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Sample records for assessment topics thermal

  1. Thermal Water of Utah Topical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goode, Harry D.

    1978-11-01

    Western and central Utah has 16 areas whose wells or springs yield hot water (35 C or higher), warm water (20-34.5 C), and slightly warm water (15.5-19.5 C). These areas and the highest recorded water temperature for each are: Lower Bear River Area, 105 C; Bonneville Salt Flats, 88 C; Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, 77 C; Curlew Valley, 43 C; East Shore Area, 60 C; Escalante Desert, 149 C; Escalante Valley (Roosevelt, 269 C, and Thermo, 85C); Fish Springs, 60.5 C; Grouse Creek Valley, 42 C; Heber Valley (Midway, 45 C); Jordan Valley, 58.5 C; Pavant Valley-Black Rock Desert, 67 C; Sevier Desert ( Abraham-Crater Hot Springs, 82 C); Sevier Valley (Monroe-Red Hill, 76.5 C, and Joseph Hot Spring, 64 C); Utah Valley, 46 C; and Central Virgin River Basin, 42 C. The only hot water in eastern Utah comes from the oil wells of the Ashley Valley Oil Field, which in 1977 yielded 4400 acre-feet of water at 43 C to 55 C. Many other areas yield warm water (20 to 34.5 C) and slightly warm water (15.5 to 19.5 C). With the possible exception of the Roosevelt KGRA, Crater Hot Springs in the Sevier Desert, Escalante Desert, Pavant-Black Rock, Cove Fort-Sulphurdale, and Coyote Spring in Curlew Valley, which may derive their heat from buried igneous bodies, the heat that warms the thermal water is derived from the geothermal gradient. Meteoric water circulates through fractures or permeable rocks deep within the earth, where it is warmed; it then rises by convection or artesian pressure and issues at the surface as springs or is tapped by wells. Most thermal springs thus rise along faults, but some thermal water is trapped in confined aquifers so that it spreads laterally as it mixes with and warms cooler near-surface water. This spreading of thermal waters is evident in Cache Valley, in Jordan Valley, and in southern Utah Valley; likely the spreading occurs in many other artesian basins where it has not yet been recognized. In the East Shore Area thermal water trapped in confined aquifers warms

  2. TOPICAL REVIEW: Thermal plasma waste treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberlein, Joachim; Murphy, Anthony B.

    2008-03-01

    Plasma waste treatment has over the past decade become a more prominent technology because of the increasing problems with waste disposal and because of the realization of opportunities to generate valuable co-products. Plasma vitrification of hazardous slags has been a commercial technology for several years, and volume reduction of hazardous wastes using plasma processes is increasingly being used. Plasma gasification of wastes with low negative values has attracted interest as a source of energy and spawned process developments for treatment of even municipal solid wastes. Numerous technologies and approaches exist for plasma treatment of wastes. This review summarizes the approaches that have been developed, presents some of the basic physical principles, provides details of some specific processes and considers the advantages and disadvantages of thermal plasmas in waste treatment applications.

  3. Proceedings of the fourth international topical meeting on nuclear thermal hydraulics, operations and safety. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than 100 papers were presented. The meeting was divided in 56 sessions and covered the following topics: Plant Operation, Retrofitting and Maintenance Experience; Steam Generator Operation and Maintenance; Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems; Seismic Technologies for Plant Design and Operations; Aging Management and Life Extension; Two-Phase Flow Modeling and Applications; Severe Accidents and Degraded Core Thermal Hydraulics; Plant Simulators, Analyzers, and Workstations; Advanced Nuclear Fuel Challenges; Recent Nuclear Power Station Decommissioning Experiences in the USA; Application of Probabilistic risk assessment/Probabilistic safety assessment (PRA/PSA) in Design and Modification; Numerical Modeling in Thermal Hydraulics; General Thermal Hydraulics; Severe Accident Management; Licensing and Regulatory Requirements; Advanced Light Water Reactor Designs to Support Reduced Emergency Planning; Best Estimate loss-of-coolant (LOCA) Methodologies; Plant Instrumentation and Control; LWR Fuel Designs for Improved Thermal Hydraulic Performance; Performance Assessment of Radioactive Waste Disposal; Thermal Hydraulics in Passive Reactor Systems; Advances in Man-Machine Interface Design and the Related Human Factors Engineering; Advances in Measurements and Instrumentation; Computer Aided Technology for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and Plant Maintenance Plant Uprating; Flow-Accelerated Corrosion in Nuclear Power Plants; Advances in Radiological Measurement and Analysis Risk Management and Assessment; Stability in Thermal Hydraulic Systems; Critical heat flux (CHF) and Post Dryout Heat Transfer; Plant Transient and Accident Modeling

  4. Proceedings of the fourth international topical meeting on nuclear thermal hydraulics, operations and safety. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than 100 papers presented at the meeting were divided in 56 sessions and covered the following topics: Plant Operation, Retrofitting and Maintenance Experience; Steam Generator Operation and Maintenance; Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems; Seismic Technologies for Plant Design and Operations; Aging Management and Life Extension; Two-Phase Flow Modeling and Applications; Severe Accidents and Degraded Core Thermal Hydraulics; Plant Simulators, Analyzers, and Workstations; Advanced Nuclear Fuel Challenges; Recent Nuclear Power Station Decommissioning Experiences in the USA; Application of Probabilistic risk assessment/Probabilistic safety assessment (PRA/PSA) in Design and Modification; Numerical Modeling in Thermal Hydraulics; General Thermal Hydraulics; Severe Accident Management; Licensing and Regulatory Requirements; Advanced Light Water Reactor Designs to Support Reduced Emergency Planning; Best Estimate loss-of-coolant (LOCA) Methodologies; Plant Instrumentation and Control; LWR Fuel Designs for Improved Thermal Hydraulic Performance; Performance Assessment of Radioactive Waste Disposal; Thermal Hydraulics in Passive Reactor Systems; Advances in Man-Machine Interface Design and the Related Human Factors Engineering; Advances in Measurements and Instrumentation; Computer Aided Technology for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and Plant Maintenance Plant Uprating; Flow-Accelerated Corrosion in Nuclear Power Plants; Advances in Radiological Measurement and Analysis Risk Management and Assessment; Stability in Thermal Hydraulic Systems; Critical heat flux (CHF) and Post Dryout Heat Transfer; Plant Transient and Accident Modeling

  5. Proceedings of the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting: Volume 1, Plenary session; Advanced reactor research; advanced control system technology; advanced instrumentation and control hardware; human factors research; probabilistic risk assessment topics; thermal hydraulics; thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25--27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. This document, Volume 1 covers the following topics: Advanced Reactor Research; Advanced Instrumentation and Control Hardware; Advanced Control System Technology; Human Factors Research; Probabilistic Risk Assessment Topics; Thermal Hydraulics; and Thermal Hydraulic Research for Advanced Passive Light Water Reactors

  6. Proceedings of the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting: Volume 1, Plenary session; Advanced reactor research; advanced control system technology; advanced instrumentation and control hardware; human factors research; probabilistic risk assessment topics; thermal hydraulics; thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteleone, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [comp.

    1994-04-01

    This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25--27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. This document, Volume 1 covers the following topics: Advanced Reactor Research; Advanced Instrumentation and Control Hardware; Advanced Control System Technology; Human Factors Research; Probabilistic Risk Assessment Topics; Thermal Hydraulics; and Thermal Hydraulic Research for Advanced Passive Light Water Reactors.

  7. Industrial thermal insulation: an assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnelly, R.G.; Tennery, V.J.; McElroy, D.L.; Godfrey, T.G.; Kolb, J.O.

    1976-03-01

    A large variety of thermal insulation materials is manufactured for application in various temperature ranges and environments. Additional and improved thermal insulation for steam systems is a key area with immediate energy conservation potential in several of the larger energy-consuming industries. Industrial thermal insulation technology was assessed by obtaining input from a variety of sources including insulation manufacturers, system designers, installers, users, consultants, measurement laboratories, open literature, and in-house knowledge. The assessment identified a number of factors relevant to insulation materials and usage that could contribute significantly to improved energy conservation.

  8. Three topics to the evolution of the environmetal impact assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Vito Verna Coronado

    2013-01-01

    The paper identifies three topics in order to evaluate the improvements in the regulation of the National System of EnvironmentalImpact Assessment, looking to benefit the people’s trust in the environmental certification. The first one consists in the gradual transition from the prevention paradigm to the integration one, as the purpose of the different instruments that compose the system; the second involves the enrichment in the evaluation of the Environmental Impact Study (EIS), by incorpo...

  9. Advanced Signal Processing for Thermal Flaw Detection; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic thermography is a promising technology for inspecting metallic and composite structures used in high-consequence industries. However, the reliability and inspection sensitivity of this technology has historically been limited by the need for extensive operator experience and the use of human judgment and visual acuity to detect flaws in the large volume of infrared image data collected. To overcome these limitations new automated data analysis algorithms and software is needed. The primary objectives of this research effort were to develop a data processing methodology that is tied to the underlying physics, which reduces or removes the data interpretation requirements, and which eliminates the need to look at significant numbers of data frames to determine if a flaw is present. Considering the strengths and weakness of previous research efforts, this research elected to couple both the temporal and spatial attributes of the surface temperature. Of the possible algorithms investigated, the best performing was a radiance weighted root mean square Laplacian metric that included a multiplicative surface effect correction factor and a novel spatio-temporal parametric model for data smoothing. This metric demonstrated the potential for detecting flaws smaller than 0.075 inch in inspection areas on the order of one square foot. Included in this report is the development of a thermal imaging model, a weighted least squares thermal data smoothing algorithm, simulation and experimental flaw detection results, and an overview of the ATAC (Automated Thermal Analysis Code) software that was developed to analyze thermal inspection data

  10. Thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membrane materials. Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, G.N.; Sanjurjo, A.; Wood, B.J.; Lau, K.H.

    1994-04-01

    This report describes the results of a literature review to evaluate the long-term thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membranes that are being developed to separate gaseous products produced by the gasification or combustion of coal in fixed-, fluidized-, and entrained-bed gasifiers, direct coal-fired turbines, and pressurized-fluidized-bed combustors. Several impurities, such as H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3}, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and trace metal compounds are generated during coal conversion, and they must be removed from the coal gas or the combustor flue gas to meet environmental standards. The use of membranes to separate these noxious gases is an attractive alternative to their removal by sorbents such as zinc titanate or calcium oxide. Inorganic membranes that have a high separation efficiency and exhibit both thermal and chemical stability would improve the economics of power generation from coal. The U.S. Department of Energy is supporting investigations to develop inorganic membranes for separating hydrogen from coal gas streams and noxious impurities from hot coal- and flue-gas streams. Membrane materials that have been investigated in the past include glass (silica), alumina, zirconia, carbon, and metals (Pd and Pt).

  11. Thermal depolymerization of plastics - PDU testing. Task 15. Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The process development unit (PDU) test program is part of an ongoing effort at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) to expand the base of knowledge for the thermal depolymerization of plastics process. This phase of the development effort, initiated after successful completion of a bench-scale program, has concentrated on maximizing liquid yield. The purposes of the PDU program were (1) to demonstrate the process on a commercially scalable unit, (2) to produce quantities of product that could be used to initiate discussions with potential end users, and (3) to gather engineering and yield data. Experimentation consisted of eleven test points on the PDU and seven on the continuous fluid-bed reactor (CFBR) bench-scale unit. Initial PDU tests (PO35-PO39) were carried out using a base blend, which consists of 60% high-density polyethylene (HDPE), 20% polypropylene (PP), and 20% polystyrene (PS) virgin resin pellets. Test PO39 used base blend with 5% polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The base blend decomposed to produce a flowable liquid, with liquid yields ranging from 33% to 45%. The next series of tests, PO40-PO44, used a postconsumer plastics feed. This material did not decompose as readily as the base blend and formed a very waxy, heavy liquid, with {open_quotes}liquid{close_quotes} yields ranging from 18% to 63% (low liquid yields are the result of using excess air in the natural gas burner in some tests in an attempt to increase gas residence time).

  12. Topical glucocorticoid has no antinociceptive or anti-inflammatory effect in thermal injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, J L; Møiniche, S; Kehlet, H

    1994-01-01

    We have studied the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of topical glucocorticoids in human thermal injury. The right and left legs of 12 healthy volunteers were allocated randomly to be treated with either 0.05% clobetasol propionate cream or placebo in a double-blind trial. Thermal...... injury caused a decrease in HPDT, HPT and MPDT, an increase in EI and development of mechanical, secondary hyperalgesia. Clobetasol propionate had no effect on any of the nociceptive or inflammatory variables studied....

  13. 6. Seminar of the IIE-ININ-IMP on technological specialties. Topic 3: thermal fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document includes 10 papers presented at the 6. Seminar of the IIE-ININ-IMP (Mexico) on technological specialties in the field of thermal fluids. (Topic 3). From these, 4 papers were in INIS subject scope and a separate abstract was prepared for each of them

  14. Thermal comfort assessment of buildings

    CERN Document Server

    Carlucci, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    A number of metrics for assessing human thermal response to climatic conditions have been proposed in scientific literature over the last decades. They aim at describing human thermal perception of the thermal environment to which an individual or a group of people is exposed. More recently, a new type of “discomfort index” has been proposed for describing, in a synthetic way, long-term phenomena. Starting from a systematic review of a number of long-term global discomfort indices, they are then contrasted and compared on a reference case study in order to identify their similarities and differences and strengths and weaknesses. Based on this analysis, a new short-term local discomfort index is proposed for the American Adaptive comfort model. Finally, a new and reliable long-term general discomfort index is presented. It is delivered in three versions and each of them is suitable to be respectively coupled with the Fanger, the European Adaptive and the American Adaptive comfort models.

  15. Topical ketorolac has no antinociceptive or anti-inflammatory effect in thermal injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møiniche, S; Pedersen, J L; Kehlet, H

    1994-01-01

    This study investigated the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effect of a topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug in human thermal injury. Twelve healthy unmedicated volunteers had identical burn injuries produced on the medial side of both calves with a 49 degrees C 15 x 25 mm thermode...... and MPDT, an increase in EI and development of mechanical hyperalgesia (P < 0.05). Ketorolac gel had no effect on any of the nociceptive or inflammatory variables studies (P > 0.2)....

  16. Iatrogenic hyperadrenocorticism during topical steroid therapy: assessment of systemic effects by metabolic criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, L J; Freinkel, R K; Zugerman, C; Levin, D L; Radtke, R

    1982-06-01

    Systemic absorption of topically applied glucocorticoids in quantities sufficient to replace endogenous production is not uncommon. However, iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome resulting from the use of topical corticosteroids is very rare. Thus the possibility that systemic absorption may cause hyperglucocorticism has been deemphasized and examined only sporadically. We have studied changes in carbohydrate metabolism induced by topical glucocorticoids in a psoriatic patient who had developed Cushing's syndrome from topical desoximetasone (Topicort). The results indicated that (1) fasting hyperglycemia and increased insulin-glucose ratios could be induced within 24 hours of administration of topical glucocorticoids, (2) insulin resistance accompanied abnormal carbohydrate tolerance, and (3) fluctuations in circulating leukocytes paralleled the changes in carbohydrate metabolism. The findings suggest that metabolic indexes of glucocorticoid action action may provide useful parameters for assessing systemic absorption of topical glucocorticoids. glucose relationship as one such index to assess the risk of treatment of extensive chronic skin disease with potent topical glucocorticoids. PMID:7047591

  17. Six Key Topics for Automated Assessment Utilisation and Acceptance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten REINERS

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Automated assessment technologies have been used in education for decades (e.g., computerised multiple choice tests. In contrast, Automated Essay Grading (AEG technologies: have existed for decades; are `good in theory' (e.g., as accurate as humans, temporally and financially efficient, and can enhance formative feedback, and yet; are ostensibly used comparatively infrequently in Australian universities. To empirically examine these experiential observations we conducted a national survey to explore the use of automated assessment in Australian universities and examine why adoption of AEG is limited. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected in an online survey from a sample of 265 staff and students from 5 Australian universities. The type of assessment used by the greatest proportion of respondents was essays/reports (82.6%, however very few respondents had used AEG (3.8%. Recommendations are made regarding methods to promote technology utilisation, including the use of innovative dissemination channels such as 3D Virtual Worlds.

  18. Assessment in Music Education: Relationships between Classroom Practice and Professional Publication Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuarrie, Sarah H.; Sherwin, Ronald G.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between actual current assessment practices of elementary music teachers and the assessment topics as published in the literature aimed at those teachers. Specifically, this study sought to: 1) identify the current assessment techniques utilized by elementary music teachers; 2) identify…

  19. Customer satisfaction assessment at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing and implementing a customer satisfaction assessment program (CSAP) to assess the quality of research and development provided by the laboratory. This report presents the customer survey component of the PNNL CSAP. The customer survey questionnaire is composed of two major sections: Strategic Value and Project Performance. Both sections contain a set of questions that can be answered with a 5-point Likert scale response. The strategic value section consists of five questions that are designed to determine if a project directly contributes to critical future national needs. The project Performance section consists of nine questions designed to determine PNNL performance in meeting customer expectations. A statistical model for customer survey data is developed and this report discusses how to analyze the data with this model. The properties of the statistical model can be used to establish a gold standard or performance expectation for the laboratory, and then to assess progress. The gold standard is defined using laboratory management input-answers to four questions, in terms of the information obtained from the customer survey: (1) What should the average Strategic Value be for the laboratory project portfolio? (2) What Strategic Value interval should include most of the projects in the laboratory portfolio? (3) What should average Project Performance be for projects with a Strategic Value of about 2? (4) What should average Project Performance be for projects with a Strategic Value of about 4? To be able to provide meaningful answers to these questions, the PNNL customer survey will need to be fully implemented for several years, thus providing a link between management perceptions of laboratory performance and customer survey data

  20. Life Cycle Assessment of Coal-fired Power Production; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coal has the largest share of utility power generation in the US, accounting for approximately 56% of all utility-produced electricity (US DOE, 1998). Therefore, understanding the environmental implications of producing electricity from coal is an important component of any plan to reduce total emissions and resource consumption. A life cycle assessment (LCA) on the production of electricity from coal was performed in order to examine the environmental aspects of current and future pulverized coal boiler systems. Three systems were examined: (1) a plant that represents the average emissions and efficiency of currently operating coal-fired power plants in the US (this tells us about the status quo), (2) a new coal-fired power plant that meets the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), and (3) a highly advanced coal-fired power plant utilizing a low emission boiler system (LEBS)

  1. Assessing Drought Responses Using Thermal Infrared Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashar, Ankush; Jones, Hamlyn G

    2016-01-01

    Canopy temperature, a surrogate for stomatal conductance, is shown to be a good indicator of plant water status and a potential tool for phenotyping and irrigation scheduling. Measurement of stomatal conductance and leaf temperature has traditionally been done by using porometers or gas exchange analyzers and fine-wire thermocouples attached to the leaves, which are labor intensive and point measurements. The advent of remote or proximal thermal sensing technologies has provided the potential for scaling up to leaves, plants, and canopies. Thermal cameras with a temperature resolution of <0.1 K now allow one to study the temperature variation within and between plants. This chapter discusses some applications of infrared thermography for assessing drought and other abiotic and biotic stress and outlines some of the main factors that need to be considered when applying this to the study of leaf or canopy temperature whether in controlled environments or in the field. PMID:26867626

  2. Current Challenges in Bioequivalence, Quality, and Novel Assessment Technologies for Topical Products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yacobi, Avraham; Shah, Vinod P; Bashaw, Edward D;

    2014-01-01

    This paper summarises the proceedings of a recent workshop which brought together pharmaceutical scientists and dermatologists from academia, industry and regulatory agencies to discuss current regulatory issues and industry practices for establishing therapeutic bioequivalence (BE) of dermatologic...... topical products. The methods currently available for assessment of BE were reviewed as well as alternatives and the advantages and disadvantages of each method were considered. Guidance on quality and performance of topical products was reviewed and a framework to categorise existing and alternative...... methods for evaluation of BE was discussed. The outcome of the workshop emphasized both a need for greater attention to quality, possibly, via a Quality-By-Design (QBD) approach and a need to develop a "whole toolkit" approach towards the problem of determination of rate and extent in the assessment...

  3. Assessment indices for uniform and non-uniform thermal environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Different assessment indices for thermal environments were compared and selected for proper assessment of indoor thermal environments.30 subjects reported their overall thermal sensation,thermal comfort,and thermal acceptability in uniform and non-uniform conditions.The results show that these three assessment indices provide equivalent evaluations in uniform environments.However,overall thermal sensation differs from the other two indices and cannot be used as a proper index for the evaluation of non-uniform environments.The relationship between the percentage and the mean vote for each index is established.

  4. Thermal ecological risk assessment - methodology for modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discharge of hot effluents into natural water bodies is a potential risk to the aquatic life. The stipulations imposed by the MoEF, Government of India for protecting the environment are in place. However, due to lack of quality scientific information, these stipulations are generally conservative in nature and hence questionable. A Coordinated Research Project on Thermal Ecological Studies, successfully completed recently came out with a suggestion of implementing multi-factorially estimated mixing zone concept. In the present paper, risk based assessment methodology is proposed as an alternate approach. The methodology is presented only conceptually and briefly over which further refining may be necessary. The methodology would enable to account for variations in the plant operational conditions, climatic conditions and the geographical and hydraulic characteristic conditions of the water body in a suitable manner. (author)

  5. Proliferation resistance assessment of thermal recycle systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines the major proliferation aspects of thermal recycle systems and the extent to which technical or institutional measures could increase the difficulty or detectability of misuse of the system by would-be proliferators. It does this by examining the various activities necessary to acquire weapons-usable material using a series of assessment factors; resources required, time required, detectability. It is concluded that resistance to proliferation could be improved substantially by collecting reprocessing, conversion and fuel fabrication plants under multi national control and instituting new measures to protect fresh MOX fuel. Resistance to theft at sub-national level could be improved by co-location of sensitive facilities high levels of physical protection at plants and during transportation and possibly by adding a radiation barrier to MOX prior to shipment

  6. Actinides recycling assessment in a thermal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Actinides recycling is assessed using BWR fuel assemblies. • Four fuel rods are substituted by minor actinides rods in a UO2 and in a MOX fuel assembly. • Performance of standard fuel assemblies and the ones with the substitution is compared. • Reduction of actinides is measured for the fuel assemblies containing minor actinides rods. • Thermal reactors can be used for actinides recycling. - Abstract: Actinides recycling have the potential to reduce the geological repository burden of the high-level radioactive waste that is produced in a nuclear power reactor. The core of a standard light water reactor is composed only by fuel assemblies and there are no specific positions to allocate any actinides blanket, in this assessment it is proposed to replace several fuel rods by actinides blankets inside some of the reactor core fuel assemblies. In the first part of this study, a single uranium standard fuel assembly is modeled and the amount of actinides generated during irradiation is quantified for use it as reference. Later, in the same fuel assembly four rods containing 6 w/o of minor actinides and using depleted uranium as matrix were replaced and depletion was simulated to obtain the net reduction of minor actinides. Other calculations were performed using MOX fuel lattices instead of uranium standard fuel to find out how much reduction is possible to obtain. Results show that a reduction of minor actinides is possible using thermal reactors and a higher reduction is obtained when the minor actinides are embedded in uranium fuel assemblies instead of MOX fuel assemblies

  7. Assessing patient satisfaction with cataract surgery under topical anesthesia supplemented by intracameral lidocaine combined with sedation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Bezerril Cipião Fernandes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Ocular akinesia, the use of anticoagulants, and patient collaboration are some of the factors that must be taken into consideration when choosing the appropriate anesthesia for phacoemulsification cataract surgery. The satisfaction of patients with the use of topical anesthesia and conscious sedation for this procedure has not been enough described in Brazil. Conscious sedation allows patient walk and answer a voice command. To assess the satisfaction, pain, and perioperative hemodynamic alterations of patients subjected to phacoemulsification under conscious sedation and topical anesthesia supplemented with intracameral lidocaine. METHODS: Prospective cohort non-controlled study that included patients treated by the same surgical team over a 70-day period. Sedation was performed with midazolam at a total dose of 3 mg and topical anesthesia with 0.5% proxymetacaine chlorhydrate and 2% lidocaine gel combined with 2% lidocaine by intracameral route. The intraoperative vital parameters, scores based on the Iowa Satisfaction with Anesthesia Scale (ISAS, and the pain visual analog scale (VAS were recorded at several time points after surgery. RESULTS: A total of 106 patients were enroled in study (73.6% female, the mean age was 65.9 years. The surgical procedures lasted 11.2 minutes on average. The hemodynamic parameters did not exhibit significant changes at any of the investigated time points. The average ISAS score was 2.67 immediately after surgery and 2.99 eight hours after the surgery; this increase was statistically significant (p<0.0001. More than two-thirds (68.9% of the participants (73 patients did not report any pain in the transoperative period, and 98.1% of patients denied the occurrence of pain after surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Patients that received topical anesthesia supplemented by intracameral lidocaine combined with sedation for phacoemulsification cataract surgery reported adequate level of satisfaction with the anesthetic

  8. Review of the integrated thermal and nonthermal treatment system studies. Topical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report analyzes three systems engineering (SE) studies performed on integrated thermal treatment systems (ITTSs) and integrated nonthermal treatment systems (INTSs) for the remediation of mixed low-level waste (MLLW) stored throughout the US Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex. The review was performed by an independent team of nine researchers from the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC), Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), the Waste Policy Institute (WPI), and Virginia Tech (VT). The three studies reviewed were as follows: Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 1--issued July 1994; Integrated Thermal Treatment System Study, Phase 2--issued February 1996; and Integrated Nonthermal Treatment System Study--drafted March 1996. The purpose of this review was to (1) determine whether the assumptions taken in the studies might bias the resulting economic evaluations of both thermal and nonthermal systems, (2) identify the critical areas of the studies that would benefit from further investigation, and (3) develop a standard template that could be used in future studies to produce sound SE applications

  9. Underground Coal Thermal Treatment: Task 6 Topical Report, Utah Clean Coal Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, P.J.; Deo, M.; Edding, E.G.; Hradisky, M.; Kelly, K.E.; Krumm, R.; Sarofim, Adel; Wang, D.

    2014-08-15

    The long-term objective of this task is to develop a transformational energy production technology by in- situ thermal treatment of a coal seam for the production of substitute natural gas and/or liquid transportation fuels while leaving much of the coal’s carbon in the ground. This process converts coal to a high-efficiency, low-greenhouse gas (GHG) emitting fuel. It holds the potential of providing environmentally acceptable access to previously unusable coal resources. This task focused on three areas: Experimental. The Underground Coal Thermal Treatment (UCTT) team focused on experiments at two scales, bench-top and slightly larger, to develop data to understand the feasibility of a UCTT process as well as to develop validation/uncertainty quantification (V/UQ) data for the simulation team. Simulation. The investigators completed development of High Performance Computing (HPC) simulations of UCTT. This built on our simulation developments over the course of the task and included the application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)- based tools to perform HPC simulations of a realistically sized domain representative of an actual coal field located in Utah. CO2 storage. In order to help determine the amount of CO2 that can be sequestered in a coal formation that has undergone UCTT, adsorption isotherms were performed on coals treated to 325, 450, and 600°C with slow heating rates. Raw material was sourced from the Sufco (Utah), Carlinville (Illinois), and North Antelope (Wyoming) mines. The study indicated that adsorptive capacity for the coals increased with treatment temperature and that coals treated to 325°C showed less or similar capacity to the untreated coals.

  10. An experimental study of the molten glass/water thermal interaction. Topical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molten glass interacts explosively with water under certain contact mode conditions. The contact mode found explosive is as follows: molten glass enters the water bath in the film boiling regime (as predicted by Henry's correlation) and soon after entry, the vapor film is perturbed sufficiently by an external pressure pulse. The ensuing reaction proceeds basically along the same lines as energetic tin/water interactions observed by several investigators. In the absence of this pressure pulse, the event is non-energetic. The reported findings are for a combination in which the hot material has a very low thermal diffusivity and the calculated interface temperature is significantly (175C) below its melting temperature. This is similar to the characteristics of the UO2/sodium combination. The observed explosive glass/water interactions show growth times of the order of a few milliseconds. The particulate size distribution from the present tests was coarser than the particulate size distribution from some in-pile and out-of-pile UO2/sodium interaction tests

  11. 78 FR 22891 - Proposed Collection; 60-day Comment Request: Topic-based Studies for the Population Assessment of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... Studies for the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study SUMMARY: In compliance with the... Collection: Topic-based Studies for the Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health (PATH) Study, 0925-New... Collection: The PATH study will establish a population-based framework for the tracking of...

  12. Journal “Topics in Early Childhood Special Education”: assessment of the periodical and articles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Celso Pereira

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Journals have the purpose of dissemination and communication of scientific knowledge. As a vehicle to the dissemination of scientific productions, it is necessary the periodical assessment to evaluate the quality of research: accuracy, reliability and seriousness. The objective of this study is to assess the journal Topics in Early Childhood Special Education, considering for the analysis the whole journal and the formal and the contents aspects of all articles. The analysis revealed that the periodical satisfactorily fulfills the normalization criterion, the authors’ instruction criterion and the articles assessment criterion. However, it was identified the need for major accuracy in the bibliographic legend that should appear on all pages of articles. Regarding the analysis of the articles it was observed the lack of keywords and a wide variety of information in the abstracts, which they were sometimes not related to the key aspects of the research. All authors and institutions are from United States of America and the type of study most published it was the research report. The participants’ characterization indicated that the journal broachs different types of special needs, but there is more studies about autism. The study data confirm the journal purpose that is providing relevant and current information on all aspects of early education for children with special needs, including their families. It was pointed the need for more articles from other countries beyond the North American continent, including the participation of researcher from other countries. Additionally, the model used for the journal assessment showed to be effective in providing data quality, reliability and accuracy of the whole periodical and the studies that it was published in the journal.

  13. Thermal impact assessment of multi power plant operations on estuaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assessment of the thermal impact of multi power plant operations on large estuaries requires careful consideration of the problems associated with: re-entrainment, re-circulation, thermal interaction, delay in the attainment of thermal equilibrium state, and uncertainty in specifying open boundaries and open boundary conditions of the regions, which are critically important in the analysis of the thermal conditions in receiving water bodies with tidal dominated, periodically reversing flow conditions. The results of an extensive study in the Hudson River at Indian Point, 42 miles upstream of the ocean end at the Battery, concluded that the tidal-transient, multi-dimensional discrete-element (UTA) thermal transport models (ESTONE, FLOTWO, TMPTWO computer codes) and the near-field far-field zone-matching methodology can be employed with a high degree of reliability in the assessment of the thermal impact of multi power plant operations on tidal dominated estuaries

  14. Assessment of topical microbicides to prevent HIV-1 transmission: concepts, testing, lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friend, David R; Kiser, Patrick F

    2013-09-01

    The development of topically applied products capable of preventing vaginal and rectal transmission of HIV-1 has been on-going for nearly 20 years. Despite this, only one clinical trial has demonstrated protection against sexual transmission of HIV-1 in women. This review covers the development of microbicides, also referred to as topical pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), through three stages. The first stage focused on nonspecific agents, including surfactants such as nonoxynol-9 (N-9), to prevent HIV-1 transmission. Unfortunately, N-9 enhanced susceptibility to sexual transmission of HIV-1 when evaluated for efficacy. Soon thereafter, other nonspecific agents (polyanions) were quickly moved into large efficacy trials. Due to a lack of coordination among investigators and funders, a large investment was made in a class of compounds shown ultimately to be ineffective, although poor adherence may have contributed to these findings. The second stage involved the assessment of the antiretroviral drug tenofovir, formulated as a vaginal gel, which was found to be modestly effective in a Phase IIb trial (CAPRISA-004) when dosed in a coitally-dependent manner. In another Phase IIb trial, VOICE (MTN-003), tenofovir gel was found to be ineffective when dosed once-daily in a coitally-independent manner. Based on pharmacokinetic data, it was concluded the participants were poorly adherent to this dosing regimen, leading to a lack of efficacy. Tenofovir gel is currently in a Phase III safety and efficacy trial in South Africa (FACTS-001), using the coitally-dependent dosing regimen employed in CAPRISA-004. We are now in the third stage of microbicide research. The antiretroviral drug dapivirine is currently in two Phase III safety and efficacy studies formulated as a vaginal ring. It is hoped that the once-monthly dosing regimen will lead to higher adherence than found in the VOICE study. It is now clear that product adherence could be the greatest challenge to demonstrating

  15. 5-Megawatt solar-thermal test facility: environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1976-01-30

    An Environmental Assessment of the 5 Megawatt Solar Thermal Test Facility (STTF) is presented. The STTF is located at Albuquerque, New Mexico. The facility will have the capability for testing scale models of major subsystems comprising a solar thermal electrical power plant. The STTF capabilities will include testing a solar energy collector subsystem comprised of heliostat arrays, a receiver subsystem which consists of a boiler/superheater in which a working fluid is heated, and a thermal storage subsystem which includes tanks of high heat capacity material which stores thermal energy for subsequent use. The STTF will include a 200-foot receiver tower on which experimental receivers will be mounted. The Environmental Assessment describes the proposed STTF, its anticipated benefits, and the environment affected. It also evaluates the potential environmental impacts associated with STTF construction and operation.

  16. Mathematical Safety Assessment Approaches for Thermal Power Plants

    OpenAIRE

    Zong-Xiao Yang; Lei Song; Chun-Yang Zhang; Chong Li; Xiao-Bo Yuan

    2014-01-01

    How to use system analysis methods to identify the hazards in the industrialized process, working environment, and production management for complex industrial processes, such as thermal power plants, is one of the challenges in the systems engineering. A mathematical system safety assessment model is proposed for thermal power plants in this paper by integrating fuzzy analytical hierarchy process, set pair analysis, and system functionality analysis. In the basis of those, the key factors in...

  17. Assessing the adherence behavior of glaucoma patients to topical eye drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welge-Lussen U

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ulrich Welge-Lussen,1 Stefanie Weise,2 Alice L Yu3 1Department of Ophthalmology, Friedrich-Alexander University, Erlangen, Germany; 2Department of Ophthalmology, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich, Germany Purpose: The goal of this study was to determine the adherence of glaucoma patients to their topical glaucoma medication. Furthermore, the relationships between the adherence behavior and the patients’ demographic data, clinical characteristics, and their knowledge about glaucoma were evaluated. Methods: This was a prospective study of 123 patients with primary open-angle glaucoma who were given two standardized questionnaires. The first questionnaire at time point T1 comprised a knowledge assessment and the self-reported adherence measures Adherence to Refills and Medication Scale 2 (ARMS2, visual analogue scale for adherence (VAS-AD, and missed doses in the past 14 days. Two months later at time point T2, a second questionnaire reevaluated the adherence measures ARMS2, VAS-AD, and missed doses in the past 14 days. Results: There was a good correlation among all the three adherence measures at T1 and T2. The mean values of ARMS2 were in the lower range, with 3.38 at T1 and 2.8 at T2. The VAS-AD detected that 18.5% of patients always took their eye drops correctly, and 77.9% of patients reported not to have missed a single dose in the past 14 days. There was no significant correlation between the patients’ demographic data or knowledge about glaucoma and the adherence measures ARMS2 or VAS-AD. Among the clinical characteristics, only single-eye blindness showed a significant correlation with VAS-AD. Conclusion: In this study, no general relationships were found between medication adherence and the patients’ demographic data, clinical characteristics, or knowledge about glaucoma. It may be assumed that more individualized strategies are required to optimize

  18. Potency assessment of topical corticoids in the vasoconstrictor assay and on tuberculin-induced inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalla, W; Schorning, S

    1991-01-01

    The topical anti-inflammatory activity of potent and very potent corticoids was studied in normal and inflamed skin using the vasoconstriction assay and tuberculin-induced inflammation in four double-blind intraindividual comparison trials. Instrumental techniques in addition to visual scores and several time points were applied to get better insight into the reliability of the models and the sensitivity of the different variables. Beta-methasone-17-valerate and two concentrations of prednicarbate were used as potent corticoids, clobetasol-17-propionate, betamethasone-17,21-dipropionate and different biopharmaceutical forms of desoximetasone (DOM) as very potent corticoids. Visual scores, the reactive skin hyperemia after arterial occlusion and skin colorimetry were used to quantify vasoconstriction; erythema scores, surface area of infiltration and changes in skin colorimetry, skin blood flow and skin temperature for the tuberculin reaction. The time courses of blanching (n = 20) and of the tuberculin reaction (n = 10) were described by orthogonal polynomials and the coefficients were statistically analyzed by nonparametric tests, the discriminative variables in tuberculin inflammation in addition by the parametric multiple analysis of variance. Important differences in the release rates of corticoids demand several assessment times and not just one as often used. The potency ranking may otherwise be misleading. In general, ointments released corticoids slowlier than the cream which in turn liberated slowlier than the gels. The DOM gel declined rapidly after an apparent peak at 5.5 h in terms of its blanching effect, but was nevertheless comparable after once-daily application to other very potent corticoids in its activity against delayed-type inflammation. Such differences may explain discrepancies found for some corticoid preparations between their blanching response and clinical efficacy. The more potent a corticoid the more the erythema is reduced, the less

  19. In-Depth Analysis of Selected Topics Related to the Quality Assessment of E-Commerce Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefani, Antonia; Stavrinoudis, Dimitris; Xenos, Michalis

    This paper provides an in-depth analysis of selected important topics related to the quality assessment of e-commerce systems. It briefly introduces to the reader a quality assessment model based on Bayesian Networks and presents in detail the practical application of this model, highlighting practical issues related to the involvement of human subjects, conflict resolution, and calibration of the measurement instruments. Furthermore, the paper presents the application process of the model for the quality assessment of various e-commerce systems; it also discusses in detail how particular features (data) of the assessed e-commerce systems can be identified and, using the described automated assessment process, lead to higher abstraction information (desiderata) regarding the quality of the assessed e-commerce systems.

  20. Spotlight Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Spotlight Topic consists of a set of two or more review articles focused on a specific subject in surface science. The topics are recommended by the Board of Editors. A topic may be chosen because it is particularly new or fast-breaking, thus deserving introduction to the general readership. Or, it may be because a topic is especially controversial or confusing, requiring clarification by experts. Each review will give a critical assessment rather than an encyclopedic report. While our editors always will insist on fairness and accuracy, any review which forwards an opinion is bound to be somewhat subjective. Therefore, it is the editors' wish that the set of reviews written by different authors on the same subject matter will provide a broad and balanced viewpoint. It is often the case that an author who is an expert in a technique or method may be especially enthusiastic or critical about this technique or method. A companion review in the set may provide a different viewpoint. We are hopeful that the reader, after studying these reviews and checking some of the key references, will obtain an informed opinion of the subject. We think the set of reviews in a spotlight area will considerably shorten the ``learning time'' that a nonexpert would otherwise need to become knowledgeable about a subject. In this issue, we feature a spotlight topic on oxide surfaces. The set contains an overview article by Jacques Jupille, and four articles written by G. Pacchioni, F. Cosandey and T. E. Madey, B. G. Daniels, R. Lindsay and G. Thornton, and C. Noguera respectively. Of these, the article by Pacchioni has already appeared in SRL 7, 277 (2000). The other three articles appear in this issue. A reader who wishes to suggest a spotlight topic or recommend authors to write such reviews should contact the Editor-in-Chief. We would like to hear from you.

  1. Assessing the adherence behavior of glaucoma patients to topical eye drops

    OpenAIRE

    Welge-Lussen U; Weise S; Yu AL

    2014-01-01

    Ulrich Welge-Lussen,1 Stefanie Weise,2 Alice L Yu3 1Department of Ophthalmology, Friedrich-Alexander University, Erlangen, Germany; 2Department of Ophthalmology, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich, Germany Purpose: The goal of this study was to determine the adherence of glaucoma patients to their topical glaucoma medication. Furthermore, the relationships between the adherence behavior and the patients’ demograp...

  2. Diacerein niosomal gel for topical delivery: development, in vitro and in vivo assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Say, Khalid M; Abd-Allah, Fathy I; Lila, Ahmed E; Hassan, Abd El-Saboor A; Kassem, Alaa Eldin A

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to load diacerein (DCR) in niosomes by applying response surface methodology and incorporate these niosomes in gel base for topical delivery. Box-Behnken design was used to investigate the effect of charge-inducing agent (X1), surfactant HLB (X2) and sonication time (X3) on the vesicle size (Y1), entrapment efficiency (Y2) and cumulative drug released (Y3). DCR niosomal formulations were prepared by thin film hydration method. The optimized formula was incorporated in different gel bases. DCR niosomal gels were evaluated for homogeneity, rheological behavior; in vitro release and pharmacodynamic activity by carrageenan-induced hind paw edema method in the rat compared with DCR commercial gel. The results revealed that the mean vesicle sizes of the prepared niosomes ranged from 7.33 to 23.72 µm and the entrapment efficiency ranged from 9.52% to 58.43% with controlled release pattern over 8 h. DCR niosomal gels exhibited pseudoplastic flow with thixotropic behavior. The pharmacodynamic activity of DCR niosomal gel in 3% HPMC showed significant, 37.66%, maximum inhibition of edema size in comparison with 20.83% for the commercial gel (p < 0.05). These results recommended the incorporation of DCR niosomes in 3% HPMC for topical application as a potent anti-inflammatory drug for the treatment of osteoarthritis. PMID:25853339

  3. An assessment methodology for thermal energy storage evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D.R.; Dirks, J.A.; Drost, M.K.; Spanner, G.E.; Williams, T.A.

    1987-11-01

    This report documents an assessment methodology for evaluating the cost, performance, and overall economic feasibility of thermal energy storage (TES) concepts. The methodology was developed by Thermal Energy Storage Evaluation Program personnel at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for use by PNL and other TES concept evaluators. The methodology is generically applicable to all TES concepts; however, specific analyses may require additional or more detailed definition of the ground rules, assumptions, and analytical approach. The overall objective of the assessment methodology is to assist in preparing equitable and proper evaluations of TES concepts that will allow developers and end-users to make valid decisions about research and development (R and D) and implementation. The methodology meets this objective by establishing standard approaches, ground rules, assumptions, and definitions that are analytically correct and can be consistently applied by concept evaluators. 15 refs., 4 figs., 13 tabs.

  4. Two Stage Assessment of Thermal Hazard in An Underground Mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenda, Jan; Sułkowski, Józef; Pach, Grzegorz; Różański, Zenon; Wrona, Paweł

    2016-06-01

    The results of research into the application of selected thermal indices of men's work and climate indices in a two stage assessment of climatic work conditions in underground mines have been presented in this article. The difference between these two kinds of indices was pointed out during the project entitled "The recruiting requirements for miners working in hot underground mine environments". The project was coordinated by The Institute of Mining Technologies at Silesian University of Technology. It was a part of a Polish strategic project: "Improvement of safety in mines" being financed by the National Centre of Research and Development. Climate indices are based only on physical parameters of air and their measurements. Thermal indices include additional factors which are strictly connected with work, e.g. thermal resistance of clothing, kind of work etc. Special emphasis has been put on the following indices - substitute Silesian temperature (TS) which is considered as the climatic index, and the thermal discomfort index (δ) which belongs to the thermal indices group. The possibility of the two stage application of these indices has been taken into consideration (preliminary and detailed estimation). Based on the examples it was proved that by the application of thermal hazard (detailed estimation) it is possible to avoid the use of additional technical solutions which would be necessary to reduce thermal hazard in particular work places according to the climate index. The threshold limit value for TS has been set, based on these results. It was shown that below TS = 24°C it is not necessary to perform detailed estimation.

  5. Retention Assessment of Core Operations Management Topics for Business Administration Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppel, Nicole B.; Hollister, Kimberly Killmer

    2009-01-01

    To meet the new AACSB International standards regarding retention assessment and adequately determine "if and what students are learning," this research presents a framework within which expected learning outcomes and specific learning are assessed. This paper presents the framework and describes how the process can be implemented with…

  6. Relationship between Usefulness Assessments and Perceptions of Work Task Complexity and Search Topic Specificity: An Exploratory Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingwersen, Peter; Wang, Peiling

    2012-01-01

    integrated document collection consisting of full text research articles in PDFs, abstracts, and bibliographic records (the iSearch Test Collection in Physics). The search results were provided to the researchers who, as task performers, made assessments of usefulness using a four-point sale (highly, fairly...... highly complex tasks tend to associate with search topics of high specificity. Although bibliographic records show better precisions than full text PDF documents, the latter contributed more useful documents. Suggestions are made for further studies in naturalist IR experiments....

  7. Topical session proceedings of the 5. IGSC meeting on: observations regarding the safety case in recent safety assessment studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the NEA, the IGSC (Integration Group for the Safety Case) has, as an essential role, to develop common views on such key aspects of the safety case. Therefore, since the inauguration of the IGSC in 2000, four meetings were organised with topical sessions to explore various of these key aspects. This is a report on the fifth such topical session, held as part of the 5. plenary meeting of the IGSC. The session was attended by 36 participants, representing waste management organisations and regulatory authorities from 16 NEA member countries, the IAEA and the European Commission. The purpose of this topical session was to provide support to the finalising of the IGSC safety case brochure by getting a description of the safety case content of the IAEA Draft Safety Requirements document and by getting an overview of progress that could be observed from national organisations on developing their cases for system safety and/or developing the required methodologies. The objective was that the IGSC safety case brochure should be supportive of the IAEA/NEA document, and be reflective of the experience of the IGSC member programmes and organisations. The topical session was mainly aimed at exchanging information on: - The safety case related content of the proposed IAEA/NEA document (currently titled: 'IAEA Safety Standards Series, Geological Disposal of Radioactive Waste, Draft Safety Requirements (DS-154)'). - National programmes where safety assessments have recently been completed, e.g. ONDRAF/NIRAS, Nagra and Andra. - Feedback from international peer reviews, e.g. the Andra Dossier 2001 Argile, the Belgian SAFIR 2 report, the SR 97 report and the US-DOE Yucca Mountain TSPA. - The evolution of some national assessment methods and approaches e.g. SKB and Nagra. - The content of the draft IGSC safety case brochure entitled: 'The Nature and Purpose of the Post-closure Safety Case in Geological Disposal'. This document presents the various

  8. Risk assessment of bearded vulture (Gypaetus barbatus) exposure to topical antiparasitics used in livestock within an ecotoxicovigilance framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Rafael; Sánchez-Barbudo, Inés S; Camarero, Pablo R; Martínez, José M

    2015-12-01

    Between 2004 and 2013, 486 suspected scavenger poisoning cases, including 24 bearded vultures (Gypaetus barbatus), were investigated in the Pyrenees and surrounding areas in Spain as part of a monitoring programme regarding accidental and intentional poisoning of wildlife. Poisoning was confirmed in 36% of all analysed cases where scavenger species were found dead within the distribution range of bearded vultures. Organophosphates and carbamates were the most frequently detected poisons. Four of the bearded vulture cases were positive for the presence of topical antiparasitics (3 with diazinon and 1 with permethrin). These likely represented accidental exposure due to the legal use of these veterinary pharmaceuticals. In order to confirm the risk of exposure to topical antiparasitics in bearded vultures, pig feet (n=24) and lamb feet (n=24) were analysed as these are one of the main food resources provided to bearded vultures at supplementary feeding stations. Pig feet had no detectable residues of topical antiparasitics. In contrast, 71.4% of lamb feet showed residues of antiparasitics including diazinon (64.3%), pirimiphos-methyl (25.4%), chlorpyrifos (7.1%), fenthion (1.6%), permethrin (0.8%) and cypermethrin (27.8%). Washing the feet with water significantly reduced levels of these topical antiparasitics, as such, this should be a recommended practice for lamb feet supplied at feeding stations for bearded vultures. Although the detected levels of antiparasitics were relatively low (≤1 μg/g), a risk assessment suggests that observed diazinon levels may affect brain acetylcholinesterase and thermoregulation in bearded vultures subject to chronic exposure. PMID:26254071

  9. The Effect of Portfolio Assessment on Students’ Academic Achievement on The Topic of Human Scletion System

    OpenAIRE

    Dilber BAHÇECİ; KURU, Mustafa

    2006-01-01

    Purposeful collection of student performances that exhibits a student's effort, progress and achievement over a period of time. In this study, the effects of portfolio assessment on studens’ academic achievement in the university level anatomy lecture have been discussed. While 109 students have been evaluated through portfolioassessment, 106 students have been evaluated by traditional assessment methods. Students’ academic achievement have been recorded by Pro-Test, Post-Test and Lasting-Tes...

  10. Thermal Imaging Assessment of Cicatrical Tissue Capabilities in Facioplasty Planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.L. Korotkova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was to study the capabilities of thermal imaging to estimate the functional reserves of blood supply of facial cicatricial tissues used in skin grafting. Materials and Methods. Using an infrared thermal imager Thermo Tracer ТН-9100 we examined 37 patients with post-burn scars on the face and anterior surface of the neck (total: 126 scar areas planned for flap dissection and 4 healthy volunteers. After recording a native (original thermal picture, we carried out a standard local alcohol test with further monitoring of space-time temperature dynamics for 7 min. To develop a criterion of tissue suitability for skin grafting, we calculated ∆Т=Тinit–Тfin, where Тinit was the initial temperature before the test, and Тfin — the temperature on the 7th minute of test recovery. Results. The obtained data on the thermal reaction dynamics of cicatricial tissues enable to evaluate the capability to use these tissues as skin grafting material. The criteria are based on thermal imaging findings of the dynamics of initial temperature recovery of healthy and cicatrical tissues. If the temperature difference by the 7th minute of the examined tissues is below 0.9°С by the end of the alcohol test, the tissues can be used for skin grafting. The temperature recovery lag by more than 1.9°С indicates inapplicability of cicatricial tissues for skin grafting. The temperature difference in the range from 0.9 to 1.9°С should be considered risky. Conclusion. The developed thermal image technique to assess the functional state of facial cicatricial tissue blood supply enables to determine the criteria of cicatrical tissue availability for minor facioplasty, and differentiate suitable and unsuitable tissues.

  11. Thermal Comfort Assessment: A Case Study at Malaysian Automotive Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Ismail

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Thermal comfort has a great influence on the productivity and satisfaction of indoor building occupants. The exposure to excessive heat during work may cause discomfort and contributed to low productivity among workers. Malaysia known with its hot and humid weather where in most of the survey study published indicated that workers in Malaysia automotive industries had exposed to excessive temperature while working. The study investigated the thermal comfort level experienced by workers at Malaysian automotive industry. Approach: The study had been conducted at one automotive parts assembly factory in Malaysia. The human subjects for the study constitute operators at tire receiving section of the factory. The environment examined was the relative humidity (%, WBGT, air temperature and radiant temperature (°C of the surrounding workstation area. The environmental factors were measured using Babuc apparatus, which is capable to measure simultaneously those mentioned environmental factors. The time series data of fluctuating level of factors were plotted to identify the significant changes of factors. Then thermal comfort of the workers was assessed by using ASHRAE thermal sensation scale by using Predicted Mean Vote (PMV. Further Predicted Percentage Dissatisfied (PPD was used to estimate the thermal comfort satisfaction of the occupant. Finally the PPD versus PMV were plotted to present the thermal comfort scenario of workers involved in related workstation. Results: The trend of relative humidity curve from the graph also indicated the increasing level of discomfort. The radiant temperature observed seems consistent during the study while there was decreasing of WBGT start from afternoon due to the rain. The study revealed that the PPD value of 54% of the workers population at the workstation are likely to be satisfied with thermal comfort at this station while the PMV index from ASHRAE indicated the value 1

  12. Outage Risk Assessment and Management (ORAM) thermal-hydraulics toolkit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A PC-based thermal-hydraulic toolkit for use in support of outage optimization, management and risk assessment has been developed. This mechanistic toolkit incorporates simple models of key thermal-hydraulic processes which occur during an outage, such as recovery from or mitigation of outage upsets; this includes heat-up of water pools following loss of shutdown cooling, inadvertent drain down of the RCS, boiloff of coolant inventory, heatup of the uncovered core, and reflux cooling. This paper provides a list of key toolkit elements, briefly describes the technical basis and presents illustrative results for RCS transient behavior during reflux cooling, peak clad temperatures for an uncovered core and RCS response to loss of shutdown cooling. (author)

  13. ASSESSMENT OF THE DRUM REMAINING LIFETIME IN THERMAL POWER PLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav M Živković

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper analysis of stress and thermal-elastic-plastic strain of the drum is performed. Influence of modified thickness, yield stress and finite element model of welded joint between pipe and drum on assessment of the remaining lifetime of the drum in the thermal power plant is analyzed. Two analyses are compared. In the first, drum is modeled by shell and by 3D finite elements with projected geometrical and material data of drum. Then, the drum is modeled by shell and by 3D finite elements with modified thickness and yield stress. The analysis show that detailed modeling of stress concentration zones is necessary. Adequate modeling gives lower maximal effective plastic strain and increased number of cycles and, in that case, 3D finite elements are better comparing to shell finite elements.

  14. Workshop on technical assessment of industrial thermal insulation materials: summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over 80 participants representing 50 organizations met to discuss the report, Industrial Thermal Insulation--An Assessment, ORNL/TM-5283. Presentations on the performance of available materials, economic considerations, and measurement problems were followed by discussion. A final wrap-up session concluded that the report was valuable in pointing the direction for needed effort in the area, confirmed the indicated actions needed to further industrial application of insulation, and called for future meetings to continue the dialogue between the various facets of the industry

  15. Assessment of in vitro methodologies to determine topical and transdermal delivery of the flavonoid quercetin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Testa Moura de Carvalho Vicentini

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available To be effective against the oxidative damages induced by UVB irradiation in the skin, the drug needs to release from the formulation in which it was incorporated and reach the skin layers where the ROS are generated. Thus, it is very important the development of a robust and sensitive methodology to extract and quantify in different skin layers the antioxidant agent delivered from topical formulations. Therefore, in the present work suitable methods to extract and quantify quercetin in skin samples and receptor phase after in vitro penetration studies were developed. The results demonstrated that the recovery from two different layers of skin, the SC and [E+D], using two different methods of quantification (DPPH• assay and HPLC, respectively, was 93.8 % when the quercetin spiked dose was 50 µg/mL, 100.4 % when it was 100 µg/mL and 89.9 % for 250 µg/mL and the average recovery of the quercetin extraction from receptor phase when dichloromethane was used as extractor solvent was 96%. These results demonstrate that the described methods have a potential application to in vitro skin penetration studies of quercetin, since it showed to be accurate and sensitive.Para ser efetiva contra os danos oxidativos induzidos pela radiação UVB na pele, é necessário que o ativo seja liberado da formulação na qual foi incorporado e alcance as camadas da pele onde são geradas as EROS. Desta forma, torna-se de grande importância o desenvolvimento de métodos eficazes e sensíveis para extrair e quantificar, nas diferentes camadas de pele, o agente antioxidante liberado de formulações tópicas. No presente trabalho foram desenvolvidos métodos adequados para extrair e quantificar a quercetina em amostras de pele e na fase receptora após estudos de penetração cutânea in vitro. Os resultados demonstraram que a recuperação das camadas de pele, EC e [E+D], quando do uso de duas diferentes metodologias de quantificação (ensaio de DPPH• e CLAE

  16. Analytical assessment of OECD thermal fatigue test - second step

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High cycle fatigue failure induced by temperature fluctuation draws a worldwide concern from recent pipe failures in light water reactors. The Japanese nuclear industry produced assessment procedures for high cycle fatigue for pipes containing hot water in 2003, having been advised by the Japanese regulatory body in 1998 after the JAPC Tsuruga-2 primary water leakage. The French parties, almost at the same time, experienced a pipe failure due to the same mechanics at Civaux-1 in 1998, and began working on the development of evaluation methodologies. The French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) proposed performance of a benchmark analysis with participations from major nuclear institutions as a part of OECD collaboration in 2000. In the collaboration with participations from five nations, seven institutions including three from Japan, thermal fatigue test using pipe specimen subjected to cyclic thermal loads is under performance at CEA. The participants are expected to predict the crack initiation life and propagation behavior with their own methods and software tools. This report describes the methods and results of the analysis performed by CRIEPI. CRIEPI's analysis is based on a simplified approach consisting of elastic finite element analysis to determine stress situations in the specimen and simplified method evaluating elastic-plastic strain range from the elastic analysis resultant employed in the Japanese Demonstration Fast Breeder Reactor High Temperature Design Guideline. Crack propagation analysis has been also performed using asymmetric stress intensity factor database developed by CRIEPI and simplified crack propagation prediction procedures in inelastic situations. The analyses placed an emphasis on simplicity rather than employing accurate but complex procedures. Analyses for the conditions of the thermal fatigue test to be performed by CEA have been done. The assessments were basically simplified approaches, based on the Japanese Fast Breeder Reactor

  17. Topically applied mesoridazine exhibits the strongest cutaneous analgesia and minimized skin disruption among tricyclic antidepressants: The skin absorption assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Chen, Yu-Wen; Aljuffali, Ibrahim A; Chang, Chia-Wen; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Fang, Jia-You

    2016-08-01

    Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are found to have an analgesic action for relieving cutaneous pain associated with neuropathies. The aim of this study was to assess cutaneous absorption and analgesia of topically applied TCAs. Percutaneous delivery was investigated using nude mouse and pig skin models at both infinite and saturated doses. We evaluated the cutaneous analgesia in nude mice using the pinprick scores. Among five antidepressants tested in the in vitro experiment, mesoridazine, promazine and doxepin showed a superior total absorption percentage. The drug with the lowest total absorption percentage was found to be fluphenazine (dose or at saturated solubility. The follicular pathway was important for mesoridazine and promazine delivery. Mesoridazine showed stronger skin analgesia than the other TCAs although the in vivo skin absorption of mesoridazine (0.34nmol/mg) was less than that of promazine (0.80nmol/mg) and doxepin (0.74nmol/mg). Mesoridazine had a prolonged duration of pain relief (165min) compared to promazine (83min) and doxepin (17min). The skin irritation test demonstrated an evident barrier function deterioration and cutaneous erythema by promazine and doxepin treatment, whereas mesoridazine caused no obvious adverse effect by topical application for up to 7days. PMID:27260201

  18. ASSESSMENT OF EFFICACY OF TOPICAL PHENYTOIN SODIUM DRESSING AS COMPARED TO CONVENTIONAL MOIST DRESSING IN THE MANAGEMENT OF LEG ULCERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikanth Reddy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic leg ulcers are one of the most common surgical conditions in surgical practice. From times immemorial, many methods have been tried to treat these types of ulcers. Many techniques have been tried over the centuries to aid in healing of chronic leg ulcers, but there exists no ideal dressing till date.(1 Phenytoin Sodium, a chemical used in management of Epilepsy, is known to produce gingival Hyperplasia, an indirect evidence to enhanced Fibroblastic activity. The present study was conducted to assess the efficacy of topical Phenytoin solution dressing as compared to conventional moist dressing in the healing process of chronic leg ulcers. Phenytoin Sodium being a cheap drug, is likely to cut down, the cost burden on the individual and the Society, if proven effective.

  19. Topical gel formulation and stability assessment of platelet lysate based on turbidimetric method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soliman Mohammadi Samani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Platelet-rich growth factors have attracted attentions of scientists and clinical practitioners who are involved in wound healing and regenerative medicine extensively, according to their unprecedented potential of promoting and catalyzing healing process. Platelet-rich growth factors are cost-benefit, available and more stable than recombinant human growth factors. These appealing characteristics have converted PRGF to one of the popular candidates for treatment of variety of wounds. According to these valuable properties, we decided to formulate and assess the effect of different excipients on the stability of such valuable protein based formulations. Different excipients have been chosen according to their effective ness on the stability of proteins and their application in other similar formulations. The stabilizing effect of excipients was evaluated by measuring heat-induced aggregation of growth factors by turbidimetric assay. Glycerol, glycine and dextrose were chosen as stabilizing excipients for these formulations. The results show that dextrose has more stabilizing effect on prevention of heat induced aggregation of the platelet lysate growth factors than glycerol and glycine. All of the formulations also contained antioxidant, chelating agents, preservative and carbopol934 in order to form appropriate gel.

