WorldWideScience

Sample records for assessment guidelines cancer

  1. The assessment of genetic risk of breast cancer : a set of GP guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bock, GH; Vlieland, TPMV; Hageman, GCHA; Oosterwijk, JC; Springer, MP; Kievit, J

    Background. Assessing a genetic risk for developing breast cancer is not an easy task for a GP. Current expert guidelines for referring and counselling women with a family history positive for breast cancer are complex and difficult to apply in general practice, and have only two strategies (to

  2. Quality assessment of clinical practice guidelines on the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma or metastatic liver cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingqiang Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To assess the quality of the currently available clinical practice guidelines (CPGs for hepatocellular carcinoma, and provide a reference for clinicians in selecting the best available clinical protocols. METHODS: The databases of PubMed, MEDLINE, Web of Science, Chinese Biomedical Literature database (CBM, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI, WanFang, and relevant CPGs websites were systematically searched through March 2014. CPGs quality was appraised using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research & Evaluation (AGREE II instrument, and data analysis was performed using SPSS 13.0 software. RESULTS: A total of 20 evidence-based and 20 expert consensus-based guidelines were included. The mean percentage of the domain scores were: scope and purpose 83% (95% confidence interval (CI, 81% to 86%, clarity of presentation 79% (95% CI, 73% to 86%, stakeholder involvement 39% (95% CI, 30% to 49%, editorial independence 58% (95% CI, 52% to 64%, rigor of development 39% (95% CI, 31% to 46%, and applicability 16% (95% CI, 10% to 23%. Evidence-based guidelines were superior to those established by consensus for the domains of rigor of development (p<0.001, clarity of presentation (p = 0.01 and applicability (p = 0.021. CONCLUSIONS: The overall methodological quality of CPGs for hepatocellular carcinoma and metastatic liver cancer is moderate, with poor applicability and potential conflict of interest issues. The evidence-based guidelines has become mainstream for high quality CPGs development; however, there is still need to further increase the transparency and quality of evidence rating, as well as the recommendation process, and to address potential conflict of interest.

  3. A pan-Canadian practice guideline and algorithm: screening, assessment, and supportive care of adults with cancer-related fatigue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, D; Keller-Olaman, S; Oliver, T K; Hack, T F; Broadfield, L; Biggs, K; Chung, J; Gravelle, D; Green, E; Hamel, M; Harth, T; Johnston, P; McLeod, D; Swinton, N; Syme, A; Olson, K

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of the present systematic review was to develop a practice guideline to inform health care providers about screening, assessment, and effective management of cancer-related fatigue (crf) in adults. The internationally endorsed adapte methodology was used to develop a practice guideline for pan-Canadian use. A systematic search of the literature identified a broad range of evidence: clinical practice guidelines, systematic reviews, and other guidance documents on the screening, assessment, and management of crf. The search included medline, embase, cinahl, the Cochrane Library, and other guideline and data sources to December 2009. Two clinical practice guidelines were identified for adaptation. Seven guidance documents and four systematic reviews also provided supplementary evidence to inform guideline recommendations. Health professionals across Canada provided expert feedback on the adapted recommendations in the practice guideline and algorithm through a participatory external review process. Practice guidelines can facilitate the adoption of evidence-based assessment and interventions for adult cancer patients experiencing fatigue. Development of an algorithm to guide decision-making in practice may also foster the uptake of a guideline into routine care.

  4. Guidelines on testicular cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, Peter; Albrecht, Walter; Algaba, Ferran; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Cohn-Cedermark, Gabriella; Horwich, Alan; Klepp, Olbjoern; Laguna, M. Pilar; Pizzocaro, Giorgio

    2005-01-01

    To up-date the 2001 version of the EAU testicular cancer guidelines. A non-structured literature review until January 2005 using the MEDLINE database has been performed. Literature has been classified according to evidence-based medicine levels. Testicular cancer is a highly curable disease.

  5. The lung cancer management guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jazieh Abdul-Rahman

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The Lung Cancer Guidelines Committee developed 2008 Lung Cancer Management Guidelines based on available evidences in the literature. These guidelines are stage-dependent and addressing the most common clinical scenarios. They address diagnosis, work-up, treatment, and follow up of lung cancer.

  6. Cancer evaluation in the assessment of solid organ transplant candidates: A systematic review of clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuna, Sergio A; Lam, Winnie; Daly, Corinne; Kim, S Joseph; Baxter, Nancy N

    2018-01-01

    Active malignancies are a contraindication to transplantation, as immunosuppression can lead to worse cancer outcomes; therefore, ensuring transplant candidates are free of malignancy before transplantation is essential. This systematic review assesses the availability, quality, and consistency of recommended cancer evaluation prior to transplantation in Clinical Practice Guidelines (CPGs) for the selection of solid organ transplant candidates. We systematically searched for CPGs for the assessment of transplant candidates. The characteristics of included CPGs, strength of recommendations and supporting evidence were extracted. A quality assessment of the CPGs was conducted using the AGREE II tool. We identified 52 CPG for the selection of solid organ transplant candidates. Only 13 (25%) included recommendations for cancer evaluation as part of the assessment of transplant candidates. Most recommended age and sex appropriate cancer screening as per the general population guidelines. Recommendations to evaluate for other malignancies and for high-risk candidates were variable. Most recommendations were based on expert opinion and only two CPGs provided an explicit link between the recommendations and supporting evidence. There is a lack of clear and consistent recommendations for pretransplant cancer evaluation in existing CPGs. Although there is some consensus regarding the indication to screen for cancer as per the recommendations for the general population, these recommendations are not an appropriate risk reduction strategy for transplant candidates. Standardized protocols to ensure transplant candidates are cancer free prior to transplantation are needed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Re-evaluation of the WHO (2010) formaldehyde indoor air quality guideline for cancer risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Gunnar Damgård; Larsen, Søren Thor; Wolkoff, Peder

    2017-01-01

    In 2010, the World Health Organization (WHO) established an indoor air quality guideline for short- and long-term exposures to formaldehyde (FA) of 0.1 mg/m(3) (0.08 ppm) for all 30-min periods at lifelong exposure. This guideline was supported by studies from 2010 to 2013. Since 2013, new key studies have been published and key cancer cohorts have been updated, which we have evaluated and compared with the WHO guideline. FA is genotoxic, causing DNA adduct formation, and has a clastogenic effect; exposure-response relationships were nonlinear. Relevant genetic polymorphisms were not identified. Normal indoor air FA concentrations do not pass beyond the respiratory epithelium, and therefore FA's direct effects are limited to portal-of-entry effects. However, systemic effects have been observed in rats and mice, which may be due to secondary effects as airway inflammation and (sensory) irritation of eyes and the upper airways, which inter alia decreases respiratory ventilation. Both secondary effects are prevented at the guideline level. Nasopharyngeal cancer and leukaemia were observed inconsistently among studies; new updates of the US National Cancer Institute (NCI) cohort confirmed that the relative risk was not increased with mean FA exposures below 1 ppm and peak exposures below 4 ppm. Hodgkin's lymphoma, not observed in the other studies reviewed and not considered FA dependent, was increased in the NCI cohort at a mean concentration ≥0.6 mg/m(3) and at peak exposures ≥2.5 mg/m(3); both levels are above the WHO guideline. Overall, the credibility of the WHO guideline has not been challenged by new studies.

  8. EPA`s program for risk assessment guidelines: Cancer classification issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiltse, J. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    Issues presented are related to classification of weight of evidence in cancer risk assessments. The focus in this paper is on lines of evidence used in constructing a conclusion about potential human carcinogenicity. The paper also discusses issues that are mistakenly addressed as classification issues but are really part of the risk assessment process. 2 figs.

  9. NCCN Practice Guidelines for Cancer Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, C; Brock, C; Cleeland, C; Coyle, N; Dubé, J E; Ferrell, B; Hassenbusch, S; Janjan, N A; Lema, M J; Levy, M H; Loscalzo, M J; Lynch, M; Muir, C; Oakes, L; O'Neill, A; Payne, R; Syrjala, K L; Urba, S; Weinstein, S M

    2000-11-01

    The overall approach to pain management encompassed in these guidelines is comprehensive. It is based on objective pain assessments, utilizes both pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic interventions, and requires continual reevaluation of the patient. The NCCN Cancer Pain Practice Guidelines Panel believes that cancer pain can be well controlled in the vast majority of patients if the algorithms presented are systematically applied, carefully monitored, and tailored to the needs of the individual patient.

  10. Assessing racial/ethnic disparities in chemotherapy treatment among breast cancer patients in context of changing treatment guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Abigail; Rauscher, Garth H; Hoskins, Kent; Rao, Ruta; Ferrans, Carol Estwing

    2013-12-01

    Conflicting study results with regards to racial/ethnic disparities in chemotherapy use among breast cancer patients may be due to the different sample populations, treatment data sources, and treatment eligibility definitions used. This study examined chemotherapy disparity in the context of changing treatment guidelines and explored factors that may help explain treatment differences observed. The data come from a population-based study that included interview and medical record data (including state cancer registry) from non-Hispanic (nH) White, nH Black, and Hispanic breast cancer patients diagnosed in 2005-2008. Logistic regression using model-based standardization was used to estimate age-adjusted risk differences and multivariate analysis was conducted to identify explanatory factors of the differences. Per the 2005/2006 National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines, minority patients appeared more likely than nH White patients to receive a chemotherapy recommendation (0.87 vs 0.75, p = 0.003). When eligibility was determined per the 2007 guidelines, there was no disparity because under these guidelines, nH White patients were more likely than minority patients to have tumors that no longer required chemotherapy. There was evidence that chemotherapy advances for breast cancer patients are implemented in the clinical setting well ahead of NCCN guidelines. Finally, among eligible patients, chemotherapy recommendation was very high and virtually always accepted and received, with no disparities found at these points of clinical care. The findings suggest that an evaluation of guideline-adherent chemotherapy treatment patterns must carefully consider the definition of treatment eligibility, given ongoing changes in treatment guidelines and early uptake of new diagnostic tools and treatments.

  11. Utility of routine data sources for feedback on the quality of cancer care: an assessment based on clinical practice guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baade Peter

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Not all cancer patients receive state-of-the-art care and providing regular feedback to clinicians might reduce this problem. The purpose of this study was to assess the utility of various data sources in providing feedback on the quality of cancer care. Methods Published clinical practice guidelines were used to obtain a list of processes-of-care of interest to clinicians. These were assigned to one of four data categories according to their availability and the marginal cost of using them for feedback. Results Only 8 (3% of 243 processes-of-care could be measured using population-based registry or administrative inpatient data (lowest cost. A further 119 (49% could be measured using a core clinical registry, which contains information on important prognostic factors (e.g., clinical stage, physiological reserve, hormone-receptor status. Another 88 (36% required an expanded clinical registry or medical record review; mainly because they concerned long-term management of disease progression (recurrences and metastases and 28 (11.5% required patient interview or audio-taping of consultations because they involved information sharing between clinician and patient. Conclusion The advantages of population-based cancer registries and administrative inpatient data are wide coverage and low cost. The disadvantage is that they currently contain information on only a few processes-of-care. In most jurisdictions, clinical cancer registries, which can be used to report on many more processes-of-care, do not cover smaller hospitals. If we are to provide feedback about all patients, not just those in larger academic hospitals with the most developed data systems, then we need to develop sustainable population-based data systems that capture information on prognostic factors at the time of initial diagnosis and information on management of disease progression.

  12. Development of cancer treatment guidelines

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Krystyna Kiel

    2011-05-26

    May 26, 2011 ... encouraging development of new radiation therapy resources or transfer of patients to those facilities where radiotherapy is available. There are regular changes in the paradigm of cancer care, and guidelines must remain current. For example, in all patients treated with breast conserving surgery breast ...

  13. American Cancer Society Lung Cancer Screening Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wender, Richard; Fontham, Elizabeth T. H.; Barrera, Ermilo; Colditz, Graham A.; Church, Timothy R.; Ettinger, David S.; Etzioni, Ruth; Flowers, Christopher R.; Gazelle, G. Scott; Kelsey, Douglas K.; LaMonte, Samuel J.; Michaelson, James S.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Sullivan, Daniel C.; Travis, William; Walter, Louise; Wolf, Andrew M. D.; Brawley, Otis W.; Smith, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Findings from the National Cancer Institute’s National Lung Screening Trial established that lung cancer mortality in specific high-risk groups can be reduced by annual screening with low-dose computed tomography. These findings indicate that the adoption of lung cancer screening could save many lives. Based on the results of the National Lung Screening Trial, the American Cancer Society is issuing an initial guideline for lung cancer screening. This guideline recommends that clinicians with access to high-volume, high-quality lung cancer screening and treatment centers should initiate a discussion about screening with apparently healthy patients aged 55 years to 74 years who have at least a 30-pack-year smoking history and who currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. A process of informed and shared decision-making with a clinician related to the potential benefits, limitations, and harms associated with screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography should occur before any decision is made to initiate lung cancer screening. Smoking cessation counseling remains a high priority for clinical attention in discussions with current smokers, who should be informed of their continuing risk of lung cancer. Screening should not be viewed as an alternative to smoking cessation. PMID:23315954

  14. Small Wind Site Assessment Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, Tim [Advanced Energy Systems LLC, Eugene, OR (United States); Preus, Robert [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Site assessment for small wind energy systems is one of the key factors in the successful installation, operation, and performance of a small wind turbine. A proper site assessment is a difficult process that includes wind resource assessment and the evaluation of site characteristics. These guidelines address many of the relevant parts of a site assessment with an emphasis on wind resource assessment, using methods other than on-site data collection and creating a small wind site assessment report.

  15. EAU guidelines on testicular cancer: 2011 update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, Peter; Albrecht, Walter; Algaba, Ferran; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Cohn-Cedermark, Gabriella; Fizazi, Karim; Horwich, Alan; Laguna, Maria Pilar

    2011-01-01

    On behalf of the European Association of Urology (EAU), guidelines for the diagnosis, therapy, and follow-up of testicular cancer were established. This article is a short version of the EAU testicular cancer guidelines and summarises the main conclusions from the guidelines on the management of

  16. Cancer cachexia: global awareness and guideline implementation on the web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Davide; Tsiara, Anna; Valachis, Antonis; Kalopita, Konstantina; Tsali, Lampriani; Tolis, Panagiotis; Polyzos, Nikolaos P

    2013-06-01

    Cancer cachexia is a common associate of cancer and has a negative impact on patients' survival. Nonetheless, cancer cachexia assessment and management are frequently less than satisfactory in daily practice. To scrutinise global cancer cachexia awareness and relative web guideline implementation among oncology societies. Systematical identification of scientific and policymaker oncology societies and their guideline implementation on cancer cachexia. Assessment of the general level of awareness on cancer cachexia and evaluation of intercontinental and national variations on guideline implementation. 144,000 web pages were scrutinised, and 275 oncology societies identified covering a large array of oncology setting (educational/clinical/research/policymaker); 71 were international (African, American, Asian, European, Oceania and Intercontinental), 110 belonged to the top 10 countries with the highest development index and 94 pertained to 10 countries with a long lasting tradition in medical oncology (not included in the top 10 high developed countries). Overall, only 10/275 web sites provided guidelines; six of them (2.2%) provided guidelines for physicians and four (0.7%) for patients. Half of the guidelines (4/10) were outdated. All guidelines for physicians reported references, while only one of the recommendations for patients reported references to support its sentences. Cancer cachexia global awareness appears extremely low; guideline implementation on the web was inconsistent for any category analysed (nation vs continent vs international vs society type vs physician vs patient oriented) and for updating.

  17. ESPEN guidelines on nutrition in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arends, Jann; Bachmann, Patrick; Baracos, Vickie; Barthelemy, Nicole; Bertz, Hartmut; Bozzetti, Federico; Fearon, Ken; Hütterer, Elisabeth; Isenring, Elizabeth; Kaasa, Stein; Krznaric, Zeljko; Laird, Barry; Larsson, Maria; Laviano, Alessandro; Mühlebach, Stefan; Muscaritoli, Maurizio; Oldervoll, Line; Ravasco, Paula; Solheim, Tora; Strasser, Florian; de van der Schueren, Marian; Preiser, Jean-Charles

    2017-02-01

    Cancers are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, and the number of new cases is expected to rise significantly over the next decades. At the same time, all types of cancer treatment, such as surgery, radiation therapy, and pharmacological therapies are improving in sophistication, precision and in the power to target specific characteristics of individual cancers. Thus, while many cancers may still not be cured they may be converted to chronic diseases. All of these treatments, however, are impeded or precluded by the frequent development of malnutrition and metabolic derangements in cancer patients, induced by the tumor or by its treatment. These evidence-based guidelines were developed to translate current best evidence and expert opinion into recommendations for multi-disciplinary teams responsible for identification, prevention, and treatment of reversible elements of malnutrition in adult cancer patients. The guidelines were commissioned and financially supported by ESPEN and by the European Partnership for Action Against Cancer (EPAAC), an EU level initiative. Members of the guideline group were selected by ESPEN to include a range of professions and fields of expertise. We searched for meta-analyses, systematic reviews and comparative studies based on clinical questions according to the PICO format. The evidence was evaluated and merged to develop clinical recommendations using the GRADE method. Due to the deficits in the available evidence, relevant still open questions were listed and should be addressed by future studies. Malnutrition and a loss of muscle mass are frequent in cancer patients and have a negative effect on clinical outcome. They may be driven by inadequate food intake, decreased physical activity and catabolic metabolic derangements. To screen for, prevent, assess in detail, monitor and treat malnutrition standard operating procedures, responsibilities and a quality control process should be established at each

  18. Prostate cancer survivorship care guideline: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline endorsement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Matthew J; Lacchetti, Christina; Bergman, Jonathan; Hauke, Ralph J; Hoffman, Karen E; Kungel, Terrence M; Morgans, Alicia K; Penson, David F

    2015-03-20

    The guideline aims to optimize health and quality of life for the post-treatment prostate cancer survivor by comprehensively addressing components of follow-up care, including health promotion, prostate cancer surveillance, screening for new cancers, long-term and late functional effects of the disease and its treatment, psychosocial issues, and coordination of care between the survivor's primary care physician and prostate cancer specialist. The American Cancer Society (ACS) Prostate Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines were reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Endorsement Panel reviewed the content and recommendations, offering modifications and/or qualifying statements when deemed necessary. The ASCO Endorsement Panel determined that the recommendations from the 2014 ACS Prostate Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines are clear, thorough, and relevant, despite the limited availability of high-quality evidence to support many of the recommendations. ASCO endorses the ACS Prostate Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines, with a number of qualifying statements and modifications. Assess information needs related to prostate cancer, prostate cancer treatment, adverse effects, and other health concerns and provide or refer survivors to appropriate resources. Measure prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level every 6 to 12 months for the first 5 years and then annually, considering more frequent evaluation in men at high risk for recurrence and in candidates for salvage therapy. Refer survivors with elevated or increasing PSA levels back to their primary treating physician for evaluation and management. Adhere to ACS guidelines for the early detection of cancer. Assess and manage physical and psychosocial effects of prostate cancer and its treatment. Annually assess for the presence of long-term or late effects of prostate cancer and its treatment. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  19. The Korean guideline for cervical cancer screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyung-Jin; Lee, Yoon Jae; Suh, Mina; Yoo, Chong Woo; Lim, Myong Cheol; Choi, Jaekyung; Ki, Moran; Kim, Yong-Man; Kim, Jae-Weon; Kim, Jea-Hoon; Park, Eal Whan; Lee, Hoo-Yeon; Lim, Sung-Chul; Cho, Chi-Heum; Hong, Sung Ran; Dang, Ji Yeon; Kim, Soo Young; Kim, Yeol; Lee, Won-Chul

    2015-01-01

    The incidence rate of cervical cancer in Korea is still higher than in other developed countries, notwithstanding the national mass-screening program. Furthermore, a new method has been introduced in cervical cancer screening. Therefore, the committee for cervical cancer screening in Korea updated the recommendation statement established in 2002. The new version of the guideline was developed by the committee using evidence-based methods. The committee reviewed the evidence for the benefits and harms of the Papanicolaou test, liquid-based cytology, and human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, and reached conclusions after deliberation. The committee recommends screening for cervical cancer with cytology (Papanicolaou test or liquid-based cytology) every three years in women older than 20 years of age (recommendation A). The cervical cytology combined with HPV test is optionally recommended after taking into consideration individual risk or preference (recommendation C). The current evidence for primary HPV screening is insufficient to assess the benefits and harms of cervical cancer screening (recommendation I). Cervical cancer screening can be terminated at the age of 74 years if more than three consecutive negative cytology reports have been confirmed within 10 years (recommendation D). PMID:26197860

  20. Oropharyngeal cancer: United Kingdom National Multidisciplinary Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehanna, H; Evans, M; Beasley, M; Chatterjee, S; Dilkes, M; Homer, J; O'Hara, J; Robinson, M; Shaw, R; Sloan, P

    2016-05-01

    This is the official guideline endorsed by the specialty associations involved in the care of head and neck cancer patients in the UK. There has been significant debate in the management of oropharyngeal cancer in the last decade, especially in light of the increased incidence, clarity on the role of the human papilloma virus in this disease and the treatment responsiveness of the human papilloma virus positive cancers. This paper discusses the evidence base pertaining to the management of oropharyngeal cancer and provides recommendations on management for this group of patients receiving cancer care. Recommendations • Cross-sectional imaging is required in all cases to complete assessment and staging. (R) • Magnetic resonance imaging is recommended for primary site and computed tomography scan for neck and chest. (R) • Positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography scanning is recommended for the assessment of response after chemoradiotherapy, and has a role in assessing recurrence. (R) • Examination under anaesthetic is strongly recommended, but not mandatory. (R) • Histological diagnosis is mandatory in most cases, especially for patients receiving treatment with curative intent. (R) • Oropharyngeal carcinoma histopathology reports should be prepared according to The Royal College of Pathologists Guidelines. (G) • Human papilloma virus (HPV) testing should be carried out for all oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas as recommended in The Royal College of Pathologists Guidelines. (R) • Human papilloma virus testing for oropharyngeal cancer should be performed within a diagnostic service where the laboratory procedures and reporting standards are quality assured. (G) • Treatment options for T1-T2 N0 oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma include radical radiotherapy or transoral surgery and neck dissection (with post-operative (chemo)radiotherapy if there are adverse pathological features on histological examination). (R)

  1. National and international guidelines for rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Liv Bjerre Juul; Wille-Jørgensen, P

    2014-01-01

    AIM: Rectal cancer is a common malignancy. Differences in daily practice may influence the morbidity and mortality, and many national and international organizations have created guidelines for staging and treatment of rectal cancer. Even though consensus is reached within individual guidelines...... concerning the definition of rectal cancer. Ten of the 11 guidelines use the TNM staging system and there was general agreement regarding the recommendation of MRI and CT in rectal cancer. There was consensus concerning a multidisciplinary approach, preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and total mesorectal...... excision (TME). There was no consensus concerning local treatment of T1 tumours and adjuvant therapy, and not all guidelines included metastatic disease and recurrence. There was no consensus on the protocol for follow up. The guidelines had different approaches to evidence. All referred to evidence...

  2. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Guideline Update: American Cancer Society Guideline Endorsement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saslow, Debbie; Andrews, Kimberly S.; Manassaram-Baptiste, Deana; Loomer, Lacey; Lam, Kristina E.; Fisher-Borne, Marcie; Smith, Robert A.; Fontham, Elizabeth T. H.

    2017-01-01

    The American Cancer Society (ACS) reviewed and updated its guideline on human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination based on a methodologic and content review of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) HPV vaccination recommendations. A literature review was performed to supplement the evidence considered by the ACIP and to address new vaccine formulations and recommendations as well as new data on population outcomes since publication of the 2007 ACS guideline. The ACS Guideline Development Group determined that the evidence supports ACS endorsement of the ACIP recommendations, with one qualifying statement related to late vaccination. The ACS recommends vaccination of all children at ages 11 and 12 years to protect against HPV infections that lead to several cancers and precancers. Late vaccination for those not vaccinated at the recommended ages should be completed as soon as possible, and individuals should be informed that vaccination may not be effective at older ages. PMID:27434803

  3. Human papillomavirus vaccination guideline update: American Cancer Society guideline endorsement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saslow, Debbie; Andrews, Kimberly S; Manassaram-Baptiste, Deana; Loomer, Lacey; Lam, Kristina E; Fisher-Borne, Marcie; Smith, Robert A; Fontham, Elizabeth T H

    2016-09-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The American Cancer Society (ACS) reviewed and updated its guideline on human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination based on a methodologic and content review of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) HPV vaccination recommendations. A literature review was performed to supplement the evidence considered by the ACIP and to address new vaccine formulations and recommendations as well as new data on population outcomes since publication of the 2007 ACS guideline. The ACS Guideline Development Group determined that the evidence supports ACS endorsement of the ACIP recommendations, with one qualifying statement related to late vaccination. The ACS recommends vaccination of all children at ages 11 and 12 years to protect against HPV infections that lead to several cancers and precancers. Late vaccination for those not vaccinated at the recommended ages should be completed as soon as possible, and individuals should be informed that vaccination may not be effective at older ages. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:375-385. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  4. Exercise for Cancer Patients; Guidelines and Precautions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winningham, Maryl L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Research and clinical observation indicate that exercise is a promising restorative technique for cancer patients. Guidelines for designing an exercise program are offered, including considerations for initial screening and ongoing monitoring of patients. (Author/MT)

  5. Primary care physician compliance with colorectal cancer screening guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodora, Jesse N; Martz, William D; Ashbeck, Erin L; Jacobs, Elizabeth T; Thompson, Patricia A; Martínez, María Elena

    2011-09-01

    To assess self-reported compliance to colorectal cancer (CRC) screening guidelines among primary care physicians (PCPs) and to assess physician and practice characteristics associated with reported compliance. Survey data from 984 PCPs in Arizona were used. Self-reported CRC screening practices, recommendations, and compliance with guidelines were assessed. Physician and practice characteristics associated with guideline compliance were also evaluated. While 77.5% of physicians reported using national screening guidelines, only 51.7% reported recommendations consistent with the guidelines. Younger physicians were significantly more likely to report compliance with screening guidelines (OR = 1.50, 95% CI = 1.07-2.10) as were female clinicians (OR = 1.46, 95% CI = 1.11-1.92). Physicians practicing in solo (OR = 0.33, 95% CI = 0.19-0.58), group (OR = 0.36, 95% CI = 0.21-0.62), or community health centers (OR = 0.37, 95% CI = 0.17-0.81) were significantly less likely to report following guidelines as compared to those in academic practice. Guideline compliance was higher for fecal occult blood test (FOBT) (65.0%) than colonoscopy (56.7%); overuse of screening for these modalities was reported among 34.4% of physicians. PCPs are not adequately following CRC screening guidelines. Further studies are needed to clarify the reasons for this lack of compliance, especially as guidelines become more complex.

  6. [CBO guideline 'Breast cancer: screening and diagnosis'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, E.; Tuut, M.K.; Verbeek, A.L.M.

    2001-01-01

    New developments in the diagnostic procedures for women with an increased risk for, or symptoms related to breast cancer led to development of new guidelines by a working group under the auspices of the Dutch Institute for Health Care Improvement, the Organisation of Comprehensive Cancer Centres and

  7. SEOM clinical guidelines for hereditary cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graña, Begoña; Lastra, Enrique; Llort, Gemma; Brunet, Joan; Isla, Dolores

    2011-08-01

    Research in genetics has facilitated the identification of highly penetrant genes responsible for a large number of diseases. In the oncology field, genetic counselling and gene testing are focused on the two most common syndromes in familial cancer: hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC) and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer or Lynch syndrome (LS). The objective of this guideline in hereditary cancer is to summarise the current state of knowledge and make recommendations in the areas of diagnosis, prevention and treatment of hereditary cancer.

  8. Guidelines on renal cell cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mickisch, G; Carballido, J; Hellsten, S; Schuize, H; Mensink, H

    Objectives., On behalf of the European Association of Urology (EAU), Guidelines for Diagnosis, Therapy and. Follow Up of Renal. Cell Carcinoma Patients were established. Criteria for recommendations were evidence based and included aspects of cost-effectiveness and clinical feasibility. Method: A

  9. EAU guidelines on testicular cancer: 2011 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, Peter; Albrecht, Walter; Algaba, Ferran; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Cohn-Cedermark, Gabriella; Fizazi, Karim; Horwich, Alan; Laguna, Maria Pilar

    2011-08-01

    On behalf of the European Association of Urology (EAU), guidelines for the diagnosis, therapy, and follow-up of testicular cancer were established. This article is a short version of the EAU testicular cancer guidelines and summarises the main conclusions from the guidelines on the management of testicular cancer. Guidelines were compiled by a multidisciplinary guidelines working group. A systematic review was carried out using Medline and Embase, also taking Cochrane evidence and data from the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group into consideration. A panel of experts weighted the references, and a level of evidence and grade of recommendation were assigned. There is a paucity of literature especially regarding longer term follow-up, and results from a number of ongoing trials are awaited. The choice of treatment centre is of the utmost importance, and treatment in reference centres within clinical trials, especially for poor-prognosis nonseminomatous germ cell tumours, provides better outcomes. For patients with clinical stage I seminoma, based on recently published data on long-term toxicity, adjuvant radiotherapy is no longer recommended as first-line adjuvant treatment. The TNM classification 2009 is recommended. These guidelines contain information for the standardised management of patients with testicular cancer based on the latest scientific insights. Cure rates are generally excellent, but because testicular cancer mainly affects men in their third or fourth decade of life, treatment effects on fertility require careful counselling of patients, and treatment must be tailored taking individual circumstances and patient preferences into account. Copyright © 2011 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Guidelines for Rational Cancer Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byunghee Yoo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, cancer therapy has relied on surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. In recent years, these interventions have become increasingly replaced or complemented by more targeted approaches that are informed by a deeper understanding of the underlying biology. Still, the implementation of fully rational patient-specific drug design appears to be years away. Here, we present a vision of rational drug design for cancer that is defined by two major components: modularity and image guidance. We suggest that modularity can be achieved by combining a nanocarrier and an oligonucleotide component into the therapeutic. Image guidance can be incorporated into the nanocarrier component by labeling with a specific imaging reporter, such as a radionuclide or contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging. While limited by the need for additional technological advancement in the areas of cancer biology, nanotechnology, and imaging, this vision for the future of cancer therapy can be used as a guide to future research endeavors.

  11. Guidelines on Testicular Cancer: 2015 Update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, Peter; Albrecht, Walter; Algaba, Ferran; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Cohn-Cedermark, Gabriella; Fizazi, Karim; Horwich, Alan; Laguna, Maria Pilar; Nicolai, Nicola; Oldenburg, Jan

    2015-01-01

    This is an update of the previous European Association of Urology testis cancer guidelines published in 2011, which included major changes in the diagnosis and treatment of germ cell tumours. To summarise latest developments in the treatment of this rare disease. Recommendations have been agreed

  12. Development of cancer treatment guidelines | Kiel | Alexandria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alexandria Journal of Medicine. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 47, No 1 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Development of cancer treatment guidelines. K Kiel ...

  13. Survivorship: Screening for Cancer and Treatment Effects, Version 2.2014: Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Denlinger, Crystal S.; Ligibel, Jennifer A.; Are, Madhuri; Baker, K. Scott; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Dizon, Don; Friedman, Debra L.; Goldman, Mindy; Jones, Lee; King, Allison; Ku, Grace H.; Kvale, Elizabeth; Langbaum, Terry S.; Leonardi-Warren, Kristin; McCabe, Mary S.

    2014-01-01

    The NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship provide screening, evaluation, and treatment recommendations for common physical and psychosocial consequences of cancer and cancer treatment. This portion of the guidelines describes recommendations regarding screening for the effects of cancer and its treatment. The panel created a sample screening tool, specifically for use in combination with the NCCN Guidelines for Survivorship, to guide providers to topics that require more in-depth assessment. Effec...

  14. Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Guide to the Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas K Rex

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The two most recent guidelines for colorectal cancer screening are those of the Agency for Healthcare Policy and Research, and the American Cancer Society. The guidelines are similar in many regards and reflect current literature, consensus opinion and compromise between members of multidisciplinary panels. The emphasis of both guidelines is to increase the options available for colorectal cancer screening. Increasing choice should expand the attractiveness of colorectal cancer screening to more patients and physicians, and the development of guidelines should help compel payers to provide reimbursement for colorectal cancer screening. These guidelines are summarized and evaluated as they pertain to colorectal cancer screening.

  15. A practice guideline from the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics and the National Society of Genetic Counselors: referral indications for cancer predisposition assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampel, Heather; Bennett, Robin L; Buchanan, Adam; Pearlman, Rachel; Wiesner, Georgia L

    2015-01-01

    The practice guidelines of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) and the National Society of Genetic Counselors (NSGC) are developed by members of the ACMG and NSGC to assist medical geneticists, genetic counselors, and other health-care providers in making decisions about appropriate management of genetic concerns, including access to and/or delivery of services. Each practice guideline focuses on a clinical or practice-based issue and is the result of a review and analysis of current professional literature believed to be reliable. As such, information and recommendations within the ACMG and NSGC joint practice guidelines reflect the current scientific and clinical knowledge at the time of publication, are current only as of their publication date, and are subject to change without notice as advances emerge. In addition, variations in practice, which take into account the needs of the individual patient and the resources and limitations unique to the institution or type of practice, may warrant approaches, treatments, and/or procedures that differ from the recommendations outlined in this guideline. Therefore, these recommendations should not be construed as dictating an exclusive course of management, nor does the use of such recommendations guarantee a particular outcome. Genetic counseling practice guidelines are never intended to displace a health-care provider's best medical judgment based on the clinical circumstances of a particular patient or patient population. Practice guidelines are published by the ACMG or the NSGC for educational and informational purposes only, and neither the ACMG nor the NSGC "approve" or "endorse" any specific methods, practices, or sources of information.Cancer genetic consultation is an important aspect of the care of individuals at increased risk of a hereditary cancer syndrome. Yet several patient, clinician, and system-level barriers hinder identification of individuals appropriate for cancer genetics

  16. Fertility preservation during cancer treatment: clinical guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Wallberg, Kenny A; Oktay, Kutluk

    2014-01-01

    The majority of children, adolescents, and young adults diagnosed with cancer today will become long-term survivors. The threat to fertility that cancer treatments pose to young patients cannot be prevented in many cases, and thus research into methods for fertility preservation is developing, aiming at offering cancer patients the ability to have biologically related children in the future. This paper discusses the current status of fertility preservation methods when infertility risks are related to surgical oncologic treatments, radiation therapy, or chemotherapy. Several scientific groups and societies have developed consensus documents and guidelines for fertility preservation. Decisions about fertility and imminent potentially gonadotoxic therapies must be made rapidly. Timely and complete information on the impact of cancer treatment on fertility and fertility preservation options should be presented to all patients when a cancer treatment is planned. PMID:24623991

  17. Implementing the Exercise Guidelines for Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolin, Kathleen Y.; Schwartz, Anna L.; Matthews, Charles E.; Courneya, Kerry S.; Schmitz, Kathryn H.

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, the American College of Sports Medicine convened an expert roundtable to issue guidelines on exercise for cancer survivors. This multidisciplinary group evaluated the strength of the evidence for the safety and benefits of exercise as a therapeutic intervention for survivors. The panel concluded that exercise is safe and offers myriad benefits for survivors including improvements in physical function, strength, fatigue, quality of life (QOL), and possibly recurrence and survival. Recommendations for situations in which deviations from the US Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans are appropriate were provided. Here, we outline a process for implementing the guidelines in clinical practice, and provide recommendations for how the oncology care provider can interface with the exercise and physical therapy community. PMID:22579268

  18. Impact of 2013 ASCO/CAP HER2 reporting guidelines in breast cancer: An assessment study from Indian oncology centre that primarily performs HER2 IHC testing with special emphasis on IHC equivocal category.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasricha, Sunil; Gupta, Gurudutt; Garg, Ritu; Sharma, Anila; Gandhi, Jatin S; Durga, Garima; Kamboj, Meenakshi; Grover, Shrruti; Mehta, Anurag

    2017-12-18

    The ASCO/CAP guidelines for HER2 reporting in breast cancer published in 2007 and were updated in 2013 to assure that the right patient receives the targeted therapy. The updated guidelines have lowered the threshold for HER2 positivity criteria and altered the equivocal category for both IHC and FISH. This first study from India addresses the impact of these updated guidelines in the various reporting categories at a tertiary care centre. We compared the trend of HER2 IHC reporting 1 year before (Period A) and 1 year after (Period B) the implementation of updated 2013 ASCO/CAP guidelines. All HER2 equivocal IHC cases of post 2013 guidelines were reclassified as per 2007 guidelines to detect additional number of cases that have been put into equivocal category. Reflex FISH correlation was also assessed to detect any additional cases eligible for anti HER2 therapy with implementation of these updated guidelines. With implementation of updated 2013 guidelines, there was significant decrease in the number of cases scored as 1+ (from 30.7% to 20.6%; P value: .0001) while significant increase in number of 2+ cases (from 20.2% to 27.3%; P value: .004). Post 2013 guidelines, 39% (64 cases) of tumors were additionally put into the equivocal category which would have been considered as negative (score 1+) as per 2007 guidelines. The reflex FISH testing in these equivocal cases resulted in detection of only 1.5% of additional cases eligible for anti HER2 therapy. With implementation of updated 2013 guidelines, there is no significant increase in HER2 positivity trend. However, there is appreciable increase in IHC equivocal cases which subsequently led to increased reflex FISH testing without significantly contributing to the detection of additional eligible cases for anti HER2 therapy, but resulted in delaying of definite HER2 status along with financial implications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Impact of Cervical Cancer Screening Guidelines on Screening for Chlamydia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursu, Allison; Sen, Ananda; Ruffin, Mack

    2015-01-01

    The highest prevalence of chlamydia infection in the United States is among people aged 15 to 24 years. We assessed the impact of not doing routine cervical cancer screening on the rates of chlamydia screening in women aged 15 to 21 years. We classified visits to family medicine ambulatory clinics according to their timing relative to the 2009 guideline change that led to more restrictive cervical cancer screening. Women had higher odds of being screened for chlamydia before vs after the guideline change (odds ratio = 13.97; 95% CI, 9.17-21.29; P <.001). Chlamydia and cervical cancer screening need to be uncoupled and new screening opportunities should be identified. © 2015 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  20. Fertility preservation during cancer treatment: clinical guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez-Wallberg KA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Kenny A Rodriguez-Wallberg,1,2 Kutluk Oktay3,4 1Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2Reproductive Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden; 3Innovation Institute for Fertility Preservation, Rye and New York, 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY, USA Abstract: The majority of children, adolescents, and young adults diagnosed with cancer today will become long-term survivors. The threat to fertility that cancer treatments pose to young patients cannot be prevented in many cases, and thus research into methods for fertility preservation is developing, aiming at offering cancer patients the ability to have biologically related children in the future. This paper discusses the current status of fertility preservation methods when infertility risks are related to surgical oncologic treatments, radiation therapy, or chemotherapy. Several scientific groups and societies have developed consensus documents and guidelines for fertility preservation. Decisions about fertility and imminent potentially gonadotoxic therapies must be made rapidly. Timely and complete information on the impact of cancer treatment on fertility and fertility preservation options should be presented to all patients when a cancer treatment is planned. Keywords: fertility preservation, cancer, cryopreservation, ovarian tissue transplantation, fertility-sparing surgery, cancer survival, quality of life

  1. Castration-resistant prostate cancer: AUA Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookson, Michael S; Roth, Bruce J; Dahm, Philipp; Engstrom, Christine; Freedland, Stephen J; Hussain, Maha; Lin, Daniel W; Lowrance, William T; Murad, Mohammad Hassan; Oh, William K; Penson, David F; Kibel, Adam S

    2013-08-01

    This Guideline is intended to provide a rational basis for the management of patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer based on currently available published data. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the published literature was conducted using controlled vocabulary supplemented with keywords relating to the relevant concepts of prostate cancer and castration resistance. The search strategy was developed and executed by reference librarians and methodologists to create an evidence report limited to English-language, published peer-reviewed literature. This review yielded 303 articles published from 1996 through 2013 that were used to form a majority of the guideline statements. Clinical Principles and Expert Opinions were used for guideline statements lacking sufficient evidence-based data. Guideline statements were created to inform clinicians on the appropriate use of observation, androgen-deprivation and antiandrogen therapy, androgen synthesis inhibitors, immunotherapy, radionuclide therapy, systemic chemotherapy, palliative care and bone health. These were based on six index patients developed to represent the most common scenarios encountered in clinical practice. As a direct result of the significant increase in FDA-approved therapeutic agents for use in patients with metastatic CRPC, clinicians are challenged with a multitude of treatment options and potential sequencing of these agents that, consequently, make clinical decision-making more complex. Given the rapidly evolving nature of this field, this guideline should be used in conjunction with recent systematic literature reviews and an understanding of the individual patient's treatment goals. In all cases, patients' preferences and personal goals should be considered when choosing management strategies. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Screening for prostate cancer: the current evidence and guidelines controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomella, Leonard G; Liu, Xiaolong S; Trabulsi, Edouard J; Kelly, Wm Kevin; Myers, Ronald; Showalter, Timothy; Dicker, Adam; Wender, Richard

    2011-10-01

    Prostate cancer presents a global public health dilemma. While screening with prostate specific antigen (PSA) has led to more men diagnosed with prostate cancer than in previous years, the potential for negative effects from over-diagnosis and treatment cannot be ignored. We reviewed Medline for recent articles that discuss clinical trials, evidence based recommendations and guidelines from major medical organizations in the United States and worldwide concerning prostate cancer screening. Results from the European Randomized Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC), the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial, and Göteborg Swedish trials regarding prostate screening are controversial with the ERSPC and Göteborg showing a reduction in prostate cancer mortality and the PLCO trial showing no benefit. Recommendations from the American Urological Association (AUA), Japanese Urological Association (JUA), and National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) have recommended that all men obtain a baseline PSA beginning at age 40. The American Cancer Society (ACS) stratifies screening recommendations based on age and risk, but states that screening should take place only after an informed discussion between provider and patient. The United States Preventative Health Service Task Force (USPSTF) states that evidence is insufficient to assess the risks and benefits of prostate cancer screening in men younger than 75 years. Other major international health organizations offer a similar reserved approach or recommend against screening for prostate cancer. Most groups indicate that screening to determine who should undergo prostate biopsy typically includes both a serum PSA and digital rectal examination, with the latest ACS publications noting that the rectal exam is optional. A common theme from all groups is that an informed discussion with the patients is strongly recommended and that screening does increase the number of men diagnosed with non

  3. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer 2016 From the Japan Pancreas Society: A Synopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Koji; Okusaka, Takuji; Shimizu, Kyoko; Furuse, Junji; Ito, Yoshinori; Hanada, Keiji; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Okazaki, Kazuichi

    Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer based on Evidence-Based Medicine 2006 were first published by the Japan Pancreas Society, and they were revised to Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer 2009 in July 2009 and were further revised to Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer 2013 in October 2013. These guidelines were established according to evidence-based medicine. In October 2016, the Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer were newly revised in Japanese. In the revised version, we introduced the concepts of GRADE - grading recommendations assessment, development, and evaluation approach for better understanding of the current guidelines. The guidelines show algorithms for the diagnosis, treatment, and chemotherapy of pancreatic cancer and address 7 subjects: diagnosis, surgical therapy, adjuvant therapy, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, stent therapy, and palliative medicine. They include 51 clinical questions and 76 statements. There are statements corresponding to clinical questions, evidence levels, recommended strengths, and agreement rates. These guidelines represent the most standard clinical and practical management at this time in Japan. This is the English synopsis of the Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer 2016 in Japanese, which aims to disseminate the Japanese guidelines worldwide for the introduction of Japanese clinical management of these diseases.

