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Sample records for assessment part iii

  1. Integrated Environmental Assessment Part III: ExposureAssessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKone, Thomas E.; Small, Mitchell J.

    2006-06-01

    Human exposure assessment is a key step in estimating the environmental and public health burdens that result chemical emissions in the life cycle of an industrial product or service. This column presents the third in a series of overviews of the state of the art in integrated environmental assessment - earlier columns described emissions estimation (Frey and Small, 2003) and fate and transport modeling (Ramaswami, et al., 2004). When combined, these first two assessment elements provide estimates of ambient concentrations in the environment. Here we discuss how both models and measurements are used to translate ambient concentrations into metrics of human and ecological exposure, the necessary precursors to impact assessment. Exposure assessment is the process of measuring and/or modeling the magnitude, frequency and duration of contact between a potentially harmful agent and a target population, including the size and characteristics of that population (IPCS, 2001; Zartarian, et al., 2005). Ideally the exposure assessment process should characterize the sources, routes, pathways, and uncertainties in the assessment. Route of exposure refers to the way that an agent enters the receptor during an exposure event. Humans contact pollutants through three routes--inhalation, ingestion, and dermal uptake. Inhalation occurs in both outdoor environments and indoor environments where most people spend the majority of their time. Ingestion includes both water and food, as well as soil and dust uptake due to hand-to-mouth activity. Dermal uptake occurs through contacts with consumer products; indoor and outdoor surfaces; the water supply during washing or bathing; ambient surface waters during swimming or boating; soil during activities such as work, gardening, and play; and, to a lesser extent, from the air that surrounds us. An exposure pathway is the course that a pollutant takes from an ambient environmental medium (air, soil, water, biota, etc), to an exposure medium

  2. Workshop 96. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Part III of the proceedings contain 155 contributions in various fields of science and technology including nuclear engineering, environmental science, and biomedical engineering. Out of these, 10 were selected to be inputted in INIS. (P.A.)

  3. Google vs. the Library (Part III): Assessing the Quality of Sources Found by Undergraduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgas, Helen

    2015-01-01

    This study assesses and compares the quality of sources found by undergraduate students when doing research using both Google and a library (federated) search tool. Thirty undergraduates were asked to find four sources (one book, two articles, and one additional source of their choosing) related to a selected research topic. Students used both…

  4. Environmental assessment of three egg production systems - Part III: Airborne bacteria concentrations and emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y; Zhao, D; Ma, H; Liu, K; Atilgan, A; Xin, H

    2016-07-01

    Airborne microorganism level is an important indoor air quality indicator, yet it has not been well documented for laying-hen houses in the United States. As a part of the Coalition for Sustainable Egg Supply (CSES) environmental monitoring project, this study comparatively monitored the concentrations and emissions of airborne total and Gram-negative (Gram(-)) bacteria in three types of commercial laying-hen houses, i.e., conventional cage (CC), aviary (AV), and enriched colony (EC) houses, over a period of eight months covering the mid and late stages of the flock cycle. It also delineated the relationship between airborne total bacteria and particulate matter smaller than 10 μm in aerodynamic diameter (PM10). The results showed airborne total bacteria concentrations (log CFU/m(3)) of 4.7 ± 0.3 in CC, 6.0 ± 0.8 in AV, and 4.8 ± 0.3 in EC, all being higher than the level recommended for human environment (3.0 log CFU/m(3)). The much higher concentrations in AV arose from the presence of floor litter and hen activities on it, as evidenced by the higher concentrations in the afternoon (with litter access) than in the morning (without litter access). The overall means and standard deviation of airborne total bacteria emission rates, in log CFU/[h-hen] (or log CFU/[h-AU], AU = animal unit or 500 kg live weight) were 4.8 ± 0.4 (or 7.3 ± 0.4) for CC, 6.1 ± 0.7 (or 8.6 ± 0.7) for AV, and 4.8 ± 0.5 (or 7.3 ± 0.5) for EC. Both concentration and emission rate of airborne total bacteria were positively related to PM10 Gram(-) bacteria were present at low concentrations in all houses; and only 2 samples (6%) in CC, 7 (22%) samples in AV, and 2 (6%) samples in EC out of 32 air samples collected in each house were found positive with Gram(-) bacteria. The concentration of airborne Gram(-) bacteria was estimated to be <2% of the total bacteria. Total bacteria counts in manure on belt (in all houses) and floor litter (only in AV) were similar; however, the manure had

  5. Drilling miniature holes, Part III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1978-07-01

    Miniature components for precision electromechanical mechanisms such as switches, timers, and actuators typically require a number of small holes. Because of the precision required, the workpiece materials, and the geometry of the parts, most of these holes must be produced by conventional drilling techniques. The use of such techniques is tedious and often requires considerable trial and error to prevent drill breakage, minimize hole mislocation and variations in hole diameter. This study of eight commercial drill designs revealed that printed circuit board drills produced better locational and size repeatability than did other drills when centerdrilling was not used. Boring holes 1 mm in dia, or less, as a general rule did not improve hole location in brass or stainless steel. Hole locations of patterns of 0.66-mm holes can be maintained within 25.4-..mu..m diametral positional tolerance if setup misalignments can be eliminated. Size tolerances of +- 3.8 ..mu..m can be maintained under some conditions when drilling flat plates. While these levels of precision are possible with existing off-the-shelf drills, they may not be practical in many cases.

  6. Neuroscience in Nazi Europe Part III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeidman, Lawrence A; Kondziella, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    In Part I, neuroscience collaborators with the Nazis were discussed, and in Part II, neuroscience resistors were discussed. In Part III, we discuss the tragedy regarding european neuroscientists who became victims of the Nazi onslaught on “non-Aryan” doctors. Some of these unfortunate...... of neuroscience, we pay homage and do not allow humanity to forget, lest this dark period in history ever repeat itself....

  7. Perspectives of precipitation science: Part III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelides, Silas

    2016-03-01

    This Special Issue of Atmospheric Research entitled "Perspectives of Precipitation Science: Part III" encompasses selected papers that were presented at the General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union, held in Vienna, Austria, from 27 April to 2 May 2014, within the framework of the (General) Session "Precipitation: Measurement, Climatology, Remote Sensing, and Modeling".

  8. Part III: Greenhouse-Gas Emissions

    OpenAIRE

    OLIVIER Jos; Janssens-Maenhout, Greet

    2011-01-01

    The information in Part III has been provided by PBL- JRC based on the EDGAR 4.2 FT2008 database as part of and in cooperation with the Global Exchange and Interactions Activity (GEIA) of IGBP and the ACCENT Network of Excellence.Country data have been provided for 1990, 2000, 2005 and 2008. Moving from the EDGAR 4.1 to the EDGAR 4.2 FT2008 database has resulted in revisions of greenhouse-gas estimates for some source categories. However, in most cases there were only small changes in the glo...

  9. Nuclear Energy Center: upper St. Lawrence region. Part I. Siting. Part II. Fort Drum surrogate site, description and impact assessment. Part III. Dispersed sites impact assessment and comparison with the NEC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merry, P.A.; Luner, C.; Hong, S.W.; Canham, H.O.; Boggs, J.F.; McCool, T.P.

    1976-12-01

    This report is one of many supporting documents used by the Nuclear Regulatory commission in the preparation of the Nuclear Energy Center Site Survey (NECSS) mandated by Congress. While the overall study focuses on the feasibility and practicability of nuclear energy centers (NECs), this report is directed towards choosing a suitable surrogate site in the upper St. Lawrence region of New York State, assessing the probable impacts associated with construction and operation of the NEC, and comparing these impacts with those associated with small dispersed nuclear power stations. The upper St. Lawrence region is surveyed to identify a specific site that might be suitable for a surrogate NEC. Several assumptions about the basic design of an NEC are delineated, and a general overview of the characteristics of the region is given. The Fort Drum Military Reservation is chosen as a suitable surrogate site. Fort Drum and the surrounding area are described in terms of land use and population patterns, terrestrial and aquatic ecology, water use and quality, meteorology, institutional framework, and socioeconomic structure. The impacts associated with NEC development are assessed. Then the impacts associated with smaller dispersed nuclear power stations located throughout New York State are assessed and compared with the impacts associated with the NEC. Finally, the impacts due to development of the transmission line networks associated with the NEC and with the dispersed power stations are assessed and compared.

  10. FUNDAMENTAL PRINCIPLES OF AYURVEDA PART - III

    OpenAIRE

    Pandya, Vaidya Navnitlal B.

    1983-01-01

    In this part the author explains the origination of Rasas (tastes) and their effect on Dosas (bodily humors) in various seasons. Also he throws some light on the fundamentals of Pharmacology of Ayurveda.

  11. Warship Radar Signatures (Ship Survivability Part III-A)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galle, L.F.; Heemskerk, H.J.M.; Ewijk, L.J. van

    2000-01-01

    Radar Cross Section (RCS) management is of paramount importance for a warships's survivability. In this first part of the paper (Part III-A), the operational benefits of low RCS will be explained. Basic RCS theory, measurement and simulation techniques will be addressed. The RCS of representative ge

  12. Assessment of Technologies for the Space Shuttle External Tank Thermal Protection System and Recommendations for Technology Improvement - Part III: Material Property Characterization, Analysis, and Test Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Johnson, Theodore F.; Whitley, Karen S.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this report is to contribute to the independent assessment of the Space Shuttle External Tank Foam Material. This report specifically addresses material modeling, characterization testing, data reduction methods, and data pedigree. A brief description of the External Tank foam materials, locations, and standard failure modes is provided to develop suitable background information. A review of mechanics based analysis methods from the open literature is used to provide an assessment of the state-of-the-art in material modeling of closed cell foams. Further, this report assesses the existing material property database and investigates sources of material property variability. The report presents identified deficiencies in testing methods and procedures, recommendations for additional testing as required, identification of near-term improvements that should be pursued, and long-term capabilities or enhancements that should be developed.

  13. The Universal Arrow of Time III-IV:(Part III) Nonquantum gravitation theory (Part IV) Quantum gravitation theory

    OpenAIRE

    Kupervasser, Oleg

    2011-01-01

    The paper consists of the two independent papers - the first one about Nonquantum Gravitation theory, the second one about Quantum Gravitation theory (Part III: Nonquantum Gravitation theory) The first paper is dealing with the analysis of general relativity theory (theory of gravitation) from the point of view of thermodynamic time arrow. Within this framework "informational paradox" for black holes and "paradox with the grandfather" for time travel "wormholes" are resolved. (Part IV: Quantu...

  14. Solar Neutrino Oscillation Parameters after SNO Phase-III and SAGE Part-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyse the recently published results from solar neutrino experiments SNO Phase-III and SAGE Part-III and show their constraints on solar neutrino oscillation parameters, especially for the mixing angle θ12. Through a global analysis using all existing data from SK, SNO, Ga and Cl radiochemical experiments and long base line reactor experiment KamLAND, we obtain the parameters shown. We also find that the discrepancy between the KamLAND and solar neutrino results can be reduced by choosing a small non-zero value for the mixing angle θ13. (the physics of elementary particles and fields)

  15. Solar neutrino oscillation parameters after SNO Phase-III and SAGE Part-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyse the recently published results from solar neutrino experiments SNO Phase-III and SAGE Part-III and show their constraints on solar neutrino oscillation parameters, especially for the mixing angle θ12. Through a global analysis using all existing data from SK, SNO, Ga and Cl radiochemical experiments and long base line reactor experiment KamLAND , we obtain the parameters Δm122=7.684-0.208+0.212 x 10-5 eV2, tan2θ12=0.440-0.057+0.059. We also find that the discrepancy between the KamLAND and solar neutrino results can be reduced by choosing a small non-zero value for the mixing angle θ13. (authors)

  16. Japanese contributions to IAEA INTOR workshop, phase two A, part 2, chapter III: impurity control (engineering)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report corresponds to the second half of Chapter III of Japanese contribution report to IAEA INTOR Workshop, Phase Two A, Part 2. Data base assessment are made on candidate materials for the divertor, limiter, and the first wall. Engineering trade-off studies are made for the high-recycling and low temperature conditions. The studies include material considerations, configuration, thermohydraulic and stress analysis, disruption, lifetime analysis, and tritium permeation. (author)

  17. Japanese contributions to IAEA INTOR workshop, phase two A, part 2 chapter III: impurity control (physics)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report corresponds to the first half of Chapter III of Japanese contribution report to IAEA INTOR Workshop, Phase Two A, Part 2. Data base assessments are made for divertor, limiter, ergodic limiter, RF pumpout, fuelling, atomic and molecular processes, surface interaction, and vessel preparation. Divertor and limiter modelling and their validation are discussed, and impurity control performance for INTOR is evaluated with the predictive modelling. (author)

  18. Assessment and accountability: part 1 - assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Trish

    2016-05-18

    Assessment in clinical practice is a complex role undertaken by mentors and practice teachers. Therefore, this and the following two articles in this series will explore student assessment in clinical practice and the theoretical concepts that relate to assessment of learning and development. This article examines the importance of assessment and the role of mentors and practice teachers in this activity. Definitions and the purpose of assessment are analysed, in addition to various assessment methods used in clinical practice that relate to the third domain and outcomes of the Nursing and Midwifery Council's Standards to Support Learning and Assessment in Practice on assessment and accountability. PMID:27191451

  19. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 280 - Statement for Shipping Tickets and Invoices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (40 CFR part 280) to determine if you are affected by this law. ... Invoices III Appendix III to Part 280 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Tickets and Invoices Note. A Federal law (the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 600 - Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Sample Fuel Economy Label Calculation III Appendix III to Part 600 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) ENERGY POLICY FUEL ECONOMY AND CARBON-RELATED EXHAUST EMISSIONS OF MOTOR VEHICLES Pt. 600, App....

  1. 29 CFR Appendix III to Part 1918 - The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory.... 1918, App. III Appendix III to Part 1918—The Mechanics of Conventional Cargo Gear (Non-mandatory) Note: This appendix is non-mandatory and provides an explanation of the mechanics in the correct spotting...

  2. The shallow water wave hindcast model: HISWA Part III: user manual

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, N.; Herbers, T.H.C.; Holthuijsen, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    Development of a two-dimensional model to hindcast spectral wave parameters in an estuary with tidal flats on the basis of bottomtopography, current and wind data. This part III contains the user manual of the HISWA model.

  3. Assessment of hydrogen combustion effects in the BWR/6 - Mark III Standard Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses General Electric's study of potential hydrogen combustion effects on the Standard Mark III containment during postulated severe accidents. This study was performed as part of the Probabilistic Risk Assessment of the BWR/6 - Mark III Standard Plant. The methodology of determining the accident event sequence and modeling of the Boiling Water Reactor core response, including hydrogen generation by metal-water reaction, is described. Combustion of hydrogen released to the containment is analyzed and effects on the Mark III containment system are assessed. It is concluded that even for those cases where containment integrity may be lost, the containment function (i.e., limiting offsite doses) is maintained by the drywell and suppression pool

  4. The Fundamental Freedom of Assembly and Part III of the Public Order Ordinance

    OpenAIRE

    Brabyn, J

    2002-01-01

    Part III of the Public Order Ordinance is now the main source of prior restraints applicable to public assemblies in Hong Kong. It is also an important source of 'at the scene' control and dispersal powers. Non-compliance with the prior restraints or disobedience of 'at the scene' orders is punishable according to the criminal provisions contained in Part III. However, since the reunification of Hong Kong and China in 1997, some of the prior restraint provisions have been widely disregarded. ...

  5. On the Riemann zeta-function, Part III

    OpenAIRE

    Csizmazia, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    An odd meromorphic function f(s) is constructed from the Riemann zeta-function evaluated at one-half plus s. The partial fraction expansion, p(s), of f(s) is obtained using the conjunction of the Riemann hypothesis and hypotheses advanced by the author. That compound hypothesis and the expansion p(s) are employed in Part IV to derive the two-sided Laplace transform representation of f(s) on the open vertical strip of all s with real part between zero and four.

  6. Toward a Model of Vocational Persistence Among Seminarians: Part III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James L.

    1970-01-01

    Assumptions underlying model rely on Cartwright and Harary's (1960) definition of Heider's cognitive balance theory and Festinger's (1957) cognitive dissonance theory. Diagrams illustrate degree of balance between personal and reference group (curch authorities, classmates, family) attitudes. Parts I and II in earlier issues. (CJ)

  7. Stabilisation of the emergency patient Part III: Central nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Sigrist, Nadja

    2011-01-01

    The emergency patient with decreased consciousness is identified by clinical examination of pupil size and reaction, additional brain stem reflexes, level of consciousness and motor activity. Priority stabilisation of respiration and perfusion is mandatory in the management of patients with neurological diseases and is part of the strategy aiming at preventing secondary neuronal damage induced by hypoxia, hypercapnia and decreased cerebral perfusion. The goal of the emergency stabilisation is...

  8. Antipsychotics and Sexual Dysfunction: Sexual Dysfunction - Part III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Kumar Mysore Nagaraj

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Satisfying sexual experience is an essential part of a healthy and enjoyable life for most people. Antipsychotic drugs are among the various factors that affect optimal sexual functioning. Both conventional and novel antipsychotics are associated with significant sexual side effects. This review has presented various studies comparing different antipsychotic drugs. Dopamine antagonism, increased serum prolactin, serotonergic, adrenergic and cholinergic mechanisms are all proposed to be the mechanisms for sexual dysfunction. Drug treatment for this has not given satisfactory long-term results. Knowledge of the receptor pharmacology of an individual antipsychotic will help to determine whether it is more or less likely to cause sexual side effects and its management.

  9. Sequencing of contents and learning objects - part III

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel Zapata Ros

    2006-01-01

    Esta es la tercera parte del artículo del mismo nombre publicado en el número anterior de RED. En él planteamos una visión de la selección y de la secuenciación de contenidos de enseñanza, en el contexto de la planificación curricular, desde la perspectiva de las corrientes del pensamiento constructivista. Señalamos la importancia de contar, en el campo de la formación apoyada en redes, con herramientas y criterios autónomos que guíen este proceso desde unas bases propias, exte...

  10. The career plateau--the differential diagnosis: Part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, L E

    1991-02-01

    This is the last article of a three-part series on the issue of the career plateau. The first article defined the problem of career plateauing and the heightened awareness by hospital and nursing administrators of hospital nurses' career needs. The second article dealt with strategies for change in the hospital organization, the manager, and the employee. This article discusses eight basic career needs of hospital nurses that resulted from a research study the author conducted on the development of an inventory designed to measure the career specialty needs of hospital nurses. The article focuses on the career needs of PACU and surgical nurses compared with three other speciality areas. PMID:1710668

  11. 46 CFR Appendix III to Part 390 - U.S. Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration-Sample Semiannual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Administration-Sample Semiannual Report III Appendix III to Part 390 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Appendix III to Part 390—U.S. Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration—Sample Semiannual... (agrees with balance sheet submitted at this date) on deposit for book purposes—June 30, 19__...

  12. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1068 - High-Altitude Counties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false High-Altitude Counties III Appendix...—High-Altitude Counties In some cases the standard-setting part includes requirements or other specifications that apply for high-altitude counties. The following counties have substantial populated...

  13. Genotoxicity hazard assessment of Caramel Colours III and IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusick, D J; Jagannath, D R; Galloway, S M; Nestmann, E R

    1992-05-01

    Results from a battery of short-term tests in vitro and in vivo used to assess the genotoxicity of caramel colours are presented and discussed in relation to reports from the literature. No evidence of genotoxicity was found in the Salmonella plate incorporation test using five standard strains or in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene conversion assay using strain D4, either with or without S-9 for activation. A weak clastogenic effect for a sample of Caramel Colour III in CHO cells was abolished in the presence of S-9. Two samples of Caramel Colour IV were not clastogenic in CHO cells. Salmonella pre-incubation tests without S-9 also failed to reveal any mutagenic activity for any of the caramel colours tested. The Caramel Colour III sample that showed clastogenic activity in CHO cells in vitro did not induce micronuclei when evaluated in a mouse bone marrow assay. These results are in general agreement with reports in the literature regarding the genotoxicity of caramel colours, and support the conclusion that caramel colours do not pose a genotoxic hazard to humans. PMID:1644382

  14. Physiotherapy and low back pain - part iii: outcomes research utilising the biosychosocial model: psychosocial outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. D. Bardin

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive understanding of low back pain (LBPhas evolved that necessitates the use of a biopsychosocial model, focusing on illness rather than disease and incorporating the biological, psychological and social aspects that are important to understand and to study LBP in its chronic form. Traditional outcome measures that measure elements within the biological component are limited to assess the spectrum of impacts caused by chronic low back pain (CLBP and the validity, reliability and sensitivity of some of these measures has been questioned.Few physiologic tests of spine function are clinically meaningful to patients, objective physical findings can be absent, and in CLBP disability and activity intolerance are often disproportional to the original injury. Biological outcomes should be complemented by outcomes of the psychosocial aspects of back pain that measure the considerable functional and emotional impact on the quality of life of patients experiencing low back dysfunction. Outcomes research is an analysis of clinical practice as it actually occurs and can  make a valuable contribution to understanding the multidimensional impact of LBP. Psychosocial aspects of the biopsychosocial model for outcomes research are discussed in part III: functional status/disability, psychological impairment, patient satisfaction, health related quality of life

  15. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 268 - List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32 III Appendix III to Part 268 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Part 268—List of Halogenated Organic Compounds Regulated Under § 268.32 In determining...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 266 - Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride III Appendix III to Part 266 Protection of Environment... to Part 266—Tier II Emission Rate Screening Limits for Free Chlorine and Hydrogen Chloride...

  17. Tenth annual meeting, Vienna, Austria, 29 March - 1 April 1977. Summary report. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Summary Report - Part III of the Tenth Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors - contains the discussions on the commercial development of FBRs according to national plans, mostly related to technology problems of containment design, fuel fabrication, fuel failures, sodium pressure, fuel-sodium interaction, computer codes needed for licensing. Most of the discussions were related to the existing reactors: BN-600, BN-350, BN-1600, BOR-60, RAPSODIE, PHENIX

  18. Eleventh annual meeting, Bologna, Italy, 17-20 April 1978. Summary report. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Summary Report - Part III of the Eleventh Annual Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors - contains the discussions on the commercialization LMFBRs according to national plans, mostly related to technology of fuel fabrication, PHENIX fuel pins testing, heterogeneous cores, in service inspection of fuel elements, regulations and licensing, and related OECD activities. Most of the discussions were related to the existing reactors: BR-10, BN-600, BN-350, BN-1600, RAPSODIE and PHENIX

  19. Assessment of Sleep in Children with Mucopolysaccharidosis Type III

    OpenAIRE

    Mahon, Louise Victoria; Lomax, Michelle; Grant, Sheena; Cross, Elaine; Hare, Dougal Julian; Wraith, James Ed; Jones, Simon; Bigger, Brian; Langford-Smith, Kia; Canal, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are prevalent in mucopolysaccharidosis Type III (MPS III), yet there is a lack of objective, ecologically valid evidence detailing sleep quantity, quality or circadian system. Eight children with MPS III and eight age-matched typically developing children wore an actigraph for 7–10 days/nights. Saliva samples were collected at three time-points on two separate days, to permit analysis of endogenous melatonin levels. Parents completed a sleep questionnaire and a daily sleep ...

  20. Assessment of sleep in children with mucopolysaccharidosis type III.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Victoria Mahon

    Full Text Available Sleep disturbances are prevalent in mucopolysaccharidosis Type III (MPS III, yet there is a lack of objective, ecologically valid evidence detailing sleep quantity, quality or circadian system. Eight children with MPS III and eight age-matched typically developing children wore an actigraph for 7-10 days/nights. Saliva samples were collected at three time-points on two separate days, to permit analysis of endogenous melatonin levels. Parents completed a sleep questionnaire and a daily sleep diary. Actigraphic data revealed that children with MPS III had significantly longer sleep onset latencies and greater daytime sleep compared to controls, but night-time sleep duration did not differ between groups. In the MPS III group, sleep efficiency declined, and sleep onset latency increased, with age. Questionnaire responses showed that MPS III patients had significantly more sleep difficulties in all domains compared to controls. Melatonin concentrations showed an alteration in the circadian system in MPS III, which suggests that treatment for sleep problems should attempt to synchronise the sleep-wake cycle to a more regular pattern. Actigraphy was tolerated by children and this monitoring device can be recommended as a measure of treatment success in research and clinical practice.

  1. Assessment of Sleep in Children with Mucopolysaccharidosis Type III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Louise Victoria; Lomax, Michelle; Grant, Sheena; Cross, Elaine; Hare, Dougal Julian; Wraith, James Ed; Jones, Simon; Bigger, Brian; Langford-Smith, Kia; Canal, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are prevalent in mucopolysaccharidosis Type III (MPS III), yet there is a lack of objective, ecologically valid evidence detailing sleep quantity, quality or circadian system. Eight children with MPS III and eight age-matched typically developing children wore an actigraph for 7–10 days/nights. Saliva samples were collected at three time-points on two separate days, to permit analysis of endogenous melatonin levels. Parents completed a sleep questionnaire and a daily sleep diary. Actigraphic data revealed that children with MPS III had significantly longer sleep onset latencies and greater daytime sleep compared to controls, but night-time sleep duration did not differ between groups. In the MPS III group, sleep efficiency declined, and sleep onset latency increased, with age. Questionnaire responses showed that MPS III patients had significantly more sleep difficulties in all domains compared to controls. Melatonin concentrations showed an alteration in the circadian system in MPS III, which suggests that treatment for sleep problems should attempt to synchronise the sleep-wake cycle to a more regular pattern. Actigraphy was tolerated by children and this monitoring device can be recommended as a measure of treatment success in research and clinical practice. PMID:24504123

  2. Neuroscience in Nazi Europe Part III: victims of the Third Reich.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidman, Lawrence A; Kondziella, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    In Part I, neuroscience collaborators with the Nazis were discussed, and in Part II, neuroscience resistors were discussed. In Part III, we discuss the tragedy regarding european neuroscientists who became victims of the Nazi onslaught on “non-Aryan” doctors. Some of these unfortunate neuroscientists survived Nazi concentration camps, but most were murdered. We discuss the circumstances and environment which stripped these neuroscientists of their profession, then of their personal rights and freedom, and then of their lives. We include a background analysis of anti-Semitism and Nazism in their various countries, then discuss in depth seven exemplary neuroscientist Holocaust victims; including Germans Ludwig Pick, Arthur Simons, and Raphael Weichbrodt, Austrians Alexander Spitzer and Viktor Frankl, and Poles Lucja Frey and Wladyslaw Sterling. by recognizing and remembering these victims of neuroscience, we pay homage and do not allow humanity to forget, lest this dark period in history ever repeat itself. PMID:23230611

  3. Imaging assessment of isolated lesions affecting cranial nerve III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to review the anatomy and main pathologic conditions affecting cranial nerve III using imaging studies, particularly magnetic resonance imaging. Imaging methods are essential in the evaluation of patients with suspected lesions of the oculomotor nerve once signs and symptoms are unspecific and a large number of diseases can affect cranial nerve III. A brief review of the literature is also presented. (author)

  4. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Coupled Processes in Safety Assessments. Report of Task 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A part (Task 4) of the International DECOVALEX III project on coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (T-H-M) processes focuses on T-H-M modelling applications in safety and performance assessment of deep geological nuclear waste repositories. A previous phase, DECOVALEX II, saw a need to improve such modelling. In order to address this need Task 4 of DECOVALEX III has: Analysed two major T-H-M experiments (Task 1 and Task 2) and three different Bench Mark Tests (Task 3) set-up to explore the significance of T-H-M in some potentially important safety assessment applications. Compiled and evaluated the use of T-H-M modelling in safety assessments at the time of the year 2000. Organised a forum a forum of interchange between PA-analysts and THM modelers at each DECOVALEX III workshop. Based on this information the current report discusses the findings and strives for reaching recommendations as regards good practices in addressing coupled T-H-M issues in safety assessments. The full development of T-H-M modelling is still at an early stage and it is not evident whether current codes provide the information that is required. However, although the geosphere is a system of fully coupled processes, this does not directly imply that all existing coupled mechanisms must be represented numerically. Modelling is conducted for specific purposes and the required confidence level should be considered. It is necessary to match the confidence level with the modelling objective. Coupled THM modelling has to incorporate uncertainties. These uncertainties mainly concern uncertainties in the conceptual model and uncertainty in data. Assessing data uncertainty is important when judging the need to model coupled processes. Often data uncertainty is more significant than the coupled effects. The emphasis on the need for THM modelling differs among disciplines. For geological radioactive waste disposal in crystalline and other similar hard rock formations DECOVALEX III shows it is essential to

  5. DECOVALEX III PROJECT. Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Coupled Processes in Safety Assessments. Report of Task 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Johan [JA Streamflow AB, Aelvsjoe (Sweden)

    2005-02-15

    A part (Task 4) of the International DECOVALEX III project on coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (T-H-M) processes focuses on T-H-M modelling applications in safety and performance assessment of deep geological nuclear waste repositories. A previous phase, DECOVALEX II, saw a need to improve such modelling. In order to address this need Task 4 of DECOVALEX III has: Analysed two major T-H-M experiments (Task 1 and Task 2) and three different Bench Mark Tests (Task 3) set-up to explore the significance of T-H-M in some potentially important safety assessment applications. Compiled and evaluated the use of T-H-M modelling in safety assessments at the time of the year 2000. Organised a forum a forum of interchange between PA-analysts and THM modelers at each DECOVALEX III workshop. Based on this information the current report discusses the findings and strives for reaching recommendations as regards good practices in addressing coupled T-H-M issues in safety assessments. The full development of T-H-M modelling is still at an early stage and it is not evident whether current codes provide the information that is required. However, although the geosphere is a system of fully coupled processes, this does not directly imply that all existing coupled mechanisms must be represented numerically. Modelling is conducted for specific purposes and the required confidence level should be considered. It is necessary to match the confidence level with the modelling objective. Coupled THM modelling has to incorporate uncertainties. These uncertainties mainly concern uncertainties in the conceptual model and uncertainty in data. Assessing data uncertainty is important when judging the need to model coupled processes. Often data uncertainty is more significant than the coupled effects. The emphasis on the need for THM modelling differs among disciplines. For geological radioactive waste disposal in crystalline and other similar hard rock formations DECOVALEX III shows it is essential to

  6. Social class, political power, and the state: their implications in medicine--part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, V

    1977-01-01

    This is the third part of an article on the distribution of power and the nature of the state in Western industrialized societies and their implications in medicine. Parts I and II were published in the preceding issue of this Journal. Part I presented a critique of contemporary theories of the Western system of power; discussed the countervailing pluralist and power of elite theories, as well as those of bureaucratic and professional control; and concluded with an examination of the Marxist theories of economic determinism, structural determinism, and corporate statism. Part II presented a Marxist theory of the role, nature, and characteristics of state intervention. Part III focuses on the mode of that intervention and the reasons for its growth, with an added analysis of the attributes of state intervention in the health sector, and of the dialectical relationship between its growth and the current fiscal crisis of the state. In all three parts, the focus is on Western European countries and on North America, with many examples and categories from the area of medicine. PMID:870557

  7. A Modified Hybrid III 6-Year-Old Dummy Head Model for Lateral Impact Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Rafukka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid III six-year-old (6YO child dummy head model was developed and validated for frontal impact assessment according to the specifications contained in Code of Federal Regulations, Title 49, Part 572.122, Subpart N by Livermore Software Technology Corporation (LSTC. This work is aimed at improving biofidelity of the head for frontal impact and also extending its application to lateral impact assessment by modifying the head skin viscoelastic properties and validating the head response using the scaled nine-year-old (9YO child cadaver head response recently published in the literature. The modified head model was validated for two drop heights for frontal, right, and left parietal impact locations. Peak resultant acceleration of the modified head model appeared to have good correlation with scaled 9YO child cadaver head response for frontal impact on dropping from 302 mm height and fair correlation with 12.3% difference for 151 mm drop height. Right parietal peak resultant acceleration values correlate well with scaled 9YO head experimental data for 153 mm drop height, while fair correlation with 16.4% difference was noticed for 302 mm drop height. Left parietal, however, shows low biofidelity for the two drop heights as the difference in head acceleration response was within 30%. The modified head model could therefore be used to estimate injuries in vehicle crash for head parietal impact locations which cannot be measured by the current hybrid III dummy head model.

  8. A benefit-risk assessment of class III antiarrhythmic agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elming, Hanne; Brendorp, Bente; Pehrson, Steen;

    2004-01-01

    relief. Since many patients experience a decrease in physical performance as well as a diminished quality of life during arrhythmia there is still a need for antiarrhythmic drug therapy. The development of new antiarrhythmic agents has changed the focus from class I to class III agents since it became...... evident that with class I drug therapy the prevalence of mortality is considerably higher. This review focuses on the benefits and risks of known and newer class III antiarrhythmic agents. The benefits discussed include the ability to maintain sinus rhythm in persistent atrial fibrillation patients, and...... reducing the need for implantable cardioverter defibrillator shock/antitachycardia therapy, since no class III antiarrhythmic agents have proven survival benefit. The risks discussed mainly focus on pro-arrhythmia as torsade de pointes ventricular tachycardia....

  9. AGGREGATIONS OF LEVEL III ECOREGIONS FOR NATIONAL NUTRIENT ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggregations of level III Ecoregions for the National Nutrient Assessment and Management Strategy: This map of draft aggregation of level III ecoregions of the conterminous United States defines broad areas within which there are general similarities in the quality and types of e...

  10. Life cycle assessment part 2: current impact assessment practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, D W; Potting, J; Finnveden, G; Lindeijer, E; Jolliet, O; Rydberg, T; Rebitzer, G

    2004-07-01

    Providing our society with goods and services contributes to a wide range of environmental impacts. Waste generation, emissions and the consumption of resources occur at many stages in a product's life cycle-from raw material extraction, energy acquisition, production and manufacturing, use, reuse, recycling, through to ultimate disposal. These all contribute to impacts such as climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion, photooxidant formation (smog), eutrophication, acidification, toxicological stress on human health and ecosystems, the depletion of resources and noise-among others. The need exists to address these product-related contributions more holistically and in an integrated manner, providing complimentary insights to those of regulatory/process-oriented methodologies. A previous article (Part 1, Rebitzer et al., 2004) outlined how to define and model a product's life cycle in current practice, as well as the methods and tools that are available for compiling the associated waste, emissions and resource consumption data into a life cycle inventory. This article highlights how practitioners and researchers from many domains have come together to provide indicators for the different impacts attributable to products in the life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) phase of life cycle assessment (LCA). PMID:15051247

  11. Assessment of technical documentation of Class III medical devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roszek B; de Bruijn ACP; Pot JWGA; van Drongelen AW; BMT; vgc

    2010-01-01

    Europese regelgeving vereist dat fabrikanten van medische hulpmiddelen een dossier opstellen waaruit blijkt dat het hulpmiddel veilig en functioneel is. De kwaliteit van dossiers van de hoogste risicoklasse medische hulpmiddelen, klasse III, laat evenwel te wensen over. Dit blijkt uit onderzoek va

  12. Mumps Virus Induces Protein-Kinase-R-Dependent Stress Granules, Partly Suppressing Type III Interferon Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Shin; Yamamoto, Soh; Ogasawara, Noriko; Sato, Toyotaka; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Katoh, Hiroshi; Kubota, Toru; Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Kojima, Takashi; Himi, Tetsuo; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Yokota, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are cytoplasmic granular aggregations that are induced by cellular stress, including viral infection. SGs have opposing antiviral and proviral roles, which depend on virus species. The exact function of SGs during viral infection is not fully understood. Here, we showed that mumps virus (MuV) induced SGs depending on activation of protein kinase R (PKR). MuV infection strongly induced interferon (IFN)-λ1, 2 and 3, and IFN-β through activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) via retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) pathway. MuV-induced IFNs were strongly upregulated in PKR-knockdown cells. MuV-induced SG formation was suppressed by knockdown of PKR and SG marker proteins, Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3-domain-binding protein 1 and T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1, and significantly increased the levels of MuV-induced IFN-λ1. However, viral titer was not altered by suppression of SG formation. PKR was required for induction of SGs by MuV infection and regulated type III IFN (IFN-λ1) mRNA stability. MuV-induced SGs partly suppressed type III IFN production by MuV; however, the limited suppression was not sufficient to inhibit MuV replication in cell culture. Our results provide insight into the relationship between SGs and IFN production induced by MuV infection. PMID:27560627

  13. WISC-III e WAIS-III na avaliação da inteligência de cegos WISC-III/WAIS-III en ciegos WISC-III and WAIS-III in intellectual assessment of blind people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth do Nascimento

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Diante da escassez de pesquisas nacionais e de testes psicológicos destinados a avaliar pessoas cegas, desenvolveu-se um estudo psicométrico com as escalas verbais dos testes WISC-III e WAIS-III. Após as adaptações de alguns estímulos e das instruções, os testes foram aplicados em crianças (N = 120 e adultos (N = 52 residentes em Belo Horizonte. Os resultados indicaram que as escalas verbais modificadas apresentam uma boa consistência interna (alfa> 0,80. Além disso, a investigação da validade fatorial identifica a presença clara de apenas um componente. Este componente explica 81% e 64% para o WISC-III e WAIS-III, respectivamente. Conclui-se que as adaptações a que se procedeu não afetaram a estrutura fatorial das escalas. Deste modo, os profissionais poderão utilizar as escalas modificadas para avaliar a inteligência de pessoas cegas.Frente a la escasez de investigaciones nacionales asi como la ausencia de tests psicológicos que evaluen personas ciegas, se ha desarrollado un estudio psicometrico com la escalas verbales del WISC-III y WAIS-III. Posteriormente a las adaptaciones de algunos estímulos y de las instrucciones, las escalas fueron aplicadas a una muestra de niños (n=120 y de adultos (n=52 residentes en la ciudad de Belo Horizonte-Brasil. Los resultados indican que las escalas verbales modificadas presentan una alta fiabilidad (alpha >0,80 asi como la presencia clara de un unico componente responsable por 81% y 64% de la variancia del WIC-III e WAIS-III respectivamente. Se ha concluido que las modificaciones efectuadas no han comprometido la estructura factorial de las escalas verbales. Por tanto, los profesionales psicólogos pueden utilizar las escalas modificadas para la evaluación de la inteligencia de personas portadoras de ceguera.Owing to the almost lack of a national research on psychological testing for the evaluation of blind people, a psychometric study has been developed with the WISC-III and WAIS-III

  14. Investigational drug tracking: phases I-III and NDA submissions--Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, K L

    1994-10-01

    The author catalogs over 800 investigational drugs/biologicals currently in Phase I, II or III clinical trials or drugs/biologicals submitted to the FDA as new drug applications. Part I of this article appeared in the September issue of Hospital Pharmacy. The list assists in predicting when new drugs will be marketed. The entries include generic/chemical name, investigational drug number, synonyms, trade names, manufacturers, clinical trial status, predicted approval year, indications or drug class, whether the drug has been developed through biotechnology, and references. Entries were gleaned from medical journals, stock market analysis publications, and the Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Association's Medicines in Development Series. The list is alphabetized by the generic/chemical name or investigational drug number and cross-indexed by the trade name and synonyms. The list reflects those drugs which were not FDA approved as of April 15, 1994. Part I concludes with the remaining alphabetical listing by generic/chemical name or investigational drug number. PMID:10137850

  15. Performance assessment of gamma cameras. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dept. of Health and Social Security and the Scottish Home and Health Dept. has sponsored a programme of measurements of the important performance characteristics of 15 leading types of gamma cameras providing a routine radionuclide imaging service in hospitals throughout the UK. Measurements have been made of intrinsic resolution, system resolution, non-uniformity, spatial distortion, count rate performance, sensitivity, energy resolution and shield leakage. The main aim of this performance assessment was to provide sound information to the NHS to ease the task of those responsible for the purchase of gamma cameras. (U.K.)

  16. Assessing the prevalence of the Metabolic Syndrome according to NCEP ATP III in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Moebus, S; Hanisch, JU; Neuhäuser, M.; Aidelsburger, P.; Wasem, J; Jöckel, KH

    2006-01-01

    Objective: Metabolic Syndrome (MetSyn) describes a cluster of metabolic disorders and is considered a risk factor for development of cardiovascular disease. Although a high prevalence is commonly assumed in Germany data about the degree of its occurrence in the population and in subgroups are still missing. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of the MetSyn according to the NCEP ATP-III (National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III) criteria in persons aged ...

  17. Assessment of the Adoption Rate of Technologies among Fadama III Farmers in Adamawa State, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Umar, AdamuMadu

    2013-01-01

    The study was conducted in Adamawa State, Nigeria. The major thrust of this study is to assess the adoption rate of technology in Fadama III. In its four years of operation, Fadama III project has realized significant impact on household access to new and proven technologies. Adoption rate of technologies among beneficiaries has increased from 43.75% before the inception of the project to 96.255% after the project intervention. This indicates 50% increase against only 20% increase among the n...

  18. Model assessment of protective barriers: Part 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayer, M.J.; Rockhold, M.L.; Holford, D.J.

    1992-02-01

    Radioactive waste exists at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in a variety of locations, including subsurface grout and tank farms, solid waste burial grounds, and contaminated soil sites. Some of these waste sites may need to be isolated from percolating water to minimize the potential for transport of the waste to the ground water, which eventually discharges to the Columbia River. Multilayer protective barriers have been proposed as a means of limiting the flow of water through the waste sites (DOE 1987). A multiyear research program (managed jointly by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company for the DOE) is aimed at assessing the performance of these barriers. One aspect of this program involves the use of computer models to predict barrier performance. Three modeling studies have already been conducted and a test plan was produced. The simulation work reported here was conducted by PNL and extends the previous modeling work. The purpose of this report are to understand phenomena that have been observed in the field and to provide information that can be used to improve hydrologic modeling of the protective barrier. An improved modeling capability results in better estimates of barrier performance. Better estimates can be used to improve the design of barriers and the assessment of their long-term performance.

  19. Quadrant III RFI draft report: Appendix J, Baseline risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In accordance with the Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund (U. S.EPA 1989), which states that background risk should be calculated separately from site-related risk in order to provide important information to the risk manager, this appendix assesses the human health risks associated with background levels of naturally occurring compounds in soil at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS). This appendix is organized as follows: Background Conditions, in which the results of Geraghty ampersand Miller's work on characterizing background levels of naturally occurring compounds in soils is summarized; Identification of Exposure Pathways; Estimation of Environmental Concentrations; Estimation of Human Intake; Toxicity Assessment, and Risk Characterization, in which numerical estimates of carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic risk are calculated for each naturally occurring compound and potential exposure pathway

  20. A Structural Molar Volume Model for Oxide Melts Part III: Fe Oxide-Containing Melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, Eric; Gheribi, Aimen E.; Jung, In-Ho

    2016-04-01

    As part III of this series, the model is extended to iron oxide-containing melts. All available experimental data in the FeO-Fe2O3-Na2O-K2O-MgO-CaO-MnO-Al2O3-SiO2 system were critically evaluated based on the experimental condition. The variations of FeO and Fe2O3 in the melts were taken into account by using FactSage to calculate the Fe2+/Fe3+ distribution. The molar volume model with unary and binary model parameters can be used to predict the molar volume of the molten oxide of the Li2O-Na2O-K2O-MgO-CaO-MnO-PbO-FeO-Fe2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 system in the entire range of compositions, temperatures, and oxygen partial pressures from Fe saturation to 1 atm pressure.

  1. Assessment and accountability: part 3 - sign-off mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Trish

    2016-08-01

    Assessment in clinical practice is a complex role undertaken by mentors and practice teachers. This article is the third of three articles about assessment in practice. Part one focused on the importance of assessment and identified assessment methods used in clinical practice, while part two discussed the importance of feedback and managing failing students. This article examines the concepts of responsibility and accountability as well as ethical issues for mentors and practice teachers in relation to the assessment process. The role of the sign-off mentor, the issue of due regard, and ethical principles are discussed. The meaning of competence and partnership working when making assessment decisions are explored. This article relates to the third domain and outcomes of the Nursing and Midwifery Council's Standards to Support Learning and Assessment in Practice on assessment and accountability. PMID:27484567

  2. Objective Assessment of Nuclear and Cortical Cataracts through Scheimpflug Images: Agreement with the LOCS III Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess nuclear and cortical opacities through the objective analysis of Scheimpflug images, and to check the correlation with the Lens Opacity Classification System III (LOCS III). Methods Nuclear and cortical opacities were graded according to the LOCS III rules after pupil dilation. The maximum and average pixel intensity values along an elliptical mask within the lens nucleus were taken to analyse nuclear cataracts. A new metric based on the percentage of opaque pixels within a region of interest was used to analyse cortical cataracts. The percentage of opaque pixels was also calculated for half, third and quarter areas from the region of interest’s periphery. Results The maximum and average intensity values along the nucleus were directly proportional to the LOCS III grade: The larger the LOCS III value, the larger maximum and average intensity ones. These metrics showed a positive and significant correlation with the LOCS grade: The larger the LOCS grade, the higher was percentage of opaque pixels along the cortex within the same mask’s size. This metric showed a significant correlation to the LOCS grade. Conclusion The metrics used to assess nuclear opacities showed good correlation with the LOCS III. The percentage of opaque pixels showed to be a useful metric to measure objectively the severity of the cortical opacity. These metrics could be implemented in an algorithm to detect and grade lens opacities automatically and objectively. PMID:26890694

  3. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part III - Abdominal Treatment Procedures (Short Version).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, C F; Lorentzen, T; Appelbaum, L; Buscarini, E; Cantisani, V; Correas, J M; Cui, X W; D'Onofrio, M; Gilja, O H; Hocke, M; Ignee, A; Jenssen, C; Kabaalioğlu, A; Leen, E; Nicolau, C; Nolsøe, C P; Radzina, M; Serra, C; Sidhu, P S; Sparchez, Z; Piscaglia, F

    2016-02-01

    The third part of the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound assesses the evidence for ultrasound-guided and assisted interventions in abdominal treatment procedures. Recommendations for clinical practice are presented covering indications, contraindications, safety and efficacy of the broad variety of these techniques. In particular, drainage of abscesses and fluid collections, interventional tumor ablation techniques, interventional treatment of symptomatic cysts and echinococcosis, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and drainage, percutaneous gastrostomy, urinary bladder drainage, and nephrostomy are addressed (short version; a long version is published online). PMID:26871408

  4. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part III - Abdominal Treatment Procedures (Long Version).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, C F; Lorentzen, T; Appelbaum, L; Buscarini, E; Cantisani, V; Correas, J M; Cui, X W; D'Onofrio, M; Gilja, O H; Hocke, M; Ignee, A; Jenssen, C; Kabaalioğlu, A; Leen, E; Nicolau, C; Nolsøe, C P; Radzina, M; Serra, C; Sidhu, P S; Sparchez, Z; Piscaglia, F

    2016-02-01

    The third part of the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS) assesses the evidence for ultrasound-guided and assisted interventions in abdominal treatment procedures. Recommendations for clinical practice are presented covering indications, contraindications, and safe and effective performance of the broad variety of these techniques. In particular, drainage of abscesses and fluid collections, interventional tumor ablation techniques, interventional treatment of symptomatic cysts and echinococcosis, percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and drainage, percutaneous gastrostomy, urinary bladder drainage, and nephrostomy are addressed (long version). PMID:26670019

  5. A Midlatitude Cirrus Cloud Climatology from the Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing. Part III: Radiative Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sassen, K.; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2001-08-01

    In Part III of a series of papers describing the extended time high-cloud observations from the University of Utah Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (FARS) supporting the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Regional Experiment, the visible and infrared radiative properties of cirrus clouds over Salt Lake City, Utah, are examined. Using {approx}860 h of combined ruby (0.694 {micro}m) lidar and midinfrared (9.5-11.5 {micro}m) radiometer data collected between 1992 and 1999 from visually identified cirrus clouds, the visible optical depths {tau} and infrared layer emittance epsilon of the varieties of midlatitude cirrus are characterized. The mean and median values for the cirrus sample are 0.75 {+-} 0.91 and 0.61 for {tau}, and 0.30 {+-} 0.22 and 0.25 for epsilon. Other scattering parameters studied are the visible extinction and infrared absorption coefficients, and their ratio, and the lidar backscatter-to-extinction ratio, which has a mean value of 0.041 sr{sup -1}. Differences among cirrus clouds generated by general synoptic (e.g., jet stream), thunderstorm anvil, and orographic mechanisms are found, reflecting basic cloud microphysical effects. The authors draw parameterizations in terms of midcloud temperature T{sub m} and physical cloud thickness {Delta}z for epsilon and {tau}: both macrophysical variables are needed to adequately address the impact of the adiabatic process on ice cloud content, which modulates radiative transfer as a function of temperature. For the total cirrus dataset, the authors find epsilon = 1 -exp [-8.5 x 10{sup -5} (T{sub m} + 80 C) {Delta}z]. These parameterizations, based on a uniquely comprehensive dataset, hold the potential for improving weather and climate model predictions, and satellite cloud property retrieval methods.

  6. Atomic Energy Control Board 1991-92 estimates part III expenditure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Expenditure Plan is designed to be used as a reference document. As such, it contains several levels of detail to respond to the various needs of its audience. This Plan is divided into two sections. Section 1 presents an overview of the Program including a description, information on its background, objectives and planning perspective as well as performance information that forms the basis for the resources requested. Section 2 provides further information on costs and resources as well as special analyses that the reader may require to understand the Program more fully. Section 1 is preceded by details of Spending Authorities from Part 2 of the Estimates and Volume 2 of the Public Accounts. This is to provide continuity with other Estimates documents and to help in assessing the Program's financial performance over the past year. 22 figs

  7. Atomic Energy Control Board 1992-93 estimates part III expenditure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Expenditure Plan is designed to be used as a reference document. As such, it contains several levels of detail to respond to the various needs of its audience. This Plan is divided into two sections. Section 1 presents an overview of the Program including a description, information on its background, objectives and planning perspective as well as performance information that forms the basis for the resources requested. Section 2 provides further information on costs and resources as well as special analyses that the reader may require to understand the Program more fully. Section 1 is preceded by details of Spending Authorities from Part 2 of the Estimates and Volume 2 of the Public Accounts. This is to provide continuity with other Estimates documents and to help in assessing the Program's financial performance over the past year. 7 refs., 21 figs

  8. National Energy Board 1992-93 estimates part III expenditure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Expenditure Plan is designed to be used as a reference document. As such, it contains several levels of detail to respond to the various needs of its audience. This Plan is divided into two sections. Section 1 presents an overview of the Program including a description, information on its background, objectives and planning perspective as well as performance information that forms the basis for the resources requested. Section 2 provides further information on costs and resources as well as special analyses that the reader may require to understand the Program more fully. Section 1 is preceded by details of Spending Authorities from Part 2 of the Estimates and Volume 2 of the Public Accounts. This is to provide continuity with other Estimates documents and to help in assessing the Program's financial performance over the past year. The format and organization of the document should be regarded as transitional. For the most part the document is organized to be consistent with the program structure approved for the National Energy Board. 16 figs

  9. Assessment and accountability: part 2 - managing failing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, Trish

    2016-06-01

    Assessment in clinical practice is a complex role undertaken by mentors and practice teachers. This article is the second of three articles about assessment in practice. Part one examined the importance of assessment and identified various assessment methods used in clinical practice. This article considers two main themes in the assessment of practice. First, it outlines the importance of providing feedback, and explores preparation for regular feedback and the documentation used to help mentors and practice teachers undertake this activity. Second, it discusses management of failing students, and reviews the literature relating to the 'failure to fail' phenomenon. This article relates to the third domain and outcomes of the Nursing and Midwifery Council's Standards to Support Learning and Assessment in Practice on assessment and accountability. PMID:27286625

  10. Neuro image in neuroectodermal disorders. Part III: angiomatous and melanotic syndromes. Neuroimagen en los transtornos neuroectodermicos. Parte III: sindromes angiomatosos y melanoticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marti-Bonmati, L.; Menor, F.; Poyatos, C.; Cortina, H.; Esteban, M.J.; Vilar, J. (Hospital La Fe Valencia. (Spain))

    1994-01-01

    Twenty-eight consecutive patients affected by these rare angiomatous melanotic neuroectodermal disorders are assessed. The diagnostics value and clinical correlation of neuroimaging methods, both CT and MR, are established. Patients with Sturge-Weber syndrome (15 cases), Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome (1 case), Rendu-Osler disease (3 cases), multiple hemangiomatosis (4 cases), von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (3 cases), neuro cutaneous melanosis (1 case) and hypo melanosis of Ito (1 case) are included. In vascular phacomatosis, neuroimaging methods usually contribute to the positive diagnosis. In melanotic disorders, the neuroradiological findings most often are unspecific and do not contribute to the diagnosis of the disease.

  11. A Review & Assessment of Current Operating Conditions Allowable Stresses in ASME Section III Subsection NH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. W. Swindeman

    2009-12-14

    The current operating condition allowable stresses provided in ASME Section III, Subsection NH were reviewed for consistency with the criteria used to establish the stress allowables and with the allowable stresses provided in ASME Section II, Part D. It was found that the S{sub o} values in ASME III-NH were consistent with the S values in ASME IID for the five materials of interest. However, it was found that 0.80 S{sub r} was less than S{sub o} for some temperatures for four of the materials. Only values for alloy 800H appeared to be consistent with the criteria on which S{sub o} values are established. With the intent of undertaking a more detailed evaluation of issues related to the allowable stresses in ASME III-NH, the availabilities of databases for the five materials were reviewed and augmented databases were assembled.

  12. Electre III method in assessment of variants of integrated urban public transport system in Cracow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna SOLECKA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a lot of methods which are currently used for assessment of urban public transport system development and operation e.g. economic analysis, mostly Cost-Benefit Analysis – CBA, Cost-Effectiveness Analysis - CEA, hybrid methods, measurement methods (survey e.g. among passengers and measurement of traffic volume, vehicles capacity etc., and multicriteria decision aiding methods (multicriteria analysis. The main aim of multicriteria analysis is the choice of the most desirable solution from among alternative variants according to different criteria which are difficult to compare against one another. There are several multicriteria methods for assessment of urban public transport system development and operation, e.g. AHP, ANP, Electre, Promethee, Oreste. The paper presents an application of one of the most popular variant ranking methods – Electre III method. The algorithm of Electre III method usage is presented in detail and then its application for assessment of variants of urban public transport system integration in Cracow is shown. The final ranking of eight variants of integration of urban public transport system in Cracow (from the best to the worst variant was drawn up with the application of the Electre III method. For assessment purposes 10 criteria were adopted: economical, technical, environmental, and social; they form a consistent criteria family. The problem was analyzed with taking into account different points of view: city authorities, public transport operators, city units responsible for transport management, passengers and others users. Separate models of preferences for all stakeholders were created.

  13. Assessment of severe accident prevention and mitigation features: BWR, Mark III containment design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plant features and operator actions, which have been found to be important in either preventing or mitigating severe accidents in BWRs with Mark III containments (BWR Mark II's), have been identified. These features and actions were developed specifically for the Grand Gulf Plant and from assessments of other relevant studies. Accident sequences that dominate the core-damage frequency and those accident sequences that are of potentially high consequence were identified. Vulnerabilities of the BWR Mark III to severe accident containment loads were also identified. In addition, those features of a BWR Mark III, which are important for preventing core damage and are available for mitigating fission-product release to the environment were also identified. This report is issued to provide focus to an analyst examining an individual plant. The report calls attention to plant features and operator actions and provides a list of deterministic attributes for assessing those features and actions found to be helpful in reducing the overall risk for Grand Gulf and other Mark III plants. Thus, the guidance is offered as a resource in examining the subject plant to determine if the same, or similar, plant features and operator actions will be of value in reducing overall plant risk. This report is intended to serve solely as guidance

  14. Circuit modeling of the electrical impedance: part III. Disuse following bone fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multifrequency measurements of the electrical impedance of muscle have been extended to the study of disuse following bone fracture, and analyzed using the five-element circuit model used earlier in the study of the effects of disease. Eighteen subjects recovering from simple fractures on upper or lower limbs were examined (ten males, eight females, aged 18–66). Muscles on uninjured contralateral limbs were used as comparison standards, and results are presented in terms of the ratios p(injured)/p(uninjured), where p stands for the circuit parameter r1, r2, r3, 1/c1 or 1/c2. These are strikingly similar to the diseased-to-healthy ratios for patients with neuromuscular disease, reported in part I of this series. In particular, r1 is virtually unaffected and the ratios for r2, r3, 1/c1 and 1/c2 can be as large as in serious disease. Furthermore, the same pattern of relationships between the parameters is found, suggesting that there is a common underlying mechanism for the impedance changes. Atrophy and fibrosis are examined as candidates for that mechanism, but it is argued that their effects are too small to explain the observed changes. Fundamental considerations aside, the sensitivity, reproducibility and technical simplicity of the technique recommend its use for in-flight assessments of muscles during orbital or interplanetary missions. (paper)

  15. Identification and assessment of containment and release management strategies for a BWR Mark III containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report identifies and assesses accident management strategies which could be important for preventing containment failure and/or mitigating the release of fission products during a severe accident in a BWR plant with a Mark III type of containment. Based on information available from probabilistic risk assessments and other existing severe accident research, and using simplified containment and release event trees, the report identifies the challenges a Mark III containment could face during the course of a severe accident, the mechanisms behind these challenges, and the strategies that could be used to mitigate the challenges. The strategies are linked to the general safety objectives which apply for containment and release management by means of a safety objective tree. The strategies were assessed by applying them to certain severe accident sequence categories deemed important for a Mark III containment because of one or more of the following characteristics: high probability of core damage, high consequences, lead to a number of challenges, and involve the failure of multiple systems

  16. Theoretical analysis of nuclear reactors (Phase II), I-V, Part III, Reactor poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This phase is dealing with influence of all the fission products except Xe135 on the reactivity of a reactor, usually named as reactor poisoning. The first part of the report is a review of methods for calculation of reactor poisoning. The second part shows the most frequently used method for calculation of cross sections and yields of pseudo products (for thermal neutrons). The system of equations was adopted dependent on the conditions of the available computer system. It is described in part three. Detailed method for their application is described in part four and results obtained are presented in part five

  17. Imaging assessment of isolated lesions affecting cranial nerve III; Avaliacao por imagem das lesoes isoladas do III par craniano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Marcelo de Mattos [Colegio Brasileiro de Radiologia e Diagnostico por Imagem (CBR), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: cidbh@cidbh.com.br; Martins, Jose Carlos Tadeu [Sociedade Brasileira de Neuroradiologia, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2005-05-15

    The aim of this study is to review the anatomy and main pathologic conditions affecting cranial nerve III using imaging studies, particularly magnetic resonance imaging. Imaging methods are essential in the evaluation of patients with suspected lesions of the oculomotor nerve once signs and symptoms are unspecific and a large number of diseases can affect cranial nerve III. A brief review of the literature is also presented. (author)

  18. Eighth annual meeting, Vienna, Austria, 15-18 April 1975. Summary report. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Summary Report of the Eighth Annual Meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors contains the minutes of the meeting (Part 1); papers which review the national programmes in the field of LMFBRs (Part 2) and the discussions on the review of national programmes (Part 3). The agenda of the meeting involved design, construction, operating experiences of demonstration fast power reactors, reprocessing of spent fuel from LMFBRs, reliability of decay heat removal systems, fuel failure mechanisms, safety of LMFBRs

  19. Preparing Instructional Designers for Game-Based Learning: Part III. Game Design as a Collaborative Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirumi, Atsusi; Appelman, Bob; Rieber, Lloyd; Van Eck, Richard

    2010-01-01

    In this three part series, four professors who teach graduate level courses on the design of instructional video games discuss their perspectives on preparing instructional designers to optimize game-based learning. Part I set the context for the series and one of four panelists discussed what he believes instructional designers should know about…

  20. A Historical Timeline of Doping in the Olympics (Part III 1989--2006)

    OpenAIRE

    Kremenik, Michael; Onodera, Sho; Nagao, Mitsushiro; Yuzuki, Osamu; Yonetani, Shozo

    2007-01-01

    This is the last part of a three part paper on a timeline history of doping in the Olympics. Part three of the timeline focuses on the creation of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA), new doping drugs, known drugs that are not detectable to current drug tests, new drug testing procedures and improvements in the sanctioning of athletes. The years 1989-2006 saw a coming together of the world sports community to fight doping. WADA has worked as a powerful umbrella group supporting this fight. It...