  20. Solar-parabolic dish-Stirling-engine-system module. Task 1: Topical report, market assessment/conceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-11-30

    The major activities reported are: a market study to identify an early market for a dish-Stirling module and assess its commercial potential; preparation of a conceptual system and subsystem design to address this market; and preparation of an early sales implementation plan. A study of the reliability of protection from the effects of walk-off, wherein the sun's image leaves the receiver if the dish is not tracking, is appended, along with an optical analysis and structural analysis. Also appended are the relationship between PURPA and solar thermal energy development and electric utility pricing rationale. (LEW)

  1. Fluorouracil Topical

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... topical solution are used to treat actinic or solar keratoses (scaly or crusted lesions [skin areas] caused by years of too much exposure to sunlight). Fluorouracil cream and topical solution are also used to treat ...

  2. Testosterone Topical

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in which the body does not produce enough natural testosterone). Testosterone is used only for men with ... topical may control your symptoms but will not cure your condition. Continue to use testosterone topical even ...

  3. Bexarotene Topical

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... condition may improve as soon as 4 weeks after you begin to use topical bexarotene, or it may ... notice any improvement. Continue to use topical bexarotene after you notice improvement; your condition may continue to improve. ...

  4. A comparative assessment of fluoride concentration available in saliva using daily prescribed topical fluoride agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talwar, Manjit; Tewari, Amrit; Chawla, H. S.; Sachdev, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the availability of fluoride concentration in saliva following the use of fluoride mouthrinse and dentifrice. Materials and Methods: The experiment was carried out in 7–15 year-old school children of Chandigarh (n = 90). The children were nonfluoride users. Baseline saliva samples were collected. The subjects were exposed to two test agents, i.e., fluoride mouthrinse (0.05%, 225 ppm F) and dentifrice (1000 ppm F) for 7 days and on the day 8, saliva samples were collected over a 20 hrs period. Wash out period of 31/2 months was there before the subjects were exposed to the second test agent. Fluoride in saliva was estimated using fluoride ion-specific electrode. Written informed consent was taken. Statistical Analysis: Kolmogorov–Smirnov test was applied to test the normality of the variables. Mann–Whitney U-test was used to compare the fluoride concentration available in saliva at respective time intervals subsequent to use of the two test agents. Results: Fluoride concentration was elevated in saliva compared to baseline for both the test agents. Fluoride mouthrinse (0.05% sodium fluoride [NaF]) and dentifrice (1000 ppm monofluorophosphate [MFP]) showed a biphasic clearance. Peak in saliva occurred at 15 mins postuse. Night-time use resulted in higher concentration of fluoride in saliva compared to baseline. There was statistically significantly higher fluoride concentration available in saliva for the dentifrice at 5 hrs, 10 hrs, and 20 hrs postuse (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Subsequent to the use of NaF (0.05%) daily mouthrinse and MFP dentifrice (1000 ppm) the fluoride concentration in saliva remained elevated to a level of 0.12 ppm for mouthrinse and 0.14 ppm for dentifrice compared to baseline (0.03 ppm) up to 20 hrs postuse. The therapeutic window though not yet established but suggested is 0.1–1 ppm for prevention of demineralization, indicating that daily use of fluoride mouthrinse and dentifrice provides fluoride concentration in

  5. Study of the Effect of Compressional Alfvin Modes on Thermal Transport in the National Spherical Torus Experiment; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the first injection of neutral beams into the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX)[Ono, et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557] a broad spectrum of fluctuations consisting of nearly equally spaced peaks in the frequency range from about 0.2 to 1.2 times the ion cyclotron frequency was observed. The frequencies scale with toroidal field and plasma density consistently with Alfvin waves. From these and other observations, the modes have been identified as Compressional Alfvin Eigenmodes (CAE). It has also recently been found that the ratio of the measured ion and electron temperatures in NSTX during neutral-beam heating is anomalously high[Bell, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 46 (2001) 206]. To explain the anomaly in the ratio of ion to electron temperature, it has been suggested that the CAE, driven by the beam ions, stochastically heat the thermal ions[Gates, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 87 (2001) 205003]. In this paper, it is shown through studies of the power balance that stochastic heating of the thermal ions by the observed CAE alone is not solely responsible for the anomaly in the ion to electron temperature ratio

  6. Assessment of proliferation resistance of thermal recycle systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment is made of the proliferation resistance of thermal recycle systems. The safeguards aspects are not addressed. Three routes to the acquisition of materials for nuclear weapons are addressed namely; a deliberate political decision by a government involving the use of dedicated facilities, a deliberate political decision by government involving abuse of nuclear fuel cycle facilities and theft by a subnational group. The most sensitive parts of the reference fuel cycle and the alternative technical measures are examined to judge their relative sensitivity. This is done by examining the difference forms in which plutonium can exist in the fuel cycle. The role which different institutional arrangements can play is also evaluated. From this comparative assessment it is concluded that, taking into account the qualitative nature of the assessment, the different stages of development of the various fuel cycles, the various realizations possible in respect of the deployment of facilities within individual countries and the evolutionary nature of the technical and institutional improvements foreseeable no fuel cycle can be made completely free from abuse. Furthermore it appears that following progressive introduction of features that will improve proliferation resistance there will not be significant differences between the various fuel cycles when compared at the point in time when they are introduced into widespread use. Provided such features are developed and implemented there is no reason on proliferation grounds to prefer one cycle to another

  7. Draft environmental assessment: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, S.M.; Sands, M.D.; Donat, J.R.; Jepsen, P.; Smookler, M.; Villa, J.F.

    1981-02-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, for the deployment and operation of a commercial 40-Megawatt (MW) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plant (hereafter called the Pilot Plant). A description of the proposed action is presented, and a generic environment typical of the candidate Pilot Plant siting regions is described. An assessment of the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed action is given, and the risk of credible accidents and mitigating measures to reduce these risks are considered. The Federal and State plans and policies the proposed action will encompass are described. Alternatives to the proposed action are presented. Appendix A presents the navigation and environmental information contained in the US Coast Pilot for each of the candidate sites; Appendix B provides a brief description of the methods and calculations used in the EA. It is concluded that environmental disturbances associated with Pilot Plant activities could potentially cause significant environmental impacts; however, the magnitude of these potential impacts cannot presently be assessed, due to insufficient engineering and environmental information. A site- and design-specific OTEC Pilot Plant Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is required to resolve the potentially significant environmental effects associated with Pilot Plant deployment and operation. (WHK)

  8. Safety assessment for ethanol-based topical antiseptic use by health care workers: Evaluation of developmental toxicity potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Andrew; Ovesen, Jerald L; Allen, Casey L; York, Raymond G; Gadagbui, Bernard K; Kirman, Christopher R; Poet, Torka; Quiñones-Rivera, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Ethanol-based topical antiseptic hand rubs, commonly referred to as alcohol-based hand sanitizers (ABHS), are routinely used as the standard of care to reduce the presence of viable bacteria on the skin and are an important element of infection control procedures in the healthcare industry. There are no reported indications of safety concerns associated with the use of these products in the workplace. However, the prevalence of such alcohol-based products in healthcare facilities and safety questions raised by the U.S. FDA led us to assess the potential for developmental toxicity under relevant product-use scenarios. Estimates from a physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling approach suggest that occupational use of alcohol-based topical antiseptics in the healthcare industry can generate low, detectable concentrations of ethanol in blood. This unintended systemic dose probably reflects contributions from both dermal absorption and inhalation of volatilized product. The resulting internal dose is low, even under hypothetical, worst case intensive use assumptions. A significant margin of exposure (MOE) exists compared to demonstrated effect levels for developmental toxicity under worst case use scenarios, and the MOE is even more significant for typical anticipated occupational use patterns. The estimated internal doses of ethanol from topical application of alcohol-based hand sanitizers are also in the range of those associated with consumption of non-alcoholic beverages (i.e., non-alcoholic beer, flavored water, and orange juice), which are considered safe for consumers. Additionally, the estimated internal doses associated with expected exposure scenarios are below or in the range of the expected internal doses associated with the current occupational exposure limit for ethanol set by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. These results support the conclusion that there is no significant risk of developmental or reproductive toxicity from

  9. Assessment of thermal embrittlement of cast stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A procedure and correlations are presented for assessing thermal embrittlement and predicting Charpy-impact energy and fracture toughness J-R curve of cast stainless steel components under Light Water Reactor operating conditions from known material information. The ''saturation'' impact strength and fracture toughness of a specific cast stainless steel, i.e., the minimum value that would be achieved for the material after long-term service, is estimated from the chemical composition of the steel. Fracture properties as a function of time and temperature of reactor service are estimated from the kinetics of embrittlement, which are also determined from chemical composition. A common ''predicted lower-bound'' J-R curve for cast stainless steels of unknown chemical composition is also defined for a given grade of steel, ferrite content, and temperature. Examples of estimating fracture toughness of cast stainless steel components during reactor service are presented

  10. Topic 8 Ecological Risk Assessment and regulatory guidance, radioecological assessment and radioprotection of the territory of Moscow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moscow is the historical centre of the atom project of the former USSR. The radiation situation in Moscow has been regularly monitored by 'Radon' Scientific-and-Industrial Association (Moscow) since 1987. In pursuance of conception and Program of the Environmental Radiation Monitoring in Moscow the environmental activity and monitoring of radiation exposure doses in Moscow area have been carried out. The environmental radiation monitoring includes radiation measuring, classification and summarisation of the data file, creation of the data bank, assessment of the general and local radiation situation and it's forecasting. The system for environmental radiation monitoring consists of mobile and stationary monitoring equipment. The mobile equipment includes the automobile, water and aircraft means for monitoring. The stationary equipment includes means for periodical monitoring (134 sites), a network for stationary monitoring of air (4 sites), water areas (64 sites) and a network for automated monitoring of radiation background (MRB) ( 19 sites). MRB are disposed at highways, railroads, large enterprises, at densely populated localities, taking into account the regularity of encompassing all administrative regions. MRB represents a totally automated component for monitoring at the region. It permanently monitors the radiation background in automatic mode, providing for monitoring the preset threshold background values and informing the data processing centre of exceeding the above preset values. The equipment monitors and reports the radiation values twenty four hours a day. The information is provided for the population at indication boards. More than 3000 environmental samples are monitored and studied; about 2500 km of automatic gamma-survey is carried out annually and 300 thermoluminescent dosimeters have been used to monitor the absorbed radiation dose. The major radionuclides monitored in the environmental samples have been the decay products of uranium and

  11. Topic 8 Ecological Risk Assessment and regulatory guidance, radioecological assessment and radioprotection of the territory of Moscow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polski, O.G.; Shmonov, M.G.; Lakaev, V.S. [Scientific-and-Industrial Association Radon, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    Moscow is the historical centre of the atom project of the former USSR. The radiation situation in Moscow has been regularly monitored by 'Radon' Scientific-and-Industrial Association (Moscow) since 1987. In pursuance of conception and Program of the Environmental Radiation Monitoring in Moscow the environmental activity and monitoring of radiation exposure doses in Moscow area have been carried out. The environmental radiation monitoring includes radiation measuring, classification and summarisation of the data file, creation of the data bank, assessment of the general and local radiation situation and it's forecasting. The system for environmental radiation monitoring consists of mobile and stationary monitoring equipment. The mobile equipment includes the automobile, water and aircraft means for monitoring. The stationary equipment includes means for periodical monitoring (134 sites), a network for stationary monitoring of air (4 sites), water areas (64 sites) and a network for automated monitoring of radiation background (MRB) ( 19 sites). MRB are disposed at highways, railroads, large enterprises, at densely populated localities, taking into account the regularity of encompassing all administrative regions. MRB represents a totally automated component for monitoring at the region. It permanently monitors the radiation background in automatic mode, providing for monitoring the preset threshold background values and informing the data processing centre of exceeding the above preset values. The equipment monitors and reports the radiation values twenty four hours a day. The information is provided for the population at indication boards. More than 3000 environmental samples are monitored and studied; about 2500 km of automatic gamma-survey is carried out annually and 300 thermoluminescent dosimeters have been used to monitor the absorbed radiation dose. The major radionuclides monitored in the environmental samples have been the decay products of

  12. Assessing the thermal performance of an emergency shelter system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, C.; McRobie, A. [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Engineering; Manfield, P. [Martin Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2005-05-01

    The aims of these tests are to improve conditions inside temporary shelters and to develop tools to assess shelter quality and comfort. Two different prototype shelters were tested in cold conditions with an internal vapour load. Temperature and humidity measurements were taken inside the shelter while the external temperature was maintained at -20 {sup o}C. Visual assessments were also carried out during and after testing. In the artificial test environment, both shelters experienced an undesirable variation of air temperature with height, averaging 17 {sup o}C between the lower and middle height zones. Models of each shelter were constructed using the Environmental Systems Performance-research (ESP-r) simulation software and were calibrated with the test data. The shelter models were simulated in three different climates using real data from Islamabad, London and Pristina. The feasibility of heating the tent using only the casual gains from occupants and solar radiation was investigated, although it was found that a tent heated in this way would only be appropriate in some locations. Design issues included coping with stratification of air temperature inside the tent, improving light levels without compromising thermal performance and fabricating the materials cheaply and simply. The validity of the results is limited by the lack of measured data for rates of air infiltration. (Author)

  13. A Randomized, Controlled Trial to Assess the Effect of Topical Insulin Versus Normal Saline in Pressure Ulcer Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Shine; Agnihotri, Meenakshi; Kaur, Sukhpal

    2016-06-01

    Insulin has been used in wound healing to increase wound collagen, granulation tissue, wound tensile strength, and local production of insulin-like growth factors by fibroblasts. Saline is a widely used irrigating and wound dressing solution. Patients admitted to an acute care facility who had a Grade 2 or Grade 3 pressure ulcer were recruited to participate in a randomized, controlled trial to compare the effect of normal saline-impregnated gauze and insulin dressing in pressure ulcer healing. Persons with immunodeficiency, diabetes mellitus, pregnancy, osteomyelitis, and peripheral vascular illness were not eligible for the study. Study participants were randomized to receive either normal saline dressing gauze or insulin dressing twice daily for 7 days. At baseline, patient demographic data and ulcer history were recorded. Baseline and follow-up ulcer assessments (days 4 and day 7) included ulcer measurement (length and width) and completion of the Pressure Ulcer Scale for Healing (PUSH version 3.0) tool. Patients in the control group received dressings of sterile gauze soaked with normal saline; patients in the intervention group received topical insulin (1 U/cm2 wound area). The insulin was sprayed over the wound surface with an insulin syringe, allowed to dry for 15 minutes, and then covered with sterile gauze. To ascertain the safety of study participants, blood glucose levels were measured with a glucometer 10 minutes before and 1 hour after the topical insulin application in the intervention group. Treatment efficacy was deter- mined by assessing the reduction in wound area and PUSH scores at follow-up. Statistical analysis was performed; data are expressed as mean ± SD and percentage for continuous and categorical variables respectively. The differences in PUSH score and ulcer sizes between the 2 groups were analyzed using independent t-test, and within-group differences were analyzed using ANOVA with repeated measures; Greenhouse-Geisser correction was

  14. Assessment of research needs for advanced heterogeneous catalysts for energy applications. Final report: Volume 2, Topic reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, G.A.

    1994-04-01

    This report assesses the direction, technical content, and priority of research needs judged to provide the best chance of yielding new and improved heterogeneous catalysts for energy-related applications over the period of 5-20 years. It addresses issues of energy conservation, alternate fuels and feedstocks, and the economics and applications that could alleviate pollution from energy processes. Recommended goals are defined in 3 research thrusts: catalytic science, environmental protection by catalysis, and industrial catalytic applications. This study was conducted by an 11-member panel of experts from industry and academia, including one each from Japan and Europe. This volume first presents an in-depth overview of the role of catalysis in future energy technology in chapter 1; then current catalytic research is critically reviewed and research recommended in 8 topic chapters: catalyst preparation (design and synthesis), catalyst characterization (structure/function), catalyst performance testing, reaction kinetics/reactor design, catalysis for industrial chemicals, catalysis for electrical applications (clean fuels, pollution remediation), catalysis for control of exhaust emissions, and catalysts for liquid transportation fuels from petroleum, coal, residual oil, and biomass.

  15. Desalination with thermal solar systems: technology assessment and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar desalination is among the most promising alternatives to apply solar energy as solar availability and the load requirements use to be matched. Solar thermal energy offers a full set of alternatives to desalt water, being the main difference among them the temperature range at which the load has to be fed. Solar technologies for the low temperature range (solar stills, plastic collectors,...) are quite suited for small loads in isolated placed or whenever the main constrain is to indigenize technology and to perform the operation and maintenance work with low qualified local labor, such as in less developed countries. The main drawback of this low temperature use of solar energy is that it is not possible to recover neither the heat of condensation of the water vapor, nor from the reject brine, to warm up the feed saline water. Higher temperature collectors, such as flat plate collectors with transparent insulation material and evacuated tubes, allow to work with conventional desalination units fed at 60-90C, as Multiple Effect Units or Multistage Flash Units, which get a performance ratio (quotient between heat required without recovery and with heat recovery) between 5 and 10. To further increase the performance ratio it is necessary to work with vapor in the 200C range. To attain this temperature range the solar option is based on the Parabolic Trough collector. This has been the line we have followed in our STD project in the Plataforma Solar in Almeria (Spain) when we have run a Multiple Effect Unit with an Absorption Heat Pump able to attain a performance ratio of 20. In this report, included within the STD project activities, we assess the potential of the solar thermal technology to desalt water in all the above mentioned temperature ranges. Beside the technology description and some characteristics results, we present a set of tool that, as the final result is dramatically dependent on the technical and economical scenario selected, will allow to

  16. AI Topics

    OpenAIRE

    Buchanan, Bruce G; Glick, Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    The debut of the AI in the News column elsewhere in this issue of AI Magazine created a good opportunity to introduce the professional community to the AI Topics web site, home of the AI in the news virtual page. Although AI Topics is designed for the lay public, it serves a much larger audience.

  17. Topical tretinoin in acanthosis nigricans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lahiri Koushik

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Efficacy of topical tretinoin was assessed in 30 cases of idiopathic acanthosis nigricans which were recalcitrant to conventional modalities of treatment. Topical tretinoin once at night application was found to be very effective both clinically and histologically.

  18. Topical tretinoin in acanthosis nigricans

    OpenAIRE

    Lahiri Koushik; Malakar Subrata

    1996-01-01

    Efficacy of topical tretinoin was assessed in 30 cases of idiopathic acanthosis nigricans which were recalcitrant to conventional modalities of treatment. Topical tretinoin once at night application was found to be very effective both clinically and histologically.

  19. Thermally assisted sensor for conformity assessment of biodiesel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although biodiesel can be intentionally tampered with, impairing its quality, ineffective production processes may also result in a nonconforming final fuel. For an incomplete transesterification reaction, traces of alcohol (ethanol or methanol) or remaining raw material (vegetable oil or animal fats) may be harmful to consumers, the environment or to engines. Traditional methods for biodiesel assessment are complex, time consuming and expensive, leading to the need for the development of new and more versatile processes for quality control. This work describes a refractometric fibre optic based sensor that is thermally assisted, developed to quantify the remaining methanol or vegetable oil in biodiesel blends. The sensing relies on a long period grating to configure an in-fibre interferometer. A complete analytical routine is demonstrated for the sensor allowing the evaluation of the biodiesel blends without segregation of the components. The results show the sensor can determine the presence of oil or methanol in biodiesel with a concentration ranging from 0% to 10% v/v. The sensor presented a resolution and standard combined uncertainty of 0.013% v/v and 0.62% v/v for biodiesel–oil samples, and 0.007% v/v and 0.22% v/v for biodiesel–methanol samples, respectively. (paper)

  20. Thermal aging degradation assessment of domestic nuclear polymer materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is well-known that polymer materials such as plastics and elastomers are easily degraded under nuclear environments, which always raises great concern on nuclear safety. Nevertheless, aging degradation data on domestic polymer materials are seldom available. In order to assess the thermal aging domestic nuclear polymers, PBT (Poly Butylene Telephtalate), EPR (Ethylene Propylene Rubber), SIR(Silicon Rubber) degradation, therefore, are chosen for the experimental tests. In this study, the reduction of elongation of the materials are tested and measured for the degradation evaluation. Results show that in case of EPR it takes 1860.47hr, 390.63hr, and 172.12hr at 140 .deg. C, 155 .deg. C, and 170 .deg. C, respectively, for 60% elongation reduction, which produces the activation energy of 1.25eV that is very close to that in the international report. Similarly, the activation of 60% elongation reduction of PBT turns out to be 1.20eV while that of SIR is revealed to be 0.94eV

  1. Thermal Imaging Assessment of Cicatrical Tissue Capabilities in Facioplasty Planning

    OpenAIRE

    N.L. Korotkova; М.G. Volovik

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to study the capabilities of thermal imaging to estimate the functional reserves of blood supply of facial cicatricial tissues used in skin grafting. Materials and Methods. Using an infrared thermal imager Thermo Tracer ТН-9100 we examined 37 patients with post-burn scars on the face and anterior surface of the neck (total: 126 scar areas planned for flap dissection) and 4 healthy volunteers. After recording a native (original) thermal picture, we carried ...

  2. Assessment of the thermal environment in an aircraft cabin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingers, S.; Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2004-01-01

    A full-scale section of a flight cabin with 21 seats was used to study the thermal environment in aircraft under laboratory conditions. Fourteen heated cylinders and two thermal manikins were used to simulate the heat load, the buoyancy flow and the flow obstruction from passengers in the cabin...... equivalent temperature, up to 5.8°C, was identified in the outer seats. The results reveal that in an aircraft cabin, passengers in the outer seats may be exposed to thermal asymmetry and draught and may not find the thermal environment acceptable if the ventilation air is not properly supplied....

  3. Estradiol Topical

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a medication that is applied topically to the vagina. Estradiol is in a class of medications called ... swelling, redness, burning, irritation, or itching of the vagina vaginal discharge Some side effects can be serious. ...

  4. Thermal impact assessment with hydrodynamics and transport modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The thermal impact of a groundwater heat pump on alluvial sequence reached 24 m. • Higher pumped flow led to thermal breakthrough and larger thermally affected zone. • The thermally affected zone of the well doublet grew to r = 55 m with a second system. • Minimum distance should be defined based on the features of the aquifer. - Abstract: While the number of installed geothermal heat pump systems is rising legislation is not prepared to address the issues concerning thermal impact. The aim of this paper is to model the effects of geothermal heat pump systems installed to shallow geothermal reservoirs in sedimentary formation based on the results of a real system in order to show the magnitude of the thermal affected zone. The system examined is a standalone geothermal heat pump with a production and an injection well-being able to produce a maximum of 3.4 m3/h groundwater. The thermal impact determined by simulation was 35 m for the standalone system. Two scenarios were considered to define the impact of two neighboring open-loop systems on each other. The results show that if two systems are to be installed on the same reservoir the minimum distance should be 55 m. That indicates that in case of designing systems installed to similar hydrogeological environment should consider the change in the water table and increased thermally affected zone if other groundwater heat pumps are in the area

  5. Environmental characterization to assess potential impacts of thermal discharge to the Columbia River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laboratory and field studies were conducted to assess the potential impact of the N-Reactor thermal plume on fish from the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. Discharge water temperatures were measured over a range of river flows and reactor operating conditions. Data were mathematically modeled to define spatial and thermal characteristics of the plume. Four species of Columbia River fish were exposed to thermal conditions expected in the plume. Exposed fish were subjected to predators and disease organisms to test for secondary effects from thermal stress. Spatial and temporal distribution of anadromous fish in the river near N-Reactor were also evaluated to define location relative to the plume. Potential thermal exposures were insufficient to kill or injure fish during operation of N-Reactor. These studies demonstrate that characterization of hydrological conditions and thermal tolerance can adequately assess potential impacts of a thermal discharge to fish

  6. Finding self-directed learning readiness and fostering self-directed learning through weekly assessment of self-directed learning topics during undergraduate clinical training in ophthalmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Soumendra

    2016-01-01

    Background: To know the individual’s current level of readiness and to manage self-directed learning (SDL) not only help learners but also the instructors. The objectives of this study were to find SDL readiness among 4th year medical student and to analyze the effect of weekly assessment of SDL topics. Methodology: This was a cross-sectional study to analyze the effect of weekly assessment of SDL topics in fostering SDL. The 51 4th year students during a clinical posting in ophthalmology participated for this study. Each recruited student was tested for SDL readiness through the SDL readiness scale (SDLRS) developed by Lucy Guglielmino (1978), which was validated in our local setting and responses were collected from students on the 1st day of the clinical posting. The students chose SDL topics which were assessed on a weekly basis in the form of scenario-based multiple choice questionnaires. Written feedback was collected from each student regarding such activity during their clinical posting, especially to know the actual utilization of SDL hours provided in teaching schedule, satisfaction on the type of questions and motivation for SDL. Results: The mean SDLRS score in male students were 214.15 ± 19.73 and in female 207.95 ± 17.983, which falls under average score as defined in Guglielmino scale. The majority of study population expressed better utilization of SDL study hours because of weekly assessment than when they had no assessment for SDL. Conclusions: Majority of the study population were found to be ready for SDL. The weekly assessment of SDL topics was found to stimulate proper utilization of SDL slots in teaching schedule thereby fostering SDL habits. PMID:27563580

  7. Assessment of the thermal environment in a simulated aircraft cabin using thermal manikin exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strøm-Tejsen, Peter; Zukowska, Daria; Jama, Agnieszka;

    2007-01-01

    The thermal environment in a full-scale 21-seat section of an aircraft cabin installed in a climate chamber was investigated. Fourteen heated cylinders and two thermal manikins were used to simulate the heat load, buoyancy flow and flow obstruction from passengers in the cabin. Measurements were...

  8. Assessment of thermal comfort in the mosque in Sarawak, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.H. Ibrahim, A. Baharun, Nawi M.N.M., Junaidi E.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In hot-humid climate, the mosque should be provided with an acceptable level of thermal comfort in order to seek serenity and focus for worship. The purpose of this study is to investigate the thermal comfort conditions in the Masjid Al-Muttaqin located in Kota Samarahan, Sarawak. The data were analysed using Corrected Effective Temperature (CET index. The analysis shows that although the air velocity in the mosque is acceptable, due to the influence of high air temperature, thermal comfort is not achieved. A retrofit design by adding new materials and installing insulations on the existing roof are proposed and the results show significant improvement of thermal comfort inside the mosque.

  9. Ciclopirox Topical

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Use the applicator brush attached to the bottle cap to apply ciclopirox topical solution evenly to all affected nails. Also apply the ... the bottle cap and neck and replace the cap tightly on the bottle. Let the solution dry for about 30 seconds before you put ...

  10. Preface to Special Topic: Marine Renewable Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, F. T.; Iglesias, G.; Santos, P. R.; Deng, Zhiqun

    2015-12-30

    Marine renewable energy (MRE) is generates from waves, currents, tides, and thermal resources in the ocean. MRE has been identified as a potential commercial-scale source of renewable energy. This special topic presents a compilation of works selected from the 3rd IAHR Europe Congress, held in Porto, Portugal, in 2014. It covers different subjects relevant to MRE, including resource assessment, marine energy sector policies, energy source comparisons based on levelized cost, proof-of-concept and new-technology development for wave and tidal energy exploitation, and assessment of possible inference between wave energy converters (WEC).

  11. Simulation and Visualization of Thermal Metaphor in a Virtual Environment for Thermal Building Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    NUGRAHA BAHAR, Yudi; LANDRIEU, Jérémie; PÈRE, Christian; Nicolle, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The current application of the design process through energy efficiency in virtual reality (VR) systems is limited mostly to building performance predictions, as the issue of the data formats and the workflow used for 3D modeling, thermal calculation and VR visualization. The importance of energy efficiency and integration of advances in building design and VR technology have lead this research to focus on thermal simulation results visualized in a virtual environment to optimize building des...

  12. Remaining Fatigue Life Assessment of Plasma Sprayed Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Philippe; Gitzhofer, François; Fauchais, Pierre; Boulos, Maher

    2010-09-01

    Ceramic functional coatings are frequently applied to structural materials, covering a wide range of thermomechanical and electrochemical applications. The main limiting feature is their reliability when subjected to cyclic transient thermal stresses. The study described in this article is a continuation of earlier research study focused on acoustic emission (AE) monitoring of the thermomechanical aging effects in ceramic coatings. Here, emphasis is placed on the usefulness of combining AE short-term monitoring with finite element modeling (FEM) to predict the performance of such coatings when subjected to cyclic thermal loads. The FEM study presented in this article is based on a three-dimensional, time-dependent approach, of the stress fields that developed within the coatings during the post-deposition cooling step and the thermal cycling. Experiments were conducted using yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and Alumina (Al2O3) ceramic coatings combined with a NiCr-based intermetallic bond coat.

  13. The assessment of thermal and radiation stability of UHMWPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preirradiated ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) was subjected to other cycle of γ-exposure in order to explain the behavior of this material after radiation processing. The oxygen uptake investigation was selected for the characterization of thermal stability of multisession irradiation. The long life radicals promote crosslinking or oxidative degradation depending on the second irradiation dose and on the environmental conditions. The main kinetic parameters, namely: oxidation period and oxidation rate were evaluated depicting the availability of radiochemical processing of UHMWPE for further long term applications. Irradiation of UHMWPE in salt solution reveals the improvement in the thermal strength for low exposure doses. (author)

  14. Sensitivity Analysis of Personal Exposure Assessment Using a Breathing Thermal Manikin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brohus, Henrik; Nielsen, Peter V.; Jensen, Mikael K.

    2009-01-01

    The present work deals with the investigation of uncertainties related to personal exposure assessment using a breathing thermal manikin subject to a partly uniform velocity field in a wind channel. Several parameters are investigated: velocity level, thermal manikin heat flux, Archimedes number...

  15. Thermal comfort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    d’Ambrosio Alfano, Francesca Romana; Olesen, Bjarne W.; Palella, Boris Igor;

    2014-01-01

    Thermal comfort is one of the most important aspects of the indoor environmental quality due to its effects on well-being, people's performance and building energy requirements. Its attainment is not an easy task requiring advanced design and operation of building and HVAC systems, taking into...... account all parameters involved. Even though thermal comfort fundamentals are consolidated topics for more than forty years, often designers seem to ignore or apply them in a wrong way. Design input values from standards are often considered as universal values rather than recommended values to be used...... under specific conditions. At operation level, only few variables are taken into account with unpredictable effects on the assessment of comfort indices. In this paper, the main criteria for the design and assessment of thermal comfort are discussed in order to help building and HVAC systems designers...

  16. On-Orbit Health Monitoring and Repair Assessment of Thermal Protection Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR project delivers On-orbit health MoNItoring and repair assessment of THERMal protection systems (OMNI_THERM). OMNI_THERM features impedance-based...

  17. Infrared Thermography Assessment of Thermal Bridges in Building Envelope: Experimental Validation in a Test Room Setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Bianchi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Thermal infrared imaging is a valuable tool to perform non-destructive qualitative tests and to investigate buildings envelope thermal-energy behavior. The assessment of envelope thermal insulation, ventilation, air leakages, and HVAC performance can be implemented through the analysis of each thermogram corresponding to an object surface temperature. Thermography also allows the identification of thermal bridges in buildings’ envelope that, together with windows and doors, constitute one of the weakest component increasing thermal losses. A quantitative methodology was proposed in previous researches by the authors in order to evaluate the effect of such weak point on the energy balance of the whole building. In the present work, in-field experimental measurements were carried out with the purpose of evaluating the energy losses through the envelope of a test room experimental field. In-situ thermal transmittance of walls, ceiling and roof were continuously monitored and each element was characterized by its own thermal insulation capability. Infrared thermography and the proposed quantitative methodology were applied to assess the energy losses due to thermal bridges. The main results show that the procedure confirms to be a reliable tool to quantify the incidence of thermal bridges in the envelope thermal losses.

  18. Adjustment of the thermal component of two tourism climatological assessment tools using thermal perception and preference surveys from Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Attila; Unger, János; Gál, Csilla V.; Kántor, Noémi

    2015-05-01

    This study introduces new methodological concepts for integrating seasonal subjective thermal assessment patterns of people into the thermal components of two tourism climatological evaluation tools: the Tourism Climatic Index (TCI) and the Climate-Tourism/Transfer-Information-Scheme (CTIS). In the case of the TCI, we replaced the air temperature and relative humidity as the basis of the initial rating system with the physiologically equivalent temperature (PET)—a complex human biometeorological index. This modification improves the TCI's potential to evaluate the thermal aspects of climate. The major accomplishments of this study are (a) the development of a new, PET-based rating system and its integration into the thermal sub-indices of the TCI and (b) the regionalization of the thermal components of CTIS to reflect both the thermal sensation and preference patterns of people. A 2-year-long (2011-2012) thermal comfort survey conducted in Szeged, Hungary, from spring to autumn was utilized to demonstrate the implementation of the introduced concepts. We found considerable differences between the thermal perception and preference patterns of Hungarians, with additional variations across the evaluated seasons. This paper describes the proposed methodology for the integration of the new seasonal, perception-based, and preference-based PET rating systems into the TCI, and presents the incorporation of new PET thresholds into the CTIS. In order to demonstrate the utility of the modified evaluation tools, we performed case study climate analyses for three Hungarian tourist destinations. The additional adjustments introduced during the course of those analyses include the reduction of TCI's temporal resolution to 10-day intervals and the exclusion of nocturnal and winter periods from the investigation.

  19. Adjustment of the thermal component of two tourism climatological assessment tools using thermal perception and preference surveys from Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Attila; Unger, János; Gál, Csilla V.; Kántor, Noémi

    2016-07-01

    This study introduces new methodological concepts for integrating seasonal subjective thermal assessment patterns of people into the thermal components of two tourism climatological evaluation tools: the Tourism Climatic Index (TCI) and the Climate-Tourism/Transfer-Information-Scheme (CTIS). In the case of the TCI, we replaced the air temperature and relative humidity as the basis of the initial rating system with the physiologically equivalent temperature (PET)—a complex human biometeorological index. This modification improves the TCI's potential to evaluate the thermal aspects of climate. The major accomplishments of this study are (a) the development of a new, PET-based rating system and its integration into the thermal sub-indices of the TCI and (b) the regionalization of the thermal components of CTIS to reflect both the thermal sensation and preference patterns of people. A 2-year-long (2011-2012) thermal comfort survey conducted in Szeged, Hungary, from spring to autumn was utilized to demonstrate the implementation of the introduced concepts. We found considerable differences between the thermal perception and preference patterns of Hungarians, with additional variations across the evaluated seasons. This paper describes the proposed methodology for the integration of the new seasonal, perception-based, and preference-based PET rating systems into the TCI, and presents the incorporation of new PET thresholds into the CTIS. In order to demonstrate the utility of the modified evaluation tools, we performed case study climate analyses for three Hungarian tourist destinations. The additional adjustments introduced during the course of those analyses include the reduction of TCI's temporal resolution to 10-day intervals and the exclusion of nocturnal and winter periods from the investigation.

  20. Thermal Storage Systems Assessment for Energy Sustainability in Housing Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania I. Lagunes Vega

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to achieve greater enhancements in energy sustainability for housing, the function and efficiency of two different passive cooling systems were studied: encapsulated water in recycled bottles of Polyethylene terephthalate (PET and polystyrene plates, in comparison with standard concrete slab systems, which are customarily used in housing. Experiments were placed over a tile surface, in which temperature changes were monitored for a period of 20 days from 08:00 to 20:00. The efficiency of passive thermal storage systems was endorsed through statistical analysis using the “SPSS” software. This resulted in a 17% energy saving, thus promoting energy sustainability in housing units, which reduces the use of electrical appliances required to stabilize conditions to achieve optimum thermal comfort for the human body inside a house, therefore, reducing electrical power consumption, CO2 emissions to the atmosphere and generating savings. Due to the complexity of a system with temperature changes, a fractal analysis was performed for each experimental system, using the “Benoit” software (V.1.3 with self-compatible tools of rescaled range (R/S and a wavelets method, showing that the thermal fluctuations on the tiles with the thermal storage system adapt to the rescaled range analysis and the regular tiles adapt to the wavelets method.

  1. Thermal hydraulic feasibility assessment for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of scoping analyses have been completed investigating the thermal-hydraulic performance and feasibility of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) Integrated Process Strategy (IPS). The SNFP was established to develop engineered solutions for the expedited removal, stabilization, and storage of spent nuclear fuel from the K Basins at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The subject efforts focused on independently investigating, quantifying, and establishing the governing heat production and removal mechanisms for each of the IPS operations and configurations, obtaining preliminary results for comparison with and verification of other analyses, and providing technology-based recommendations for consideration and incorporation into the design bases for the SNFP. The goal was to develop a series fo thermal-hydraulic models that could respond to all process and safety-related issues that may arise pertaining to the SNFP. A series of sensitivity analyses were also performed to help identify those parameters that have the greatest impact on energy transfer and hence, temperature control. It is anticipated that the subject thermal-hydraulic models will form the basis for a series of advanced and more detailed models that will more accurately reflect the thermal performance of the IPS and alleviate the necessity for some of the more conservative assumptions and oversimplifications, as well as form the basis for the final process and safety analyses

  2. Solar Program Assessment: Environmental Factors - Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Energy Research and Development Administration, Washington, DC. Div. of Solar Energy.

    This report presents the environmental problems which may arise with the further development of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, one of the eight Federally-funded solar technologies. To provide a background for this environmental analysis, the history and basic concepts of the technology are reviewed, as are its economic and resource requirements.…

  3. Analytic model for assessing thermal performance of SCUBA divers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, L. D.

    1975-01-01

    To assist design of adequate protective clothing, mathematical model of man's thermoregulatory system has been developed so that body thermal responses under immersed conditions can be predicted accurately. Experimental data encompassed wide range of water temperatures, protective clothing, breathing-gas mixtures, and durations of immersion.

  4. Safety and anti-HIV assessments of natural vaginal cleansing products in an established topical microbicides in vitro testing algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Jones Maureen; Mankowski Marie K; Osterling Mark C; Marotte Katherine M; Snyder Beth A; Lackman-Smith Carol S; Nieves-Duran Lourdes; Richardson-Harman Nicola; Cummins James E; Sanders-Beer Brigitte E

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background At present, there is no effective vaccine or other approved product for the prevention of sexually transmitted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. It has been reported that women in resource-poor communities use vaginally applied citrus juices as topical microbicides. These easily accessible food products have historically been applied to prevent pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and cytotoxic...

  5. Breathing thermal manikin for indoor environment assessment: Important characteristics and requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melikov, Arsen Krikor

    2003-01-01

    Recently breathing thermal manikins have been developed and used for indoor environment measurement, evaluation and optimization as well as validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) predictions of airflow around a human body. Advances in the assessment of occupants¿ thermal comfort and...... perceived air quality by means of breathing thermal manikins have been made as well. In order to perform accurate measurements and realistic evaluation and assessment, the design and characteristics of a manikin must comply with certain requirements. The most important of these, such as number, size and...... shape of body segments, control mode, breathing simulation, etc. are discussed and specified in this paper....

  6. Assessment of Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Facility and Capability Needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of a Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) system rests heavily upon being able to fabricate and demonstrate the performance of a high temperature nuclear fuel as well as demonstrating an integrated system prior to launch. A number of studies have been performed in the past which identified the facilities needed and the capabilities available to meet the needs and requirements identified at that time. Since that time, many facilities and capabilities within the Department of Energy have been removed or decommissioned. This paper provides a brief overview of the anticipated facility needs and identifies some promising concepts to be considered which could support the development of a nuclear thermal propulsion system. Detailed trade studies will need to be performed to support the decision making process.

  7. Pest damage assessment in fruits and vegetables using thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadakkapattu Canthadai, Badrinath; Muthuraju, M. Esakki; Pachava, Vengalrao; Sengupta, Dipankar

    2015-05-01

    In some fruits and vegetables, it is difficult to visually identify the ones which are pest infested. This particular aspect is important for quarantine and commercial operations. In this article, we propose to present the results of a novel technique using thermal imaging camera to detect the nature and extent of pest damage in fruits and vegetables, besides indicating the level of maturity and often the presence of the pest. Our key idea relies on the fact that there is a difference in the heat capacity of normal and damaged ones and also observed the change in surface temperature over time that is slower in damaged ones. This paper presents the concept of non-destructive evaluation using thermal imaging technique for identifying pest damage levels of fruits and vegetables based on investigations carried out on random samples collected from a local market.

  8. Crop water-stress assessment using an airborne thermal scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, J. P.; Jackson, R. D.; Reginato, R. J.; Idso, S. B.; Goettelman, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    An airborne thermal scanner was used to measure the temperature of a wheat crop canopy in Phoenix, Arizona. The results indicate that canopy temperatures acquired about an hour and a half past solar noon were well correlated with presunrise plant water tension, a parameter directly related to plant growth and development. Pseudo-colored thermal images reading directly in stress degree days, a unit indicative of crop irrigation needs and yield potential, were produced. The aircraft data showed significant within-field canopy temperature variability, indicating the superiority of the synoptic view provided by aircraft over localized ground measurements. The standard deviation between airborne and ground-acquired canopy temperatures was 2 C or less.

  9. Assessment of Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Facility and Capability Needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Werner

    2014-07-01

    The development of a Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) system rests heavily upon being able to fabricate and demonstrate the performance of a high temperature nuclear fuel as well as demonstrating an integrated system prior to launch. A number of studies have been performed in the past which identified the facilities needed and the capabilities available to meet the needs and requirements identified at that time. Since that time, many facilities and capabilities within the Department of Energy have been removed or decommissioned. This paper provides a brief overview of the anticipated facility needs and identifies some promising concepts to be considered which could support the development of a nuclear thermal propulsion system. Detailed trade studies will need to be performed to support the decision making process.

  10. Assessment of social values in thermal plant siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the project is to develop a method for combining social values with techno-economic data for better decision making in thermal nuclear power plant siting. Quantified technical impact data which is socially weighted will allow for the optimal choice of site/design alternatives. In this phase, a study of community leadership in energy/environment issues was conducted in a town familiar with a (nuclear) thermal power plant. Secondly, a linear composite analysis of the measurement problems associated with combining diverse scales of impacts was completed. Third, a revision of the social values instrument used in a previous phase of the study was initiated. Finally, liaison activities with utilities were undertaken. Quantification of three of the technical impact factors is currently underway

  11. Assessment of seasonal static thermal ratings of overhead transmission conductors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heckenbergerová, Jana; Musílek, P.; Filimonenkov, K.

    Piscataway : IEEE, 2011, s. 1-8. ISBN 978-1-4577-1001-8. ISSN 1944-9925. [PES 2011. Detroit (US), 24.07.2011-29.07.2011] Grant ostatní: GA AV ČR(CZ) M100300904 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : transmission line * overhead conductor * weather conditions * thermal rating * ampacity * risk * aging Subject RIV: JE - Non-nuclear Energetics, Energy Consumption ; Use

  12. Infrared thermal image for assessing animal health and welfare

    OpenAIRE

    Irenilza de Alencar Nääs; Rodrigo Garófallo Garcia; Fabiana Ribeiro Caldara

    2014-01-01

    Infrared thermal imaging is a non-destructive testing technology that can be used to determine the superficial temperature of objects. This technology has an increasing use in detecting diseases and distress in animal husbandry within the poultry, pig and dairy production. The process can identify changes in peripheral blood flow from the resulting changes in heat loss and; therefore, have been a useful tool for evaluating the presence of disease, edema, and stress in animals. This paper revi...

  13. Assessment of thermal insulation materials and systems for building applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-06-01

    The primary goal of the study was to provide a proper foundation for decision making by the federal government, industry, and consumer. The report may be used to identify areas where new test methods and standards are needed to establish new programs for improving thermal performance of buildings, and as a basis for setting new or improved standards after the recommended test programs have been completed.

  14. Assessment of the Influence of Thermal Scattering Library on Monte-Carlo Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte-Carlo Neutron Transport Code uses continuous energy neutron libraries generally. Also thermal scattering libraries are used to represent a thermal neutron scattering by molecules and crystalline solids completely. Both neutron libraries and thermal scattering libraries are generated by NJOY based on ENDF data. While a neutron library can be generated for any specific temperature, a thermal scattering library can be generated for restricted temperatures when using ENDF data. However it is able to generate a thermal scattering for any specific temperature by using the LEAPR module in NJOY instead of using ENDF data. In this study, thermal scattering libraries of hydrogen bound in light water and carbon bound in graphite are generated by using the LEAPR module and ENDF data, and it is assessed the influence of each libraries on Monte-Carlo calculations. In addition, it is assessed the influence of a library temperature on Monte-Carlo calculations. In this study, thermal scattering libraries are generated by using LEAPR module in NJOY, and it is developed NIM program to do this work. It is compared above libraries with libraries generated from ENDF thermal scattering data. And the comparison carried out for H in H2O and C in graphite. As a result, similar results came out between libraries generated from LEAPR module and that generated from ENDF thermal scattering data. Hereby, it is conclude that the generation of thermal scattering libraries with LEAPR module is appropriate to use and it is able to generate a library with user-specific temperature. Also it is assessed how much a temperature in a thermal scattering library influences on Monte-Carlo calculations

  15. Assessment of the Influence of Thermal Scattering Library on Monte-Carlo Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gwanyoung; Woo, Swengwoong [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Monte-Carlo Neutron Transport Code uses continuous energy neutron libraries generally. Also thermal scattering libraries are used to represent a thermal neutron scattering by molecules and crystalline solids completely. Both neutron libraries and thermal scattering libraries are generated by NJOY based on ENDF data. While a neutron library can be generated for any specific temperature, a thermal scattering library can be generated for restricted temperatures when using ENDF data. However it is able to generate a thermal scattering for any specific temperature by using the LEAPR module in NJOY instead of using ENDF data. In this study, thermal scattering libraries of hydrogen bound in light water and carbon bound in graphite are generated by using the LEAPR module and ENDF data, and it is assessed the influence of each libraries on Monte-Carlo calculations. In addition, it is assessed the influence of a library temperature on Monte-Carlo calculations. In this study, thermal scattering libraries are generated by using LEAPR module in NJOY, and it is developed NIM program to do this work. It is compared above libraries with libraries generated from ENDF thermal scattering data. And the comparison carried out for H in H{sub 2}O and C in graphite. As a result, similar results came out between libraries generated from LEAPR module and that generated from ENDF thermal scattering data. Hereby, it is conclude that the generation of thermal scattering libraries with LEAPR module is appropriate to use and it is able to generate a library with user-specific temperature. Also it is assessed how much a temperature in a thermal scattering library influences on Monte-Carlo calculations.

  16. A relation between calculated human body exergy consumption rate and subjectively assessed thermal sensation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simone, Angela; Kolarik, Jakub; Iwamatsu, Toshiya;

    2011-01-01

    occupants, it is reasonable to consider both the exergy flows in building and those within the human body. Until now, no data have been available on the relation between human-body exergy consumption rates and subjectively assessed thermal sensation. The objective of the present work was to relate thermal...... sensation data, from earlier thermal comfort studies, to calculated human-body exergy consumption rates. The results show that the minimum human body exergy consumption rate is associated with thermal sensation votes close to thermal neutrality, tending to the slightly cool side of thermal sensation....... Generally, the relationship between air temperature and the exergy consumption rate, as a first approximation, shows an increasing trend. Taking account of both convective and radiative heat exchange between the human body and the surrounding environment by using the calculated operative temperature, exergy...

  17. Proceedings of the ANS/ASME/NRC international topical meeting on nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics: LMFBR and HTGR advanced reactor concepts and analysis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning the thermal-hydraulics of LMFBR type reactors; mathematical methods in nuclear reactor thermal-hydraulics; heat transfer in gas-cooled reactors; and thermal-hydraulics of pebble-bed reactors. Two papers have been previously abstracted and input to the data base

  18. Assessment of human thermal perception in the hot-humid climate of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndetto, Emmanuel L.; Matzarakis, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, is a typical African city along the Indian Ocean coast, and therefore an important urban area to examine human thermal perception in the hot-humid tropical climate. Earlier research on human bioclimate at Dar es Salaam indicated that heat stress prevails during the hot season from October to March, peaking between December and February, particularly the early afternoons. In order to assess the human thermal perception and adaptation, two popular places, one at an urban park and another at a beach environment, were selected and questionnaire surveys were conducted in August-September 2013 and January 2014, concurrently with local micro-meteorological measurements at survey locations. The thermal conditions were quantified in terms of the thermal index of the physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) using the micro-scale climate model RayMan. The thermal comfort range of human thermal comfort and the local thermal adaptive capacity were determined in respect to the thermal index by binning thermal sensation votes. The thermal comfort range was found to be well above that in temperate climates at about 23-31 °C of PET. The study could significantly contribute to urban planning in Dar es Salaam and other coastal cities in the tropics.

  19. Assessment of variations in thermal cycle life data of thermal barrier coated rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mcdonald, G.

    1981-01-01

    The reported study had the purpose to examine variations in cyclic life and in adhesive/cohesive coating strength. Possible effects of heating rate, stress reversal, temperature level, and ceramic deposition methods on coating life were also investigated. Life cycle data for 22 thermal barrier coated rods were examined and found to be statistically modeled by normal or log-normal distributions. The sample mean was 1330 cycles with a standard deviation of 520 cycles. Adhesive/cohesive pulloff strength data for 20 thermal barrier coated flat head piston specimens were taken. The average pulloff stress was 9 MPa with a standard deviation of 4.2 MPa. It was found that variations in heating rate can produce significant variations in the life cycle data.

  20. Assessing the thermoelectric properties of single InSb nanowires: the role of thermal contact resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazji, S.; Swinkels, M. Y.; De Luca, M.; Hoffmann, E. A.; Ercolani, D.; Roddaro, S.; Abstreiter, G.; Sorba, L.; Bakkers, E. P. A. M.; Zardo, I.

    2016-06-01

    The peculiar shape and dimensions of nanowires (NWs) have opened the way to their exploitation in thermoelectric applications. In general, the parameters entering into the thermoelectric figure of merit are strongly interdependent, which makes it difficult to realize an optimal thermoelectric material. In NWs, instead, the power factor can be increased and the thermal conductivity reduced, thus boosting the thermoelectric efficiency compared to bulk materials. However, the assessment of all the thermoelectric properties of a NW is experimentally very challenging. Here, we focus on InSb NWs, which have proved to be promising thermoelectric materials. The figure of merit is accurately determined by using a novel method based on a combination of Raman spectroscopy and electrical measurements. Remarkably, this type of experiment provides a powerful approach allowing us to neglect the role played by thermal contact resistance. Furthermore, we compare the thermal conductivity determined by this novel method to the one determined on the same sample by the thermal bridge method. In this latter approach, the thermal contact resistance is a non-negligible parameter, especially in NWs with large diameters. We provide experimental evidence of the crucial role played by thermal contact resistance in the assessment of the thermal properties of nanostructures, using two different measurement methods of the thermal conductivity.

  1. Assessment of Thermal Comfort: A Study at Closed and Ventilated Call Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Ismail

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The aims of study were to investigate the effects of environmental factors including the human physiology and thermal comfort during the cycle of process works in workplace. Approach: The selected production line was handling the restoration of trouble report. The environment examined was the relative humidity (%, wind speed (m sec-1, illuminance (lux and air temperature (°C of the surrounding workstation area. The environmental factors were measured using thermal comfort apparatus, which is capable to measure simultaneously those mentioned environmental factors. The time series data of fluctuating level of factors were plotted to identify the significant changes of factors. Then the thermal comfort of the workers was assessed by using ISO Standard 7730 and thermal sensation scale by using Predicted Mean Vote (PMV. Further Predicted Percentage Dissatisfied (PPD is used to estimate the thermal comfort satisfaction of the occupant. Finally the PMV were plotted to present the thermal comfort scenario of workers involved in related workstation. Results: The thermal comfort assessment of this workplace which is slightly warm following by thermal sensation and likely to be dissatisfied by the occupant. Conclusion: The result indicated that the activity level and clothing more influenced comfort to the occupants.

  2. Safety and anti-HIV assessments of natural vaginal cleansing products in an established topical microbicides in vitro testing algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Maureen

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At present, there is no effective vaccine or other approved product for the prevention of sexually transmitted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection. It has been reported that women in resource-poor communities use vaginally applied citrus juices as topical microbicides. These easily accessible food products have historically been applied to prevent pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and cytotoxicity of these substances using an established topical microbicide testing algorithm. Freshly squeezed lemon and lime juice and household vinegar were tested in their original state or in pH neutralized form for efficacy and cytotoxicity in the CCR5-tropic cell-free entry and cell-associated transmission assays, CXCR4-tropic entry and fusion assays, and in a human PBMC-based anti-HIV-1 assay. These products were also tested for their effect on viability of cervico-vaginal cell lines, human cervical explant tissues, and beneficial Lactobacillus species. Results Natural lime and lemon juice and household vinegar demonstrated anti-HIV-1 activity and cytotoxicity in transformed cell lines. Neutralization of the products reduced both anti-HIV-1 activity and cytotoxicity, resulting in a low therapeutic window for both acidic and neutralized formulations. For the natural juices and vinegar, the IC50 was ≤ 3.5 (0.8-3.5% and the TC50 ≤ 6.3 (1.0-6.3%. All three liquid products inhibited viability of beneficial Lactobacillus species associated with vaginal health. Comparison of three different toxicity endpoints in the cervical HeLa cell line revealed that all three products affected membrane integrity, cytosolic enzyme release, and dehydrogenase enzyme activity in living cells. The juices and vinegar also exerted strong cytotoxicity in cervico-vaginal cell lines, mainly due to their acidic pH. In human cervical explant tissues, treatment with 5% lemon or lime juice

  3. Detection of Embryonic Research Topics by Analysing Semantic Topic Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Salatino, Angelo Antonio; Motta, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Being aware of new research topics is an important asset for anybody involved in the research environment, including researchers, academic publishers and institutional funding bodies. In recent years, the amount of scholarly data available on the web has increased steadily, allowing the development of several approaches for detecting emerging research topics and assessing their trends. However, current methods focus on the detection of topics which are already associated with a label or a sub...

  4. Acoustic emission assessment of interface cracking in thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Zhong, Zhi-Chun; Zhou, Yi-Chun; Zhu, Wang; Zhang, Zhi-Biao; Cai, Can-Ying; Lu, Chun-Sheng

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, acoustic emission (AE) and digital image correlation methods were applied to monitor interface cracking in thermal barrier coatings under compression. The interface failure process can be identified via its AE features, including buckling, delamination incubation and spallation. According to the Fourier transformation of AE signals, there are four different failure modes: surface vertical cracks, opening and sliding interface cracks, and substrate deformation. The characteristic frequency of AE signals from surface vertical cracks is 0.21 MHz, whilst that of the two types of interface cracks are 0.43 and 0.29 MHz, respectively. The energy released of the two types of interface cracks are 0.43 and 0.29 MHz, respectively. Based on the energy released from cracking and the AE signals, a relationship is established between the interface crack length and AE parameters, which is in good agreement with experimental results.

  5. Thermal performance monitoring and assessment in Dukovany nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Competition in the European electricity market forces generators to achieve - in compliance with safety and environmental standards - efficiency of production as high as possible. This efficiency or heat rate is an important indicator of both the condition of the plant equipment and the quality of plant operation. Similar thermal performance indicators can also be calculated for components of the plant equipment such as heat exchangers. However, it is not easy to quantify these indicators with sufficient precision so that the results can be used for conduct of plant operation in near-real time and for predictive maintenance. This paper describes a present state of the system monitoring and evaluating thermal performance of the reactor units in Dukovany Nuclear Power Plant. The system provides information on actual and desirable (should-be) values of thermal performance indicators for control room operators, performance engineers and maintenance planners. The system is designed to monitor steady states and has two main functions: data validation and process simulation. Data validation is based on data reconciliation methodology and carried out with Recon software by Chemplant Technology. A detailed model of the secondary side for mass and heat balancing has been made up by means of the Recon's graphical editor; now it contains roughly 300 flows and employs data of about 200 measurements. Main advantages of the data reconciliation are: - reconciled data are consistent with the model, - reconciled data are more precise than data directly measured with consequence that the thermal power of steam generators is determined with substantially lower uncertainty than before - data reconciliation represents a solid basis for detection and identification of data corrupted by gross errors. Simulation is performed with a different analytical model of plant components configured into secondary side. The model has been developed by I and C Energo. Main purposes of simulation are

  6. Thermal Fatigue and Creep Assessment for the ITER Tritium SDS bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the tritium is absorbed and desorbed, the primary vessel is heated to 500 .deg. C and cool down to the room temperature. During this procedure, high alternating thermal stress occurs in the primary vessel. Fatigue analysis is conducted with the information of the magnitude and the number of the calculated cyclic load. In case that the duration for which the bed stay in high temperature increases, thermal creep effects should be evaluated. This paper describes the thermal fatigue and creep assessment for the SDS bed. For the ITER tritium SDS bed, thermal fatigue and creep assessments were performed. A new operation procedure to obtain more integrity margin was recommended. On the contrary, the other operation procedure should be considered which makes the rapid heating and cooling operation possible at the cost of giving up the marginal integrity

  7. Thermal Fatigue and Creep Assessment for the ITER Tritium SDS bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Woo-seok; Park, Chang-kyu; Ju, Young-sun [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hyun-goo; Jang, Min-ho; Yun, Sei-hun [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    As the tritium is absorbed and desorbed, the primary vessel is heated to 500 .deg. C and cool down to the room temperature. During this procedure, high alternating thermal stress occurs in the primary vessel. Fatigue analysis is conducted with the information of the magnitude and the number of the calculated cyclic load. In case that the duration for which the bed stay in high temperature increases, thermal creep effects should be evaluated. This paper describes the thermal fatigue and creep assessment for the SDS bed. For the ITER tritium SDS bed, thermal fatigue and creep assessments were performed. A new operation procedure to obtain more integrity margin was recommended. On the contrary, the other operation procedure should be considered which makes the rapid heating and cooling operation possible at the cost of giving up the marginal integrity.

  8. Environmental assessment and remediation of thermal well casing failures: The Cold Lake experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thermal well casing failure is a break or leak in the production string of a thermal well. Depending on the circumstances of the event, the fluids leaked may be condensed steam, produced water, oil, or a mixture of all these fluid types. The fluids may be injected into the surrounding oil reservoir, or in upper geologic strata or groundwater zones, or occasionally to the surface. Environmental assessment and mitigation of thermal casing failures is reviewed. Within each impact type (aquifer contamination, atmospheric emission, surface contamination) there are four classes of severity. The remediation requirements of these classes of severity range from minimal to continual, long-term remediation. Statistics relating to thermal well casing failures in the Alberta petroleum industry are presented. A case example is presented of a casing failure event that resulted in a surface spill. Groundwater aquifer assessment to determine the extent of contamination is described. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Assessment of effective thermal conductivity in U–Mo metallic fuels with distributed gas bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Shenyang; Casella, Andrew M.; Lavender, Curt A.; Senor, David J.; Burkes, Douglas E.

    2015-07-15

    This work presents a numerical method to assess the relative impact of various microstructural features including grain sizes, nanometer scale intragranular gas bubbles, and larger intergranular gas bubbles in irradiated U–Mo metallic fuels on the effective thermal conductivity. A phase-field model was employed to construct a three-dimensional polycrystalline U–Mo fuel alloy with a given crystal morphology and gas bubble microstructures. An effective thermal conductivity “concept” was taken to capture the effect of polycrystalline structures and gas bubble microstructures with significant size differences on the thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of inhomogeneous materials was calculated by solving the heat transport equation. The obtained results are in reasonably good agreement with experimental measurements made on irradiated U–Mo fuel samples containing similar microstructural features. The developed method can be used to predict the thermal conductivity degradation in operating nuclear fuels if the evolution of microstructures is known during operation of the fuel.