  4. Singapore Cancer Network (SCAN) Guidelines for Systemic Therapy of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The SCAN colorectal cancer systemic therapy workgroup aimed to develop Singapore Cancer Network (SCAN) clinical practice guidelines for systemic therapy for colorectal cancer in Singapore. The workgroup utilised a modified ADAPTE process to calibrate high quality international evidence-based clinical practice guidelines to our local setting. Five international guidelines were evaluated-those developed by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network for colon (2014) and rectal (2014) cancer, the European Society of Medical Oncology for advanced (2012) and early (2013) cancer and the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (2011). Recommendations on systemic therapy in colorectal cancer were produced. These adapted guidelines form the SCAN Guidelines 2015 for systemic therapy of colorectal cancer.

  5. The need for advanced breast cancer treatment guidelines: results of an internet-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardley, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    Although not curable, advanced breast cancer is treatable, however, treatment options are many and varied, and unlike early breast cancer (EBC), consistent guidelines are lacking. Breast cancer physicians were surveyed to assess the emotional impact of recurrence, factors affecting their treatment decisions, the role of guidelines in the management of advanced breast cancer and the need for new guidelines. Overall, distress levels were higher at recurrence than at first diagnosis of early breast cancer for both patients and physicians and the goal of treatment for this disease stage was to improve the patient's quality of life, delay disease progression and improve overall survival. While most respondents (96%) use the currently available guidelines, improvements are required, including the development of uniform global guidelines and recommendations for specific patient groups. Interactive computer programs and e-mail updates should also be utilised to ensure physicians are able to make fully informed decisions regarding optimum treatment.

  6. Protocol of the Definition for the Assessment of Time-to-event Endpoints in CANcer trials (DATECAN) project: formal consensus method for the development of guidelines for standardised time-to-event endpoints' definitions in cancer clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellera, Carine A; Pulido, Marina; Gourgou, Sophie; Collette, Laurence; Doussau, Adélaïde; Kramar, Andrew; Dabakuyo, Tienhan Sandrine; Ouali, Monia; Auperin, Anne; Filleron, Thomas; Fortpied, Catherine; Le Tourneau, Christophe; Paoletti, Xavier; Mauer, Murielle; Mathoulin-Pélissier, Simone; Bonnetain, Franck

    2013-03-01

    In randomised phase III cancer clinical trials, the most objectively defined and only validated time-to-event endpoint is overall survival (OS). The appearance of new types of treatments and the multiplication of lines of treatment have resulted in the use of surrogate endpoints for overall survival such as progression-free survival (PFS), or time-to-treatment failure. Their development is strongly influenced by the necessity of reducing clinical trial duration, cost and number of patients. However, while these endpoints are frequently used, they are often poorly defined and definitions can differ between trials which may limit their use as primary endpoints. Moreover, this variability of definitions can impact on the trial's results by affecting estimation of treatments' effects. The aim of the Definition for the Assessment of Time-to-event Endpoints in CANcer trials (DATECAN) project is to provide recommendations for standardised definitions of time-to-event endpoints in randomised cancer clinical trials. We will use a formal consensus methodology based on experts' opinions which will be obtained in a systematic manner. Definitions will be independently developed for several cancer sites, including pancreatic, breast, head and neck and colon cancer, as well as sarcomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs). The DATECAN project should lead to the elaboration of recommendations that can then be used as guidelines by researchers participating in clinical trials. This process should lead to a standardisation of the definitions of commonly used time-to-event endpoints, enabling appropriate comparisons of future trials' results. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. EAU Guidelines on Muscle-invasive and Metastatic Bladder Cancer: Summary of the 2013 Guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witjes, J.A.; Comperat, E.; Cowan, N.C.; Santis, M. de; Gakis, G.; Lebret, T.; Ribal, M.J.; Heijden, A.G. van der; Sherif, A.

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT: The European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines panel on Muscle-invasive and Metastatic bladder cancer (BCa) updates its guidelines yearly. This updated summary provides a synthesis of the 2013 guidelines document, with emphasis on the latest developments. OBJECTIVE: To provide graded

  8. Oral cavity and lip cancer: United Kingdom National Multidisciplinary Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerawala, C; Roques, T; Jeannon, J-P; Bisase, B

    2016-05-01

    This is the official guideline endorsed by the specialty associations involved in the care of head and neck cancer patients in the UK. It provides recommendations on the assessment and management of patients with cancer of the oral cavity and the lip. Recommendations • Surgery remains the mainstay of management for oral cavity tumours. (R) • Tumour resection should be performed with a clinical clearance of 1 cm vital structures permitting. (R) • Elective neck treatment should be offered for all oral cavity tumours. (R) • Adjuvant radiochemotherapy in the presence of advanced neck disease or positive margins improves control rates. (R) • Early stage lip cancer can be treated equally well by surgery or radiation therapy. (R).

  9. Evaluating compliance to Kenya national cancer guidelines on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: In Kenya, breast cancer is one of the most prevalent diseases among women. Early diagnosis and stage-directed treatment are vital in reducing morbidity and mortality associated with it. The Kenya National Cancer Guidelines (KNCG) was developed in 2013. Utility of the guidelines is expected to improve early ...

  10. Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement of the American Cancer Society Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Lacchetti, Christina; Davis, Nancy B; Garvey, Thomas Q; Goldstein, David P; Nunnink, J Chris; Ninfea, Jose I Ruades; Salner, Andrew L; Salz, Talya; Siu, Lillian L

    2017-05-10

    Purpose This guideline provides recommendations on the management of adults after head and neck cancer (HNC) treatment, focusing on surveillance and screening for recurrence or second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, care coordination, and practice implications. Methods ASCO has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. The American Cancer Society (ACS) HNC Survivorship Care Guideline was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. An ASCO Expert Panel reviewed the content and recommendations, offering modifications and/or qualifying statements when deemed necessary. Results The ASCO Expert Panel determined that the ACS HNC Survivorship Care Guideline, published in 2016, is clear, thorough, clinically practical, and helpful, despite the limited availability of high-quality evidence to support many of the recommendations. ASCO endorsed the ACS HNC Survivorship Care Guideline, adding qualifying statements aimed at promoting team-based, multispecialty, multidisciplinary, collaborative head and neck survivorship care. Recommendations The ASCO Expert Panel emphasized that caring for HNC survivors requires a team-based approach that includes primary care clinicians, oncology specialists, otolaryngologists, dentists, and other allied professionals. The HNC treatment team should educate the primary care clinicians and patients about the type(s) of treatment received, the likelihood of potential recurrence, and the potential late and long-term complications. Primary care clinicians should recognize symptoms of recurrence and coordinate a prompt evaluation. They should also be prepared to manage late effects either directly or by referral to appropriate specialists. Health promotion is critical, particularly regarding tobacco cessation and dental care. Additional information is available at www

  11. Breast cancer practice guidelines: evaluation and quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edge, S B

    1997-11-01

    The utility of practice guidelines in breast cancer management remains unproved. This paper examines the scope and goals of published guidelines and their utility in the process of breast cancer treatment quality improvement. Although existing breast cancer guidelines vary widely in scope and intent, they provide a framework for meaningful quality-of-care evaluation. Among the few comprehensive breast cancer guideline programs are those developed by the Ontario Cancer Treatment Practice Guidelines Initiative, the Revlon/UCLA Breast Center, the Association of Community Cancer Centers (ACCC), the Society of Surgical Oncology (SSO), and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN). Ultimately, guidelines will prove useful only if they are utilized as part of a comprehensive program to improve quality, cost-effectiveness, and outcomes. To accomplish this, they must include mechanisms for revision and evaluation. The evaluation of guideline utility in quality improvement, particularly in breast cancer care, is a complex long-term process, which should include input from practitioners, institutions, payors, and government.

  12. Laryngeal cancer: United Kingdom National Multidisciplinary guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, T M; De, M; Foran, B; Harrington, K; Mortimore, S

    2016-05-01

    This is the official guideline endorsed by the specialty associations involved in the care of head and neck cancer patients in the UK. Significantly new data have been published on laryngeal cancer management since the last edition of the guidelines. This paper discusses the evidence base pertaining to the management of laryngeal cancer and provides updated recommendations on management for this group of patients receiving cancer care. Recommendations • Radiotherapy (RT) and transoral laser microsurgery (TLM) are accepted treatment options for T1a-T2a glottic carcinoma. (R) • Open partial surgery may have a role in the management of selected tumours. (R) • Radiotherapy, TLM and transoral robotic surgery are reasonable treatment options for T1-T2 supraglottic carcinoma. (R) • Supraglottic laryngectomy may have a role in the management of selected tumours. (R) • Most patients with T2b-T3 glottic cancers are suitable for non-surgical larynx preservation therapies. (R) • Concurrent chemoradiotherapy should be regarded as the standard of care for non-surgical management. (R) • Subject to the availability of appropriate surgical expertise and multi-disciplinary rehabilitation services, TLM or open partial surgical procedures ± post-operative RT, may be also be appropriate in selected cases. (R) • In the absence of clinical or radiological evidence of nodal disease, elective treatment (RT or surgery ± post-operative RT) is recommended to at least lymph node levels II, III and IV bilaterally. In node positive disease, it is recommended that lymph node levels II-V should be treated on the involved side. If level II nodes are involved, then elective irradiation of ipsilateral level Ib nodes may be considered. (R) • Most patients with T3 supraglottic cancers are suitable for non-surgical larynx preservation therapies. (R) • Concurrent chemoradiotherapy should be regarded as the standard of care for non-surgical management. (R) • Subject to the

  13. Cancer guideline development in Europe: a survey among ECCO members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrijvers, Dirk; Del Turco, Marco Rosselli; Maddock, Carol; Marotti, Lorenza; Van Hemelryck, Françoise

    2012-06-01

    A survey was conducted among European Cancer Organisations by the European CanCer Organisation (ECCO) to evaluate initiatives on cancer guideline development. An electronic questionnaire based on the 'Appraisal of Guidelines Research and Evaluation' (AGREE) instrument was sent to different ECCO members and other Scientific European Organisations involved in cancer care. Between April 2010 and July 2010, 30 European Cancer Organisations (ECOs) were contacted and 21 responded to the questionnaire. Of these, 13 were involved in the production of clinical practice guidelines. The majority of the cancer guidelines were treatment or disease-management related (84.6%). The objectives were appropriate clinical care (76.9%), cost containment (7.7%) or both (23.1%). Almost all organisations developed guidelines for their members but more than half were also aimed at policy makers (53.9%). In 69% of cases, the guidelines were developed according to specific instructions by searches in an electronic data base while in 46.2% there was a manual evaluation of the original articles. Disciplines almost always involved in guideline development groups were the medical and nursing specialities, while in some groups, communication specialists were always involved. Patients, as key stakeholders of the guidelines were involved by eight organisations in their development. The median costs for the development of a cancer guideline were between 25000 and 50,000 euro. This survey shows that many European cancer organisations are producing cancer guidelines. Since their development is both costly and time consuming, a coordinated approach should be encouraged. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Awareness of Dietary and Alcohol Guidelines Among Colorectal Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Nikki A; Berkowitz, Zahava; Rodriguez, Juan L

    2015-12-01

    Although dietary habits can affect colorectal cancer (CRC) survivors' health, it is unclear how familiar survivors are with dietary guidelines, what they believe about healthy eating and alcohol consumption, and what hinders healthy dietary habits after cancer. This study assessed CRC survivors' familiarity with dietary guidelines, their eating and drinking habits, and perceived facilitators and barriers to healthy eating after cancer, including social support and self-efficacy for maintaining a healthy diet and limiting alcohol. A total of 593 individuals (50% female; mean age, 74 years) diagnosed with CRC approximately 6 years prior to study entry in early 2010 were identified through California Cancer Registry records and participated in a cross-sectional mailed survey assessing health behavior after cancer (46% adjusted response rate). Analyses were conducted in 2014-2015. Survivors were most familiar with-and most likely to follow-recommendations to choose low-fat foods; 15% had never heard of recommendations to limit alcohol. Survivors were more aware of recommendations involving messages to limit/avoid versus approach/choose certain foods. The most common barrier to a healthy diet involved the effort required (26%). Survivors received more family/friend support and provider recommendations for healthy eating than limiting alcohol. Results provide an overview of awareness of and adherence to dietary recommendations among CRC survivors, highlighting the need for increasing awareness of recommendations that are especially relevant for survivors. Suggestions are made for modifying diet-related messages to facilitate comprehension and recall among CRC survivors, and increasing awareness among groups with the lowest awareness levels. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Assessment of Practice Patterns Following Publication of the SSO–ASTRO Consensus Guideline on Margins for Breast-Conserving Therapy in Stage I and II Invasive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSnyder, Sarah M.; Hunt, Kelly K.; Smith, Benjamin D.; Moran, Meena S.; Klimberg, Suzanne; Lucci, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Background The recently published SSO–ASTRO consensus guideline on margins concluded “no ink on tumor” is the standard for an adequate margin. This study was conducted to determine how this guideline is aligned with current clinical practice. Methods A survey was sent to 3057 members of the American Society of Breast Surgeons. Questions assessed respondents’ clinical practice type and duration, familiarity with the guideline, and preferences for margin re-excision. Results Of those surveyed, 777 (25 %) responded. Most (92 %) indicated familiarity with the guideline. Of these respondents, the majority (n = 678, or 94.7 %) would re-excise all or most of the time when tumor extended to the inked margin. Very few (n = 9, or 1.3 %) would re-excise all or most of the time when tumor was within 2 mm of the margin. Over 12 % (n = 90) would re-excise all or most of the time for a triple-negative tumor within 1 mm of the margin, whereas 353 (49.6 %) would re-excise all or most of the time when imaging and pathology were discordant, and tumor was within 1 mm of multiple margins. Finally, 330 (45.8 %) would re-excise all or most of the time when multiple foci of ductal carcinoma in situ extended to within 1 mm of multiple inked margins. Conclusions Surgeons are in agreement to re-excise margins when tumor touches ink and generally not to perform re-excisions when tumor is close to (but not touching) the inked margin. For more complex scenarios, surgeons are utilizing their individual clinical judgment to determine the need for re-excision. PMID:26202554

  16. Assessment of Practice Patterns Following Publication of the SSO-ASTRO Consensus Guideline on Margins for Breast-Conserving Therapy in Stage I and II Invasive Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSnyder, Sarah M; Hunt, Kelly K; Smith, Benjamin D; Moran, Meena S; Klimberg, Suzanne; Lucci, Anthony

    2015-10-01

    The recently published SSO-ASTRO consensus guideline on margins concluded "no ink on tumor" is the standard for an adequate margin. This study was conducted to determine how this guideline is aligned with current clinical practice. A survey was sent to 3057 members of the American Society of Breast Surgeons. Questions assessed respondents' clinical practice type and duration, familiarity with the guideline, and preferences for margin re-excision. Of those surveyed, 777 (25%) responded. Most (92%) indicated familiarity with the guideline. Of these respondents, the majority (n = 678, or 94.7%) would re-excise all or most of the time when tumor extended to the inked margin. Very few (n = 9, or 1.3%) would re-excise all or most of the time when tumor was within 2 mm of the margin. Over 12 % (n = 90) would re-excise all or most of the time for a triple-negative tumor within 1 mm of the margin, whereas 353 (49.6%) would re-excise all or most of the time when imaging and pathology were discordant, and tumor was within 1 mm of multiple margins. Finally, 330 (45.8%) would re-excise all or most of the time when multiple foci of ductal carcinoma in situ extended to within 1 mm of multiple inked margins. Surgeons are in agreement to re-excise margins when tumor touches ink and generally not to perform re-excisions when tumor is close to (but not touching) the inked margin. For more complex scenarios, surgeons are utilizing their individual clinical judgment to determine the need for re-excision.

  17. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  18. Assessing the HER2 status in mucinous epithelial ovarian cancer on the basis of the 2013 ASCO/CAP guideline update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Wan-Ru; Lee, Ming-Yung; Lin, Wea-Lung; Koo, Chiew-Loon; Sheu, Gwo-Tarng; Han, Chih-Ping

    2014-09-01

    Her2 gene amplification and protein overexpression are important factors in predicting clinical sensitivity to anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody therapy in breast, gastric, or gastro-esophageal junction cancer patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the HER2 status in the mucinous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). Adopting the 2013 American Society for Clinical Oncology and the College of American Pathologists guideline update for HER2 testing, 49 tissue microarray samples of mucinous EOC were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) tests. The prevalence of HER2 positivity in Asian mucinous EOC was 9 of 49 Asian women (18.37%). The overall concordance was 100% between IHC and FISH results. Her2 gene copies before chromosome-17 correction increased significantly in a stepwise order through the negative, equivocal, and positive IHC result categories (PIHC and FISH tests for the Her2 gene copies per tumor cell either before or after correction of chromosome-17, and this can be applied as a potentially valuable tool to analyze the HER2 status. Polysomy-17 was absent under the CEP17 cutoff ≥3. The existence of HER2 heterogeneity can be discerned in certain HER2-expressed primary mucinous EOC in Taiwanese women.

  19. Gastric cancer diagnosis and treatment guidelines 2008: Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In Uganda most cancers to the exception of bladder and penis are increasing in incidence. The incidence of cancer of stomach is 5.6/100,000 from 0.8/100,000 in the 1960s a seven fold increase.The purpose of this guideline document is to highlight the salient points in gastric cancer diagnosis and treatment in the ...

  20. Lay Epistemology of Breast Cancer Screening Guidelines Among Appalachian Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Record, Rachael A; Scott, Allison M; Shaunfield, Sara; Jones, M Grace; Collins, Tom; Cohen, Elisia L

    2017-09-01

    Recent changes to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force guidelines for breast cancer screening have contributed to increased patient uncertainty regarding the timing and appropriateness of screening behaviors. To gain insight into the lay epistemology of women regarding breast cancer screening practices, we conducted in-depth, face-to-face interviews with 24 adult women living in a medically underserved Appalachian region. We found that women were unaware of breast cancer screening guidelines (i.e., start age, frequency, stop age). Qualitative analysis revealed two lay epistemological narratives establishing (a) uncertain knowledge and ambiguity about breast cancer screening guidelines but certain knowledge of other women's experiences with breast cancer diagnoses, and (b) feelings of knowing one's own body best and seeing the value in "overscreening" to save even one life. Our findings have theoretical and practical implications for scholars and practitioners seeking to improve knowledge or behavior regarding adherence to breast cancer screening recommendations.

  1. Expert consensus panel guidelines on geriatric assessment in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donovan, A; Mohile, S G; Leech, M

    2015-07-01

    Despite consensus guidelines on best practice in the care of older patients with cancer, geriatric assessment (GA) has yet to be optimally integrated into the field of oncology in most countries. There is a relative lack of consensus in the published literature as to the best approach to take, and there is a degree of uncertainty as to how integration of geriatric medicine principles might optimally predict patient outcomes. The aim of the current study was to obtain consensus on GA in oncology to inform the implementation of a geriatric oncology programme. A four-round Delphi process was employed. The Delphi method is a structured group facilitation process, using multiple iterations to gain consensus on a given topic. Consensus was reached on the optimal assessment method and interventions required for the commonly employed domains of GA. Other aspects of GA, such as screening methods and age cut-off for assessment, represented a higher degree of disagreement. The expert panel employed in this study clearly identified the criteria that should be included in a clinical geriatric oncology programme. In the absence of evidence-based guidelines, this may prove useful in the care of older cancer patients. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Expert Consensus Panel Guidelines on Geriatric Assessment in Oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donovan, A.; Mohile, S.G.; Leech, M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite consensus guidelines on best practice in the care of older patients with cancer, geriatric assessment (GA) has yet to be optimally integrated into the field of oncology in most countries. There is a relative lack of consensus in the published literature as to the best approach to take, and there is a degree of uncertainty as to how integration of geriatric medicine principles might optimally predict patient outcomes. The aim of the current study was to obtain consensus on GA in oncology to inform the implementation of a geriatric oncology programme. Methods A four round Delphi process was employed. The Delphi method is a structured group facilitation process, using multiple iterations in order to gain consensus on a given topic Results Consensus was reached on the optimal assessment method and interventions required for the commonly employed domains of GA. Other aspects of GA, such as screening methods and age cutoff for assessment represented a higher degree of disagreement. Discussion The expert panel employed in this study clearly identified the criteria that should be included in a clinical geriatric oncology programme. In the absence of evidence-based guidelines, this may prove useful in the care of older cancer patients. PMID:25757457

  3. [Clinical application evaluation of Guidelines for Diagnosis and Treatment of Cancer in Traditional Chinese Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Nan-Nan; Liu, Meng-Yu; Liu, Yu-Qi; Wang, Yue-Xi; Wang, Li-Ying; Yuwen, Ya; Zhao, Xue-Yao; Wei, Dong-Feng; Kou, Shuang; Han, Xue-Jie; Wang, Yan-Ping

    2017-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate the adaptability and applicability of Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Cancer in Traditional Chinese Medicine. The assessment methods included adaptability assessment and applicability assessment. The adaptability assessment was based on the questionnaire survey to evaluate the familiarity, utilization, quality, and clinical application of the Guidelines; applicability assessment was based on the prospective observation of 853 clinical cases to investigate the applicability and effect of the Guidelines, including effectiveness, economy and safety. Statistical analysis for basic description, construction of different comparison groups for cross or hierarchical statistical test, multi-factor analysis, and confounding factors were used in the study. Adaptability assessment results showed that 63.03% of TCM doctors considered guidelines as good or very good applicability and 4.24% of TCM doctors considered guidelines with very poor applicability in clinical practice. For the applicability evaluation, TCM doctors considered that the "overall efficacy and technology level", "satisfactory degree" and "adaptability in clinical practice" of the guideline were 85.46%, 80.43% and 69.40% respectively. The results showed that guideline was well known among TCM doctors, especially junior TCM doctors. Adaptability and applicability of Guidelines were totally good but the quality and adaptability of the intervention schemes were still week, so the quality of Guidelines should be improved by revision. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  4. Adherence to Guidelines for Cancer Survivors and Health-Related Quality of Life among Korean Breast Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sihan; Hwang, Eunkyung; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Noh, Dong-Young; Lee, Jung Eun

    2015-01-01

    There is limited evidence on the association between adherence to guidelines for cancer survivors and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). In a cross-sectional study of Korean breast cancer survivors, we examined whether adherence to the guidelines of the American Cancer Society (ACS) and World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) for cancer survivors was related to levels of HRQoL, assessed by the Korean version of Core 30 (C30) and Breast cancer module 23 (BR23) of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC-QLQ). We included a total of 160 women aged 21 to 79 years who had been diagnosed with breast cancer according to American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stages I to III and had breast cancer surgery at least six months before the interview. Increasing adherence to ACS guidelines was associated with higher scores of social functioning (p for trend = 0.05), whereas increasing adherence to WCRF/AICR recommendations was associated with higher scores of arm symptoms (p for trend = 0.01). These associations were limited to those with stage II or III cancer. Diet may be an important factor in relation to quality of life among Korean breast cancer survivors, however our findings warrant further prospective studies to evaluate whether healthy diet improves survivors’ quality of life. PMID:26690215

  5. Adherence to Guidelines for Cancer Survivors and Health-Related Quality of Life among Korean Breast Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sihan; Hwang, Eunkyung; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Noh, Dong-Young; Lee, Jung Eun

    2015-12-09

    There is limited evidence on the association between adherence to guidelines for cancer survivors and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). In a cross-sectional study of Korean breast cancer survivors, we examined whether adherence to the guidelines of the American Cancer Society (ACS) and World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) for cancer survivors was related to levels of HRQoL, assessed by the Korean version of Core 30 (C30) and Breast cancer module 23 (BR23) of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC-QLQ). We included a total of 160 women aged 21 to 79 years who had been diagnosed with breast cancer according to American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stages I to III and had breast cancer surgery at least six months before the interview. Increasing adherence to ACS guidelines was associated with higher scores of social functioning (p for trend = 0.05), whereas increasing adherence to WCRF/AICR recommendations was associated with higher scores of arm symptoms (p for trend = 0.01). These associations were limited to those with stage II or III cancer. Diet may be an important factor in relation to quality of life among Korean breast cancer survivors, however our findings warrant further prospective studies to evaluate whether healthy diet improves survivors' quality of life.

  6. Hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline endorsement of the familial risk-colorectal cancer: European Society for Medical Oncology Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, Elena M; Mangu, Pamela B; Gruber, Stephen B; Hamilton, Stanley R; Kalady, Matthew F; Lau, Michelle Wan Yee; Lu, Karen H; Roach, Nancy; Limburg, Paul J

    2015-01-10

    To provide recommendations on prevention, screening, genetics, treatment, and management for people at risk for hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) syndromes. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. The Familial Risk-Colorectal Cancer: European Society for Medical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline published in 2013 on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Guidelines Working Group in Annals of Oncology was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists, with content and recommendations reviewed by an ASCO endorsement panel. The ASCO endorsement panel determined that the recommendations of the ESMO guidelines are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence. The ASCO panel endorsed the ESMO guidelines and added a few qualifying statements. Approximately 5% to 6% of patient cases of CRC are associated with germline mutations that confer an inherited predisposition for cancer. The possibility of a hereditary cancer syndrome should be assessed for every patient at the time of CRC diagnosis. A diagnosis of Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, or another genetic syndrome can influence clinical management for patients with CRC and their family members. Screening for hereditary cancer syndromes in patients with CRC should include review of personal and family histories and testing of tumors for DNA mismatch repair deficiency and/or microsatellite instability. Formal genetic evaluation is recommended for individuals who meet defined criteria. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  7. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Syndromes: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement of the Familial Risk–Colorectal Cancer: European Society for Medical Oncology Clinical Practice Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, Elena M.; Mangu, Pamela B.; Gruber, Stephen B.; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Kalady, Matthew F.; Lau, Michelle Wan Yee; Lu, Karen H.; Roach, Nancy; Limburg, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To provide recommendations on prevention, screening, genetics, treatment, and management for people at risk for hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) syndromes. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. Methods The Familial Risk–Colorectal Cancer: European Society for Medical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline published in 2013 on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Guidelines Working Group in Annals of Oncology was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists, with content and recommendations reviewed by an ASCO endorsement panel. Results The ASCO endorsement panel determined that the recommendations of the ESMO guidelines are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence. The ASCO panel endorsed the ESMO guidelines and added a few qualifying statements. Recommendations Approximately 5% to 6% of patient cases of CRC are associated with germline mutations that confer an inherited predisposition for cancer. The possibility of a hereditary cancer syndrome should be assessed for every patient at the time of CRC diagnosis. A diagnosis of Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, or another genetic syndrome can influence clinical management for patients with CRC and their family members. Screening for hereditary cancer syndromes in patients with CRC should include review of personal and family histories and testing of tumors for DNA mismatch repair deficiency and/or microsatellite instability. Formal genetic evaluation is recommended for individuals who meet defined criteria. PMID:25452455

  8. [The German Guideline Clearinghouse on Breast Cancer: the need for frequent updating of breast cancer guidelines requires effective guideline updating procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingart, Olaf; Sonntag, Dietrich; Trapp, Henrike; Bartsch, Hans-Helge; Baumeister, Rüdiger G H; Goerke, Kay; Giersiepen, Klaus; Hindenburg, Hans-Joachim; Ming, Karin; Schulz-Wendtland, Rüdiger; Störkel, Stephan; Kober, Thilo; Thole, Henning; Kirchner, Hanna; Ollenschläger, Günter

    2004-08-01

    In order to promote the quality of health care and guidelines in Germany the German Guideline Clearinghouse (Sponsors: German Medical Association, National Association of the Statutory Health Insurance Physicians, German Hospital Federation, Associations of the Sickness Funds and the Statutory Pension Insurance) was established at the Agency for Quality in Medicine (AQuMed) in 1999. The results of the 10th Guideline Clearing Project, the Guideline Clearing Report "Breast Cancer", were published in December 2003. In a systematic search using English/German language guideline databases and literature databases (Medline, Healthstar, Embase), 16 national guidelines were identified which were in accordance to the inclusion criteria (breast cancer treatment; German or English language; published after 1992; new guideline or genuine update (no adaptation); recommended for country-wide implementation). The methodological quality of these 16 guidelines was evaluated using the appraisal instrument of the German Guideline Clearinghouse, the checklist "Methodological Quality of Clinical Practice Guidelines". A peer review of the guidelines was performed by a multidisciplinary focus group of experts (intended guideline users from clinical and ambulatory settings as well as patients). This group consented comments and recommendations for actions of health care policy makers in Germany for a German breast cancer guideline based on examples from the appraised guidelines. None of the identified guidelines contained information about all of the 24 key topics that the focus group considered to be relevant for a German national guideline. The selected exemplary text extracts from the evaluated guidelines can be used as benchmarks and example sources for the development of a national German breast cancer guideline. From the beginning, patients should be involved in the development process within a multidisciplinary team. Due to the rapid emergence of new evidence, oncology guidelines

  9. Guidelines for guidelines: are they up to the task? A comparative assessment of clinical practice guideline development handbooks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabnam Ansari

    . The findings help decision makers in identifying the necessary tasks for guideline development, provide an updated comparative list of guideline development handbooks, and provide a checklist to assess the comprehensiveness of guideline development processes.

  10. Guidelines for guidelines: are they up to the task? A comparative assessment of clinical practice guideline development handbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Shabnam; Rashidian, Arash

    2012-01-01

    necessary tasks for guideline development, provide an updated comparative list of guideline development handbooks, and provide a checklist to assess the comprehensiveness of guideline development processes.

  11. Effective interventions to facilitate the uptake of breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening: an implementation guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brouwers Melissa C

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Appropriate screening may reduce the mortality and morbidity of colorectal, breast, and cervical cancers. Several high-quality systematic reviews and practice guidelines exist to inform the most effective screening options. However, effective implementation strategies are warranted if the full benefits of screening are to be realized. We developed an implementation guideline to answer the question: What interventions have been shown to increase the uptake of cancer screening by individuals, specifically for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancers? Methods A guideline panel was established as part of Cancer Care Ontario's Program in Evidence-based Care, and a systematic review of the published literature was conducted. It yielded three foundational systematic reviews and an existing guidance document. We conducted updates of these reviews and searched the literature published between 2004 and 2010. A draft guideline was written that went through two rounds of review. Revisions were made resulting in a final set of guideline recommendations. Results Sixty-six new studies reflecting 74 comparisons met eligibility criteria. They were generally of poor to moderate quality. Using these and the foundational documents, the panel developed a draft guideline. The draft report was well received in the two rounds of review with mean quality scores above four (on a five-point scale for each of the items. For most of the interventions considered, there was insufficient evidence to support or refute their effectiveness. However, client reminders, reduction of structural barriers, and provision of provider assessment and feedback were recommended interventions to increase screening for at least two of three cancer sites studied. The final guidelines also provide advice on how the recommendations can be used and future areas for research. Conclusion Using established guideline development methodologies and the AGREE II as our methodological

  12. Effective interventions to facilitate the uptake of breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening: an implementation guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, Melissa C; De Vito, Carol; Bahirathan, Lavannya; Carol, Angela; Carroll, June C; Cotterchio, Michelle; Dobbins, Maureen; Lent, Barbara; Levitt, Cheryl; Lewis, Nancy; McGregor, S Elizabeth; Paszat, Lawrence; Rand, Carol; Wathen, Nadine

    2011-09-29

    Appropriate screening may reduce the mortality and morbidity of colorectal, breast, and cervical cancers. Several high-quality systematic reviews and practice guidelines exist to inform the most effective screening options. However, effective implementation strategies are warranted if the full benefits of screening are to be realized. We developed an implementation guideline to answer the question: What interventions have been shown to increase the uptake of cancer screening by individuals, specifically for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancers? A guideline panel was established as part of Cancer Care Ontario's Program in Evidence-based Care, and a systematic review of the published literature was conducted. It yielded three foundational systematic reviews and an existing guidance document. We conducted updates of these reviews and searched the literature published between 2004 and 2010. A draft guideline was written that went through two rounds of review. Revisions were made resulting in a final set of guideline recommendations. Sixty-six new studies reflecting 74 comparisons met eligibility criteria. They were generally of poor to moderate quality. Using these and the foundational documents, the panel developed a draft guideline. The draft report was well received in the two rounds of review with mean quality scores above four (on a five-point scale) for each of the items. For most of the interventions considered, there was insufficient evidence to support or refute their effectiveness. However, client reminders, reduction of structural barriers, and provision of provider assessment and feedback were recommended interventions to increase screening for at least two of three cancer sites studied. The final guidelines also provide advice on how the recommendations can be used and future areas for research. Using established guideline development methodologies and the AGREE II as our methodological frameworks, we developed an implementation guideline to advise on

  13. Salient Features and Outline of the Joint Japanese Guidelines for Safe Handling of Cancer Chemotherapy Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Kiyoko; Hirai, Kazue; Iino, Keiko; Nomura, Hisanaga; Yasui, Hisateru; Kano, Taro; Ichikawa, Chisato; Hiura, Sumiko; Morita, Tomoko; Mitsuma, Ayako; Komatsu, Hiroko

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce the outline and describe the salient features of the "Joint Guidelines for Safe Handling of Cancer Chemotherapy Drugs" (hereinafter, "Guideline"), which were published in July 2015. The purpose of this Guideline is to provide guidance to protect against occupational exposure to hazardous drugs (HDs) to all medical personnel involved in cancer chemotherapy, including physicians, pharmacists, and nurses and home health-care providers. The Guideline was developed according to the Medical Information Network Distribution Service guidance for developing clinical practice guidelines, with reference to five authoritative guidelines used worldwide. PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Ichushi-Web, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were used for a systematic search of the literature. Eight clinical questions (CQs) were eventually established, and the strength of recommendation for each CQ is presented based on 867 references. The salient features of the Guideline are that it was jointly developed by three societies (Japanese Society of Cancer Nursing, Japanese Society of Medical Oncology, and Japanese Society of Pharmaceutical Oncology), contains descriptions including the definition of HDs and the concept of hierarchy of controls, and addresses exposure control measures during handling of chemotherapy drugs. Our future task is to collect additional evidence for the recommended exposure control measures and to assess whether publication of the Guideline has led to adherence of measures to prevent occupational exposure.

  14. Final Accessibility Guidelines for Play Areas: Economic Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board, Washington, DC.

    This economic assessment informs the public about the implications of the final accessibility guidelines for play areas issued by the Access Board. The guidelines include scoping and technical provisions, which specify when and how access is to be provided to ground level and elevated play components. The guidelines also address soft contained…

  15. Fertility drugs and cancer: a guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Methodological limitations in studying the association between the use of fertility drugs and cancer include the inherent increased risk of cancer in women who never conceive, the low incidence of most of these cancers, and that the age of diagnosis of cancer typically is many years after fertility drug use. Based on available data, there does not appear to be a meaningful increased risk of invasive ovarian cancer, breast cancer, or endometrial cancer following the use of fertility drugs. Several studies have shown a small increased risk of borderline ovarian tumors; however, there is insufficient consistent evidence that a particular fertility drug increases the risk of borderline ovarian tumors, and any absolute risk is small. Given the available literature, patients should be counseled that infertile women may be at an increased risk of invasive ovarian, endometrial, and breast cancer; however, use of fertility drugs does not appear to increase this risk. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Salient features and outline of the joint Japanese guidelines for safe handling of cancer chemotherapy drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyoko Kanda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to introduce the outline and describe the salient features of the “Joint Guidelines for Safe Handling of Cancer Chemotherapy Drugs” (hereinafter, “Guideline”, which were published in July 2015. The purpose of this Guideline is to provide guidance to protect against occupational exposure to hazardous drugs (HDs to all medical personnel involved in cancer chemotherapy, including physicians, pharmacists, and nurses and home health-care providers. The Guideline was developed according to the Medical Information Network Distribution Service guidance for developing clinical practice guidelines, with reference to five authoritative guidelines used worldwide. PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Ichushi-Web, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were used for a systematic search of the literature. Eight clinical questions (CQs were eventually established, and the strength of recommendation for each CQ is presented based on 867 references. The salient features of the Guideline are that it was jointly developed by three societies (Japanese Society of Cancer Nursing, Japanese Society of Medical Oncology, and Japanese Society of Pharmaceutical Oncology, contains descriptions including the definition of HDs and the concept of hierarchy of controls, and addresses exposure control measures during handling of chemotherapy drugs. Our future task is to collect additional evidence for the recommended exposure control measures and to assess whether publication of the Guideline has led to adherence of measures to prevent occupational exposure.

  17. Clinical Guidelines for the Care of Childhood Cancer Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily S. Tonorezos

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Long-Term Follow-Up Guidelines for survivors of childhood, adolescent, and young adult cancers are evidence- and consensus-based guidelines that have been developed and published by the Children’s Oncology Group (COG Late Effects Committee, Nursing Discipline, and the Patient Advocacy Committee. Originally published in 2004, the guidelines are currently in version 3.0. While the COG guidelines have been praised as a model for providing risk-based survivorship care, adherence has not been uniform. Reasons for this gap include unawareness on the part of the survivor and/or care team as well as disagreement about the individual recommendations. In some cases, the burden of testing (such as annual echocardiography or repeat pulmonary function testing may be too great. A small number of intervention studies have documented improved adherence to guideline recommendations with dissemination of informational material. Future studies should focus on individualizing screening recommendations, as well as identifying unnecessary testing.