  1. Dynamic Assessment with the Bayley-III: A Standardised Diagnostic Instrument 1-42 months

    OpenAIRE

    Visser, Linda; Ruiter, Selma; van der Meulen, Bieuwe; Timmerman, Marieke; Ruijssenaars, Wied

    2010-01-01

    When problems are suspected with the development of a child, developmental assessment is often carried out as part of the diagnostic process. The obtained test score indicates the level at which the child is functioning at this moment in time. This appears not to be sufficient information for practitioners to be able to formulate and evaluate an intervention plan and to predict future development. In the past decennia, research has been done on dynamic assessment, which is an assessment of cu...

  2. Annex III. Experimental investigations relevant for the assessment of extreme mechanical and thermal loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annex III lists the most important experimental investigations that are relevant for the assessment of extreme mechanical and thermal loads acting on the casks. It reports on drop tests, high speed crash tests, aircraft crash tests, tank wagon explosion and fire experiments. Apart from the drop tests within the framework of cask licensing, a range of drop tests was also performed from greater heights or under more severe conditions. In all the experiments with increased mechanical load impacts going beyond IAEA design requirements the casks showed no loss of integrity

  3. Assessment of the Adoption Rate of Technologies among Fadama III Farmers in Adamawa State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umar, AdamuMadu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted in Adamawa State, Nigeria. The major thrust of this study is to assess the adoption rate of technology in Fadama III. In its four years of operation, Fadama III project has realized significant impact on household access to new and proven technologies. Adoption rate of technologies among beneficiaries has increased from 43.75% before the inception of the project to 96.255% after the project intervention. This indicates 50% increase against only 20% increase among the non-beneficiaries. Adoption rate of off-farm technologies (agricultural marketing and financial management was also large. The adoption rate for the all the technologies was significant at p = 0.05, except for fish feed formulation, Cold storage, marketing and fish smoking. Yields among respondents have increased significantly due to adoption of proven technologies. The increase was higher among crop farmers (59.38% followed by livestock farmers (48.75%. The increase in yields across all the enterprises has exceeded the set target of 20% increase except for fish production (11.25% and Agro-forestry (6.88%. The increase was more among the beneficiaries compared to non-beneficiaries. It can be concluded that project did not only influence the beneficiaries to adopt technologies for the purpose of improving their socio-economic status but it has also influenced the non-beneficiaries living in Fadama III communities to adopt technologies. Fadama III needs to harmonize existing approaches and need to use complementary systems rather than conflicting ones.

  4. About the International System of Units (SI) Part III. SI Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrecht, Gordon J., II; French, Anthony P.; Iona, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Before discussing more details of SI, we will summarize the essentials in a few tables that can serve as ready references. If a unit isn't listed in Tables I-IV, it is not part of SI or specifically allowed for use with SI. The units and symbols that are sufficient for most everyday applications are given in bold.

  5. The Health of Healthcare, Part III: Dissolving (curing) the cancer in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Deane

    2013-01-01

    In a previous part of this "The Health of Healthcare" series, the etiology of sickness in our healthcare system was established as cancer. This article offers a method to "cure" healthcare, taken from strategic management thinking called VOSIE. In this article, the use of VOSIE is described as well as who needs to apply this cure: the public. A unifying mantra is suggested: Think and decide. PMID:24772497

  6. Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part III: Peripheral nerves of the lower limb

    OpenAIRE

    Kowalska, Berta; Sudoł-Szopińska, Iwona

    2012-01-01

    The ultrasonographic examination is currently increasingly used in imaging peripheral nerves, serving to supplement the physical examination, electromyography and magnetic resonance imaging. As in the case of other USG imaging studies, the examination of peripheral nerves is non-invasive and well-tolerated by patients. The typical ultrasonographic picture of peripheral nerves as well as the examination technique have been discussed in part I of this article series, following the example of th...

  7. Burnout in boiling heat transfer. Part III. High-quality forced-convection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the final part of a review of burnout during boiling heat transfer. The status of burnout in high-quality forced-convection systems is reviewed, and recent developments are summarized in detail. A general guide to the considerable literature is given. Parametric effects and correlations for water in circular and noncircular ducts are presented. Other topics discussed include transients, steam-generator applications, correlations for other fluids, fouling, and augmentation

  8. Summary for Policymakers IPCC Fourth Assessment Report, WorkingGroup III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, Terry; Bashmakov, Igor; Bernstein, Lenny; Bogner,Jean; Bosch, Peter; Dave, Rutu; Davidson, Ogunlade; Fisher, Brian; Grubb,Michael; Gupta, Sujata; Halsnaes, Kirsten; Heij, Bertjan; Kahn Ribeiro,Suzana; Kobayashi, Shigeki; Levine, Mark; Martino, Daniel; MaseraCerutti, Omar; Metz, Bert; Meyer, Leo; Nabuurs, Gert-Jan; Najam, Adil; Nakicenovic, Nebojsa; Rogner, Hans Holger; Roy, Joyashree; Sathaye,Jayant; Schock, Robert; Shukla, Priyaradshi; Sims, Ralph; Smith, Pete; Swart, Rob; Tirpak, Dennis; Urge-Vorsatz, Diana; Zhou, Dadi

    2007-04-30

    A. Introduction 1. The Working Group III contribution to theIPCC Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) focuses on new literature on thescientific, technological, environmental, economic and social aspects ofmitigation of climate change, published since the IPCC Third AssessmentReport (TAR) and the Special Reports on COB2B Capture and Storage (SRCCS)and on Safeguarding the Ozone Layer and the Global Climate System (SROC).The following summary is organised into six sections after thisintroduction: - Greenhouse gas (GHG) emission trends, - Mitigation in theshort and medium term, across different economic sectors (until 2030), -Mitigation in the long-term (beyond 2030), - Policies, measures andinstruments to mitigate climate change, - Sustainable development andclimate change mitigation, - Gaps in knowledge. References to thecorresponding chapter sections are indicated at each paragraph in squarebrackets. An explanation of terms, acronyms and chemical symbols used inthis SPM can be found in the glossary to the main report.

  9. The History of Articulators: The Wonderful World of "Grinders," Part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starcke, Edgar N; Engelmeier, Robert L

    2016-02-01

    This is the third article in a three-part series on the history of denture occlusal grinders. The first article reviewed the earliest attempts to "grind in" denture occlusion by hand manipulating simple articulators with special features to those more complex devices powered by hand cranks. The second article explored devices that were motor driven, either those with cast holders to grind the occlusion of processed dentures or those designed to utilize an articulator's condylar or incisal controls for that purpose. This article examines those articulators that have a rotary occlusal grinder as an essential feature. Additionally, this article reviews those grinding devices produced as attachments for popular contemporary articulators. PMID:25754238

  10. Building Worlds and Learning Astronomy on Facebook Part III: Testing, Launch, and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harold, J.; Hines, D.; Vidugiris, E.; Goldman, K. H.

    2015-11-01

    James Harold (SSI), Dean Hines (STScI/SSI) and a team at the National Center for Interactive Learning at the Space Science Institute are developing Starchitect, an end-to-end stellar and planetary evolution game for the Facebook platform. Supported by NSF and NASA, and based in part on a prototype presented at ASP several years ago, Starchitect uses the “sporadic play” model of games such as Farmville, where players might only take actions a few times a day, but may continue playing for months. This paper is an update to a presentation at last year's ASP conference.

  11. Early Pottery Making in Northern Coastal Peru. Part III: Moessbauer Study of Sican Pottery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sican blackware from a 1000-year old elite tomb at Huaca Loro was characterised by neutron activation analysis, optical thin-section microscopy, X-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy. A number of blackware fragments from the later site of Puerto Pobre (ca. AD 1460-1550) were included in the analysis for comparison and found to be of different origin. The black surface of the specimens from Huaca Loro is mostly due to carbon deposition during firing in a reducing environment. Part of the pottery was merely dried at temperatures below 400 deg. C, perhaps because it was made in haste for funeral use.

  12. Preliminary assessments the shortcut to remediation (category III-surplus facility assessments)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the details of the preliminary assessments for the shortcut of decontamination of surplus nuclear facilities. Topics discussed include: environment, health and safety concerns; economic considerations; reduction of transition time; preliminary characterization reports; preliminary project plan; health and safety plan; quality assurance plan; surveillance and maintenance plan; and waste management plan

  13. Managing the multicultural laboratory, Part III: Putting the cross-cultural tools to work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketchum, S M

    1993-01-01

    This third article provides two case studies that enable laboratory managers to see how the cross-cultural model postulated by Dr. Geert Hofstede can be practically applied to two important issues--staff training and conflict resolution between employees. In addition, the opinions of several managers from a variety of industries are presented to add realism and perspective. This encourages laboratory managers to step outside the laboratory environment and learn from other managers who have years of experience supervising culturally diverse groups of employees. Part I of this series explained what is meant by "culture" and featured the research-based model set forth by Dutch social psychologist and management consultant, Dr. Geert Hofstede. His four dimensions of culture (Power Distance, Masculinity/Femininity, Individualism/Collectivism, and Uncertainty Avoidance) provide a useful framework for understanding the different values, attitudes, and behaviors exhibited by those of different cultural backgrounds. Part II presented advice in the form of 13 anecdotes from experienced cross-cultural managers. Issues of performance management, interpersonal skills, and language and safety were explored in light of the four dimensions. In this third article, abbreviated reference tables adapted from Hofstede's research are presented that make these cross-cultural data more useful for management decision making. Laboratory managers will receive practical, "real world" advice that will help them to positively resolve conflicts and to take full advantage of staff training opportunities. PMID:10123894

  14. Models for Quarks and Elementary Particles. Part III: What is the Nature of the Gravitational Field?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neumann U. K. W.

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The first two parts of this article series dealt with the questions: What is a quark? and What is mass? While the present models lead to a physical idea of the mass, the geometrical theory of the general relativity only shows the effect of mass. From the physical idea of mass, from the idea of the resultant vector (EV as electric flux and from the ideas relating to the magnetic monopole (MMP it follows that the gravitational field is an electrical field. The share of the electrical gravitational flux on the entire electrical flux of a quark is determined from Newton’s empirical gravitational constant G . The superposition of the < fluxes of two quark collectives produces the gravitational force effect between two quark collectives. Gravitational fields reach infinitely far according to our current ideas. Connected with the quark oscillations hinted in the Parts I and II this results in the idea of the < - < flux spreading with infinite speed, having enormous consequences.

  15. Two-loop renormalization in the standard model, part III. Renormalization equations and their solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In part I and II of this series of papers all elements have been introduced to extend, to two loops, the set of renormalization procedures which are needed in describing the properties of a spontaneously broken gauge theory. In this paper, the final step is undertaken and finite renormalization is discussed. Two-loop renormalization equations are introduced and their solutions discussed within the context of the minimal standard model of fundamental interactions. These equations relate renormalized Lagrangian parameters (couplings and masses) to some input parameter set containing physical (pseudo-)observables. Complex poles for unstable gauge and Higgs bosons are used and a consistent setup is constructed for extending the predictivity of the theory from the Lep1 Z-boson scale (or the Lep2 WW scale) to regions of interest for LHC and ILC physics. (orig.)

  16. A review of biomass burning emissions part III: intensive optical properties of biomass burning particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Reid

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of its wide coverage over much of the globe, biomass burning has been widely studied in the context of direct radiative forcing. Such study is warranted as smoke particles scatter and at times absorb solar radiation efficiently. Further, as much of what is known about smoke transport and impacts is based on remote sensing measurements, the optical properties of smoke particles have far reaching effects into numerous aspects of biomass burning studies. Global estimates of direct forcing have been widely varying, ranging from near zero to −1 W m-2. A significant part of this difference can be traced to varying assumptions on the optical properties of smoke. This manuscript is the third part of four examining biomass-burning emissions. Here we review and discuss the literature concerning measurement and modeling of optical properties of biomass-burning particles. These include available data from published sensitivity studies, field campaigns, and inversions from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET of Sun photometer sites. As a whole, optical properties reported in the literature are varied, reflecting both the dynamic nature of fires, variations in smoke aging processes and differences in measurement technique. We find that forward modeling or ''internal closure'' studies ultimately are of little help in resolving outstanding measurement issues due to the high degree of degeneracy in solutions when using ''reasonable'' input parameters. This is particularly notable with respect to index of refraction and the treatment of black carbon. Consequently, previous claims of column closure may in fact be more ambiguous. Differences between in situ and retrieved ωo values have implications for estimates of mass scattering and mass absorption efficiencies. In this manuscript we review and discuss this community dataset. Strengths and lapses are pointed out, future research topics are prioritized, and best estimates and uncertainties of key

  17. A review of biomass burning emissions part III: intensive optical properties of biomass burning particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Reid

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Because of its wide coverage over much of the globe, biomass burning has been widely studied in the context of direct radiative forcing. Such study is warranted as smoke particles scatter and at times absorb solar radiation efficiently. Further, as much of what is known about smoke transport and impacts is based on remote sensing measurements, the optical properties of smoke particles have far reaching effects into numerous aspects of biomass burning studies. Global estimates of direct forcing have been widely varying, ranging from near zero to −1 Wm−2. A significant part of this difference can be traced to varying assumptions on the optical properties of smoke. This manuscript is the third part of four examining biomass-burning emissions. Here we review and discuss the literature concerning measurement and modeling of optical properties of biomass-burning particles. These include available data from published sensitivity studies, field campaigns, and inversions from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET of Sun photometer sites. As a whole, optical properties reported in the literature are varied, reflecting both the dynamic nature of fires, variations in smoke aging processes and differences in measurement technique. We find that forward modeling or "internal closure" studies ultimately are of little help in resolving outstanding measurement issues due to the high degree of degeneracy in solutions when using "reasonable" input parameters. This is particularly notable with respect to index of refraction and the treatment of black carbon. Consequently, previous claims of column closure may in fact be more ambiguous. Differences between in situ and retrieved ωo values have implications for estimates of mass scattering and mass absorption efficiencies. In this manuscript we review and discuss this community dataset. Strengths and lapses are pointed out, future research topics are prioritized, and best estimates and

  18. Carbon honeycomb grids for advanced lead-acid batteries. Part III: Technology scale-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchev, A.; Serra, L.; Dumenil, S.; Brichard, G.; Alias, M.; Jammet, B.; Vinit, L.

    2015-12-01

    The carbon honeycomb grid technology employs new carbon/carbon composites with ordered 3D structure instead of the classic lead-acid battery current collectors. The technology is laboratory scaled up from small size grids corresponding to electrodes with a capacity of 3 Ah to current collectors suitable for assembly of lead-acid batteries covering the majority of the typical lead-acid battery applications. Two series of 150 grids each (one positive and one negative) are manufactured using low-cost lab-scale equipment. They are further subjected to pasting with active materials and the resulting battery plates are assembled in 12 V AGM-VLRA battery mono-blocks for laboratory testing and outdoor demonstration in electric scooter replacing its original VRLAB pack. The obtained results demonstrate that the technology can replace successfully the state of the art negative grids with considerable benefits. The use of the carbon honeycomb grids as positive plate current collectors is limited by the anodic corrosion of the entire structure attacking both the carbon/carbon composite part and the electroplated lead-tin alloy coating.

  19. Rich methane laminar flames doped with light unsaturated hydrocarbons. Part III : cyclopentene

    CERN Document Server

    Gueniche, Hadj-Ali; Fournet, René; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique

    2008-01-01

    In line with the studies presented in the parts I and II of this paper, the structure of a laminar rich premixed methane flame doped with cyclopentene has been investigated. The gases of this flame contains 15.3% (molar) of methane, 26.7% of oxygen and 2.4% cyclopentene corresponding to an equivalence ratio of 1.79 and a ratio C5H8 / CH4 of 16 %. The flame has been stabilized on a burner at a pressure of 6.7 kPa using argon as dilutant, with a gas velocity at the burner of 36 cm/s at 333 K. The temperature ranged from 627 K close to the burner up to 2027 K. Quantified species included usual methane C0-C2 combustion products, but also propyne, allene, propene, propane, 1-butene, 1,3-butadiene, 1,2-butadiene, vinylacetylene, diacetylene, cyclopentadiene, 1,3-pentadiene, benzene and toluene. A new mechanism for the oxidation of cyclopentene has been proposed. The main reaction pathways of consumption of cyclopentene and of formation of benzene and toluene have been derived from flow rate analyses.

  20. A Study of Future Communications Concepts and Technologies for the National Airspace System-Part III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchak, Denise S.; Apaza, Rafael D.; Wichgersm Joel M.; Haynes, Brian; Roy, Aloke

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) is investigating current and anticipated wireless communications concepts and technologies that the National Airspace System (NAS) may need in the next 50 years. NASA has awarded three NASA Research Announcements (NAR) studies with the objective to determine the most promising candidate technologies for air-to-air and air-to-ground data exchange and analyze their suitability in a post-NextGen NAS environment. This paper will present progress made in the studies and describe the communications challenges and opportunities that have been identified as part of the study. NASA's NextGen Concepts and Technology Development (CTD) Project integrates solutions for a safe, efficient and high-capacity airspace system through joint research efforts and partnerships with other government agencies. The CTD Project is one of two within NASA's Airspace Systems Program and is managed by the NASA Ames Research Center. Research within the CTD Project is in support the 2011 NASA Strategic Plan Sub-Goal 4.1: Develop innovative solutions and advanced technologies, through a balanced research portfolio, to improve current and future air transportation. The focus of CTD is on developing capabilities in traffic flow management, dynamic airspace configuration, separation assurance, super density operations and airport surface operations. Important to its research is the development of human/automation information requirements and decisionmaking guidelines for human-human and human-machine airportal decision-making. Airborne separation, oceanic intrail climb/descent and interval management applications depend on location and intent information of surrounding aircraft. ADS-B has been proposed to provide the information exchange, but other candidates such as satellite-based receivers, broadband or airborne internet, and cellular communications are possible candidate's.

  1. Assessment of temporomandibular disorder and occlusion in treated class III malocclusion patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karyna Valle-Corotti

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to compare the prevalence of temporomandibular disorders (TMD in individuals submitted to either orthodontic or ortho-surgical Class III malocclusion treatment and to assess the influence of occlusal aspects on TMD severity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The sample consisted of 50 individuals divided into two groups, according to the type of treatment (orthodontic or orthodontic with orthognathic surgery. The presence of signs and symptoms of TMD was evaluated by an anamnestic questionnaire and a clinical examination, including TMJ and muscle palpation, active mandibular range of motion, joint noises and occlusal examination. RESULTS: Based on the anamnestic questionnaire, 48% had no TMD, 42% had mild TMD and 10% had moderate TMD. The presence and severity of TMD did not show any relationship with the type of orthodontic treatment (p>0.05. The chi-square test showed a positive association (p<0.05 between TMD and non-working side occlusal interferences. CONCLUSION: Based on the methodology used and the results obtained, it may be concluded that Class III orthodontic treatment was not associated with the presence of TMD signs and symptoms and the non-working side contacts can be occlusal factors of risk. There was no significant difference in TMD prevalence between the studied groups (orthodontically treated patients and patients treated with orthodontics followed by orthognathic surgery.

  2. An Independent Scientific Assessment of Well Stimulation in California Volume III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Jane C.S. [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Feinstein, Laura C. [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Foxall, William [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Houseworth, James [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Jordan, Preston [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lindsey, Nathaniel [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Maddalena, Randy [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); McKone, Thomas [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Stringfellow, William [California Council on Science and Technology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Ulrich, Craig [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Heberger, Matthew [Pacific Inst., Oakland, CA (United States); Shonkoff, Seth [PSE Healthy Energy, Berkeley, CA (United States); Brandt, Adam [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Ferrar, Kyle [The FracTracker Alliance, Oakland, CA (United States); Gautier, Donald [DonGautier LLC., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Phillips, Scott [California State Univ. Stanislaus, Turlock, CA (United States); Greenfield, Ben [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Jerrett, Michael L.B. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    This study is issued in three volumes. Volume I, issued in January 2015, describes how well stimulation technologies work, how and where operators deploy these technologies for oil and gas production in California, and where they might enable production in the future. Volume II, issued in July 2015, discusses how well stimulation could affect water, atmosphere, seismic activity, wildlife and vegetation, and human health. Volume II reviews available data, and identifies knowledge gaps and alternative practices that could avoid or mitigate these possible impacts. Volume III, this volume, presents case studies that assess environmental issues and qualitative risks for specific geographic regions. The Summary Report summarizes key findings, conclusions and recommendations of all three volumes.

  3. Electronics and telecommunications in Poland, issues and perspectives: Part III. Innovativeness, applications, economy, development scenarios, politics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modelski, Józef; Romaniuk, Ryszard

    2010-09-01

    important role of ET is combined with the existence in the society of an adequate infrastructure which recreates the full development cycle of high technology embracing: people, institutions, finances and logistics, in this also science, higher education, education, continuous training, dissemination and outreach, professional social environment, legal basis, political support and lobbying, innovation structures, applications, industry and economy. The digest of chosen development tendencies in ET was made here from the academic perspective, in a wider scale and on this background the national one, trying to situate this branch in the society, determine its changing role to build a new technical infrastructure of a society based on knowledge, a role of builder of many practical gadgets facilitating life, a role of a big future integrator of today's single bricks into certain more useful unity. This digest does not have a character of a systematic analysis of ET. It is a kind of an arbitrary utterance of the authors inside their field of competence. The aim of this paper is to take an active part in the discussion of the academic community in this country on the development strategy of ET, choice of priorities for cyclically rebuilding economy, in competitive environments. The review paper was initiated by the Committee of Electronics and Telecommunications of Polish Academy of Sciences and was published in Polish as introductory chapter of a dedicated expertise, printed in a book format. This version makes the included opinions available for a wider community.

  4. Long maximal incremental tests accurately assess aerobic fitness in class II and III obese men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Lanzi

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare two different maximal incremental tests with different time durations [a maximal incremental ramp test with a short time duration (8-12 min (STest and a maximal incremental test with a longer time duration (20-25 min (LTest] to investigate whether an LTest accurately assesses aerobic fitness in class II and III obese men. Twenty obese men (BMI≥35 kg.m-2 without secondary pathologies (mean±SE; 36.7±1.9 yr; 41.8±0.7 kg*m-2 completed an STest (warm-up: 40 W; increment: 20 W*min-1 and an LTest [warm-up: 20% of the peak power output (PPO reached during the STest; increment: 10% PPO every 5 min until 70% PPO was reached or until the respiratory exchange ratio reached 1.0, followed by 15 W.min-1 until exhaustion] on a cycle-ergometer to assess the peak oxygen uptake [Formula: see text] and peak heart rate (HRpeak of each test. There were no significant differences in [Formula: see text] (STest: 3.1±0.1 L*min-1; LTest: 3.0±0.1 L*min-1 and HRpeak (STest: 174±4 bpm; LTest: 173±4 bpm between the two tests. Bland-Altman plot analyses showed good agreement and Pearson product-moment and intra-class correlation coefficients showed a strong correlation between [Formula: see text] (r=0.81 for both; p≤0.001 and HRpeak (r=0.95 for both; p≤0.001 during both tests. [Formula: see text] and HRpeak assessments were not compromised by test duration in class II and III obese men. Therefore, we suggest that the LTest is a feasible test that accurately assesses aerobic fitness and may allow for the exercise intensity prescription and individualization that will lead to improved therapeutic approaches in treating obesity and severe obesity.

  5. Management strategies to effect change in intensive care units: lessons from the world of business. Part III. Effectively effecting and sustaining change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershengorn, Hayley B; Kocher, Robert; Factor, Phillip

    2014-03-01

    Reaping the optimal rewards from any quality improvement project mandates sustainability after the initial implementation. In Part III of this three-part ATS Seminars series, we discuss strategies to create a culture for change, improve cooperation and interaction between multidisciplinary teams of clinicians, and position the intensive care unit (ICU) optimally within the hospital environment. Coaches are used throughout other industries to help professionals assess and continually improve upon their practice; use of this strategy is as of yet infrequent in health care, but would be easily transferable and potentially beneficial to ICU managers and clinicians alike. Similarly, activities focused on improving teamwork are commonplace outside of health care. Simulation training and classroom education about key components of successful team functioning are known to result in improvements. In addition to creating an ICU environment in which individuals and teams of clinicians perform well, ICU managers must position the ICU to function well within the hospital system. It is important to move away from the notion of a standalone ("siloed") ICU to one that is well integrated into the rest of the institution. Creating a "pull-system" (in which participants are active in searching out needed resources and admitting patients) can help ICU managers both provide better care for the critically ill and strengthen relationships with non-ICU staff. Although not necessary, there is potential upside to creating a unified critical care service to assist with achieving these ends. PMID:24601653

  6. Workshop 95. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Out of 140 short communications presented in the proceedings, 13 have been inputted into INIS. The topics covered include lifetime control in semiconductor devices by ion irradiation, single crystal scintillation detectors, environmental monitoring, diffusion and sorption of radionuclides in soils, accelerator driven reactors, radioactive waste disposal, digital reactor control systems and research reactors. (Z.S.)

  7. Modeling and experimental assessment of a buried Leu-Ile mutation in dengue envelope domain III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Manjiri R; Numoto, Nobutaka; Ito, Nobutoshi; Kuroda, Yutaka

    2016-02-26

    Envelope protein domain III (ED3) of the dengue virus is important for both antibody binding and host cell interaction. Here, we focused on how a L387I mutation in the protein core could take place in DEN4 ED3, but cannot be accommodated in DEN3 ED3 without destabilizing its structure. To this end, we modeled a DEN4_L387I structure using the Penultimate Rotamer Library and taking the DEN4 ED3 main-chain as a fixed template. We found that three out of seven Ile(387) conformers fit in DEN4 ED3 without introducing the severe atomic clashes that are observed when DEN3 serotype's ED3 is used as a template. A more extensive search using 273 side-chain rotamers of the residues surrounding Ile(387) confirmed this prediction. In order to assess the prediction, we determined the crystal structure of DEN4_L387I at 2 Å resolution. Ile(387) indeed adopted one of the three predicted rotamers. Altogether, this study demonstrates that the effects of single mutations are to a large extent successfully predicted by systematically modeling the side-chain structures of the mutated as well as those of its surrounding residues using fixed main-chain structures and assessing inter-atomic steric clashes. More accurate and reliable predictions require considering sub-angstrom main-chain deformation, which remains a challenging task. PMID:26826384

  8. RF thermal and new cold part design studies on TTF-III input coupler for Project-X

    CERN Document Server

    Pei, Shilun; Li, Zenghai; Solyak, Nikolay A; Gonin, Ivan V

    2011-01-01

    RF power coupler is one of the key components in superconducting (SC) linac. It provides RF power to the SC cavity and interconnects different temperature layers (1.8K, 4.2K, 70K and 300K). TTF-III coupler is one of the most promising candidates for the High Energy (HE) linac of Project X, but it cannot meet the average power requirements because of the relatively high temperature rise on the warm inner conductor, some design modifications will be required. In this paper, we describe our simulation studies on the copper coating thickness on the warm inner conductor with RRR value of 10 and 100. Our purpose is to rebalance the dynamic and static loads, and finally lower the temperature rise along the warm inner conductor. In addition, to get stronger coupling, better power handling and less multipacting probability, one new cold part design was proposed using 60mm coaxial line; the corresponding multipacting simulation studies have also been investigated.

  9. RF thermal and new cold part design studies on TTF-III input coupler for Project-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Shilun [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China); Adolphsen, Chris E. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Li, Zenghai [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Solyak, Nikolay A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Gonin, Ivan V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-05-15

    An RF power coupler is one of the key components in a superconducting (SC) linac. It provides RF power to the SC cavity and interconnects different temperature layers (1.8 K, 4.2 K, 70 K and 300 K). The TTF-III coupler is one of the most promising candidates for the High Energy (HE) linac of Project X, but it cannot meet the average power requirements because of the relatively high temperature rise on the warm inner conductor, so some design modifications will be required. In this paper, we describe our simulation studies on the copper coating thickness on the warm inner conductor with RRR values of 10 and 100. Our purpose is to rebalance the dynamic and static loads, and finally lower the temperature rise along the warm inner conductor. Additionally, to get stronger coupling, better power handling and less multipacting probability, one new cold part design was proposed using a 60 mm coaxial line; the corresponding multipacting simulation studies have also been investigated.

  10. Helping General Physical Educators and Adapted Physical Educators Address the Office of Civil Rights Dear Colleague Guidance Letter: Part III--Practitioners and Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, David; Martinez, David; Aenchbacher, Amy; Aiello, Rocco; Doyle, Mike; Hilgenbrinck, Linda; Busse, Sean; Cappuccio, Jim

    2013-01-01

    In Part III of the feature, physical educators and adapted physical educators offer current best practices as models of implementation for readers. Contributions included are: (1) Answer to the Dear Colleague Letter from the Anchorage School District's Adapted Sport Program (David Poulin); (2) Georgia's Adapted Physical Educators…

  11. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (83rd, Phoenix, Arizona, August 9-12, 2000). Miscellaneous, Part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Miscellaneous, part III section of the proceedings contains the following 11 papers: "The Relationship between Health and Fitness Magazine Reading and Eating-Disordered Weight-Loss Methods among High School Girls" (Steven R. Thomsen, Michelle M. Weber, and Lora Beth Brown); "A Practical Exercise for Teaching Ethical Decision Making to…

  12. Assessing braze quality in the actively cooled Tore Supra Phase III outboard pump limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quality of brazing of pyrolytic graphite armor brazed to copper tubes in Tore Supra's Phase III Outboard Pump Limiter was assessed through pre-service qualification testing of individual copper/tile assemblies. The evaluation used non-destructive, hot water transient heating tests performed in the high-temperature, high-pressure flow loop at Sandia's Plasma Materials Test Facility. Surface temperatures of tiles were monitored with an infrared camera as water at 120 degrees C at about 2.07 MPa (300 psi) passed through a tube assembly initially at 30 degrees C. For tiles with braze voids or cracks, the surface temperatures tagged behind those of adjacent well-bonded tiles. Temperature tags were correlated with flaw sizes observed during repairs based upon a detailed 2-D heat transfer analyses. open-quotes Badclose quotes tiles, i.e., temperature tags of 10-20 degrees C depending upon tile's size, were easy to detect and, when removed, revealed braze voids of roughly 50% of the joint area. Eleven of the 14 tubes were rebrazed after bad tiles were detected and removed. Three tubes were rebrazed twice

  13. Bioaccumulation of Cr(III) ions by Blue Green-alga Spirulina sp. Part II. Mathematical Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Chojnacka; Piotr M. Wojciechowski

    2007-01-01

    In the present paper bioaccumulation of Cr(III) ions by blue-green algae Spirulina sp. is discussed. We found that the process consisted of two stages: passive in which Cr(III) ions are bound to the surface of cells, identical with biosorption and active, metabolism-dependent, in which Cr(III) ions are transported into the cellular interior. The passive stage occurs in both living and non-living cells and the active only in living biomass. Two distinctive mathematical models of the process we...

  14. European Union Summary Risk Assessment Report - Nitrobenzene - Part I - Environment

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    This report provides a summary, with conclusions, of the risk assessment report of the substance nitrobenzene that has been prepared by Germany in the context of Council Regulation (EEC) No. 793/93 on the evaluation and control of existing substances. For detailed information on the risk assessment principles and procedures followed, the underlying data and the literature references the reader is referred to the comprehensive Final Risk Assessment Report (Final RAR) that can be obtained f...

  15. Assessment for Learning: Research That Is Convincing (Part 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlen, Wynne

    2009-01-01

    What began as formative assessment, now also known as assessment for learning (AfL), is a set of ideas and practices that has--for an educational innovation--an unusually good research pedigree. In the past decade, these ideas and practices have been incorporated into national education policies in all four countries of the UK, although with…

  16. Bioaccumulation of Cr(III ions by Blue Green-alga Spirulina sp. Part II. Mathematical Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Chojnacka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper bioaccumulation of Cr(III ions by blue-green algae Spirulina sp. is discussed. We found that the process consisted of two stages: passive in which Cr(III ions are bound to the surface of cells, identical with biosorption and active, metabolism-dependent, in which Cr(III ions are transported into the cellular interior. The passive stage occurs in both living and non-living cells and the active only in living biomass. Two distinctive mathematical models of the process were proposed. The first was physical model basing on the identified mechanism of the process. In the second model, artificial neural networks were proposed.

  17. Application for approval of the Cold Lake Expansion Project: volume 2: environmental impact assessment: Part 1: biophysical and resource use assessment. Part 2: impact model descriptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An environmental assessment of the Cold Lake Expansion Project has been conducted to identify major issues of concern by public and government agencies, to determine means to eliminate or reduce those impacts, and to recommend any further efforts required to obtain missing information or monitor impacts. Volume 2 of the environmental impact assessment is divided into two parts. Part 1 (biophysical and resource use assessment) constitutes the primary environmental impact assessment document for the Cold Lake expansion project. It includes technical support documentation in regard to: (1) an assessment of noise impacts, (2) an assessment of greenhouse gas emissions, (3) a conceptual conservation and reclamation plan, (4) a historical resource impact assessment, and (5) a description of effects of oil spills on fish. Part 2 (impact model description) serves a reference document for part 1. It describes the approach taken in developing and assessing the impact models, discusses proposed methods for mitigation and management of residual impacts, and the recommended monitoring requirements for each of the major resource disciplines. The impact models describe the specific pathways through which impacts will occur as a result of interactions between project-related activities and important environmental components. 476 refs., 58 tabs., 23 figs

  18. A Main Steam Safety Valve (MSSV) With Fixed Blowdown According to ASME Section III,Part NC-7512

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1986, the NRC issued the Information Notice (IN) 86-05 'Main Steam Safety Valve test failures and ring setting adjustments'. Shortly after this IN was issued, the Code was revised to require that a full flow test has to be performed on each CL.2 MSSV by the manufacturer to verify that the valve was adjusted so that it would reach full lift and thus full relieving capacity and would re-close at a pressure as specified in the valve Design Specification. In response to the concern discussed in the IN, the Westinghouse Owners Group (WOG) performed extensive full flow testing on PWR MSSVs and found that each valve required a unique setting of a combination of two rings in order to achieve full lift at accumulation of 3% and re-closing at a blowdown of 5%. The Bopp and Reuther MSSV type SiZ 2507 has a 'fixed blowdown' i.e. without any adjusting rings to adjust the 'blowdown' so that the blowdown is 'fixed'. More than 1000 pieces of this type are successfully in nuclear power plants in operation. Many of them since about 25 years. Therefore it can be considered as a proven design. It is new that an optimization of this MSSV type SiZ 2507 fulfill the requirements of part NC-7512 of the ASME Section III although there are still no adjusting rings in the flow part. In 2000, for the Qinshan Candu unit 1 and 2 full flow tests were performed with 32 MSSV type SiZ 2507 size 8'' x 12'' at 51 bar saturated steam in only 6 days. In all tests the functional performance was very stable. It was demonstrated by recording the signals lift and system pressure that all valves had acceptable results to achieve full lift at accumulation of 3% and to re-close at blowdown of 5%. This is an advantage which gives a reduction in cost for flow tests and which gives more reliability after maintenance work during outage compared to the common MSSV design with an individual required setting of the combination of the two rings. The design of the type SiZ 2507 without any adjusting rings in the

  19. Standing on shaky ground- US patent-eligibility of isolated DNA and genetic diagnostics after AMP v. USPTO - Part III (unsolved questions & subsequent case law)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minssen, Timo; Nilsson, David

    2012-01-01

    This is the third part of a four-partite article discussing the US Federal Circuit decision in AMP v. USPTO , also known as the ACLU /Myriad "gene patenting" case ("Myriad"). Part I commenced with a description of the legal framework and an explanation of how the decision relates to the recently...... invigorated U.S. debate on patent eligibility, referring inter alia to the 2010 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Bilski v. Kappos and the pending certiorari in Prometheus v. Mayo (1). Before this background, Part I recited the complex procedural history of AMP v. USPTO (2) and summarized the underpinnings of...... Court review (5). Why a potential Supreme Court review of AMP v. USPTO would indeed be a much welcomed and necessary development is now analyzed in Part III. This part will elaborate on the myriad of unsolved questions raised by both AMP v. USPTO and a bulk of subsequent case law addressing the patent...

  20. Model assessment of protective barrier designs: Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protective barriers are being considered for use at the Hanford Site to enhance the isolation of radioactive wastes from water, plant, and animal intrusion. This study assesses the effectiveness of protective barriers for isolation of wastes from water. In this report, barrier designs are reviewed and several barrier modeling assumptions are tested. 20 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs

  1. River Pollution: Part II. Biological Methods for Assessing Water Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Openshaw, Peter

    1984-01-01

    Discusses methods used in the biological assessment of river quality and such indicators of clean and polluted waters as the Trent Biotic Index, Chandler Score System, and species diversity indexes. Includes a summary of a river classification scheme based on quality criteria related to water use. (JN)

  2. Enhanced FAA-Hybrid III dummy for aircraft occupant safety assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waagmeester, C.D.; Ratingen, M.R. van; Giavotto, V.; Notarnicola, L.; Goldner, S.

    2002-01-01

    Following an integral approach unique in aircraft safety, the European HeliSafe project aims to improve the survivability of helicopter crashes and to reduce the risk at injuries for occupants in cockpit and cabin. In the project, a modified FAA-Hybrid III is used for the baseline-, design- and conc

  3. Cephalometric assessment of maxillary length in Serbian children with skeletal class III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Zdenka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Malocclusion of skeletal class III is a complex irregularity of sagittal inter-jaw relationship, which is due to irregularities of sagittal position of one or both of the jaw bones, which is often associated with disproportionate ratio of their length. The aim of this study was to determine whether the length of the jaw of children with skeletal class III in the period of mixed dentition was changed. Methods. Fifty children with skeletal class III and the same number of those with skeletal class I, of both sexes, have been selected on the basis of cephalometric analysis of profile tele-x-ray of the head. All the children aged 6-12 had mixed dentition, and were divided according to sex and age into three subgroups within each group. The length of maxilla, mandible and cranial base were measured. Proportions among the lengths measured within each group were found and difference significance in the measured lengths and their proportions among groups and subgroups were evaluated. Results. The children with skeletal class III, compared with the findings in the control group, had significantly lower values of maxillary length, total maxillary length, as well as lower values of their lengths in proportion to lengths of the front or the total length of cranial base and in proportion to mandibular lengths (p < 0.05. Among the patients of different sexes, both in the test and the control group, a significant difference in the values of the measured lengths was found. Conclusion. The children with skeletal class III have significantly shorter maxilla than those with skeletal class I.

  4. Solar energy scenarios in Brazil, Part one: Resource assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 'Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment' (SWERA) project was an international project financed by GEF/UNEP, which aimed at providing a consistent and accessible database to foster the insertion of renewable energies on the energy matrix of developing countries. This paper presents the solar energy resource assessment generated during the SWERA project by using the radiative transfer model BRASIL-SR fed with satellite and climate data. The solar irradiation estimates were validated by comparing with the ground data acquired in several sites spread out the Brazilian territory. Maps on 10x10 km2 spatial resolution were generated for global, diffuse and direct normal solar irradiation. Solar irradiation on a plane tilted by an angle equal to the local latitude was also generated at the same spatial resolution. Besides the solar resource maps, the annual and seasonal variability of solar energy resource was evaluated and discussed. By analyzing the Brazilian solar resource and variability maps, the great potential available for solar energy applications in Brazil is apparent, even in the semi-temperate climate in the southern region where the annual mean of solar irradiation is comparable to that estimated for the equatorial Amazonian region

  5. New perspectives in the use of ink evidence in forensic science: Part III: Operational applications and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Cedric; Margot, Pierre

    2009-11-20

    The research reported in this series of article aimed at (1) automating the search of questioned ink specimens in ink reference collections and (2) at evaluating the strength of ink evidence in a transparent and balanced manner. These aims require that ink samples are analysed in an accurate and reproducible way and that they are compared in an objective and automated way. This latter requirement is due to the large number of comparisons that are necessary in both scenarios. A research programme was designed to (a) develop a standard methodology for analysing ink samples in a reproducible way, (b) comparing automatically and objectively ink samples and (c) evaluate the proposed methodology in forensic contexts. This report focuses on the last of the three stages of the research programme. The calibration and acquisition process and the mathematical comparison algorithms were described in previous papers [C. Neumann, P. Margot, New perspectives in the use of ink evidence in forensic science-Part I: Development of a quality assurance process for forensic ink analysis by HPTLC, Forensic Sci. Int. 185 (2009) 29-37; C. Neumann, P. Margot, New perspectives in the use of ink evidence in forensic science-Part II: Development and testing of mathematical algorithms for the automatic comparison of ink samples analysed by HPTLC, Forensic Sci. Int. 185 (2009) 38-50]. In this paper, the benefits and challenges of the proposed concepts are tested in two forensic contexts: (1) ink identification and (2) ink evidential value assessment. The results show that different algorithms are better suited for different tasks. This research shows that it is possible to build digital ink libraries using the most commonly used ink analytical technique, i.e. high-performance thin layer chromatography, despite its reputation of lacking reproducibility. More importantly, it is possible to assign evidential value to ink evidence in a transparent way using a probabilistic model. It is therefore

  6. Probabilistic seismic hazard assessment in Greece – Part 3: Deaggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G-A. Tselentis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The present third part of the study, concerning the evaluation of earthquake hazard in Greece in terms of various ground motion parameters, deals with the deaggregation of the obtained results The seismic hazard maps presented for peak ground acceleration and spectral acceleration at 0.2 s and 1.0 s, with 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years, were deaggregated in order to quantify the dominant scenario. There are three basic components of each dominant scenario: earthquake magnitude (M, source-to-site distance (R and epsilon (ε. We present deaggregation maps of mean and mode values of M-R-ε triplet showing the contribution to hazard over a dense grid.

  7. Part I. Bacteriorhodopsin-related materials work for molecular electronics. Part II. Volumetric optical memory based on the branched photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin. Part III. The role of calcium in the bacteriorhodopsin binding site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Jeffrey Alan

    Part I. A protocol for the routine isolation and purification of purple membrane sheets containing the integral membrane protein, bacteriorhodopsin, was developed based upon modifications of protocols already in the literature. This simplified protocol is geared toward the facile isolation of protein for use in molecular electronic devices. Methods for the incorporation of bacteriorhodopsin into various polymeric supports were also developed, primarily in the form of dried films and hydrated cubes. This work also represents the first reported production of dried films of the deionized protein, or blue membrane. Part II. An architecture for a volumetric optical memory based on the branched-photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin is presented. The branching reaction circumvents problems associated with destructive reading and writing processes and allows access to a stable, long-lived state, separated both temporally and energetically from the main photocycle, thereby making long-term data storage possible. The state, denoted as Q, can only be accessed by exposing the protein to two different wavelengths of light in the proper sequence, with the appropriate temporal separation (roughly 2 ms between the light pulses). The Q-state (assigned as a binary one) is transparent to both writing and reading processes, making them rigorously non-destructive. Bacteriorhodopsin in its resting state is assigned as a binary zero. A differential absorption reading process is used to determine the state of each volumetric binary element. Preliminary results are reported. Part III. The nature of the chromophore binding site of light-adapted bacteriorhodopsin is analyzed by using all-valence electron MNDO and MNDO-PSDCI molecular orbital theory to interpret previously reported linear and nonlinear optical spectroscopic measurements. It is concluded that the unique two-photon properties of the chromophore are due in part to the electrostatic field associated with a Casp{2+} ion near the

  8. Charleso Dickenso kūrybos recepcija lietuvių literatūros kritikoje (III dalis | The Reception of Charles Dickens in Lithuanian Literary Criticism (Part III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Rudaitytė

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although traditionally Dickens has always been regarded by Lithuanian critics and literary scholars as an emblematic English writer, one of the great­est representatives of the Victorian realist novel in England, his writing, however, has been given only cursory treatment in Lithuania, almost never until recently crossing the boundaries of biographical ar­ticles, reviews and notices with a biographical slant scattered in the press, particularly, but not only, dur­ing the early stages of reception. There is no book specifically dedicated to Dickens’s art by Lithuanian literary scholars, no comprehensive, fundamental and completely scholarly investigation of his writing. The critical assessment of Dickens’s writing has generally been coming in the form of reviews and articles dedicated to Dickens, in the form of prefaces and afterwords accompanying the translations of his books. In the inter-war years, Dickens was perceived as the great humanist, romanticist, and critic of the social evils of the Victorian England; he was glori­fied for his Christian ethics and his ‘Christmas phi­losophy’ with the focus on goodness and ‘religion of the heart’, with his cult of fireside tranquility. In the Soviet period, it is important to stress the tremen­dous influence of Marxist and communist ideology on the reception of Dickens who was favoured by the Marxist critics. In his writing they found the suit­able object to dissect using the tools, whatever blunt, of the Marxist approach, which was the only possi­ble method of literary analysis in Soviet times.Thus, during the period of Soviet occupation, Dickens was perceived as a typical representative of the social novel and of critical realism in English literature. His novels were popular because of political and social implications; he was the most translated and celebrated of English authors as providing a critique of capitalist society. This communist and Marxist bias was a crucial factor

  9. Comparative Assessment of Genotyping Methods for Epidemiologic Study of Burkholderia cepacia Genomovar III

    OpenAIRE

    Coenye, Tom; Spilker, Theodore; Martin, Alissa; LiPuma, John J.

    2002-01-01

    We analyzed a collection of 97 well-characterized Burkholderia cepacia genomovar III isolates to evaluate multiple genomic typing systems, including pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), BOX-PCR fingerprinting and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) typing. The typeability, reproducibility, and discriminatory power of these techniques were evaluated, and the results were compared to each other and to data obtained in previous studies by using multilocus restriction typing (MLRT). All m...

  10. Clinical competency assessment in intravenous therapy and vascular access: part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louise Hulse, Anna

    This article explores and critically evaluates clinical practice competencies as a form of assessment within post-registration nurse education, specifically relating to competence assessment of intravenous (IV) therapy. In the first article in this two-part series, 'Competency assessment in intravenous therapy and vascular access: part 1' (BJN, 22(16)), an in-depth literature review was carried out and applied to current competency assessment design. Clinical staff opinion was sought to evaluate users' opinions of this assessment method against recommended literature. The aim of both articles is to describe critically and analyse existing practice using this form of assessment, and relate other forms of assessment to IV therapy and vascular access clinical competence. A small-scale study was performed to evaluate whether clinical competency assessment is the most appropriate form of assessment of IV therapy and vascular access skills. A questionnaire was designed to assess nurse opinion in relation to advantages (positives) and disadvantages (negatives) of clinical practice competency assessment; 35 randomly selected post-registered nurses were included in the sample. Findings illustrated that clinical competency assessment is the most appropriate form for the assessment of clinical skills in IV therapy. However, recommendations were made for the possible use of Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) assessment. Furthermore, this report recommends the assessment of theory and knowledge through written exams or multiple-choice questions (MCQs) as an addition to clinical practice competence assessment for IV therapy. PMID:24067310

  11. Population-scale assessment endpoints in ecological risk assessment. Part 1: Reflections of stakeholder values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Wayne G

    2006-01-01

    The selection of appropriate assessment endpoints is a basic element of an ecological risk assessment, especially at regional or watershed scales. Because ecological services often are tied to specific species, the risk to populations is a critical endpoint and feature of ecological risk assessments. The first item is a discussion of the replacement of population-level risk assessment with the construct of a population-scale assessment endpoint. Next, the criteria that are currently used for assessment endpoints are reviewed and evaluated for utility in an ecological risk assessment. Following this examination, assessment endpoints from a number of regional-scale ecological risk assessments are compared. The outcome of this evaluation is that population-scale assessment endpoints are important expressions of the valued components of ecological structures. Finally, a few recommendations for the selection of assessment endpoints at a population scale are listed. PMID:16640323

  12. 18 CFR 410.1 - Basin regulations-Water Code and Administrative Manual-Part III Water Quality Regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... part with the approval of the Director of the Federal Register under 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Basin regulations-Water... Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS;...

  13. Assessment of the optic nerve head parameters using Heidelberg retinal tomography III in preterm children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem Alshaarawi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Variations in optic nerve head morphology and abnormal retinal vascular pattern have been described in preterm children using digital image analysis of fundus photograph, optical coherence tomograph and serial funduscopy. We aimed to compare the optic nerve head parameters in preterm and term Malay children using Heidelberg Retinal Tomograph III. DESIGN: A cross sectional study. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Thirty-two preterm Malay children who were born at up to 32 weeks postconception, and 32 term Malay children aged 8-16 years old were recruited into this cross sectional study, which was conducted in the Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia, Malaysia from January to December 2011. Their optic nerves were scanned and analyzed using a Heidelberg Retinal Tomography (HRT III (Heidelberg Engineering, Germany. Preterm children showed an increased rim volume (SD (0.56 (0.26 vs 0.44 (0.18 mm(3, respectively, smaller cup shape (SD (0.18 (0.07 vs 0.25 (0.06 mm, respectively, increased height variation contour (SD (0.44 (0.14 vs 0.35 (0.08 mm, respectively, and increased cup depth (SD (0.24 (0.11 vs 0.17 (0.05 mm(3, respectively when compared to their normal peers (p0.05 in our study. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Preterm children exhibit different characteristics of optic nerve head parameters with HRT III analysis. Increased cup depth in preterm children suggests a need for close observation and monitoring. It may raise suspicion of pediatric glaucoma when proper documentation of intraocular pressure and clinical funduscopy are unsuccessful in uncooperative children.

  14. Fostering Continuous Improvement and Learning through Peer Assessment: Part of an Integral Model of Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Nancy T.; Kumtepe, Evrim Genc; Aydeniz, Mehmet

    2007-01-01

    Assessment is a critical component of educational practices and thus impacts educational reform efforts. This article reviews and considers assessment from 2 perspectives: a focus on accountability and a focus on continuous improvement. A class of preservice and practicing science teachers explored notions of assessment while experiencing peer…

  15. Your workers may be contingent but your liability for them is certain: Part III: other employment issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koen, Clifford M; Mitchell, Michael S; Crow, Stephen M

    2010-01-01

    Hiring contingent workers can significantly help health care employers reduce labor costs while maintaining the staff required for quality patient care. However, a number of federal laws create legal land mines that await the unsuspecting employer. This article, the concluding part of a 3-part examination of contingent employment, addresses additional issues including benefits, tax implications, workers' compensation, contract considerations, and the screening of potential staffing partners. PMID:20686392

  16. Assessing Strategy of Power Transformers Insulation State Based on Part-division and Entropy Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Ruijin; LIU Bin; ZHANG Yiyi; YANG Lijun; ZHENG Hanbo

    2013-01-01

    Failure mechanisms of power transformers are complex and uncertain; it is difficult to determine index weights of insulation state.Therefore,it is a challenge to acquire an accurate assessment of insulation state of power transformers.In this paper,an assessing strategy for transformer insulation is proposed base on part-division of transformer and a comprehensive weight determination method.An index system of transformer is established on the basis of part-division of transformer.Each index's weight is consisted of two parts,the constant weight and the variable weight,which are determined by improved analytic hierarchy process (AHP) and entropy method respectively.After categorizing insulation state into four levels and standardizing assessing indexes,a Cauchy membership function is forged,and a fuzzy algorithm is employed to simulate the uncertainty of the insulation state.Finally,a confidence criterion is employed to perform part-division based condition assessment of transformer.Case studies reveal that the proposed assessing strategy method is effective,convenient,and practical; with the new strategy,potential failures of transformers can be forecasted and insulation state of transformer parts can also be assessed.Furthermore,the assessing results can be used to guide condition-based maintenance.

  17. Assessment of Cognitive Ability of Students with Severe and Low-Incidence Disabilities--Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepeau-Hobson, Franci; Vujeva, Hana

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of cognitive ability in students with the most severe disabilities presents a challenge to the clinicians who are charged with this task. This article is the second of a two-part series that summarizes what is currently known about effective assessment of the cognitive ability of students with significant impairments in order to…

  18. 78 FR 78349 - Andrew Peklo III; Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... Commission's (Commission) regulations, 18 CFR Part 380 (Order No. 486, 52 FR 47897), the Office of Energy....gov/docs-filing/efiling.asp . Commenters can submit brief comments up to 6,000 characters,...

  19. Developmental assessment in cases of PIMD : The opinion of support staff and psychologists about the suitability of the GTI and Bayley-III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Linda; Oldenburger, M.N.C.; van der Meulen, Bieuwe

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Developmental assessment is important to be able to adjust the support that is offered to a person with PIMD to his/her possibilities and needs. The focus of this poster is the suitability of two developmental assessment instruments: the Bayley-III and the GTI (GedragsTaxatie-Instrumen

  20. European Union Summary Risk Assessment Report - Part I - Environment - Propan-1-ol

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    This report provides a summary, with conclusions, of the risk assessment report of the environmental part of the substance propan-1-ol that has been prepared by Germany in the context of Council Regulation (EEC) No. 793/93 on the evaluation and control of existing substances. For detailed information on the risk assessment principles and procedures followed, the underlying data and the literature references the reader is referred to the comprehensive Final Risk Assessment Report (Final R...

  1. Comparative assessment of predictions in ungauged basins – Part 3: Runoff signatures in Austria

    OpenAIRE

    Blöschl, G.; M. Sivapalan; G. Laaha; J. L. Salinas; M. Rogger; Parajka, J.; Viglione, A.

    2013-01-01

    In a three-part paper we assess the performance of runoff predictions in ungauged basins in a comparative way. While Parajka et al. (2013) and Salinas et al. (2013) assess the regionalisation of hydrographs and hydrological extremes through a literature review, in this paper we assess prediction of a range of runoff signatures for a consistent dataset. Daily runoff time series are predicted for 213 catchments in Austria by a regionalised rainfall–runoff model and by Top-Kriging, a geosta...

  2. Acoustic-gravity waves in a viscous and thermally conducting isothermal atmosphere (part III: for arbitrary Prandtl number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Yahya Alkahby

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we will investigate the combined effect of Newtonian cooling, viscosity and thermal condition on upward propagating acoustic waves in an isothermal atmosphere. In part one of this series we considered the case of large Prandtl number, while in part two we investigated the case of small Prandtl number. In those parts we examined only the limiting cases, i.e. the cases of small and large Prandtl number, and it is more interesting to consider the case of arbitrary Prandtl number, which is the subject of this paper, because it is a better representative model. It is shown that if the Newtonian cooling coefficient is small compared to the frequency of the wave, the effect of the thermal conduction is dominated by that of the viscosity. Moreover, the solution can be written as a linear combination of an upward and a downward propagating wave with equal wavelengths and equal damping factors. On the other hand if Newtonian cooling is large compared to the frequency of the wave the effect of thermal conduction will be eliminated completely and the atmosphere will be transformed from the adiabatic form to an isothermal. In addition, all the linear relations among the perturbations quantities will be modified. It follows from the above conclusions and those of the first two parts, that when the effect of Newtonian cooling is negligible thermal conduction influences the propagation of the wave only in the case of small Prandtl number.

  3. Final Report for Dynamic Models for Causal Analysis of Panel Data. Dynamic Analysis of Event Histories. Part III, Chapter 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuma, Nancy Brandon; Hannan, Michael T.

    The document, part of a series of chapters described in SO 011 759, examines sociological research methods for the study of change. The advantages and procedures for dynamic analysis of event-history data (data giving the number, timing, and sequence of changes in a categorical dependent variable) are considered. The authors argue for grounding…

  4. EPHECT III: Health risk assessment of exposure to household consumer products

    OpenAIRE

    TRANDALLIDI Marilena; DIMITROULOPOULOU Chrysanthi; Wolkoff, Peder; Kephalopoulos, Stylianos; Carrer, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    In the framework of the EU EPHECT project (Emissions, exposure patterns and health effects of consumer products in the EU), irritative and respiratory effects were assessed in relation to acute (30-min) and long-term (24-h) inhalation exposure to key and emerging indoor air pollutants emitted during household use of selected consumer products. A detailed Health Risk Assessment (HRA) was performed for five selected pollutants of respiratory health relevance, namely acrolein, formal...

  5. Fermilab III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The total ongoing plans for Fermilab are wrapped up in the Fermilab III scheme, centrepiece of which is the proposal for a new Main Injector. The Laboratory has been awarded a $200,000 Illinois grant which will be used to initiate environmental assessment and engineering design of the Main Injector, while a state review panel recommended that the project should also benefit from $2 million of funding

  6. Preformulation Considerations for Controlled Release Dosage Forms: Part III. Candidate Form Selection Using Numerical Weighting and Scoring

    OpenAIRE

    Chrzanowski, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Two numerical methods, Decision Analysis (DA) and Potential Problem Analysis (PPA) are presented as alternative selection methods to the logical method presented in Part I. In DA properties are weighted and outcomes are scored. The weighted scores for each candidate are totaled and final selection is based on the totals. Higher scores indicate better candidates. In PPA potential problems are assigned a seriousness factor and test outcomes are used to define the probability of occurrence. The ...

  7. Review article: A primer for clinical researchers in the emergency department: Part III: How to write a scientific paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Andrew; McD Taylor, David; Babl, Franz E

    2012-08-01

    In this series we address key topics for clinicians who conduct research as part of their work in the ED. Analysis of research data does not represent the completion of a project as the findings need to be communicated to clinicians and other researchers in the field. In this section, we describe how to write up clinical research data for publication in a peer-reviewed journal. We also describe the editorial and peer-review process. PMID:22862751

  8. Comprehensive safety assessment of a human inactivated diploid enterovirus 71 vaccine based on a phase III clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Kong, Yujia; Jiang, Zhiwei; Li, Chanjuan; Wang, Ling; Xia, Jielai

    2016-04-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a causative agent of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). In a previous phase III trial in children, a human diploid cell-based inactivated EV71 vaccine elicited EV71 specific immune responses and protection against EV71 associated HFMD. This study aimed to assess the factors influencing the severity of adverse events observed in this previous trial. This was a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, phase III clinical trial of a human diploid vaccine carried out in 12,000 children in Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01569581). Solicited events were recorded for 7 days and unsolicited events were reported for 28 days after each injection. Age trend analysis of adverse reaction was conducted in each treatment group. Multiple logistic regression models were built to identify factors influencing the severity of adverse reactions. Fewer solicited adverse reactions were observed in older participants within the first 7 days after vaccination (P vaccine achieved a satisfactory safety profile. PMID:26837471

  9. Pantoea agglomerans: a mysterious bacterium of evil and good. Part III. Deleterious effects: infections of humans, animals and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Barbara; Kinga Lemieszek, Marta; Golec, Marcin; Milanowski, Janusz

    2016-06-01

    (Arrhenatherum elatius). Some plant-pathogenic strains of P. agglomerans are tumourigenic, inducing gall formation on table beet, an ornamental plant gypsophila (Gypsophila paniculata), wisteria, Douglas-fir and cranberry. Recently, a Pantoea species closely related to P. agglomerans has been identified as a cause of bacterial blight disease in the edible mushroom Pleurotus eryngii cultivated in China. The genetically governed determinants of plant pathogenicity in Pantoea agglomerans include such mechanisms as the hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp) system, phytohormones, the quorum-sensing (QS) feedback system and type III secretion system (T3SS) injecting the effector proteins into the cytosol of a plant cell. PMID:27294620

  10. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for the K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act Incinerator Operations, Level III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Level III pollution prevention opportunity assessment (PPOA) was performed for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) Incinerator to evaluate pollution prevention (P2) options for various waste streams: The main objective of this study was to identify and evaluate options to reduce the quantities of each waste stream generated by the TSCA Incinerator operations to realize significant environmental and/or economic benefits from P2. For each of the waste streams, P2 options were evaluated following the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) hierarchy to (1) reduce the quantity of waste generated, (2) recycle the waste, and/or (3) use alternate waste treatment or segregation methods. This report provides process descriptions, identification and evaluation of P2 options, and final recommendations

  11. Safety analysis of RA reactor operation, I-II, Part I - RA reactor technical and operation characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RA research reactor is a thermal, heavy water moderated system with graphite reflector having nominal power 6.5 MW. The 2% enriched metal uranium fuel in the reactor core produces mean thermal neutron flux of 2.9 1013 neutrons/cm2 s, and maximum neutron flux 5.5 1013 neutrons/cm2 s. main components of the reactor described in this report are: rector core, reflector, biological shield, heavy water cooling system, ordinary water cooling system, helium system, reactor control system, reactor safety system, dosimetry system, power supply system, and fuel transport system. Detailed reactor properties and engineering drawings of all the system are part of this volume

  12. New 20-cm radio-continuum study of the small Magellanic cloud - part III: Compact Hii regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong G.F.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present and discuss a new catalogue of 48 compact Hii regions in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC and a newly created deep 1420 MHz (λ=20 cm radio-continuum image of the N19 region located in the southwestern part of the SMC. The new images were created by merging 1420 MHz radiocontinuum archival data from the Australian Telescope Compact Array. The majority of these detected radio compact Hii regions have rather flat spectral indices which indicates, as expected, that the dominant emission mechanism is of thermal nature.