  10. Using a Zonal Model To Assess the Effect of a Heated Floor on Thermal Comfort Quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    People s perceptions of indoor air quality and thermal comfort are affected by air speed and temperature. We have extended the three-dimensional zonal model, ZAER, to be able to predict the temperature fields and the air distributions between and within rooms in the case of natural convection. This paper presents an application of the new zonal model dealing with the influence of a heated floor of one room upon the winter thermal comfort of an unconditioned Tunisian dwelling. Coupling ZAER with a thermal comfort model allows the assessment of the thermal quality of the dwelling through the prediction of a comfort indicator. The obtained results show that a heated floor can be a useful component to improve thermal comfort in the Tunisian context, even in another room

  11. ASSESSMENT OF THERMAL SENSATION OF RESIDENTS IN THE SOUTHERN GREAT PLAIN, HUNGARY

    OpenAIRE

    Kovács, A; KÁNTOR NOÉMI; ÉGERHÁZI LILLA ANDREA

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the subjective thermal sensation characteristics of people living in Szeged, in the Southern Hungarian Great Plain. Micrometeorological measurements were conducted with two mobile stations in six urban public spaces during 70 days from spring to autumn in 2011 and 2012. Simultaneously, 6080 visitors were asked to assess their actual subjective thermal sensation. The collected climatic variables (air temperature, relative humidity, wind velocity, and mean radiant temperatur...

  12. Assessment of applicability of TRAC-BF1 for thermal hydraulic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the stability of advanced light water reactors or steam generators in FBR, JAEA has been developing a prediction method for thermal-hydraulic instability based on system analysis code TRAC-BF1. In the present paper, thermal-hydraulic instability experiments were analyzed with TRAC-BF1 code and the applicability of the code for thermal-hydraulic instability was estimated. The heat flux of the boundary between stable and unstable region is in agreement with the experimental data within about 10% of error. The onset of instability can be predicted with TRAC-BF1. (author)

  13. Quantitative ultrasound assessment of thermal damage in excised liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmerer, Jeremy P.; Ghoshal, Goutam; Oelze, Michael L.

    2012-10-01

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) is a novel approach for characterizing tissue microstructure and changes in tissue microstructure due to therapy. In this report, we discuss changes in QUS parameters in liver tissues after being exposed to thermal insult. Effective scatterer diameter (ESD) and effective acoustic concentration (EAC) from the normalized backscattered power spectrum were examined in rat liver specimens heated in a degassed saline bath. Individual liver samples were bisected, with half of each sample heated to a therapeutic temperature of 60°C for 10 minutes and the other half held at 37°C. The ultrasonic backscatter and attenuation coefficient were then estimated at 37°C from both halves. ESD was observed to decrease by an average of 34% in exposed compared to unexposed sample sections, EAC increased by 18 dB, and the attenuation coefficient increased by 70%. Histological slides from these samples indicate cell size and/or concentration may be affected by heating. This work was supported by NIH R01-EB008992.

  14. Validity of Thermal Ramping Assays Used to Assess Thermal Tolerance in Arthropods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Johannes; Kristensen, Torsten Nygård; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov

    2012-01-01

    empirically test these model predictions using two sets of independent experiments. We clearly demonstrate that results from ramping assays of small insects (Drosophila melanogaster) are not compromised by starvation- or dehydration-stress. Firstly we show that the mild disturbance of water and energy balance...... of D. melanogaster experienced during the ramping tests does not confound heat tolerance estimates. Secondly we show that flies pre-exposed to starvation and dehydration have ‘‘normal’’ heat tolerance and that resistance to heat stress is independent of the energetic and water status of the flies. On...... animals under laboratory conditions must select appropriate methodology on which conclusions can be drawn. Ideally these methods should precisely estimate the trait of interest and also be biological meaningful. In an attempt to develop such tests it has been proposed that thermal ramping assays are...

  15. ASSESSMENT OF THERMAL SENSATION OF RESIDENTS IN THE SOUTHERN GREAT PLAIN, HUNGARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOVÁCS A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the subjective thermal sensation characteristics of people living in Szeged, in the Southern Hungarian Great Plain. Micrometeorological measurements were conducted with two mobile stations in six urban public spaces during 70 days from spring to autumn in 2011 and 2012. Simultaneously, 6080 visitors were asked to assess their actual subjective thermal sensation. The collected climatic variables (air temperature, relative humidity, wind velocity, and mean radiant temperature were assigned to the respondents individually, taking the actual spatial position of the subjects and the meteorological stations, as well as the degree of their solar exposure into account. From the linked basic parameters the Physiologically Equivalent Temperature (PET index was calculated to quantify the overall thermal conditions. This study presents the characteristics of the visitors’ Thermal Sensation Votes (TSV as well as their relationships with the measured or calculated objective variables. The results confirmed that PET has the strongest influence on the thermal sensation. Based on the TSV−PET regression function, the widely used European PET thermal sensation classes were rescaled in order to express more closely the thermal perception characteristics of the people living under the climatic conditions of the Southern Hungarian Great Plain. The results indicate significant shifts in the PET class boundaries, emphasizing the role of thermal adaptation of people living in distinct climates.

  16. [Topical contraceptives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipov, V I; Korkhov, V V

    1982-02-01

    Recently there has been little interest in topical contraceptives. The most popular are the cervical cap and the diaphragm. Other types of mechanical contraceptive devices are being investigated. Standley and Kessler have developed a device for introduction into the cervical canal with a reservoir of spermatocide, it does not block the flow of blood during menstruation. New models of vaginal rings are also being developed which are simple enough for self-insertion and also contain a reservoir of spermatocide. Work is being done on spermatocide-containing sponges in many countries. Another project being investigated is the possibility of using natural proteins, collagens, and other substances which absorb spermatozoids. The ancients used various vaginal suppositories to kill spermatozoids; in the late 19th century quinine sulfate was used for this, and a variety of substances have been used recently. These spermicidal creams also have the advantage of acting as anti-infectious agents in many cases. But they do have some negative effects. They are about 85% effective, are local irritants, and some cause discomfort during intercourse. And it is possible that some are resorbed by the body and act on the liver and other organs. Vaginal globules and suppositories are also popular. The "Kontraceptin-T" brand contains quinosol, boric acid, and tannin. There are also foaming tablets which are mixed with water and then introduced. New locally-active chemical substances are being developed in Japan, West Germany, and the USSR. Kontraceptin-E contains paranonyl-phenoxypolyethylene glycol and sodium dioctylsulfosuccinate. The "Norforks" and other preparations contain mercurial compounds which may turn out to be harmful. The future promises the development of products which will act to prevent fertilization by acting on the hyaluronidase and the acrosine of the spermatozoid, thus preventing it from penetrating the ovum. It would be best to find enzyme inhibitors which are

  17. Task 38 - commercial mercury remediation demonstrations: Thermal retorting and physical separation/chemical leaching. Topical report, December 1, 1994--June 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlton, D.S.; Fraley, R.H.; Stepan, D.J.

    1998-12-31

    Results are presented on the demonstration of two commercial technologies for the removal of mercury from soils found at natural gas metering sites. Technologies include a thermal retorting process and a combination of separation, leaching, and electrokinetic separation process.

  18. Plant-Damage Assessment Technique for Evaluating Military Vehicular Impacts to Vegetation in the Mojave Desert; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new plant damage assessment technique was developed by plant ecologists from Bechtel Nevada at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Security Administration Nevada Operations Office and funded by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program Project CS-1131 in cooperation with the U.S. Army's National Training Center (NTC) at Fort Irwin, California. The technique establishes linear transects the width of vehicle tracts from evidence of vehicle tracks in the soil (usually during a prior training rotation period of 30 days or since the last rain or wind storm), and measures vegetation within the tracks to determine the area of plant parts being run over, the percent of the impacted parts damaged, and the percent of impacted parts expected to recover. It documents prior-damage classes based on estimated of damage that plants have apparently experienced previously (as assessed from field indicators of damage such as plant shape and height). The technique was used to evaluate different vehicle types (rubber-tire wheels vs. tracks) in six area at the NTC with different soils and training intensity levels. The technique provides tabular data that can be sorted and queried to show a variety of trends related to military vehicular impacts. The technique also appears suitable for assessing other non-military off-road traffic impacts. Findings report: (1) differences in plant sensitivity of different vehicular impacts, (2) plant cover and density by species and training area, (3) the degree to which wheels have less impact than tracks, and (4) the mean percent survival is inversely proportional to the degree of prior damage received by the vegetation (i.e., plants previously impacted have lower survival than plants not previously impacted)

  19. Profits or preferences? Assessing the adoption of residential solar thermal technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar thermal technologies offer the potential to meet a substantial share of residential water and space heating needs in the EU, but current levels of adoption are low. This paper uses data from a large sample of German households to assess the effects of geographic, residence, and household characteristics on the adoption of solar thermal water and space heating technologies. In addition, the impact of solar thermal technology adoption on household energy expenditures is estimated after controlling for observed household heterogeneity in geographic, residential, and household characteristics. While evidence is found of moderate household energy expenditure savings from combined solar water and space heating systems, the findings generally confirm that low in-home energy cost savings and fixed housing stocks limit the diffusion of residential solar thermal technologies. Little evidence is found of differential adoption by distinct socio-economic groups.

  20. Assessment of monitored energy use and thermal comfort conditions in mosques in hot-humid climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Homoud, Mohammad S.; Abdou, Adel A.; Budaiwi, Ismail M. [Architectural Engineering Department, KFUPM, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2009-06-15

    In harsh climatic regions, buildings require air-conditioning in order to provide an acceptable level of thermal comfort. In many situations buildings are over cooled or the HVAC system is kept running for a much longer time than needed. In some other situations thermal comfort is not achieved due to improper operation practices coupled with poor maintenance and even lack it, and consequently inefficient air-conditioning systems. Mosques represent one type of building that is characterized by their unique intermittent operating schedule determined by prayer times, which vary continuously according to the local solar time. This paper presents the results of a study designed to monitor energy use and thermal comfort conditions of a number of mosques in a hot-humid climate so that both energy efficiency and the quality of thermal comfort conditions especially during occupancy periods in such intermittently operated buildings can be assessed accurately. (author)

  1. A relation between calculated human body exergy consumption rate and subjectively assessed thermal sensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simone, Angela; Kolarik, Jakub; Olesen, Bjarne W. [ICIEE/BYG, Technical University of Denmark (Denmark); Iwamatsu, Toshiya [Faculty of Urban Environmental Science, Tokyo Metropolitan University (Japan); Asada, Hideo [Architech Consulting Co., Tokyo (Japan); Dovjak, Mateja [Faculty of Civil and Geodetic Engineering, University of Ljubljana (Slovenia); Schellen, Lisje [Eindhoven University of Technology, Faculty of Architecture Building and Planning (Netherlands); Shukuya, Masanori [Laboratory of Building Environment, Tokyo City University, Yokohama (Japan)

    2011-01-15

    Application of the exergy concept to research on the built environment is a relatively new approach. It helps to optimize climate conditioning systems so that they meet the requirements of sustainable building design. As the building should provide a healthy and comfortable environment for its occupants, it is reasonable to consider both the exergy flows in building and those within the human body. Until now, no data have been available on the relation between human-body exergy consumption rates and subjectively assessed thermal sensation. The objective of the present work was to relate thermal sensation data, from earlier thermal comfort studies, to calculated human-body exergy consumption rates. The results show that the minimum human body exergy consumption rate is associated with thermal sensation votes close to thermal neutrality, tending to the slightly cool side of thermal sensation. Generally, the relationship between air temperature and the exergy consumption rate, as a first approximation, shows an increasing trend. Taking account of both convective and radiative heat exchange between the human body and the surrounding environment by using the calculated operative temperature, exergy consumption rates increase as the operative temperature increases above 24 C or decreases below 22 C. With the data available so far, a second-order polynomial relationship between thermal sensation and the exergy consumption rate was established. (author)

  2. Assessment of thermal fatigue crack propagation in safety injection PWR lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyclic thermal stratification resulting in alternating thermal stresses in pipe cross sections has been identified as the primary cause of high cycle thermal fatigue failure. A number of piping lines in operating plants around the world, susceptible to thermal stratification, have experienced circumferential cracking as a result of high levels of alternating bending stresses. This paper addresses the mechanisms of crack initiation and crack growth and provides estimates of fatigue cycles to failure for a typical safety injection line with such cyclic load history. Utilizing a 3-D finite element analysis, the temperature profile and the corresponding thermal stress field of a complete thermal cycle in a safety injection line consisting of a horizontal pipe section and an elbow, is obtained. Since the observed cracking occurred in the region of the elbow-to-horizontal pipe weld, the analysis performed assessed (1) the impact of the level of local geometric discontinuities on the initiation of an inside surface flaw is greatest and (2) the number of thermal cycles required to drive a small surface crack through the pipe wall. 12 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Endoscopic assessment of effacement of balloon waist during pneumatic dilatation of primary achalasia cardia under topical anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balloon dilatation of Primary Achalasia Cardia (PAC) is usually performed under antegrade endoscopic guidance, with conscious sedation. The main goals of this prospective study were to assess the safety and efficacy of pneumatic dilatation without conscious sedation and to determine the endoscopic signs of effacement of the balloon waist. Pneumatic dilatation was successfully performed as outdoor procedure without conscious sedation in patients (n= 25; mean age 42.56 years) with endoscopic and radiologic diagnosis of PAC. Immediate relief of symptoms was observed in 23 (92%) cases. Effacement of the balloon waist under endoscopic vision was appreciated in all cases in the present study. Common complications of pneumatic dilatation were chest pain in all (100%) subjects and mild local bleeding in 17 (68%) patients. There was no cancellation of procedure. Re-dilatation was required in 2 (8%) cases. The duration of follow-up was from 6 weeks to 23 months. Pneumatic dilatation of PAC can be safely performed as same day procedure, without conscious sedation. Obliteration of the balloon waist can be readily determined by antegrade endoscopic assessment of stretch on the lower oesophageal sphincter (EASL). (author)

  4. Thermal-hydraulic assessment of concrete storage cubicle with horizontal 3013 canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FIDAP computer code was used to perform a series of analyses to assess the thermal-hydraulic performance characteristics of the concrete plutonium storage cubicles, as modified for the horizontal placement of 3013 canisters. Four separate models were developed ranging from a full height model of the storage cubicle to a very detailed standalone model of a horizontal 3013 canister

  5. Low-cost and versatile thermal test chip for power assemblies assessment and thermometric calibration purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chips specifically designed for thermal tests such as the assessment of packages, are of main interest in Microelectronics. Nevertheless, these test dies are required in relatively low quantities and their price is a limiting factor. This work describes a low-cost thermal test chip, specifically developed for the needs of power electronics. It is based on a poly-silicon heating resistor and a decoupled Pt temperature sensing resistor on the top, allowing to dissipate more than 60 W (170 W/cm2) and reaching temperatures up to 200 oC. Its simple structure allows an easy simulation and modeling. These features have been taken in profit for packaging materials assessment, calibration of temperature measurement apparatus and methods, and validation of thermal models and simulations. - Highlights: → We describe a low-cost thermal test chip developed for power electronics applications. → It integrates a poly-silicon heating resistor and a Pt temperature sensing resistor on the top. → It can dissipate up to 200 W/cm2 and work up to 200 oC. → It has been used for thermal resistance and conductivity measurement of substrates. → It allowed also the calibration of advanced thermometric equipments.

  6. Development of thermal stress concentration factors for life assessment of turbine casings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major components of thermal power plants are made of low-alloy steel and operated under high temperature and pressure conditions. Even though such facilities have design lives of 100,000 h, unexpected failure can occur due to thermal fatigue or creep damages during operation. In particular, high-pressure and intermediate-pressure casing components are susceptible to frequent cracking due to thermo-mechanical low-cycle fatigue at the nozzle fit corner radius and other stress concentration shapes. Thus, for effective maintenance, it is necessary to have accurate knowledge of transient thermal stresses at critical positions that are susceptible to failure. In this paper, thermal stress concentration factors for the inner surface of the casing and valve are defined to account for variations in the geometry using three-dimensional finite element analysis. In addition, the total strain range is obtained to assess the low-cycle fatigue life according to the life assessment procedures in Korea. Highlights: ► Analytical model of thermal stress concentration factors of casing was developed. ► TSCFs take into account variations in geometry through three-dimensional FEA. ► TSCFs from approximated equation correspondence with TSCFs from FEA. ► TSCFs from approximated equation is independent of disk length L.

  7. Assessments of UCB-Kuhn Condensation Tests by Various Thermal-Hydraulic Codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power (KHNP) submitted a topical report on 'Safety and Performance Analysis CodE (SPACE) for nuclear power plants' to Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety (KINS) and KINS is reviewing the topical report at present. To validate and verify a new Thermal-Hydraulic (TH) code such as SPACE, a lot of code calculations should be done with respect to a systematic validation and verification matrix which is composed of analytical problems or physical experiments related to various thermal-hydraulic phenomena. One of these T-H phenomena is condensation heat transfer with and without non-condensable gas. This experiment has been referenced frequently as a representative experiment on condensation heat transfer with and without non-condensable gas. However, KHNP only presents a comparison between SPACE code calculation and the experimental data in the topical report, therefore, it is very difficult to decide whether SPACE code performance is good or not. Therefore in the present study, various other T-H codes such as RELAP, MARS and TRACE calculations are made for the same UCB-Kuhn condensation tests which were solved by SPACE code and comparisons among various T-H codes results including SPACE are made to see if SPACE code is reasonable enough to predict the condensation heat transfer with and without non-condensable gas. Simulations for UCB-Kuhn condensation tests (RUN 1.1-1 for pure steam test and RUN 4.3-3 for mixture of steam-air test) were performed by various T-H codes such as RELAP, MARS and TRACE and their results were compared to experimental data and SPACE code calculation result given in the topical report for SPACE. Most of T-H codes results including that of SPACE show much similarity among them and they also show reasonable agreement with the experimental data, respectively. TRACE code shows excellent prediction capability for this condensation experiment and RELAP and MARS codes shows prediction capability between TRACE

  8. Analysis of heart rate control to assess thermal sensitivity responses in Brazilian toads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.E.S. Natali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In anurans, changes in ambient temperature influence body temperature and, therefore, energy consumption. These changes ultimately affect energy supply and, consequently, heart rate (HR. Typically, anurans living in different thermal environments have different thermal sensitivities, and these cannot be distinguished by changes in HR. We hypothesized that Rhinella jimi (a toad from a xeric environment that lives in a wide range of temperatures would have a lower thermal sensitivity regarding cardiac control than R. icterica (originally from a tropical forest environment with a more restricted range of ambient temperatures. Thermal sensitivity was assessed by comparing animals housed at 15° and 25°C. Cardiac control was estimated by heart rate variability (HRV and heart rate complexity (HRC. Differences in HRV between the two temperatures were not significant (P=0.214 for R. icterica and P=0.328 for R. jimi, whereas HRC differences were. All specimens but one R. jimi had a lower HRC at 15°C (all P<0.01. These results indicate that R. jimi has a lower thermal sensitivity and that cardiac control is not completely dependent on the thermal environment because HRC was not consistently different between temperatures in all R. jimi specimens. This result indicates a lack of evolutive trade-offs among temperatures given that heart rate control at 25°C is potentially not a constraint to heart rate control at 15°C.

  9. Thermal inertia and energy efficiency – Parametric simulation assessment on a calibrated case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We perform a parametric simulation study on a calibrated building energy model. • We introduce adaptive shadings and night free cooling in simulations. • We analyze the effect of thermal capacity on the parametric simulations results. • We recognize that cooling demand and savings scales linearly with thermal capacity. • We assess the advantage of medium-heavy over medium and light configurations. - Abstract: The reduction of energy consumption for heating and cooling services in the existing building stock is a key challenge for global sustainability today and buildings’ envelopes retrofit is one the main issues. Most of the existing buildings’ envelopes have low levels of insulation, high thermal losses due to thermal bridges and cracks, absence of appropriate solar control, etc. Further, in building refurbishment, the importance of a system level approach is often undervalued in favour of simplistic “off the shelf” efficient solutions, focused on the reduction of thermal transmittance and on the enhancement of solar control capabilities. In many cases, the importance of the dynamic thermal properties is often neglected or underestimated and the effective thermal capacity is not properly considered as one of the design parameters. The research presented aims to critically assess the influence of the dynamic thermal properties of the building fabric (roof, walls and floors) on sensible heating and cooling energy demand for a case study. The case study chosen is an existing office building which has been retrofitted in recent years and whose energy model has been calibrated according to the data collected in the monitoring process. The research illustrates the variations of the sensible thermal energy demand of the building in different retrofit scenarios, and relates them to the variations of the dynamic thermal properties of the construction components. A parametric simulation study has been performed, encompassing the use of

  10. Assessing Cumulative Thermal Stress in Fish During Chronic Exposure to High Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevelhimer, M.S.; Bennett, W.R.

    1999-11-14

    As environmental laws become increasingly protective, and with possible future changes in global climate, thermal effects on aquatic resources are likely to receive increasing attention. Lethal temperatures for a variety of species have been determined for situations where temperatures rise rapidly resulting in lethal effects. However, less is known about the effects of chronic exposure to high (but not immediately lethal) temperatures and even less about stress accumulation during periods of fluctuating temperatures. In this paper we present a modeling framework for assessing cumulative thermal stress in fish. The model assumes that stress accumulation occurs above a threshold temperature at a rate depending on the degree to which the threshold is exceeded. The model also includes stress recovery (or alleviation) when temperatures drop below the threshold temperature as in systems with large daily variation. In addition to non-specific physiological stress, the model also simulates thermal effects on growth.

  11. Assessment of remineralized dentin lesions with thermal and near-infrared reflectance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Robert C.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Fried, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Accurate detection and measurement of the highly mineralized surface layer that forms on caries lesions is important for the diagnosis of lesion activity. Previous studies have demonstrated that optical imaging methods can be used to measure the degree of remineralization on enamel lesions. The purpose of this study was to determine if thermal and near-IR reflectance imaging could be used to assess the remineralization process in simulated dentin lesions. Artificial bovine (n=15) dentin lesions were prepared by immersion in a demineralization solution for 24 hours and they were subsequently placed in an acidic remineralization solution for up to 12 days. The samples were dehydrated using an air spray for 30 seconds and imaged using thermal and InGaAs cameras. The area enclosed by the time-temperature curve, ΔQ, from thermal imaging decreased significantly with longer periods of remineralization. However, near-IR reflectance intensity differences, ΔI, before and after dehydration failed to show any significant relationship with the degree of remineralization. This study shows that thermal imaging can be used for the assessment of the remineralization of dentin lesions.

  12. Development of simplified methods for fatigue crack growth assessment under cyclic thermal loadings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes methods developed to assess fatigue crack growth and shows their applicability to the prediction of the fatigue crack growth behaviour under cyclic thermal transient loadings. A detailed non-linear fracture mechanics parameter evaluation code and a simplified crack growth analysis code have been developed. The former estimates fracture mechanics parameters based on the path integral method in a stress and strain field calculated by the finite element method (FEM) and the latter simulates the crack growth behaviour by using stress intensity factors which are obtained from influence function methods based on the principle of superposition. A series of thermal fatigue crack growth tests on pre-flawed specimens were carried out to verify the validity of these codes. The predictions by these codes were compared with the results of the thermal fatigue crack growth tests. It was shown that the simplified crack growth assessment methods were found to be applicable to the prediction of the crack growth behaviour under cyclic thermal transient loadings. (author). 8 refs, figs

  13. Assessment of thermal analysis software for the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This assessment uses several recent assessments and the more general code compilations that have been completed to produce a list of 116 codes that can be used for thermal analysis. This list is then compared with criteria prepared especially for the Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (DOE/OCRWM). Based on these criteria, fifteen codes are narrowed to three primary codes and four secondary codes for use by the OCRWM thermal analyst. The analyst is cautioned that since no single code is sufficient for all applications, a code must be selected based upon the predominate heat transfer mode of the problem to be solved, but the codes suggested in this report have been used successfully for a range of OCRWM applications. The report concludes with a series of recommendations for additional work of which the major points include the following: The codes suggested by this report must be benchmarked with the existing US and international problems and validated when possible; An interactive code selection tool could be developed or, perhaps even more useful, a users group could be supported to ensure the proper selection of thermal codes and dissemination of information on the latest version; The status of the 116 codes identified by this report should be verified, and methods for maintaining the still active codes must be established; and special capabilities of each code in phase change, convection and radiation should be improved to better enable the thermal analyst to model OCRWM applications. 37 refs., 3 figs., 12 tabs

  14. One day-old chicks transport: Assessment of thermal profile in a tropical region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aérica C. Nazareno

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the thermal profile of truck with different levels of box placement during one day-old chicks transport. An experiment was conducted through monitoring of 11 transport loads. A acclimatized truck was used in this research, with maximum capacity of 630 one day-old chicks boxes, totalizing 63,000 animals. The assessment of thermal environment was performed in 5 min intervals, through the following variables: temperature, relative humidity and specific enthalpy. The treatments were registered at two levels of the load (first rack and floor where 17 data loggers were distributed throughout the truck. The experiment used a completely randomized design and geostatistics was used for spatial dependency and Kriging interpolation. The microclimatic conditions of the truck were not as per recommended values, which confirm a heterogeneous distribution of heat and moisture in environment. Regarding the box positioning, the mean values of thermal variables associated with thermal comfort of one day-old chicks was found in the floor area. The most stressful environment for birds inside the truck was located in front and at the center of the truck.

  15. Overcooling transient selection and thermal hydraulic analyses of the Loviisa PTS assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes transients selection and thermal hydraulic analyses of various PTS assessment studies performed for the pressure vessels of the Loviisa WWER-reactors. Deterministic analyses have been performed in various stages of the PTS studies and they have always made the formal basis for design and licensing of the reactor pressure vessel. The integrated, probabilistic PTS study was carried out to give an overview of the severity of all different PTS sequences, and give a quantitative estimate of the importance of the PTS issues in relation to the overall safety of the plant. Later, the sequences including external flooding of the pressure vessels were added to the PTS assessment. Thermal recovery annealing of the Loviisa 1 reactor pressure vessel took place during refuelling outage in 1996. (author). 10 refs, 4 figs, 3 tabs

  16. Stress assessment in piping under synthetic thermal loads emulating turbulent fluid mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Generation of complex space-continuous and time-dependent temperature fields. • 1D and 3D thermo-mechanical analyses of pipes under complex surface thermal loads. • Surface temperatures and stress fluctuations are highly linearly correlated. • 1D and 3D results agree for a wide range of Fourier and Biot numbers. • Global thermo-mechanical loading promotes non-equibiaxial stress state. - Abstract: Thermal fatigue assessment of pipes due to turbulent fluid mixing in T-junctions is a rather difficult task because of the existing uncertainties and variability of induced thermal stresses. In these cases, thermal stresses arise on three-dimensional pipe structures due to complex thermal loads, known as thermal striping, acting at the fluid-wall interface. A recently developed approach for the generation of space-continuous and time-dependent temperature fields has been employed in this paper to reproduce fluid temperature fields of a case study from the literature. The paper aims to deliver a detailed study of the three-dimensional structural response of piping under the complex thermal loads arising in fluid mixing in T-junctions. Results of three-dimensional thermo-mechanical analyses show that fluctuations of surface temperatures and stresses are highly linearly correlated. Also, surface stress fluctuations, in axial and hoop directions, are almost equi-biaxial. These findings, representative on cross sections away from system boundaries, are moreover supported by the sensitivity analysis of Fourier and Biot numbers and by the comparison with standard one-dimensional analyses. Agreement between one- and three-dimensional results is found for a wide range of studied parameters. The study also comprises the effects of global thermo-mechanical loading on the surface stress state. Implemented mechanical boundary conditions develop more realistic overall system deformation and promote non-equibiaxial stresses

  17. Stress assessment in piping under synthetic thermal loads emulating turbulent fluid mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa Garrido, Oriol, E-mail: oriol.costa@ijs.si; El Shawish, Samir, E-mail: samir.elshawish@ijs.si; Cizelj, Leon, E-mail: leon.cizelj@ijs.si

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Generation of complex space-continuous and time-dependent temperature fields. • 1D and 3D thermo-mechanical analyses of pipes under complex surface thermal loads. • Surface temperatures and stress fluctuations are highly linearly correlated. • 1D and 3D results agree for a wide range of Fourier and Biot numbers. • Global thermo-mechanical loading promotes non-equibiaxial stress state. - Abstract: Thermal fatigue assessment of pipes due to turbulent fluid mixing in T-junctions is a rather difficult task because of the existing uncertainties and variability of induced thermal stresses. In these cases, thermal stresses arise on three-dimensional pipe structures due to complex thermal loads, known as thermal striping, acting at the fluid-wall interface. A recently developed approach for the generation of space-continuous and time-dependent temperature fields has been employed in this paper to reproduce fluid temperature fields of a case study from the literature. The paper aims to deliver a detailed study of the three-dimensional structural response of piping under the complex thermal loads arising in fluid mixing in T-junctions. Results of three-dimensional thermo-mechanical analyses show that fluctuations of surface temperatures and stresses are highly linearly correlated. Also, surface stress fluctuations, in axial and hoop directions, are almost equi-biaxial. These findings, representative on cross sections away from system boundaries, are moreover supported by the sensitivity analysis of Fourier and Biot numbers and by the comparison with standard one-dimensional analyses. Agreement between one- and three-dimensional results is found for a wide range of studied parameters. The study also comprises the effects of global thermo-mechanical loading on the surface stress state. Implemented mechanical boundary conditions develop more realistic overall system deformation and promote non-equibiaxial stresses.

  18. Health Risk Assessment of Inhalable Particulate Matter in Beijing Based on the Thermal Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-Yu Xu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Inhalable particulate matter (PM10 is a primary air pollutant closely related to public health, and an especially serious problem in urban areas. The urban heat island (UHI effect has made the urban PM10 pollution situation more complex and severe. In this study, we established a health risk assessment system utilizing an epidemiological method taking the thermal environment effects into consideration. We utilized a remote sensing method to retrieve the PM10 concentration, UHI, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, and Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI. With the correlation between difference vegetation index (DVI and PM10 concentration, we utilized the established model between PM10 and thermal environmental indicators to evaluate the PM10 health risks based on the epidemiological study. Additionally, with the regulation of UHI, NDVI and NDWI, we aimed at regulating the PM10 health risks and thermal environment simultaneously. This study attempted to accomplish concurrent thermal environment regulation and elimination of PM10 health risks through control of UHI intensity. The results indicate that urban Beijing has a higher PM10 health risk than rural areas; PM10 health risk based on the thermal environment is 1.145, which is similar to the health risk calculated (1.144 from the PM10 concentration inversion; according to the regulation results, regulation of UHI and NDVI is effective and helpful for mitigation of PM10 health risk in functional zones.

  19. The complex assessment of a thermal performance of the building envelope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Kornienko

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The complex assessment of a thermal performance of the envelope on the basis of natural measurements and numerical modeling of the heat and moisture transport in building components was executed. On the basis of natural measurements it was shown that thermal performance qualities of a maintained building do not meet standard requirements. For the purpose of establishment of the reason of low level of a thermal performance numerical modeling of the heat and moisture transport in an external wall according to the computer program developed by the author, by two options — on the basis of the actual and design data was executed. It was shown that results of numerical modeling on the basis of actual data will well be coordinated with natural data that confirms reliability of the results received on the computer program. On the basis of numerical modeling with use of design data it was established that the design solution of external walls corresponded to standard requirements for a thermal performance, and, therefore, deterioration of a thermal performance can be caused by the violations allowed during construction and reconstruction of the building.

  20. Health risk assessment of inhalable particulate matter in Beijing based on the thermal environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lin-Yu; Yin, Hao; Xie, Xiao-Dong

    2014-12-01

    Inhalable particulate matter (PM10) is a primary air pollutant closely related to public health, and an especially serious problem in urban areas. The urban heat island (UHI) effect has made the urban PM10 pollution situation more complex and severe. In this study, we established a health risk assessment system utilizing an epidemiological method taking the thermal environment effects into consideration. We utilized a remote sensing method to retrieve the PM10 concentration, UHI, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), and Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI). With the correlation between difference vegetation index (DVI) and PM10 concentration, we utilized the established model between PM10 and thermal environmental indicators to evaluate the PM10 health risks based on the epidemiological study. Additionally, with the regulation of UHI, NDVI and NDWI, we aimed at regulating the PM10 health risks and thermal environment simultaneously. This study attempted to accomplish concurrent thermal environment regulation and elimination of PM10 health risks through control of UHI intensity. The results indicate that urban Beijing has a higher PM10 health risk than rural areas; PM10 health risk based on the thermal environment is 1.145, which is similar to the health risk calculated (1.144) from the PM10 concentration inversion; according to the regulation results, regulation of UHI and NDVI is effective and helpful for mitigation of PM10 health risk in functional zones. PMID:25464132

  1. Assessment of Time-Lapse in Visible and Thermal Face Recognition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Farokhi, S.; Shamsuddin, S. M.; Flusser, Jan; Sheikh, U. U.

    Kuala Lumpur : WASET, 2012, s. 578-583. ISSN 2010-376X. [International Conference on Machine Learning and Pattern Recognition ICMLPR'12. Kuala Lumpur (MY), 19.02.2012-21.02.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP103/11/1552 Keywords : Face recognition * Zernike moments * infrared imaging Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2012/ZOI/flusser-assessment of time-lapse in visible and thermal face recognition.pdf

  2. Life cycle assessment of thermal Waste-to-Energy technologies: Review and recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard; Tonini, Davide; Turconi, Roberto; Boldrin, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used extensively within the recent decade to evaluate the environmental performance of thermal Waste-to-Energy (WtE) technologies: incineration, co-combustion, pyrolysis and gasification. A critical review was carried out involving 250 individual case-studies published in 136 peer-reviewed journal articles within 1995 and 2013. The studies were evaluated with respect to critical aspects such as: (i) goal and scope definitions (e.g. functional units, system...

  3. Probabilistic assessment of crack initiation in a piping under thermal-fatigue loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European research project THERFAT concerned with an evaluation of the thermal fatigue phenomenon in mixing tees of austenite piping. Computational results obtained for conservatively selected boundary conditions revealed high stresses in a mixing tee and, correspondingly, a possibility of fatigue damage. In this paper, statistical methods are applied to properly account for the scatter and uncertainties in the input data, leading to a probabilistic assessment of the component lifetime. Results are compared with previous predictions based on a deterministic approach. (orig.)

  4. Prediction of Maintenance Period of Equipment Through Risk Assessment of Thermal Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Gee Wook; Kim, Bum Shin; Choi, Woo Song; Park, Myung Soo [KEPCO Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Risk-based inspection (RBI) is a well-known method that is used to optimize inspection activities based on risk analysis in order to identify the high-risk components of major facilities such as power plants. RBI, when implemented and maintained properly, improves plant reliability and safety while reducing unplanned outages and repair costs. Risk is given by the product of the probability of failure (Pof) and the consequence of failure (COF). A semi-quantitative method is generally used for risk assessment. Semi-quantitative risk assessment complements the low accuracy of qualitative risk assessment and the high expense and long calculation time of quantitative risk assessment. The first step of RB I is to identify important failure modes and causes in the equipment. Once these are defined, the Pof and COF can be assessed for each failure. During Pof and COF assessment, an effective inspection method and range can be easily found. In this paper, the calculation of the Pof is improved for accurate risk assessment. A modified semi-quantitative risk assessment was carried out for boiler facilities of thermal power plants, and the next maintenance schedules for the equipment were decided.

  5. Two topics from lattice NRQCD at non-zero temperature: heavy quark mass dependence and S-wave bottomonium states moving in a thermal bath

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Seyong; Allton, Chris; Lombardo, Maria Paola; Oktay, Mehmet B; Ryan, Sinead M; Sinclair, Donald K; Skullerud, Jon-Ivar

    2012-01-01

    Using Non-Relativistic QCD (NRQCD), we study heavy quark mass dependence of S-wave and P-wave bottomonium correlators for 0.42Tc <= T <= 2.09Tc and study spectral functions of S-wave bottomonium states moving in a thermal bath at these temperatures using Maximum Entropy Method with NRQCD kernel. For the studied momentum range, the energy of moving states shows quadratic momentum-dependence and the width of moving states does not show significant changes as the momentum of bottomonium is increased. Also, we find that in correlator ratios, the temperature effect is larger than the effect caused by 20% change in the bottom quark mass.

  6. Thermal control and performance assessment of a proton exchanger membrane fuel cell generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Thermal control unit along with a smart algorithm is able to limit the fuel cell temperature in a desired range. • Thermal control unit comprises a thermostat, a radiator/fan assembly, a coolant heater, and a convection fan. • The system efficiency is increased with increasing the external load, reaching 46% at 80% load-duty. • The stack coolant inlet temperature is optimized in the range 58–63 °C. - Abstract: An original-designed thermal control scheme that manages the thermal behaviors in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell generator has been proposed. It not only keeps the stack from overheating under extreme high external loads, but also prevents the stack from staying too cold in the cold-start conditions. A thermal control unit (TCU) together with a smart control algorithm is able to limit the fuel cell operation temperature in a desired range. The TCU comprises mainly a thermostat, a radiator, and a heater. It divides the stack coolant into a cooling stream and a heating stream that maintains a pre-set coolant temperature before entering the stack. Parametric studies include the external loads (0 L < 4 kW) and the stack coolant inlet temperature (SCIT = 53, 58, and 63 °C). The dynamics of SCIT under different loads are measured to verify the thermal reliability of the fuel cell generator. Then, examining the effect of SCIT on the system efficiency assesses the performance the fuel cell generator. Finally, an empirical correlation for the system efficiency of the PEM fuel cell generator under different SCITs is presented as a function of the external loads

  7. Analysis of heart rate control to assess thermal sensitivity responses in Brazilian toads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natali, J E S; Santos, B T; Rodrigues, V H; Chauí-Berlinck, J G

    2015-01-01

    In anurans, changes in ambient temperature influence body temperature and, therefore, energy consumption. These changes ultimately affect energy supply and, consequently, heart rate (HR). Typically, anurans living in different thermal environments have different thermal sensitivities, and these cannot be distinguished by changes in HR. We hypothesized that Rhinella jimi (a toad from a xeric environment that lives in a wide range of temperatures) would have a lower thermal sensitivity regarding cardiac control than R. icterica (originally from a tropical forest environment with a more restricted range of ambient temperatures). Thermal sensitivity was assessed by comparing animals housed at 15° and 25°C. Cardiac control was estimated by heart rate variability (HRV) and heart rate complexity (HRC). Differences in HRV between the two temperatures were not significant (P=0.214 for R. icterica and P=0.328 for R. jimi), whereas HRC differences were. All specimens but one R. jimi had a lower HRC at 15°C (all Ptemperatures in all R. jimi specimens. This result indicates a lack of evolutive trade-offs among temperatures given that heart rate control at 25°C is potentially not a constraint to heart rate control at 15°C. PMID:25493382

  8. Remote assessment of permeability/thermal diffusivity of consolidated clay sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The search for a suitable repository in which high-level waste may be safely contained over long periods of time has directed attention towards the geotechnical state of the deep ocean floor. Two geotechnical parameters of special importance are the permeability and thermal diffusivity of any proposed storage medium. In an attempt to evaluate the usefulness of geophysical techniques in predicting these parameters, a laboratory uniaxial consolidation cell has been modified to allow simultaneous geophysical measurements (P-wave, S-wave, electrical resistivity, thermal conductivity) during a standard consolidation test (permeability values being derived from the consolidation results). Results for nine surface sediment samples and four from depth in the sediment column suggest that permeability may be estimated to within an order of magnitude using compressional wave velocity measurements in a theoretical model based on Biot's equations. Similar success may be achieved empirically using electrical formation factor measurements. Thermal diffusivity may be assessed through the porosity of a sample, this in turn may be predicted from electrical formation factor measurements. The overall accuracies of the predictions are difficult to assess due to the possible effects of any sampling disturbance and laboratory constraints. The predictive methods identified require testing in an in situ environment where all the necessary measurements may be made simultaneously. This may be conducted initially on land using material similar to that evident in the samples already used, and at a fraction of the cost of marine operations

  9. Assessing the average Thermal Losses in Indian Households : A study for the city of Hyderabad, AP, India

    OpenAIRE

    Nandamuru, Venkateswara Himavanth

    2012-01-01

    A Thermal loss occurs when energy is consumed and work is done by a system. The use of ElectricalAppliances in households consumes energy and causes Thermal loss which gets dissipated to itssurrounding surfaces. Harnessing these losses by using principles like Cogeneration or CombinedHeat and Power (CHP) would result in the development of new energy techniques and provide asecure and decentralized supply of Energy to the Built Environment. This study aimed at assessing theaverage Thermal loss...

  10. Assessment of accident thermal testing and analysis procedures for radioactive materials shipping package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, Type-B packages for transporting radioactive materials are required by regulations to survive exposure to an engulfing 30-min, 8000C thermal source. This requirement is specified as a test, but allowances are provided to permit the requirement to be met by analyses. Various test methods, including pool fires and furnaces, are used when testing of packages is desired. The exposure of packages to pool fires, with and without wind deflectors and/or transportation vehicle structure is reviewed, with the goals of: (1) defining appropriate boundary conditions for analytically assessing package response in various fire environments; and (2) assessing the level of protection afforded by the regulations. Specific test data obtained with lead-shielded casks in open pool fires in both the United States and Japan are used to assess fire source temperatures, nonuniformities, wind effects and convective and radiative coefficients. 9 figures

  11. Assessment of the Impact of the Measurement Precision of Thermal Properties of Materials on the Prediction of Their Thermal Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatun, Ayesha

    The thermal properties of the sidewall lining materials are capturing attention since the last two decades. Good prediction of the dynamic thermal behaviour of Hall Heroult cells, including precise estimation of energy losses and location of the side ledge formed by the solidification of electrolytic bath, is made possible when the sidelining materials are well characterized in function of temperature. The present work aim at measuring the thermal diffusivity, heat capacity and thermal conductivity of silicon carbide (SiC), graphitic and graphitized carbon materials and cryolite (Na3AlF 6) based on transient characterization techniques. The thermal diffusivity and the heat capacity are measured by using state-of-the-art transient laser flash analyzer and differential scanning calorimeter respectively. The thermal conductivity is calculated by assuming a constant density. The range of precision error for each thermal property is also calculated for a finite number of data sets. Empirical correlation has been drawn for each of the properties to describe the relation with temperature in mathematical terms. Thermal characterization of the latent heat evolved during the melting of ledge is also carried out. Finally, based on the calculations conducted with a 2-D numerical model, the effect of the precision errors of temperature varying thermal properties of the sidewall materials and ledge on the dynamic behaviour of a laboratory scale phase change reactor is also presented. The results, so obtained, encourage further studies on the thermal properties of materials used in the aluminium reduction cell to find out the thermal environment inside the cell, heat loss estimation and effect of the additives on the location of ledge. Key words: Thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, heat capacity, temperature varying properties, precision error, phase change profile, latent heat.

  12. Assessment of Accrued Damage and Remaining Useful Life in Leadfree Electronics Subjected to Multiple Thermal Environments of Thermal Aging and Thermal Cycling

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A method has been developed for prognostication of accrued prior damage in electronics subjected to overlapping sequential environments of thermal aging and thermal...

  13. Comparison of different test methods to assess thermal stresses of metal oxide surge arresters under pollution conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report deals with the research conducted by ENEL, the Italian Electricity Board, to assess the performance of zinc oxide surge arresters under pollution condition, with special reference to the consequent thermal stress on internal active parts which can affect the energy handling capabality of the arrester and may lead, in particular conditions, even to thermal runaway

  14. An investigation on the assessed thermal sensation and human body exergy consumption rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simone, Angela; Kolarik, Jakub; Iwamatsu, Toshiya;

    2010-01-01

    perception of the indoor environment is rare. As the building should provide healthy and comfortable environment for its occupants, it is reasonable to consider both the exergy flows in the building and within the human body. A relatively new approach of the relation between the exergy concept and the built......-environment research has been explored in the present work. The relationship of subjectively assessed thermal sensation data, from earlier thermal comfort studies, to the calculated human-body exergy consumption has been analysed. The results show that the minimum human body exergy consumption rate was related to the......The exergy concept helps to optimize indoor climate conditioning systems to meet the requirements of sustainable building design. While the exergy approach to design and operation of indoor climate conditioning systems is relatively well established, its exploitation in connection to human...

  15. Comparative study of approaches to assess damage in thermally fatigued Cusbnd Crsbnd Zr alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Arya; Mitra, R.; Chakraborty, A. K.; Rotti, C.; Ray, K. K.

    2016-06-01

    For the first time the nature of response of thermal fatigue damage (TFD) in Cusbnd Crsbnd Zr alloys, considered for the High Heat Flux components of Tokamak and its subsystems in International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor application has been studied. Temperature cycling between 290 °C and 30 °C, similar to the service condition, has been carried out on two differently aged Cusbnd Crsbnd Zr alloys. The TFD has been assessed by damage mechanics approach using damage parameters, and by surface characteristics. The damage parameters increase exponentially during initial fatigue cycles and saturates, whilst surface characteristics shows continuous increase with increase in thermal fatigue cycles. Damages are different in the aged alloys depending upon the aging conditions.

  16. An assessment of thermal behavior of the DUPIC fuel bundle by subchannel analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal behavior of the standard DUPIC fuel has been assessed. The DUPIC fuel bundle has been modeled for a subchannel analysis using the ASSERT-IV code which was developed by AECL. From the calculated mixture enthalpy, equilibrium quality and void fraction distributions of the DUPIC fuel bundle, it is found that net buoyancy effect is pronounced in the central region of the DUPIC fuel bundle when compared with the standard CANDU fuel bundle. It is also found that the central region of the DUPIC fuel bundle can be cooled more efficiently than that of the standard fuel bundle. Based upon the subchannel modeling used in this study, the location of minimum CHFR in the DUPIC fuel bundle has been found to be very similar to that of the standard fuel. From the calculated mixture enthalpy distribution at the exit of the fuel channel, it is found that the mixture enthalpy and void fraction can be highest in the peripheral region of the DUPIC fuel bundle. On the other hand, the enthalpy and the void fraction was found to be highest in the central region of the standard CANDU fuel bundle at the exit of the fuel channel. Since the transverse interchange model between subchannels is important for the behavior of these variables, it is needed to put more effort in validating the transverse interchange model. For the purpose of investigating influence of thermal-hydraulic parameter variations of the DUPIC fuel bundle, four different values of the channel flow rates were used in the subchannel analysis. The effect of the channel flow reduction on thermal-hydraulic parameters have been presented. This study shows that the subchannel analysis is very useful in assessing thermal behavior of the fuel bundles in CANDU reactors. (author). 12 refs., 3 tabs., 17 figs

  17. Thermal hydraulic performance assessment of dual-cooled annular nuclear fuel for OPR-1000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Chang-Hwan, E-mail: shinch@kaeri.re.kr [LWR Fuel Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-Daero, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Tae-Hyun, E-mail: thchun@kaeri.re.kr [LWR Fuel Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-Daero, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Dong-Seok, E-mail: dsoh1@kaeri.re.kr [LWR Fuel Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-Daero, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); In, Wang-Kee, E-mail: wkin@kaeri.re.kr [LWR Fuel Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-Daero, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A thermal hydraulic performance of a 12 Multiplication-Sign 12 annular fuel array is evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The subchannel analysis code for the dual-cooled annular fuel, MATRA-AF is validated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We evaluate the sensitivity for geometry tolerances and operating parameter. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We decide the essential design parameters to uprate the power generation by dual-cooled annular fuel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A thermal margin amount accommodating a 20% power-uprate seems viable. - Abstract: An internally and externally cooled annular fuel was proposed for an advance PWR, which can endure substantial power uprating. KAERI is pursuing the development for a reloading of power uprated annular fuel for the operating PWR reactors of OPR-1000. In this paper, the characteristics and verification of the MATRA-AF are described. The thermal hydraulic performance of a 12 Multiplication-Sign 12 annular fuel is calculated for the major design parameters and its performance is compared against the reference 16 Multiplication-Sign 16 cylindrical fuel assembly. In particular, the enhancements of the thermal hydraulic performance of dual-cooled annular fuel are estimated for the 100% normal power reactor core. The purpose of this study is to estimate a normal power for OPR-1000 with dual-cooled annular fuel, and ultimately to assess the feasibility of 120% core power. The parametric study was carried out for the fuel rod dimension, gap conductance, thermal diffusion coefficients, and pressure loss of the spacer grids. As a result of the analysis on the nominal power, annular fuel showed a sufficient margin available on DNB and fuel pellet temperature relative to cylindrical fuel. The margin amount seems accommodating a 20% power-uprate seems viable.

  18. Thermal Measurements from a Series of Tests with a Large Cylindrical Calorimeter on the Leeward Edge of a JP-8 Pool Fire in Cross-Flow; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the full scale fuel fire experimental program, a series of JP-8 pool fire experiments with a large cylindrical calorimeter (3.66 m diameter), representing a C-141 aircraft fuselage, at the lee end of the fuel pool were performed at Naval Air Warfare Center, Weapons Division (NAWCWPNS). The series was designed to support Weapon System Safety Assessment (WSSA) needs by addressing the case of a transport aircraft subjected to a large fuel fire. The data collected from this mock series will allow for characterization of the fire environment via a survivable test fixture. This characterization will provide important background information for a future test series utilizing the same fuel pool with an actual C-141 aircraft in place of the cylindrical calorimeter

  19. The deterministic structural integrity assessment of reactor pressure vessels under pressurized thermal shock loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The conservative and non-conservative assumptions in the codes were shown. • The influence of different loads on the SM was given. • The unloading effect of the cladding was studied. • A concentrated reflection of the safety was shown based on 3-D FE analyses. - Abstract: The deterministic structural integrity of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) related to pressurized thermal shocks (PTSs) has been extensively studied. While the nil-ductility-transition temperature (RTNDT) parameter is widely used, the influence of fluence and temperature distributions along the thickness of the base metal wall cannot be reflected in the comparative analysis. This paper introduces the method using a structure safety margin (SM) parameter which is based on a comparison between the material toughness (the fracture initiation toughness KIC or fracture arrest toughness KIa) and the stress intensity factor (SIF) along the crack front for the integrity analysis of a RPV subjected to PTS transients. A 3-D finite element model is used to perform fracture mechanics analyses considering both crack initiation assessment and arrest assessment. The results show that the critical part along the crack front is always the clad-base metal interface point (IP) rather than the deepest point (DP) for either crack initiation assessment or crack arrest assessment under the thermal load. It is shown that the requirement in Regulatory Guide 1.154 that ‘axial flaws with depths less than 20% of the wall thickness and all circumferential flaws should be modeled in infinite length’ may be non-conservative. As the assessment result is often poor universal for a given material, crack and transient, caution is recommended in the safety assessment, especially for the IP. The SIF reduces under the thermal or pressure load if the map cracking (MC) effect is considered. Therefore, the assumption in the ASME and RCCM codes that the cladding should be taken into account in determining the

  20. A new way of assessment of environmental effects of thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starting from some fundamental aspects of the atmospheric pollution by gases resulted from the burning of fossil fuels in thermal power plants (TPP) a new method was devised to evaluate quantitatively the harmful consequences of air pollution. This method makes use of some quantities introduced first in the assessment of earthquake consequences. Its application resulted in worth indications with respect to optimal utilization of fuels in TPPs from the point of view of environmental impacts and energy production efficiency. (author) 1 fig., 2 tabs., 4 refs

  1. Annex III. Experimental investigations relevant for the assessment of extreme mechanical and thermal loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annex III lists the most important experimental investigations that are relevant for the assessment of extreme mechanical and thermal loads acting on the casks. It reports on drop tests, high speed crash tests, aircraft crash tests, tank wagon explosion and fire experiments. Apart from the drop tests within the framework of cask licensing, a range of drop tests was also performed from greater heights or under more severe conditions. In all the experiments with increased mechanical load impacts going beyond IAEA design requirements the casks showed no loss of integrity

  2. Structural integrity assessment of reactor pressure vessels during pressurized thermal shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparative assessment study is performed for the deterministic fracture mechanics approach of the pressurized thermal shock of a reactor pressure vessel. Round robin problems consisting of two transients and two defects are solved. Their results are compared to suggest some recommendations of best practices and to assure an understanding of the key parameters of this type of approach, which will be helpful not only for the benchmark calculations and results comparisons but also as a part of the knowledge management for the future generation. Seven participants from five organizations solved the problem and their results are compiled in this study

  3. Thermal-fluid assessment of multijet atomization for spray cooling applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal management is a particularly difficult challenge to the miniaturization of electronic components because it requires high performance cooling systems capable of removing large heat loads at fast rates in order to keep the operating temperature low and controlled. To meet this challenge, the Intermittent Spray Cooling (ISC) concept has been suggested as a promising technology which uses a proper match between the frequency and duration of consecutive injection cycles to control heat transfer. This concept also depends on: the atomization strategy; a homogeneous dispersion of droplets impinging on the hot surface; and the quantitative control of the liquid deposited, avoiding excessive secondary atomization or pre-impingement-evaporation. In this work, the use of liquid atomization by multiple jets impact, also referred as multijet atomization, is the subject of a thermal-fluid assessment using heat transfer correlations previously derived for intermittent sprays. Simultaneous measurements of droplet size and velocity are provided as input for the correlations and the analysis explores the influence of the number of impinging jets on the heat removal pattern and magnitude. Emphasis is put on the promising applicability of multijet atomization for promoting an intelligent use of energy in the thermal management of electronic devices.

  4. Assessment of the thermal performance and energy conservation opportunities of a cement industry in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple model is presented to assess the thermal performance of a cement industry with an integrated view to improve the productivity of the plant. The model is developed on the basis of mass, energy and exergy balance and is applied to an existing Portland cement industry in Indonesia. The data obtained from industry show that the burning efficiency and the second law efficiency of the kiln system are 52.07% and 57.07% respectively. Cooler efficiency and heat recovery efficiency are 47.75% and 51.2% respectively. The unaccounted loss at kiln system was found to be 1.85% and that of cooler system was 19%. The high loss at cooler was mainly due to the convection and radiation losses from the uninsulated cooler. Irreversibility of the system was found to be about 20%, which is due to the conversion from chemical to thermal energy. The thermal energy conservation opportunities are identified. This study show that by replacing industrial diesel oil (IDO) with waste heat recovery from kiln and cooler exhaust for drying of raw meal and fuel, and preheating of combustion air, a cement industry in Indonesia can save about 1.264 x 105 US dollars per year

  5. Unsteady-state human-body exergy consumption rate and its relation to subjective assessment of dynamic thermal environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweiker, Marcel; Kolarik, Jakub; Dovjak, Mateja;

    2016-01-01

    Few examples studied applicability of exergy analysis on human thermal comfort. These examples relate the human-body exergy consumption rate with subjectively obtained thermal sensation votes and had been based on steady-state calculation methods. However, humans are rarely exposed to steady...... between the human-body exergy consumption rate and subjective assessment of thermal environment represented by thermal sensation as well as to extend the investigation towards thermal acceptability votes. Comparison of steady-state and unsteady-state model showed that results from both models were...... the present study confirmed previously indicated trends that lowest human body exergy consumption rate is associated with thermal sensation close to neutrality. Moreover, higher acceptability was in general associated with lower human body exergy consumption rate. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights...

  6. Infrared thermal imaging in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review describes the features of modern infrared imaging technology and the standardization protocols for thermal imaging in medicine. The technique essentially uses naturally emitted infrared radiation from the skin surface. Recent studies have investigated the influence of equipment and the methods of image recording. The credibility and acceptance of thermal imaging in medicine is subject to critical use of the technology and proper understanding of thermal physiology. Finally, we review established and evolving medical applications for thermal imaging, including inflammatory diseases, complex regional pain syndrome and Raynaud's phenomenon. Recent interest in the potential applications for fever screening is described, and some other areas of medicine where some research papers have included thermal imaging as an assessment modality. In certain applications thermal imaging is shown to provide objective measurement of temperature changes that are clinically significant. (topical review)

  7. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Life Cycle Cost Assessment, Final Technical Report, 30 May 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martel, Laura [Lockheed Martin, Manassas, VA (United States); Smith, Paul [John Halkyard and Associates: Glosten Associates, Houston, TX (United States); Rizea, Steven [Makai Ocean Engineering, Waimanalo, HI (United States); Van Ryzin, Joe [Makai Ocean Engineering, Waimanalo, HI (United States); Morgan, Charles [Planning Solutions, Inc., Vancouver, WA (United States); Noland, Gary [G. Noland and Associates, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States); Pavlosky, Rick [Lockheed Martin, Manassas, VA (United States); Thomas, Michael [Lockheed Martin, Manassas, VA (United States); Halkyard, John [John Halkyard and Associates: Glosten Associates, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-05-30

    The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Life Cycle Cost Assessment (OLCCA) is a study performed by members of the Lockheed Martin (LM) OTEC Team under funding from the Department of Energy (DOE), Award No. DE-EE0002663, dated 01/01/2010. OLCCA objectives are to estimate procurement, operations and maintenance, and overhaul costs for two types of OTEC plants: -Plants moored to the sea floor where the electricity produced by the OTEC plant is directly connected to the grid ashore via a marine power cable (Grid Connected OTEC plants) -Open-ocean grazing OTEC plant-ships producing an energy carrier that is transported to designated ports (Energy Carrier OTEC plants) Costs are developed using the concept of levelized cost of energy established by DOE for use in comparing electricity costs from various generating systems. One area of system costs that had not been developed in detail prior to this analysis was the operations and sustainment (O&S) cost for both types of OTEC plants. Procurement costs, generally referred to as capital expense and O&S costs (operations and maintenance (O&M) costs plus overhaul and replacement costs), are assessed over the 30 year operational life of the plants and an annual annuity calculated to achieve a levelized cost (constant across entire plant life). Dividing this levelized cost by the average annual energy production results in a levelized cost of electricity, or LCOE, for the OTEC plants. Technical and production efficiency enhancements that could result in a lower value of the OTEC LCOE were also explored. The thermal OTEC resource for Oahu, Hawaii and projected build out plan were developed. The estimate of the OTEC resource and LCOE values for the planned OTEC systems enable this information to be displayed as energy supplied versus levelized cost of the supplied energy; this curve is referred to as an Energy Supply Curve. The Oahu Energy Supply Curve represents initial OTEC deployment starting in 2018 and demonstrates the

  8. Assessment of Outdoor Thermal Comfort and Wind Characteristics at Three Different Locations in Peninsular Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanipah Mohd Hafizal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urbanization and rapid growth in construction have led to the problems of global warming and urban heat island throughout the world. In order to reduce these problems particularly in hot and humid climatic region, a research on current level of outdoor thermal comfort and wind characteristics based on the local weather conditions around Malaysia should be conducted. This paper reports on the analysis of outdoor thermal comfort level at hottest temperatures and wind characteristics at three locations in Peninsular Malaysia by using hourly climatic data recorded by Malaysian Meteorological Department (MetMalaysia. The level of outdoor thermal comfort was assessed based on the Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI. The results showed extreme heat stress conditions have occurred at Alor Setar, Kuantan, and Subang with UTCI values of 51.2°C, 49.7°C, and 49.0°C respectively taking into account only temperature data from the year 2012 to 2014. However, for 20 years data from 1994 to 2014, the calculated UTCI also showed extreme heat stress conditions with their respective values of 49.6°C, 43.8°C, and 49.7°C for Alor Setar, Kuantan, and Subang respectively. Meanwhile, the hourly mean wind speed for three years data at Alor Setar, Kuantan, and Subang, were 1.70m/s, 1.69m/s, and 1.63m/s respectively. The highest mean wind speed of 11.6m/s was observed at Subang, while no wind movement (i.e. 0m/s was considered to be the lowest hourly wind speed for all three locations. The observed prevailing wind direction for all the three locations was from the north (0°. It can be concluded that Peninsular Malaysia is generally facing extreme heat stress problem due to unfavourable climatic conditions.