  18. AHNS Series - Do you know your guidelines? Lip cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, William; Givi, Babak; Jameson, Mark J

    2017-08-01

    Lip cancer is one of the most curable primary head and neck malignancies, as the prominent location typically lends to an early diagnosis. The incidence of lip cancer varies by sex, ethnicity, and region, but is estimated to be up to 2.5/100 000 in the United States (squamous cell carcinoma [SCC]). This article will review the current literature and National Comprehensive Cancer Network practice guidelines in the treatment of lip cancer. Resection of lip cancer with negative margins remains the mainstay of therapy. Positive nodal disease should be treated with neck dissection and adjuvant radiotherapy. Lip cancer remains highly curable when diagnosed at an early stage. A multidisciplinary approach is crucial to treating patients with advanced-stage lip cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. European Fissure Sealant Guidelines: assessment using AGREE II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Martin-Galindo, L; Rodríguez-Lozano, F J; Abalos-Labruzzi, C; Niederman, R

    2017-02-01

    Pit and fissure sealants are effective in reducing the incidence of occlusal caries, and multiple clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) have been developed for recommending their proper use. The usefulness of CPGs depends on their quality and on the rigour of the guideline development process. A study was made to assess the quality of current European CPGs based on the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) instrument, which uses 23 key items rated on a 7-point scale to assess practice guideline development and the quality of reporting. A search was conducted for fissure sealant guidelines for preventing caries in children and adults at high and low risk published in the last 10 years. Calibration was carried out before scoring to assess agreement between the appraisers using the AGREE II instrument. The searches identified 19 relevant guidelines, and following application of the inclusion/exclusion criteria, three guidelines were retained for evaluation. The proportion of observed agreement was calculated, expressed by the agreement separately for positive and negative ratings (PA = 0.89, NA = 0-91). The results of the guideline assessments revealed the highest score for the Irish guideline, a moderate score for the French guideline and the lowest score for the European guideline. Based on the AGREE II instrument, the results obtained show significant variation in the quality assessment of the three European Fissure Sealant Guidelines. Future studies should be carried out both to develop quality dental CPGs and to investigate effective ways of adopting them. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Guidelines for rating Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aas IH Monrad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF is a scoring system for the severity of illness in psychiatry. It is used clinically in many countries, as well as in research, but studies have shown several problems with GAF, for example concerning its validity and reliability. Guidelines for rating are important. The present study aimed to identify the current status of guidelines for rating GAF, and relevant factors and gaps in knowledge for the development of improved guidelines. Methods A thorough literature search was conducted. Results Few studies of existing guidelines have been conducted; existing guidelines are short; and rating has a subjective element. Seven main categories were identified as being important in relation to further development of guidelines: (1 general points about guidelines for rating GAF; (2 introduction to guidelines, with ground rules; (3 starting scoring at the top, middle or bottom level of the scale; (4 scoring for different time periods and of different values (highest, lowest or average; (5 the finer grading of the scale; (6 different guidelines for different conditions; and (7 different languages and cultures. Little information is available about how rules for rating are understood by different raters: the final score may be affected by whether the rater starts at the top, middle or bottom of the scale; there is little data on which value/combination of GAF values to record; guidelines for scoring within 10-point intervals are limited; there is little empirical information concerning the suitability of existing guidelines for different conditions and patient characteristics; and little is known about the effects of translation into different languages or of different cultural understanding. Conclusions Few studies have dealt specifically with guidelines for rating GAF. Current guidelines for rating GAF are not comprehensive, and relevant points for new guidelines are presented. Theoretical and

  1. Adherence to Diet and Physical Activity Cancer Prevention Guidelines and Cancer Outcomes: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Kohler, Lindsay N.; Garcia, David O.; Harris, Robin B.; Oren, Eyal; Roe, Denise J.; Jacobs, Elizabeth T

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have reported that adherence to health promotion guidelines for diet, physical activity, and maintenance of healthy body weight may decrease cancer incidence and mortality. A systematic review was performed to examine associations between adherence to established cancer prevention guidelines for diet and physical activity and overall cancer incidence and mortality. PubMed, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Reviews databases were searched following the current recommendations of Prefer...

  2. Guidelines for radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luster, M.; Clarke, S.E.; Dietlein, M.; Lassmann, M.; Lind, P.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Tennvall, J.; Bombardieri, E.

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The purpose of the present guidelines on the radioiodine therapy (RAIT) of differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) formulated by the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) Therapy Committee is to provide advice to nuclear medicine clinicians and other members of the DTC-treating

  3. [NCCN Asian consensus statement - can Asian patients with cancer accept treatment modalities from NCCN guidelines ?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozono, Seiichiro; Hinotsu, Shiro; Namiki, Mikio; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2014-06-01

    To spread the National Comprehensive Cancer Network(NCCN)guidelines widely in Asia, committee members from Asian countries have been preparing an Asia Consensus Statement(ACS)along the NCCN guidelines. The ACS for Kidney Cancer guidelines and Prostate Cancer guidelines were issued in 2009 and in 2011, respectively. In addition, second versions of both these guidelines were issued in 2011 and 2013, respectively. In this review, the process and contents of NCCN ACS have been described.

  4. Fertility preservation during cancer treatment: clinical guidelines

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez-Wallberg KA; Oktay K

    2014-01-01

    Kenny A Rodriguez-Wallberg,1,2 Kutluk Oktay3,4 1Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2Reproductive Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden; 3Innovation Institute for Fertility Preservation, Rye and New York, 4Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY, USA Abstract: The majority of children, adolescents, and young adults diagnosed with cancer...

  5. Cancer care Ontario guideline recommendations for hormone receptor testing in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nofech-Mozes, S; Vella, E T; Dhesy-Thind, S; Hanna, W M

    2012-12-01

    Hormone receptor testing (oestrogen and progesterone) in breast cancer at the time of primary diagnosis is used to guide treatment decisions. Accurate and standardised testing methods are critical to ensure the proper classification of the patient's hormone receptor status. Recommendations were developed to improve the quality and accuracy of hormone receptor testing based on a systematic review conducted jointly by the American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists and Cancer Care Ontario's Program in Evidence-Based Care. Evidence-based recommendations were formulated to set standards for optimising immunohistochemistry in assessing hormone receptor status, as well as assuring quality and proficiency between and within laboratories. A formal external review was conducted to validate the relevance of these recommendations. It is anticipated that widespread adoption of these guidelines will further improve the accuracy of hormone receptor testing in Canada. Copyright © 2012 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Management of thyroid cancer: United Kingdom National Multidisciplinary Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, A L; Gandhi, A; Scott-Coombes, D; Perros, P

    2016-05-01

    This is the official guideline endorsed by the specialty associations involved in the care of head and neck cancer patients in the UK. This paper provides recommendations on the management of thyroid cancer in adults and is based on the 2014 British Thyroid Association guidelines. Recommendations • Ultrasound scanning (USS) of the nodule or goitre is a crucial investigation in guiding the need for fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC). (R) • FNAC should be considered for all nodules with suspicious ultrasound features (U3-U5). If a nodule is smaller than 10 mm in diameter, USS guided FNAC is not recommended unless clinically suspicious lymph nodes on USS are also present. (R) • Cytological analysis and categorisation should be reported according to the current British Thyroid Association Guidance. (R) • Ultrasound scanning assessment of cervical nodes should be done in FNAC-proven cancer. (R) • Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) should be done in suspected cases of retrosternal extension, fixed tumours (local invasion with or without vocal cord paralysis) or when haemoptysis is reported. When CT with contrast is used pre-operatively, there should be a two-month delay between the use of iodinated contrast media and subsequent radioactive iodine (I131) therapy. (R) • Fluoro-deoxy-glucose positron emission tomography imaging is not recommended for routine evaluation. (G) • In patients with thyroid cancer, assessment of extrathyroidal extension and lymph node disease in the central and lateral neck compartments should be undertaken pre-operatively by USS and cross-sectional imaging (CT or MRI) if indicated. (R) • For patients with Thy 3f or Thy 4 FNAC a diagnostic hemithyroidectomy is recommended. (R) • Total thyroidectomy is recommended for patients with tumours greater than 4 cm in diameter or tumours of any size in association with any of the following characteristics: multifocal disease, bilateral disease, extrathyroidal

  7. Forceps versus snare polypectomies in colorectal cancer screening: are we adhering to the guidelines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto-Arias, Martha; Waldmann, Elisabeth; Jeschek, Philip; Gessl, Irina; Sallinger, Daniela; Bannert, Christina; Weber, Michael; Trauner, Michael; Weiss, Werner; Ferlitsch, Arnulf; Ferlitsch, Monika

    2015-10-01

    European guidelines for quality assurance in colorectal cancer screening recommend snare resection for polyps > 5 mm. The aim of this study was to investigate polypectomy technique according to lesion size and shape, and to assess adherence of endoscopists enrolled in the national quality assurance program to the European guidelines. This cohort study included screening colonoscopies performed between 2007 and 2013 within a quality assurance program in Austria. Resection technique was analyzed according to lesion characteristics and endoscopy facility (private practices, hospitals, outpatient clinics) before publication of the EU guidelines (2007 - 2010) and adherence to the guidelines after publication (2011 - 2013). All surveillance colonoscopies and examinations with missing data were excluded. A total of 128 969 screening colonoscopies performed by 278 endoscopy units were included. The polyp detection rate was 39.6 % (n = 47 797) and 95.6 % of polyps were resected. Of polyps ≥ 5 mm, 46.0 % were resected using forceps and were therefore not treated in accordance with the guidelines. Forceps polypectomy of lesions 5 - 10 mm and > 10 mm decreased significantly in hospitals after implementation of the guidelines (both P guidelines, and for polyps > 10 mm forceps usage even increased (P guidelines (51.9 % vs. 53.5 %; P = 0.161). This study confirmed the importance of the European guidelines. The inclusion of adequate resection technique as a quality indicator in colorectal cancer screening programs is recommended. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Facilitating pre-operative assessment guidelines representation using SNOMED CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadian, Leila; Cornet, Ronald; de Keizer, Nicolette F

    2010-12-01

    To investigate whether SNOMED CT covers the terms used in pre-operative assessment guidelines, and if necessary, how the measured content coverage can be improved. Pre-operative assessment guidelines were retrieved from the websites of (inter)national anesthesia-related societies. The recommendations in the guidelines were rewritten to "IF condition THEN action" statements to facilitate data extraction. Terms were extracted from the IF-THEN statements and mapped to SNOMED CT. Content coverage was measured by using three scores: no match, partial match and complete match. Non-covered concepts were evaluated against the SNOMED CT editorial documentation. From 6 guidelines, 133 terms were extracted, of which 71% (n=94) completely matched with SNOMED CT concepts. Disregarding the vague concepts in the included guidelines SNOMED CT's content coverage was 89%. Of the 39 non-completely covered concepts, 69% violated at least one of SNOMED CT's editorial principles or rules. These concepts were categorized based on four categories: non-reproducibility, classification-derived phrases, numeric ranges, and procedures categorized by complexity. Guidelines include vague terms that cannot be well supported by terminological systems thereby hampering guideline-based decision support systems. This vagueness reduces the content coverage of SNOMED CT in representing concepts used in the pre-operative assessment guidelines. Formalization of the guidelines using SNOMED CT is feasible but to optimize this, first the vagueness of some guideline concepts should be resolved and a few currently missing but relevant concepts should be added to SNOMED CT. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Expert Consensus Contouring Guidelines for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Esophageal and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Abraham J., E-mail: wua@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Chang, Daniel T. [Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Hong, Theodore S. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Jabbour, Salma K. [Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Kleinberg, Lawrence R. [Johns Hopkins Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Mamon, Harvey J. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health & Sciences University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Goodman, Karyn A. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose/Objective(s): Current guidelines for esophageal cancer contouring are derived from traditional 2-dimensional fields based on bony landmarks, and they do not provide sufficient anatomic detail to ensure consistent contouring for more conformal radiation therapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Therefore, we convened an expert panel with the specific aim to derive contouring guidelines and generate an atlas for the clinical target volume (CTV) in esophageal or gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Methods and Materials: Eight expert academically based gastrointestinal radiation oncologists participated. Three sample cases were chosen: a GEJ cancer, a distal esophageal cancer, and a mid-upper esophageal cancer. Uniform computed tomographic (CT) simulation datasets and accompanying diagnostic positron emission tomographic/CT images were distributed to each expert, and the expert was instructed to generate gross tumor volume (GTV) and CTV contours for each case. All contours were aggregated and subjected to quantitative analysis to assess the degree of concordance between experts and to generate draft consensus contours. The panel then refined these contours to generate the contouring atlas. Results: The κ statistics indicated substantial agreement between panelists for each of the 3 test cases. A consensus CTV atlas was generated for the 3 test cases, each representing common anatomic presentations of esophageal cancer. The panel agreed on guidelines and principles to facilitate the generalizability of the atlas to individual cases. Conclusions: This expert panel successfully reached agreement on contouring guidelines for esophageal and GEJ IMRT and generated a reference CTV atlas. This atlas will serve as a reference for IMRT contours for clinical practice and prospective trial design. Subsequent patterns of failure analyses of clinical datasets using these guidelines may require modification in the future.

  10. Guidelines for Conducting Socially Valid Systematic Preference Assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohrmann-O'Rourke, Sharon; Browder, Diane M.; Brown, Fredda

    2000-01-01

    This paper translates research findings on systematic preference assessment with individuals with nonsymbolic or limited symbolic communication skills into guidelines for planning such assessments to reduce the risk of missing or misinterpreting the person's preferences. It offers four questions for guiding the planning of preference assessments,…

  11. Swiss clinical practice guidelines on field cancerization of the skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofbauer, Günther; Anliker, Mark; Boehncke, Wolf-Henning; Brand, Christoph; Braun, Ralph; Gaide, Olivier; Hafner, Jürg; Hunger, Robert; Itin, Peter; Kaeuper, Gina; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Mainetti, Carlo; Streit, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) affects millions of people worldwide, and its prevalence continues to increase. AK lesions are caused by chronic ultraviolet radiation exposure, and the presence of two or more AK lesions along with photodamage should raise the consideration of a diagnosis of field cancerization. Effective treatment of individual lesions as well as field cancerization is essential for good long-term outcomes. The Swiss Registry of Actinic Keratosis Treatment (REAKT) Working Group has developed clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of field cancerization in patients who present with AK. These guidelines are intended to serve as a resource for physicians as to the most appropriate treatment and management of AK and field cancerization based on current evidence and the combined practical experience of the authors. Treatment of AK and field cancerization should be driven by consideration of relevant patient, disease, and treatment factors, and appropriate treatment decisions will differ from patient to patient. Prevention measures and screening recommendations are discussed, and special considerations related to management of immunocompromised patients are provided.

  12. Adherence patterns to National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines for referral to cancer genetic professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febbraro, Terri; Robison, Katina; Wilbur, Jennifer Scalia; Laprise, Jessica; Bregar, Amy; Lopes, Vrishali; Legare, Robert; Stuckey, Ashley

    2015-07-01

    Genetic predisposition is responsible for 5-10% of breast cancer, 10% of ovarian cancer and 2-5% of uterine cancer. The study objective was to compare genetic counseling and testing referral rates among women with breast cancer that met NCCN referral guidelines to the referral rates among women with gynecologic cancers and determine predictors of referral. Utilizing an institutional tumor registry database, patients from an academic women's oncology program were identified who met a subset of NCCN guidelines for genetic referral between 2004 and 2010. Patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer, breast cancer ≤50years of age, or uterine cancer genetic referral and uptake of genetic testing. 820 women were included (216 uterine, 314 breast, and 290 ovarian cancer). The overall genetic referral rate was 21.7%. 34% of eligible breast cancer patients were referred compared to 13.4% of uterine cancer and 14.5% of ovarian cancer patients (pcancer diagnosis, family history and earlier stage were all significant referral predictors. The odds of being referred increased with the number of affected family members. 70.8% of referred patients, consulted with genetics. Among those who consulted with genetics, 95.2% underwent testing. Although increasing, genetic counseling remains underutilized across cancer diagnosis. Women with breast cancer are more likely to be referred than women with gynecologic cancers. Younger age, earlier stage and positive family history appear to be predictive of referral for genetic evaluation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Financial Relationships With Industry Among National Comprehensive Cancer Network Guideline Authors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Aaron P; Basch, Ethan M; Dusetzina, Stacie B

    2016-12-01

    Financial conflicts of interest (FCOIs) among authors of clinical practice guidelines have the potential to influence treatment recommendations. To quantify FCOIs with industry among authors of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines. We assessed FCOIs occurring during 2014 among NCCN guideline authors in the United States. All were physician members of the NCCN guideline committees for lung, breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer as of the end of 2014. The data source for FCOIs was Open Payments, which is publically reported by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. This study was cross-sectional. The proportion of NCCN authors having FCOIs with industry; the average amount received from industry sources per author. Of 125 guideline authors, 108 (86%) had at least 1 reported FCOI. Authors received an average of $10 011 (range, $0-$106 859) in general payments (GPs), which include consulting, meals, lodging, and similar transfers of value, and $236 066 (range $0-$2 756 713) in industry research payments (RPs), including funding associated with clinical trials. Approximately 84% of authors received GPs, while 47% received RPs. Eight (6%) had FCOIs in excess of the $50 000 net and/or $20 000 single-company maximums stipulated by NCCN. Among NCCN guideline authors, FCOIs involving RPs were of greater value, while those involving GPs were more prevalent. Although FCOIs may result from engaging in important scholarship, FCOIs may still influence guideline authors in counterproductive ways. Research is needed to understand how best to manage author FCOIs during guideline creation.

  14. Trends in the receipt of guideline care and survival for women with ovarian cancer: A population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Joan L; Harlan, Linda C; Trimble, Edward L; Stevens, Jennifer; Grimes, Melvin; Cronin, Kathleen A

    2017-06-01

    We assessed trends in the receipt of guideline care and 2-year cause-specific survival for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer. This retrospective cohort analysis used National Cancer Institute's Patterns of Care studies data for women diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2002 and 2011 (weighted n=6427). Data included patient characteristics, treatment type, and provider characteristics. We used logistic regression to evaluate the association of year of diagnosis with receipt of guideline surgery, multiagent chemotherapy, or both. Two-year cause-specific survival, 2002-2013, was assessed using SEER data. The adjusted rate of women who received stage-appropriate surgery, 48%, was unchanged from 2002 to 2011. Gynecologic oncologist (GO) consultations increased from 43% (2002) to 78% (2011). GO consultation was a significant predictor for receipt of guideline care, although only 40% of women who saw a GO received guideline surgery and chemotherapy. The percent of women who received guideline surgery and chemotherapy increased significantly from 32% in 2002 to 37% in 2011. From 2002 to 2011, 2-year cause-specific ovarian cancer survival was unchanged for Stages I-III cancers, with slight improvement for Stage IV cancers. Receipt of guideline care has improved modestly from 2002-2011 for women with ovarian cancer. Current treatment is far below clinical recommendations and may explain limited improvement in 2-year cause-specific survival. Most women consulted a GO in 2011 yet did not receive guideline care. There needs to be a better understanding of the decision-making process about treatment during the consultation with GOs and other factors precluding receipt of guideline care. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Inequity in Access to Guideline-Recommended Colorectal Cancer Treatment in Nova Scotia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddison, André R.; Asada, Yukiko; Urquhart, Robin; Johnston, Grace; Burge, Frederick; Porter, Geoff

    2012-01-01

    Cancer continues to be one of the heaviest burdens of disease in Canada, and assessing potential inequities in access to cancer care may serve as a barometer of the health of Canadian health systems. This study tackled three limitations of the current literature by clearly differentiating between inequality and inequity, by assessing inequity in receipt of care and wait times for care, and by taking advantage of inequity indices to enhance comparability of inequities between studies and populations. We measured income-, age-, sex- and distance-related inequities among colorectal cancer (CRC) patients in Nova Scotia by accounting for clinical guidelines and patient need. Results reveal statistically significant inequity in access to chemotherapy and radiotherapy for CRC by age, sex and distance, but not income. This study demonstrates the importance of carefully examining inequity in access to cancer care and highlights one method to report and compare inequities with conceptual clarity. PMID:23968617

  16. Guidelines for a Scientific Approach to Critical Thinking Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensley, D. Alan; Murtagh, Michael P.

    2012-01-01

    Assessment of student learning outcomes can be a powerful tool for improvement of instruction when a scientific approach is taken; unfortunately, many educators do not take full advantage of this approach. This article examines benefits of taking a scientific approach to critical thinking assessment and proposes guidelines for planning,…

  17. [Guideline thyroid cancer including diagnostics of the nodule].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Links, Thera P; de Heide, L J M Loek; Janssen, Marcel; van Nederveen, Francien H; van der Lugt, Aad; Vriens, Menno R; Smit, Johannes W A

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid cancer is comparatively rare. Thyroid nodules, on the other hand, are frequently diagnosed as a result of increasing use of diagnostic imaging. Cytological investigation of small nodules that have been found by chance often reveals micropapillary carcinoma that is probably not clinically relevant. The new guideline 'Thyroid cancer' advises that cytological investigation of these non-palpable, incidentally discovered thyroid nodules should only be performed on indication. The standard treatment for patients with papillary or follicular thyroid cancer consists of thyroidectomy followed by, if indicated, lymph-node dissection, ablation therapy with radioactive iodine and TSH-suppression. The extent of this treatment is determined on the basis of known prognostic factors and the results of initial treatment. Targeted systemic therapy is available for patients with metastatic progressive disease. There is more focus on the effects of short- and long-term treatment, in order to optimise quality of life.

  18. Updated guidelines on the preoperative staging of thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hye Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Kyungpook National University Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-10-15

    Recent studies have provided prognostic information and recommendations for staging thyroid cancers that have changed the staging and management guidelines for the disease. Consequently, minimal extrathyroidal extension (ETE) was removed from the T3 stage classification in the eighth edition of the TNM staging system by the American Joint Committee on Cancer. New T categories have been subsequently added, including T3a, defined as a tumor >4 cm in its greatest dimension, limited to the thyroid gland, and T3b, defined as a tumor of any size with gross ETE invading only the strap muscles. In this article, the author reviews the changes in the TNM staging system for thyroid cancer, with an emphasis on ultrasonography in preoperative staging.

  19. Genetic heterogeneity in HER2 testing in breast cancer: panel summary and guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Gail H; Barry, Todd S; Bloom, Kenneth J; Fitzgibbons, Patrick L; Hicks, David G; Jenkins, Robert B; Persons, Diane L; Tubbs, Raymond R; Hammond, M Elizabeth H

    2009-04-01

    Intratumoral heterogeneity of HER2 gene amplification has been well documented and represents subclonal diversity within the tumor. The reported incidence of intratumor HER2 amplification genetic heterogeneity ranges in the literature from approximately 5% to 30%. The presence of HER2 genetic heterogeneity may increase subjectivity in HER2 interpretation by the pathologist. To define HER2 genetic heterogeneity and to provide practice guidelines for examining and reporting breast tumors with genetic heterogeneity for improvement of HER2 testing in breast cancer. We convened an expert panel to discuss HER2 gene amplification testing by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Components addressed included a definition of HER2 amplification heterogeneity, practice guidelines for examination of the tissue, and reporting criteria for this analysis. Genetic heterogeneity for amplification of HER2 gene status in invasive breast cancer is defined and guidelines established for assessing and reporting HER2 results in these cases. These guidelines are additive to and expand those published in 2007 by the American Society of Clinical Oncology and the College of American Pathologists. Standardized methods for analysis will improve the accuracy and consistency of interpretation of HER2 gene amplification status in breast cancer.

  20. 42 CFR 81.23 - Guidelines for cancers for which primary site is unknown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Guidelines for cancers for which primary site is... Estimate Probability of Causation § 81.23 Guidelines for cancers for which primary site is unknown. (a) In claims for which the primary cancer site cannot be determined, but a site of metastasis is known, DOL...

  1. An audit comparing the reporting of staging MRI scans for rectal cancer with the London Cancer Alliance (LCA) guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, M R S; Shanmuganandan, A P; Rasheed, S; Tekkis, P; Brown, G; Abulafi, A M

    2017-11-01

    This article focuses on the audit and assessment of clinical practice before and after introduction of MRI reporting guidelines. Standardised proforma based reporting may improve quality of MRI reports. Uptake of the use may be facilitated by endorsement from regional and national cancer organisations. This audit was divided into 2 phases. MRI reports issued between April 2014 and June 2014 were included in the first part of our audit. Phase II included MRI reports issued between April 2015 and June 2015. 14 out of 15 hospitals that report MRI scans in the LCA responded to our audit proposal. The completion rate of key MRI metrics/metrics was better in proforma compared to prose reports both before (98% vs 73%; p < 0.05) and after introduction of the guidelines (98% vs 71%; p < 0.05). There was an approximate doubling of proforma reporting after the introduction of guidelines and workshop interventions (39% vs 65%; p < 0.05). Evaluation of locally advanced cancers (tumours extending to or beyond the circumferential resection margin) for beyond TME surgery was reported in 3% of prose reports vs. 42% in proformas. Incorporation of standardised reporting in official guidelines improved the uptake of proforma based reporting. Proforma based reporting captured more MRI reportable items compared to prose summaries, before and after the implementation of guidelines. MRI reporting of advanced cancers for beyond TME surgery falls short of acceptable standards but is more detailed in proforma based reports. Further work to improve completion especially in beyond TME reporting is required. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  2. ACG Clinical Guideline: Genetic Testing and Management of Hereditary Gastrointestinal Cancer Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syngal, Sapna; Brand, Randall E.; Church, James M.; Giardiello, Francis M.; Hampel, Heather L.; Burt, Randall W.

    2015-01-01

    This guideline presents recommendations for the management of patients with hereditary gastrointestinal cancer syndromes. The initial assessment is the collection of a family history of cancers and premalignant gastrointestinal conditions and should provide enough information to develop a preliminary determination of the risk of a familial predisposition to cancer. Age at diagnosis and lineage (maternal and/or paternal) should be documented for all diagnoses, especially in first- and second-degree relatives. When indicated, genetic testing for a germline mutation should be done on the most informative candidate(s) identified through the family history evaluation and/or tumor analysis to confirm a diagnosis and allow for predictive testing of at-risk relatives. Genetic testing should be conducted in the context of pre- and post-test genetic counseling to ensure the patient's informed decision making. Patients who meet clinical criteria for a syndrome as well as those with identified pathogenic germline mutations should receive appropriate surveillance measures in order to minimize their overall risk of developing syndrome-specific cancers. This guideline specifically discusses genetic testing and management of Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis (AFAP), MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP), Peutz–Jeghers syndrome, juvenile polyposis syndrome, Cowden syndrome, serrated (hyperplastic) polyposis syndrome, hereditary pancreatic cancer, and hereditary gastric cancer. PMID:25645574

  3. Assessing Visualization: An analysis of Chilean teachers’ guidelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andrade-Molina, Melissa; Díaz, Leonora

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to argue on how visualization is recommended, by official curricular guidelines, to be assessed in schools. We contend that spatial abilities have been granted with the status of a key element to improve students’ performances by research and also by policy makers. Howeve...... do not help teachers while assessing visualization in schools; rather its focus is embedded in a tradition of training that leads to a reduction of space.......The aim of this paper is to argue on how visualization is recommended, by official curricular guidelines, to be assessed in schools. We contend that spatial abilities have been granted with the status of a key element to improve students’ performances by research and also by policy makers. However......, this importance seems to fade when it comes to assessing students while learning school mathematics and geometry. We conducted an analysis of the official guidelines for the assessment school mathematics in Chile. The analysis of two of those guides is considered here. The results revealed that these guidelines...

  4. Evidence-based physical activity guidelines for cancer survivors: Current guidelines, knowledge gaps and future research directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buffart, L.M.; Galvao, D.A.; Brug, J.; Chin A Paw, M.J.M.; Newton, R.U.

    2014-01-01

    Physical activity during and after cancer treatment has beneficial effects on a number of physical and psychosocial outcomes. This paper aims to discuss the existing physical activity guidelines for cancer survivors and to describe future research directions to optimize prescriptions. Studies on

  5. Compliance with adjuvant treatment guidelines in endometrial cancer: room for improvement in high risk patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggink, F A; Mom, C H; Boll, D; Ezendam, N P M; Kruitwagen, R F P M; Pijnenborg, J M A; van der Aa, M A; Nijman, H W

    2017-08-01

    Compliance of physicians with guidelines has emerged as an important indicator for quality of care. We evaluated compliance of physicians with adjuvant therapy guidelines for endometrial cancer patients in the Netherlands in a population-based cohort over a period of 10years. Data from all patients diagnosed with endometrial cancer between 2005 and 2014, without residual tumor after surgical treatment, were extracted from the Netherlands Cancer Registry (N=14,564). FIGO stage, grade, tumor type and age were used to stratify patients into risk groups. Possible changes in compliance over time and impact of compliance on survival were assessed. Patients were stratified into low/low-intermediate (52%), high-intermediate (21%) and high (20%) risk groups. Overall compliance with adjuvant therapy guidelines was 85%. Compliance was highest in patients with low/low-intermediate risk (98%, no adjuvant therapy indicated). The lowest compliance was determined in patients with high risk (61%, external beam radiotherapy with/without chemotherapy indicated). Within this group compliance decreased from 64% in 2005-2009 to 57% in 2010-2014. In high risk patients with FIGO stage III serous disease compliance was 55% (chemotherapy with/without radiotherapy indicated) and increased from 41% in 2005-2009 to 66% in 2010-2014. While compliance of physicians with adjuvant therapy guidelines is excellent in patients with low and low-intermediate risk, there is room for improvement in high risk endometrial cancer patients. Eagerly awaited results of ongoing randomized clinical trials may provide more definitive guidance regarding adjuvant therapy for high risk endometrial cancer patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Brachytherapy guideline in prostate cancer (high and low dose rate)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanna, Samir Abdallah; Pimentel, Leonardo [Sociedade Brasileira de Radioterapia (SBR), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-04-15

    Through the elaboration of seven relevant clinical questions related to the proposed theme, we sought to present the main evidences regarding safety, toxicity and effectiveness of the presented radiotherapy (RT) techniques. The study population consisted of male patients of all ages with early primary prostate cancer and candidates for treatment with curative intent. For this, a systematic review of the literature was carried out in primary scientific databases (MEDLINE - PubMed; Embase - Elsevier; LILACS - BIREME; Cochrane Library -Record of Controlled Trials). All articles available through February 22, 2015 were considered. The search strategy used in MEDLINE searches is described in Appendix 1. The articles were selected based on critical evaluation, seeking the best evidence available. The recommendations were elaborated from discussions held with a drafting group composed of four members of the Brazilian Society of Radiotherapy. The guideline was reviewed by an independent group, which specializes in evidence-based clinical guidelines. After completion, the guideline was released for public consultation for 15 days; the suggestions obtained were forwarded to the authors for evaluation and possible insertion in the final text. (author)

  7. Cancer and contraception. Release date May 2012. SFP Guideline #20121.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ashlesha; Schwarz, E Bimla

    2012-09-01

    As a result of advances in cancer diagnosis and treatment, young women within the reproductive-aged group are now more likely to survive cancer. Reproductive-aged women with cancer may be interested in deferring pregnancy either temporarily or permanently at cancer diagnosis, during therapy or after treatment. Currently, there are limited guidelines to aide clinicians in managing the contraceptive needs in this special population. After reviewing the evidence regarding the safety and efficacy of available methods of contraception for women who have been diagnosed with cancer, the Society of Family Planning recommends that women of childbearing age who are being treated for cancer avoid combined hormonal contraceptive methods (containing estrogen and progestin) when possible because they may further increase the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) (Level A). The copper T380A intrauterine device, a highly effective, reversible, long-acting, hormone-free method, should be considered the first-line contraceptive option for women with a history of breast cancer (Level A), although for women being treated with tamoxifen, the levonorgestrel-containing intrauterine system (IUS) which decreases endometrial proliferation may be preferable (Level B). Women who develop anemia may benefit from use of a progestin-containing contraceptive (Level A). Women who develop osteopenia or osteoporosis following chemotherapy should avoid the progestin-only contraceptive injection (Level B). More information is needed in many areas. There are insufficient data to evaluate the risk of VTE when progestin-only contraceptives are used by women at high risk of VTE. Information is also needed on whether the levonorgestrel-containing IUS affects the risk of breast cancer recurrence and whether hormonal contraceptives affect the risk of breast cancer among women who have received chest wall, or "mantle field," radiation. Finally, studies of the safety and effectiveness of IUS use by women who are

  8. Oncology medications prescription in a cancer service: appropriateness to clinical practice guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Palchik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess prescription of oncology medications in municipal public health network of Rosario for its appropriateness to clinical practice guidelines. Methods: Descriptive pharmacoepidemiological study in adult patients in an Oncology Service between January and June 2012. Compliance requirements with clinical practice guidelines were evaluated. Results: 51.8% of diagnoses had at least one prescription medication that did not match recommendation by at least one of the guides considered. Prescriptions of doxorrubicine and ifosfamide did not agree with the recommendation of any reference guides. 5.4% of prescriptions weren´t considered by local guides, nor 7.7% by national on es. Regarding comparison with international guidelines: 4.2% of prescriptions weren ´t considered by the European Society for Medical Oncology guidelines, 2.3% not considered by the American Cancer Society and only 1.9% were not considered by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network ones. Conclusions: Prescription of oncology treatments is closer to international reference guides. One reason could be that there is still no standard definition in the management of tumor diseases by the National State.

  9. Institutional review of compliance with NCCN guidelines for breast cancer: lessons learned from real-time multidimensional synoptic reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegboyega, Titilayo O; Landercasper, Jeffrey; Linebarger, Jared H; Johnson, Jeanne M; Andersen, Jeremiah J; Dietrich, Leah L; Driscoll, Collin D; Raghavendra, Meghana; Madadi, Anusha R; Al-Hamadani, Mohammed; Vang, Choua A; Marcou, Kristen A; Hudak, Jane; Go, Ronald S

    2015-02-01

    Variations exist in compliance with NCCN Guidelines. Prior reports of adherence to NCCN Guidelines contain limitations because of lack of contemporary review and incomplete listing of reasons for noncompliance. To assess institutional compliance and assist national quality improvement strategies through identifying valid reasons for noncompliance. Compliance with NCCN Guidelines was recorded prospectively using electronic synoptic templates for patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer treated at a single institution between January 2010 and December 2011. Compliance with NCCN Guidelines was recorded. The accuracy of real-time synoptic auditing methods compared with retrospective chart review and reasons for noncompliance was assessed. SAS 9.3 software was used for data analysis. Compliance with NCCN Guidelines among 395 patients was 94% for initial staging evaluation, 97% for surgery, 91% for chemotherapy, 89% for hormone therapy, 91% for radiation therapy, 85% for follow-up, and 100% for determination of estrogen receptor/progesterone receptor and HER2 status. Age, comorbidities, and stage influenced guideline compliance. The most common reasons for noncompliance were patient refusal, patient choice after shared decision-making, and overuse of testing. Synoptic templated reporting was accurate in 97% patients. High compliance with NCCN Guidelines was demonstrated. Reasons for noncompliance were identifiable. Compliance and nonadherence can be evaluated quickly with electronic synoptic reporting. This allows real-time action plans to address quality concerns and aids national risk adjustment for comparison and benchmarking. Copyright © 2015 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  10. Memoranda about Implementation of the Cancer Guidelines and Accompanying Supplemental Guidance - Science Policy Council Cancer Guidelines Implementation Workgroup Communication I and II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memoranda from the Chair of EPA's Science Policy Council to the Science Policy Council and the Science Policy Council Steering Committee regarding Implementation of the Cancer Guidelines and Accompanying Supplemental Guidance.

  11. Assessing Clinical Microbiology Practice Guidelines: American Society for MicrobiologyAd HocCommittee on Evidence-Based Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachamkin, Irving; Kirn, Thomas J; Westblade, Lars F; Humphries, Romney

    2017-11-01

    As part of the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) Evidence-Based Laboratory Medicine Practice Guidelines Committee of the Professional Practice Committee, an ad hoc committee was formed in 2014 to assess guidelines published by the committee using an assessment tool, Appraisal of Guidelines for Research Evaluation II (AGREE II). The AGREE II assessment helps reviewers determine whether published guidelines are robust, transparent, and clear in presenting practice recommendations in a standardized manner. Identifying strengths and weaknesses of practice guidelines by ad hoc assessments helps with improving future guidelines through the participation of key stakeholders. This minireview describes the development of the ad hoc committee and results from their review of several ASM best practices guidelines and a non-ASM practice guideline from the Emergency Nurses Association. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Quality of Cancer Surveillance Clinical Practice Guidelines: Specificity and Consistency of Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkow, Ryan P; Korenstein, Deborah; Yeahia, Rubaya; Bach, Peter B; Baxi, Shrujal S

    2017-05-01

    Primary care clinicians, who are increasingly responsible for caring for the growing population of cancer survivors, may be unfamiliar with appropriate cancer surveillance strategies. Clinical practice guidelines can inform cancer follow-up care and surveillance testing. Vague recommendations and inconsistencies among guidelines can lead to overuse and underuse of health care resources and have a negative impact on cost and quality of survivorship care. To examine the specificity and consistency of recommendations for surveillance after active treatment across cancer guidelines. Retrospective cross-sectional analysis of national cancer guidelines from North America and Europe published since 2010 addressing posttreatment care for survivors of the 9 most common cancers. We categorized surveillance modalities into history and physical examinations, tumor markers, diagnostic procedures (eg, colonoscopy), and imaging. Within each guideline, we classified individual recommendations into 5 categories: (1) risk-based recommendation, (2) recommendation for surveillance, (3) addressed but no clear recommendation, (4) recommendation against surveillance, or (5) cases in which surveillance was not addressed. We reviewed each surveillance recommendation for frequency and a stop date, evaluated consistency among guidelines, and analyzed associations between the organizations proposing the guidelines and recommendation characteristics. Description of guideline recommendations for cancer surveillance. We identified 41 guidelines published between January 1, 2010, and March 1, 2016. Eighty-five percent of guidelines (35) were from professional organizations. Ambiguous recommendations (ie, modality not discussed or discussed without a clear recommendation) were present in 83% of guidelines (34), and 44% (18) recommended against at least 1 test. European guidelines were more likely than North American guidelines to contain ambiguous recommendations (100% vs 68%; P guidelines for

  13. Cancer Risk Prediction and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer prediction models provide an important approach to assessing risk and prognosis by identifying individuals at high risk, facilitating the design and planning of clinical cancer trials, fostering the development of benefit-risk indices, and enabling estimates of the population burden and cost of cancer.

  14. Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... know before using this tool: The Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool was designed for use by doctors and other health providers with their patients. If you are not a health ... your personal risk of colorectal cancer. (Colorectal cancer is another way ...

  15. MINI REVIEW - EPIGENETIC PROCESSES AND CANCER RISK ASSESSMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Guidelines for Carcinogen Risk Assessment encourages the use of mechanistic data in the assessment of human cancer risk at low (environmental) exposure levels. The key events that define a particular mode of action for tumor fo...

  16. American Cancer Society guidelines for breast screening with MRI as an adjunct to mammography.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saslow, D.; Boetes, C.; Burke, W.; Harms, S.; Leach, M.O.; Lehman, C.D.; Morris, E.; Pisano, E.; Schnall, M.; Sener, S.; Smith, R.A.; Warner, E.; Yaffe, M.; Andrews, K.S.; Russell, C.A.

    2007-01-01

    New evidence on breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) screening has become available since the American Cancer Society (ACS) last issued guidelines for the early detection of breast cancer in 2003. A guideline panel has reviewed this evidence and developed new recommendations for women at

  17. Assessing biocomputational modelling in transforming clinical guidelines for osteoporosis management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiel, Rainer; Viceconti, Marco; Stroetmann, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Biocomputational modelling as developed by the European Virtual Physiological Human (VPH) Initiative is the area of ICT most likely to revolutionise in the longer term the practice of medicine. Using the example of osteoporosis management, a socio-economic assessment framework is presented that captures how the transformation of clinical guidelines through VPH models can be evaluated. Applied to the Osteoporotic Virtual Physiological Human Project, a consequent benefit-cost analysis delivers promising results, both methodologically and substantially.

  18. Do patients discussed at a lung cancer multidisciplinary team meeting receive guideline-recommended treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxer, Miriam M; Duggan, Kirsten J; Descallar, Joseph; Vinod, Shalini K

    2016-03-01

    Clinical guidelines provide evidence-based management recommendations to guide practice. This study aimed to evaluate whether patients discussed at a lung cancer multidisciplinary team meeting received guideline-recommended treatment and determine reasons for not receiving guideline-recommended treatment. All new lung cancer patients discussed at the Liverpool/Macarthur lung cancer multidisciplinary team meeting between 1 December 2005 and 31 December 2010 were included. Guideline-recommended treatment was assigned according to pathology, stage and ECOG (Eastern Co-operative Oncology Group) performance status as per the 2004 Australian Lung Cancer Guidelines. This was compared with actual treatment received to determine adherence to guidelines. For those patients who did not receive guideline-recommended treatment, the medical record was reviewed to determine the reason(s) for this. Survival was compared between those who did and did not receive guideline-recommended treatment. 808 new patients were discussed at the multidisciplinary team meeting. Guideline-recommended treatment could not be assigned in 2% of patients due to missing data. 435 patients (54%) received guideline-recommended treatment, and 356 (44%) did not. The most common reasons for not receiving guideline-recommended treatment were a decline in ECOG performance status (24%), large tumor volume precluding radical radiotherapy (17%), comorbidities (15%) and patient preference (13%). Patients less than 70 years who received guideline-recommended treatment had improved survival compared with those who did not. A significant proportion of lung cancer patients did not receive guideline-recommended treatment due to legitimate reasons. Alternative guidelines are needed for patients not suitable for current best practice. Treatment according to guidelines was a predictor for survival. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Critical appraisal guidelines for assessing the quality and impact of user involvement in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David; Foster, Claire; Amir, Ziv; Elliott, Jim; Wilson, Roger

    2010-12-01

    The involvement of service users in the design and conduct of health research has developed significantly in the UK in recent years. Involving service users is now seen as a core component of good research practice for all forms of health research. Given the important role that users have in health research, it is necessary to develop guidelines for their effective involvement. Whilst guidelines are currently being formulated, there remain no criteria with which to assess user involvement in published studies and funding applications. This study offers guidelines for appraising the quality and impact of user involvement in published papers and grant applications. Appraisal guidelines for user involvement have been developed on the basis of available literature and experiences from studies involving cancer patients and carers in the design and conduct of research. Nine appraisal criteria have been developed. Criteria include issues such as 'Is the rationale for involving users clearly demonstrated?', 'Is the level of user involvement appropriate?', 'Is the recruitment strategy appropriate?', and 'Is the nature of training appropriate?' Generating and applying guidelines is vital if the impact of user involvement agenda in health research is to be understood. © 2010 University of Southampton. Health Expectations © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. [Cancer pain management: Systematic review and critical appraisal of clinical practice guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Nicolás, I; Ángel-García, D; Saturno, P J; López-Soriano, F

    2016-01-01

    Although several clinical practice guidelines have been developed in the last decades, cancer pain management is still deficient. The purpose of this work was to carry out a comprehensive and systematic literature review of current clinical practice guidelines on cancer pain management, and critically appraise their methodology and content in order to evaluate their quality and validity to cope with this public health issue. A systematic review was performed in the main databases, using English, French and Spanish as languages, from 2008 to 2013. Reporting and methodological quality was rated with the Appraisal of Guidelines, Research and Evaluation II (AGREE-II) tool, including an inter-rater reliability analysis. Guideline recommendations were extracted and classified into several categories and levels of evidence, aiming to analyse guidelines variability and evidence-based content comprehensiveness. Six guidelines were included. A wide variability was found in both reporting and methodological quality of guidelines, as well as in the content and the level of evidence of their recommendations. The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network guideline was the best rated using AGREE-II, while the Sociedad Española de Oncología Médica guideline was the worst rated. The Ministry of Health Malaysia guideline was the most comprehensive, and the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network guideline was the second one. The current guidelines on cancer pain management have limited quality and content. We recommend Ministry of Health Malaysia and Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network guidelines, whilst Sociedad Española de Oncología Médica guideline still needs to improve. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. EPA`s program for risk assessment guidelines: Quantification issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dourson, M.L. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    The quantitative procedures associated with noncancer risk assessment include reference dose (RfD), benchmark dose, and severity modeling. The RfD, which is part of the EPA risk assessment guidelines, is an estimation of a level that is likely to be without any health risk to sensitive individuals. The RfD requires two major judgments: the first is choice of a critical effect(s) and its No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL); the second judgment is choice of an uncertainty factor. This paper discusses major assumptions and limitations of the RfD model.

