passing through the transponder, one can reduce and balance the relative intermodulation power levels falling into the SCPC channels. Through computer simulation, optimal carrier frequency assignments are found for four different criteria of optimality. The optimal assignments vary with respect to the difference in the two levels of carrier output power. All four criteria provide the conclusion that when the difference is around 3 dB, the assignment with small carriers stacked in the middle is best; and, when the difference is large (greater than 6 dB) the assignment with large carriers and small carriers alternated is best.

  1. X-ray and light scattering study of the structure of large protein aggregates at neutral pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pouzot, M.; Nicolai, T.; Visschers, R.W.; Weijers, M.

    2005-01-01

    The structure of large ovalbumin and ß-lactoglobulin aggregates formed after heat-denaturation at neutral pH was studied using a combination of light and small-angle X-ray scattering. The effect of the electrostatic interactions was investigated by varying the ionic strength. The results were

  2. Expressions of tight junction proteins Occludin and Claudin-1 are under the circadian control in the mouse large intestine: implications in intestinal permeability and susceptibility to colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyoko, Oh-oka; Kono, Hiroshi; Ishimaru, Kayoko; Miyake, Kunio; Kubota, Takeo; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Shibata, Shigenobu; Nakao, Atsuhito

    2014-01-01

    The circadian clock drives daily rhythms in behavior and physiology. A recent study suggests that intestinal permeability is also under control of the circadian clock. However, the precise mechanisms remain largely unknown. Because intestinal permeability depends on tight junction (TJ) that regulates the epithelial paracellular pathway, this study investigated whether the circadian clock regulates the expression levels of TJ proteins in the intestine. The expression levels of TJ proteins in the large intestinal epithelium and colonic permeability were analyzed every 4, 6, or 12 hours between wild-type mice and mice with a mutation of a key clock gene Period2 (Per2; mPer2(m/m). In addition, the susceptibility to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis was compared between wild-type mice and mPer2(m/m) mice. The mRNA and protein expression levels of Occludin and Claudin-1 exhibited daily variations in the colonic epithelium in wild-type mice, whereas they were constitutively high in mPer2(m/m) mice. Colonic permeability in wild-type mice exhibited daily variations, which was inversely associated with the expression levels of Occludin and Claudin-1 proteins, whereas it was constitutively low in mPer2(m/m) mice. mPer2(m/m) mice were more resistant to the colonic injury induced by DSS than wild-type mice. Occludin and Claudin-1 expressions in the large intestine are under the circadian control, which is associated with temporal regulation of colonic permeability and also susceptibility to colitis.

  3. Expressions of tight junction proteins Occludin and Claudin-1 are under the circadian control in the mouse large intestine: implications in intestinal permeability and susceptibility to colitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh-oka Kyoko

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND & AIMS: The circadian clock drives daily rhythms in behavior and physiology. A recent study suggests that intestinal permeability is also under control of the circadian clock. However, the precise mechanisms remain largely unknown. Because intestinal permeability depends on tight junction (TJ that regulates the epithelial paracellular pathway, this study investigated whether the circadian clock regulates the expression levels of TJ proteins in the intestine. METHODS: The expression levels of TJ proteins in the large intestinal epithelium and colonic permeability were analyzed every 4, 6, or 12 hours between wild-type mice and mice with a mutation of a key clock gene Period2 (Per2; mPer2(m/m. In addition, the susceptibility to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS-induced colitis was compared between wild-type mice and mPer2(m/m mice. RESULTS: The mRNA and protein expression levels of Occludin and Claudin-1 exhibited daily variations in the colonic epithelium in wild-type mice, whereas they were constitutively high in mPer2(m/m mice. Colonic permeability in wild-type mice exhibited daily variations, which was inversely associated with the expression levels of Occludin and Claudin-1 proteins, whereas it was constitutively low in mPer2(m/m mice. mPer2(m/m mice were more resistant to the colonic injury induced by DSS than wild-type mice. CONCLUSIONS: Occludin and Claudin-1 expressions in the large intestine are under the circadian control, which is associated with temporal regulation of colonic permeability and also susceptibility to colitis.

  4. Epstein-Barr virus large tegument protein BPLF1 contributes to innate immune evasion through interference with toll-like receptor signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel van Gent

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Viral infection triggers an early host response through activation of pattern recognition receptors, including Toll-like receptors (TLR. TLR signaling cascades induce production of type I interferons and proinflammatory cytokines involved in establishing an anti-viral state as well as in orchestrating ensuing adaptive immunity. To allow infection, replication, and persistence, (herpesviruses employ ingenious strategies to evade host immunity. The human gamma-herpesvirus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is a large, enveloped DNA virus persistently carried by more than 90% of adults worldwide. It is the causative agent of infectious mononucleosis and is associated with several malignant tumors. EBV activates TLRs, including TLR2, TLR3, and TLR9. Interestingly, both the expression of and signaling by TLRs is attenuated during productive EBV infection. Ubiquitination plays an important role in regulating TLR signaling and is controlled by ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitinases (DUBs. The EBV genome encodes three proteins reported to exert in vitro deubiquitinase activity. Using active site-directed probes, we show that one of these putative DUBs, the conserved herpesvirus large tegument protein BPLF1, acts as a functional DUB in EBV-producing B cells. The BPLF1 enzyme is expressed during the late phase of lytic EBV infection and is incorporated into viral particles. The N-terminal part of the large BPLF1 protein contains the catalytic site for DUB activity and suppresses TLR-mediated activation of NF-κB at, or downstream of, the TRAF6 signaling intermediate. A catalytically inactive mutant of this EBV protein did not reduce NF-κB activation, indicating that DUB activity is essential for attenuating TLR signal transduction. Our combined results show that EBV employs deubiquitination of signaling intermediates in the TLR cascade as a mechanism to counteract innate anti-viral immunity of infected hosts.

  5. Privacy-Preserving Task Assignment in Spatial Crowdsourcing

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, An

    2017-09-20

    With the progress of mobile devices and wireless networks, spatial crowdsourcing (SC) is emerging as a promising approach for problem solving. In SC, spatial tasks are assigned to and performed by a set of human workers. To enable effective task assignment, however, both workers and task requesters are required to disclose their locations to untrusted SC systems. In this paper, we study the problem of assigning workers to tasks in a way that location privacy for both workers and task requesters is preserved. We first combine the Paillier cryptosystem with Yao’s garbled circuits to construct a secure protocol that assigns the nearest worker to a task. Considering that this protocol cannot scale to a large number of workers, we then make use of Geohash, a hierarchical spatial index to design a more efficient protocol that can securely find approximate nearest workers. We theoretically show that these two protocols are secure against semi-honest adversaries. Through extensive experiments on two real-world datasets, we demonstrate the efficiency and effectiveness of our protocols.

  6. Active Processing via Write-to-Learn Assignments: Learning and Retention Benefits in Introductory Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingerich, Karla J.; Bugg, Julie M.; Doe, Sue R.; Rowland, Christopher A.; Richards, Tracy L.; Tompkins, Sara Anne; McDaniel, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated brief, in-class write-to-learn assignments as a tool for promoting learning and retention in large, introductory psychology courses. A within-subjects (student) design was used with assignment of concepts to write-to-learn and copy (control) conditions counterbalanced across sections for each instructor. Students performed…

  7. Flexible taxonomic assignment of ambiguous sequencing reads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jansson Jesper

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To characterize the diversity of bacterial populations in metagenomic studies, sequencing reads need to be accurately assigned to taxonomic units in a given reference taxonomy. Reads that cannot be reliably assigned to a unique leaf in the taxonomy (ambiguous reads are typically assigned to the lowest common ancestor of the set of species that match it. This introduces a potentially severe error in the estimation of bacteria present in the sample due to false positives, since all species in the subtree rooted at the ancestor are implicitly assigned to the read even though many of them may not match it. Results We present a method that maps each read to a node in the taxonomy that minimizes a penalty score while balancing the relevance of precision and recall in the assignment through a parameter q. This mapping can be obtained in time linear in the number of matching sequences, because LCA queries to the reference taxonomy take constant time. When applied to six different metagenomic datasets, our algorithm produces different taxonomic distributions depending on whether coverage or precision is maximized. Including information on the quality of the reads reduces the number of unassigned reads but increases the number of ambiguous reads, stressing the relevance of our method. Finally, two measures of performance are described and results with a set of artificially generated datasets are discussed. Conclusions The assignment strategy of sequencing reads introduced in this paper is a versatile and a quick method to study bacterial communities. The bacterial composition of the analyzed samples can vary significantly depending on how ambiguous reads are assigned depending on the value of the q parameter. Validation of our results in an artificial dataset confirm that a combination of values of q produces the most accurate results.

  8. Time course of large ribosomal subunit assembly in E. coli cells overexpressing a helicase inactive DbpA protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Riley C.; Childs, Jared J.; Gevorkyan, Jirair; Gerasimova, Yulia V.; Koculi, Eda

    2016-01-01

    DbpA is a DEAD-box RNA helicase implicated in Escherichia coli large ribosomal subunit assembly. Previous studies have shown that when the ATPase and helicase inactive DbpA construct, R331A, is expressed in E. coli cells, a large ribosomal subunit intermediate accumulates. The large subunit intermediate migrates as a 45S particle in a sucrose gradient. Here, using a number of structural and fluorescent assays, we investigate the ribosome profiles of cells lacking wild-type DbpA and overexpressing the R331A DbpA construct. Our data show that in addition to the 45S particle previously described, 27S and 35S particles are also present in the ribosome profiles of cells overexpressing R331A DbpA. The 27S, 35S, and 45S independently convert to the 50S subunit, suggesting that ribosome assembly in the presence of R331A and the absence of wild-type DbpA occurs via multiple pathways. PMID:27194011

  9. Large-scale proteome analysis of abscisic acid and ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3-dependent proteins related to desiccation tolerance in Physcomitrella patens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yotsui, Izumi, E-mail: izumi.yotsui@riken.jp [Department of BioScience, Tokyo University of Agriculture 1-1-1 Sakuragaoka, Setagayaku, Tokyo, 156-8502 (Japan); Serada, Satoshi, E-mail: serada@nibiohn.go.jp [Laboratory of Immune Signal, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Health and Nutrition, 7-6-8 Saito-Asagi, Ibaraki, Osaka, 567-0085 (Japan); Naka, Tetsuji, E-mail: tnaka@nibiohn.go.jp [Laboratory of Immune Signal, National Institute of Biomedical Innovation, Health and Nutrition, 7-6-8 Saito-Asagi, Ibaraki, Osaka, 567-0085 (Japan); Saruhashi, Masashi, E-mail: s13db001@mail.saitama-u.ac.jp [Department of BioScience, Tokyo University of Agriculture 1-1-1 Sakuragaoka, Setagayaku, Tokyo, 156-8502 (Japan); Taji, Teruaki, E-mail: t3teruak@nodai.ac.jp [Department of BioScience, Tokyo University of Agriculture 1-1-1 Sakuragaoka, Setagayaku, Tokyo, 156-8502 (Japan); Hayashi, Takahisa, E-mail: t4hayash@nodai.ac.jp [Department of BioScience, Tokyo University of Agriculture 1-1-1 Sakuragaoka, Setagayaku, Tokyo, 156-8502 (Japan); Quatrano, Ralph S., E-mail: rsq@wustl.edu [Department of Biology, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO, 63130-4899 (United States); Sakata, Yoichi, E-mail: sakata@nodai.ac.jp [Department of BioScience, Tokyo University of Agriculture 1-1-1 Sakuragaoka, Setagayaku, Tokyo, 156-8502 (Japan)

    2016-03-18

    tolerance might have evolved in ancestral land plants before the separation of bryophytes and vascular plants. - Highlights: • Large-scale proteomics highlighted proteins related to plant desiccation tolerance. • The proteins were regulated by both the phytohormone ABA and ABI3. • The proteins accumulated in desiccation tolerant cells of both Arabidopsis and moss. • Evolutionary origin of regulatory machinery for desiccation tolerance is proposed.

  10. Olfactory receptor signaling is regulated by the post-synaptic density 95, Drosophila discs large, zona-occludens 1 (PDZ) scaffold multi-PDZ domain protein 1.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dooley, Ruth

    2009-12-01

    The unique ability of mammals to detect and discriminate between thousands of different odorant molecules is governed by the diverse array of olfactory receptors expressed by olfactory sensory neurons in the nasal epithelium. Olfactory receptors consist of seven transmembrane domain G protein-coupled receptors and comprise the largest gene superfamily in the mammalian genome. We found that approximately 30% of olfactory receptors possess a classical post-synaptic density 95, Drosophila discs large, zona-occludens 1 (PDZ) domain binding motif in their C-termini. PDZ domains have been established as sites for protein-protein interaction and play a central role in organizing diverse cell signaling assemblies. In the present study, we show that multi-PDZ domain protein 1 (MUPP1) is expressed in the apical compartment of olfactory sensory neurons. Furthermore, on heterologous co-expression with olfactory sensory neurons, MUPP1 was shown to translocate to the plasma membrane. We found direct interaction of PDZ domains 1 + 2 of MUPP1 with the C-terminus of olfactory receptors in vitro. Moreover, the odorant-elicited calcium response of OR2AG1 showed a prolonged decay in MUPP1 small interfering RNA-treated cells. We have therefore elucidated the first building blocks of the putative \\'olfactosome\\

  11. A large set of estrogen receptor β-interacting proteins identified by tandem affinity purification in hormone-responsive human breast cancer cell nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassa, Giovanni; Tarallo, Roberta; Ambrosino, Concetta; Bamundo, Angela; Ferraro, Lorenzo; Paris, Ornella; Ravo, Maria; Guzzi, Pietro H; Cannataro, Mario; Baumann, Marc; Nyman, Tuula A; Nola, Ernesto; Weisz, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Estrogen receptors α (ER-α) and β (ER-β) play distinct biological roles in onset and progression of hormone-responsive breast cancer, with ER-β exerting a modulatory activity on ER-α-mediated estrogen signaling and stimulation of cell proliferation by mechanisms still not fully understood. We stably expressed human ER-β fused to a tandem affinity purification-tag in estrogen-responsive MCF-7 cells and applied tandem affinity purification and nanoLC-MS/MS to identify the ER-β interactome of this cell type. Functional annotation by bioinformatics analyses of the 303 proteins that co-purify with ER-β from nuclear extracts identify several new molecular partners of this receptor subtype that represents nodal points of a large protein network controlling multiple processes and functions in breast cancer cells. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. The Airport Gate Assignment Problem: A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelghani Bouras

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The airport gate assignment problem (AGAP is one of the most important problems operations managers face daily. Many researches have been done to solve this problem and tackle its complexity. The objective of the task is assigning each flight (aircraft to an available gate while maximizing both conveniences to passengers and the operational efficiency of airport. This objective requires a solution that provides the ability to change and update the gate assignment data on a real time basis. In this paper, we survey the state of the art of these problems and the various methods to obtain the solution. Our survey covers both theoretical and real AGAP with the description of mathematical formulations and resolution methods such as exact algorithms, heuristic algorithms, and metaheuristic algorithms. We also provide a research trend that can inspire researchers about new problems in this area.

  13. The Airport Gate Assignment Problem: A Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaleb, Mageed A.; Salem, Ahmed M.