  9. Life cycle assessment of thermal Waste-to-Energy technologies: Review and recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard; Tonini, Davide; Turconi, Roberto;

    2015-01-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used extensively within the recent decade to evaluate the environmental performance of thermal Waste-to-Energy (WtE) technologies: incineration, co-combustion, pyrolysis and gasification. A critical review was carried out involving 250 individual case-studies ......Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used extensively within the recent decade to evaluate the environmental performance of thermal Waste-to-Energy (WtE) technologies: incineration, co-combustion, pyrolysis and gasification. A critical review was carried out involving 250 individual case...... improved. Based on the review, a detailed overview of assumptions and modeling choices in existing literature is provided in conjunction with practical recommendations for state-of-the-art LCA of Waste-to-Energy.......-studies published in 136 peer-reviewed journal articles within 1995 and 2013. The studies were evaluated with respect to critical aspects such as: (i) goal and scope definitions (e.g. functional units, system boundaries, temporal and geographic scopes), (ii) detailed technology parameters (e.g. related to waste...

  10. Correlation between subjective assessments of local thermal discomfort and thermal manikin measurements in a simulated aircraft cabin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zukowska, Daria; Strøm-Tejsen, Peter; Jama, Agnieszka;

    2005-01-01

    The thermal environment in a 21-seat simulated section of an aircraft cabin installed in a climate chamber was investigated. Using two thermal manikins and fourteen heated cylin-ders to represent passengers, measurements were carried out at cabin temperatures of 20.6°C, 23.3°C and 26.1°C (69°F, 74...

  11. Extravehicular Activity Probabilistic Risk Assessment Overview for Thermal Protection System Repair on the Hubble Space Telescope Servicing Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Mark; Canga, Michael A.; Duncan, Gary

    2010-01-01

    The Shuttle Program initiated an Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) to assess the risks associated with performing a Shuttle Thermal Protection System (TPS) repair during the Space Transportation System (STS)-125 Hubble repair mission as part of risk trades between TPS repair and crew rescue.

  12. Summary assessment of solar thermal parabolic dish technology for electrical power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penda, P. L.; Fujita, T.; Lucas, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    An assessment is provided of solar thermal parabolic dish technology for electrical power generation. The assessment is based on the development program undertaken by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy and covers the period from the initiation of the program in 1976 through mid-1984. The program was founded on developing components and subsystems that are integrated into parabolic dish power modules for test and evaluation. The status of the project is summarized in terms of results obtained through testing of modules, and the implications of these findings are assessed in terms of techno-economic projections and market potential. The techno-economic projections are based on continuation of an evolutionary technological development program and are related to the accomplishments of the program as of mid-1984. The accomplishments of the development effort are summarized for each major subsystem including concentrators, receivers, and engines. The ramifications of these accomplishments are assessed in the context of developmental objectives and strategies.

  13. Case study for model validation : assessing a model for thermal decomposition of polyurethane foam.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowding, Kevin J.; Leslie, Ian H. (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Hobbs, Michael L.; Rutherford, Brian Milne; Hills, Richard Guy (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Pilch, Martin M.

    2004-10-01

    A case study is reported to document the details of a validation process to assess the accuracy of a mathematical model to represent experiments involving thermal decomposition of polyurethane foam. The focus of the report is to work through a validation process. The process addresses the following activities. The intended application of mathematical model is discussed to better understand the pertinent parameter space. The parameter space of the validation experiments is mapped to the application parameter space. The mathematical models, computer code to solve the models and its (code) verification are presented. Experimental data from two activities are used to validate mathematical models. The first experiment assesses the chemistry model alone and the second experiment assesses the model of coupled chemistry, conduction, and enclosure radiation. The model results of both experimental activities are summarized and uncertainty of the model to represent each experimental activity is estimated. The comparison between the experiment data and model results is quantified with various metrics. After addressing these activities, an assessment of the process for the case study is given. Weaknesses in the process are discussed and lessons learned are summarized.

  14. Topic and Textual Coherence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何明烈; 戢焕奇

    2008-01-01

    Based on the investigation of the origin and definition of topic as well as the classification of textual coherence, this paper ana-lyzes the function of topic to non-coherence, imphcit coherence and explicit coherence, and concludes that topic relevance is the primary cri-terion for textual coherence.

  15. Freshman Health Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovde, Karen

    2011-01-01

    This article examines a cluster of health topics that are frequently selected by students in lower division classes. Topics address issues relating to addictive substances, including alcohol and tobacco, eating disorders, obesity, and dieting. Analysis of the topics examines their interrelationships and organization in the reference literature.…

  16. Thermal Runaway Severity Reduction Assessment and Implementation: On Li-Ion Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darcy, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Preventing cell-cell thermal runaway propagation and flames/sparks from exiting battery enclosure is possible with proper thermal & electrical design and cell thermal runaway ejecta/effluent management and can be had with minimal mass/volume penalty.

  17. Seasonal differences in the subjective assessment of outdoor thermal conditions and the impact of analysis techniques on the obtained results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kántor, Noémi; Kovács, Attila; Takács, Ágnes

    2016-03-01

    Wide research attention has been paid in the last two decades to the thermal comfort conditions of different outdoor and semi-outdoor urban spaces. Field studies were conducted in a wide range of geographical regions in order to investigate the relationship between the thermal sensation of people and thermal comfort indices. Researchers found that the original threshold values of these indices did not describe precisely the actual thermal sensation patterns of subjects, and they reported neutral temperatures that vary among nations and with time of the year. For that reason, thresholds of some objective indices were rescaled and new thermal comfort categories were defined. This research investigates the outdoor thermal perception patterns of Hungarians regarding the Physiologically Equivalent Temperature (PET) index, based on more than 5800 questionnaires. The surveys were conducted in the city of Szeged on 78 days in spring, summer, and autumn. Various, frequently applied analysis approaches (simple descriptive technique, regression analysis, and probit models) were adopted to reveal seasonal differences in the thermal assessment of people. Thermal sensitivity and neutral temperatures were found to be significantly different, especially between summer and the two transient seasons. Challenges of international comparison are also emphasized, since the results prove that neutral temperatures obtained through different analysis techniques may be considerably different. The outcomes of this study underline the importance of the development of standard measurement and analysis methodologies in order to make future studies comprehensible, hereby facilitating the broadening of the common scientific knowledge about outdoor thermal comfort.

  18. A Prospective, Descriptive Study to Assess the Clinical Benefits of Using Calendula officinalis Hydroglycolic Extract for the Topical Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzi, Marcelo; de Freitas, Franciele; Winter, Marcos

    2016-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) have a significant impact on patient quality of life. A prospective, descriptive pilot study was conducted between May 2012 and December 2013 through the dermatology outpatient unit in a Brazilian hospital to evaluate the clinical benefits of using Calendula officinalis hydroglycolic extract in the treatment of DFUs. Patients diagnosed with a stable neuropathic ulcer of >3 months' duration; ranging in size from 0.5-40 cm(2); without osteomyelitis, gangrene, bone exposure, cancer, or deep tissue infection; ages 18-90 years; with adequate glycemic control and no history of an allergy to C. officinalis were enrolled. Patients provided demographic and diabetes-related information and were evaluated biweekly for 30 weeks or until healing (ie, full epithelialization with no wound drainage). DFUs were measured and clinically examined for microbiological flora and presence of odor, tissue type (eg, granulation, fibrin sloth, necrosis), exudate, and retraction rate using planimetry images. Patients' blood tests and neuropathic pain assessment (the latter by clinician-directed questionnaire) were performed at baseline and the end of treatment; pain also was assessed during dressing changes using a 10-point rating scale. Patients' ulcers were treated twice daily with C. officinalis hydroglycolic extract spray solution and covered with saline-moistened, sterile, nonadherent gauze and bandages followed by foot offloading with adequate protective footwear. Patients received their first treatment in the clinic then performed care at home. From a potential population of 109 patients, 25 did not meet the inclusion criteria. Of the remaining 84 participants enrolled, 43 withdrew before study completion; cited reasons included lost to follow-up (16), medical judgment (2), failure to attend >3 scheduled visits (17), protocol violation (5), and death (3). Forty-one (41) - 17 women, average age 62 years (range 44-82 years), average glycemic level 153 mg

  19. Independent assessment of MELCOR as a severe accident thermal-hydraulic/source term analysis tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MELCOR is a fully integrated computer code that models all phases of the progression of severe accidents in light water reactor nuclear power plants, and is being developed for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has a program with the NRC called ''MELCOR Verification, Benchmarking, and Applications,'' whose aim is to provide independent assessment of MELCOR as a severe accident thermal-hydraulic/source term analysis tool. The scope of this program is to perform quality control verification on all released versions of MELCOR, to benchmark MELCOR against more mechanistic codes and experimental data from severe fuel damage tests, and to evaluate the ability of MELCOR to simulate long-term severe accident transients in commercial LWRs, by applying the code to model both BWRs and PWRs. Under this program, BNL provided input to the NRC-sponsored MELCOR Peer Review, and is currently contributing to the MELCOR Cooperative Assessment Program (MCAP). This paper presents a summary of MELCOR assessment efforts at BNL and their contribution to NRC goals with respect to MELCOR

  20. Syntactic Topic Models

    CERN Document Server

    Boyd-Graber, Jordan

    2010-01-01

    The syntactic topic model (STM) is a Bayesian nonparametric model of language that discovers latent distributions of words (topics) that are both semantically and syntactically coherent. The STM models dependency parsed corpora where sentences are grouped into documents. It assumes that each word is drawn from a latent topic chosen by combining document-level features and the local syntactic context. Each document has a distribution over latent topics, as in topic models, which provides the semantic consistency. Each element in the dependency parse tree also has a distribution over the topics of its children, as in latent-state syntax models, which provides the syntactic consistency. These distributions are convolved so that the topic of each word is likely under both its document and syntactic context. We derive a fast posterior inference algorithm based on variational methods. We report qualitative and quantitative studies on both synthetic data and hand-parsed documents. We show that the STM is a more pred...

  1. GIS methodology and case study regarding assessment of the solar potential at territorial level: PV or thermal?

    OpenAIRE

    Quiquerez, Loic; Faessler, Jérôme; Lachal, Bernard Marie; Mermoud, Floriane; Hollmuller, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a GIS-based methodology for assessing solar photovoltaic (PV) and solar thermal potentials in urban environment. The consideration of spatial and temporal dimensions of energy resource and demand allows, for two different territories of the Geneva region, to determine the suitable building roof areas for solar installations, the solar irradiance on these areas and, finally, the electrical and/or thermal energy potentials related to the demand. Results show that the choice ...

  2. A resource assessment of Southeast Florida as related to ocean thermal energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leland, Anna E.

    2009-11-01

    An assessment of the thermal resource in the Straits of Florida was performed to estimate the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) potential. Direct measurements of the temperature profile across the Florida Straits were taken from nearshore Southeast Florida to the Exclusive Economic Zone boundary along four evenly spaced transects perpendicular to Florida's Southeast coast, spanning 160 km. Along the southern transects in summer, nearshore cold and warm water resources meet or exceed the average 20°C temperature difference required for OTEC. In winter, the nearshore average Delta T of 17.76°C can produce 59-75% design net power and 70-86% in spring with DeltaT averaging 18.25°C. Offshore along the southern transects, a high steady DeltaT from 18.5-24°C creates an annual average net power of 120-125MW. Along the northern transects, the nearshore resource does not exist, but a consistent OTEC resource is present offshore, providing 70-80% design net power in winter, and 100-158% in spring and summer.

  3. Technology overview: assessment of social values in thermal power plant siting, social impact methodology evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology was developed to facilitate the selection of favorable thermal power plant site and design alternatives from the community perspective. A two-stage, multicriteria decision technique was employed to combine technical assessments of effects of the proposed site/design alternatives with corresponding community values. In the first stage, submodels are used to develop indices of plant impact on each of ten decision criteria. These criteria include effects on aesthetics, water quality, cost of power, air quality, ecology, social quality, local economy, recreational opportunities, cultural resources, and human health and safety. In the second stage, each of the impact indices is weighted by corresponding community values and then summed to provide an overall index of plant acceptability

  4. Study on Thermal Performance Assessment of Solar Hot Water Systems in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman Shaharin Anwar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Solar Hot Water Systems (SHWS are gaining popularity in Malaysia due to increasing cost of electricity and also awareness of environmental issues related to the use of fossil fuels. The introduction of solar hot water systems in Malaysia is an indication that it has potential market. However, there is a need for a proper methodology for rating the energy performance of these systems. The main objective of this study is to assess the thermal performance of several SHWS subject to four different locations in Malaysia using combined direct measurement and computer modelling using the TRNSYS simulation program. The results showed distinct differences in performance of the systems as a result of locations and manufacturers. The findings could be used further in developing an acceptable rating system for SHWS in Malaysia.

  5. Uncertainty propagation in a 3-D thermal code for performance assessment of a nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Given the very large time scale involved, the performance assessment of a nuclear waste repository requires numerical modelling. Because we are uncertain of the exact value of the input parameters, we have to analyse the impact of these uncertainties on the outcome of the physical models. The EDF Division Research and Development has set a reliability method to propagate these uncertainties or variability through models which requires much less physical simulations than the usual simulation methods. We apply the reliability method MEFISTO to a base case modelling the heat transfers in a virtual disposal in the future site of the French underground research laboratory, in the East of France. This study is led in collaboration with ANDRA which is the French Nuclear Waste Management Agency. With this exercise, we want to evaluate the thermal behaviour of a concept related to the variation of physical parameters and their uncertainty. (author)

  6. PREFACE: CEWQO Topical Issue CEWQO Topical Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozic, Mirjana; Man'ko, Margarita

    2009-09-01

    This topical issue of Physica Scripta collects selected peer-reviewed contributions based on invited and contributed talks and posters presented at the 15th Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics (CEWQO) which took place in Belgrade 29 May-3 June 2008 (http://cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu). On behalf of the whole community took place in Belgrade 29 May-3 June 2008 (http://cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu, cewqo08.phy.bg.ac.yu). On behalf of the whole community of the workshop, we thank the referees for their careful reading and useful suggestions which helped to improve all of the submitted papers. A brief description of CEWQO The Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics is a series of conferences started informally in Budapest in 1992. Sometimes small events transform into important conferences, as in the case of CEWQO. Professor Jozsef Janszky, from the Research Institute of Solid State Physics and Optics, is the founder of this series. Margarita Man'ko obtained the following information from Jozsef Janszky during her visit to Budapest, within the framework of cooperation between the Russian and Hungarian Academies of Sciences in 2005. He organized a small workshop on quantum optics in Budapest in 1992 with John Klauder as a main speaker. Then, bearing in mind that a year before Janszky himself was invited by Vladimir Buzek to give a seminar on the same topic in Bratislava, he decided to assign the name 'Central European Workshop on Quantum Optics', considering the seminar in Bratislava to be the first workshop and the one in Budapest the second. The third formal workshop took place in Bratislava in 1993 organized by Vladimir Buzek, then in 1994 (Budapest, by Jozsef Janszky), 1995 and 1996 (Budmerice, Slovakia, by Vladimir Buzek), 1997 (Prague, by Igor Jex), 1999 (Olomouc, Czech Republic, by Zdenek Hradil), 2000 (Balatonfüred, Hungary, by Jozsef Janszky ), 2001 (Prague, by Igor Jex), 2002 (Szeged, Hungary, by Mihaly Benedict), 2003 (Rostock,Germany, by Werner Vogel and

  7. Topical report review status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Topical Report Review Status is scheduled to be published semi-annually. The primary purpose of this document is to provide periodic progress reports of on-going topical report reviews, to identify those topical reports for which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff review has been completed and, to the extent practicable, to provide NRC management with sufficient information regarding the conduct of the topical report program to permit taking whatever actions deemed necessary or appropriate. This document is also intended to be a source of information to NRC Licensing Project Managers and other NRC personnel regarding the status of topical reports which may be referenced in applications for which they have responsibility. This status report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the topical report program, but is also used by NRC to advise the industry of report review status

  8. Alkyl polyglucoside-stabilized emulsion as a prospective vehicle for Usnea barbata CO2-supercritical extract: Assessing stability, safety and efficiency of a topical formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žugić Ana R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial activity of Usnea barbata especially against bacteria involved in pathogenesis of various skin conditions has been well documented in literature. Nevertheless, there are no papers dealing with formulation of its isolates into topical preparations for treatment of skin infections. In present study, alkyl polyglucoside (APG - based vehicle was developed as carrier of U. barbata CO2-supercritical extract (U-SE that demonstrated the best antimicrobial potential in preliminary screening. For comparison, chosen extract in the same concentration and using the same procedure was incorporated into a pharmacopoeial vehicle. Comparative evaluation of physicochemical stability, efficiency and safety proved APG-based vehicle to possess certain preferential features as carrier of U-SE compared to the reference one, composing a topical formulation with potential clinical relevance in treatment of skin infections. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III45017 i br. TR34031

  9. Topical treatment of melasma

    OpenAIRE

    Bandyopadhyay Debabrata

    2009-01-01

    Melasma is a common hypermelanotic disorder affecting the face that is associated with considerable psychological impacts. The management of melasma is challenging and requires a long-term treatment plan. In addition to avoidance of aggravating factors like oral pills and ultraviolet exposure, topical therapy has remained the mainstay of treatment. Multiple options for topical treatment are available, of which hydroquinone (HQ) is the most commonly prescribed agent. Besides HQ, other topical ...

  10. Comparison report of RPV pressurised thermal shock - international comparative assessment study (PTS ICAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary of the recently completed International Comparative Assessment Study of Pressurized- Thermal-Shock in Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV PTS ICAS) is presented here to record the results in actual and comparative fashions. The ICAS Project brought together an international group of experts from research, utility and regulatory organizations to perform a comparative evaluation of analysis methodologies employed in the assessment of RPV integrity under PTS loading conditions. The Project was sponsored jointly by Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS), Koeln, Germany, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), USA, with assistance from the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)/Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA)/Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI)/Principal Working Group (PWG) No. 3 (Integrity of Components and Structures). The ICAS Project grew out of a strong interest expressed by participants in the previous FALSIRE II Project to proceed with further evaluations of analysis methods used in RPV integrity assessment. A Launch Meeting for the ICAS Project was held at GRS-Koeln, during June 1996, where an emphasis was placed on identifying the different approaches to RPV integrity assessment being employed within the international nuclear technology community. Also a Problem Statement was drafted that defined a Western type four-loop RPV with cladding on the inner surface. Also, a detailed task matrix was defined that included a set of transient thermal-mechanical loading conditions postulated to result from loss-of-coolant accidents. The primary focus of the analyses was on the behaviour of relatively shallow cracks under these conditions. The assessment activities based on the Problem Statement were divided under three tasks: deterministic fracture mechanics (DFM), probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) and thermal-hydraulic mixing (THM). An Intermediate Workshop was held at OECD/NEA-Paris during June 1997, to

  11. Neutron Tomography Using Mobile Neutron Generators for Assessment of Void Distributions in Thermal Hydraulic Test Loops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, P.; Bjelkenstedt, T.; Sundén, E. Andersson; Sjöstrand, H.; Jacobsson-Svärd, S.

    Detailed knowledge of the lateral distribution of steam (void) and water in a nuclear fuel assembly is of great value for nuclear reactor operators and fuel manufacturers, with consequences for both reactor safety and economy of operation. Therefore, nuclear relevant two-phase flows are being studied at dedicated thermal-hydraulic test loop, using two-phase flow systems ranging from simplified geometries such as heated circular pipes to full scale mock-ups of nuclear fuel assemblies. Neutron tomography (NT) has been suggested for assessment of the lateral distribution of steam and water in such test loops, motivated by a good ability of neutrons to penetrate the metallic structures of metal pipes and nuclear fuel rod mock-ups, as compared to e.g. conventional X-rays, while the liquid water simultaneously gives comparatively good contrast. However, these stationary test loops require the measurement setup to be mobile, which is often not the case for NT setups. Here, it is acknowledged that fast neutrons of 14 MeV from mobile neutron generators constitute a viable option for a mobile NT system. We present details of the development of neutron tomography for this purpose at the division of Applied Nuclear Physics at Uppsala University. Our concept contains a portable neutron generator, exploiting the fusion reaction of deuterium and tritium, and a detector with plastic scintillator elements designed to achieveadequate spatial and energy resolution, all mounted in a light-weight frame without collimators or bulky moderation to allow for a mobile instrument that can be moved about the stationary thermal hydraulic test sections. The detector system stores event-to-event pulse-height information to allow for discrimination based on the energy deposition in the scintillator elements.

  12. Performance assessment of three concentrating solar thermal units designed with XCPC reflectors and evacuated tubes, using an analytical thermal model

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    This thesis is a part of an ongoing applied research project at the Solar Energy Laboratory at UC Merced, with the objective of developing a solar thermal system able to increase the temperature of a heat transfer fluid to output temperatures around 200°C(∼400°F). The goal of this project is to design and implement a modular, low profile, scalable and solar-powered system to offer an on-site heat source. Operating temperatures on the target range of this project create the possibility of pro...

  13. Syntacticized topics in Kurmuk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Torben

    2015-01-01

    This article argues that Kurmuk, a little-described Western Nilotic language, is characterized by a syntacticized topic whose grammatical relation is variable. In this language, declarative clauses have as topic an obligatory preverbal NP which is either a subject, an object or an adjunct. The gr...

  14. Assessment and forecast of changes of reservoir volumes due to thermal settling in permafrost areas of Russia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ilja S.Sobol; Stanislav V.Sobol

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of data analyses and assessments of field and theoretical researches on reservoir bed relief transformation due to thermal settling in the permafrost regions of Russia. The resulting changes (increases) of the total volumes of large and small reservoirs are quantified, of which information will be of great use in future reservoir design and exploitation.

  15. Development of Energy Efficient Technologies for Burning Coal in Modern Thermal Power Plants and Efficiency Assessment Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrovskiy, Vitali; Zubova, Marina; Sedelnikov, Nikolai; Dihnova, Anna

    2016-02-01

    Universal ecological energy-efficient burner was described. The burner allows to burn different types of coal and lignite without the use of fuel oil for kindling the boiler. Efficiency assessment tools of the introduction of the burner for combustion of coal in modern thermal power plants were given.

  16. Borehole thermal energy storage system for heating applications: Thermodynamic performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Exergy analysis of BTES for heating season is carried out. • Exergy efficiency of BTES is determined to be 41.35% for overall system. • COPHP is determined to be 2.6 for overall system. • Increasing evaporator temperature to 6 °C decreases the exergy destruction rate. • Increasing condenser temperature to 70 °C increases the exergy destruction rate. - Abstract: A comprehensive thermodynamic assessment of a borehole thermal energy storage system (BTES), which helps in meeting the heating and cooling demands of campus buildings of University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT), is presented for the heating case. The BTES located on UOIT campus in Oshawa, Canada is recognized as the world’s second largest BTES system. Energy and exergy analyses of the heating system are performed through the balance equations, and exergy destruction rates are determined for each system component and the overall BTES. In addition, a comparative system performance assessment is carried out. Based on the conducted research for the studied system, COPHP is calculated to be 2.65 for heating applications. Energy and exergy efficiencies of the boilers are determined to be 83.2% and 35.83%, respectively. The results of the exergy analysis show that the boilers are the major contributor to exergy destruction, followed by condenser and evaporator. The effects of condenser and evaporator temperatures of the heat pump systems on energy and exergy efficiencies are also investigated. The overall exergy efficiency of the whole system is calculated to be 41.35%

  17. Spatial resolution effects on the assessment of evapotranspiration in olive orchards using high resolution thermal imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Cristina; Zarco-Tejada, Pablo J.; Lorite, Ignacio J.; Allen, Richard G.

    2013-04-01

    The use of remote sensing techniques for estimating surface energy balance and water consumption has significantly improved the characterization of the agricultural systems by determining accurate information about crop evapotranspiration and stress, mainly for extensive crops. However the use of these methodologies for woody crops has been low due to the difficulty in the accurate characterization of these crops, mainly caused by a coarse resolution of the imagery provided by the most widely used satellites (such as Landsat 5 and 7). The coarse spatial resolution provided by these satellite sensors aggregates into a single pixel the tree crown, sunlit and shaded soil components. These surfaces can each exhibit huge differences in temperature, albedo and vegetation indexes calculated in the visible, near infrared and short-wave infrared regions. Recent studies have found that the use of energy balance approaches can provide useful results for non-homogeneous crops (Santos et al., 2012) but detailed analysis is required to determine the effect of the spatial resolution and the aggregation of the scene components in these heterogeneous canopies. In this study a comparison between different spatial resolutions has been conducted using images from Landsat 7 (with thermal resolution of 60m) and from an airborne thermal (with resolution of 80 cm) flown over olive orchards at different dates coincident with the Landsat overpass. The high resolution thermal imagery was resampled at different scales to generate images with spatial resolution ranging from 0.8 m up to 120m (thermal resolution for Landsat 5 images). The selection of the study area was made to avoid those areas with missing Landsat 7 data caused by SLC-off gaps. The selected area has a total area of around 2500 ha and is located in Southern Spain, in the province of Malaga. The selected area is mainly cultivated with olive orchards with different crop practices (rainfed, irrigated, high density, young and adult

  18. Assessing factors affecting the thermal properties of a passive thermal refuge using three-dimensional hydrodynamic flow and transport modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Jeremy D.; Swain, Eric D.; Stith, Bradley M.; Langtimm, Catherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Everglades restoration activities may cause changes to temperature and salinity stratification at the Port of the Islands (POI) marina, which could affect its suitability as a cold weather refuge for manatees. To better understand how the Picayune Strand Restoration Project (PSRP) may alter this important resource in Collier County in southwestern Florida, the USGS has developed a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model for the marina and canal system at POI. Empirical data suggest that manatees aggregate at the site during winter because of thermal inversions that provide warmer water near the bottom that appears to only occur in the presence of salinity stratification. To study these phenomena, the environmental fluid dynamics code simulator was used to represent temperature and salinity transport within POI. Boundary inputs were generated using a larger two-dimensional model constructed with the flow and transport in a linked overland-aquifer density-dependent system simulator. Model results for a representative winter period match observed trends in salinity and temperature fluctuations and produce temperature inversions similar to observed values. Modified boundary conditions, representing proposed PSRP alterations, were also tested to examine the possible effect on the salinity stratification and temperature inversion within POI. Results show that during some periods, salinity stratification is reduced resulting in a subsequent reduction in temperature inversion compared with the existing conditions simulation. This may have an effect on POI’s suitability as a passive thermal refuge for manatees and other temperature-sensitive species. Additional testing was completed to determine the important physical relationships affecting POI’s suitability as a refuge.

  19. Solar thermal technologies benefits assessment: Objectives, methodologies and results for 1981

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, W. R.

    1982-07-01

    The economic and social benefits of developing cost competitive solar thermal technologies (STT) were assessed. The analysis was restricted to STT in electric applications for 16 high insolation/high energy price states. Three fuel price scenarios and three 1990 STT system costs were considered, reflecting uncertainty over fuel prices and STT cost projections. After considering the numerous benefits of introducing STT into the energy market, three primary benefits were identified and evaluated: (1) direct energy cost savings were estimated to range from zero to $50 billion; (2) oil imports may be reduced by up to 9 percent, improving national security; and (3) significant environmental benefits can be realized in air basins where electric power plant emissions create substantial air pollution problems. STT research and development was found to be unacceptably risky for private industry in the absence of federal support. The normal risks associated with investments in research and development are accentuated because the OPEC cartel can artificially manipulate oil prices and undercut the growth of alternative energy sources.

  20. Terrestrial mammal fauna and habitat in environmental assessment reports of thermal and nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yatake, Hatsuho; Nashimoto, Makoto; Chiba, Shinji [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Abiko, Chiba (Japan). Abiko Research Lab

    2000-04-01

    We analyzed the geological distribution of mammals, relationships between ecological distribution of mammals and land use, and vegetation type in the 49 environmental assessment reports of thermal and nuclear power stations in the coastal area of Japan. Seven orders and 17 families of 66 terrestrial mammal species including subspecies were listed from the reports. This is about 40% of the total species of terrestrial mammals observed in Japan. Mammals were divided into 3 groups: distributed in the nationwide, in limited districts, and in limited area. The geological distributions of Insectivora, Rodentia, Chiroptera and naturalized mammals, of which have not been well known, were arranged in a topographic map at the scale of 1:50,000 in this survey. The characteristics of power station sites were classified into 4 categories as follows: Industrial site, Industrial-agricultural mixed site, Industrial-agricultural-forest mixed site, and forest site. The relationships between site categories and species compositions were analyzed. The listed species were fifteen species in the industrial site, however, there were thirty six species in the forest site. The mammal species were classified into six groups by vegetation types of habitat; forest-dwelling, grassland-dwelling, farmland and orchard-dwelling, wide-dwelling except residential area, wide-dwelling mammals including residential area, and residential area-dwelling mammals. (author)

  1. An assessment of ocean thermal energy conversion as an advanced electric generation methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydt, Gerald T.

    1993-03-01

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a process that employs the temperature difference between surface and deep ocean water to alternately evaporate and condense a working fluid. In the open-cycle OTEC configuration, the working fluid is seawater. In the closed-cycle configuration, a working fluid such as propane is used. In this paper, OTEC is assessed for its practical merits for electric power generation, and the history of the process is reviewed. Because the OTEC principle operates under a small net temperature difference regime, rather large amounts of seawater and working fluid are required. The energy requirements for pumping these fluids may be greater than the energy recovered from the OTEC engine itself. The concept of net power production is discussed. The components of a typical OTEC plant are discussed with emphasis on the evaporator heat exchanger. Operation of an OTEC electric generating station is discussed, including transient operation. Perhaps the most encouraging aspect of OTEC is the recent experiments and efforts at the Natural Energy Laboratory in Hawaii, which are discussed in the paper. Remarks are made on bottlenecks and the future of OTEC as an advanced electric generation methodology.

  2. Life cycle assessment of thermal waste-to-energy technologies: review and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard; Tonini, Davide; Turconi, Roberto; Boldrin, Alessio

    2015-03-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used extensively within the recent decade to evaluate the environmental performance of thermal Waste-to-Energy (WtE) technologies: incineration, co-combustion, pyrolysis and gasification. A critical review was carried out involving 250 individual case-studies published in 136 peer-reviewed journal articles within 1995 and 2013. The studies were evaluated with respect to critical aspects such as: (i) goal and scope definitions (e.g. functional units, system boundaries, temporal and geographic scopes), (ii) detailed technology parameters (e.g. related to waste composition, technology, gas cleaning, energy recovery, residue management, and inventory data), and (iii) modeling principles (e.g. energy/mass calculation principles, energy substitution, inclusion of capital goods and uncertainty evaluation). Very few of the published studies provided full and transparent descriptions of all these aspects, in many cases preventing an evaluation of the validity of results, and limiting applicability of data and results in other contexts. The review clearly suggests that the quality of LCA studies of WtE technologies and systems including energy recovery can be significantly improved. Based on the review, a detailed overview of assumptions and modeling choices in existing literature is provided in conjunction with practical recommendations for state-of-the-art LCA of Waste-to-Energy. PMID:25052337

  3. Terrestrial mammal fauna and habitat in environmental assessment reports of thermal and nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyzed the geological distribution of mammals, relationships between ecological distribution of mammals and land use, and vegetation type in the 49 environmental assessment reports of thermal and nuclear power stations in the coastal area of Japan. Seven orders and 17 families of 66 terrestrial mammal species including subspecies were listed from the reports. This is about 40% of the total species of terrestrial mammals observed in Japan. Mammals were divided into 3 groups: distributed in the nationwide, in limited districts, and in limited area. The geological distributions of Insectivora, Rodentia, Chiroptera and naturalized mammals, of which have not been well known, were arranged in a topographic map at the scale of 1:50,000 in this survey. The characteristics of power station sites were classified into 4 categories as follows: Industrial site, Industrial-agricultural mixed site, Industrial-agricultural-forest mixed site, and forest site. The relationships between site categories and species compositions were analyzed. The listed species were fifteen species in the industrial site, however, there were thirty six species in the forest site. The mammal species were classified into six groups by vegetation types of habitat; forest-dwelling, grassland-dwelling, farmland and orchard-dwelling, wide-dwelling except residential area, wide-dwelling mammals including residential area, and residential area-dwelling mammals. (author)

  4. A Novel Algorithm for the Assessment of Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Suggests That Brain Topical Application of Endothelin-1 Does Not Cause Early Opening of the Barrier in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Jorks

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There are a number of different experimental methods for ex vivo assessment of blood-brain barrier (BBB opening based on Evans blue dye extravasation. However, these methods require many different steps to prepare the brain and need special equipment for quantification. We here report a novel, simple, and fast semiquantitative algorithm to assess BBB integrity ex vivo. The method is particularly suitable for cranial window experiments, since it keeps the spatial information about where the BBB opened. We validated the algorithm using sham controls and the established model of brain topical application of the bile salt dehydrocholate for early BBB disruption. We then studied spreading depolarizations in the presence and the absence of the vasoconstrictor endothelin-1 and found no evidence of early BBB opening (three-hour time window. The algorithm can be used, for example, to assess BBB permeability ex vivo in combination with dynamic in vivo studies of BBB opening.

  5. Design of Block Copolymer Costabilized Nonionic Microemulsions and Their In Vitro and In Vivo Assessment as Carriers for Sustained Regional Delivery of Ibuprofen via Topical Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djekic, Ljiljana; Martinovic, Martina; Stepanović-Petrović, Radica; Tomić, Maja; Micov, Ana; Primorac, Marija

    2015-08-01

    Nonionic surfactants (caprylocaproyl macrogol-8 glycerides, octoxynol-12, polysorbate-20, and polyethylene glycol-40 hydrogenated castor oil) (47.03%, w/w), costabilizer (poloxamer 407) (12%-20%, w/w), oil (isopropyl myristate) (5.22%, w/w), water (q.s. ad 100%, w/w), and ibuprofen (5%, w/w) were used to develop oil-in-water microemulsions with Newtonian flow behavior, low viscosity (from 368 ± 38 to 916 ± 46 mPa s), and average droplet size from 14.79 ± 0.31 to 16.54 ± 0.75 nm. Ibuprofen in vitro release from the microemulsions was in accordance with zero-order kinetics (R0(2) > 0.99) for at least 12 h. The maximum drug release rate (3.55%h(-1) ) was from the microemulsion M3 comprising 16%, w/w of poloxamer 407. The release rate of ibuprofen from the reference hydrogel followed Higuchi kinetics (RH(2) > 0.99), and drug amount released after the 6th hour was negligible. In a rat model of inflammation, the microemulsion M3 was significantly more efficacious than the reference hydrogel in exerting antihyperalgesic effects in prophylactic topical treatment, whereas they were comparable in therapeutic treatment as well as in producing antiedematous effect in both protocols. No obvious skin irritation was observed in in vivo studies. The developed nonionic surfactants-based microemulsions containing the optimal concentration of poloxamer 407 could be promising carriers for sustained regional delivery of ibuprofen via topical administration. PMID:26045240

  6. Methodology for assessment of amount and amplitude of thermal stress cycles in masonry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beran, Pavel

    2016-06-01

    Analysis of amount and amplitude of thermal stress cycles in historic masonry has been made by means of combination of three 2-D numerical models of heterogeneous ashlar masonry. The numerical models were used to simulate thermal stress cycles during June, July and August in reference climatic year valid for Prague Castle, Czech Republic. For evaluation of amplitude and amount of the thermal stress cycles the effective stress in selected point in masonry was used. Afterwards rainflow method was used to count the amplitude and amount of the stress cycles. The results show that during summer quite a lot of significant thermal stress cycles originate in masonry, especially during sunny hot days. The results presented in this paper confirm the significant fatigue character of the thermal stress cycles and the method presented here could be suitable to evaluate thermal stress in building materials and structures.

  7. Topics in Nuclear Astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some topics in nuclear astrophysics are discussed, e.g.: highly evolved stellar cores, stellar evolution (through the temperature analysis of stellar surface), nucleosynthesis and finally the solar neutrino problem. (L.C.)

  8. Topical anesthesia in phacoemulsification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Waheeb

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion : Topical anesthesia is a satisfactory and safe alternative to retrobulbar and peribulbar anesthesia for clear corneal phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation in selected cataract patients in the hands of experienced cataract surgeon.

  9. Advanced Topics in Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filippone, Antonino

    1999-01-01

    "Advanced Topics in Aerodynamics" is a comprehensive electronic guide to aerodynamics,computational fluid dynamics, aeronautics, aerospace propulsion systems, design and relatedtechnology. We report data, tables, graphics, sketches,examples, results, photos, technical andscientific literature, for...

  10. Thermal boost combined with interstitial brachytherapy in breast conserving therapy - Assessment of early toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Hyperthermia (HT) causes a direct damage to cancerous cells and/or sensitize them to radiotherapy with usually minimal injury to normal tissues. Adjuvant HT is probably one of the most effective radiation sensitizers known and works best when delivered simultaneously with radiation. In breast conserving therapy, irradiation has to minimize the risk of local relapse within the treated breast, especially in an area of a tumor bed. Brachytherapy boost reduces 5-year local recurrence rate to mean 5,5%, so there still some place for further improvement. The investigated therapeutic option is an adjuvant single session of local HT (thermal boost) preceding standard CT-based multi catheter interstitial HDR brachytherapy boost in order to increase the probability of local cure. Aim: To report the short-term results in regard to early toxicity of high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy (BT) boost with or without interstitial microwave hyperthermia (MV HT) for early breast cancer patients treated with breast conserving therapy (BCT). Materials and methods: Between February 2006 and December 2007, 57 stage IA-IIIA breast cancer patients received a 10 Gy HDR BT boost after conservative surgery and 42.5-50 Gy whole breast irradiation (WBI) ± adjuvant chemotherapy. 32 patients (56.1%) were treated with additional pre-BT single session of interstitial MW HT to a tumor bed (multi-catheter technique). Reference temperature was 43 oC and therapeutic time (TT) was 1 h. Incidence, severity and duration of radiodermatitis, skin oedema and skin erythema in groups with (I) or without HT (II) were assessed, significant p-value ≤ 0.05. Results: Median follow-up was 40 months. Local control was 100% and distant metastasis free survival was 91.1%. HT sessions (median): reference temperature 42.2 .C, therapeutic time (TT) 61.4 min, total thermal dose 42 min and a gap between HT and BT 30 min. Radiodermatitis grades I and II occurred in 24 and 6 patients, respectively, differences

  11. Topical treatment of melasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandyopadhyay Debabrata

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Melasma is a common hypermelanotic disorder affecting the face that is associated with considerable psychological impacts. The management of melasma is challenging and requires a long-term treatment plan. In addition to avoidance of aggravating factors like oral pills and ultraviolet exposure, topical therapy has remained the mainstay of treatment. Multiple options for topical treatment are available, of which hydroquinone (HQ is the most commonly prescribed agent. Besides HQ, other topical agents for which varying degrees of evidence for clinical efficacy exist include azelaic acid, kojic acid, retinoids, topical steroids, glycolic acid, mequinol, and arbutin. Topical medications modify various stages of melanogenesis, the most common mode of action being inhibition of the enzyme, tyrosinase. Combination therapy is the preferred mode of treatment for the synergism and reduction of untoward effects. The most popular combination consists of HQ, a topical steroid, and retinoic acid. Prolonged HQ usage may lead to untoward effects like depigmentation and exogenous ochronosis. The search for safer alternatives has given rise to the development of many newer agents, several of them from natural sources. Well-designed controlled clinical trials are needed to clarify their role in the routine management of melasma.

  12. Topical Drugs for Pain Relief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjali Srinivasan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Topical therapy helps patients with oral and perioral pain problems such as ulcers, burning mouth syndrome, temporomandibular disorders, neuromas, neuropathies and neuralgias. Topical drugs used in the field of dentistry are topical anaesthetics, topical analgesics, topical antibiotics and topical corticosteroids. It provides symptomatic/curative effect. Topical drugs are easy to apply, avoids hepatic first pass metabolism and more sites specific. But it can only be used for medications that require low plasma concentrations to achieve a therapeutic effect.

  13. Thermodynamic analyses and assessments of various thermal energy storage systems for buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Proposing a novel latent (PCM), thermochemical and sensible (aquifer) TES combination for building heating. ► Performing comprehensive environmental, energy, exergy and sustainability analyses. ► Investigating the effect of varying dead state temperatures on the TESs. - Abstract: In this study, energetic, exergetic, environmental and sustainability analyses and their assessments are carried out for latent, thermochemical and sensible thermal energy storage (TES) systems for phase change material (PCM) supported building applications under varying environment (surrounding) temperatures. The present system consists of a floor heating system, System-I, System-II and System-III. The floor heating system stays at the building floor supported with a floor heating unit and pump. The System-I includes a latent TES system and a fan. The latent TES system is comprised of a PCM supported building envelope, in which from outside to inside; glass, transparent insulation material, PCM, air channel and insulation material are placed, respectively. Furthermore, System-II mainly has a solar-thermochemical TES while there are an aquifer TES and a heat pump in System-III. Among the TESs, the hot and cold wells of the aquifer TES have maximum exergetic efficiency values of 88.782% and 69.607% at 8 °C dead state temperature, respectively. According to the energy efficiency aspects of TESs, the discharging processes of the latent TES and the hot well of the aquifer TES possess the minimum and maximum values of 5.782% and 94.118% at 8 °C dead state temperature, respectively. Also, the fan used with the latent TES is the most environmentally-benign system component among the devices. Furthermore, the most sustainable TES is found for the aquifer TES while the worst sustainable system is the latent TES.

  14. Assessment of thermal aging embrittlement of cast austenitic stainless steel components in the Babcock and Wilcox -designed PWR reactor internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The currently operating Babcock and Wilcox (BW) designed pressurized water reactors (PWRs) were constructed during the late sixties and seventies. Some of the reactor internals components were fabricated from cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS). The selection of CASS for the internals components was made to expedite the construction schedule by reducing machining and allowing production in large quantities. Since then, test data have shown that some CASS materials are susceptible to thermal aging embrittlement at PWR operating temperatures and its effect on functionality is of concern. Recently, the US nuclear power industry has developed inspection and evaluation guidelines (MRP-227, Rev.0) for managing aging degradation in PWR reactor internals for both the current and extended license periods. The MRP-227, Rev.0 guidelines recommend additional inspections for certain internals components including CASS components in BW PWRs due to thermal aging embrittlement concerns. The thermal aging embrittlement susceptibility for CASS can be assessed by the casting method and ferrite content if sufficient information in the original fabrication records is available. AREVA NP has performed a fabrication records search to identify several CASS components in the BW PWR internals and reviewed the archived fabrication records. A database has been assembled as a result of this records search. Based on the fabrication records, the ferrite content is determined using Hull's equivalent factors. Grade CF8 castings (without molybdenum) have been found to not be susceptible to thermal aging embrittlement. However, thermal aging embrittlement is a potential concern for Grade CF3M castings (containing 2 to 3% molybdenum). As a result of this assessment, several CASS components in the BW PWRs are concluded to not be susceptible to thermal aging embrittlement. The findings provide the basis for the removal of these CASS components from the additional inspection requirements in MRP-227

  15. Optimizing the Environmental Performance of In Situ Thermal Remediation Technologies Using Life Cycle Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemming, Gitte; Nielsen, Steffen G.; Weber, Klaus;

    2013-01-01

    In situ thermal remediation technologies provide efficient and reliable cleanup of contaminated soil and groundwater, but at a high cost of environmental impacts and resource depletion due to the large amounts of energy and materials consumed. This study provides a detailed investigation of four in...... situ thermal remediation technologies (steam enhanced extraction, thermal conduction heating, electrical resistance heating, and radio frequency heating) in order to (1) compare the life-cycle environmental impacts and resource consumption associated with each thermal technology, and (2) identify...... by up to 75%. Moreover, a number of technology-specific improvements were identified, for instance by the substitution of stainless steel types in wells, heaters, and liners used in thermal conduction heating, thus reducing the nickel consumption by 45%. The combined effect of introducing all the...

  16. Nanosized ethosomes-based hydrogel formulations of methoxsalen for enhanced topical delivery against vitiligo: formulation optimization, in vitro evaluation and preclinical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Bhawna Jain; Garg, Neeraj K; Beg, Sarwar; Singh, Bhupinder; Katare, Om Prakash

    2016-01-01

    The present investigation aimed for the development and characterization of ethosomes-based hydrogel formulations of methoxsalen for enhanced topical delivery and effective treatment against vitiligo. The ethosomes were prepared by central composite design (CCD) and characterized for various quality attributes like vesicle shape, size, zeta potential, lamellarity, drug entrapment and drug leaching. The optimized ethosomes were subsequently incorporated int Carbopol® 934 gel and characterized for drug content, rheological behavior, texture profile, in vitro release, ex vivo skin permeation and retention, skin photosensitization and histopathological examination. Ethosomes were found to be spherical and multilamellar in structures having nanometric size range with narrow size distribution, and high encapsulation efficiency. Ethosomal formulations showed significant skin permeation and accumulation in the epidermal and dermal layers. The fluorescence microscopy study using 123 Rhodamine exhibited enhanced permeation of the drug-loaded ethosomes in the deeper layers of skin. Also, the developed formulation showed insignificant phototoxicity and erythema vis-à-vis the conventional cream. The results were cross-validated using histopathological examination of skin segments. In a nutshell, the ethosomes-based hydrogel formulation was found to be a promising drug delivery system demonstrating enhanced percutaneous penetration of methoxsalen with reduced phototoxicity and erythema, thus leading to improved patient compliance for the treatment against vitiligo. PMID:26325228

  17. The effect of thermal quality on the thermoregulatory behavior of the bearded dragon Pogona vitticeps: influences of methodological assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena, Viviana; Tattersall, Glenn J

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic functions are generally optimized within a narrow range of body temperatures (T(b)'s), conferring thermoregulation great importance to the survival and fitness of an animal. In lizards, T(b) regulation is mainly behavioral, and the metabolic costs associated with behavioral thermoregulation are primarily locomotory. In reptiles, however, it has been proposed that they thermoregulate less precisely when the associated costs, metabolic or otherwise, are high. Such a strategy enhances fitness by allowing lizards to be more flexible to changing environmental conditions while maximizing the benefits of maintaining a high T(b) and minimizing energy expenditure. We evaluated the behavioral thermoregulation of inland bearded dragons Pogona vitticeps under various thermal quality conditions requiring different locomotory investment for thermoregulation. The selected ambient temperature and preferred T(b) ranges increased at lower environmental thermal qualities, indicating a decrease in thermoregulatory precision in environments where the costs associated with thermoregulation were high. The level of thermoregulation was also affected, exhibiting a decrease in preferred T(b) of approximately 2 degrees C at the lowest-thermal-quality treatment. These data provide important implications for the procedural assessment of preferred T(b) and a better understanding of thermal set points in reptiles in general. Our results emphasize that the precise maintenance and assessment of preferred T(b) is contingent on the quality of the environment, laboratory or natural, that the animal inhabits. PMID:19323642

  18. Characters and Topical Diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Rune

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to contribute to our understanding of the difference between the bestseller and the non-bestseller in nonfiction. It is noticed that many bestsellers in nonfiction belongs to the sub-genre of creative nonfiction, but also that the topics in this kind of literature is...... largely ignored by the critics. Thus, the article tests how topics may work in creative nonfiction. Two Danish bestsellers belonging to the genre, Frank’s Mit smukke genom ( My Beautiful Genome), about genomics, and Buk-Swienty’s Slagtebænk Dybbøl ( ‘Slaughter-bench Dybbøl’), a history book, are chosen as...... cases and analysed using a slightly modified motif model by Johansen. The result is that in both books the main topic is treated from a double perspective, but also that six out of seven secondary topics, or motifs, are treated as well. It is concluded that also in a topical sense creative nonfiction...

  19. Assessment of Pressure Fluctuation Effect for Thermal Fatigue in a T-junction Using Thermo-Hydro Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result, when evaluating thermal fatigue for the mixing tee, temperature fluctuation is dominant for this phenomenon, it can be reasonably assumed that the pressure is constant on the pipe inner wall. Recently, thermal fatigue due to mixing of the fluids having different temperatures has been considered as an important issue on the fatigue evaluation of nuclear piping. Mainly, this phenomenon occurs in a T-junction operating with the fluids consisted of different temperatures. Because of the turbulent mixing of hot and cold water, the temperature on the inner wall of the pipe fluctuates rapidly, causing the variation of thermal stresses in the pipe and resulting in high cycle thermal fatigue. In practice, cracking by high cycle thermal fatigue is reported at a T-junction in the residual heat removal system at Civaux unit 1 in France. However, because of irregular flow inside the pipe, the pressure also fluctuates rapidly as well as temperature in the inner wall of the pipe. Therefore, in this paper, three-dimensional thermo-hydro analysis was performed for the mixing tee of the shutdown cooling system of the pressurized water reactor plant, examining the pressure variation at the pipe inner wall. Based on the analysis result, this study aims at assessing the pressure fluctuation effect on the thermal fatigue. In this paper, it is verified that there is pressure fluctuation as well as temperature on the inner wall of mixing tee operating with the fluids having different temperatures. However, since the amplitude of pressure is relatively smaller than design pressure of the shutdown cooling system, the effect wouldn't be important for the thermal fatigue

  20. Provisional Assessment of Candidate High-Temperature Thermal Conductivity Reference Materials in the EMRP “Thermo” Project

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, J.; Morrell, R; T. Fry; Gnaniah, S.; Gohil, D.; Dawson, A.; Hameury, J.; Koenen, Alain; Hammerschmidt, U.; Turzó-András, E.; Strnad, R.; Blahut, A.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the provisional assessment of a short list of four candidate high-temperature thermal conductivity reference materials in a European research project, “Thermo.” These four candidate materials are low-density calcium silicate, amorphous silica, high-density calcium silicate, and exfoliated vermiculite. Based on initial tests on material composition and microstructure changes, dimensional stability, mechanical stability, chemical stability and uniformity, the best two can...

  1. Thermal Comfort Assessment-A Study Toward Workersâ Satisfaction in a Low Energy Office Building

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd Nafiz Shaharon; Juliana Jalaludin

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: The government of Malaysia has raised their concerns towards the issue of workers comfort and workspace quality in a Low Energy Office (LEO) building. New energy efficient building concepts and technologies require a revision of comfort standards, to create a suitable thermal condition in avoiding occupant dissatisfaction, adverse effect on their productivity and overall building performance. Approach: Assessment was conducted using Babuc-A (Portable air quality monitor) an...

  2. Assessment of reference structural materials, heavy liquid metal technology and thermal-hydraulics for European waste transmutation ADS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The R and D program, named DEMETRA (DEvelopment and assessment of structural materials and heavy liquid MEtal technology for TRAnsmutation systems) program is a domain of the integrated EU project EUROpean Research Program for the TRANSmutation of High-Level Nuclear Waste in an Accelerator Driven System (EUROTRANS). DEMETRA has been fully defined on the basis of the design needs for the European Accelerator Driven System devoted to the transmutation of spent nuclear waste. The subjects addressed in DEMETRA are materials assessment, chemical-physical characterization of the LBE, technologies and thermal-hydraulics. (author)

  3. Experimental Assays to Assess the Efficacy of Vinegar and Other Topical First-Aid Approaches on Cubozoan (Alatina alata Tentacle Firing and Venom Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel A. Yanagihara

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the medical urgency presented by cubozoan envenomations, ineffective and contradictory first-aid management recommendations persist. A critical barrier to progress has been the lack of readily available and reproducible envenomation assays that (1 recapitulate live-tentacle stings; (2 allow quantitation and imaging of cnidae discharge; (3 allow primary quantitation of venom toxicity; and (4 employ rigorous controls. We report the implementation of an integrated array of three experimental approaches designed to meet the above-stated criteria. Mechanistically overlapping, yet distinct, the three approaches comprised (1 direct application of test solutions on live tentacles (termed tentacle solution assay, or TSA with single image- and video-microscopy; (2 spontaneous stinging assay using freshly excised tentacles overlaid on substrate of live human red blood cells suspended in agarose (tentacle blood agarose assays, or TBAA; and (3 a “skin” covered adaptation of TBAA (tentacle skin blood agarose assay, or TSBAA. We report the use and results of these assays to evaluate the efficacy of topical first-aid approaches to inhibit tentacle firing and venom activity. TSA results included the potent stimulation of massive cnidae discharge by alcohols but only moderate induction by urine, freshwater, and “cola” (carbonated soft drink. Although vinegar, the 40-year field standard of first aid for the removal of adherent tentacles, completely inhibited cnidae firing in TSA and TSBAA ex vivo models, the most striking inhibition of both tentacle firing and subsequent venom-induced hemolysis was observed using newly-developed proprietary formulations (Sting No More™ containing copper gluconate, magnesium sulfate, and urea.

  4. Topic Identification in Discourse

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Kuang-hua

    1995-01-01

    This paper proposes a corpus-based language model for topic identification. We analyze the association of noun-noun and noun-verb pairs in LOB Corpus. The word association norms are based on three factors: 1) word importance, 2) pair co-occurrence, and 3) distance. They are trained on the paragraph and sentence levels for noun-noun and noun-verb pairs, respectively. Under the topic coherence postulation, the nouns that have the strongest connectivities with the other nouns and verbs in the di...

  5. Topics in Physical Mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Marathe, Kishore

    2010-01-01

    This title adopts the view that physics is the primary driving force behind a number of developments in mathematics. Previously, science and mathematics were part of natural philosophy and many mathematical theories arose as a result of trying to understand natural phenomena. This situation changed at the beginning of last century as science and mathematics diverged. These two fields are collaborating once again; 'Topics in Mathematical Physics' takes the reader through this journey. The author discusses topics where the interaction of physical and mathematical theories has led to new points o

  6. Assessing District Energy Systems Performance Integrated with Multiple Thermal Energy Storages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaie, Behnaz

    The goal of this study is to examine various energy resources in district energy (DE) systems and then DE system performance development by means of multiple thermal energy storages (TES) application. This study sheds light on areas not yet investigated precisely in detail. Throughout the research, major components of the heat plant, energy suppliers of the DE systems, and TES characteristics are separately examined; integration of various configurations of the multiple TESs in the DE system is then analysed. In the first part of the study, various sources of energy are compared, in a consistent manner, financially and environmentally. The TES performance is then assessed from various aspects. Then, TES(s) and DE systems with several sources of energy are integrated, and are investigated as a heat process centre. The most efficient configurations of the multiple TESs integrated with the DE system are investigated. Some of the findings of this study are applied on an actual DE system. The outcomes of this study provide insight for researchers and engineers who work in this field, as well as policy makers and project managers who are decision-makers. The accomplishments of the study are original developments TESs and DE systems. As an original development the Enviro-Economic Function, to balance the economic and environmental aspects of energy resources technologies in DE systems, is developed; various configurations of multiple TESs, including series, parallel, and general grid, are developed. The developed related functions are discharge temperature and energy of the TES, and energy and exergy efficiencies of the TES. The TES charging and discharging behavior of TES instantaneously is also investigated to obtain the charging temperature, the maximum charging temperature, the charging energy flow, maximum heat flow capacity, the discharging temperature, the minimum charging temperature, the discharging energy flow, the maximum heat flow capacity, and performance

  7. Republic of Tajikistan: Financial System Stability Assessment, including Reports on Observance of Standards and Codes on the following topics, Banking Supervision, and Monetary and Financial Policy Transparency

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2008-01-01

    The Republic of Tajikistan’s Financial System Stability Assessment and reports on the Observance of Standards and Codes are examined. The Tajik financial system is small despite recent rapid growth. Overall, banks remain well capitalized and liquid, but the brisk expansion of their loan portfolios is rapidly eroding capital buffers in a context where governance and supervision of the financial system raise concerns. The governance, regulatory, and supervisory frameworks for the financial se...

  8. Norway: Financial System Stability Assessment, including Reports on the Observance of Standards and Codes on the following topics: Banking Supervision, Insurance Regulation, and Payment Systems

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents key findings of Norway’s Financial System Stability Assessment, including Reports on the Observance of Standards and Codes on Banking Supervision, Insurance Regulation, and Payment Systems. Norway’s financial system appears sound and well managed. Short-term vulnerabilities appear low overall, given improved macroeconomic conditions and historically low interest rates, coupled with generally prudent and transparent policies. Beyond the short term, however, rising house...

  9. Assessment of thermal shock induced damage in silicon carbide fibre reinforced glass matrix composites

    OpenAIRE

    Boccaccini, A. R.; Boccaccini, D. N.; Pearce, D. H.; Janczak-Rusch, J.

    1998-01-01

    The development of microstructural damage in silicon carbide fibre (Nicalon™) reinforced glass matrix composite samples subjected to thermal shock was investigated by using a nondestructive forced resonance technique and fibre push out indentation tests. Thermal shock testing involved quenching samples in a water bath maintained at room temperature from a high temperature (650ºC). Changes in the Young's modulus and internal friction of the samples with increasing number of shocks were measure...

  10. Bench Scale Process for Low Cost CO2 Capture Using a Phase-Changing Absorbent: Topical Report EH&S Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westendorf, Tiffany; Farnum, Rachel; Perry, Robert; Herwig, Mark; Giolando, Salvatore; Green, Dianne; Morall, Donna

    2016-05-11

    GE Global Research was contracted by the Department of Energy to design and build a bench-scale process for a novel phase-changing aminosilicone-based CO2 capture solvent (award number DEFE0013687). As part of this program, a technology EH&S assessment (Subtask 5.1) has been completed for a CO2 capture system for a 550 MW coal-fired power plant. The assessment focuses on two chemicals used in the process, the aminosilicone solvent, GAP-0, and dodecylbenzenesulfonic acid (DDBSA), the GAP-0 carbamate formed upon reaction of the GAP-0 with CO2, and two potential byproducts formed in the process, GAP-0/SOx salts and amine-terminated, urea-containing silicone (also referred to as “ureas” in this report). The EH&S assessment identifies and estimates the magnitude of the potential air and water emissions and solid waste generated by the process and reviews the toxicological profiles of the chemicals associated with the process. Details regarding regulatory requirements, engineering controls, and storage and handling procedures are also provided in the following sections.

  11. Thermal Assessment of Very High Temperature Reactors: Direct and Indirect Brayton Power Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Search for a sustainable energy supply system has driven nuclear engineering towards what has been termed Generation IV. One of the main objectives of these innovative nuclear designs is to reach a high thermal efficiency in their power cycles. This way a substantial fuel saving and waste reduction is achieved, which would enhance competitiveness of the nuclear kWh. This paper investigates the thermal performance of helium-cooled power cycles based on the characteristic working parameters of Very High Temperature Reactor systems both at present and at the near future. Direct (C(IC)2HTRTX) and indirect (C(IC)2(IHX)TX) cycle baselines have been modelled and both have shown an excellent thermal performance ( with thermal efficiencies near or even higher than 50%). Enhancement of associated technology would increase thermal performance (i.e., and wnet) of both cycles drastically. The analysis of the results indicate that from the thermal performance standpoint, the cycle C(IC)2HTRTX would be a better option. However, when advances in associated technologies are considered, the efficiency gap between the two baselines analyzed become smaller. In no case net power turned out to be a differential feature between the layouts. (authors)

  12. The perceived temperature - a versatile index for the assessment of the human thermal environment. Part A: scientific basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiger, Henning; Laschewski, Gudrun; Grätz, Angelika

    2012-01-01

    The Perceived Temperature (PT) is an equivalent temperature based on a complete heat budget model of the human body. It has proved its suitability for numerous applications across a wide variety of scales from micro to global and is successfully used both in daily forecasts and climatological studies. PT is designed for staying outdoors and is defined as the air temperature of a reference environment in which the thermal perception would be the same as in the actual environment. The calculation is performed for a reference subject with an internal heat production of 135 W m-2 (who is walking at 4 km h-1 on flat ground). In the reference environment, the mean radiant temperature equals the air temperature and wind velocity is reduced to a slight draught. The water vapour pressure remains unchanged. Under warm/humid conditions, however, it is implicitly related to a relative humidity of 50%. Clothing is adapted in order to achieve thermal comfort. If this is impossible, cold or heat stress will occur, respectively. The assessment of thermal perception by means of PT is based on Fanger's Predicted Mean Vote (PMV) together with additional model extensions taking account of stronger deviations from thermal neutrality. This is performed using a parameterisation based on a two-node model. In the cold, it allows the mean skin temperature to drop below the comfort value. In the heat, it assesses additionally the enthalpy of sweat-moistened skin and of wet clothes. PT has the advantages of being self-explanatory due to its deviation from air temperature and being—via PMV—directly linked to a thermo-physiologically-based scale of thermal perception that is widely used and has stood the test of time. This paper explains in detail the basic equations of the human heat budget and the coefficients of the parameterisations.