  2. Cancer screening in the United States, 2017: A review of current American Cancer Society guidelines and current issues in cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert A; Andrews, Kimberly S; Brooks, Durado; Fedewa, Stacey A; Manassaram-Baptiste, Deana; Saslow, Debbie; Brawley, Otis W; Wender, Richard C

    2017-03-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Each year, the American Cancer Society publishes a summary of its guidelines for early cancer detection, data and trends in cancer screening rates, and select issues related to cancer screening. In this issue of the journal, the authors summarize current American Cancer Society cancer screening guidelines, describe an update of their guideline for using human papillomavirus vaccination for cancer prevention, describe updates in US Preventive Services Task Force recommendations for breast and colorectal cancer screening, discuss interim findings from the UK Collaborative Trial on Ovarian Cancer Screening, and provide the latest data on utilization of cancer screening from the National Health Interview Survey. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:100-121. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  3. Non-melanoma skin cancer: United Kingdom National Multidisciplinary Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newlands, C; Currie, R; Memon, A; Whitaker, S; Woolford, T

    2016-05-01

    This is the official guideline endorsed by the specialty associations involved in the care of head and neck cancer patients in the UK. This paper provides consensus recommendations on the management of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck region on the basis of current evidence. Recommendations • Royal College of Pathologists minimum datasets for NMSC should be adhered to in order to improve patient care and help work-force planning in pathology departments. (G) • Tumour depth is of critical importance in identifying high-risk cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC), and should be reported in all cases. (R) • Appropriate imaging to determine the extent of primary NMSC is indicated when peri-neural involvement or bony invasion is suspected. (R) • In the clinically N0 neck, radiological imaging is not beneficial, and a policy of watchful waiting and patient education can be adopted. (R) • Patients with high-risk NMSC should be treated by members of a skin cancer multidisciplinary team (MDT) in secondary care. (G) • Non-infiltrative basal cell carcinoma (BCC) skin cancer prevention measures. (G) • Patients who have had a single completely excised BCC or low-risk cSCC can be discharged after a single post-operative visit. (G) • Patients with an excised high-risk cSCC should be reviewed three to six monthly for two years, with further annual review depending upon clinical risk. (G) • Those with recurrent or multiple BCCs should be offered annual review. (G).

  4. Literacy analysis of National Comprehensive Cancer Network patient guidelines for the most common malignancies in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Bao Ngoc N; Ruan, Qing Z; Epstein, Sherise; Ricci, Joseph A; Rudd, Rima E; Lee, Bernard T

    2017-11-27

    Cancer information is of critical interest to the public. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) offers a series of comprehensive patient guidelines on the management of the most common cancer diagnoses. This study was aimed at assessing the health literacy demands of NCCN patient guidelines for the most common malignancies in the United States. The American Cancer Society's most common malignancies by annual incidence in the United States and their corresponding NCCN patient guidelines were identified. Four validated tools were used to evaluate literacy levels: 1) the Simple Measure of Gobbledygook, 2) the Peter Mosenthal and Irwin Kirsch readability formula (PMOSE/IKIRSCH), 3) the Patient Education Materials Assessment Tool (PEMAT), and 4) the Clear Communication Index from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The average reading grade level was 10.3, which was higher than the recommended 6th-grade level. The average PMOSE/IKIRSCH score was 11; this corresponded to moderate complexity and required some college-level education for interpretation. Only 1 tool, the PEMAT, yielded scores above the benchmarks for high-quality materials. The PEMAT's understandability, actionability, and overall scores were 94%, 83%, and 91%, respectively. The average CDC index was 85%, which was below the recommended 90% for an appropriate health literacy demand. Overall, the assessment indicates high demand scores for the readability and complexity of the NCCN patient guidelines and thus that the materials are not quite suitable for the general US adult population. Further input from patient focus groups to address appropriateness and usefulness is critical. Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  5. Review of guidance on recurrence risk management for general practitioners in breast cancer, colorectal cancer and melanoma guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spronk, Inge; Korevaar, Joke C; Burgers, Jako S; Albreht, Tit; Schellevis, François G

    2017-04-01

    General practitioners (GPs) will face cancer recurrences more frequently due to the rising number of cancer survivors and greater involvement of GPs in the follow-up care. Currently, GPs are uncertain about managing recurrence risks and may need more guidance. To explore what guidance is available for GPs on managing recurrence risks for breast cancer, colorectal cancer and melanoma, and to examine whether recurrence risk management differs between these tumour types. Breast cancer, colorectal cancer and melanoma clinical practice guidelines were identified via searches on internet and the literature, and experts were approached to identify guidelines. Guidance on recurrence risk management that was (potentially) relevant for GPs was extracted and summarized into topics. We included 24 breast cancer, 21 colorectal cancer and 15 melanoma guidelines. Identified topics on recurrence risk management were rather similar among the three tumour types. The main issue in the guidelines was recurrence detection through consecutive diagnostic testing. Guidelines agree on both routine and nonroutine tests, but, recommended frequencies for follow-up are inconsistent, except for mammography screening for breast cancer. Only six guidelines provided targeted guidance for GPs. This inventory shows that recurrence risk management has overlapping areas between tumour types, making it more feasible for GPs to provide this care. However, few guidance on recurrence risk management is specific for GPs. Recommendations on time intervals of consecutive diagnostic tests are inconsistent, making it difficult for GPs to manage recurrence risks and illustrating the need for more guidance targeted for GPs.

  6. 77 FR 45350 - Notice of Availability of Microbial Risk Assessment Guideline: Pathogenic Microorganisms With...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    ... to develop this guideline. Clear and credible microbial risk assessment methods will leverage limited... this guideline, agencies assessing a similar microbial medium or pathogen are able to more readily... for microbial risk assessment in a wide range of media and scenarios. The MRA Guideline applies to...

  7. Guideline on Muscle-Invasive and Metastatic Bladder Cancer (European Association of Urology Guideline): American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milowsky, Matthew I; Rumble, R Bryan; Booth, Christopher M; Gilligan, Timothy; Eapen, Libni J; Hauke, Ralph J; Boumansour, Pat; Lee, Cheryl T

    2016-06-01

    To endorse the European Association of Urology guideline on muscle-invasive (MIBC) and metastatic bladder cancer. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. The guideline on MIBC and metastatic bladder cancer was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. The ASCO Endorsement Panel then reviewed the content and recommendations. The ASCO Endorsement Panel determined that the recommendations from the European Association of Urology guideline on MIBC and metastatic bladder cancer, published online in March 2015, are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence. ASCO endorses the guideline on MIBC and metastatic bladder cancer and has added qualifying statements, including highlighting the use of chemoradiotherapy for select patients with MIBC and recommending a preference for clinical trials in the treatment of metastatic disease in the second-line setting. Multidisciplinary care for patients with MIBC and metastatic bladder cancer is critical. The standard treatment of MIBC (cT2-T4a N0M0) is neoadjuvant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy followed by radical cystectomy. In cisplatin-ineligible patients, radical cystectomy alone is recommended. Adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy may be offered to high-risk patients who have not received neoadjuvant therapy. Chemoradiotherapy may be offered as an alternative to cystectomy in appropriately selected patients with MIBC and in some patients for whom cystectomy is not an option. Metastatic disease should be treated with cisplatin-containing combination chemotherapy or with carboplatin combination chemotherapy or single agents in patients ineligible for cisplatin.Additional information is available at http://www.asco.org/endorsements/MIBC and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  8. Revised Bethesda Guidelines for Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colorectal Cancer (Lynch Syndrome) and Microsatellite Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Asad; Boland, C. Richard; Terdiman, Jonathan P.; Syngal, Sapna; de la Chapelle, Albert; Rüschoff, Josef; Fishel, Richard; Lindor, Noralane M.; Burgart, Lawrence J.; Hamelin, Richard; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Hiatt, Robert A.; Jass, Jeremy; Lindblom, Annika; Lynch, Henry T.; Peltomaki, Païvi; Ramsey, Scott D.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Vasen, Hans F. A.; Hawk, Ernest T.; Barrett, J. Carl; Freedman, Andrew N.; Srivastava, Sudhir

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), also known as Lynch syndrome, is a common autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by early age at onset, neoplastic lesions, and microsatellite instability (MSI). Because cancers with MSI account for approximately 15% of all colorectal cancers and because of the need for a better understanding of the clinical and histologic manifestations of HNPCC, the National Cancer Institute hosted an international workshop on HNPCC in 1996, which led to the development of the Bethesda Guidelines for the identification of individuals with HNPCC who should be tested for MSI. To consider revision and improvement of the Bethesda Guidelines, another HNPCC workshop was held at the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, MD, in 2002. In this commentary, we summarize the Workshop presentations on HNPCC and MSI testing; present the issues relating to the performance, sensitivity, and specificity of the Bethesda Guidelines; outline the revised Bethesda Guidelines for identifying individuals at risk for HNPCC; and recommend criteria for MSI testing. PMID:14970275

  9. Active Surveillance for the Management of Localized Prostate Cancer (Cancer Care Ontario Guideline): American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ronald C; Rumble, R Bryan; Loblaw, D Andrew; Finelli, Antonio; Ehdaie, Behfar; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Morgan, Scott C; Tyldesley, Scott; Haluschak, John J; Tan, Winston; Justman, Stewart; Jain, Suneil

    2016-06-20

    To endorse Cancer Care Ontario's guideline on Active Surveillance for the Management of Localized Prostate Cancer. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines developed by other professional organizations. The Active Surveillance for the Management of Localized Prostate Cancer guideline was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. The ASCO Endorsement Panel then reviewed the content and the recommendations. The ASCO Endorsement Panel determined that the recommendations from the Active Surveillance for the Management of Localized Prostate Cancer guideline, published in May 2015, are clear, thorough, and based upon the most relevant scientific evidence. ASCO endorsed the Active Surveillance for the Management of Localized Prostate Cancer guideline with added qualifying statements. The Cancer Care Ontario recommendation regarding 5-alpha reductase inhibitors was not endorsed by the ASCO panel. For most patients with low-risk (Gleason score ≤ 6) localized prostate cancer, active surveillance is the recommended disease management strategy. Factors including younger age, prostate cancer volume, patient preference, and ethnicity should be taken into account when making management decisions. Select patients with low-volume, intermediate-risk (Gleason 3 + 4 = 7) prostate cancer may be offered active surveillance. Active surveillance protocols should include prostate-specific antigen testing, digital rectal examinations, and serial prostate biopsies. Ancillary radiologic and genomic tests are investigational but may have a role in patients with discordant clinical and/or pathologic findings. Patients who are reclassified to a higher-risk category (Gleason score ≥ 7) or who have significant increases in tumor volume on subsequent biopsies should be offered active therapy. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  10. The clinical database and implementation of treatment guidelines by the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group in 2007-2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maj-Britt; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke; Offersen, Birgitte V

    2018-01-01

    guidelines for the management of early breast cancer. By use of the clinical DBCG database we analyze the effectiveness of the implementation of guideline revisions in Denmark. METHODS: From the DBCG guidelines we extracted modifications introduced in 2007-2016 and selected examples regarding surgery......, radiotherapy (RT) and systemic treatment. We assessed introduction of modifications from release on the DBCG webpage to change in clinical practice using the DBCG clinical database. RESULTS: Over a 10-year period data from 48,772 patients newly diagnosed with malignant breast tumors were entered into DBCG......'s clinical database and 42,197 of these patients were diagnosed with an invasive carcinoma following breast conserving surgery (BCS) or mastectomy. More than twenty modifications were introduced in the guidelines. Implementations, based on prospectively collected data, varied widely; exemplified with around...

  11. Possible consequences of applying guidelines to healthy women with a family history of breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Asperen, CJ; Tollenaar, RAEM; Krol-Warmerdam, EMM; Blom, Jannet; Hoogendoorn, WE; Seynaeve, CMJC; Brekelmans, CTM; Devilee, P; Cornelisse, CJ; Klijn, JGM; de Bock, GH

    Possible effects of consistently applying published guidelines on healthy women with breast cancer in their family history were analysed. We investigated 1060 unrelated breast cancer patients and calculated the numbers of first-degree relatives that would be referred to a familial cancer clinic if

  12. MASCC/ISOO clinical practice guidelines for the management of mucositis secondary to cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lalla, Rajesh V; Bowen, Joanne; Barasch, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mucositis is a highly significant, and sometimes dose-limiting, toxicity of cancer therapy. The goal of this systematic review was to update the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer and International Society of Oral Oncology (MASCC/ISOO) Clinical Practice Guidelines...... evidence-based management of mucositis secondary to cancer therapy....

  13. 42 CFR 81.25 - Guidelines for claims including two or more primary cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... cancers. 81.25 Section 81.25 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Estimate Probability of Causation § 81.25 Guidelines for claims including two or more primary cancers. For claims including two or more primary cancers, DOL will use NIOSH-IREP to calculate the estimated...

  14. Prostate cancer guidelines on Web 2.0-based sites: the screening dilemma continues online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Daniela B; Koskan, Alexis; Rose, India D

    2011-03-01

    Little is known about prostate cancer (PrCA) screening information on participatory, interactive, and consumer-generated websites collectively referred to as Web 2.0. A content analysis was conducted of PrCA resources on four highly trafficked Web 2.0 social bookmarking sites. A total of 127 webpages were analyzed. Most content was from news websites (48.9%) and blogs (37.8%). PrCA screening was mentioned on 95.3% of pages; only 30.7% discussed the prostate-specific antigen test. Less than half (43.8%) mentioned current screening guidelines. PrCA content is inconsistent on Web 2.0 sites. Future research should assess the readability and usability of Web 2.0 cancer resources.

  15. Systematic review of guidelines for the assessment and management of high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN II/III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, N N; White, D A; Narang, S K; Daniels, I R; Smart, N J

    2016-02-01

    There is ambiguity with regard to the optimal management of anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) III. The aim of this review was to assess and compare international/national society guidelines currently available in the literature on the management, treatment and surveillance of AIN III. We also aimed to assess the quality of the studies used to compile the guidelines and to clarify the terminology used in histological assessment. An electronic search of PubMed and Embase was performed using the search terms 'anal intraepithelial neoplasia', 'AIN', 'anal cancer', 'guidelines', 'surveillance' and 'management'. Literature reviews and guidelines or practice guidelines in peer reviewed journals from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2014 assessing the treatment, surveillance or management of patients with AIN related to human papilloma virus were included. The guidelines identified by the search were assessed for the quality of evidence behind them using the Oxford Centre for Evidence-based Medicine 2011 Levels of Evidence. The database search identified 5159 articles and two further guidelines were sourced from official body guidelines. After inclusion criteria were applied, 28 full-text papers were reviewed. Twenty-five of these were excluded, leaving three guidelines for inclusion in the systematic review: those published by the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland, the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons and the Italian Society of Colorectal Surgery. No guidelines were identified on the management of AIN III from human papilloma virus associations and societies. All three guidelines agree that a high index of clinical suspicion is essential for diagnosing AIN with a disease-specific history, physical examination, digital rectal examination and anal cytology. There is interchange of terminology from high-grade AIN (HGAIN) (which incorporates AIN II/III) and AIN III in the literature leading to confusion in therapy use. Treatment varies

  16. Pragmatic evidence and textual arrangements: a case study of French clinical cancer guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaapen, Loes; Cazeneuve, Hervé; Cambrosio, Alberto; Castel, Patrick; Fervers, Beatrice

    2010-08-01

    Both critics and supporters of evidence-based medicine view clinical practice guidelines as an important component of this self-defined "new paradigm" whose goal is to rationalize medicine by grounding clinical decision-making in a careful assessment of the medical literature. We present an analysis of the debates within a guideline development group (GDG) that led to the drafting, revision and publication of a French cancer guideline. Our ethnographic approach focuses on the various aspects of the dispositif (or apparatus) that defines the nature and roles of participants, procedures, topics and resources within the GDG. Debates between GDG members are framed (but not dictated) by procedural and methodological rules as well as by the reflexive critical contributions of the GDG members themselves, who justify their (tentative) recommendations by relating to its (possible or intended) audiences. Guideline production work cannot be reduced to an exchange of arguments and to consensus-seeking between pre-defined professional interests. It is about the production of a text in the material sense of the term, i.e. as a set of sentences, paragraphs, statements and formulations that GDG members constantly readjust and rearrange until closure is achieved. As such, guidelines partake in the emergence and stabilization of a new configuration of biomedical knowledge and practices grounded in the establishment of mutually constitutive links between two processes: on the one hand, the re-formatting of clinical trials into a device for producing carefully monitored evidence statements targeting specific populations and clinical indications and, on the other hand, the increasingly pervasive role of regulatory processes. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. 2015 American Thyroid Association Management Guidelines for Adult Patients with Thyroid Nodules and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: The American Thyroid Association Guidelines Task Force on Thyroid Nodules and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Erik K.; Bible, Keith C.; Doherty, Gerard M.; Mandel, Susan J.; Nikiforov, Yuri E.; Pacini, Furio; Randolph, Gregory W.; Sawka, Anna M.; Schlumberger, Martin; Schuff, Kathryn G.; Sherman, Steven I.; Sosa, Julie Ann; Steward, David L.; Tuttle, R. Michael; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Background: Thyroid nodules are a common clinical problem, and differentiated thyroid cancer is becoming increasingly prevalent. Since the American Thyroid Association's (ATA's) guidelines for the management of these disorders were revised in 2009, significant scientific advances have occurred in the field. The aim of these guidelines is to inform clinicians, patients, researchers, and health policy makers on published evidence relating to the diagnosis and management of thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer. Methods: The specific clinical questions addressed in these guidelines were based on prior versions of the guidelines, stakeholder input, and input of task force members. Task force panel members were educated on knowledge synthesis methods, including electronic database searching, review and selection of relevant citations, and critical appraisal of selected studies. Published English language articles on adults were eligible for inclusion. The American College of Physicians Guideline Grading System was used for critical appraisal of evidence and grading strength of recommendations for therapeutic interventions. We developed a similarly formatted system to appraise the quality of such studies and resultant recommendations. The guideline panel had complete editorial independence from the ATA. Competing interests of guideline task force members were regularly updated, managed, and communicated to the ATA and task force members. Results: The revised guidelines for the management of thyroid nodules include recommendations regarding initial evaluation, clinical and ultrasound criteria for fine-needle aspiration biopsy, interpretation of fine-needle aspiration biopsy results, use of molecular markers, and management of benign thyroid nodules. Recommendations regarding the initial management of thyroid cancer include those relating to screening for thyroid cancer, staging and risk assessment, surgical management, radioiodine remnant ablation and therapy

  18. 2015 American Thyroid Association Management Guidelines for Adult Patients with Thyroid Nodules and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: The American Thyroid Association Guidelines Task Force on Thyroid Nodules and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Bryan R; Alexander, Erik K; Bible, Keith C; Doherty, Gerard M; Mandel, Susan J; Nikiforov, Yuri E; Pacini, Furio; Randolph, Gregory W; Sawka, Anna M; Schlumberger, Martin; Schuff, Kathryn G; Sherman, Steven I; Sosa, Julie Ann; Steward, David L; Tuttle, R Michael; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid nodules are a common clinical problem, and differentiated thyroid cancer is becoming increasingly prevalent. Since the American Thyroid Association's (ATA's) guidelines for the management of these disorders were revised in 2009, significant scientific advances have occurred in the field. The aim of these guidelines is to inform clinicians, patients, researchers, and health policy makers on published evidence relating to the diagnosis and management of thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer. The specific clinical questions addressed in these guidelines were based on prior versions of the guidelines, stakeholder input, and input of task force members. Task force panel members were educated on knowledge synthesis methods, including electronic database searching, review and selection of relevant citations, and critical appraisal of selected studies. Published English language articles on adults were eligible for inclusion. The American College of Physicians Guideline Grading System was used for critical appraisal of evidence and grading strength of recommendations for therapeutic interventions. We developed a similarly formatted system to appraise the quality of such studies and resultant recommendations. The guideline panel had complete editorial independence from the ATA. Competing interests of guideline task force members were regularly updated, managed, and communicated to the ATA and task force members. The revised guidelines for the management of thyroid nodules include recommendations regarding initial evaluation, clinical and ultrasound criteria for fine-needle aspiration biopsy, interpretation of fine-needle aspiration biopsy results, use of molecular markers, and management of benign thyroid nodules. Recommendations regarding the initial management of thyroid cancer include those relating to screening for thyroid cancer, staging and risk assessment, surgical management, radioiodine remnant ablation and therapy, and thyrotropin suppression

  19. A prospective study of 100 cases of penile cancer managed according to European Association of Urology guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegarty, Paul K; Kayes, Oliver; Freeman, Alex; Christopher, Nim; Ralph, David J; Minhas, Suks

    2006-09-01

    To prospectively assess the outcome of patients treated according to the European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines on the management of penile cancer, a system originally based on retrospective series. Between 2002 and 2005, 100 consecutive patients (median age 62 years) with penile cancer were treated at one institution; all were categorized and treated according to EAU guidelines. Data were analysed using the z-test, with significance defined as P 12 months of follow-up (mean 29); the survival of the whole group was 92%. Of men with palpable nodes, 72% had lymph node involvement, whereas 18% of those with impalpable nodes who had lymphadenectomy according to the guidelines had lymph node disease. The grade of the primary tumour was more predictive than T stage for lymph node involvement and survival. The 3-year disease-specific survival for N0, N1 and N2 disease was 100%, 100% and 73%, respectively, and survival at 12 months for N3 disease was 67%. The median survival for those with metastases was 3 months. The overall survival of men with penile cancer is high, with a clear benefit for early lymphadenectomy in men with positive nodal disease. However, the current EAU guidelines are limited in predicting those patients with micrometastatic disease, with the result that 82% of patients undergo unnecessary prophylactic lymphadenectomy. There is a need to identify more accurate molecular markers for predicting lymph node disease, or the role of novel staging techniques must be assessed.

  20. Chemotherapy for bladder cancer: treatment guidelines for neoadjuvant chemotherapy, bladder preservation, adjuvant chemotherapy, and metastatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternberg, Cora N; Donat, S Machele; Bellmunt, Joaquim

    2007-01-01

    chemotherapy. Systemic cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy is the only current modality that has been shown in phase 3 trials to improve survival in responsive patients with advanced urothelial cancer. A panel of international experts has formulated grade A through D recommendations for the management......To determine the optimal use of chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and metastatic setting in patients with advanced urothelial cell carcinoma, a consensus conference was convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Société Internationale d'Urologie (SIU) to critically review...... the published literature on chemotherapy for patients with locally advanced bladder cancer. This article reports the development of international guidelines for the treatment of patients with locally advanced bladder cancer with neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapy. Bladder preservation is also discussed...

  1. Does adherence to National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines improve pain-related outcomes? An evaluation of inpatient cancer pain management at an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearis, Michael; Shega, Joseph W; Knoebel, Randall W

    2014-09-01

    Evidence-based guidelines are in place for the management of cancer-related pain, yet adherence remains problematic throughout health systems because of efficacy and safety concerns. To evaluate adherence to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines on pain management among cancer inpatients and assess whether adherence is associated with pain control. A retrospective chart review of patients admitted to the hematology/oncology service at an academic medical center between April 1, 2011 and September 30, 2011 was conducted, and patients were allocated into groups based on adherence to NCCN guidelines. Pain control and safety outcomes were compared between adherence groups for the first 24 hours of hospital admission. Multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of regimens nonadherent to guidelines and predictors of inadequate achievement of analgesia. Among a random sample of 193 inpatients, 109 met the inclusion criteria of which 70 were guideline adherent and 39 nonadherent. A total of 63% of the patients initiated on NCCN adherent guidelines obtained analgesia at 24 hours compared with 41% in the nonadherent group (P=0.028). Average pain scores across the 24-hour period were lower in the adherent compared with the nonadherent group (3.5 vs. 4.4, respectively, P<0.001). Naloxone use, respiratory depression, and hypoxia did not significantly vary between adherence groups. Chronic home opioid exposure was significantly associated with nonadherent therapy (vs. adherent; odds ratio=3.04, confidence interval=1.28-7.18, P=0.01) and achievement of analgesia at 24 hours (vs. not; odds ratio=0.30, confidence interval=0.12-0.73, P<0.01). Adherence to NCCN guidelines remains insufficient, with nonadherence being associated with inadequate analgesia. Opioid-tolerant patients remain at higher risk for guideline nonadherence and inadequate analgesia. Quality improvement initiatives should target opioid-tolerant patients. Copyright © 2014

  2. International clinical practice guidelines for the treatment and prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farge, D.; Debourdeau, P.; Beckers, M.; Baglin, C.; Bauersachs, R. M.; Brenner, B.; Brilhante, D.; Falanga, A.; Gerotzafias, G. T.; Haim, N.; Kakkar, A. K.; Khorana, A. A.; Lecumberri, R.; Mandala, M.; Marty, M.; Monreal, M.; Mousa, S. A.; Noble, S.; Pabinger, I.; Prandoni, P.; Prins, M. H.; Qari, M. H.; Streiff, M. B.; Syrigos, K.; Bounameaux, H.; Buller, H. R.

    . Background: Guidelines addressing the management of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in cancer patients are heterogeneous and their implementation has been suboptimal worldwide. Objectives: To establish a common international consensus addressing practical, clinically relevant questions in this

  3. International clinical practice guidelines for the treatment and prophylaxis of venous thromboembolism in patients with cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farge, D.; Debourdeau, P.; Beckers, M.; Baglin, C.; Bauersachs, R. M.; Brenner, B.; Brilhante, D.; Falanga, A.; Gerotzafias, G. T.; Haim, N.; Kakkar, A. K.; Khorana, A. A.; Lecumberri, R.; Mandala, M.; Marty, M.; Monreal, M.; Mousa, S. A.; Noble, S.; Pabinger, I.; Prandoni, P.; Prins, M. H.; Qari, M. H.; Streiff, M. B.; Syrigos, K.; Bounameaux, H.; Büller, H. R.

    2013-01-01

    Guidelines addressing the management of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in cancer patients are heterogeneous and their implementation has been suboptimal worldwide. To establish a common international consensus addressing practical, clinically relevant questions in this setting. An international

  4. Regulatory assessment of proposed accessibility guidelines for pedestrians in the public right-of-way

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-30

    This report assesses the potential costs and benefits of proposed accessibility guidelines issued by the Access Board for pedestrian facilities in the public right-of-way. The report also analyzes the potential impacts of the proposed guidelines on s...

  5. The updated EAU guidelines on muscle-invasive and metastatic bladder cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stenzl, A.; Cowan, N.C.; Santis, M. de; Jakse, G.; Kuczyk, M.A.; Merseburger, A.S.; Ribal, M.J.; Sherif, A.; Witjes, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    CONTEXT: New data regarding diagnosis and treatment of muscle-invasive and metastatic bladder cancer (MiM-BC) has emerged and led to an update of the European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines for MiM-BC. OBJECTIVE: To review the new EAU guidelines for MiM-BC. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: A

  6. Compliance with adjuvant treatment guidelines in endometrial cancer : Room for improvement in high risk patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eggink, F. A.; Mom, C. H.; Boll, D.; Ezendam, N. P. M.; Kruitwagen, R. F. P. M.; Pijnenborg, J. M. A.; van der Aa, M. A.; Nijman, H. W.

    Objectives. Compliance of physicians with guidelines has emerged as an important indicator for quality of care. We evaluated compliance of physicians with adjuvant therapy guidelines for endometrial cancer patients in the Netherlands in a population-based cohort over a period of 10 years. Methods.

  7. Colorectal cancer family history assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patricia Paul

    2011-10-01

    This article describes family history assessment for colorectal cancer in three outpatient gastroenterology units and examines gastroenterology unit nurses' knowledge and attitudes about family history assessments. Eighty-eight colonoscopy records were surveyed, and 16 RNs were interviewed. The medical record documentation was surveyed using a researcher-developed tool to identify type of cancer, age at disease onset, family relationship, and number of family members with cancer. Gastroenterology unit nurses were interviewed to assess knowledge and attitudes about family history assessment regarding colorectal cancer. Findings indicate that limited family history documentation was present in the medical record and that important age-at-disease-onset information was missing in 95% of patients with a family history of colorectal cancer and in 85% of patients with a family history of Lynch syndrome-associated cancers. No documentation was found in any charts about the number of affected relatives within the same family. Inconsistencies in family history documentation within the same medical record were noted, and family history information was found in multiple chart forms. Gastroenterology nurses rated family history as very important but gave a lower rating to personal knowledge about and resources for family history assessment.

  8. Canadian Association of Gastroenterology and the Canadian Digestive Health Foundation: Guidelines on Colon Cancer Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desmond Leddin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent cancer affecting both men and women in Canada. Many of these cancers are preventable, and the Canadian Association of Gastroenterology (CAG and the Canadian Digestive Health Foundation (CDHF strongly support the establishment of screening programs for colorectal cancer. These guidelines discuss a number of screening options, listing the advantages and disadvantages of each. Ultimately, the test that is used for screening should be determined by patient preference, current evidence and local resources.

  9. Development and implementation of guidelines for quality assurance in breast cancer screening: The European experience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence von Karsa

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In Europe, as in many other regions of the world, breast cancer is a major cause of suffering and death. Early detection of breast cancer by systematic mammography screening can find lesions for which treatment is more effective and generally more favourable for quality of life. Comprehensive quality assurance guidelines for breast cancer screening based on mammography have been developed in the Europe Against Cancer programme with the aim of maximising screening benefits while minimising adverse effects, such as unnecessary examination or treatment resulting from false-positive screening tests. The present report provides an overview of the European experience in developing and implementing quality assurance guidelines for breast cancer screening. It highlights implications relevant to those regions of the world in which the burden of breast cancer in the coming years will make population-based screening an option for cancer control.

  10. Aggressive surgery for borderline resectable pancreatic cancer: evaluation of National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Suguru; Fujii, Tsutomu; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Nomoto, Shuji; Takeda, Shin; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Nakao, Akimasa

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the relevance of defining borderline resectable (BR) pancreatic cancer as a distinct entity in the treatment scheme of pancreatic cancer as proposed by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Among 375 patients with pancreatic cancer, 137 patients were deemed to have resectable disease (R) by preoperative imaging studies, whereas 96 were found to have an unresectable disease during surgery. The remaining 142 patients fulfilled the definition of BR and were further classified into 3 subgroups based on the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines: portal vein invasion (PV[+]), common hepatic artery invasion (CHA[+]), and superior mesenteric artery invasion (SMA[+]). PV(+) was subdivided into types B, C, and D according to the degree of portal vein invasion. Patients in the R group had significantly better survival than those in the PV(+) group (P = 0.0038), who in turn survived significantly longer than those classified as SMA(+) (P = 0.041). Type B patients survived significantly longer than did types C and D patients (P = 0.013 and P = 0.030, respectively). In PV(+) patients, compliance with postoperative chemotherapy at 3 and 6 months was 56.9% and 44.6%, respectively, substantially inferior to patients with resectable disease (72.6% and 54.7%, respectively). The optimal treatment strategy may differ among various subgroups within the BR category.

  11. PRACTICE POINTS: Breast cancer guidelines for Uganda | The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breast cancer in Uganda is the third commonest cancer in women coming only next to cancer of the cervix and Kaposi's sarcoma. The incidence of breast cancer in Uganda has doubled from 11:100,000 in 1961 to 22:100,000 in 1995. Unfortunately the cases are often seen in late stages thus the outcome of treatment is ...

  12. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Gastric Cancer in Korea: An Evidence-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Haeng; Jung, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Jung Hoon; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Jeon, Tae Joo; Kim, Joon Mee; Kim, Young Il; Ryu, Keun Won; Kong, Seong-Ho; Kim, Hyoung-Il; Jung, Hwoon-Yong; Kim, Yong Sik; Zang, Dae Young; Cho, Jae Yong; Park, Joon Oh; Lim, Do Hoon; Jung, Eun Sun; Ahn, Hyeong Sik; Kim, Hyun Jung

    2014-01-01

    Although gastric cancer is quite common in Korea, the treatment outcome is relatively favorable compared to those in western countries. However, there are currently no Korean multidisciplinary guidelines for gastric cancer. Experts from related societies developed guidelines de novo to meet Korean circumstances and requirements, including 23 recommendation statements for diagnosis (n=9) and treatment (n=14) based on relevant key questions. The quality of the evidence was rated according to the GRADE evidence evaluation framework: the evidence levels were based on a systematic review of the literature, and the recommendation grades were classified as either strong or weak. The applicability of the guidelines was considered to meet patients' view and preferences in the context of Korea. The topics of the guidelines cover diagnostic modalities (endoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound, and radiologic diagnosis), treatment modalities (surgery, therapeutic endoscopy, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy), and pathologic evaluation. An external review of the guidelines was conducted during the finalization phase. PMID:25061536

  13. European guidelines for quality assurance in colorectal cancer screening and diagnosis. First Edition--Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austoker, J; Giordano, L; Hewitson, P; Villain, P

    2012-09-01

    Multidisciplinary, evidence-based guidelines for quality assurance in colorectal cancer screening and diagnosis have been developed by experts in a project coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. The full guideline document covers the entire process of population-based screening. It consists of 10 chapters and over 250 recommendations, graded according to the strength of the recommendation and the supporting evidence. The 450-page guidelines and the extensive evidence base have been published by the European Commission. The chapter on communication includes 35 graded recommendations. The content of the chapter is presented here to promote international discussion and collaboration by making the principles and standards recommended in the new EU Guidelines known to a wider professional and scientific community. Following these recommendations has the potential to enhance the control of colorectal cancer through improvement in the quality and effectiveness of screening programmes and services. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Cancer Fatalism and Preferred Sources of Cancer Information: an Assessment Using 2012 HINTS Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinky, Tassnym H; Faith, Jennifer; Lindly, Olivia; Thorburn, Sheryl

    2018-02-01

    Cancer fatalism is associated with lower participation in cancer screening, nonadherence to cancer screening guidelines, and avoidance of medical care. Few studies, however, have examined the relationship between cancer fatalism and health information seeking. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between endorsement of fatalistic beliefs regarding cancer and preferred sources of cancer information. We analyzed data from the Health Information National Trends Survey 4 Cycle 2, which were collected in late 2012 and early 2013 (N = 3630). When weighted, the data are representative of the non-institutionalized US population aged 18 or older. In bivariate and multivariate analyses, we assessed three cancer fatalism beliefs as predictors of preferred use of healthcare provider versus preferred use of the Internet for cancer information. Results indicate the majority of US adults endorse one or more fatalistic beliefs about cancer. Unadjusted results indicate endorsing the fatalistic belief that "there's not much you can do to lower your chances of getting cancer" was significantly associated with lower odds of preferring the Internet (versus healthcare providers) as the source of cancer information (OR: 0.70; CI: 0.50, 0.98). In the adjusted model, however, none of the three cancer fatalism measures were significantly associated with preferred source of cancer information. In conclusion, fatalistic beliefs about cancer are common, and further research is warranted to understand cancer fatalism and whether and how it may impact health information-seeking behaviors.

  15. Updated 2016 EAU Guidelines on Muscle-invasive and Metastatic Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witjes, J.A.; Lebret, T.; Comperat, E.M.; Cowan, N.C.; Santis, M. de; Bruins, H.M.; Hernandez, V.; Espinos, E.L.; Dunn, J.; Rouanne, M.; Neuzillet, Y.; Veskimae, E.; Heijden, A.G. van der; Gakis, G.; Ribal, M.J.

    2017-01-01

    CONTEXT: Invasive bladder cancer is a frequently occurring disease with a high mortality rate despite optimal treatment. The European Association of Urology (EAU) Muscle-invasive and Metastatic Bladder Cancer (MIBC) Guidelines are updated yearly and provides information to optimise diagnosis,

  16. Japan Society of Gynecologic Oncology guidelines 2015 for the treatment of ovarian cancer including primary peritoneal cancer and fallopian tube cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komiyama, Shinichi; Katabuchi, Hidetaka; Mikami, Mikio; Nagase, Satoru; Okamoto, Aikou; Ito, Kiyoshi; Morishige, Kenichiro; Suzuki, Nao; Kaneuchi, Masanori; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Udagawa, Yasuhiro; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The fourth edition of the Japan Society of Gynecologic Oncology guidelines for the treatment of ovarian cancer including primary peritoneal cancer and fallopian tube cancer was published in 2015. The guidelines contain seven chapters and six flow charts. The major changes in this new edition are as follows-(1) the format has been changed from reviews to clinical questions (CQ), and the guidelines for optimal clinical practice in Japan are now shown as 41 CQs and answers; (2) the 'flow charts' have been improved and placed near the beginning of the guidelines; (3) the 'basic points', including tumor staging, histological classification, surgical procedures, chemotherapy, and palliative care, are described before the chapter; (4) the FIGO surgical staging of ovarian cancer, fallopian tube cancer, and primary peritoneal cancer was revised in 2014 and the guideline has been revised accordingly to take the updated version of this classification into account; (5) the procedures for examination and management of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer are described; (6) information on molecular targeting therapy has been added; (7) guidelines for the treatment of recurrent cancer based on tumor markers alone are described, as well as guidelines for providing hormone replacement therapy after treatment.

  17. Assessing physicians' compliance with guidelines for Papanicolaou testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M M; Roos, N P; MacWilliam, L; Wajda, A

    1992-06-01

    In this study, population-based data were used to examine the appropriateness of Papanicolaou (Pap) testing from the perspective of the women being tested and their physicians. The approach used is unique in its assessment of overtesting and undertesting in the primary care setting. From the data base of the province of Manitoba's universal health insurance plan, 4-year health histories (1981 to 1984) were constructed for each woman from a random sample of the population of women who, in 1982, were between the ages of 25 to 64 years (n = 22,287). At the last visit to a general practitioner, gynecologist, or general surgeon in 1984 (termed the current visit), the authors determined whether a Pap test was given for each woman. Using decision rules from a Canadian task force report on cervical screening and previous health history, the authors evaluated the appropriateness of screening by determining whether a Pap test was given and was needed, or whether a women who had not received a Pap test required one. Overall, 55.7% of women were tested appropriately. Of the 5352 women who received a Pap test at the current visit, 62.8% were overtested. Of the 16,935 women not tested at the current visit, 38.5% required screening (i.e. were undertested). Characteristics of a physician's practice that were significantly related to compliance with the guidelines included having a high proportion of patients visiting for obstetric or gynecologic reasons. Variables that were associated with negative compliance were 1) being a gynecologist; and 2) having a high proportion of patients who lived in inner city or rural areas. Because physicians are paid a fee for every Pap smear taken and the guidelines were well disseminated, these results should be reasonably representative of fee-for-service practice in North America, where preventive care is not subject to user charges. This study supports previous findings that a passive approach to dissemination of guidelines is insufficient to

  18. [Guidelines on life-style modification for Chinese breast cancer survivors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Existing evidences proved that healthy life style after diagnosis contributes to better overall survival and quality of life for breast cancer survivors. The healthy life style includes maintaining healthy weight, regular physical activity and healthy diet. In order to address the concerns of the breast cancer survivors in their disease free and long-term survival period, and provide instruction to the clinical and public health professionals, breast cancer survivors and their families, Breast Health Group(BEST: Breast Education Screening Diagnosis and Treatment Group), the Branch of Women Health of Chinese Preventive Medicine Association convened experts to systematically evaluate the existing evidences and the characteristics of Chinese breast cancer survivors, developed guidelines on the life-style modification for breast cancer survivors. The suggestion and recommendation in the guideline aim to help the breast cancer survivors to take healthy diet, keep regular physical activity and maintain healthy weight, for improving overall health, prognosis, and quality of life over their long term survivorship.