    2014-01-01

    The airport gate assignment problem (AGAP) is one of the most important problems operations managers face daily. Many researches have been done to solve this problem and tackle its complexity. The objective of the task is assigning each flight (aircraft) to an available gate while maximizing both conveniences to passengers and the operational efficiency of airport. This objective requires a solution that provides the ability to change and update the gate assignment data on a real time basis. In this paper, we survey the state of the art of these problems and the various methods to obtain the solution. Our survey covers both theoretical and real AGAP with the description of mathematical formulations and resolution methods such as exact algorithms, heuristic algorithms, and metaheuristic algorithms. We also provide a research trend that can inspire researchers about new problems in this area. PMID:25506074

  14. Assignment of fields from particles to mesh

    CERN Document Server

    Duque, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In Computational Fluid Dynamics there have been many attempts to combine the power of a fixed mesh on which to carry out spatial calculations with that of a set of particles that moves following the velocity field. These ideas indeed go back to Particle-in-Cell methods, proposed about 60 years ago. Of course, some procedure is needed to transfer field information between particles and mesh. There are many possible choices for this "assignment", or "projection". Several requirements may guide this choice. Two well-known ones are conservativity and stability, which apply to volume integrals of the fields. An additional one is here considered: preservation of information. This means that mesh interpolation, followed by mesh assignment, should leave the field values invariant. The resulting methods are termed "mass" assignments due to their strong similarities with the Finite Element Method. We test several procedures, including the well-known FLIP, on three scenarios: simple 1D convection, 2D convection of Zales...

  15. Writing Assignments that Promote Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2014-12-01

    Encourage students to write a detailed, analytical report correlating classroom discussions to an important historical event or a current event. Motivate students interview an expert from industry on a topic that was discussed in class. Ask the students to submit a report with supporting sketches, drawings, circuit diagrams and graphs. Propose that the students generate a complete a set of reading responses pertaining to an assigned topic. Require each student to bring in one comment or one question about an assigned reading. The assignment should be a recent publication in an appropriate journal. Have the students conduct a web search on an assigned topic. Ask them to generate a set of ideas that can relate to classroom discussions. Provide the students with a study guide. The study guide should provide about 10 or 15 short topics. Quiz the students on one or two of the topics. Encourage the students to design or develop some creative real-world examples based on a chapter discussed or a topic of interest. Require that students originate, develop, support and defend a viewpoint using a specifically assigned material. Make the students practice using or utilizing a set of new technical terms they have encountered in an assigned chapter. Have students develop original examples explaining the different terms. Ask the students to select one important terminology from the previous classroom discussions. Encourage the students to explain why they selected that particular word. Ask them to talk about the importance of the terminology from the point of view of their educational objectives and future career. Angelo, T. A. (1991). Ten easy pieces: Assessing higher learning in four dimensions. In T. A. Angelo (Ed.), Classroom research: Early lessons from success (pp. 17-31). New Directions for Teaching and Learning, No. 46. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

  16. Manganese Oxidation State Assignment for Manganese Catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, Nathan J; O'Malley, Patrick J

    2016-04-06

    The oxidation state assignment of the manganese ions present in the superoxidized manganese (III/IV) catalase active site is determined by comparing experimental and broken symmetry density functional theory calculated (14)N, (17)O, and (1)H hyperfine couplings. Experimental results have been interpreted to indicate that the substrate water is coordinated to the Mn(III) ion. However, by calculating hyperfine couplings for both scenarios we show that water is coordinated to the Mn(IV) ion and that the assigned oxidation states of the two manganese ions present in the site are the opposite of that previously proposed based on experimental measurements alone.

  17. Phosphorylation of the PCNA binding domain of the large subunit of replication factor C by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibits DNA synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maga, G; Mossi, R; Fischer, R

    1997-01-01

    delta and epsilon. The DNA and PCNA binding domains of the large 140 kDa subunit of human RF-C have been recently cloned [Fotedar, R., Mossi, R., Fitzgerald, P., Rousselle, T., Maga, G., Brickner, H., Messier, H., Khastilba. S., Hübscher, U., & Fotedar, A. (1996) EMBO J. 15, 4423-4433]. Here we show...... that the PCNA binding domain is phosphorylated by the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), an enzyme required for cell cycle progression in eukaryotic cells. The DNA binding domain, on the other hand, is not phosphorylated. Phosphorylation by CaMKII reduces the binding of PCNA to RF...

  18. Probabilistic Identification of Spin Systems and their Assignments including Coil-Helix Inference as Output (PISTACHIO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eghbalnia, Hamid R., E-mail: eghbalni@nmrfam.wisc.edu; Bahrami, Arash; Wang, Liya [National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison, Biochemistry Department (United States); Assadi, Amir [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Mathematics Department (United States); Markley, John L. [National Magnetic Resonance Facility at Madison, Biochemistry Department (United States)

    2005-07-15

    We present a novel automated strategy (PISTACHIO) for the probabilistic assignment of backbone and sidechain chemical shifts in proteins. The algorithm uses peak lists derived from various NMR experiments as input and provides as output ranked lists of assignments for all signals recognized in the input data as constituting spin systems. PISTACHIO was evaluated by comparing its performance with raw peak-picked data from 15 proteins ranging from 54 to 300 residues; the results were compared with those achieved by experts analyzing the same datasets by hand. As scored against the best available independent assignments for these proteins, the first-ranked PISTACHIO assignments were 80-100% correct for backbone signals and 75-95% correct for sidechain signals. The independent assignments benefited, in a number of cases, from structural data (e.g. from NOESY spectra) that were unavailable to PISTACHIO. Any number of datasets in any combination can serve as input. Thus PISTACHIO can be used as datasets are collected to ascertain the current extent of secure assignments, to identify residues with low assignment probability, and to suggest the types of additional data needed to remove ambiguities. The current implementation of PISTACHIO, which is available from a server on the Internet, supports input data from 15 standard double- and triple-resonance experiments. The software can readily accommodate additional types of experiments, including data from selectively labeled samples. The assignment probabilities can be carried forward and refined in subsequent steps leading to a structure. The performance of PISTACHIO showed no direct dependence on protein size, but correlated instead with data quality (completeness and signal-to-noise). PISTACHIO represents one component of a comprehensive probabilistic approach we are developing for the collection and analysis of protein NMR data.

  19. Large-Scale Structure-Based Prediction and Identification of Novel Protease Substrates Using Computational Protein Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pethe, Manasi A; Rubenstein, Aliza B; Khare, Sagar D

    2017-01-20

    Characterizing the substrate specificity of protease enzymes is critical for illuminating the molecular basis of their diverse and complex roles in a wide array of biological processes. Rapid and accurate prediction of their extended substrate specificity would also aid in the design of custom proteases capable of selectively and controllably cleaving biotechnologically or therapeutically relevant targets. However, current in silico approaches for protease specificity prediction, rely on, and are therefore limited by, machine learning of sequence patterns in known experimental data. Here, we describe a general approach for predicting peptidase substrates de novo using protein structure modeling and biophysical evaluation of enzyme-substrate complexes. We construct atomic resolution models of thousands of candidate substrate-enzyme complexes for each of five model proteases belonging to the four major protease mechanistic classes-serine, cysteine, aspartyl, and metallo-proteases-and develop a discriminatory scoring function using enzyme design modules from Rosetta and AMBER's MMPBSA. We rank putative substrates based on calculated interaction energy with a modeled near-attack conformation of the enzyme active site. We show that the energetic patterns obtained from these simulations can be used to robustly rank and classify known cleaved and uncleaved peptides and that these structural-energetic patterns have greater discriminatory power compared to purely sequence-based statistical inference. Combining sequence and energetic patterns using machine-learning algorithms further improves classification performance, and analysis of structural models provides physical insight into the structural basis for the observed specificities. We further tested the predictive capability of the model by designing and experimentally characterizing the cleavage of four novel substrate motifs for the hepatitis C virus NS3/4 protease using an in vivo assay. The presented structure

  20. 48 CFR 208.7002 - Assignment authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... activities concerned. (b) Under the Integrated Materiel Management Program, assignments are made by the... Secretary of Defense (Logistics); (2) To GSA, through agreement with GSA, by the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense (Logistics); (3) Outside the contiguous United States, by the Unified Commanders; and (4) For...

  1. Assigning sporadic tasks to unrelated machines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchetti-Spaccamela, A.; Rutten, C.; van der Ster, S.L.; Wiese, A.

    2015-01-01

    We study the problem of assigning sporadic tasks to unrelated machines such that the tasks on each machine can be feasibly scheduled. Despite its importance for modern real-time systems, this problem has not been studied before. We present a polynomial-time algorithm which approximates the problem

  2. Generalised Assignment Matrix Methodology in Linear Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerome, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    Discrete Mathematics instructors and students have long been struggling with various labelling and scanning algorithms for solving many important problems. This paper shows how to solve a wide variety of Discrete Mathematics and OR problems using assignment matrices and linear programming, specifically using Excel Solvers although the same…

  3. A Generalized Assignment Heuristic for Vehicle Routing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-08-01

    operating costs included in objective (1) of (VRP). This kind of parametric analysis would be useful, for example, in evaluating vehicle acquisition decisions...of solution qcuality and runnina time for the five methods. In terms of solution cualit -i, the Fisher-Jaikumar generalized assignment method clearly

  4. Credit assignment during movement reinforcement learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, Gregory; Kording, Konrad; Wei, Kunlin

    2013-01-01

    We often need to learn how to move based on a single performance measure that reflects the overall success of our movements. However, movements have many properties, such as their trajectories, speeds and timing of end-points, thus the brain needs to decide which properties of movements should be improved; it needs to solve the credit assignment problem. Currently, little is known about how humans solve credit assignment problems in the context of reinforcement learning. Here we tested how human participants solve such problems during a trajectory-learning task. Without an explicitly-defined target movement, participants made hand reaches and received monetary rewards as feedback on a trial-by-trial basis. The curvature and direction of the attempted reach trajectories determined the monetary rewards received in a manner that can be manipulated experimentally. Based on the history of action-reward pairs, participants quickly solved the credit assignment problem and learned the implicit payoff function. A Bayesian credit-assignment model with built-in forgetting accurately predicts their trial-by-trial learning.

  5. Tabu search for target-radar assignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindsberger, Magnus; Vidal, Rene Victor Valqui

    2000-01-01

    In the paper the problem of assigning air-defense illumination radars to enemy targets is presented. A tabu search metaheuristic solution is described and the results achieved are compared to those of other heuristic approaches, implementation and experimental aspects are discussed. It is argued...

  6. 47 CFR 74.702 - Channel assignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... land mobile radio operations. (b) Changes in the TV Table of Allotments or Digital Television Table of..., AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.702 Channel assignments. (a) An applicant for a new low power TV or TV translator...

  7. Training the American Businessman for Foreign Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Philip R.; Harris, Dorothy L.

    1972-01-01

    Describes a program in cross cultural training for the American businessman about to go on foreign assignment which should increase employee effectiveness when serving outside one's own country or when working with minority groups within the United States." (Author/DR)

  8. Teachers' Grading Practices: Meaning and Values Assigned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Youyi; Cheng, Liying

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the meaning Chinese secondary school English language teachers associate with the grades they assign to their students, and the value judgements they make in grading. A questionnaire was issued to 350 junior and senior school English language teachers in China. The questionnaire data were analysed both quantitatively and…

  9. Teaching Historical Analysis through Creative Writing Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Janine Larmon; Graham, Lea

    2015-01-01

    Incorporating creative writing exercises in history courses can heighten students' critical reading and analytical skills in an active learning model. We identify and define two types of possible assignments that use model texts as their locus: centripetal, which focuses on specific context and disciplinary terms, and centrifugal, which address…

  10. School Assignment, School Choice and Social Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Simon; Briggs, Adam

    2010-01-01

    We estimate the chances of poor and non-poor children getting places in good schools, analysing the relationship between poverty, location and school assignment. Our dataset allows us to measure location and distance very precisely. The simple unconditional difference in probabilities of attending a good school is substantial. We run an analysis…

  11. 7 CFR 1437.104 - Assigned production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Assigned production. 1437.104 Section 1437.104 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS NONINSURED CROP DISASTER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM...

  12. income tax assignment under the ethiopian constitution

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eliasn

    Constitution from an income tax point of view. And finally, the article ends with some concluding remarks. 1. Theories of Fiscal Federalism In Income Tax Assignment. Few countries pursue the course of decentralization on grounds of its perceived economic efficiency or equity. Political, social, cultural or historical forces are.

  13. Politics, Internet Assignments, and Civic Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Vaughn

    2000-01-01

    Describes how one professor of American government fights the apathy and cynicism of college students toward politics by using the Internet to help students more fairly appraise the workings of the American political system. One assignment has students research and manage a particular public policy initiative through visits to Web sites…

  14. 47 CFR 74.602 - Frequency assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO... 2450 and 2500 MHz are also shared with other communication services and exclusive channel assignments... Emerging Technologies licensee in accordance with § 74.690 or § 78.40. Licensees declining relocation may...

  15. Accounting for Sustainability: An Active Learning Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusc, Joanna; van Veen-Dirks, Paula

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Sustainability is one of the newer topics in the accounting courses taught in university teaching programs. The active learning assignment as described in this paper was developed for use in an accounting course in an undergraduate program. The aim was to enhance teaching about sustainability within such a course. The purpose of this…

  16. Semi-infinite assignment and transportation games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, Judith B.; Sánchez-Soriano, Joaqu´ın; Llorca, Navidad; Tijs, Stef; Goberna, Miguel A.; López, Marco A.

    2001-01-01

    Games corresponding to semi-infinite transportation and related assignment situations are studied. In a semi-infinite transportation situation, one aims at maximizing the profit from the transportation of a certain good from a finite number of suppliers to an infinite number of demanders. An

  17. Democratization of Learning through Thematic Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medellu, Christophil S.; Lumingkewas, S.; Walangitan, J. F.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the results of research on learning democratization in Sangihe. This study is the first year of a five-year plan. Long-term goal of this research is to create the democratic science learning in schools. Democratic learning model was developed through thematic assignment, involving the participation of parents and…

  18. On Online Assignments in a Calculus Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungic, Veselin; Kent, Deborah; Menz, Petra

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe our experience with the creation and utilization of online assignments for several calculus classes at Simon Fraser University (SFU). We present our findings regarding available software by considering the needs and perspectives of the instructors, students, and administrators. We provide a list of questions that guide…

  19. On the expected number of assignments in reduced matrices for the linear assignment problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nawijn, W.M.; Dorhout, B.

    1989-01-01

    A linear n × n assignment problem is considered for which the elements of the cost matrix are sampled from a continuous probability distribution. Based on the zero entries of the reduced matrix the expectation of the maximum number of initial assignments is determined for general n, as well as an

  20. Computational Study of a Heterostructural Model of Type I Collagen and Implementation of an Amino Acid Potential Method Applicable to Large Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Eifler

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Collagen molecules are the primary structural proteins of many biological systems. Much progress has been made in the study of the structure and function of collagen, but fundamental understanding of its electronic structures at the atomic level is still lacking. We present the results of electronic structure and bonding calculations of a specific model of type I collagen using the density functional theory-based method. Information on density of states (DOS, partial DOS, effective charges, bond order values, and intra- and inter-molecular H-bonding are obtained and discussed. We further devised an amino-acid-based potential method (AAPM to circumvent the full self-consistent field (SCF calculation that can be applied to large proteins. The AAPM is validated by comparing the results with the full SCF calculation of the whole type I collagen model with three strands. The calculated effective charges on each atom in the model retained at least 95% accuracy. This technique provides a viable and efficient way to study the electronic structure of large complex biomaterials at the ab initio level.