  13. Assessment of optimum thermal humidity index for crossbred dairy cows in Dehradun district, Uttarakhand, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Kohli

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Uttarakhand is a relatively new state and many cross bred cattle were introduced to boost the milk yield of the state. Despite all efforts the milk yield of dairy in Uttarakhand is comparatively low. In our study, we assessed the effect of heat stress on milk production, using thermal humidity index (THI in high (cross bred cattle and low milk producing (LMP cows (native cows in Dehradun district of Uttarakhand, India. Materials and Methods: Effect of heat stress was measured on high and LMP cross bred cows using THI maintained on standard feeding and nutritional value. Daily ambient temperature and relative humidity were recorded to calculate the THI. Daily milk production was noted to verify the effect of heat stress. Furthermore, profile the thyroid hormones using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Low yielding cows did not show any significant change when the THI was above 72 from month June to October during stress condition. But high yielding cows shows a significant decrease (p<0.05 in milk yield when THI was above 80 (severe stress zone in the month of June to October and milk production decrease from an average of 18±1.4 to 10.9±0.92 L whereas in November-December when THI declines in the zone of comfort the milk yield did not show significant rise. The thyroid hormones (T3 and T4 level were found lower in summer heat stress condition for a high yielding cattle. Conclusion: Summer heat stress significantly decreased milk yield in high milk producing (HMP crossbred cows. As THI rises from comfort zone to stress zone milk yield decreased by 30-40% and this loss in milk production is irreversible. Management strategies should be needed as environmental control housing is suggested for the HMP crossbred cattle to minimize the heat stress. If all the dairies with cross bred cattle implement these small modifications in housing of cattle, there would be a huge increase in milk production.

  14. Topic: Mastery Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killoran, James, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    This journal issue addresses the topic of mastery learning at both the elementary and secondary school levels. The first article, "The Theory and Practice of Mastery Learning" (Guskey), gives a definition of and information about the development, operation, and application of mastery learning, based on the theories of Benjamin Bloom. In addition,…

  15. Topical Research: Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Karen

    This lesson plan can be used in social studies, language arts, or library research. The instructional objective is for students to select a topic of study relating to Africa, write a thesis statement, collect information from media sources, and develop a conclusion. The teacher may assign the lesson for written or oral evaluation. The teacher…

  16. Differential Topic Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Changyou; Buntine, Wray; Ding, Nan; Xie, Lexing; Du, Lan

    2015-02-01

    In applications we may want to compare different document collections: they could have shared content but also different and unique aspects in particular collections. This task has been called comparative text mining or cross-collection modeling. We present a differential topic model for this application that models both topic differences and similarities. For this we use hierarchical Bayesian nonparametric models. Moreover, we found it was important to properly model power-law phenomena in topic-word distributions and thus we used the full Pitman-Yor process rather than just a Dirichlet process. Furthermore, we propose the transformed Pitman-Yor process (TPYP) to incorporate prior knowledge such as vocabulary variations in different collections into the model. To deal with the non-conjugate issue between model prior and likelihood in the TPYP, we thus propose an efficient sampling algorithm using a data augmentation technique based on the multinomial theorem. Experimental results show the model discovers interesting aspects of different collections. We also show the proposed MCMC based algorithm achieves a dramatically reduced test perplexity compared to some existing topic models. Finally, we show our model outperforms the state-of-the-art for document classification/ideology prediction on a number of text collections. PMID:26353238

  17. Contrastive topics decomposed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wagner

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of contrastive topics introduced in Büring 1997b and further developed in Büring 2003 relies on distinguishing two types of constituents that introduce alternatives: the sentence focus, which is marked by a FOC feature, and the contrastive topic, which is marked by a CT feature. A non-compositional rule of interpretation that refers to these features is used to derive a topic semantic value, a nested set of sets of propositions. This paper presents evidence for a correlation between the restrictive syntax of nested focus operators and the syntax of contrastive topics, a correlation which is unexpected under this analysis. A compositional analysis is proposed that only makes use of the flatter focus semantic values introduced by focus operators. The analysis aims at integrating insights from the original analysis while at the same time capturing the observed syntactic restrictions. http://dx.doi.org/10.3765/sp.5.8 BibTeX info

  18. Topics in Nonlinear Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mosekilde, Erik

    Through a significant number of detailed and realistic examples this book illustrates how the insights gained over the past couple of decades in the fields of nonlinear dynamics and chaos theory can be applied in practice. Aomng the topics considered are microbiological reaction systems, ecological...

  19. Selected topics in magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, L C

    1993-01-01

    Part of the ""Frontiers in Solid State Sciences"" series, this volume presents essays on such topics as spin fluctuations in Heisenberg magnets, quenching of spin fluctuations by high magnetic fields, and kondo effect and heavy fermions in rare earths amongst others.

  20. Historical Topics in Algebra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Inc., Reston, VA.

    This is a reprint of the historical capsules dealing with algebra from the 31st Yearbook of NCTM,"Historical Topics for the Mathematics Classroom." Included are such themes as the change from a geometric to an algebraic solution of problems, the development of algebraic symbolism, the algebraic contributions of different countries, the origin and…

  1. A comparative assessment of independent thermal-hydraulic models for research reactors: The RSG-GAS case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatzidakis, S., E-mail: schatzid@purdue.edu [Purdue University, School of Nuclear Engineering, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Hainoun, A. [Atomic Energy Commission of Syria (AECS), Nuclear Engineering Department, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Doval, A. [Nuclear Engineering Department, Av. Cmdt. Luis Piedrabuena 4950, C.P. 8400, San Carlos de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Alhabet, F. [Atomic Energy Commission of Syria (AECS), Nuclear Engineering Department, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Francioni, F. [Nuclear Engineering Department, Av. Cmdt. Luis Piedrabuena 4950, C.P. 8400, San Carlos de Bariloche, Rio Negro (Argentina); Ikonomopoulos, A. [Institute of Nuclear and Radiological Sciences, Energy, Technology and Safety, National Center for Scientific Research ‘Demokritos’, 15130, Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece); Ridikas, D. [Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna International Centre, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-03-15

    Highlights: • Increased use of thermal-hydraulic codes requires assessment of important phenomena in RRs. • Three independent modeling teams performed analysis of loss of flow transient. • Purpose of this work is to examine the thermal-hydraulic codes response. • To perform benchmark analysis comparing the different codes with experimental measurements. • To identify the impact of the user effect on the computed results, performed with the same codes. - Abstract: This study presents the comparative assessment of three thermal-hydraulic codes employed to model the Indonesian research reactor (RSG-GAS) and simulate the reactor behavior under steady state and loss of flow transient (LOFT). The RELAP5/MOD3, MERSAT and PARET-ANL thermal-hydraulic codes are used by independent research groups to perform benchmark analysis against measurements of coolant and clad temperatures, conducted on an instrumented fuel element inside RSG-GAS core. The results obtained confirm the applicability of RELAP5/MOD3, MERSAT and PARET-ANL on the modeling of loss of flow transient in research reactors. In particular, the three codes are able to simulate flow reversal from downward forced to upward natural convection after pump trip and successful reactor scram. The benchmark results show that the codes predict maximum clad temperature of hot channel conservatively with a maximum overestimation of 27% for RELAP5/MOD3, 17% for MERSAT and 8% for PARET-ANL. As an additional effort, the impact of user effect on the simulation results has been assessed for the code RELAP5/MOD3, where the main differences among the models are presented and discussed.

  2. An assessment of radiance in Landsat TM middle and thermal infrared wavebands for the detection of tropical forest regeneration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been postulated that tropical forests regenerating after deforestation constitute an unmeasured terrestrial sink of atmospheric carbon, and that the strength of this sink is a function of regeneration stage. Such regeneration stages can be characterized by biophysical properties, such as leaf and wood biomass, which influence the radiance emitted and/or reflected from the forest canopy. Remotely sensed data can therefore be used to estimate these biophysical properties and thereby determine the forest regenerative stage. Studies conducted on temperate forests have related biophysical properties successfully with red and near-infrared radiance, particularly within the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). However, only weak correlations have generally been observed for tropical forests and it is suggested here that the relationship between forest biophysical properties and middle and thermal infrared radiance may be stronger than that between those properties and visible and near-infrared radiance.An assessment of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) data revealed that radiance acquired in middle and thermal infrared wavebands contained significant information for the detection of regeneration stages in Amazonian tropical forests. It was demonstrated that tropical forest regeneration stages were most separable using middle infrared and thermal infrared wavebands and that the correlation with regeneration stage was stronger with middle infrared, thermal infrared or combinations of these wavebands than they were with visible, near infrared or combinations of these wavebands. For example, correlation coefficients increased from — 0·26 (insignificant at 95 per cent confidence level) when using the NDVI, to up to 0·93 (significant at 99 per cent confidence level) for a vegetation index containing data acquired in the middle and thermal infrared wavebands. These results point to the value of using data acquired in middle and thermal infrared wavebands for the

  3. Topic Tracking with Dynamic Topic Model and Topic-based Weighting Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Zhang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In topic tracking, a topic is usually described by several stories. How to represent a topic is always an issue and a difficult problem in the research on topic tracking. To emphasis the topic in stories, we provide an improved topic-based tf*idf weighting method to measure the topical importance of the features in the representation model. To overcome the topic drift problem and filter the noise existed in the tracked topic description, a dynamic topic model is proposed based on the static model. It extends the initial topic model with the information from the incoming related stories and filters the noise using the latest unrelated story. The topic tracking systems are implemented on the TDT4 Chinese corpus. The experimental results indicate that both the new weighting method and the dynamic model can improve the tracking performance.

  4. Assessment of environmental, health, and safety issues related to the use of alternative transportation fuels. Topical report, October 1990-November 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Substituting alternative transportation fuels for gasoline and diesel fuel may improve air quality in the United States. Before the 'best' fuel can be identified, each fuel's impact on a variety of environmental factors must be assessed and compared. In addition to considering the direct effect on traditional air quality problems such as ozone attainment, a comprehensive evaluation should also address new concerns about air toxics, acidic deposition and global warming. There may also be health and safety risks associated with the production, marketing, and use of alternative fuels. The fuels of interest are methanol, natural gas, and LPG

  5. Topics and topic prominence in two sign languages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Kimmelman

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we describe topic marking in Russian Sign Language (RSL) and Sign Language of the Netherlands (NGT) and discuss whether these languages should be considered topic prominent. The formal markers of topics in RSL are sentence-initial position, a prosodic break following the topic, and non

  6. Feasibility and validity of animal-based indicators for on-farm welfare assessment of thermal stress in dairy goats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battini, Monica; Barbieri, Sara; Fioni, Luna; Mattiello, Silvana

    2016-02-01

    This investigation tested the feasibility and validity of indicators of cold and heat stress in dairy goats for on-farm welfare assessment protocols. The study was performed on two intensive dairy farms in Italy. Two different 3-point scale (0-2) scoring systems were applied to assess cold and heat stress. Cold and heat stress scores were visually assessed from outside the pen in the morning, afternoon and evening in January-February, April-May and July 2013 for a total of nine sessions of observations/farm. Temperature (°C), relative humidity (%) and wind speed (km/h) were recorded and Thermal Heat Index (THI) was calculated. The sessions were allocated to three climatic seasons, depending on THI ranges: cold (65). Score 2 was rarely assessed; therefore, scores 1 and 2 were aggregated for statistical analysis. The amount of goats suffering from cold stress was significantly higher in the cold season than in neutral ( P valid indicators to detect thermal stress in intensively managed dairy goats. The use of a binary scoring system (presence/absence), merging scores 1 and 2, may be a further refinement to improve the feasibility. This study also allows the prediction of optimal ranges of THI for dairy goat breeds in intensive husbandry systems, setting a comfort zone included into 55 and 70.

  7. Biomechanical assessment and monitoring of thermal ablation using Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Gary Yi

    Cancer remains, one of the major public health problems in the United States as well as many other countries worldwide. According to According to the World Health Organization, cancer is currently the leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for 7.6 million deaths annually, and 25% of the annual death was due to Cancer during the year of 2011. In the long history of the cancer treatment field, many treatment options have been established up to date. Traditional procedures include surgical procedures as well as systemic therapies such as biologic therapy, chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and radiation therapy. Nevertheless, side-effects are often associated with such procedures due to the systemic delivery across the entire body. Recently technologies have been focused on localized therapy under minimally or noninvasive procedure with imaging-guidance, such as cryoablation, laser ablation, radio-frequency (RF) ablation, and High Intensity F-ocused Ultrasound (HIFU). HIFU is a non-invasive procedure aims to coagulate tissue thermally at a localized focal zone created with noninvasively emitting a set of focused ultrasound beams while the surrounding healthy tissues remain relatively untreated. Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a dynamic, radiation-force-based imaging technique, which utilizes a single HIFU transducer by emitting an Amplitude-modulated (AM) beam to both thermally ablate the tumor while inducing a stable oscillatory tissue displacement at its focal zone. The oscillatory response is then estimated by a cross-correlation based motion tracking technique on the signal collected by a confocally-aligned diagnostic transducer. HMIFU addresses the most critical aspect and one of the major unmet needs of HIFU treatment, which is the ability to perform real-time monitoring and mapping of tissue property change during the HIFU treatment. In this dissertation, both the assessment and monitoring aspects of HMIFU have been investigated

  8. Uncertainty Assessment of the Core Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis Using the Monte Carlo Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sun Rock; Yoo, Jae Woon; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Kim, Sang Ji [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    In the core thermal-hydraulic design of a sodium cooled fast reactor, the uncertainty factor analysis is a critical issue in order to assure safe and reliable operation. The deviations from the nominal values need to be quantitatively considered by statistical thermal design methods. The hot channel factors (HCF) were employed to evaluate the uncertainty in the early design such as the CRBRP. The improved thermal design procedure (ISTP) calculates the overall uncertainty based on the Root Sum Square technique and sensitivity analyses of each design parameters. Another way to consider the uncertainties is to use the Monte Carlo method (MCM). In this method, all the input uncertainties are randomly sampled according to their probability density functions and the resulting distribution for the output quantity is analyzed. It is able to directly estimate the uncertainty effects and propagation characteristics for the present thermalhydraulic model. However, it requires a huge computation time to get a reliable result because the accuracy is dependent on the sampling size. In this paper, the analysis of uncertainty factors using the Monte Carlo method is described. As a benchmark model, the ORNL 19 pin test is employed to validate the current uncertainty analysis method. The thermal-hydraulic calculation is conducted using the MATRA-LMR program which was developed at KAERI based on the subchannel approach. The results are compared with those of the hot channel factors and the improved thermal design procedure

  9. 载人飞船密封舱热舒适性评价%Thermal Comfort Assessment in Manned Spaceship Cabin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于新刚; 满广龙; 范宇峰

    2014-01-01

    结合在轨飞行数据,采用PMV-PPD模型对载人飞船密封舱热舒适性进行了评估,基于在轨飞行数据计算了载人飞船PMV值,分析了密封舱空气温度、湿度以及舱内壁温度对热舒适性的影响。同时针对目前载人飞船实际情况,提出了通过提高舱壁辐射温度改善密封舱热舒适性的方法,可为后续的载人航天器特别是载人飞船密封舱在热控设计中提高热舒适性提供参考。%Based on flight data , thermal comfort of the airtight cabin in manned spaceship was as-sessed using PMV-PPD model.The effects of cabin temperature , humidity and wall temperature on thermal comfort were presented in detail .To improve thermal comfort in manned spaceship cabin , a method of raising cabin wall temperature was suggested , which provided a reference for thermal de-sign of manned spaceship .

  10. Discovering Health Topics in Social Media Using Topic Models

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Michael J.; Dredze, Mark

    2014-01-01

    By aggregating self-reported health statuses across millions of users, we seek to characterize the variety of health information discussed in Twitter. We describe a topic modeling framework for discovering health topics in Twitter, a social media website. This is an exploratory approach with the goal of understanding what health topics are commonly discussed in social media. This paper describes in detail a statistical topic model created for this purpose, the Ailment Topic Aspect Model (ATAM...

  11. Pathological considerations of laser-tissue interactions: light microscopic assessment of thermal damage of skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flotte, Thomas J.; Goetschkes, Margaret

    1992-06-01

    A variety of fixatives and stains were examined for the ability to differentially stain the extracellular matrix components of thermal damage to the skin in an attempt to provide methods for examining the extent of thermal effects. This information is important in comparing different lasers and laser parameters. Four zones of thermal damage were identified including char and three zones of less extensive damage. The lower bounds of the damage with steady state conditions for these zones were 64 - 66 degree(s)C, 80 - 85 degree(s)C, and > 100 degree(s)C. The best choices based on this study include the following: fixative: Bouin's, overall stain: H & E, inner zone stain: Pinkus' acid orcein giemsa, middle zone stain: Movat's pentachrome, and outer zone stain: the modified elastic stain presented in the appendix of this paper.

  12. A research needs assessment for the capture, utilization and disposal of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel-fired power plants. Volume 2, Topical reports: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    This study, identifies and assesses system approaches in order to prioritize research needs for the capture and non-atmospheric sequestering of a significant portion of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emitted from fossil fuel-fired electric power plants (US power plants presently produce about 7% of the world`s CO{sub 2} emissions). The study considers capture technologies applicable either to existing plants or to those that optimistically might be demonstrated on a commercial scale over the next twenty years. The research needs that have high priority in establishing the technical, environmental, and economic feasibility of large-scale capture and disposal of CO{sub 2} from electric power plants are:(1) survey and assess the capacity, cost, and location of potential depleted gas and oil wells that are suitable CO{sub 2} repositories (with the cooperation of the oil and gas industry); (2) conduct research on the feasibility of ocean disposal, with objectives of determining the cost, residence time, and environmental effects for different methods of CO{sub 2} injection; (3) perform an in-depth survey of knowledge concerning the feasibility of using deep, confined aquifers for disposal and, if feasible, identify potential disposal locations (with the cooperation of the oil and gas industry); (4) evaluate, on a common basis, system and design alternatives for integration of CO{sub 2} capture systems with emerging and advanced technologies for power generation; and prepare a conceptual design, an analysis of barrier issues, and a preliminary cost estimate for pipeline networks necessary to transport a significant portion of the CO{sub 2} to potentially feasible disposal locations.

  13. Research on structural integral assessment of cylinders with circumference cracks under pressurized thermal shock based on probabilistic fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Many investigations on the structural integrity assessment of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under the pressure thermal stress (PTS) conditions have been performed. Probabilistic fracture mechanics (PFM) technique has been used for RPV PTS analysis since 1980. However, research on the structure integrity assessment techniques using the PFM method is insufficient in China to support the application of the method to be used for assessment of RPV under PTS conditions. Purpose: To gain the effective right assessment approach applied to Chinese RPV against PTS. Methods: Thermal stress distribution along the cylinder wall-thickness under PTS is firstly evaluated by FE in order to get the corresponding stress intensity factors (SIF) and to validate them with some available SIF solutions. The PFM analyses based on crack initiation are then performed under conditions of the crack size, fracture toughness and material yield stress. Both linear elastic fracture mechanics and R6 method are used in the analyses, and the sensitivity of uncertainties as well as the effect of the assessment method is discussed. Monte Carlo simulation is used to calculate the failure probability. Results: preliminary software is developed to perform the assessment for PTS analysis. The failure probability with R6 method is a little higher than with the linear elastic fracture mechanics approach. The effect of reference nil-ductility transition temperature RTNDT on the failure probability is more significant than other factors. Conclusions: Many uncertainties should be considered in RPV PTS analysis with PFM approach in the further, including the input parameters and failure models. Low RTNDT can extend the time of failure, and reduce the failure probability. (authors)

  14. Molecular level assessment of thermal transport and thermoelectricity in materials: From bulk alloys to nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinaci, Alper

    The ability to manipulate material response to dynamical processes depends on the extent of understanding of transport properties and their variation with chemical and structural features in materials. In this perspective, current work focuses on the thermal and electronic transport behavior of technologically important bulk and nanomaterials. Strontium titanate is a potential thermoelectric material due to its large Seebeck coefficient. Here, first principles electronic band structure and Boltzmann transport calculations are employed in studying the thermoelectric properties of this material in doped and deformed states. The calculations verified that excessive carrier concentrations are needed for this material to be used in thermoelectric applications. Carbon- and boron nitride-based nanomaterials also offer new opportunities in many applications from thermoelectrics to fast heat removers. For these materials, molecular dynamics calculations are used to evaluate lattice thermal transport. To do this, first, an energy moment term is reformulated for periodic boundary conditions and tested to calculate thermal conductivity from Einstein relation in various systems. The influences of the structural details (size, dimensionality) and defects (vacancies, Stone-Wales defects, edge roughness, isotopic disorder) on the thermal conductivity of C and BN nanostructures are explored. It is observed that single vacancies scatter phonons stronger than other type of defects due to unsatisfied bonds in their structure. In pristine states, BN nanostructures have 4-6 times lower thermal conductivity compared to C counterparts. The reason of this observation is investigated on the basis of phonon group velocities, life times and heat capacities. The calculations show that both phonon group velocities and life times are smaller in BN systems. Quantum corrections are also discussed for these classical simulations. The chemical and structural diversity that could be attained by

  15. Thermal energy storage technologies for sustainability systems design, assessment and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kalaiselvam, S

    2014-01-01

    Thermal Energy Storage Technologies for Sustainability is a broad-based overview describing the state-of-the-art in latent, sensible, and thermo-chemical energy storage systems and their applications across industries. Beginning with a discussion of the efficiency and conservation advantages of balancing energy demand with production, the book goes on to describe current state-of-the art technologies. Not stopping with description, the authors also discuss design, modeling, and simulation of representative systems, and end with several case studies of systems in use.Describes how thermal energ

  16. Topical retinoids for acne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Lindsey; Bonati, Lauren Meshkov; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2016-06-01

    Topical retinoids are currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of acne vulgaris in nonpregnant, nonlactating patients 12 years of age and older. Their efficacy, safety, and tolerability are well documented for inflammatory and noninflammatory acne with studies repeatedly demonstrating a decrease in the number of lesions, significant improvement in acne severity, improvement in the cosmetic appearance of acne, and the prevention of acne lesions through microcomedone formation. There is some variability between prescription retinoid products regarding efficacy, safety, and tolerability; with erythema, peeling, and dryness being common, potential side effects. Due to their efficacious and safe profile, topical retinoids remain the first-line treatment for acne vulgaris. PMID:27416308

  17. An assessment of thermal destruction technologies for application to Department of Energy mixed wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As evidenced by the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan, the Department is committing to a long-range waste management program. A category of waste that represents a sizable portion of the total DOE waste picture and also presents significant complications in management is waste that contains both hazardous and radioactive components. This category of wastes, referred to as mixed waste (MW), is present at all but a few of the Department's sites. The presence of radioactive constituents in this waste category implies that it be managed, like radioactive-only wastes, on DOE-owned property. Thermal treatment of MW's offers a variety of benefits in the final disposition of the waste. One obvious benefit is volume reduction of the waste if it contains organics because most of the organics are converted to gases and water, leaving only the inert material or ash. Another benefit is the destruction of hazardous materials by thermal conversion to simple, nonhazardous gases water. A third benefit, for some thermal technologies, is that the thermal process yields a process residue that meets disposal requirements for both hazardous and radioactive constituents without further processing. 2 refs., 47 figs., 8 tabs

  18. Regional assessment of aquifers for thermal-energy storage. Volume 2. Regions 7 through 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-06-01

    This volume contains information on the geologic and hydrologic framework, major aquifers, aquifers which are suitable and unsuitable for annual thermal energy storage (ATES) and the ATES potential of the following regions of the US: Unglaciated Central Region; Glaciated Appalachians, Unglaciated Appalachians; Coastal Plain; Hawaii; and Alaska. (LCL)

  19. Assessment of industry views on international business prospects for solar thermal technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Easterling, J.C.

    1984-09-01

    This report contains a review of solar thermal industry viewpoints on their prospects for developing international business. The report documents the industry's current involvement in foreign markets, view of foreign competition in overseas applications, and view of federal R and D and policy requirements to strengthen international business prospects. The report is based on discussions with equipment manufacturers and system integrators who have a product or service with potential international demand. Interviews with manufacturers and system integrators were conducted by using a standard format for interview questions. The use of a standard format for questions provided a basis for aggregating similar views expressed by US companies concerning overseas business prospects. A special effort was made to gather responses from the entire solar thermal industry, including manufacturers of line-focus, point-focus, and central receiver systems. General, technical, economic, institutional, and financial findings are provided in this summary. In addition, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) recommendations are provided (based upon advice from the Solar Thermal Review Panel) for activities to improve US solar thermal business prospects overseas.

  20. An assessment of thermal spray coating technologies for high temperature corrosion protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of thermally sprayed coatings in combating high temperature corrosion continues to grow in the major industries of chemical, waste incineration, power generation and pulp and paper. This has been driven partially by the development of corrosion resistant alloys, improved knowledge and quality in the thermal spray industry and continued innovation in thermal spray equipment. There exists today an extensive range of thermal spray process options, often with the same alloy solution. In demanding corrosion applications it is not sufficient to just specify alloy and coating method. For the production of reliable coatings the whole coating production envelope needs to be considered, including alloy selection, spray parameters, surface preparation, base metal properties, heat input etc. Combustion, arc-wire, plasma, HVOF and spray+fuse techniques are reviewed and compared in terms of their strengths and limitations to provide cost-effective solutions for high temperature corrosion protection. Arc wire spraying, HP/HVOF and spray+fuse are emerging as the most promising techniques to optimise both coating properties and economic/practical aspects. (orig.)

  1. Remote assessment of permeability/thermal diffusivity of consolidated clay sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this project was to examine the feasibility of predicting marine sediment permeability and thermal diffusivity by remote geophysical observations. For this purpose a modified consolidation cell was developed and constructed and tests on deep sea sediment samples carried out. Results and conclusions of a nineteen month programme are presented. (U.K.)

  2. Theoretical assessment of electro-thermal imaging: A new technique for medical diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlak, H. Feza; Gencer, Nevzat G.; Besikci, Cengiz

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most crucial cancer types. To improve the diagnosis performance, a hybrid system is proposed through simultaneous utilization of thermal and electrical impedance imaging methods. The innovation of the approach relies on the frequency dependence of the tissue's electrical impedance which facilitates the acquisition of multiple thermal images with currents at different frequencies injected to the region of the body under inspection. The applied current and the resulting heating at the body surface are distributed based on the frequency dependent conductivity distribution. The electrical currents increase the thermal contrast on the body surface depending on the electrical properties of the tissues at the operation frequency. The technique also provides frequency dependent conductivity distribution data through thermal imaging which can be used as a basis for the detection of the breast carcinoma. Based on our findings, the contrast resolution between the healthy and cancerous tissue is increased, improving the depth-dependent imaging performance from 3 mm to 9 mm for a 1.5 mm tumor. The sensitivity of the technique can be further increased by an infrared camera with dual band imaging capability. Consequently, the proposed approach has a potential to improve the sensitivity and accuracy of medical imaging over the standard thermography.

  3. Photopyroelectric assessment of the thermal effusivity of fresh hen egg and of rehydrated egg powders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szafner, G.; Nemeth, C.; Bicanic, D.D.; Doka, O.

    2015-01-01

    The availability of thermo-physical data of foods and their constituents is of general importance to food industry. The thermal effusivity e is one among the relevant thermodynamical quantities. The latter is normally calculated from the relationship e = (¿¿c)½, where c is specific heat, ¿ is the de

  4. Biological functioning of PAH-polluted and thermal desorption-treated soils assessed by fauna and microbial bioindicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cébron, Aurélie; Cortet, Jérôme; Criquet, Stéven; Biaz, Asmaa; Calvert, Virgile; Caupert, Cécile; Pernin, Céline; Leyval, Corinne

    2011-11-01

    A large number of soil bioindicators were used to assess biological diversity and activity in soil polluted with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and the same soil after thermal desorption (TD) treatment. Abundance and biodiversity of bacteria, fungi, protozoa, nematodes and microarthropods, as well as functional parameters such as enzymatic activities and soil respiration, were assessed during a two year period of in situ monitoring. We investigated the influence of vegetation (spontaneous vegetation and Medicago sativa) and TD treatment on biological functioning. Multivariate analysis was performed to analyze the whole data set. A principal response curve (PRC) technique was used to evaluate the different treatments (various vegetation and contaminated vs. TD soil) contrasted with control (bare) soil over time. Our results indicated the value of using a number of complementary bioindicators, describing both diversity and functions, to assess the influence of vegetation on soil and discriminate polluted from thermal desorption (TD)-treated soil. Plants had an influence on the abundance and activity of all organisms examined in our study, favoring the whole trophic chain development. However, although TD-treated soil had a high abundance and diversity of microorganisms and fauna, enzymatic activities were weak because of the strong physical and chemical modifications of this soil. PMID:21392572

  5. Quantifying the thermal heat requirement of Brassica in assessing biophysical parameters under semi-arid microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adak, Tarun; Chakravarty, N. V. K.

    2010-07-01

    Evaluation of the thermal heat requirement of Brassica spp. across agro-ecological regions is required in order to understand the further effects of climate change. Spatio-temporal changes in hydrothermal regimes are likely to affect the physiological growth pattern of the crop, which in turn will affect economic yields and crop quality. Such information is helpful in developing crop simulation models to describe the differential thermal regimes that prevail at different phenophases of the crop. Thus, the current lack of quantitative information on the thermal heat requirement of Brassica crops under debranched microenvironments prompted the present study, which set out to examine the response of biophysical parameters [leaf area index (LAI), dry biomass production, seed yield and oil content] to modified microenvironments. Following 2 years of field experiments on Typic Ustocrepts soils under semi-arid climatic conditions, it was concluded that the Brassica crop is significantly responsive to microenvironment modification. A highly significant and curvilinear relationship was observed between LAI and dry biomass production with accumulated heat units, with thermal accumulation explaining ≥80% of the variation in LAI and dry biomass production. It was further observed that the economic seed yield and oil content, which are a function of the prevailing weather conditions, were significantly responsive to the heat units accumulated from sowing to 50% physiological maturity. Linear regression analysis showed that growing degree days (GDD) could indicate 60-70% variation in seed yield and oil content, probably because of the significant response to differential thermal microenvironments. The present study illustrates the statistically strong and significant response of biophysical parameters of Brassica spp. to microenvironment modification in semi-arid regions of northern India.

  6. Assessment of the Potential to Reduce Emissions from Road Transportation, Notably NOx, Through the Use of Alternative Vehicles and Fuels in the Great Smoky Mountains Region; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Air pollution is a serious problem in the region of the Great Smoky Mountains. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) may designate non-attainment areas by 2003 for ozone. Pollutants include nitrogen oxides (NOx), sulfur dioxide (SO(sub 2)), carbon monoxide (CO), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), lead, and particulate matter (PM), which are health hazards, damage the environment, and limit visibility. The main contributors to this pollution are industry, transportation, and utilities. Reductions from all contributors are needed to correct this problem. While improvements are projected in each sector over the next decades, the May 2000 Interim Report issued by the Southern Appalachian Mountains Initiative (SAMI) suggests that the percentage of NOx emissions from transportation may increase. The conclusions are: (1) It is essential to consider the entire fuel cycle in assessing the benefits, or disadvantages, of an alternative fuel option, i.e., feedstock and fuel production, in addition to vehicle operation; (2) Many improvements to the energy efficiency of a particular vehicle and engine combination will also reduce emissions by reducing fuel use, e.g., engine efficiency, reduced weight, drag and tire friction, and regenerative braking; (3) In reducing emissions it will be important to install the infrastructure to provide the improved fuels, support the maintenance of advanced vehicles, and provide emissions testing of both local vehicles and those from out of state; (4) Public transit systems using lower emission vehicles can play an important role in reducing emissions per passenger mile by carrying passengers more efficiently, particularly in congested areas. However, analysis is required for each situation; (5) Any reduction in emissions will be welcome, but the problems of air pollution in our region will not be solved by a few modest improvements. Substantial reductions in emissions of key pollutants are required both in East Tennessee and in

  7. Feasibility and validity of animal-based indicators for on-farm welfare assessment of thermal stress in dairy goats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battini, Monica; Barbieri, Sara; Fioni, Luna; Mattiello, Silvana

    2016-02-01

    This investigation tested the feasibility and validity of indicators of cold and heat stress in dairy goats for on-farm welfare assessment protocols. The study was performed on two intensive dairy farms in Italy. Two different 3-point scale (0-2) scoring systems were applied to assess cold and heat stress. Cold and heat stress scores were visually assessed from outside the pen in the morning, afternoon and evening in January-February, April-May and July 2013 for a total of nine sessions of observations/farm. Temperature (°C), relative humidity (%) and wind speed (km/h) were recorded and Thermal Heat Index (THI) was calculated. The sessions were allocated to three climatic seasons, depending on THI ranges: cold (65). Score 2 was rarely assessed; therefore, scores 1 and 2 were aggregated for statistical analysis. The amount of goats suffering from cold stress was significantly higher in the cold season than in neutral ( P < 0.01) and hot ( P < 0.001) seasons. Signs of heat stress were recorded only in the hot season ( P < 0.001). The visual assessment from outside the pen confirms the on-farm feasibility of both indicators: No constraint was found and time required was less than 10 min. Our results show that cold and heat stress scores are valid indicators to detect thermal stress in intensively managed dairy goats. The use of a binary scoring system (presence/absence), merging scores 1 and 2, may be a further refinement to improve the feasibility. This study also allows the prediction of optimal ranges of THI for dairy goat breeds in intensive husbandry systems, setting a comfort zone included into 55 and 70.

  8. Assessment of fast and thermal neutron ambient dose equivalents around the KFUPM neutron source storage area using nuclear track detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazal-ur-Rehman [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)]. E-mail: fazalr@kfupm.edu.sa; Al-Jarallah, M.I. [Physics Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Abu-Jarad, F. [Radiation Protection Unit, Environmental Protection Department, Saudi Aramco, P. O. Box 13027, Dhahran 31311 (Saudi Arabia); Qureshi, M.A. [Center for Applied Physical Sciences, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2005-11-15

    A set of five {sup 241}Am-Be neutron sources are utilized in research and teaching at King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM). Three of these sources have an activity of 16Ci each and the other two are of 5Ci each. A well-shielded storage area was designed for these sources. The aim of the study is to check the effectiveness of shielding of the KFUPM neutron source storage area. Poly allyl diglycol carbonate (PADC) Nuclear track detectors (NTDs) based fast and thermal neutron area passive dosimeters have been utilized side by side for 33 days to assess accumulated low ambient dose equivalents of fast and thermal neutrons at 30 different locations around the source storage area and adjacent rooms. Fast neutron measurements have been carried out using bare NTDs, which register fast neutrons through recoils of protons, in the detector material. NTDs were mounted with lithium tetra borate (Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}) converters on their surfaces for thermal neutron detection via B10(n,{alpha})Li6 and Li6(n,{alpha})H3 nuclear reactions. The calibration factors of NTD both for fast and thermal neutron area passive dosimeters were determined using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) with and without a polyethylene moderator. The calibration factors for fast and thermal neutron area passive dosimeters were found to be 1.33 proton tracks cm{sup -2}{mu}Sv{sup -1} and 31.5 alpha tracks cm{sup -2}{mu}Sv{sup -1}, respectively. The results show variations of accumulated dose with the locations around the storage area. The fast neutron dose equivalents rates varied from as low as 182nSvh{sup -1} up to 10.4{mu}Svh{sup -1} whereas those for thermal neutron ranged from as low as 7nSvh{sup -1} up to 9.3{mu}Svh{sup -1}. The study indicates that the area passive neutron dosimeter was able to detect dose rates as low as 7 and 182nSvh{sup -1} from accumulated dose for thermal and fast neutrons, respectively, which were not possible to detect with the available active neutron

  9. Assessment of human thermal comfort and mitigation measures in different urban climatotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, N.; Kuttler, W.

    2012-04-01

    This study analyses thermal comfort in the model city of Oberhausen as an example for the densely populated metropolitan region Ruhr, Germany. As thermal loads increase due to climate change negative impacts especially for city dwellers will arise. Therefore mitigation strategies should be developed and considered in urban planning today to prevent future thermal stress. The method consists of the combination of in-situ measurements and numerical model simulations. So in a first step the actual thermal situation is determined and then possible mitigation strategies are derived. A measuring network was installed in eight climatotopes for a one year period recording air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and wind direction. Based on these parameters the human thermal comfort in terms of physiological equivalent temperature (PET) was calculated by RayMan Pro software. Thus the human comfort of different climatotopes was determined. Heat stress in different land uses varies, so excess thermal loads in urban areas could be detected. Based on the measuring results mitigation strategies were developed, such as increasing areas with high evaporation capacity (green areas and water bodies). These strategies were implemented as different plan scenarios in the microscale urban climate model ENVI-met. The best measure should be identified by comparing the range and effect of these scenarios. Simulations were run in three of the eight climatotopes (city center, suburban and open land site) to analyse the effectiveness of the mitigation strategies in several land use structures. These cover the range of values of all eight climatotopes and therefore provide representative results. In the model area of 21 ha total, the modified section in the different plan scenarios was 1 ha. Thus the effect of small-scale changes could be analysed. Such areas can arise due to population decline and structural changes and hold conversion potential. Emphasis was also laid on analysing the

  10. Thermal control system technology discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Wilbert E.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on thermal control systems technology discipline for Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: heat rejection; heat acquisition and transport; monitoring and control; passive thermal control; and analysis and test verification.

  11. Corrosiveness of wet residential building thermal insulation---Mechanisms and evaluation of electrochemical methods for assessing corrosion behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stansbury, E.E. (Stansbury (E.E.), Knoxville, TN (United States))

    1991-10-01

    An evaluation has been made of the corrosiveness of selected wet residential building thermal insulation materials in contact with low carbon steel. Investigations were conducted both in wet insulations and in filtered leachates from insulations derived from thirteen cellulosic, three mineral fiber and four foam products. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements are reported from which the overall corrosion response was assessed and then the techniques of Tafel and polarization resistance analysis applied to estimate corrosion rates. Corrosion rates were also estimated electrochemically using a direct reading instrument which performs the rate calculation based on the polarization resistance principle. Direct determinations of corrosion rate were based on weight loss measurements.

  12. Topical Nitroglycerine in Perniosis/Chilblains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Prashant

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of perniosis is largely inadequate. The success rate of 0.2% nitroglycerine ointment is demonstrated in the present series. Twenty-two patients clinically diagnosed with severe perniosis were prescribed the topical vasodilator nitroglycerine. Digital photography and patient self-report of the clinical appearance, degree of irritation, and pain and soreness of the lesions were assessed on a 3-point scale to assess therapeutic response. A total of 18 of the 22 patients had regression of the lesions within the first week of treatment and complete regression in 2 weeks. Of these patients, 2 who experienced a relapse were successfully treated with another course of topical nitroglycerine. Two of 22 patients had regression of the lesions during the second week and complete regression in another week. Response was delayed in patients with a longer duration of disease. Topical 0.2% nitroglycerine ointment may be a promising alternative treatment option in perniosis. PMID:26380502

  13. A model of human physiology and comfort for assessing complex thermal environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huizenga, C.; Zhang Hui; Arens, E. [University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Center for Environmental Design Research

    2001-07-01

    The Berkeley Comfort Model is based on the Stolwijk model of human thermal regulation but includes several significant improvements. Our new model allows an unlimited body segment (compared to six in the Stolwijk model). Each segment is modeled as four body layers (core, muscle, fat, and skin tissues) and a clothing layer. Physiological mechanisms such as vasodilation, vasoconstriction, sweating, and metabolic heat production are explicitly considered. Convection, conduction (such as to a car seat or other surface in contact with any part of the body) and radiation between the body and the environment are treated independently. The model is capable of predicting human physiological response to transient, non-uniform thermal environments. This paper describes the physiological algorithms as well as the implementation of the model. (author)

  14. Environmental assessment of the potential effects of aquifer thermal energy storage systems on microorganisms in groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hicks, R.J.; Stewart, D.L.

    1988-03-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the potential environmental effects (both adverse and beneficials) of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) technology pertaining to microbial communities indigenous to subsurface environments (i.e., aquifers) and the propagation, movement, and potential release of pathogenic microorganisms (specifically, Legionella) within ATES systems. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in aquifers shows great promise to reduce peak demand; reduce electric utility load problems; contribute to establishing favorable economics for district heating and cooling systems; and reduce pollution from extraction, refining, and combustion of fossil fuels. However, concerns that the widespread implementation of this technology may have adverse effects on biological systems indigeneous to aquifers, as well as help to propagate and release pathogenic organisms that enter thee environments need to be resolved. 101 refs., 2 tabs.

  15. Assessment of microbial fouling in an ocean thermal energy conversion experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aftring, R P; Taylor, B F

    1979-10-01

    A project to investigate biofouling, under conditions relevant to ocean thermal energy conversion heat exchangers, was conducted during July through September 1977 at a site about 13 km north of St. Croix (U.S. Virgin Islands). Seawater was drawn from a depth of 20 m, within the surface mixed layer, through aluminum pipes (2.6 m long, 2.5-cm internal diameter) at flow velocities of about 0.9 and 1.8 m/s. The temperature of the seawater entering the mock heat exchanger units was between 27.8 and 28.6 degrees C. After about 10 weeks of exposure to seawater, when their thermal conductivity was reported to be significantly impaired, the pipes were assayed for the accumulation of biological material on their inner surfaces. The extent of biofouling was very low and independent of flow velocity. Bacterial populations, determined from plate counts, were about 10 cells per cm. The ranges of mean areal densities for other biological components were: organic carbon, 18 to 27 mug/cm; organic nitrogen, 1.5 to 3.0 mug/cm; adenosine 5'-triphosphate, 4 to 28 ng/cm; carbohydrate (as glucose in the phenol assay), 3.8 to 7.0 mug/cm; chlorophyll a, 0.2 to 0.8 ng/cm. It was estimated from the adenosine 5'-triphosphate and nitrogen contents that the layer of live bacteria present after 10 weeks was only of the order of 1mum thick. The C/N ratio of the biological material suggested the presence of extracellular polysaccharidic material. Such compounds, because of their water-retaining capacities, could account for the related increase in thermal resistance associated with the pipes. This possibility merits further investigation, but the current results emphasize the minor degree of biofouling which is likely to be permissible in ocean thermal energy conversion heat exchangers. PMID:16345450

  16. Ecological assessment of process of thermal energy generation at boiler-houses with small capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecologic effectiveness of power generation process at boiler-houses with small capacity is estimated. Both the material and thermal balances describing quantitative motion of materials, capacity of recoverable resources generation, applying wastes, losses values are carried out. Balances are developed for two cases: 1. without heat utilization of discharge gases and without precipitation of dust discharges; 2. with heat utilization and with precipitation of dust discharges under equal productivity and operation conditions. Results are sited in tabular form

  17. Assessing Thermal Comfort Indices In Line With The Architectural Design Compatible With The Climate In Babolsar

    OpenAIRE

    KAMYABI, Saeid; DABBAGHIAN, Rouha

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Today, the impact of climatic characteristics and weather conditions on construction and housing cannot be overlooked. Considering climatic conditions and characteristics, examining the effect of these elements on architecture and its interactive relationship with buildings are inevitable. This study examined the thermal comfort indices and corresponding climatic factors in Babolsar.In order to determine the comfort conditions in buildings of Babolsar, this research has been conduct...

  18. Thermal-Hydraulic Assessment Of HLM-Cooled Pin Bundle In CIRCE Pool Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) has been conceptualized in the frame of GEN IV International Forum (GIF), ENEA is strongly involved on the HLM technology development. Currently ENEA has implemented large competencies and capabilities in the field of HLM thermal-hydraulic, coolant technology, material for high temperature applications, corrosion and material protection, heat transfer and removal, component development and testing, remote maintenance, procedure definition and coolant handling. In this frame the CIRCE pool facility has been refurbished to host a suitable test section able to thermal-hydraulically simulate the primary system of a HLM cooled pool reactor. In particular a fuel pin bundle simulator (FPS) has been installed in the CIRCE pool. It has been conceived with a thermal power of about 1 MW and a linear power up to 25 kW/m, relevant values for a LMFR. It consist of 37 fuel pins (electrically simulated) placed on a hexagonal lattice with a pitch to diameter ratio of 1.8. The pins have a diameter of 8.2 mm and an active length of 1 m. Along the FPS, three spacer grid properly designed by ENEA have been installed. The FPS has been deeply instrumented by several thermocouples. In particular three sections of the FPS have been instrumented to monitor the heat transfer coefficient along the bundle as well as the cladding temperature in different rank of sub-channels. A first set of experiments were run to investigate the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the fuel pin bundle both under forced (by gas lift) and buoyancy driven circulation into the pool. The paper reports the experimental data carried out as well as a preliminary analysis and discussion, also in comparison with CFD calculations performed by CFX code. (author)

  19. Initial assessment of the processes and significance of thermal aging in cast stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpy-impact and J-R curve data for thermally aged cast stainless steel are presented. The effects of material variables on the embrittlement of cast materials are evaluated. The chemical composition and ferrite morphology have a strong effect on the kinetics and extent of embrittlement. The procedure and correlations for predicting the impact strength and fracture toughness of cast component during reactor service are described. 19 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs

  20. Thermal hydraulic performance assessment of 18x18 solid fuel for the reactor power uprate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, C. H.; Kim, H. I.; In, W. K.; Chun, T. H. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    The thermal hydraulic analysis of the 18x18 solid fuel assembly has been carried out for the power uprate of OPR-1000. The suggested 18x18 solid fuel assembly has a structural compatibility for reloading to operating PWR reactors of OPR-1000. In the thermal hydraulic analysis, the mixing effect between the neighboring channels has to be carried out in a subchannel analysis. A subchannel analysis code, MATRA has been developed by KAERI. The main parameters for the thermal hydraulic design, such as a pressure drop and DNBR, and the maximum temperature in a fuel pellet have been estimated. The 18x18 solid fuel in the 120% power uprate showed an increased pressure drop and a similar DNBR behavior. The peak temperature in the fuel centerline, however, was slightly higher than that of the 16x16 solid fuel assembly for the normal operation condition. The peak temperature of a fuel pellet in the solid fuel should be seriously considered for increasing power density.

  1. An assessment of the CORCON-MOD3 code. Part 1: Thermal-hydraulic calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report deals with the subject of CORCON-Mod3 code validation (thermal-hydraulic modeling capability only) based on MCCI (molten core concrete interaction) experiments conducted under different programs in the past decade. Thermal-hydraulic calculations (i.e., concrete ablation, melt temperature, melt energy, concrete temperature, and condensible and non-condensible gas generation) were performed with the code, and compared with the data from 15 experiments, conducted at different scales using both simulant (metallic and oxidic) and prototypic melt materials, using different concrete types, and with and without an overlying water pool. Sensitivity studies were performed in a few cases involving, for example, heat transfer from melt to concrete, condensed phase chemistry, etc. Further, special analysis was performed using the ACE L8 experimental data to illustrate the differences between the experimental and the reactor conditions, and to demonstrate that with proper corrections made to the code, the calculated results were in better agreement with the experimental data. Generally, in the case of dry cavity and metallic melts, CORCON-Mod3 thermal-hydraulic calculations were in good agreement with the test data. For oxidic melts in a dry cavity, uncertainties in heat transfer models played an important role for two melt configurations--a stratified geometry with segregated metal and oxide layers, and a heterogeneous mixture. Some discrepancies in the gas release data were noted in a few cases

  2. An assessment of the CORCON-MOD3 code. Part 1: Thermal-hydraulic calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strizhov, V.; Kanukova, V.; Vinogradova, T.; Askenov, E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Nuclear Safety; Nikulshin, V. [Russian Research Center, Moscow (Russian Federation). Kurchatov Inst.

    1996-09-01

    This report deals with the subject of CORCON-Mod3 code validation (thermal-hydraulic modeling capability only) based on MCCI (molten core concrete interaction) experiments conducted under different programs in the past decade. Thermal-hydraulic calculations (i.e., concrete ablation, melt temperature, melt energy, concrete temperature, and condensible and non-condensible gas generation) were performed with the code, and compared with the data from 15 experiments, conducted at different scales using both simulant (metallic and oxidic) and prototypic melt materials, using different concrete types, and with and without an overlying water pool. Sensitivity studies were performed in a few cases involving, for example, heat transfer from melt to concrete, condensed phase chemistry, etc. Further, special analysis was performed using the ACE L8 experimental data to illustrate the differences between the experimental and the reactor conditions, and to demonstrate that with proper corrections made to the code, the calculated results were in better agreement with the experimental data. Generally, in the case of dry cavity and metallic melts, CORCON-Mod3 thermal-hydraulic calculations were in good agreement with the test data. For oxidic melts in a dry cavity, uncertainties in heat transfer models played an important role for two melt configurations--a stratified geometry with segregated metal and oxide layers, and a heterogeneous mixture. Some discrepancies in the gas release data were noted in a few cases.

  3. Numerical method for assessing the potential of smart engine thermal management: Application to a medium-upper segment passenger car

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant reductions in vehicle fuel consumption can be obtained through a greater control of the thermal status of the engine, especially under partial load conditions. Different systems have been proposed to implement this concept, referred to as improved engine thermal management. The amount of fuel saved depends on the components and layout of the engine cooling plant and on the performance of its control system. In this work, a method was developed to calculate the theoretical minimum fuel consumption of a passenger car and used as a reference in comparing different engine cooling system concepts. A high-medium class car was taken as an example and simulated on standard cycles. Models for power train and cooling system components were developed and linked to simulate the vehicle. A preliminary analysis of the engine was performed using AVL's Boost program. The fuel consumption of the complete vehicle, equipped with a conventional cooling plant, was determined on standard cycles and compared with that of a vehicle equipped with a 'perfect' cooling system, to calculate the theoretical reduction in fuel consumption. - Highlights: → We propose a method for assessing the potential of smart engine thermal management. → A conventional cooling system is compared to a 'perfect' one to estimate fuel economy. → We tested the method in an upper-medium segment passenger car.

  4. Thermal Comfort Assessment-A Study Toward Workers’ Satisfaction in a Low Energy Office Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Nafiz Shaharon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The government of Malaysia has raised their concerns towards the issue of workers comfort and workspace quality in a Low Energy Office (LEO building. New energy efficient building concepts and technologies require a revision of comfort standards, to create a suitable thermal condition in avoiding occupant dissatisfaction, adverse effect on their productivity and overall building performance. Approach: Assessment was conducted using Babuc-A (Portable air quality monitor and sets of questionnaire adapted from ASHRAE-2004 were 99 respondents selected using a stratified random sampling. Results: This study shows that the thermal comfort zone temperature was identified to be within the range of 21.6-23.6°C and relative humidity of 42-54%. Conclusion: The results suggested that the thermal condition was in the acceptable range of ISO7730 and a lower room temperature was preferred by Malaysian in an office environment compared with the temperature criteria cited in ASHRAE-55. To create an optimum comfortable workplace, temperature between 20-26°C and relative humidity between 40-60% must be maintained. Adequate ventilation must be provided at the minimum rate of 10 l/s of fresh air per person for general office space or every 10 m2 of floor space.

  5. Applying an overall criterion according to the European norms, for ecological assessment of the thermal electrical power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work consists of assessing the thermal power plants impact on the environment by the global considering of the pollutant SO2 and NOx emissions. This assessment takes into account the emission comparisons with the admissible values provided by the European norms. The conclusion we might draw is that the SN proposed global criterion application, (S from sulfur, namely the sulfur dioxide and N from nitrogen, namely the nitrogen oxides), the investment expenses for installing the necessary SDN and SDS systems (were SDN stands for denox plant and SDS for desulfurization systems), and the operation expenses are smaller (in case of pit coal they are even smaller) if we apply such criterion. The ecologic analysis model we applied as an estimation for large solid fuels categories (lignite, pit coal) and for the 330 MW existing power units, can also be applied to the actual cases for different fuel qualities or unit unitary power levels

  6. CSNI Integral test facility validation matrix for the assessment of thermal-hydraulic codes for LWR LOCA and transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report deals with an internationally agreed integral test facility (ITF) matrix for the validation of best estimate thermal-hydraulic computer codes. Firstly, the main physical phenomena that occur during the considered accidents are identified, test types are specified, and test facilities suitable for reproducing these aspects are selected. Secondly, a life of selected experiments carried out in these facilities has been set down. The criteria to achieve the objectives are outlined. The construction of such a matrix is an attempt to collect together in a systematic way the best sets of openly available test data for code validation, assessment and improvement, including quantitative assessment of uncertainties in the modelling of phenomena by the codes. In addition to this objective, it is an attempt to record information which has been generated around the world over the last 20 years so that it is more accessible to present and future workers in that field than would otherwise be the case

  7. Radioactive contamination and health risk assessment due to burning of coal in thermal energy generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radon being a ubiquitous air pollutant has global impact and its monitoring in the environment at work places is essential from health and hygiene point of view. In thermal power plants, a lot of coal is burnt which contains radionuclides which are released into the environment and are hazardous. Radon is the main culprit in the local radioactive contamination of the environment due to burning of coal in thermal energy generation. It has been reported by several researchers (Nikl and Vegvari 1992, Bodizs et al. 1992) that the concentrations of the isotopes U 238 and Ra 226 become 3-5 times more than those in the coal itself in the coal slag and fly ash obtained by burning the coal in coal fired power plants. Several researchers have reported radon levels in thermal power plants (Bodizs et al. 1992, Rawat et al. 1991, Nikl and Vevgari 1992, Papastefanou and Charalanbous 1979, Kant et al. 2001). Keeping in view the environmental pollution caused due to the burning of coal in thermal power stations, there is an upsurge in the establishment of nuclear and gas turbine power stations in recent times. An increased share of gas and nuclear in power generation could lead to lower emissions. Also, considerable emphasis is being laid on developing non-polluting and renewable energy sources like water, air, solar energy and others. In this study, measurement of radon and its progeny levels was carried out over long integrated times in thermal power plant in Haryana by using LR-115, Type- II (Kodak Pathe, France), plastic track detectors commonly known as solid state nuclear track detectors (SS NTDs). Alpha particles emitted from radon cause radiation damage tracks, which were subsequently revealed by chemical etching in NaOH. These alpha tracks registered were counted by optical microscope at suitable magnification and converted into radon concentration. The findings indicate that it is very important to carry out these studies and the results of the full study will

  8. Thermal-hydraulic Analysis and Code Assessment for Reactor Vessel Upper-head Small Break LOCA using SPACE code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2002, the discovery of thinning of the vessel head wall at the Davis Besse nuclear power plant reactor indicated the possibility of an SBLOCA in the upper-head as a result of circumferential cracking of a Control Red Drive Mechanism (CRDM) penetration nozzle. Several experimental tests have been performed at the large scale test facility to simulate the behavior of a PWR during an upper-head SBLOCA. Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development Nuclear Energy Agency Rig of Safety Assessment (OECD/NEA ROSA) Test 6.1 was performed with a break size equivalent to 1.9% cold leg break. Additionally, analysis of an upper-head SBLOCA with high pressure safety injection failed in a Westinghouse PWR was examined taking into account different accident management actions and conditions in order to check the suitability. In this study, the thermal-hydraulic analysis was performed for postulated upper-head breaks in OPR 1000 (Optimized Power Reactor 1000 MWe) using SPACE (Safety and Performance Analysis Code for Nuclear Power Plants) code, which has been developed in recent years by the Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company (KHNP). The calculation results were compared with MARS-KS code to assess the capability of the SPACE code to simulate the transient thermal-hydraulic behavior. Inspections of existing nuclear power plants have pointed out the possibility of small break loss of coolant accidents (SBLOCAs) were initiated by a small break located in the upper-head of the reactor pressure vessel. The thermal-hydraulic analysis was performed for postulated upper-head breaks in OPR 1000 plant using SPACE (Safety and Performance Analysis Code for Nuclear Power Plants) code, which has been developed in recent years by the Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company (KHNP). The calculation results were compared with MARS-KS code to assess the capability of the SPACE code to simulate the transient thermal-hydraulic behavior. The prediction showed good agreement with the MARS

  9. Thermal-hydraulic Analysis and Code Assessment for Reactor Vessel Upper-head Small Break LOCA using SPACE code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Minhee; Kim, Seyun [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In 2002, the discovery of thinning of the vessel head wall at the Davis Besse nuclear power plant reactor indicated the possibility of an SBLOCA in the upper-head as a result of circumferential cracking of a Control Red Drive Mechanism (CRDM) penetration nozzle. Several experimental tests have been performed at the large scale test facility to simulate the behavior of a PWR during an upper-head SBLOCA. Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development Nuclear Energy Agency Rig of Safety Assessment (OECD/NEA ROSA) Test 6.1 was performed with a break size equivalent to 1.9% cold leg break. Additionally, analysis of an upper-head SBLOCA with high pressure safety injection failed in a Westinghouse PWR was examined taking into account different accident management actions and conditions in order to check the suitability. In this study, the thermal-hydraulic analysis was performed for postulated upper-head breaks in OPR 1000 (Optimized Power Reactor 1000 MWe) using SPACE (Safety and Performance Analysis Code for Nuclear Power Plants) code, which has been developed in recent years by the Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company (KHNP). The calculation results were compared with MARS-KS code to assess the capability of the SPACE code to simulate the transient thermal-hydraulic behavior. Inspections of existing nuclear power plants have pointed out the possibility of small break loss of coolant accidents (SBLOCAs) were initiated by a small break located in the upper-head of the reactor pressure vessel. The thermal-hydraulic analysis was performed for postulated upper-head breaks in OPR 1000 plant using SPACE (Safety and Performance Analysis Code for Nuclear Power Plants) code, which has been developed in recent years by the Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company (KHNP). The calculation results were compared with MARS-KS code to assess the capability of the SPACE code to simulate the transient thermal-hydraulic behavior. The prediction showed good agreement with the MARS

  10. Topics on continua

    CERN Document Server

    Macias, Sergio

    2005-01-01

    Specialized as it might be, continuum theory is one of the most intriguing areas in mathematics. However, despite being popular journal fare, few books have thoroughly explored this interesting aspect of topology. In Topics on Continua, Sergio Macías, one of the field's leading scholars, presents four of his favorite continuum topics: inverse limits, Jones's set function T, homogenous continua, and n-fold hyperspaces, and in doing so, presents the most complete set of theorems and proofs ever contained in a single topology volume. Many of the results presented have previously appeared only in research papers, and some appear here for the first time. After building the requisite background and exploring the inverse limits of continua, the discussions focus on Professor Jones''s set function T and continua for which T is continuous. An introduction to topological groups and group actions lead to a proof of Effros''s Theorem, followed by a presentation of two decomposition theorems. The author then offers an...

  11. Steam generation in line-focus solar collectors: A comparative assessment of thermal performance, operating stability and cost issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, L. M.; May, E. K.

    1982-04-01

    The engineering and system benefits of using direct steam (in situ) generation in line-focus collectors are assessed. The major emphasis of the analysis is a detailed thermal performance comparison of in situ systems (which utilize unfired boilers). The analysis model developed for this study is discussed in detail. An analysis of potential flow stability problems is also provided along with a cursory cost analysis and an assessment of freeze protection, safety, and control issues. Results indicated a significant thermal performance advantage over the more conventional oil and flash systems and the flow stability does not appear to be a significant problem. In particular, at steam temperatures of 220 C (430 F) under the chosen set of assumptions, annual delivered energy predictions indicate that the in situ system can deliver 15% more energy than an oil system and 12% more energy than flash system, with all of the systems using the same collector field. Further, the in situ system may result in a 10% capital cost reduction.