  19. Reporting and Guidelines in Propensity Score Analysis: A Systematic Review of Cancer and Cancer Surgical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiaoxin I; Wang, Xiaofei; Speicher, Paul J; Hwang, E Shelley; Cheng, Perry; Harpole, David H; Berry, Mark F; Schrag, Deborah; Pang, Herbert H

    2017-08-01

    : Propensity score (PS) analysis is increasingly being used in observational studies, especially in some cancer studies where random assignment is not feasible. This systematic review evaluates the use and reporting quality of PS analysis in oncology studies. : We searched PubMed to identify the use of PS methods in cancer studies (CS) and cancer surgical studies (CSS) in major medical, cancer, and surgical journals over time and critically evaluated 33 CS published in top medical and cancer journals in 2014 and 2015 and 306 CSS published up to November 26, 2015, without earlier date limits. The quality of reporting in PS analysis was evaluated. It was also compared over time and among journals with differing impact factors. All statistical tests were two-sided. More than 50% of the publications with PS analysis from the past decade occurred within the past two years. Of the studies critically evaluated, a considerable proportion did not clearly provide the variables used to estimate PS (CS 12.1%, CSS 8.8%), incorrectly included non baseline variables (CS 3.4%, CSS 9.3%), neglected the comparison of baseline characteristics (CS 21.9%, CSS 15.6%), or did not report the matching algorithm utilized (CS 19.0%, CSS 36.1%). In CSS, the reporting of the matching algorithm improved in 2014 and 2015 ( P  = .04), and the reporting of variables used to estimate PS was better in top surgery journals ( P  = .008). However, there were no statistically significant differences for the inclusion of non baseline variables and reporting of comparability of baseline characteristics. The use of PS in cancer studies has dramatically increased recently, but there is substantial room for improvement in the quality of reporting even in top journals. Herein we have proposed reporting guidelines for PS analyses that are broadly applicable to different areas of medical research that will allow better evaluation and comparison across studies applying this approach.

  20. [EAU guidelines on testicular cancer: 2011 update. European Association of Urology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, P; Albrecht, W; Algaba, F; Bokemeyer, C; Cohn-Cedermark, G; Fizazi, K; Horwich, A; Laguna, M P

    2012-03-01

    On behalf of the European Association of Urology (EAU), guidelines for the diagnosis, therapy, and follow-up of testicular cancer were established. This article is a short version of the EAU testicular cancer guidelines and summarises the main conclusions from the guidelines on the management of testicular cancer. Guidelines were compiled by a multidisciplinary guidelines working group. A systematic review was carried out using Medline and Embase, also taking Cochrane evidence and data from the European Germ Cell Cancer Consensus Group into consideration. A panel of experts weighted the references, and a level of evidence and grade of recommendation were assigned. There is a paucity of literature especially regarding longer term follow-up, and results from a number of ongoing trials are awaited. The choice of treatment centre is of the utmost importance, and treatment in reference centres within clinical trials, especially for poor-prognosis nonseminomatous germ cell tumours, provides better outcomes. For patients with clinical stage I seminoma, based on recently published data on long-term toxicity, adjuvant radiotherapy is no longer recommended as first-line adjuvant treatment. The TNM classification 2009 is recommended. These guidelines contain information for the standardised management of patients with testicular cancer based on the latest scientific insights. Cure rates are generally excellent, but because testicular cancer mainly affects men in their third or fourth decade of life, treatment effects on fertility require careful counselling of patients, and treatment must be tailored taking individual circumstances and patient preferences into account. Although testicular cancer has excellent cure rates, the choice of treatment centre is of the utmost importance. Expert centres achieve better results for both early stage testicular cancer (lower relapse rates) and overall survival (higher stages within clinical trials). For patients with clinical stage I

  1. Introduction to European comments on ?Medullary Thyroid Cancer: management guidelines of the American Thyroid Association?

    OpenAIRE

    Jarzab, Barbara; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2013-01-01

    Guest Editors of Thyroid Research supplement devoted to medullary thyroid cancer present the history on how the discussion about ?Medullary Thyroid Cancer: management guidelines of the American Thyroid Association? was initiated and subsequently widely commented before and during European Thyroid Association ? Cancer Research Network Meeting in Lisbon. It is explained why it has been decided to publish the manuscripts within the supplement ? to document voices from the discussion and populari...

  2. Breast Cancer Screening and Social Media: a Content Analysis of Evidence Use and Guideline Opinions on Twitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastasi, Anthony; Bryant, Tyler; Canner, Joseph K; Dredze, Mark; Camp, Melissa S; Nagarajan, Neeraja

    2017-01-17

    There is ongoing debate regarding the best mammography screening practices. Twitter has become a powerful tool for disseminating medical news and fostering healthcare conversations; however, little work has been done examining these conversations in the context of how users are sharing evidence and discussing current guidelines for breast cancer screening. To characterize the Twitter conversation on mammography and assess the quality of evidence used as well as opinions regarding current screening guidelines, individual tweets using mammography-related hashtags were prospectively pulled from Twitter from 5 November 2015 to 11 December 2015. Content analysis was performed on the tweets by abstracting data related to user demographics, content, evidence use, and guideline opinions. Standard descriptive statistics were used to summarize the results. Comparisons were made by demographics, tweet type (testable claim, advice, personal experience, etc.), and user type (non-healthcare, physician, cancer specialist, etc.). The primary outcomes were how users are tweeting about breast cancer screening, the quality of evidence they are using, and their opinions regarding guidelines. The most frequent user type of the 1345 tweets was "non-healthcare" with 323 tweets (32.5%). Physicians had 1.87 times higher odds (95% CI, 0.69-5.07) of providing explicit support with a reference and 11.70 times higher odds (95% CI, 3.41-40.13) of posting a tweet likely to be supported by the scientific community compared to non-healthcare users. Only 2.9% of guideline tweets approved of the guidelines while 14.6% claimed to be confused by them. Non-healthcare users comprise a significant proportion of participants in mammography conversations, with tweets often containing claims that are false, not explicitly backed by scientific evidence, and in favor of alternative "natural" breast cancer prevention and treatment. Furthermore, users appear to have low approval and confusion regarding

  3. Tumour assessment and staging: United Kingdom National Multidisciplinary Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, N; Porter, G; Fish, B; Makura, Z

    2016-05-01

    In general, the first decision to be made in a patient with a confirmed head and neck cancer is whether or not to treat the patient before deciding what form of management strategy is appropriate. There is no more important an aspect of head and neck cancer care than the initial evaluation of the patient and the patient's tumour. The practice requires specific expertise and judgement. The current tumour-node-metastasis system relies on morphology of the tumour (anatomical site and extent of disease) but the final decision on treatment hinges on a full assessment of the patient including physiological age and general condition. The aim of this paper is primarily to describe why and how we appraise a patient and their tumour. It addresses the general principles applicable to the topic of evaluation, classification and staging. In addition, the limitations and pitfalls of this process are described. Recommendations • All patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) should undergo tumour classification and staging prior to treatment. (R) • Pre-therapeutic clinical staging of HNCs should be based on at least a C2 factor (evidence obtained by special diagnostic means, e.g. radiographic imaging (e.g. computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasound scan), endoscopy, biopsy and cytology). (R) • Imaging to evaluate the primary site should be performed prior to biopsy to avoid the effect of upstaging from the oedema caused by biopsy trauma. (G) • Panendoscopy is only recommended for symptomatic patients or patients with primary tumours known to have a significant risk of a second (synchronous) primary tumour. (G).

  4. Familial colorectal cancer: Patient assessment, surveillance and surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennelly, R P; Gryfe, R; Winter, D C

    2017-02-01

    Germline mutations account for 5-10% of colorectal cancer. Most mutations are autosomal dominant with high penetrance and affected patients benefit greatly from appropriate treatment. This review presents the current knowledge regarding familial colorectal cancer and provides practical information based on international guidelines and the best available evidence regarding patient assessment, surveillance and surgical management. Surgeons are often the first point of contact and frequently, the main provider of care for families with cancer syndromes or patients with familial cancer. Patients with a polyposis phenotype should undergo appropriate genetic testing. In non-polyposis patients with a cancer diagnosis, tumor testing for Lynch syndrome can guide the use of genetic testing. In patients without a personal history of cancer or polyposis, a carefully obtained family history with testing of available tumor tissue or of a living relative affected by colorectal cancer informs the need for genetic testing. Surveillance and surgical management should be planned following thorough assessment of familial cancer risk. Evidence exists to provide guidance as to the surveillance strategies required, the specific indications of genetic testing and the appropriate timing of operative intervention. A carefully obtained family history with selective genetic testing should inform surveillance and surgical management in patients who have a genetic predisposition for the development of colorectal cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd, BASO ~ The Association for Cancer Surgery, and the European Society of Surgical Oncology. All rights reserved.

  5. Establishing a family risk assessment clinic for breast cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mulsow, Jurgen

    2012-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer affecting European women and the leading cause of cancer-related death. A total of 15-20% of women who develop breast cancer have a family history and 5-10% a true genetic predisposition. The identification and screening of women at increased risk may allow early detection of breast cancer and improve prognosis. We established a family risk assessment clinic in May 2005 to assess and counsel women with a family history of breast cancer, to initiate surveillance, and to offer risk-reducing strategies for selected high-risk patients. Patients at medium or high risk of developing breast cancer according to NICE guidelines were accepted. Family history was determined by structured questionnaire and interview. Lifetime risk of developing breast cancer was calculated using Claus and Tyrer-Cuzick scoring. Risk of carrying a breast cancer-related gene mutation was calculated using the Manchester system. One thousand two hundred and forty-three patients have been referred. Ninety-two percent were at medium or high risk of developing breast cancer. Formal assessment of risk has been performed in 368 patients, 73% have a high lifetime risk of developing breast cancer, and 72% a Manchester score >or=16. BRCA1\\/2 mutations have been identified in 14 patients and breast cancer diagnosed in two. Our initial experience of family risk assessment has shown there to be a significant demand for this service. Identification of patients at increased risk of developing breast cancer allows us to provide individuals with accurate risk profiles, and enables patients to make informed choices regarding their follow-up and management.

  6. 2014 Korean Liver Cancer Study Group-National Cancer Center Korea practice guideline for the management of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The guideline for the management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was first developed in 2003 and revised in 2009 by the Korean Liver Cancer Study Group and the National Cancer Center, Korea. Since then, many studies on HCC have been carried out in Korea and other countries. In particular, a substantial body of knowledge has been accumulated on diagnosis, staging, and treatment specific to Asian characteristics, especially Koreans, prompting the proposal of new strategies. Accordingly, the new guideline presented herein was developed on the basis of recent evidence and expert opinions. The primary targets of this guideline are patients with suspicious or newly diagnosed HCC. This guideline provides recommendations for the initial treatment of patients with newly diagnosed HCC.

  7. Non-melanoma Skin Cancer in Canada Chapter 1: Introduction to the Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenther, Lyn C; Barber, Kirk; Searles, Gordon E; Lynde, Charles W; Janiszewski, Peter; Ashkenas, John

    2015-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), including basal and squamous cell carcinoma, represents the most common malignancy. The aim of this document is to provide guidance to Canadian health care practitioners on NMSC management. After conducting a literature review, the group developed recommendations for prevention, management, and treatment of basal cell carcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas, and actinic keratoses. These tumour types are considered separately in the accompanying articles. The Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation system was used to assign strength to each recommendation. This introduction describes the scope and structure of the guidelines and the methods used to develop them. The epidemiology of NMSC is reviewed, as are the pathophysiologic changes occurring with damage to the skin, which lead to the formation of actinic keratoses and invasive squamous or basal cell carcinomas. This introduction describes the need for primary prevention and offers an overview of treatment options that are discussed in later chapters of the guidelines. © The Author(s) 2015.

  8. Korean Society of Thoracic Radiology Guideline for Lung Cancer Screening with Low-Dose CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Ju [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Hwan [Dept. of Radiology, Chungnam National University Hospital, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yoon Kyung [Dept. of Radiology, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chang Min [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Yeon Joo [Dept. of Radiology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine and Medical Research Institute, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), a nation-wide randomized controlled trial involving more than 50,000 current and former heavy smokers ages 55 to 74, compared the effects of two screening procedures (low-dose helical CT and standard chest radiography) on lung cancer mortality and found 20 percent fewer lung cancer deaths among trial participants screened with low-dose CT. Korean Society of Thoracic Radiology (KSTR) planned to establish an effective guideline for lung cancer screening with low-dose CT to improve health of Korean people and to reduce harms from misuse of lung cancer screening with low-dose CT. KSTR guideline for lung cancer screening with low-dose CT established based on objective medical evidences obtained by NLST.

  9. Guidelines for assessing the knowledge management maturity of organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Kruger

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available In a recent article Kruger and Snyman hypothesized that progressions in knowledge management maturity (from a strategic perspective are directly related to an increased ability to speed up the strategic cycle of imitation, consolidation and innovation. The arguments proposed, however, neglected to supply the reader with a practical toolkit or even a roadmap (a time-related matrix, or questionnaire to successfully measure succession in knowledge management maturity. This article builds on the previous one and proposes a questionnaire consisting of six sections, containing 101 descriptive questions, to enable organizations to test and assess their knowledge management maturity empirically. The development of an instrument to measure knowledge management maturity required adhering to a research design that combined theoretical propositions with practical experimentation. As a point of departure, a knowledge management maturity matrix consisting of seven maturity levels was formulated. All questions contained within the matrix were benchmarked against a survey questionnaire developed by the public management service of the OECD (PUMA and were also pre-tested and validated. This process of refinement led to the formulation of the Knowledge Management Maturity Questionnaire. To avoid any taint of this research being based only on theoretical propositions, the questionnaire was tested by 178 master students of the University of Pretoria, South Africa, in nine different industries. The proposed questionnaire provides a bridge between theoretical propositions and practical usability, not only enabling knowledge management practitioners to assess the level of knowledge management maturity reached successfully but, more importantly, also serving as a guideline to institutionalize further and future knowledge management endeavours.

  10. Concordance With Prevention Guidelines and Subsequent Cancer, Cardiovascular Disease, and Mortality: A Longitudinal Study of Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Heather; Strizich, Garrett; Lovasi, Gina S; Kaplan, Robert C; Biggs, Mary L; Li, Christopher I; Richardson, John; Burke, Gregory L; Fitzpatrick, Annette L; Fretts, Amanda M; Psaty, Bruce M; Fried, Linda P

    2017-11-15

    Reports on the associations between multiple clinical and behavioral health indicators and major health outcomes among older adults are scarce. We prospectively examined concordance with guidelines from the American Cancer Society and American Heart Association for disease prevention in relation to cancer, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and mortality among Cardiovascular Health Study enrollees aged 65-98 years who, at baseline assessment in 1989-1996 (n = 3,491), were free of CVD and cancer. Total and cause-specific mortality, as well as incidence of cancer and CVD, were lower with higher guideline concordance. Independent of body mass index, blood pressure, total cholesterol, and fasting plasma glucose, better health behaviors (diet, physical activity, and alcohol consumption) were associated with lower mortality (2-sided P recommendations had higher mortality compared with those who had the highest concordance with these behavioral recommendations (adjusted mortality hazard ratio = 1.82, 95% confidence interval: 1.25, 2.67). Older adults who are concordant with recommendations for cancer and CVD prevention have reduced rates of chronic disease and mortality. Interventions to achieve and maintain healthy lifestyle behaviors may offer benefits both in the presence and absence of adverse traditional clinical risk factors. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. [Procedure guidelines for radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer (version 2)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietlein, M; Dressler, J; Farahati, J; Grünwald, F; Leisner, B; Moser, E; Reiners, C; Schicha, H; Schober, O

    2004-08-01

    The procedure guidelines for radioiodine therapy (RIT) of differentiated thyroid cancer (version 2) are the counter-part to the procedure guidelines for (131)I whole-body scintigraphy (version 2) and specify the interdisciplinary guidelines for thyroid cancer of the Deutsche Krebsgesellschaft and the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Chirurgie concerning the nuclear medicine part. Compared with version 1 facultative options for RIT can be chosen in special cases: ablative RIT for papillary microcarcinoma sperm cryoconservation. An interdisciplinary consensus is necessary whether the new TNM-classification (UICC, 6(th) edition, 2002) will lead to modified recommendations for surgical or nuclear medicine therapy, especially for the surgical completeness and for the ablative RIT of pT1 papillary cancer.

  12. Saudi oncology society and Saudi urology association combined clinical management guidelines for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Abusamra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an update to the previously published Saudi guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer. It is categorized according to the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system 7th edition. The guidelines are presented with supporting evidence level, they are based on comprehensive literature review, several internationally recognized guidelines, and the collective expertise of the guidelines committee members (authors who were selected by the Saudi oncology society and Saudi urological association. Considerations to the local availability of drugs, technology, and expertise have been regarded. These guidelines should serve as a roadmap for the urologists, oncologists, general physicians, support groups, and health care policy makers in the management of patients diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the prostate to.

  13. Noninvasive diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma: Elaboration on Korean liver cancer study group-National Cancer Center Korea Practice Guidelines compared with other guidelines and remaining issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Jeong Hee; Lee, Jeong Min [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Joong Won [Center for Liver Cancer, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can be diagnosed based on characteristic findings of arterial-phase enhancement and portal/delayed 'washout' in cirrhotic patients. Several countries and major academic societies have proposed varying specific diagnostic criteria for HCC, largely reflecting the variable HCC prevalence in different regions and ethnic groups, as well as different practice patterns. In 2014, a new version of Korean practice guidelines for management of HCC was released by the Korean Liver Cancer Study Group (KLCSG) and the National Cancer Center (NCC). According to the KLCSG-NCC Korea practice guidelines, if the typical hallmark of HCC (i.e., hypervascularity in the arterial phase with washout in the portal or 3 min-delayed phases) is identified in a nodule ≥ 1 cm in diameter on either dynamic CT, dynamic MRI, or MRI using hepatocyte-specific contrast agent in high-risk groups, a diagnosis of HCC is established. In addition, the KLCSG-NCC Korea practice guidelines provide criteria to diagnose HCC for subcentimeter hepatic nodules according to imaging findings and tumor marker, which has not been addressed in other guidelines such as Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and European Association for the Study of the Liver. In this review, we briefly review the new HCC diagnostic criteria endorsed by the 2014 KLCSG-NCC Korea practice guidelines, in comparison with other recent guidelines; we furthermore address several remaining issues in noninvasive diagnosis of HCC, including prerequisite of sonographic demonstration of nodules, discrepancy between transitional phase and delayed phase, and implementation of ancillary features for HCC diagnosis.

  14. Noninvasive Diagnosis of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Elaboration on Korean Liver Cancer Study Group-National Cancer Center Korea Practice Guidelines Compared with Other Guidelines and Remaining Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jeong Hee; Park, Joong-Won

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) can be diagnosed based on characteristic findings of arterial-phase enhancement and portal/delayed "washout" in cirrhotic patients. Several countries and major academic societies have proposed varying specific diagnostic criteria for HCC, largely reflecting the variable HCC prevalence in different regions and ethnic groups, as well as different practice patterns. In 2014, a new version of Korean practice guidelines for management of HCC was released by the Korean Liver Cancer Study Group (KLCSG) and the National Cancer Center (NCC). According to the KLCSG-NCC Korea practice guidelines, if the typical hallmark of HCC (i.e., hypervascularity in the arterial phase with washout in the portal or 3 min-delayed phases) is identified in a nodule ≥ 1 cm in diameter on either dynamic CT, dynamic MRI, or MRI using hepatocyte-specific contrast agent in high-risk groups, a diagnosis of HCC is established. In addition, the KLCSG-NCC Korea practice guidelines provide criteria to diagnose HCC for subcentimeter hepatic nodules according to imaging findings and tumor marker, which has not been addressed in other guidelines such as Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and European Association for the Study of the Liver. In this review, we briefly review the new HCC diagnostic criteria endorsed by the 2014 KLCSG-NCC Korea practice guidelines, in comparison with other recent guidelines; we furthermore address several remaining issues in noninvasive diagnosis of HCC, including prerequisite of sonographic demonstration of nodules, discrepancy between transitional phase and delayed phase, and implementation of ancillary features for HCC diagnosis. PMID:26798212

  15. Familial gastric cancer: guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and periodic surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluijt, I.; Sijmons, R.H.; Hoogerbrugge-van der Linden, N.; Plukker, J.T.; Jong, D.J. de; Krieken, J.H. van; Hillegersberg, R. van; Ligtenberg, M.J.L.; Bleiker, E.; Cats, A.

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is a relatively rare disorder, with a mutated CDH1 gene as the only known cause. Carriers of a germline mutation in CDH1 have a lifetime risk of >80% of developing diffuse gastric cancer. As periodic gastric surveillance is of limited value in detecting

  16. Familial gastric cancer: guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and periodic surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluijt, Irma; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Plukker, John T.; de Jong, Daphne; van Krieken, J. Han; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn; Bleiker, Eveline; Cats, Anemieke; Ausems, M. G. E. M.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; Kluijt, I.; Sijmons, R. H.; Cats, A.; Wagner, A.; Dekker, E.; Tytgat, Kristien; Kleibeuker, J. H.; Vasen, H. F. A.; Plukker, J. T.; Ligtenberg, M.; van Hillegersberg, R.; van Grieken, N. C. T.; de Jong, D.; van Krieken, J. H.; Bleiker, E.

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is a relatively rare disorder, with a mutated CDH1 gene as the only known cause. Carriers of a germline mutation in CDH1 have a lifetime risk of >80% of developing diffuse gastric cancer. As periodic gastric surveillance is of limited value in detecting early

  17. Familial gastric cancer : guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and periodic surveillance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluijt, Irma; Sijmons, Rolf H.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Plukker, John T.; de Jong, Daphne; van Krieken, J. Han; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn; Bleiker, Eveline; Cats, Anemieke

    Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) is a relatively rare disorder, with a mutated CDH1 gene as the only known cause. Carriers of a germline mutation in CDH1 have a lifetime risk of > 80% of developing diffuse gastric cancer. As periodic gastric surveillance is of limited value in detecting

  18. Specialized survivor clinic attendance increases adherence to cardiomyopathy screening guidelines in adult survivors of childhood cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Kristin C; Agha, Mohammad; Sutradhar, Rinku; Pole, Jason D; Hodgson, David; Guttmann, Astrid; Greenberg, Mark; Nathan, Paul C

    2017-10-01

    To determine if attendance at a specialized clinic for adult survivors of childhood cancer is associated with better rates of adherence to the Children's Oncology Group (COG) Long-term Follow-up (LTFU) guidelines for cardiomyopathy screening. We conducted a retrospective population-based study using administrative data in Ontario, Canada of 5-year survivors diagnosed between 1986 and 2005 at risk of therapy-related late cardiomyopathy. Patients were classified into three groups based on the recommended frequency of screening: annual, every 2 years, and every 5 years. Of 1811 eligible survivors followed for median 7.8 years (range 0-14.0), patients were adherent to screening for only 8.6% of their period of follow-up. Survivor clinic utilization had the strongest association with increased rates of adherence: when compared to no attendance, ≥ 5 clinic visits/10-year period had RR of adherence of 10.6 (95% CI 5.7-19.5) in the annual group, 3.3 (95% CI 2.3-4.8) in the every 2-year group, and 2.3 (95% CI 1.6-3.2) in the every 5-year group. Additional factors associated with increased adherence after adjusting for clinic attendance included annual assessment by a general practioner, female sex, diagnosis prior to 2003, and living in a rural area. In a model of specialized survivor care, increased clinic utilization is associated with improved patient adherence to COG LTFU cardiomyopathy screening guidelines. Specialized survivor clinics may improve health outcomes in survivors through improved adherence to screening. However, rates of adherence remain suboptimal and further multifacetted strategies need to be explored to improve overall rates of screening in adult survivors of childhood cancer.

  19. Japan Society of Gynecologic Oncology guidelines 2011 for the treatment of uterine cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebina, Yasuhiko; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Katabuchi, Hidetaka; Nagase, Satoru; Udagawa, Yasuhiro; Hachisuga, Toru; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Mikami, Mikio; Aoki, Yoichi; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-01

    The second edition of the Japan Society of Gynecologic Oncology guidelines for the treatment of uterine cervical cancer was published in 2011. The guidelines comprise eight chapters and five algorithms. They were prepared by consensus among the members of the Japan Society of Gynecologic Oncology Guidelines Formulation Committee and Evaluation Committee and are based on a careful review of the evidence obtained from the literature, health insurance system, and actual clinical settings in Japan. The highlights of the 2011 revision are (1) the recommended grades have been changed to five stages--A, B, C1, C2, and D; (2) the revisions are consistent with the new International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics staging system; (3) the roles are shared between the 'Japanese classification of cervical cancer' and the new guidelines; (4) clinical questions related to adenocarcinoma have been revised; and (5) a clinical question regarding cervical cancer in pregnant patients has been added. Each chapter includes a clinical question, recommendations, background, objectives, explanations, and references. Each recommendation is accompanied by a classification of recommendation categories. The objective of these guidelines is to update the standard treatment strategies for cervical cancer, thus eliminating unnecessary and insufficient treatment.

  20. 77 FR 3450 - Guidelines for Assessing Marine Mammal Stocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-24

    ... electronic comments in Microsoft Word, Excel, WordPerfect, or Adobe PDF file formats only. FOR FURTHER... guidelines specify that when biological information is sufficient to identify the stock from which a dead or...

  1. Comparative assessment of bioanalytical method validation guidelines for pharmaceutical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadian, Naveen; Raju, Kanumuri Siva Rama; Rashid, Mamunur; Malik, Mohd Yaseen; Taneja, Isha; Wahajuddin, Muhammad

    2016-07-15

    The concepts, importance, and application of bioanalytical method validation have been discussed for a long time and validation of bioanalytical methods is widely accepted as pivotal before they are taken into routine use. United States Food and Drug Administration (USFDA) guidelines issued in 2001 have been referred for every guideline released ever since; may it be European Medical Agency (EMA) Europe, National Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) Brazil, Ministry of Health and Labour Welfare (MHLW) Japan or any other guideline in reference to bioanalytical method validation. After 12 years, USFDA released its new draft guideline for comments in 2013, which covers the latest parameters or topics encountered in bioanalytical method validation and approached towards the harmonization of bioanalytical method validation across the globe. Even though the regulatory agencies have general agreement, significant variations exist in acceptance criteria and methodology. The present review highlights the variations, similarities and comparison between bioanalytical method validation guidelines issued by major regulatory authorities worldwide. Additionally, other evaluation parameters such as matrix effect, incurred sample reanalysis including other stability aspects have been discussed to provide an ease of access for designing a bioanalytical method and its validation complying with the majority of drug authority guidelines. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Endorectal MRI assessment of local relapse after surgery for prostate cancer: A model to define treatment field guidelines for adjuvant radiotherapy in patients at high risk for local failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralbell, Raymond; Vees, Hansjörg; Lozano, Joan; Khan, Haleem; Mollà, Meritxell; Hidalgo, Alberto; Linero, Dolors; Rouzaud, Michel

    2007-02-01

    To assess the role of endorectal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in defining local relapse after radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer to help to reassess the clinical target volume (CTV) for adjuvant postprostatectomy radiotherapy. Sixty patients undergoing an endorectal MRI before salvage radiotherapy were selected. Spatial coordinates of the relapses were assessed using two reference points: the inferior border of the pubic symphysis (point 1) and the urethro-vesical anastomosis (point 2). Every lesion on MRI was delineated on the planning computed tomography and center of mass coordinates were plotted in two separate diagrams (along the x, y, and z axes) with the urethro-vesical anastomosis as the coordinate origin. An "ideal" CTV was constructed, centered at a point defined by the mathematical means of each of the three coordinates with dimensions defined as twice 2 standard deviations in each of the three axes. The dosimetric impact of the new CTV definition was evaluated in six adjuvantly treated patients. The ideal CTV center of mass was located at coordinates 0 (x), -5 (y), and -3 (z) mm with SDs of 6 (x), 6 (y), and 9 (z) mm, respectively. The CTV size was 24 (x) x 24 (y) x 36 (z) mm. Significant rectal sparing was observed with the new CTV. A CTV with an approximately cylindrical shape (approximately 4 x 3 cm) centered 5 mm posterior and 3 mm inferior to the urethro-vesical anastomosis was defined. Such CTV may reduce the irradiation of normal nontarget tissue in the pelvis potentially improving treatment tolerance.

  3. Adherence Patterns to National Comprehensive Cancer Network Guidelines for Referral of Women With Breast Cancer to Genetics Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckey, Ashley; Febbraro, Terri; Laprise, Jessica; Wilbur, Jennifer S; Lopes, Vrishali; Robison, Katina

    2016-08-01

    Genetic predisposition is responsible for 5% to 10% of breast cancer. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) established guidelines delineating appropriate candidates for genetic counseling. This study aims to determine referral patterns for genetic counseling in women who met such guidelines. Utilizing an institutional tumor registry, patients from an academic oncology program who met a subset of NCCN guidelines for genetic referrals between 2004 and 2010 were identified (breast cancer diagnosis ≤50 y without a known BRCA mutation). A retrospective chart review was conducted. Statistics were analyzed using SAS version 9.2. A total of 314 patients were identified and 107 (34.1%) were referred for genetic counseling. Median age at diagnosis was younger for those referred versus not referred (43 and 46 y; PWomen were more likely referred with a family history suspicious for an inherited cancer syndrome (67.3% vs. 36.2%; Pwomen referred. Those patients who choose prophylactic contralateral mastectomy were likely to have been referred for genetic counseling (63.6% vs. 36.4%, Pwomen who meet NCCN referral guidelines. Age and family history were noted to be predictive of referral for genetic evaluation. Further research is needed to determine additional factors that may impact not only referral rates but subsequent care for women with possible genetic predispositions to cancer.

  4. American Cancer Society Guidelines on nutrition and physical activity for cancer prevention: reducing the risk of cancer with healthy food choices and physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushi, Lawrence H; Doyle, Colleen; McCullough, Marji; Rock, Cheryl L; Demark-Wahnefried, Wendy; Bandera, Elisa V; Gapstur, Susan; Patel, Alpa V; Andrews, Kimberly; Gansler, Ted

    2012-01-01

    The American Cancer Society (ACS) publishes Nutrition and Physical Activity Guidelines to serve as a foundation for its communication, policy, and community strategies and, ultimately, to affect dietary and physical activity patterns among Americans. These Guidelines, published approximately every 5 years, are developed by a national panel of experts in cancer research, prevention, epidemiology, public health, and policy, and they reflect the most current scientific evidence related to dietary and activity patterns and cancer risk. The ACS Guidelines focus on recommendations for individual choices regarding diet and physical activity patterns, but those choices occur within a community context that either facilitates or creates barriers to healthy behaviors. Therefore, this committee presents recommendations for community action to accompany the 4 recommendations for individual choices to reduce cancer risk. These recommendations for community action recognize that a supportive social and physical environment is indispensable if individuals at all levels of society are to have genuine opportunities to choose healthy behaviors. The ACS Guidelines are consistent with guidelines from the American Heart Association and the American Diabetes Association for the prevention of coronary heart disease and diabetes, as well as for general health promotion, as defined by the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans and the 2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans. Copyright © 2012 American Cancer Society, Inc.

  5. Application of bone scans for prostate cancer staging: Which guideline shows better result?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Ari; Hwang, Insang; Ha, Jung-min; Yu, Seong Hyeon; Hwang, Eu Chang; Yu, Ho Song; Kim, Sun Ouck; Jung, Seung-Il; Kang, Taek Won; Kwon, Dong Deuk; Park, Kwangsung

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We evaluated the accuracy of current guidelines by analyzing bone scan results and clinical parameters of patients with prostate cancer to determine the optimal guideline for predicting bone metastasis. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed patients who were diagnosed with prostate cancer and who underwent a bone scan. Bone metastasis was confirmed by bone scan results with clinical and radiological follow-up. Serum prostate-specific antigen, Gleason score, percent of positive biopsy core, clinical staging and bone scan results were analyzed. We analyzed diagnostic performance in predicting bone metastasis of the guidelines of the European Association of Urology (EAU), American Urological Association (AUA), and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines as well as Briganti’s classification and regression tree (CART). We also compared the percent of positive biopsy core between patients with and without bone metastases. Results: A total 167 of 806 patients had bone metastases. Receiver operating curve analysis revealed that the AUA and EAU guidelines were better for detecting bone metastases than were Briganti’s CART and NCCN. No significant difference was observed between AUA and EAU guidelines. Patients with bone metastases had a higher percent positive core than did patients without metastasis (the cut-off value >55.6). Conclusion: The EAU and AUA guidelines showed better results than did Briganti’s CART and NCCN for predicting bone metastasis in the enrolled patients. A bone scan is strongly recommended for patients who have a higher percent positive core and who meet the EAU and AUA guidelines. PMID:25210554

  6. Documentation of Fertility Preservation Discussions for Young Adults With Cancer: Examining Compliance With Treatment Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsman, John M; Yanez, Betina; Smith, Kristin N; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Snyder, Mallory A; Barnes, Khouri; Clayman, Marla L

    2016-03-01

    Professional guidelines have been developed to promote discussion between providers and newly diagnosed young adults with cancer about the possibility of cancer treatment-related infertility, but previous research suggests many young adults fail to receive this information. The aim of this study was to examine rates of and factors predictive of oncologists' compliance with national guidelines for discussing potential treatment-related infertility with newly diagnosed young adults with cancer seen at an NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center. We reviewed data from the electronic medical record for new clinic encounters between medical oncologists and young adults with cancer (ages 18-39 years) from 2010 to 2012. Data from oncologist discussions of fertility preservation were abstracted, as were patient (age, sex, race, ethnicity, cancer type) and oncologist (gender, graduation year from fellowship) characteristics. A total of 1,018 cases were reviewed, with 454 patients (mean, 31.5 years; 67.8% women) meeting inclusion criteria. Overall, 83% of patients were informed about potential treatment-related infertility, with patients with breast cancer (85% informed), Hodgkin lymphoma (95% informed), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (94% informed), leukemia (88% informed), or testicular cancer (100% informed) more likely to be informed than those with other cancer types (60%-74% informed). There was a significant effect for patient sex (odds ratio, 3.57; CI, 1.33, 9.60; P=.012), with women being more likely to be informed than men. Reported compliance with fertility preservation guidelines was greater than published rates. Higher compliance rates in female patients and in patients with cancers more common among young adults may reflect greater awareness of fertility-related concerns among these patients and their providers. Copyright © 2016 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  7. Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Endometrial Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement of the American Society for Radiation Oncology Evidence-Based Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Larissa A; Bohlke, Kari; Powell, Matthew A; Fader, Amanda N; Franklin, Gregg E; Lee, Larissa J; Matei, Daniela; Coallier, Lourie; Wright, Alexi A

    2015-09-10

    To provide guidance on the role of adjuvant radiation therapy in the treatment of endometrial cancer. "The Role of Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Endometrial Cancer: An ASTRO Evidence-Based Guideline" by Klopp et al, published in 2014 in Practical Radiation Oncology, was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) guideline content and recommendations were further reviewed by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Endorsement Panel. The ASCO Endorsement Panel determined that the recommendations from the ASTRO guideline are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence. ASCO endorsed the ASTRO guideline with several qualifying statements. Surveillance without adjuvant radiation therapy is a reasonable option for women without residual disease in the hysterectomy specimen and for women with grade 1 or 2 cancer and Endorsement Panel added qualifying statements to the ASTRO recommendations to provide stronger statements in favor of chemotherapy (with or without radiation therapy). © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  8. ACOG Recommendations and Guidelines for Cervical Cancer Screening and Management

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-15

    Dr. Alan Waxman, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of New Mexico and chair of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) committee for the underserved, talks about ACOG's recommendations for cervical cancer screening and management.  Created: 10/15/2009 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (DCPC).   Date Released: 6/9/2010.

  9. [New guidelines in regard to cervical cancer screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Hernández, Víctor Manuel; Acosta-Altamirano, Gustavo; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario Adán; Vargas-Aguilar, Víctor Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Cancer screening programs have been successful in reducing the incidence and mortality due to cervical cancer. For more than a decade, the human papillomavirus test has been recommended as part of these programs, however, Pap tests is not currently recommended for women 65 years of age who participated adequately in screening programs, continuing with these screening programs is not needed. Screening programs will be different in special populations at greatest risk where tests are frequently needed or use of alternative methods.

  10. Screening guidelines for non-AIDS defining cancers in HIV-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Deepthi; Aboulafia, David M

    2013-09-01

    The growing burden of non-AIDS defining malignancies (non-ADMs) among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) highlights the need for cancer prevention and early detection. In this article, we propose screening guidelines for non-ADMs in PLWHA. A number of recent findings may help direct cancer screening guidelines in PLWHA. Screening for lung cancer with low-dose helical chest computerized tomography (LDCT) in the National Lung Screening Trial data demonstrated a decrease in lung cancer and all-cause mortality. Recent studies have demonstrated a favorable experience among PLWHA with liver transplantation. Overdiagnosis is common with breast and prostate cancer screening. Anal cancer rates were substantially higher for HIV-infected MSM, other men and women than for HIV-uninfected individuals. Screening recommendations for the general population can be applied to PLWHA patients for breast, colon and prostate cancer. Screening for lung cancer with LDCT could be considered in PLWHA at risk. American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases screening recommendations with biennial ultrasonography may be applied to at-risk PLWHA for hepatocellular carcinoma. All HIV-infected adults should be offered anal cancer screening as part of clinical care at specialized centres.

  11. Developing a Cookbook with Lifestyle Tips: A Community-Engaged Approach to Promoting Diet-Related Cancer Prevention Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Selina A.; Sheats, Joyce Q.; Whitehead, Mary S.; Delmoor, Ernestine; Britt, Thomas; Harris, Cassandra L.; Robinson-Flint, Janette; Porche-Smith, L. Monique; Umeakunne, Kayellen Edmonds; Coughlin, Steven S.

    2015-01-01

    Supplementing nutrition education with skills-building activities may enhance community awareness of diet-related cancer prevention guidelines. To develop a cookbook with lifestyle tips, recipes were solicited from the National Black Leadership Initiative on Cancer (NBLIC) community coalitions and dietary intake advice from participants in the Educational Program to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening (EPICS). With guidance from a chef and registered dietitian, recipes were tested, assessed, and transformed; lifestyle advice was obtained from focus groups. The cookbook with lifestyle tips, named “Down Home Healthy Living (DHHL) 2.0,” was distributed in print form to 2,500 EPICS participants and shared electronically through websites and social media. PMID:26709388

  12. Critical assessment of the European Association of Urology guideline indications for pelvic lymph node dissection at radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollah, Firas; Sun, Maxine; Briganti, Alberto; Thuret, Rodolphe; Schmitges, Jan; Gallina, Andrea; Suardi, Nazareno; Capitanio, Umberto; Salonia, Andrea; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Perrotte, Paul; Rigatti, Patrizio; Montorsi, Francesco; Karakiewicz, Pierre I

    2011-12-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Lymphadenectomy is the most accurate lymph node staging procedure in patients with prostate cancer. We presented the first formal validation of the 2010 European Association of Urology guidelines for lymphadenectomy in prostate cancer patients. • To assess the 2010 European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines for prostate cancer, which recommend a pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) at radical prostatectomy in all individuals with a nomogram-predicted lymph node invasion (LNI) risk of >7%. • We focused on 1520 patients treated with radical prostatectomy and PLND, between 2006 and 2010, at a single European institution. We examined the ability of the EAU proposed threshold to correctly predict histologically confirmed LNI. Moreover, we tested the ability of a range of nomogram thresholds between 1 and 14% to correctly predict histologically confirmed LNI. Finally, we externally validated the EAU PLND guideline nomogram. • Overall, 10.6% of patients had LNI. The use of the 7% limit would have allowed the avoidance of 49% of PLNDs, at the cost of missing 11% of patients with LNI. The use of thresholds of 6% and 8% would have allowed the avoidance of respectively 46% and 52% of PLNDs, at the cost of missing respectively 9% and 11% of patients with LNI. Overall, the accuracy of the EAU guideline nomogram according to the receiver operating characteristics derived area under curve was 81% • Our observations indicate that the EAU guideline nomogram is highly accurate. The recommended threshold of 7%, above which a PLND should be performed, is associated with a favourable compromise between avoidable PLNDs and potentially missed LNI cases. © 2011 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2011 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  13. Asia Oceania Guidelines for the Implementation of Programs for Cervical Cancer Prevention and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hextan Y. S. Ngan

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of these guidelines is to provide information on scientific evidence on the different modalities and approaches of cervical cancer prevention programs, for high resource and low resource settings. The secondary purpose is to provide an overview of the current situation of cervical cancer control and prevention in various Asian Oceania countries: their views of an ideal program, identified obstacles, and suggestions to overcome them are discussed.

  14. Using communication to manage uncertainty about cervical cancer screening guideline adherence among Appalachian women

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Elisia L.; Gordon, Allison Scott; Record, Rachael; Shaunfield, Sara; Jones, Grace M.; Collins, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Changes to the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations for cervical cancer preventive services have led to patient confusion, especially in medically underserved populations. We investigated how patient uncertainty concerning cervical cancer screening guidelines is appraised and managed through communication with healthcare providers by conducting in-depth, face-to-face interviews with 24 adult women between the ages of 24 and 65 (m = 41, SD = 14) living in Appal...