  13. Assessment of the Forensic Sciences Profession: A Legal Study Concerning the Forensic Sciences Personnel. Volume III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Oliver, Jr.

    The place and function of forensic sciences personnel in American criminal law and court procedure, and the criteria used by criminal trial judges and lawyers to assess the value of forensic sciences personnel were investigated. Federal, state, Virgin Island, and Puerto Rican laws were examined, and a search of the medical and legal literature…

  14. Quality assessment in in vivo NMR spectroscopy: III. Clinical test objects: design, construction, and solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leach, M.O.; Collins, D.J.; Keevil, S;

    1995-01-01

    Based on the requirements of test protocols developed to evaluate clinical MRS single slice and volume localisation sequences, two clinical test objects, STO1 and STO2 have been developed. The properties of a range of potential construction materials have been assessed, demonstrating that the water...

  15. Breckinridge Project, initial effort. Report VII, Volume III. Cultural resource assessment socioeconomic background data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macfarlane, Heather; Janzen, Donald E.

    1980-11-26

    This report has been prepared in conjunction with an environmental baseline study for a commercial coal conversion facility being conducted by Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. (ASFI) and Airco Energy Company (AECO). This report represents a cultural resource assessment for the proposed plant site and two potential solid waste disposal areas. This assessment presents data collected by Dames and Moore during a recent archaeological reconnaissance of the unsurveyed southeastern portion of the proposed plant site and two potential solid waste disposal areas. Also, results of two previous surveys on the northern and southwestern portion of the plant site for American Smelting and Refining Company (ASARCO) and Kentucky Utilities are included. The Dames and Moore survey of the southeastern portion of the plant site identified one archaeological site, three standing structures and one historic cemetery. In addition 47 archaeological sites and six standing structures are known from two previous surveys of the remainder of the plant site (Cowan 1975 and Turnbow et al 1980). Eleven of the previously recorded archaeological sites were recommended for further assessment to evaluate their potential for inclusion within the Holt Bottoms Archaeological District currently listed on the National Register of Historic Places. None of the archaeological sites or standing structures located within the plant site during the Dames and Moore survey were recommended for further assessment. A total of eight archaeological sites were located during the Dames and Moore survey of the two potential solid waste disposal areas. Of this total only two sites were recommended for further assessment. Also, one previously unknown historic cemetry was located in the southernmost potential waste disposal area.

  16. Pantoea agglomerans: a mysterious bacterium of evil and good. Part III. Deleterious effects: infections of humans, animals and plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Dutkiewicz

    2016-06-01

    plant called Chinese taro ([i]Alocasia cucullata[/i], and a grass called onion couch ([i]Arrhenatherum elatius[/i]. Some plant-pathogenic strains of [i]P. agglomerans[/i] are tumourigenic, inducing gall formation on table beet, an ornamental plant gypsophila ([i]Gypsophila paniculata[/i], wisteria, Douglas-fir and cranberry. Recently, a [i]Pantoea[/i] species closely related to [i]P. agglomerans[/i] has been identified as a cause of bacterial blight disease in the edible mushroom [i]Pleurotus eryngii[/i] cultivated in China. The genetically governed determinants of plant pathogenicity in [i]Pantoea agglomerans[/i] include such mechanisms as the hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp system, phytohormones, the quorum-sensing (QS feedback system and type III secretion system (T3SS injecting the effector proteins into the cytosol of a plant cell.

  17. Assessment of Long-Term Research Needs for Shale-Oil Recovery (FERWG-III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penner, S.S.

    1981-03-01

    The Fossil Energy Research Working Group (FERWG), at the request of E. Frieman (Director, Office of Energy Research) and G. Fumich, Jr. (Assistant Secretary for Fossil Fuels), has reviewed and evaluated the U.S. programs on shale-oil recovery. These studies were performed in order to provide an independent assessment of critical research areas that affect the long-term prospects for shale-oil availability. This report summarizes the findings and research recommendations of FERWG.

  18. Functional role of inorganic trace elements in angiogenesis part III: (Ti, Li, Ce, As, Hg, Va, Nb and Pb).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Orangi, Jafar; Asatourian, Armen; Sorenson, Christine M; Sheibani, Nader

    2016-02-01

    Many essential elements exist in nature with significant influence on human health. Angiogenesis is vital in developmental, repair, and regenerative processes, and its aberrant regulation contributes to pathogenesis of many diseases including cancer. Thus, it is of great importance to explore the role of these elements in such a vital process. This is third in a series of reviews that serve as an overview of the role of inorganic elements in regulation of angiogenesis and vascular function. Here we will review the roles of titanium, lithium, cerium, arsenic, mercury, vanadium, niobium, and lead in these processes. The roles of other inorganic elements in angiogenesis were discussed in part I (N, Fe, Se, P, Au, and Ca) and part II (Cr, Si, Zn, Cu, and S) of these series. The methods of exposure, structure, mechanisms, and potential activities of these elements are briefly discussed. An electronic search was performed on the role of these elements in angiogenesis from January 2005 to April 2014. These elements can promote and/or inhibit angiogenesis through different mechanisms. The anti-angiogenic effect of titanium dioxide nanoparticles comes from the inhibition of angiogenic processes, and not from its toxicity. Lithium affects vasculogenesis but not angiogenesis. Nanoceria treatment inhibited tumor growth by inhibiting angiogenesis. Vanadium treatment inhibited cell proliferation and induced cytotoxic effects through interactions with DNA. The negative impact of mercury on endothelial cell migration and tube formation activities was dose and time dependent. Lead induced IL-8 production, which is known to promote tumor angiogenesis. Thus, understanding the impact of these elements on angiogenesis will help in development of new modalities to modulate angiogenesis under various conditions. PMID:26638864

  19. Medicina por Imágenes: la visión globalizada. Parte III: la visión desde el Derecho Image Based Medicine: the global vision. Part III: Legal Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Carestia

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available La visión globalizada del diagnóstico por imágenes es una puesta al día, creemos que necesaria, de los caracteres más relevantes de esta bellísima disciplina. Está dirigida a quienes todavía no han decidido su camino y están finalizando sus carreras de grado -médica o técnica-, pero también a aquellos que ya han comenzado la residencia; y quizá también para quienes habiendo recorrido ya un largo trayecto, conservan un espíritu crítico y una mirada joven. A la luz del nuevo milenio, y cuando se han cumplido veinticinco años de su reconocimiento como especialidad por parte de la comunidad médica de nuestro país, los autores examinamos esta visión que no se conforma con la mirada unilateral del radiólogo sino que busca también la proveniente de otros saberes y ciencias. Por ello, se incluye una aproximación desde el derecho -sobre un tema puntual-, se tratan los aspectos educacionales y se incorporan la mirada desde el área técnica, la perspectiva de la filosofía y la bioética y las visiones desde la psicología, desde la gestión de los recursos humanos y los aspectos de ciencia y tecnología, entre otras.The global vision of diagnostic imaging is a necessary update, we think, of the most relevant characters of this beautiful discipline. It is directed to those advanced students of Medicine and Radiology Technique career who have not yet decided their future activity but also to the already graduated who are just beginning their residence training programs; and maybe to those who keep a critical spirit and a young glance, in spite of the chronological age. At daybreak of the millennium and when we are assisting to the twenty five anniversary of its origin and recognition as a new speciality inside the medical community in our country, we the authors, have selected not only the unique vision of the radiologist but also the vision of other fields of knowledge and sciences. So because of this we develop the legal view on

  20. Use of rumination and activity monitoring for the identification of dairy cows with health disorders: Part III. Metritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangaferro, M L; Wijma, R; Caixeta, L S; Al-Abri, M A; Giordano, J O

    2016-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate (1) the performance of an automated health-monitoring system (AHMS) to identify cows with metritis based on an alert system (health index score, HIS) that combines rumination time and physical activity; (2) the number of days between the first HIS alert and clinical diagnosis (CD) of metritis by farm personnel; and (3) the daily rumination time, physical activity, and HIS patterns around CD. In this manuscript, the overall performance of HIS to detect cows with all disorders of interest in this study [ketosis, displaced abomasum, indigestion (companion paper, part I), mastitis (companion paper, part II), and metritis] is also reported. Holstein cattle (n=1,121; 451 nulliparous and 670 multiparous) were fitted with a neck-mounted electronic rumination and activity monitoring tag (HR Tags, SCR Dairy, Netanya, Israel) from at least -21 to 80 d in milk (DIM). Raw data collected in 2-h periods were summarized per 24 h as daily rumination and activity. An HIS (0 to 100 arbitrary units) was calculated daily for individual cows with an algorithm that used rumination and activity. A positive HIS outcome was defined as an HIS of rumination, activity, and HIS patterns around CD, alterations of blood markers of metabolic and health status around calving, reduced milk production, and were more likely to exit the herd than cows not flagged based on the HIS and cows without disease, suggesting that cows flagged based on the HIS had a more severe episode of metritis. Including all disorders of interest for this study, the overall sensitivity was 59%, specificity was 98%, positive predictive value was 58%, negative predictive value was 98%, and accuracy was 96%. The AHMS was effective for identifying cows with severe cases of metritis, but less effective for identifying cows with mild cases of metritis. Also, the overall accuracy and timing of the AHMS alerts for cows with health disorders indicated that AHMS that combine rumination and

  1. A review of quality of life in Alzheimer's disease. Part 2: Issues in assessing drug effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salek, S S; Walker, M D; Bayer, A J

    1998-12-01

    There are numerous methods available for assessing patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or other forms of dementia. Quality-of-life (QOL) assessment is unique among these methods. The subjective nature of quality of life provides healthcare professionals with the opportunity of incorporating the value systems of patients and their carers into their assessments. A systematic review was carried out to assess the published data (and some unpublished data) on QOL assessment tools and instruments that claim to measure quality of life in dementia. A number of measures or methods used in the literature for assessing the quality of life of patients with dementing illnesses were identified. It was decided to present the resultant review in 2 parts that correspond to the 2 main groups into which the instruments were categorised. The first (part 1), looked at measures used to assess the impact of disease as well as instruments at a developmental or testing stage. The second (part 2), includes instruments that claim to measure quality of life in studies documenting the impact of a drug in this therapeutic area. This second group consists mainly of instruments identified as being used to assess quality of life during clinical trials in dementia/AD. As in part 1, this part of the review was unable to identify any validated methods of assessing the quality of life of both patients with dementia and their carers at the same time. The ideal instrument must show that it can reliably, reproducibly and comprehensively assess quality of life for both patients with dementia and their carers. It should also demonstrate that it can measure quality of life effectively using a practical administration technique that does not place any unnecessary burden on either informal carers, other healthcare workers involved or the patient themselves. In addition, any measure intended for use in assessing the impact of drug treatment on quality of life must demonstrate sensitivity to change, also

  2. EPHECT III: Health risk assessment of exposure to household consumer products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trantallidi, M; Dimitroulopoulou, C; Wolkoff, P; Kephalopoulos, S; Carrer, P

    2015-12-01

    In the framework of the EU EPHECT project (Emissions, Exposure Patterns and Health Effects of Consumer Products in the EU), irritative and respiratory effects were assessed in relation to acute (30-min) and long-term (24-h) inhalation exposure to key and emerging indoor air pollutants emitted during household use of selected consumer products. A detailed Health Risk Assessment (HRA) was performed for five selected pollutants of respiratory health relevance, namely acrolein, formaldehyde, naphthalene, d-limonene and α-pinene. For each pollutant, the Critical Exposure Limit (CEL) was compared to indoor air concentrations and exposure estimates for the use of 15 selected consumer products by two population groups (housekeepers and retired people) in the four geographical regions of Europe (North, West, South, East), which were derived previously based on microenvironmental modelling. For the present HRA, health-based CELs were derived for certain compounds in case indoor air quality guidelines were not available by the World Health Organization for end-points relevant to the current study. For each pollutant, the highest indoor air concentrations in each microenvironment and exposure estimates across home microenvironments during the day were lower than the corresponding acute and long-term CELs. However, considerable contributions, especially to acute exposures, were obtained in some cases, such as formaldehyde emissions resulting from single product use of a floor cleaning agent (82% CEL), a candle (10% CEL) and an electric air freshener (17% CEL). Regarding multiple product use, the case of 30-min formaldehyde exposure reaching 34% CEL when eight product classes were used across home microenvironments, i.e. all-purpose/kitchen/floor cleaning agents, furniture/floor polish, combustible/electric air fresheners, and perfume, needs to be highlighted. Such estimated values should be evaluated with caution, as these may be attributed to the exposure scenarios

  3. Planck early results. III. First assessment of the Low Frequency Instrument in-flight performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennella, A.; Bersanelli, M.; Butler, R. C.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Davis, R. J.; Dick, J.; Frailis, M.; Galeotta, S.; Gregorio, A.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leach, S.; Leahy, J. P.; Lowe, S.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martínez-González, E.; Meinhold, P. R.; Morgante, G.; Pearson, D.; Perrotta, F.; Polenta, G.; Poutanen, T.; Sandri, M.; Seiffert, M. D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Tavagnacco, D.; Terenzi, L.; Tomasi, M.; Valiviita, J.; Villa, F.; Watson, R.; Wilkinson, A.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.; Aja, B.; Artal, E.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaglia, P.; Bennett, K.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Cabella, P.; Cappellini, B.; Chen, X.; Colombo, L.; Cruz, M.; Danese, L.; D'Arcangelo, O.; Davies, R. D.; de Gasperis, G.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Donzelli, S.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falvella, M. C.; Finelli, F.; Foley, S.; Franceschet, C.; Franceschi, E.; Gaier, T. C.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; George, D.; Gómez, F.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Hansen, F. K.; Herranz, D.; Herreros, J. M.; Hoyland, R. J.; Hughes, N.; Jewell, J.; Jukkala, P.; Juvela, M.; Kangaslahti, P.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kilpia, V.-H.; Kisner, T. S.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Laaninen, M.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Leutenegger, P.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Malaspina, M.; Marinucci, D.; Massardi, M.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Miccolis, M.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Nesti, R.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Pagano, L.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Pettorino, V.; Pietrobon, D.; Pospieszalski, M.; Prézeau, G.; Prina, M.; Procopio, P.; Puget, J.-L.; Quercellini, C.; Rachen, J. P.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Ricciardi, S.; Robbers, G.; Rocha, G.; Roddis, N.; Rubino-Martín, J. A.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Silvestri, R.; Simonetto, A.; Sjoman, P.; Smoot, G. F.; Sozzi, C.; Stringhetti, L.; Tauber, J. A.; Tofani, G.; Toffolatti, L.; Tuovinen, J.; Türler, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Varis, J.; Vielva, P.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L. A.; Watson, C.; White, S. D. M.; Winder, F.

    2011-12-01

    The scientific performance of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) after one year of in-orbit operation is presented. We describe the main optical parameters and discuss photometric calibration, white noise sensitivity, and noise properties. A preliminary evaluation of the impact of the main systematic effects is presented. For each of the performance parameters, we outline the methods used to obtain them from the flight data and provide a comparison with pre-launch ground assessments, which are essentially confirmed in flight. Corresponding author: A. Mennella, e-mail: aniello.mennella@fisica.unimi.it

  4. Planck early results. III. First assessment of the Low Frequency Instrument in-flight performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    León-Tavares, J.; Falvella, M.C.; Hughes, N.;

    2011-01-01

    The scientific performance of the Planck Low Frequency Instrument (LFI) after one year of in-orbit operation is presented. We describe the main optical parameters and discuss photometric calibration, white noise sensitivity, and noise properties. A preliminary evaluation of the impact of the main...... systematic effects is presented. For each of the performance parameters, we outline the methods used to obtain them from the flight data and provide a comparison with pre-launch ground assessments, which are essentially confirmed in flight. © ESO, 2011....

  5. An integrated model for the assessment of global water resources – Part 2: Applications and assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hanasaki

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available To assess global water resources from the perspective of subannual variation in water availability and water use, an integrated water resources model was developed. In a companion report, we presented the global meteorological forcing input used to drive the model and six modules, namely, the land surface hydrology module, the river routing module, the crop growth module, the reservoir operation module, the environmental flow requirement module, and the anthropogenic withdrawal module. Here, we present the results of the model application and global water resources assessments. First, the timing and volume of simulated agriculture water use were examined because agricultural use composes approximately 85% of total consumptive water withdrawal in the world. The estimated crop calendar showed good agreement with earlier reports for wheat, maize, and rice in major countries of production. In major countries, the error in the planting date was ±1 mo, but there were some exceptional cases. The estimated irrigation water withdrawal also showed fair agreement with country statistics, but tended to be underestimated in countries in the Asian monsoon region. The results indicate the validity of the model and the input meteorological forcing because site-specific parameter tuning was not used in the series of simulations. Finally, global water resources were assessed on a subannual basis using a newly devised index. This index located water-stressed regions that were undetected in earlier studies. These regions, which are indicated by a gap in the subannual distribution of water availability and water use, include the Sahel, the Asian monsoon region, and southern Africa. The simulation results show that the reservoir operations of major reservoirs (>1 km3 and the allocation of environmental flow requirements can alter the population under high water stress by approximately −11% to +5% globally. The integrated model is applicable to

  6. Biological affinities and adaptations of Bronze Age Bactrians: III. An initial craniometric assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemphill, B E

    1998-07-01

    Discovery of a previously unknown Bronze Age civilization (Oxus Civilization) centered on the oases of Central Asia immediately raised questions concerning the origin and interregional impacts of this civilization. Fifteen craniometric variables from 12 Bronze Age samples--encompassing 544 adults from Central Asia, Iran, the Indus Valley, and Anatolia--are compared to test which, if any, of the current hypotheses offered by archaeologists are best supported by the pattern of phenetic affinities possessed by the Oxus Civilization inhabitants of the north Bactrian oasis. Craniometric differences between samples are compared with Mahalanobis generalized distance, and patterns of phenetic affinity are assessed with two types of cluster analysis (WPGMA, neighbor-joining method), multidimensional scaling, and principal coordinates analysis. Results obtained by this analysis indicate that current hypotheses for both the origin and interregional impacts of Oxus Civilization populations are incomplete. PMID:9696149

  7. Initial assessment of scaled-up sexually transmitted infection intervention in Himachal Pradesh under National AIDS Control Program - III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunite A Ganju

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : To assess the impact of scaled-up sexually transmitted infection (STI intervention under National AIDS Control Program (NACP III and to examine the profile of STI/RTI clinic (now named Suraksha Clinic attendees. Materials and Methods : A retrospective study by data analysis was done from April 2008 to March 2010. The scaled-up intervention comprised of (i adopting enhanced syndromic approach, (ii capacity building by appointing counselors and trainings of staff, (iii strengthening STI/RTI clinics by provision of logistics and privacy by civil works, and (iv supervisory support. The outcome which directly influenced service delivery was evaluated within this framework. Results : Sixteen "Suraksha Clinics" have been remodeled, equipped with supplies and laboratory set up. A total of 64,554 clinic visits were reported of which 27,317 [42%] attended the clinics for index STI/RTI complaint(s. Majority of the clients (44% were young, 25-44 years old. Male to female ratio was 1:1.8. In females, the commonest complaint was lower abdominal pain (25% and vaginal discharge (33%, the commonest syndrome. Amongst laboratory-confirmed STIs, 305 (1.4% attendees were positive for trichomoniasis, while bacterial vaginosis was corroborated in 230 (1.07% patients with clue cells. Amongst antenatal women, 251 were reactive for syphilis (≥1:8 dilutions. 10,579 partners of index STI/RTI patients were notified and partner management was attained to the level of 99%. Conclusion : Preliminary results show increased utilization of STI clinical services, though laboratory services need further strengthening. Continued supportive supervision and capacity building will enable skill development and quality monitoring.

  8. Short term administration of glucocorticoids in patients with protracted and chronic gout arthritis. Part III – frequency of adverse events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A A Fedorova

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess frequency of adverse events during short term administration of gluco- corticoid (GC in protracted and chronic gout arthritis. Material and methods. 59 pts with tophaceous gout (crystal-verified diagnosis and arthritis of three and more joints lasting more than a months in spite of treatment with sufficient doses of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were included. Median age of pts was 56 [48;63], median disease duration – 15,2 years [7,4;20], median swollen joint count at the examination – 8 [5;11]. The patients were randomized into 2 groups. Methylprednisolone (MP 500 mg/day iv during 2 days and placebo im once was administered in one of them, betamethasone (BM 7 mg im once and placebo iv twice – in the other. Clinical evaluation of inflamed joints was performed every day. Standard laboratory examination and ECG were done before drug administration, at 3rd, 7th, and 14th day of follow up. Immunoreactive insulin level was evaluated before drug administration and at day 14. Blood pressure (BP was measured every day. Results. After first GC administration BP elevated in 28 (47% pts. In pts not having appropriate BP values BP elevated in 73% of cases. Pts with appropriate BP values showed less frequent BP elevation – 38% (p=0,02. In 8 (13% pts at day 3 after GC administration ECG signs of myocardial blood supply deterioration were revealed. Glucose level elevated in 10 (17% pts and after the second BM administration – in 5 (8% pts. Cholesterol level did not significantly change after 14 days of follow up but in 28 (47% pts it increased in comparison with baseline. Trigliceride level significantly decreased at day 14 from 149 [106; 187] to 108 [66,5; 172] mg/dl (p=0,02. 26 (44% pts had face hyperemia, 4 (7% –42 palpitation and 2 (3,4% – bitter taste. Conclusion. Administration of short course of GC in pts with gout requires monitoring of possible adverse events. Antihypertensive therapy providing appropriate BP

  9. [Legal issues of physician-assisted euthanasia. Part III--Passive euthanasia, comparison of international legislation, conclusions for medical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, Johannes; Röbel, Andreas; Parzeller, Markus

    2013-01-01

    The generic term "passive euthanasia" includes different issues dealing with the omission, discontinuation or termination of life-sustaining or life-prolonging medical treatments. The debate around passive euthanasia focuses on the constitutional right of self-determination of every human being on the one hand and the constitutional mandate of the State to protect human life on the other. Issues of passive euthanasia always require a differentiated approach. Essentially, it comes down to the following: In Germany, the human right of self-determination includes the right to prohibit the performance of life-sustaining treatments, even if this leads to the death of the patient. A physician who does not take life-sustaining treatment measures because this is the free will expressed by the patient is not subject to prosecution. On the other hand, if the physician treats the patient against his will, this can be deemed a punishable act of bodily injury. The patient's will is decisive even if his concrete state of health does no longer allow him to freely express his will. In the Patient's Living Will Act of 2009, the German legislator clarified the juridical assessment of such constellations being of particular relevance in practice. A written living will of a person in which he requests to take or not to take certain medical treatment measures in case that he is no longer able to make the decision himself shall be binding for the people involved in the process of medical treatment. If there is no living will, the supposed will of the patient shall be relevant. In its judgment in the "Putz case", the German Federal Court of Justice ruled in 2010 that actions terminating a life-sustaining treatment that does not correspond to the patient's will must be limited to letting an already ongoing disease process run its course. In this context it is not important, however, whether treatment is discontinued by an active act or by omission. Under certain circumstances, the

  10. MATLAB-based Applications for Image Processing and Image Quality AssessmentPart II: Experimental Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Krasula

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides an overview of some possible usage of the software described in the Part I. It contains the real examples of image quality improvement, distortion simulations, objective and subjective quality assessment and other ways of image processing that can be obtained by the individual applications.

  11. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium Part 2: Human, Toxicokinetic, and Mechanistic Studies (Preliminary Assessment Materials)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In August 2014, EPA released the second part of draft literature searches and associated search strategies, evidence tables, and exposure response arrays for Cr(VI) to obtain input from stakeholders and the public prior to developing the draft IRIS assessment. Specifically, EPA w...

  12. DNA Topoisomerase I Gene Copy Number and mRNA Expression Assessed as Predictive Biomarkers for Adjuvant Irinotecan in Stage II/III Colon Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygård, Sune Boris; Vainer, Ben; Nielsen, Signe L;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Prospective-retrospective assessment of the TOP1 gene copy number and TOP1 mRNA expression as predictive biomarkers for adjuvant irinotecan in stage II/III colon cancer (CC). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue microarrays were obtained from an adjuvant CC trial...

  13. Test-retest reliability of UPDRS-III, dyskinesia scales, and timed motor tests in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease: an argument against multiple baseline assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metman, Leo Verhagen; Myre, Brian; Verwey, Niek; Hassin-Baer, Sharon; Arzbaecher, Jean; Sierens, Diane; Bakay, Roy

    2004-09-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the intra-rater reliability of the motor section of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS-III) in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). The secondary objective was to assess the intra-rater reliability of standard timed motor tests and dyskinesia scales to determine the necessity of multiple baseline core evaluations before surgery for PD. We carried out two standardized preoperative core evaluations of patients with advanced PD scheduled to undergo deep brain stimulation. Patients were examined in the defined off and on conditions by the same rater. UPDRS-III, timed tests, and dyskinesia scores from the two evaluations were compared using Wilcoxon Signed Ranks tests and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Differences in UPDRS-III scores for the two visits were clinically and statistically nonsignificant, and the ICC was 0.9. Similarly, there were no significant differences in timed motor tests or dyskinesia scores, with a median ICC of 0.8. The results indicate that previous findings of high test-retest reliability of UPDRS-III in early untreated PD patients can now be extended to those with advanced disease complicated by motor fluctuations. In addition, test-retest reliability of dyskinesia scales and timed motor tests was high. Taken together, these findings challenge the need for multiple baseline assessments as currently stipulated in core assessment protocols for surgical intervention in PD. PMID:15372601

  14. Nuclear computerized library for assessing reactor reliability (NUCLARR): Part 2, Guide to operations: User's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) is an automated data base management system for processing and storing human error probability and hardware component failure data. The NUCLARR system software resides on an IBM (or compatible) personal micro-computer. NUCLARR can be used by the end user to furnish data inputs for both human and hardware reliability analysis in support of a variety of risk assessment activities. The NUCLARR system is documented in a five-volume series of reports. Volume IV of this series is the User's Guide for operating the NUCLARR software and is presented in three parts. This volume, Part 2: Guide to Operations, contains the instructions and basic procedures for using the NUCLARR software. Part 2 provides guidance and information for getting started, performing the desired functions, and making the most efficient use of the system's features

  15. MCNP6 Results for the Phase III Sensitivity Benchmark of the OCED/NEA Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiedrowski, Brian C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-19

    Within the last decade, there has been increasing interest in the calculation of cross section sensitivity coefficients of k{sub eff} for integral experiment design and uncertainty analysis. The OECD/NEA has an Expert Group devoted to Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis within the Working Party for Nuclear Criticality Safety. This expert group has developed benchmarks to assess code capabilities and performance for doing sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. Phase III of a set of sensitivity benchmarks evaluates capabilities for computing sensitivity coefficients. MCNP6 has the capability to compute cross section sensitivities for k{sub eff} using continuous-energy physics. To help verify this capability, results for the Phase III benchmark cases are generated and submitted to the Expert Group for comparison. The Phase III benchmark has three cases: III.1, an array of MOX fuel pins, III.2, a series of infinite lattices of MOX fuel pins with varying pitches, and III.3 two spheres with homogeneous mixtures of UF{sub 4} and polyethylene with different enrichments.

  16. Children's exposure to indoor air in urban nurseries-part I: CO2 and comfort assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indoor air quality (IAQ) in nurseries is an emerging case-study. Thus, this study, as the Part I of the larger study “Children's exposure to indoor air in urban nurseries”, aimed to: i) evaluate nurseries’ indoor concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2), a global IAQ indicator, in class and lunch rooms; ii) assess indoor comfort parameters–temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH); and iii) analyse them according to guidelines and references for IAQ, comfort and children's health. Indoor continuous measurements were performed. Non-compliances with guidelines were found in comfort parameters, which could cause discomfort situations and also microbial proliferation. Exceedances in CO2 concentrations were also found and they were caused by poor ventilation and high classroom occupation. More efficient ventilation and control of comfort parameters, as well as to reduce occupation by reviewing Portuguese legislation on that matter, would certainly improve IAQ and comfort in nurseries and consequently safeguard children's health. - Highlights: • High occupation and poor ventilation were main determinants of IAQ in nurseries. • T and RH indoor values found in nurseries are likely to cause thermal discomfort. • Building characteristics and an inadequate ventilation determined T and RH values. • High CO2 concentrations found could indicate accumulation of other air pollutants

  17. Refuge Management Plan: Part III

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Union Slough National Wildlife Refuge Master Plan guides the longrange development of the Refuge by identifying and integrating appropriate habitats, management...

  18. Workshop 97. Part III. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume of the Proceedings covers the following branches of science and technology: power systems and electrical engineering, electronics and measuring and communication engineering, optics, quantum electronics and photonics, microelectronics, and biomedical engineering. Out of the contributions, 2 have been input to INIS. (P.A.)

  19. ASIST 2003: Part III: Posters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proceedings of the ASIST Annual Meeting, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Twenty-three posters address topics including access to information; metadata; personal information management; scholarly information communication; online resources; content analysis; interfaces; Web queries; information evaluation; informatics; information needs; search effectiveness; digital libraries; diversity; automated indexing; e-commerce;…

  20. Progressing in Spanish: Part III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    Contents of this Spanish text of instructional materials focus on a city in Spain, a city in South America, and a hypothetical visit to a railroad station. Students learn about the imperfect tense, reflexive pronouns, and several other grammatical concepts. Exercises and readings related to the stories "La Despedida" and "Recuerdos Juveniles" are…

  1. Presentation of safety after closure of the repository for spent nuclear fuel. Main report of the project SR-Site. Part III; Redovisning av saekerhet efter foerslutning av slutfoervaret foer anvaent kaernbraensle. Huvudrapport fraan projekt SR-Site. Del III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of the safety assessment SR-Site is to investigate whether a safe repository for spent nuclear fuel by KBS-3 type can be constructed at Forsmark in Oesthammar in Sweden. The location of the Forsmark has been selected based on results of several surveys from surface conditions at depth in Forsmark and in Laxemar in Oskarshamn. The choice of location is not justified in SR-Site Report, but in other attachments to SKB's permit applications. SR-Site Report is an important part of SKB's permit applications to construct and operate a repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark in Oesthammar. The purpose of the report in the applications is to show that a repository at Forsmark is safe after closure

  2. West Texas geothermal resource assessment. Part II. Preliminary utilization assessment of the Trans-Pecos geothermal resource. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilliland, M.W.; Fenner, L.B.

    1980-01-01

    The utilization potential of geothermal resources in Trans-Pecos, Texas was assessed. The potential for both direct use and electric power generation were examined. As with the resource assessment work, the focus was on the Hueco Tanks area in northeastern El Paso County and the Presidio Bolson area in Presidio County. Suitable users of the Hueco Tanks and Presidio Bolson resource areas were identified by matching postulated temperature characteristics of the geothermal resource to the need characteristics of existing users in each resource area. The amount of geothermal energy required and the amount of fossil fuel that geothermal energy would replace were calculated for each of the users identified as suitable. Current data indicate that temperatures in the Hueco Tanks resource area are not high enough for electric power generation, but in at least part of the Presidio Bolson resource area, they may be high enough for electric power generation.

  3. Assessment of the changes in quality of life of patients with class II and III deformities during and after orthodontic-surgical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baherimoghaddam, T; Tabrizi, R; Naseri, N; Pouzesh, A; Oshagh, M; Torkan, S

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this longitudinal study was to assess and compare the oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) of patients with class II and III deformities during and after orthodontic-surgical treatment. Thirty class III and 28 class II patients were evaluated at baseline (T0), just prior to surgery (T1), at 6 months after surgery (T2), and at 12 months after debonding (T3). OHRQoL was assessed using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14). Friedman two-way analysis of variance and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test were performed to compare the relative changes in OHRQoL during treatment. Significant changes in the overall OHIP-14 scores were observed during and after orthodontic-surgical treatment in both groups. During the pre-surgical stage, psychological discomfort and psychological disability decreased in class III patients, and class II patients experienced a significant deterioration in psychological discomfort during the same period. Six months after surgery, patients in both groups showed improvements in psychological discomfort, social disability, and handicap. Physical disability and functional limitation showed further improvement at 12 months after debonding in class II patients. This study reaffirms that orthodontic-surgical treatment has a significant effect on the OHRQoL of class III and class II patients. PMID:26603194

  4. Jポップに見る男と女の言説 : 平成の若者の「こころもとなさ」(PART III)

    OpenAIRE

    難波江, 和英; Kazuhide, NABAE

    2003-01-01

    This is the last part of the present trilogy study on discourses of heterosexual love in J-POP. The opening chapter contains a summary of Part I and Part II, which is devised to help the reader have a quick review of the preceding chapters so that they will readily posit the main body of Part III in a proper and whole contextual perspective. The second chapter titled "Historicizing the Heisei Period" discusses the cultural climate of the Heisei period in which heroines and heroes of J-POP hav...

  5. Confirmatory factor analysis of an integrated model of psycopathology assessed with MMPI-2-RF and the MCMI-III

    OpenAIRE

    Ruiz Rodríguez, José; Fusté Escolano, Adela; Ferrando, P.J.; García Grau, Eugeni

    2013-01-01

    We presented an integrated hierarchical model of psychopathology that more accurately captures empirical patterns of comorbidity between clinical syndromes and personality disorders. In order to verify the structural validity of the model proposed, this study aimed to analyze the convergence between the Restructured Clinical (RC) scales and Personality scales (PSY-5) of the MMPI-2-RF and the Clinical Syndrome and Personality Disorder scales of the MCMI-III. The MMPI-2-RF and MCMI-III we...

  6. How do Banks Manage the Credit Assessment to Small Businesses and What Is the Effect of Basel III? : An implementation of smaller and larger banks in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Ahlberg, Heléne; Andersson, Linn

    2012-01-01

    Background: Small businesses are considered as a valuable source for the society and the economic growth and bank loan is the main source of finance for them. Small businesses are commonly seen as riskier than larger businesses it is thus noteworthy to examine banks’ credit assessment for small businesses. The implementation of the Basel III Accord will start in 2013 with the aim to generate further protection of financial stability and promote sustainable economic growth, and the main idea u...

  7. Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project on Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research (SPAR-III) 2009–2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the beginning of 2014, there were 437 nuclear power reactors in operation and 72 reactors under construction. To date, around 370 500 t (HM) (tonnes of heavy metal) of spent fuel have been discharged from reactors, and approximately 253 700 t (HM) are stored at various storage facilities. Although wet storage at reactor sites still dominates, the amount of spent fuel being transferred to dry storage technologies has increased significantly since 2005. For example, around 28% of the total fuel inventory in the United States of America is now in dry storage. Although the licensing for the construction of geological disposal facilities is under way in Finland, France and Sweden, the first facility is not expected to be available until 2025 and for most States with major nuclear programmes not for several decades afterwards. Spent fuel is currently accumulating at around 7000 t (HM) per year worldwide. The net result is that the duration of spent fuel storage has increased beyond what was originally foreseen. In order to demonstrate the safety of both spent fuel and the storage system, a good understanding of the processes that might cause deterioration is required. To address this, the IAEA continued the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research (SPAR-III) in 2009 to evaluate fuel and materials performance under wet and dry storage and to assess the impact of interim storage on associated spent fuel management activities (such as handling and transport). This has been achieved through: evaluating surveillance and monitoring programmes of spent fuel and storage facilities; collecting and exchanging relevant experience of spent fuel storage and the impact on associated spent fuel management activities; facilitating the transfer of knowledge by documenting the technical basis for spent fuel storage; creating synergy among research projects of the participating Member States; and developing the capability to assess the impact

  8. Proposed changes in personality and personality disorder assessment and diagnosis for DSM-5 part II: clinical application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. Skodol; D.S. Bender; J.M. Oldham; L.A. Clark; L.C. Morey; R. Verheul; R.F. Krueger; L.J. Siever

    2011-01-01

    The four-part assessment of personality psychopathology proposed for DSM-5 focuses attention on identifying personality psychopathology with increasing degrees of specificity, based on a clinician's available time, information, and expertise. In Part I of this two-part article, we described the comp

  9. Environmental assessment for issuance of 10 CFR Parts 834 and 835

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing that two rules for radiation protection be included in Title 10 of the US Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). These proposed rule are 10 CFR Part 834, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment,'' and 10 CFR Part 835. ''Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers.'' Both would apply to normal operations at all DOE and DOE contractor facilities where ionizing radiation exposure could occur. The proposed rules are based on existing DOE Orders for radiation protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Proposed rule 10 CFR Part 834 essentially incorporates Order DOE 5400.5, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment'' (DOE 1990a), which was issued on February 8, 1990. Proposed rule 10 CFR Part 835 incorporates DOE 5480.11, ''Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers'' (DOE 1988a), which was issued on December 21, 1988. The intent in codifying these Orders is to provide the DOE with regulations for protection of members of the public and radiation workers against ionizing radiation and to enhance enforcement of the requirements under the Price Anderson Amendments Act (PAAA 1988). The proposed rules are designed to preserve the radiation protection provisions of the DOE Orders. The purpose of this environmental assessment (EA) is to provide an analysis that can be used to determine whether the proposed action -- promulgation of proposed 10 CFR Part 834 and 10 CFR Part 835 -- significantly affects the quality of the environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA 1969). This EA identifies alternatives to the proposed action and examines what impact each of the alternatives would have on environmental quality

  10. Nuclear computerized library for assessing reactor reliability (NUCLARR): Data manual: Part 1, Summary description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume of a five-volume series summarizes those data currently resident in the first release of the Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) data base. The raw human error probability (HEP) and hardware component failure data (HCFD) contained herein are accompanied by a glossary of terms and the HEP and hardware taxonomies used to structure the data. Instructions are presented on how the user may navigate through the NUCLARR data management system to find anchor values to assist in solving risk-related problems. Volume V: Data Manual will be updated on a periodic basis so that risk analysis without access to a computer may have access to the largest NUCLARR data. This document Part 1 of Volume 5 introduces aspects of the NUCLARR data base management system and prepares the reader for reviewing data in other Parts of Volume 5

  11. Methods for collecting benthic invertebrate samples as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuffney, Thomas F.; Gurtz, Martin E.; Meador, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    Benthic invertebrate communities are evaluated as part of the ecological survey component of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program. These biological data are collected along with physical and chemical data to assess water-quality conditions and to develop an understanding of the factors that affect water-quality conditions locally, regionally, and nationally. The objectives of benthic invertebrate community characterizations are to (1) develop for each site a list of tax a within the associated stream reach and (2) determine the structure of benthic invertebrate communities within selected habitats of that reach. A nationally consistent approach is used to achieve these objectives. This approach provides guidance on site, reach, and habitat selection and methods and equipment for qualitative multihabitat sampling and semi-quantitative single habitat sampling. Appropriate quality-assurance and quality-control guidelines are used to maximize the ability to analyze data within and among study units.

  12. Research on the marine food chain. Progress report, July 1974--June 1975. Part I. Introduction and account of work in progress. Part II. Manuscript reports of work concluded. Part III. Cruise summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The all-group field program during 1971-74 was on plankton dynamics in the central gyre of the North Pacific. Cruises to this area were completed, and the resultant manuscripts for the 1974-75 period are included in Part II of the report. During the past year the major field program was a series of four quarterly cruises in the Southern California Bight designed to evaluate the possible local and far-field effects of the cooling water system and thermal plume of the San Onofre Nuclear Power plant. Additional field programs included a cruise to the Gulf of California (R/V Alpha Helix) concerned with problems in marine photobiology, a cruise in Antarctic waters south of Buenos Aires (Islas Orcadas, formerly U.S.N.S. Eltanin) concerned with phytoplankton productivity, and a cruise in the Atlantic off northwestern Africa (F. S. Meteor) concerned with sediment microbiology. (auth)

  13. Drought vulnerability assessment for the agriculture: a case study for the west part of Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slejko, M.; Gregorič, G.; Bergant, K.

    2009-04-01

    One of the main aspects of drought adaptation and planning is the assessment of vulnerability. Since agriculture is the primary sector affected by drought and is directly dependent on water availability, we have started with a pilot project in an important agricultural area in the west part of Slovenia. The project is a part of the activities of the Drought Management Centre for Southeastern Europe - DMCSEE. Drought in this area often results in significant economic, environmental, and social impacts. The significance of the impacts of drought on the agricultural sector is assessed taking into account the severity of the drought (magnitude and duration of the drought episode) and the vulnerability of the agricultural system. For that purpose we have developed a general method which can be used as a preliminary tool for assessing drought vulnerability in agriculture and that could be applied on the entire Southeastern Europe region. The approach was based on impact assessment and vulnerability model supported by geographic information system (GIS) software. We found out that factors influencing drought vulnerability were numerous, and the model application might depend on data availability. We have used appropriate and available digital data layers for climate, pedology, solar radiation, land use, irrigation infrastructure and other factors. The final product is a categorical map of agricultural drought vulnerability for the study area, which synthesizes a variety of data and serves as an indicator of areas deserving a detailed drought risk evaluation. It could aid regional decision makers in identifying appropriate mitigation and adaptation actions before the next drought event, lessen impacts of that event and allow sustainable development of the sector.

  14. A global water scarcity assessment under shared socio-economic pathways – Part 1: Water use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Masui

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel global water scarcity assessment for the 21st century is presented in a two-part paper. In this first paper, water use scenarios are presented for the latest global hydrological models. The scenarios are compatible with the socio-economic scenarios of the Shared Socio-economic Pathways (SSPs, which are a part of the latest set of scenarios on global change developed by the integrated assessment, IAV (climate change impact, adaptation, and vulnerability assessment, and climate modeling community. The SSPs depict five global situations based on substantially different socio-economic conditions during the 21st century. Water use scenarios were developed to reflect the key concepts underpinning each situation. Each scenario consists of five factors: irrigation area, crop intensity, irrigation efficiency, industrial water withdrawal, and municipal water withdrawal. The first three factors are used to estimate agricultural water withdrawal. All factors were developed using simple models based on a literature review and analysis of historical records. The factors are grid-based at a spatial resolution of 0.5° × 0.5° and cover the whole 21st century at 5-yr intervals. Each factor displays a wide variation among the different global situations depicted: the irrigation area in 2085 varies between 270 and 450 km2, industrial water between 246 and 1714 km3 yr−1, and domestic water withdrawal between 573 and 1280 km3 yr−1. The water use scenarios can be used for global water scarcity assessments by identifying the regions vulnerable to water scarcity and analyzing the timing and magnitude of scarcity conditions.

  15. Preliminary Guideline for the High Temperature Structure Integrity Assessment Procedure Part II. High Temperature Structural Integrity Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Han; Kim, J. B.; Lee, H. Y.; Park, C. G.; Joo, Y. S.; Koo, G. H.; Kim, S. H

    2007-02-15

    A high temperature structural integrity assessment belongs to the Part II of a whole preliminary guideline for the high temperature structure. The main contents of this guideline are the evaluation procedures of the creep-fatigue crack initiation and growth in high temperature condition, the high temperature LBB evaluation procedure, and the inelastic evaluations of the welded joints in SFR structures. The methodologies for the proper inelastic analysis of an SFR structures in high temperatures are explained and the guidelines of inelastic analysis options using ANSYS and ABAQUS are suggested. In addition, user guidelines for the developed NONSTA code are included. This guidelines need to be continuously revised to improve the applicability to the design and analysis of the SFR structures.

  16. Assessment of land degradation hazards, Jamui district India using IRS P6 LISS-III multi-temporal satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londhe, S.; Talukdar, G.; Deshmukh, B.; Srivastava, S.

    2009-04-01

    Asian region is under high pressure to supply required food for rapidly increasing population. This, together with harsh climatic conditions and changes in land use accelerates land degradation process, which eventually leads to yield reduction. Soil erosion is one of the mode of land degradation and serious problem in granitic terrains of Semi-arid regions. This accounts the loss of fertile soil through detachment and transportation from one place and deposition to another place resulting in decreased soil fertility and reduced crop yields as well as sedimentation of rivers and reservoirs. IRSP6 LISS-III satellite data of three different season viz. Khrif, rabi and summer data in conjunction of with Survey of India toposheets and subsequent ground truth has been used for assessment of land degradation using onscreen visual interpretation. Based on severity of degradation the area is mapped into sheet erosion, rill erosion, gully erosion, ravenous erosion, seasonal waterlogging and rock out crops. The complex degradation problems having more than one degradation processes were appropriately represented in the mapping unit as combination. In order to understand the associated land use and feasibility of reclamination of degraded lands different landforms are identified along with land use level 1 classification. It was observed that 23.2 % of the total area (3044.5 km2) of the district is under sheet erosion followed by rill erosion 33.5 %, gully erosion 13.3% and ravenous erosion 0.4%. Highly degraded area, rock out crops is associated with higher elements of slope and barren areas accounts for 2.0%. The seasonal waterlogging is associated with lower elements of slope in depression where there is no facility for water to drain out through surface or sub-surface drainage and affecting agricultural activities which occupy 0.90% area in the district. Around 26.8 % area of the Jamui district is depicted as not affected due to degradation process due to its lower slopes

  17. Presentation of safety after closure of the repository for spent nuclear fuel. Main report of the project SR-Site. Part III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the safety assessment SR-Site is to investigate whether a safe repository for spent nuclear fuel by KBS-3 type can be constructed at Forsmark in Oesthammar in Sweden. The location of the Forsmark has been selected based on results of several surveys from surface conditions at depth in Forsmark and in Laxemar in Oskarshamn. The choice of location is not justified in SR-Site Report, but in other attachments to SKB's permit applications. SR-Site Report is an important part of SKB's permit applications to construct and operate a repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark in Oesthammar. The purpose of the report in the applications is to show that a repository at Forsmark is safe after closure

  18. An assessment of BWR [boiling water reactor] Mark III containment challenges, failure modes, and potential improvements in performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes risk-significant challenges posed to Mark III containment systems by severe accidents as identified for Grand Gulf. Design similarities and differences between the Mark III plants that are important to containment performance are summarized. The accident sequences responsible for the challenges and the postulated containment failure modes associated with each challenge are identified and described. Improvements are discussed that have the potential either to prevent or delay containment failure, or to mitigate the offsite consequences of a fission product release. For each of these potential improvements, a qualitative analysis is provided. A limited quantitative risk analysis is provided for selected potential improvements. 21 refs., 5 figs., 46 tabs

  19. The Design of Research Laboratories. Part I: A General Assessment. Part II: Air Conditioning and Conditioned Rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legget, R. F.; Hutcheon, N. B.

    Design factors in the planning of research laboratories are described which include--(1) location, (2) future expansion, (3) internal flexibility, (4) provision of services, (5) laboratory furnishing, (6) internal traffic, (7) space requirements, and (8) building costs. A second part discusses air-conditioning and conditioned rooms--(1)…

  20. Basel III and the continuing evolution of bank capital regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Ennis, Huberto M.; Price, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Adopted in part as a response to the 2007-08 financial crisis, the Basel III accord is the most recent revision to international capital standards for banks. Basel III primarily relies on methods similar to those of Basel II for assessing the relative risks of different types of assets. The main focus of the changes in Basel III, rather, is to increase banks' equity capital requirements. This emphasis is a reflection of the conclusions drawn from the crisis: that bank fragility is more preval...

  1. Biochemical parameters in Tubifex tubifex as an integral part of complex sediment toxicity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smutna, M.; Hilscherova, K.; Paskova, V. [Masaryk Univ., Brno (CZ). RECETOX (Research Centre for Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology); Marsalek, B [Czech Academy of Science, Brno (Czech Republic). Centre for Cyanobacteria and their Toxins

    2008-06-15

    Background, aim, and scope Restoration of lakes and reservoirs with extensive cyanobacterial water bloom often requires evaluation of the sediment quality. Next to the chemical analysis of known pollutants, sediment bioassays should be employed to assess toxicity of the present contaminants and to make predictions of associated risk. Brno reservoir in the Czech Republic is a typical example of water bodies with long-term problems concerning cyanobacterial water blooms. Comprehensive assessment of reservoir sediment quality was conducted since successful reservoir restoration might require sediment removal. An important part of this survey focused on an examination of the utility of Tubifex tubifex and its sublethal biochemical markers for the assessment of direct sediment toxicity. Materials and methods This complex study included chemical analysis of contaminants (heavy metals, organic pollutants), ecotoxicity testing of sediment elutriates (tests with Daphnia magna, Pseudomonas putida, Sinapis alba, Scenedesmus subspicatus), and other parameters. We have tested in more detail the applicability of T. tubifex as a test organism for direct evaluation of contact sediment toxicity. Survival tests after 14 days of exposure were complemented by an assessment of parameters serving as biomarkers for sublethal effects [such as total glutathione content (GSH), activities of the enzymes glutathione transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR)]. The data matrix was subjected to multivariate analysis to interpret relationships between different parameters and possible differences among locations. Results The multivariate statistical techniques helped to clearly identify the more contaminated upstream sites and separate them from the less contaminated and reference samples. The data document closer relationships of the detected sediment contamination with results of direct sediment exposure in the T. tubifex test regarding mortality but namely

  2. Technical reliability of geological disposal for high-level radioactive wastes in Japan. The second progress report. Part 3. Safety assessment for geological disposal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the Advisory Committee Report on Nuclear Fuel Cycle Backend Policy submitted to the Japanese Government in 1997, JNC documents the progress of research and development program in the form of the second progress report (the first one published in 1992). It summarizes an evaluation of the technical reliability and safety of the geological disposal concept for high-level radioactive wastes (HLW) in Japan. The present document, the part 3 of the progress report, concerns safety assessment for geological disposal systems definitely introduced in part 1 and 2 of this series and consists of 9 chapters. Chapter I concerns the methodology for safety assessment while Chapter II deals with diversity and uncertainty about the scenario, the adequate model and the required data of the systems above. Chapter III summarizes the components of the geological disposal system. Chapter IV refers to the relationship between radioactive wastes and human life through groundwater, i.e. nuclide migration. In Chapter V is made a reference case which characterizes the geological environmental data using artificial barrier specifications. (Ohno. S.)

  3. Technical reliability of geological disposal for high-level radioactive wastes in Japan. The second progress report. Part 3. Safety assessment for geological disposal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-11-01

    Based on the Advisory Committee Report on Nuclear Fuel Cycle Backend Policy submitted to the Japanese Government in 1997, JNC documents the progress of research and development program in the form of the second progress report (the first one published in 1992). It summarizes an evaluation of the technical reliability and safety of the geological disposal concept for high-level radioactive wastes (HLW) in Japan. The present document, the part 3 of the progress report, concerns safety assessment for geological disposal systems definitely introduced in part 1 and 2 of this series and consists of 9 chapters. Chapter I concerns the methodology for safety assessment while Chapter II deals with diversity and uncertainty about the scenario, the adequate model and the required data of the systems above. Chapter III summarizes the components of the geological disposal system. Chapter IV refers to the relationship between radioactive wastes and human life through groundwater, i.e. nuclide migration. In Chapter V is made a reference case which characterizes the geological environmental data using artificial barrier specifications. (Ohno. S.)

  4. Further Characterization of a Type III Secretion System (T3SS) and of a New Effector Protein from a Clinical Isolate of Aeromonas Hydrophila - Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    A type III secretion system (T3SS)-associated cytotoxin, AexT, with ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and homology to Pseudomonas aeruginosa bifuncational toxins ExoT/S, was recently identified from a fish pathogen Aeromonas salmonicida. In this study, we reported the molecular cha...

  5. Effectiveness of water infrastructure for river flood management – Part 1: Flood hazard assessment using hydrological models in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    M. A. Gusyev; Kwak, Y.; Khairul, M. I.; Arifuzzaman, M. B.; Magome, J.; Sawano, H.; Takeuchi, K

    2015-01-01

    This study introduces a flood hazard assessment part of the global flood risk assessment (Part 2) conducted with a distributed hydrological Block-wise TOP (BTOP) model and a GIS-based Flood Inundation Depth (FID) model. In this study, the 20 km grid BTOP model was developed with globally available data on and applied for the Ganges, Brahmaputra and Meghna (GBM) river basin. The BTOP model was calibrated with observed river discharges in Bangladesh and was applied for climate...

  6. Radiographic cephalometry assessment of the linear and angular parameters on cranial base in children with skeletal class III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojanović Zdenka M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. In malocclusion of skeletal class III, mandible is located in front of maxilla in sagital plain, which is manifested by a lower value of the sagital inter-jaw angle than in skeletal class I, where the jaw sagital relation is normal. Apart from the deformities on mandible and/or maxilla, in skeletal class III deformities are also frequent on the cranial base. The aim of this research was to find the differences in the parameter values on the cranial base among the children with skeletal class III and the children with skeletal class I in the period of mixed dentition. Methods. After clinical examination and orthopan-tomography, profile radiography of the head was analyzed in 60 examinees, aged from 6−12 years. The examinees were divided into two groups: group 1 - the children with skeletal class III; group 2 - the children with skeletal class I. Both linear and angular parameters on the cranial base were measured, as well as the angles of maxillary and mandible prognatism and the angle of sagital inter-jaw relation. The level of difference in the parameter values between the groups was estimated and the degree of correlation of the main angle of the cranial base with the angles of sagital position of the jaws in each of the two groups was established. Results. A significant difference between the groups was found only in the average values of the angles of maxillary prognatism and sagital interjaw relation. In the group 1, the main angle of the cranial base was in a significant correlation with the angles of sagital positions of the jaws, while in the group 2, such significance was not found. Conclusion. There were no significant differences in the parameter values on the cranial base between the groups. There was a significant correlation of the main angle of the cranial base with the angles of sagital position of the jaws in the group 1 only. .

  7. Environmental impact assessment of STORA SKOG:s forest fertilizing program. Part 1: Basic facts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitrogen fertilization of forest soils has been used for several decades to improve productivity. STORA plans to fertilize 10 to 15 thousand hectares forests with nitrogen annually, over an area of 1 545 000 hectares productive forest land. The ecological effects of this forest fertilization plan have been studied in the form of an environmental impact assessment (EIA). The first part of this EIA, presented in this report by the Swedish Environmental Research Institute (IVL), include the present and possible future state of the forest environment in Sweden, in relation to STORA owned forests and the fertilization programme and present knowledge about nitrogen cycling and forest fertilization. The second part, presented in a separate report contains information about the ecological effects of implementation of STORA fertilization plans, identification of shortcomings in knowledge to date, and recommendations for evasion of possible negative effects of implementation. Environmental effects of nitrogen fertilization are described in contrast to the possible environmental effects of acidification of soil and surface water, build-up of nitrogen pool in soils, leakage of nitrogen to surface waters from soils, changes in forest soil fertility, uptake and loss of climate affecting gases, and the biological diversity of the forest ecosystem. 193 refs, 4 figs, 7 tabs

  8. Human Body Parts Tracking and Kinematic Features Assessment Based on RSSI and Inertial Sensor Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaddi Blumrosen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Acquisition of patient kinematics in different environments plays an important role in the detection of risk situations such as fall detection in elderly patients, in rehabilitation of patients with injuries, and in the design of treatment plans for patients with neurological diseases. Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI measurements in a Body Area Network (BAN, capture the signal power on a radio link. The main aim of this paper is to demonstrate the potential of utilizing RSSI measurements in assessment of human kinematic features, and to give methods to determine these features. RSSI measurements can be used for tracking different body parts’ displacements on scales of a few centimeters, for classifying motion and gait patterns instead of inertial sensors, and to serve as an additional reference to other sensors, in particular inertial sensors. Criteria and analytical methods for body part tracking, kinematic motion feature extraction, and a Kalman filter model for aggregation of RSSI and inertial sensor were derived. The methods were verified by a set of experiments performed in an indoor environment. In the future, the use of RSSI measurements can help in continuous assessment of various kinematic features of patients during their daily life activities and enhance medical diagnosis accuracy with lower costs.

  9. Methods for collecting algal samples as part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Stephen D.; Cuffney, Thomas F.; Gurtz, Martin E.; Meador, Michael R.

    1993-01-01

    Benthic algae (periphyton) and phytoplankton communities are characterized in the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment Program as part of an integrated physical, chemical, and biological assessment of the Nation's water quality. This multidisciplinary approach provides multiple lines of evidence for evaluating water-quality status and trends, and for refining an understanding of the factors that affect water-quality conditions locally, regionally, and nationally. Water quality can be characterized by evaluating the results of qualitative and quantitative measurements of the algal community. Qualitative periphyton samples are collected to develop of list of taxa present in the sampling reach. Quantitative periphyton samples are collected to measure algal community structure within selected habitats. These samples of benthic algal communities are collected from natural substrates, using the sampling methods that are most appropriate for the habitat conditions. Phytoplankton samples may be collected in large nonwadeable streams and rivers to meet specific program objectives. Estimates of algal biomass (chlorophyll content and ash-free dry mass) also are optional measures that may be useful for interpreting water-quality conditions. A nationally consistent approach provides guidance on site, reach, and habitat selection, as well as information on methods and equipment for qualitative and quantitative sampling. Appropriate quality-assurance and quality-control guidelines are used to maximize the ability to analyze data locally, regionally, and nationally.

  10. Life cycle assessment part 1: framework, goal and scope definition, inventory analysis, and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebitzer, G; Ekvall, T; Frischknecht, R; Hunkeler, D; Norris, G; Rydberg, T; Schmidt, W-P; Suh, S; Weidema, B P; Pennington, D W

    2004-07-01

    Sustainable development requires methods and tools to measure and compare the environmental impacts of human activities for the provision of goods and services (both of which are summarized under the term "products"). Environmental impacts include those from emissions into the environment and through the consumption of resources, as well as other interventions (e.g., land use) associated with providing products that occur when extracting resources, producing materials, manufacturing the products, during consumption/use, and at the products' end-of-life (collection/sorting, reuse, recycling, waste disposal). These emissions and consumptions contribute to a wide range of impacts, such as climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion, tropospheric ozone (smog) creation, eutrophication, acidification, toxicological stress on human health and ecosystems, the depletion of resources, water use, land use, and noise-among others. A clear need, therefore, exists to be proactive and to provide complimentary insights, apart from current regulatory practices, to help reduce such impacts. Practitioners and researchers from many domains come together in life cycle assessment (LCA) to calculate indicators of the aforementioned potential environmental impacts that are linked to products-supporting the identification of opportunities for pollution prevention and reductions in resource consumption while taking the entire product life cycle into consideration. This paper, part 1 in a series of two, introduces the LCA framework and procedure, outlines how to define and model a product's life cycle, and provides an overview of available methods and tools for tabulating and compiling associated emissions and resource consumption data in a life cycle inventory (LCI). It also discusses the application of LCA in industry and policy making. The second paper, by Pennington et al. (Environ. Int. 2003, in press), highlights the key features, summarises available approaches, and outlines the key

  11. Petroleum resources assessment on the western part of the Kunsan Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, K.S.; Park, K.P.; Sunwoo, D.; Yoo, D.G.; Cheong, T.J.; Oh, J.H.; Bong, P.Y.; Son, J.D.; Lee, H.Y.; Ryu, B.J.; Son, B.K.; Hwang, I.G.; Kwon, Y.I.; Lee, Y.J.; Kim, H.J. [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    Palynomorphs including spores, pollen and organic-walled microfossils and calcareous microfossils such as ostracods, charophytes and gastropods were studied for the biostratigraphic work of Kachi-1 and IIH-1Xa wells. All the microfossils yielded from two wells indicate nonmarine environment ranging from shallow lacustrine to fluvial one. The paleoclimates have been fluctuated between subtropical and cool temperate with arid/humid alternating conditions. The fluvial sandstone of the interval between 2017 m and 2021 m could be a potential reservoir rock in the well Kachi-1. The sandstone from 1587 m to 1592 could be also a potential reservoir rock even if further study is necessary for the cap rock. Content of organic matter is very low and the type is compared to III in the section penetrated by the above two wells. Thermal maturity might reach top of oil window at depth about 1200 m by Tmax and about 1300 m by biomarker analysis in the Kachi-1 well. On the basis of illite crystallinity, the top of oil generation zone could be located at the depth 1600 m. The thermal maturity could not be determined in the IIH-1Xa well, because of the extremely low organic matter content or bad state of samples. Hydrocarbon genetic potential is almost null in the both well except for a few sample in the thermally immature interval. Analysis of approximately 3,300 Line-km of multichannel seismic data integrated with 3 well data provides an insight of structural evolution of the western part of the Yellow Sea Basin. Tectonics of the rifting phase have been established on the basis of structural and stratigraphic analyses of depositional sequences and their seismic expressions. Based on available well data, the rifting probably began in the Cretaceous time had continued until Paleocene. It is considered that compressional force immediately after rifting event deformed sedimentary sections. During the period of Paleocene to middle Miocene, the sediments were deposited in stable

  12. The KULTURisk Regional Risk Assessment methodology for water-related natural hazards - Part 1: Physical-environmental assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronco, P.; Gallina, V.; Torresan, S.; Zabeo, A.; Semenzin, E.; Critto, A.; Marcomini, A.