  12. Assessment of thermal-hydraulic regulatory auditing codes for the UPTF downcomer injection test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Young Seok; Shin, A. D.; Jung, J. W.; Seul, K. W.; Lee, J. I

    2001-02-15

    In the Korean Next Generation Reactors (KNGR) which has been developed under the purpose of the enhancement of safety and the improvement of economy in design and operation, it is the most important to evaluate the plant thermal-hydraulic behavior with Direct Vessel Injection (DVI) of Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) during the Loss-of-Coolant-Accident (LOCA) and to confirm the adequate core cooling capability based on those evaluations. In this study, the capabilities of the codes, TRAC and RELAP5, were evaluated, which will be used in the independent auditing calculation of the LBLOCA of KNGR. Especially Test 21A which was the full-scale test and simulated the complex steam-water interaction during the refill phase of LBLOCA was calculated. The major thermal-hydraulic phenomena were identified by the peer review on the facility design and test data and the input was prepared by modeling effort. The obtained result are as follows: The current TRAC and RELAP5 codes could predict, in qualitative way, the major thermal-hydraulic phenomena such as ECCS bypass and lower plenum delivery which was measured in the UPTF Test 21A. However, there are still some of the areas to be improved for the code accuracy. Predicting a longer condensation in the downcomer than the experiment was believed as the TRAC code inaccuracy while the overprediction of the interfacial drag in the downcomer steam upflow as the RELAP5 one. Both codes were found to have conservative prediction of the ECC bypass and lower plenum refill during LBLOCA under DVI condition, in spite of such an inaccuracy of those codes.

  13. Assessing the impact of primary measures for NOx reduction on the thermal power plant steam boiler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European normatives prescribe content of 200 mg/Nm3 NOx for pulverized coal combusting power plants. In order to reduce content of NOx in Serbian thermal power plant (TPP) 'Kostolac B' it's necessary to implement particular measures until 2016. The mathematical model of lignite combustion in the steam boiler furnace is defined and applied to analyze the possibility of implementing certain primary measures for reducing nitrogen oxides and their effects on the steam boiler operation. This model includes processes in the coal-fired furnace and defines radiating reactive two-phase turbulent flow. The model of turbulent flow also contains sub-model of fuel and thermal NOx formation and destruction. This complex mathematical model is related to thermal and aerodynamic calculations of the steam boiler within a unified calculation system in order to analyze the steam boiler overall work. This system provides calculations with a number of influential parameters. The steam boiler calculations for unit 1 (350 MWe) of TPP 'Kostolac B' are implemented for existing and modified combustion system in order to achieve effective, reliable and ecological facility work. The paper presents the influence analysis of large number of parameters on the steam boiler operation with an accepted concept of primary measures. Presented system of calculations is verified against measurements in TPP 'Kostolac B'. - Highlights: • Modern steam boilers need to operate according to ecological standards. • Possibility of applying some of the primary measures of NOx reduction. • Conventional calculations have no possibility to estimate sub-stoichiometric combustion. • Develop a new method of connecting the calculations. • Analysis shows the most favorable operation boiler regime (efficiency and ecology)

  14. Contribution to the assessment of thermal ageing of stainless steel castings and welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indentation tests are considered for measuring and verifying of thermal ageing of stainless steel castings and welds in service. Therefore, relations between indentation- and tensile diagrams were analyzed. Conventional tensile characteristics, deduced from the indentation diagram, should be used for fracture toughness prediction. Form of correlation of yield stress and tensile strength on one side and of fracture toughness on the other side was proposed, which is specific for austenitic-ferritic two-phase materials. Properties of castings and welds were compared and analyzed within the framework of a mesomechanical homogenization model with micromechanical effect of geometric slip distance. (author)

  15. Experimental and numerical assessment of thermal fatigue in 316 austenitic steel pipes

    OpenAIRE

    PAFFUMI Elena; Nilsson, Karl-Fredrik; Szaraz, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental and numerical investigation of thermal fatigue of 316L steel pipe components with 14 mm wall thickness heated by induction to 300–550 °C on the outer surface and cyclically cooled internally with room temperature water. The damage is initiated as network of surface cracks where some cracks become dominant. At 550 °C the pipe fails after typically 50,000 cycles whereas at 300 °C the deepest cracks have only penetrated half the thickness after 250,000 cycles....

  16. Performance assessment of OTEC power systems and thermal power plants, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidenfrost, W.; Liley, P. E.; McDonald, A. T.; Mudawwar, I.; Pearson, J. T.

    1985-05-01

    The focus of this report is on closed-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power systems under research at Purdue University. The working operations of an OTEC power plant are briefly discussed. Methods of improving the performance of OTEC power systems are presented. Brief discussions on the methods of heat exchanger analysis and design are provided, as are the thermophysical properties of the working fluids and seawater. An interactive code capable of analyzing OTEC power system performance is included for use with an IBM personal computer.

  17. Topical Acne Treatments and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topical Acne Treatments and Pregnancy In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having ... This sheet talks about whether exposure to topical acne treatments may increase the risk for birth defects ...

  18. Low temperature thermal ageing embrittlement of austenitic stainless steel welds and its electrochemical assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Embrittlement study of austenitic stainless steel welds after ageing up to 20,000 h. ► Spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation in ferrite at 400 °C. ► Spinodal decomposition of ferrite at 335 and 365 °C. ► Large decrease in corrosion resistance due to G-phase precipitation. ► Good correlation between electrochemical properties and the degree of embrittlement. - Abstract: The low temperature thermal ageing embrittlement of austenitic stainless steel welds is investigated after ageing up to 20,000 h at 335, 365 and 400 °C. Spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation after thermal ageing were identified by transmission electron microscopy. Ageing led to increase in hardness of the ferrite phase while there was no change in the hardness of austenite. The degree of embrittlement was evaluated by non-destructive methods, e.g., double-loop and single-loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation tests. A good correlation was obtained between the electrochemical properties and hardening of the ferrite phase of the aged materials.

  19. Risk assessment of topically applied products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søborg, Tue; Basse, Line Hollesen; Halling-Sørensen, Bent

    2007-01-01

    as model compounds. Tolerable daily intake (TDI) values have been established for BADGE and derivatives. Endocrine disruption was chosen as endpoint for 3-BC and 4-MBC. Skin permeation of the model compounds was investigated in vitro using pig skin membranes. Tape stripping was applied to simulate broken...... skin associated with various skin disorders. BADGE and derivatives had a tendency to permeate pig skin membranes in vitro with higher fluxes in the tape stripped membranes compared to the non-treated membranes. Data from the in vitro skin permeation study and from the literature were used as input....... Both UV filters are endocrine disrupting compounds with 3-BC being the more potent. UV filters in sunscreen are often present in high concentrations, which potentially may lead to high systemic exposure dosages. Thus, the risk associated with use of 3-BC and 4-MBC containing sunscreen with regards...

  20. Nevada Test Site Wetlands Assessment; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report identifies 16 Nevada Test Site (NTS) natural water sources that may be classified by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) as jurisdictional wetlands and identifies eight water sources that may be classified as waters of the United States. These water sources are rare, localized habitats on the NTS that are important to regional wildlife and to isolated populations of water tolerant plants and aquatic organisms. No field investigations on the NTS have been conducted in the past to identify those natural water sources which would be protected as rare habitats and which may fall under regulatory authority of the Clean Water Act (CWA) of 1997. This report identifies and summarizes previous studies of NTS natural water sources, and identifies the current DOE management practices related to the protection of NTS wetlands. This report also presents management goals specific for NTS wetlands that incorporate the intent of existing wetlands legislation, the principles of ecosystem management, and the interests of regional land managers and other stakeholders

  1. Urban Wood Waste Resource Assessment; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study collected and analyzed data on urban wood waste resources in 30 randomly selected metropolitan areas in the United States. Three major categories wood wastes disposed with, or recovered from, the municipal solid waste stream; industrial wood wastes such as wood scraps and sawdust from pallet recycling, woodworking shops, and lumberyards; and wood in construction/demolition and land clearing debris

  2. Topics in atomic physics

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhardt, Charles E

    2006-01-01

    The study of atomic physics propelled us into the quantum age in the early twentieth century and carried us into the twenty-first century with a wealth of new and, in some cases, unexplained phenomena. Topics in Atomic Physics provides a foundation for students to begin research in modern atomic physics. It can also serve as a reference because it contains material that is not easily located in other sources. A distinguishing feature is the thorough exposition of the quantum mechanical hydrogen atom using both the traditional formulation and an alternative treatment not usually found in textbooks. The alternative treatment exploits the preeminent nature of the pure Coulomb potential and places the Lenz vector operator on an equal footing with other operators corresponding to classically conserved quantities. A number of difficult to find proofs and derivations are included as is development of operator formalism that permits facile solution of the Stark effect in hydrogen. Discussion of the classical hydrogen...

  3. Pressurized thermal shock in nuclear power plants: Good practices for assessment. Deterministic evaluation for the integrity of reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starting in the early 1970s, a series of coordinated research projects (CRPs) was sponsored by the IAEA focusing on the effects of neutron radiation on reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels and RPV integrity. In conjunction with these CRPs, many consultants meetings, specialists meetings, and international conferences, dating back to the mid-1960s, were held. Individual studies on the basic phenomena of radiation hardening and embrittlement were also performed to better understand increases in tensile strength and shifts to higher temperatures for the integrity of the RPV. The overall objective of this CRP was to perform benchmark deterministic calculations of a typical pressurized thermal shock (PTS) regime, with the aim of comparing the effects of individual parameters on the final RPV integrity assessment, and then to recommend the best practices for their implementation in PTS procedures. At present, several different procedures and approaches are used for RPV integrity assessment for both WWER 440-230 reactors and pressurized water reactors (PWRs). These differences in procedures and approaches are based, in principle, on the different codes and rules used for design and manufacturing, and the different materials used for the various types of reactor, and the different levels of implementation of recent developments in fracture mechanics. Benchmark calculations were performed to improve user qualification and to reduce the user effect on the results of the analysis. This addressed generic PWR and WWER types of RPV, as well as sensitivity analyses. The complementary sensitivity analyses showed that the following factors significantly influenced the assessment: flaw size, shape, location and orientation, thermal hydraulic assumptions and material toughness. Applying national codes and procedures to the benchmark cases produced significantly different results in terms of allowable material toughness. This was mainly related to the safety factors used and the

  4. Development of creep damage assessment system for aged thermal power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nonaka, Isamu [IshikawaJima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Umaki, Hideo [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Nishida, Hidetalca [The Chugoku Electric Power Co., Inc., Hiroshima (Japan); Yamaguchi, Hiroshi [The Chugoku Electric Power Co., Inc., Hiroshima (Japan)

    1998-12-31

    IHI has developed the Creep Damage Assessment System to identify voids by processing an image observed by a small laser microscope with an advanced image processing technique jointly with Chugoku Electric Power Co., Inc. The result can be obtained immediately on the spot. Application tests of the system at the Unit No.3 boiler of the Kudamatsu Power Station showed good operability, adaptability to the environment, and accuracy. The new system can easily indicate damage conditions in parts during the periodical inspection, allowing rapid maintenance. Time reduction required for assessment and increased reliability of equipment can be also achieved. (orig.)

  5. Prospects for the establishment of plutonium recycle in thermal reactors in the Foratom countries. Status and assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper reviews the technical status of plutonium recycle in thermal reactors in the Foratom countries and assesses the prospect for it becoming established in the future with the implicit assumptions that uranium oxide reprocessing capacity will be installed commensurate with the projected programmes for thermal reactor installation and that there will be no insuperable environmental, security or safeguards obstacles to the use of plutonium as a fuel. It is argued that the feasibility of using plutonium as an alternative to 235U as the fuel for thermal reactors, particularly LWRs, has been extensively demonstrated by a number of Foratom countries and the main problem areas are fuel fabrication and fuel reprocessing. Mixed-oxide fuel fabrication has been well established on the prototype plant scale using low-irradiation plutonium, but it is recognized that the future design of production-scale plants will need to cater for the significantly higher radiation levels from high burnup plutonium and meet stricter environmental requirements on operator dosage and waste arisings. The main constraint on the establishment of recycle up to now has been the lack of available plutonium owing to the absence of significant uranium-oxide fuel reprocessing capacity. An assessment of the plutonium arisings in Europe, based on the projected uranium-oxide reprocessing capacity, shows that by 1990 plutonium, surplus to FBR requirements, should be accumulating by about 10t/a, sufficient to fuel about 8000MW(e) of LWRs. A further constraint would then be the availability and technical problems of mixed-oxide reprocessing, which is one of the areas identified for international collaboration. It is concluded that whilst there is unlikely to be substantial recycle of plutonium in thermal reactors in the Foratom countries before the early 1990s, an incentive could possibly arise about that time. The strength of this incentive will depend on a number of factors including the status of the

  6. Thermal analysis on parchments I: DSC and TGA combined approach for heat damage assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fessas, D.; Signorelli, M.; Schiraldi, A.; Kennedy, C.J.; Wess, T.J.; Hassel, B.; Nielsen, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    Ancient, new and artificially aged parchments were investigated with both differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TGA). Criteria to define a quantitative ranking of the damage experienced by the bulk collagen of historical parchments were assessed. A damage-related correlation...

  7. Design analysis and risk assessment for a single stage to orbit nuclear thermal rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labib, Satira I.

    Recent advances in high power density fuel materials have renewed interest in nuclear thermal rockets (NTRs) as a viable propulsion technology for future space exploration. This thesis describes the design of three NTR reactor engines designed for the single stage to orbit launch of payloads from 1-15 metric tons. Thermal hydraulic and rocket engine analyses indicate that the proposed rocket engines are able to reach specific impulses in excess of 700 seconds. Neutronics analyses performed using MCNP5 demonstrate that the hot excess reactivity, shutdown margin, and submersion criticality requirements are satisfied for each NTR reactor. The reactors each consist of a 40 cm diameter core packed with hexagonal tungsten cermet fuel elements. The core is surrounded by radial and axial beryllium reflectors and eight boron carbide control drums. At the same power level, the 40 cm reactor results in the lowest radiation dose rate of the three reactors. Radiation dose rates decrease to background levels ~3.5 km from the launch site. After a one-year decay time, all of the activated materials produced by an NTR launch would be classified as Class A low-level waste. The activation of air produces significant amounts of argon-41 and nitrogen-16 within 100 m of the launch. The derived air concentration, DAC, from the activation products decays to less than unity within two days, with only argon-41 remaining. After 10 minutes of full power operation the 120 cm core corresponding to a 15 MT payload contains 2.5 x 1013, 1.4 x 1012, 1.5 x 1012, and 7.8 x 10 7 Bq of 131I, 137Cs, 90Sr, and 239Pu respectively. The decay heat after shutdown increases with increasing reactor power with a maximum decay heat of 108 kW immediately after shutdown for the 15 MT payload.

  8. Methodology to assess plant thermal-hydraulic behavior during transients and accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety evaluation approach proposed is based on strict criteria regarding fuel and thermohydraulics. Models used in the assessment are based on separate effect tests using large rigs. Computer codes have been developed incorporating the models - for transients, LOCA and containment. System tests have been conducted to validate the code system. The codes are used to investigate accident management of LWRs. The report is in a poster form. 20 figs

  9. Assessment of properties thermal sprayed coatings realised using cermet blend powder

    OpenAIRE

    Brezinová, J.; A. Guzanová; Spišák, E.

    2014-01-01

    The article deals with the assessment of selected properties of plasma sprayed coatings based on ZrSiO4 doped with different volume fractions of metal dopant (Ni). Mixed powders are cermet blends. Aim of the work consists of verificating the possibility to replace the application of Ni interlayer by adding Ni directly to the ceramic powder and apply them together in a single technological operation. The coatings were studied from point of view of their structure, porosity, adhesion of the coa...

  10. Post-Flight Assessment of Avcoat Thermal Protection System for the Exploration Flight Test-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Deepak; Santos, Jose; Rodriguez, Erika; Mahzari, Milad; Remark, Brian; Muppidi, Suman

    2016-01-01

    On December 5, 2014 NASA conducted the first flight test of its next generation human-class Orion spacecraft. The flight was called the Exploration Flight Test -1 (EFT-1) which lasted for 4 hours and culminated into a re-entry trajectory at 9 km/s. This flight test of the 5-meter Orion Crew Module demonstrated various sub-systems including the Avcoat ablative thermal protection system (TPS) on the heat shield. The Avcoat TPS had been developed from the Apollo-era recipe with a few key modifications. The engineering for thermal sizing was supported by modeling, analysis, and ground tests in arc jet facilities. This paper will describe a postlfight analysis plan and present results from post-recovery inspections, data analysis from embedded sensors, TPS sample extraction and characterization in the laboratory. After the recovery of the vehicle, a full photographic survey and surface scans of the TPS were performed. The recovered vehicle showed physical evidence of flow disturbances, varying degrees of surface roughness, and excessive recession downstream of compression pads. The TPS recession was measured at more than 200 locations of interest on the Avcoat surface. The heat shield was then processed for sample extraction prior to TPS removal using the 7-Axis Milling machine at Marshall Space Flight Center. Around 182 rectangular TPS samples were extracted for subsequent analysis and investigation. The final paper will also present results of sample analysis. The planned investigation includes sidewall imaging, followed by image analysis to characterize TPS response by quantifying different layers in the char and pyrolysis zones. A full postmortem of the instrumentation and sensor ports will also be performed to confirm no adverse effects due to the sensors themselves. A subset of the samples will undergo structural testing and perform detailed characterization of any cracks and integrity of gore seams. Finally, the material will be characterized with layer

  11. Initial risk assessment for a single stage to orbit nuclear thermal rocket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labib, Satira, E-mail: Satira.Labib@duke-energy.com; King, Jeffrey, E-mail: kingjc@mines.edu

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • The risks posed by the surface launch of a nuclear thermal rocket are considered. • Radiation exposure at the public viewing distance is insignificant. • Production of fission products and actinides during launch is limited. • The production of activated argon around the rocket may be a significant concern. - Abstract: In order to consider the possibility of a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) ground launch, it is necessary to evaluate the risks from such a launch. This includes analysis of the radiation dose rate around the rocket, determining the rate of activation of the materials near the launch, and considering the radionuclides present in the core after the launch. This paper evaluates the potential risk of the NTR ground launch for a range of payloads from 1 to 15 metric tons (MT) using three NTR reactor cores (40, 80, and 120 cm in length) designed in a previous study, based on data produced by MCNP5 and MCNPX models. At the same power level, the 40 cm core length reactor results in the lowest radiation dose rate of the three reactors. Radiation dose rates decrease to background levels 3.5 km from the launch site. After a 1-year decay time, all of the activated materials produced by an NTR launch would be classified as Class A low-level waste. The activation of air produces significant amounts of argon-41 and nitrogen-16 within 100 m of the launch. The derived air concentration (DAC) ratio of the activation products decays to less than unity within 2 days, with only argon-41 remaining. After 10 min of full power operation, the 120 cm core for a 15 MT payload contains 2.5 × 10{sup 13}, 1.4 × 10{sup 12} and 1.5 × 10{sup 12} Bq of {sup 131}I, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 90}Sr, respectively. The decay heat after shutdown increases with increasing reactor power with a maximum decay heat of 108 kW immediately after shutdown for the 15 MT payload.

  12. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Coupled Processes in Safety Assessments. Report of Task 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A part (Task 4) of the International DECOVALEX III project on coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (T-H-M) processes focuses on T-H-M modelling applications in safety and performance assessment of deep geological nuclear waste repositories. A previous phase, DECOVALEX II, saw a need to improve such modelling. In order to address this need Task 4 of DECOVALEX III has: Analysed two major T-H-M experiments (Task 1 and Task 2) and three different Bench Mark Tests (Task 3) set-up to explore the significance of T-H-M in some potentially important safety assessment applications. Compiled and evaluated the use of T-H-M modelling in safety assessments at the time of the year 2000. Organised a forum a forum of interchange between PA-analysts and THM modelers at each DECOVALEX III workshop. Based on this information the current report discusses the findings and strives for reaching recommendations as regards good practices in addressing coupled T-H-M issues in safety assessments. The full development of T-H-M modelling is still at an early stage and it is not evident whether current codes provide the information that is required. However, although the geosphere is a system of fully coupled processes, this does not directly imply that all existing coupled mechanisms must be represented numerically. Modelling is conducted for specific purposes and the required confidence level should be considered. It is necessary to match the confidence level with the modelling objective. Coupled THM modelling has to incorporate uncertainties. These uncertainties mainly concern uncertainties in the conceptual model and uncertainty in data. Assessing data uncertainty is important when judging the need to model coupled processes. Often data uncertainty is more significant than the coupled effects. The emphasis on the need for THM modelling differs among disciplines. For geological radioactive waste disposal in crystalline and other similar hard rock formations DECOVALEX III shows it is essential to

  13. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Coupled Processes in Safety Assessments. Report of Task 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Johan [JA Streamflow AB, Aelvsjoe (Sweden)

    2005-02-15

    A part (Task 4) of the International DECOVALEX III project on coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (T-H-M) processes focuses on T-H-M modelling applications in safety and performance assessment of deep geological nuclear waste repositories. A previous phase, DECOVALEX II, saw a need to improve such modelling. In order to address this need Task 4 of DECOVALEX III has: Analysed two major T-H-M experiments (Task 1 and Task 2) and three different Bench Mark Tests (Task 3) set-up to explore the significance of T-H-M in some potentially important safety assessment applications. Compiled and evaluated the use of T-H-M modelling in safety assessments at the time of the year 2000. Organised a forum a forum of interchange between PA-analysts and THM modelers at each DECOVALEX III workshop. Based on this information the current report discusses the findings and strives for reaching recommendations as regards good practices in addressing coupled T-H-M issues in safety assessments. The full development of T-H-M modelling is still at an early stage and it is not evident whether current codes provide the information that is required. However, although the geosphere is a system of fully coupled processes, this does not directly imply that all existing coupled mechanisms must be represented numerically. Modelling is conducted for specific purposes and the required confidence level should be considered. It is necessary to match the confidence level with the modelling objective. Coupled THM modelling has to incorporate uncertainties. These uncertainties mainly concern uncertainties in the conceptual model and uncertainty in data. Assessing data uncertainty is important when judging the need to model coupled processes. Often data uncertainty is more significant than the coupled effects. The emphasis on the need for THM modelling differs among disciplines. For geological radioactive waste disposal in crystalline and other similar hard rock formations DECOVALEX III shows it is essential to

  14. Topics in statistical mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elser, V.

    1984-05-01

    This thesis deals with four independent topics in statistical mechanics: (1) the dimer problem is solved exactly for a hexagonal lattice with general boundary using a known generating function from the theory of partitions. It is shown that the leading term in the entropy depends on the shape of the boundary; (2) continuum models of percolation and self-avoiding walks are introduced with the property that their series expansions are sums over linear graphs with intrinsic combinatorial weights and explicit dimension dependence; (3) a constrained SOS model is used to describe the edge of a simple cubic crystal. Low and high temperature results are derived as well as the detailed behavior near the crystal facet; (4) the microscopic model of the lambda-transition involving atomic permutation cycles is reexamined. In particular, a new derivation of the two-component field theory model of the critical behavior is presented. Results for a lattice model originally proposed by Kikuchi are extended with a high temperature series expansion and Monte Carlo simulation. 30 references.

  15. Topics in statistical mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis deals with four independent topics in statistical mechanics: (1) the dimer problem is solved exactly for a hexagonal lattice with general boundary using a known generating function from the theory of partitions. It is shown that the leading term in the entropy depends on the shape of the boundary; (2) continuum models of percolation and self-avoiding walks are introduced with the property that their series expansions are sums over linear graphs with intrinsic combinatorial weights and explicit dimension dependence; (3) a constrained SOS model is used to describe the edge of a simple cubic crystal. Low and high temperature results are derived as well as the detailed behavior near the crystal facet; (4) the microscopic model of the lambda-transition involving atomic permutation cycles is reexamined. In particular, a new derivation of the two-component field theory model of the critical behavior is presented. Results for a lattice model originally proposed by Kikuchi are extended with a high temperature series expansion and Monte Carlo simulation. 30 references

  16. Superconcentration and related topics

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Sourav

    2014-01-01

    A certain curious feature of random objects, introduced by the author as “super concentration,” and two related topics, “chaos” and “multiple valleys,” are highlighted in this book. Although super concentration has established itself as a recognized feature in a number of areas of probability theory in the last twenty years (under a variety of names), the author was the first to discover and explore its connections with chaos and multiple valleys. He achieves a substantial degree of simplification and clarity in the presentation of these findings by using the spectral approach. Understanding the fluctuations of random objects is one of the major goals of probability theory and a whole subfield of probability and analysis, called concentration of measure, is devoted to understanding these fluctuations. This subfield offers a range of tools for computing upper bounds on the orders of fluctuations of very complicated random variables. Usually, concentration of measure is useful when more direct prob...

  17. Advanced verification topics

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Bishnupriya; Hall, Gary; Heaton, Nick; Kashai, Yaron; Khan Neyaz; Kirshenbaum, Zeev; Shneydor, Efrat

    2011-01-01

    The Accellera Universal Verification Methodology (UVM) standard is architected to scale, but verification is growing and in more than just the digital design dimension. It is growing in the SoC dimension to include low-power and mixed-signal and the system integration dimension to include multi-language support and acceleration. These items and others all contribute to the quality of the SOC so the Metric-Driven Verification (MDV) methodology is needed to unify it all into a coherent verification plan. This book is for verification engineers and managers familiar with the UVM and the benefits it brings to digital verification but who also need to tackle specialized tasks. It is also written for the SoC project manager that is tasked with building an efficient worldwide team. While the task continues to become more complex, Advanced Verification Topics describes methodologies outside of the Accellera UVM standard, but that build on it, to provide a way for SoC teams to stay productive and profitable.

  18. Environmental Sensitivity in Nuclear Emergencies in Rural and Semi-natural Environments. Report of Working Group 8, Environmental Sensitivity of EMRAS II Topical Heading Approaches for Assessing Emergency Situations. Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II) Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental assessment models are used for evaluating the radiological impact of actual and potential releases of radionuclides to the environment. They are essential tools for use in the regulatory control of routine discharges to the environment and also in planning measures to be taken in the event of accidental releases. They are also used for predicting the impact of releases which may occur far into the future, for example, from underground radioactive waste repositories. It is important to verify, to the extent possible, the reliability of the predictions of such models by comparison with measured values in the environment or by comparing them with the predictions of other models. The IAEA has been organizing programmes of international model testing since the 1980s. The programmes have contributed to a general improvement in models, in transfer data and in the capabilities of modellers in Member States. IAEA publications on this subject over the past three decades demonstrate the comprehensive nature of the programmes and record the associated advances which have been made. From 2009 to 2011, the IAEA organized a programme entitled Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II), which concentrated on the improvement of environmental transfer models and the development of reference approaches to estimate the radiological impacts on humans, as well as on flora and fauna, arising from radionuclides in the environment. The following topics were addressed in nine working groups: Reference Approaches for Human Dose Assessment - Working Group 1: Reference Methodologies for Controlling Discharges of Routine Releases; - Working Group 2: Reference Approaches to Modelling for Management and Remediation at NORM and Legacy Sites; - Working Group 3: Reference Models for Waste Disposal Reference Approaches for Biota Dose Assessment; - Working Group 4: Biota Modelling; - Working Group 5: Wildlife Transfer Coefficient Handbook; - Working Group 6: Biota Dose

  19. Combined Use of Neutron Thermalization and Electromagnetic Sensing in Assessing Soil Water Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agriculture is by far the largest consumer of available fresh water accounting for 70% of withdrawals worldwide. Meeting increased future demands for food and fibre will, by and large, need to be met by improving the efficient use of both irrigation and precipitation for crop production (FAO, 2002). Field research aimed at evaluating the efficiency of water use by crops invariably requires monitoring changes in soil water with time (e.g. Ibragimov et al., 2011). Such monitoring integrates the irrigation, precipitation, evapotranspiration and deep drainage history that affects the aggregate response of the system, which is manifested as soil water storage. These dynamic processes are important in evaluating the efficiency with which crop cultivars, irrigation strategies, cropping and tillage systems utilize available soil water for grain and biomass production. The neutron probe has been particularly effective in estimating soil water content because of its large measurement volume and linear response to changes in soil water (Hignett and Evett, 2002). However, neutron thermalization techniques suffer from poor spatial resolution which is problematic near the surface where there are steep soil water content gradients. Data acquisition at sub-daily intervals using the neutron probe is also impractical and restricts measurements to temporal resolutions that are unable to capture highly dynamic hydrological processes. When properly calibrated, automated soil water monitoring with proven electromagnetic (EM) sensors can facilitate measurements at short time scales associated with infiltration and evaporation processes near the surface.

  20. Computational models for thermal-hydraulic assessment of TADSEA and its use for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Transmutation Advanced Device for Sustainable Energy Applications (TADSEA) is a pebble-bed Accelerator Driven System (ADS) with a graphite-gas configuration, designed for nuclear waste transmutation and for obtaining heat at very high temperatures to produce hydrogen. In previous work, the TADSEA's nuclear core was considered as a porous medium performed with a CFD code and thermal-hydraulic studies of the nuclear core were presented. In this paper, three critical fuel elements groups were defined regarding their position inside the core. In this article, the heat transfer from the fuel to the coolant was analyzed for the three core states during normal operation. The heat transfer inside the spherical fuel elements was also studied with a realistic CFD model of the critical elements groups. During the steady state, no critical elements reached the limit temperature of this type of fuel. Also, it is presented a model built in ANSYS for the simulation and optimization of high- temperature electrolysis using the TADSEA as a heat source. A flow diagram of the electrolysis process with the high temperature electrolyzer as the main component using TADSEA as an energy source is finally proposed and discussed. (Author)

  1. Assessment of the reliability of thermal-hydraulic and neutronics parameters of Ghana research reactor-1 control systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal-hydraulics and neutronics parameters of GHARR-1 control systems were assessed for its reliability after 18 years of operation using the Micro-Computer Closed Loop System (MCCLS) and original control Console (CC). The MCCLS and some components that control the sensitivity and the reading mechanism of the meters on the control systems have been replaced with new ones over the years, due to ageing, repairs and obsolescence. The results show that when reactor is operated at the different power levels the preset neutron fluxes at the control systems is 1.6 times the neutron fluxes obtained using a flux monitor at the inner irradiation site two of the reactor. The average percentage of deviation of fluxes from the actual preset was 36.5% which compares very well with the reactivity decrease of 36.3% after operating the reactor at critical neutron flux of 1.0 × 109n/cm2s. The reactivity regulators were adjusted to increase the core reactivity to 4 mk and the reactor operated at 15kW. The preset neutron flux at the control systems reduced to 1.07 times the Neutron fluxes obtained using a flux monitor at the inner irradiation site 2 of the reactor. The performance of the current micro - amplifiers in the two independent control instrumentations was assessed at an input current of 10µA. The results showed that the flux registered on both the CC and MCCLS varied by a factor of 1.2. The correlation between neutron flux and power, as well as temperature and power at transient state produced almost the same thermal power at about 20% above the rating power of 30 kW but deviated at lower and higher power ratings. The dynamic test through positive reactivity insertion, demonstrate or confirm the inherent safety of the reactor. (au)

  2. Damodar Valley Corporation, Chandrapura Unit 2 Thermal Power Station Residual Life Assessment Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    The BHEL/NTPC/PFC/TVA teams assembled at the DVC`s Chadrapura station on July 19, 1994, to assess the remaining life of Unit 2. The workscope was expanded to include major plant systems that impact the unit`s ability to sustain generation at 140 MW (Units 1-3 have operated at average rating of about 90 MW). Assessment was completed Aug. 19, 1994. Boiler pressure parts are in excellent condition except for damage to primary superheater header/stub tubes and economizer inlet header stub tubes. The turbine steam path is in good condition except for damage to LP blading; the spar rotor steam path is in better condition and is recommended for Unit 2. Nozzle box struts are severely cracked from the flame outs; the cracks should not be repaired. HP/IP rotor has surface cracks at several places along the steam seal areas; these cracks are shallow and should be machined out. Detailed component damage assessments for above damaged components have been done. The turbine auxiliary systems have been evaluated; cooling tower fouling/blockage is the root cause for the high turbine back pressure. The fuel processing system is one of the primary root causes for limiting unit capacity. The main steam and hot reheat piping systems were conservatively designed and have at least 30 years left;deficiencies needing resolution include restoration of insulation, replacement of 6 deformed hanger clamp/bolts, and adjustment of a few hanger settings. The cold reheat piping system is generally in good condition; some areas should be re-insulated and the rigid support clamps/bolts should be examined. The turbine extraction piping system supports all appeared to be functioning normally.

  3. Assessment of the PIUS physics and thermal-hydraulic experimental data bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PIUS reactor utilizes simplified, inherent, passive, or other innovative means to accomplish safety functions. Accordingly, the PIUS reactor is subject to the requirements of 10CFR52.47(b)(2)(i)(A). This regulation requires that the applicant adequately demonstrate the performance of each safety feature, interdependent effects among the safety features, and a sufficient data base on the safety features of the design to assess the analytical tools used for safety analysis. Los Alamos has assessed the quality and completeness of the existing and planned data bases used by Asea Brown Boveri to validate its safety analysis codes and other relevant data bases. Only a limited data base of separate effect and integral tests exist at present. This data base is not adequate to fulfill the requirements of 10CFR52.47(b)(2)(i)(A). Asea Brown Boveri has stated that it plans to conduct more separate effect and integral test programs. If appropriately designed and conducted, these test programs have the potential to satisfy most of the data base requirements of 10CFR52.47(b)(2)(i)(A) and remedy most of the deficiencies of the currently existing combined data base. However, the most important physical processes in PIUS are related to reactor shutdown because the PIUS reactor does not contain rodded shutdown and control systems. For safety-related reactor shutdown, PIUS relies on negative reactivity insertions from the moderator temperature coefficient and from boron entering the core from the reactor pool. Asea Brown Boveri has neither developed a direct experimental data base for these important processes nor provided a rationale for indirect testing of these key PIUS processes. This is assessed as a significant shortcoming. In preparing the conclusions of this report, test documentation and results have been reviewed for only one integral test program, the small-scale integral tests conducted in the ATLE facility

  4. Developmental assessment of the multidimensional component in RELAP5 for Savannah River Site thermal hydraulic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents ten developmental assessment problems which were used to test the multidimensional component in RELAP5/MOD2.5, Version 3w. The problems chosen were a rigid body rotation problem, a pure radial symmetric flow problem, an r-θ symmetric flow problem, a fall problem, a rest problem, a basic one-dimensional flow test problem, a gravity wave problem, a tank draining problem, a flow through the center problem, and coverage analysis using PIXIE. The multidimensional code calculations are compared to analytical solutions and one-dimensional code calculations. The discussion section of each problem contains information relative to the code's ability to simulate these problems

  5. Assessment of properties thermal sprayed coatings realised using cermet blend powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brezinová

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the assessment of selected properties of plasma sprayed coatings based on ZrSiO4 doped with different volume fractions of metal dopant (Ni. Mixed powders are cermet blends. Aim of the work consists of verificating the possibility to replace the application of Ni interlayer by adding Ni directly to the ceramic powder and apply them together in a single technological operation. The coatings were studied from point of view of their structure, porosity, adhesion of the coatings in relation to the volume of dopant added and wear resistance. The best properties reached composite coating doped with 12 % Ni.

  6. Thermal treatment of municipal solid waste. Assessment of the 42 French facilities funded by ADEME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    Between 1993 and 2000, Ademe provided a financial assistance to the construction of 42 municipal solid waste incinerators, covering an average of 5,7 % of the required investments. This note outlines the lessons to be drawn from the assessment of the operation of these units, which was produced within the framework of a study steered by Ademe and carried out by Trivalor. It contents details on the in-depth modification of french facilities, a complete mastery of operations, the economic conditions in the sector, the analysis of Ademe subsidies and evaluates the market over the next ten years. (A.L.B.)

  7. Topics in inflationary cosmologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several aspects of inflationary cosmologies are discussed. An introduction to the standard hot big bang cosmological model is reviewed, and some of the problems associated with it are presented. A short review of the proposals for solving the cosmological conundrums of the big bang model is presented. Old and the new inflationary scenarios are discussed and shown to be unacceptable. Some alternative scenarios especially those using supersymmetry are reviewed briefly. A study is given of inflationary models where the same set of fields that breaks supersymmetry is also responsible for inflation. In these models, the scale of supersymmetry breaking is related to the slope of the potential near the origin and can thus be kept low. It is found that a supersymmetry breaking scale of the order of the weak breaking scale. The cosmology obtained from the simplest of such models is discussed in detail and it is shown that there are no particular problems except a low reheating temperature and a violation of the thermal constraint. A possible solution to the thermal constraint problem is given by introducing a second field, and the role played by this second field in the scenario is discussed. An alternative mechanism for the generation of baryon number within the framework of supergravity inflationary models is studied using the gravitational couplings of the heavy fields with the hidden sector (the sector which breaks supersymmetry). This mechanism is applied to two specific models - one with and one without supersymmetry breaking. The baryon to entropy ratio is found to be dependent on parameters which are model dependent. Finally, the effect of direct coupling between the two sectors on results is related, 88 refs., 6 figs

  8. Thermal and Chemical Analyses of Silicone Polymers for Component Engineering Lifetime Assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balazs, B; Maxwell, R S

    2002-05-14

    Accurate predictions of a polymer component's functional lifetime at best arc tenuous when one has only relatively short term chemical or mechanical property data to extrapolate. We have analyzed a series of silica-filled siloxanes to determine the chemical and microstructural signatures of aging, and we are incorporating these data into rational methodologies for assessing a component's lifetime measured against as-designed engineering properties. We are monitoring changes in mechanical properties, crystallization kinetics, cross-link density changes, and motional dynamics with a variety of analysis methods: Modulated DSC, Dynamic Mechanical Analysis, and Solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. Previous work has shown that the addition of phenyl side groups to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer chains reduces the rate and extent of crystallization of the co-polymer compared to that of pure PDMS. Crystallization has been observed in copolymer systems up to 6.5 mol % phenyl composition by DSC and up to 8 mol % phenyl by XRD. The PDMS-PDPS-silica composite materials studied here are silica reinforced random block copolymers consisting of dimethyl and diphenyl monomer units with 11.2 mol. % polydiphenylsiloxane. Based on this previous work, it is not expected that this material would exhibit crystallization in the polymer network; however, these silicones do, in fact, exhibit crystallization phenomena. This report focuses primarily on our efforts to assess the information content of the crystallization phenomena with respect to aging signatures and mechanisms that may be limiting the functional lifetime of the composite materials.

  9. The use of a task-based exposure assessment model (T-BEAM) for assessment of metal fume exposures during welding and thermal cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, P; Goldberg, M; Barnes, P; Stafford, E

    2000-01-01

    Elevated disease rates have been documented among construction workers for cancer, pneumonoconiosis, asbestosis, and silicosis. However, methodologies for exposure assessment in construction are not well described in the U.S. literature. Working through a cooperative agreement with the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the Center to Protect Workers' Rights--a research arm of the Building and Construction Trades Department, AFL-CIO--has developed and used a "Task-Based Exposure Assessment Model (T-BEAM)" for construction. The characteristic elements of T-BEAM are: (1) an emphasis on the identification, implementation, and evaluation of engineering and work practice controls; and (2) use of experienced, specially trained construction workers (construction safety and health specialists) in the exposure assessment process. A task-based approach was used because tasks, or specialized skills, form the single greatest thread of continuity in the dynamic environment of construction. Workers in the construction industry come from several crafts and are typically employed by a large number of contractors throughout their career. Project types (e.g., residential or industrial rehabilitation) are also highly variable and present unique health risks. Finally, because construction involves building, renovating, or dismantling physical surroundings, the work site is constantly changing. Between 1995 and 1996, T-BEAM was applied to the collection of approximately 200 personal exposure measurements associated with "hot work tasks"--welding and thermal cutting. Data were collected with the assistance of specially trained, journeyman ironworkers, pipe fitters, and boilermakers on nine construction sites located throughout the United States. Portable local exhaust ventilation was provided to participating contractors with the intent of measuring its impact on exposure. Results indicate that data collected in a standardized, systematic fashion from multiple

  10. Thermal camera used for the assessment of metabolism and functions of the rat brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastek, Mariusz; Piatkowski, Tadeusz; Polakowski, Henryk; Kaczmarska, Katarzyna; Czernicki, Zbigniew; Koźniewska, Ewa; Przykaza, Lukasz

    2014-05-01

    Motivation to undertake research on brain surface temperature in clinical practice is based on a strong conviction that the enormous progress in thermal imaging techniques and camera design has a great application potential. Intraoperative imaging of pathological changes and functionally important areas of the brain is not yet fully resolved in neurosurgery and remains a challenge. Extensive knowledge of the complex mechanisms controlling homeostasis (thermodynamic status of an organism being a part of it ) and laws of physics (which are the foundations of thermography), make this method very good and a simple imaging tool in comparison with other modern techniques, such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and angiography. Measurements of temperature distribution across the brain surface were performed on four rats (Wistar strain) weighing approximately 300 g each. Animals have remained under general anesthesia typically conducted using isoflurane. The brain was unveiled (the dura mater remained untouched) through the skin incision and removal of the bone cranial vault. Cerebrocortical microflow was measured using laser-Doppler flow meter. Arterial blood pressure was also measured in rat femoral artery. From the above data the cerebrovascular resistance index was calculated. Cerebral flow was modified by increasing the CO2 concentration in the inspired air to 5% for the duration of 6 minutes. Another change in cerebral flow was induced by periodic closing of right middle cerebral artery. Artery occlusion was performed by introducing a filament for a period of 15 minutes, then an artery was opened again. Measurements were carried out before, during and after the artery occlusion. Paper presents results and methodology of measurements.

  11. Assessment of SAR and thermal changes near a cochlear implant system for mobile phone type exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Robert L; Iskra, Steve; McKenzie, Raymond J; Chambers, John; Metzenthen, Bill; Anderson, Vitas

    2008-01-01

    A cochlear implant system is a device used to enable hearing in people with severe hearing loss and consists of an internal implant and external speech processor. This study considers the effect of scattered radiofrequency fields when these persons are subject to mobile phone type exposure. A worst-case scenario is considered where the antenna is operating at nominal full power, the speech processor is situated behind the ear using a metallic hook, and the antenna is adjacent to the hook and the internal ball electrode. The resultant energy deposition and thermal changes were determined through numerical modelling. With a 900 MHz half-wave dipole antenna producing continuous-wave (CW) 250 mW power, the maximum 10 g averaged SAR was 1.31 W/kg which occurred in the vicinity of the hook and the ball electrode. The maximum temperature increase was 0.33 degrees C in skin adjacent to the hook. For the 1800 MHz antenna, operating at 125 mW, the maximum 10 g averaged SAR was 0.93 W/kg in the pinna whilst the maximum temperature change was 0.16 degrees C. The analysis predicts that the wearer complies with the radiofrequency safety limits specified by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) for 900 and 1800 MHz mobile phone type exposure and thus raises no cause for concern. The resultant temperature increase is well below the maximum rise of 1 degrees C recommended by ICNIRP. Effects in the cochlea were insignificant. PMID:17902159

  12. Probabilistic assessment of a reactor pressure vessel subjected to pressurized thermal shocks by using crack distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Probabilistic methods are used to analyze a reactor pressure vessel. • Crack distribution data from the decommissioned plants, Shoreham and PVRUF is used. • Weld type, size and its manufacturing process are also considered. • Embedded and surface short cracks result in the highest probability for failure. - Abstract: Probabilistic methods are used to analyze a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) subjected to pressurized thermal shocks (PTSs) initiated by a small loss-of-coolant accident (SLOCA) and a medium loss-of-coolant accident (MLOCA). The FAVOR code is applied to calculate the probabilities for crack initiation and failure by considering crack distributions based on cracks observed in the Shoreham and PVRUF RPVs in the U.S. The crack parameters, i.e. crack density, depth, aspect ratio, orientation and location are assumed as random variables following different distributions. The Vflaw code is used to generate FAVOR input files for the crack distribution data from the decommissioned plants. Weld type, size and its manufacturing process are also considered in the calculation. In this paper it is shown that the calculated failure probability of the RPV subjected to the SLOCA is higher than that subjected to the MLOCA due to different loading. The failure probabilities are compared with those based on a different crack assumption. Among the analyzed cracks, the embedded crack with a depth of 6.83 mm and surface crack with a depth of 5.13 mm result in the highest probability for failure. Maximum stress intensity factors of the simulated cracks range from 36 MPa m0.5 to 91 MPa m0.5 for the MLOCA and from 30 to 41 MPa m0.5 for the SLOCA, respectively. We conclude that considering the observed crack distribution in probabilistic PTS analyses may lead to higher failure probabilities than by assuming cracks of specific size

  13. Assessment of potential impact of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant thermal effluent on the Watts Bar Reservoir striped bass population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is an assessment of potential adverse impact to striped bass (Morone saxatilis) in Watts Bar Reservoir caused by thermal effluent from operation of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP). The Clinch River arm of Watts Bar Reservoir is occupied by adult striped bass during the warmest months of the year. Concern was raised that operation of the CRBRP, specifically thermal discharges, could conflict with management of striped bass. In all cases examined the thermal plume becomes nearly imperceptible within a short distance from the discharge pipe (about 30 ft [10 m]) compared to river width (about 630 ft [190 m]). Under worst case conditions any presence of the plume in the main channel (opposite side of the river from the discharge) will be confined to the surface layer of the water. An ample portion of river cross sections containing ambient temperature water for passage or residence of adult striped bass will always be available in the vicinity of this thermal effluent. Although a small portion of river cross section would exceed the thermal tolerance of striped bass, the fish would naturally avoid this area and seek out adjacent cooler water. Therefore, it is concluded the CRBRP thermal effluent will not significantly affect the integrity of the striped bass thermal refuge in the Clinch River arm of Watts Bar Reservoir. At this time there is no need to consider alternative diffuser designs and thermal modeling. 8 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  14. KEY TOPICS IN SPORTS MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Ali Narvani

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Key Topics in Sports Medicine is a single quick reference source for sports and exercise medicine. It presents the essential information from across relevant topic areas, and includes both the core and emerging issues in this rapidly developing field. It covers: 1 Sports injuries, rehabilitation and injury prevention, 2 Exercise physiology, fitness testing and training, 3 Drugs in sport, 4 Exercise and health promotion, 5 Sport and exercise for special and clinical populations, 6 The psychology of performance and injury. PURPOSE The Key Topics format provides extensive, concise information in an accessible, easy-to-follow manner. AUDIENCE The book is targeted the students and specialists in sports medicine and rehabilitation, athletic training, physiotherapy and orthopaedic surgery. The editors are authorities in their respective fields and this handbook depends on their extensive experience and knowledge accumulated over the years. FEATURES The book contains the information for clinical guidance, rapid access to concise details and facts. It is composed of 99 topics which present the information in an order that is considered logical and progressive as in most texts. Chapter headings are: 1. Functional Anatomy, 2. Training Principles / Development of Strength and Power, 3. Biomechanical Principles, 4. Biomechanical Analysis, 5. Physiology of Training, 6. Monitoring of Training Progress, 7. Nutrition, 8. Hot and Cold Climates, 9. Altitude, 10. Sport and Travelling, 11. Principles of Sport Injury Diagnosis, 12. Principles of Sport and Soft Tissue Management, 13. Principles of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation, 14. Principles of Sport Injury Prevention, 15. Sports Psychology, 16. Team Sports, 17. Psychological Aspects of Injury in Sport, 18. Injury Repair Process, 19. Basic Biomechanics of Tissue Injury, 20. Plain Film Radiography in Sport, 21. Nuclear Medicine, 22. Diagnostic Ultrasound, 23. MRI Scan, 24. Other Imaging, 5. Head Injury, 26. Eye

  15. Scaling up Dynamic Topic Models

    OpenAIRE

    Bhadury, Arnab; Chen, Jianfei; Zhu, Jun; Liu, Shixia

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic topic models (DTMs) are very effective in discovering topics and capturing their evolution trends in time series data. To do posterior inference of DTMs, existing methods are all batch algorithms that scan the full dataset before each update of the model and make inexact variational approximations with mean-field assumptions. Due to a lack of a more scalable inference algorithm, despite the usefulness, DTMs have not captured large topic dynamics. This paper fills this research void, a...

  16. Topic Modeling of Hierarchical Corpora /

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Do-kyum

    2014-01-01

    The sizes of modern digital libraries have grown beyond our capacity to comprehend manually. Thus we need new tools to help us in organizing and browsing large corpora of text that do not require manually examining each document. To this end, machine learning researchers have developed topic models, statistical learning algorithms for automatic comprehension of large collections of text. Topic models provide both global and local views of a corpus; they discover topics that run through the co...

  17. Topical corticosteroid addiction and phobia

    OpenAIRE

    Aparajita Ghosh; Sujata Sengupta; Arijit Coondoo; Amlan Kusum Jana

    2014-01-01

    Corticosteroids, one of the most widely prescribed topical drugs, have been used for about six decades till date. However, rampant misuse and abuse down the years has given the drug a bad name. Topical steroid abuse may lead to two major problems which lie at the opposing ends of the psychosomatic spectrum. Topical steroid addiction, a phenomenon that came to be recognized about a decade after the introduction of the molecule is manifested as psychological distress and rebound phenomenon on s...

  18. Environmental assessment of the thermal neutron activation explosive detection system for concourse use at US airports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is an environmental assessment of a system designed to detect the presence of explosives in checked airline baggage or cargo. The system is meant to be installed at the concourse or lobby ticketing areas of US commercial airports and uses a sealed radioactive source of californium-252 to irradiate baggage items. The major impact of the use of this system arises from direct exposure of the public to scattered or leakage radiation from the source and to induced radioactivity in baggage items. Under normal operation and the most likely accident scenarios, the environmental impacts that would be created by the proposed licensing action would not be significant. 44 refs., 19 figs., 18 tabs

  19. Assessing coastal plain wetland composition using advanced spaceborne thermal emission and reflection radiometer imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaleoni, Eva

    Establishing wetland gains and losses, delineating wetland boundaries, and determining their vegetative composition are major challenges that can be improved through remote sensing studies. We used the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) to separate wetlands from uplands in a study of 870 locations on the Virginia Coastal Plain. We used the first five bands from each of two ASTER scenes (6 March 2005 and 16 October 2005), covering the visible to the short-wave infrared region (0.52-2.185mum). We included GIS data layers for soil survey, topography, and presence or absence of water in a logistic regression model that predicted the location of over 78% of the wetlands. While this was slightly less accurate (78% vs. 86%) than current National Wetland Inventory (NWI) aerial photo interpretation procedures of locating wetlands, satellite imagery analysis holds great promise for speeding wetland mapping, lowering costs, and improving update frequency. To estimate wetland vegetation composition classes, we generated a classification and regression tree (CART) model and a multinomial logistic regression (logit) model, and compared their accuracy in separating woody wetlands, emergent wetlands and open water. The overall accuracy of the CART model was 73.3%, while for the logit model was 76.7%. The CART producer's accuracy of the emergent wetlands was higher than the accuracy from the multinomial logit (57.1% vs. 40.7%). However, we obtained the opposite result for the woody wetland category (68.7% vs. 52.6%). A McNemar test between the two models and NWI maps showed that their accuracies were not statistically different. We conducted a subpixel analysis of the ASTER images to estimate canopy cover of forested wetlands. We used top-of-atmosphere reflectance from the visible and near infrared bands, Delta Normalized Difference Vegetation Index, and a tasseled cap brightness, greenness, and wetness in linear regression model with canopy

  20. Assessment and Correction of on-Orbit Radiometric Calibration for FY-3 VIRR Thermal Infrared Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Xu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available FengYun-3 (FY-3 Visible Infrared Radiometer (VIRR, along with its predecessor, Multispectral Visible Infrared Scanning Radiometer (MVISR, onboard FY-1C&D have had continuous global observation more than 14 years. This data record is valuable for weather prediction, climate monitoring, and environment research. Data quality is vital for satellite data assimilations in Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP and quantitative remote sensing applications. In this paper, the accuracies of radiometric calibration for VIRR onboard FY-3A and FY-3B, in thermal infrared (TIR channels, are evaluated using the Low Earth Orbit (LEO-LEO simultaneous nadir overpass intercalibration method. Hyperspectral and high-quality observations from Infrared Atmosphere Sounding Instrument (IASI onboard METOP-A are used as reference. The biases of VIRR measurements with respect to IASI over one-and-a-half years indicate that the TIR calibration accuracy of FY-3B VIRR is better than that of FY-3A VIRR. The brightness temperature (BT measured by FY-3A/VIRR is cooler than that measured by IASI with monthly mean biases ranging from −2 K to −1 K for channel 4 and −1 K to 0.2 K for channel 5. Measurements from FY-3B/VIRR are more consistent with that from IASI, and the annual mean biases are 0.84 ± 0.16 K and −0.66 ± 0.18 K for channels 4 and 5, respectively. The BT biases of FY-3A/VIRR show scene temperature-dependence and seasonal variation, which are not found from FY-3B/VIRR BT biases. The temperature-dependent biases are shown to be attributed to the nonlinearity of detectors. New nonlinear correction coefficients of FY-3A/VIRR TIR channels are reevaluated using various collocation samples. Verification results indicate that the use of the new nonlinear correction can greatly correct the scene temperature-dependent and systematic biases.

  1. Analysis of a pressurized-thermal-shock experiment for assessing cladding effects on finite-element cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents scoping analyses of the cylinder specimen being used in the international Network for Evaluating Steel Components (NESC) large-scale spinning-cylinder project (NESC-1). The NESC was organized as an international forum to exchange information on processes of structural integrity assessment, to collaborate on specific projects, and to promote the harmonization of international standards. The objective of the NESC-1 project is to focus on a complete process for assessing the structural integrity of aged reactor pressure vessels. The scoping analyses were carried out to assist the NESC in determining a critical crack size that will insure cleavage initiation in the experiment. Three-dimensional finite-element models of the cladded cylinder were generated with 6:1 semielliptical subclad and surface cracks with depths ranging from 40 to 100 mm. The cylinder specimen was subjected to thermal-shock and centrifugal loading conditions and analyzed with thermo-elastic and thermo-elastic-plastic material models. Thermo-elastic analytical results indicate that a subclad crack (40 to 100-mm-deep) is not likely to initiate based on toughness values from large-scale spinning cylinder tests, while thermo-elastic-plastic analyses predict that a 70-mm-deep subclad crack is likely to initiate. Thus, including plasticity effects in the model is crucial to the design of the spinning cylinder test. In all cases, warm prestress conditions may reduce the probability of achieving cleavage initiation

  2. Hot topic [editorial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    simulations 'would be seriously in error'. One may ask if this magazine should give space to Lindzen or those involved in geoengineering to air their views. Given the uncertainties still present within climate models and the potential costs of dealing with global warming, it would be wrong for Physics World to ignore those outside the mainstream. After all, as Richard Feynman once wrote: 'There is no harm in doubt and scepticism, for it is through these that new discoveries are made'. Physicists should never take anything at face value, not least a topic as important as climate change. (U.K.)

  3. Assessment of Urban Infrastructure Impact on New York City Neighborhoods Thermal Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, R.; Ghandehari, M.; Karimi, M.; Vant-hull, B.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2013-12-01

    New York City (NYC) is a highly urbanized city with most of the population living in tall buildings. Despite technological improvements and stricter regulations, cities still show increasing signs of environmental stress such as traffic congestion, noise and air quality degradation. Rethinking the current models of city planning could enable to limit these detrimental effects of urbanization. In addition, the built environment creates a new climatic regime which needs a better understanding. Building density, height and emission has a major impact on local temperature and other air quality indicators. Studies have shown that during extreme weather conditions and heat waves the mortality rate in urban areas increases. Cities are comprised of a wide variety of urban settings and various neighborhoods have different physical responses to meteorological events, so it is expected that the temperature and heat stress across a given city to fluctuate sharply. Therefore, this research has focused on neighborhood-scale field campaigns to downscale temperature and air quality predictions from city to neighborhood scale in NYC. In order to assess the temperature variability within the city at street level, during the hottest part of the day, this project used eight mobile units bearing temperature and relative humidity sensors, as well as ten weather stations mounted on light poles in various NYC neighborhoods. This study also looks at fine scale structures in the urban heat island of Manhattan at street level through an infrared camera with the spectral range of 7.5-13 μm in order to relate heat and emissions from building surfaces to land surface characteristics such as building density, vegetation coverage, proximity to water, and albedo. LandSat TM5 images were used (with 30 m resolution) for land surface classification. During the summer and early fall of 2011, 2012 and 2013 extensive field campaigns were performed, the results of which show some persistent patterns

  4. Topical and transdermal delivery of caffeine.

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, L.; Lane, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine is administered topically and transdermally for a variety of pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications and it is also used as a model hydrophilic compound in dermal risk assessment studies. This review considers the physicochemical and permeation properties of caffeine with reference to its delivery to and through the skin. Since it has been used as a model compound the findings have implications for the delivery of many hydrophilic compounds having similar properties. Various passive...

  5. Topical Day on Biological Effects of Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topical day has been focussed on the potential effects of ionizing radiation on human health. A general overview on molecular and biophysical aspects of radiation, its effects on cells and organisms, and the contribution of radiobiology to radiation protection and risk assessment is given. The genetic effects of radiation and its effects on the developing organism, the effects of radiation on the cell cycle and the mechanisms of radiation induced apoptosis were also discussed

  6. Topical Day on Biological Effects of Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baatout, S.; Jacquet, P.

    1997-05-15

    The topical day has been focussed on the potential effects of ionizing radiation on human health. A general overview on molecular and biophysical aspects of radiation, its effects on cells and organisms, and the contribution of radiobiology to radiation protection and risk assessment is given. The genetic effects of radiation and its effects on the developing organism, the effects of radiation on the cell cycle and the mechanisms of radiation induced apoptosis were also discussed.

  7. Risk Management Plan; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this Risk Management Plan (RMP) is to establish the concept and define the process to assure that National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office Environmental Management (NNSA/NV EM) programs and projects incorporate appropriate, efficient, cost-effective measures to mitigate the impact of program-and/or project-related risks. In addition, it describes the roles and responsibilities of program personnel in performing the risk management functions, and defines reporting and tracking requirements for risk-related information. The product of this risk analysis will be a risk analysis report listing the various risks with their classification, mitigation and handling strategies, impact on cost and schedule, and action items. The risk management process will identify potential risk sources; assess individual risks and impacts on performance, cost, and schedule; evaluate alternative approaches to mitigate high and moderate risks; develop action plans to handle individual risks; and interface risks with other programs and/or projects. Risk management and risk assessment will be consistent with DOE Orders 430.1 and 413.3 and their associated guidance documentation. The RMP will remain valid for the life cycle of the program and/or projects and will be under configuration control with revisions to be conducted as required and approved

  8. Assessment of a fiber-optic distributed-temperature-sensing system to monitor the thermal dynamics of vegetated roof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousiño, J. A.; Hausner, M. B.; Victorero, F.; Bonilla, C.; Gironas, J. A.; Vera, S.; Bustamante, W.; Rojas, V.; Pasten, P.; Suarez, F. I.