  1. Quantitation of 87 Proteins by nLC-MRM/MS in Human Plasma: Workflow for Large-Scale Analysis of Biobank Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezeli, Melinda; Sjödin, Karin; Lindberg, Henrik; Gidlöf, Olof; Lindahl, Bertil; Jernberg, Tomas; Spaak, Jonas; Erlinge, David; Marko-Varga, György

    2017-09-01

    A multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) assay was developed for precise quantitation of 87 plasma proteins including the three isoforms of apolipoprotein E (APOE) associated with cardiovascular diseases using nanoscale liquid chromatography separation and stable isotope dilution strategy. The analytical performance of the assay was evaluated and we found an average technical variation of 4.7% in 4-5 orders of magnitude dynamic range (≈0.2 mg/L to 4.5 g/L) from whole plasma digest. Here, we report a complete workflow, including sample processing adapted to 96-well plate format and normalization strategy for large-scale studies. To further investigate the MS-based quantitation the amount of six selected proteins was measured by routinely used clinical chemistry assays as well and the two methods showed excellent correlation with high significance (p-value proteins, in addition for the cardiovascular predictor factor, APOB: APOA1 ratio (r = 0.969, p-value < 10e-5). Moreover, we utilized the developed assay for screening of biobank samples from patients with myocardial infarction and performed the comparative analysis of patient groups with STEMI (ST- segment elevation myocardial infarction), NSTEMI (non ST- segment elevation myocardial infarction) and type-2 AMI (type-2 myocardial infarction) patients.

  2. Prognostic Significance of Bcl-2 and p53 Protein Expressions and Ki67 Proliferative Index in Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betül Bolat Küçükzeybek

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL is a high-grade neoplasm that has heterogeneous properties in clinical, morphological, and immunophenotypic aspects. In the present study the effects of p53, Bcl-2, and Ki67 on prognosis and their relationships with clinical parameters were examined. Materials and Methods: Thirty-five patients who had been diagnosed with nodally located DLBCL at İzmir Atatürk Training and Research Hospital between January 1999 and June 2006 were included in the study. The Ann Arbor classification system was used to determine the stage of the patients. The patients were evaluated according to age, sex, stage, B symptoms, extranodal involvement, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH level as well as immunohistochemically. P53 protein and Bcl-2 oncoprotein expressions and Ki67 proliferation index were assessed immunohistochemically. Results: High Bcl-2 expression was found in 9 patients (25.7%, high p53 expression was found in 10 patients (28.6%, and high Ki67 was observed in 23 patients (65.7%. There was no significant correlation between p53 expression, Bcl-2 expression, or Ki67 proliferation index and age, sex, stage, B symptoms, extranodal involvement, LDH level, and overall survival (p>0.05. We did not find a relationship among p53 expression, Bcl-2 expression, Ki67 proliferation index, and prognosis (p>0.05. There was no significant relationship between overall survival and age, sex, stage, B symptoms, extranodal involvement, or LDH level (p>0.05. Our results revealed that Bcl-2 and p53 protein expressions and Ki67 proliferation index have no effect on overall survival of patients with DLBCL. Conclusion: The prognostic importance of p53 and Bcl-2 protein expressions and Ki67 proliferation index in DLBCL, which has biological and clinical heterogeneity, can be understood in a large series of studies that have subclasses and immunohistochemical markers with optimal cut-off values.

  3. Critical Role of K1685 and K1829 in the Large Protein of Rabies Virus in Viral Pathogenicity and Immune Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Dayong; Luo, Zhaochen; Zhou, Ming; Li, Mingming; Yu, Lan; Wang, Chong; Yuan, Jiaolong; Li, Fang; Tian, Bin; Sui, Baokun; Chen, Huanchun; Fu, Zhen F; Zhao, Ling

    2015-10-14

    Rabies, one of the oldest infectious diseases, still presents a public health threat in most parts of the world today. Its pathogen, rabies virus (RABV), can utilize its viral proteins, such as the nucleoprotein and phosphorylation protein, to subvert the host innate immune system. For a long time, the large (L) protein was believed to be essential for RABV transcription and replication, but its role in viral pathogenicity and immune evasion was not known. Recent studies have found that the conserved K-D-K-E tetrad motif in the L protein is related to the methyltransferase (MTase) activity in the viral mRNA process. In the present study, a series of RABV mutations in this motif was constructed with the recombinant CVS-B2c (rB2c) virus. Two of these mutants, rB2c-K1685A and rB2c-K1829A, were found to be stable and displayed an attenuated phenotype in both in vitro growth and in vivo pathogenicity in adult and suckling mice. Further studies demonstrated that these two mutants were more sensitive to the expression of the interferon-stimulated gene product IFIT2 than the parent virus. Taken together, our results suggest that K1685 and K1829 in the L protein play important roles in pathogenicity and immune evasion during RABV infection. Rabies continues to present a public health threat in most areas of the world, especially in the developing countries of Asia and Africa. The pathogenic mechanisms for rabies are not well understood. In the present study, it was found that the recombinant rabies viruses rB2c-K1685A and rB2c-K1829A, carrying mutations at the predicted MTase catalytic sites in the L protein, were highly attenuated both in vitro and in vivo. Further studies showed that these mutants were more sensitive to the expression of the interferon-stimulated gene product IFIT2 than the parent virus. These findings improve our understanding of rabies pathogenesis, which may help in developing potential therapeutics and an avirulent rabies vaccine. Copyright © 2015

  4. 75 FR 55352 - Delegation of Authorities and Assignment of Responsibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-10

    ... of the Secretary Delegation of Authorities and Assignment of Responsibilities Secretary's Order 5-2010 Subject: Delegation of Authorities and Assignment of Responsibilities to the Administrator, Wage and Hour Division. 1. Purpose. To delegate authorities and assign responsibilities to the...

  5. Assigning cause for sudden unexpected infant death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Carl E; Darnall, Robert A; McEntire, Betty L; Hyma, Bruce A

    2015-06-01

    We have reached a conundrum in assigning cause of death for sudden unexpected infant deaths. We summarize the discordant perspectives and approaches and how they have occurred, and recommend a pathway toward improved consistency. This lack of consistency affects pediatricians and other health care professionals, scientific investigators, medical examiners and coroners, law enforcement agencies, families, and support or advocacy groups. We recommend that an interdisciplinary international committee be organized to review current approaches for assigning cause of death, and to identify a consensus strategy for improving consistency. This effort will need to encompass intrinsic risk factors or infant vulnerability in addition to known environmental risk factors including unsafe sleep settings, and must be sufficiently flexible to accommodate a progressively expanding knowledge base.

  6. Solving Quadratic Assignment Problem with Fixed Assignment (QAPFA) using Branch and Bound Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuthairah Syed-Abdullah, Sharifah; Abdul-Rahman, Syariza; Mauziah Benjamin, Aida; Wibowo, Antoni; Ku-Mahamud, Ku-Ruhana

    2018-01-01

    Quadratic Assignment Problem (QAP) has been a very popular problem to be solved among researchers due to its practical applications. Several variants of QAP have been proposed by researchers in the past in order to reflect the real situations of QAP. One of the real problems of QAP is related with facilities which are required to be assigned to certain locations due to its function. In solving this problem, a fixed assignment has to be made thus allowing for the complexity of the problem to be reduced. Hence, this study introduces Quadratic Assignment Problem with Fixed Assignment (QAPFA) with the objective to minimize the assignment cost between the facility and location. This assignment takes into account the flow and distance between facility and location. QAPFA represents the real-world situation of the problem especially in dealing with specific requirement of some facilities to specific locations. Dataset of QAPFA is introduced and is solved using branch and bound approach. As for validation, the results of QAPFA are compared with QAP in terms of objective function and running time. The computational results show that the solution quality of QAPFA is lower when compared with the QAP, while the running time for QAPFA is lower than the QAP. Since the complexity of the problem is reduced by fixing the assignment, thus there is possibility that QAPFA has lower quality than QAP due to the fixed assignment. Nevertheless, in terms of running time QAPFA is better than QAP. It can be concluded that this problem reflect the real problem and practical to be used.

  7. Gender Assignment in Danish, Swedish and Norwegian: A Comparison of the Status of Assignment Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Kilarski

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with gender assignment of English loanwords in Danish, Swedish and Norwegian. The following assignment criteria have been analysed: semantic (animate, mass, phonological (number of syllables, homonymy, and morphological (inflection, suffixation, deverbal monosyllables, compounds. Common gender in Danish and Swedish and masculine in Norwegian are overrepresented in comparison with the native lexicon. This is confirmed by discriminant function analysis, which shows that neuter nouns in the three languages and feminine nouns in Norwegian show fewer characteristic features. This analysis has also been used to measure the degree of regularity based on the postulated criteria: the percentage of correctly classified cases (from 67% in Swedish to 68% in Norwegian and 72% in Danish suggests only a partial regularity in gender assignment. The stronger pull of common or masculine gender is reflected in the contribution of selected assignment rules, particularly in the assignment of animates, where common or masculine nouns constitute 96% of assigned nouns. As regards phonological rules, monosyllables show a slightly better correlation with neuter gender, particularly in Danish. Homonymy is significant for nouns of both genders in Danish, while in Swedish and Norwegian nouns with a native neuter or feminine homonym are more likely to be assigned common or masculine gender. Likewise, most inflectional and derivational assignment rules contribute to the assignment of common or masculine genders, with the exception of zero plurals, Swedish n-plurals, suffixes such as -ment, -ery, deverbal monosyllables in Danish and Norwegian, and compounds whose base appears in the corpus with n. gender. Discriminant function analysis shows that plural inflection has the greatest discriminant power among the postulated criteria. Finally, it is suggested that these tendencies may indicate an ongoing expansion of common and masculine genders in the three

  8. Assignments, Details, and Transfers: Overseas Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-30

    contract will be served regardless of the prescribed tour length. This includes soldiers assigned to Technical Assistance Field Teams ( TAFTS ). r...PUERTO RICO (except as indicated) 36 24 2 Ponce (Ft Allen) and Isabela, Yauco, Cagus, Juana Diaz 36 18 Vieques Island NA 12 QATAR 24 12 40 AR 614–30...55AR 614–30 • 30 August 2001 TAADS The Army Authorization Document System TAFT Technical Assistance Field Team TAT turnaround time TDA table of

  9. Capacity constrained assignment in spatial databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    U, Leong Hou; Yiu, Man Lung; Mouratidis, Kyriakos

    2008-01-01

    Given a point set P of customers (e.g., WiFi receivers) and a point set Q of service providers (e.g., wireless access points), where each q 2 Q has a capacity q.k, the capacity constrained assignment (CCA) is a matching M Q × P such that (i) each point q 2 Q (p 2 P) appears at most k times (at most...

  10. Students' Achievement and Homework Assignment Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Alonso, Rubén; Álvarez-Díaz, Marcos; Suárez-Álvarez, Javier; Muñiz, José

    2017-01-01

    The optimum time students should spend on homework has been widely researched although the results are far from unanimous. The main objective of this research is to analyze how homework assignment strategies in schools affect students' academic performance and the differences in students' time spent on homework. Participants were a representative sample of Spanish adolescents (N = 26,543) with a mean age of 14.4 (±0.75), 49.7% girls. A test battery was used to measure academic performance in four subjects: Spanish, Mathematics, Science, and Citizenship. A questionnaire allowed the measurement of the indicators used for the description of homework and control variables. Two three-level hierarchical-linear models (student, school, autonomous community) were produced for each subject being evaluated. The relationship between academic results and homework time is negative at the individual level but positive at school level. An increase in the amount of homework a school assigns is associated with an increase in the differences in student time spent on homework. An optimum amount of homework is proposed which schools should assign to maximize gains in achievement for students overall.

  11. ProfileGrids as a new visual representation of large multiple sequence alignments: a case study of the RecA protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abajian Aaron C

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple sequence alignments are a fundamental tool for the comparative analysis of proteins and nucleic acids. However, large data sets are no longer manageable for visualization and investigation using the traditional stacked sequence alignment representation. Results We introduce ProfileGrids that represent a multiple sequence alignment as a matrix color-coded according to the residue frequency occurring at each column position. JProfileGrid is a Java application for computing and analyzing ProfileGrids. A dynamic interaction with the alignment information is achieved by changing the ProfileGrid color scheme, by extracting sequence subsets at selected residues of interest, and by relating alignment information to residue physical properties. Conserved family motifs can be identified by the overlay of similarity plot calculations on a ProfileGrid. Figures suitable for publication can be generated from the saved spreadsheet output of the colored matrices as well as by the export of conservation information for use in the PyMOL molecular visualization program. We demonstrate the utility of ProfileGrids on 300 bacterial homologs of the RecA family – a universally conserved protein involved in DNA recombination and repair. Careful attention was paid to curating the collected RecA sequences since ProfileGrids allow the easy identification of rare residues in an alignment. We relate the RecA alignment sequence conservation to the following three topics: the recently identified DNA binding residues, the unexplored MAW motif, and a unique Bacillus subtilis RecA homolog sequence feature. Conclusion ProfileGrids allow large protein families to be visualized more effectively than the traditional stacked sequence alignment form. This new graphical representation facilitates the determination of the sequence conservation at residue positions of interest, enables the examination of structural patterns by using residue physical

  12. ProfileGrids as a new visual representation of large multiple sequence alignments: a case study of the RecA protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Alberto I; Almada, Albert E; Abajian, Aaron C

    2008-12-22

    Multiple sequence alignments are a fundamental tool for the comparative analysis of proteins and nucleic acids. However, large data sets are no longer manageable for visualization and investigation using the traditional stacked sequence alignment representation. We introduce ProfileGrids that represent a multiple sequence alignment as a matrix color-coded according to the residue frequency occurring at each column position. JProfileGrid is a Java application for computing and analyzing ProfileGrids. A dynamic interaction with the alignment information is achieved by changing the ProfileGrid color scheme, by extracting sequence subsets at selected residues of interest, and by relating alignment information to residue physical properties. Conserved family motifs can be identified by the overlay of similarity plot calculations on a ProfileGrid. Figures suitable for publication can be generated from the saved spreadsheet output of the colored matrices as well as by the export of conservation information for use in the PyMOL molecular visualization program.We demonstrate the utility of ProfileGrids on 300 bacterial homologs of the RecA family - a universally conserved protein involved in DNA recombination and repair. Careful attention was paid to curating the collected RecA sequences since ProfileGrids allow the easy identification of rare residues in an alignment. We relate the RecA alignment sequence conservation to the following three topics: the recently identified DNA binding residues, the unexplored MAW motif, and a unique Bacillus subtilis RecA homolog sequence feature. ProfileGrids allow large protein families to be visualized more effectively than the traditional stacked sequence alignment form. This new graphical representation facilitates the determination of the sequence conservation at residue positions of interest, enables the examination of structural patterns by using residue physical properties, and permits the display of rare sequence features within

  13. Assignment and Correspondence Tracking System - Tactical / Operational Reporting

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — Reporting data store for the Assignment and Correspondence Tracking System (ACT). ACT automates the assignment and tracking of correspondence processing within the...