  15. Exercise Intensity Guidelines for Cancer Survivors: a Comparison with Reference Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Rey, E; Quevedo-Jerez, K; Maldonado-Martin, S; Herrero-Román, F

    2014-11-27

    The optimal dose of physical activity (PA) in cancer survivors (CS) is unknown due to the large variety of types of cancer, illness stages and treatments, low cardiorespiratory fitness, and physical inactivity. It is recommended that CS follow current PA guidelines for healthy population. There are no specific exercise prescription guidelines for CS. To know the cardiorespiratory parameters of CS in order to create exercise prescription guidelines for this population, 152 inactive CS were recruited to perform a cardiopulmonary exercise test. Peak oxygen uptake (VO 2peak ), ventilatory threshold (VT) and respiratory compensation point (RCP) determined 3 exercise intensity zones to create exercise intensity classification guidelines for CS. VO 2peak (18.7±4.6 mL·kg -1 ·min -1 ) and peak heart rate (HR peak ) (145.1±17.9 bpm) were lower than the estimated values (phealthy population: 41-64% VO 2max , 55-70% HR max , 23-48% HR res , 2.5-4 METs and 8-14 points on RPE scale. Intensities in PA guidelines for healthy population are not adapted to the characteristics of CS. For individual exercise prescription in CS specific PA guidelines should be used in order to maximize the benefits obtained by the use of aerobic exercise training. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Clinical practice guidelines of the French Association for Supportive Care in Cancer and the French Society for Psycho-oncology: refusal of treatment by adults afflicted with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faivre, J C; Adam, V; Block, V; Metzger, M; Salleron, J; Dauchy, S

    2017-11-01

    The study's purpose was to develop practical guidelines for assessment and management of refusal of treatment by adults afflicted with cancer. The French Association for Supportive Care in Cancer and the French Society for Psycho-oncology gathered a task force that applied a consensus methodology to draft guidelines studied predisposing situations, the diagnosis, regulatory aspects, and the management of refusal of treatment by adults afflicted with cancer. We propose five guidelines: (1) be aware of the conditions/profiles of patients most often associated with refusal of treatment so as to adequately underpin the care and support measures; (2) understand the complexity of the process of refusal and knowing how to accurately identify the type and the modalities of the refused treatments; (3) apply a way to systematically analyze refusal, thereby promoting progression from a situation of disaccord toward a consensual decision; (4) devise procedures, according to the legal context, to address refusal of treatment that safeguards the stakeholders in situations of sustained disaccord; and (5) know the indications for ethical collective decision-making. The quality of the relationship between patients and health professionals, and the communication between them are essential components involved in reaching a point of consent or refusal of treatment. A process of systematic analysis of refusal is recommended as the only way to ensure that all of the physiological, psychological, and contextual elements that are potentially involved are taken into account.

  17. Development of a Nursing Practice Guideline for Pre and Post-Operative Care of Gastric Cancer Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Mi-Ok; Park, Hyeoun-Ae

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to develop nursing practice guidelines and algorithms for the pre- and postoperative care of gastric cancer patients. Methods The guidelines and algorithms were developed based on a literature review and subject-matter experts' knowledge. The usefulness and applicability of the developed guidelines and algorithms were evaluated by the expert group. Results The guidelines comprised 64 recommendations and algorithms for admission care, preoperative care on t...

  18. ESTRO consensus guideline on target volume delineation for elective radiation therapy of early stage breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offersen, B.V.; Boersma, L.J.; Kirkove, C.; Hol, S.; Aznar, M.C.; Sola, A. Biete; Kirova, Y.M.; Pignol, J.P.; Remouchamps, V.; Verhoeven, K.; Weltens, C.; Arenas, M.; Gabrys, D.; Kopek, N.; Krause, M.; Lundstedt, D.; Marinko, T.; Montero, A.; Yarnold, J.; Poortmans, P.M.P.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Delineation of clinical target volumes (CTVs) is a weak link in radiation therapy (RT), and large inter-observer variation is seen in breast cancer patients. Several guidelines have been proposed, but most result in larger CTVs than based on conventional simulator-based RT.

  19. Treatment of Non-Metastatic Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: AUA/ASCO/ASTRO/SUO Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sam S; Bochner, Bernard H; Chou, Roger; Dreicer, Robert; Kamat, Ashish M; Lerner, Seth P; Lotan, Yair; Meeks, Joshua J; Michalski, Jeff M; Morgan, Todd M; Quale, Diane Z; Rosenberg, Jonathan E; Zietman, Anthony L; Holzbeierlein, Jeffrey M

    2017-09-01

    This multidisciplinary, evidence-based guideline for clinically non-metastatic muscle-invasive bladder cancer focuses on the evaluation, treatment and surveillance of muscle-invasive bladder cancer guided toward curative intent. A systematic review utilizing research from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality as well as additional supplementation by the authors and consultant methodologists was used to develop the guideline. Evidence-based statements were based on body of evidence strengths Grade A, B or C and were designated as Strong, Moderate and Conditional Recommendations with additional statements presented in the form of Clinical Principles or Expert Opinions. For the first time for any type of malignancy, the American Urological Association, American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology and Society of Urologic Oncology have formulated an evidence-based guideline based on a risk-stratified clinical framework for the management of muscle-invasive urothelial bladder cancer. This document is designed to be used in conjunction with the associated treatment algorithm. The intensity and scope of care for muscle-invasive bladder cancer should focus on the patient, disease and treatment response characteristics. This guideline attempts to improve a clinician's ability to evaluate and treat each patient, but higher quality evidence in future trials will be essential to improve level of care for these patients. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Saudi oncology society and Saudi urology association combined clinical management guidelines for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhateeb, Sultan; Abusamra, Ashraf; Rabah, Danny; Alotaibi, Mohammed; Mahmood, Rana; Almansour, Mubarak; Murshid, Esam; Alsharm, Abdullah; Alolayan, Ashwaq; Ahmad, Imran; Alkushi, Hussain; Alghamdi, Abdullah; Bazarbashi, Shouki

    2014-10-01

    In this report, updated guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of prostate cancer are presented. They are categorized according the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system 7(th) edition. The recommendations are presented with supporting evidence level.

  1. Saudi oncology society and Saudi urology association combined clinical management guidelines for prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Alkhateeb

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this report, updated guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of prostate cancer are presented. They are categorized according the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system 7 th edition. The recommendations are presented with supporting evidence level.

  2. European Society of Gynaecological Oncology (ESGO) Guidelines for Ovarian Cancer Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Querleu, Denis; Planchamp, Francois; Chiva, Luis; Fotopoulou, Christina; Barton, Desmond; Cibula, David; Aletti, Giovanni; Carinelli, Silvestro; Creutzberg, Carien; Davidson, Ben; Harter, Philip; Lundvall, Lene; Marth, Christian; Morice, Philippe; Rafii, Arash; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle; Rockall, Andrea; Sessa, Christiana; van der Zee, Ate; Vergote, Ignace; duBois, Andreas

    Objective The aim of this study was to develop clinically relevant and evidence-based guidelines as part of European Society of Gynaecological Oncology's mission to improve the quality of care for women with gynecological cancers across Europe. Methods The European Society of Gynaecological Oncology

  3. Validation of microsatellite instability histology scores with Bethesda guidelines in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Mustafa; Basak, Fatih; Sisik, Abdullah; Hasbahceci, Mustafa; Bas, Gurhan; Alimoglu, Orhan; Topal, Cumhur Selçuk; Kir, Gozde

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is a subgroup of colorectal cancer (CRC) which should be differentiated because of the high risk for additional cancers and risk evaluation for other family members, especially for CRC. It is not practical to perform genetic testing for all CRC patients; therefore, various prediction modalities, for example, Bethesda guideline (BG) were studied in the literature. We aimed to assess the association of microsatellite instability (MSI), histology scores, and BG for predicting HNPCC risk. Data were collected from CRC patients between 2009 and 2012. A total of 127 patients were retrospectively reviewed for BG status and the MSI scores, MsPath, and PathScore. Definitive statistical methods (mean, standard deviation, median, frequency, and percentage) were used to evaluate the study data. Comparison used Student's t-test, Continuity (Yates) correction, Fisher-Freeman-Halton test, Pearson correlation, and receiver operating characteristics curve analysis. Patients who were detected as Bethesda-positive had significantly higher MsPath and PathScore scores (P = 0.001 and P = 0.007, respectively). According to the cut-off value of 2.8 and 2.9 for MsPath and PathScore, respectively, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy were 90%, 43%, 22.8%, 95.8%, and 50.4% for MsPath, and 55%, 83.2%, 37.9%, 90.8%, and 78.7% for PathScore, respectively. The MSI scoring systems, MsPath, and PathScore, are reliable systems and effectively correlated with BG for predicting patients who need advanced analysis techniques because of the risk of HNPCC.

  4. Assessing adherence to the 2010 antiretroviral guidelines in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These clinical practice guidelines can be defined as systematically developed statements for both practitioners and patients, to assist with appropriate healthcare decisions for specific clinical circumstances.[2] Their intention is to improve healthcare processes, decrease practice variation and optimise use of resources.

  5. Exercise for Breast Cancer Survivors: Research Evidence and Clinical Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courneya, Kerry S.; Mackey, John R.; McKenzie, Donald C.

    2002-01-01

    Exercise can significantly benefit breast cancer survivors during and after treatment. Moderate intensity aerobic exercise as well as resistance training are important. Psychological health is optimized by enjoyable exercise that develops new skills, incorporates social interaction, and occurs in a stimulating environment. Several conditions…

  6. [Guideline thyroid cancer including diagnostics of the nodule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Links, T.P.; Heide, L.J. de; Janssen, M; Nederveen, F.H. Van; Lugt, A. van der; Vriens, M.R.; Smit, J.W.A.

    2015-01-01

    - Thyroid cancer is comparatively rare. Thyroid nodules, on the other hand, are frequently diagnosed as a result of increasing use of diagnostic imaging.- Cytological investigation of small nodules that have been found by chance often reveals micropapillary carcinoma that is probably not clinically

  7. EBM-based Clinical Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer (2013) issued by the Japan Pancreas Society: a synopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Koji; Okusaka, Takuji; Shimizu, Kyoko; Furuse, Junji; Ito, Yoshinori; Hanada, Keiji; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2014-10-01

    Clinical practice guidelines for pancreatic cancer based on evidence-based medicine (2006) were published by the Japan Pancreas Society (Committee for revision of clinical guidelines for pancreatic cancer) in March 2009 in Japanese, revised to Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer based on evidence-based medicine (2009) in July 2009 in Japanese and further revised to Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer (2013) in October 2013 in Japanese. These guidelines were established according to evidence-based medicine. A total of 629 papers were collected from among 4612 reports concerning pancreatic cancer listed in PubMed and Igakuchuo Zasshi between May 2007 and January 2011. This new set of guidelines was written by members of the Committee for the Revision of Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer in the Japan Pancreas Society. The guidelines provide an algorithm for the diagnosis (Fig. 1) and treatment (Fig. 2) of pancreatic cancer and address six subjects (Diagnosis, Surgery, Adjuvant therapy, Radiation therapy, Chemotherapy and stent therapy), with 35 clinical questions and 57 recommendations. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer IV. Radiotherapy following mastectomy for invasive breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenz, Frederik; Sperk, Elena [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Mannheim (Germany); Budach, Wilfried [Heinrich-Heine-University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Dunst, Juergen [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany); Feyer, Petra [Vivantes Hospital Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Fietkau, Rainer; Sauer, Rolf [University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Haase, Wulf [Formerly St.-Vincentius-Hospital, Karlsruhe (Germany); Harms, Wolfgang [St. Clara Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Piroth, Marc D. [Helios Hospital, Wuppertal (Germany); Sautter-Bihl, Marie-Luise [Municipal Hospital, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sedlmayer, Felix; Fussl, Christoph [Paracelsus Medical University Hospital, Salzburg (Germany); Souchon, Rainer; Collaboration: Breast Cancer Expert Panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO)

    2014-08-15

    Since the last recommendations from the Breast Cancer Expert Panel of the German Society for Radiation Oncology (DEGRO) in 2008, evidence for the effectiveness of postmastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) has grown. This growth is based on updates of the national S3 and international guidelines, as well as on new data and meta-analyses. New aspects were considered when updating the DEGRO recommendations. The authors performed a comprehensive survey of the literature. Data from recently published (meta-)analyses, randomized clinical trials and international cancer societies' guidelines yielding new aspects compared to 2008 were reviewed and discussed. New aspects were included in the current guidelines. Specific issues relating to particular PMRT constellations, such as the presence of risk factors (lymphovascular invasion, blood vessel invasion, positive lymph node ratio > 20 %, resection margins < 3 mm, G3 grading, young age/premenopausal status, extracapsular invasion, negative hormone receptor status, invasive lobular cancer, size > 2 cm or a combination of ≥ 2 risk factors) and 1-3 positive lymph nodes are emphasized. The evidence for improved overall survival and local control following PMRT for T4 tumors, positive resection margins, > 3 positive lymph nodes and in T3 N0 patients with risk factors such as lymphovascular invasion, G3 grading, close margins, and young age has increased. Recently identified risk factors such as invasive lobular subtype and negative hormone receptor status were included. For patients with 1-3 positive lymph nodes, the recommendation for PMRT has reached the 1a level of evidence. PMRT is mandatory in patients with T4 tumors and/or positive lymph nodes and/or positive resection margins. PMRT should be strongly considered in patients with T3 N0 tumors and risk factors, particularly when two or more risk factors are present. (orig.) [German] Seit der letzten Aktualisierung der 2008 publizierten Leitlinie der &apos

  9. Documentation of fertility preservation discussions for young adults with cancer: Examining compliance with treatment guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salsman, John M.; Yanez, Betina; Smith, Kristin N.; Beaumont, Jennifer L.; Snyder, Mallory A.; Barnes, Khouri; Clayman, Marla L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Professional guidelines have been developed to promote discussion between providers and newly diagnosed young adults with cancer about the possibility of cancer treatment-related infertility, but previous research suggests many young adults fail to receive this information. The aim of this study was to examine rates of and factors predictive of oncologists’ compliance with national guidelines for discussing potential treatment-related infertility with newly diagnosed young adults seen at an NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center. Methods We reviewed data from the electronic medical record for new clinic encounters between medical oncologists and young adults with cancer (ages 18–39) from 2010 to 2012. Data from oncologist discussions of fertility preservation were abstracted, as were patient (age, gender, race, ethnicity, cancer type) and oncologist (gender, graduation year from fellowship) characteristics. Results 1018 cases were reviewed with 454 patients (M=31.5 years old, 67.8% women) meeting inclusion criteria. Overall, 83% of patients were informed about potential treatment-related infertility with patients with breast cancer (85% informed), Hodgkin lymphoma (95% informed), Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (94% informed), leukemia (88% informed) or testicular cancer (100% informed) more likely to be informed than other cancer types (60%–74% informed). There was a significant effect for patient gender (OR=3.57, CI: 1.33, 9.60, p=0.012) with females being more likely to be informed than males. Conclusions Reported compliance with fertility preservation guidelines was greater than published rates. Higher compliance rates in female patients and in patients with cancers more common among young adults may reflect greater awareness of fertility-related concerns among these patients and their providers. PMID:26957616

  10. European clinical guidelines for Tourette Syndrome and other tic disorders. Part I : assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cath, Danielle C.; Hedderly, Tammy; Ludolph, Andrea G.; Stern, Jeremy S.; Murphy, Tara; Hartmann, Andreas; Czernecki, Virginie; Robertson, Mary May; Martino, Davide; Munchau, A.; Rizzo, R.

    A working group of the European Society for the Study of Tourette Syndrome (ESSTS) has developed the first European assessment guidelines of Tourette Syndrome (TS). The available literature including national guidelines was thoroughly screened and extensively discussed in the expert group of ESSTS

  11. New diagnostic criteria and severity assessment of acute cholecystitis in revised Tokyo guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yokoe, Masamichi; Takada, Tadahiro; Strasberg, Steven M.; Solomkin, Joseph S.; Mayumi, Toshihiko; Gomi, Harumi; Pitt, Henry A.; Gouma, Dirk J.; Garden, O. James; Büchler, Markus W.; Kiriyama, Seiki; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Tsuyuguchi, Toshio; Itoi, Takao; Yoshida, Masahiro; Miura, Fumihiko; Yamashita, Yuichi; Okamoto, Kohji; Gabata, Toshifumi; Hata, Jiro; Higuchi, Ryota; Windsor, John A.; Bornman, Philippus C.; Fan, Sheung-Tat; Singh, Harijt; de Santibanes, Eduardo; Kusachi, Shinya; Murata, Atsuhiko; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Jagannath, Palepu; Lee, Sunggyu; Padbury, Robert; Chen, Miin-Fu

    2012-01-01

    Background The Tokyo Guidelines for the management of acute cholangitis and cholecystitis (TG07) were published in 2007 as the world's first guidelines for acute cholangitis and cholecystitis. The diagnostic criteria and severity assessment of acute cholecystitis have since been widely used all over

  12. Survey of Policies and Guidelines on Antioxidant Use for Cancer Prevention, Treatment, and Survivorship in North American Cancer Centers: What Do Institutions Perceive as Evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Gyeongyeon; White, Jennifer; Zhong, Lihong; Carlson, Linda E

    2015-07-01

    Health care policies and guidelines that are clear and consistent with research evidence are important for maximizing clinical outcomes. To determine whether cancer centers in Canada and the United States had policies and/or guidelines about antioxidant use, and whether policies were aligned with the evidence base, we reviewed current research evidence in the field, and we undertook a survey of the policies and guidelines on antioxidant use at cancer institutions across North America. A survey of policies and guidelines on antioxidant use and the development and communication of the policies and guidelines was conducted by contacting cancer institutions in North America. We also conducted a Website search for each institution to explore any online resources. Policies and guidelines on antioxidant use were collected from 78 cancer institutions. Few cancer institutions had policies (5%) but most provided guidelines (69%). Antioxidants from diet were generally encouraged at cancer institutions, consistent with the current research evidence. In contrast, specific antioxidant supplements were generally not recommended at cancer institutions. Policies and guidelines were developed using evidence-based methods (53%), by consulting another source (35%), or through discussions/conference (26%), and communicated mainly through online resources (65%) or written handouts (42%). For cancer institutions that had no policy or guideline on antioxidants, lack of information and lack of time were the most frequently cited reasons. Policies and guidelines on antioxidants from diet were largely consistent with the research evidence. Policies and guidelines on antioxidant supplements during treatment were generally more restrictive than the research evidence might suggest, perhaps due to the specificity of results and the inability to generalize findings across antioxidants, adding to the complexity of their optimal and safe use. Improved communication of comprehensive research

  13. Interpretation of NCCN Guidelines: General Therapies on Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (Version 6. 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-en HUANG

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors in China and ranks the first of cancer-related death. The major etiological agent of lung cancer is an industry-made and promoted addictive product, so lung cancer is considered to be a unique disease in all cancers. Effective policies for public health are required to prevent the smoking initiation so as to reduce the mortality of lung cancer, so Food and Drug Administration (FDA has introduced a series of measures to monitor the tobacco products. As to patients with strong suspicion of lung cancer in stage Ⅰ-Ⅱ, a preoperative biopsy is needed and intra-operative diagnosis is necessary before pneumonectomy, bilobectomy or lobectomy if the preoperative tissue diagnosis is not obtained. However, lung cancer still cannot be easily diagnosed and cured, so the annual improvement and update of new therapeutic protocols and the development of new agents is of great significance. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC accounts for about 80% of all lung cancer, and above 75% NSCLC patients are in middle-advanced stage when diagnosed, so they have lost the optimal therapeutic opportunity and the 5-year survival rate is relatively low. Therefore, this study mainly interpreted the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN guidelines on the general therapies on NSCLC, hoping to provide references for the treatment of NSCLC patients and prolong their long-term survival.

  14. Colon Cancer Risk Assessment - Gauss Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    An executable file (in GAUSS) that projects absolute colon cancer risk (with confidence intervals) according to NCI’s Colorectal Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (CCRAT) algorithm. GAUSS is not needed to run the program.

  15. SEOM clinical guidelines in Hereditary Breast and ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llort, G; Chirivella, I; Morales, R; Serrano, R; Sanchez, A Beatriz; Teulé, A; Lastra, E; Brunet, J; Balmaña, J; Graña, B

    2015-12-01

    Approximately, 7 % of all breast cancers (BC) and 11-15 % of ovarian cancers (OC) are associated with inherited predisposition, mainly related to germline mutations in high penetrance BRCA1/2 genes. Clinical criteria for genetic testing are based on personal and family history to estimate a minimum 10 % detection rate. Selection criteria are evolving according to new advances in this field and the clinical utility of genetic testing. Multiplex panel testing carries its own challenges and we recommend inclusion of genes with clinical utility. We recommend screening with annual mammography from age 30 and breast MRI from age 25 for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy should be offered to women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, between 35 and 40 years and after completion of childbearing, or individualise based on the earliest age of ovarian cancer diagnosed in the family. Bilateral risk-reducing mastectomy is an option for healthy BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, as well as contralateral mastectomy for young patients with a prior BC diagnosis. BRCA genetic testing in patients with BC and OC may influence their locoregional and systemic treatment.

  16. Opioid Prescribing Laws and Emergency Department Guidelines for Chronic Non-Cancer Pain in Washington State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaer, Tracy L; Nwude, Azuka C

    2016-06-01

    Rising mortality rates, increased opioid prescription abuse, and a perceived need to provide practitioners with structured guidance in opioid prescribing have prompted the Washington State Legislature to establish new legal standards of practice regarding chronic non-cancer pain management. Clinicians are required to conduct a detailed physical examination and health history prior to treatment. Risk assessments for abuse and detailed periodic reviews of treatment are required at least every 6 months. Those considered "high risk" or who have significant psychiatric comorbidities will be required to sign and follow a written agreement or pain contract, obtain their pain prescriptions from a single provider, and submit to biological drug screening. Unless an exemption exists, patients prescribed > 120 mg of morphine-equivalents daily, considered severe pain nonresponders, necessitating dosage escalation, diagnosed with multifaceted mental health-related comorbidities, demonstrating diagnostic ambiguity, and/or requiring significant treatment individualization are referred to a pain specialist. Episodic care settings should refrain from supplying opioids to chronic pain patients whenever possible. The ER is for Emergencies coalition instituted the Seven Best Practices program throughout the state to reduce unnecessary visits, coordinate prescribing practice, reduce Medicaid expenditures, and improve overall patient care. The state reported approximately $33.65 million in savings in 2013 through the use of these practices and converting Medicaid participants from fee-for-service to managed care plans. Similar legislation to complement clinical practice guidelines is expected to be enacted in other states. It is vital that practitioners comprehend the new guidelines and make appropriate adjustments in their opioid prescribing habits. © 2015 World Institute of Pain.

  17. Qualitative assessment of agritourism safety guidelines: a demonstration project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutor-Marcom, Robin; Greer, Annette; Clay, Maria; Ellis, Tammy; Thompson, Tami; Adam-Samura, Esther Seisay

    2013-01-01

    In 2007, the National Children's Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety (NCCRAHS) published Agritourism Health and Safety Guidelines for Children to provide helpful recommendations for protecting the health and safety of children visiting agritourism farms. Supplement A: Policies and Procedures Guide and Supplement B: Worksite Guide were subsequently published in 2009 and provided agritourism farms with checklists to use in reviewing, planning, and implementing their own health and safety practices. In order to better understand what would be required of a farm wishing to implement the guidelines using Supplements A and B, the North Carolina Agromedicine Institute conducted a single-family farm demonstration project with support from the NCCRAHS. The aims of the project were to (1) determine child health and safety risks associated with an existing agritourism farm; (2) determine the cost of making improvements necessary to reduce risks; and (3) use project findings to motivate other agritourism farms, Cooperative Extension agents, and agritourism insurers to adopt or recommend Agritourism Health and Safety Guidelines for Children for their own farms or farms with which they work. At the conclusion of the study, the target farm was in compliance with an average of 86.9% of items in Supplements A and B. Furthermore, 89% of individuals self-identifying as farmers or farm workers and 100% of Cooperative Extension agents and agritourism insurers attending an end-of-project workshop indicated their intent to adopt or recommend Agritourism Health and Safety Guidelines for Children for their own farms or farms with which they work.

  18. Management of pulmonary nodules in head and neck cancer patients - Our experience and interpretation of the British Thoracic Society Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Richard; King, Matthew; Reid, Helen; Murchison, John T; Evans, Andrew; Nixon, Iain J

    2017-08-01

    and purpose of the study: The frequency of lung nodules in the head and neck cancer population is unknown, currently the only guidance available recommends following local policy. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of pulmonary nodules in our head and neck cancer group and interpret the recently updated British Thoracic Society (BTS) Lung Nodule Guidelines in a head and neck cancer setting. 100 patients were diagnosed with head and neck cancer between July 2013-March 2014, clinico-pathological, demographic and radiological data was extracted from the electronic records. Images with lung findings were re-reviewed by a single consultant radiologist for patients with lung pathology on the initial staging CT report. Twenty patients (20%) had discreet pulmonary findings on CT. Eleven (11%) had lung nodules, 6 (6%) had lesions suspicious for metastasis and 3 (3%) had co-incidental bronchogenic primary cancers. These patients were re-imaged between 6 and 18 months and in 1 patient the previously identified 7 mm nodule had progressed to 16 mm at 1 year. There was no set follow up imaging protocol used. The MDT in NHS Lothian has reviewed the BTS guidance and now has a local policy for the management of lung nodules in head and neck cancer patients. Lung Nodules in the head and neck cancer population are common >10%. Higher risk patients with larger nodules should be risk assessed with validated assessment tools. PET-CT has a place in the assessment of lung nodules when risk of malignancy is high. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. European clinical guidelines for Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders. Part I: assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cath, Danielle C; Hedderly, Tammy; Ludolph, Andrea G

    2011-01-01

    members. Detailed clinical assessment guidelines of tic disorders and their comorbidities in both children and adults are presented. Screening methods that might be helpful and necessary for specialists' differential diagnosis process are suggested in order to further analyse cognitive abilities...

  20. Technical Review Guidelines for Environmental Impact Assessments in the Tourism, Energy and Mining Sectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA coordinated a regional collaborative process with Central America and Dominican Republic Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR) partners to develop Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Technical Review Guidelines for three sectors.

  1. The Gap between Tobacco Treatment Guidelines, Health Service Organization, and Clinical Practice in Comprehensive Cancer Centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mazza

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Smoking cessation is necessary to reach a higher quality of life, and, for a cancer patient, it represents an important step in improving the outcome of both prognosis and therapy. Being a cancer patient addicted to nicotine may be a critical situation. We conducted a survey to monitor how many comprehensive cancer centres in Italy have an outpatient smoker clinic and which kinds of resources are available. We also inquired about inpatient services offering psychological and pharmacological support for smoking cessation, reduction, or care of acute nicotine withdrawal symptoms. What we have witnessed is a significant gap between guidelines and services. Oncologists and cancer nurses are overscheduled, with insufficient time to engage in discussion on a problem that they do not consider directly related to cancer treatment. Furthermore, smoking habits and limited training in tobacco dependence and treatment act as an important barrier and lead to the undervaluation of smokers' needs.

  2. Oncologist's knowledge and implementation of guidelines for breakthrough cancer pain in Spain: CONOCE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López López, R; Camps Herrero, C; Khosravi-Shahi, P; Guillem Porta, V; Carrato Mena, A; Garcia-Foncillas, J; Cruz Hernández, J J; Gascón Vilaplana, P; Antón Torres, A; Diaz-Rubio, E; Feyjoo Saus, M; Aranda Aguilar, E

    2017-10-03

    Breakthrough cancer pain (BTcP) has been shown to be a prevalent and poor prognostic factor for oncologic patients, which remain under diagnosed and undertreated. In 2012, the Spanish Society of Medical Oncology (SEOM) published a clinical practice guideline (CPG) for the treatment of cancer pain which specifically addressed the management of BTcP. Fundación ECO designed a qualitative study using an Internet-based survey to investigate the attitudes toward, compliance with, and use of SEOM Guideline. A total of 83 oncologists with a mean experience of 13 years responded. Overall, 82% were aware of different guidelines to manage BTcP. Notably, attitudes toward guidelines were highly positive and there was nearly unanimous agreement that CPG provided the best scientific evidence available (99%), on the minimum information to be gathered for the medical history (100%), on the need for a specific treatment for BTcP (100%), and fentanyl as the first-choice drug (99%). Interestingly, there were discrepancies between what oncologists agreed with and what they do in clinical practice. In fact, 87.6% declare full compliance with SEOM guideline, although adherence to registration of BTcP data in medical records ranged from 30.1 to 91.6% (mean 64.5%); therapeutic management compliance was higher ranging from 75.9 to 91.6%. Main barriers identified were time pressure together with vague statements and limited dissemination of the guidelines. Despite oncologist's clinical practice is increasingly guided by GPC, it suffers from limited compliance, at least in part due to suboptimal statements. Improved dissemination and education are needed to enhance guideline implementation.

  3. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer VI: therapy of locoregional breast cancer recurrences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harms, Wolfgang [St. Claraspital, Abteilung fuer Radioonkologie, Basel (Switzerland); Budach, W. [Heinrich-Heine-University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Dunst, J. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany); Feyer, P. [Vivantes Hospital Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Fietkau, R.; Sauer, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Krug, D. [University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Piroth, M.D. [Witten/Herdecke University, HELIOS-Hospital Wuppertal, Wuppertal (Germany); Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Municipal Hospital, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sedlmayer, F. [Paracelsus Medical University Hospital, Salzburg (Austria); Wenz, F. [University of Heidelberg, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Haase, W.; Souchon, R.; Collaboration: Breast Cancer Expert Panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO)

    2016-04-15

    To update the practical guidelines for radiotherapy of patients with locoregional breast cancer recurrences based on the current German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines 2012. A comprehensive survey of the literature using the search phrases ''locoregional breast cancer recurrence'', ''chest wall recurrence'', ''local recurrence'', ''regional recurrence'', and ''breast cancer'' was performed, using the limits ''clinical trials'', ''randomized trials'', ''meta-analysis'', ''systematic review'', and ''guidelines''. Patients with isolated in-breast or regional breast cancer recurrences should be treated with curative intent. Mastectomy is the standard of care for patients with ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence. In a subset of patients, a second breast conservation followed by partial breast irradiation (PBI) is an appropriate alternative to mastectomy. If a second breast conservation is performed, additional irradiation should be mandatory. The largest reirradiation experience base exists for multicatheter brachytherapy; however, prospective clinical trials are needed to clearly define selection criteria, long-term local control, and toxicity. Following primary mastectomy, patients with resectable locoregional breast cancer recurrences should receive multimodality therapy including systemic therapy, surgery, and radiation +/- hyperthermia. This approach results in high local control rates and long-term survival is achieved in a subset of patients. In radiation-naive patients with unresectable locoregional recurrences, radiation therapy is mandatory. In previously irradiated patients with a high risk of a second local recurrence after surgical resection or in patients with unresectable recurrences, reirradiation should be strongly considered. Indication and dose concepts

  4. [European Association of Urology guidelines on assessment and nonsurgical management of urinary incontinence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, M G; Bosch, R J L; Burkhard, F C; Cruz, F; Madden, T B; Nambiar, A K; Neisius, A; de Ridder, D J M K; Tubaro, A; Turner, W H; Pickard, R S

    2013-04-01

    The previous European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines on urinary incontinence comprised a summary of sections of the 2009 International Consultation on Incontinence. A decision was made in 2010 to rewrite these guidelines based on an independent systematic review carried out by the EAU guidelines panel, using a sustainable methodology. We present a short version of the full guidelines on assessment, diagnosis, and nonsurgical treatment of urinary incontinence, with the aim of increasing their dissemination. Evidence appraisal included a pragmatic review of existing systematic reviews and independent new literature searches, based on Population, Intervention, Comparator, Outcome questions. Appraisal of papers was carried out by an international panel of experts, who also collaborated on a series of consensus discussions, to develop concise structured evidence summaries and action-based recommendations using a modified Oxford system. The full version of the guidelines is available online (http://www.uroweb.org/guidelines/online-guidelines/). The guidelines include algorithms that refer the reader back to the supporting evidence, and they are more immediately useable in daily clinical practice. These new guidelines present an up-to-date summary of the available evidence, together with clear clinical algorithms and action-based recommendations based on the best available evidence. Where such evidence does not exist, they present a consensus of expert opinion. Copyright © 2012 AEU. Published by Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. Using communication to manage uncertainty about cervical cancer screening guideline adherence among Appalachian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Elisia L; Gordon, Allison Scott; Record, Rachael; Shaunfield, Sara; Jones, Grace M; Collins, Tom

    Changes to the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations for cervical cancer preventive services have led to patient confusion, especially in medically underserved populations. We investigated how patient uncertainty concerning cervical cancer screening guidelines is appraised and managed through communication with healthcare providers by conducting in-depth, face-to-face interviews with 24 adult women between the ages of 24 and 65 (m = 41, SD = 14) living in Appalachia Kentucky. In general, participants expressed a high degree of uncertainty about the updated cervical cancer screening guidelines and appraised this uncertainty as both a danger and an opportunity. Communication with healthcare providers served both to exacerbate and to mitigate patient uncertainty. The study identifies how health care providers may use the change in USPSTF guidelines as a 'teachable moment' to productively counsel patients on the importance of timely screening, the typical progression of certain types of high-risk HPV infection to cervical cancer, and the importance of follow-up care.

  6. A controlled ‘before-after’ study: impact of a clinical guidelines programme and regional cancer network organization on medical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray-Coquard, I; Philip, T; de Laroche, G; Froger, X; Suchaud, J-P; Voloch, A; Mathieu-Daudé, H; Fervers, B; Farsi, F; Browman, G P; Chauvin, F

    2002-01-01

    A regional cancer network has been set up in the Rhône-Alpes region in France. The aim of the project is to improve the quality of care and to rationalize prescriptions in the network. In this network, we assessed the impact of the implementation of a clinical practice guidelines project by assessing the conformity of practice with the guidelines and comparing this with the conformity in an external matched control group from another French region without a regional cancer network. Four hospitals (private and public) accepted to assess the impact of the clinical practice guidelines on the management of breast and colon cancer in the experimental group and three hospitals (private and public) in the control group. In 1994 and 1996, women with non-metastatic breast cancer (282 and 346 patients in the experimental group, 194 and 172 patients in the control group, respectively) and all new patients with colon cancer (95 and 94 patients in the experimental group, and 89 and 118 patients in the control group, respectively) were selected. A controlled ‘before-after’ study, using institutional medical records of patients with breast and colon cancer. The medical decisions concerning the patients were analyzed to assess their compliance with the clinical practice guidelines. When medical decisions were judged to be non-compliant, we verified if they were based on scientific evidence in a published article, if they were not, the medical decision was classified as having ‘no convincing supporting scientific evidence’ The compliance rates were significantly higher in 1996 than in 1994 in the experimental group; 36% (126 out of 346) vs 12% (34 out of 282) and 46% (56 out of 123) vs 14% (14 out of 103) (P<0.001) for breast and colon cancer, respectively. Whereas, in the control group the compliance rates were the same for the two periods; 7% (12 out of 173) vs 6% (12 out of 194) (P=0.46) and 39% (49 out of 126) vs 32% (31 out of 96), P=0.19. In the experimental group

  7. Using Oncology Nursing Society Cancer Chemotherapy Guidelines as a basis for continuing education in rural hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, S A

    1995-05-01

    To describe a workshop developed to teach nurses caring for patients with cancer in a southern, rural area how to administer chemotherapy in an inpatient or homecare setting. The Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) Cancer Chemotherapy Guidelines and published articles and books. An oncology clinical nurse specialist teaching at a local university developed and presented 10 hours of didactic content and a 6-hour clinical practicum. The workshop was conducted in association with a community hospital, which offered oncology care to patients with cancer in the community. All nurses who successfully completed the workshop demonstrated improved ability in caring for patients with cancer and in administering chemotherapy. The ONS Cancer Chemotherapy Guidelines provided an excellent outline for the development of an initial course on the science of chemotherapy and management of related symptoms. Many nurses work in rural areas where they are expected to provide competent nursing care to a variety of specialized patient populations, yet they have limited access to educational opportunities. A workshop format is feasible and can provide the education necessary for nurses who care for patients with cancer.

  8. Association between the Adherence to the International Guidelines for Cancer Prevention and Mammographic Density.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Castelló

    Full Text Available Mammographic density (MD is considered a strong predictor of Breast Cancer (BC. The objective of the present study is to explore the association between MD and the compliance with the World Cancer Research Fund and the American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR recommendations for cancer prevention.Data of 3584 women attending screening from a population-based multicenter cross-sectional study (DDM-Spain collected from October 7, 2007 through July 14, 2008, was used to calculate a score that measures the level of compliance with the WCRF/AICR recommendations: R1Maintain adequate body weight; R2Be physically active; 3RLimit the intake of high density foods; R4Eat mostly plant foods; R5Limit the intake of animal foods; R6Limit alcohol intake; R7Limit salt and salt preserved food intake; R8Meet nutritional needs through diet. The association between the score and MD (assessed by a single radiologist using a semi-quantitative scale was evaluated using ordinal logistic models with random center-specific intercepts adjusted for the main determinants of MD. Stratified analyses by menopausal status and smoking status were also carried out.A higher compliance with the WCRF/AICR recommendations was associated with lower MD (OR1-unit increase = 0.93 95%CI:0.86;0.99. The association was stronger in postmenopausal women (OR = 0.91 95%CI:0.84;0.99 and nonsmokers (OR = 0.87;95%CI:0.80;0.96 for nonsmokers, OR = 1.01 95%CI:0.91;1.12 for smokers, P-interaction = 0.042. Among nonsmokers, maintaining adequate body weight (OR = 0.81 95%CI:0.65;1.01, practicing physical activity (OR = 0.68 95%CI:0.48;0.96 and moderating the intake of high-density foods (OR = 0.58 95%CI:0.40;0.86 and alcoholic beverages (OR = 0.76 95%CI:0.55;1.05 were the recommendations showing the strongest associations with MD.postmenopausal women and non-smokers with greater compliance with the WCRF/AICR guidelines have lower MD. These results may provide guidance to design specific

  9. Follow-up after treatment for head and neck cancer: United Kingdom National Multidisciplinary Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simo, R; Homer, J; Clarke, P; Mackenzie, K; Paleri, V; Pracy, P; Roland, N

    2016-05-01

    This is the official guideline endorsed by the specialty associations involved in the care of head and neck cancer patients in the UK. In the absence of high-level evidence base for follow-up practices, the duration and frequency are often at the discretion of local centres. By reviewing the existing literature and collating experience from varying practices across the UK, this paper provides recommendations on the work up and management of lateral skull base cancer based on the existing evidence base for this rare condition. Recommendations • Patients should be followed up to a minimum of five years with a prolonged follow-up for selected patients. (G) • Patients should be followed up at least two monthly in the first two years and three to six monthly in the subsequent years. (G) • Patients should be seen in dedicated multidisciplinary head and neck oncology clinics. (G) • Patients should be followed up by dedicated multidisciplinary clinical teams. (G) • The multidisciplinary follow-up team should include clinical nurse specialists, speech and language therapists, dietitians and other allied health professionals in the role of key workers. (G) • Clinical assessment should include adequate clinical examination including fibre-optic rigid or flexible nasopharyngolaryngoscopy. (R) • Magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography imaging should be used when recurrence is suspected. (R) • Narrow band imaging can be used in the follow-up in selected sites. (R) • Second primary tumours should be part of rationale of follow-up and therefore adequate screening strategies should be used to detect them. (G) • Patients should be educated with regard to the appearance and detection of recurrences. (G) • Patients with persistent pain should be investigated to exclude recurrent disease. (R) • Patients should be offered support with tobacco and alcohol cessation services. (R).

  10. Best practice guidelines in the psychosocial management of HPV-related head and neck cancer: recommendations from the European Head and Neck Cancer Society's Make Sense Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, M; Licitra, L; Vermorken, J B; Bernier, J; Parmar, S; Golusinski, W; Castellsagué, X; Leemans, C R

    2016-10-01

    Over the past three decades, oral human papillomavirus (HPV) has been associated with an increase in the incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) in several countries. Specialist oncologists in head and neck cancer are observing a wider range of demographics, sexual behaviours, and survival outcomes with their patients. Additionally, there are fewer smokers, consumers of alcohol, or people of lower socioeconomic status than in previous decades. In order to support patients, the European Head and Neck Society's Make Sense Campaign aims to promote best practice in the management of head and neck cancer through the delivery of counselling, psychological assessment, support with the patient experience following HPV-related cancer diagnosis, sexual impact (in terms of communication, behaviour and prevention), facilitating access to educational resources about HPV in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and OPSCC, and early referral if necessary. New concerns about psychosocial distress and unmet psychosocial needs following diagnosis, therefore, exist throughout the disease and treatment periods. Oncologists treating patients with HPV-related head and neck cancer must integrate new parameters focused on infection risk transmission and sexual topics. The development and dissemination of best practice guidelines through The European Head and Neck Cancer Society Make Sense Campaign will help healthcare professionals to be more confident and resourceful in supporting patients with HPV-related head and neck cancer. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Diet Assessment Methods in the Nurses' Health Studies and Contribution to Evidence-Based Nutritional Policies and Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Frank B; Satija, Ambika; Rimm, Eric B; Spiegelman, Donna; Sampson, Laura; Rosner, Bernard; Camargo, Carlos A; Stampfer, Meir; Willett, Walter C

    2016-09-01

    To review the contribution of the Nurses' Health Studies (NHSs) to diet assessment methods and evidence-based nutritional policies and guidelines. We performed a narrative review of the publications of the NHS and NHS II between 1976 and 2016. Through periodic assessment of diet by validated dietary questionnaires over 40 years, the NHSs have identified dietary determinants of diseases such as breast and other cancers; obesity; type 2 diabetes; cardiovascular, respiratory, and eye diseases; and neurodegenerative and mental health disorders. Nutritional biomarkers were assessed using blood, urine, and toenail samples. Robust findings, from the NHSs, together with evidence from other large cohorts and randomized dietary intervention trials, have contributed to the evidence base for developing dietary guidelines and nutritional policies to reduce intakes of trans fat, saturated fat, sugar-sweetened beverages, red and processed meats, and refined carbohydrates while promoting higher intake of healthy fats and carbohydrates and overall healthful dietary patterns. The long-term, periodically collected dietary data in the NHSs, with documented reliability and validity, have contributed extensively to our understanding of the dietary determinants of various diseases, informing dietary guidelines and shaping nutritional policy.