    2014-12-01

    , exposure and vulnerability. It integrates the outputs of various hydrodynamic models with site-specific bio-geophysical and socio-economic indicators (e.g. slope, land cover, population density, economic activities etc.) to develop tailored risk indexes and GIS-based maps for each of the selected receptors (i.e. people, buildings, infrastructure, agriculture, natural and semi-natural systems, cultural heritage) in the considered region. It further compares the baseline scenario with alternative scenarios, where different structural and/or non-structural mitigation measures are planned and eventually implemented. As demonstrated in the companion paper (Part 2, Ronco et al., 2014), risk maps, along with related statistics, allow one to identify and classify, on a relative scale, areas at risk which are more likely to be affected by floods and support the development of strategic adaptation and prevention measures to minimizing flood impacts. In addition, the outcomes of the RRA can be eventually used for a further socio-economic assessment, considering the tangible and intangible costs as well as the human dimension of vulnerability.

  13. Assessment of the effects of As(III) treatment on cyanobacteria lipidomic profiles by LC-MS and MCR-ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Aline S; Bedia, Carmen; Lima, Kássio M G; Tauler, Romà

    2016-08-01

    Cyanobacteria are a group of photosynthetic, nitrogen-fixing bacteria present in a wide variety of habitats such as freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems. In this work, the effects of As(III), a major toxic environmental pollutant, on the lipidomic profiles of two cyanobacteria species (Anabaena and Planktothrix agardhii) were assessed by means of a recently proposed method based on the concept of regions of interest (ROI) in liquid chromatography mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) together with multivariate curve resolution alternating least squares (MCR-ALS). Cyanobacteria were exposed to two concentrations of As(III) for a week, and lipid extracts were analyzed by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry in full scan mode. The data obtained were compressed by means of the ROI strategy, and the resulting LC-MS data sets were analyzed by the MCR-ALS method. Comparison of profile peak areas resolved by MCR-ALS in control and exposed samples allowed the discrimination of lipids whose concentrations were changed due to As(III) treatment. The tentative identification of these lipids revealed an important reduction of the levels of some galactolipids such as monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, the pigment chlorophyll a and its degradation product, pheophytin a, as well as carotene compounds such as 3-hydroxycarotene and carotene-3,3'-dione, all of these compounds being essential in the photosynthetic process. These results suggested that As(III) induced important changes in the composition of lipids of cyanobacteria, which were able to compromise their energy production processes. Graphical abstract Steps of the proposed LC-MS + MCR-ALS procedure. PMID:27311955

  14. Electrical insulating materials - Determination of the effects of ionizing radiation - Part 5: Procedures for assessment of ageing in service

    CERN Document Server

    International Electrotechnical Commission. Geneva

    2003-01-01

    Covers ageing assessment methods which can be applied to components based on polymeric materials (for example, cable insulation and jackets, elastomeric seals, polymeric coatings, gaiters) which are used in environments where they are exposed to radiation. The object of this part of IEC 60544 is to provide guidelines on the assessment of ageing in service. The approaches discussed cover ageing assessment programmes based on condition monitoring (CM), the use of equipment deposits in severe environments and sampling of real-time aged components.

  15. Comparison of in-person and digital photograph assessment of stage III and IV pressure ulcers among veterans with spinal cord injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darcey D. Terris, PhD

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Digital photographs are often used in treatment monitoring for home care of less advanced pressure ulcers. We investigated assessment agreement when stage III and IV pressure ulcers in individuals with spinal cord injury were evaluated in person and with the use of digital photographs. Two wound-care nurses assessed 31 wounds among 15 participants. One nurse assessed all wounds in person, while the other used digital photographs. Twenty-four wound description categories were applied in the nurses' assessments. Kappa statistics were calculated to investigate agreement beyond chance (p < or = 0.05. For 10 randomly selected "double-rated wounds," both nurses applied both assessment methods. Fewer categories were evaluated for the double-rated wounds, because some categories were chosen infrequently and agreement could not be measured. Interrater agreement with the two methods was observed for 12 of the 24 categories (50.0%. However, of the 12 categories with agreement beyond chance, agreement was only "slight" (kappa = 0-0.20 or "fair" (kappa = 0.21-0.40 for 6 categories. The highest agreement was found for the presence of undermining (kappa = 0.853, p < 0.001. Interrater agreement was similar to intramethod agreement (41.2% of the categories demonstrated agreement beyond chance for the nurses' in-person assessment of the double-rated wounds. The moderate agreement observed may be attributed to variation in subjective perception of qualitative wound characteristics.

  16. Technology demonstration assessment report for X-231B (Part 1) and summary of closure activities (Part 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Technology Demonstration Assessment Report (TDAR) was developed to evaluate and recommend the most feasible approach for cleanup of contaminated Minford soil in the vadose zone and to summarize closure activities at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) X-231B Oil Biodegradation Plot (X-231B). The X-23 IB site, consisting of a north and south area, is oriented on a north-south axis. The north and south areas measure 265 ft by I 10 ft and 100 ft by 70 ft, respectively. The X-231B Technology Demonstration (TD) Project was initiated during fall 1990 to identify and evaluate emerging technologies which could provide cost effective and feasible in situ soil treatment. The four technologies plus the Contingent Design evaluated were: In situ Soil Mixing with Solidification/Stabilization; In situ Soil Mixing with Isothermal Vapor Extraction; In situ Soil Mixing with Thermally Enhanced Vapor Extraction; In situ Soil Mixing with Peroxidation Destruction; Center-line Trench Drain - Contingent Design

  17. Orthopedic treatment of Class III malocclusion with rapid maxillary expansion combined with a face mask: a cephalometric assessment of craniofacial growth patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniella Torres Tagawa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this prospective study was to assess potential changes in the cephalometric craniofacial growth pattern of 17 children presenting Angle Class III malocclusion treated with a Haas-type expander combined with a face mask. METHODS: Lateral cephalometric radiographs were taken at beginning (T1 and immediately after removal of the appliances (T2, average of 11 months of treatment. Linear and angular measurements were used to evaluate the cranial base, dentoskeletal changes and facial growth pattern. RESULTS: The length of the anterior cranial base experienced a reduction while the posterior cranial base assumed a more vertical position at T1. Some maxillary movement occurred, there was no rotation of the palatal plane, there was a slight clockwise rotation of the mandible, although not significant. The ANB angle increased, thereby improving the relationship between the jaws; dentoalveolar compensation was more evident in the lower incisors. Five out of 12 cases (29.41% showed the following changes: In one case the pattern became more horizontal and in four cases more vertical. CONCLUSIONS: It was concluded after a short-term assessment that treatment with rapid maxillary expansion (RME associated with a face mask was effective in the correction of Class III malocclusion despite the changes in facial growth pattern observed in a few cases.

  18. PISC II and PISC III: from capability assessment of nondestructive testing techniques in heavy steel sections to validation of results on real cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper on the 'Programme for the Inspection of Steel Components' (PISC) was presented to the conference on Non-destructive testing (NDT) in the fitness-for-purpose assessment of welded constructions', London, 1984. The PISC II exercise involves the cooperation of more than 50 NDT institutions in testing for large test assemblies containing deliberate flaws, for assessment of NDT technique. The status of this programme is discussed, including the round robin test on the steel assemblies and the parametric studies. Motivation for further work of the PISC type results from facts or recommendations prepared by several experts from EEC countries. This work includes the validation of results on real cases during the period 1984-7. Resources and installations, as well as the finalisation of the PISC III programme, are briefly discussed. (UK)

  19. A chronic plant test for the assessment of contaminated soils. Part 2. Testing of contaminated soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junker, T.; Roembke, J. [ECT Oekotoxikologie GmbH, Floersheim (Germany); Kalsch, W.

    2006-06-15

    Background and scope. A new chronic plant test system which is based on experiences with various acute plant tests (e.g. published by OECD or ISO) and existing north American plant-life-cycle bioassays was standardised in a project sponsored by the German government. Characteristic properties of the test system, which can be performed either with Brassica rapa (turnip rape) or Avena sativa (oat), are described in part 1 of this mini-series. Methods. This new test was used to assess the effects of natural soil samples contaminated with TNT (2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene) or PAHs (poly-aromatic hydrocarbons). The soils were tested after taken from the field as well as after being remediated. Different control and reference soils were used to evaluate the test results. In addition, they were compared with the results of tests in which either TNT or Pyrene were spiked to field and standard soils (see part 1 of this mini-series). Results. All contaminated soils showed clear effects in the chronic plant test (usually B. rapa was more sensitive than A. sativa). LUFA 2.2 standard soil and OECD artificial soil are well-suited as control and mixture substrates, while reference soils collected at uncontaminated sites were several times as phytotoxic. In most of the latter cases, soil properties could be identified as the main cause of these effects (e.g. the pH value). While the sensitivity of the reproduction and biomass endpoints did not differ much in general, it is recommended to measure different endpoints (i.e. biomass and reproduction) due to the different mode-of-action of contaminants. In the case of TNT, a good agreement between the results of single chemical tests and tests with TNT-contaminated soils was found (due to the minimal effects of Pyrene, the same statement is not possible for PAHs). (orig.)

  20. Environmental impact assessment of STORA SKOG:s forest fertilizing program. Part 2: Judgement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ecological effects of forest fertilization have been studied in the form of an environmental impact assessment (EIA). The first part of this EIA, presented in an earlier report by the Swedish Environmental Research Institute (IVL), included the present and possible future state of the forest environment in Sweden, in relation to STORA owned forests and the fertilization programme and present knowledge about nitrogen cycling and forest fertilization. The second part is presented here, and contains information about the ecological effects of implementation of STORA fertilization plans, identification of shortcomings in knowledge to date, and recommendations for evasion of possible negative effects of implementation. The general consensus of this EIA is that the forest fertilization plans drawn up by STORA will not negatively affect the use of the forest as a natural resource in an ecologically sound way, taken into account that the guidelines included in the EIA are followed. The possible environmental effects of a 10 to 20 year period from onset of the plan were studied in contrast to the possible environmental effects of acidification of soil and surface water, build-up of nitrogen pool in soils, leakage of nitrogen to surface waters from soils, changes in forest soil fertility, uptake and loss of climate affecting gases, and the biological diversity of the forest ecosystem. The recommendations given in this EIA include the choice of forest stands for fertilization, environmental awareness, amount of fertilizer applied, frequency of applications, application procedures and effects follow up, communications, and documentation of the events. 69 refs, 14 tabs

  1. Theoretical analysis of nuclear reactors (Phase III), I-V, Part IV, Influence of isotopic composition of nuclear fuel on the reactivity with constant flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Part one of this report presents a series of differential equations describing the nuclear fuel depletion during reactor operation. This series of differential equations is extended to describe the fission products. This part includes equations for effective multiplication factor keff and reactivity ρ as a function of irradiation τ. Part two includes results obtained on the analog computer PACE 231 R, and related to Calder Hall type reactor. Part three covers detailed preparation of the series of equations for solution by using the analog computer. Part four includes the list of references related to this task

  2. An Approach for Assessing Ecosystem Services with Application in Albanian Part of Prespa Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DORINA GRAZHDANI

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Nature provides us with the very essentials of life. It gives us clean air and water; enables us to produce and gather food, fuel and raw materials from the land and sea; regulates our climate; stems flood waters and it filters pollution. It also gives us personal benefits from enjoying it that increases our health and happiness. Collectively, these benefits are known as ecosystem services. A study to obtain information concerning ecosystem services issues in the Albanian part of Prespa Park (AL-Prespa basin, south-eastern Albania, was conducted from 2010-2012. The main aim of the study was providing an assessment of services coming from a range of AL-Prespa ecosystems, and benefits of the services under different management scenarios. In this study, the problem of how to address and solve the complex issues of assessing ecosystem services is addressed, using a deliberative process based on citizens’ juries aided by multi-criteria evaluation method of analysis. The main elements of the approach presented in this paper are: an inventory process to focus on sets of ecosystem services in AL-Prespa, and a number of future management scenarios are developed in conjunction with an expert panel of stakeholder and scientific representatives. This approach presents an important tool in an analysis of ecosystem services and is essential for identifying and prioritizing the relative importance of the services produced by ecosystems in a protected area. The approach described in this study may be applied to larger ecosystems with a broader range of the ecosystem services to be valued.

  3. Assessment of the occupational exposure at a fertiliser industry in the northern part of Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the northern part of Greece, close to the city of Kavala, a phosphoric acid production industry has operated since 1965. The raw material used is the phosphate rock imported from the foreign countries. During industrial processes, naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) deposits exist in many facilities in the industry, causing increased levels of radiation exposure. Additionally, increased levels of NORM concentrations are also detected in the waste material of the production process, the phosphogypsum. According to the Greek Regulations for Radiation Protection (no. 216B, 5/3/2001), which is in accordance with the 96/29/EURATOM 31/5/1996, the action levels concerning the effective dose to workers at workplaces due to natural radiation sources are 1 mSv y-1. Work activities where the corresponding doses exceed 6 mSv y-1 are under the control of the Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC). The mean yearly radon concentration action level at workplaces is 400 Bq m-3, while the corresponding concentration limit is 3000 Bq m-3, respectively. GAEC, according to its constitutional law, is the responsible organisation to enforce and to implement the law by means of in situ surveys and laboratory measurements. The first inspection of the area was performed in 2002 and the first measures were proposed. Periodic inspections were performed every 2 y in order to extend the operation licensing of the industry. In this work a dose assessment of the workers based on in situ and laboratory measurements is presented. In order to assess the doses to the workers the external and the internal doses are estimated. (authors)

  4. Assessment of the occupational exposure at a fertiliser industry in the northern part of Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potiriadis, C; Koukouliou, V; Seferlis, S; Kehagia, K

    2011-03-01

    In the northern part of Greece, close to the city of Kavala, a phosphoric acid production industry has operated since 1965. The raw material used is the phosphate rock imported from the foreign countries. During industrial processes, naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) deposits exist in many facilities in the industry, causing increased levels of radiation exposure. Additionally, increased levels of NORM concentrations are also detected in the waste material of the production process, the phosphogypsum. According to the Greek Regulations for Radiation Protection (no. 216B, 5/3/2001), which is in accordance with the 96/29/EURATOM 31/5/1996, the action levels concerning the effective dose to workers at workplaces due to natural radiation sources are 1 mSv y(-1). Work activities where the corresponding doses exceed 6 mSv y(-1) are under the control of the Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC). The mean yearly radon concentration action level at workplaces is 400 Bq m(-3), while the corresponding concentration limit is 3000 Bq m(-3), respectively. GAEC, according to its constitutional law, is the responsible organisation to enforce and to implement the law by means of in situ surveys and laboratory measurements. The first inspection of the area was performed in 2002 and the first measures were proposed. Periodic inspections were performed every 2 y in order to extend the operation licensing of the industry. In this work a dose assessment of the workers based on in situ and laboratory measurements is presented. In order to assess the doses to the workers the external and the internal doses are estimated. PMID:21051434

  5. Bibliographical database of radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment: Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is part 11 of a database constructed to support research in radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment. Relevant publications were identified through detailed searches of national and international electronic databases and through our personal knowledge of the subject. Publications were numbered and key worded, and referenced in an electronic data-retrieval system that permits quick access through computerized searches on authors, key words, title, year, journal name, or publication number. Photocopies of the publications contained in the database are maintained in a file that is numerically arranged by our publication acquisition numbers. This volume contains 1048 additional entries, which are listed in alphabetical order by author. The computer software used for the database is a simple but sophisticated relational database program that permits quick information access, high flexibility, and the creation of customized reports. This program is inexpensive and is commercially available for the Macintosh and the IBM PC. Although the database entries were made using a Macintosh computer, we have the capability to convert the files into the IBM PC version. As of this date, the database cites 2260 publications. Citations in the database are from 200 different scientific journals. There are also references to 80 books and published symposia, and 158 reports. Information relevant to radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment is widely distributed within the scientific literature, although a few journals clearly predominate. The journals publishing the largest number of relevant papers are Health Physics, with a total of 242 citations in the database, and Mutation Research, with 185 citations. Other journals with over 100 citations in the database, are Radiation Research, with 136, and International Journal of Radiation Biology, with 132

  6. Children's exposure to indoor air in urban nurseries--Part II: Gaseous pollutants' assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, P T B S; Nunes, R A O; Alvim-Ferraz, M C M; Martins, F G; Sousa, S I V

    2015-10-01

    This study, Part II of the larger study "Children's exposure to indoor air in urban nurseries", aimed to: (i) evaluate nursery schools' indoor concentrations of several air pollutants in class and lunch rooms; and (ii) analyse them according to guidelines and references. Indoor continuous measurements were performed, and outdoor concentrations were obtained to determine indoor/outdoor ratios. The influence of outdoor air seemed to be determinant on carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) indoor concentrations. The peak concentrations of formaldehyde and volatile organic compounds (VOC) registered (highest concentrations of 204 and 2320 µg m(-3) respectively), indicated the presence of specific indoor sources of these pollutants, namely materials emitting formaldehyde and products emitting VOC associated to cleaning and children's specific activities (like paints and glues). For formaldehyde, baseline constant concentrations along the day were also found in some of the studied rooms, which enhances the importance of detailing the study of children's short and long-term exposure to this indoor air pollutant. While CO, NO2 and O3 never exceeded the national and international reference values for IAQ and health protection, exceedances were found for formaldehyde and VOC. For this reason, a health risk assessment approach could be interesting for future research to assess children's health risks of exposure to formaldehyde and to VOC concentrations in nursery schools. Changing cleaning schedules and materials emitting formaldehyde, and more efficient ventilation while using products emitting VOC, with the correct amount and distribution of fresh air, would decrease children's exposure. PMID:26342590

  7. Development and application of a risk assessment method for radioactive waste management. Volume III. Economic analysis; description and implementation of AMRAW-B model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Radioactive Waste Management Systems Model, is presented. The systems model and associated computer code called AMRAW (Assessment Method for Radioactive Waste), has two parts. The first part, AMRAW-A, consists of the Source Term (radioactive inventory versus time), the Release Model, and the Environmental Model. The second part of the systems model, AMRAW-B, is the Economic Model which calculates health effects corresponding to the various organ dose rates from AMRAW-A, collects these health effects in terms of economic costs and attributes these costs to radionuclides, decay groups, and elements initially in the waste inventory. This volume describes AMRAW-B, the Economics Model, and is in two parts: Part 1 presents a generic description of the AMRAW-B model, background economic theory and a description of the AMRAW-B computer code, and Part 2 presents implementation of the model with an application to terminal storage in a bedded salt reference repository

  8. Effectiveness of Water Infrastructure for River Flood Management: Part 2 - Flood Risk Assessment and Its Changes in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Y.; Gusyev, M.; Arifuzzaman, B.; Khairul, I.; Iwami, Y.; Takeuchi, K.

    2015-06-01

    A case study of Bangladesh presents a methodological possibility based on a global approach for assessing river flood risk and its changes considering flood hazard, exposure, basic vulnerability and coping capacity. This study consists of two parts in the issue of flood change: hazard assessment (Part 1) and risk assessment (Part 2). In Part 1, a hazard modeling technology was introduced and applied to the Ganges, Brahmaputra and Meghna (GBM) basin to quantify the change of 50- and 100-year flood hazards in Bangladesh under the present (1979-2003) and future (2075-2099) climates. Part 2 focuses on estimating nationwide flood risk in terms of affected people and rice crop damage due to a 50-year flood hazard identified in Part 1, and quantifying flood risk changes between the presence and absence of existing water infrastructure (i.e., embankments). To assess flood risk in terms of rice crop damage, rice paddy fields were extracted and flood stage-damage curves were created for maximum risk scenarios as a demonstration of risk change in the present and future climates. The preliminary results in Bangladesh show that a tendency of flood risk change strongly depends on the temporal and spatial dynamics of exposure and vulnerability such as distributed population and effectiveness of water infrastructure, which suggests that the proposed methodology is applicable anywhere in the world.

  9. USE OF THE PERFORMANCE APPROACH FOR EVERGLADES REGIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM (R-EMAP) PHASE III

    Science.gov (United States)

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) occasionally performs environmental monitoring/assessment studies such as the Everglades Regional Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (R-EMAP). In-situ data were documented in the field, and eight analytical labs were contr...

  10. Assessment of the greenhouse gas emissions from cogeneration and trigeneration systems. Part I: Models and indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diffusion of cogeneration and trigeneration plants as local generation sources could bring significant energy saving and emission reduction of various types of pollutants with respect to the separate production of electricity, heat and cooling power. The advantages in terms of primary energy saving are well established. However, the potential of combined heat and power (CHP) and combined cooling heat and power (CCHP) systems for reducing the emission of hazardous greenhouse gases (GHG) needs to be further investigated. This paper presents and discusses a novel approach, based upon an original indicator called trigeneration CO2emission reduction (TCO2ER), to assess the emission reduction of CO2 and other GHGs from CHP and CCHP systems with respect to the separate production. The indicator is defined in function of the performance characteristics of the CHP and CCHP systems, represented with black-box models, and of the GHG emission characteristics from conventional sources. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is shown in the companion paper (Part II: Analysis techniques and application cases) with application to various cogeneration and trigeneration solutions

  11. Assessment of soil erodibility and aggregate stability for different parts of a forest road

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aidin Parsakhoo; Majid Lotfalian; Ataollah Kavian; Seyed Ataollah Hosseini

    2014-01-01

    We measured erodibility and mean weight diameter (MWD) of soil aggregates in different parts of a forest road. Samples of topsoil were collected from cutslope, fillslope, road surface and forest ground to assess the texture, bulk density, moisture, CaCO3 and organic matter. Soil aggregate stability was determined by wet sieving. Soil erodibility on the road surface was 2.3 and 1.3 times higher than on the fillslope and cutslope, respectively. The forest soil had the lowest erodibility. Aggregate stability of cutslope and road surface were low and very low, respectively. There was a significant negative relationship between cutslope erodibility with CaCO3 and sand content. Cutslope erodibility increased with increasing silt, clay and moisture content. On fillslopes, MWD increased with in-creasing rock fragment cover, plant cover, litter cover, organic matter and sand. There was a strong negative correlation between fillslope erodibility and organic matter, sand and MWD. There was no significant difference between erodibility of bare soil and soils beneathRubus hyrcanusL. and Philonotis marchica (Hedw.) Brid.

  12. Drug interactions evaluation: An integrated part of risk assessment of therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pharmacokinetic drug interactions can lead to serious adverse events or decreased drug efficacy. The evaluation of a new molecular entity's (NME's) drug-drug interaction potential is an integral part of risk assessment during drug development and regulatory review. Alteration of activities of enzymes or transporters involved in the absorption, distribution, metabolism, or excretion of a new molecular entity by concomitant drugs may alter drug exposure, which can impact response (safety or efficacy). The recent Food and Drug Administration (FDA) draft drug interaction guidance ( (http://www.fda.gov/downloads/Drugs/GuidanceComplianceRegulatoryInformation/Guidances/ucm072101.pdf)) highlights the methodologies and criteria that may be used to guide drug interaction evaluation by industry and regulatory agencies and to construct informative labeling for health practitioner and patients. In addition, the Food and Drug Administration established a 'Drug Development and Drug Interactions' website to provide up-to-date information regarding evaluation of drug interactions ( (http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DevelopmentApprovalProcess/DevelopmentResources/DrugInteractionsLabeling/ucm080499.htm)). This review summarizes key elements in the FDA drug interaction guidance and new scientific developments that can guide the evaluation of drug-drug interactions during the drug development process.

  13. Assessment of the greenhouse gas emissions from cogeneration and trigeneration systems. Part I: Models and indicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chicco, Gianfranco; Mancarella, Pierluigi [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, I-10129, Torino (Italy)

    2008-03-15

    The diffusion of cogeneration and trigeneration plants as local generation sources could bring significant energy saving and emission reduction of various types of pollutants with respect to the separate production of electricity, heat and cooling power. The advantages in terms of primary energy saving are well established. However, the potential of combined heat and power (CHP) and combined cooling heat and power (CCHP) systems for reducing the emission of hazardous greenhouse gases (GHG) needs to be further investigated. This paper presents and discusses a novel approach, based upon an original indicator called trigeneration CO{sub 2} emission reduction (TCO{sub 2}ER), to assess the emission reduction of CO{sub 2} and other GHGs from CHP and CCHP systems with respect to the separate production. The indicator is defined in function of the performance characteristics of the CHP and CCHP systems, represented with black-box models, and of the GHG emission characteristics from conventional sources. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is shown in the companion paper (Part II: Analysis techniques and application cases) with application to various cogeneration and trigeneration solutions. (author)

  14. Phytochemical analysis, antibacterial, and antifungal assessment of aerial parts of Polygonatum verticillatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Haroon; Saeed, Muhammad; Muhammad, Naveed; Perviz, Samreen

    2016-05-01

    The current study was designed to assess the phytochemical profile, antibacterial, and antifungal activities of the crude methanol extract of the aerial parts of Polygonatum verticillatum (PA) and its various subsequent solvent fractions using agar well diffusion, agar tube dilution, and microdilution methods. Phytochemical analysis showed positive for different chemical groups and also contained marked quantity of saponin and flavonoid contents. Significant antibacterial activity was observed against various tested pathogenic bacteria. The only susceptible Gram-positive bacterium was Bacillus subtilis and their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) measured ranged from 11-50 µg/ml. The sensitive Gram-negative bacteria were Salmonella typhi and Shigella flexeneri The estimated MICs were in the range of 2-7 µg/ml and 8-50 µg/ml for S. typhi and S. flexeneri, respectively. However, the antifungal activity of the plant was limited to Microsporum canis and their MICs ranged from 60 to 250 µg/ml. Our study confirmed significant antibacterial potential of the plant and substantiated its folk use in dysentery and pyrexia of multiple origins. PMID:24311628

  15. Structural systematics of rare earth complexes. Part 8. The rare earth (III) nitrate/dimethyl sulfoxide adducts [(dmso)n Ln(O2NO)3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adducts [(dmso)nLn(O2NO)3], obtained by the crystallization of lanthanoid (III) nitrate (Ln(NO3)3.-xH2O) with excess dimethyl sulfoxide ('dmso') in methanol or ethanol, have been the subject of a series of room-temperature single-crystal X-ray studies. The manner in which stoichiometry and structure systematically vary with change in metal ion radius was clearly defined. All complexes studies are mononuclear, the metal ion being complexed by three bidentate nitrate ligands and a number of dmso ligands, four for La-Sm and three beyond. 8 refs., 8 tabs., 2 figs

  16. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U.S. commercial nuclear power plants. Appendices III and IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The items listed below summarize the detail sections which follow: a listing of definitions and a discussion of the general treatment of data within the random variable approach as utilized by the study; a tabulation of the assessed data base containing failure classifications, final assessed ranges utilized in quantification and reference source values considered in determining the ranges; a discussion of nuclear power plant experience that was used to validate the data assessment by testing its applicability as well as to check on the adequacy of the model to incorporate typical real incidents; an expanded presentation of the data assessment giving information on applicability considerations; a discussion of test and maintenance data including comparisons of models with experience data; and special topics, including assessments required for the initiating event probabilities and human error data and modeling

  17. Assessing the Potential Hydrological Impact of the Gibe III Dam on Lake Turkana Water Level Using Multi-Source Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naga Manohar Velpuri; Senai, G.B.

    2012-01-01

    Lake Turkana, the largest desert lake in the world, is fed by ungauged or poorly gauged river systems. To meet the demand of electricity in the East African region, Ethiopia is currently building the Gibe III hydroelectric dam on the Omo River, which supplies more than 80% of the inflows to Lake Turkana. On completion, the Gibe III dam will be the tallest dam in Africa with a height of 241 m. However, the nature of interactions and potential impacts of regulated inflows to Lake Turkana are not well understood due to its remote location and unavailability of reliable in-situ datasets. In this study, we used 12 years (1998–2009) of existing multi-source satellite and model-assimilated global weather data. We use calibrated multi-source satellite data-driven water balance model for Lake Turkana that takes into account model routed runoff, lake/reservoir evapotranspiration, direct rain on lakes/reservoirs and releases from the dam to compute lake water levels. The model evaluates the impact of Gibe III dam using three different approaches such as (a historical approach, a knowledge-based approach, and a nonparametric bootstrap resampling approach) to generate rainfall-runoff scenarios. All the approaches provided comparable and consistent results. Model results indicated that the hydrological impact of the dam on Lake Turkana would vary with the magnitude and distribution of rainfall post-dam commencement. On average, the reservoir would take up to 8–10 months, after commencement, to reach a minimum operation level of 201 m depth of water. During the dam filling period, the lake level would drop up to 2 m (95% confidence) compared to the lake level modelled without the dam. The lake level variability caused by regulated inflows after the dam commissioning were found to be within the natural variability of the lake of 4.8 m. Moreover, modelling results indicated that the hydrological impact of the Gibe III dam would depend on the initial lake level at the time of

  18. Assessing the potential hydrological impact of the Gibe III Dam on Lake Turkana water level using multi-source satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. M. Velpuri

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Lake Turkana, the largest desert lake in the world, is fed by ungauged or poorly gauged river systems. To meet the demand of electricity in the East African region, Ethiopia is currently building the Gibe III hydroelectric dam on the Omo River, which supplies more than 80% of the inflows to Lake Turkana. On completion, the Gibe III dam will be the tallest dam in Africa with a height of 241 m. However, the nature of interactions and potential impacts of regulated inflows to Lake Turkana are not well understood due to its remote location and unavailability of reliable in-situ datasets. In this study, we used 12 years (1998–2009 of existing multi-source satellite and model-assimilated global weather data. We use calibrated multi-source satellite data-driven water balance model for Lake Turkana that takes into account model routed runoff, lake/reservoir evapotranspiration, direct rain on lakes/reservoirs and releases from the dam to compute lake water levels. The model evaluates the impact of Gibe III dam using three different approaches such as (a historical approach, a knowledge-based approach, and a nonparametric bootstrap resampling approach to generate rainfall-runoff scenarios. All the approaches provided comparable and consistent results. Model results indicated that the hydrological impact of the dam on Lake Turkana would vary with the magnitude and distribution of rainfall post-dam commencement. On average, the reservoir would take up to 8–10 months, after commencement, to reach a minimum operation level of 201 m depth of water. During the dam filling period, the lake level would drop up to 2 m (95% confidence compared to the lake level modelled without the dam. The lake level variability caused by regulated inflows after the dam commissioning were found to be within the natural variability of the lake of 4.8 m. Moreover, modelling results indicated that the hydrological impact of the Gibe III dam would depend on the initial lake level

  19. Assessing the potential hydrological impact of the Gibe III Dam on Lake Turkana water level using multi-source satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velpuri, N. M.; Senay, G. B.

    2012-03-01

    Lake Turkana, the largest desert lake in the world, is fed by ungauged or poorly gauged river systems. To meet the demand of electricity in the East African region, Ethiopia is currently building the Gibe III hydroelectric dam on the Omo River, which supplies more than 80% of the inflows to Lake Turkana. On completion, the Gibe III dam will be the tallest dam in Africa with a height of 241 m. However, the nature of interactions and potential impacts of regulated inflows to Lake Turkana are not well understood due to its remote location and unavailability of reliable in-situ datasets. In this study, we used 12 years (1998-2009) of existing multi-source satellite and model-assimilated global weather data. We use calibrated multi-source satellite data-driven water balance model for Lake Turkana that takes into account model routed runoff, lake/reservoir evapotranspiration, direct rain on lakes/reservoirs and releases from the dam to compute lake water levels. The model evaluates the impact of Gibe III dam using three different approaches such as (a historical approach, a knowledge-based approach, and a nonparametric bootstrap resampling approach) to generate rainfall-runoff scenarios. All the approaches provided comparable and consistent results. Model results indicated that the hydrological impact of the dam on Lake Turkana would vary with the magnitude and distribution of rainfall post-dam commencement. On average, the reservoir would take up to 8-10 months, after commencement, to reach a minimum operation level of 201 m depth of water. During the dam filling period, the lake level would drop up to 2 m (95% confidence) compared to the lake level modelled without the dam. The lake level variability caused by regulated inflows after the dam commissioning were found to be within the natural variability of the lake of 4.8 m. Moreover, modelling results indicated that the hydrological impact of the Gibe III dam would depend on the initial lake level at the time of dam

  20. Mathematics III

    OpenAIRE

    Viader Canals, Pelegrí

    2013-01-01

    Apunts de l'assignatura Mathematics III del Grau en International Business Economics del curs 2012-2013. Conté : Diagonalization, Difference Equations, Differential Equations, Lagrange-Kuhn-Tucker, Second order Difference Equations.

  1. A Review of Quality of Life in Alzheimer's Disease: Part 2: Issues in Assessing Drug Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Sam S. Salek; Melvyn D. Walker; Antony J. Bayer

    1998-01-01

    There are numerous methods available for assessing patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or other forms of dementia. Quality-of-life (QOL) assessment is unique among these methods. The subjective nature of quality of life provides healthcare professionals with the opportunity of incorporating the value systems of patients and their carers into their assessments. A systematic review was carried out to assess the published data (and some unpublished data) on QOL assessment tools and instrument...

  2. Superfund TIO videos. Set A. Regulatory overview - CERCLA's relationship to other programs: RCRA, Title III, UST, CWA, SDWA. Part 1. Audio-Visual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The videotape is divided into five sections. Section 1 provides definitions and historical information on both the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). The four types of RCRA regulatory programs - Subtitles C, D, I, and J - are described. Treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) and recycling facilities are also discussed. Section 2 discusses the history behind the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (Title III). The four major provisions of Title III, which are emergency planning, emergency release notification, community right-to-know reporting, and the toxic chemical release inventory are covered. Section 3 outlines the UST program covering notification, record keeping, and the UST Trust Fund. Section 4 outlines the six major provisions of the Clean Water Act (CWA): water quality, pretreatment, prevention of oil and hazardous substance discharges, responses to oil and hazardous substance discharges, discharges of hazardous substances into the ocean, and dredge and fill. Section 5 explains the purpose, regulations, and standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA). Specific issues such as underground injection, sole source aquifers, and lead contamination are discussed

  3. Thermoanalytical study of linkage isomerism in coordination compounds. Part III: A DSC study on the effect of counterion on the solid state isomerization of nitro and nitrito linkage isomers of pentaamminecobalt(III) complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eslami, Abbas, E-mail: eslami@umz.ac.ir; Hasani, Nahid

    2014-01-10

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The effect of counterion on solid state thermal isomerization of nitro and nitrito linkage isomers of pentaamminecobalt(III) complexes studied by DSC. • The different prepared salts of both isomers are in metastable state at room temperature which convert to an equilibrium stale state upon heating. • Change of the counterion affects thermodynamic parameters of the isomerization reaction, but the nitro isomer is always more stable than the nitrito one. • The kinetic parameters of the linkage isomerization depend significantly on the nature of the counterion. - Abstract: Solid state thermal interconversion of [Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}NO{sub 2}]X{sub 2} (nitro isomer) and [Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 5}ONO]X{sub 2} (nitrito isomer) complexes (X = Cl{sup −}, Br{sup −}, I{sup −}, PF{sub 6}{sup −}) was studied by DSC at several heating rates. The isomerization of pure sample of both isomers leads to an equilibrium stable state in which nitro and nitrito isomers are major and minor components, respectively. Change of the counterion affects thermodynamic parameters of the isomerization reaction, but the nitro isomer is always more stable than the nitrito one. The equilibrium constant (nitro to nitrito molar ratio) increases in the series Cl{sup −} ≈ Br{sup −} < PF{sub 6}{sup −} < I{sup −}. The kinetic parameters of isomerization of both isomers were determined by Kissinger method. It was founded that the rate of interconversion of different salts of both isomers decreases in the series Cl{sup −} > Br{sup −} > PF{sub 6}{sup −} > I{sup −}. The negative activation entropy supports an associative mechanism with a seven coordinate transition state in solid state.

  4. Chemical equilibria of lanthanide (Ln(III)-Pr, Sm, Gd, Dy)-macrocyclic complexes with auxiliary ligands in CH3OH(part III); study of the coordination of nitrogen- or oxygen-containing bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macroacyclic transition metal complexes such as Cu(H2L(A))·H2O, Cu(H2L(B))·H2O, CuFe(L(A))(NO3)·4H2O, CuFe(L(B))(NO3)·4H2O, (CuGd(H2L(A))(NO3)2)(NO3)·2CH3OH, (CuGd(H2L(B))(NO3)2)(NO3)·2CH3OH were prepared from the corresponding hexadentate compartmental ligands, H4L(A) and H4L(B), which were obtained by the condensation of 2-hydroxy-3-hydroxymethyl-5methylbenzaldehyde(HHMMB) and ethylenediamine or 1,3-diaminopropane. Ln-macrocyclic((20)DOTA) complexes, (Ln((20) DOTA)(NO3)(H2O))(NO3)2·xH2O(Ln(III)=Pr, Sm, Gd, Dy), which had been synthesized from 2,6-diformyl-p-cresol(DFPC), was placed in methanol for 2 days, and (Ln((20) DOTA)(NO3)(CH3OH))2+ was formed. The equilibrium constants (K) for the substitution of coordinated CH3OH in the Ln-(20)DOTA complexes by various bidentate auxiliary ligands, La(=o-phenylenediamine, 1,10,-phenanthroline, ethylenediamine, oxalic acid, malonic acid, acethylacetone) were determined by spectroscopic method at 25 .deg. C and 0.1M NaClO4. The pKa of auxiliary ligands is in the order of o-phenylenediamine < 1,10-phenanthroline < ethylenediamine, oxalic acid < malonic acid < acethylacetone. However, the equilibrium constant(K) has shown the trend of ethyleneiamine < 1,10-phenanthroline < o-phenylenediamine, acethylacetone < malonic acid < oxalic acid

  5. Basel III

    OpenAIRE

    Štrbová, Barbora

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to analyze current capital adequacy in Europe under regulatory framework Basel III and compare the state of its implementation within European banks and Slovak financial sector, which is represented by two Slovak case banks. Firstly it is focused on the two previous regulatory frameworks, especially on their capital adequacy and three-pillar structure of Basel II. Then we proceed to present the new regulatory framework Basel III. The third regulatory framework of the...

  6. Image quality assessment in digital mammography: part I. Technical characterization of the systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, N W; Monnin, P; Bosmans, H; Bochud, F O; Verdun, F R

    2011-07-21

    In many European countries, image quality for digital x-ray systems used in screening mammography is currently specified using a threshold-detail detectability method. This is a two-part study that proposes an alternative method based on calculated detectability for a model observer: the first part of the work presents a characterization of the systems. Eleven digital mammography systems were included in the study; four computed radiography (CR) systems, and a group of seven digital radiography (DR) detectors, composed of three amorphous selenium-based detectors, three caesium iodide scintillator systems and a silicon wafer-based photon counting system. The technical parameters assessed included the system response curve, detector uniformity error, pre-sampling modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectrum (NNPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Approximate quantum noise limited exposure range was examined using a separation of noise sources based upon standard deviation. Noise separation showed that electronic noise was the dominant noise at low detector air kerma for three systems; the remaining systems showed quantum noise limited behaviour between 12.5 and 380 µGy. Greater variation in detector MTF was found for the DR group compared to the CR systems; MTF at 5 mm(-1) varied from 0.08 to 0.23 for the CR detectors against a range of 0.16-0.64 for the DR units. The needle CR detector had a higher MTF, lower NNPS and higher DQE at 5 mm(-1) than the powder CR phosphors. DQE at 5 mm(-1) ranged from 0.02 to 0.20 for the CR systems, while DQE at 5 mm(-1) for the DR group ranged from 0.04 to 0.41, indicating higher DQE for the DR detectors and needle CR system than for the powder CR phosphor systems. The technical evaluation section of the study showed that the digital mammography systems were well set up and exhibiting typical performance for the detector technology employed in the respective systems. PMID:21701051

  7. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Assessment of Lower Facial Asymmetry in Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate and Non-Cleft Patients with Class III Skeletal Relationship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifan Lin

    Full Text Available To evaluate, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT, both the condylar-fossa relationships and the mandibular and condylar asymmetries between unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP patients and non-cleft patients with class III skeletal relationship, and to investigate the factors of asymmetry contributing to chin deviation.The UCLP and non-cleft groups consisted of 30 and 40 subjects, respectively, in mixed dentition with class III skeletal relationships. Condylar-fossa relationships and the dimensional and positional asymmetries of the condyles and mandibles were examined using CBCT. Intra-group differences were compared between two sides in both groups using a paired t-test. Furthermore, correlations between each measurement and chin deviation were assessed.It was observed that 90% of UCLP and 67.5% of non-cleft subjects had both condyles centered, and no significant asymmetry was found. The axial angle and the condylar center distances to the midsagittal plane were significantly greater on the cleft side than on the non-cleft side (P=0.001 and P=0.028, respectively and were positively correlated with chin deviation in the UCLP group. Except for a larger gonial angle on the cleft side, the two groups presented with consistent asymmetries showing shorter mandibular bodies and total mandibular lengths on the cleft (deviated side. The average chin deviation was 1.63 mm to the cleft side, and the average absolute chin deviation was significantly greater in the UCLP group than in the non-cleft group (P=0.037.Compared with non-cleft subjects with similar class III skeletal relationships, the subjects with UCLP showed more severe lower facial asymmetry. The subjects with UCLP presented with more asymmetrical positions and rotations of the condyles on axial slices, which were positively correlated with chin deviation.

  8. Assessment of the Accuracy and Classification of Weigh-in-Motion Systems: Part 2 European Specification

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob, Bernard; O'Brien, Eugene J.; Newton, William

    2000-01-01

    This is the second part of a two-part paper which addresses the issue of accuracy in weigh-in-motion (WIM) systems. The first part develops the statistical background necessary for any system of accuracy classification applied to a WIM system. This second part describes a draft European specification for the weigh-in-motion (WIM) of road vehicles, prepared by the COST 323 management committee. The philosophy behind the specification is outlined and the basic structure detailed. The specificat...

  9. National Water Infrastructure Adaptation Assessment, Part I: Climate Change Adaptation Readiness Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report “National Water Infrastructure Adaptation Assessment” is comprised of four parts (Part I to IV), each in an independent volume. The Part I report presented herein describes a preliminary regulatory and technical analysis of water infrastructure and regulations in the ...

  10. Flood Risk Assessment as a Part of Integrated Flood and Drought Analysis. Case Study: Southern Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabnakorn, Saowanit; Suryadi, Fransiscus X.; de Fraiture, Charlotte

    2015-04-01

    Flood and drought are two main meteorological catastrophes that have created adverse consequences to more than 80% of total casualties universally, 50% by flood and 31% by drought. Those natural hazards have the tendency of increasing frequency and degree of severity and it is expected that climate change will exacerbate their occurrences and impacts. In addition, growing population and society interference are the other key factors that pressure on and exacerbate the adverse impacts. Consequently, nowadays, the loss from any disasters becomes less and less acceptable bringing about more people's consciousness on mitigation measures and management strategies and policies. In general, due to the difference in their inherent characteristics and time occurrences flood and drought mitigation and protection have been separately implemented, managed, and supervised by different group of authorities. Therefore, the objective of this research is to develop an integrated mitigation measure or a management policy able to surmount both problems to acceptable levels and is conveniently monitored by the same group of civil servants which will be economical in both short- and long-term. As aforementioned of the distinction of fundamental peculiarities and occurrence, the assessment processes of floods and droughts are separately performed using their own specific techniques. In the first part of the research flood risk assessment is focused in order to delineate the flood prone area. The study area is a river plain in southern Thailand where flooding is influenced by monsoon and depression. The work is mainly concentrated on physically-based computational modeling and an assortment of tools was applied for: data completion, areal rainfall interpolation, statistical distribution, rainfall-runoff analysis and flow model simulation. The outcome from the simulation can be concluded that the flood prone areas susceptible to inundation are along the riparian areas, particularly at the

  11. AMEE Guide No. 14. Outcome-Based Education: Part 3--Assessment in Outcome-Based Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-David, Miriam Friedman

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the role of performance assessment in outcome-based education. Compares the relationship and interplay between the two related paradigms and presents guidelines of assessment programs in outcome-based education. (Author/CCM)

  12. Chemical equilibria of lanthanides(Ln(III)=Pr, Sm, Gd, Dy)-macro-cyclic complexes with monodentate ligands in CH3OH(Part I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ln-macrocyclic((20)DOTA) complexes, (Ln((20)DOTA)NO3)(H2O))(NO3)2·xH2O(Ln(III)=Pr, Sm, Gd, Dy), which had been synthesized from 2, 6-diformyl-p-cresol(DFPC), was placed in methanol for 2 days, and (Ln((20)DOTA)(NO3)(CH3OH))2+ was formed. The equilibrium constants(K) for the substitution of coordinated CH3OH in the Ln-(20)DOTA complexes by various auxiliary ligands, La(=monodentate ligands; pyridine, imidazole, triethylamine, diethylamine, piperidine) were determined spectroscopically at 25. deg. C and 0.1 M. The pKa of auxiliary ligand is in the order of pyridine < imidazole< triethylamine< diethylamine< piperidine, however the K has shown the trend of pyridine< imidazole< diethylamine< piperidine< triethylamine

  13. Risk assessment methodologies for Critical Infrastructure Protection. Part I: A state of the art

    OpenAIRE

    Giannopoulos, Georgios; FILIPPINI ROBERTO; SCHIMMER Muriel

    2012-01-01

    Effective risk assessment methodologies are the cornerstone of a successful Critical Infrastructure Protection program. The extensive number of risk assessment methodologies for critical infrastructures clearly supports this argument. Risk assessment is indispensable in order to identify threats, assess vulnerabilities and evaluate the impact on assets, infrastructures or systems taking into account the probability of the occurrence of these threats. This is a critical element that differenti...

  14. Risk assessment, session 1-4. International conference 1992. Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international conference on Risk Assessment, 5-9 October 1992, London was organised by the Health and Safety Commission of the UK and co-sponsored by a number of regional and international organizations namely: the European Commission, the ILO, the OECD and WHO. The main sessions of the conference cover what risk assessment means, the role of risk assessment in devising policies and regulations; and risk assessment in practice

  15. Music Education for Life: Music Assessment, Part 1--What and Why

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuler, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Assessment is both essential and a potentially powerful positive force. Music teachers need to provide assessment evidence to survive in today's data-driven school environment. However, the more important reasons they must assess are to improve their professional effectiveness as teachers, to improve student learning, and to help them advocate for…

  16. Developing a voltage-stability-constrained security assessment system part II : Structure and function design and technology used

    OpenAIRE

    Ni, YX; Wu, FF; Shi, LB; Zhou, HF; Tam, PTC; Chang, NC; Su, JF; Du, ZB

    2005-01-01

    This is the second part in a two-part paper on the development of a voltage stability constrained security assessment system (VSC-SAS). In this part, overall VSC-SAS structure and function design and technology used will be presented. The system is expected to be used in both on-line and off-line modes. In on-line mode, on-line SCADA/EMS data will be used for VSC-SAS use; while in off-line mode (usually day-ahead calculation), historical data can be used for VSC-SAS. Both results (i.e. system...

  17. An assessment of uncertainty on a LOFT L2-5 LBLOCA PCT based on the ACE-RSM approach: complementary work for the OECD BEMUSE PHASE-III program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As pointed out in the OECD BEMUSE Program, when a high computation time is taken to obtain the relevant output values of a complex physical model (or code), the number of statistical samples that must be evaluated through it is a critical factor for the sampling-based uncertainty analysis. Two alternative methods have been utilized to avoid the problem associated with the size of these statistical samples: one is based on Wilks' formula, which is based on simple random sampling, and the other is based on the conventional nonlinear regression approach. While both approaches provide a useful means for drawing conclusions on the resultant uncertainty with a limited number of code runs, there are also some unique corresponding limitations. For example, a conclusion based on the Wilks' formula can be highly affected by the sampled values themselves, while the conventional regression approach requires an a priori estimate on the functional forms of a regression model. The main objective of this paper is to assess the feasibility of the ACE-RSM approach as a complementary method to the Wilks' formula and the conventional regression-based uncertainty analysis. This feasibility was assessed through a practical application of the ACE-RSM approach to the LOFT L2-5 LBLOCA PCT uncertainty analysis, which was implemented as a part of the OECD BEMUSE Phase III program

  18. Missouri General Revenue and Higher Education Appropriation Trends and Projections. Master Plan III Assessment. Project Report Number Two.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missouri State Coordinating Board for Higher Education, Jefferson City.

    As part of an evaluation of the Missouri master plan for higher education, recent patterns of state appropriations are examined, along with a set of assumptions from which fiscal estimates are developed for the future. Since fiscal year (FY) 1979, the appropriations for higher education did not keep pace with inflation. While Missouri higher…

  19. Fishy Fishes: The Typicality of Object Stimuli Used to Assess Children's Language in the Reynell Development Language Scales--III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrnyk, Corinne; Meints, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies show clear evidence that children display typicality effects during early word learning. However, little is known of the typicality of stimuli used by standardized language tests to assess children's language development. Aims: To examine the typicality of stimuli used by the Reynell Developmental Language Scales--III…

  20. ROSA-III system description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ROSA-III system and its instrumentations are described. The informations are necessary to understand and analyze the experimental data obtained from loss-of-coolant experiments (LOCEs) conducted in the ROSA (Rig of Safety Assessment)-III facility. (author)

  1. Assessment of flares in lupus patients enrolled in a phase II/III study of rituximab (EXPLORER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Jt; Buyon, Jp; Furie, Ra; Latinis, Km; Gordon, C; Hsieh, H-J; Brunetta, P

    2011-06-01

    The EXPLORER study was designed to assess the response to rituximab versus placebo in patients with moderate to severe extrarenal systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) receiving background immunosuppression. The definition of response required reduced clinical activity without subsequent flares over 52 weeks, and the study did not meet its efficacy endpoint. The current exploratory analysis assessed flare rates in patients who achieved initial low disease activity response (British Isles Lupus Assessment Group [BILAG] C or better in all organs) during the study. Exploratory reanalysis of data from the EXPLORER trial was conducted, considering alternative definitions for flare. No difference was found between rituximab and placebo in preventing or delaying moderate to severe flares. However, when severe (BILAG A) flares alone were examined, rituximab reduced the risk of a subsequent first A flare (hazard ratio = 0.61; p = 0.052) and lowered mean ± SD annualized A flare rates (0.86 ± 1.47 vs. 1.41 ± 2.14; p = 0.038). Eighty-four (49.7%) rituximab-treated patients achieved low disease activity without subsequent A flares versus 31 (35.2%) placebo-treated patients (p = 0.027). Prednisone rescue for A flares was similar in rituximab- (24%) and placebo-treated (14%) patients (p = 0.204). This post hoc analysis evaluates the hypothesis that assessment of BILAG A flares may distinguish potential treatment effects with greater sensitivity than assessment of BILAG B flares. PMID:21478286

  2. Assessment of pulmonary antibodies with induced sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage induced by nasal vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a clinical phase I/II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freihorst Joachim

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a desirable albeit challenging strategy for prevention of airway infection in patients with cystic fibrosis. We assessed the immunogenicity of a nasal vaccine based on the outer membrane proteins F and I from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the lower airways in a phase I/II clinical trial. Methods N = 12 healthy volunteers received 2 nasal vaccinations with an OprF-OprI gel as a primary and a systemic (n = 6 or a nasal booster vaccination (n = 6. Antibodies were assessed in induced sputum (IS, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL, and in serum. Results OprF-OprI-specific IgG and IgA antibodies were found in both BAL and IS at comparable rates, but differed in the predominant isotype. IgA antibodies in IS did not correlate to the respective serum levels. Pulmonary antibodies were detectable in all vaccinees even 1 year after the vaccination. The systemic booster group had higher IgG levels in serum. However, the nasal booster group had the better long-term response with bronchial antibodies of both isotypes. Conclusion The nasal OprF-OprI-vaccine induces a lasting antibody response at both, systemic and airway mucosal site. IS is a feasible method to non-invasively assess bronchial antibodies. A further optimization of the vaccination schedule is warranted.

  3. Head and neck squamous cell cancer (stages III and IV) induction chemotherapy assessment: value of FDG volumetric imaging parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate whether the change in the metabolic tumour volume (MTV) or total lesion glycolysis (TLG) of the primary tumour, before and after induction chemotherapy, predicts outcome for patients with advanced head and neck squamous cell cancer (SCC). Twenty-eight patients with advanced (American Joint Committee on Cancer stage III and IV) head and neck SCC who underwent positron emission tomography (PET)/CT were included in this retrospective study. Primary tumour MTV and TLG were measured using gradient and fixed percentage threshold segmentations. Outcome endpoint was disease progression or mortality. Pearson correlation, Bland-Altman and receiver operator characteristic analysis were performed. The Pearson's correlation coefficients between percentage changes (pre- and post-induction chemotherapy) from gradient MTV (MTVG) and the 38% SUVmax threshold MTV (MTV38) was 0.96 and between MTVG and the 50% threshold MTV (MTV50) was 0.95 (PG and TLG38 was 0.94 and between TLGG and TLG50 was 0.96 (PG and MTV50. The areas under the curve for predicting progression or mortality were 0.76 (P=0.03) for MTVG and 0.82 for TLGG (P=0.009). Optimum cut points of a 42% reduction in MTVG and a 55% reduction in the TLGG predict event-free survival with a sensitivity of 62.5% and a specificity of 90% and a hazards ratio of 6.25. A reduction in primary tumour MTV of at least 42% or in TLG of at least 55% after induction chemotherapy may predict event-free survival in patients with advanced head and neck SCC.

  4. Geothermal energy in the United States; Part II, Assessment of resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D.L.

    1976-01-01

    Geothermal energy-from heat deep inside the Earth- is a vast potential source of power. This article is the second part of a series on geothermal energy, the first part of which was in volume 8, number 1, of the Earthquake Information Bulletin (January-February 1976). Part 1 of this series described the categories of the geothermal resource base. 

  5. Effectiveness of water infrastructure for river flood management - Part 1: Flood hazard assessment using hydrological models in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusyev, M. A.; Kwak, Y.; Khairul, M. I.; Arifuzzaman, M. B.; Magome, J.; Sawano, H.; Takeuchi, K.

    2015-06-01

    This study introduces a flood hazard assessment part of the global flood risk assessment (Part 2) conducted with a distributed hydrological Block-wise TOP (BTOP) model and a GIS-based Flood Inundation Depth (FID) model. In this study, the 20 km grid BTOP model was developed with globally available data on and applied for the Ganges, Brahmaputra and Meghna (GBM) river basin. The BTOP model was calibrated with observed river discharges in Bangladesh and was applied for climate change impact assessment to produce flood discharges at each BTOP cell under present and future climates. For Bangladesh, the cumulative flood inundation maps were produced using the FID model with the BTOP simulated flood discharges and allowed us to consider levee effectiveness for reduction of flood inundation. For the climate change impacts, the flood hazard increased both in flood discharge and inundation area for the 50- and 100-year floods. From these preliminary results, the proposed methodology can partly overcome the limitation of the data unavailability and produces flood~maps that can be used for the nationwide flood risk assessment, which is presented in Part 2 of this study.

  6. Safety assessment in plant layout design using indexing approach: implementing inherent safety perspective. Part 1 - guideword applicability and method description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugnoli, Alessandro; Khan, Faisal; Amyotte, Paul; Cozzani, Valerio

    2008-12-15

    Layout planning plays a key role in the inherent safety performance of process plants since this design feature controls the possibility of accidental chain-events and the magnitude of possible consequences. A lack of suitable methods to promote the effective implementation of inherent safety in layout design calls for the development of new techniques and methods. In the present paper, a safety assessment approach suitable for layout design in the critical early phase is proposed. The concept of inherent safety is implemented within this safety assessment; the approach is based on an integrated assessment of inherent safety guideword applicability within the constraints typically present in layout design. Application of these guidewords is evaluated along with unit hazards and control devices to quantitatively map the safety performance of different layout options. Moreover, the economic aspects related to safety and inherent safety are evaluated by the method. Specific sub-indices are developed within the integrated safety assessment system to analyze and quantify the hazard related to domino effects. The proposed approach is quick in application, auditable and shares a common framework applicable in other phases of the design lifecycle (e.g. process design). The present work is divided in two parts: Part 1 (current paper) presents the application of inherent safety guidelines in layout design and the index method for safety assessment; Part 2 (accompanying paper) describes the domino hazard sub-index and demonstrates the proposed approach with a case study, thus evidencing the introduction of inherent safety features in layout design. PMID:18406519

  7. Regional Issue Identification and Assessment (RIIA). Volume III. Institutional barriers to developing power generation facilities in the Pacific Northwest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, F. A.; Sawyer, C. H.; Maxwell, J. H.

    1979-10-01

    The Regional Assessments Division in the US Department of Energy (DOE) has undertaken a program to assess the probable consequences of various national energy policies in regions of the United States and to evaluate the constraints on national energy policy imposed by conditions in these regions. The program is referred to as the Regional Issues Identification and Assessment (RIIA) Program. Currently the RIIA Program is evaluating the Trendlong Mid-Mid scenario, a pattern of energy development for 1985 and 1990 derived from the Project Independence Evaluation System (PIES) model. This scenario assumes a medium annual growth rate in both the national demand for and national supply of energy. It has been disaggregated to specify the generating capacity to be supplied by each energy source in each state. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has the responsibility for evaluating the scenario for the Federal Region 10, consisting of Alaska, Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. PNL is identifying impacts and constraints associated with realizing the scenario in a variety of categories, including air and water quality impacts, health and safety effects, and socioeconomic impacts. This report summarizes the analysis of one such category: institutional constraints - defined to include legal, organizational, and political barriers to the achievement of the scenario in the Northwest.

  8. Adamantyl-group containing mixed-mode acrylamide-based continuous beds for capillary electrochromatography. Part III. Optimization of the chromatographic efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Massaedh, Ayat Allah; Pyell, Ute

    2014-01-17

    In a previous article we described the synthesis of amphiphilic monolithic stationary phases by in situ free radical copolymerization of cyclodextrin-solubilized N-adamantyl acrylamide, piperazinediacrylamide, methacrylamide and vinylsulfonic acid in aqueous medium in pre-treated fused silica capillaries of 100μ.m I.D. In this work, a series of N-adamantyl-group containing acrylamide-based continuous beds is synthesized under variation of different synthesis parameters. The studied synthesis parameters are (i) concentration of the lyotropic salt ammonium sulfate, (ii) concentration of the initiator ammonium persulfate, and (iii) concentration of the negatively charged monomer vinylsulfonic acid in the polymerization mixture. The influence of the synthesis parameters on the chromatographic efficiency is studied under isocratic conditions for a homologues series of alkylphenones in the reversed-phase mode at constant composition of the mobile phase via capillary electrochromatography with varied electric field strength. With varied concentration of the lyotropic salt ammonium sulfate or varied concentration of the initiator ammonium persulfate in the polymerization mixture, a strong impact on the chromatographic efficiency is observed, while there is only a minor influence when varying the molar fraction of the charged monomer VSA. The absence of a significant influence of extra-column band broadening effects on the determined efficiency is confirmed. There is a good repeatability (with respect to capillary-to-capillary variation and run-to-run variation) reached for the theoretical plate heights obtained for DMF and selected alkylphenones in the reversed-phase mode. PMID:24296296

  9. Semiconducting III-V compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Hilsum, C; Henisch, Heinz R

    1961-01-01

    Semiconducting III-V Compounds deals with the properties of III-V compounds as a family of semiconducting crystals and relates these compounds to the monatomic semiconductors silicon and germanium. Emphasis is placed on physical processes that are peculiar to III-V compounds, particularly those that combine boron, aluminum, gallium, and indium with phosphorus, arsenic, and antimony (for example, indium antimonide, indium arsenide, gallium antimonide, and gallium arsenide).Comprised of eight chapters, this book begins with an assessment of the crystal structure and binding of III-V compounds, f

  10. Support of the Ukrainean Supervisory Authority during the extension of the improved operational NCP monitoring. Final report part III; Unterstuetzung der ukrainischen Aufsichtsbehoerde beim Ausbau der verbesserten betrieblichen KKW-Ueberwachung. Abschlussbericht Teil III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, M.; Carl, H.