  14. Large scale comparative proteomics of a chloroplast Clp protease mutant reveals folding stress, altered protein homeostasis, and feedback regulation of metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zybailov, Boris; Friso, Giulia; Kim, Jitae; Rudella, Andrea; Rodríguez, Verenice Ramírez; Asakura, Yukari; Sun, Qi; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2009-08-01

    The clpr2-1 mutant is delayed in development due to reduction of the chloroplast ClpPR protease complex. To understand the role of Clp proteases in plastid biogenesis and homeostasis, leaf proteomes of young seedlings of clpr2-1 and wild type were compared using large scale mass spectrometry-based quantification using an LTQ-Orbitrap and spectral counting with significance determined by G-tests. Virtually only chloroplast-localized proteins were significantly affected, indicating that the molecular phenotype was confined to the chloroplast. A comparative chloroplast stromal proteome analysis of fully developed plants was used to complement the data set. Chloroplast unfoldase ClpB3 was strongly up-regulated in both young and mature leaves, suggesting widespread and persistent protein folding stress. The importance of ClpB3 in the clp2-1 mutant was demonstrated by the observation that a CLPR2 and CLPB3 double mutant was seedling-lethal. The observed up-regulation of chloroplast chaperones and protein sorting components further illustrated destabilization of protein homeostasis. Delayed rRNA processing and up-regulation of a chloroplast DEAD box RNA helicase and polynucleotide phosphorylase, but no significant change in accumulation of ribosomal subunits, suggested a bottleneck in ribosome assembly or RNA metabolism. Strong up-regulation of a chloroplast translational regulator TypA/BipA GTPase suggested a specific response in plastid gene expression to the distorted homeostasis. The stromal proteases PreP1,2 were up-regulated, likely constituting compensation for reduced Clp protease activity and possibly shared substrates between the ClpP and PreP protease systems. The thylakoid photosynthetic apparatus was decreased in the seedlings, whereas several structural thylakoid-associated plastoglobular proteins were strongly up-regulated. Two thylakoid-associated reductases involved in isoprenoid and chlorophyll synthesis were up-regulated reflecting feedback from rate

  15. Identification of human-to-human transmissibility factors in PB2 proteins of influenza A by large-scale mutual information analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miotto, Olivo; Heiny, At; Tan, Tin Wee; August, J Thomas; Brusic, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    The identification of mutations that confer unique properties to a pathogen, such as host range, is of fundamental importance in the fight against disease. This paper describes a novel method for identifying amino acid sites that distinguish specific sets of protein sequences, by comparative analysis of matched alignments. The use of mutual information to identify distinctive residues responsible for functional variants makes this approach highly suitable for analyzing large sets of sequences. To support mutual information analysis, we developed the AVANA software, which utilizes sequence annotations to select sets for comparison, according to user-specified criteria. The method presented was applied to an analysis of influenza A PB2 protein sequences, with the objective of identifying the components of adaptation to human-to-human transmission, and reconstructing the mutation history of these components. We compared over 3,000 PB2 protein sequences of human-transmissible and avian isolates, to produce a catalogue of sites involved in adaptation to human-to-human transmission. This analysis identified 17 characteristic sites, five of which have been present in human-transmissible strains since the 1918 Spanish flu pandemic. Sixteen of these sites are located in functional domains, suggesting they may play functional roles in host-range specificity. The catalogue of characteristic sites was used to derive sequence signatures from historical isolates. These signatures, arranged in chronological order, reveal an evolutionary timeline for the adaptation of the PB2 protein to human hosts. By providing the most complete elucidation to date of the functional components participating in PB2 protein adaptation to humans, this study demonstrates that mutual information is a powerful tool for comparative characterization of sequence sets. In addition to confirming previously reported findings, several novel characteristic sites within PB2 are reported. Sequence signatures

  16. A silicon nanomembrane detector for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) of large proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jonghoo; Blick, Robert H

    2013-10-11

    We describe a MALDI-TOF ion detector based on freestanding silicon nanomembrane technology. The detector is tested in a commercial MALDI-TOF mass spectrometer with equimolar mixtures of proteins. The operating principle of the nanomembrane detector is based on phonon-assisted field emission from these silicon nanomembranes, in which impinging ion packets excite electrons in the nanomembrane to higher energy states. Thereby the electrons can overcome the vacuum barrier and escape from the surface of the nanomembrane via field emission. Ion detection is demonstrated of apomyoglobin (16,952 Da), aldolase (39,212 Da), bovine serum albumin (66,430 Da), and their equimolar mixtures. In addition to the three intact ions, a large number of fragment ions are also revealed by the silicon nanomembrane detector, which are not observable with conventional detectors.

  17. A large multi-centre European study validates high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) as a clinical biomarker for the diagnosis of diabetes subtypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thanabalasingham, G.; Shah, N.; Vaxillaire, M.

    2011-01-01

    An accurate molecular diagnosis of diabetes subtype confers clinical benefits; however, many individuals with monogenic diabetes remain undiagnosed. Biomarkers could help to prioritise patients for genetic investigation. We recently demonstrated that high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs......CRP) levels are lower in UK patients with hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 alpha (HNF1A)-MODY than in other diabetes subtypes. In this large multi-centre study we aimed to assess the clinical validity of hsCRP as a diagnostic biomarker, examine the genotype-phenotype relationship and compare different hsCRP assays....... High-sensitivity CRP levels were analysed in individuals with HNF1A-MODY (n = 457), glucokinase (GCK)-MODY (n = 404), hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4A)-MODY (n = 54) and type 2 diabetes (n = 582) from seven European centres. Three common assays for hsCRP analysis were evaluated. We excluded 121...

  18. A Silicon Nanomembrane Detector for Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS of Large Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonghoo Park

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe a MALDI-TOF ion detector based on freestanding silicon nanomembrane technology. The detector is tested in a commercial MALDI-TOF mass spectrometer with equimolar mixtures of proteins. The operating principle of the nanomembrane detector is based on phonon-assisted field emission from these silicon nanomembranes, in which impinging ion packets excite electrons in the nanomembrane to higher energy states. Thereby the electrons can overcome the vacuum barrier and escape from the surface of the nanomembrane via field emission. Ion detection is demonstrated of apomyoglobin (16,952 Da, aldolase (39,212 Da, bovine serum albumin (66,430 Da, and their equimolar mixtures. In addition to the three intact ions, a large number of fragment ions are also revealed by the silicon nanomembrane detector, which are not observable with conventional detectors.

  19. Formation of large viroplasms and virulence of Cauliflower mosaic virus in turnip plants depend on the N-terminal EKI sequence of viral protein TAV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angèle Geldreich

    Full Text Available Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV TAV protein (TransActivator/Viroplasmin plays a pivotal role during the infection cycle since it activates translation reinitiation of viral polycistronic RNAs and suppresses RNA silencing. It is also the major component of cytoplasmic electron-dense inclusion bodies (EDIBs called viroplasms that are particularly evident in cells infected by the virulent CaMV Cabb B-JI isolate. These EDIBs are considered as virion factories, vehicles for CaMV intracellular movement and reservoirs for CaMV transmission by aphids. In this study, focused on different TAV mutants in vivo, we demonstrate that three physically separated domains collectively participate to the formation of large EDIBs: the N-terminal EKI motif, a sequence of the MAV domain involved in translation reinitiation and a C-terminal region encompassing the zinc finger. Surprisingly, EKI mutant TAVm3, corresponding to a substitution of the EKI motif at amino acids 11-13 by three alanines (AAA, which completely abolished the formation of large viroplasms, was not lethal for CaMV but highly reduced its virulence without affecting the rate of systemic infection. Expression of TAVm3 in a viral context led to formation of small irregularly shaped inclusion bodies, mild symptoms and low levels of viral DNA and particles accumulation, despite the production of significant amounts of mature capsid proteins. Unexpectedly, for CaMV-TAVm3 the formation of viral P2-containing electron-light inclusion body (ELIB, which is essential for CaMV aphid transmission, was also altered, thus suggesting an indirect role of the EKI tripeptide in CaMV plant-to-plant propagation. This important functional contribution of the EKI motif in CaMV biology can explain the strict conservation of this motif in the TAV sequences of all CaMV isolates.

  20. Chemical shift assignments of calmodulin constructs with EF hand mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Michael; Guillemette, J Guy; Dieckmann, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) is a ubiquitous cytosolic Ca(2+)-binding protein able to bind and regulate hundreds of different proteins. It consists of two globular domains joined by a flexible central linker region. Each one of these domains contains two EF hand pairs capable of binding to Ca(2+). Upon Ca(2+) binding CaM undergoes a conformational change exposing hydrophobic patches that interact with its intracellular target proteins. CaM is able to bind to target proteins in the Ca(2+)-replete and Ca(2+)-deplete forms. To study the Ca(2+)-dependent/independent properties of binding and activation of target proteins by CaM, CaM constructs with Ca(2+) binding disrupting mutations of Asp to Ala at position one of each EF hand have been used. One target protein of CaM is nitric oxide synthase, which catalyzes the production of nitric oxide. At elevated Ca(2+) concentrations, CaM binds to neuronal NOS and endothelial NOS, making them the Ca(2+)-dependent NOS enzymes. In contrast, inducible NOS is transcriptionally regulated in vivo and binds to CaM at basal levels of Ca(2+). Here we report the NMR backbone and sidechain resonance assignments of C-lobe Ca(2+)-replete and deplete CaM12, N-lobe Ca(2+)-replete and deplete CaM34, CaM1234 in the absence of Ca(2+) and N-lobe Ca(2+)-replete CaM34 with the iNOS CaM-binding domain peptide.

  1. Structural Encoding of Static Single Assignment Form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gal, Andreas; Probst, Christian; Franz, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Static Single Assignment (SSA) form is often used as an intermediate representation during code optimization in Java Virtual Machines. Recently, SSA has successfully been used for bytecode verification. However, constructing SSA at the code consumer is costly. SSAbased mobile code transport formats...... have been shown to eliminate this cost by shifting SSA creation to the code producer. These new formats, however, are not backward compatible with the established Java class-file format. We propose a novel approach to transport SSA information implicitly through structural code properties of standard...

  2. Characteristic ratio assignment in fractional order systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, Mohammad; Haeri, Mohammad

    2010-10-01

    In this paper the characteristic ratios and generalized time constant are defined for all-pole commensurate fractional order systems. The sufficient condition for stability of these systems in terms of their characteristic ratios is obtained. Also an analytical approach for characteristic ratio assignment (CRA) to have a non-overshooting fast closed loop step response is introduced. The proposed CRA method is then employed to design a fractional order controller. Computer simulation results are presented to illustrate the performance of the CRA based designed fractional order controllers. Copyright © 2010 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Optimisation of timetable-based, stochastic transit assignment models based on MSA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Otto Anker; Frederiksen, Rasmus Dyhr

    2006-01-01

    Public transport assignment models have increased in complexity in order to describe passengers' route choices as detailed and correctly as possible. Important trends in the development are (1) timetable-based assignment, (2) inclusion of feeder modes, (3) use of stochastic components to describe...... differences in passengers' preferences within and between purposes and classes (random coefficients), as well as to describe non-explained variation within a utility theory framework, and (4) consideration of capacity problems at coach level, system level and terminal level. In the Copenhagen-Ringsted Model...... (CRM), such a large-scale transit assignment model was developed and estimated. The Stochastic User Equilibrium problem was solved by the Method of Successive Averages (MSA). However, the model suffered from very large calculation times. The paper focuses on how to optimise transit assignment models...

  4. Caspase-1 promotes Epstein-Barr virus replication by targeting the large tegument protein deneddylase to the nucleus of productively infected cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Gastaldello

    Full Text Available The large tegument proteins of herpesviruses contain N-terminal cysteine proteases with potent ubiquitin and NEDD8-specific deconjugase activities, but the function of the enzymes during virus replication remains largely unknown. Using as model BPLF1, the homologue encoded by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, we found that induction of the productive virus cycle does not affect the total level of ubiquitin-conjugation but is accompanied by a BPLF1-dependent decrease of NEDD8-adducts and accumulation of free NEDD8. Expression of BPLF1 promotes cullin degradation and the stabilization of cullin-RING ligases (CRLs substrates in the nucleus, while cytoplasmic CRLs and their substrates are not affected. The inactivation of nuclear CRLs is reversed by the N-terminus of CAND1, which inhibits the binding of BPLF1 to cullins and prevents efficient viral DNA replication. Targeting of the deneddylase activity to the nucleus is dependent on processing of the catalytic N-terminus by caspase-1. Inhibition of caspase-1 severely impairs viral DNA synthesis and the release of infectious virus, pointing a previously unrecognized role of the cellular response to danger signals triggered by EBV reactivation in promoting virus replication.

  5. Difference in soft tissue response between immediate and delayed delivery suggests a new mechanism for recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 action in large segmental bone defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Khaled A; Zakhary, Ibrahim E; Elawady, Ahmed R; Emam, Hany A; Sharawy, Mohamed; Baban, Babak; Akeel, Sara; Al-Shabrawey, Mohamed; Elsalanty, Mohammed E

    2012-03-01

    The ability of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 on absorbable collagen sponge (rhBMP2/ACS) to regenerate bone in segmental defect has been well characterized. However, clinical results of rhBMP2/ACS constructs in secondary reconstruction of large mandibular and craniofacial defects have not been consistent. We hypothesized that rhBMP2 delivery triggers an endogenous response in the soft tissues surrounding the defect, in the form of expression of BMP2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Such osteogenic response will occur only after immediate, as opposed to delayed, rhBMP2 delivery, suggesting a new explanation to the difference in bone regeneration between the two settings. A 35-mm segmental bone and periosteum defect was created on one side of the mandible in 16 dogs divided in three groups. Group 1 (Gp1, n=6) ACS was loaded with 8 mL of rhBMP2 (0.2 mg/mL). In Gp2 (n=5) the same dose of rhBMP2/ACS was delivered into the defect 4 weeks after surgery. In Gp3 (control; n=5) the defect was reconstructed using ACS loaded with 8 mL of buffer only (devoid of rhBMP2). Tissues were collected after 12 weeks of reconstruction in all groups. Direct measurement of physical dimensions of regenerates and bone morphometry was performed to evaluate bone regeneration. The mRNA expression of both BMP2 and VEGF in the soft tissue surrounding the defect was evaluated using real-time quantitative PCR. Both BMP2 and VEGF proteins were quantified in immunostained sections. Immunoflurescence colocalization of BMP2 and acetylated low density lipoprotein (AcLDL) was done to detect the source of BMP2. Immediate delivery yielded better bone regeneration. Both BMP2 and VEGF mRNA expression was upregulated only in Gp1 (+7.3, p=0.001; +1.53, p=0.001, respectively). BMP2 protein was significantly higher in the immediate reconstruction group; however, VEGF protein was undetected in the examined sections. Immediate delivery of rhBMP2 seemed to induce endogenous release of

  6. Optimization of demand assigned SCPC satellite networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laborde, E.

    1985-09-01

    This paper investigates various system aspects and price tradeoffs involved in providing cost-effective Demand Assignment (DA) satellite channel service. Those network characteristics which significantly affect the ultimate cost-based decision are discussed. The number of stations participating in the DA or PA system, the number of satellite channels, and the traffic are kept parametric within expected limits, covering most of the present and future applications. In particular, the interrelationships between the network requirements (e.g., grade of service) and network elements, and the impacts of different blocking assignment allocations on the number of modems in the network is examined. A cost model is then derived that allows the evaluation and comparison of both DA and PA networks. Absolute and differential costing of PA and DA networks is permitted using economic quantities available to the system planner. These include modem cost, satellite channel cost, network size, and defined efficiency factors. Based on the differential cost comparisons for several DA and PA network strategies, tradeoffs have been derived to aid the system designer in configuring the most cost-effective DA network.

  7. An automated framework for NMR resonance assignment through simultaneous slice picking and spin system forming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Ahmed; Guo, Xianrong; Jing, Bing-Yi; Gao, Xin

    2014-06-01

    Despite significant advances in automated nuclear magnetic resonance-based protein structure determination, the high numbers of false positives and false negatives among the peaks selected by fully automated methods remain a problem. These false positives and negatives impair the performance of resonance assignment methods. One of the main reasons for this problem is that the computational research community often considers peak picking and resonance assignment to be two separate problems, whereas spectroscopists use expert knowledge to pick peaks and assign their resonances at the same time. We propose a novel framework that simultaneously conducts slice picking and spin system forming, an essential step in resonance assignment. Our framework then employs a genetic algorithm, directed by both connectivity information and amino acid typing information from the spin systems, to assign the spin systems to residues. The inputs to our framework can be as few as two commonly used spectra, i.e., CBCA(CO)NH and HNCACB. Different from the existing peak picking and resonance assignment methods that treat peaks as the units, our method is based on 'slices', which are one-dimensional vectors in three-dimensional spectra that correspond to certain ([Formula: see text]) values. Experimental results on both benchmark simulated data sets and four real protein data sets demonstrate that our method significantly outperforms the state-of-the-art methods while using a less number of spectra than those methods. Our method is freely available at http://sfb.kaust.edu.sa/Pages/Software.aspx.