    2014-12-01

    Vegetated (green) roofs include a growing media and vegetation layer, and offer a range of benefits such as the reduction of: the heat island effect, rooftop runoff peak flows, roof surface temperatures, energy used for cooling or heating buildings, and noise levels inside infrastructures. Vegetated roofs also offer aesthetic benefits and increase the biodiversity of the urban environment, and are increasingly used in sustainable urban development. Understanding the thermal dynamics of vegetated roofs will make it possible to improve their design and to better assess their impacts on energy efficiency. Here, we evaluate the first vertical high-resolution distributed-temperature-sensing (DTS) system installed in a vegetated roof. This system allows a continuous measurement of the thermal profile within a vegetated roof - going from the interior, upward through the drainage layers and soil substrate of the vegetated roof and ending in the air above the vegetation. Temperatures can be observed as frequently as every 30 s at a spatial resolution on the order of centimeters. This DTS system was installed in the "Laboratory of Vegetal Infrastructure of Buildings" (LIVE - its acronym in Spanish), located in the San Joaquín Campus of the Pontifical Catholic University, Santiago, Chile. The laboratory features 18 experimental modules to investigate different configurations of the vegetated roof layers. The LIVE was designed with the installation of the optical fibers in mind, and the DTS system allows simultaneous monitoring of three or four modules of the LIVE. In this work, we describe the design of this DTS deployment, the calibration metrics obtained using the software provided by the manufacturers, and other calibration algorithms previously developed. We compare the results obtained using single- and double-ended measurements, highlighting strengths and weaknesses of DTS methods. Finally, we present the observations obtained from this biophysical environment

  9. Assessment of multi-scale thermal-hydraulic simulation for a PWR steam generator with CUPID/MARS coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the thermal hydraulics analysis of nuclear reactor components of LWRs (Light Water Reactors) such as reactor vessel, steam generator, containment, a multi-dimensional two-phase flow code, named CUPID, has been being developed. The CUPID code pursues a capability of multi-physics and multi-scale thermal hydraulics analysis. In the present study, multi-scale simulation was performed by coupling with system-scale code, MARS. The coupled code was assessed to visualize the flow behavior of the steam generator of the Advanced Power Reactor (APR1400). The primary side of the steam generator and remaining Reactor Coolant System (RCS) is modeled by MARS and secondary side is by CUPID. For the secondary side simulation by the CUPID part, a porous media approach was adopted to two-fluid model and conductor model to simplify the complicated geometry of the steam generator. In order to obtain a porosity of a given computing cell, a special algorithm was employed to directly calculate volume ratio by mapping the 3D CAD file onto the grid system. Besides, the proper constitutive relationships for U-tubes are considered further. To treat the complex thermo-hydraulic phenomena on the shell side of a steam generator, a set of constitutive models available in the literature for a two-phase flow map, interfacial heat and mass transfer, interfacial drag, wall friction, wall heating, and heat partitioning in flows over tube bundles were applied to close the numerical model. This paper presents the description of the coupling method, porous media approach to simplify the steam generator, and the simulation results using the coupled codes. (author)

  10. Experimental assessment of the aero-thermal performance of rib roughened trailing edge cooling channels for gas turbine blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the combined analysis of detailed flow field and heat transfer experimental data, the aero-thermal behaviour of different trailing edge cooling channels is reported. The reference geometry (G0) is characterized by a trapezoidal cross section of high aspect-ratio, inlet radial flow, and coolant discharge at both model tip and trailing edge, where seven elongated pedestals are also installed. Two variations of the reference geometry have squared ribs installed inside the channel radial central portion (G1) or inside the trailing edge exit region (G2). The forced convection heat transfer coefficient has been measured by means of a steady state Liquid Crystal Thermography (LCT) technique, while reliable and detailed flow measurements have been performed by means of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) or Stereo-PIV techniques. The experimental Reynolds number has been fixed at 20,000. The heat transfer data for the three configurations have been analyzed and compared considering both local and channel-averaged features of the heat transfer fields. In particular, the flow mechanisms responsible for the existence of high or low heat transfer regions have been identified and explained. The effects of the different turbulence promoters on both the flow and heat transfer fields have been put in evidence as well. With the aim to determine the most effective configuration, area averaged heat transfer data have been compared, together with information about the channels pressure losses. Configuration G1 turned out to be the most promising, giving rise to a significant heat transfer enhancement associated to a moderate increase in pressure losses. -- Highlights: • Combined aero-thermal analysis of cooling ducts for gas turbine blade trailing edge. • Stereo-PIV and LCT experimental investigation. • Performance comparison of different configurations (smooth and ribbed channels). • Coupling of peculiar flow features with heat transfer augmentation. • Assessment of

  11. Linguistic Extensions of Topic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd-Graber, Jordan

    2010-01-01

    Topic models like latent Dirichlet allocation (LDA) provide a framework for analyzing large datasets where observations are collected into groups. Although topic modeling has been fruitfully applied to problems social science, biology, and computer vision, it has been most widely used to model datasets where documents are modeled as exchangeable…

  12. Topics of Evolutionary Computation 2001

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ursem, Rasmus Kjær

    This booklet contains the student reports from the course: Topics of Evolutionary Computation, Fall 2001, given by Thiemo Krink, Rene Thomsen and Rasmus K. Ursem......This booklet contains the student reports from the course: Topics of Evolutionary Computation, Fall 2001, given by Thiemo Krink, Rene Thomsen and Rasmus K. Ursem...

  13. The factors related to local recurrence after radiofrequency thermal ablation of hepatic malignancies: assessment of spiral CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Woo Kyeong; Rhim, Hyun Chul; Kim, Yong Soo; Koh, Byung Hee; Cho, On Koo; Seo, Heung Seok; Joo, Kyung Bin [College of Medicine, Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-05-01

    To determine the factors that are related to local recurrence after Radiofrequency Thermal Ablation (RFTA) fo hepatic tumors. We selected 30 patients with 51 hepatic nodules less than 5 cm in diameter (HCC, n=33; metastasis, n=18) who underwent RF thermal ablation between May 1999 and April 2000. Ablation was defined as 'complete' if immediately post-procedual CT showed that a nodule's margin was completely covered by ablation. Every three months, follow-up CT scans were examined for signs of local recurrence, and a nodule was assessed in terms of its size, the histologic diagnosis, adjacent vessels, perfect ablation (a safety margin of more than 5mm beyond the tumor margin), and whether hyperemia was observed after ablation. Finally, a group in which there was local recurrence (group A, n=15) and another showing no recurrence (group B, n=36) were compared. Mean nodule size in group A and group B was 3.26 and 2.24 cm, respectively. Local recurrence was noted in 7 of 33 HCC nodules (21.2%), and in 8 of 18 (44.4%) which were metastatic. There was recurrence in 9 of 31 nodules with adjacent vessels (29.0%), and in 6 of 20 (30%) without adjacent vessels. In two of 17 perfectly ablated nodules (11.8%) there was local recurrence, but this was observed in 13 of 34 imperfectly ablated nodules (38.2%). Finally, local recurrence was seen in 14 of 36 nodules showing hyperemia (38.9%) but in one of 15 (6.7%) without hyperemia. Using chi-square analysis, it was thus shown that with regard to local recurrence, tumor size, perfect ablation and peritumoral hyperemia were statistically significant factors (p<0.05). Local recurrence after RF thermal ablation of hepatic tumors clearly increases in nodules which are larger. The degree to which ablation is perfect, and the presence of peritumoral hyperemia, may be factors related to the local recurrence observed after RFTA.

  14. Quantitative assessment of the relationship between radiant heat exposure and protective performance of multilayer thermal protective clothing during dry and wet conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Thermal protective performance of multilayer protective clothing was studied. • Two kinds of moisture barrier with different vapor permeability were compared. • Moisture transfer affects the heat transfer of the multilayer clothing. • A linear correlation between temperature of each layer and heat flux is found. - Abstract: The beneficial effect of clothing on a person is important to the criteria for people exposure to radiant heat flux from fires. The thermal protective performance of multilayer thermal protective clothing exposed to low heat fluxes during dry and wet conditions was studied using two designed bench-scale test apparatus. The protective clothing with four fabric layers (outer shell, moisture barrier, thermal linear and inner layer) was exposed to six levels of thermal radiation (1, 2, 3, 5, 7 and 10 kW/m2). Two kinds of the moisture barrier (PTFE and GoreTex) with different vapor permeability were compared. The outside and inside surface temperatures of each fabric layer were measured. The fitting analysis was used to quantitatively assess the relationship between the temperature of each layer during thermal exposure and the level of external heat flux. It is indicated that there is a linear correlation between the temperature of each layer and the radiant level. Therefore, a predicted equation is developed to calculate the thermal insulation of the multilayer clothing from the external heat flux. It can also provide some useful information on the beneficial effects of clothing for the exposure criteria of radiant heat flux from fire

  15. Evaluation of the economic costs and benefits of methods for reducing nutrient loads to the Gulf of Mexico: Topic 6 Report for the Integrated Assessment on Hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico.

    OpenAIRE

    Doering, Otto C., III; Diaz-Hermelo, Francisco; Howard, Crystal; Heimlich, Ralph; Hitzhusen, Fred; Kazmierczak, Richard; Lee, John; Libby, Larry; Milon, Walter; Prato, Tony; Ribaudo, Marc

    1999-01-01

    In this report we analyze the Topic 5 report’s recommendations for reducing nitrogen losses to the Gulf of Mexico (Mitsch et al. 1999). We indicate the relative costs and cost-effectiveness of different control measures, and potential benefits within the Mississippi River Basin. For major nonpoint sources, such as agriculture, we examine both national and basin costs and benefits. Based on the Topic 2 economic analysis (Diaz and Solow 1999), the direct measurable dollar benefits to Gulf...

  16. Advancements in Topical Antifungal Vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kircik, Leon H

    2016-02-01

    The primary treatment for superficial fungal infections is antifungal topical formulations, and allylamines and azoles represent the two major classes of topical formulations that are used to treat these infections. The stratum corneum (SC) is composed of keratinocytes that are surrounded by a matrix of lipids. The efficacy of topically applied formulations depends on their ability to penetrate this lipid matrix, and the vehicle plays an integral role in the penetration of active molecule into skin. There are several challenges to formulating topical drugs, which include the biotransformation of the active molecules as they pass through the SC and the physical changes that occur to the vehicle itself when it is applied to the skin. This article will review current and emerging topical antifungal vehicles. PMID:26885798

  17. Damage Assessment of Creep Tested and Thermally Aged Metallic Alloys Using Acousto-Ultrasonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Kautz, Harold E.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years emphasis has been placed on the early detection of material changes experienced in turbine powerplant components. During the scheduled overhaul of a turbine, the current techniques of examination of various hot section components aim to find flaws such as cracks, wear, and erosion, as well as excessive deformations. Thus far, these localized damage modes have been detected with satisfactory results. However, the techniques used to find these flaws provide no information on life until the flaws are actually detected. Major improvements in damage assessment, safety, as well as more accurate life prediction could be achieved if nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques could be utilized to sense material changes that occur prior to the localized defects mentioned. Because of elevated temperatures and excessive stresses, turbine components may experience creep behavior. As a result, it is desirable to monitor and access the current condition of such components. Research at the NASA Glenn Research Center involves developing and utilizing an NDE technique that discloses distributed material changes that occur prior to the localized damage detected by the current methods of inspection. In a recent study, creep processes in a nickel-base alloy were the life-limiting condition of interest, and the NDE technique was acousto-ultrasonics (AU). AU is an NDE technique that utilizes two ultrasonic transducers to interrogate the condition of a test specimen. The sending transducer introduces an ultrasonic pulse at a point on the surface of the specimen while a receiving transducer detects the signal after it has passed through the material. The goal of the method is to correlate certain parameters of the detected waveform to characteristics of the material between the two transducers. Here, the waveform parameter of interest is the attenuation due to internal damping for which information is being garnered from the frequency domain. The parameters utilized to

  18. Topics in emerging technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurdsson, Halldor Matthias; Thorsteinsson, Saemundur E.; Stidsen, Thomas K.

    2004-01-01

    -generation network NGN enables network operators to run all services (i.e., voice, data and video) on one network. In this article the migration of Iceland Telecom's circuit-switched PSTN towards NGN is described. A cost model of the telecommunications system has been developed to enable cost and benefits analysis...... deviations from the optimum affect cost. The feasibility of NGN is assessed by comparing the cost of NGN migration to that of maintaining the current circuit-switched network.......A key development of telecommunication systems during the past two decades has been the evolution from the circuit-switched network toward the packet-switched network paradigm. Many operators are now migrating their PSTNs from circuit switched networks. This new approach is often called the next...

  19. Thermal assessment of Shippingport pressurized water reactor blanket fuel assemblies within a multi-canister overpack within the canister storage building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of analyses were performed to assess the thermal performance characteristics of the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 Blanket Fuel Assemblies as loaded within a Multi-Canister Overpack within the Canister Storage Building. A two-dimensional finite element was developed, with enough detail to model the individual fuel plates: including the fuel wafers, cladding, and flow channels

  20. Topics in nuclear power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnitz, Robert J.

    2015-03-01

    The 101 nuclear plants operating in the US today are far safer than they were 20-30 years ago. For example, there's been about a 100-fold reduction in the occurrence of "significant events" since the late 1970s. Although the youngest of currently operating US plants was designed in the 1970s, all have been significantly modified over the years. Key contributors to the safety gains are a vigilant culture, much improved equipment reliability, greatly improved training of operators and maintenance workers, worldwide sharing of experience, and the effective use of probabilistic risk assessment. Several manufacturers have submitted high quality new designs for large reactors to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for design approval, and several companies are vigorously working on designs for smaller, modular reactors. Although the Fukushima reactor accident in March 2011 in Japan has been an almost unmitigated disaster for the local population due to their being displaced from their homes and workplaces and also due to the land contamination, its "lessons learned" have been important for the broader nuclear industry, and will surely result in safer nuclear plants worldwide - indeed, have already done so, with more safety improvements to come.

  1. Topics in nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 101 nuclear plants operating in the US today are far safer than they were 20-30 years ago. For example, there's been about a 100-fold reduction in the occurrence of 'significant events' since the late 1970s. Although the youngest of currently operating US plants was designed in the 1970s, all have been significantly modified over the years. Key contributors to the safety gains are a vigilant culture, much improved equipment reliability, greatly improved training of operators and maintenance workers, worldwide sharing of experience, and the effective use of probabilistic risk assessment. Several manufacturers have submitted high quality new designs for large reactors to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for design approval, and several companies are vigorously working on designs for smaller, modular reactors. Although the Fukushima reactor accident in March 2011 in Japan has been an almost unmitigated disaster for the local population due to their being displaced from their homes and workplaces and also due to the land contamination, its 'lessons learned' have been important for the broader nuclear industry, and will surely result in safer nuclear plants worldwide - indeed, have already done so, with more safety improvements to come

  2. Topics in nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budnitz, Robert J. [Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-03-30

    The 101 nuclear plants operating in the US today are far safer than they were 20-30 years ago. For example, there's been about a 100-fold reduction in the occurrence of 'significant events' since the late 1970s. Although the youngest of currently operating US plants was designed in the 1970s, all have been significantly modified over the years. Key contributors to the safety gains are a vigilant culture, much improved equipment reliability, greatly improved training of operators and maintenance workers, worldwide sharing of experience, and the effective use of probabilistic risk assessment. Several manufacturers have submitted high quality new designs for large reactors to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for design approval, and several companies are vigorously working on designs for smaller, modular reactors. Although the Fukushima reactor accident in March 2011 in Japan has been an almost unmitigated disaster for the local population due to their being displaced from their homes and workplaces and also due to the land contamination, its 'lessons learned' have been important for the broader nuclear industry, and will surely result in safer nuclear plants worldwide - indeed, have already done so, with more safety improvements to come.

  3. Topic Model for Graph Mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Junyu; Lu, Jie; Zhang, Guangquan; Luo, Xiangfeng

    2015-12-01

    Graph mining has been a popular research area because of its numerous application scenarios. Many unstructured and structured data can be represented as graphs, such as, documents, chemical molecular structures, and images. However, an issue in relation to current research on graphs is that they cannot adequately discover the topics hidden in graph-structured data which can be beneficial for both the unsupervised learning and supervised learning of the graphs. Although topic models have proved to be very successful in discovering latent topics, the standard topic models cannot be directly applied to graph-structured data due to the "bag-of-word" assumption. In this paper, an innovative graph topic model (GTM) is proposed to address this issue, which uses Bernoulli distributions to model the edges between nodes in a graph. It can, therefore, make the edges in a graph contribute to latent topic discovery and further improve the accuracy of the supervised and unsupervised learning of graphs. The experimental results on two different types of graph datasets show that the proposed GTM outperforms the latent Dirichlet allocation on classification by using the unveiled topics of these two models to represent graphs. PMID:25616091

  4. Assessment Framework of Building Facade in Optimizing Indoor Thermal Comfort of Green Building Index (GBI Certified Office Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Tharim Asniza Hamimi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past decade, the construction industry has seen a new trend in the development of “green” or “sustainable” construction concept around the world with vast support from prominent organization, together with the introduction of sustainable building codes. The establishment of green building certification systems worldwide is seen as one of the most efforts in the emerging green building movement. In order to support the development of the “green” and “sustainable” concept in Malaysia, Green Building Index (GBI was launched by the government on 21 May 2009 that created to promote sustainability in the built environment and raise awareness of environmental issues. However, the construction industry seems to have focused only on findings the “right mechanism” for an environmentally sustainable “final result” in order for the building to be certified as green with the lacking of continuous assessment on the building performance after the certifications. This study is purposely conducted to investigate the performance of various rated Green Building Index (GBI Non-Residential New Construction office buildings and the influence on Indoor Thermal Comfort (ITC of the selected buildings. The aim is to develop an assessment framework for optimum green building architectural façade to be used for office buildings in Malaysia as well as to analyse the occupants’ perception, satisfaction and performance in the selected Green Building Index (GBI rated office indoor environment. This research is still in its infancy; therefore the paper is focused on research aims, research scope and methodology, and expected deliverables for the proposed research.

  5. The future of topical analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnstein, Paul M

    2013-07-01

    Topically applied analgesic therapies have been used throughout history to treat a variety of patient conditions that present with pain. Before modem pharmaceuticals became readily available, mud-based emollients, salves, cold therapies, and other natural remedies were often used. Now we have effective therapies and are developing advanced topical analgesics as we learn more about the physiology and pathophysiology of pain. The use of topical analgesics may be associated with fewer patient systemic side effects than are seen with oral, parenteral, or transdermally administered agents, making the topical route of administration attractive to prescribers and patients. With further refinement of existing drugs and the development of novel agents, topical analgesics may offer relief for treating patient pain conditions that are currently challenging to treat, such as pain resulting from burns, wound debridement, and pressure ulcers. Recognizing the value of a multimodal approach, topical analgesics may offer a therapeutic option that can become part of a comprehensive treatment plan for the patient. With continued advancements in targeted drug-delivery systems, topical analgesics may be able to provide a method to prevent or reverse the phenomena of peripheral and central sensitization, or the neuroplastic changes believed to be responsible for the transition from acute to chronic pain states in patients. For those patients at risk for developing chronic pain states, such as complex regional pain syndrome, the combination of cutaneous stimulation (achieved through rubbing during application) and analgesic effects produced by the drug itself may prevent the disabling pain that often emerges during the subacute phase of disease. In summary, better utilization of currently available topical analgesics and continued research promise to ensure that topical analgesics are, and will continue to be, important tools in the treatment of patients with resistant pain. PMID

  6. Assessment of thermal load reduction due to the application of simple passive techniques in a house office building at the south of Libya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assessment of possible reduction of heating and cooling requirements of 300 m2 house-office building has been presented in this paper, when simple Thermal Passive Techniques (TPT) have been applied to building's construction in Sebha city at the Libyan south. The known software for dynamic simulation (TRNSYS) has been used as an environment of digital experimentation for this study. A prototype represents the building has been constructed with the help of the available model of single thermal zone of TRNSYS (Type 19). The built-in ASHREA Transfer Function Method within this model has been used to calculate the heat flux through building's materials. Primarily, the thermal load on building's construction without TPTs has been evaluated under weather conditions of a Typical Meteorological Year (TMY) of Sebha city. Then, the building has been equipped with simple TPTs (such as the control of building materials, insulation, shading, infiltration and ventilation with windows resizing). This building was subjected to the same weather conditions and again the thermal load has been evaluated in order to report the percentage of reduction of thermal load. The simulation has been conducted successfully, where good assessment of reduction of annual heating and cooling demands in the building has been obtained. It is proved that, about (46%) of annual heating load and (48%) of annual cooling load can be reduced if suitable simple TPTs were incorporated in buildings.(Author)

  7. Health Topic XML File Description

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... XML File Description: MedlinePlus URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/xmldescription.html Health ... corresponding health topic page on MedlinePlus. Example: url="https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/abdominalpain.html" Use ...

  8. Selected topics in nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collection of abstracts on selected topics in nuclear structure are given. Special attention pays to collective excitations and high-spin states of nuclei, giant resonance structure, nuclear reaction mechanisms and so on

  9. Encyclopedia of thermal stresses

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    The Encyclopedia of Thermal Stresses is an important interdisciplinary reference work.  In addition to topics on thermal stresses, it contains entries on related topics, such as the theory of elasticity, heat conduction, thermodynamics, appropriate topics on applied mathematics, and topics on numerical methods. The Encyclopedia is aimed at undergraduate and graduate students, researchers and engineers. It brings together well established knowledge and recently received results. All entries were prepared  by leading experts from all over the world, and are presented in an easily accessible format. The work is lavishly illustrated, examples and applications are given where appropriate, ideas for further development abound, and the work will challenge many students and researchers to pursue new results of their own. This work can also serve as a one-stop resource for all who need succinct, concise, reliable and up to date information in short encyclopedic entries, while the extensive references will be of inte...

  10. Topics of Bioengineering in Wikipedia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassia Atanassova

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The present report aims to give a snapshot of how topics from the field of bioengineering (bioinformatics, bioprocess systems, biomedical engineering, biotechnology, etc. are currently covered in the free electronic encyclopedia Wikipedia. It also offers insights and information about what Wikipedia is, how it functions, how and when to cite Wikipedian articles, if necessary. Several external wikis, devoted to topics of bioengineering, are also listed and reviewed.

  11. Do scientists trace hot topics?

    OpenAIRE

    Tian Wei; Menghui Li; Chensheng Wu; Xiao-Yong Yan; Ying Fan; Zengru Di; Jinshan Wu

    2013-01-01

    Do scientists follow hot topics in their scientific investigations? In this paper, by performing analysis to papers published in the American Physical Society (APS) Physical Review journals, it is found that papers are more likely to be attracted by hot fields, where the hotness of a field is measured by the number of papers belonging to the field. This indicates that scientists generally do follow hot topics. However, there are qualitative differences among scientists from various countries,...

  12. Key Topics in Sports Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Ali Narvani; Panagiotis Thomas; Burce Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Key Topics in Sports Medicine is a single quick reference source for sports and exercise medicine. It presents the essential information from across relevant topic areas, and includes both the core and emerging issues in this rapidly developing field. It covers: 1) Sports injuries, rehabilitation and injury prevention, 2) Exercise physiology, fitness testing and training, 3) Drugs in sport, 4) Exercise and health promotion, 5) Sport and exercise for special and clinical populations, 6) The ps...

  13. A Green's function approach for assessing the thermal disturbance caused by drilling deep boreholes in rock or ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clow, Gary D.

    2015-12-01

    A knowledge of subsurface temperatures in sedimentary basins, fault zones, volcanic environments and polar ice sheets is of interest for a wide variety of geophysical applications. However, the process of drilling deep boreholes in these environments to provide access for temperature and other measurements invariably disturbs the temperature field around a newly created borehole. Although this disturbance dissipates over time, most temperature measurements are made while the temperature field is still disturbed. Thus, the measurements must be `corrected' for the drilling-disturbance effect if the undisturbed temperature field is to be determined. This paper provides compact analytical solutions for the thermal drilling disturbance based on 1-D (radial) and 2-D (radial and depth) Green's functions (GFs) in cylindrical coordinates. Solutions are developed for three types of boundary conditions (BCs) at the borehole wall: (1) prescribed temperature, (2) prescribed heat flux and (3) a prescribed convective condition. The BC at the borehole wall is allowed to vary both with depth and time. Inclusion of the depth dimension in the 2-D solution allows vertical heat-transfer effects to be quantified in situations where they are potentially important, that is, near the earth's surface, at the bottom of a well and when considering finite-drilling rates. The 2-D solution also includes a radial- and time-dependent BC at the earth's surface to assess the impact of drilling-related infrastructure (drilling pads, mud pits, permanent shelters) on the subsurface temperature field. Latent-heat effects due to the melting and subsequent refreezing of interstitial ice while drilling a borehole through ice-rich permafrost can be included in the GF solution as a moving-plane heat source (or sink) located at the solid-liquid interface. Synthetic examples are provided illustrating the 1-D and 2-D GF solutions. The flexibility of the approach allows the investigation of thermal drilling

  14. Topical protection of human esophageal mucosal integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodland, P; Batista-Lima, F; Lee, C; Preston, S L; Dettmar, P; Sifrim, D

    2015-06-15

    Patients with nonerosive reflux disease exhibit impaired esophageal mucosal integrity, which may underlie enhanced reflux perception. In vitro topical application of an alginate solution can protect mucosal biopsies against acid-induced changes in transepithelial electrical resistance (TER). We aimed to confirm this finding in a second model using 3D cell cultures and to assess prolonged protection in a biopsy model. We assessed the protective effect of a topically applied alginate solution 1 h after application. 3D cell cultures were grown by using an air-liquid interface and were studied in Ussing chambers. The apical surface was "protected" with 200 μl of either alginate or viscous control or was unprotected. The tissue was exposed to pH 3 + bile acid solution for 30 min and TER change was calculated. Distal esophageal mucosal biopsies were taken from 12 patients and studied in Ussing chambers. The biopsies were coated with either alginate or viscous control solution. The biopsies were then bathed in pH 7.4 solution for 1 h. The luminal chamber solution was replaced with pH 2 solution for 30 min. Percentage changes in TER were recorded. In five biopsies fluorescein-labeled alginate solution was used to allow immunohistological localization of the alginate after 1 h. In the cell culture model, alginate solution protected tissue against acid-induced change in TER. In biopsies, 60 min after protection with alginate solution, the acidic exposure caused a -8.3 ± 2.2% change in TER compared with -25.1 ± 4.5% change after protection with the viscous control (P < 0.05). Labeled alginate could be seen coating the luminal surface in all cases. In vitro, alginate solutions can adhere to the esophageal mucosa for up to 1 h and exert a topical protectant effect. Durable topical protectants can be further explored as first-line/add-on therapies for gastroesophageal reflux disease. PMID:25907692

  15. Solar Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrish, Harold P., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on Solar Thermal Propulsion (STP). Some of the topics include: 1) Ways to use Solar Energy for Propulsion; 2) Solar (fusion) Energy; 3) Operation in Orbit; 4) Propulsion Concepts; 5) Critical Equations; 6) Power Efficiency; 7) Major STP Projects; 8) Types of STP Engines; 9) Solar Thermal Propulsion Direct Gain Assembly; 10) Specific Impulse; 11) Thrust; 12) Temperature Distribution; 13) Pressure Loss; 14) Transient Startup; 15) Axial Heat Input; 16) Direct Gain Engine Design; 17) Direct Gain Engine Fabrication; 18) Solar Thermal Propulsion Direct Gain Components; 19) Solar Thermal Test Facility; and 20) Checkout Results.

  16. COBRA-SFS [Spent Fuel Storage]: A thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code: Volume 3, Validation assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of the COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) computer code validation effort. COBRA-SFS, while refined and specialized for spent fuel storage system analyses, is a lumped-volume thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code that predicts temperature and velocity distributions in a wide variety of systems. Through comparisons of code predictions with spent fuel storage system test data, the code's mathematical, physical, and mechanistic models are assessed, and empirical relations defined. The six test cases used to validate the code and code models include single-assembly and multiassembly storage systems under a variety of fill media and system orientations and include unconsolidated and consolidated spent fuel. In its entirety, the test matrix investigates the contributions of convection, conduction, and radiation heat transfer in spent fuel storage systems. To demonstrate the code's performance for a wide variety of storage systems and conditions, comparisons of code predictions with data are made for 14 runs from the experimental data base. The cases selected exercise the important code models and code logic pathways and are representative of the types of simulations required for spent fuel storage system design and licensing safety analyses. For each test, a test description, a summary of the COBRA-SFS computational model, assumptions, and correlations employed are presented. For the cases selected, axial and radial temperature profile comparisons of code predictions with test data are provided, and conclusions drawn concerning the code models and the ability to predict the data and data trends. Comparisons of code predictions with test data demonstrate the ability of COBRA-SFS to successfully predict temperature distributions in unconsolidated or consolidated single and multiassembly spent fuel storage systems

  17. International Space Station (ISS) External Thermal Control System (ETCS) Loop A Pump Module (PM) Jettison Options Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murri, Daniel G.; Dwyer Cianciolo, Alicia; Shidner, Jeremy D.; Powell, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    On December 11, 2013, the International Space Station (ISS) experienced a failure of the External Thermal Control System (ETCS) Loop A Pump Module (PM). To minimize the number of extravehicular activities (EVA) required to replace the PM, jettisoning the faulty pump was evaluated. The objective of this study was to independently evaluate the jettison options considered by the ISS Trajectory Operations Officer (TOPO) and to provide recommendations for safe jettison of the ETCS Loop A PM. The simulation selected to evaluate the TOPO options was the NASA Engineering and Safety Center's (NESC) version of Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories II (POST2) developed to support another NESC assessment. The objective of the jettison analysis was twofold: (1) to independently verify TOPO posigrade and retrograde jettison results, and (2) to determine jettison guidelines based on additional sensitivity, trade study, and Monte Carlo (MC) analysis that would prevent PM recontact. Recontact in this study designates a propagated PM trajectory that comes within 500 m of the ISS propagated trajectory. An additional simulation using Systems Tool Kit (STK) was run for independent verification of the POST2 simulation results. Ultimately, the ISS Program removed the PM jettison option from consideration. However, prior to the Program decision, the retrograde jettison option remained part of the EVA contingency plan. The jettison analysis presented showed that, in addition to separation velocity/direction and the atmosphere conditions, the key variables in determining the time to recontact the ISS is highly dependent on the ballistic number (BN) difference between the object being jettisoned and the ISS.

  18. Assessment of olive wastes as energy source: pyrolysis, torrefaction and the key role of H loss in thermal breakdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work describes the first stage of a multi-stage process seeking to develop a usable and cheap design for a downdraft gasifier fed with lingo-cellulosic olive waste. The thermochemical behaviour of two types of olive waste has been assessed during pyrolysis and torrefaction experiments. Olive tree trimmings and olive pulp were pyrolysed in a quartz reactor at peak temperatures between 400 °C and 650 °C, during slow heating experiments (50 °C/min) under a helium blanket. These samples were also torrefied under nitrogen to temperatures between 200 °C and 325 °C. At the peak temperature of 650 °C, mass losses of up to 74% were recorded. Elemental analyses of the chars showed a consistent linear increase of Carbon to values around 75% and a linear decrease of oxygen to values near 10%. By contrast, the H-content remained relatively constant up to about 300 °C and then decreased to as the peak temperature was raised further. The results suggest that the combination of mass loss and H-content may be used as indicators for linear char-GCV increases up to the torrefaction limit of around 300 °C. - Highlights: • A process to develop a design for an olive waste downdraft gasifier is described. • Thermochemical processes may be tracked by Hydrogen concentration in the chars. • SEM micrograms reveal the precise stages by which the samples thermally decompose

  19. A multi-criteria assessment of scenarios on thermal processing of infectious hospital wastes: A case study for Central Macedonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Greece more than 14,000 tonnes of infectious hospital waste are produced yearly; a significant part of it is still mismanaged. Only one off-site licensed incineration facility for hospital wastes is in operation, with the remaining of the market covered by various hydroclave and autoclave units, whereas numerous problems are still generally encountered regarding waste segregation, collection, transportation and management, as well as often excessive entailed costs. Everyday practices still include dumping the majority of solid hospital waste into household disposal sites and landfills after sterilization, still largely without any preceding recycling and separation steps. Discussed in the present paper are the implemented and future treatment practices of infectious hospital wastes in Central Macedonia; produced quantities are reviewed, actual treatment costs are addressed critically, whereas the overall situation in Greece is discussed. Moreover, thermal treatment processes that could be applied for the treatment of infectious hospital wastes in the region are assessed via the multi-criteria decision method Analytic Hierarchy Process. Furthermore, a sensitivity analysis was performed and the analysis demonstrated that a centralized autoclave or hydroclave plant near Thessaloniki is the best performing option, depending however on the selection and weighing of criteria of the multi-criteria process. Moreover the study found that a common treatment option for the treatment of all infectious hospital wastes produced in the Region of Central Macedonia, could offer cost and environmental benefits. In general the multi-criteria decision method, as well as the conclusions and remarks of this study can be used as a basis for future planning and anticipation of the needs for investments in the area of medical waste management.

  20. Assessing population and environmental effects on thermal resistance in Drosophila melanogaster using ecologically relevant assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Johannes; Hoffmann, Ary A; Kristensen, Torsten Nygård

    2011-01-01

    To make laboratory studies of thermal resistance in ectotherms more ecologically relevant, temperature changes that reflect conditions experienced by individuals in nature should be used. Here we describe an assay that is useful for quantifying multiple measures of thermal resistance of individua...

  1. A plan for the modification and assessment of TRAC-PF1/MOD2 for use in analyzing CANDU 3 transient thermal-hydraulic phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of the review and planning done for the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission to identify the thermal-hydraulic phenomena that could occur in the CANDU 3 reactor design during transient conditions, plan modifications to the TRAC-PF1/MOD2 (TRAC) computer code needed to adequately predict CANDU 3 transient thermal-hydraulic phenomena, and identify an assessment program to verify the ability of TRAC, when modified, to predict these phenomena. This work builds on analyses and recommendations produced by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). To identify the thermal-hydraulic phenomena, a large-break loss-of-coolant accident simulation, performed as part of earlier work by INEL with an Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited (AECL) thermal-hydraulic computer code (CATHENA), was analyzed in detail. Other accident scenarios were examined for additional phenomena. A group of Los Alamos National Laboratory reactor thermal-hydraulics experts ranked the phenomena to produce a preliminary phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT). The preliminary nature of the PIRT was a result of a lack of direct expertise with the unique processes and phenomena of the CANDU 3. Nonetheless, this PIRT provided an adequate foundation for planning a program of code modifications. We believe that this PIRT captured the most important phenomena and that refinements to the PIRT will mainly produce clarification of the relative importance (ranking) of phenomena. A plan for code modifications was developed based on this PIRT and on information about the modeling methodologies for CANDU-specific phenomena used in AECL codes. AECL thermal-hydraulic test facilities and programs were reviewed and the information used in developing an assessment plan to ensure that TRAC-PF1/MOD2, when modified, will adequately predict CANDU 3 phenomena

  2. Modeling of thermal stratification in main coolant piping under natural circulation for assessment of reactor pressure vessel thermal shock conditions using RELAP5/MOD3.2 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cold and hot legs are split in the WWER-1000 model for RELAP/MOD3.2 code into two vertical levels to model the stratified flows in the main coolant piping in case of water injection by core cooling systems. The model is tested using the cold leg stratification and mixing experimental data. The comparison of the results for a leak through the open pressurizer safety valve with experimental data showed improvement of transient behavior. The model can be used for the evaluation of anticipated thermal stratification phenomena in cold legs

  3. Life Cycle Assessment of Thermal Treatment Technologies. An environmental and financial systems analysis of gasification, incineration and landfilling of waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assefa, Getachew; Eriksson, Ola [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Industrial Ecology; Jaeraas, Sven; Kusar, Henrik [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Chemical Technology

    2003-05-01

    A technology which is currently developed by researchers at KTH is catalytic combustion. which is one component of a gasification system. Instead of performing the combustion in the gas turbine by a flame, a catalyst is used. When the development of a new technology (as catalytic combustion) reaches a certain step where it is possible to quantify material-, energy- and capital flows, the prerequisites for performing a systems analysis is at hand. The systems analysis can be used to expand the know-how about the potential advantages of the catalytic combustion technology by highlighting its function as a component of a larger system. In this way it may be possible to point out weak points which have to be investigated more, but also strong points to emphasise the importance of further development. The aim of this project was to assess the energy turnover as well as the potential environmental impacts and economic costs of thermal treatment technologies in general and catalytic combustion in particular. By using a holistic assessment of the advantages and disadvantages of catalytic combustion of waste it was possible to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the technology under different conditions. Following different treatment scenarios have been studied: (1) Gasification with catalytic combustion, (2) Gasification with flame combustion, (3) Incineration with energy recovery and (4) Landfilling with gas collection. In the study compensatory district heating is produced by combustion. of biofuel. The power used for running the processes in the scenarios is supplied by the waste-to-energy technologies themselves while compensatory power is assumed to be produced. from natural gas. The emissions from the system studied were classified and characterised using methodology from Life Cycle Assessment into the following environmental impact categories: Global Warming Potential, Acidification Potential, Eutrophication Potential and finally Formation of Photochemical

  4. Topical agents in burn care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Momčilović Dragan

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Understanding of fluid shifts and recognition of the importance of early and appropriate fluid replacement therapy have significantly reduced mortality in the early post burn period. After the bum patient successfully passes the resuscitation period, the burn wound represents the greatest threat to survival. History Since the dawn of civilization, man has been trying to find an agent which would help burn wounds heal, and at the same time, not harm general condition of the injured. It was not until the XX century, after the discovery of antibiotics, when this condition was fulfilled. In 1968, combining silver and sulfadiazine, fox made silver-sulfadiazine, which is a 1% hydro-soluble cream and a superior agent in topical treatment of burns today. Current topical agents None of the topical antimicrobial agents available today, alone or combined, have the characteristics of ideal prophylactic agents, but they eliminate colonization of burn wound, and invasive infections are infrequent. With an excellent spectrum of activity, low toxicity, and ease of application with minimal pain, silver-sulfadiazine is still the most frequently used topical agent. Conclusion The incidence of invasive infections and overall mortality have been significantly reduced after introduction of topical burn wound antimicrobial agents into practice. In most burn patients the drug of choice for prophylaxis is silver sulfadiazine. Other agents may be useful in certain clinical situations.

  5. Using aromatic biological markers as a tool for assessing thermal maturity of source rocks in the campano-maastrichtian mamu formation, southeastern nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Ogala, Jude E.; Akaegbobi, Mike I.

    2014-01-01

    The concentration and distribution of aromatic biomarkers in coals and shales from five boreholes penetrating the Maastrichtian Mamu Formation of the Anambra Basin, southeastern Nigeria, were investigated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometryto assess the thermal maturity and organic matter input. The study focused on the variations of the relative abundances of naphthalenes, phenanthrenes, and monaromatic and triaromatic steroids identified on the mass fragmentograms. Trimethylnaphthalene(...

  6. Topical corticosteroid addiction and phobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparajita Ghosh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Corticosteroids, one of the most widely prescribed topical drugs, have been used for about six decades till date. However, rampant misuse and abuse down the years has given the drug a bad name. Topical steroid abuse may lead to two major problems which lie at the opposing ends of the psychosomatic spectrum. Topical steroid addiction, a phenomenon that came to be recognized about a decade after the introduction of the molecule is manifested as psychological distress and rebound phenomenon on stoppage of the drug. The rebound phenomenon, which can affect various parts of the body particularly the face and the genitalia has been reported by various names in the literature. TC phobia which lies at the opposite end of the psychiatric spectrum of steroid abuse has been reported particularly among parents of atopic children. Management of both conditions is difficult and frustrating. Psychological counseling and support can be of immense help in both the conditions.

  7. Topical corticosteroid addiction and phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Aparajita; Sengupta, Sujata; Coondoo, Arijit; Jana, Amlan Kusum

    2014-09-01

    Corticosteroids, one of the most widely prescribed topical drugs, have been used for about six decades till date. However, rampant misuse and abuse down the years has given the drug a bad name. Topical steroid abuse may lead to two major problems which lie at the opposing ends of the psychosomatic spectrum. Topical steroid addiction, a phenomenon that came to be recognized about a decade after the introduction of the molecule is manifested as psychological distress and rebound phenomenon on stoppage of the drug. The rebound phenomenon, which can affect various parts of the body particularly the face and the genitalia has been reported by various names in the literature. TC phobia which lies at the opposite end of the psychiatric spectrum of steroid abuse has been reported particularly among parents of atopic children. Management of both conditions is difficult and frustrating. Psychological counseling and support can be of immense help in both the conditions. PMID:25284851

  8. Quantum mechanics II advanced topics

    CERN Document Server

    Rajasekar, S

    2015-01-01

    Quantum Mechanics II: Advanced Topics uses more than a decade of research and the authors’ own teaching experience to expound on some of the more advanced topics and current research in quantum mechanics. A follow-up to the authors introductory book Quantum Mechanics I: The Fundamentals, this book begins with a chapter on quantum field theory, and goes on to present basic principles, key features, and applications. It outlines recent quantum technologies and phenomena, and introduces growing topics of interest in quantum mechanics. The authors describe promising applications that include ghost imaging, detection of weak amplitude objects, entangled two-photon microscopy, detection of small displacements, lithography, metrology, and teleportation of optical images. They also present worked-out examples and provide numerous problems at the end of each chapter.

  9. Visual experience during phacoemulsification cataract surgery under topical anaesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Visual awareness during phacoemulsification cataract surgery is an important determinant of patient satisfaction with any anaesthetic technique. Topical anaesthesia could be associated with significant visual awareness because it does not affect optic nerve function.
METHODS—The visual experience during phacoemulsification cataract surgery under topical anaesthesia (without sedation) was assessed for 106 consecutive unselected patients. Patients were interviewed immediately af...

  10. Topical minoxidil in the treatment of alopecia areata

    OpenAIRE

    Fenton, D A; Wilkinson, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    A modified double blind crossover study was performed to assess the effect of 1% topical minoxidil as compared with placebo in 30 patients with alopecia areata and alopecia totalis. The active preparation produced a highly significant incidence of hair regrowth. A cosmetically acceptable response was noted in 16 patients. No side effects were seen. The study confirmed that topical minoxidil will induce new hair growth in alopecia areata but that it is less likely to do so in more severe and e...

  11. Selected topics in nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fourth International Conference on selected topics in nuclear structure was held at Dubna in July 1994 on recent experimental and theoretical investigations in nuclear structure. Topics discussed were the following: nuclear structure at low-energy excitations (collective quasiparticle phenomena, proton-neutron interactions, microscopic and phenomenological theories of nuclear structure; nuclear structure studies with charged particles. heavy ions, neutrons and photons; nuclei at high angular momenta and superdeformation, structure and decay properties of giant resonances, charge-exchange resonances and β-decay; semiclassical approach of large amplitude collective motion and structure of hot nuclei

  12. Topics in millimeter wave technology

    CERN Document Server

    Button, Kenneth

    1988-01-01

    Topics in Millimeter Wave Technology, Volume 1 presents topics related to millimeter wave technology, including fin-lines and passive components realized in fin-lines, suspended striplines, suspended substrate microstrips, and modal power exchange in multimode fibers. A miniaturized monopulse assembly constructed in planar waveguide with multimode scalar horn feeds is also described. This volume is comprised of five chapters; the first of which deals with the analysis and synthesis techniques for fin-lines as well as the various passive components realized in fin-line. Tapers, discontinuities,

  13. Topics in current aerosol research

    CERN Document Server

    Hidy, G M

    1971-01-01

    Topics in Current Aerosol Research deals with the fundamental aspects of aerosol science, with emphasis on experiment and theory describing highly dispersed aerosols (HDAs) as well as the dynamics of charged suspensions. Topics covered range from the basic properties of HDAs to their formation and methods of generation; sources of electric charges; interactions between fluid and aerosol particles; and one-dimensional motion of charged cloud of particles. This volume is comprised of 13 chapters and begins with an introduction to the basic properties of HDAs, followed by a discussion on the form

  14. Comparison of UTCI with other thermal indices in the assessment of heat and cold effects on cardiovascular mortality in the Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Ales; Kyselý, Jan

    2014-05-01

    Several studies have compared various human thermal comfort indices as to their applications in evaluating heat-related mortality. Much less attention has been devoted to application of thermal indices in evaluating cold-related mortality. So far, only a few studies have examined performance of the Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI), one of the most advanced indicators of biometeorological conditions, in assessing heat- and cold-related mortality. We compare UTCI and other selected thermal indices in analysing heat- and cold-related effects on cardiovascular (CVD) mortality in two different (urban and rural) regions in the Czech Republic during the 16-year period of 1994-2009. Excess mortality is represented by the number of deaths above expected daily values, the latter being adjusted for long-term changes, annual and weekly cycles, and epidemics of influenza/acute respiratory infections. The association between excess CVD mortality and air temperature, UTCI, Physiologically Equivalent Temperature (PET), and Apparent Temperature (AT) is analyzed using Poisson generalized additive models (GAMs). Heat- / cold-stress days are identified by percentiles of (equivalent) temperature distribution in summer / winter. We found air temperature (as the most widely used proxy for ambient thermal conditions in environmental epidemiology) comparable to thermal indices in assessing heat-related mortality. On the other hand, air temperature provides a weak cold effect in comparison with the thermal indices in both regions and its application may underestimate the magnitude of cold-related mortality. These findings are important when possible climate change effects on heat- and cold-related mortality are estimated. AT and PET appear to be more universal predictors of heat- and cold- related mortality than UTCI when both urban and rural environments are of concern. UTCI tends to select windy rather than freezing days in winter, though these show little effect on mortality in the

  15. Assessment of generic solar thermal systems for large power applications. Volume II. Analysis of thermal energy production costs for systems from 50 to 600 MWt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bird, S.P.; Apley, W.J.; Barnhart, J.S.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.; Fort, J.A.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Williams, T.A.

    1981-06-01

    A comparative analysis of solar thermal concepts that are potentially suitable for development as large process heat systems (50 to 600 MWt) was performed. The concepts considered can be classified into three categories based on the type of solar tracking used by the collector: (1) two-axis tracking, in which concentrators track the sun's motion in both azimuth and altitude; (2) one-axis tracking, in which concentrators track changes in either azimuth or altitude; and (3) non-tracking, in which the concentrators are fixed. Seven generic types of collectors were considered. Conceptual designs developed for the seven systems were based on common assumptions of available technology in the 1990 to 2000 time frame. Costs were estimated on the basis of identical assumptions, ground rules, methodologies, and unit costs of materials and labor applied uniformly to all of the concepts.

  16. Comparison of the efficacy and safety of topical clindamycin and 5% benzoyl peroxide with nadifloxacin cream and 5% benzoyl peroxide gel in the treatment of acne vulgaris and assessment of the effects of these treatments on quality of life

    OpenAIRE

    Aslıhan Kırkağaç; Zeynep Nurhan Saraçoğlu; Ayşe Esra Koku Aksu

    2015-01-01

    Background and Design: Acne vulgaris is a multifactorial chronic inflammatory disase of the pilosebaceous unit. Topical antibiotics and anti-inflammatory treatment are used for mild and moderate acne. Clindamycin is frequently used for acne treatment, altough nadifloxacin is a relatively new agent. There are few studies evaluating nadifloxacin efficacy. It's impact on quality of life has not been determined previously. In this study, it is aimed to compare the effect of these two agents, and ...

  17. Influence of the Thermal Inertia in the European Simplified Procedures for the Assessment of Buildings’ Energy Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Luca Evangelisti; Gabriele Battista; Claudia Guattari; Carmine Basilicata; Roberto de Lieto Vollaro

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to highlight the importance of thermal inertia in buildings. Nowadays, it is possible to use energy analysis software to simulate the building energy performance. Considering Italian standards, these analyses are based on the UNI TS 11300 that defines the procedures for the national implementation of the UNI EN ISO 13790. These standards require an energy analysis under steady-state condition, underestimating the thermal inertia of the building. In order to understand the iner...

  18. Assessment of Extent and Degree of Thermal Damage to Polymeric Materials in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal damage to susceptible materials in accessible regions of the TMI-2 reactor building shows damage-distribution patterns that indicate non-uniform intensity of exposure. No clear explanation for non-uniformity is found in existing evidence; e.g., in some regions a lack of thermally susceptible materials frustrates analysis. Elsewhere, burned materials are present next to materials that seem similar but appear unscathed-leading to conjecture that the latter materials preferentially absorb water vapor during periods of high local steam concentration. Most of the polar crane pendant shows heavy burns on one half of its circumferential surface. This evidence suggests that the polar crane pendant side that experienced heaviest burn damage was exposed to intense radiant energy from a transient fire plume in the reactor containment volume. Tests and simple heat-transfer calculations based on pressure and temperature records from the accident show that the atmosphere inside the reactor building was probably 8% hydrogen in air, a value not inconsistent with the extent of burn damage. Burn-pattern geography indicates uniform thermal exposure in the dome volume to the 406-ft level (about 6 ft below the polar crane girder), partial thermal exposure in the volume between the 406- and 347-ft levels as indicated by the polar crane cable, and lack of damage to most thermally susceptible materials in the west quadrant of the reactor building; some evidence of thermal exposure Is seen in the free volume between the 305- and 347-ft levels. (author)

  19. Effects on topic familiarity on online search behaviour and use of relevance criteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wen, Lei; Ruthven, Ian; Borlund, Pia

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study on the effect of topic familiarity on the assessment behaviour of online searchers. In particular we investigate the effect of topic familiarity on the resources and relevance criteria used by searchers. Our results indicate that searching on an unfamiliar...... topic leads to use of more generic and fewer specialised resources and that searchers employ different relevance criteria when searching on less familiar topics....

  20. Topics in optics and music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Andrew W.

    2012-10-01

    While the use of optics in the playback of music has been a tremendously successful technology and laser light shows are a common occurrence, other intersections of optics and music tend to be less well known. Topics such as optics-based instruments, performance tools and effects, instrument characterization and manufacturing, recording, playback, and signal processing are explored.

  1. The Health Curriculum: 500 Topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Oliver E.

    2001-01-01

    This 1958 paper divides 500 health topics into 20 categories: health as a social accomplishment/social problem; nutrition; physical fitness; mental health and disease; heredity/eugenics; infection/immunity; chronic and degenerative disease; substance abuse; skin care; vision, hearing, and speech; dental health; safety; physical environment; health…

  2. Topics on Galactic Chemical Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Prantzos, Nikos

    2011-01-01

    I discuss three different topics in Galactic chemical evolution:the "puzzling" absence of any observational signature of secondary elements ; the building of the Galactic halo in the framework of hierarchical galaxy formation, as evidenced from its metallicity distribution ; and the potentially important role that radial migration may play in the evolution of galactic disks, according to recent studies.

  3. Two topics in quantum chromodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two topics are (1) estimates of perturbation theory coefficients for R(e+e- → hadrons), and (2) the virtual-photon structure function, with emphasis on the analytic behavior in its squared mass. 20 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Topics in combinatorial pattern matching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vildhøj, Hjalte Wedel

    This dissertation studies problems in the general theme of combinatorial pattern matching. More specifically, we study the following topics: Longest Common Extensions. We revisit the longest common extension (LCE) problem, that is, preprocess a string T into a compact data structure that supports...

  5. Selected topics in nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    19. winter school in Zakopane was devoted to selected topics in nuclear structure such as: production of spin resonances, heavy ions reactions and their applications to the investigation of high spin states, octupole deformations, excited states and production of new elements etc. The experimental data are ofen compared with theoretical predictions. Report contains 28 papers. (M.F.W.)

  6. Field Test of ATHEANA (A Technique for Human Event Analysis) in Pressurised Thermal Shock Probabilistic Risk Assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) is currently developing the technical basis for potentially modifying the Pressurised Thermal Shock (PTS) screening criteria specified in Title 10 Part 50.61 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations. As part of this effort, PTS probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) are being performed by the USNRC and its contractors, for two U.S. nuclear power plants, with assistance by the respective utilities. Two other plant analyses will also be performed as part of the PTS work, but are not the subject of this paper. These latter two analyses are being performed by industry and will be reviewed by the USNRC for inclusion into the entire effort. The ATHEANA methodology is being applied to address the human reliability portion of the two USNRC analyses in a way that is also significantly interactive with the accident sequence and system modelling portions of the work. This paper discusses the results to date of the application of ATHEANA in these PTS analyses, including consideration of possible relevant errors of commission. The field test of ATHEANA on this project has served two purposes. One is to use it in developing technical analyses to address and solve a particular issue; i.e., the risk of PTS. The results of these analyses will be used by the USNRC to decide whether or not the PTS screening criteria should be modified. The second purpose is to test the use of ATHEANA in a real application to determine strengths and weaknesses of the method, and how it might be improved. With regard to the first purpose, the PTS project is one where a current screening criteria may be relaxed. Before that can be done, the NRC must be sure that it is safe to do so, and to the extent the specific risk values affect that decision, those values must be able to withstand public scrutiny. Since the ATHEANA process requires the analysts to identify potential vulnerabilities and challenging scenario deviations associated with a human action, and to

  7. Assessment of residual heat generation at cyclic operation of a research reactor as input data for thermal hydraulic calculations and safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Residual heat generating assessment at cyclic mode of operation is considered. • Thermal hydraulic calculations of the critical point parameters are discussed. • The model is applied to assess the residual heat generation on a concrete facility. - Abstract: A review was made of the methods for analysis and evaluation of the residual heat generation in the reactor core after a certain uninterrupted period of operation. We have considered a possible approach to solving the problem for residual heat generation assessment at cyclic mode of facility operation, i.e. after several periods of operation and idle time. The input data preparation for thermal hydraulic calculations used for nuclear safety assessment is discussed. The study of the process is necessary for evaluation of the nuclear safety in case of black-out accident and/or loss of the forced reactor core cooling. The presented approach is applied to evaluate the residual heat generation in the reactor core in the reconstruction design of the nuclear research reactor IRT-2000, Sofia, Bulgaria, configured with LEU fuel IRT-4M (19.75% U235). The residual heat generation is estimated for the reactor core as a whole at operating power of 1000 kW in the end of the last working day after 2 weeks of operation in the following mode: 12 h per day, 5 days per week (Monday–Friday). The accumulated working and downtime hours during the operation period, as well as the weekend break, are accounted in the calculations

  8. Assessment of the impact of neutronic/thermal-hydraulic coupling on the design and performance of nuclear reactors for space propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aithal, S.M.; Aldemir, T.; Vafai, K. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    A series of studies has been performed to investigate the potential impact of the coupling between neutronics and thermal hydraulics on the design and performance assessment of solid core reactors for nuclear thermal space propulsion, using the particle bed reactor (PBR) concept as an example system. For a given temperature distribution in the reactor, the k[sub eff] and steady-state core power distribution are obtained from three-dimensional, continuous energy Monte Carlo simulations using the MCNP code. For a given core power distribution, determination of the temperature distribution in the core and hydrogen-filled annulus between the reflector and pressure vessel is based on a nonthermal equilibrium analysis. The results show that a realistic estimation of fuel, core size, and control requirements for PBRs using hydrogenous moderators, as well as optimization of the overall engine design, may require coupled neutronic/thermal-hydraulic studies. However, it may be possible to estimate the thermal safety margins and propellant exit temperatures based on power distributions obtained from neutronic calculations at room temperature. The results also show that, while variation of the hydrogen flow rate in the annulus has been proposed as a partial control mechanism for PBRs, such control mechanism may not be feasible for PBRs with high moderator-to-fuel ratios and hence soft core neutron spectra.

  9. Coupling of near-field thermal radiative heating and phonon Monte Carlo simulation: Assessment of temperature gradient in n-doped silicon thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Near-field thermal radiative exchange between two objects is typically more effective than the far-field thermal radiative exchange as the heat flux can increase up to several orders higher in magnitudes due to tunneling of evanescent waves. Such an interesting phenomenon has started to gain its popularity in nanotechnology, especially in nano-gap thermophotovoltaic systems and near-field radiative cooling of micro-/nano-devices. Here, we explored the existence of thermal gradient within an n-doped silicon thin film when it is subjected to intensive near-field thermal radiative heating. The near-field radiative power density deposited within the film is calculated using the Maxwell equations combined with fluctuational electrodynamics. A phonon Monte Carlo simulation is then used to assess the temperature gradient by treating the near-field radiative power density as the heat source. Results indicated that it is improbable to have temperature gradient with the near-field radiative heating as a continuous source unless the source comprises of ultra-short radiative pulses with a strong power density. - Highlights: • This study investigates temperature distribution in an n-doped silicon thin film. • Near-field radiative heating is treated as a volumetric phenomenon. • The temperature gradient is computed using phonon MC simulation. • Temperature of thin film can be approximated as uniform for radiation calculations. • If heat source is a pulsed radiation, a temperature gradient can be established

  10. Assessment of MARS for downcomer multi-dimensional thermal hydraulics during LBLOCA reflood using KAERI air-water direct vessel injection tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MARS code has been assessed for the downcomer multi-dimensional thermal hydraulics during a large break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA) reflood of Korean Next Generation Reactor (KNGR) that adopted an upper direct vessel injection (DVI) design. Direct DVI bypass and downcomer level sweep-out tests carried out at 1/50-scale air-water DVI test facility are simulated to examine the capability of MARS. Test conditions are selected such that they represent typical reflood conditions of KNGR, that is, DVI injection velocities of 1.0 ∼ 1.6 m/sec and air injection velocities of 18.0 ∼ 35.0 m/sec, for single and double DVI configurations. MARS calculation is first adjusted to the experimental DVI film distribution that largely affects air-water interaction in a scaled-down downcomer, then, the code is assessed for the selected test matrix. With some improvements of MARS thermal-hydraulic (T/H) models, it has been demonstrated that the MARS code is capable of simulating the direct DVI bypass and downcomer level sweep-out as well as the multi-dimensional thermal hydraulics in downcomer, where condensation effect is excluded. (authors)

  11. Technical feasibility assessment of horizontal alterning steam drive (HASD) implementation as a thermal recovery option for the Junin 8 block in Faja Petrolifera del Orinoco, Venezuela

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasquez, R.G.; Figueroa, Y.; Pinto, L.R. [PDVSA CVP (Venezuela)

    2011-07-01

    The Faja Petrolifera del Orinoco, Venezuela, is the largest accumulation field in the world, extraction is mainly achieved with cold production and recovery factors are around 10%. Thus the implementation of new technologies such as thermal recovery methods is needed to increase oil production through better recovery factors. This study aimed at assessing the technical feasibility of applying the horizontal alternate steam drive (HASD) method which consists of 3 or more parallel horizontal wells acting alternately as injectors and producers. Simulations, sensitivity analyses, uncertainty assessments and optimizations were conducted on a base case of 4 well pad in the Junin 8 block. Parameters influencing the oil recovery factor and the steam oil ratio were found as well as the optimal operational conditions; under those conditions, a recovery factor of more than 30% was observed. This study suggested that HASD could be technically feasible but an economical assessment should be undertaken.