    2005-05-01

    Technical systems to improve the operational monitoring for the three units of the South Ukraine NPP and for the 1{sup st} unit of the Chmelnitzky NPP were put up by analogy with the systems for the Zaporoshye NPP and the Rovno NPP. For that up to 51 safety-relevant technological and 16 radiological parameters from every unit are available to the supervisory authority on-site and in the crisis centre in Kiev for collection and assessment. These parameters are transferred on-line by modern technical equipment once a minute. The developed evaluation software enables the visualisation of the monitoring results in form of diagrams, charts and graphs. By means of an archive modus the trends of all parameters can be analysed. With the integration of the technical equipment delivered for the sheltered room of the Zaporoshye NPP into the on-site existing remote monitoring system is it now possible to record and to evaluate essential safety-relevant parameters of the whole NPP also during severe accidents by means of modern technical equipment. (orig.)

  11. Quality control and process capability assessment for injection-moulded micro mechanical parts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gasparin, Stefania; Tosello, Guido; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard;

    2013-01-01

    Quality control of micro components is an increasing challenge. Smaller mechanical parts are characterized by smaller tolerance to be verified. This paper focuses on the dimensional verification of micro injection-moulded components selected from an industrial application. These parts are measure...

  12. Preliminary Guideline for the High Temperature Structure Integrity Assessment Procedure Part I. High Temperature Structure Design Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Han; Kim, J. B.; Lee, H. Y.; Park, C. G.; Joo, Y. S.; Koo, G. H.; Kim, S. H

    2007-02-15

    A preliminary guideline for the design and evaluation of LMR high temperature structure is presented based upon ASME B and PV Code, Section III, Subsection NH. The main contents of this guideline are the materials, general design, vessel, piping, core support structure, pumps, valves, fabrication, examination, and testing for the class 1 components. The ratcheting evaluation, enhanced creep assessment, welds design and evaluation, inelastic analysis approach, piping design alternatives, and bellows design method are described in appendices. A user of this guideline should follow the essential procedures and may refer to other pertinent codes, standards, laws, regulations, or other pertinent documents when this guideline does not lead to proper design of the structure. While this guideline adopts major procedures of Subsection NH, it refers to the RCC-MR and/or DDS in some amount for the items where these codes have excellency to improve this guideline.

  13. Children's exposure to indoor air in urban nurseries-part I: CO{sub 2} and comfort assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branco, P.T.B.S.; Alvim-Ferraz, M.C.M.; Martins, F.G.; Sousa, S.I.V., E-mail: sofia.sousa@fe.up.pt

    2015-07-15

    Indoor air quality (IAQ) in nurseries is an emerging case-study. Thus, this study, as the Part I of the larger study “Children's exposure to indoor air in urban nurseries”, aimed to: i) evaluate nurseries’ indoor concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), a global IAQ indicator, in class and lunch rooms; ii) assess indoor comfort parameters–temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH); and iii) analyse them according to guidelines and references for IAQ, comfort and children's health. Indoor continuous measurements were performed. Non-compliances with guidelines were found in comfort parameters, which could cause discomfort situations and also microbial proliferation. Exceedances in CO{sub 2} concentrations were also found and they were caused by poor ventilation and high classroom occupation. More efficient ventilation and control of comfort parameters, as well as to reduce occupation by reviewing Portuguese legislation on that matter, would certainly improve IAQ and comfort in nurseries and consequently safeguard children's health. - Highlights: • High occupation and poor ventilation were main determinants of IAQ in nurseries. • T and RH indoor values found in nurseries are likely to cause thermal discomfort. • Building characteristics and an inadequate ventilation determined T and RH values. • High CO{sub 2} concentrations found could indicate accumulation of other air pollutants.

  14. Good practice criteria and improving infrastructure for leisure-time physical activity in the local arena - the Impala project, part iii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Vašíčková

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This project is aimed at unifying information about local infrastructure for leisure-time physical activity (LTPA in twelve European countries. This is due to the exchange of information about national strategies, policies, and mechanism at working meetings. This also includes their improvement with regard to social inequalities, inter-sectoral cooperation and participation. AIM: The aim of the third part of the IMPALA project is to summarize the results of the project into certain fundamental criteria that can be used by regional and local policy and stakeholders who can participate in planning, financing, building or managing of infrastructure for LTPA. METHODS: Based on identification of national strategies and policies (1st part of the project as well as mechanisms (2nd part of the project, we identified examples of positive practice in each of the participating countries in the sphere of LTPA infrastructures. To find out this information we used qualitative methods, namely structured interviews, focus group method, and brainstorming among relevant people who were involved into the project on national levels. RESULTS: The main outcome of the project are the guidelines that are drawn up as a list of criteria for evaluation of contemporary situations within the sphere of policy, planning, financing, building and managing of LTPA infrastructures. Another integral part that follows evaluation criteria are proposals for improving the mentioned spheres regarding to equality of approaches, inter-sectoral cooperation and participation of concerned parties. The appendix contains examples of practice that were chosen within the project from all of the participating countries and represent a certain sphere such as planning, building, financing or management. CONCLUSION: The main results of the project are: relevance of infrastructure and public physical activity connectivity; searching for the possibility to widely use the existing

  15. Characteristics and quality assessment of groundwater in parts of Akure, South-Western Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.O Nwankwoala

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater samples were collected from different parts of Akure town and analysed for various physico-chemical parameters using conventional field and laboratory techniques. The essence of the study is to evaluate the characteristics and quality assessment of groundwater in the area. The pH values falls between 7.1 to 7.7, indicating that the ground water is neutral. The range of conductivity for the area is between 116 to 1000µS/cm with an average of 365µS/cm which met the WHO (2006 standard of 1000µS/cm for drinking water. The low levels of turbidity ranging from 1 to 2 NTU were obtained. The TDS concentrations range between 81 to 700 mg/l. The total hardness of water sampled range from 20.2 to 345.6mg/l. Sulphate ion concentration is between 2.5 to 23.2mg/l. Phosphate values ranges from 0.05 to 0.07mg/l in all locations, and average value of 0.12mg/l which are within the WHO (2006 standards for drinking water. Nitrate levels ranged from 1.13 to 2.91mg/l. The values of bicarbonates range from 28 to 88mg/l with a mean value of 43.9mg/l, as all locations are far below the W.H.O (2006 limit of 600mg/l. The concentration of calcium ranged from 12.3 to 92.2mg/l while the concentrations of magnesium ion ranged from 0.9 to 32.6mg/l with an average of 7.3gm/l and this is below the WHO limit for drinking water (150mg/l. The concentration of sodium ion (Na+ ranged from 1.067 to 8.696mg/l. The concentration of potassium also ranged from 7.537 to 51.881mg/l with a mean value of 19.098mg/l. Although there is no reference to WHO standards for the parameter, the relatively low values of potassium suggest the suitability of the analysed groundwater samples for drinking. The common form of iron in groundwater is the soluble ferrous ion Fe2+. The concentration of iron in the water samples ranged from <0.001 to 0.001mg/l showing a very low value of iron in all boreholes. Generally, results compare favourably with the WHO (2006 standards for drinking water

  16. Landslide Susceptibility Assessment in the Central Part of Republic of Moldova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercanoglu, Murat; Boboc, Nicolae; Sirodoev, Igor; Ahmet Temiz, F.; Sirodoev, Ghenadi

    2010-05-01

    There has been an increasing interest in natural hazard assessments within the scientific community, particularly in the last two decades. In other respect, there is also a dramatically rising trend in the number of natural hazards. Growing population and expansion of settlements and lifelines over hazardous areas have largely increased the impact of natural disasters both in industrialized and developing countries. Furthermore, natural disasters such as earthquakes, landslides, floods have dramatic effects on human life, infrastructures, environment, and so on. Landslides, one of the most destructive natural hazards, constitute a major geological hazard throughout the world, like in Turkey and Moldova. There are a lot of regions affected by landslides in Turkey (particularly the West, Middle and East Black Sea Region) and Moldova (e.g.: area between Nisporeni, Calarasi, Balti, Western Rezina District, Codri Hills in Central Moldova etc.), and consequences of landslides are of great importance in the two countries. In the last 50 years' period, only the economic loss due to landslides in Turkey is estimated about 5 billion , and 12.5 % of the whole settlement areas, including big and populated cities, are facing landslide threat. Similar to Turkey, there are about 16000 areas affected by landslides in Moldova. In February-March, 1998 the intensity of landslides in the central part of Moldova, including Chisinau, considerably increased. In total, 357 private households involving 1400 people were affected, 214 houses were destroyed, and 137 were damaged. The total national damage accounted for 44.3 million Lei. At present on Moldavian territory, there are more than 17000 landslides of various types. These landslides are mostly located within Central Moldavian heights, one of the most complicated geomorphologic structure and territory's fragmentation. Among major landslide triggering factors, in addition to natural ones, one should also consider the anthropogenic

  17. Environmental assessment of three egg production systems--Part I: Monitoring system and indoor air quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y; Shepherd, T A; Li, H; Xin, H

    2015-03-01

    To comprehensively assess conventional vs. some alternative laying-hen housing systems under U.S. production conditions, a multi-institute and multi-disciplinary project, known as the Coalition for Sustainable Egg Supply (CSES) study, was carried out at a commercial egg production farm in the Midwestern United States over two single-cycle production flocks. The housing systems studied include a conventional cage house (200,000 hen capacity), an aviary house (50,000 hen capacity), and an enriched colony house (50,000 hen capacity). As an integral part of the CSES project, continual environmental monitoring over a 27-month period described in this paper quantifies indoor gaseous and particulate matter concentrations, thermal environment, and building ventilation rate of each house. Results showed that similar indoor thermal environments in all three houses were maintained through ventilation management and environmental control. Gaseous and particulate matter concentrations of the enriched colony house were comparable with those of the conventional cage house. In comparison, the aviary house had poorer indoor air quality, especially in wintertime, resulting from the presence of floor litter (higher ammonia levels) and hens' activities (higher particulate matter levels) in it. Specifically, daily mean indoor ammonia concentrations had the 95% confidence interval values of 3.8 to 4.2 (overall mean of 4.0) ppm for the conventional cage house; 6.2 to 7.2 (overall mean of 6.7) ppm for the aviary house; and 2.7 to 3.0 (overall mean of 2.8) ppm for the enriched colony house. The 95% confidence interval (overall mean) values of daily mean indoor carbon dioxide concentrations were 1997 to 2170 (2083) ppm for the conventional cage house, 2367 to 2582 (2475) ppm for the aviary house, and 2124 to 2309 (2216) ppm for the enriched colony house. Daily mean indoor methane concentrations were similar for all three houses, with 95% confidence interval values of 11.1 to 11.9 (overall

  18. European clinical guidelines for Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders. Part I: assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cath, Danielle C; Hedderly, Tammy; Ludolph, Andrea G;

    2011-01-01

    members. Detailed clinical assessment guidelines of tic disorders and their comorbidities in both children and adults are presented. Screening methods that might be helpful and necessary for specialists' differential diagnosis process are suggested in order to further analyse cognitive abilities...

  19. Ex ante impact assessment of policies affecting land use, Part B: application of the analytical framework

    OpenAIRE

    Grzegorz Siebielec; Tomasz Stuczynski; Paul Zagame; Pierre LeMouël; John Farrington; Zuzana Drillet; Jake Breton. Morris; Paul Tabbush; Pieter Johannes. Verkerk; Laurence Jones; Martha Bakker; Marta Perez-Soba; Peter H. Verburg; Torbjörn Jansson; Tom Kuhlman

    2011-01-01

    The use of science-based tools for impact assessment has increasingly gained focus in addressing the complexity of interactions between environment, society, and economy. For integrated assessment of policies affecting land use, an analytical framework was developed. The aim of our work was to apply the analytical framework for specific scenario cases and in combination with quantitative and qualitative application methods. The analytical framework was tested for two cases involving the ex an...

  20. Ex Ante Impact Assessment of Policies Affecting Land Use, Part B: Application of the Analytical Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Helming, K.; K. Diehl; Kuhlman, J.W.; Bakker, M.M.; Perez-Soba, M.

    2011-01-01

    The use of science-based tools for impact assessment has increasingly gained focus in addressing the complexity of interactions between environment, society, and economy. For integrated assessment of policies affecting land use, an analytical framework was developed. The aim of our work was to apply the analytical framework for specific scenario cases and in combination with quantitative and qualitative application methods. The analytical framework was tested for two cases involving the ex an...

  1. Climate change impact assessment in Veneto and Friuli Plain groundwater. Part II: a spatially resolved regional risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasini, S; Torresan, S; Rizzi, J; Zabeo, A; Critto, A; Marcomini, A

    2012-12-01

    Climate change impact assessment on water resources has received high international attention over the last two decades, due to the observed global warming and its consequences at the global to local scale. In particular, climate-related risks for groundwater and related ecosystems pose a great concern to scientists and water authorities involved in the protection of these valuable resources. The close link of global warming with water cycle alterations encourages research to deepen current knowledge on relationships between climate trends and status of water systems, and to develop predictive tools for their sustainable management, copying with key principles of EU water policy. Within the European project Life+ TRUST (Tool for Regional-scale assessment of groundwater Storage improvement in adaptation to climaTe change), a Regional Risk Assessment (RRA) methodology was developed in order to identify impacts from climate change on groundwater and associated ecosystems (e.g. surface waters, agricultural areas, natural environments) and to rank areas and receptors at risk in the high and middle Veneto and Friuli Plain (Italy). Based on an integrated analysis of impacts, vulnerability and risks linked to climate change at the regional scale, a RRA framework complying with the Sources-Pathway-Receptor-Consequence (SPRC) approach was defined. Relevant impacts on groundwater and surface waters (i.e. groundwater level variations, changes in nitrate infiltration processes, changes in water availability for irrigation) were selected and analyzed through hazard scenario, exposure, susceptibility and risk assessment. The RRA methodology used hazard scenarios constructed through global and high resolution model simulations for the 2071-2100 period, according to IPCC A1B emission scenario in order to produce useful indications for future risk prioritization and to support the addressing of adaptation measures, primarily Managed Artificial Recharge (MAR) techniques. Relevant

  2. Thermodynamic assessment of the In-Ir system in the In rich part

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Servant, Colette, E-mail: coletteservant@orange.fr [Laboratoire de Physicochimie de l' Etat Solide, ICMMO, Universite de Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Idbenali, Mohamed, E-mail: idbenalimohamed@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de Thermodynamique Metallurgique et Rheologie des Materiaux, Universite Ibn Zohr, B.P. 496, Dcheira, Agadir (Morocco)

    2011-04-20

    Highlights: {yields} The optimised In rich part of the In-Ir system in the present work will serve as a binary constituent for some ternary systems we are studying. {yields} A coherent set of thermodynamic parameters was optimized based on the CALPHAD approach, which led to the calculation of a phase diagram which is in good agreement with the experimental part determined up to about x(Ir) = 0.35. {yields} The calculated integral and partial enthalpies of mixing of the liquid phase are also in good agreement, within the experimental error, with the numerous and coherent experimental data up to about x(Ir) = 0.35. Beyond this value, the agreement is not satisfactory due to the precipitation of solid phases in the liquid. {yields} So, the In-Ir phase diagram seems therefore to be more complex than the interpolated part from x(Ir) = 0.40 up to 1, and further experimental determinations are therefore needed in the Ir rich part of the phase diagram. - Abstract: Optimization by the CALPHAD method of the thermodynamic parameters of the In-Ir system has been carried out using the experimental phase diagram data and thermodynamic properties. The numerous experimental data of the liquid phase determined in the 0 < x(Ir) < 0.35 composition range by two authors are coherent and associated with the scarce enthalpies of formation of the two intermetallic compounds allowed to optimize a set of coherent thermodynamic parameters in order to calculate the phase diagram in the In rich part. In the 0.40 < x(Ir) {<=} 1 composition range, the phase diagram seems more complex than the schematic part extrapolated at high temperature and the agreement between the calculated diagram and this extrapolated experimental part is not satisfactory. Further experimental investigations are needed to improve the calculation in this composition range, but which are difficult because hampered by different phenomena.

  3. Mathematical Model of a pH-gradient Creation at Isoelectrofocusing. Part III: Numerical Solution of the Non-stationary Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Shiryaeva, E V; Zhukov, M Yu

    2013-01-01

    The mathematical model describing the non-stationary natural pH-gradient arising under the action of an electric field in an aqueous solution of ampholytes (amino acids) is constructed and investigated. The model is part of a more general model of the isoelectrofocusing (IEF) process. To numerical study of the model we use the finite elements method that allows to significantly reduce the computation time. We also examine the influence of the different effects (taking into account the water ions, the various forms of Ohm's law, the difference between isoelectric and isoionic points of the substances) on the process IEF.

  4. Assessment and recommendations for fissile-material packaging exemptions and general licenses within 10 CFR Part 71

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, C.V.; Hopper, C.M.; Lichtenwalter, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-07-01

    This report provides a technical and regulatory assessment of the fissile material general licenses and fissile material exemptions within Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 71. The assessment included literature studies and calculational analyses to evaluate the technical criteria; review of current industry practice and concerns; and a detailed evaluation of the regulatory text for clarity, consistency and relevance. Recommendations for potential consideration by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff are provided. The recommendations call for a simplification and consolidation of the general licenses and a change in the technical criteria for the first fissile material exemptions.

  5. Nutritional Status Assessment During the Phase IIA and Phase III Lunar/Mars Life Support Test Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott M.; Block, Gladys; Davis-Street, Janis E.; DeKerlegand, Diane E.; Fanselow, Stephanie A.; Fesperman, J. Vernell; Gillman, Patricia L.; Nillen, Jeannie I.; Rice, Barbara L.; Smith, Myra D.

    2000-01-01

    Nutrition is a critical concern for extended-duration space missions (Smith and Lane, 1999). Loss of body weight is a primary consequence of altered nutrition, and is frequently observed during space flight (Smith and Lane; 1999). Other existing dietary concerns for space flight include excessive intakes of sodium and iron, and insufficient intakes of water and vitamin D (Smith and Lane, 1999). Furthermore, dependence on closed or semi-closed food systems increases the likelihood of inadequate intakes of key nutrients. This is a significant concern for extended-duration space missions. Space nutrition research often necessitates detailed recording of all food consumption. While this yields extremely accurate data, it requires considerable time and effort, and thus is not suitable for routine medical monitoring during space flight. To alleviate this problem, a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was designed to provide a quick and easy, yet reasonably accurate, method for crewmembers to provide dietary intake information to the ground. We report here a study which was designed to assess nutritional status before, during, and after the 60-d and 91-d chamber stays. An additional goal of the study was to validate a food frequency questionnaire designed specifically for use with space flight food systems.

  6. Demand study for advanced dental hygiene educational degrees: part 2: assessing educational demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Annelise Ydstebo; Fottler, Myron; Liberman, Aaron; Pitts, Louise; Wan, Thomas T H

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the debate over the addition of the midlevel provider position for dental hygienists rages on. The midlevel provider (similar to the physician's assistant) in dentistry exists in a handful of states in various forms, but is hotly contested in many other states. This is the second half of a 2-part study undertaken to add to the current body of knowledge by addressing the clinical needs changing in our population and the associated demand study for additional educational degrees for dental hygienists to address these changing needs. Part 1 addressed a literature update on oral health and systemic correlations contributing to our populations' declining health conditions, whereas part 2 illustrates the results of the demand study. It attempts to benchmark "adequate demand" and applies the stakeholder theory as its theoretical framework. PMID:21537139

  7. [Parte III. Ethical and juridical aspects in end-stage chronic organ failures. A position paper on a shared care planning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbisan, Camillo; Casonato, Carlo; Palermo Fabris, Elisabetta; Piccinni, Mariassunta; Zatti, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The specific target of an experts panel was to assess in terms of law and ethics the compliance of a new specific decision making algorithm described in the position paper proposed by the Gruppo di Lavoro Insufficienze Croniche d'Organo, with the main goal of the position paper consisting in the shared care planning process. The following specific aspects were assessed by the experts: a) the impact on case law and statute law of a new clinical pathway shared by scientific societies in light of good clinical practice and scientific evidence; b) the relevance of all tools useful to identify the appropriateness of care pathways, recognizing responsibilities and decision-making skills related to the end of life choices made by all stakeholders involved (healthcare professionals, patients and their beloved ones); c) the consistency of the healthcare professionals duties proposed in the position paper with the Italian legal order; d) the opportunity to take into account the role of all healthcare providers involved in care relationship; e) the consistency of the definition of patient rights at the end of life as proposed in the position paper with the Italian legal order and the relevance in this context of simultaneous palliative care; f) the relevance of shared care planning and its consistency with the proposed operative tools; g) the relevance of the conscientious objection issue and the compliance of management tools proposed in the position paper with the results of ethical and legal considerations; h) considerations about available resources allocation. PMID:24553594

  8. Volume-based assessment by 18F-FDG PET/CT predicts survival in patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the prognostic impact of volume-based assessment by 18F-FDG PET/CT in patients with stage III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We reviewed 194 consecutive patients with stage IIIA NSCLC treated with surgical resection (surgical group) and 115 patients treated with nonsurgical therapy (nonsurgical group: 50 stage IIIA, 65 stage IIIB). Metabolic tumour volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) of primary tumours were measured using pretreatment 18F-FDG PET/CT. Overall survival was assessed using the Kaplan-Meier method. The prognostic significance of PET parameters and other clinical variables was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. To evaluate and compare the predictive performance of PET parameters, time-dependent receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used. In the Cox proportional hazards models, MTV (HR = 1.27 for a doubling of MTV, P = 0.008) and TLG (HR = 1.22 for a doubling of TLG, P = 0.035) were significantly associated with an increased risk of death after adjusting for age, gender, histological cell type, T stage, N stage, and treatment variables in the surgical group. SUVmax was not a significant prognostic factor in either the surgical or nonsurgical group. In the time-dependent ROC curve analysis, volume-based PET parameters predicted survival better than SUVmax. The volume-based PET parameters (MTV and TLG) are significant prognostic factors for survival independent of tumour stage and better prognostic imaging biomarkers than SUVmax in patients with stage IIIA NSCLC after surgical resection. (orig.)

  9. A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing of Ceramic Composites. Part III; Additive Manufacturing and Characterization of Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Grady, Joseph E.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Ramsey, Jack; Patterson, Clark; Santelle, Tom

    2015-01-01

    This publication is the third part of a three part report of the project entitled "A Fully Nonmetallic Gas Turbine Engine Enabled by Additive Manufacturing" funded by NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI). The objective of this project was to conduct additive manufacturing to produce ceramic matrix composite materials and aircraft engine components by the binder jet process. Different SiC powders with median sizes ranging from 9.3 to 53.0 microns were investigated solely and in powder blends in order to maximize powder packing. Various infiltration approaches were investigated to include polycarbosilane (SMP-10), phenolic, and liquid silicon. Single infiltrations of SMP-10 and phenolic only slightly filled in the interior. When the SMP-10 was loaded with sub-micron sized SiC powders, the infiltrant gave a much better result of filling in the interior. Silicon carbide fibers were added to the powder bed to make ceramic matrix composite materials. Microscopy showed that the fibers were well distributed with no preferred orientation on the horizontal plane and fibers in the vertical plane were at angles as much as 45deg. Secondary infiltration steps were necessary to further densify the material. Two to three extra infiltration steps of SMP-10 increased the density by 0.20 to 0.55 g/cc. However, the highest densities achieved were 2.10 to 2.15 g/cc. Mechanical tests consisting of 4 point bend tests were conducted. Samples from the two CMC panels had higher strengths and strains to failure than the samples from the two nonfiber reinforced panels. The highest strengths were from Set N with 65 vol% fiber loading which had an average strength of 66 MPa. Analysis of the fracture surfaces did not reveal pullout of the reinforcing fibers. Blunt fiber failure suggested that there was not composite behavior. The binder jet additive manufacturing method was used to also demonstrate the fabrication of turbine engine vane components of two different designs and sizes. The

  10. Collision Avoidance Short Course: Conjunction Assessment Risk Analysis - NASA Robotic CARA. Part I: ; Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejduk, M. D.; Frigm, Ryan C.

    2015-01-01

    Satellite conjunction assessment is perhaps the fastest growing area in space situational awareness and protection with military, civil and commercial satellite owner-operators embracing more and more sophisticated processes to avoid the avoidable - namely collisions between high value space assets and orbital debris. NASA and Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES) have collaborated to offer an introductory short course on all the major aspects of the conjunctions assessment problem. This half-day course will cover satellite conjunction dynamics and theory. Joint Space Operations Center (JsPOC) conjunction data products, major risk assessment parameters and plots, conjunction remediation decision support, and present and future challenges. This briefing represents the NASA portion of the course.

  11. Formation and modelling assessment perculiarities of the Quaternary aquifer system groundwater resources in the Southeastern part of Lithuania

    OpenAIRE

    Štuopis, Anicetas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the research was accomplish an assessment of the groundwater resources (budget, distribution and formation) and reveal their formation peculiarities in the Quaternary aquifer system of the southeaster part of Lithuania. Substantiation and formulation of schematization principles of the Quaternary multi-aquifer system for conceptualization of groundwater flow model based on the complex of lithologic, hydrogeochemistry, isotopic and hydraulic data have been developed by this disserta...

  12. Structural and functional biological assessment of aggregate dredging intensity on the Belgian part of the North Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Backer, A De; Hillewaert, H.; Van Hoey, G; Wittoeck, J.; Hostens, K.

    2014-01-01

    Marine aggregate dredging in the Belgian part of the North Sea (BPNS) is restricted to four dedicated concession zones. Within these zones, there are areas under different dredging pressure, but with the advantage that these are situated within a similar habitat (cfr. similar sediment characteristics) . As such, this study assessed how different degrees of dredging pressure executed on a similar sandy habitat affect the benthic ecosystem. Possible responses of the macrobenthos on the dredging...

  13. Direct and indirect drift assessment means. Part 4: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuyttens, D; Baetens, K; De Schampheleire, M; Sonck, B

    2008-01-01

    Three contrasting drift risk assessment means were evaluated when predicting absolute losses of sedimenting pesticide drift from field crop sprayers namely PDPA laser measurements, wind tunnel measurements (both indirect drift risk assessment means) and field drift experiments (direct drift risk assessment means). In total, 90 PDPA laser measurements, 45 wind tunnel experiments and 61 field drift experiments were performed with 10 different spray nozzles at a pressure of 3.0 bar. The effect of nozzle size (ISO 02, 03 04 and 06) and nozzle type (standard flat fan, low-drift flat fan, air inclusion) on the amount of near-field sedimenting spray drift was studied. The reference spray application was defined as a Hardi ISO F 110 03 standard flat fan nozzle at a pressure of 3.0 bar with a nozzle or boom height of 0.50 m and a driving speed of 8 km.h(-1) for the field measurements; conditions that were always used for the comparative assessment of the different investigated nozzle-pressure combinations. A comparison is made between the results obtained with the indirect drift assessment means and the direct drift assessment method to evaluate the potential of these three different drift assessment means. Droplet size as well as droplet velocity characteristics are related with DRPt (field experiments) and DPRP (wind tunnel experiments). Because of the strong intercorrelation between droplet size and velocity characteristics for the nozzle-pressure combinations investigated in this study, simple first-order linear regressions with one of the droplet characteristics as a predictor variable, were the best choice to predict DRPt and DPRP. Results showed that with the indirect risk assessment means (wind tunnel and PDPA laser measurement), driftability experiments can be made with different spraying systems under directly comparable and repeatable conditions and both methods are suited to permit relative studies of drift risk. Moreover, based on these indirect drift

  14. TRIGA Mark-III reactor dismantling program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activation assessment of the main parts of the TRIGA Mark-III (KRR-2) was estimated to effectively dismantle the activated and contaminated areas. All of the method and the order for decommissioning the KRR-2 have been chosen as a result of the examination of the physical structure and radiological conditions of the reactor component. These decommissioning methods and orders were reviewed as part of the Hazard and Operability (HAZOP) studies for the project. Radiological assessment is also done to protect the workers and the environment from the dismantling work. License documents were submitted to the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) at the end of 1998. Practical work of the D and D will start at the end of 1999 once the government issues the license. Radiation protection plan was also set up to control the workers and environment. This paper summarized the main lines of those studies. (author)

  15. Assessment of Cognitive Ability of Students with Severe and Low-Incidence Disabilities--Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepeau-Hobson, Franci; Vujeva, Hana

    2012-01-01

    Students with severe and low-incidence disabilities comprise a heterogeneous population that often presents a challenge to the professionals charged with evaluating their skills and abilities. This is especially true in conducting a valid assessment of the cognitive ability of these children. Often, school psychologists are limited to the use of…

  16. Assessment and Accountability in Reference Work. Part I: Requirements and Methodologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlatch, Jo Bell; Walsh, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    Includes three articles: the first presents rules and regulations from the "Federal Register" that focus on educational effectiveness in postsecondary institutions; the second discusses the appropriateness of various research methodologies for assessment and accountability of reference services; and the third examines data collection techniques…

  17. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium Part 1: Experimental Animal Studies (Preliminary Assessment Materials)

    Science.gov (United States)

    In April 2014, EPA released the draft literature searches and associated search strategies, evidence tables, and exposure response arrays for Cr(VI) to obtain input from stakeholders and the public prior to developing the draft IRIS assessment. Specifically, EPA was interested in...

  18. Empowering or Disabling? Emotional Reactions to Assessment amongst Part-Time Adult Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramp, Andy; Lamond, Catherine; Coleyshaw, Liz; Beck, Sue

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on emotional reactions to learning and assessment. It draws on a qualitative research project involving first-generation adult students on a foundation degree programme. Endorsing the notion of emotional reactions as situated in participants' lived power relations, we map out emotional patterns to Semester 1 and then explore…

  19. Assessment of Ecological Factors as an Integral Part of Academic and Mental Health Consultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ysseldyke, Jim; Lekwa, Adam J.; Klingbeil, David A.; Cormier, Damien C.

    2012-01-01

    The assessment of ecological factors that affect individual mental health or academic functioning is an important component of educational and psychological consultation. Researchers and practitioners have conceptualized such ecological or environmental factors in a variety of ways and from a broad range of perspectives. In this article we…

  20. Reactor oscillator - I - III, Part III - Electronic device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes functioning of the reactor oscillator electronic system. Two methods of oscillator operation were discussed. The first method is so called method of amplitude modulation of the reactor power, and the second newer method is phase method. Both methods are planned for the present reactor oscillator

  1. The european flood alert system EFAS – Part 2: Statistical skill assessment of probabilistic and deterministic operational forecasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Bartholmes

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Since 2005 the European Flood Alert System (EFAS has been producing probabilistic hydrological forecasts in pre-operational mode at the Joint Research Centre (JRC of the European Commission. EFAS aims at increasing preparedness for floods in trans-national European river basins by providing medium-range deterministic and probabilistic flood forecasting information, from 3 to 10 days in advance, to national hydro-meteorological services.

    This paper is Part 2 of a study presenting the development and skill assessment of EFAS. In Part 1, the scientific approach adopted in the development of the system has been presented, as well as its basic principles and forecast products. In the present article, two years of existing operational EFAS forecasts are statistically assessed and the skill of EFAS forecasts is analysed with several skill scores. The analysis is based on the comparison of threshold exceedances between proxy-observed and forecasted discharges. Skill is assessed both with and without taking into account the persistence of the forecasted signal during consecutive forecasts.

    Skill assessment approaches are mostly adopted from meteorology and the analysis also compares probabilistic and deterministic aspects of EFAS. Furthermore, the utility of different skill scores is discussed and their strengths and shortcomings illustrated. The analysis shows the benefit of incorporating past forecasts in the probability analysis, for medium-range forecasts, which effectively increases the skill of the forecasts.

  2. Rapid assessment of home management of malaria among caregivers in parts of south eastern Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Uche Chukwuocha

    2011-01-01

    Background This study was carried out to rapidly access the practice of home management of malaria by caregivers and community health workers in a rural part of South Eastern Nigeria between March and October, 2010. Methods Structured, pretested questionnaires, focus group discussions and oral interviews were used to collect data from 300 consenting individuals. Results Most of the participants/respondents were civil servants/teachers (44.3%). About 88.3% of them recognized malaria as an illn...

  3. Methods for assessing quality characteristics of non-grain starch staples. (Part 4. Advanced methods.)

    OpenAIRE

    Bainbridge, Z.; Tomlins, K.; Wellings, K; Westby, A.

    1996-01-01

    This manual sets out in a four-part publication the main methods necessary to evaluate the quality characteristics of nongrain starch staple (NGSS) food crops (cassava, sweet potato, banana, plantain, yam and cocoyam) and their processed products. It is designed to be a reference source and laboratory guide for food analysis laboratories and those concerned with the quality of NGSS. It is hoped that the provision of this manual and its active promotion through workshops will assist in the upt...

  4. Methods for assessing quality characteristics of non-grain starch staples. (Part 3. Laboratory methods.)

    OpenAIRE

    Bainbridge, Z.; Tomlins, K.; Wellings, K; Westby, A.

    1996-01-01

    This manual sets out in a four-part publication the main methods necessary to evaluate the quality characteristics of nongrain starch staple (NGSS) food crops (cassava, sweet potato, banana, plantain, yam and cocoyam) and their processed products. It is designed to be a reference source and laboratory guide for food analysis laboratories and those concerned with the quality of NGSS. It is hoped that the provision of this manual and its active promotion through workshops will assist in the upt...

  5. Methods for assessing quality characteristics of non-grain starch staples. (Part 1. Introduction.)

    OpenAIRE

    Bainbridge, Z.; Tomlins, K.; Wellings, K; Westby, A.

    1996-01-01

    This manual sets out in a four-part publication the main methods necessary to evaluate the quality characteristics of nongrain starch staple (NGSS) food crops (cassava, sweet potato, banana, plantain, yam and cocoyam) and their processed products. It is designed to be a reference source and laboratory guide for food analysis laboratories and those concerned with the quality of NGSS. It is hoped that the provision of this manual and its active promotion through workshops will assist in the upt...

  6. Methods for assessing quality characteristics of non-grain starch staples. (Part 2. Field Methods.)

    OpenAIRE

    Bainbridge, Z.; Tomlins, K.; Wellings, K; Westby, A.

    1996-01-01

    This manual sets out in a four-part publication the main methods necessary to evaluate the quality characteristics of nongrain starch staple (NGSS) food crops (cassava, sweet potato, banana, plantain, yam and cocoyam) and their processed products. It is designed to be a reference source and laboratory guide for food analysis laboratories and those concerned with the quality of NGSS. It is hoped that the provision of this manual and its active promotion through workshops will assist in the upt...

  7. Characterization of Solid Digestates: Part 1, Review of Existing Indicators to Assess Solid Digestates Agricultural Use

    OpenAIRE

    Téglia, C.; Trémier, A.; Martel, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of organic wastes is clearly encouraged by current regulations in Europe. In complement to the energy supply it represents, this biological treatment process also allows the recycling of organic matter and nutrients contained in biodegradable wastes. Indeed the digestion residue can be further promoted as soil improver or fertilizer. The sustainability of anaerobic digestion plants partly depends on the management of these digestion residues. Digestates present particular ...

  8. Climate Change Impacts for the Conterminous USA. An Integrated Assessment. Part 4. Water Resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global climate change will impact the hydrologic cycle by increasing the capacity of the atmosphere to hold moisture. Anticipated impacts are generally increased evaporation at low latitudes and increased precipitation at middle and high latitudes. General Circulation Models (GCMs) used to simulate climate disagree on whether the U.S. as a whole and its constituent regions will receive more or less precipitation as global warming occurs. The impacts on specific regions will depend on changes in weather patterns and are certain to be complex. Here we apply the suite of 12 potential climate change scenarios, previously described in Part 1, to the Hydrologic Unit Model of the United States (HUMUS) to simulate water supply in the conterminous United States in reference to a baseline scenario. We examine the sufficiency of this water supply to meet changing demands of irrigated agriculture. The changes in water supply driven by changes in climate will likely be most consequential in the semi-arid western parts of the country where water yield is currently scarce and the resource is intensively managed. Changes of greater than ±50% with respect to present day water yield are projected in parts of the Midwest and Southwest U.S. Interannual variability in the water supply is likely to increase where conditions become drier and to decrease under wetter conditions

  9. EURADOS intercomparison exercise on MC modelling for the in-vivo monitoring of AM-241 in skull phantoms (Part II and III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrba, Tomas; Broggio, David; Caldeira, Margarida; Capello, Kevin; Fantínová, Karin; Franck, Didier; Gómez-Ros, Jose Maria; Hunt, John; Kinase, Sakae; Leone, Debora; Lombardo, Pasquale Alessandro; Manohari, Murugan; Marzocchi, Olaf; Moraleda, Montserrat; Nogueira, Pedro; Ośko, Jakub; Arron, Shutt; Suhl, Soheigh; Takahashi, Masa; Teles, Pedro; Tremblay, Marilyn; Tymińska, Katarzyna; Lopez, Maria Antonia; Tanner, Rick

    2015-08-01

    An intercomparison on in-vivo monitoring for determination of Am-241 in three skull phantoms was launched by EURADOS in 2011. The project focused on measurement and estimation of the activity of Am-241 in the human skull. Three human skull phantoms of different complexity were used. A Monte Carlo (MC) intercomparison exercise with the voxel representations of the physical phantom was launched additionally in September of 2012. The main goals of the action were (1) to investigate the different methodologies for developing MC calibrations that might arise from a complex radiological assessment and (2) to compare individual approaches of the participating laboratories in order to determine international guidance for best practice. The MC exercise consisted of three tasks with increasing difficulty, in order to test the extent of skills needed by the participating laboratory. The first task was to simulate a given detector and a well-defined semi-skull phantom. The second and third tasks presented in this paper-introduced more complex simulations with individual geometry and real detector modelling. The paper provides an overview of the participant's results, analyses of the observed issues concerning tasks two and three, and a general evaluation of the whole project.

  10. EURADOS intercomparison exercise on MC modelling for the in-vivo monitoring of AM-241 in skull phantoms (Part II and III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An intercomparison on in-vivo monitoring for determination of Am-241 in three skull phantoms was launched by EURADOS in 2011. The project focused on measurement and estimation of the activity of Am-241 in the human skull. Three human skull phantoms of different complexity were used. A Monte Carlo (MC) intercomparison exercise with the voxel representations of the physical phantom was launched additionally in September of 2012. The main goals of the action were (1) to investigate the different methodologies for developing MC calibrations that might arise from a complex radiological assessment and (2) to compare individual approaches of the participating laboratories in order to determine international guidance for best practice. The MC exercise consisted of three tasks with increasing difficulty, in order to test the extent of skills needed by the participating laboratory. The first task was to simulate a given detector and a well-defined semi-skull phantom. The second and third tasks presented in this paper-introduced more complex simulations with individual geometry and real detector modelling. The paper provides an overview of the participant's results, analyses of the observed issues concerning tasks two and three, and a general evaluation of the whole project. - Highlights: • Participants were able to model real detectors and geometries. • Three head phantoms with different complexities were used. • Typical difference between measured and simulated detection efficiency was less than ±12%. • Simulation with voxel phantom is suitable for calibration of partial body counters

  11. Part III: Comparing observed growth of selected test organisms in food irradiation studies with growth predictions calculated by ComBase softwares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of intensive predictive microbiological modelling activities, several computer programs and softwares became available recently for facilitating microbiological risk assessment. Among these tools, the establishment of the ComBase, an international database and its predictive modelling softwares of the Pathogen Modelling Program (PMP) set up by the USDA Eastern Regional Research Center, Wyndmore, PA, and the Food Micromodel/Growth Predictor by the United Kingdom's Institute of Food Research, Norwich, are most important. The authors have used the PMP 6.1 software version of ComBase as a preliminary trial to compare observed growth of selected test organisms in relation to their food irradiation work during recent years within the FAO/IAEA Coordinated Food Irradiation Research Projects (D6.10.23 and D6.20.07) with the predicted growth on the basis of growth models available in ComBase for the same species as those of the authors' test organisms. The results of challenge tests with Listeria monocytogenes inoculum in untreated or irradiated experimental batches of semi-prepared breaded turkey meat steaks (cordon bleu), sliced tomato, sliced watermelon, sliced cantaloupe and sous vide processed mixed vegetables, as well as Staphylococcus aureus inoculum of a pasta product, tortellini, were compared with their respective growth models under relevant environmental conditions. This comparison showed good fits in the case of non-irradiated and high moisture food samples, but growth of radiation survivors lagged behind the predicted values. (author)

  12. The Development Of A Diagnostic ‘Project Management Culture’ Assessment Tool (Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne du Plessis

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The growing interest in project management as a management approach requires organisations to adopt an operational culture that supports project management principles and practices. The availability of an empirically developed assessment tool would enable organisations to assess their present organisational culture's readiness for project work. The aim of this study is to develop a diagnostic instrument that can measure the operational ‘project management culture’ in organisations. The final tool (PMCAT comprises of a five-factor scale. The overall reliability of the items in this scale was highly acceptable with a Cronbach alpha above 0,70. The tool has a high validity with a inter- item correlation above 0,32.

  13. An occupational therapy approach to persons with chronic fatigue syndrome: part two, assessment and intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Renee R; Kielhofner, Gary W

    2003-01-01

    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is a highly disabling condition that significantly interferes with occupational life. Occupational therapy services are very relevant for this population. Yet, information about the assessment and treatment of CFS is almost absent from occupational therapy literature. As a result, few occupational therapists possess expertise in evaluating and providing therapy for this complex condition. This paper describes an approach to evaluating and providing services for individuals with CFS according to the Model of Human Occupation. This model offers an integrative means of understanding the synergistic and evolving relationships between motivation, values, roles, habits, functional capabilities, and the environment as they influence individuals with CFS, and it provides a framework for the types of changes required in these different domains during the rehabilitation process. A case study illustrates recommended assessment and intervention approaches. PMID:23944638

  14. Assessment of horizontal in-tube condensation models using MARS code. Part I: Stratified flow condensation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Seong-Su [Department of Engineering Project, FNC Technology Co., Ltd., Bldg. 135-308, Seoul National University, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Soon-Joon, E-mail: sjhong90@fnctech.com [Department of Engineering Project, FNC Technology Co., Ltd., Bldg. 135-308, Seoul National University, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ju-Yeop; Seul, Kwang-Won [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19 Kuseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Goon-Cherl [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study collected 11 horizontal in-tube condensation models for stratified flow. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study assessed the predictive capability of the models for steam condensation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Purdue-PCCS experiments were simulated using MARS code incorporated with models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cavallini et al. (2006) model predicts well the data for stratified flow condition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results of this study can be used to improve condensation model in RELAP5 or MARS. - Abstract: The accurate prediction of the horizontal in-tube condensation heat transfer is a primary concern in the optimum design and safety analysis of horizontal heat exchangers of passive safety systems such as the passive containment cooling system (PCCS), the emergency condenser system (ECS) and the passive auxiliary feed-water system (PAFS). It is essential to analyze and assess the predictive capability of the previous horizontal in-tube condensation models for each flow regime using various experimental data. This study assessed totally 11 condensation models for the stratified flow, one of the main flow regime encountered in the horizontal condenser, with the heat transfer data from the Purdue-PCCS experiment using the multi-dimensional analysis of reactor safety (MARS) code. From the assessments, it was found that the models by Akers and Rosson, Chato, Tandon et al., Sweeney and Chato, and Cavallini et al. (2002) under-predicted the data in the main condensation heat transfer region, on the contrary to this, the models by Rosson and Meyers, Jaster and Kosky, Fujii, Dobson and Chato, and Thome et al. similarly- or over-predicted the data, and especially, Cavallini et al. (2006) model shows good predictive capability for all test conditions. The results of this study can be used importantly to improve the condensation models in thermal hydraulic code, such as RELAP5 or MARS code.

  15. Assessment of horizontal in-tube condensation models using MARS code. Part I: Stratified flow condensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► This study collected 11 horizontal in-tube condensation models for stratified flow. ► This study assessed the predictive capability of the models for steam condensation. ► Purdue-PCCS experiments were simulated using MARS code incorporated with models. ► Cavallini et al. (2006) model predicts well the data for stratified flow condition. ► Results of this study can be used to improve condensation model in RELAP5 or MARS. - Abstract: The accurate prediction of the horizontal in-tube condensation heat transfer is a primary concern in the optimum design and safety analysis of horizontal heat exchangers of passive safety systems such as the passive containment cooling system (PCCS), the emergency condenser system (ECS) and the passive auxiliary feed-water system (PAFS). It is essential to analyze and assess the predictive capability of the previous horizontal in-tube condensation models for each flow regime using various experimental data. This study assessed totally 11 condensation models for the stratified flow, one of the main flow regime encountered in the horizontal condenser, with the heat transfer data from the Purdue-PCCS experiment using the multi-dimensional analysis of reactor safety (MARS) code. From the assessments, it was found that the models by Akers and Rosson, Chato, Tandon et al., Sweeney and Chato, and Cavallini et al. (2002) under-predicted the data in the main condensation heat transfer region, on the contrary to this, the models by Rosson and Meyers, Jaster and Kosky, Fujii, Dobson and Chato, and Thome et al. similarly- or over-predicted the data, and especially, Cavallini et al. (2006) model shows good predictive capability for all test conditions. The results of this study can be used importantly to improve the condensation models in thermal hydraulic code, such as RELAP5 or MARS code.

  16. Assessing the precision of strain measurements using electron backscatter diffraction – Part 2: Experimental demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, T.B., E-mail: b.britton@imperial.ac.uk; Jiang, J.; Clough, R.; Tarleton, E.; Kirkland, A.I.; Wilkinson, A.J.

    2013-12-15

    The residual impression after performing a microhardness indent in silicon has been mapped with high resolution EBSD to reveal residual elastic strain and lattice rotation fields. Mapping of the same area has been performed with variable pattern binning and exposure times to reveal the qualitative and quantitative differences resulting from reducing the pattern size and exposure time. Two dimension ‘image’ plots of these fields indicate that qualitative assessment of the shape and size of the fields can be performed with as much as 4×4 binning. However, quantitative assessment using line scans reveals that the smoothest profile can be obtained using minimal pattern binning and long exposure times. To compare and contrast with these experimental maps, finite element analysis has been performed using a continuum damage-plasticity material law which has been independently calibrated to Si [9]. The constitutive law incorporates isotropic hardening in compression, and isotropic hardening and damage in tension. To accurately capture the localised damage which develops during indentation via the nucleation and propagation of cracks around the indentation site cohesive elements were assigned along the interfaces between the planes which experience the maximum traction. The residual strain state around the indenter and the size of the cracks agree very well with the experimentally measured value. - Highlights: • Similar deformation fields around a microhardness indent have been characterised with HR-EBSD and simulated with a finite element model. • Qualitative assessment of the stress field can be performed with significant EBSD pattern binning (i.e. faster capture of maps). • Quantitative assessment of the stress fields benefits significantly from increased exposure times and minimal binning.

  17. Assessing the precision of strain measurements using electron backscatter diffraction – Part 2: Experimental demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The residual impression after performing a microhardness indent in silicon has been mapped with high resolution EBSD to reveal residual elastic strain and lattice rotation fields. Mapping of the same area has been performed with variable pattern binning and exposure times to reveal the qualitative and quantitative differences resulting from reducing the pattern size and exposure time. Two dimension ‘image’ plots of these fields indicate that qualitative assessment of the shape and size of the fields can be performed with as much as 4×4 binning. However, quantitative assessment using line scans reveals that the smoothest profile can be obtained using minimal pattern binning and long exposure times. To compare and contrast with these experimental maps, finite element analysis has been performed using a continuum damage-plasticity material law which has been independently calibrated to Si [9]. The constitutive law incorporates isotropic hardening in compression, and isotropic hardening and damage in tension. To accurately capture the localised damage which develops during indentation via the nucleation and propagation of cracks around the indentation site cohesive elements were assigned along the interfaces between the planes which experience the maximum traction. The residual strain state around the indenter and the size of the cracks agree very well with the experimentally measured value. - Highlights: • Similar deformation fields around a microhardness indent have been characterised with HR-EBSD and simulated with a finite element model. • Qualitative assessment of the stress field can be performed with significant EBSD pattern binning (i.e. faster capture of maps). • Quantitative assessment of the stress fields benefits significantly from increased exposure times and minimal binning

  18. Crescimento da base craniana nos diferentes tipos faciais nos relacionamentos maxilomandibulares ortopédicos de Classe I, II e III: parte 1 Cranial base growth in different facial types in Class I, II and III orthopedic maxillomandibular relationship: part 1

    OpenAIRE

    Lucelma Vilela Pieri; Kurt Faltin Junior; Cristina Lúcia Feijó Ortolani; Rolf Marçon Faltin; Márcia Aparecida Alves de Almeida

    2007-01-01

    OBJETIVO: este estudo retrospectivo avaliou o crescimento médio anual da base craniana nos diferentes tipos faciais nos relacionamentos maxilomandibulares ortopédicos de Classe I, II e III. METODOLOGIA: uma amostra aleatória de 300 pacientes brasileiros leucodermas (131 do gênero masculino, 169 do gênero feminino), com idade média inicial de 10 anos e 2 meses (dentadura mista) e final de 14 anos e 8 meses (segundos molares em oclusão) e tempo médio de observação de 4 anos e 5 meses, foi selec...

  19. Crescimento da base craniana nos diferentes tipos faciais nos relacionamentos maxilomandibulares ortopédicos de Classe I, II e III: parte 3 (Crescimento médio de CF-Po) Cranial base growth in different facial types in Class I, II and III orthopedic maxillomandibular relationship: part 3 (Mean growth of CF-Po)

    OpenAIRE

    Lucelma Vilela Pieri; Kurt Faltin Junior; Cristina Lúcia Feijó Ortolani; Rolf Marçon Faltin; Márcia Aparecida Alves de Almeida

    2007-01-01

    OBJETIVO: este estudo retrospectivo avaliou o crescimento médio de CF-Po nos diferentes tipos faciais nos relacionamentos maxilomandibulares ortopédicos de Classe I, II e III. METODOLOGIA: uma amostra aleatória de 300 pacientes brasileiros leucodermas (131 do gênero masculino, 169 do gênero feminino), com idade média inicial de 10 anos e 2 meses (dentadura mista) e final de 14 anos e 8 meses (segundos molares em oclusão) e tempo médio de observação de 4 anos e 5 meses, foi selecionada em uma ...

  20. A quantitative assessment of safety culture as part of the national programme on nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper seeks to give practical value to the concept of Safety Culture, proposing a method that may be used to judge the effectiveness of Safety Culture in all phases of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The paper describes the quantification of the Safety Culture assessment on statistical basis. The safety culture assessment is based on the IAEA ASCOT (Assessment of Safety Culture in Organizing Team) Guidelines. This Procedural Guide, used as an instrumental tool in addition to 'ASCOT Guidelines', could improve the ASCOT reviews and permit to give more accurate and objective conclusions at the end of these reviews. It would also reveal areas needing improvements, giving an overall rating of the Safety Culture level, which could be compared with a new result after implementing some corrective measures. This method could be applied in all phases of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (mining, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage, conditioning of spent fuel, final disposal of spent fuel, heavy water production, transport, etc.) and should be an all embracing characteristics which, when prevailing in a satisfactory measure, would eliminate accidents and reduce incidents to insignificant levels. Included as an Annex to the National Program on Nuclear Energy, the proposed method could contribute to the improvement of Safety Culture in all phases of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and at all levels. (author)

  1. Dosimetric accuracy of a deterministic radiation transport based 192Ir brachytherapy treatment planning system. Part III. Comparison to Monte Carlo simulation in voxelized anatomical computational models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare TG43-based and Acuros deterministic radiation transport-based calculations of the BrachyVision treatment planning system (TPS) with corresponding Monte Carlo (MC) simulation results in heterogeneous patient geometries, in order to validate Acuros and quantify the accuracy improvement it marks relative to TG43. Methods: Dosimetric comparisons in the form of isodose lines, percentage dose difference maps, and dose volume histogram results were performed for two voxelized mathematical models resembling an esophageal and a breast brachytherapy patient, as well as an actual breast brachytherapy patient model. The mathematical models were converted to digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) image series for input to the TPS. The MCNP5 v.1.40 general-purpose simulation code input files for each model were prepared using information derived from the corresponding DICOM RT exports from the TPS. Results: Comparisons of MC and TG43 results in all models showed significant differences, as reported previously in the literature and expected from the inability of the TG43 based algorithm to account for heterogeneities and model specific scatter conditions. A close agreement was observed between MC and Acuros results in all models except for a limited number of points that lay in the penumbra of perfectly shaped structures in the esophageal model, or at distances very close to the catheters in all models. Conclusions: Acuros marks a significant dosimetry improvement relative to TG43. The assessment of the clinical significance of this accuracy improvement requires further work. Mathematical patient equivalent models and models prepared from actual patient CT series are useful complementary tools in the methodology outlined in this series of works for the benchmarking of any advanced dose calculation algorithm beyond TG43.

  2. A comparative assessment of non-laboratory-based versus commonly used laboratory-based cardiovascular disease risk scores in the NHANES III population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankur Pandya

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: National and international primary CVD risk screening guidelines focus on using total CVD risk scores. Recently, we developed a non-laboratory-based CVD risk score (inputs: age, sex, smoking, diabetes, systolic blood pressure, treatment of hypertension, body-mass index, which can assess risk faster and at lower costs compared to laboratory-based scores (inputs include cholesterol values. We aimed to assess the exchangeability of the non-laboratory-based risk score to four commonly used laboratory-based scores (Framingham CVD [2008, 1991 versions], and Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation [SCORE] for low and high risk settings in an external validation population. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Analyses were based on individual-level, score-specific rankings of risk for adults in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III aged 25-74 years, without history of CVD or cancer (n = 5,999. Risk characterization agreement was based on overlap in dichotomous risk characterization (thresholds of 10-year risk >10-20% and Spearman rank correlation. Risk discrimination was assessed using receiver operator characteristic curve analysis (10-year CVD death outcome. Risk characterization agreement ranged from 91.9-95.7% and 94.2-95.1% with Spearman correlation ranges of 0.957-0.980 and 0.946-0.970 for men and women, respectively. In men, c-statistics for the non-laboratory-based, Framingham (2008, 1991, and SCORE (high, low functions were 0.782, 0.776, 0.781, 0.785, and 0.785, with p-values for differences relative to the non-laboratory-based score of 0.44, 0.89, 0.68 and 0.65, respectively. In women, the corresponding c-statistics were 0.809, 0.834, 0.821, 0.792, and 0.792, with corresponding p-values of 0.04, 0.34, 0.11 and 0.09, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Every score discriminated risk of CVD death well, and there was high agreement in risk characterization between non-laboratory-based and laboratory-based risk scores, which

  3. Development of remote sensing technology in New Zealand, part 1. Mapping land use and environmental studies in New Zealand, part 2. Indigenous forest assessment, part 3. Seismotectonic, structural, volcanologic and geomorphic study of New Zealand, part 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probine, M. C.; Suggate, R. P.; Stirling, I. F.; Mcgreevy, M. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. As part of the tape reformatting process, a simple coded picture output program was developed. This represents Pixel's radiance level by one of a 47 character set on a nonoverprinting line printer. It not only has aided in locating areas for the reformatting process, but has also formed the foundation for a supervised clustering package. This in turn has led to a simplistic but effective thematic mapping package.

  4. Potential radionuclide emissions from stacks on the Hanford site, Part 1: Dose assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, W.E.; Barnett, J.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    On February 3, 1993, the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Division of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10. The Compliance Order requires RL to evaluate all radionuclide emission points at the Hanford Site to determine which are subject to continuous emission monitoring requirements in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, and to continuously monitor radionuclide emissions in accordance with requirements in 40 CFR 61.93. The Information Request required RL to provide a written Compliance Plan to meet the requirements of the Compliance Order. A Compliance Plan was submitted to EPA, Region 10, on April 30, 1993. The Compliance Plan specified that a dose assessment would be performed for 84 Westinghouse Hanford Company stacks registered with the Washington State Department of Health on the Hanford Site. Stacks that have the potential emissions to cause an effective dose equivalent to a maximum exposed individual greater than 0.1 mrem/y must be monitored continuously for radionuclide emissions. Five methods were approved by EPA, Region 10 for performing the assessments: Release Fractions from Appendix D of 40 CFR 61, Back Calculations Using A HEPA Filtration Factor, Nondestructive Assay of HEPA Filters, A Spill Release Fraction, and Upstream of HEPA Filter Air Concentrations. The first two methods were extremely conservative for estimating releases. The third method, which used a state-of-the-art portable gamma spectrometer, yielded surprising results from the distribution of radionuclides on the HEPA filters. All five methods are described. Assessments using a HEPA Filtration Factor for back calculations identified 32 stacks that would have emissions that would cause an EDE to the MEI greater than 0.1 mrem y{sup {minus}1}. The number was reduced to 15 stacks when the other methods were applied. The paper discusses reasons for the overestimates.

  5. Post-war Kosovo: Part 2. Assessment of emergency medicine leadership development strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliades, M J; Lis, J; Barbosa, J; VanRooyen, M J

    2001-01-01

    Since the return of the refugee population to Kosovo, attempts at development of an emergency medical system in Kosovo have met with varied success, and have been hampered by unforeseen barriers. These barriers have been exacerbated by the lack of detailed health system assessments. A multimodal approach of data collection and analysis was used to identify potential barriers, and determine the appropriate level of intervention for emergency medicine (EM) development in Kosovo. The four step, multi-modal, data collection tool utilized: 1) demographic and health systems data; 2) focus group discussions with health-care workers; 3) individual interviews with key individuals in EM development; and 4) Q-Analysis of the attitudes and opinions of EM leaders. Results indicated that Emergency Medicine in Kosovo is under-developed. This method of combined quantitative and qualitative analysis identified a number of developmental needs in the Kosovar health system. There has been little formal training, the EMS system lacks organization, equipment, and a reliable communication system, and centralized emergency centers, other than the center at Prishtina Hospital, are inadequate. Group discussions and interviews support the desire by Kosovar health-care workers to establish EM, and highlight a number of concerns. A Q-methodology analysis of the attitudes of potential leaders in the field, supported these concerns and identified two attitudinal groups with deeper insights into their opinions on the development of such a system. This study suggests that a multi-modal assessment of health systems can provide important information about the need for emergency health system improvements in Kosovo. This methodology may serve as a model for future, system-wide assessments in post-conflict health system reconstruction. PMID:12090209

  6. Plants and parts of plants used in food supplements: an approach to their safety assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunella Carratù

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In Italy most herbal products are sold as food supplements and are subject only to food law. A list of about 1200 plants authorised for use in food supplements has been compiled by the Italian ministry of Health. In order to review and possibly improve the ministry's list an ad hoc working group of Istituto Superiore di Sanità was requested to provide a technical and scientific opinion on plant safety. The listed plants were evaluated on the basis of their use in food, therapeutic activity, human toxicity and in no-alimentary fields. Toxicity was also assessed and plant limitations to use in food supplements were defined.

  7. ASSESSMENT OF ISSUES AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR SUSTAINABLE SOCIAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN ALBANIAN PART OF PRESPA PARK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doriana Grazhdani

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The Albanian part of Prespa Lakes Basin includes part of Macro Prespa and Micro Prespa Lakes, and the surrounding forested mountainous slopes, covering a total area of 27750 ha. Despite the contribution of a range of services to human wellbeing, these ecosystems are facing numerous challenges, stemming for the existing practices in many areas that directly or indirectly affect the lakes. An important dilemma encountered in the present situation is the need to sustain growth while preventing damage to environment through the degradation of natural resource. Current resource management practices including water and land-use planning, agriculture, forestry, fisheries and tourism are failing to maintain and restore the health of ecosystems within the Albanian Prespa Lakes area. This paper is focused on issues and opportunities arising from linkages between social economic development and environment. First a summary information on trends and constrains of social economic indicators are provided. Then, associations of environmental issues with social economic activities are analyzed using SWOT analysis method. Finally, some remedies and possible ways for sustainable development are presented in the present paper.