  8. Rationalization of some genetic anticodonic assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, J. C., Jr.; Hall, L. M.; Mullins, D. W., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The hydrophobicity of most amino acids correlates well with that of their anticodon nucleotides, with Trp, Tyr, Ile, and Ser being the exceptions to this rule. Using previous data on hydrophobicity and binding constants, and new data on rates of esterification of polyadenylic acid with several N-acetylaminoacyl imidazolides, several of the anticodon assignments are rationalized. Chemical reasons are shown supporting the idea of the inclusion of the Ile in the catalog of biological amino acids late in the evolution, through a mutation of the existing tRNA and its aminoacyl-tRNA-synthetase. It was found that an addition of hexane increases the incorporation of hydrophobic Ac-Phe into poly-A, in support of the Fox (1965) and Oparin (1965) emphasis on the biogenetic importance of phase-separated systems.

  9. Characterization of E3 ubiquitin ligase neuregulin receptor degradation protein-1 (Nrdp1) in the large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea) and its immune responses to Cryptocaryon irritans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong Ling; Han, Fang; Yu, Da Hui; Xiao, Shi Jun; Li, Ming Yun; Chen, Jian; Wang, Zhi Yong

    2015-02-10

    Neuregulin receptor degradation protein-1 (Nrdp1) was recently identified in humans as an important immune factor responding to the challenge of virus, LPS or cytokine. Its role in fish immune defense and whether it is involved in anti-parasite immunity have not been proven yet. In this report, the full-length cDNA sequence and genomic structure of Nrdp1 in the large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea (LcNrdp1) were identified and characterized. The full-length cDNA of LcNrdp1 was 1248bp, including a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 32bp, a 3' UTR of 259bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 937bp, encoding a polypeptide of 318 amino acid residues. The full-length genomic DNA sequence of LcNrdp1 was composed of 2635 nucleotides, including four exons and three introns. The putative LcNrdp1 protein had no signal peptide sequence and contained a characteristic Nrdp1 consensus motif C3HC3D ring finger and a Coiled-coil domain. Phylogenetic analysis showed that Nrdp1 in fish was closer with that in other vertebrates (79%-90% amino acid identity) than in invertebrates and bacteria (27%-65%). In fishes, Nrdp1 in large yellow croaker was closer with that in Takifugu rubripes. The expression profile showed that LcNrdp1 was constitutively expressed in all tested tissues, especially highly expressed in brain, muscle and kidney. Post-infection (PI) with Cryptocaryon irritans, an increased expression of LcNrdp1 was induced in infection sites (skin and gill), whereas in immune organs, the expression of LcNrdp1 was up-regulated in spleen (except the 1st d and 10th d PI) but suppressed in head kidney. These results suggested that LcNrdp1 might play an important immune role in the finfish L. crocea in the defense against the parasite C. irritans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Quantification of large and middle proteins of hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) as a novel tool for the identification of inactive HBV carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferkorn, Maria; Böhm, Stephan; Schott, Tina; Deichsel, Danilo; Bremer, Corinna M; Schröder, Kathrin; Gerlich, Wolfram H; Glebe, Dieter; Berg, Thomas; van Bömmel, Florian

    2017-09-26

    Among individuals with chronic hepatitis B, those with hepatitis B e-antigen (HBeAg)-negative chronic hepatitis (CHB) can be difficult to distinguish from those with HBeAg-negative chronic HBV infection, also referred to as inactive HBV carriers (ICs), but both require different medical management. The level of HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) has been proposed as a marker to discriminate between chronic infection and hepatitis stages. HBsAg consists of large, middle and small HBs. The aim of this study was to determine whether the composition of HBsAg improved the identification of ICs among HBsAg-positive subjects with different phases of HBV infections. HBV large surface proteins (LHBs) and HBV middle surface proteins (MHBs) were quantified in serum samples from 183 clinically well-characterised untreated patients with acute (n=14) HBV infection, ICs (n=44), CHBs (n=46), chronic HBeAg-positive phase (n=68) and hepatitis delta coinfection (n=11) using an ELISA, with well-defined monoclonal antibodies against the preS1 domain (LHBs) and the preS2-domain (MHBs). A Western blot analysis was used to verify the quantitation of the components of HBsAg. Total HBsAg was quantified using a modified commercially available assay (HBsAg V.6.0, Enzygnost, Siemens, Erlangen). The composition of HBsAg showed specific patterns across different phases of hepatitis B. Individuals in the IC phase had significantly lower proportions of LHBs and MHBs than patients in acute or chronic phases irrespective of their HBV e-antigen status (p<0.0001) or HBsAg level. Both LHBs and MHBs ratios better predicted the IC phase than total HBsAg levels. Quantification of MHBs, particularly LHBs represents a novel tool for the identification of the IC stage. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Induction and Persistence of Large γH2AX Foci by High Linear Energy Transfer Radiation in DNA-Dependent protein kinase–Deficient Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracalente, Candelaria; Ibañez, Irene L. [Departamento de Micro y Nanotecnología, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Molinari, Beatriz [Departamento de Radiobiología, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Palmieri, Mónica [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kreiner, Andrés [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de San Martín, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Valda, Alejandro [Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnología, Universidad Nacional de San Martín, San Martín, Buenos Aires (Argentina); and others

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the cell response to DNA double-strand breaks induced by low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations when the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs), an essential protein of the nonhomologous end-joining repair pathway, lacks kinase activity. Methods and Materials: CHO10B2, a Chinese hamster ovary cell line, and its derived radiosensitive mutant cell line, irs-20, lacking DNA-PKcs activity, were evaluated after 0 to 3 Gy of γ-rays, plateau and Bragg peak protons, and lithium beams by clonogenic assay, and as a measurement of double-strand breaks, phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX) foci number and size were quantified by immunocytofluorescence. Results: Irs-20 exhibited greater radiosensitivity and a higher amount of γH2AX foci than CHO10B2 at 6 hours after irradiation for all types of radiations. Remarkably, CHO10B2 and irs-20 maintained their difference in radiosensitivity after high-LET radiation. Six hours after low-LET radiations, irs-20 did not reach basal levels of γH2AX at high doses, whereas CHO10B2 recovered basal levels for all doses. After high-LET radiation, only CHO10B2 exhibited a reduction in γH2AX foci, but it never reached basal levels. Persistent foci in irs-20 confirmed a repair deficiency. Interestingly, after 30 minutes of high-LET radiation both cell lines exhibited large foci (size >0.9 μm{sup 2}) related to the damage nature, whereas at 6 hours irs-20 showed a higher amount of large foci than CHO10B2, with a 7-fold increase at 3 Gy, that could also be associated to radiosensitivity. Conclusions: We demonstrated, for the first time, an association between deficient DNA-PKcs activity and not only high levels of H2AX phosphorylation but also persistence and size increase of γH2AX foci after high-LET irradiation.

  12. Diagnosis code assignment: models and evaluation metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotte, Adler; Pivovarov, Rimma; Natarajan, Karthik; Weiskopf, Nicole; Wood, Frank; Elhadad, Noémie

    2014-01-01

    The volume of healthcare data is growing rapidly with the adoption of health information technology. We focus on automated ICD9 code assignment from discharge summary content and methods for evaluating such assignments. We study ICD9 diagnosis codes and discharge summaries from the publicly available Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II (MIMIC II) repository. We experiment with two coding approaches: one that treats each ICD9 code independently of each other (flat classifier), and one that leverages the hierarchical nature of ICD9 codes into its modeling (hierarchy-based classifier). We propose novel evaluation metrics, which reflect the distances among gold-standard and predicted codes and their locations in the ICD9 tree. Experimental setup, code for modeling, and evaluation scripts are made available to the research community. The hierarchy-based classifier outperforms the flat classifier with F-measures of 39.5% and 27.6%, respectively, when trained on 20,533 documents and tested on 2282 documents. While recall is improved at the expense of precision, our novel evaluation metrics show a more refined assessment: for instance, the hierarchy-based classifier identifies the correct sub-tree of gold-standard codes more often than the flat classifier. Error analysis reveals that gold-standard codes are not perfect, and as such the recall and precision are likely underestimated. Hierarchy-based classification yields better ICD9 coding than flat classification for MIMIC patients. Automated ICD9 coding is an example of a task for which data and tools can be shared and for which the research community can work together to build on shared models and advance the state of the art.

  13. Solving multiconstraint assignment problems using learning automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Geir; Oommen, B John

    2010-02-01

    This paper considers the NP-hard problem of object assignment with respect to multiple constraints: assigning a set of elements (or objects) into mutually exclusive classes (or groups), where the elements which are "similar" to each other are hopefully located in the same class. The literature reports solutions in which the similarity constraint consists of a single index that is inappropriate for the type of multiconstraint problems considered here and where the constraints could simultaneously be contradictory. This feature, where we permit possibly contradictory constraints, distinguishes this paper from the state of the art. Indeed, we are aware of no learning automata (or other heuristic) solutions which solve this problem in its most general setting. Such a scenario is illustrated with the static mapping problem, which consists of distributing the processes of a parallel application onto a set of computing nodes. This is a classical and yet very important problem within the areas of parallel computing, grid computing, and cloud computing. We have developed four learning-automata (LA)-based algorithms to solve this problem: First, a fixed-structure stochastic automata algorithm is presented, where the processes try to form pairs to go onto the same node. This algorithm solves the problem, although it requires some centralized coordination. As it is desirable to avoid centralized control, we subsequently present three different variable-structure stochastic automata (VSSA) algorithms, which have superior partitioning properties in certain settings, although they forfeit some of the scalability features of the fixed-structure algorithm. All three VSSA algorithms model the processes as automata having first the hosting nodes as possible actions; second, the processes as possible actions; and, third, attempting to estimate the process communication digraph prior to probabilistically mapping the processes. This paper, which, we believe, comprehensively reports the

  14. Backbone and side chain chemical shift assignments of apolipophorin III from Galleria mellonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowhurst, Karin A; Horn, James V C; Weers, Paul M M

    2016-04-01

    Apolipophorin III, a 163 residue monomeric protein from the greater wax moth Galleria mellonella (abbreviated as apoLp-IIIGM), has roles in upregulating expression of antimicrobial proteins as well as binding and deforming bacterial membranes. Due to its similarity to vertebrate apolipoproteins there is interest in performing atomic resolution analysis of apoLp-IIIGM as part of an effort to better understand its mechanism of action in innate immunity. In the first step towards structural characterization of apoLp-IIIGM, 99 % of backbone and 88 % of side chain (1)H, (13)C and (15)N chemical shifts were assigned. TALOS+ analysis of the backbone resonances has predicted that the protein is composed of five long helices, which is consistent with the reported structures of apolipophorins from other insect species. The next stage in the characterization of apoLp-III from G. mellonella will be to utilize these resonance assignments in solving the solution structure of this protein.

  15. A novel C-type lectin, Nattectin-like protein, with a wide range of bacterial agglutination activity in large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Changhuan; Zhang, Dongling; Wang, Zhiyong

    2016-03-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) are generally recognized as a superfamily of Ca(2+)-dependent carbohydrate-binding proteins, which serve as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) in innate immunity of vertebrates. In this study, the molecular characterization and immune roles of a novel CTL from Larimichthys crocea (designated as LcNTC) were investigated. LcNTC is a novel protein that shared 33%-49% homology with other teleosts CTLs. The full-length cDNA of LcNTC was composed of 859 bp with a 465 bp open reading frame encoding a putative protein of 154 residues. LcNTC contained a single CRD with four conserved disulfide-bonded cysteine residues (Cys(57)-Cys(148), Cys(126)-Cys(140)) and EPN/AND motifs instead of invariant EPN/WND motifs required for carbohydrate-binding specificity and constructing Ca(2+)-binding sites. LcNTC mRNA was detected in all examined tissues with the most abundant in the gill. After challenged with poly I:C and Vibrio parahaemolyticus, the temporal expression of LcNTC was significantly up-regulated in the liver, spleen and head-kidney. LcNTC transcripts were also induced in the gill, skin, spleen and head-kidney post-infection with Cryptocaryon irritans. The recombinant LcNTC (rLcNTC) purified from Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) exhibited strong agglutination activity against erythrocytes from human, rabbit and large yellow croaker in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner, and the agglutination could be inhibited by D-Mannose, D-Glucose, D-Fructose, α-Lactose, D-Maltose and LPS. Positive microbial agglutination activities of rLcNTC were observed against all tested bacteria in the presence of Ca(2+), including Gram-positive bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus and Micrococcus lysoleikticus) and Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli, V. parahaemolyticus, Vibrio alginolyticus and Aeromonas hydrophila). These findings collectively indicated that LcNTC might be involved in the innate immunity of L. crocea as a PRR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  16. Ribose 2'-O methylation of the vesicular stomatitis virus mRNA cap precedes and facilitates subsequent guanine-N-7 methylation by the large polymerase protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmeh, Amal A; Li, Jianrong; Kranzusch, Philip J; Whelan, Sean P J

    2009-11-01

    During conventional mRNA cap formation, two separate methyltransferases sequentially modify the cap structure, first at the guanine-N-7 (G-N-7) position and subsequently at the ribose 2'-O position. For vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), a prototype of the nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses, the two methylase activities share a binding site for the methyl donor S-adenosyl-l-methionine and are inhibited by individual amino acid substitutions within the C-terminal domain of the large (L) polymerase protein. This led to the suggestion that a single methylase domain functions for both 2'-O and G-N-7 methylations. Here we report a trans-methylation assay that recapitulates both ribose 2'-O and G-N-7 modifications by using purified recombinant L and in vitro-synthesized RNA. Using this assay, we demonstrate that VSV L typically modifies the 2'-O position of the cap prior to the G-N-7 position and that G-N-7 methylation is diminished by pre-2'-O methylation of the substrate RNA. Amino acid substitutions in the C terminus of L that prevent all cap methylation in recombinant VSV (rVSV) partially retain the ability to G-N-7 methylate a pre-2'-O-methylated RNA, therefore uncoupling the effect of substitutions in the C terminus of the L protein on the two methylations. In addition, we show that the 2'-O and G-N-7 methylase activities act specifically on RNA substrates that contain the conserved elements of a VSV mRNA start at the 5' terminus. This study provides new mechanistic insights into the mRNA cap methylase activities of VSV L, demonstrates that 2'-O methylation precedes and facilitates subsequent G-N-7 methylation, and reveals an RNA sequence and length requirement for the two methylase activities. We propose a model of regulation of the activity of the C terminus of L protein in 2'-O and G-N-7 methylation of the cap structure.

  17. Pregnancy-associated plasma protein A in a large cohort of Type 1 diabetic patients with and without diabetic nephropathy-a prospective follow--up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, A S; Tarnow, L; Christiansen, M

    2007-01-01

    AIM: Pregnancy-associated plasma protein A (PAPP-A) has been implicated in the aetiology of acute coronary syndromes and carotid and peripheral artherosclerosis. Diabetic nephropathy is characterized by increased cardiovascular risk. We investigated the prognostic value of PAPP-A in a large cohort...... of Type 1 diabetic patients. METHODS: In a prospective observational follow-up study, 197 Type 1 diabetic patients with diabetic nephropathy and a matched group of 178 patients with normoalbuminuria were followed for 10.1 (0-10.3) years. PAPP-A was determined at baseline. RESULTS: In patients...... with diabetic nephropathy, plasma PAPP-A was elevated 3.6 (0.4-51.1) mIU/l [median (range)] vs. 2.1 (0.4-46.6) mIU/l in normoalbuminuric patients, P PAPP-A threshold of 10 mIU/l has been suggested. Thirty-seven patients were above the threshold and of these 13 patients...