  12. RCC-RMX appendix A16 methodology for the analytical J calculation under thermal and combined thermal plus mechanical loadings for pipes and elbows and related assessment tool MJSAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RCC-MRx code provides flaw assessment methodologies and related tools for Nuclear Power Plant cracked components. An important work has been made in particular to develop a large set of compendia for the calculation of the parameter J for various components (plates, pipes, elbows,...) and various defect geometries. Also, CEA in the frame of collaborations with IRSN, developed a methodology for J analytical calculation for cracked pipes and elbows submitted to thermal and combined mechanical and thermal loadings. This paper presents first the development of this methodology and an overview of the validation strategy, based on reference 2D and 3D F.E. calculations. The second part of the paper presents the last version of the MJSAM tools which is based on the 2010 version of the appendix A16 of the RCC-MRx code. All compendia (for KI, J and C* calculation) and all defect assessment procedures have been implemented in the tool: It covers crack initiation and propagation under fatigue, creep, creep-fatigue and ductile tearing situations. Sensitivity and probabilistic analyses can also been performed with this tool, directly linked to Microsoft Excel software for the results exploitation. (authors)

  13. Validation matrix for the assessment of thermal-hydraulic codes for VVER LOCA and transients. A report by the OECD support group on the VVER thermal-hydraulic code validation matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report deals with an internationally agreed experimental test facility matrix for the validation of best estimate thermal-hydraulic computer codes applied for the analysis of VVER reactor primary systems in accident and transient conditions. Firstly, the main physical phenomena that occur during the considered accidents are identified, test types are specified, and test facilities that supplement the CSNI CCVMs and are suitable for reproducing these aspects are selected. Secondly, a list of selected experiments carried out in these facilities has been set down. The criteria to achieve the objectives are outlined. The construction of VVER Thermal-Hydraulic Code Validation Matrix follows the logic of the CSNI Code Validation Matrices (CCVM). Similar to the CCVM it is an attempt to collect together in a systematic way the best sets of available test data for VVER specific code validation, assessment and improvement, including quantitative assessment of uncertainties in the modelling of phenomena by the codes. In addition to this objective, it is an attempt to record information which has been generated in countries operating VVER reactors over the last 20 years so that it is more accessible to present and future workers in that field than would otherwise be the case. (authors)

  14. Topical menthol increases cutaneous blood flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craighead, Daniel H; Alexander, Lacy M

    2016-09-01

    Menthol, the active ingredient in several topically applied analgesics, activates transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8) receptors on sensory nerves and on the vasculature inducing a cooling sensation on the skin. Ilex paraguariensis is also a common ingredient in topical analgesics that has potential vasoactive properties and may alter the mechanisms of action of menthol. We sought to characterize the microvascular effects of topical menthol and ilex application and to determine the mechanism(s) through which these compounds may independently and combined alter cutaneous blood flow. We hypothesized that menthol would induce vasoconstriction and that ilex would not alter skin blood flow (SkBF). Three separate protocols were conducted to examine menthol and ilex-mediated changes in SkBF. In protocol 1, placebo, 4% menthol, 0.7% ilex, and combination menthol+ilex gels were applied separately to the skin and red cell flux was continuously measured utilizing laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI). In protocol 2, seven concentrations of menthol gel (0.04%, 0.4%, 1%, 2%, 4%, 7%, 8%) were applied to the skin to model the dose-response curve. In protocol 3, placebo, menthol, ilex, and menthol+ilex gels were applied to skin under local thermal control (34°C) both with and without sensory nerve blockage (topical lidocaine 4%). Post-occlusive reactive hyperemia (PORH) and local heating (42°C) protocols were conducted to determine the relative contribution of endothelium derived hyperpolarizing factors (EDHFs)/sensory nerves and nitric oxide (NO), respectively. Red cell flux was normalized to mean arterial pressure expressed as cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC: flux·mmHg(-1)) in all protocols. Topical menthol application increased SkBF compared to placebo (3.41±0.33 vs 1.1±0.19CVC: peffect, p<0.05) with an ED50 of 1.0%. Similarly, SkBF was increased after menthol application during PORH (3.62±0.29 vs. 2.50±0.21flux·mmHg(-1); p<0.001), but not local heating

  15. Interaction between thermal/hydraulics, human factors and system analysis for assessing feed and bleed risk benefits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For probabilistic analysis of accident sequences, thermal/hydraulics, human factors and systems operation problems are frequently closely interrelated. This presentation will discuss a typical example which illustrates this interrelation: total loss of feedwater flow. It will present thermal/hydraulic analyses performed, how the T/H analyses are related to human factors and systems operation, and how, based on this, the failure probability of the feed and bleed cooling mode was evaluated. This analysis was part of the probabilistic safety analysis conducted for French 900 MWe plants by the CEA. (orig./HSCH)

  16. Ethical use of topical corticosteroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abir Saraswat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dermatologists rely very heavily on corticosteroids for treating many common dermatoses. Concerns about their incorrect use are widely expressed both in lay public and specialist discourse. From the point of view of medical ethics, issues of autonomy, beneficence and non-maleficence are all raised frequently when we prescribe topical corticosteroids to our patients. We need to be aware of situations when conflicts between these issues arise and have a clear thought process about resolving them. This can only be achieved if we have a thorough understanding of the skin disease being treated coupled with expertise in the use of the varied potencies and available dosage forms of topical corticosteroids. A good understanding of human psychology and effective communication is also needed to use these agents optimally.

  17. Four (Somewhat Nonstandard) Research Topics

    OpenAIRE

    Paun, Gheorghe; Research Group on Natural Computing (Universidad de Sevilla) (Coordinador)

    2014-01-01

    Four research directions are suggested, dealing with the following four main ideas: computing along the axon (up to now, this topic was only preliminarily investi- gated), using pre-computed resources in order to solve computationally hard problems, considering in P systems both objects \\of matter" and \\of anti-matter" (which annihilate each other when meet), and considering the distance (naturally de ned in a membrane structure of a given type) as a support of information.

  18. Preface to Special Topic: Optofluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ai-qun

    2010-01-01

    This Special Topic section of Biomicrofluidics is on optofluidics or micro-optofluidic systems (MOFS), a burgeoning technology that aims to manipulate light and fluid at microscale and exploits their interaction to create highly versatile devices and integrated systems. This special issue puts together various contributed articles focusing on optofluidics or MOFS, which help inspire new research ideas and innovation in the microfluidics and nanofluidics community.

  19. Stochastic Analysis and Related Topics

    CERN Document Server

    Ustunel, Ali

    1988-01-01

    The Silvri Workshop was divided into a short summer school and a working conference, producing lectures and research papers on recent developments in stochastic analysis on Wiener space. The topics treated in the lectures relate to the Malliavin calculus, the Skorohod integral and nonlinear functionals of white noise. Most of the research papers are applications of these subjects. This volume addresses researchers and graduate students in stochastic processes and theoretical physics.

  20. Topics in clinical oncology. 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The monograph comprising primarily papers on topical subjects of oncology and cancer research, contains also a selection of papers presented at the 2. Congress of the Czechoslovak Society of Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Hygiene. Seven papers were selected on behalf of their subject related to clinical oncology. All of them were iputted in INIS; five of them deal with the scintiscanning of the skeleton of cancer patients, one with radioimmunodetection of tumors, and one with radionuclide lymphography. (A.K.)

  1. Hot topics from the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenzinski, D.; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    The Tevatron Run-II began in March 2001. To date, both the CDF and D0 experiments have collected 1 fb{sup -1} of data each. The results obtained from this data set were summarized at this conference in 39 parallel session presentations covering a wide range of topics. The author summarizes the most important of those results here and comments on some of the prospects for the future.

  2. Topic prominence in Chinese EFL learners’ interlanguage

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shaopeng; Yang, Lianrui

    2014-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the general characteristics of topic-prominent typological interlanguage development of Chinese learners of English in terms of acquiring subject-prominent English structures from a discourse perspec- tive. Topic structures mainly appear in Chinese discourse in the form of topic chains (Wang, 2002; 2004). The research target are the topic chain, which is the main topic-prominent structure in Chinese discourse, and zero anaphora, which is the most common t...

  3. Influence of the Thermal Inertia in the European Simplified Procedures for the Assessment of Buildings’ Energy Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Evangelisti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to highlight the importance of thermal inertia in buildings. Nowadays, it is possible to use energy analysis software to simulate the building energy performance. Considering Italian standards, these analyses are based on the UNI TS 11300 that defines the procedures for the national implementation of the UNI EN ISO 13790. These standards require an energy analysis under steady-state condition, underestimating the thermal inertia of the building. In order to understand the inertial behavior of walls, a cubic Test-Cell was modelled through the dynamic calculation code TRNSYS and three different wall types were tested. Different stratigraphies, characterized by the same thermal transmittance value, composed by massive elements and insulating layers in different order, were simulated. Through TRNSYS, it was possible to define maximum surface temperatures and to calculate thermal lag between maximum values, both external and internal. Moreover, the attenuation between external surface temperatures and internal ones during summer (July was calculated. Finally, the comparison between Test-Cell’s annual energy demands, performed by using a commercial code based on the Italian standard UNITS 11300 and the dynamic code, TRNSYS, was carried out.

  4. Fracture mechanics assessment of cracks in the HDR reactor pressure vessel due to pressurized thermal shock loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feeding of cold water into the hot ring chamber of a LWR pressure vessel (RPV) during emergency core cooling is treated in this paper on the basis of a series of tests experimentally and analytically. The extensive works in this context have been performed and are under way at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and at University of Tokyo. The thermal shock cyclic loading test and the long term pressurized thermal shock loading test on HDR-RPVs have been carried out. The testing methods and the results of these tests are summarized. Accompanying the tests, the on-line and off-line measurements, the properties of the base metal and the cladding, the metallography and fractography of cracked material, the finite element stress calculation, the fatigue and crack growth in cyclic thermal loading and the long term thermal shocks on the nozzle and the cylinder wall were examined. A few hairline cracks appeared on the cylinder wall after 5000 cycles, and after 9500 cycles, a pronounced crack field was observed. The distribution of the J-integral as a function of time is shown for the cracks in the nozzle and the cylinder. (K.I.)

  5. Advanced experimental tools designed for the assessment of the thermal load applied to the mixing tee and nozzle geometries in the PWR plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal fatigue studies have been started again, after the incident in the heat removal system of the Civaux NPP (may 1998). Thermal fatigue problem was suspected, the cracks occurred in the mixing tee were probably due to the fluctuation at large gap of temperature. This paper introduces the experimental strategy directed by the CEA for assessing the thermal load in the mixing area. 2 mockups of mixing tee, similar in geometry are tested in the FATHERINO facility under similar thermal hydraulic conditions; the first one in brass for selecting the mixing areas where the temperature fluctuation is high and the second one in stainless steel for setting measurements with local specific sensors to determine the thermal load. The specific sensors, Tf fluid, fluxmeter sensor, and the Coefh sensor, record in local, the fluctuation close to the wall in the fluid and in the wall. The heat flux sensor 'fluxmeter' and the heat transfer sensor 'Coefh' are equipped with 3 micro thermocouples in their respective body, non intrusive and typically designed to catch the fluctuations within a low attenuation in the frequency range from 0 to 20 Hz. By applying an inverse heat conduction method to the output data given by the fluxmeter, the wall temperature (mean and fluctuating values) at the internal surface can be accurately determined. The Coefh sensor is like a fluxmeter sensor using the same technology but equipped with a thermocouple in the fluid to determine the heat transfer coefficient. In addition, the results from both experiments (brass and stainless steel mockups) are implemented as input data for the needs of the CFD calculation. The FATHERINO experiment consists of emptying 2 vessels in the mockup, initially field in water and conditioned at low (5 C) and high temperature (80 C). There is a motor pump for each line (cold and hot legs) and the flow rate is controlled by temperature valve

  6. Waste package degradation from thermal and chemical processes in performance assessments for the Yucca Mountain disposal system for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes modeling of waste container degradation in performance assessments conducted between 1984 and 2008 to evaluate feasibility, viability, and assess compliance of a repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. As understanding of the Yucca Mountain disposal system increased, modeling of container degradation evolved from a component of the source term in 1984 to a separate module describing both container and drip shield degradation in 2008. A thermal module for evaluating the influence of higher heat loads from more closely packed, large waste packages was also introduced. In addition, a module for evaluating drift chemistry was added in later PAs to evaluate the potential for localized corrosion of the outer barrier of the waste container composed of Alloy 22, a highly corrosion-resistant nickel–chromium–tungsten–molybdenum alloy. The uncertainty of parameters related to container degradation contributed significantly to the estimated uncertainty of performance measures (cumulative release in assessments prior to 1995 and individual dose, thereafter). - Highlights: • Progression of container modeling from an assumption of complete failure before 1993 to a stochastic description after 1995 is described. • Introduction of thermal-hydrologic model to examine interaction between the engineered and natural barrier, and container degradation is described. • The introduction of a water chemistry module to evaluate the possibility of localized corrosion of the container is described. • The addition of seismic damage models to evaluate container damage from drift degradation and container movement is described

  7. Enhanced Gender Recognition System Using an Improved Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG) Feature from Quality Assessment of Visible Light and Thermal Images of the Human Body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dat Tien; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2016-01-01

    With higher demand from users, surveillance systems are currently being designed to provide more information about the observed scene, such as the appearance of objects, types of objects, and other information extracted from detected objects. Although the recognition of gender of an observed human can be easily performed using human perception, it remains a difficult task when using computer vision system images. In this paper, we propose a new human gender recognition method that can be applied to surveillance systems based on quality assessment of human areas in visible light and thermal camera images. Our research is novel in the following two ways: First, we utilize the combination of visible light and thermal images of the human body for a recognition task based on quality assessment. We propose a quality measurement method to assess the quality of image regions so as to remove the effects of background regions in the recognition system. Second, by combining the features extracted using the histogram of oriented gradient (HOG) method and the measured qualities of image regions, we form a new image features, called the weighted HOG (wHOG), which is used for efficient gender recognition. Experimental results show that our method produces more accurate estimation results than the state-of-the-art recognition method that uses human body images. PMID:27455264

  8. Enhanced Gender Recognition System Using an Improved Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG) Feature from Quality Assessment of Visible Light and Thermal Images of the Human Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dat Tien; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2016-01-01

    With higher demand from users, surveillance systems are currently being designed to provide more information about the observed scene, such as the appearance of objects, types of objects, and other information extracted from detected objects. Although the recognition of gender of an observed human can be easily performed using human perception, it remains a difficult task when using computer vision system images. In this paper, we propose a new human gender recognition method that can be applied to surveillance systems based on quality assessment of human areas in visible light and thermal camera images. Our research is novel in the following two ways: First, we utilize the combination of visible light and thermal images of the human body for a recognition task based on quality assessment. We propose a quality measurement method to assess the quality of image regions so as to remove the effects of background regions in the recognition system. Second, by combining the features extracted using the histogram of oriented gradient (HOG) method and the measured qualities of image regions, we form a new image features, called the weighted HOG (wHOG), which is used for efficient gender recognition. Experimental results show that our method produces more accurate estimation results than the state-of-the-art recognition method that uses human body images. PMID:27455264

  9. Application of High-Resolution Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing and GIS to Assess the Urban Heat Island Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, C. P.; Quattrochi, D. A.; Luvall, J. C.

    1997-01-01

    Day and night airborne thermal infrared image data at 5 m spatial resolution acquired with the 15-channel (0.45 micron - 12.2 micron) Advanced Thermal and Land Applications Sensor (ATLAS) over Alabama, Huntsville on 7 September, 1994 were used to study changes in the thermal signatures of urban land cover types between day and night. Thermal channel number 13 (9.6 micron - 10.2 micron) data with the best noise-equivalent temperature change (NEAT) of 0.25 C after atmospheric corrections and temperature calibration were selected for use in this analysis. This research also examined the relation between land cover irradiance and vegetation amount, using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), obtained by ratioing the difference and the sum of the red (channel number 3: 0.60-0.63 micron) and reflected infrared (channel number 6: 0.76-0.90 micron) ATLAS data. Based on the mean radiance values, standard deviations, and NDVI extracted from 351 pairs of polygons of day and night channel number 13 images for the city of Huntsville, a spatial model of warming and cooling characteristics of commercial, residential, agricultural, vegetation, and water features was developed using a GIS approach. There is a strong negative correlation between NDVI and irradiance of residential, agricultural, and vacant/transitional land cover types, indicating that the irradiance of a land cover type is greatly influenced by the amount of vegetation present. The predominance of forests, agricultural, and residential uses associated with varying degrees of tree cover showed great contrasts with commercial and services land cover types in the center of the city, and favors the development of urban heat islands. The high-resolution thermal infrared images match the complexity of the urban environment, and are capable of characterizing accurately the urban land cover types for the spatial modeling of the urban heat island effect using a GIS approach.

  10. SAFE for PTSD: noncontact psychophysiological measure based on high-resolution thermal imaging to aid in PTSD diagnosis and assessment of treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Familoni, Babajide O.; Ma, Lein; Hutchinson, J. Andrew; Morgan, C. Andrew, III; Rasmusson, Ann; O'Kane, Barbara L.

    2012-06-01

    Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) sometimes develops following exposure to very stressful or traumatic events such as motor vehicle accidents, rape, and war. It is arguably the signature injury of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Previous studies have demonstrated that PTSD sufferers exhibit autonomic hyper-responsiveness to both neutral and trauma-related stimuli. In this study, we propose using high resolution thermal imaging of sweat-pores to obtain a noncontact, remote, and quantifiable measure of the sympathetic autonomic nervous reactivity to guide diagnosis, assess response to treatment, and tease out important cues to suicidality as a PTSD comorbidity.

  11. Environmental Assessment for the Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the US Department of Energy's Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The glass melter would thermally treat mixed waste (hazardous waste contaminated with radioactive constituents largely tritium, Pu-238, and/or Th-230) that was generated at the Mound Plant and is now in storage, by stabilizing the waste in glass blocks. Depending on the radiation level of the waste, the glass melter may operate for 1 to 6 years. Two onsite alternatives and seven offsite alternatives were considered. This environmental assessment indicates that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA, and therefore the finding of no significant impact is made, obviating the need for an environmental impact statement

  12. Environmental Assessment for the Operation of the Glass Melter Thermal Treatment Unit at the US Department of Energy`s Mound Plant, Miamisburg, Ohio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The glass melter would thermally treat mixed waste (hazardous waste contaminated with radioactive constituents largely tritium, Pu-238, and/or Th-230) that was generated at the Mound Plant and is now in storage, by stabilizing the waste in glass blocks. Depending on the radiation level of the waste, the glass melter may operate for 1 to 6 years. Two onsite alternatives and seven offsite alternatives were considered. This environmental assessment indicates that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA, and therefore the finding of no significant impact is made, obviating the need for an environmental impact statement.

  13. Comparison of the efficacy and safety of topical clindamycin and 5% benzoyl peroxide with nadifloxacin cream and 5% benzoyl peroxide gel in the treatment of acne vulgaris and assessment of the effects of these treatments on quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslıhan Kırkağaç

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Acne vulgaris is a multifactorial chronic inflammatory disase of the pilosebaceous unit. Topical antibiotics and anti-inflammatory treatment are used for mild and moderate acne. Clindamycin is frequently used for acne treatment, altough nadifloxacin is a relatively new agent. There are few studies evaluating nadifloxacin efficacy. It's impact on quality of life has not been determined previously. In this study, it is aimed to compare the effect of these two agents, and to evaluate the effect of these treatments on quality of life. Materials and Methods: Eighty patients with mild-moderate acne vulgaris were divided in two groups of 40 people that had no difference in terms of age, gender and acne severity. The combination of topical clindamycin and 5% benzoyl peroxide gel twice a day was given to group 1 for 12 weeks. The combination of nadifloxacin cream and 5% benzoyl peroxide gel twice a day was given to group 2 for 12 weeks. The number of the inflammatory and non-inflammatory lesions were recorded at baseline and on weeks 2, 4, 8, 12 and side effects were recorded and evaluated. Global improvement was evaluated separately by patients and doctor after the treatment. Before and after the treatment, the quality of life of the patients were evaluated with Skindex-29. Results: Both treatment group regimens were significantly effective on inflammatory and non-inflammatory lesions and were well tolerated by patients in terms of side effects. It was also observed that there was statistically significant recovery after treatment in terms of clinical severity and quality of life. There was not any statistically significant difference between two treatment methods in terms of effectiveness, side effect and quality of life. Conclusion: Nadifloxacin and 5% benzoyl peroxide combination is effective in the treatment and improvement of quality of life in acne patients.

  14. Assessment of the Effectiveness of Silver-Coated Dressing, Chlorhexidine Acetate (0.5%), Citric Acid (3%), and Silver Sulfadiazine (1%) for Topical Antibacterial Effects Against the Multi-Drug Resistant Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infecting Full-Skin Thickness Burn Wounds on Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Yabanoglu, Hakan; Basaran, Ozgur; Aydogan, Cem; Azap, Ozlem Kurt; Karakayali, Feza; Moray, Gokhan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of four different topical antimicrobial dressings on a multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa contaminated full-thickness burn wound rat model. A total of 40 adult male Wistar albino rats were used. The control group (group 1), silver sulfadiazine (1%) group 2, chlorhexidine acetate (0.5%) group 3, citric acid (3%) group 4, and silver-coated dressing group 5 were compared to assess the antibacterial effects of a daily application to a 30% ...

  15. Comparative Assessment of Thermal Performance of Existing Roof System and Retrofitted Green Roof System in Istanbul, Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Nil TÜRKERİ; M. Cem ALTUN; Caner GÖÇER

    2011-01-01

    Urban heat islands, temperature increase due to climate change and energy consumption due to high summer cooling load are significant issues in Turkey. International studies indicate that the green roof system serves as an energy efficient building technology. However, the thermal performance of green roofs when exposed to local climate conditions is still unknown in Turkey. A research project is being conducted at Istanbul Technical University, in which part of a low-slope existing roof syst...

  16. Assessment of the impact of moving fluids on the regional thermal field for the area of Brandenburg (North German Basin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack, V.; Scheck-Wenderoth, M.; Cacace, M.; Lewerenz, B.

    2012-04-01

    We present results from numerical simulations of the 3D thermal field for the area of Brandenburg in the North German Basin. The study area encompasses a part of the basin centre in the north, whereas to the south the basin margin is enclosed. Starting with Permocarboniferous volcanic rocks the basin fill is represented by Permian to Cenozoic sediments. A thick layer of mobilized salt (Zechstein, Upper Permian) generated elevated structures such as salt pillows and diapirs. Especially where diapirs pierce their overburden, the overlying deposits are strongly influenced in their thickness and distribution. This special configuration of the Zechstein salt is relevant for the thermal calculations due to the fact that salt has a distinctly higher thermal conductivity than the surrounding sediments and is impermeable to fluid flow. Therefore, the Zechstein salt acts as a conductive chimney for heat and a hydraulic decoupling horizon between the Pre-Permian and the Mesozoic-Cenozoic strata. The latter are characterized by two further quasi-impervious sediment complexes, the Rupelian-clay and the Muschelkalk. These two divide the Post-Permian strata in three main aquifer systems: the Buntsandstein, Keuper to Pre-Rupelian and the Post-Rupelian complex. Based on results from purely conductive modelling we additionally analyse the influence of moving fluids on the shallow temperature field above the Zechstein salt. Therefore coupled fluid flow and heat transfer numerical simulations are carried out to investigate the hydrothermal field. The 3D simulations for the heat transport processes are based on the finite element method. The results indicate that the distribution of thermal conductivities in the basin fill controls the short-wavelength pattern of the temperature distribution whereas the long wavelength pattern results from interaction between the highly conductive crust and low conductive sediments. Furthermore, the results reveal that the shallow temperature field

  17. Topics in black hole evaporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two major aspects of particle creation by gravitational fields of black holes are studied: the neutrino emission from rotating black holes; and interactions between scalar particles emitted by a black hole. Neutrino emission is investigated under three topics: The asymmetry of the angular dependence of neutrino emission from rotating black holes; the production of a local matter excess by rotating black holes in a baryon symmetric universe; and cosmological magnetic field generation by neutrinos from evaporating black holes. Finally the author studies the effects of interactions on the black hole evaporation process

  18. Topics in strangeness nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strangeness nuclear physics bears a broad impact on contemporary physics since it lies at the intersection of nuclear and elementary particle physics, having, moreover, significant implications to the astrophysics of compact objects. This set of extensive lectures presents a balanced theoretical and experimental introduction to, and survey of, the field, addressing topics such as the production and spectroscopy of strange nuclear systems, modern approaches to the hyperon-nucleon interaction, and weak decays of hypernuclei. With new experiments underway, this burgeoning research field is well served by this tutorial primer and review for both newcomers and seasoned researchers alike. (orig.)

  19. Topics in commutative ring theory

    CERN Document Server

    Watkins, John J

    2009-01-01

    Topics in Commutative Ring Theory is a textbook for advanced undergraduate students as well as graduate students and mathematicians seeking an accessible introduction to this fascinating area of abstract algebra. Commutative ring theory arose more than a century ago to address questions in geometry and number theory. A commutative ring is a set-such as the integers, complex numbers, or polynomials with real coefficients--with two operations, addition and multiplication. Starting from this simple definition, John Watkins guides readers from basic concepts to Noetherian rings-one of

  20. Modern topics in electron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Frois, Bernard

    1991-01-01

    This book summarizes the considerable progress recently achieved in the understanding of nucleon and nuclear structure by using high energy electrons as a probe. A collection of papers discusses in detail the new frontiers of this field. Experimental and theoretical articles cover topics such as the structure of the nucleon, nucleon distributions, many-body correlations, non-nucleonic degrees of freedom and few-body systems. This book is an up-to-date introduction to the research planned with continuous beam electron accelerators.

  1. Thermal analyses to assess diffusion kinetics in the nano-sized interspaces between the growing crystals of a glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Macroscopic, routine laboratory methods of the 'Thermal Analysis' type (DSC, DMA) allow a rough description of the kinetics in the nano-sized interstitial spaces of glass ceramics. → These macroscopic measurements support the idea of a rigid zone around the crystals which builds up during ceramization and is part of a negative feedback loop which finally stops crystal growth and Ostwald ripening within the time window of observation. → Ostwald ripening may be provoked by thermally softening said rigid zone. Under certain conditions, this gives rise to a characteristic peak in the DSC. - Abstract: According to a hypothesis by Ruessel and coworkers, the absence of Ostwald ripening during isothermal crystallization of lithium aluminosilicate (LAS) and other glass ceramics indicates the existence of a kinetic hindrance of atomic reorganization in the interstitial spaces between the crystals. Methods of Thermal Analysis (Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA)) which are sensitive to the local atomic rearrangements in the interstitial spaces (including viscous flow) are applied to find support for the idea of kinetic hindrance and the formation of a core shell structure acting as diffusion barrier. Both the DSC-measured calorimetric glass transition and the DMA-measured viscoelastic properties indicate an increase in the time constants of atomic rearrangements and diffusion by at least two orders of magnitude during ceramization. This fits to the above idea. Based on these findings, thermo analytic studies have been performed in order to find out how Ostwald ripening may be provoked.

  2. Assessment of extent and degree of thermal damage to polymeric materials in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes assumptions and procedures used to perform thermal damage analysis caused by post loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) hydrogen deflagration at Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor. Examination of available photographic evidence yields data on the extent and range of thermal and burn damage. Thermal damage to susceptible material in accessible regions of the reactor building was distributed in non-uniform patterns. No clear explanation for non-uniformity was found in examined evidence, e.g., burned materials were adjacent to materials that appear similar but were not burned. Because these items were in proximity to vertical openings that extend the height of the reactor building, the authors assume the unburned materials preferentially absorbed water vapor during periods of high, local steam concentration. A control pendant from the polar crane located in the top of the reactor building sustained asymmetric burn damage of decreasing degree from top to bottom. Evidence suggests the polar-crane pendant side that experienced heaviest damage was exposed to intense radiant energy from a transient fire plume in the reactor containment volume. Simple hydrogen-fire-exposure tests and heat transfer calculations approximate the degree of damage found on inspected materials from the containment building and support for an estimated 8% pre-fire hydrogen

  3. Assessment of fatigue and fracture on a tee-junction of LMFBR piping under thermal striping phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with the industrial problem of thermal striping damage on the French prototype fast breeder reactor, Phenix and it was studied in coordination with the research program of IAEA. The thermomechanical and fracture mechanics evaluation procedure of thermal striping damage on the tee-junction of the secondary piping using Green's function method and standard FEM is presented. The thermohydraulic (T/H) loading condition used in the present analysis is the random type thermal loads computed by T/H analysis on the turbulent mixing of the two flows with different temperatures. The thermomechanical fatigue damage was evaluated according to ASME code section III subsection NH. The results of the fatigue analysis showed that fatigue failure would occur at the welded joint showed that the crack would be initiated at an early stage in the operation. It took 42,698.9 hours for the crack to propagate up to 5 mm along the thickness direction. After then, however, the instability analysis, using tearing modulus, showed that the crack would be arrested, which was in agreement with the actual observation of the crack. An efficient analysis procedure using Green's function approach for the crack propagation problem under random type load was proposed in this study. The analysis results showed good agreement with those of the practical observation. (author). 7 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  4. Assessment of extent and degree of thermal damage to polymeric materials in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes assumptions and procedures used to perform thermal damage analysis caused by post loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) hydrogen deflagration at Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor. Examination of available photographic evidence yields data on the extent and range of thermal and burn damage. Thermal damage to susceptible material in accessible regions of the reactor building was distributed in non-uniform patterns. No clear explanation for non-uniformity was found in examined evidence, e.g., burned materials were adjacent to materials that appear similar but were not burned. Because these items were in proximity to vertical openings that extend the height of the reactor building, we assume the unburned materials preferentially absorbed water vapor during periods of high, local steam concentration. A control pendant from the polar crane located in the top of the reactor building sustained asymmetric burn damage of decreasing degree from top to bottom. Evidence suggests the polar-crane pendant side that experienced heaviest damage was exposed to intense radiant energy from a transient fire plume in the reactor containment volume. Simple hydrogen-fire-exposure tests and heat transfer calculations approximate the degree of damage found on inspected materials from the containment building and support for an estimated 8% pre-fire hydrogen

  5. Assessing energy and thermal comfort of different low-energy cooling concepts for non-residential buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Impact of five cooling technologies are simulated in six European climate zones with Trnsys 17. • The ventilation strategies reduce the cooling energy need even in South Europe climate. • Constant ventilation controller can lead to a poor cooling performance. • Comparing radiant strategies with air conditioning scenario, the energy saving is predicted to within 5–35%. - Abstract: Energy consumption for cooling is growing dramatically. In the last years, electricity peak consumption grew significantly, switching from winter to summer in many EU countries. This is endangering the stability of electricity grids. This article outlines a comprehensive analysis of an office building performances in terms of energy consumption and thermal comfort (in accordance with static – ISO 7730:2005 – and adaptive thermal comfort criteria – EN 15251:2007 –) related to different cooling concepts in six different European climate zones. The work is based on a series of dynamic simulations carried out in the Trnsys 17 environment for a typical office building. The simulation study was accomplished for five cooling technologies: natural ventilation (NV), mechanical night ventilation (MV), fan-coils (FC), suspended ceiling panels (SCP), and concrete core conditioning (CCC) applied in Stockholm, Hamburg, Stuttgart, Milan, Rome, and Palermo. Under this premise, the authors propose a methodology for the evaluation of the cooling concepts taking into account both, thermal comfort and energy consumption

  6. Thermal Analysis by Structural Characterization as a Method for Assessing Heterogeneity in Complex Solid Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhijjaj, Muqdad; Reading, Mike; Belton, Peter; Qi, Sheng

    2015-11-01

    Characterizing inter- and intrasample heterogeneity of solid and semisolid pharmaceutical products is important both for rational design of dosage forms and subsequent quality control during manufacture; however, most pharmaceutical products are multicomponent formulations that are challenging in this regard. Thermal analysis, in particular differential scanning calorimetry, is commonly used to obtain structural information, such as degree of crystallinity, or identify the presence of a particular polymorph, but the results are an average over the whole sample; it cannot directly provide information about the spatial distribution of phases. This study demonstrates the use of a new thermo-optical technique, thermal analysis by structural characterization (TASC), that can provide spatially resolved information on thermal transitions by applying a novel algorithm to images acquired by hot stage microscopy. We determined that TASC can be a low cost, relatively rapid method of characterizing heterogeneity and other aspects of structure. In the examples studied, it was found that high heating rates enabled screening times of 3-5 min per sample. In addition, this study demonstrated the higher sensitivity of TASC for detecting the metastable form of polyethylene glycol (PEG) compared to conventional differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). This preliminary work suggests that TASC will be a worthwhile additional tool for characterizing a broad range of materials. PMID:26430775

  7. Gibraltar; Assessment of Financial Sector Supervision and Regulation including Reports on the Observance of Standards and Codes on the following topics: Banking Supervision, Insurance Supervision, and Anti-Money Laundering and Combating the Financing of Terrorism

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents Gibraltar’s assessment of Financial Sector Supervision and Regulation including reports on the Observance of Standards and Codes on banking and insurance supervision. The Financial Services Commission has been assigned significant additional resources and has developed a well-structured approach to the management of its resources that includes a risk-based approach to supervision. The assessment found a high standard of compliance with the Basel Core Principles for banki...

  8. Quantitative compositional analysis of sedimentary materials using thermal emission spectroscopy: 2. Application to compacted fine-grained mineral mixtures and assessment of applicability of partial least squares methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, C.; Rogers, A. D.; Thorpe, M. T.

    2015-11-01

    Fine-grained sedimentary deposits on planetary surfaces require quantitative assessment of mineral abundances in order to better understand the environments in which they formed. One way that planetary surface mineralogy is commonly assessed is through thermal emission (~6-50 µm) spectroscopy. To that end, we characterized the TIR spectral properties of compacted, very fine-grained mineral mixtures of oligoclase, augite, calcite, montmorillonite, and gypsum. Nonnegative linear least squares minimization (NNLS) is used to assess the linearity of spectral combination. A partial least squares (PLS) method is also applied to emission spectra of fine-grained synthetic mixtures and natural mudstones to assess its applicability to fine-grained rocks. The NNLS modeled abundances for all five minerals investigated are within ±10% of the known abundances for 39% of the mixtures, showing the relationships between known and modeled abundance follow nonlinear curves. The poor performance of NNLS is due to photon transmission through small grains over portions of the wavelength range and multiple reflections in the volume. The PLS method was able to accurately recover the known abundances (to within ±10%) for 78-90% of synthetic mixtures and for 85% of the mudstone samples chosen for this study. The excellent agreement between known and modeled abundances is likely due to high absorption coefficients over portions of the thermal infrared (TIR) spectral range, and thus, combinations are linear over portions of the range. PLS can be used to recover abundances from very fine-grained rocks from TIR measurements and could potentially be applied to landed or orbital TIR observations.

  9. On-line Hot Topic Recommendation Using Tolerance Rough Set Based Topic Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghui Wu

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present our research of online hot topic detection and label extraction method for our hot topic recommendation system. Using a new topical feature selection method, the feature space is compressed suitable for an online system. The tolerance rough set model is used to enriching the small set of topical feature words to a topical approximation space. According to the distance defined on the topical approximation space, the web pages are clustered into groups which will be merged with document overlap. The topic labels are extracted based on the approximation topical space enriched with the useful but high frequency topical words dropped by the clustering process. The experiments show that our method could generate more information abundant classes and more topical class labels, alleviate the topical drift caused by the non-topical and noise words.

  10. Compliance with topical glaucoma medications in Owo, Nigeria.

    OpenAIRE

    BO OMOLASE; OA ADEOSUN; AK AKINWALERE; OA SOTILOYE; OT OGUNLEYE; CO OMOLASE

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Poor compliance with medications is a major challenge in the management of primary open angle glaucoma as it can lead to deterioration of eyesight. This study assessed the compliance with glaucoma medications among patients attending an Eye Clinic in Nigeria. We also assessed the problems encountered during the applications of topical medications. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted over a period of one year (October 2011 to October 2012) at the Eye Clinic of the Fed...

  11. The degree of hydration assessment of blended cement pastes by differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis. Morphological evolution of the solid phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteagudo, S.M., E-mail: sm.monteagudo@alumnos.upm.es [Departamento de Ingeniería Civil: Construcción, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros de Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Moragues, A., E-mail: amoragues@caminos.upm.es [Departamento de Ingeniería Civil: Construcción, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros de Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Gálvez, J.C., E-mail: jaime.galvez@upm.es [Departamento de Ingeniería Civil: Construcción, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros de Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Casati, M.J., E-mail: mariajesus.casati@upm.es [Departamento de Vehículos Aeroespaciales, Escuela de Ingeniería Aeronáutica, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (Spain); Reyes, E., E-mail: encarnacion.reyes@upm.es [Departamento de Ingeniería Civil: Construcción, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieros de Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2014-09-20

    Highlights: • A proposal of hydration degree calculation for blended cement pastes is presented. • The method is based both on the contributions of various authors and on DTA–TG results. • Paste and mortar specimens with BFS, FA and SF mineral admixtures were used. • The evaluation of CH gives information on hydration and pozzolanic reactions. • The assessment of α provides an insight into future strength evolution. - Abstract: The degree of hydration assessment of cement paste from differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis data has been performed by several authors that have offered a number of proposals for technical application to blended cements. In this paper, two calculation methods are studied in detail. Then, a proposal of the degree of hydration calculation for blended cements, based on the analysis of experimental results of DTA–TG, is presented. The proposed method combines the contributions of the authors and allows straightforward calculation of the degree of hydration from the experimental results. Validation of the methodology was performed by macroscopic and microstructural tests through paste and mortar specimens with blast furnace slag, flying ash and silica fume mineral admixtures bei(g)ng used. Tests of scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive analyser on paste specimens, and of mechanical strength on mortar specimens with the same percentages of substitution, were performed. They showed good agreement with the information derived from the differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis data.

  12. The degree of hydration assessment of blended cement pastes by differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis. Morphological evolution of the solid phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A proposal of hydration degree calculation for blended cement pastes is presented. • The method is based both on the contributions of various authors and on DTA–TG results. • Paste and mortar specimens with BFS, FA and SF mineral admixtures were used. • The evaluation of CH gives information on hydration and pozzolanic reactions. • The assessment of α provides an insight into future strength evolution. - Abstract: The degree of hydration assessment of cement paste from differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis data has been performed by several authors that have offered a number of proposals for technical application to blended cements. In this paper, two calculation methods are studied in detail. Then, a proposal of the degree of hydration calculation for blended cements, based on the analysis of experimental results of DTA–TG, is presented. The proposed method combines the contributions of the authors and allows straightforward calculation of the degree of hydration from the experimental results. Validation of the methodology was performed by macroscopic and microstructural tests through paste and mortar specimens with blast furnace slag, flying ash and silica fume mineral admixtures bei(g)ng used. Tests of scanning electron microscopy with an energy dispersive analyser on paste specimens, and of mechanical strength on mortar specimens with the same percentages of substitution, were performed. They showed good agreement with the information derived from the differential thermal and thermogravimetric analysis data

  13. Georgia-Pacific Palatka Plant Uses Thermal Pinch Analysis and Evaluates Water Reduction in Plant-Wide Energy Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-12-01

    This OIT BestPractices Case Study describes the methods and results used in a plant-wide assessment at a Georgia-Pacific paper mill in Palatka, FL. Assessment personnel recommended several projects, which, if implemented, have the potential to save the plant more than 729,000 MMBtu per year and $2.9 million per year. In addition, the plant could reduce water use by 2,100 gallons per minute.

  14. Human-competitive automatic topic indexing

    CERN Document Server

    Medelyan, Olena

    2009-01-01

    Topic indexing is the task of identifying the main topics covered by a document. These are useful for many purposes: as subject headings in libraries, as keywords in academic publications and as tags on the web. Knowing a document’s topics helps people judge its relevance quickly. However, assigning topics manually is labor intensive. This thesis shows how to generate them automatically in a way that competes with human performance. Three kinds of indexing are investigated: term assignment, a task commonly performed by librarians, who select topics from a controlled vocabulary; tagging, a popular activity of web users, who choose topics freely; and a new method of keyphrase extraction, where topics are equated to Wikipedia article names. A general two-stage algorithm is introduced that first selects candidate topics and then ranks them by significance based on their properties. These properties draw on statistical, semantic, domain-specific and encyclopedic knowledge. They are combined using a machine learn...

  15. On-line Hot Topic Recommendation Using Tolerance Rough Set Based Topic Clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Yonghui Wu; Yuxin Ding; Xiaolong Wang; Jun Xu

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we present our research of online hot topic detection and label extraction method for our hot topic recommendation system. Using a new topical feature selection method, the feature space is compressed suitable for an online system. The tolerance rough set model is used to enriching the small set of topical feature words to a topical approximation space. According to the distance defined on the topical approximation space, the web pages are clustered into groups which will be mer...

  16. Using High-Resolution Hyperspectral and Thermal Airborne Imagery to Assess Physiological Condition in the Context of Wheat Phenotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Gonzalez-Dugo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing need for developing high-throughput tools for crop phenotyping that would increase the rate of genetic improvement. In most cases, the indicators used for this purpose are related with canopy structure (often acquired with RGB cameras and multispectral sensors allowing the calculation of NDVI, but using approaches related with the crop physiology are rare. High-resolution hyperspectral remote sensing imagery provides optical indices related to physiological condition through the quantification of photosynthetic pigment and chlorophyll fluorescence emission. This study demonstrates the use of narrow-band indicators of stress as a potential tool for phenotyping under rainfed conditions using two airborne datasets acquired over a wheat experiment with 150 plots comprising two species and 50 varieties (bread and durum wheat. The flights were performed at the early stem elongation stage and during the milking stage. Physiological measurements made at the time of flights demonstrated that the second flight was made during the terminal stress, known to largely determine final yield under rainfed conditions. The hyperspectral imagery enabled the extraction of thermal, radiance, and reflectance spectra from 260 spectral bands from each plot for the calculation of indices related to photosynthetic pigment absorption in the visible and red-edge regions, the quantification of chlorophyll fluorescence emission, as well as structural indices related to canopy structure. Under the conditions of this study, the structural indices (i.e., NDVI did not show a good performance at predicting yield, probably because of the large effects of terminal water stress. Thermal indices, indices related to chlorophyll fluorescence (calculated using the FLD method, and carotenoids pigment indices (PRI and CAR demonstrated to be better suited for screening complex traits such as crop yield. The study concludes that the indicators derived from high

  17. A Thermal/Hydraulic Safety Assessment of the Blanket Conceptual Design for the Accelerator Production of Tritium Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In support of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project, safety analyses for the blanket system have been performed based on the conceptual design for the Target/Blanket (T/B) Facility. During mitigated event sequences safety engineered features, such as the residual heat removal (RHR) and cavity flood systems, provide sufficient protection for maintaining the structural integrity of the blanket system and its components. During unmitigated (with beam shutdown only) event sequences, passive features such as natural circulation, thermal inertia, and boil-off provide significant time for corrective measures to be taken

  18. Performance assessment of OTEC power systems and thermal power plants. Volume 2: Users manual for PACC-OTECs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leidenfrost, W.; Liley, P. E.; McDonald, A. T.; Mudawwar, I.; Pearson, J. T.

    1985-05-01

    A user's manual for an interactive computer program that can calculate the simulated performance of closed cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power systems is presented. The program was developed for use on the IBM personal computer. The program calculate the thermodynamic properties of the working fluids (ammonia and seawater). This manual specifies the power system flow configuration, the input data requirements, and the results calculated by the program. The geometry of the heat exchangers is also described. A listing of the computer program is included.

  19. Thermophysical properties of alkali metal vapours. Part II - assessment of experimental data on thermal conductivity and viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    Fialho, Paulo; Ramires, Maria de Lurdes V.; Nieto de Castro, Carlos A.; João M. N. A. Fareleira; Mardolcar, Umesh V.

    1994-01-01

    Copyright © 1994 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Article first published online: 8 MAY 2010. An analysis of the available data on the viscosity and thermal conductivity coefficients of the alkali metal vapours is presented. The analysis is based upon theoretical calculations of the properties of the monatomic systems, described in the preceding parts I and I.A of the present paper, and making use of the kinetic theory of a binary gas reacting mixture. A summary of the measur...

  20. 3-D numerical simulation of Yb:YAG active slabs with longitudinal doping gradient for thermal load effects assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, P; Ciofini, M; Esposito, L; Hostaša, J; Labate, L; Lapucci, A; Pirri, A; Toci, G; Vannini, M; Gizzi, L A

    2014-03-10

    We present a study of Yb:YAG active media slabs, based on a ceramic layered structure with different doping levels. We developed a procedure allowing 3D numerical analysis of the slab optical properties as a consequence of the thermal load induced by the pump process. The simulations are compared with a set of experimental results in order to validate the procedure. These structured ceramics appear promising in appropriate geometrical configurations, and thus are intended to be applied in the construction of High Energy Diode Pumped Solid State Laser (DPSSL) systems working in high repetition-rate pulsed regimes. PMID:24663877

  1. Topical report review status: Volume 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides industry with procedures for submitting topical reports, guidance on how the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) processes and responds to topical report submittals, and an accounting, with review schedules, of all topical reports currently accepted for review by the NRC. This report is published annually

  2. Effects of Preexamination Disclosure of Essay Topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Donald E.; Fowles, Mary E.

    1998-01-01

    To determine the effects on test performance and test validity of releasing essay topics before an examination, 300 prospective graduate students wrote essays on a released and an unreleased topic. Analyses did not reveal any statistically significant effect of topic release. (SLD)

  3. Topics in Banach space theory

    CERN Document Server

    Albiac, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    This text provides the reader with the necessary technical tools and background to reach the frontiers of research without the introduction of too many extraneous concepts. Detailed and accessible proofs are included, as are a variety of exercises and problems. The two new chapters in this second edition are devoted to two topics of much current interest amongst functional analysts: Greedy approximation with respect to bases in Banach spaces and nonlinear geometry of Banach spaces. This new material is intended to present these two directions of research for their intrinsic importance within Banach space theory, and to motivate graduate students interested in learning more about them. This textbook assumes only a basic knowledge of functional analysis, giving the reader a self-contained overview of the ideas and techniques in the development of modern Banach space theory. Special emphasis is placed on the study of the classical Lebesgue spaces Lp (and their sequence space analogues) and spaces of continuous f...

  4. Conclusion from the fifth topic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topic ''mechanics and alteration kinetics of glasses'' is a crucial point for the understanding of the long-term behaviour of nuclear glasses. Kinetic models used in simulation are based on the works made by Grambow who imputes the control of the alteration kinetics of borosilicate glasses to the desorption of the ortho-silica acid produced at the reactive interface. The ensuing kinetics law requires the existence of an equilibrium of the silica at the interface glass/gel and the existence of a linear concentration gradient dissolved in the interstitial gel solution. The role of the gel needs further studies to be well understood. The difficulty lies in the fact that the composition and the structure of the gel varies with time, space (anisotropy) and with the conditions of alteration (temperature, pH, flowrate...). (A.C.)

  5. Synergetics introduction and advanced topics

    CERN Document Server

    Haken, Hermann

    2004-01-01

    This book is an often-requested reprint of two classic texts by H. Haken: "Synergetics. An Introduction" and "Advanced Synergetics". Synergetics, an interdisciplinary research program initiated by H. Haken in 1969, deals with the systematic and methodological approach to the rapidly growing field of complexity. Going well beyond qualitative analogies between complex systems in fields as diverse as physics, chemistry, biology, sociology and economics, Synergetics uses tools from theoretical physics and mathematics to construct an unifying framework within which quantitative descriptions of complex, self-organizing systems can be made. This may well explain the timelessness of H. Haken's original texts on this topic, which are now recognized as landmarks in the field of complex systems. They provide both the beginning graduate student and the seasoned researcher with solid knowledge of the basic concepts and mathematical tools. Moreover, they admirably convey the spirit of the pioneering work by the founder of ...

  6. Current Topics in Epilepsy Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Naotaka

    2016-05-15

    This article reviews the current topics in the field of epilepsy surgery. Each type of epilepsy is associated with a different set of questions and goals. In mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) with hippocampal sclerosis (HS), postoperative seizure outcome is satisfactory. A recent meta-analysis revealed superior seizure outcome after anterior temporal lobectomy compared with selective amygdalohippocampectomy; in terms of cognitive outcome; however, amygdalohippocampectomy may be beneficial. In temporal lobe epilepsy with normal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), postoperative seizure outcome is not as favorable as it is in MTLE with HS; further improvement of seizure outcome in these cases is necessary. Focal cortical dysplasia is the most common substrate in intractable neocortical epilepsy, especially in children, as well as in MRI-invisible neocortical epilepsy. Postoperative seizure-free outcome is approximately 60-70%; further diagnostic and therapeutic improvement is required. Regarding diagnostic methodology, an important topic currently under discussion is wideband electroencephalogram (EEG) analysis. Although high-frequency oscillations and ictal direct current shifts are considered important markers of epileptogenic zones, the clinical significance of these findings should be clarified further. Regarding alternatives to surgery, neuromodulation therapy can be an option for patients who are not amenable to resective surgery. In addition to vagus nerve stimulation, intracranial stimulation such as responsive neurostimulation or anterior thalamic stimulation is reported to have a modest seizure suppression effect. Postoperative management such as rehabilitation and antiepileptic drug (AED) management is important. It has been reported that postoperative rehabilitation improves postoperative employment status. Pre- and post-operative comprehensive care is mandatory for postoperative improvement of quality of life. PMID:26984452

  7. Current topics in radiation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current research topics in radiation measurements will be shown in this presentation. Applications of radiation measurements have grown with the development of radiation sources and new measurement techniques. Recent new developments in this field are briefly introduced. Optical techniques such as lasers and fiber optics, which are widely used in an optical communication field, are successfully applied to radiation measurements. Micro-fabrication techniques and the photolithography technique are indispensable for semiconductor or even gas detectors. Complicated analog signal processing is being simplified by the use of fast computation techniques available in digital chips. Cryogenic X-ray detectors are making a great progress in the energy resolution. Some of the current research topics found in the recent journals and international symposiums are as follows: the development of room temperature semiconductor radiation detectors like CdZnTe and SiC, new signal processing methods such as coplanar grid unipolar charge sensing, medical γ-ray imaging, the development of cryogenic X-ray detectors such as STJs (Superconducting Tunnel Junction) and TES (Transition Edge Sensor) microcalorimeters, micromachined gas proportional counters like MSGC/MGC/GEM, new detection system which requires both the energy and spatial resolutions, the search of longer wavelength scintillators, development of new fast scintillators such as LSO/YAP/LuAP, new digital waveform processing based on fast digitizing technique, etc. Current developments are especially focused on the increase of the information derived from the detector and the improvement in the resolution. One of the other directions of the development is toward the microscopic visualization of the radiation. Such an approach must solve many technological difficulties both in fabrication of the detectors and even in the detection scheme, however, we might proceed to open a new phase of radiation measurements soon. (author)

  8. A One-year, Short-Stay Crewed Mars Mission Using Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Electric Propulsion (BNTEP) - A Preliminary Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Laura A.; Borowski, Stanley K.; McCurdy, David R.; Packard, Thomas W.

    2013-01-01

    A crewed mission to Mars poses a signi cant challenge in dealing with the physiolog- ical issues that arise with the crew being exposed to a near zero-gravity environment as well as signi cant solar and galactic radiation for such a long duration. While long sur- face stay missions exceeding 500 days are the ultimate goal for human Mars exploration, short round trip, short surface stay missions could be an important intermediate step that would allow NASA to demonstrate technology as well as study the physiological e ects on the crew. However, for a 1-year round trip mission, the outbound and inbound hy- perbolic velocity at Earth and Mars can be very large resulting in a signi cant propellant requirement for a high thrust system like Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP). Similarly, a low thrust Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) system requires high electrical power lev- els (10 megawatts electric (MWe) or more), plus advanced power conversion technology to achieve the lower speci c mass values needed for such a mission. A Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Electric Propulsion (BNTEP) system is examined here that uses three high thrust Bimodal Nuclear Thermal Rocket (BNTR) engines allowing short departure and capture maneuvers. The engines also generate electrical power that drives a low thrust Electric Propulsion (EP) system used for ecient interplanetary transit. This combined system can help reduce the total launch mass, system and operational requirements that would otherwise be required for equivalent NEP or Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) mission. The BNTEP system is a hybrid propulsion concept where the BNTR reactors operate in two separate modes. During high-thrust mode operation, each BNTR provides 10's of kilo- Newtons of thrust at reasonably high speci c impulse (Isp) of 900 seconds for impulsive trans-planetary injection and orbital insertion maneuvers. When in power generation / EP mode, the BNTR reactors are coupled to a Brayton power conversion system allowing each

  9. Multilingual Topic Models for Unaligned Text

    CERN Document Server

    Boyd-Graber, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    We develop the multilingual topic model for unaligned text (MuTo), a probabilistic model of text that is designed to analyze corpora composed of documents in two languages. From these documents, MuTo uses stochastic EM to simultaneously discover both a matching between the languages and multilingual latent topics. We demonstrate that MuTo is able to find shared topics on real-world multilingual corpora, successfully pairing related documents across languages. MuTo provides a new framework for creating multilingual topic models without needing carefully curated parallel corpora and allows applications built using the topic model formalism to be applied to a much wider class of corpora.

  10. Topical Day on Site Remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ongoing activities at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre relating to site remediation and restoration are summarized. Special attention has been paid to the different phases of remediation including characterization, impact assessment, evaluation of remediation actions, and execution of remediation actions

  11. Topical Day on Site Remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenhove, H. [ed.

    1996-09-18

    Ongoing activities at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre relating to site remediation and restoration are summarized. Special attention has been paid to the different phases of remediation including characterization, impact assessment, evaluation of remediation actions, and execution of remediation actions.

  12. Topical antifungals for seborrhoeic dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Okokon, Enembe O; Verbeek, Jos H.; Ruotsalainen, Jani H; Ojo, Olumuyiwa A; Bakhoya, Victor Nyange

    2015-01-01

    Background Seborrhoeic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that is distributed worldwide. It commonly affects the scalp, face and flexures of the body. Treatment options include antifungal drugs, steroids, calcineurin inhibitors, keratolytic agents and phototherapy. Objectives To assess the effects of antifungal agents for seborrhoeic dermatitis of the face and scalp in adolescents and adults. A secondary objective is to assess whether the same interventions are effective in t...

  13. Assessment of Models of Galactic Thermal Dust Emission Using COBE/FIRAS and COBE/DIRBE Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Odegard, N; Chuss, D T; Miller, N J

    2016-01-01

    Accurate modeling of the spectrum of thermal dust emission at millimeter wavelengths is important for improving the accuracy of foreground subtraction for CMB measurements, for improving the accuracy with which the contributions of different foreground emission components can be determined, and for improving our understanding of dust composition and dust physics. We fit four models of dust emission to high Galactic latitude COBE/FIRAS and COBE/DIRBE observations from 3 millimeters to 100 microns and compare the quality of the fits. We consider the two-level systems model because it provides a physically motivated explanation for the observed long wavelength flattening of the dust spectrum and the anticorrelation between emissivity index and dust temperature. We consider the model of Finkbeiner, Davis, and Schlegel because it has been widely used for CMB studies, and the generalized version of this model recently applied to Planck data by Meisner and Finkbeiner. For comparison we have also fit a phenomenologic...

  14. Assessment of thermal damage to polymeric materials by hydrogen deflagration in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal damage to susceptible material in accessible regions of the reactor building was distributed in non-uniform patterns. No clear explanation for non-uniformity was found in examined evidence, e.g., burned materials were adjacent to materials that appear similar but were not burned. Because these items were in proximity to vertical openings that extend the height of the reactor building, we assume the unburned materials preferentially absorbed water vapor during periods of high, local steam concentration. Simple hydrogen-fire-exposure tests and heat transfer calculations duplicate the degree of damage found on inspected materials from the containment building. These data support estimated 8% pre-fire hydrogen concentration predictions based on various hydrogen production mechanisms

  15. WASTE MINIMIZATION ASSESSMENT FOR A MANUFACTURER OF PAPER ROLLS, INK ROLLS, INK RIBBONS, AND MAGNETIC AND THERMAL TRANSFER RIBBON

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S.Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected un...

  16. Republic of Kazakhstan; Financial System Stability Assessment-Update including Reports on the Observance of Standards and Codes on the following topics: Banking Supervision and Anti-Money Laundering and Combating the Financing of Terrorism

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an update on Kazakhstan’s Financial System Stability Assessment including Reports on the Observance of Standards and Codes on Banking Supervision and Anti-Money Laundering and Combating the Financing of Terrorism. Kazakhstan has made impressive improvements in its financial sector legislation, and has revamped its institutional structure for financial sector oversight. The financial sector, which is dominated by banks, has been one of the fastest-growing sectors of the e...

  17. Kingdom of Bahrain: Financial System Stability Assessment, including Reports on the Observance of Standards and Codes on the following topics, Banking Supervision, Insurance Supervision, Securities Regulation, and Anti-Money Laundering and Combating the Financing of Terrorism

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2006-01-01

    The Kingdom of Bahrain’s Financial System Stability Assessment highlights banking supervision, insurance supervision, securities regulation, and antimoney laundering and combating the financing of terrorism. The banking sector is well capitalized. Asset quality has been improving and provisioning is high. Profitability surged in 2004–05, but historically, return on equity has been moderate for many institutions. Favorable liquidity conditions have caused regional equity and real estate ma...

  18. Transfer of Tritium in the Environment after Accidental Releases from Nuclear Facilities. Report of Working Group 7 Tritium Accidents of EMRAS II Topical Heading Approaches for Assessing Emergency Situations. Environmental Modelling for Radiation Safety (Emras II) Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental assessment models are used for evaluating the radiological impact of actual and potential releases of radionuclides to the environment. They are essential tools for use in the regulatory control of routine discharges to the environment and also in planning measures to be taken in the event of accidental releases. They are also used for predicting the impact of releases which may occur far into the future, for example, from underground radioactive waste repositories. It is important to verify, to the extent possible, the reliability of the predictions of such models by a comparison with measured values in the environment or with predictions of other models. The IAEA has been organizing programmes of international model testing since the 1980s. These programmes have contributed to a general improvement in models, in the transfer of data and in the capabilities of modellers in Member States. IAEA publications on this subject over the past three decades demonstrate the comprehensive nature of the programmes and record the associated advances which have been made. From 2009 to 2011, the IAEA organized a programme entitled Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II), which concentrated on the improvement of environmental transfer models and the development of reference approaches to estimate the radiological impacts on humans, as well as on flora and fauna, arising from radionuclides in the environment. Different aspects were addressed by nine working groups covering three themes: reference approaches for human dose assessment, reference approaches for biota dose assessment and approaches for assessing emergency situations. This publication describes the work of the Tritium Accidents Working Group

  19. CFD Analysis for Assessing the Effect of Wind on the Thermal Control of the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Anderson, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The challenging range of landing sites for which the Mars Science Laboratory Rover was designed, requires a rover thermal management system that is capable of keeping temperatures controlled across a wide variety of environmental conditions. On the Martian surface where temperatures can be as cold as -123 C and as warm as 38 C, the rover relies upon a Mechanically Pumped Fluid Loop (MPFL) Rover Heat Rejection System (RHRS) and external radiators to maintain the temperature of sensitive electronics and science instruments within a -40 C to 50 C range. The RHRS harnesses some of the waste heat generated from the rover power source, known as the Multi Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG), for use as survival heat for the rover during cold conditions. The MMRTG produces 110 W of electrical power while generating waste heat equivalent to approximately 2000 W. Heat exchanger plates (hot plates) positioned close to the MMRTG pick up this survival heat from it by radiative heat transfer. Winds on Mars can be as fast as 15 m/s for extended periods. They can lead to significant heat loss from the MMRTG and the hot plates due to convective heat pick up from these surfaces. Estimation of this convective heat loss cannot be accurately and adequately achieved by simple textbook based calculations because of the very complicated flow fields around these surfaces, which are a function of wind direction and speed. Accurate calculations necessitated the employment of sophisticated Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) computer codes. This paper describes the methodology and results of these CFD calculations. Additionally, these results are compared to simple textbook based calculations that served as benchmarks and sanity checks for them. And finally, the overall RHRS system performance predictions will be shared to show how these results affected the overall rover thermal performance.

  20. Assessing the perception and reality of arguments against thermal waste treatment plants in terms of property prices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Previous research studies have shown that EfW facilities negatively impact the local house prices. • In this study property prices surrounding 3 operational EfW plants were analysed. • No significant negative effect on property prices due to an incinerator was found. - Abstract: The thermal processing of waste materials, although considered to be an essential part of waste management, is often sharply contested in the UK. Arguments such as health, depletion of resources, cost, noise, odours, traffic movement and house prices are often cited as reasons against the development of such facilities. This study aims to review the arguments and identify any effect on property prices due to the public perception of the plant. A selection of existing energy from waste (EfW) facilities in the UK, operational for at least 7 years, was selected and property sales data, within 5 km of the sites, was acquired and analysed in detail. The locations of the properties were calculated in relation to the plant using GIS software (ArcGIS) and the distances split into 5 zones ranging from 0 to 5 km from the site. The local property sale prices, normalised against the local house price index, were compared in two time periods, before and after the facility became operational, across each of the 5 zones. In all cases analysed no significant negative effect was observed on property prices at any distance within 5 km from a modern operational incinerator. This indicated that the perceived negative effect of the thermal processing of waste on local property values is negligible