  8. Social assessment of wind power. Part 2: Environmental evaluation of wind power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report focuses on the environmental aspects of wind power. The main aim of this report is to look at some of the most important environmental effects, to evaluate (monetize) these effects - if possible - and add these figures to the production cost estimates. It is not the intention to include all environmental aspects in the environmental assessment, but to analyse some of the most important, that is: The reduction of CO2, SO2 and NOx emitted to the atmosphere, e.g. from central power plants. Noise and visual effects from wind mills. Further, this report also assesses the influence of wind power on sustainability, i.e. that wind power, compared to power based on coal and natural gas, is a renewable energy resource. The valuation of the environmental effects is limited to the national effects. Since the valuation of the CO2-emissions is crucial to the main conclusion, some of the fundamental assumptions are: The Danish CO2-reduction goal is reached by using national abatement means. Therefore international agreements on distributing CO2 standards (joint implementation) are neglected; The power plants only produce electricity - not combined heat and power. If it is possible to utilize the production of heat, the environmental benefits from wind power will be reduced. It is uncertain whether the Danish, empirical investigations included in this report encompass the optimal abatement means and use them to the right extent. (EG) 55 refs

  9. Bibliographical database of radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment: Part 1, through June 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straume, T.; Ricker, Y.; Thut, M.

    1988-08-29

    This database was constructed to support research in radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment. Relevant publications were identified through detailed searches of national and international electronic databases and through our personal knowledge of the subject. Publications were numbered and key worded, and referenced in an electronic data-retrieval system that permits quick access through computerized searches on publication number, authors, key words, title, year, and journal name. Photocopies of all publications contained in the database are maintained in a file that is numerically arranged by citation number. This report of the database is provided as a useful reference and overview. It should be emphasized that the database will grow as new citations are added to it. With that in mind, we arranged this report in order of ascending citation number so that follow-up reports will simply extend this document. The database cite 1212 publications. Publications are from 119 different scientific journals, 27 of these journals are cited at least 5 times. It also contains reference to 42 books and published symposia, and 129 reports. Information relevant to radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment is widely distributed among the scientific literature, although a few journals clearly dominate. The four journals publishing the largest number of relevant papers are Health Physics, Mutation Research, Radiation Research, and International Journal of Radiation Biology. Publications in Health Physics make up almost 10% of the current database.

  10. Accounting for ecosystem services in life cycle assessment, Part I: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Singh, Shweta; Bakshi, Bhavik R

    2010-04-01

    If life cycle oriented methods are to encourage sustainable development, they must account for the role of ecosystem goods and services, since these form the basis of planetary activities and human well-being. This article reviews methods that are relevant to accounting for the role of nature and that could be integrated into life cycle oriented approaches. These include methods developed by ecologists for quantifying ecosystem services, by ecological economists for monetary valuation, and life cycle methods such as conventional life cycle assessment, thermodynamic methods for resource accounting such as exergy and emergy analysis, variations of the ecological footprint approach, and human appropriation of net primary productivity. Each approach has its strengths: economic methods are able to quantify the value of cultural services; LCA considers emissions and assesses their impact; emergy accounts for supporting services in terms of cumulative exergy; and ecological footprint is intuitively appealing and considers biocapacity. However, no method is able to consider all the ecosystem services, often due to the desire to aggregate all resources in terms of a single unit. This review shows that comprehensive accounting for ecosystem services in LCA requires greater integration among existing methods, hierarchical schemes for interpreting results via multiple levels of aggregation, and greater understanding of the role of ecosystems in supporting human activities. These present many research opportunities that must be addressed to meet the challenges of sustainability. PMID:20178382

  11. Bibliographical database of radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment: Part 1, through June 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This database was constructed to support research in radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment. Relevant publications were identified through detailed searches of national and international electronic databases and through our personal knowledge of the subject. Publications were numbered and key worded, and referenced in an electronic data-retrieval system that permits quick access through computerized searches on publication number, authors, key words, title, year, and journal name. Photocopies of all publications contained in the database are maintained in a file that is numerically arranged by citation number. This report of the database is provided as a useful reference and overview. It should be emphasized that the database will grow as new citations are added to it. With that in mind, we arranged this report in order of ascending citation number so that follow-up reports will simply extend this document. The database cite 1212 publications. Publications are from 119 different scientific journals, 27 of these journals are cited at least 5 times. It also contains reference to 42 books and published symposia, and 129 reports. Information relevant to radiation biological dosimetry and risk assessment is widely distributed among the scientific literature, although a few journals clearly dominate. The four journals publishing the largest number of relevant papers are Health Physics, Mutation Research, Radiation Research, and International Journal of Radiation Biology. Publications in Health Physics make up almost 10% of the current database

  12. Threshold Assessment: Definition of Acceptable Sites as Part of Site Selection for the Japanese HLW Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the last ten years, the Japanese High-Level Nuclear Waste (HLW) repository program has focused on assessing the feasibility of a basic repository concept, which resulted in the recently published H12 Report. As Japan enters the implementation phase, a new organization must identify, screen and choose potential repository sites. Thus, a rapid mechanism for determining the likelihood of site suitability is critical. The threshold approach, described here, is a simple mechanism for defining the likelihood that a site is suitable given estimates of several critical parameters. We rely on the results of a companion paper, which described a probabilistic performance assessment simulation of the HLW reference case in the H12 report. The most critical two or three input parameters are plotted against each other and treated as spatial variables. Geostatistics is used to interpret the spatial correlation, which in turn is used to simulate multiple realizations of the parameter value maps. By combining an array of realizations, we can look at the probability that a given site, as represented by estimates of this combination of parameters, would be good host for a repository site

  13. Model assessment of protective barriers: Part 3. Status of FY 1990 work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayer, M.J.; Rockhold, M.L.; Holford, D.J.

    1992-02-01

    Radioactive waste exists at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site in a variety of locations, including subsurface grout and tank farms, solid waste burial grounds, and contaminated soil sites. Some of these waste sites may need to be isolated from percolating water to minimize the potential for transport of the waste to the ground water, which eventually discharges to the Columbia River. Multilayer protective barriers have been proposed as a means of limiting the flow of water through the waste sites (DOE 1987). A multiyear research program [managed jointly by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company for the DOE] is aimed at assessing the performance of these barriers. One aspect of this program involves the use of computer models to predict barrier performance. Three modeling studies have already been conducted and a test plan was produced. The simulation work reported here was conducted by PNL and extends the previous modeling work. The purpose of this report are to understand phenomena that have been observed in the field and to provide information that can be used to improve hydrologic modeling of the protective barrier. An improved modeling capability results in better estimates of barrier performance. Better estimates can be used to improve the design of barriers and the assessment of their long-term performance.

  14. Optimization of municipal solid waste leaching test procedure: assessment of the part of hydrosoluble organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, A; Feuillade-Cathalifaud, G; Pallier, V; Mansour, A A

    2011-02-28

    Despite national recycling campaigns, the amount of municipal solid waste (MSW) to be treated remains very important in France with almost 39% of the waste produced going to landfills. Therefore with the increasing concern over sustainable development and energy valorization, it seems essential to optimize current treatment methods and develop new preparation techniques of the waste. Nevertheless an important first step to take into account is to evaluate the waste using a different method than biogas production. In this perspective, the leaching test (LT) could be used as a tool to evaluate the ability of a waste to mobilize organic and mineral compounds. This research aims at optimizing a leaching test protocol mainly adapted to organic waste in order to be used on MSW to assess the fractions of both fast and slow mobilized organic matter. Several leaching tests have thus been implemented, optimized and compared in terms of accessible organic matter in the waste. Results have shown that the test conditions have a great influence on the mobilization of pollutants. The duration of the test affects mainly the quantity and quality of organic molecules extracted. The renewal of the eluent does not properly simulate the conditions of a landfill. The results would be used to assess the performance and the efficiency of new ways of waste pretreatment. PMID:21156339

  15. Drifting buoy and other data as part of the Outer Continental Drifting buoy and other data as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 04 June 1976 to 01 October 1976 (NODC Accession 7700020)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting buoy and other data was collected by the University of Washington (UW) as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP)....

  16. SONOGRAPHICAL ASSESSMENT OF PORTAL VEIN DIAMETER IN NORTHERN PART OF WEST BENGAL, INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayanta Bhattacharya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Measurement of the diameter of the portal vein may be particularly important in detecting and evaluating patients with portal hypertension as well as some other clinical disorders. But there is paucity of data regarding normal portal vein diameter in northern part of West Bengal, India. Therefore this study was undertaken to throw light into this matter. In this work, we analyzed retrospectively the data regarding portal vein diameter obtained from 2D-Ultrasound of whole abdomen from 500 adults aged between 20 to 50 years of both sexes (male 276, female 224. All the cases met our selection criteria. The results were tabulated and analyzed statistically. The mean diameter of portal vein in male subjects was 10.37 + 1.03 mm and in females it was 9.82 + 1.01 mm. A standard for normal portal vein diameter has been set up which may help clinicians to detect and evaluate several clinical situations.

  17. Assessment of airborne heavy metal pollution using plant parts and topsoil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbula, Snezana M; Miljkovic, Dusanka Dj; Kovacevic, Renata M; Ilic, Ana A

    2012-02-01

    Robinia pseudoacacia L. (Fabaceae) was evaluated as a possible bioindicator of airborne heavy metal pollution, which originates from mining and pyrometallurgical copper production in Bor (Eastern Serbia). Concentrations of Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd, As and Hg were determined in different plant organs (washed/unwashed leaves, branches, roots) and topsoil of R. pseudoacacia by ICP-AES and by AAS. Sampling was carried out during 2008 at ten selected sites distributed in five zones with different levels of pollution. Concentrations of Pb, Cd and Hg did not exceeded the maximum allowed concentration (MAC) in soils at any of the sampling sites. Cu and As were present only at two sites within the MAC, whereas Zn exceeded the MAC at two sampling sites. Although present in the soil, As, Cd and Hg were below limit of detection in all parts of R. pseudoacacia. The rest of the studied elements, collected at the sites closest to the copper smelter or in the directions of the prevailing winds, were found to be at high levels. The higest Cu and Zn concentrations were detected in branches of R. pseudoacacia at the site Krivelj in the rural zone (6418.2±355.4 mg kg⁻¹ and 4699.8±320.8 mg kg⁻¹, respectively). Pb was present in similar amounts in all parts of R. pseudoacacia in the concentration ranging from 4.9 ± 0.3 mg kg⁻¹ (in washed leaves, at tourist zone) to 66.9±5.3 mg kg⁻¹ (in roots, at urban-industrial zone). According to the mobility ratio, leaves and branches of R. pseudoacacia acted as excluders of Cu, Zn and Pb, except for the branches which acted as indicators of Zn. Although As is present in high concentrations in the air and topsoil of the examined area, results show that R. pseudoacacia is not a suitable indicator of environmental pollution with As. PMID:22018546

  18. Epistemic uncertainties and natural hazard risk assessment - Part 1: A review of the issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beven, K. J.; Aspinall, W. P.; Bates, P. D.; Borgomeo, E.; Goda, K.; Hall, J. W.; Page, T.; Phillips, J. C.; Rougier, J. T.; Simpson, M.; Stephenson, D. B.; Smith, P. J.; Wagener, T.; Watson, M.

    2015-12-01

    Uncertainties in natural hazard risk assessment are generally dominated by the sources arising from lack of knowledge or understanding of the processes involved. There is a lack of knowledge about frequencies, process representations, parameters, present and future boundary conditions, consequences and impacts, and the meaning of observations in evaluating simulation models. These are the epistemic uncertainties that can be difficult to constrain, especially in terms of event or scenario probabilities, even as elicited probabilities rationalized on the basis of expert judgements. This paper reviews the issues raised by trying to quantify the effects of epistemic uncertainties. Such scientific uncertainties might have significant influence on decisions that are made for risk management, so it is important to communicate the meaning of an uncertainty estimate and to provide an audit trail of the assumptions on which it is based. Some suggestions for good practice in doing so are made.

  19. Seismic performance assessment based on damage of structures, Part 1: Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lađinović Đorđe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents methodology for safety assessment and design of earthquake resistant structures based on application of damage spectra. The damage spectrum can be used for seismic evaluation of vulnerability of structures with given properties and can provide information of damage potential of the recorded ground motions. Damage spectrum represents a variation of a damage index versus structural period for a single-degree-of-freedom system subjected to an earthquake ground motion. The improved damage index, based on plastic deformation and hysteretic energy dissipation, is applied. It depends on maximal plastic deformation, ductility capacity and function including cumulative damage effects. This function, besides the parameter including influence of deterioration, depends on the history of cyclic deformations and on both cyclic and accumulative ductility.

  20. Assessment of mental health in adults of the northern part of the city of Kosovska Mitrovica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirković Momčilo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Mental health disorders lead to disorder of effective functioning of people and deterioration of quality of life. Early detection of individuals at risk of mental health disorders is extremely important from the aspect of mental health disorders prevention. The aim of the research was to determine the frequency of mental health problems among adult residents of northern Kosovska Mitrovica and to examine the association between frequency of mental health problems and socio-demographic and other characteristics of the population obtained by the questionnaire. Methods. The cross-sectional study on the representative sample of adult residents of northern Kosovska Mitrovica was performed in October 2009. To obtain information about the characteristics of mental health the Goldberg’s General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28 was used. For performing survey at site the method of rapid epidemiological assessment was chosen. Statistical analysis included the methods of descriptive statistics, multivariate regression analysis and calculation of the Cronbach’s alpha coefficient of internal consistency of the questionnaire. Results. Mental health problems (total score were present in almost half of the respondents (49.2%. Psychosomatic problems were present in more than half of the respondents (55.4%, while anxiety and insomnia were present in almost half of the respondents (49.2%. Social dysfunction had more than three fifths of the respondents (63.1% and depression more than a quarter of the respondents (28.5%. More positive responses in the questionnaire were statistically significantly associated with older age, poor financial situation, abuse and assessing of the current political-security situation as high risk. The value of Cronbach’s alpha coefficient was 0.705. Conclusions. Almost half of the respondents (49.2% of North Kosovska Mitrovica had mental health problems. Mental health problems were associated with older age, poor

  1. Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products, Part 3: LED Environmental Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuenge, Jason R.; Hollomon, Brad; Dillon, Heather E.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.

    2013-03-01

    This report covers the third part of a larger U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project to assess the life-cycle environmental and resource impacts in the manufacturing, transport, use, and disposal of light-emitting diode (LED) lighting products in relation to incumbent lighting technologies. All three reports are available on the DOE website (www.ssl.energy.gov/tech_reports.html). • Part 1: Review of the Life-Cycle Energy Consumption of Incandescent, Compact Fluorescent and LED Lamps; • Part 2: LED Manufacturing and Performance; • Part 3: LED Environmental Testing. Parts 1 and 2 were published in February and June 2012, respectively. The Part 1 report included a summary of the life-cycle assessment (LCA) process and methodology, provided a literature review of more than 25 existing LCA studies of various lamp types, and performed a meta-analysis comparing LED lamps with incandescent and compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs). Drawing from the Part 1 findings, Part 2 performed a more detailed assessment of the LED manufacturing process and used these findings to provide a comparative LCA taking into consideration a wider range of environmental impacts. Both reports concluded that the life-cycle environmental impact of a given lamp is dominated by the energy used during lamp operation—the upstream generation of electricity drives the total environmental footprint of the product. However, a more detailed understanding of end-of-life disposal considerations for LED products has become increasingly important as their installation base has grown. The Part 3 study (reported herein) was undertaken to augment the LCA findings with chemical analysis of a variety of LED, CFL, and incandescent lamps using standard testing procedures. A total of 22 samples, representing 11 different models, were tested to determine whether any of 17 elements were present at levels exceeding California or Federal regulatory thresholds for hazardous waste. Key findings include: • The selected

  2. Availability and use of medical isotopes in Canada : performed as part of a radiological terrorism risk assessment. Technical memorandum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment of the availability of radioactive material used for medical applications in Canada has been performed as part of the CBRN Research and Technology Initiative (CRTI) Project CRTI-02-0024RD (Probabilistic Risk Assessment Tool for Radiological Dispersal Devices). A general list of medical radioisotopes used worldwide was compiled via literature searches and Internet investigations. This list was then compared to all isotopes licenced to healthcare facilities in Canada. Sources of lesser concern for this study, such as noble gases, short-lived isotopes, and radioisotopes not licenced for medical applications in Canada, were eliminated. The remaining sources were then analysed for frequency of use and maximum licenced activity to assess which materials would be of highest concern in relation to radiological terrorism. A detailed description of the application, typical administered activity, and other relevant information for these most common and highest licenced activity medical sources was assembled to feed directly into the risk assessment database. A general discussion of security in healthcare facilities is also given. Due to the constant advances made in medicine, the information relating to licenced isotopes is dynamic and thus requires updating to ensure the database is kept current. (author)

  3. Forest fire risk assessment in parts of Northeast India using geospatial tools

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kanchan Puri; G. Areendran; Krishna Raj; Sraboni Mazumdar; P.K. Joshi

    2011-01-01

    Forest fire is a major cause of changes in forest structure and function.Among various floristic regions,the northeast region of India suffers maximum from the fires due to age-old practice of shifting cultivation and spread of fires from jhum fields.For proper mitigation and management,an early warning of forest fires through risk modeling is required.The study results demonstrate the potential use of remote sensing and Geographic Information System (GIS) in identifying forest fire prone areas in Manipur,southeastern part of Northeast India.Land use land cover (LULC),vegetation type,Digital elevation model (DEM),slope,aspect and proximity to roads and settlements,factors that influence the behavior of fire,were used to model the forest fire risk zones.Each class of the layers was given weight according to their fire inducing capability and their sensitivity to fire.Weighted sum modeling and ISODATA clustering was used to classify the fire zones.To validate the results,Along Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR),the historical fire hotspots data was used to check the occurrence points and modeled forest fire locations.The forest risk zone map has 55-63% of agreement with ATSR datsset.

  4. Toxicological assessment of kretek cigarettes Part 4: mechanistic investigations, smoke chemistry and in vitro toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemer, E; Dempsey, R; Lawless-Pyne, J; Lukman, S; Evans, A Deger; Trelles-Sticken, E; Wittke, S; Schorp, M K

    2014-12-01

    The smoke chemistry and in vitro toxicity of mainstream smoke (MS) was investigated in American-blended cigarettes with or without the addition of 2.5%, 5% or 10% eugenol to the tobacco and in Indonesian-blended cigarettes with and without the addition of cloves, cloves extracted with hot ethanol, and extracted cloves replenished with eugenol or clove oil. The addition of eugenol reduced the concentration of nearly all toxicants measured in MS as well as the in vitro cytotoxicity of the gas/vapor phase. Reductions were also seen in bacterial mutagenicity of the total particulate matter (TPM) assessed by the Ames Assay. The addition of extracted cloves led to increases and decreases of toxicant concentrations in MS. Replenishment with eugenol or clove oil decreased the toxicant concentrations; with most smoke constituent concentrations reduced below the concentration found in tobacco-only cigarettes. Cytotoxicity of the TPM was not affected by the clove preparations. However, GVP cytotoxicity was reduced (untreated cloves showing the highest reductions). Mutagenicity of TPM was decreased by the clove preparations. Mechanisms for the reductions, (up to 40%), are most likely due to dilution effects by eugenol, changed burning characteristics of the tobacco, and free radical scavenging by eugenol. PMID:25455230

  5. Toxicological assessment of kretek cigarettes Part 5: mechanistic investigations, inhalation toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemer, E; Dempsey, R; Van Overveld, F J; Berges, A; Pype, J; Weiler, H; Vanscheeuwijck, P; Schorp, M K

    2014-12-01

    The biological effects of mainstream smoke (MS) from Indonesian-blended cigarettes with and without added cloves, cloves extracted with hot ethanol, and extracted cloves replenished with eugenol or clove oil were assessed in a 90-day inhalation study in rats. A separate 35-day inhalation study in rats was performed with MS from American-blended cigarettes with 0%, 2.5%, 5% or 10% added eugenol. Effects commonly seen in inhalation studies with MS were observed. These included histopathological changes indicative of irritation in the entire respiratory tract and inflammatory responses in the lung. Adding cloves to American- or Indonesian-blended cigarettes reduced the inflammatory response in the lung but with no difference between the two blend types. When the clove oil was extracted (∼ 75% reduction of eugenol achieved) from cloves, the inflammatory response in the lung was still reduced similarly to whole cloves but the severity of histopathological changes in the upper respiratory tract was less reduced. Add back of clove oil or pure eugenol reduced this response to a level similar to what was seen with whole cloves. When eugenol was added to American-blended cigarettes, similar findings of reduced lung inflammation and severity of histopathological changes in respiratory the tract was confirmed. These studies demonstrate a clear effect of cloves, and in particular eugenol, in explaining these findings. PMID:25455231

  6. Risk assessment of desertification using GIS in parts of Mond Basin, Southern Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper attempts to evolve a new model by considering various indicators of different types of land degradation desertification, namely water erosion, soil salinity, vegetation degradation, and lowering of ground water table. the Mond river basin, located centrally to this zone, has been selected as a test area to assess the risk and kind of desertification. For this purpose two sub basins of the Payab and Quareh Aghaj have been chosen for detailed study. The thresholds for the severity classes of indicators have been established and then the hazards map for each indicator of types of desertification has been prepared in a GIS. The risk maps of water erosion, soil salinization, lowering of water table, vegetation degradation have been produced for each of the two sub basins. It was possible to distinguish the areas under actual risk from areas under potential risk of desertification types. Also areas under potential risk are classified to subclasses with different probability level to show a statistical picture of risk in future. (Author) 3 refs.

  7. Performance assessment of time-domain optical brain imagers, part 2: nEUROPt protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wabnitz, Heidrun; Jelzow, Alexander; Mazurenka, Mikhail; Steinkellner, Oliver; Macdonald, Rainer; Milej, Daniel; Żołek, Norbert; Kacprzak, Michal; Sawosz, Piotr; Maniewski, Roman; Liebert, Adam; Magazov, Salavat; Hebden, Jeremy; Martelli, Fabrizio; Di Ninni, Paola; Zaccanti, Giovanni; Torricelli, Alessandro; Contini, Davide; Re, Rebecca; Zucchelli, Lucia; Spinelli, Lorenzo; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; Pifferi, Antonio

    2014-08-01

    The nEUROPt protocol is one of two new protocols developed within the European project nEUROPt to characterize the performances of time-domain systems for optical imaging of the brain. It was applied in joint measurement campaigns to compare the various instruments and to assess the impact of technical improvements. This protocol addresses the characteristic of optical brain imaging to detect, localize, and quantify absorption changes in the brain. It was implemented with two types of inhomogeneous liquid phantoms based on Intralipid and India ink with well-defined optical properties. First, small black inclusions were used to mimic localized changes of the absorption coefficient. The position of the inclusions was varied in depth and lateral direction to investigate contrast and spatial resolution. Second, two-layered liquid phantoms with variable absorption coefficients were employed to study the quantification of layer-wide changes and, in particular, to determine depth selectivity, i.e., the ratio of sensitivities for deep and superficial absorption changes. We introduce the tests of the nEUROPt protocol and present examples of results obtained with different instruments and methods of data analysis. This protocol could be a useful step toward performance tests for future standards in diffuse optical imaging. PMID:25121480

  8. Assessing and helping challenging students: Part One, Why do some students have difficulty learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricson, William D; Kleffner, John H

    2002-01-01

    When students struggle with routine assignments and fall behind classmates, a busy teacher may pigeonhole them as slow, give up on them, or become frustrated from failed efforts to bring them up to speed. Well-intentioned efforts to help struggling students by providing repetitions of the same experiences may fail because the specific cause of the sub-par performance was not identified. Six potential causes of inadequate student performance can serve as a diagnostic framework to help teachers pinpoint why a student is struggling academically: 1) cognitive factors, including poorly integrated, compartmentalized information, poor metacognition that hinders the student's ability to monitor and self-correct performance, bona fide learning disabilities that require professional assessment and treatment, and sensory-perceptual difficulties that may hinder performance in certain health care disciplines; 2) ineffective study habits, which are more common among professional students than faculty realize; 3) an inadequate educational experience (unclear objectives, poorly organized instruction, absence of coaching and timely feedback) or a punitive environment in which students avoid approaching instructors for assistance; 4) distraction due to nonacademic issues such as social relationships, health of a spouse, or employment; 5) dysfunctional levels of defensiveness that hinder student-teacher communication; and 6) underlying medical conditions that may affect student attentiveness, motivation, energy, and emotional balance. The objective of this article is to help faculty recognize potential underlying causes of a student's learning problems. Strategies for helping the academically struggling student are also introduced for several of these etiologies. PMID:12358100

  9. Las Pteridophyta y el paleoambiente de la parte media de la Formación La Ternera (Triásico Superior, en Quebrada La Cachivarita, III Región, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Herbst

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN Se describen e ilustran diez especies de Pteridophyta procedentes de estratos de la parte media de la Formación La Ternera (Triásico Superior, aflorantes en la quebrada La Cachivarita, afluente norte de la quebrada Paipote, Provincia de Copiapó, III Región, Chile. Se trata de Rienitsia ternerae, Todites chilensis, Todites sp., Neocalamites carrerei, Asterotheca rigbyana, Asterotheca fuchsi, Cladophlebis mendozaensis, Cladophlebis kurtzi, Gleichenites cachivaritensis y Dictyophyllum (D. tenuifolium, de las cuales las dos primeras son nuevas. El conjunto paleoflorístico confirma la edad triásica superior asignada con anterioridad a la Formación La Ternera. El estudio sedimentológico de la sección que incluye tales estratos permitió distinguir cinco facies diferentes que, en conjunto, son interpretadas como depósitos en un lago que progresivamente se torna más somero.ABSTRACT The Pteridophyta and the paleoenvironment of the middle part of the La Ternera Formation (Upper Triassic at Quebrada La Cachivarita, Atacama Region, Chile. Ten species of Pteridophyta from the middle part of the La Ternera Formation (Upper Triassic, in quebrada La Cachivarita, Copiapó Province, northern Chile, are described and figured. They include Rienitsia chilensis, Todites chilensis, Todites sp., Neocalamites carrerei, Asterotheca rigbyana, Asterotheca fuchsi, Cladophlebis mendozaensis, Cladophlebis kurtzi, Gleichenites cachivaritensis and Dictyophyllum (D. tenuifolium, being the first two, new ones. This assemblage agrees with an Upper Triassic age for the La Ternera Formation as formerly proposed. A sedimentological analysis of the section which includes the fossiliferous strata, recognizes five different facies which are interpreted as deposits in a lake becoming progressively shallower.

  10. Assessment of surface and groundwater quality for use in aquaculture in parts of northern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Arabi,

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent times, fish farming (aquaculture has become a major source of income and a substitute for beef in many homes all over Nigeria because a kilogram of fish is cheaper especially the so call ice-fish compare to same kilogram of beef. As a result, many people have embraced fish farming and while some aquaculturist have recorded loss, only few got it right especially at the initial stage of the fish farming business. Some fish farm had average fish weighing a kilogram while others have average weighing less than half a kilogram due to many factors ranging from contamination of pond water from pile up of feeding stuff at bottom of the pond to the use of ground or surface water whose constituents or chemically controlled parameters have adverse effects on harvest in aquaculture. This study was carried out to ascertain the worth or not of surface and groundwater from parts of northern Nigeria for fish farming. Thirty seven surface and groundwater samples were collected during the peak of dry season and analyzed for physicochemical parameter, major and minor elements that can have adverse effects on fish farming using model V-2000 multi-analyte photometer, atomic absorption spectrophotometer, pH and conductivity meter. Some of the measurements were carried out in-situ, while others were carried out in the laboratory. Most of the samples (92% analyzed indicate that they can be used efficiently for aquaculture, only few were observed to have some adverse effects on the intended use and these include pH, salinity, sodium contents and residual sodium carbonate which are closely related to the pH of water samples analyzed. It can be summarized that the studied water samples are generally good for aquaculture.

  11. Portugal and United States cooperative energy assessment. Volume 3. Reference reports, Part 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-09-01

    Statistical data on energy production and consumption and supporting information were obtained from US Bureau of Mines records supplemented by additional data obtained in Portugal. Geologic descriptions and analysis of known areas and of areas having possible future potential have been prepared by the US Geological Survey. Portugal lacks sufficient indigenous supplies of organic fuels to meet its energy demands, and so must import large quantities of petroleum and coal. Approximately 80% of Portugal's electric energy is produced by hydroelectric stations; thermal stations produce the other 20%. Portugal has produced no crude oil, natural gas, or condensate; no resources or reserves in these categories are listed for Portugal in the 1976 World Energy Conference report. Until the last year or so (1980), no significant onshore petroleum exploration had been done in Portugal since 1963. Production of coal in Portugal has declined steadily to the present annual yield of about 200,000 metric tons. On the basis of estimates in only three coal fields, resources of coal of all ranks in Portugal total at least 76 million (10/sup 6/) metric tons. Uranium is mined near Viseu and Guarda in the northern part of Portugal; the Nisa mine in east-central Portugal will begin producing uranium ore in 1985 after installation of a processing plant. Portugal produced 95 metric tons of uranium oxide (U/sub 3/O/sub 8/) from ore stocks in each year from 1972 through 1974; production is assumed to have continued at the same rate since then. Geothermal energy has not been developed in mainland Portugal; however, hot springs that may have geothermal energy potential are known in the Minho district in the northwest. Geothermal energy resources exist in the Azores and a program of evaluation and exploration with technical assistance from the USGS is presently in progress there.

  12. Ambient Air Quality Assessment With Particular Reference to Particulates in Western Part of Jharia Coalfield, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurdeep Singh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available India is in the list of fastest growing countries of the world. India's energy needs are also increasing due to population and industrial growth for improving quality of living style. In India, coal is major input infrastructure industries for example Power plants, Steel plants and Cement industries. India’s 52% of primary energy is coal dependent1. 66% of India's power generation depends upon coal production1. Jharia Coalfield (JCF is falling in the Lower Gondwana Coalfields of India. The area of the JCF is about 450 km2. It is important for the major supply of precious coking coal required for steel plants in India. It is located in Dhanbad district of Jharkhand state of India, The latitude is 23° 39' to 23° 48' N and longitude is 86° 11' to 86° 27' E for the Jharia coalfield. Based on environmental parameters, all the 103 mines of BCCL have been grouped under 17 Clusters. A cluster consists of a group of mines with mine lease boundary lying in close vicinity and includes-Operating mines, Abandoned/ closed mines and proposed projects.The focused study area is in the western part of the Jharia coalfield is named as Cluster XV group of mines of BCCL consists of four mines, Kharkharee Colliery (UG, Dharmaband Colliery (UG, Madhuband Colliery (UG and Phularitand Colliery (UG .The present study was carried out with the objective to measure the ambient air quality of the study area with reference to particulate matter (SPM, PM10 & PM2.5. Ambient air monitoring results have shown that the observe air quality were found within the limit prescribed by MoEF / CPCB. It may due to Underground mines as there are pollution causing lesser activities involved in the UG mining process compared to opencast mining. Implementation of Master plan for Jharia coalfields for environmental management has also improve the air quality in the area10,11.

  13. The coupling of thermochemistry and phase diagrams for group III-V semiconductor systems. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, T.J.

    1998-07-21

    The project was directed at linking the thermochemical properties of III-V compound semiconductors systems with the reported phase diagrams. The solid-liquid phase equilibrium problem was formulated and three approaches to calculating the reduced standard state chemical potential were identified and values were calculated. In addition, thermochemical values for critical properties were measured using solid state electrochemical techniques. These values, along with the standard state chemical potentials and other available thermochemical and phase diagram data, were combined with a critical assessment of selected III-V systems. This work was culminated with a comprehensive assessment of all the III-V binary systems. A novel aspect of the experimental part of this project was the demonstration of the use of a liquid encapsulate to measure component activities by a solid state emf technique in liquid III-V systems that exhibit high vapor pressures at the measurement temperature.

  14. SCANAIR a transient fuel performance code Part two: Assessment of modelling capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The SCANAIR code is devoted to the study of irradiated fuel rod behaviour during RIA. • The paper deals with the status of the code validation for PWR rods. • During the PCMI stage there is a good agreement between calculations and experiments. • The boiling crisis occurrence is rather well predicted. • The code assessment during the boiling crisis has still to be improved. - Abstract: In the frame of their research programmes on fuel safety, the French Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire develops the SCANAIR code devoted to the study of irradiated fuel rod behaviour during reactivity initiated accident. A first paper was focused on detailed modellings and code description. This second paper deals with the status of the code validation for pressurised water reactor rods performed thanks to the available experimental results. About 60 integral tests carried out in CABRI and NSRR experimental reactors and 24 separated tests performed in the PATRICIA facility (devoted to the thermal-hydraulics study) have been recalculated and compared to experimental data. During the first stage of the transient, the pellet clad mechanical interaction phase, there is a good agreement between calculations and experiments: the clad residual elongation and hoop strain of non failed tests but also the failure occurrence and failure enthalpy of failed tests are correctly calculated. After this first stage, the increase of cladding temperature can lead to the Departure from Nucleate Boiling. During the film boiling regime, the clad temperature can reach a very high temperature (>700 °C). If the boiling crisis occurrence is rather well predicted, the calculation of the clad temperature and the clad hoop strain during this stage have still to be improved

  15. Photography in dentistry: Part III (Dental portraits)

    OpenAIRE

    Mirfazaelian A; Siadat H.

    2006-01-01

    Dental portraits are predominantly used for orthodontics, orthognathic surgery and prosthetic dentistry. If these images are to be used for documentation, then the patient must be positioned in accordance with strict guidelines for further references. If the images are to be used to present an aesthetic impression of dental treatment there is more flexibility in positioning the patient. Dental photography is used to make pictures of teeth and surrounding tissues, radiographs, casts and other ...

  16. Essential Oils, Part III: Chemical Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Anton C; Schmidt, Erich

    2016-01-01

    Data on the chemistry of essential oils which have caused contact allergy are provided. The largest group of chemicals found in essential oils consists of terpenes. The number of identified components usually ranges from 100 to 250, but in some oils (lavender, geranium, rosemary) 450 to 500 chemicals have been found. Many chemicals are present in a large number of oils, up to 98% for β-caryophyllene and 97% for limonene. Chemicals that are important constituents of >20 oils are limonene, linalool, and α-pinene. In many essential oils, there are 2 to 5 components which together constitute over 50% to 60% of the oil. In some oils, however, there is one dominant ingredient, making up more than 50% of the oil, including (E)-anethole in aniseed and star anise oil, carvone in spearmint oil, 1,8-cineole (eucalyptol) in Eucalyptus globulus oil, and (E)-cinnamaldehyde in cassia oil. The most important chemicals in 93 individual oils are specified. PMID:27427817

  17. Topics in Finance Part III--Leverage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, Judy

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates operating and financial leverage from the perspective of the financial manager, accenting the relationships to stockholder wealth maximization (SWM), risk and return, and potential agency problems. It also covers some of the pertinent literature related specifically to the implications of operating and financial risk and…

  18. Part III: Total Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    OpenAIRE

    OLIVIER Jos; Janssens-Maenhout, Greet

    2014-01-01

    CO2 emissions from fuel combustion represent the majority of anthropogenic GHG emissions. However, comprehensive analysis of emission trends considers other sources of CO2 as well as other gases, knowing that data on gases and sources other than CO2 from fuel combustion are much more uncertain. Country- specific estimates of CO2 from biomass burning and F-gas emissions are particularly difficult to ascertain. To complement work regarding the emissions of CO2 from fuel combustion, the IEA elec...

  19. KURDISH READERS. PART III, KURDISH SHORT STORIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABDULLA, JAMAL JALAL; MCCARUS, ERNEST N.

    THE SIX STORIES IN THIS COLLECTION ARE WRITTEN IN THE KURDISH DIALECT OF SULAIMANIA, THE LANGUAGE OF OFFICIAL PUBLICATIONS AND TEXTBOOKS IN IRAQI KURDISTAN. THE VARIOUS THEMES INCLUDED ARE REPRESENTATIVE OF KURDISH CULTURE AND TRADITION. EACH SELECTION (WRITTEN IN KURDISH SCRIPT) IS FOLLOWED BY VOCABULARY AND EXPLANATORY NOTES IN ORDER OF…

  20. Photography in dentistry: Part III (Dental portraits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirfazaelian A.

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Dental portraits are predominantly used for orthodontics, orthognathic surgery and prosthetic dentistry. If these images are to be used for documentation, then the patient must be positioned in accordance with strict guidelines for further references. If the images are to be used to present an aesthetic impression of dental treatment there is more flexibility in positioning the patient. Dental photography is used to make pictures of teeth and surrounding tissues, radiographs, casts and other objects. In this section, standard principles for portrait pictures are explained.

  1. High temperature abatement of acid gases from waste incineration. Part II: Comparative life cycle assessment study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biganzoli, Laura; Racanella, Gaia; Marras, Roberto; Rigamonti, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    The performances of a new dolomitic sorbent, named Depurcal®MG, to be directly injected at high temperature in the combustion chamber of Waste-To-Energy (WTE) plants as a preliminary stage of deacidification, were experimentally tested during full-scale commercial operation. Results of the experimentations were promising, and have been extensively described in Biganzoli et al. (2014). This paper reports the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) study performed to compare the traditional operation of the plants, based on the sole sodium bicarbonate feeding at low temperature, with the new one, where the dolomitic sorbent is injected at high temperature. In the latter the sodium bicarbonate is still used, but at lower rate because of the decreased load of acid gases entering the flue gas treatment line. The major goal of the LCA was to make sure that a burden shifting was not taking place somewhere in the life cycle stages, as it might be the case when a new material is used in substitution of another one. According to the comparative approach, only the processes which differ between the two operational modes were included in the system boundaries. They are the production of the two reactants and the treatment of the corresponding solid residues arising from the neutralisation of acid gases. The additional CO2 emission at the stack of the WTE plant due to the activation of the sodium bicarbonate was also included in the calculation. Data used in the modelling of the foreground system are primary, derived from the experimental tests described in Biganzoli et al. (2014) and from the dolomitic sorbent production plant. The results of the LCA show minor changes in the potential impacts between the two operational modes of the plants. These differences are for 8 impact categories in favour of the new operational mode based on the addition of the dolomitic sorbent, and for 7 impact categories in favour of the traditional operation. A final evaluation was conducted on the potential

  2. High temperature abatement of acid gases from waste incineration. Part II: Comparative life cycle assessment study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Two scenarios of acid gases removal in WTE plants were compared in an LCA study. • A detailed inventory based on primary data has been reported for the production of the new dolomitic sorbent. • Results show that the comparison between the two scenarios does not show systematic differences. • The potential impacts are reduced only if there is an increase in the energy efficiency of the WTE plant. - Abstract: The performances of a new dolomitic sorbent, named Depurcal®MG, to be directly injected at high temperature in the combustion chamber of Waste-To-Energy (WTE) plants as a preliminary stage of deacidification, were experimentally tested during full-scale commercial operation. Results of the experimentations were promising, and have been extensively described in Biganzoli et al. (2014). This paper reports the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) study performed to compare the traditional operation of the plants, based on the sole sodium bicarbonate feeding at low temperature, with the new one, where the dolomitic sorbent is injected at high temperature. In the latter the sodium bicarbonate is still used, but at lower rate because of the decreased load of acid gases entering the flue gas treatment line. The major goal of the LCA was to make sure that a burden shifting was not taking place somewhere in the life cycle stages, as it might be the case when a new material is used in substitution of another one. According to the comparative approach, only the processes which differ between the two operational modes were included in the system boundaries. They are the production of the two reactants and the treatment of the corresponding solid residues arising from the neutralisation of acid gases. The additional CO2 emission at the stack of the WTE plant due to the activation of the sodium bicarbonate was also included in the calculation. Data used in the modelling of the foreground system are primary, derived from the experimental tests described in

  3. High temperature abatement of acid gases from waste incineration. Part II: Comparative life cycle assessment study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biganzoli, Laura, E-mail: laura.biganzoli@mail.polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Racanella, Gaia [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Marras, Roberto [Unicalce S.p.A., R and D Department, Via Tonio da Belledo 30, 23900 Lecco (Italy); Rigamonti, Lucia [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Two scenarios of acid gases removal in WTE plants were compared in an LCA study. • A detailed inventory based on primary data has been reported for the production of the new dolomitic sorbent. • Results show that the comparison between the two scenarios does not show systematic differences. • The potential impacts are reduced only if there is an increase in the energy efficiency of the WTE plant. - Abstract: The performances of a new dolomitic sorbent, named Depurcal®MG, to be directly injected at high temperature in the combustion chamber of Waste-To-Energy (WTE) plants as a preliminary stage of deacidification, were experimentally tested during full-scale commercial operation. Results of the experimentations were promising, and have been extensively described in Biganzoli et al. (2014). This paper reports the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) study performed to compare the traditional operation of the plants, based on the sole sodium bicarbonate feeding at low temperature, with the new one, where the dolomitic sorbent is injected at high temperature. In the latter the sodium bicarbonate is still used, but at lower rate because of the decreased load of acid gases entering the flue gas treatment line. The major goal of the LCA was to make sure that a burden shifting was not taking place somewhere in the life cycle stages, as it might be the case when a new material is used in substitution of another one. According to the comparative approach, only the processes which differ between the two operational modes were included in the system boundaries. They are the production of the two reactants and the treatment of the corresponding solid residues arising from the neutralisation of acid gases. The additional CO{sub 2} emission at the stack of the WTE plant due to the activation of the sodium bicarbonate was also included in the calculation. Data used in the modelling of the foreground system are primary, derived from the experimental tests described in

  4. Assessment of the greenhouse gas emissions from cogeneration and trigeneration systems. Part II: Analysis techniques and application cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides a set of specific examples to show the effectiveness of the trigeneration CO2 emission reduction (TCO2ER) indicator proposed in the companion paper (Part I: Models and indicators) to assess the greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction from cogeneration and trigeneration systems. Specific break-even analyses are developed by introducing further indicators, with the aim of assessing the conditions for which different types of combined systems and conventional separate production systems are equivalent in terms of GHG emissions. The various emission indicators are evaluated and discussed for a number of relevant application cases concerning cogeneration and trigeneration solutions with different types of equipment. Scenario analyses are carried out to assess the possible emission reduction benefits from extended diffusion of cogeneration and trigeneration in regions characterized by different energy generation frameworks. The results strongly depend on the available technologies for combined production, on the composition of the energy generation mix, and on the trend towards upgrading the various generation systems. The numerical outcomes indicate that cogeneration and trigeneration solutions could bring significant benefits in countries with prevailing electricity production from fossil fuels, quantified by the use of the proposed indicators

  5. Cetuximab in combination with irinotecan/5-fluorouracil/folinic acid (FOLFIRI in the initial treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: a multicentre two-part phase I/II study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cals Laurent

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was designed to investigate the efficacy and safety of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR inhibitor cetuximab combined with irinotecan, folinic acid (FA and two different doses of infusional 5-fluorouracil (5-FU in the first-line treatment of EGFR-detectable metastatic colorectal cancer. Methods The 5-FU dose was selected on the basis of dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs during part I of the study. Patients received cetuximab (400 mg/m2 initial dose and 250 mg/m2/week thereafter and every 2 weeks irinotecan (180 mg/m2, FA (400 mg/m2 and 5-FU (either low dose [LD], 300 mg/m2 bolus plus 2,000 mg/m2 46-hour infusion, n = 7; or, high-dose [HD], 400 mg/m2 bolus plus 2,400 mg/m2; n = 45. Results Only two DLTs occurred in the HD group, and HD 5-FU was selected for use in part II. Apart from rash, commonly observed grade 3/4 adverse events such as leucopenia, diarrhoea, vomiting and asthenia occurred within the expected range for FOLFIRI. Among 52 patients, the overall response rate was 48%. Median progression-free survival (PFS was 8.6 months (counting all reported progressions and the median overall survival was 22.4 months. Treatment facilitated the resection of initially unresectable metastases in fourteen patients (27%: of these, 10 patients (71% had no residual tumour after surgery, and these resections hindered the estimation of PFS. Conclusion The combination of cetuximab and FOLFIRI was active and well tolerated in this setting. Initially unresectable metastases became resectable in one-quarter of patients, with a high number of complete resections, and these promising results formed the basis for the investigation of FOLFIRI with and without cetuximab in the phase III CRYSTAL trial.

  6. Assessment of radiation risk as a part of ecological risk in the Republic of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    -effect' can be used for correction of chemical substance limitations in the environment in case of increased radioactive background. It is first shown that mono-factor risk assessment can be used, when negative environmental factors act on the human body at a one time, only. The results (in its part dedicated to radioactive risks) were recommended by the IAEA courses committee (Course Code C7-RER9062-017 'Regional Post Graduate Training Course on Radiation Protection and Safety of Radiation Sources') as an introduction course for IAEA program participants, preliminary to their field experience in the Gomel region. Theoretical and experimental foundation for the necessity of integral ecological risk assessment is suggested. (author)

  7. Drifting buoy and other data as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 17 May 1976 to 23 December 1976 (NODC Accession 7800105)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Drifting buoy data was collected by the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) as part of the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment...

  8. Integrated laboratory coagulation tests in hypercoagulation diagnosis and thrombosis risk assessment. Part I. The pathophysiology of thrombosis and hypercoagulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Lipets

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombosis is a fatal hemostatic disorders occurring in various conditions ranging from pregnancy and surgery to cancer, sepsis and heart attack. Despite the availability of different anticoagulants and accumulated clinical experience, proving their effectiveness, thrombosis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality. This is largely due to the fact that conventional laboratory coagulation tests are not sufficiently sensitive to the hypercoagulable state, and they are difficult to use for assessing the risk of thrombosis. Specific molecular markers (D-dimers, fibrinopeptide, thrombin-antithrombin complex are more effective, but also have a large number of disadvantages. A possible solution is the use of integrated test, which simulate in vitro the majority of the physiological coagulation processes. In the first part of this paper the biochemical processes that cause the risk of thrombosis were discussed.

  9. A Hybrid Multi-Criteria Decision Model for Technological Innovation Capability Assessment: Research on Thai Automotive Parts Firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumrit Detcharat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficient appraisal of technological innovation capabilities (TICs of enterprises is an important factor to enhance competitiveness. This study aims to evaluate and rank TICs evaluation criteria in order to provide a practical insight of systematic analysis by gathering the qualified experts’ opinions combined with three methods of multi-criteria decision making approach. Firstly, Fuzzy Delphi method is used to screen TICs evaluation criteria from the recent published researches. Secondly, the Analytic Hierarchy Process is utilized to compute the relative important weights. Lastly, the VIKOR method is used to rank the enterprises based on TICs evaluation criteria. An empirical study is applied for Thai automotive parts firms to illustrate the proposed methods. This study found that the interaction between criteria is essential and influences TICs; furthermore, this ranking development of TICs assessment is also one of key management tools to simply facilitate and offer a new mindset for managements of other related industries.

  10. Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products Part 2: LED Manufacturing and Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholand, Michael; Dillon, Heather E.

    2012-05-01

    Part 2 of the project (this report) uses the conclusions from Part 1 as a point of departure to focus on two objectives: producing a more detailed and conservative assessment of the manufacturing process and providing a comparative LCA with other lighting products based on the improved manufacturing analysis and taking into consideration a wider range of environmental impacts. In this study, we first analyzed the manufacturing process for a white-light LED (based on a sapphire-substrate, blue-light, gallium-nitride LED pumping a yellow phosphor), to understand the impacts of the manufacturing process. We then conducted a comparative LCA, looking at the impacts associated with the Philips Master LEDbulb and comparing those to a CFL and an incandescent lamp. The comparison took into account the Philips Master LEDbulb as it is now in 2012 and then projected forward what it might be in 2017, accounting for some of the anticipated improvements in LED manufacturing, performance and driver electronics.

  11. Evaluation of natural gas supply options for Southeast and Central Europe: Part 2. Multi-criteria assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decision making methods are used as a tool for the selection of alternatives to be evaluated on the basis of several criteria. Evaluation of the potential routes for natural gas supply to the Southeast and Central European countries is studied using single and multi-criteria evaluation. The potential options included in this analysis are the: Yamal Route; Nabucco Route; West Balkan Route; LNG Neum Route; and Gas by Wire Route. In part 1, the paper was devoted to the definition of the indicators and to single indicator analysis. In part 2, the analysis is based on multi-criteria evaluation, which comprises the possibility to assess the options under predefined constraints amongst indicators. The paper also describes different methods used for multi-criteria evaluation. This analysis focuses on cases with different priorities defined among individual weighting coefficients with the others having the same value. It was shown that all options under specific constraints can be qualified as promising in the decision making process. It is also concluded that favourite indicator constraints may exaggerate some options

  12. Detection of radioactive particles offshore by γ-ray spectrometry Part II: Monte Carlo assessment of acquisition times

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper represents a supplementary study to Part I: Monte Carlo assessment of detection depth limits, aimed at estimating the acquisition times, required to detect radioactive particles offshore by towed γ-ray spectrometry. Using Monte Carlo simulations, sets of measuring conditions were covered, addressing different types and sizes of scintillation detectors as well as variations in source strength, source-detector geometry and intensity of the natural gamma background. The performance of a large-volume BGO detector (12.7 cm diameter, 15 cm length) was assessed, to further enhance the sensitivity of simulated towed measurements. The simulations indicate that this detector represent a major step forward in detecting the radioactive particles offshore by gamma-ray spectrometry, particularly in a variable naturally radioactive background. With this detector, particles with an activity as low as 105 Bq should be detectable, at a towing speed of 2 knots (1 m/s), with an acquisition time of 2 s. However, detection of such particles is limited to relatively shallow burial depths (∼10 cm) and small detector-particle distances (6 Bq source and 80 cm for 108 Bq at the same burial depth

  13. Input parameters for the statistical seismic hazard assessment in central part of Romania territory using crustal earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seismic hazard assessment in dense-populated geographical regions and subsequently the design of the strategic objectives (dams, nuclear power plants, etc.) are based on the knowledge of the seismicity parameters of the seismic sources which can generate ground motion amplitudes above the minimum level considered risky at the specific site and the way the seismic waves propagate between the focus and the site. The purpose of this paper is to provide a set of information required for a probabilistic assessment of the seismic hazard in the central Romanian territory relative to the following seismic sources: Fagaras zone (FC), Campulung zone (CP), and Transilvania zone (TD) all of them in the crust domain. Extremely vulnerable objectives are present in the central part of Romania, including cities of Pitesti and Sibiu and the 'Vidraru' dam. The analysis that we propose implies: (1) geometrical definition of the seismic sources, (2) estimation of the maximum possible magnitude, (3) estimation of the frequency - magnitude relationship and (4) estimation of the attenuation laws. As an example, the obtained input parameters are used to evaluate the seismic hazard distribution due to the crustal earthquakes applying the McGuire's procedure (1976). These preliminary results are in good agreement with the previous research based on deterministic approach (Radulian et al., 2000). (authors)

  14. Viability testing of material derived from Mycobacterium tuberculosis prior to removal from a Containment Level-III Laboratory as part of a Laboratory Risk Assessment Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabani Amin M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the field of clinical mycobacteriology, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB can be a difficult organism to manipulate due to the restrictive environment of a containment level 3 (CL3 laboratory. Tests for rapid diagnostic work involving smears and molecular methods do not require CL3 practices after the organism has been rendered non-viable. While it has been assumed that after organism deactivation these techniques can be performed outside of a CL3, no conclusive study has consistently confirmed that the organisms are noninfectious after the theoretical 'deactivation' steps. Previous studies have shown that initial steps (such as heating /chemical fixation may not consistently kill MTB organisms. Methods An inclusive viability study (n = 226 was undertaken to determine at which point handling of culture extraction materials does not necessitate a CL3 environment. Four different laboratory protocols tested for viability included: standard DNA extractions for IS6110 fingerprinting, crude DNA preparations for PCR by boiling and mechanical lysis, protein extractions, and smear preparations. For each protocol, laboratory staff planted a proportion of the resulting material to Bactec 12B medium that was observed for growth for 8 weeks. Results Of the 208 isolates initially tested, 21 samples grew within the 8-week period. Sixteen (7.7% of these yielded positive results for MTB that included samples of: deactivated culture resuspensions exposed to 80°C for 20 minutes, smear preparations and protein extractions. Test procedures were consequently modified and tested again (n = 18, resulting in 0% viability. Conclusions This study demonstrates that it cannot be assumed that conventional practices (i.e. smear preparation or extraction techniques render the organism non-viable. All methodologies, new and existing, should be examined by individual laboratories to validate the safe removal of material derived from MTB to the outside of a CL3 laboratory. This process is vital to establish in house biosafety-validated practices with the aim of protecting laboratory workers conducting these procedures.

  15. Aspectos da Reologia e da Estabilidade de Suspensões Cerâmicas. Parte III: Mecanismo de Estabilização Eletroestérica de Suspensões com Alumina Aspects of Rheology and Stability of Ceramic Suspensions. Part III: Electrosteric Stabilization Mechanism of Alumina Suspensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. Ortega

    1997-08-01

    Full Text Available Esta terceira e última parte da revisão sobre os aspectos reológicos e de estabilização de suspensões com pós cerâmicos vem reunir a aplicação dos conhecimentos adquiridos nas primeiras duas partes publicadas anteriormente. Aqui, os fenômenos eletrostático devido à dupla camada elétrica, e estérico, relacionado à adsorção de moléculas poliméricas, são combinados para explicar o mecanismo eletroestérico de estabilização de suspensões cerâmicas. Os defloculantes que atuam através desse mecanismo abrangem uma classe específica de polímero denominada polieletrólitos, a qual é constituída por macromoléculas ionizáveis quando em solução. O estudo da forma com que os polieletrólitos atuam justifica-se devido à larga utilização desta classe de polímeros na indústria cerâmica. Os ácidos poliacrílico (PAA e polimetacrílico (PMAA são exemplos de polieletrólitos amplamente utilizados no processo de materiais à base de alumina. Dá-se destaque à influência do pH do meio e da presença de íons, sendo novamente aqui importante o conceito de força iônica da suspensão. Como aplicação prática, apresenta-se a estabilidade do sistema alumina-PMAA, reportando-se sobre o comportamento da viscosidade e da efetiva defloculação da suspensão. Este estudo é concluído apresentando resultados do efeito do peso molecular sobre a viscosidade, chamando atenção para o fato de que não basta definir apenas a classe de polímero a ser usada, sendo também fundamental especificar o peso molecular médio do polímero selecionado.The third and last part of this review about stabilization and rheological aspects of ceramic suspension gathers the knowledge in the two parts previously published. Here, the electrostatic and steric phenomena, related to the electrical double layer and polymeric molecules adsorption, respectively, are combined to explain the electrosteric stabilization mechanism of ceramic suspensions. The

  16. Using magnetic levitation for non-destructive quality control of plastic parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennek, Jonathan W; Nemiroski, Alex; Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Bwambok, David K; Yang, Dian; Harburg, Daniel V; Tricard, Simon; Ellerbee, Audrey K; Whitesides, George M

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic levitation (MagLev) enables rapid and non-destructive quality control of plastic parts. The feasibility of MagLev as a method to: i) rapidly assess injection-molded plastic parts for defects during process optimization, ii) monitor the degradation of plastics after exposure to harsh environmental conditions, and iii) detect counterfeit polymers by density is demonstrated. PMID:25589230

  17. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the department's plutonium storage. Volume II, part 4: Savannah River Site working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of a plutonium ES ampersand H vulnerability assessment at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The assessment at SRS is part of a broader plutonium ES ampersand H vulnerability assessment being made by the DOE, encompassing all DOE sites with plutonium holdings. Vulnerabilities across all the sites will be identified and prioritized as a basis for determining the necessity and schedule for taking corrective action

  18. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume III. Resources and fuel cycle facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    Volume III explores resources and fuel cycle facilities. Chapters are devoted to: estimates of US uranium resources and supply; comparison of US uranium demands with US production capability forecasts; estimates of foreign uranium resources and supply; comparison of foreign uranium demands with foreign production capability forecasts; and world supply and demand for other resources and fuel cycle services. An appendix gives uranium, fissile material, and separative work requirements for selected reactors and fuel cycles.

  19. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power: report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume III. Resources and fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume III explores resources and fuel cycle facilities. Chapters are devoted to: estimates of US uranium resources and supply; comparison of US uranium demands with US production capability forecasts; estimates of foreign uranium resources and supply; comparison of foreign uranium demands with foreign production capability forecasts; and world supply and demand for other resources and fuel cycle services. An appendix gives uranium, fissile material, and separative work requirements for selected reactors and fuel cycles

  20. DD-02PHARMACODYNAMIC BIOMARKER ASSESSMENTS IN A PHASE I/II TRIAL OF THE HYPOXIA-ACTIVATED PRODRUG TH-302 AND BEVACIZUMAB IN BEVACIZUMAB-REFRACTORY RECURRENT GLIOBLASTOMA

    OpenAIRE

    Cavazos, David; Gruslova, Aleksandra; Sun, J.; Floyd, John R.; Fichtel, Lisa; Tadi, Surendar; Lodi, Alessia; Tiziani, Stefano; van der Hart, C.P.; Eng, Clarence; Brenner, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma (GBM) remains an incurable malignancy with rapid progression and poor survival. GBM exhibits a hypoxic nature, and treatment with bevacizumab (BEV) may increase intratumoral hypoxia. TH-302 is an investigational prodrug that selectively releases the DNA cross-linker (Br-IPM) under hypoxic conditions. A phase I/II trial (NCT01403610) is evaluating the safety and efficacy of combined TH-302 and BEV treatment in patients with BEV-refractory GBM and investigating pharmaco...

  1. A global water scarcity assessment under shared socio-economic pathways – Part 2: Water availability and scarcity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Masui

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A global water scarcity assessment for the 21st century was conducted under the latest socio-economic scenario for global change studies, namely Shared Socio-economic Pathways (SSPs. SSPs depict five global situations with substantially different socio-economic conditions. In the accompanying paper, a water use scenario compatible with the SSPs was developed. This scenario considers not only quantitative socio-economic factors such as population and electricity production but also qualitative ones such as the degree of technological change and overall environmental consciousness. In this paper, water availability and water scarcity were assessed using a global hydrological model called H08. H08 simulates both the natural water cycle and major human activities such as water withdrawal and reservoir operation. It simulates water availability and use at daily time intervals at a spatial resolution of 0.5° × 0.5°. A series of global hydrological simulations were conducted under the SSPs, taking into account different climate policy options and the results of climate models. Water scarcity was assessed using an index termed the Cumulative Withdrawal to Demand ratio, which is expressed as the accumulation of daily water withdrawal from a river over the potential daily water consumption demand. This index can be used to express whether renewable water resources are available from rivers when required. The results suggested that by 2071–2100 the population living under severely water stressed conditions for SSP1-5 will reach 2588–2793 × 106 (39–42% of total population, 3966–4298 × 106 (46–50%, 5334–5643 × 106 (52–55%, 3427–3786 × 106 (40–45%, 3164–3379 × 106 (46–49%, respectively, if climate policies are not adopted. Even in SSP1 (the scenario with least change in water use and climate global water scarcity increases considerably, as compared to the present day. This is mainly due to the growth in population and economic

  2. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department's plutonium storage. Volume II, part 7: Mound working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the report of a visit to the Mound site by the Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) to assess plutonium vulnerabilities. Purposes of the visit were: to review results of the site's self assessment of current practices for handling and storing plutonium; to conduct an independent assessment of these practices; to reconcile differences and assemble a final list of vulnerabilities; to calculate consequences and probability for each vulnerability; and to issue a report to the Working Group. This report, representing completion of the Mound visit, will be compiled along with those from all other sites with plutonium inventories as part of a final report to the Secretary of Energy

  3. Assessment of the English literacy level of patients in primary health care services in Tshwane, Gauteng province: Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd M. Maja

    2010-03-01

    ,naamlik die Learning Ability Battery (LAB en die aangepasde Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy, Revised(REALM-R te assesseer. Daar is voorts ook bepaal hoe die resultate van die aangepaste REALM-R met die LAB korreleer. Data is deur self-rapportering ingesamel, waar die deelnemers vrae uit die LAB-instrument moes beantwoord en spesifieke woorde vir die aangepaste REALM-R hardop te lees. Die data is ontleed deur gebruik te maak van beskrywende en inferensiële statistiek, met inbegrip van ’n chikwadraat-toets en Spearman se rho. Die resultate dui daarop dat die skoolgraad bereik en die leesgeletterdheid van die deelnemers in Suid-Afrika met vier grade verskil. Die korrelasie tussen die resultate van die LAB en die aangepaste REALM-R was r = 0.43 (p < 0.001.Na gelang van die afsnypunt wat vir die aangepaste REALM-R gebruik word, dui die resultate daarop dat 67% van die deelnemers lae geletterdheidsvlakke het. Die studie toon die belang van ’n geldige, vinnige instrument vir geletterdheidsifting. Die doeltreffende assessering van pasiënte se geletterdheidsvlakke kan geregistreerde verpleegkundiges help om gesondheidsonderrig op ’n toepaslike vlak aan te bied ten einde pasiënte se gesondheidsgeletterdheid te verbeter.