  18. Y-box-binding protein-1 (YB-1) promotes cell proliferation, adhesion and drug resistance in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xiaobing; Wu, Yaxun; Wang, Yuchan; Zhu, Xinghua; Yin, Haibing; He, Yunhua; Li, Chunsun; Liu, Yushan; Lu, Xiaoyun; Chen, Yali; Shen, Rong; Xu, Xiaohong; He, Song

    2016-08-15

    YB-1 is a multifunctional protein, which has been shown to correlate with resistance to treatment of various tumor types. This study investigated the expression and biologic function of YB-1 in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the expression statuses of YB-1 and pYB-1(S102) were reversely correlated with the clinical outcomes of DLBCL patients. In addition, we found that YB-1 could promote the proliferation of DLBCL cells by accelerating the G1/S transition. Ectopic expression of YB-1 could markedly increase the expression of cell cycle regulators cyclin D1 and cyclin E. Furthermore, we found that adhesion of DLBCL cells to fibronectin (FN) could increase YB-1 phosphorylation at Ser102 and pYB-1(S102) nuclear translocation. In addition, overexpression of YB-1 could increase the adhesion of DLBCL cells to FN. Intriguingly, we found that YB-1 overexpression could confer drug resistance through cell-adhesion dependent and independent mechanisms in DLBCL. Silencing of YB-1 could sensitize DLBCL cells to mitoxantrone and overcome cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) phenotype in an AKT-dependent manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Y-box-binding protein-1 (YB-1) promotes cell proliferation, adhesion and drug resistance in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Xiaobing; Wu, Yaxun [Department of Pathology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong 226361, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Yuchan [Department of Pathogen, Medical College, Nantong University, Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory for Inflammation and Molecular Drug Target, Nantong University, Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); Zhu, Xinghua; Yin, Haibing [Department of Pathology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong 226361, Jiangsu (China); He, Yunhua [Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory for Inflammation and Molecular Drug Target, Nantong University, Nantong 226001, Jiangsu (China); Li, Chunsun; Liu, Yushan; Lu, Xiaoyun; Chen, Yali; Shen, Rong [Department of Pathology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong 226361, Jiangsu (China); Xu, Xiaohong, E-mail: xuxiaohongnantong@126.com [Department of Oncology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong 226361, Jiangsu (China); He, Song, E-mail: hesongnt@126.com [Department of Pathology, Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Nantong University, Nantong 226361, Jiangsu (China)

    2016-08-15

    YB-1 is a multifunctional protein, which has been shown to correlate with resistance to treatment of various tumor types. This study investigated the expression and biologic function of YB-1 in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the expression statuses of YB-1 and pYB-1{sup S102} were reversely correlated with the clinical outcomes of DLBCL patients. In addition, we found that YB-1 could promote the proliferation of DLBCL cells by accelerating the G1/S transition. Ectopic expression of YB-1 could markedly increase the expression of cell cycle regulators cyclin D1 and cyclin E. Furthermore, we found that adhesion of DLBCL cells to fibronectin (FN) could increase YB-1 phosphorylation at Ser102 and pYB-1{sup S102} nuclear translocation. In addition, overexpression of YB-1 could increase the adhesion of DLBCL cells to FN. Intriguingly, we found that YB-1 overexpression could confer drug resistance through cell-adhesion dependent and independent mechanisms in DLBCL. Silencing of YB-1 could sensitize DLBCL cells to mitoxantrone and overcome cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR) phenotype in an AKT-dependent manner. - Highlights: • The expression statuses of YB-1 and pYB-1{sup S102} are reversely correlated with outcomes of DLBCL patients. • YB-1 promotes cell proliferation by accelerating G1/S transition in DLBCL. • YB-1 confers drug resistance to mitoxantrone in DLBCL.

  20. Nitrogen-detected TROSY yields comparable sensitivity to proton-detected TROSY for non-deuterated, large proteins under physiological salt conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeuchi, Koh [National Institute for Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Molecular Profiling Research Center for Drug Discovery (Japan); Arthanari, Haribabu [Harvard Medical School, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology (United States); Imai, Misaki [Japan Biological Informatics Consortium, Research and Development Department (Japan); Wagner, Gerhard, E-mail: gerhard-wagner@hms.harvard.edu [Harvard Medical School, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology (United States); Shimada, Ichio, E-mail: shimada@iw-nmr.f.u-tokyo.ac.jp [National Institute for Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Molecular Profiling Research Center for Drug Discovery (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Direct detection of the TROSY component of proton-attached {sup 15}N nuclei ({sup 15}N-detected TROSY) yields high quality spectra with high field magnets, by taking advantage of the slow {sup 15}N transverse relaxation. The slow transverse relaxation and narrow line width of the {sup 15}N-detected TROSY resonances are expected to compensate for the inherently low {sup 15}N sensitivity. However, the sensitivity of {sup 15}N-detected TROSY in a previous report was one-order of magnitude lower than in the conventional {sup 1}H-detected version. This could be due to the fact that the previous experiments were performed at low salt (0–50 mM), which is advantageous for {sup 1}H-detected experiments. Here, we show that the sensitivity gap between {sup 15}N and {sup 1}H becomes marginal for a non-deuterated, large protein (τ{sub c} = 35 ns) at a physiological salt concentration (200 mM). This effect is due to the high salt tolerance of the {sup 15}N-detected TROSY. Together with the previously reported benefits of the {sup 15}N-detected TROSY, our results provide further support for the significance of this experiment for structural studies of macromolecules when using high field magnets near and above 1 GHz.

  1. ¹H, ¹⁵N, and ¹³C backbone chemical shift assignment of titin domains A59-A60 and A60 alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajlik, András; Thompson, Gary S; Khan, Ghulam N; Kalverda, Arnout P; Homans, Steve W; Trinick, John

    2014-10-01

    The giant protein titin is the third most abundant protein of vertebrate striated muscle. The titin molecule is >1 μm long and spans half the sarcomere, from the Z-disk to the M-line, and has important roles in sarcomere assembly, elasticity and intracellular signaling. In the A-band of the sarcomere titin is attached to the thick filaments and mainly consists immunoglobulin-like and fibronectin type III-like domains. These are mostly arranged in long-range patterns or 'super-repeats'. The large super-repeats each contain 11 domains and are repeated 11 times, thus forming nearly half the titin molecule. Through interactions with myosin and C-protein, they are involved in thick filament assembly. The importance of titin in muscle assembly is highlighted by the effect of mutations in the A-band portion, which are the commonest cause of dilated cardiomyopathy, affecting ~1 in 250 (Herman et al. in N Engl J Med 366:619-628, 2012). Here we report backbone (15)N, (13)C and (1)H chemical shift and (13)Cβ assignments for the A59-A60 domain tandem from the titin A59-A69 large super-repeat, completed using triple resonance NMR. Since, some regions of the backbone remained unassigned in A60 domain of the complete A59-A60 tandem, a construct containing a single A60 domain, A60sd, was also studied using the same methods. Considerably improved assignment coverage was achieved using A60sd due to its lower mass and improved molecular tumbling rate; these assignments also allowed the analysis of inter-domain interactions using chemical shift mapping against A59-A60.

  2. Consultant-Guided Search Algorithms for the Quadratic Assignment Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iordache, Serban

    Consultant-Guided Search (CGS) is a recent swarm intelligence metaheuristic for combinatorial optimization problems, inspired by the way real people make decisions based on advice received from consultants. Until now, CGS has been successfully applied to the Traveling Salesman Problem. Because a good metaheuristic should be able to tackle efficiently a large variety of problems, it is important to see how CGS behaves when applied to other classes of problems. In this paper, we propose an algorithm for the Quadratic Assignment Problem (QAP), which hybridizes CGS with a local search procedure. Our experimental results show that CGS is able to compete in terms of solution quality with one of the best Ant Colony Optimization algorithms, the MAX-MIN Ant System.

  3. ¹H, ¹⁵N and ¹³C backbone chemical shift assignment of the titin A67-A68 domain tandem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajlik, András; Thompson, Gary S; Khan, Ghulam N; Kalverda, Arnout P; Homans, Steve W; Trinick, John

    2012-04-01

    Single molecules of the giant protein titin extend across half of the muscle sarcomere, from the Z-line to the M-line, and have roles in muscle assembly and elasticity. In the A-band titin is attached to thick filaments and here the domain arrangement occurs in regular patterns of eleven called the large super-repeat. The large super-repeat itself occurs eleven times and forms nearly half the titin molecule. Interactions of the large super-repeats with myosin are consistent with a role in thick filament assembly. Here we report backbone assignments of the titin A67-A68 domain tandem (Fn-Ig) from the third super-repeat (A65-A75) completed using triple resonance NMR experiments.

  4. Heuristic Scheme for Home Circuit Grouping andWavelength Assignment in LOBS-HC Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ximin; Yi, Bo; Tang, Wan; Li, Jingcong

    2014-09-01

    Grouping the Home Circuits (HCs) with the same source is a critical issue of Labeled Optical Burst Switching with Home Circuit (LOBS-HC). To maximize the wavelength utilization in LOBS-HC ring networks, an HC grouping and wavelength assignment scheme, called Longest Path Matching and Graph Coloring (LPMGC), is proposed. LPMGC consists of two phases: grouping and wavelength assignment. First, a heuristic algorithm, named Longest Path Matching (LPM), is proposed to group the HCs according to the longest common path matching between HCs and to make each group as large as possible. And then, Graph Coloring (GC) is introduced to assign wavelengths for HC groups. The numerical results show that the proposed scheme performances better than Complementary HC Assignment (CHA) and some other heuristics in both unidirectional and bidirectional LOBS-HC ring networks in terms of wavelength utilization.

  5. Relationship between protein structure and geometrical constrains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Hansen, Jan; Brunak, Søren

    1996-01-01

    We evaluate to what extent the structure of proteins can be deduced from incomplete knowledge of disulfide bridges, surface assignments, secondary structure assignments, and additional distance constraints. A cost function taking such constraints into account was used to obtain protein structures...... using a simple minimization algorithm. For small proteins, the approximate structure could be obtained using one additional distance constraint for each amino acid in the protein. We also studied the effect of using predicted secondary structure and surface assignments. The constraints used...

  6. Relationship between protein structure and geometrical constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Ole; Hansen, Jan; Brunak, Søren

    1996-01-01

    We evaluate to what extent the structure of proteins can be deduced from incomplete knowledge of disulfide bridges, surface assignments, secondary structure assignments, and additional distance constraints. A cost function taking such constraints into account was used to obtain protein structures...... using a simple minimization algorithm. For small proteins, the approximate structure could be obtained using one additional distance constraint for each amino acid in the protein. We also studied the effect of using predicted secondary structure and surface assignments. The constraints used...

  7. Assigning Priorities for Fixed Priority Preemption Threshold Scheduling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saehwa Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Preemption threshold scheduling (PTS enhances real-time schedulability by controlling preemptiveness of tasks. This benefit of PTS highly depends on a proper algorithm that assigns each task feasible scheduling attributes, which are priority and preemption threshold. Due to the existence of an efficient optimal preemption threshold assignment algorithm that works with fully assigned priority orderings, we need an optimal priority assignment algorithm for PTS. This paper analyzes the inefficiency or nonoptimality of the previously proposed optimal priority assignment algorithms for PTS. We develop theorems for exhaustively but safely pruning infeasible priority orderings while assigning priorities to tasks for PTS. Based on the developed theorems, we correct the previously proposed optimal priority assignment algorithm for PTS. We also propose a performance improved optimal priority assignment algorithm for PTS proving its optimality. The empirical evaluation results clearly show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  8. An addendum on sensitivity analysis of the optimal assignment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volgenant, A.

    2006-01-01

    We point out that sensitivity results for the linear assignment problem can be produced by a shortest path based approach in a straightforward manner and as efficient as finding an optimal solution. Keywords: Assignment; Sensitivity analysis

  9. Efficient Mechanisms to Allocate Assignment Incentives in the Navy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nimon, R. W; Hall, Ricky D; Zaki, Hossam

    2005-01-01

    .... All assignments, however, may not necessarily be voluntary. These assignments (jobs) have been labeled as "hard to fill" by Navy leadership, and the Navy has implemented market-based, cash stipends to attract Sailors to these jobs...

  10. Automatic Assignment of Methyl-NMR Spectra of Supramolecular Machines Using Graph Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritišanac, Iva; Degiacomi, Matteo T; Alderson, T Reid; Carneiro, Marta G; Ab, Eiso; Siegal, Gregg; Baldwin, Andrew J

    2017-07-19

    Methyl groups are powerful probes for the analysis of structure, dynamics and function of supramolecular assemblies, using both solution- and solid-state NMR. Widespread application of the methodology has been limited due to the challenges associated with assigning spectral resonances to specific locations within a biomolecule. Here, we present Methyl Assignment by Graph Matching (MAGMA), for the automatic assignment of methyl resonances. A graph matching protocol examines all possibilities for each resonance in order to determine an exact assignment that includes a complete description of any ambiguity. MAGMA gives 100% accuracy in confident assignments when tested against both synthetic data, and 9 cross-validated examples using both solution- and solid-state NMR data. We show that this remarkable accuracy enables a user to distinguish between alternative protein structures. In a drug discovery application on HSP90, we show the method can rapidly and efficiently distinguish between possible ligand binding modes. By providing an exact and robust solution to methyl resonance assignment, MAGMA can facilitate significantly accelerated studies of supramolecular machines using methyl-based NMR spectroscopy.

  11. 46 CFR 67.237 - Requirements for assignments of mortgages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for assignments of mortgages. 67.237... MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS DOCUMENTATION OF VESSELS Filing and Recording of Instruments-Mortgages, Preferred Mortgages, and Related Instruments § 67.237 Requirements for assignments of mortgages. An assignment of...

  12. Solving the k-cardinality assignment problem by transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Volgenant, A.

    2004-01-01

    The k-cardinality Linear Assignment Problem (k-LAP) with k a given integer is a generalization of the linear assignment problem: one wants to assign k rows (a free choice out of more rows) to k columns (a free choice out of more columns) minimizing the sum of the corresponding costs. For this

  13. Learning through Writing: Teaching Critical Thinking Skills in Writing Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavdar, Gamze; Doe, Sue

    2012-01-01

    Traditional writing assignments often fall short in addressing problems in college students' writing as too often these assignments fail to help students develop critical thinking skills and comprehension of course content. This article reports the use of a two-part (staged) writing assignment with postscript as a strategy for improving critical…

  14. 75 FR 55354 - Delegation of Authority and Assignment of Responsibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-10

    ... of the Secretary Delegation of Authority and Assignment of Responsibilities Secretary's Order 3-2010 Subject: Delegation of Authority and Assignment of Responsibilities to the Employee Benefits Security Administration. 1. Purpose. To delegate authority and assign responsibilities for the administration of the...

  15. Cationic lipid-formulated DNA vaccine against hepatitis B virus: immunogenicity of MIDGE-Th1 vectors encoding small and large surface antigen in comparison to a licensed protein vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Endmann

    Full Text Available Currently marketed vaccines against hepatitis B virus (HBV based on the small (S hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg fail to induce a protective immune response in about 10% of vaccinees. DNA vaccination and the inclusion of PreS1 and PreS2 domains of HBsAg have been reported to represent feasible strategies to improve the efficacy of HBV vaccines. Here, we evaluated the immunogenicity of SAINT-18-formulated MIDGE-Th1 vectors encoding the S or the large (L protein of HBsAg in mice and pigs. In both animal models, vectors encoding the secretion-competent S protein induced stronger humoral responses than vectors encoding the L protein, which was shown to be retained mainly intracellularly despite the presence of a heterologous secretion signal. In pigs, SAINT-18-formulated MIDGE-Th1 vectors encoding the S protein elicited an immune response of the same magnitude as the licensed protein vaccine Engerix-B, with S protein-specific antibody levels significantly higher than those considered protective in humans, and lasting for at least six months after the third immunization. Thus, our results provide not only the proof of concept for the SAINT-18-formulated MIDGE-Th1 vector approach but also confirm that with a cationic-lipid formulation, a DNA vaccine at a relatively low dose can elicit an immune response similar to a human dose of an aluminum hydroxide-adjuvanted protein vaccine in large animals.