  12. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer I. Breast-conserving therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Municipal Hospital Karlsruhe (Germany); Budach, W. [Univ. Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany); Dunst, J. [Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany); Feyer, P. [Klinikum Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Haase, W. [St.-Vincentius-Kliniken, Karlsruhe (Germany); Harms, W. [Univ. Hospital Heidelberg (Germany); Sedlmayer, F. [Univ. Hospital, Salzburger Landeskliniken, Salzburg (Austria); Souchon, R. [Allgemeines Krankenhaus Hagen (Germany); Wenz, F. [Univ. Hospital Mannheim (Germany); Sauer, R. [Univ. Hospital Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    Background: The present paper is an update of the practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer published in 2006 by the breast cancer expert panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO). These recommendations have been elaborated on the basis of the S3 guidelines of the German Cancer Society that were revised in March 2007 by an interdisciplinary panel. Methods: The DEGRO expert panel performed a comprehensive survey of the literature, comprising lately published meta-analyses, data from recent randomized trials and guidelines of international breast cancer societies, referring to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. In addition to the more general statements of the German Cancer Society, this paper emphasizes specific radiotherapeutic aspects. It is focused on radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery. Technique, targeting, and dose are described in detail. Results: Postoperative radiotherapy significantly reduces rates of local recurrence. The more pronounced the achieved reduction is, the more substantially it translates into improved survival. Four prevented local recurrences result in one avoided breast cancer death. This effect is independent of age. An additional boost provides a further absolute risk reduction for local recurrence irrespective of age. Women > 50 years have a hazard ratio of 0.59 in favor of the boost. For DCIS, local recurrence was 2.4% per patient year even in a subgroup with favorable prognostic factors leading to premature closure of the respective study due to ethical reasons. For partial-breast irradiation as a sole method of radiotherapy, results are not yet mature enough to allow definite conclusions. Conclusion: After breast-conserving surgery, whole-breast irradiation remains the gold standard of treatment. The indication for boost irradiation should no longer be restricted to women {<=} 50 years. Partial-breast irradiation is still an experimental treatment and therefore discouraged outside controlled

  13. Guidelines for the welfare and use of animals in cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, P; Aboagye, E O; Balkwill, F; Balmain, A; Bruder, G; Chaplin, D J; Double, J A; Everitt, J; Farningham, D A H; Glennie, M J; Kelland, L R; Robinson, V; Stratford, I J; Tozer, G M; Watson, S; Wedge, S R; Eccles, S A

    2010-01-01

    Animal experiments remain essential to understand the fundamental mechanisms underpinning malignancy and to discover improved methods to prevent, diagnose and treat cancer. Excellent standards of animal care are fully consistent with the conduct of high quality cancer research. Here we provide updated guidelines on the welfare and use of animals in cancer research. All experiments should incorporate the 3Rs: replacement, reduction and refinement. Focusing on animal welfare, we present recommendations on all aspects of cancer research, including: study design, statistics and pilot studies; choice of tumour models (e.g., genetically engineered, orthotopic and metastatic); therapy (including drugs and radiation); imaging (covering techniques, anaesthesia and restraint); humane endpoints (including tumour burden and site); and publication of best practice. PMID:20502460

  14. Guideline-based management of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Justin R.; Dahm, Philipp; Chang, Sam S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) represents a broad spectrum of disease, the hallmarks of which include disease recurrence and progression. Clinicians have a number of surgical and therapeutic options at their disposal when treating this disease, and the underlying evidence continues to evolve. A number of professional organizations have invested in the development of clinical practice guidelines to guide patient management. Materials and Methods: We review and summarize four major guidelines, the American Urological Association, the European Association of Urology, the International Consultation on Urological Disease and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Results: Guideline panels differed in their composition, methodological approach and structure of recommendations. Despite this, many recommendations were similar between various panels, although differences are present in panel recommendations related to initial diagnosis and treatment, adjuvant therapy and disease surveillance. Conclusions: Guideline recommendations are similar at many decision points that clinicians face when managing NMIBC, although they are far from uniform. While future prospective, well-designed studies will hopefully clarify NMIBC management, urologists ultimately must rely on a combination of evidence-based recommendations, which they should seek to integrate with patients’ values and preferences and the individual circumstances to provide the best possible patient care. PMID:26604443

  15. Guideline-based management of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin R Gregg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC represents a broad spectrum of disease, the hallmarks of which include disease recurrence and progression. Clinicians have a number of surgical and therapeutic options at their disposal when treating this disease, and the underlying evidence continues to evolve. A number of professional organizations have invested in the development of clinical practice guidelines to guide patient management. Materials and Methods: We review and summarize four major guidelines, the American Urological Association, the European Association of Urology, the International Consultation on Urological Disease and the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Results: Guideline panels differed in their composition, methodological approach and structure of recommendations. Despite this, many recommendations were similar between various panels, although differences are present in panel recommendations related to initial diagnosis and treatment, adjuvant therapy and disease surveillance. Conclusions: Guideline recommendations are similar at many decision points that clinicians face when managing NMIBC, although they are far from uniform. While future prospective, well-designed studies will hopefully clarify NMIBC management, urologists ultimately must rely on a combination of evidence-based recommendations, which they should seek to integrate with patients' values and preferences and the individual circumstances to provide the best possible patient care.

  16. Going DEEP: guidelines for building simulation-based team assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grand, James A; Pearce, Marina; Rench, Tara A; Chao, Georgia T; Fernandez, Rosemarie; Kozlowski, Steve W J

    2013-05-01

    Whether for team training, research or evaluation, making effective use of simulation-based technologies requires robust, reliable and accurate assessment tools. Extant literature on simulation-based assessment practices has primarily focused on scenario and instructional design; however, relatively little direct guidance has been provided regarding the challenging decisions and fundamental principles related to assessment development and implementation. The objective of this manuscript is to introduce a generalisable assessment framework supplemented by specific guidance on how to construct and ensure valid and reliable simulation-based team assessment tools. The recommendations reflect best practices in assessment and are designed to empower healthcare educators, professionals and researchers with the knowledge to design and employ valid and reliable simulation-based team assessments. Information and actionable recommendations associated with creating assessments of team processes (non-technical 'teamwork' activities) and performance (demonstration of technical proficiency) are presented which provide direct guidance on how to Distinguish the underlying competencies one aims to assess, Elaborate the measures used to capture team member behaviours during simulation activities, Establish the content validity of these measures and Proceduralise the measurement tools in a way that is systematically aligned with the goals of the simulation activity while maintaining methodological rigour (DEEP). The DEEP framework targets fundamental principles and critical activities that are important for effective assessment, and should benefit healthcare educators, professionals and researchers seeking to design or enhance any simulation-based assessment effort.

  17. ESO-ESMO 3rd international consensus guidelines for breast cancer in young women (BCY3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluch-Shimon, Shani; Pagani, Olivia; Partridge, Ann H; Abulkhair, Omalkhair; Cardoso, Maria-João; Dent, Rebecca Alexandra; Gelmon, Karen; Gentilini, Oreste; Harbeck, Nadia; Margulies, Anita; Meirow, Dror; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Senkus, Elzbieta; Spanic, Tanja; Sutliff, Medha; Travado, Luzia; Peccatori, Fedro; Cardoso, Fatima

    2017-10-01

    The 3rd International Consensus Conference for Breast Cancer in Young Women (BCY3) took place in November 2016, in Lugano, Switzerland organized by the European School of Oncology (ESO) and the European Society of Medical Oncologists (ESMO). Consensus recommendations for the management of breast cancer in young women were updated from BCY2 with incorporation of new evidence to inform the guidelines, and areas of research priorities were identified. This manuscript summarizes the ESO-ESMO international consensus recommendations, which are also endorsed by the European Society of Breast Specialists (EUSOMA). Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Evidence-based clinical practice guidelines for interventional pain management in cancer pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushma Bhatnagar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intractable cancer pain not amenable to standard oral or parenteral analgesics is a horrifying truth in 10-15% of patients. Interventional pain management techniques are an indispensable arsenal in pain physician′s armamentarium for severe, intractable pain and can be broadly classified into neuroablative and neuromodulation techniques. An array of neurolytic techniques (chemical, thermal, or surgical can be employed for ablation of individual nerve fibers, plexuses, or intrathecalneurolysis in patients with resistant pain and short life-expectancy. Neuraxial administration of drugs and spinal cord stimulation to modulate or alter the pain perception constitutes the most frequently employed neuromodulation techniques. Lately, there is a rising call for early introduction of interventional techniques in carefully selected patients simultaneously or even before starting strong opioids. After decades of empirical use, it is the need of the hour to head towards professionalism and standardization in order to secure credibility of specialization and those practicing it. Even though the interventional management has found a definite place in cancer pain, there is a dearth of evidence-based practice guidelines for interventional therapies in cancer pain. This may be because of paucity of good quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs evaluating their safety and efficacy in cancer pain. Laying standardized guidelines based on existing and emerging evidence will act as a foundation step towards strengthening, credentialing, and dissemination of the specialty of interventional cancer pain management. This will also ensure an improved decision-making and quality of life (QoL of the suffering patients.

  19. Nutritional management in head and neck cancer: United Kingdom National Multidisciplinary Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talwar, B; Donnelly, R; Skelly, R; Donaldson, M

    2016-05-01

    . Patients should have their weight and nutritional intake monitored regularly to determine whether their energy requirements are being met. (R) • Perform nutritional assessment of cancer patients frequently. (G) • Initiate nutritional intervention early when deficits are detected. (G) • Integrate measures to modulate cancer cachexia changes into the nutritional management. (G) • Start nutritional therapy if undernutrition already exists or if it is anticipated that the patient will be unable to eat for more than 7 days. Enteral nutrition should also be started if an inadequate food intake (60 per cent of estimated energy expenditure) is anticipated for more than 10 days. (R) • Use standard polymeric feed. (G) • Consider gastrostomy insertion if long-term tube feeding is necessary (greater than four weeks). (R) • Monitor nutritional parameters regularly throughout the patient's cancer journey. (G) • Pre-operative: ○ Patients with severe nutritional risk should receive nutrition support for 10-14 days prior to major surgery even if surgery has to be delayed. (R) ○ Consider carbohydrate loading in patients undergoing head and neck surgery. (R) • Post-operative: ○ Initiate tube feeding within 24 hours of surgery. (R) ○ Consider early oral feeding after primary laryngectomy. (R) • Chyle Leak: ○ Confirm chyle leak by analysis of drainage fluid for triglycerides and chylomicrons. (R) ○ Commence nutritional intervention with fat free or medium chain triglyceride nutritional supplements either orally or via a feeding tube. (R) ○ Consider parenteral nutrition in severe cases when drainage volume is consistently high. (G) • Weekly dietetic intervention is offered for all patients undergoing radiotherapy treatment to prevent weight loss, increase intake and reduce treatments interruptions. (R) • Offer prophylactic tube feeding as part of locally agreed guidelines, where oral nutrition is inadequate. (R) • Offer nutritional intervention (dietary

  20. An assessment of oral cancer curricula in dental hygiene programmes: implications for cancer control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacker, K K; Kaste, L M; Homsi, K D; LeHew, C W

    2016-11-01

    To assess oral cancer prevention and early detection curricula in Illinois associate-degree dental hygiene programmes and highlight global health applications. An email invitation was sent to each Illinois associate-degree granting dental hygiene programme's oral cancer contact to participate in a survey via a SurveyMonkey™ link to a 21-item questionnaire. Questions elicited background information on each programme and inquired about curriculum and methods used for teaching oral cancer prevention and early detection. Eight of the 12 (67%) programmes responded. Three (37.5%) reported having a specific oral cancer curriculum. Five (62.5%) require students to perform examinations for signs and symptoms of oral cancer at each clinic visit. Variations exist across the programmes in the number of patients each student sees annually and the number of oral cancer examinations each student performs before graduation. Seven programmes (87.5%) conduct early detection screening in community settings. All programmes included risk assessment associated with tobacco. All other risk factors measured were treated inconsistently. Significant differences in training and experience were reported across Illinois dental hygiene programmes. Training is neither standardized nor uniformly comprehensive. Students' preparation for delivering prevention and early detection services to their patients could be strengthened to ensure competence including reflection of risk factors and behaviours in a global context. Regular review of curricular guidelines and programme content would help dental hygienists meet the expectations of the Crete Declaration on Oral Cancer Prevention. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Could a revision of the current guidelines for cancer drug use improve the quality of cancer treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lippert TH

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Theodor H Lippert,1 Hans-Jörg Ruoff,1 Manfred Volm2 1Medical Faculty, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany; 2Medical Faculty, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany Abstract: Clinical practice guidelines are indispensable for such a variable disease as malignant solid tumors, with the complex possibilities of drug treatment. The current guidelines may be criticized on several points, however. First, there is a lack of information on the outcome of treatment, such as the expected success and failure rates. Treating not only drug responders but also nonresponders, that is, patients with drug resistance, must result in failures. There is no mention of the possibility of excluding the drug nonresponders, identifiable by special laboratory tests and no consideration is given to the different side effects of the recommended drug regimens. Nor are there any instructions concerning tumor cases for which anticancer drug treatment is futile. In such cases, early palliative care may lead to significant improvements in both life quality and life expectancy. Not least, there is no transparency concerning the preparation of the guidelines: persons cannot be identified who could give a statement of conflicts of interest, and responsibility is assumed only by anonymous medical associations. A revision of the current guidelines could considerably improve cancer treatment. Keywords: anticancer drugs, quality of guidelines, critical remarks

  2. DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF BREAST CANCER IN SITU. RUSSIAN ASSOCIATION OF ONCOLOGICAL MAMMOLOGY CLINICAL GUIDELINES (PROJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Semiglazov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the first and foremost tasks of the Russian Association of Oncological Mammology (RAOM is to develop clinical guidelines on diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer taking into account international experience. The guidelines must also be applicable in all regions of the Russian Federation allowing all Russian specialist to be informed about the latest strategies of diagnosis and treatment.These clinical guidelines are based on the following consensus documents:• St. Gallen Expert Panel (2011, 2013,• Expert Panel of the IX International Conference “White Nights – 2012”,• Expert Panel of the RAOM (2013,• International consensus on treatment of metastatic breast cancer ABC 1,• NCCN (2014  and ESMO (2011 practical guidelines,as well as the results of large international randomized studies conducted in partnership with Russian oncological centers.The guidelines take into account the results of the analysis of a cumulative database on breast cancer treatment methods performed at• N.N. Petrov National Medical Research Oncology Center, Ministry of Health of Russia,• Saint  Petersburg City Clinical Oncological  Dispensary.Our guidelines are based on methods that are available everywhere in the Russian Federation, treatment schemes and drugs are presented in accordance with the marketing authorization of the Ministry of Health of Russia, drug therapy takes into account biological subtypes of breast cancer, different courses of the disease as well as nonuniform situation with drug availability in various regions of the Russian Federation.Obviously, such materials cannot serve as a direct guide for action (every patient’s disease is different, but they can lend a helping hand to a doctor striving to treat patients according to the latest achievements of modern oncology.All-Russian non-governmental organization Russian Association of Oncological Mammology. President of the RAOM, corresponding member of the RAS, Prof. V

  3. Design guidelines for self-assessment support for adult academic distance learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menendez Blanco, Maria; van der Veer, Gerrit; Benvenuti, Laura

    2011-01-01

    This contribution focuses on adult distance learning. Based on experiences at the Open University of the Netherlands we investigate specific problems that our students have with self-assessment and metacognition while studying. Starting from a literature review and complementing this with available...... student data from our teaching research center, we developed a conceptual framework that was iteratively adjusted and assessed by a questionnaire study and interviews. This allowed us to develop design guidelines for self-assessment support in distance learning environments. These guidelines were reviewed...

  4. Individual Breast Cancer risk assessment in Underserved Populations: Integrating empirical Bioethics and Health Disparities Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Emily E.; Hoskins, Kent

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that individual breast cancer risk assessment may improve adherence to recommended screening and prevention guidelines, thereby decreasing morbidity and mortality. Further research on the use of risk assessment models in underserved minority populations is critical to informing national public health efforts to eliminate breast cancer disparities. However, implementing individual breast cancer risk assessment in underserved patient populations raises particular ethical issues that require further examination. After reviewing these issues, we will discuss how empirical bioethics research can be integrated with health disparities research to inform the translation of research findings. Our in-progress National Cancer Institute (NCI) funded study, How Do Underserved Minority Women Think About Breast Cancer?, conducted in the context of a larger study on individual breast cancer risk assessment, is presented as a model. PMID:23124498

  5. A practical guideline for human error assessment: A causal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayele, Y. Z.; Barabadi, A.

    2017-12-01

    To meet the availability target and reduce system downtime, effective maintenance have a great importance. However, maintenance performance is greatly affected in complex ways by human factors. Hence, to have an effective maintenance operation, these factors needs to be assessed and quantified. To avoid the inadequacies of traditional human error assessment (HEA) approaches, the application of Bayesian Networks (BN) is gaining popularity. The main purpose of this paper is to propose a HEA framework based on the BN for maintenance operation. The proposed framework aids for assessing the effects of human performance influencing factors on the likelihood of human error during maintenance activities. Further, the paper investigates how operational issues must be considered in system failure-rate analysis, maintenance planning, and prediction of human error in pre- and post-maintenance operations. The goal is to assess how performance monitoring and evaluation of human factors can effect better operation and maintenance.

  6. Reductions in Long-Term Suspensions Following Adoption of the Virginia Student Threat Assessment Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, Dewey G.; Gregory, Anne; Fan, Xitao

    2011-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study examined the adoption of the Virginia Student Threat Assessment Guidelines in 23 high schools. After training, school administrators and other staff members demonstrated substantial increases in knowledge of threat assessment principles and decreased commitment to zero tolerance approaches. Schools using the…

  7. Guidelines, Criteria, and Rules of Thumb for Evaluating Normed and Standardized Assessment Instruments in Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchetti, Domenic V.

    1994-01-01

    In the context of developing assessment instruments in psychology, issues of standardization, norming procedures, and test reliability and validity are discussed. Criteria, guidelines, and rules of thumb are provided to help the clinician with instrument selection for a given psychological assessment. (SLD)

  8. Adherence over time to cervical cancer screening guidelines: insights from the Canadian National Population Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Catherine; McLeish, Kendra; Fuller-Thomson, Esme

    2012-02-01

    A substantial percentage of North American women are nonadherent to cervical cancer screening guidelines despite the effectiveness of the Papinicolaou (pap) test for papillomavirus. Our objective was to determine factors associated with changes in adherence for cervical cancer screening guidelines over a 14-year period. Using data from cycles 1 (1994-1995) through 7 (2006-2007) of the Canadian National Population Health Survey, we used logistic regression to compare the regularity of pap testing (at least once every 36 months) among women. We compared women with increasing adherence to pap testing guidelines to those who were never adherent, and women with decreasing adherence to those who were always adherent. The sample included women aged 20-70 years who responded in at least three of seven waves of data collection and had not undergone a hysterectomy (n=4949). Independent variables were based on Andersen's Behavioral Model of predisposing, enabling, and need variables. The majority of our sample were either always adherent (61.4%) or had increasing adherence (9.9%) over the course of the study. Another 4.8% were never adherent, and 6.6% had decreasing adherence over their involvement in the study. Predominantly, both enabling (e.g., presence of regular doctor) and need (e.g., birth control pill use, obesity) factors were associated with changing patterns of adherence. Physicians have a crucial role to play in the trajectories of adherence to cervical cancer screening guidelines over time. In addition, women with obesity need to be particularly targeted for services because they are vulnerable to negative trajectories in adherence over time.

  9. Molecular Testing Guideline for Selection of Lung Cancer Patients for EGFR and ALK Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeman, Neal I.; Cagle, Philip T.; Beasley, Mary Beth; Chitale, Dhananjay Arun; Dacic, Sanja; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Jenkins, Robert Brian; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Saldivar, Juan-Sebastian; Squire, Jeremy; Thunnissen, Erik; Ladanyi, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Objective To establish evidence-based recommendations for the molecular analysis of lung cancers that are that are required to guide EGFR- and ALK-directed therapies, addressing which patients and samples should be tested, and when and how testing should be performed. Participants Three cochairs without conflicts of interest were selected, one from each of the 3 sponsoring professional societies: College of American Pathologists, International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, and Association for Molecular Pathology. Writing and advisory panels were constituted from additional experts from these societies. Evidence Three unbiased literature searches of electronic databases were performed to capture articles published published from January 2004 through February 2012, yielding 1533 articles whose abstracts were screened to identify 521 pertinent articles that were then reviewed in detail for their relevance to the recommendations. Evidence was formally graded for each recommendation. Consensus Process Initial recommendations were formulated by the cochairs and panel members at a public meeting. Each guideline section was assigned to at least 2 panelists. Drafts were circulated to the writing panel (version 1), advisory panel (version 2), and the public (version 3) before submission (version 4). Conclusions The 37 guideline items address 14 subjects, including 15 recommendations (evidence grade A/B). The major recommendations are to use testing for EGFR mutations and ALK fusions to guide patient selection for therapy with an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor, respectively, in all patients with advanced-stage adenocarcinoma, regardless of sex, race, smoking history, or other clinical risk factors, and to prioritize EGFR and ALK testing over other molecular predictive tests. As scientific discoveries and clinical practice outpace the completion of randomized clinical trials, evidence-based guidelines developed

  10. ESTRO consensus guideline on target volume delineation for elective radiation therapy of early stage breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offersen, Birgitte V; Boersma, Liesbeth J; Kirkove, Carine; Hol, Sandra; Aznar, Marianne C; Biete Sola, Albert; Kirova, Youlia M; Pignol, Jean-Philippe; Remouchamps, Vincent; Verhoeven, Karolien; Weltens, Caroline; Arenas, Meritxell; Gabrys, Dorota; Kopek, Neil; Krause, Mechthild; Lundstedt, Dan; Marinko, Tanja; Montero, Angel; Yarnold, John; Poortmans, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Delineation of clinical target volumes (CTVs) is a weak link in radiation therapy (RT), and large inter-observer variation is seen in breast cancer patients. Several guidelines have been proposed, but most result in larger CTVs than based on conventional simulator-based RT. The aim was to develop a delineation guideline obtained by consensus between a broad European group of radiation oncologists. During ESTRO teaching courses on breast cancer, teachers sought consensus on delineation of CTV through dialogue based on cases. One teacher delineated CTV on CT scans of 2 patients, followed by discussion and adaptation of the delineation. The consensus established between teachers was sent to other teams working in the same field, both locally and on a national level, for their input. This was followed by developing a broad consensus based on discussions. Borders of the CTV encompassing a 5mm margin around the large veins, running through the regional lymph node levels were agreed, and for the breast/thoracic wall other vessels were pointed out to guide delineation, with comments on margins for patients with advanced breast cancer. The ESTRO consensus on CTV for elective RT of breast cancer, endorsed by a broad base of the radiation oncology community, is presented to improve consistency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Staging of uterine cervical cancer with MRI: guidelines of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balleyguier, Corinne [Radiology Department, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Sala, E. [Radiology Department, Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Cunha, T. da [Radiology Department, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia de Lisboa Francisco Gentil, Lisbon (Portugal); Bergman, A. [Department of Radiology, Uppsala University Hospital (Sweden); Brkljacic, B. [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital ' ' Dubrava' ' , Zagreb (Croatia); Danza, F. [Dipartimento di Bioimmaginie Scienze Radiologiche, Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Rome (Italy); Forstner, R. [Zentralroentgeninstitut, Landeskliniken Salzburg, Salzburg (Austria); Hamm, B. [Department of Radiology, Charite Humboldt Universitaet, Berlin (Germany); Kubik-Huch, R. [Institut Radiologie, Kantonsspital Baden, Baden (Switzerland); Lopez, C.; Manfredi, R. [Department of Radiology, ' ' A. Gemelli' ' University Hospital, Rome (Italy); McHugo, J. [Department of Radiology, Birmingham Women' s Hospital, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Oleaga, L. [Radiology Department, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain); Togashi, K. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Kinkel, K. [Institut de Radiologie, Clinique des Grangettes, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2011-05-15

    To design clear guidelines for the staging and follow-up of patients with uterine cervical cancer, and to provide the radiologist with a framework for use in multidisciplinary conferences. Methods: Guidelines for uterine cervical cancer staging and follow-up were defined by the female imaging subcommittee of the ESUR (European Society of Urogenital Radiology) based on the expert consensus of imaging protocols of 11 leading institutions and a critical review of the literature. The results indicated that high field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) should include at least two T2-weighted sequences in sagittal, axial oblique or coronal oblique orientation (short and long axis of the uterine cervix) of the pelvic content. Axial T1-weighted sequence is useful to detect suspicious pelvic and abdominal lymph nodes, and images from symphysis to the left renal vein are required. The intravenous administration of Gadolinium-chelates is optional but is often required for small lesions (<2 cm) and for follow-up after treatment. Diffusion-weighted sequences are optional but are recommended to help evaluate lymph nodes and to detect a residual lesion after chemoradiotherapy. Expert consensus and literature review lead to an optimized MRI protocol to stage uterine cervical cancer. MRI is the imaging modality of choice for preoperative staging and follow-up in patients with uterine cervical cancer. (orig.)

  12. Canada’s Guideline 9: improving SOGIE claims assessment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moira Dustin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Asylum seekers making claims relating to their sexual orientation and gender identity often face unfair refusal. New guidance from the Immigration and Refugee Board of Canada takes admirable steps towards improving claims assessment, and offers a model for practitioners elsewhere.

  13. EPa`s program for risk assessment guidelines: Exposure issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callahan, M.A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    Three major issues to be dealt with over the next ten years in the exposure assessment field are: consistency in terminology, the impact of computer technology on the choice of data and modeling, and conceptual issues such as the use of time-weighted averages.

  14. Diagnostic criteria and severity assessment of acute cholecystitis: Tokyo Guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirota, Masahiko; Takada, Tadahiro; Kawarada, Yoshifumi; Nimura, Yuji; Miura, Fumihiko; Hirata, Koichi; Mayumi, Toshihiko; Yoshida, Masahiro; Strasberg, Steven; Pitt, Henry; Gadacz, Thomas R.; de Santibanes, Eduardo; Gouma, Dirk J.; Solomkin, Joseph S.; Belghiti, Jacques; Neuhaus, Horst; Buechler, Markus W.; Fan, Sheung-Tat; Ker, Chen-Guo; Padbury, Robert T.; Liau, Kui-Hin; Hilvano, Serafin C.; Belli, Giulio; Windsor, John A.; Dervenis, Christos

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this article is to propose new criteria for the diagnosis and severity assessment of acute cholecystitis, based on a systematic review of the literature and a consensus of experts. A working group reviewed articles with regard to the diagnosis and treatment of acute cholecystitis and

  15. Assessing adherence to the 2010 antiretroviral guidelines in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    what combinations of drugs to use when a change was indicated. • what laboratory ... 1 Infectious Disease Clinic,1 Military Hospital, Pretoria, South Africa. 2 Department of ... rollout clinic of the Infectious Diseases Clinic Pharmacy at 1 Military Hospital (1MH) over a period of 3 years to assess clinicians' adherence to the ...

  16. Salvage radical prostatectomy for recurrent prostate cancer: verification of European Association of Urology guideline criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Philipp; Steuber, Thomas; Ahyai, Sascha; Kriegmair, Maximilian; Schiffmann, Jonas; Boehm, Katharina; Heinzer, Hans; Michl, Uwe; Schlomm, Thorsten; Haese, Alexander; Huland, Hartwig; Graefen, Markus; Tilki, Derya

    2016-01-01

    To analyse oncological and functional outcomes of salvage radical prostatectomy (SRP) in patients with recurrent prostate cancer and to compare outcomes of patients within and outside the European Association of Urology (EAU) guideline criteria (organ-confined prostate cancer ≤T2b, Gleason score ≤7 and preoperative PSA level 0.2 ng/mL and rising, continence as the use of 0-1 safety pad/day, and potency as a five-item version of the International Index of Erectile Function score of ≥18. The median follow-up was 36 months. After SRP, 42.0% of the patients experienced BCR, 15.9% developed metastasis, and 5.5% died from prostate cancer. Patients fulfilling the EAU guideline criteria were less likely to have positive lymph nodes (LNs) and had significantly better BCR-free survival (5-year BCR-free survival 73.9% vs 11.6%; P = 0.001). In multivariate analysis, low-dose-rate brachytherapy as primary treatment (P = 0.03) and presence of positive LNs at SRP (P = 0.02) were significantly associated with worse BCR-free survival. The presence of positive LNs or Gleason score >7 at SRP were independently associated with metastasis. The urinary continence rate at 1 year after SRP was 74%. Seven patients (12.7%) had complications ≥III (Clavien grade). SRP is a safe procedure providing good cancer control and reasonable urinary continence. Oncological outcomes are significantly better in patients who met the EAU guideline recommendations. © 2015 The Authors BJU International © 2015 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. [Interpretation of the updates of NCCN 2017 version 1.0 guideline for colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gong

    2017-01-25

    The NCCN has recently released its 2017 version 1.0 guideline for colorectal cancer. There are several updates from this new version guideline which are believed to change the current clinical practice. Update one, low-dose aspirin is recommended for patients with colorectal cancer after colectomy for secondary chemoprevention. Update two, biological agents are removed from the neoadjuvant treatment regimen for resectable metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). This update is based on lack of evidence to support benefits of biological agents including bevacizumab and cetuximab in the neoadjuvant setting. Both technical criteria and prognostic information should be considered for decision-making. Currently biological agents may not be excluded from the neoadjuvant setting for patients with resectable but poor prognostic disease. Update three, panitumumab and cetuximab combination therapy is only recommended for left-sided tumors in the first line therapy. The location of the primary tumor can be both prognostic and predictive in response to EGFR inhibitors in metastatic colorectal cancer. Cetuximab and panitumumab confer little benefit to patients with metastatic colorectal cancer in the primary tumor originated on the right side. On the other hand, EGFR inhibitors provide significant benefit compared with bevacizumab-containing therapy or chemotherapy alone for patients with left primary tumor. Update four, PD-1 immune checkpoint inhibitors including pembrolizumab or nivolumab are recommended as treatment options in patients with metastatic deficient mismatch repair (dMMR) colorectal cancer in second- or third-line therapy. dMMR tumors contain thousands of mutations, which can encode mutant proteins with the potential to be recognized and targeted by the immune system. It has therefore been hypothesized that dMMR tumors may be sensitive to PD-1 inhibitors.

  18. Implementation of cancer pain guidelines by acute care nurse practitioners using an audit and feedback strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulko, Dorothy; Hertz, Elisheva; Julien, Jerelyn; Beck, Susan; Mooney, Kathi

    2010-01-01

    Despite the availability of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for cancer pain, consistent integration of these principles into practice has not been achieved. The optimal method for implementing CPGs and the impact of guidelines on healthcare outcomes remain uncertain. This study evaluated the effect of an audit and feedback (A/F) intervention on nurse practitioner (NP) implementation of cancer pain CPGs and on hospitalized patients' self-report of pain and satisfaction with pain relief. Eight NPs and two groups of 96 patients were the sources of data. Eligible patients in both groups completed the Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form (BPI-SF) within 24 h of admission and every 48 h until discharge. During A/F, NPs received weekly feedback on pain scores and guideline adherence. Nurse practitioner adherence to CPGs increased during A/F. Pain intensity did not significantly differ between groups. Intervention group patients reported significantly less overall pain interference (p pain relief increased from 68.4% to 95.1% during A/F (p pain severity underscores the need to consider symptom clusters when studying pain.

  19. Practice guidelines for management of cervical cancer in Korea: a Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology Consensus Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Myong Cheol; Lee, Maria; Shim, Seung Hyuk; Nam, Eun Ji; Lee, Jung Yun; Kim, Hyun Jung; Lee, Yoo Young; Lee, Kwang Beom; Park, Jeong Yeol; Kim, Yun Hwan; Ki, Kyung Do; Song, Yong Jung; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Kim, Sunghoon; Lee, Jeong Won; Kim, Jae Weon; Bae, Duk Soo; Lee, Jong Min

    2017-05-01

    Clinical practice guidelines for gynecologic cancers have been developed by academic society from several countries. Each guideline reflected their own insurance system and unique medical environment, based on the published evidence. The Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology (KSGO) published the first edition of practice guidelines for gynecologic cancer treatment in late 2006; the second edition was released in July 2010 as an evidence-based recommendation. The Guidelines Revision Committee was established in 2015 and decided to develop the third edition of the guidelines in an advanced format based on evidence-based medicine, embracing up-to-date clinical trials and qualified Korean data. These guidelines cover strategies for diagnosis and treatment of primary and recurrent cervical cancer. The committee members and many gynecologic oncologists derived key questions through discussions, and a number of relevant scientific literature were reviewed in advance. Recommendations for each specific question were developed by the consensus conference, and they are summarized here, along with the details. The objective of these practice guidelines is to establish standard policies on issues in clinical practice related to the management in cervical cancer based on the results in published papers to date and the consensus of experts as a KSGO Consensus Statement. Copyright © 2017. Asian Society of Gynecologic Oncology, Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology.

  20. Laparoscopic colectomy for cancer: Improved compliance with guidelines for chemotherapy and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Roger H; Kavanaugh, Mindie M; Caldito, Gloria C

    2017-06-01

    Laparoscopic surgery for colon cancer has been demonstrated in clinical trials to have short-term benefits when compared to the open surgical approach. Guidelines of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network recommend that patients with stage III or high-risk stage II colon cancer undergo adjuvant chemotherapy. We hypothesized that laparoscopic colectomy is associated with increased compliance to recommendations for chemotherapy, a lesser time to start of chemotherapy, and increased overall survival. The National Cancer Data Base was queried to identify patients with stage III or high-risk stage II colon cancer (T4, positive margins, chemotherapy, time from diagnosis and date of operation to start of chemotherapy, and overall survival were compared. A total of 48,257 patients were included for analysis; 18,801 patients underwent laparoscopic colectomy and 29,456 underwent open colectomy. Laparoscopic colectomy patients received adjuvant chemotherapy at a somewhat greater rate than open colectomy (66.2% vs 59.4%, P chemotherapy, mean time to start of chemotherapy after definitive resection was somewhat less for laparoscopic colectomy than open colectomy (48.7 vs 52.7 days, P chemotherapy for stage III and high-risk stage II colon cancer, as well as a slightly lesser time to start of chemotherapy and improved overall survival. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Improving cancer pain control with NCCN guideline-based analgesic administration: a patient-centered outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjan, Nora

    2014-09-01

    Improving the control of cancer-related pain (CRP) is a clinical and ethical imperative. Clinical research has documented improved treatment tolerance and survival rates among patients with cancer who have effective pain control. Barriers to CRP control include inadequate patient and physician education. Meta-analyses of patient education studies correlate improvements in CRP control with improved communications with health care providers and the implementation of strategies that assist with adherence to medication schedules. These strategies build patient confidence, allowing better self-management of pain and reduced psychological consequences. For physicians, ample educational resources exist in CRP management. However, in both the inpatient and outpatient settings, compliance with NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Adult Cancer Pain continues to be less than 70%, and more than one-third of patients continue to receive inadequate doses of analgesics. Patient-centered outcomes have become an integral end point in health policy, and the nation's medical training, research, and delivery systems are transforming to a value-based accreditation and reimbursement system. Pain control is a significant patient-centered outcome in cancer care, because pain adversely impacts function and affects all domains of quality of life. Agreement is clear on the value of health care interventions that relieve suffering from cancer pain and restore personal dignity. Copyright © 2014 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  2. New trends in nutritional status assessment of cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, A; De Lorenzo, A; Cadeddu, F; Iacopino, L; Grande, M

    2011-05-01

    Nutritional status assessment and support should be considered a valuable measure within the overall oncology strategy. Despite extensive research in the field of clinical nutrition, definite guidelines to base rational nutritional assessment and support in cancer patients are still debated. This review examines different approaches to nutritional status in cancer patients. The assessment of nutritional status is usually based on anthropometric measures, biochemical or laboratory tests, clinical indicators and dietary assessment. At present, body composition (BC) is rarely measured in the clinical setting because it is thought to be too unmanageable and time-consuming. However, using new technologies, the estimation of fat, lean and body fluids, that is significant in the management of nutrition therapies in oncology, has become easy. The present study evaluates the different methods of nutrition assessment today available, especially body composition (BC) measurements. Furthermore, nutrition assessment, relevance of nutritional support and choice of nutritional strategy, in surgical patients, are discussed. Given the clinical relevance of nutritional intervention in patients' quality of life, the nutritional status assessment has a key role in oncological and surgical practice and should include BC assessment in order to tailor nutritional treatment to patients' individual requirements. Furthermore, administration of the supplemented diet before and after surgery seemed to be the best strategy to reduce complications and length of hospital stay.

  3. The use of clinical guidelines for referral of patients with lesions suspicious for oral cancer may ease early diagnosis and improve education of healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoane, Juan; Corral-Lizana, Cesar; González-Mosquera, Antonio; Cerero, Rocío; Esparza, Germán; Sanz-Cuesta, Teresa; Varela-Centelles, Pablo

    2011-11-01

    Early diagnosis and referral of oral cancer is essential. Successful implementation of clinical guidelines must include current practitioners and students. To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of students at oral cancer screening and to assess the effectiveness of clinical referral guidelines. Fifth year dental students were randomly allocated to either control (n=19) or experimental groups (n = 18). Both received the customary training in oral diagnosis. The experimental group underwent a 2 hour workshop where the guidelines for the referral of suspicious lesions were discussed. Three months later, a set of 51 clinical cases including benign, malignant, and precancerous conditions/lesions were used to assess the screening ability of each subject. All 37 students entered the study. Sensitivity (control group) ranged from 16.7% to 66.7%; the experimental group scored from 16.7% to 83.3%. Fifty percent of the experimental students reached sensitivity values ≥ 62.5% (p = 0.01). Diagnostic specificity (control group) spanned from 80% to 93.3% (median = 50%); amongst experimental group it ranged from 82.2% to 97.8% (median = 92.8%); (p = 0.003). Concordance -control group- was X = 82.5 (SD = 3.2), and X = 88.2 (SD = 4.3) for the experimental, (p > 0.001). Cohen's kappa test was poor (K cancers urgently (p = 0.002) and left less unreferred cancers (0.04). This group also referred more precancerous lesions/conditions urgently (p = 0.02). The implementation of a clinical referral guideline at undergraduate level has proved valuable, under experimental conditions, to significantly increase diagnostic abilities of the examiners and thus to improve screening for oral cancer.