    How to cite this article: Wasserman,Z.,Wright,S.C.D. & Maja,T.M.,2010, ‘Assessment of the English literacy level of patients in primary health care services in Tshwane,Gauteng Province: Part 2’,Health SA Gesondheid 15(1,Art. #469, 6 pages. DOI:10.4102/hsag.v15i1.469

  4. Image quality assessment in digital mammography: part II. NPWE as a validated alternative for contrast detail analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessment of image quality for digital x-ray mammography systems used in European screening programs relies mainly on contrast-detail CDMAM phantom scoring and requires the acquisition and analysis of many images in order to reduce variability in threshold detectability. Part II of this study proposes an alternative method based on the detectability index (d') calculated for a non-prewhitened model observer with an eye filter (NPWE). The detectability index was calculated from the normalized noise power spectrum and image contrast, both measured from an image of a 5 cm poly(methyl methacrylate) phantom containing a 0.2 mm thick aluminium square, and the pre-sampling modulation transfer function. This was performed as a function of air kerma at the detector for 11 different digital mammography systems. These calculated d' values were compared against threshold gold thickness (T) results measured with the CDMAM test object and against derived theoretical relationships. A simple relationship was found between T and d', as a function of detector air kerma; a linear relationship was found between d' and contrast-to-noise ratio. The values of threshold thickness used to specify acceptable performance in the European Guidelines for 0.10 and 0.25 mm diameter discs were equivalent to threshold calculated detectability indices of 1.05 and 6.30, respectively. The NPWE method is a validated alternative to CDMAM scoring for use in the image quality specification, quality control and optimization of digital x-ray systems for screening mammography.

  5. Formative Evaluation for a Healthy Corner Store Initiative in Pitt County, North Carolina: Assessing the Rural Food Environment, Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Nelson Laska, PhD, RD

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Obesity prevalence in the rural United States is higher than in urban or suburban areas, perhaps as a result of the food environment. Because rural residents live farther from supermarkets than their urban- and suburban-dwelling counterparts, they may be more reliant on smaller corner stores that offer fewer healthful food items. Methods As part of a Communities Putting Prevention to Work (CPPW healthy corner store initiative, we reviewed audit tools in the fall of 2010 to measure the consumer food environment in eastern North Carolina and chose the NEMS-S-Rev (Nutrition Environment Measures Survey-Stores-Revised to assess 42 food stores. During the spring and summer of 2011, 2 trained graduate assistants audited stores, achieving interrater reliability of at least 80%. NEMS-S-Rev scores of stores in rural versus urban areas were compared. Results Overall, healthful foods were less available and of lower quality in rural areas than in urban areas. NEMS-S-Rev scores indicated that healthful foods were more likely to be available and had similar pricing and quality in rural corner stores than in urban corner stores. Conclusion Food store audit data provided a baseline to implement and evaluate a CPPW healthy corner store initiative in Pitt County. This work serves as a case study, providing lessons learned for engaging community partners when conducting rural food store audits.

  6. A prática clínica baseada em evidências: parte III - avaliação crítica das informações de pesquisas clínicas Evidence based clinical practice: part III - critical appraisal of clinical research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moacyr Roberto Cuce Nobre

    2004-12-01

    consistente quanto à adequação do desenho de estudo e ao controle dos vícios. Concluímos que se deve oferecer atualização metodológica aos profissionais interessados, e colocar a informação já avaliada à disposição de todos, elaborando e divulgando diretrizes baseadas em evidências.Evidence based health care begins with a clinical question and the search on data bases to retrieve the relevant information, that was the issue of two preceding articles of this series. At present it will be discussed how to critically appraise the medical literature using the clinical epidemiological methodology. Clinical research aims to develop diagnostic and therapeutic procedures measuring association and causality between the exposure and outcome. In this case the exposures are signs, symptoms, laboratorial or image exam, and therapy intervention. It is a mistake to take surrogate end-points instead of clinical outcomes. The main types of clinical study design are diagnostic, prognostic, therapeutic and harm/etiology. Experimental, physiologic and animal studies are useful for the medical undergraduate education, but do not contribute with clinical decisions. The study designs are classified according with the presence of a control group, patient's follow-up, and therapy interventions. The evidence hierarchy was done by the previous characteristics and the presence of systematic bias. Systematic reviews are stronger than the primary observational studies and are on the top when they revised randomized clinical trial. Since 1998 the proportion of evidence based practice guidelines was increasing compared with systematic reviews or other types of practice guidelines, although the former still are in a few numbers. The article critical appraisal must answer the clinical question, and need to have consistent study design and bias under control. In conclusion we ought to offer methodological actualization to interested physicians and put the information already critically assessed

  7. Assessment of color quality and energy effciency : new insights for modern lighting. Part I : color quality in general lighting applications. Part II : mesopic photometry and street lighting

    OpenAIRE

    Quintero, Jesús M.

    2015-01-01

    Cotutela Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya i Institut de Recerca en Energia de Catalunya. La consulta íntegra de la tesi, inclosos els articles no comunicats públicament per drets d'autor, es pot realitzar, prèvia petició, a l'Arxiu de la UPC This dissertation is divided in two parts: The first one deal with two main characteristics of the light sources for general lighting: Color quality and luminous efficacy. The second one deals with technical aspects of the mesopic photometry appli...

  8. VTT ENIGMA Calculations for FUMEX-III CRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International Atomic Energy Agency IAEA has initiated a string of Coordinated Research Programmes (CRPs) to enhance co-operation between fuel modellers. One of these CRPs, FUMEX-III, was ongoing during 2008 - 2011 and has provided material and incentive for assessment of the fuel codes. This report presents the Finnish FUMEX-III simulations performed with the VTT-modified ENIGMA v5.9b. The work has been done as a part of SAFIR2010 (SAfety of FInnish Reactors 2010) project POKEVA (years 2008 to 2010) and SAFIR2014 project PALAMA (year 2011). VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland received ENIGMA v5.9b from Nuclear Electric plc of the UK in 1992. Internal development has been on-going since then. 'ENIGMA v5.9b with VTT modifications' (from now on, 'ENIGMA' for short) is a separate and different program from British Energy's ENIGMA 5.14 and UK National Nuclear Laboratory's ENIGMA-B. The FUMEX-III work has been performed in tandem of VTT's internal review work attempting to catalogue the changes done since 1992 and to assess the current state of the code. Several individual internal reports detail the changes made and the individual model assessments done during the years. (author)

  9. Perfis cognitivos de crianças e adolescentes com dislexia na WISC-III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Cruz-Rodrigues

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive assessment in Development Dyslexia is of paramount important because it is a part of the diagnostic criteria and it can assist in the planning of effective interventions allowing to identify a profile of difficulties and facilities on the specific tasks. This aim of this study was to investigate the profile on the WISC-III. For such, 123 participants with developmental dyslexia were assessment. The age ranges from 8 to 14 years old, with 83 (67,5% boys and 40 (52,5% girls, belonging to private (52,8% and public (47,% schools. Clusters analysis showed 3 profiles according to WISC-III measures. ANOVA showed differences between all groups in the IQ measures and in majority of the subtests. No differences were found between groups in age and grade. Furthermore, there was a higher number of subjects in public schools in the group with lower performance in the WISC-III subtests.

  10. Balloon Borne Soundings of Water Vapor, Ozone and Temperature in the Upper Tropospheric and Lower Stratosphere as Part of the Second SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voemel, Holger

    2004-01-01

    The main goal of our work was to provide in situ water vapor and ozone profiles in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere as reference measurements for the validation of SAGE III water vapor and ozone retrievals. We used the NOAA/CMDL frost point hygrometer and ECC ozone sondes on small research balloons to provide continuous profiles between the surface and the mid stratosphere. The NOAA/CMDL frost point hygrometer is currently the only lightweight balloon borne instrument capable of measuring water vapor between the lower troposphere and middle stratosphere. The validation measurements were based in the arctic region of Scandinavia for northern hemisphere observations and in New Zealand for southern hemisphere observations and timed to coincide with overpasses of the SAGE III instrument. In addition to SAGE III validation we also tried to coordinate launches with other instruments and studied dehydration and transport processes in the Arctic stratospheric vortex.

  11. 17 CFR Table III to Subpart E of... - Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments III Table III to Subpart E of Part 201 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES..., Table III Table III to Subpart E of Part 201—Civil Monetary Penalty Inflation Adjustments U.S....

  12. Assessment of Soil Degradation in The Northern Part of Nile Delta, Egypt, Using Remote Sensing and Gis Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work aims at monitoring soil degradation process within the last two decades in the northern part of Nile Delta .The investigated area lies between longitudes 31 00 and 31 15 E and latitudes 31 00 and 31 37 N, covering an area of about 344584.01 feddans. Detecting soil degradation and recognizing its various types is a necessity to take the practical measures for combating it as well as conserving and keeping the agricultural soil healthy. Land degradation was assessed by adopting new approach through the integration of GLASOD/ FAa approach and Remote Sensing / GIS techniques .The main types of human induced soil degradation that observed in the studied area are salinity, alkalinity (sodicity), compaction and water logging .On the other hand water erosion because of sea rise is assessed. The obtained data showed that, areas that were affected by compaction increment have been spatially enlarged by 40.9 % and those affected by compaction decrease have been spatially reduced by 22.6 % of the total area, meanwhile areas that have been unchanged were estimated by 36.5% of the total area. The areas that were affected by water logging increase have been spatially enlarged by 52.2 % and those affected by water logging decrease have been spatially reduced by 10.1 % of the total area, meanwhile the areas which have been unchanged were represented by 37.7 % of the total area. Areas that were affected by salinity increase have been spatially enlarged by 31.4 % of the total area and those affected by salinity decrease have been reduced by 43.3 % of the total area. An area represented by 25.2 % of the total area has been unchanged. Alkalinization (sodicity) was expressed by the exchangeable sodium percentage (ESP).Areas that were affected by sodicity increase have been spatially enlarged by 33.7 %, meanwhile those affected by sodicity decrease have been spatially reduced by 33.6 % of the total area. An area represented by 32.6 % of the total area has been unchanged

  13. An integrated model for the assessment of global water resources – Part 1: Model description and input meteorological forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hanasaki

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available To assess global water availability and use at a subannual timescale, an integrated global water resources model was developed consisting of six modules: land surface hydrology, river routing, crop growth, reservoir operation, environmental flow requirement estimation, and anthropogenic water withdrawal. The model simulates both natural and anthropogenic water flow globally (excluding Antarctica on a daily basis at a spatial resolution of 1°×1° (longitude and latitude. This first part of the two-feature report describes the six modules and the input meteorological forcing. The input meteorological forcing was provided by the second Global Soil Wetness Project (GSWP2, an international land surface modeling project. Several reported shortcomings of the forcing component were improved. The land surface hydrology module was developed based on a bucket type model that simulates energy and water balance on land surfaces. The crop growth module is a relatively simple model based on concepts of heat unit theory, potential biomass, and a harvest index. In the reservoir operation module, 452 major reservoirs with >1 km3 each of storage capacity store and release water according to their own rules of operation. Operating rules were determined for each reservoir by an algorithm that used currently available global data such as reservoir storage capacity, intended purposes, simulated inflow, and water demand in the lower reaches. The environmental flow requirement module was newly developed based on case studies from around the world. Simulated runoff was compared and validated with observation-based global runoff data sets and observed streamflow records at 32 major river gauging stations around the world. Mean annual runoff agreed well with earlier studies at global and continental scales, and in individual basins, the mean bias was less than ±20% in 14 of the 32 river basins and less than ±50% in 24 basins. The error in the peak was less

  14. KULTURisk regional risk assessment methodology for water-related natural hazards - Part 2: Application to the Zurich case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronco, P.; Bullo, M.; Torresan, S.; Critto, A.; Olschewski, R.; Zappa, M.; Marcomini, A.

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this paper is the application of the KULTURisk regional risk assessment (KR-RRA) methodology, presented in the companion paper (Part 1, Ronco et al., 2014), to the Sihl River basin, in northern Switzerland. Flood-related risks have been assessed for different receptors lying on the Sihl River valley including Zurich, which represents a typical case of river flooding in an urban area, by calibrating the methodology to the site-specific context and features. Risk maps and statistics have been developed using a 300-year return period scenario for six relevant targets exposed to flood risk: people; economic activities: buildings, infrastructure and agriculture; natural and semi-natural systems; and cultural heritage. Finally, the total risk index map has been produced to visualize the spatial pattern of flood risk within the target area and, therefore, to identify and rank areas and hotspots at risk by means of multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) tools. Through a tailored participatory approach, risk maps supplement the consideration of technical experts with the (essential) point of view of relevant stakeholders for the appraisal of the specific scores weighting for the different receptor-relative risks. The total risk maps obtained for the Sihl River case study are associated with the lower classes of risk. In general, higher (relative) risk scores are spatially concentrated in the deeply urbanized city centre and areas that lie just above to river course. Here, predicted injuries and potential fatalities are mainly due to high population density and to the presence of vulnerable people; flooded buildings are mainly classified as continuous and discontinuous urban fabric; flooded roads, pathways and railways, most of them in regards to the Zurich central station (Hauptbahnhof) are at high risk of inundation, causing severe indirect damage. Moreover, the risk pattern for agriculture, natural and semi-natural systems and cultural heritage is relatively

  15. Development of a guidance manual for the identification and assessment of interactions as part of Environmental Impact Assessment; Entwicklung einer Arbeitsanleitung zur Beruecksichtigung der Wechselwirkungen in der Umweltvertraeglichkeitspruefung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rassmus, J.; Bruening, H.; Kleinschmidt, V.; Reck, H.; Dierssen, K.; Bonk, A. [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Oekologie-Zentrum

    2001-03-01

    The objective of the project was the development of a practice-oriented guidance manual for the identification and assessment of interactions as part of EIA. The guidance manual is to assist developers and their consultants in identifying the effects of a project on interactions and adequately describing them in the application dossier and to support the authorities in subsequent assessment. Based inter alia on a review of relevant literature and through the performance of workshops, relevant legal principles and scientific knowledge (notably current knowledge from ecosystem research), guidelines, procedural instructions and similar documents from Germany and elsewhere as well as the approaches applied in EIA practice were evaluated and further developed. On this basis, a definition of 'interactions' was in the project, which defines interactions within the meaning of the Eu's EIA Directive and Art. 2 of the German Environmental Impact Assessment Act as processes which occur in the environment. The analysis of effect chains and webs, as often carried out in EIA practice to date, already enables an extensive identification and characterisation of processes/interactions, since the elements of the chains and webs are interlinked by processes. Here, the guidance manual developed in the project goes one step farther in that it recommends a procedure for the systematic analysis of effect chains and webs, with defined interfaces for data delivery from one specialist to another which are situated at the points where these chains or webs meet. The effects of a project on interactions, as identified using the above procedure, are described in chapters specific to individual protected assets and subsequently evaluated using the conventional approach which involves the application of assessment standards (e.g., limit values laid down in the various specialised laws, precautionary guide and threshold values) according to current knowledge. As an additional module

  16. [Assessment of REC (Reduction in Earning Capacity) after Thermal Trauma as Part of the Appraisal Process for Statutory Accident Insurance in Germany (Part 2): The New REC Form Developed by Ottomann and Hartmann in 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottomann, C; Rapp, M; Bruck, J C; Hartmann, B

    2015-12-01

    The calculation of REC forms the basis of expert opinions for the purposes of making accident insurance assessments after an occupational accident or an accident suffered en route while travelling to or from the workplace. The estimation of REC is based on a procedure quoted in the 1995 "Jahrbuch der Versicherungsmedizin" (Yearbook of Insurance Medicine) using a form developed by Henkel von Donnersmarck and Hoerbrand. The overall estimation of damages resulting from the accident comprises 3 main components, namely the functional impairment, the assessment of local findings and the resulting somatic and vegetative complaints. The criteria for all 3 components are nevertheless imprecise and open to a great deal of interpretation on the part of the evaluator, leading to a highly variable and subjective overall assessment of REC. The new REC form includes a modified factor-based categorisation of the scar quality and the localisation, so that assessment can now be carried out in a differentiated manner. Visible, stigmatising areas such as the neck are provided with their own Q values. The pigmental and textural alterations describing the scar quality are now more precisely defined. Considering the complexity of the somatic and vegetative alterations, more precise (objective) assessments can now be derived. The new REC form increases the validity and transparency of post-thermal trauma REC assessments for the purposes of making statutory accident insurance assessments. PMID:26470030

  17. Assessment of MCH services in the district of Solenzo, Burkina Faso. III. Effectiveness of MCH services in detecting of and caring for mothers and children at risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauerborn, R; Nougtara, A; Sorgho, G; Bidiga, J; Diesfeld, H J

    1989-06-01

    A time and motion study was carried out in all five professional MCH-facilities in the study area. The chain of decision making process--from (i) collecting information, (ii) interpreting it as indicating risk to (iii) action--was followed while taking care not to interfere with it. At each step specific shortcomings were identified: a great number of commonly accepted risk factors was not looked for (e.g. outcome of previous pregnancies in a woman in labour). On the other hand, information indicating risk was collected, but not recognized as such (e.g. weight loss). The most striking feature of both under fives' (UFC), antenatal clinics (ANC) and maternity care was the consistent lack of any action taken as a consequence of a recognized risk factor. The possible underlying causes for the poor functioning of the risk approach in the studied peripheral services are discussed: (i) implementation failure, (ii) inappropriateness of cut-off points for risk definition leading to an unmanageably great proportion of risk clients, and (iii) a conceptual problem, i.e. the reluctance of the auxiliary staff as well as the patients to act on the basis of risk prediction, i.e. something that has not yet happened. PMID:2754778

  18. Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR): Data manual, Part 2: Human Error Probability (HEP) Data. Volume 5, Revision 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This data manual contains a hard copy of the information in the Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) Version 3.5 database, which is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUCLARR was designed as a tool for risk analysis. Many of the nuclear reactors in the US and several outside the US are represented in the NUCLARR database. NUCLARR includes both human error probability estimates for workers at the plants and hardware failure data for nuclear reactor equipment. Aggregations of these data yield valuable reliability estimates for probabilistic risk assessments and human reliability analyses. The data manual is organized to permit manual searches of the information if the computerized version is not available. Originally, the manual was published in three parts. In this revision the introductory material located in the original Part 1 has been incorporated into the text of Parts 2 and 3. The user can now find introductory material either in the original Part 1, or in Parts 2 and 3 as revised. Part 2 contains the human error probability data, and Part 3, the hardware component reliability data

  19. Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR): Data manual. Part 2: Human error probability (HEP) data; Volume 5, Revision 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, W.J.; Gilbert, B.G.; Richards, R.E. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-09-01

    This data manual contains a hard copy of the information in the Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) Version 3.5 database, which is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUCLARR was designed as a tool for risk analysis. Many of the nuclear reactors in the US and several outside the US are represented in the NUCLARR database. NUCLARR includes both human error probability estimates for workers at the plants and hardware failure data for nuclear reactor equipment. Aggregations of these data yield valuable reliability estimates for probabilistic risk assessments and human reliability analyses. The data manual is organized to permit manual searches of the information if the computerized version is not available. Originally, the manual was published in three parts. In this revision the introductory material located in the original Part 1 has been incorporated into the text of Parts 2 and 3. The user can now find introductory material either in the original Part 1, or in Parts 2 and 3 as revised. Part 2 contains the human error probability data, and Part 3, the hardware component reliability data.

  20. Antithrombin III for critically ill patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allingstrup, Mikkel; Wetterslev, Jørn; Ravn, Frederikke B.;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: Antithrombin III (AT III) is an anticoagulant with anti-inflammatory properties. We assessed the benefits and harms of AT III in critically ill patients. METHODS: We searched from inception to 27 August 2015 in CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CAB, BIOSIS and CINAHL. We included randomized cont...

  1. Safety assessment in plant layout design using indexing approach: implementing inherent safety perspective. Part 2-Domino Hazard Index and case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugnoli, Alessandro; Khan, Faisal; Amyotte, Paul; Cozzani, Valerio

    2008-12-15

    The design of layout plans requires adequate assessment tools for the quantification of safety performance. The general focus of the present work is to introduce an inherent safety perspective at different points of the layout design process. In particular, index approaches for safety assessment and decision-making in the early stages of layout design are developed and discussed in this two-part contribution. Part 1 (accompanying paper) of the current work presents an integrated index approach for safety assessment of early plant layout. In the present paper (Part 2), an index for evaluation of the hazard related to the potential of domino effects is developed. The index considers the actual consequences of possible escalation scenarios and scores or ranks the subsequent accident propagation potential. The effects of inherent and passive protection measures are also assessed. The result is a rapid quantification of domino hazard potential that can provide substantial support for choices in the early stages of layout design. Additionally, a case study concerning selection among various layout options is presented and analyzed. The case study demonstrates the use and applicability of the indices developed in both parts of the current work and highlights the value of introducing inherent safety features early in layout design. PMID:18406517

  2. Psychometric Features of the General Aptitude Test-Verbal Part (GAT-V): A Large-Scale Assessment of High School Graduates in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Dimiter M.; Shamrani, Abdul Rahman

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the psychometric features of a General Aptitude Test-Verbal Part, which is used with assessments of high school graduates in Saudi Arabia. The data supported a bifactor model, with one general factor and three content domains (Analogy, Sentence Completion, and Reading Comprehension) as latent aspects of verbal aptitude.

  3. Reactor safety study. An assessment of accident risks in U. S. commercial nuclear power plants. Appendices III and IV. [PWR and BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-10-01

    The items listed below summarize the detail sections which follow: a listing of definitions and a discussion of the general treatment of data within the random variable approach as utilized by the study; a tabulation of the assessed data base containing failure classifications, final assessed ranges utilized in quantification and reference source values considered in determining the ranges; a discussion of nuclear power plant experience that was used to validate the data assessment by testing its applicability as well as to check on the adequacy of the model to incorporate typical real incidents; an expanded presentation of the data assessment giving information on applicability considerations; a discussion of test and maintenance data including comparisons of models with experience data; and special topics, including assessments required for the initiating event probabilities and human error data and modeling.

  4. NEPTUN-III reflooding and boil-off experiments with an LWHCR fuel rod bundle simulator: experimental results and initial code assessment efforts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NEPTUN test facility at Wuerenlingen has been modified to enable LWHCR-representative reflooding and boil-off experiments to be carried out. Results from a first series of forced feed reflooding tests, simulating cold-leg injection, are presented for a range of values of the parameters flooding rate, rod power and initial temperature. Rewetting of the LWHCR fuel bundle simulator was found to be possible in each case. Analysis of the NEPTUN-III reflooding experiments with RELAP5/MOD2 yield discrepant results and it has been shown, in the context of calculcations of the boil-off experiments, that some LWHCR-specific models and correlations need to be developed. (author)

  5. Dynamic performance assessment of a residential building-integrated cogeneration system under different boundary conditions. Part I: Energy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A building-integrated micro-cogeneration system was dynamically simulated. • Simulation data were analyzed from an energy point of view. • The proposed system was compared with a conventional supply system. • The proposed system allows to save energy under heat-led operation. • Electric vehicle charging enhances the energy saving under electric load-led logic. - Abstract: This work examines the energy performance of a residential building-integrated micro-cogeneration system during the winter season by means of a whole building simulation software; a 6.0 kWel natural gas-fuelled internal combustion engine-based cogeneration unit was coupled with a multi-family house composed of three floors, compliant with the thermal transmittances of both walls and windows equated to the threshold values suggested by the Italian Law. The main purpose of the paper is to compare the proposed system with a conventional system composed of a natural gas-fired boiler (for thermal energy production) and a power plant mix connected to the Italian central grid (for electric energy production) in order to assess the potential energy saving under various operating scenarios. The simulations were performed by considering the multi-family house located into four different Italian cities (Palermo, Napoli, Roma and Milano) representative of different climatic regions of Italy in order to estimate the influence of climatic conditions; a parametric analysis was also performed with the aim to evaluate the sensitivity of the energy flows when varying the volume of the combined storage tank; taking into consideration that the economic viability of the cogeneration unit strongly depends also on the value of the co-produced electricity, the system performance was also evaluated by considering two different electric demand profiles (with and without the electric consumption associated to the overnight charging of an electric vehicle); the operation of the micro

  6. French participation to PISC III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PISC III programme was set up in 1986 after the conclusions of the PISC II programme. The main objective was assessment of ISI procedures on few particular components or materials. France with IPSN, CEA/DTA, DCN INDRET, EDF, FRAMATOME and INTERCONTROLE decided to have an important participation in several of the eight actions. This paper describes shortly the key points of this participation and the consequences in France. (authors). 10 figs., 1 tab

  7. Columnar modelling of nucleation burst evolution in the convective boundary layer – first results from a feasibility study Part III: Preliminary results on physicochemical model performance using two "clean air mass" reference scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Hellmuth

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In Paper I of four papers, a revised columnar high-order model to investigate gas-aerosol-turbulence interactions in the convective boundary layer (CBL was proposed. In Paper II, the model capability to predict first-, second- and third-order moments of meteorological variables in the CBL was demonstrated using available observational data. In the present Paper III, the high-order modelling concept is extended to sulphur and ammonia chemistry as well as to aerosol dynamics. Based on the previous CBL simulation, a feasibility study is performed using two "clean air mass" scenarios with an emission source at the ground but low aerosol background concentration. Such scenarios synoptically correspond to the advection of fresh post-frontal air in an anthropogenically influenced region. The aim is to evaluate the time-height evolution of ultrafine condensation nuclei (UCNs and to elucidate the interactions between meteorological and physicochemical variables in a CBL column. The scenarios differ in the treatment of new particle formation (NPF, whereas homogeneous nucleation according to the classical nucleation theory (CNT is considered. The first scenario considers nucleation of a binary system consisting of water vapour and sulphuric acid (H2SO4 vapour, the second one nucleation of a ternary system additionally involving ammonia (NH3. Here, the two synthetic scenarios are discussed in detail, whereas special attention is payed to the role of turbulence in the formation of the typical UCN burst behaviour, that can often be observed in the surface layer. The intercomparison of the two scenarios reveals large differences in the evolution of the UCN number concentration in the surface layer as well as in the time-height cross-sections of first-order moments and double correlation terms. Although in both cases the occurrence of NPF bursts could be simulated, the burst characteristics and genesis of the bursts are completely different. It is demonstrated

  8. Assessing The Welfare Of Captive Asian Small-Clawed Otters (Amblonyx cinereus): Can Inductive Methods Play A Part?

    OpenAIRE

    Wright L.C.

    2003-01-01

    A large number of factors need to be taken into account when assessing an animal's welfare under field conditions. Grounded Theory, an inductive method, might be of use in correlating these factors with the results of scientific studies to produce a freely available IT tool that could be used by relatively untrained persons to assess the welfare of animals. This ongoing work is intended to establish whether inductive techniques can contribute to welfare assessment of captive Asian Small-Clawe...

  9. McKenzie River Subbasin Assessment, Technical Report 2000.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alsea Geospatial, Inc.

    2000-02-01

    This document details the findings of the McKenzie River Subbasin Assessment team. The goal of the subbasin assessment is to provide an ecological assessment of the McKenzie River Floodplain, identification of conservation and restoration opportunities, and discussion of the influence of some upstream actions and processes. This Technical Report can be viewed in conjunction with the McKenzie River Subbasin Summary or as a stand-alone document. The purpose of the technical report is to detail the methodology and findings of the consulting team that the observations and recommendations in the summary document are based on. This part, Part I, provides an introduction to the subbasin and a general overview. Part II details the specific findings of the science team. Part III provides an explanation and examples of how to use the data that has been developed through this assessment to aid in prioritizing restoration activities. Part III also includes the literature cited and appendices.

  10. A Safety Assessment for the Wolsong LILW Disposal Center: As a part of safety case for the first stage disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post-closure safety assessment for the Wolsong Low- and Intermediate-level radioactive waste Disposal Center is described. Based on assessment context, closure concept and ground water flow characteristics of the disposal site, brief descriptions are included on the assessment scenarios, models, input parameters and tools. Radionuclide transport modeling in the near-field and far-field, gas generation and transport modeling, human intrusion and biosphere transport are also described briefly. Assessment results for each scenarios are shown to meet the performance criteria of regulatory body. Further and continuous efforts to improve the safety of disposal facility will be made during the construction and operational period.

  11. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 553 - Statement of Policy: Rulemakings Involving the Assessment of the Functional Equivalence of Safety...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... conditions, driver demographics, driver behavior, occupant behavior (e.g., level of safety belt use), road... connection with a petition for rulemaking by any interested party under 49 CFR Part 552. Such determinations... will consider the merits of the petition in accordance with 49 CFR Part 552, Petitions for...

  12. Comparison of Provider-Assessed and Patient-Reported Outcome Measures of Acute Skin Toxicity During a Phase III Trial of Mometasone Cream Versus Placebo During Breast Radiotherapy: The North Central Cancer Treatment Group (N06C4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Considerable interobserver variability exists among providers and between providers and patients when measuring subjective symptoms. In the recently published Phase III N06C4 trial of mometasone cream vs. placebo to prevent radiation dermatitis, the primary provider-assessed (PA) endpoint, using the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), was negative. However, prospectively planned secondary analyses of patient-reported outcomes (PROs), using the Skindex-16 and Skin Toxicity Assessment Tool (STAT), were positive. This study assesses the relationship between PA outcomes and PROs. Methods and Materials: Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to compare the three tools. Statistical correlations were defined as follows: 0.7, strong. Results: CTCAE dermatitis moderately correlated with STAT erythema, and CTCAE pruritus strongly correlated with STAT itching. CTCAE pruritus had a moderate correlation with Skindex-16 itching. Comparing the 2 PRO tools, Skindex-16 itching correlated moderately with STAT itching. Skindex-16 burning, hurting, irritation, and persistence all showed the strongest correlation with STAT burning; they showed moderate correlations with STAT itching and tenderness. Conclusions: The PRO Skindex-16 correlated well with the PRO portions of STAT, but neither tool correlated well with CTCAE. PROs delineated a wider spectrum of toxicity than PA measures and provided more information on rash, redness, pruritus, and annoyance measures compared with CTCAE findings of rash and pruritus. PROs may provide a more complete measure of patient experience than single-symptom, PA endpoints in clinical trials assessing radiation skin toxicity.

  13. Numerical study of the thm effects on the near-field safety of a hypothetical nuclear waste repository - bmt1 of the decovalex iii project. part 1: conceptualization and characterization of the problems and summary of results

    OpenAIRE

    Chijimatsu, M.; Nguyen, T.S.; Jing, L.; de Jonge, J; Kohlmeier, M.; Millard, A.; Rejeb, A.; J. Rutqvist; Souley, M.; Sugita, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Geological disposal of the spent nuclear fuel uses often the concept of multiple barrier systems. In order to predict the performance of these barriers, mathematical models have been developed, verified and validated against analytical solutions, laboratory tests and field experiments within the international DECOVALEX III project. These models in general consider the full coupling of thermal (T), hydraulic (H) and mechanical (M) processes that would prevail in the geological media aroun...

  14. Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the department's plutonium storage. Volume II, part 11: Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory working group assessment team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    President Clinton has directed an Interagency Working Group to initiate a comprehensive review of long-term options for the disposition of surplus plutonium. As part of this initiative, Secretary of Energy, Hazel O'Leary, has directed that a Department of Energy project be initiated to develop options and recommendations for the safe storage of these materials in the interim. A step in the process is a plutonium vulnerability assessment of facilities throughout the Department. The Plutonium Vulnerability Working Group was formed to produce the Project and Assessment Plans, to manage the assessments and to produce a final report for the Secretary by September 30, 1994. The plans established the approach and methodology for the assessment. The Project Plan specifies a Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) to examine each of the twelve DOE sites with significant holdings of plutonium. The Assessment Plan describes the methodology that the Site Assessment Team (SAT) used to report on the plutonium holdings for each specific site.This report provides results of the assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

  15. Sintassi e Tassonomia: Teoria della valenza e lessico-grammatica in tedesco e in italiano (III) (Syntax and Taxonomy: Theory of Valence and Lexical Grammar in German and Italian, Part 3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Maria Teresa

    1987-01-01

    In this article, the author concludes a three-part series in which she analyzes verb complements in German and Italian. Parts 1 and 2 of the series appear in volume 18, numbers 2 and 3, respectively. (CFM)

  16. Bayesian networks in educational assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Almond, Russell G; Steinberg, Linda S; Yan, Duanli; Williamson, David M

    2015-01-01

    Bayesian inference networks, a synthesis of statistics and expert systems, have advanced reasoning under uncertainty in medicine, business, and social sciences. This innovative volume is the first comprehensive treatment exploring how they can be applied to design and analyze innovative educational assessments. Part I develops Bayes nets’ foundations in assessment, statistics, and graph theory, and works through the real-time updating algorithm. Part II addresses parametric forms for use with assessment, model-checking techniques, and estimation with the EM algorithm and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). A unique feature is the volume’s grounding in Evidence-Centered Design (ECD) framework for assessment design. This “design forward” approach enables designers to take full advantage of Bayes nets’ modularity and ability to model complex evidentiary relationships that arise from performance in interactive, technology-rich assessments such as simulations. Part III describes ECD, situates Bayes nets as ...

  17. Assessing the robustness of passive scattering proton therapy with regard to local recurrence in stage III non-small cell lung cancer: a secondary analysis of a phase II trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We assessed the robustness of passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT) plans for patients in a phase II trial of PSPT for stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) by using the worst-case scenario method, and compared the worst-case dose distributions with the appearance of locally recurrent lesions. Worst-case dose distributions were generated for each of 9 patients who experienced recurrence after concurrent chemotherapy and PSPT to 74 Gy(RBE) for stage III NSCLC by simulating and incorporating uncertainties associated with set-up, respiration-induced organ motion, and proton range in the planning process. The worst-case CT scans were then fused with the positron emission tomography (PET) scans to locate the recurrence. Although the volumes enclosed by the prescription isodose lines in the worst-case dose distributions were consistently smaller than enclosed volumes in the nominal plans, the target dose coverage was not significantly affected: only one patient had a recurrence outside the prescription isodose lines in the worst-case plan. PSPT is a relatively robust technique. Local recurrence was not associated with target underdosage resulting from estimated uncertainties in 8 of 9 cases

  18. Environmental assessment of three egg production systems--Part II. Ammonia, greenhouse gas, and particulate matter emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, T A; Zhao, Y; Li, H; Stinn, J P; Hayes, M D; Xin, H

    2015-03-01

    As an integral part of the Coalition for Sustainable Egg Supply (CSES) Project, this study simultaneously monitored air emissions of 3 commercially operated egg production systems at the house level and associated manure storage over 2 single-cycle flocks (18 to 78 wk of age). The 3 housing systems were 1) a conventional cage house (CC) with a 200,000-hen capacity (6 hens in a cage at a stocking density of 516 cm2/hen), 2) an enriched colony house (EC) with a 50,000-hen capacity (60 hens per colony at a stocking density of 752 cm2/hen), and 3) an aviary house (AV) with a 50,000-hen capacity (at a stocking density of 1253 to 1257 cm2/hen). The 3 hen houses were located on the same farm and were populated with Lohmann white hens of the same age. Indoor environment and house-level gaseous (ammonia [NH3] and greenhouse gasses [GHG], including carbon dioxide [CO2], methane [CH4], and nitrous oxide [N2O]) and particulate matter (PM10, PM2.5) emissions were monitored continually. Gaseous emissions from the respective manure storage of each housing system were also monitored. Emission rates (ERs) are expressed as emission quantities per hen, per animal unit (AU, 500 kg live BW), and per kilogram of egg output. House-level NH3 ER (g/hen/d) of EC (0.054) was significantly lower than that of CC (0.082) or AV (0.112) (P<0.05). The house-level CO2 ER (g/hen/d) was lower for CC (68.3) than for EC and AV (74.4 and 74.0, respectively), and the CH4 ER (g/hen/d) was similar for all 3 houses (0.07 to 0.08). The house-level PM ER (mg/hen/d), essentially representing the farm-level PM ER, was significantly higher for AV (PM10 100.3 and PM2.5 8.8) than for CC (PM10 15.7 and PM2.5 0.9) or EC (PM10 15.6 and PM2.5 1.7) (P<0.05). The farm-level (house plus manure storage) NH3 ER (g/hen/d) was significantly lower for EC (0.16) than for CC (0.29) or AV (0.30) (P<0.05). As expected, the magnitudes of GHG emissions were rather small for all 3 production systems. Data from this study enable

  19. Crescimento da base craniana nos diferentes tipos faciais nos relacionamentos maxilomandibulares ortopédicos de Classe I, II e III: Parte 2 (Crescimento médio de Ba-Na, CC-Na e CC-Ba Cranial base growth in different facial types in Class I, II and III orthopedic maxillomandibular relationship: Part 2 (Mean growth of Ba-Na, CC-Na and CC-Ba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucelma Vilela Pieri

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: este estudo retrospectivo avaliou o crescimento médio da base craniana nos diferentes tipos faciais e de relacionamentos maxilomandibulares ortopédicos.METODOLOGIA: uma amostra aleatória de 300 pacientes brasileiros leucodermas (131 do gênero masculino, 169 do gênero feminino, com idade média inicial de 10 anos e 2 meses (dentadura mista e final de 14 anos e 8 meses (segundos molares em oclusão e tempo médio de observação de 4 anos e 5 meses, foi selecionada em uma clínica particular, em São Paulo, Brasil. Havia 118 Classe I, 151 Classe II e 31 Classe III. Todas as 600 radiografias cefalométricas laterais foram obtidas no mesmo aparelho de raios-x. As análises de Ricketts e Schwarz modificadas por Faltin foram usadas. As medidas lineares (Ba-Na, CC-Na e CC-Ba foram feitas manualmente pelo mesmo examinador em T1 e T2. Os relacionamentos foram estudados juntos e separadamente, considerando tipo facial e gênero. O teste t-pareado e ANOVA foram aplicados. RESULTADOS E CONCLUSÕES: o tipo facial retrovertido cresceu significantemente mais em CC-Na na Classe II, sendo a sua correção desfavorável no gênero feminino; com tendência favorável na Classe III e crescimento dentro do esperado na Classe I. O neutrovertido cresceu significantemente mais em CC-Na nas Classes I e II, sendo desfavorável na Classe II; com crescimento eqüitativo de CC-Na e CC-Ba na Classe III e levemente acima do esperado na Classe I. O provertido teve crescimento eqüitativo em todas as Classes, sendo significantemente favorável na Classe II mandibular; com tendência favorável na Classe III e crescimento médio acima do esperado na Classe I.AIM: This retrospective study evaluated the cranial base mean growth in different facial types and orthopedic maxillomandibular relationship. METHODS: A random sample of 300 Brazilian Caucasian patients (131 males, 169 females, initial and final mean age (10 years 2 months-mixed dentition; 14 years 8 months

  20. Proposed changes in personality and personality disorder assessment and diagnosis for DSM-5 part I: description and rationale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.E. Skodol; L.A. Clark; D.S. Bender; R.F. Krueger; L.C. Morey; R. Verheul; R.D. Alarcon; C.C. Bell; L.J. Siever; J.M. Oldham

    2011-01-01

    A major reconceptualization of personality psychopathology has been proposed for DSM-5 that identifies core impairments in personality functioning, pathological personality traits, and prominent pathological personality types. A comprehensive personality assessment consists of four components: level

  1. MRI assessment of cardiac tumours: part 2, spectrum of appearances of histologically malignant lesions and tumour mimics

    OpenAIRE

    Hoey, Edward T.D.; Shahid, Muhammad; Ganeshan, Arul; Baijal, Shobhit; Simpson, Helen; Watkin, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the reference standard technique for assessment and characterization of a suspected cardiac tumour. It provides an unrestricted field of view, high temporal resolution and non-invasive tissue characterization based on multi-parametric assessment of the chemical micro-environment. Sarcomas account for around 95% of all primary malignant cardiac tumours with lymphoma, and primary pericardial mesothelioma making up most of the remainder of cases. By co...

  2. Assessment of possible airborne impact from nuclear risk sites – Part I: methodology for probabilistic atmospheric studies

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. Baklanov; A. G. Mahura

    2003-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to develop a methodology for a multidisciplinary nuclear risk and vulnerability assessment, and to test this methodology through estimation of a nuclear risk to population in the Northern European countries in case of a severe accident at the nuclear risk sites. For assessment of the probabilistic risk and vulnerability, a combination of social-geophysical factors and probabilities are considered. The main focus of this paper is the description of meth...

  3. Procedures for Collecting and Processing Aquatic Invertebrates and Fish for Analysis of Mercury as Part of the National Water-Quality Assessment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudder, Barbara C.; Chasar, Lia C.; DeWeese, L. Rod; Brigham, Mark E.; Wentz, Dennis A.; Brumbaugh, William G.

    2008-01-01

    Mercury studies conducted as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program have included nationwide reconnaissance samplings of hundreds of stream sites, as well as detailed, process-oriented research at selected sites. These reconnaissance and detailed studies are intended to provide a better understanding of methylmercury bioaccumulation in stream ecosystems over a range of environmental settings. This publication describes trace-element-clean techniques used for collection and processing of aquatic invertebrates and fish to be analyzed for total mercury, methylmercury, and stable isotopes as part of NAWQA studies.

  4. Distribution of cadmium, mercury, and lead in different body parts of Baltic herring (Clupea harengus) and perch (Perca fluviatilis): Implications for environmental status assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Good Environmental Status (GES) is assessed based on whole fish body concentrations. • Heavy metals were analyzed in different parts of herring and perch body. • Conversion factors between these tissues were calculated and applied to assess GES. • GES in herring improved compared to assessments using muscle/liver concentrations. • Status assessments must reflect whole fish concentrations, not only sampled tissues. -- Abstract: For heavy metals, quality standards indicating good environmental status are designed to evaluate concentrations in the whole fish body, whereas monitoring of metals is often conducted using muscle or liver tissue. As most metals accumulate at different rates in different parts of fish, data should be adjusted to reflect whole fish body concentrations; however, this requires knowledge on distribution of metal concentrations within fish. Here, concentrations of cadmium, mercury, and lead were analyzed in the liver, muscle and whole fish of herring and perch to create conversion factors for transformation of heavy metal concentrations between these tissues. Species-specific accumulation of metals between muscle, liver, and whole fish were observed. Relationships between different tissues were used to recalculate data from monitoring programs in the Baltic Sea region. Based on whole fish concentrations, environmental status for cadmium and mercury in herring improved compared to assessments based on muscle or liver concentrations alone

  5. Safety case for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel at Olkiluoto. Data basis for the Biosphere Assessment BSA-2012. Part 1-2, Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the report is to document and justify the input data used in the models of the biosphere assessment. Methodology similar to that presented in the Models and Data for the Repository System report has been followed. After more introductory parts, chapter 3 lays the foundation of data selection by describing typical properties of the soil and sediment types and biotopes, and summarises the representative plants and animals selected in the Biosphere Description report. The conceptual models on pools and fluxes of elements in the ecosystems are presented in chapter 4. These, together with the more qualitative descriptions of the succession lines in the Biosphere Description report, are simplified into the actual assessment models (summarised in chapter 5) in an iterative manner. Chapter 6 briefly presents the scenarios and calculation cases of the biosphere assessment, detailed in the Formulation of Radionuclide Releases Scenarios report. The account of the actual input data to the assessment models begins in chapter 7 with the data needed to identify the biotopes and compartments common to all assessment models. Chapters 8 to 13, grouped by the sub-models, address the input data to the terrain and ecosystems development modelling (detailed in the Terrain and Ecosystems Development Modelling report), and chapter 14 those to the surface and near-surface hydrological model (the Surface and Near-Surface Hydrological Modelling report). Chapters 15 to 18 address the data to the radionuclide transport modelling in the biosphere, and chapter 19 those needed for the dose assessment for humans (the Biosphere Radionuclide Transport and Dose Assessment report). Finally, before conclusions in chapter 21, the input data specific to the dose assessment for plants and animals (the Dose Assessment for the Plants and Animals report) are addressed in chapter 20. However, several parameters are common to the assessment models and are presented in connection to the model

  6. Remediation strategies after nuclear or radiological accidents: part 2 - accident scenarios for assessing effectiveness of cleanup procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The selection of protective measures and remediation strategies after an accident needs to be based on previously established criteria, to minimize unnecessary stress and the exposures involved in cleanup operations that are not effective in reducing doses to the public. In a first stage, a database describing the countermeasures has been developed including their efficiency on removing contamination from surfaces. However, to assess the effectiveness of cleanup procedures in reducing doses to members of the public, it was necessary to derive specific scenarios in order to simulate the long term behavior of the material in the environment, since the contribution of different surfaces to doses changes with time after contamination. A basic release and exposure scenario was developed to assess the dose reduction due to the mostly used procedures. Exposure scenarios were selected to fit the surroundings of the Brazilian nuclear power plants in Angra dos Reis. Simulations were performed using SIEM, the integrated system for dose assessment after contamination events, developed at IRD. The contamination of urban environments was assessed for Cs-137, as this was found to be the most relevant long term radionuclide to contribute to doses to member of the public. The effects on reducing external exposures were assessed for periods up to 50 years after the contamination. For agricultural areas, the focus was on ingestion doses from contamination with I-131 for periods up to 1 year after contamination. Results will be complemented on the database in order to support multi-criteria decision making processes after accidents. (author)

  7. Ultrasound evaluation of liver disease in cystic fibrosis as part of an annual assessment clinic: A 9-year review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AIM: To review 9 years of annual assessment data in cystic fibrosis (CF) and evaluate the frequency of hepatobiliary abnormalities and the correlation between ultrasound and biochemical findings. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Over a 9-year period (1990-99), 168 children (age range 1-18 years) with CF have undergone an annual assessment which has included clinical, biochemical and ultrasonographic evaluation of the hepatobiliary system. We have retrospectively reviewed the sequential ultrasound reports and correlated them with the contemporaneous biochemical results. RESULTS: A total of 725 ultrasound examinations were performed over the review period. Sixty patients had at least one examination showing an abnormality of liver echo texture and in 39 patients this was a persisting finding. Seven patients (4.2%) developed frank cirrhotic change on ultrasound criteria, while 15 patients (8.9%) had evidence of persistent splenomegaly. Gall-bladder calculi were present in 4.8%. In 176 examinations (24%) there was disparity between the ultrasound findings and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels. In 3.0% of cases (five patients) there were persisting abnormalities of liver echo texure and persisting splenomegaly with a normal range AST value. CONCLUSION: No perfect method of assessing hepatobiliary involvement in CF is currently available. Ultrasonographic and biochemical assessment may reflect different aspects of disease progression. Routine use of ultrasound in annual assessment allows identification of a minority of patients with liver changes but with normal biochemistry. Williams, S.M. et al. (2002)

  8. Does part-time work make employees more efficient? Importance of context in assessing flexible work arrangements

    OpenAIRE

    Þóra Þorgeirsdóttir 1979

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine employee perceptions of flexible work arrangements with special emphasis on part-­time work, in light of the different contexts they find themselves in. It further seeks to understand the effects of part-­time work on employees' way of working.  The literature review discusses various contextual factors that impact employee perceptions, such as public and organisational context and management and colleague support. It further explores outcomes such as wo...

  9. 2007 status of climate change: Mitigation of Climate Change. Contribution of Working Group III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Summary for Policy-makers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Working Group III contribution to the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) focuses on new literature on the scientific, technological, environmental, economic and social aspects of mitigation of climate change, published since the IPCC Third Assessment Report (TAR) and the Special Reports on CO2 Capture and Storage (SRCCS) and on Safeguarding the Ozone Layer and the Global Climate System (SROC).The main aim of this summary report is to assess options for mitigating climate change. Several aspects link climate change with development issues. This report explores these links in detail, and illustrates where climate change and sustainable development are mutually reinforcing. Economic development needs, resource endowments and mitigative and adaptive capacities differ across regions. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to the climate change problem, and solutions need to be regionally differentiated to reflect different socio-economic conditions and, to a lesser extent, geographical differences. Although this report has a global focus, an attempt is made to differentiate the assessment of scientific and technical findings for the various regions. Given that mitigation options vary significantly between economic sectors, it was decided to use the economic sectors to organize the material on short- to medium-term mitigation options. Contrary to what was done in the Third Assessment Report, all relevant aspects of sectoral mitigation options, such as technology, cost, policies etc., are discussed together, to provide the user with a comprehensive discussion of the sectoral mitigation options. The report is organised into six sections after the introduction: - Greenhouse gas (GHG) emission trends; - Mitigation in the short and medium term, across different economic sectors (until 2030); - Mitigation in the long-term (beyond 2030); - Policies, measures and instruments to mitigate climate change; - Sustainable development and climate change mitigation; - Gaps in

  10. Free Radicals and Reactive Intermediates for the SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, James G.

    2001-01-01

    This grant provided partial support for participation in the SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment. The NASA-sponsored SOLVE mission was conducted Jointly with the European Commission-sponsored Third European Stratospheric Experiment on Ozone (THESEO 2000). Researchers examined processes that control ozone amounts at mid to high latitudes during the arctic winter and acquired correlative data needed to validate the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) III satellite measurements that are used to quantitatively assess high-latitude ozone loss. The campaign began in September 1999 with intercomparison flights out of NASA Dryden Flight Research Center in Edwards. CA. and continued through March 2000. with midwinter deployments out of Kiruna. Sweden. SOLVE was co-sponsored by the Upper Atmosphere Research Program (UARP). Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project (AEAP). Atmospheric Chemistry Modeling and Analysis Program (ACMAP). and Earth Observing System (EOS) of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise (ESE) as part of the validation program for the SAGE III instrument.

  11. The use and abuse of attachment theory in clinical practice with maltreated children, part I: diagnosis and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Debate has ensued regarding the appropriate assessment and diagnosis for school-age children who display severe behavioral problems as a result of previous abuse and neglect within the primary attachment relationship. The current nomenclature recognizes reactive attachment disorder and some clinicians have suggested broader categories of attachment disorder. These attempts at classification are often criticized on empirical grounds; however, often lost in these criticisms is the fact that that these diagnostic approaches often misapply attachment theory and research. This article summarizes the original contributions of John Bowlby and other attachment researchers to our understanding of child development, examines misguided attempts to apply attachment theory to the diagnosis and assessment of maltreated children, and offers a diagnostic conceptualization and assessment recommendations consistent with the available attachment research. PMID:21288931

  12. Hydrogeochemistry and quality assessment of shallow groundwater in the southern part of the yellow river alluvial plain (zhongwei section), northwest china

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Peiyue; Wu, Jianhua; Qian, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Statistical analyses, a Piper diagram, the saturation index and the correlations of chemical parameters were used to reveal the hydrogeochemistry and hydrogeochemical evolution of shallow groundwater in the southern part of the Zhongwei section of the Yellow River alluvial plain. The water quality for agricultural and domestic uses was also assessed in the study. The results suggest that the shallow groundwater in the study area is fresh to moderately mineralized water. Higher Ca2+ and HCO3- ...

  13. Assessment of oral health promotion services offered as part of maternal and child health services in the Tshwane Health District, Pretoria, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Kolisa, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The study aimed to assess the oral health promotion services provided as part of the maternal and child health (MCH) services in the Tshwane Health District, Pretoria, South Africa. Methods The research design was a descriptive cross-sectional study using a modified standard questionnaire. The population was drawn from the parents/caregivers (PCGs) and the MCH nurses at seven clinics during June 2012 and June 2013 in Pretoria. Results The nurses’ response rate was 83%; average age ...

  14. 12 CFR Appendix B to Part 364 - Interagency Guidelines Establishing Information Security Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Part 364—Interagency Guidelines Establishing Information Security Standards Table of Contents I... Customer Information A. Information Security Program B. Objectives III. Development and Implementation of Customer Information Security Program A. Involve the Board of Directors B. Assess Risk C. Manage...

  15. A Three-Attribute Transfer Skills Framework--Part II: Applying and Assessing the Model in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasson, Irit; Dori, Yehudit Judy

    2015-01-01

    In an era in which information is rapidly growing and changing, it is very important to teach with the goal of students' engagement in life-long learning in mind. This can partially be achieved by developing transferable thinking skills. In our previous paper--Part I, we conducted a review of the transfer literature and suggested a…

  16. Oxidation of Pu(III) by nitric acid in tri-n-butyl phosphate solutions. Part II. Chemical methods for the suppression of oxidation to improve plutonium separation in contactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic method has been used to screen a number of potential stabilizers (holding reductants) for Pu(III) in tri-n-butyl phosphate/diluent solutions used in irradiated fuel reprocessing systems. The conditions assumed were similar to those used in solvent extraction contactor operations. Of the reagents tested, oximes as a group appeared to be very effective. Acetaldoxime, in particular, was selected for extensive tests and was used as a Pu(III) stabilizer, in both the aqueous and organic phases, in contactor runs for plutonium partition from thorium and uranium. In the best results, the plutonium loss to the thorium/uranium stream was 2.8 X 10-5 g/l or 0.0046%; without using acetaldoxime, the loss was 12%. Rates of plutonium reduction in 1.5 M nitric acid have been compared for a number of reducing agents under identical conditions. Some derivatives of hydroxylamine were found to be much more effective than hydroxylamine itself

  17. Transition metal complexes with thiosemicarbazide-based ligands. Part46. Synthesis and physico-chemical characterization of mixed ligand cobalt(III-complexes with salicylaldehyde semi-, thiosemi- and isothiosemicarbazone and pyridine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VUKADIN M. LEOVAC

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Mixed ligand octahedral cobalt(III complexes with the tridentate salicylaldehyde semi-, thiosemi- and isothiosemicarbazone and pyridine of general formula [CoIII(L11-3(py3]X (H2L1 = salicylaldehyde semicarbazone, X = [CoIICl3(py]-, ClO4- . H2O, I- . 0.5 I2; H2L2 = salicylaldehyde thiosemicarbazone, X = [CoIICl3(py]-, [CoIIBr3(py]-, ClO4- . H2O, I3-; H2L3 = salicylaldehyde S-methylisothiosemicarbazone, X = [ CoIIBr3(py ]-, ClO4- . H2O, BF4- were synthesized. The tridentate coordination of all the three dianionic forms of the ligands involves the phenol oxygen, hydrazine nitrogen and the chalcogen (O or S in case of salicylaldehyde semi-, thiosemicarbazone and the terminal nitrogen atom in the case of isothiosemicarbazone. For all the complexes, a meridial octahedral arrangement is proposed, which is a consequence of the planarity of the chelate ligand. The compounds were characterized by elemental analysis, molar conductivity, magnetic susceptibility, IR and electronic absorption spectra. The thermal decomposition of the complexes was investigated by thermogravimetry, coupled TG-MS measurements and DSC.

  18. Which part of a short, global risk assessment, the Risk Instrument for Screening in the Community, predicts adverse healthcare outcomes?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’Caoimh, Rónán

    2015-01-01

    The Risk Instrument for Screening in the Community (RISC) is a short, global risk assessment to identify community-dwelling older adults’ one-year risk of institutionalisation, hospitalisation, and death. We investigated the contribution that the three components of the RISC (\

  19. Aggregation of measures to produce an overall assessment of animal welfare. Part 1: a review of existing methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boteau, R.; Bonde, Marianne; Butterworth, A.;

    2007-01-01

    multidimensional nature of welfare and the relative importance of various welfare measures. It is concluded that different methods may be used at different stages of the construction of an overall assessment of animal welfare, depending on the constraints imposed on the aggregation process....

  20. Examination of Assessment Practices for Engineering Design Projects in Secondary Technology Education (Second Article in 3-Part Series)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Todd R.; Wicklein, Robert C.

    2009-01-01

    Based on the efforts to infuse engineering practices within the technology education curriculum it is appropriate to now investigate how technology education teachers are assessing engineering design activities within their classrooms. This descriptive study drew a full sample of high school technology teachers from the current International…

  1. Revised assessment of cancer risk to dichloromethane: part I Bayesian PBPK and dose-response modeling in mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Marino, Dale J.; Clewell, Harvey J.; Gentry, P. Robinan; Covington, Tammie R.; Hack, C. Eric; David, Raymond M.; Morgott, David A.

    2006-01-01

    KEYWORDS - CLASSIFICATION: analysis;Animals;Bayes Theorem;chemically induced;Carcinogens;Dose-Response Relationship,Drug;Environment;Inhalation Exposure;metabolism;methods;Markov Chains;mechanisms of carcinogenesis;Methylene Chloride;Mice;Models,Biological;Monte Carlo Method;Neoplasms;pharmacokinetics;Risk Assessment;Safety.

  2. Nuclear proliferation and civilian nuclear power. Report of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program. Volume III. Resources and fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of uranium supply and the rest of the nuclear fuel cycle to meet the demand for nuclear power is an important consideration in future domestic and international planning. Accordingly, the purpose of this assessment is to evaluate the adequacy of potential supply for various nuclear resources and fuel cycle facilities in the United States and in the world outside centrally planned economy areas (WOCA). Although major emphasis was placed on uranium supply and demand, material resources (thorium and heavy water) and facility resources (separative work, spent fuel storage, and reprocessing) were also considered

  3. 'Reference Biospheres' for solid radioactive waste disposal. Report of BIOMASS Theme 1 of the BIOsphere Modelling and ASSessment (BIOMASS) Programme. Part of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project on Biosphere Modelling and Assessment (BIOMASS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA Programme on BIOsphere Modelling and ASSessment (BIOMASS) was launched in Vienna in October 1996. The programme was concerned with developing and improving capabilities to predict the transfer of radionuclides in the environment. The programme had three themes: Theme 1: Radioactive Waste Disposal. The objective was to develop the concept of a standard or reference biosphere for application to the assessment of the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. Under the general heading of 'Reference Biospheres', six Task Groups were established: Task Group 1: Principles for the Definition of Critical and Other Exposure Groups. Task Group 2: Principles for the Application of Data to Assessment Models. Task Group 3: Consideration of Alternative Assessment Contexts. Task Group 4: Biosphere System Identification and Justification. Task Group 5: Biosphere System Descriptions. Task Group 6: Model Development. Theme 2: Environmental Releases. BIOMASS provided an international forum for activities aimed at increasing the confidence in methods and models for the assessment of radiation exposure related to environmental releases. Two Working Groups addressed issues concerned with the reconstruction of radiation doses received by people from past releases of radionuclides to the environment and the evaluation of the efficacy of remedial measures. Theme 3: Biosphere Processes. The aim of this Theme was to improve capabilities for modelling the transfer of radionuclides in particular parts of the biosphere identified as being of potential radiological significance and where there were gaps in modelling approaches. This topic was explored using a range of methods including reviews of the literature, model inter-comparison exercises and, where possible, model testing against independent sources of data. Three Working Groups were established to examine the modelling of: (1) long term tritium dispersion in the environment; (2) radionuclide uptake by fruits; and (3

  4. Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR): Guide to data processing and revision: Part 1, Technical overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) is an automated data base management system for processing and storing human error probability (HEP) and hardware component failure data (HCFD). The NUCLARR system software resides on an IBM (or compatible) personal micro-computer. Users can perform data base searches to furnish HEP estimates and HCFD rates. In this manner, the NUCLARR system can be used to support a variety of risk assessment activities. This volume, Volume 3 of a 5-volume series, presents the procedures used to process HEP and HCFD for entry in NUCLARR and describes how to modify the existing NUCLARR taxonomy in order to add either equipment types or action verbs. Volume 3 also specifies the various roles of the administrative staff on assignment to the NUCLARR Clearinghouse who are tasked with maintaining the data base, dealing with user requests, and processing NUCLARR data. 5 refs., 2 figs

  5. Passive air sampler as a tool for long-term air pollution monitoring: Part 2. Air genotoxic potency screening assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capability of passive air sampling to be employed in the evaluation of direct genotoxicity of ambient air samples was assessed. Genotoxic effects of the total extracts from the polyurethane foam filters exposed for 28 days during a regional passive air sampling campaign were investigated. Twenty sampling sites were selected in Brno city on the area of approximately 20 x 20 km in October and November 2004. Brno is the second largest city of the Czech Republic, highly industrialized with approximately 370,000 of permanent inhabitants. The levels of PAHs, PCBs, and chlorinated pesticides were determined in all samples. Fraction of each extract was also assayed in the bacterial genotoxicity test using Escherichia coli sulA::lacZ. Complete dose-response relationships of the air extracts were determined. The statistical analysis showed significant correlation between observed biological effects and PAHs concentrations in samples. - Extracts from passive air samples can be used to assess genotoxic potency

  6. Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR): Data manual: Part 3, Hardware Component Failure Data (HCFD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume of a five-volume series summarizes those data currently resident in the first release of the Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) data base. The hardware component failure data (HCFD) contained herein are accompanied by a glossary of terms and the HEP and hardware taxonomies used to structure the data. Instructions are presented on how the user may navigate through the NUCLARR data management system to find anchor values to assist in solving risk-related problems

  7. Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR): Part 2, Human Error Probability (HEP) estimates: Data manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume of a five-volume series summarizes those data currently resident in the first releases of the Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) data base. The raw human error probability (HEP) contained herein is accompanied by a glossary of terms and the HEP and hardware taxonomies used to structure the data. Instructions are presented on how the user may navigate through the NUCLARR data management system to find anchor values to assist in solving risk-related problems

  8. A global water scarcity assessment under Shared Socio-economic Pathways – Part 2: Water availability and scarcity

    OpenAIRE

    Hanasaki, N.; Fujimori, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yoshikawa, S.; Masaki, Y; Hijioka, Y.; M. Kainuma; Kanamori, Y; T. Masui; Takahashi, K; Kanae, S.