  16. Therapeutic Targeting of Protein Kinase CK2 Gene Expression in Feline Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Naturally Occurring Large-Animal Model of Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Claire M; Trembley, Janeen H; Kren, Betsy T; Unger, Gretchen M; O'Sullivan, M Gerard; Cornax, Ingrid; Modiano, Jaime F; Ahmed, Khalil

    2017-06-01

    Protein kinase CK2 (CK2) is a highly promising target for cancer therapy, and anti-CK2 gene expression therapy has shown effectiveness in rodent models of human head and neck cancer (HNC). To date, there has been no large-animal model of cancer in which to further explore anti-CK2 therapies. Feline oral squamous cell carcinoma (FOSCC) has been proposed as a large-animal model for human HNC, and we have previously shown that CK2 is a rational target in FOSCC. Here we have tested the hypothesis that a novel tenfibgen-coated tumor-specific nanocapsule carrying RNA interference (RNAi) oligonucleotides targeting feline CK2α and CK2α' (TBG-RNAi-fCK2αα') would be safe in cats with FOSCC; assessment of target inhibition and tumor response were secondary aims. Nine cats were enrolled and treated at two dose levels in a 3+3 escalation. Cats received a total of six treatments with TBG-RNAi-fCK2αα'. Pre- and posttreatment, tumor and normal oral mucosa biopsies were collected to assess CK2 expression, using immunohistochemistry (IHC) preparations evaluated by light microscopy. Toxicity and tumor response were assessed on the basis of standard criteria. The most common adverse events were grade 1 or 2 weight loss and anorexia. Grade 3 tissue necrosis was seen in association with tumor response in one cat, asymptomatic grade 4 elevations in aspartate transaminase and creatine phosphokinase in one cat, and asymptomatic grade 3 hypokalemia in one cat. Of six cats with evaluable biopsies, two had a reduction in CK2 IHC score in tumors after treatment. Four cats had progressive disease during the study period, three had stable disease, one had partial response, and response could not be evaluated in one cat. We conclude that the drug appeared safe and that there is some evidence of efficacy in FOSCC. Further investigation regarding dosing, schedule, target modulation, toxicity, and efficacy in a larger group of cats is warranted and may inform future clinical studies in human

  17. Prevalence of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPA) in patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL): a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assmann, Gunter; Shihadeh, Klara; Poeschel, Viola; Murawski, Niels; Conigliarou, Jutta; Ong, Mei Fang; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies against citrullinated proteins (ACPA) have been recognised as the most specific serum marker for rheumatoid arthritis. However, serum autoantibodies such as anti-nuclear antibodies have also been detected in the sera of different lymphatic malignancies without accompanying rheumatologic disease. Therefore, we conducted a study to evaluate the prevalence of ACPA in diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (DLBCL). Sera of 395 DLBCL patients and 258 age-matched healthy controls were investigated to evaluate the prevalence of ACPA and RF. ACPA-positive data were stratified into subgroups of RF positivity and established prognostic parameters for DLBCL, including overall survival. In addition, the ACPA serum concentrations levels were compared to an ACPA-positive RA cohort (n = 175). The statistics were performed with χ2 test and Mann- Whitney-U test; Kaplan-Meyer curves (log rank test) were used to analyse the overall survival. P-value DLBCL patients than in healthy controls (3.5% versus 0.8%, p = 0.030). However, the ACPA serum concentration levels were significantly lower than in RA patients (median 10.4 versus 124.1 U/ml, p = 0.0001). After subgroup stratification, ACPA positivity in DLBCL was significantly associated with male gender (4.4% versus 0%, p = 0.022; odds ratio 1.046, CI 1.014-1.079) and with RF-IgM seropositivity (1.77% versus 0%, p = 0.043), but not with prognostic parameters for DLBCL. DLBCL is associated with a significantly higher prevalence of ACPA, with an increased prevalence in male patients, and simultaneous RF-IgM positivity. However, ACPA is not prognostic for DLBCL. The prevalence of RF-IgM, -IgA, or -IgG did not differ from healthy controls.

  18. Implementation of Peer-Reviewed Homework Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare, Richard N.; Cox, Charles T., Jr.; Murphy, Katherine; Bayas, Camille

    2017-01-01

    In large, introductory courses, instructors and teaching assistants often struggle to provide detailed feedback on student homework in a timely manner. Here we describe a peer-reviewed homework system that provides quick turnaround while offering flexibility in the construction of homework problems. Homework is administered through a cycle, which…

  19. A Bayesian approach to simultaneously quantify assignments and linguistic uncertainty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez, Gregory M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Booker, Jane M [BOOKER SCIENTIFIC FREDERICKSBURG; Ross, Timothy J [UNM

    2010-10-07

    Subject matter expert assessments can include both assignment and linguistic uncertainty. This paper examines assessments containing linguistic uncertainty associated with a qualitative description of a specific state of interest and the assignment uncertainty associated with assigning a qualitative value to that state. A Bayesian approach is examined to simultaneously quantify both assignment and linguistic uncertainty in the posterior probability. The approach is applied to a simplified damage assessment model involving both assignment and linguistic uncertainty. The utility of the approach and the conditions under which the approach is feasible are examined and identified.

  20. Backbone resonance assignments of the micro-RNA precursor binding region of human TRBP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Matthieu P M H; Plevin, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    TAR-RNA binding protein (TRBP) is a multidomain human protein involved in micro-RNA (miRNA) biogenesis. TRBP is a component of both the Dicer complex, which processes precursor miRNAs, and the RNA-induced silencing complex-loading complex. In addition, TRBP is implicated in the human immunodeficiency virus replication cycle and interferon-protein kinase R activity. TRBP contains 3 double-stranded RNA binding domains the first two of which have been shown to interact with miRNA precursors. Here we present the backbone resonance assignments and secondary structure of residues 19-228 of human TRBP2.

  1. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments for a putative ADF/Cofilin from Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Kun; Yuan, Guangfa; Liao, Shanhui; Zhang, Jiahai; Tu, Xiaoming

    2011-10-01

    Actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin proteins are a family of actin-binding proteins expressed in almost all eukaryotic cells, and play a significant role in regulating actin-filament dynamics. Here we report the resonance assignments of a putative ADF/cofilin from Trypanosoma brucei for further understanding of the relationship between its structure and function.

  2. Probabilistic protein function prediction from heterogeneous genome-wide data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Nariai

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Dramatic improvements in high throughput sequencing technologies have led to a staggering growth in the number of predicted genes. However, a large fraction of these newly discovered genes do not have a functional assignment. Fortunately, a variety of novel high-throughput genome-wide functional screening technologies provide important clues that shed light on gene function. The integration of heterogeneous data to predict protein function has been shown to improve the accuracy of automated gene annotation systems. In this paper, we propose and evaluate a probabilistic approach for protein function prediction that integrates protein-protein interaction (PPI data, gene expression data, protein motif information, mutant phenotype data, and protein localization data. First, functional linkage graphs are constructed from PPI data and gene expression data, in which an edge between nodes (proteins represents evidence for functional similarity. The assumption here is that graph neighbors are more likely to share protein function, compared to proteins that are not neighbors. The functional linkage graph model is then used in concert with protein domain, mutant phenotype and protein localization data to produce a functional prediction. Our method is applied to the functional prediction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes, using Gene Ontology (GO terms as the basis of our annotation. In a cross validation study we show that the integrated model increases recall by 18%, compared to using PPI data alone at the 50% precision. We also show that the integrated predictor is significantly better than each individual predictor. However, the observed improvement vs. PPI depends on both the new source of data and the functional category to be predicted. Surprisingly, in some contexts integration hurts overall prediction accuracy. Lastly, we provide a comprehensive assignment of putative GO terms to 463 proteins that currently have no assigned function.

  3. Large-Scale Sequence Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Devi; Verma, Mansi

    2017-01-01

    There are millions of sequences deposited in genomic databases, and it is an important task to categorize them according to their structural and functional roles. Sequence comparison is a prerequisite for proper categorization of both DNA and protein sequences, and helps in assigning a putative or hypothetical structure and function to a given sequence. There are various methods available for comparing sequences, alignment being first and foremost for sequences with a small number of base pairs as well as for large-scale genome comparison. Various tools are available for performing pairwise large sequence comparison. The best known tools either perform global alignment or generate local alignments between the two sequences. In this chapter we first provide basic information regarding sequence comparison. This is followed by the description of the PAM and BLOSUM matrices that form the basis of sequence comparison. We also give a practical overview of currently available methods such as BLAST and FASTA, followed by a description and overview of tools available for genome comparison including LAGAN, MumMER, BLASTZ, and AVID.

  4. Sequential extraction results in improved proteome profiling of medicinal plant Pinellia ternata tubers, which contain large amounts of high-abundance proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Wu

    Full Text Available Pinellia ternata tuber is one of the well-known Chinese traditional medicines. In order to understand the pharmacological properties of tuber proteins, it is necessary to perform proteome analysis of P. ternata tubers. However, a few high-abundance proteins (HAPs, mainly mannose-binding lectin (agglutinin, exist in aggregates of various sizes in the tubers and seriously interfere with proteome profiling by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE. Therefore, selective depletion of these HAPs is a prerequisite for enhanced proteome analysis of P. ternata tubers. Based on differential protein solubility, we developed a novel protocol involving two sequential extractions for depletion of some HAPs and prefractionation of tuber proteins prior to 2-DE. The first extraction using 10% acetic acid selectively extracted acid-soluble HAPs and the second extraction using the SDS-containing buffer extracted remaining acid-insoluble proteins. After application of the protocol, 2-DE profiles of P. ternata tuber proteins were greatly improved and more protein spots were detected, especially low-abundance proteins. Moreover, the subunit composition of P. ternata lectin was analyzed by electrophoresis. Native lectin consists of two hydrogen-bonded subunits (11 kDa and 25 kDa and the 11 kDa subunit was a glycoprotein. Subsequently, major HAPs in the tubers were analyzed by mass spectrometry, with nine protein spots being identified as lectin isoforms. The methodology was easy to perform and required no specialized apparatus. It would be useful for proteome analysis of other tuber plants of Araceae.

  5. An automated framework for NMR resonance assignment through simultaneous slice picking and spin system forming

    KAUST Repository

    Abbas, Ahmed

    2014-04-19

    Despite significant advances in automated nuclear magnetic resonance-based protein structure determination, the high numbers of false positives and false negatives among the peaks selected by fully automated methods remain a problem. These false positives and negatives impair the performance of resonance assignment methods. One of the main reasons for this problem is that the computational research community often considers peak picking and resonance assignment to be two separate problems, whereas spectroscopists use expert knowledge to pick peaks and assign their resonances at the same time. We propose a novel framework that simultaneously conducts slice picking and spin system forming, an essential step in resonance assignment. Our framework then employs a genetic algorithm, directed by both connectivity information and amino acid typing information from the spin systems, to assign the spin systems to residues. The inputs to our framework can be as few as two commonly used spectra, i.e., CBCA(CO)NH and HNCACB. Different from the existing peak picking and resonance assignment methods that treat peaks as the units, our method is based on \\'slices\\', which are one-dimensional vectors in three-dimensional spectra that correspond to certain (N, H) values. Experimental results on both benchmark simulated data sets and four real protein data sets demonstrate that our method significantly outperforms the state-of-the-art methods while using a less number of spectra than those methods. Our method is freely available at http://sfb.kaust.edu.sa/Pages/Software.aspx. © 2014 Springer Science+Business Media.

  6. An Interactive Introduction to Protein Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W. Theodore

    2004-01-01

    To improve student understanding of protein structure and the significance of noncovalent interactions in protein structure and function, students are assigned a project to write a paper complemented with computer-generated images. The assignment provides an opportunity for students to select a protein structure that is of interest and detail…

  7. An economical method for production of (2H, (13CH3-threonine for solution NMR studies of large protein complexes: application to the 670 kDa proteasome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Algirdas Velyvis

    Full Text Available NMR studies of very high molecular weight protein complexes have been greatly facilitated through the development of labeling strategies whereby (13CH(3 methyl groups are introduced into highly deuterated proteins. Robust and cost-effective labeling methods are well established for all methyl containing amino acids with the exception of Thr. Here we describe an inexpensive biosynthetic strategy for the production of L-[α-(2H; β-(2H;γ-(13C]-Thr that can then be directly added during protein expression to produce highly deuterated proteins with Thr methyl group probes of structure and dynamics. These reporters are particularly valuable, because unlike other methyl containing amino acids, Thr residues are localized predominantly to the surfaces of proteins, have unique hydrogen bonding capabilities, have a higher propensity to be found at protein nucleic acid interfaces and can play important roles in signaling pathways through phosphorylation. The utility of the labeling methodology is demonstrated with an application to the 670 kDa proteasome core particle, where high quality Thr (13C,(1H correlation spectra are obtained that could not be generated from samples prepared with commercially available U-[(13C,(1H]-Thr.

  8. Index assignment of a carbon nanotube rope using tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goss, Karin; Schneider, Claus M.; Meyer, Carola [Peter Gruenberg Institut, Forschungszentrum Juelich and JARA Juelich Aachen Research Alliance, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Peica, Niculina; Thomsen, Christian; Maultzsch, Janina [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenberg Str. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    We used tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to study the diameter-dependent Raman modes in a contacted carbon nanotube (CNT) rope. We show that with the near-field tip enhancement a large number of nanotubes within a rope can be identified, even if the nanotube modes cannot be distinguished in the far-field signal. Several metallic and semiconducting nanotubes can be identified and assigned to nanotube families. Additionally, we provide a tentative chiral index assignment. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Ant Colony Algorithm and Simulation for Robust Airport Gate Assignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Airport gate assignment is core task for airport ground operations. Due to the fact that the departure and arrival time of flights may be influenced by many random factors, the airport gate assignment scheme may encounter gate conflict and many other problems. This paper aims at finding a robust solution for airport gate assignment problem. A mixed integer model is proposed to formulate the problem, and colony algorithm is designed to solve this model. Simulation result shows that, in consideration of robustness, the ability of antidisturbance for airport gate assignment scheme has much improved.

  10. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YJL199C, YJL199C [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available d in closely related Saccharomyces species; protein detected in large-scale protein-protein interaction studies...cies; protein detected in large-scale protein-protein interaction studies Rows with this prey as prey (4) Ro...n; not conserved in closely related Saccharomyces species; protein detected in large-scale protein-protein interaction studies... species; protein detected in large-scale protein-protein interaction studies Rows with this prey as prey Ro

  11. Vectors bicistronically linking a gene of interest to the SV40 large T antigen in combination with the SV40 origin of replication enhance transient protein expression and luciferase reporter activity

    OpenAIRE

    Mahon, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    The Simian Virus large T antigen (SVLT) induces replication of plasmids bearing the SV40 origin of replication (SV40 ori) within mammalian cells. The internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) is an element that allows for the co-translation of proteins from one polycistronic mRNA. Through the combination of these elements, IRES-dependent co-expression of a protein of interest and the SVLT, either constitutive or regulated, on plasmids bearing the SV40 ori generates a positive feedback loop, result...

  12. Deletion of a single helix from the transmembrane domain causes large changes in membrane insertion properties and secondary structure of the bacterial conjugation protein TrwB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecino, Ana Julia; Segura, Rosa de Lima; de la Arada, Igor; de la Cruz, Fernando; Goñi, Félix M; Arrondo, José L; Alkorta, Itziar

    2012-12-01

    TrwB is an essential protein in the conjugative transfer of plasmid R388. The protein consists of a bulky cytosolic domain containing the catalytic site, and a small transmembrane domain (TMD). Our previous studies support the idea that the TMD plays an essential role in the activity, structure and stability of the protein. We have prepared a mutant, TrwBΔN50 that lacks one of the two α-helices in the TMD. The mutant has been studied both in detergent suspension and reconstituted in lipid vesicles. Deletion of a single helix from the TMD is enough to increase markedly the affinity of TrwB for ATP. The deletion changes the secondary structure of the cytosolic domain, whose infrared spectroscopy (IR) spectra become similar to those of the mutant TrwBΔN70 lacking the whole TMD. Interestingly, when TrwBΔN50 is reconstituted into lipid membranes, the cytosolic domain orients itself towards the vesicle interior, opposite to what happens for wild-type TrwB. In addition, we analyze the secondary structure of the TMD and TMD-lacking mutant TrwBΔN70, and found that the sum IR spectrum of the two protein fragments is different from that of the native protein, indicating the irreversibility of changes caused in TrwB by deletion of the TMD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Manganese superoxide dismutase interacts with a large scale of cellular and mitochondrial proteins in low dose radiation-induced adaptive radioprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Angela; Fan, Ming; Woloschak, Gayle; Grdina, David J.; Chromy, Brett A.; Li, Jian Jian

    2012-01-01

    Cellular adaptive response to certain low level genotoxic stresses including the exposure to low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) shows promise as a tool to enhance radioprotection in normal cells but not in tumor cells. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), a fundamental mitochondrial antioxidant in mammalian cells plays a key role in LDIR-induced adaptive response. In this study, we aim to elucidate the signaling network associated with the MnSOD-induced radiation protection. A MnSOD-interacting protein profile was established in LDIR-treated human skin cells. Human skin keratinocytes (HK18) were irradiated with a single dose LDIR (10 cGy x-ray) and the cell lysates were immunoprecipitated using α-MnSOD and applied to two different gel-based proteomics followed by mass spectrometry for protein identification. Analysis of the profiles of MnSOD interacting partners before and after LDIR detected different patterns of MnSOD protein-protein interactions in response to LDIR. Interestingly, many of the MnSOD interacting proteins are known to have functions related to mitochondrial regulations on cell metabolism, apoptosis and DNA repair. These results provide the evidence indicating that in addition to the enzymatic action detoxifying superoxide, the antioxidant MnSOD may function as a signaling regulator in stress induced adaptive protection through cell survival pathways. PMID:23000060

  14. The UNCITRAL Convention on the Assignment of Receivables in International Trade, assignment of future receivables and Turkish law.

    OpenAIRE

    Akseli, N. Orkun

    2006-01-01

    The Assignment of receivables is an important financing technique the regulation of which varies from legal system to legal system. In December 2001, the Convention on the Assignment of Receivables in International Trade made by the United Nations Commission on International Trade (“the UNCITRAL Convention”)1 was adopted by the General Assembly2. The UNCITRAL Convention was prepared for the purposes of establishing a model for the modernisation of domestic assignment law and as a first substa...

  15. Active learning in pre-class assignments: Exploring the use of interactive simulations to enhance reading assignments

    CERN Document Server

    Stang, Jared B; Perez, Sarah; Ives, Joss; Roll, Ido

    2016-01-01

    Pre-class reading assignments help prepare students for active classes by providing a first exposure to the terms and concepts to be used during class. We investigate if the use of inquiry-oriented PhET-based activities in conjunction with pre-class reading assignments can improve both the preparation of students for in-class learning and student attitudes towards and engagement with pre-class assignments. Over three course modules covering different topics, students were assigned randomly to complete either a textbook-only pre-class assignment or both a textbook pre-class assignment and a PhET-based activity. The assignments helped prepare students for class, as measured by performance on the pre-class quiz relative to a beginning-of-semester pre-test, but no evidence for increased learning due the PhET activity was observed. Students rated the assignments which included PhET as more enjoyable and, for the topic latest in the semester, reported engaging more with the assignments when PhET was included.

  16. Methods of using the quadratic assignment problem solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Kudelska

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Quadratic assignment problem (QAP is one of the most interesting of combinatorial optimization. Was presented by Koopman and Beckamanna in 1957, as a mathematical model of the location of indivisible tasks. This problem belongs to the class NP-hard issues. This forces the application to the solution already approximate methods for tasks with a small size (over 30. Even though it is much harder than other combinatorial optimization problems, it enjoys wide interest because it models the important class of decision problems. Material and methods: The discussion was an artificial intelligence tool that allowed to solve the problem QAP, among others are: genetic algorithms, Tabu Search, Branch and Bound. Results and conclusions: QAP did not arise directly as a model for certain actions, but he found its application in many areas. Examples of applications of the problem is: arrangement of buildings on the campus of the university, layout design of electronic components in systems with large scale integration (VLSI, design a hospital, arrangement of keys on the keyboard.

  17. Cerebellar Synaptic Plasticity and the Credit Assignment Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jörntell, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    The mechanism by which a learnt synaptic weight change can contribute to learning or adaptation of brain function is a type of credit assignment problem, which is a key issue for many parts of the brain. In the cerebellum, detailed knowledge not only of the local circuitry connectivity but also of the topography of different sources of afferent/external information makes this problem particularly tractable. In addition, multiple forms of synaptic plasticity and their general rules of induction have been identified. In this review, we will discuss the possible roles of synaptic and cellular plasticity at specific locations in contributing to behavioral changes. Focus will be on the parts of the cerebellum that are devoted to limb control, which constitute a large proportion of the cortex and where the knowledge of the external connectivity is particularly well known. From this perspective, a number of sites of synaptic plasticity appear to primarily have the function of balancing the overall level of activity in the cerebellar circuitry, whereas the locations at which synaptic plasticity leads to functional changes in terms of limb control are more limited. Specifically, the postsynaptic forms of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) at the parallel fiber synapses made on interneurons and Purkinje cells, respectively, are the types of plasticity that mediate the widest associative capacity and the tightest link between the synaptic change and the external functions that are to be controlled.

  18. Simian virus Large T antigen interacts with the N-terminal domain of the 70 kD subunit of Replication Protein A in the same mode as multiple DNA damage response factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boting Ning

    Full Text Available Simian virus 40 (SV40 serves as an important model organism for studying eukaryotic DNA replication. Its helicase, Large T-antigen (Tag, is a multi-functional protein that interacts with multiple host proteins, including the ubiquitous ssDNA binding protein Replication Protein A (RPA. Tag recruits RPA, actively loads it onto the unwound DNA, and together they promote priming of the template. Although interactions of Tag with RPA have been mapped, no interaction between Tag and the N-terminal protein interaction domain of the RPA 70kDa subunit (RPA70N has been reported. Here we provide evidence of direct physical interaction of Tag with RPA70N and map the binding sites using a series of pull-down and mutational experiments. In addition, a monoclonal anti-Tag antibody, the epitope of which overlaps with the binding site, blocks the binding of Tag to RPA70N. We use NMR chemical shift perturbation analysis to show that Tag uses the same basic cleft in RPA70N as multiple of DNA damage response proteins. Mutations in the binding sites of both RPA70N and Tag demonstrate that specific charge reversal substitutions in either binding partner strongly diminish the interaction. These results expand the known repertoire of contacts between Tag and RPA, which mediate the many critical roles of Tag in viral replication.

  19. Conformational analysis of large and highly disulfide-stabilized proteins by integrating online electrochemical reduction into an optimized H/D exchange mass spectrometry workflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trabjerg, Esben; Jakobsen, Rasmus Uffe; Mysling, Simon

    2015-01-01

    solution (e.g. TCEP). The chemical reduction, however, is severely limited under quenched conditions due to a narrow time window as well as low pH and temperature. Here, we demonstrate the real-world applicability of integrating electrochemical reduction into an online HDX-MS workflow. We have optimized......-antibody, respectively. The presented results demonstrate the successful electrochemical reduction during HDX-MS analysis of both a small exceptional tightly disulfide-bonded protein (NGF) as well as the largest protein attempted to date (IgG1-antibody). We envision that online electrochemical reduction...

  20. A heuristic decomposition method for large-scale traffic assignment: Aburra Valley case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Lotero

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available La asignación de tráfico es una de las etapas más importante de la planificación del transporte, sin embargo su aplicación a casos reales en ciudades de tamaño medio y grande se hace difícil de resolver por la gran escala y complejidad computacional de estos modelos, asociada a su naturaleza combinatoria y no lineal. El objetivo de este artículo es presentar un método de descomposición basado en subregiones y una regla heurística sencilla, para resolver modelos de asignación de tráfico de gran escala, que reducen la cantidad de variables y de ecuaciones del modelo, sin comprometer la calidad de la solución. El modelo de asignación de tráfico propuesto es aplicado a la red multimodal de vías principales del Valle de Aburrá, y dicha aplicación resulta en un problema de gran escala, por el alto número de variables y ecuaciones asociadas. El método propuesto reduce significativamente la complejidad computacional del problema y encuentra soluciones adecuadas en un tiempo de ejecución razonable para un modelo de gran escala.

  1. The Eco-Sculpture Assignment: Using Art to Scaffold Metacognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polegato, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    The Eco-Sculpture Assignment demonstrates that art may be used as a conduit to scaffold metacognition in marketing courses. Theoretical underpinnings are drawn from the literature on pedagogy used in general, marketing, and art education contexts. The assignment is described in detail, followed by examples of learner response that illustrate…

  2. A Poster Assignment Connects Information Literacy and Writing Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a poster assignment in a writing and information literacy course required for undergraduate Life Sciences and Environmental Biology majors with the Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at McGill University. The assignment was introduced in response to weaknesses identified through course…

  3. 24 CFR 203.350 - Assignment of mortgage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assignment of mortgage. 203.350... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES SINGLE FAMILY MORTGAGE INSURANCE Contract Rights and Obligations Assignment of Mortgage § 203.350...

  4. A tri-objective, dynamic weapon assignment model for surface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, a tri-objective, dynamic weapon assignment model is proposed by modelling the weapon assignment problem as a multi-objective variation of the celebrated vehicle routing problem with time windows. A multi-objective, evolutionary metaheuristic for solving the vehicle routing problem with time windows is ...

  5. 47 CFR 74.786 - Digital channel assignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.786 Digital channel assignments. (a) An applicant for a new low... same TV channel and the adjacent channel within whose licensed geographic boundaries the digital LPTV... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Digital channel assignments. 74.786 Section 74...

  6. Evaluation of Automatically Assigned Job-Specific Interview Modules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friesen, Melissa C; Lan, Qing; Ge, Calvin; Locke, Sarah J; Hosgood, Dean; Fritschi, Lin; Sadkowsky, Troy; Chen, Yu-Cheng; Wei, Hu; Xu, Jun; Lam, Tai Hing; Kwong, Yok Lam; Chen, Kexin; Xu, Caigang; Su, Yu-Chieh; Chiu, Brian C H; Ip, Kai Ming Dennis; Purdue, Mark P; Bassig, Bryan A; Rothman, Nat; Vermeulen, Roel

    OBJECTIVE: In community-based epidemiological studies, job- and industry-specific 'modules' are often used to systematically obtain details about the subject's work tasks. The module assignment is often made by the interviewer, who may have insufficient occupational hygiene knowledge to assign the

  7. Negotiating Languages and Cultures: Enacting Translingualism through a Translation Assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiernan, Julia; Meier, Joyce; Wang, Xiqiao

    2016-01-01

    This collaborative project explores the affordances of a translation assignment in the context of a learner-centered pedagogy that places composition students' movement among languages and cultures as both a site for inquiry and subject of analysis. The translation assignment asks students to translate scholarly articles or culture stories from…

  8. SKU assignment to unidirectional picking lines using correlations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The clustering storage assignment policy was further expanded as three sequential steps ... determine the next SKU to assign to a cluster, had a risk of generating correlated couplets of SKUs instead of ..... an order picking system: an application to the food service industry, International Journal of Logistics. Research and ...

  9. A tri-objective, dynamic weapon assignment model for surface ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-05-11

    May 11, 2015 ... Mateo (CA). [12] Hosein PA & Athans M, 1989, The dynamic weapon-target assignment problem, (Unpublished). Technical Report, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (MA). [13] Huaiping C, Jingxu L, Yingwu C & Hao W, 2006, Survey of the research on dynamic weapon-target assignment ...

  10. Income Tax Assignment under the Ethiopian Constitution: Issues to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article uses the income tax assignment in the Ethiopian Constitution to highlight some of these questions and concerns. There is ample evidence to show that the assignment formula adopted by the Constitution, indeed its predecessor - the 1992 law - was motivated by the desire to divide the power of taxation over ...

  11. Case Assignment in the Inalienable Possession Construction in Korean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maling, Joan; Kim, Soowon

    1992-01-01

    Investigates principles for assigning case to the Noun Phrases (NP) in the Part-Whole Construction in Korean. It is shown that the case marking on the part-NP is a function of the case-assigning properties of the matrix verb, even when this is lexically governed. (41 references) (Author/LB)

  12. Determining Feasible Solutions of a Multicriteria Assignment Problem.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents an important research tool in operations research as it applies to a particular structure of the multicriteria assignment problem. The paper addresses the problem of effectiveness of feasible solutions of a multicriteria assignment problem and this was done in two steps. In the first step, we determine ...

  13. 48 CFR 1442.202 - Assignment of contract administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Assignment of contract administration. 1442.202 Section 1442.202 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR CONTRACT MANAGEMENT CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION AND AUDIT SERVICES Contract Administration Services 1442.202 Assignment of contract administration. ...

  14. 48 CFR 1342.202 - Assignment of contract administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Assignment of contract administration. 1342.202 Section 1342.202 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION Contract Administration Services 1342.202 Assignment of contract administration. The designee authorized...

  15. Frequency assignment with minimum intermodulation noise for satellite SCPC systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Y.-H.; Skellern, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    A simple, fast, and effective procedure for quasi-optimum frequency assignment of equal carrier systems is given. The quality of assignments is marginally the same as published results. The computation time has been reduced greatly; a conservative estimate shows that the reduction factor can be greater than N/2.

  16. 14 CFR 1245.109 - Assignment of title to NASA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Assignment of title to NASA. 1245.109... INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY RIGHTS Patent Waiver Regulations § 1245.109 Assignment of title to NASA. (a) The instrument of waiver set forth in § 1245.115(c) shall be voided by NASA with respect to the domestic title to...

  17. Key Issue: Teacher Hiring, Placement, and Assignment Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrstock, Ellen; Coggshall, Jane G.

    2009-01-01

    The literature on teacher hiring and assignment tends to omit definitions of these key terms. An exception in Cohen-Vogel and Osborne-Lampkin (277), who define teacher assignment as "the reciprocal process between school management and teachers to guide decisions about who will teach, where they will teach, and what they will teach." But the…

  18. On some special cases of the restricted assignment problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, C. (Chao); R.A. Sitters (René)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe consider some special cases of the restricted assignment problem. In this scheduling problem on parallel machines, any job j can only be assigned to one of the machines in its given subset Mj of machines. We give an LP-formulation for the problem with two job sizes and show that it

  19. 76 FR 34658 - The Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-14

    ... National Telecommunications and Information Administration The Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA.... ACTION: Further Notice of Inquiry. ] SUMMARY: Critical to the Internet Domain Name System (DNS) is the continued performance of the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA) functions. The IANA functions have...

  20. Writing Assignments: What We Know We Don't Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beene, LynnDianne

    Questions raised by the misinterpretations evidenced in the final examination essays of a freshman English class should lead teachers to a new understanding of how the phrasing of writing assignments influences what students write. Some of the questions included: (1) How detailed must an assignment be to communicate its goals? (2) What type of…