    2013-01-01

    A global water scarcity assessment for the 21st century was conducted under the latest socio-economic scenario for global change studies, namely Shared Socio-economic Pathways (SSPs). SSPs depict five global situations with substantially different socio-economic conditions. In the accompanying paper, a water use scenario compatible with the SSPs was developed. This scenario considers not only quantitative socio-economic factors such as population and electricity production but also qualitativ...

  9. Development of flaw evaluation software for structural integrity of nuclear power plants (Part 2: failure assessment procedure)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer program has been developed to perform failure assessment for the structural integrity of light water reactor class 1 components. It enables flaw evaluation for flawed pressure vessels and piping, mainly in accordance with the Japanese maintenance standard for nuclear components, JSME Fitness-for-Service, and with the ASME Code Sec.XI and UK NE's R-6 FAD method as well. The paper outlines the evaluation procedures, acceptance criteria and specific features of the system. (authors)

  10. Pesticide exposure assessment for surface waters in the EU. Part 1: Some comments on the current procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Martin; Diesner, Mirjam; Großmann, Dietlinde; Guerniche, Djamal; Hommen, Udo; Klein, Michael; Kubiak, Roland; Müller, Alexandra; Priegnitz, Jan; Reichenberger, Stefan; Thomas, Kai; Trapp, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    In 2001, the European Commission introduced a risk assessment project known as FOCUS (FOrum for the Coordination of pesticide fate models and their USe) for the surface water risk assessment of active substances in the European Union. Even for the national authorisation of plant protection products (PPPs), the vast majority of EU member states still refer to the four runoff and six drainage scenarios selected by the FOCUS Surface Water Workgroup. However, our study, as well as the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), has stated the need for various improvements. Current developments in pesticide exposure assessment mainly relate to two processes. Firstly, predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) of pesticides are calculated by introducing model input variables such as weather conditions, soil properties and substance fate parameters that have a probabilistic nature. Secondly, spatially distributed PECs for soil-climate scenarios are derived on the basis of an analysis of geodata. Such approaches facilitate the calculation of a spatiotemporal cumulative distribution function (CDF) of PECs for a given area of interest and are subsequently used to determine an exposure concentration endpoint as a given percentile of the CDF. For national PPP authorisation, we propose that, in the future, exposure endpoints should be determined from the overall known statistical PEC population for an area of interest, and derived for soil and climate conditions specific to the particular member state. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:27059427

  11. Genomic structure and sequence of a human homologue (NTHL1/NTH1) of Escherichia coli endonuclease III with those of the adjacent parts of TSC2 and SLC9A3R2 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imai, K; Sarker, A H; Akiyama, K; Ikeda, S; Yao, M; Tsutsui, K; Shohmori, T; Seki, S

    1998-11-19

    Genomic cloning and sequencing of a human homologue (the gene name, endonuclease III-like 1; gene symbol, NTHL1 or NTH1) for Escherichia coli endonuclease III, that is involved in pyrimidine base excision repair, were performed. The sequence covered the entire NTHL1 gene consisting of six exons and five introns spanning 8kb with 5' flanking (8kb) and 3' flanking (3.8kb) regions. Southern blot analysis suggested that the NTHL1 gene exists as a single copy in a haploid genome. The sequenced 5' flanking region lacks typical TATA and CAAT boxes, but contains a CpG island having putative binding sites for several transcription factors such as Ets1 and Sp1. The NTHL1 gene lies immediately adjacent to the tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) gene on chromosome 16p13.3 in a 5'-to-5' orientation. Transcription initiation sites of both NTHL1 and TSC2 genes were suggested to be multiple by 5' RACE experiments. The northern hybridization experiment suggested that both genes are expressed in all tissues, but at different levels. Downstream of the NTHL1 gene, the gene for the regulatory factor 2 (SLC9A3R2/E3KARP; also called OCTS2, TKA-1 and SIP-1) of the solute carrier family 9 (sodium/hydrogen exchanger), isoform A3, lies in a 3'-to-3' orientation. This paper demonstrates for the first time the spatial relationship of these three genes (TSC2, NTHL1 and SLC9A3R2) at the nucleotide level, and the presence of multiple transcription initiation sites of the NTHL1 and TSC2 genes. PMID:9831664

  12. Uncertainty in runoff based on Global Climate Model precipitation and temperature data – Part 1: Assessment of Global Climate Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. McMahon

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Two key sources of uncertainty in projections of future runoff for climate change impact assessments are uncertainty between Global Climate Models (GCMs and within a GCM. Uncertainty between GCM projections of future climate can be assessed through analysis of runs of a given scenario from a wide range of GCMs. Within GCM uncertainty is the variability in GCM output that occurs when running a scenario multiple times but each run has slightly different, but equally plausible, initial conditions. The objective of this, the first of two complementary papers, is to reduce between-GCM uncertainty by identifying and removing poorly performing GCMs prior to the analysis presented in the second paper. Here we assess how well 46 runs from 22 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 3 (CMIP3 GCMs are able to reproduce observed precipitation and temperature climatological statistics. The performance of each GCM in reproducing these statistics was ranked and better performing GCMs identified for later analyses. Observed global land surface precipitation and temperature data were drawn from the CRU 3.10 gridded dataset and re-sampled to the resolution of each GCM for comparison. Observed and GCM based estimates of mean and standard deviation of annual precipitation, mean annual temperature, mean monthly precipitation and temperature and Köppen climate type were compared. The main metrics for assessing GCM performance were the Nash–Sutcliffe efficiency index and RMSE between modelled and observed long-term statistics. This information combined with a literature review of the performance of the CMIP3 models identified the following five models as the better performing models for the next phase of our analysis in assessing the uncertainty in runoff estimated from GCM projections of precipitation and temperature: HadCM3 (Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, MIROCM (Center for Climate System Research (The University of Tokyo, National

  13. Review of models for use in probabilistic assessments of the disposal of high level radioactive wastes on or beneath the seabed: appendix III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MARINRAD (MARINe RADionuclide Transport and Dose) is a system of computer programs designed to evaluate the consequences from release of radioactive waste into the ocean. It is presently being used in safety assessment studies for the Subseabed Disposal Program by Sandia National Laboratories. MARINRAD calculates doses to humans and biota and health effects to humans. The MARINRAD software system is composed of three computer programs: ORIGEN, MARRAD and MAROUT. The use of the ORIGEN program to generate a nuclide inventory file is optional. The MARRAD program incorporates an ocean transport box model that calculates radionuclide concentrations as a function of time, and a steady-state food-chain model that calculates the biota concentration factors. Program MAROUT evaluates a pathways-to-man model which is used to calculate dose and health effects to man for up to seven different exposure pathways. (author)

  14. Assessment of the potential allergenicity of ice structuring protein type III HPLC 12 using the FAO/WHO 2001 decision tree for novel foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindslev-Jensen, C; Sten, E; Earl, L K;

    2003-01-01

    modern biotechnology and derived from fish are being considered for use in food and other applications, and since allergy to fish is well established, a potential risk from such proteins to susceptible human beings exists. The overall aim of the study was to investigate the potential allergenicity of an......, methods for assessing degradability under standardised conditions, assays for detection of specific IgE against the protein (Maxisorb RAST) and histamine release from human basophils. In the present paper we describe the serum screening phase of the study and discuss the overall application of the...... sequence similarity to known allergens nor was it stable to proteolytic degradation using standardised methods. Using sera from 20 patients with a well-documented clinical history of fish allergy, positive in skin prick tests to ocean pout, eel pout and eel were used, positive IgE-binding in vitro to...

  15. A procedure for assessing seismic hazard generated by Vrancea earthquakes and its application. III. A method for developing isoseismal and isoacceleration maps. Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for developing isoseismal and isoacceleration maps assumedly valid for future strong earthquakes (MGR > 6.7) is described as constituting the third stage of a procedure for assessing the seismic hazard generated by Vrancea earthquakes. The method relies on the results of the former two stages given by Enescu et al., and on further developments that are presented in this paper. Moreover, it is based on instrument recording data. Major earthquakes taking place in Vrancea (November 10, 1940 - MGR 7.4, March 4, 1977 - MGR = 7.2 and the strongest possible) were examined as a way to test the method. The method is also applied for an earthquake of magnitude MGR = 6.7. Given the successful results of the tests, the method can by used for predicting isoseismal and isoacceleration maps for future Vrancea earthquakes of various magnitudes MGR ≥ 6.7. (authors)

  16. Development of a site-specific Ecological Risk Assessment for contaminated sites: part II. A multi-criteria based system for the selection of bioavailability assessment tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenzin, Elena; Critto, Andrea; Carlon, Claudio; Rutgers, Michiel; Marcomini, Antonio

    2007-06-15

    A comparison procedure based on Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (MCDA) and expert judgment was developed in order to allow the comparison of bioavailability tests to implement the chemical Line of Evidence (LoE) within a TRIAD based site-specific Ecological Risk Assessment framework including three tires of investigation. The proposed methodology was included in the Module 1 of the Decision Support System DSS-ERAMANIA and the obtained rank supported the selection of a suitable set of available tests to be applied to the case study. A simplified application of the proposed procedure is described and results obtained by the system software are discussed. PMID:17434575

  17. Generation III reactors - the nuclear renaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European Pressurized Reactor - GEN III+, the PWR type reactor, remains the world's first and currently being built power reactor everywhere. ATMEA1, a new 1,100 MWe pressurized water reactor combines state-of-the art- technology from AREVA and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries to meet the challenges of the nuclear renaissance. Thus, the next evolutionary design of Generation III reactors will be deployed over many decades and will represent a large part of the worldwide fleet throughout the 21st century. Generation III reactors will equip the future NPPs ensuring improved safety and reliability, with passive safety systems and a very low probability for core melt. The Generation III Reactors as 'The Nuclear Renaissance' is presented in the paper. (author)

  18. Assessment of environmental radioactive elements in groundwater in parts of Nalgonda district, Andhra Pradesh, South India using scintillation detection methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work was to determine the radioactive element concentrations in groundwater in parts of the Nalgonda district. Results indicate that 222Rn activity is present in significant levels in deep groundwater compared to shallow groundwater and tank water. An increasing 222Rn activity trend is noticed along the well depth while electrical conductivity, uranium, and alkalinity levels showed inverse trends. Environmental tritium data indicates modern recharge to groundwater. Inter-elemental correlations suggest that high dissolved uranium is associated with high alkalinity and high electrical conductivity groundwater. The study also infers recharge sources and mechanisms to shallow and deep groundwater. (author)

  19. Thermophysical properties of alkali metal vapours. Part II - assessment of experimental data on thermal conductivity and viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    Fialho, Paulo; Ramires, Maria de Lurdes V.; Nieto de Castro, Carlos A.; João M. N. A. Fareleira; Mardolcar, Umesh V.

    1994-01-01

    Copyright © 1994 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Article first published online: 8 MAY 2010. An analysis of the available data on the viscosity and thermal conductivity coefficients of the alkali metal vapours is presented. The analysis is based upon theoretical calculations of the properties of the monatomic systems, described in the preceding parts I and I.A of the present paper, and making use of the kinetic theory of a binary gas reacting mixture. A summary of the measur...

  20. Integrated assessment of global water scarcity over the 21st century – Part 2: Climate change mitigation policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Hejazi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the effects of emission mitigation policies on water scarcity both globally and regionally using the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM, a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. Three climate policy scenarios with increasing mitigation stringency of 7.7, 5.5, and 4.2 W m−2 in year 2095 (equivalent to the SRES A2, B2, and B1 emission scenarios, respectively, under two carbon tax regimes (a universal carbon tax (UCT which includes land use change emissions, and a fossil fuel and industrial emissions carbon tax (FFICT which excludes land use change emissions are analyzed. The results are compared to a baseline scenario (i.e. no climate change mitigation policy with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W m−2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario by 2095. When compared to the baseline scenario and maintaining the same baseline socioeconomic assumptions, water scarcity declines under a UCT mitigation policy but increases with a FFICT mitigation scenario by the year 2095 particularly with more stringent climate mitigation targets. The decreasing trend with UCT policy stringency is due to substitution from more water-intensive to less water-intensive choices in food and energy production, and in land use. Under the FFICT scenario, water scarcity is projected to increase driven by higher water demands for bio-energy crops. This study implies an increasingly prominent role for water availability in future human decisions, and highlights the importance of including water in integrated assessment of global change. Future research will be directed at incorporating water shortage feedbacks in GCAM to better understand how such stresses will propagate across the various human and natural systems in GCAM.

  1. The development of Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society classification criteria for axial spondyloarthritis (part II)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudwaleit, M; van der Heijde, D; Landewé, R;

    2009-01-01

    or by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plus at least one SpA feature ("imaging arm") or the presence of HLA-B27 plus at least two SpA features ("clinical arm"). The sensitivity and specificity of the entire set of the new criteria were 82.9% and 84.4%, and for the imaging arm alone 66.2% and 97......OBJECTIVE: To validate and refine two sets of candidate criteria for the classification/diagnosis of axial spondyloarthritis (SpA). METHODS: All Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS) members were invited to include consecutively new patients with chronic (> or =3 months) back...

  2. Sierra cooperative ozone impact assessment study: Year 4. Volume 2, Part B. 1994 hourly data tabulations. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, J.J.; Dixon, A.J.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of the Sierra Cooperative Ozone Impact Assessment Study (SCOIAS) was to characterize ozone concentration and meteorological conditions in mixed conifer forests on the western slope of the Sierra Nevada. The report summarizes the data collected in 1994. The major tasks were to continue aerometric monitoring at six stations in five national forests, and to measure leaf water potential as a factor influencing ozone uptake by pine trees growing near the monitoring stations. The six stations were located at Mountain Home in the Sequoia, Shaver Lake and Jerseydale in the Sierra, Five-Mile in the Stanislaus, Sly Park in the El Dorado, and White Cloud in the Tahoe National Forests.

  3. An assessment of the effects on seabirds of oil exploration in the Norwegian part of the Skagerrak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of an assessment of the effects on seabirds of possible petroleum exploration in the North Sea east of 7o East (Skagerrak). Relative index values for the direct effects of oil spills were calculated by combining oil spill simulations with the distribution of the valued ecosystem components, Common Eider and auks, and their vulnerability indexes, using the analysis system SIMPACT. Based on these results and other considerations, recommendations for limiting possible drilling activity are given. 105 refs., 30 figs., 9 tabs

  4. Basel III B: Basel III Overview

    OpenAIRE

    Christian M. McNamara; Michael Wedow; Andrew Metrick

    2014-01-01

    In the wake of the financial crisis of 2007-2009, the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS) faced the critical task of diagnosing what went wrong and then updating regulatory standards aimed at preventing it from occurring again.  In seeking to strengthen the microprudential regulation associated with the earlier Basel Accords while also adding a macroprudential overlay, Basel III consists of proposals in three main areas intended to address 1) capital reform, 2) liquidity standards, ...

  5. DECOVALEX III/BENCHPAR PROJECTS. Approaches to Upscaling Thermal-Hydro-Mechanical Processes in a Fractured Rock. Mass and its Significance for Large-Scale Repository Performance Assessment. Summary of Findings. Report of BMT2/WP3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Benchmark Test 2 of DECOVALEX III and Work Package 3 of BENCHPAR concerns the upscaling Thermal (T), Hydrological (H) and Mechanical (M) processes in a fractured rock mass and its significance for large-scale repository performance assessment. The work is primarily concerned with the extent to which various thermo-hydro-mechanical couplings in a fractured rock mass adjacent to a repository are significant in terms of solute transport typically calculated in large-scale repository performance assessments. Since the presence of even quite small fractures may control the hydraulic, mechanical and coupled hydromechanical behaviour of the rock mass, a key of the work has been to explore the extent to which these can be upscaled and represented by 'equivalent' continuum properties appropriate PA calculations. From these general aims the BMT was set-up as a numerical study of a large scale reference problem. Analysing this reference problem should: help explore how different means of simplifying the geometrical detail of a site, with its implications on model parameters, ('upscaling') impacts model predictions of relevance to repository performance, explore to what extent the THM-coupling needs to be considered in relation to PA-measures, compare the uncertainties in upscaling (both to uncertainty on how to upscale or uncertainty that arises due to the upscaling processes) and consideration of THM couplings with the inherent uncertainty and spatial variability of the site specific data. Furthermore, it has been an essential component of the work that individual teams not only produce numerical results but are forced to make their own judgements and to provide the proper justification for their conclusions based on their analysis. It should also be understood that conclusions drawn will partly be specific to the problem analysed, in particular as it mainly concerns a 2D application. This means that specific conclusions may have limited applicability to real problems in

  6. Field and laboratory investigations to assess impacts to fish health from oil sands wastewater releases (Part 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combined field and laboratory investigation was conducted during 1995 to evaluate the health of fish which were exposed to wastewaters from Suncor Inc., Oil Sands Group's operation. This investigation was designed to: assess effects on major trophic components of aquatic ecosystems; assess effects on the general condition and health of fish; and relate chemical characteristics to measured responses. A suite of indicators was examined at several levels of biological organization: biochemical, physiological, whole-organisms, population and community. This comprehensive approach was followed because stress effects on fish cannot be adequately evaluated by measuring a single indicator at a single level of organization. Fish health data for walleye (Stizostedion vitreum), goldeye (Hiodon alosoides) and longnose sucker (Catostomus catostomus) showed that there were no adverse effects on fish health at any level of organization. The laboratory investigations comprised 7 and 28 exposures to wastewater and showed that no observed effect levels (NOELs) and lowest observed effect levels (LOELs) were greater than 10% for biochemical and physiological and whole-organism endpoints

  7. Integrated Assessment of Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining in Ghana—Part 2: Natural Sciences Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhgon Rajaee

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper is one of three synthesis documents produced via an integrated assessment (IA that aims to increase understanding of artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM in Ghana. Given the complexities surrounding ASGM, an integrated assessment (IA framework was utilized to analyze socio-economic, health, and environmental data, and co-develop evidence-based responses with stakeholders. This paper focuses on the causes, status, trends, and consequences of ecological issues related to ASGM activity in Ghana. It reviews dozens of studies and thousands of samples to document evidence of heavy metals contamination in ecological media across Ghana. Soil and water mercury concentrations were generally lower than guideline values, but sediment mercury concentrations surpassed guideline values in 64% of samples. Arsenic, cadmium, and lead exceeded guideline values in 67%, 17%, and 24% of water samples, respectively. Other water quality parameters near ASGM sites show impairment, with some samples exceeding guidelines for acidity, turbidity, and nitrates. Additional ASGM-related stressors on environmental quality and ecosystem services include deforestation, land degradation, biodiversity loss, legacy contamination, and potential linkages to climate change. Though more research is needed to further elucidate the long-term impacts of ASGM on the environment, the plausible consequences of ecological damages should guide policies and actions to address the unique challenges posed by ASGM.

  8. A comprehensive, mechanistic heat transfer modeling package for dispersed flow film boiling—Part 2—Implementation and assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Implementation of a Lagrangian subscale dry contact heat transfer model in COBRA-IE. • Comparisons of COBRA-IE predictions using Forslund–Rohsenow and mechanistic model. • Reduction in RMS temperature error from 86.56 K to 46.96 K using mechanistic model. • Reduction in standard deviation of temperature error from 82.15 K to 44.75 K. - Abstract: A mechanistic, first-principles based Dispersed Flow Film Boiling (DFFB) heat transfer package has been implemented within the existing framework of an in-house version of COBRA-TF, called COBRA-IE. Several sensitivities studies were performed on the proposed model to determine how to characterize the droplet size distribution and to validate the use of a quasi-static Lagrangian subscale trajectory calculation within COBRA-IE. Assessing the proposed model against experimental data from 118 experimental runs in four separate facilities has shown a marked improvement over the predictions of the base line COBRA-IE DFFB model set. Over the entire assessment database, the proposed model has reduced the mean error, RMS error, and standard deviation of the error in the wall temperature predictions and improved the prediction in the axial variation of the wall temperature. The proposed DFFB model marks a step-change in the use of mechanistically based DFFB models in reactor safety analysis codes resulting in improved predictive capabilities

  9. Final Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1107, analyzing the environmental effects relating to the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SLAC is a national facility operated by Stanford University, California, under contract with DOE. The center is dedicated to research in elementary particle physics and in those fields that make use of its synchrotron facilities. The objective for the construction and operation of an office building is to provide adequate office space for existing SLAC Waste Management (WM) personnel, so as to centralize WM personnel and to make WM operations more efficient and effective. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI)

  10. A National Study Assessing the Teaching and Learning of Introductory Astronomy; Part I: The Effect of Interactive Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, E. E.; Rudolph, A. L.; Brissenden, G.; Schlingman, W. M.

    2011-09-01

    We present the results of a national study on the teaching and learning of astronomy taught in general education, non-science major, introductory astronomy courses (Astro 101). Nearly 4000 students enrolled in 69 sections of Astro 101 taught at 31 institutions completed (pre- and post- instruction) the Light and Spectroscopy Concept Inventory (LSCI) from Fall 2006 to Fall 2007. The classes varied in size from very small (N different classrooms affected student learning, we developed and administered an Interactivity Assessment Instrument (IAI). This short survey, completed by instructors, allowed us to estimate the fraction of classroom time spent on learner- centered, active-engagement instruction such as Peer Instruction and collaborative tutorials. Pre-instruction LSCI scores were clustered around ˜25% (24 ± 2%), independent of class size and institution type; however, the gains measured varied from about (-)0.07-0.50. The distribution of gain scores indicates that differences were due to instruction in the classroom, not the type of class or institution. Interactivity Assessment Scores (IAS's) ranged from 0%-50%, showing that our IAI was able to distinguish between classes with higher and lower levels of interactivity. A comparison of class-averaged gain score to IAS showed that higher interactivity classes (IAS > 25%) were the only instructional environments capable of reaching the highest gains ( > 0.30). However, the range of gains seen for both groups of classes was quite wide, suggesting that the use of interactive learning strategies is not sufficient by itself to achieve high student gain.

  11. Integrated Assessment of Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining in Ghana-Part 2: Natural Sciences Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaee, Mozhgon; Obiri, Samuel; Green, Allyson; Long, Rachel; Cobbina, Samuel J; Nartey, Vincent; Buck, David; Antwi, Edward; Basu, Niladri

    2015-08-01

    This paper is one of three synthesis documents produced via an integrated assessment (IA) that aims to increase understanding of artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) in Ghana. Given the complexities surrounding ASGM, an integrated assessment (IA) framework was utilized to analyze socio-economic, health, and environmental data, and co-develop evidence-based responses with stakeholders. This paper focuses on the causes, status, trends, and consequences of ecological issues related to ASGM activity in Ghana. It reviews dozens of studies and thousands of samples to document evidence of heavy metals contamination in ecological media across Ghana. Soil and water mercury concentrations were generally lower than guideline values, but sediment mercury concentrations surpassed guideline values in 64% of samples. Arsenic, cadmium, and lead exceeded guideline values in 67%, 17%, and 24% of water samples, respectively. Other water quality parameters near ASGM sites show impairment, with some samples exceeding guidelines for acidity, turbidity, and nitrates. Additional ASGM-related stressors on environmental quality and ecosystem services include deforestation, land degradation, biodiversity loss, legacy contamination, and potential linkages to climate change. Though more research is needed to further elucidate the long-term impacts of ASGM on the environment, the plausible consequences of ecological damages should guide policies and actions to address the unique challenges posed by ASGM. PMID:26264012

  12. Thermodynamics of the O-U system: III - Critical assessment of phase diagram data in the U-UO2+x composition range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to help understand the behavior of the UO2 fuel in a severe nuclear accident, the phase diagram data of the O-U system in the U-UO2 composition range are reviewed critically, so that the most reliable set of original data can be selected. In the course of this assessment, a special effort is made to evaluate as realistically as possible the associated uncertainties, not only for reliable data selection, but also as weights in the procedure, which is used later to optimize phase diagram and thermodynamic data. Among the criteria for selection, the non-congruent vaporization of the UO2±x phase and the interactions between UO2 and the containment materials are discussed, together with a detailed analysis of the experimental techniques used. A melting temperature for UO2 of 3138 ± 15 K is proposed, which is compatible with the selected data for the liquidus and solidus temperatures in this composition range. The solubility limit of oxygen in liquid uranium is selected as the smallest value among different and largely non-consistent values, and this selection leads to the existence of a large miscibility gap in the liquid phase between one metal rich liquid and one oxide rich liquid

  13. Use of the food-chain model FOOD III and the soil model SCEMR to assess irrigation as a biosphere pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irrigation of contaminated water onto crop land is a relatively direct pathway for radionuclides to deliver a radiation dose to man. Irrigation was not originally included in the SYVAC assessment model for the Precambrian Shield because no irrigation is currently practised in the region. This report re-evaluates this decision. An analysis of meteorological data shows that crop yield in northern Ontario would benefit from irrigation. Thus, incentives are present for subsistence-scale, and perhaps commercial-scale, irrigation of surface or well water. A food-chain analysis indicated that irrigation with contaminated water could deliver a dose comparable to direct consumption (drinking) of the same water, for some radionuclides. Long-term contamination of soil through irrigation was predicted to be a substantial hazard, even when soil leaching was incorporated into the food-chain model. This report presents parameter estimates that could be used to incorporate irrigation as a pathway in the SYVAC code and will constitute the basis for further decisions concerning this pathway

  14. 33 CFR Schedule III to Subpart A... - Calling-in Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Calling-in Table III Schedule III to Subpart A of Part 401 Navigation and Navigable Waters SAINT LAWRENCE SEAWAY DEVELOPMENT... Schedule III to Subpart A of Part 401—Calling-in Table C.I.P. and checkpoint Station to call...

  15. Contamination of Japanese foodstuffs of terrestrial origin after the Fukushima nuclear accident and related dose assessment - Part 2: ingestion dose assessments for the first year after the accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article proposes an assessment of the ingestion doses potentially received by people living in the Japanese areas most severely affected by the radioactive deposits due to the Fukushima nuclear accident. The assessment distinguishes two consecutive periods: the first 2 months (March 15 to May 15 2011) and the rest of the year 2011, according to the two main foodstuff contamination periods identified (Renaud et al., 2013). On the basis of the worst- case hypothesis that can reasonably be made, the estimated doses are much lower than they might have been in other circumstances, on account of generally moderate levels of contamination for most foods, early evacuation of the most severely affected areas and the consumption bans ordered by the Japanese authorities. Thus, a single ingestion of 100 g of leafy vegetables in the early days by a one-year-old child living in non-evacuated localities near Iitate and Kawamata could have led to an equivalent dose to the thyroid of about 25 mSv; and to a thyroid dose of about 140 mSv for the rather unrealistic scenario of a daily consumption. Because of the rapid decrease in the contamination of vegetables and a much weaker contamination of other crops, and thanks to measures taken by the authorities (prohibition of consumption, use of certain fodder, etc.), the ingestion doses potentially received during the remainder of the year 2011 are estimated to be below 1 mSv. In the event that sales limits would have been ignored, only repeated consumption of mushrooms would have led to doses above that level. Even with the worst-case hypotheses, the doses potentially caused by ingestion are much lower than those resulting from outdoor exposure to radioactive deposits: approximately several milli-sieverts in a year for the population living in the non-evacuated localities near Iitate and Kawamata. (authors)

  16. Probabilistic seismic hazard assessment in Greece – Part 2: Acceleration response spectra and elastic input energy spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G-A. Tselentis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This second part of the study, deals with the evaluation of the earthquake hazard in Greece in terms of the response spectral acceleration and the elastic input energy equivalent velocity. Four sets of predictive equations were selected, two for each type of spectra. Probabilistic hazard maps were created by determining the seismic hazard at grid points covering the region of interest. The maps are presented for the dominant periods of 0.2 s and 1.0 s for each spectrum. Uniform hazard response spectra (UHRS for six cities located in the regions of highest estimated hazard are also presented. The comparison with elastic design spectra proposed by the latest national building code, has shown that the UHRS values exceed the design values at almost all periods.

  17. An Assessment of the Academic Achievement of Students in Two Modes of Part-time Programme in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kola Adeyemi

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available This study analyses the academic achievement of students enrolled in part-times studies at on-campus and outreach centres at three dual-mode Nigerian universities, during the 1996/97 to 1998/ 99 academic years. Research subjects in this study were examination and record officers employed by on-campus and outreach institutions. A checklist was prepared to collect students’ grades; these checklists were then transcribed into grade points (GPAs for data collection purposes. Simple percentage mean (x and t-test statistic were used for data analysis. Interviews were also conducted with key stakeholders to add qualitative context to the quantitative data collected. This study shows that there was significant difference in the academic performance of students enrolled in the on-campus versus outreach-based, part-time programmes in selected disciplines. Also the average mean (x performance of students enrolled in the on-campus programme was higher than those students enrolled in the outreach centres. Based on the findings of this study, it is recommended that the government provide adequate funding to increase access individuals seeking higher education in Nigeria. The establishment of functional Open University system is also recommended to provide students with distant learning opportunities and likewise increase access. Several quality improvements are likewise recommended: the use of modern information technology for instructional delivery, recruitment of skilled teachers, improved teaching/ learning facilities, and strict adherence to standardized student admission requirements as specified by the National Universities Commission (NUC. We wrap up with practical suggestions, such as providing orientation sessions for outreach students to learn practical skills such as how to access library materials.

  18. An integrated ecosystem approach for assessing the potential role of cultivated bivalve shells as part of the carbon trading system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filgueira, Ramón; Byron, C.J.; Comeau, L.A.;

    2015-01-01

    The role of bivalve mariculture in the CO2 cycle has been commonly evaluated as the balance between respiration, shell calcium carbonate sequestration and CO2 release during biogenic calcification. However, this approach neglects the ecosystem implications of cultivating bivalves at high densities......, e.g. the impact on phytoplankton dynamics and benthic-pelagic coupling, which can significantly contribute to the CO2 cycle. Therefore, an ecosystem approach that accounts for the trophic interactions of bivalve aquaculture, including dissolved and particulate organic and inorganic carbon cycling......, is needed to provide a rigorous assessment of the role of bivalve mariculture in the CO2 cycle. On the other hand, the discussion about the inclusion of shells of cultured bivalves into the carbon trading system should be framed in the context of ecosystem goods and services. Humans culture bivalves...

  19. SABRE: a computer-based system for the assessment of body radioactivity by photon spectrometry. Part 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A PDP-11/10 computer system is described for the acquisition and processing of pulse height spectra from detectors used for the measurement of body radioactivity. Version 4 of SABRE (System for the Assessment of Body Radioactivity) provides control of multiple detection systems from visual display consoles by means of a command language. A wide range of facilities is available for the display, processing and storage of acquired spectra and complex operations may be pre-programmed by means of the SABRE MACRO language. The hardware includes a CAMAC interface to the detection systems, disc cartridge drives for mass storage of data and programs, and data-links to other computers. The software is written in assembler language and includes special features for the dynamic allocation of computer memory and for safeguarding acquired data. (author)

  20. Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program: Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program -- Final Report. Part 1: The lower atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tooman, T.P. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Exploratory Systems Technology Dept.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents work done between FY91 and FY95 for the lower atmospheric portion of the joint Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program (ARSAP) within the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). The work focused on (1) developing new measurement capabilities and (2) measuring atmospheric heating in a well-defined layer and then relating it to cloud properties an water vapor content. Seven new instruments were develop3ed for use with Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles (UAVs) as the host platform for flux, radiance, cloud, and water vapor measurements. Four major field campaigns were undertaken to use these new as well as existing instruments to make critically needed atmospheric measurements. Scientific results include the profiling of clear sky fluxes from near surface to 14 km and the strong indication of cloudy atmosphere absorption of solar radiation considerably greater than predicted by extant models.

  1. Comparative study of eddy current and Barkhausen noise methods in microstructural assessment of heat treated steel parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahebalam, Alireza; Kashefi, Mehrdad; Kahrobaee, Saeed

    2014-07-01

    The present paper describes details of the comparison on the capability of eddy current (EC) and magnetic Barkhausen noise (MBN) techniques in the assessment of different microstructures in mild steel. To produce various microstructures, AISI 1045 steel samples were subjected to different heat treatment processes including annealing, normalising, quenching and tempering. EC outputs (induced voltage, normalised impedance and phase angle) as well as MBN outputs (peak width, position and amplitude) were evaluated. Comparing the EC/MBN outputs for the microstructures, the MBN peak characteristics show better agreement with changes in the microstructures. Besides, using regression analysis, peak width has been proved to be the optimum output to separate the microstructures with high accuracy.

  2. The perceived temperature - a versatile index for the assessment of the human thermal environment. Part A: scientific basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiger, Henning; Laschewski, Gudrun; Grätz, Angelika

    2012-01-01

    The Perceived Temperature (PT) is an equivalent temperature based on a complete heat budget model of the human body. It has proved its suitability for numerous applications across a wide variety of scales from micro to global and is successfully used both in daily forecasts and climatological studies. PT is designed for staying outdoors and is defined as the air temperature of a reference environment in which the thermal perception would be the same as in the actual environment. The calculation is performed for a reference subject with an internal heat production of 135 W m-2 (who is walking at 4 km h-1 on flat ground). In the reference environment, the mean radiant temperature equals the air temperature and wind velocity is reduced to a slight draught. The water vapour pressure remains unchanged. Under warm/humid conditions, however, it is implicitly related to a relative humidity of 50%. Clothing is adapted in order to achieve thermal comfort. If this is impossible, cold or heat stress will occur, respectively. The assessment of thermal perception by means of PT is based on Fanger's Predicted Mean Vote (PMV) together with additional model extensions taking account of stronger deviations from thermal neutrality. This is performed using a parameterisation based on a two-node model. In the cold, it allows the mean skin temperature to drop below the comfort value. In the heat, it assesses additionally the enthalpy of sweat-moistened skin and of wet clothes. PT has the advantages of being self-explanatory due to its deviation from air temperature and being—via PMV—directly linked to a thermo-physiologically-based scale of thermal perception that is widely used and has stood the test of time. This paper explains in detail the basic equations of the human heat budget and the coefficients of the parameterisations.

  3. Assessment of possible airborne impact from nuclear risk sites – Part I: methodology for probabilistic atmospheric studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Baklanov

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is to develop a methodology for a multidisciplinary nuclear risk and vulnerability assessment, and to test this methodology through estimation of a nuclear risk to population in the Northern European countries in case of a severe accident at the nuclear risk sites. For assessment of the probabilistic risk and vulnerability, a combination of social-geophysical factors and probabilities are considered. The main focus of this paper is the description of methodology for evaluation of the atmospheric transport of radioactive releases from the risk site regions. The suggested methodology is given from the probabilistic point of view. The main questions stated are: What are probabilities and times for radionuclide atmospheric transport to different neighbouring countries and territories in case of the hypothetical accidental release at the nuclear risk site? Which geographical territories or countries are at the highest risk from the hypothetical accidental releases? To answer this question we suggest applying the following research tools for probabilistic atmospheric studies. First, it is atmospheric modelling to calculate multiyear forward trajectories originated over the sites. Second, it is statistical analysis tools to explore temporal and spatial structure of calculated trajectories in order to evaluate different probabilistic impact indicators: atmospheric transport pathways, airflow, fast transport, typical transport time, maximum possible impact zone, maximum reaching distance, etc. These indicators are applicable for further GIS-analysis and integration to estimate regional risk and vulnerability in case of accidental releases at the risk sites and for planning the emergency response and preparedness systems.

  4. Reactive polymers: part I - Novel polystyrene-anchored copper (II), nickel (II), cobalt (II), iron (III), zinc (II), cadmium (II), molybdenum (VI) and uranium (VI) complexes of the chelating resin containing thiosemicarbazone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new chelating resin containing thiosemicarbazone has been synthesized by the reaction of aldehydopolystyrene and thiosemicarbazide. The polystyrene bound thiosemicarbazone reacts with salicylaldehyde leading to the formation of a new Schiff base chelating resin which reacts with sodium monochloroacetate and gives the polymer bound S-acetatothiosemicarbazone. The new chelating resin forms complexes of the types PS-LCuX·S, PS-LNiX·3S, PS-LHNi(acac)2, PS-LCoX·3S, PS-LFeX2·2S, PS-LZnX·S, PS-LCdX·S, PS-LMoO2(acac) and PS-LUO2X·S (where PS-LH = polymeranchored ligand; S = DMF or CH3OH; X=Cl or CH3COO- and acacH = acetylacetone). The chelating resins and complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, IR and electronic spectra and magnetic measurements. The Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), and Fe(III) complexes are paramagnetic while the Zn(II), Cd(II), Mo(VI) and U(VI) complexes are diamagnetic. The IR data indicate the thioenolization of the ligand in the complexes (except in PS-LHNi(acac)2 where it behaves as a neutral bidentate ligand). (author). 24 refs., 2 tabs

  5. Assessment of impact on the groundwater quality due to urbanization by hydrogeochemical facies analysis in SE part of Pune city, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. G. Sayyed

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The groundwater from the south-eastern part of Pune city has been assessed for the seasonal variation in their quality parameters. Using Piper diagram the hydrogeochemical facies were identified and the groundwaters were classified with regards to the changes in their major chemical compositions. Based on the hydrogeochemical facies it has been found that the groundwater regime is severly deteriorated by the anthropogernic activities. Although the area of Manjari, Hadapsar and uruli Devachi show high influx of pollutants in rainy season the Mantarwadi and Fursungi area have strong influence of leachate throughout the year.

  6. Current assessment of integrated content of long-lived radionuclides in soils of the head part of the East Ural Radioactive Trace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the datasets obtained during investigations from 2003 to 2012, the spatial distributions of 90Sr, 137Cs, and 239,240Pu content in the soils of the head part of the East Ural Radioactive Trace (EURT) were mapped using the geographic information system ArcGIS. Taking into account the presence of spatial autocorrelation and anisotropy in the source data, an ordinary kriging method was applied to interpolate values of radionuclide contamination density at unsampled places. Further geostatistical data analysis was performed to determine the basic parameters of spatial dependencies and to integrally assess the contamination by long-lived radionuclides in soils of the central, east peripheral, and west peripheral parts of the trace. This analysis was based on simplified geometric models (sector- and rectangle-shaped areas). The Monte Carlo method was used to quantitatively assess the uncertainty of the values for the integrated quantities resulting from the statistical errors of the source data approximation. - Highlights: • We investigated 102 soil samples in 2003–2012 at different distances from PA Mayak. • We mapped spatial distribution of 90Sr, 137Cs, and 239,240Pu at this area by ArcGIS. • Integrated content based on sector- and rectangle-shaped models are similar. • The studied area clearly split into central, west, and east parts. • Radionuclide content of the central part is higher two orders than of west and east. - Capsule abstract: The spatial distribution of 90Sr, 137Cs, and 239,240Pu at the EURT area by ArcGIS

  7. HISTORY OF EMPLOYMENT AND MANPOWER POLICY IN THE UNITED STATES. PARTS III AND IV, LOOKING AHEAD TO THE POSTWAR ECONOMY AND THE CONCEPT OF FULL EMPLOYMENT IN CONGRESS. SELECTED READINGS IN EMPLOYMENT AND MANPOWER, VOLUME 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Public Welfare.

    THE SELECTED READINGS WERE COMPILED TO PROVIDE SUBCOMMITTEE MEMBERS WITH A BROAD BACKGROUND OF DEVELOPMENTS LEADING TO THE EMPLOYMENT ACT OF 1946 AND ARE CONCERNED WITH THE FORMULATION OF U.S. EMPLOYMENT POLICIES FOLLOWING WORLD WAR II. PARTS I AND II (VT 004 819) PROVIDE THE HISTORICAL BACKGROUND FROM THE LATE 1920'S THROUGH THE GREAT DEPRESSION.…

  8. Climate change impact assessment on Veneto and Friuli plain groundwater. Part I: An integrated modeling approach for hazard scenario construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baruffi, F. [Autorita di Bacino dei Fiumi dell' Alto Adriatico, Cannaregio 4314, 30121 Venice (Italy); Cisotto, A., E-mail: segreteria@adbve.it [Autorita di Bacino dei Fiumi dell' Alto Adriatico, Cannaregio 4314, 30121 Venice (Italy); Cimolino, A.; Ferri, M.; Monego, M.; Norbiato, D.; Cappelletto, M.; Bisaglia, M. [Autorita di Bacino dei Fiumi dell' Alto Adriatico, Cannaregio 4314, 30121 Venice (Italy); Pretner, A.; Galli, A. [SGI Studio Galli Ingegneria, via della Provvidenza 13, 35030 Sarmeola di Rubano (PD) (Italy); Scarinci, A., E-mail: andrea.scarinci@sgi-spa.it [SGI Studio Galli Ingegneria, via della Provvidenza 13, 35030 Sarmeola di Rubano (PD) (Italy); Marsala, V.; Panelli, C. [SGI Studio Galli Ingegneria, via della Provvidenza 13, 35030 Sarmeola di Rubano (PD) (Italy); Gualdi, S., E-mail: silvio.gualdi@bo.ingv.it [Centro Euro-Mediterraneo per i Cambiamenti Climatici (CMCC), via Augusto Imperatore 16, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Bucchignani, E., E-mail: e.bucchignani@cira.it [Centro Euro-Mediterraneo per i Cambiamenti Climatici (CMCC), via Augusto Imperatore 16, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Torresan, S., E-mail: torresan@cmcc.it [Centro Euro-Mediterraneo per i Cambiamenti Climatici (CMCC), via Augusto Imperatore 16, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Pasini, S., E-mail: sara.pasini@stud.unive.it [Centro Euro-Mediterraneo per i Cambiamenti Climatici (CMCC), via Augusto Imperatore 16, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Department of Environmental Sciences, Informatics and Statistics, University Ca' Foscari Venice, Calle Larga S. Marta 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); Critto, A., E-mail: critto@unive.it [Centro Euro-Mediterraneo per i Cambiamenti Climatici (CMCC), via Augusto Imperatore 16, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Department of Environmental Sciences, Informatics and Statistics, University Ca' Foscari Venice, Calle Larga S. Marta 2137, 30123 Venice (Italy); and others

    2012-12-01

    Climate change impacts on water resources, particularly groundwater, is a highly debated topic worldwide, triggering international attention and interest from both researchers and policy makers due to its relevant link with European water policy directives (e.g. 2000/60/EC and 2007/118/EC) and related environmental objectives. The understanding of long-term impacts of climate variability and change is therefore a key challenge in order to address effective protection measures and to implement sustainable management of water resources. This paper presents the modeling approach adopted within the Life + project TRUST (Tool for Regional-scale assessment of groUndwater Storage improvement in adaptation to climaTe change) in order to provide climate change hazard scenarios for the shallow groundwater of high Veneto and Friuli Plain, Northern Italy. Given the aim to evaluate potential impacts on water quantity and quality (e.g. groundwater level variation, decrease of water availability for irrigation, variations of nitrate infiltration processes), the modeling approach integrated an ensemble of climate, hydrologic and hydrogeologic models running from the global to the regional scale. Global and regional climate models and downscaling techniques were used to make climate simulations for the reference period 1961-1990 and the projection period 2010-2100. The simulation of the recent climate was performed using observed radiative forcings, whereas the projections have been done prescribing the radiative forcings according to the IPCC A1B emission scenario. The climate simulations and the downscaling, then, provided the precipitation, temperatures and evapo-transpiration fields used for the impact analysis. Based on downscaled climate projections, 3 reference scenarios for the period 2071-2100 (i.e. the driest, the wettest and the mild year) were selected and used to run a regional geomorphoclimatic and hydrogeological model. The final output of the model ensemble produced

  9. Climate change impact assessment on Veneto and Friuli plain groundwater. Part I: An integrated modeling approach for hazard scenario construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Climate change impacts on water resources, particularly groundwater, is a highly debated topic worldwide, triggering international attention and interest from both researchers and policy makers due to its relevant link with European water policy directives (e.g. 2000/60/EC and 2007/118/EC) and related environmental objectives. The understanding of long-term impacts of climate variability and change is therefore a key challenge in order to address effective protection measures and to implement sustainable management of water resources. This paper presents the modeling approach adopted within the Life + project TRUST (Tool for Regional-scale assessment of groUndwater Storage improvement in adaptation to climaTe change) in order to provide climate change hazard scenarios for the shallow groundwater of high Veneto and Friuli Plain, Northern Italy. Given the aim to evaluate potential impacts on water quantity and quality (e.g. groundwater level variation, decrease of water availability for irrigation, variations of nitrate infiltration processes), the modeling approach integrated an ensemble of climate, hydrologic and hydrogeologic models running from the global to the regional scale. Global and regional climate models and downscaling techniques were used to make climate simulations for the reference period 1961–1990 and the projection period 2010–2100. The simulation of the recent climate was performed using observed radiative forcings, whereas the projections have been done prescribing the radiative forcings according to the IPCC A1B emission scenario. The climate simulations and the downscaling, then, provided the precipitation, temperatures and evapo-transpiration fields used for the impact analysis. Based on downscaled climate projections, 3 reference scenarios for the period 2071–2100 (i.e. the driest, the wettest and the mild year) were selected and used to run a regional geomorphoclimatic and hydrogeological model. The final output of the model ensemble

  10. Potential radionuclide emissions from stacks on the Hanford site, Part 2: Dose assessment methodology using portable low-resolution gamma spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, J.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    In September 1992, the Westinghouse Hanford Company began developing an in situ measurement method to assess gamma radiation emanating from high-efficiency particulate air filters using portable low-resolution gamma spectroscopy. The purpose of the new method was to assess radioactive exhaust stack air emissions from empirical data rather than from theoretical models and to determine the potential unabated dose to an offsite theoretical maximally exposed individual. In accordance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61, Subpart H, {open_quotes}National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants{close_quotes}, stacks that have the potential to emit {ge} 1 {mu}Sv y{sup {minus}1} (0.1 mrem y{sup {minus}1}) to the maximally exposed individual are considered {open_quotes}major{close_quotes} and must meet the continuous monitoring requirements. After the method was tested and verified, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10, approved its use in June 1993. Of the 125 stacks operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company, 22 were targeted for evaluation by this method, and 15 were assessed. (The method could not be applied at seven stacks because of excessive background radiation or because no gamma emitting particles appear in the emission stream.) The most significant result from this study was the redesignation of the T Plant main stack. The stack was assessed as being {open_quotes}minor{close_quotes}, and it now only requires periodic confirmatory measurements and meets federally imposed sampling requirements.

  11. Analysis of area events as part of probabilistic safety assessment for Romanian TRIGA SSR 14 MW reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international experience has shown that the external events could be an important contributor to plant/ reactor risk. For this reason such events have to be included in the PSA studies. In the context of PSA for nuclear facilities, external events are defined as events originating from outside the plant, but with the potential to create an initiating event at the plant. To support plant safety assessment, PSA can be used to find methods for identification of vulnerable features of the plant and to suggest modifications in order to mitigate the impact of external events or the producing of initiating events. For that purpose, probabilistic assessment of area events concerning fire and flooding risk and impact is necessary. Due to the relatively large power level amongst research reactors, the approach to safety analysis of Romanian 14 MW TRIGA benefits from an ongoing PSA project. In this context, treatment of external events should be considered. The specific tasks proposed for the complete evaluation of area event analysis are: identify the rooms important for facility safety, determine a relative area event risk index for these rooms and a relative area event impact index if the event occurs, evaluate the rooms specific area event frequency, determine the rooms contribution to reactor hazard state frequencies, analyze power supply and room dependencies of safety components (as pumps, motor operated valves). The fire risk analysis methodology is based on Berry's method [1]. This approach provides a systematic procedure to carry out a relative index of different rooms. The factors, which affect the fire probability, are: personal presence in the room, number and type of ignition sources, type and area of combustibles, fuel available in the room, fuel location, and ventilation. The flooding risk analysis is based on the amount of piping in the room. For accuracy of the information regarding piping a facility walk-about is necessary. In case of flooding risk

  12. Suitability Assessment of Deep Groundwater for Drinking and Irrigation Use in the Parts of Hoskote and Malur Taluks, Karnataka (India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Ravikumar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater samples from thirty four bore wells used for drinking and irrigation in parts of Hoskote and Malur taluks, Karnataka State (India, were collected and geochemically analysed during December 2014. The hydrochemical characteristics was dominated by Ca2+-Mg2+ -Cl--SO42- (58.82% and Ca2+-Mg2+-HCO3- (38.24%, with alkaline earth (Ca+Mg exceeding alkalies (Na+K and strong acidic anions dominating weak acidic anions. Weathering of rock-forming minerals regulated chemistry of the groundwater in the study area as indicated by Gibbs plot. The groundwater chemistry in the study area is influenced by silicate dissolution of host rock with contribution from weathering of carbonate rocks while positive CAI values indicated exchange of Na and K from the water with Mg and Ca of the rocks in the study area. The Ca2+/Mg2+ molar ratio plot further supported the fact that dissolution of calcite with effect of silicate minerals contributes calcium and magnesium to 97.06% of the groundwater. SAR, percent sodium, WQI and permeability index values demonstrated the suitability of a majority of the samples for irrigation.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.erem.71.1.9809

  13. Hydrogeochemistry and groundwater quality assessment of lower part of the Ponnaiyar River Basin, Cuddalore district, South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevanandam, M; Kannan, R; Srinivasalu, S; Rammohan, V

    2007-09-01

    The Lower Ponnaiyar River Basin forms an important groundwater province in South India constituted by Tertiary formations dominated by sandstones and overlain by alluvium. The region enjoyed artesian conditions 50 years back but at present frequent failure of monsoon and over exploitation is threatening the aquifer. Further, extensive agricultural and industrial activities and urbanization has resulted in the increase in demand and contamination of the aquifer. To identify the sources and quality of groundwater, water samples from 47 bore wells were collected in an area of 154 km2 and were analysed for major ions and trace metals. The results reveal that the groundwater in many places is contaminated by higher concentrations of NO3, Cl, PO4 and Fe. Four major hydrochemical facies Ca-Mg-Cl, Na-Cl, Ca-HCO3 and Na-HCO3 were identified using Piper trilinear diagram. Salinity, sodium adsorption ratio, and sodium percentage indicate that most of the groundwater samples are not suitable for irrigation as well as for domestic purposes and far from drinking water standards. The most serious pollution threat to groundwater is from nitrate ions, which are associated with sewage and fertilizers application. The present state of the quality of the lower part of Ponnaiyar River Basin is of great concern and the higher concentration of toxic metals (Fe and Ni) may entail various health hazards. PMID:17180415

  14. Life time assessment and repair of dissimilar metal welds. Part 1; Livslaengdsbedoemning och reparation av blandsvetsskarvar. Etapp 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storesund, Jan; Borggreen, Kjeld

    2005-04-01

    Research on the performance of dissimilar metal welds in high temperature plant has been performed for many years. Nevertheless damages are frequent in such welds. In order to decrease the damage problems and make it possible to estimate residual lifetimes of dissimilar metal welds in our Nordic countries it is first essential to i) collect the knowledge in the literature and ii) map current dissimilar metal welds and their condition in Swedish and Danish plants. The present report describes this first part of the work. There is a comprehensive literature of she subject. Most work has been performed on ferritic/austenitic dissimilar welds. In Swedish and Danish plants the dominating type is ferritic/martensitic dissimilar welds. The damage mechanisms are about the same in the two types, creep is the dominating mechanism, but plant experience indicates that the ferritic/austenitic combination is more prone to damage than the ferritic/martensitic one. An important difference between the two types is that Ni-base weld metal generally prolongs the lifetime for ferritic/austenitic dissimilar welds whereas it shows an opposite effect in ferritic/martensitic ones. In the latter case use of a 5 % Cr weld metal seems to be the best choice but the experiences of such welds are limited. The mapping of dissimilar welds indicates that there are predominantly special kinds of welds which fail whereas ordinary butt welds and branch welds are relatively free from damage.

  15. Assessment of trace metal contamination level and toxicity in sediments from coastal regions of West Bengal, eastern part of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antizar-Ladislao, Blanca; Mondal, Priyanka; Mitra, Soumita; Sarkar, Santosh Kumar

    2015-12-30

    The work investigated concentration of trace metals in surface sediments (0-10 cm; Mangrove Wetland (SMW), eastern coastal part of India. The trace metal concentrations in sediments exhibited an overall decreasing trend as follows: Cr (21.2-60.9)>Cu (11.60-102.47)>Ni (19.10-52.60)>Pb (7.09-183.88)>As (4.41-11.46)>Cd (0.02-4.4)>Ag (0.02-0.87). Both the geo-accumulation index (Igeo) and contamination factor (CF) values revealed significant pollution by Ag, Cd and Pb at Nurpur of HRE. Potential Ecological Risk Index (RI) (61.21 ± 112.40) showed wide range of variations from low (19.76) to serious (463.20) ecological risk. A positive significant correlation was found between metals and organic carbon in sediments. The ecological risk associated with the trace metals in sediment was considered on the consensus based Sediment Quality Guidelines (SQGs). The work suggests that the trace metals present in sediments posed adverse effects on the sediment-dwelling organisms. PMID:26581818

  16. Mitigation of global greenhouse gas emissions from waste: conclusions and strategies from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report. Working Group III (Mitigation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogner, Jean; Pipatti, Riitta; Hashimoto, Seiji; Diaz, Cristobal; Mareckova, Katarina; Diaz, Luis; Kjeldsen, Peter; Monni, Suvi; Faaij, Andre; Gao, Qingxian; Zhang, Tianzhu; Ahmed, Mohammed Abdelrafie; Sutamihardja, R T M; Gregory, Robert

    2008-02-01

    . Existing studies on mitigation potentials and costs for the waste sector tend to focus on landfill CH4 as the baseline. The commercial recovery of landfill CH4 as a source of renewable energy has been practised at full scale since 1975 and currently exceeds 105 Mt CO2-eq year(-1). Although landfill CH4 emissions from developed countries have been largely stabilized, emissions from developing countries are increasing as more controlled (anaerobic) landfilling practices are implemented; these emissions could be reduced by accelerating the introduction of engineered gas recovery, increasing rates of waste minimization and recycling, and implementing alternative waste management strategies provided they are affordable, effective, and sustainable. Aided by Kyoto mechanisms such as the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) and Joint Implementation (JI), the total global economic mitigation potential for reducing waste sector emissions in 2030 is estimated to be > 1000 Mt CO2-eq (or 70% of estimated emissions) at costs below 100 US$ t(-1) CO2-eq year(-1). An estimated 20-30% of projected emissions for 2030 can be reduced at negative cost and 30-50% at costs 130 Mt waste year(-1) incinerated at more than 600 plants. Current uncertainties with respect to emissions and mitigation potentials could be reduced by more consistent national definitions, coordinated international data collection, standardized data analysis, field validation of models, and consistent application of life-cycle assessment tools inclusive of fossil fuel offsets. PMID:18338699

  17. AN ATTEMPT TO DETERMINE THE RELATION BETWEEN HUCUL HORSES CONFORMATION ASSESSMENT, MOVEMENT AND COURAGE TEST RESULTS PART II. MARE FAMILIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadwiga TOPCZEWSKA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research was to determine the relationship between evaluation of conformation and motion indicators and results of the Huculs’ path and also to ascertain the courage (basic and elimination of Hucul horses with their classification into mare families being taken account of. The scores of 116 horses presented for the evaluation of their exterior (championship breeding were analyzed. The assessment covered the type, body conformation, movement in walk and trot as well as overall impression and preparedness for the exhibition. Measurements of length of steps, frequency and rate of the walk and trot were performed during the tests for courage. The estimated correlation coefficients exhibited the existence of some interesting trends i.e., there was positive correlation between values for type, body conformation, movement in walk and trot and the length of steps in walk and trot in individuals representing most of mare families. The reverse was the case with horses from the Sroczka and Wyderka families. Amongst the Wrona, however, negative correlations between the grade for walk and frequency of steps in walk was observed while that of between the result of path and utility tests was positive.

  18. A National Study Assessing the Teaching and Learning of Introductory Astronomy Part I: The Effect of Interactive Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, A. L.; Prather, E. E.; Brissenden, G.; Schlingman, W. M.

    2010-08-01

    We present the results of a national study on the teaching and learning of astronomy as taught in general education, non-science major, and introductory astronomy courses (commonly referred to as Astro 101). Nearly 4000 students enrolled in 69 sections of courses taught by 36 different instructors at 31 institutions completed (pre- and post-instruction) the Light and Spectroscopy Concept Inventory (LSCI) from Fall 2006 to Fall 2007. The classes varied in size and were from all types of institutions, including two- and four-year colleges and universities. Normalized gain scores for each class were calculated. Pre-instruction LSCI scores were clustered around 25%, independent of class size and institution type, and normalized gain scores varied from about -0.07 to 0.50. To estimate the fraction of classroom time spent on learner-centered, active-engagement instruction we developed and administered an Interactivity Assessment Instrument (IAI). Our results suggest that the differences in gains were due to instruction in the classroom, not the type of class or institution. We also found that higher interactivity classes had the highest gains, confirming that interactive learning strategies are capable of increasing student conceptual understanding. However, the wide range of gains scores seen for both lower and higher interactivity classes suggests that the use of interactive learning strategies is not sufficient by itself to achieve high student gain.

  19. River modeling and multi-level fish health assessment to evaluate impacts from oil sands water releases (Part 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multi-level, multi-scale approach was used to assess potential impacts to fish health from oil sands water releases. The method used to arrive at predicted impacts involved assembling experimental data on the effects of chronic exposure to oil sands wastewaters on biochemical, physiological and whole-organism endpoint. This information was used to determine no effect levels (NOELs) and lowest effect levels (LOELs) for the suite of fish health parameters used in laboratory experiments (primarily biochemical and physiological measurement endpoints). LOELs and NOELs were compared to modeled concentrations of wastewater in the Athabasca River for five time snapshots. For each time period, concentrations were predicted based on mean annual flows and 7Q10 flows (low flows). This comparison was used to predict impacts on biochemical/physiological endpoints. Impacts on at the whole-organism and population-level were determined by comparing what the laboratory data would predict with what was observed in the field. This process was used to draw a conclusion regarding the health and sustainability of fish populations

  20. Climate Change Impacts for the Conterminous USA. An Integrated Assessment. Part 3. Dryland Production of Grain and Forage Crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we simulate dryland agriculture in the United States in order to assess potential future agricultural production under a set of general circulation model (GCM)-based climate change scenarios. The total national production of three major grain crops-corn, soybeans, and winter wheat-and two forage crops-alfalfa and clover hay-is calculated for the actual present day core production area (CPA) of each of these crops. In general, higher global mean temperature (GMT) reduces production and higher atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) increases production. Depending on the climatic change scenarios employed overall national production of the crops studied changes by up to plus or minus 25% from present-day levels. Impacts are more significant regionally, with crop production varying by greater than ±50% from baseline levels. Analysis of currently possible production areas (CPPAs) for each crop indicates that the regions most likely to be affected by climate change are those on the margins of the areas in which they are currently grown. Crop yield variability was found to be primarily influenced by local weather and geographic features rather than by large-scale changes in climate patterns and atmospheric composition. Future US agronomic potential will be significantly affected by the changes in climate projected here. The nature of the crop response will depend primarily on to what extent precipitation patterns change and also on the degree of warming experienced