  4. Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: AUA/ASTRO/SUO Guideline. Part I: Risk Stratification, Shared Decision Making, and Care Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanda, Martin G; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A; Kirkby, Erin; Chen, Ronald C; Crispino, Tony; Fontanarosa, Joann; Freedland, Stephen J; Greene, Kirsten; Klotz, Laurence H; Makarov, Danil V; Nelson, Joel B; Rodrigues, George; Sandler, Howard M; Taplin, Mary Ellen; Treadwell, Jonathan R

    2017-12-14

    This guideline is structured to provide a clinical framework stratified by cancer severity to facilitate care decisions and guide the specifics of implementing the selected management options. The summary presented represents Part I of the two-part series dedicated to Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer: AUA/ASTRO/SUO Guideline discussing risk stratification and care options by cancer severity. The systematic review utilized in the creation of this guideline was completed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and through additional supplementation by ECRI Institute. This review included articles published between January 2007 and March 2014 with an update search conducted through August 2016. When sufficient evidence existed, the body of evidence for a particular treatment was assigned a strength rating of A (high), B (moderate), or C (low) for support of Strong, Moderate, or Conditional Recommendations. Additional information is provided as Clinical Principles and Expert Opinions (table 2 in supplementary unabridged guideline, http://jurology.com/). The AUA (American Urological Association), ASTRO, and SUO (Society of Urologic Oncology) formulated an evidence-based guideline based on a risk-stratified clinical framework for the management of localized prostate cancer. This guideline attempts to improve a clinician's ability to treat patients diagnosed with localized prostate cancer, but higher quality evidence in future trials will be essential to improve the level of care for these patients. In all cases, patient preferences should be considered when choosing a management strategy. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. DIET@NET: Best Practice Guidelines for dietary assessment in health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cade, Janet E; Warthon-Medina, Marisol; Albar, Salwa; Alwan, Nisreen A; Ness, Andrew; Roe, Mark; Wark, Petra A; Greathead, Katharine; Burley, Victoria J; Finglas, Paul; Johnson, Laura; Page, Polly; Roberts, Katharine; Steer, Toni; Hooson, Jozef; Greenwood, Darren C; Robinson, Sian

    2017-11-15

    Dietary assessment is complex, and strategies to select the most appropriate dietary assessment tool (DAT) in epidemiological research are needed. The DIETary Assessment Tool NETwork (DIET@NET) aimed to establish expert consensus on Best Practice Guidelines (BPGs) for dietary assessment using self-report. The BPGs were developed using the Delphi technique. Two Delphi rounds were conducted. A total of 131 experts were invited, and of these 65 accepted, with 48 completing Delphi round I and 51 completing Delphi round II. In all, a total of 57 experts from North America, Europe, Asia and Australia commented on the 47 suggested guidelines. Forty-three guidelines were generated, grouped into the following four stages: Stage I. Define what is to be measured in terms of dietary intake (what? who? and when?); Stage II. Investigate different types of DATs; Stage III. Evaluate existing tools to select the most appropriate DAT by evaluating published validation studies; Stage IV. Think through the implementation of the chosen DAT and consider sources of potential biases. The Delphi technique consolidated expert views on best practice in assessing dietary intake. The BPGs provide a valuable guide for health researchers to choose the most appropriate dietary assessment method for their studies. These guidelines will be accessible through the Nutritools website, www.nutritools.org .

  6. DEGRO practical guidelines. Radiotherapy of breast cancer I. Radiotherapy following breast conserving therapy for invasive breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlmayer, F. [Paracelsus Medical Univ. Hospital, Salzburg (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology; Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Staedtisches Klinium Karlsruhe (Germany). Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie; Budach, W. [University Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany)] [and others

    2013-10-15

    Background and purpose: The aim of the present paper is to update the practical guidelines for postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy of breast cancer published in 2007 by the breast cancer expert panel of the German Society for Radiooncology (Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Radioonkologie, DEGRO). The present recommendations are based on a revision of the German interdisciplinary S-3 guidelines published in July 2012. Methods: A comprehensive survey of the literature concerning radiotherapy following breast conserving therapy (BCT) was performed using the search terms 'breast cancer', 'radiotherapy', and 'breast conserving therapy'. Data from lately published meta-analyses, recent randomized trials, and guidelines of international breast cancer societies, yielding new aspects compared to 2007, provided the basis for defining recommendations according to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. In addition to the more general statements of the DKG (Deutsche Krebsgesellschaft), this paper addresses indications, target definition, dosage, and technique of radiotherapy of the breast after conservative surgery for invasive breast cancer. Results: Among numerous reports on the effect of radiotherapy during BCT published since the last recommendations, the recent EBCTCG report builds the largest meta-analysis so far available. In a 15 year follow-up on 10,801 patients, whole breast irradiation (WBI) halves the average annual rate of disease recurrence (RR 0.52, 0.48-0.56) and reduces the annual breast cancer death rate by about one sixth (RR 0.82, 0.75-0.90), with a similar proportional, but different absolute benefit in prognostic subgroups (EBCTCG 2011). Furthermore, there is growing evidence that risk-adapted dose augmentation strategies to the tumor bed as well as the implementation of high precision RT techniques (e.g., intraoperative radiotherapy) contribute substantially to a further reduction of local relapse rates. A main focus of ongoing

  7. Clinical assessment of chest pain and guidelines for imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruettner, J., E-mail: joachim.gruettner@umm.de [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Henzler, T. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Sueselbeck, T. [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Fink, C. [Institute of Clinical Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany); Borggrefe, M.; Walter, T. [1st Department of Medicine (Cardiology), University Medical Center Mannheim, Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, Mannheim (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    For many emergency facilities, risk assessment of patients with diffuse chest pain still poses a major challenge. In their currently valid recommendations, the international cardiological societies have defined a standardized assessment of the prognostically relevant cardiac risk criteria. Here the classic sequence of basic cardiac diagnostics including case history (cardiac risk factors), physical examination (haemodynamic and respiratory vital parameters), ECG (ST segment analysis) and laboratory risk markers (troponin levels) is paramount. The focus is, on the one hand, on timely indication for percutaneous catheterization, especially in patients at high cardiac risk with or without ST-segment elevation in the ECG, and, on the other hand, on the possibility of safely discharging patients with intermediate or low cardiac risk after non-invasive exclusion of a coronary syndrome. For patients in the intermediate or low risk group, physical or pharmacological stress testing in combination with scintigraphy, echocardiography or magnetic resonance imaging is recommended in addition to basic diagnostics. Moreover, the importance of non-invasive coronary imaging, primarily cardiac CT angiography (CCTA), is increasing. Current data show that in intermediate or low risk patients this method is suitable to reliably rule out coronary heart disease. In addition, attention is paid to the major differential diagnoses of acute coronary syndrome, particularly pulmonary embolism and aortic dissection. Here the diagnostic method of choice is thoracic CT, possibly also in combination with CCTA aiming at a triple rule-out.

  8. Current status and guidelines for the assessment of tumour vascular support with dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, K.A. [University of Sussex, Clinical Imaging Sciences Centre, Brighton and Sussex Medical School, Falmer (United Kingdom); Lee, T.Y. [Robarts Research Institute, Imaging Research Laboratories, London, Ontario (Canada); Goh, V. [St Thomas' Hospital, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Klotz, E. [Computed Tomography H IM CT PLM-E PA, Siemens Healthcare Sector, Forchheim (Germany); Cuenod, C. [INSERM U970 PARCC, Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou (HEGP), Paris (France); Bisdas, S. [Eberhard Karls University, Department of Neuroradiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Groves, A.M. [University College London, University College Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Hayball, M.P. [Cambridge Computed Imaging Ltd, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Alonzi, R. [Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Northwood (United Kingdom); Brunner, T. [Gray Institute for Radiation, Oncology and Biology, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2012-07-15

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) assesses the vascular support of tumours through analysis of temporal changes in attenuation in blood vessels and tissues during a rapid series of images acquired with intravenous administration of iodinated contrast material. Commercial software for DCE-CT analysis allows pixel-by-pixel calculation of a range of validated physiological parameters and depiction as parametric maps. Clinical studies support the use of DCE-CT parameters as surrogates for physiological and molecular processes underlying tumour angiogenesis. DCE-CT has been used to provide biomarkers of drug action in early phase trials for the treatment of a range of cancers. DCE-CT can be appended to current imaging assessments of tumour response with the benefits of wide availability and low cost. This paper sets out guidelines for the use of DCE-CT in assessing tumour vascular support that were developed using a Delphi process. Recommendations encompass CT system requirements and quality assurance, radiation dosimetry, patient preparation, administration of contrast material, CT acquisition parameters, terminology and units, data processing and reporting. DCE-CT has reached technical maturity for use in therapeutic trials in oncology. The development of these consensus guidelines may promote broader application of DCE-CT for the evaluation of tumour vascularity. (orig.)

  9. Management Guidelines for Children with Thyroid Nodules and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waguespack, Steven G.; Bauer, Andrew J.; Angelos, Peter; Benvenga, Salvatore; Cerutti, Janete M.; Dinauer, Catherine A.; Hamilton, Jill; Hay, Ian D.; Luster, Markus; Parisi, Marguerite T.; Rachmiel, Marianna; Thompson, Geoffrey B.; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Previous guidelines for the management of thyroid nodules and cancers were geared toward adults. Compared with thyroid neoplasms in adults, however, those in the pediatric population exhibit differences in pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and long-term outcomes. Furthermore, therapy that may be recommended for an adult may not be appropriate for a child who is at low risk for death but at higher risk for long-term harm from overly aggressive treatment. For these reasons, unique guidelines for children and adolescents with thyroid tumors are needed. Methods: A task force commissioned by the American Thyroid Association (ATA) developed a series of clinically relevant questions pertaining to the management of children with thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Using an extensive literature search, primarily focused on studies that included subjects ≤18 years of age, the task force identified and reviewed relevant articles through April 2014. Recommendations were made based upon scientific evidence and expert opinion and were graded using a modified schema from the United States Preventive Services Task Force. Results: These inaugural guidelines provide recommendations for the evaluation and management of thyroid nodules in children and adolescents, including the role and interpretation of ultrasound, fine-needle aspiration cytology, and the management of benign nodules. Recommendations for the evaluation, treatment, and follow-up of children and adolescents with DTC are outlined and include preoperative staging, surgical management, postoperative staging, the role of radioactive iodine therapy, and goals for thyrotropin suppression. Management algorithms are proposed and separate recommendations for papillary and follicular thyroid cancers are provided. Conclusions: In response to our charge as an independent task force appointed by the ATA, we developed recommendations based on scientific evidence and expert opinion for the

  10. Management Guidelines for Children with Thyroid Nodules and Differentiated Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Gary L; Waguespack, Steven G; Bauer, Andrew J; Angelos, Peter; Benvenga, Salvatore; Cerutti, Janete M; Dinauer, Catherine A; Hamilton, Jill; Hay, Ian D; Luster, Markus; Parisi, Marguerite T; Rachmiel, Marianna; Thompson, Geoffrey B; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2015-07-01

    Previous guidelines for the management of thyroid nodules and cancers were geared toward adults. Compared with thyroid neoplasms in adults, however, those in the pediatric population exhibit differences in pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and long-term outcomes. Furthermore, therapy that may be recommended for an adult may not be appropriate for a child who is at low risk for death but at higher risk for long-term harm from overly aggressive treatment. For these reasons, unique guidelines for children and adolescents with thyroid tumors are needed. A task force commissioned by the American Thyroid Association (ATA) developed a series of clinically relevant questions pertaining to the management of children with thyroid nodules and differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Using an extensive literature search, primarily focused on studies that included subjects ≤18 years of age, the task force identified and reviewed relevant articles through April 2014. Recommendations were made based upon scientific evidence and expert opinion and were graded using a modified schema from the United States Preventive Services Task Force. These inaugural guidelines provide recommendations for the evaluation and management of thyroid nodules in children and adolescents, including the role and interpretation of ultrasound, fine-needle aspiration cytology, and the management of benign nodules. Recommendations for the evaluation, treatment, and follow-up of children and adolescents with DTC are outlined and include preoperative staging, surgical management, postoperative staging, the role of radioactive iodine therapy, and goals for thyrotropin suppression. Management algorithms are proposed and separate recommendations for papillary and follicular thyroid cancers are provided. In response to our charge as an independent task force appointed by the ATA, we developed recommendations based on scientific evidence and expert opinion for the management of thyroid nodules and DTC in

  11. Testicular Cancer on the Web-an Appropriate Source of Patient Information in Concordance with the European Association of Urology Guidelines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paffenholz, Pia; Salem, Johannes; Borgmann, Hendrik; Nestler, Tim; Pfister, David; Ruf, Christian; Tsaur, Igor; Haferkamp, Axel; Heidenreich, Axel

    2017-08-04

    Despite the continuous growth of the internet, little is known about the quality of online information on testicular cancer, the most common solid malignancy in young men. In our study, we analysed the quality, readability and popularity of the most popular websites on testicular cancer. Therefore, we performed a web search for the term "testicular cancer" using www.google.com . Fifty-one websites were evaluated for HONcode quality certification, Alexa Popularity Rank and readability levels. Furthermore, the websites' content on eight major topics of the current European Association of Urology Guidelines on testicular cancer was assessed. Fourteen (28%) had a HONcode quality certificate and the mean Alexa Popularity Rank of all 51 websites was 54,040 (interquartile range 6648-282,797). Websites were difficult to read requiring 9 years of US school education to properly understand the information. The websites mentioned 80% of the guideline topics on average, revealing "prognosis" (59%) and "follow-up" (57%) as underrepresented subtopics. Furthermore, 12% of all topics were displayed incorrectly, particularly due to wrong information concerning "aetiology" (42%). Sixty percent of the topics were mentioned in an incomplete fashion, with less than half of the websites displaying complete information on "staging" (47%), "diagnostic evaluation" (49%) or "disease management" (45%). In general, online health information concerning testicular cancer is mentioned correctly on most websites. However, improvement regarding readability and completeness of the given information is needed. Nevertheless, highly selected websites on testicular cancer can serve as an appropriate source of patient information.

  12. Critical questions in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: Integrating emerging clinical evidence and guideline recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC typically confers a poor prognosis, however, novel advances in treatment options, as well as biomarkers for monitoring disease response and progression, have recently helped improve survival rates. Additionally, new guidelines provide some direction on incorporating these new treatments but some confusion still exists among clinicians about best methods for initiating treatment and the optimal sequencing of agents to prolong survival. In this article, we review the literature and answer some frequently asked questions about treating men with metastatic CRPC, including choosing a first-line treatment, monitoring treatment response, and proceeding to additional lines of therapy.

  13. Assessing Tumor Response to Treatment in Patients with Lung Cancer Using Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strauch, Louise S; Eriksen, Rie Ø; Sandgaard, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Only original research articles concerning treatment response in patients with lung cancer assessed with DCE-CT were included. To assess the validity of each study we implemented Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2). The initial search...... after treatment. Four out of five studies that measured blood flow post anti-angiogenic treatments found that blood flow was significantly decreased. DCE-CT may be a useful tool in assessing treatment response in patients with lung cancer. It seems that particularly permeability and blood flow...

  14. Multicentre evaluation of prescribing concurrence with anti-infective guidelines : epidemiological assessment of indicators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fijn, R; Chow, MC; Schuur, PMH; De Jong-Van den Berg, LTW; Brouwers, JRBJ

    2002-01-01

    Purpose To assess indicators for anti-infective prescribing not concurrent with regional pharmacotherapeutic treatment guidelines (PTGs) on infectious diseases. Methods A retrospective explorative cohort study based on hospital-wide anti-infective prescription data of a 2-month cross-sectional

  15. Guidelines for Preparing Psychological Specialists: An Entry-Level Course on Intellectual Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakland, Thomas; Wechsler, Solange Muglia

    2016-01-01

    This article provides guidelines for an entry-level course that prepares psychology students and practitioners to acquire entry-level skills, abilities, knowledge, and attitudes important to the individual assessment of intellectual abilities of children and youth. The article reviews prominent international, regional, and national policies,…

  16. Early Intervention Evaluation Reports: Guidelines for Writing User-Friendly and Strength-Based Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towle, Patricia; Farrell, Anne F.; Vitalone-Raccaro, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    Assessment and evaluation activities are an integral part of early intervention services. These activities culminate in written evaluation reports that include information such as observations of skills and deficits, diagnosis, and recommendations for intervention. However, few guidelines exist to help guide early intervention providers in writing…

  17. Guidelines for the Design of Digital Closed Questions for Assessment and Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draaijer, Silvester; Hartog, R. J. M.; Hofstee, J.

    2007-01-01

    Systems for computer based assessment as well as learning management systems offer a number of innovative closed question types, which are used more and more in higher education. These closed questions are used in computer based summative exams, in diagnostic tests, and in computer based activating learning material. Guidelines focusing on the…

  18. Food allergy guidelines and assessing allergic reaction risks: a regulatory perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luccioli, Stefano

    2012-06-01

    To review information in food allergy guidelines and the literature on assessing and understanding food allergic reaction risks. Current food allergy guidelines have focused on tools for better diagnosis of food allergy and treatment of reactions. These guidelines have not addressed the growing body of literature on risk assessment and diagnostic tools being used to assess dose-response relationships in relation to food-allergen exposures. The literature includes substantial data from food-allergen challenges performed in sensitive individuals, and probabilistic modeling of these data may help to elucidate the relationship between allergen dose exposures, including thresholds, and reaction risk in allergic individuals. Understanding this relationship has potential to improve the health-related quality of life of allergic consumers. Recent findings in the literature have highlighted improved diagnostic tools and other information that can be used to assess risks for allergic reaction to low-dose allergen exposures (thresholds) and reaction severity in food allergic consumers. Recommendations to better define and stratify allergic reaction risks for consumers could be adopted into guidelines for the diagnosis and clinical management of food allergy.

  19. Clinical Practice Guideline for Physical Therapy Assessment and Treatment in Patients With Nonspecific Neck Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bier, Jasper D; Scholten-Peeters, Wendy G M; Staal, J Bart; Pool, Jan; van Tulder, Maurits W; Beekman, Emmylou; Knoop, Jesper; Meerhoff, Guus; Verhagen, Arianne P

    2017-01-01

    The Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF) issued a clinical practice guideline for physical therapists that addresses the assessment and treatment of patients with nonspecific neck pain, including cervical radiculopathy, in Dutch primary care. Recommendations were based on a review of

  20. Guidelines for assessing favourable conservation status of Natura 2000 species and habitat types in Bulgaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zingstra, H.L.; Kovachev, A.; Kitnaes, K.; Tzonev, R.; Dimova, D.; Tzvetkov, P.

    2009-01-01

    This executive summary describes the methodology for assessing the favourable conservation status of N2000 habitats and species on site level in Bulgaria and gives guidelines for its application. The methodology was developed in the frame of the BBI/Matra project 2006/014 “Favourable Conservation

  1. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 209 - Federal Railroad Administration Guidelines for Initial Hazardous Materials Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... were International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) labels instead of 10″ placards. (Unit of violation... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Federal Railroad Administration Guidelines for Initial Hazardous Materials Assessments B Appendix B to Part 209 Transportation Other Regulations Relating...

  2. Guidelines for Assessing the Need for Adaptive Devices for Visually Impaired Pedestrians at Signalized Intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Brian R.; de Oca, Patricia Montes

    1998-01-01

    Presents guidelines for orientation and mobility instructors and traffic engineers to assess the need for adaptive devices to make crosswalks at signalized intersections accessible to pedestrians with visual impairments. The discussions of audible and tactile pedestrian devices, along with case examples, distinguish when each device should be…

  3. Design guidelines for an umbilical cord blood stem cell therapy quality assessment model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januszewski, Witold S.; Michałek, Krzysztof; Yagensky, Oleksandr; Wardzińska, Marta

    The paper enlists the pivotal guidelines for producing an empirical umbilical cord blood stem cell therapy quality assessment model. The methodology adapted was single equation linear model with domain knowledge derived from MEDAFAR classification. The resulting model is ready for therapeutical application.

  4. Best Practices for Mental Health in Child Welfare: Screening, Assessment, and Treatment Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanelli, Lisa Hunter; Landsverk, John; Levitt, Jessica Mass; Leslie, Laurel K.; Hurley, Maia M.; Bellonci, Christopher; Gries, Leonard T.; Pecora, Peter J.; Jensen, Peter S.

    2009-01-01

    The Best Practices for Mental Health in Child Welfare Consensus Conference focused on developing guidelines in five key areas (screening and assessment, psychosocial interventions, psychopharmacologic treatment, parent engagement, and youth empowerment) related to children's mental health. This paper provides an overview of issues related to the…

  5. Pathology features in Bethesda guidelines predict colorectal cancer microsatellite instability: a population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Mark A; Hayashi, Shinichi; O'Shea, Anne-Marie; Burgart, Lawrence J; Smyrk, Tom C; Shimizu, David; Waring, Paul M; Ruszkiewicz, Andrew R; Pollett, Aaron F; Redston, Mark; Barker, Melissa A; Baron, John A; Casey, Graham R; Dowty, James G; Giles, Graham G; Limburg, Paul; Newcomb, Polly; Young, Joanne P; Walsh, Michael D; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Lindor, Noralane M; Lemarchand, Loïc; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Potter, John D; Hopper, John L; Jass, Jeremy R

    2007-07-01

    The revised Bethesda guidelines for Lynch syndrome recommend microsatellite instability (MSI) testing all colorectal cancers in patients diagnosed before age 50 years and colorectal cancers diagnosed in patients between ages 50 and 59 years with particular pathology features. Our aim was to identify pathology and other features that independently predict high MSI (MSI-H). Archival tissue from 1098 population-based colorectal cancers diagnosed before age 60 years was tested for MSI. Pathology features, site, and age at diagnosis were obtained. Multiple logistic regression was performed to determine the predictive value of each feature, as measured by an odds ratio (OR), from which a scoring system (MsPath) was developed to estimate the probability a colorectal cancer is MSI-H. Fifteen percent of tumors (162) were MSI-H. Independent predictors were tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (OR, 9.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.9-14.1), proximal subsite (OR, 4.7; 95% CI, 3.1-7.3), mucinous histology (OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.7-4.8), poor differentiation (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.2-3.1), Crohn's-like reaction (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.2-2.9), and diagnosis before age 50 years (OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.3-2.9). MsPath score >or=1.0 had a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 55% for MSI-H. The probability an individual colorectal cancer is MSI-H is predicted well by the MsPath score. There is little value in testing for DNA mismatch repair loss in tumors, or for germline mismatch repair mutations, for colorectal cancers diagnosed in patients before age 60 years with an MSPath score <1 (approximately 50%). Pathology can identify almost all MSI-H colorectal cancers diagnosed before age 60 years.

  6. ESMO consensus guidelines for the management of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Cutsem, E; Cervantes, A; Adam, R

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies in Western countries. Over the last 20 years, and the last decade in particular, the clinical outcome for patients with metastatic CRC (mCRC) has improved greatly due not only to an increase in the number of patients being referred...... for and undergoing surgical resection of their localised metastatic disease but also to a more strategic approach to the delivery of systemic therapy and an expansion in the use of ablative techniques. This reflects the increase in the number of patients that are being managed within a multidisciplinary team...... environment and specialist cancer centres, and the emergence over the same time period not only of improved imaging techniques but also prognostic and predictive molecular markers. Treatment decisions for patients with mCRC must be evidence-based. Thus, these ESMO consensus guidelines have been developed...

  7. Recommendations for Breast Cancer Surveillance for Female Childhood, Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Survivors Treated with Chest Radiation: A Report from the International Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Guideline Harmonization Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Renée L.; Kremer, Leontien C.M.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Bhatia, Smita; Landier, Wendy; Levitt, Gill; Constine, Louis S.; Wallace, W. Hamish; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Ronckers, Cécile M.; Henderson, Tara O.; Dwyer, Mary; Skinner, Roderick; Oeffinger, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Female childhood, adolescent and young adult (CAYA) cancer survivors treated with radiation to fields that include breast tissue (chest radiation) have an increased risk of breast cancer. Clinical practice guidelines are essential to ensure that these survivors receive optimum care, and thereby reduce the detrimental consequences of cancer treatment. However, surveillance recommendations vary among the existing long-term follow-up guidelines. This guideline provides international harmonized breast cancer surveillance recommendations for female CAYA cancer survivors treated with chest radiation prior to age 30 years. We applied evidence-based methods to develop the international harmonized recommendations. The recommendations were formulated by an international multidisciplinary guideline panel and categorized according to a 4-level colour grading schema adapted from existing level of evidence criteria. The harmonized breast cancer surveillance recommendations are based on a transparent process and are intended to be scientifically rigorous, positively influence health outcomes, and facilitate care for CAYA cancer survivors. PMID:24275135

  8. Harvesting forest biomass for energy in Minnesota: An assessment of guidelines, costs and logistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Dalia El Sayed Abbas Mohamed

    The emerging market for renewable energy in Minnesota has generated a growing interest in utilizing more forest biomass for energy. However, this growing interest is paralleled with limited knowledge of the environmental impacts and cost effectiveness of utilizing this resource. To address environmental and economic viability concerns, this dissertation has addressed three areas related to biomass harvest: First, existing biomass harvesting guidelines and sustainability considerations are examined. Second, the potential contribution of biomass energy production to reduce the costs of hazardous fuel reduction treatments in these trials is assessed. Third, the logistics of biomass production trials are analyzed. Findings show that: (1) Existing forest related guidelines are not sufficient to allow large-scale production of biomass energy from forest residue sustainably. Biomass energy guidelines need to be based on scientific assessments of how repeated and large scale biomass production is going to affect soil, water and habitat values, in an integrated and individual manner over time. Furthermore, such guidelines would need to recommend production logistics (planning, implementation, and coordination of operations) necessary for a potential supply with the least site and environmental impacts. (2) The costs of biomass production trials were assessed and compared with conventional treatment costs. In these trials, conventional mechanical treatment costs were lower than biomass energy production costs less income from biomass sale. However, a sensitivity analysis indicated that costs reductions are possible under certain site, prescriptions and distance conditions. (3) Semi-structured interviews with forest machine operators indicate that existing fuel reduction prescriptions need to be more realistic in making recommendations that can overcome operational barriers (technical and physical) and planning and coordination concerns (guidelines and communications

  9. True North: Building Imaginary Worlds with the Revised Canadian (CADTH Guidelines for Health Technology Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C Langley

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In March 2017 the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH released the 4th edition of their Guidelines for the Economic Evaluation of Health Technologies: Canada. These guidelines, which were first published and revised for a 3rd edition in 2006 are intended to help decision makers, health systems leaders and policy makers make well-informed decisions. They are designed, apparently, to support best practice in conducting health technology assessments in Canada. The purpose of this commentary is to consider whether or not the evidence standards proposed and the consequent modeled claims for economic effectiveness meet the standards of normal science: are the CADTH standards capable of generating claims for competing products that are credible, evaluable and replicable? The review argues that the standards proposed by CADTH do not meet the standards expected in normal science. Technical sophistication in building reference case imaginary worlds is not a substitute for claims that are experimentally evaluable or capable of assessment through systematic observation. There is no way of judging whether imaginary claims are right or even if they are wrong. CADTH is not alone in setting standards that fail to meet the standards of normal science. Recent commentaries on formulary submission guidelines in a number of other countries, to include Ireland, the Netherlands, France, Australia, the UK and New Zealand conclude that they are subject to the same criticism. If the CADTH guidelines were never intended to support feedback to health system decision makers, then this should be made clear. If not, then consideration should be given to withdrawing the guidelines to ensure they conform to these standards. Hopefully, future versions of the CADTH guidelines will address this issue and focus on a rigorous research program of claims assessment and feedback and not the building of imaginary worlds.   Type:  Commentary

  10. Reliability of radioisotope-guided sentinel lymph node biopsy in penile cancer: verification in consideration of the European guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Tim; Uphoff, Jens; Henke, Rolf-Peter; Wawroschek, Friedhelm; Winter, Alexander

    2015-09-28

    Lymph node (LN) staging in penile cancer has strong prognostic implications. This contrasts with the high morbidity of extended inguinal LN dissection (LND) or over-treatment of many patients. Therefore, inguinal dynamic sentinel node biopsy (DSNB) or modified LND is recommended by the European Association of Urology (EAU) guidelines to evaluate the nodal status of patients with clinically node-negative penile cancer. This study analyzed the reliability and morbidity of radioguided DSNB in penile cancer under consideration of the current EAU recommendations in an experienced center with long-term follow-up. Thirty-four patients who received primary surgery and had radioguided inguinal DSNB for penile cancer (≥ T1G2) were included (July 2004 to July 2013). Preoperative sentinel LN (SLN) mapping was performed using lymphoscintigraphy after peritumoral injection of (99m)Technetium nanocolloid on the day of surgery. During surgery, SLNs were detected using a gamma probe. According to the EAU guidelines, a secondary ipsilateral radical inguinal LND was performed in patients who had positive SLNs. The false-negative and complication rates of DSNB were assessed. A total of 32 patients were analyzed. Two patients were lost to follow-up. A total of 166 SLNs (median, 5; range, 1-15) were removed and 216 LNs (SLNs + non-SLNs; median, 6; range, 2-19) were dissected. LN metastases were found in five of the 32 (15.6 %) patients and nine of the 166 (5.4 %) SLNs were found to contain metastases. None of the remaining 50 non-SLNs contained metastases. In only one of the five SLN-positive patients, a singular further metastasis was detected by secondary radical inguinal LND. During follow-up (median, 30.5; range, 5-95 months) no inguinal nodal recurrence was detected. DSNB-related complications occurred in 11.1 % of explored groins. Radioguided DSNB is a suitable procedure for LN staging in penile cancer considering the EAU recommendations and with the required experience. Under

  11. Physiotherapy in hip and knee osteoarthritis: development of a practice guideline concerning initial assessment, treatment and evaluation.

    OpenAIRE

    Peter, W.F.H.; Jansen, M.J.; Hurkmans, E.J.; Bloo, H.; Dekker-Bakker, L.M.M.C.J.; Dilling, R.G.; Hilberdink, W.K.H.A.; Kersten-Smit, C.; Rooij, M. de; Veenhof, C.; Vermeulen, H.M.; Vos, R.J. de; Schoones, J.W.; Vliet Vlieland, T.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: An update of a Dutch physiotherapy practice guideline in Hip and Knee Osteoarthritis (HKOA) was made, based on current evidence and best practice. METHODS: A guideline steering committee, comprising 10 expert physiotherapists, selected topics concerning the guideline chapters: initial assessment, treatment and evaluation. With respect to treatment a systematic literature search was performed using various databases, and the evidence was graded (1-4). For the initial assessment and...

  12. Genetic Cancer Risk Assessment for Breast Cancer in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarri-Guerra, Yanin; Blazer, Kathleen Reilly; Weitzel, Jeffrey Nelson

    2017-01-01

    In Latin America, breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women, and limited available data suggest that up to 15% of all breast cancer cases in the region are hereditary. Genetic cancer risk assessment and counseling is a critical component of the appropriate clinical care of patients with hereditary breast cancer and their families. Unfortunately, genetic services are underdeveloped across Latin America, and access to genetic testing and counseling is very scarce in the region. Barriers contributing to the access to genetic care are high cost and lack of insurance coverage for genetic tests, insufficient oncogenetics training or expertise, nonexistence of genetic counseling as a clinical discipline and lack of supportive healthcare policies. In this review, we highlight relevant initiatives undertaken in several Latin American countries aimed at creating genetic cancer risk assessment programs. Additionally, we present a review of the scientific literature on the current status of breast cancer genomics in Latin America, with specific emphasis on demographic indicators, access to cancer genetic care, training and strategies to improve outcomes and international collaborations. PMID:28453507

  13. Differential research impact in cancer practice guidelines' evidence base: lessons from ESMO, NICE and SIGN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallari, Elena; Fox, Anthony W; Lewison, Grant

    2018-01-01

    This is an appraisal of the impact of cited research evidence underpinning the development of cancer clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) by the professional bodies of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO), the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN). A total of 101 CPGs were identified from ESMO, NICE and SIGN websites across 13 cancer sites. Their 9486 cited references were downloaded from the Web of Science Clarivate Group database, analysed on Excel (2016) using Visual Basic Application macros and imported onto SPSS (V.24.0) for statistical tests. ESMO CPGs mostly cited research from Western Europe, while the NICE and SIGN ones from the UK, Canada, Australia and Scandinavian countries. The ESMO CPGs cited more recent and basic research (eg, drugs treatment), in comparison with NICE and SIGN CPGs where older and more clinical research (eg, surgery) papers were referenced. This chronological difference in the evidence base is also in line with that ESMO has a shorter gap between the publication of the research and its citation on the CPGs. It was demonstrated that ESMO CPGs report more chemotherapy research, while the NICE and SIGN CPGs report more surgery, with the results being statistically significant. We showed that ESMO, NICE and SIGN differ in their evidence base of CPGs. Healthcare professionals should be aware of this heterogeneity in effective decision-making of tailored treatments to patients, irrespective of geographic location across Europe.

  14. Asia Oceania Guidelines for the Implementation of Programs for Cervical Cancer Prevention and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngan, Hextan Y. S.; Garland, Suzanne M.; Bhatla, Neerja; Pagliusi, Sonia R.; Chan, Karen K. L.; Cheung, Annie N. Y.; Chu, Tang-Yuan; Domingo, Efren J.; Qiao, You Lin; Park, Jong Sup; Tay, Eng Hseon; Supakarapongkul, Wisit

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to provide evidence-based recommendations for health professionals, to develop a comprehensive cervical cancer program for a clinic, a community, or a country. Ensuring access to healthcare is the responsibility of all societies, and the Asia Oceania Research Organisation in Genital Infections and Neoplasia (AOGIN) is committed to working collaboratively with governments and health professionals to facilitate prevention programs, to protect girls and women from cervical cancer, a disease that globally affects 500,000 and kills nearly 300,000 women annually, just over half of whom are in the Asia Oceania region. We share the vision that a comprehensive program of vaccination, screening, and treatment should be made accessible to all girls and women in the world. The primary purpose of these guidelines is to provide information on scientific evidence on the different modalities and approaches of cervical cancer prevention programs, for high resource and low resource settings. The secondary purpose is to provide an overview of the current situation of cervical cancer control and prevention in various Asian Oceania countries: their views of an ideal program, identified obstacles, and suggestions to overcome them are discussed. PMID:21559068

  15. Opioid therapy for chronic non-cancer pain: guidelines for Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, C W; Chan, T Cw; Chen, P P; Chu, M C; Chui, W Cm; Ho, P T; Lam, F; Law, S W; Lee, J Ly; Wong, S Hs; Wong, V Kc

    2016-10-01

    Opioids are increasingly used to control chronic non-cancer pain globally. International opioid guidelines have been issued in many different countries but a similar document is not generally available in Hong Kong. Chronic opioid therapy has a role in multidisciplinary management of chronic non-cancer pain despite insufficient evidence for its effectiveness and safety for long-term use. This document reviews the current literature to inform Hong Kong practitioners about the rational use of chronic opioid therapy in chronic non-cancer pain. It also aims to provide useful recommendations for the appropriate, effective, and safe use of such therapy in the management of chronic non-cancer pain in adults. Physicians should conduct a comprehensive biopsychosocial evaluation of patients prior to the commencement of opioid therapy. When opioid use is deemed appropriate, the patient should provide informed consent within an agreement that specifies treatment goals and expectations. A trial of opioid can be commenced and, provided there is progress towards treatment goals, then chronic therapy can be considered at a dose that minimises harm. Monitoring of effectiveness, safety, and drug misuse should be continued. Treatment should be stopped when opioids become ineffective, intolerable, or misused. The driving principles for opioid prescription in chronic pain management should be: start with a low dose, titrate slowly, and maintain within the shortest possible time.

  16. Asia oceania guidelines for the implementation of programs for cervical cancer prevention and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngan, Hextan Y S; Garland, Suzanne M; Bhatla, Neerja; Pagliusi, Sonia R; Chan, Karen K L; Cheung, Annie N Y; Chu, Tang-Yuan; Domingo, Efren J; Qiao, You Lin; Park, Jong Sup; Tay, Eng Hseon; Supakarapongkul, Wisit

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to provide evidence-based recommendations for health professionals, to develop a comprehensive cervical cancer program for a clinic, a community, or a country. Ensuring access to healthcare is the responsibility of all societies, and the Asia Oceania Research Organisation in Genital Infections and Neoplasia (AOGIN) is committed to working collaboratively with governments and health professionals to facilitate prevention programs, to protect girls and women from cervical cancer, a disease that globally affects 500,000 and kills nearly 300,000 women annually, just over half of whom are in the Asia Oceania region. We share the vision that a comprehensive program of vaccination, screening, and treatment should be made accessible to all girls and women in the world. The primary purpose of these guidelines is to provide information on scientific evidence on the different modalities and approaches of cervical cancer prevention programs, for high resource and low resource settings. The secondary purpose is to provide an overview of the current situation of cervical cancer control and prevention in various Asian Oceania countries: their views of an ideal program, identified obstacles, and suggestions to overcome them are discussed.

  17. Guideline for optimization of surgical and pathological quality performance for radical prostatectomy in prostate cancer management: evidentiary base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Joseph L.; Srigley, John; Mayhew, Linda A.; Rumble, R. Bryan; Crossley, Claire; Hunter, Amber; Fleshner, Neil; Bora, Bish; McLeod, Robin; McNair, Sheila; Langer, Bernard; Evans, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Background: The objective is to provide surgical and pathological guidelines for radical prostatectomy (RP) with or without concurrent pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) to achieve optimal benefit for patients, with minimal risk of harm. Methods: For surgical questions, a literature search of MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane database was performed. A literature search for the pathological questions was not conducted since the protocol for invasive carcinomas of the prostate gland developed by the College of American Pathologists (CAP) was endorsed. Urologists and pathologists were consulted for their assessment of the surgical and pathological recommendations. Results: Limited high-quality evidence from 95 primary studies was available and, therefore, the expert panel developed recommendations on the basis of a consensus of the expert opinion of the working group and through a consultation with urologists and pathologists. In addition to the CAP protocol, some technical recommendations related to the handling and processing of the specimen were made. Conclusion: Radical prostatectomy is recommended for the surgical treatment of prostate cancer, depending on a patient’s preoperative risk profile. The panel unanimously determined that the goals for RP are to attain a positive margin rate of Ontario website (www.cancercare.on.ca); search in their Toolbox, Quality Guidelines & Standards, Clinical Program category under “surgery.” PMID:20165572

  18. Are we following the guidelines on non-muscle invasive bladder cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Oliveira Reis

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives To evaluate the clinical practice of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC treatment in Brazil in relation to international guidelines: Sociedade Brasileira de Urologia (SBU, European Association of Urology (EAU and American Urological Association (AUA. Materials and Methods Cross-sectional study using questionnaires about urological practice on treatment of NMIBC during the 32nd Brazilian Congress of Urology. A total of 650 question forms were answered. Results There were 73% of complete answers (total of 476 question forms. In total, 246 urologists (51.68% lived in the southeast region and 310 (65.13% treat 1 to 3 cases of NMIBC per month. Low risk cancer: Only 35 urologists (7.5% apply the single intravesical dose of immediate chemotherapy with Mitomicin C recommended by the above guidelines. Adjuvant therapy with BCG 2 to 4 weeks after TUR is used by 167 participants (35.1% and 271 urologists (56.9% use only TUR. High risk tumors: 397 urologists (83.4% use adjuvant therapy, 375 (78.8% use BCG 2 to 4 weeks after TUR, of which 306 (64.3% referred the use for at least one year. Intravesical chemotherapy with Mitomicin C (a controversial recommendation was used by 22 urologists (4.6%. BCG dose raised a lot of discrepancies. Induction doses of 40, 80 and 120mg were referred by 105 (22%, 193 (40.4% and 54 (11.3% respectively. Maintenance doses of 40, 80 and 120mg were referred by 190 (48.7%, 144 (37.0% and 32 (8.2% urologists, respectively. Schemes of administration were also varied and the one cited by SWOG protocol was the most used: 142 (29.8%. Conclusion SBU, EAU and AUA guidelines are partially respected by Brazilian urologists, particularly in low risk tumors. In high risk tumors, concordance rates are comparable to international data. Further studies are necessary to fully understand the reasons of such disagreement.

  19. Assessing the methodological quality of clinical guidelines for preventing falls of patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Majkusová

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study aimed to assess the methodological quality of selected clinical practice guidelines (CPGs for preventing risk of falling in adult patients in acute and long-term institutional care. Design: Descriptive study using qualitative research techniques. Methods: CPGs were systematically searched in databases of clinical guidelines, systematic reviews, electronic databases, and websites of organizations and professional societies, based on predefined criteria and keywords fo the period 2000-2015. After sorting and analysing 53 documents, the methodological quality of seven selected CPGs were assessed with the AGREE II generic instrument. Results: All CPGs obtained highest domain scores in the dimensions Clarity and Framework, and Purpose, while the lowest standardized scores were achieved by the Applicability and Editorial independence domains. The Rigor of development and Stakeholder Involvement domains achieved an average score. A total of three recommended guidelines showed high methodological quality: Falls. Assessment and prevention of falls in older people - 572 b., 84 % (NICE, 2013; Preventing Falls and Harm From Falls in Older People. Best Practice Guidelines for Australian Hospitals - 556 b., 84 % (ACSQHC, 2009; and Prevention of falls and fall injuries in the older adult - 559 b., 82 % (RNAO, 2005. Conclusion: Assessing the methodological quality of clinical guidelines using the AGREE instrument is one of the key steps in the process of their adaptation for other socio-cultural and organizational conditions. It would be possible to adapt and use all of the three most highly-rated CPGs to reduce risk of falling of inpatients in the Czech organizational and socio-cultural context.

  20. World Health Organization Guidelines for treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2-3 and screen-and-treat strategies to prevent cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santesso, Nancy; Mustafa, Reem A; Schünemann, Holger J; Arbyn, Marc; Blumenthal, Paul D; Cain, Joanna; Chirenje, Michael; Denny, Lynette; De Vuyst, Hugo; Eckert, Linda O'Neal; Forhan, Sara E; Franco, Eduardo L; Gage, Julia C; Garcia, Francisco; Herrero, Rolando; Jeronimo, José; Lu, Enriquito R; Luciani, Silvana; Quek, Swee Chong; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Tsu, Vivien; Broutet, Nathalie

    2016-03-01

    It is estimated that 1%-2% of women develop cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2-3 (CIN 2-3) annually worldwide. The prevalence among women living with HIV is higher, at 10%. If left untreated, CIN 2-3 can progress to cervical cancer. WHO has previously published guidelines for strategies to screen and treat precancerous cervical lesions and for treatment of histologically confirmed CIN 2-3. Guidelines were developed using the WHO Handbook for Guideline Development and the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation) approach. A multidisciplinary guideline panel was created. Systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials and observational studies were conducted. Evidence tables and Evidence to Recommendations Tables were prepared and presented to the panel. There are nine recommendations for screen-and-treat strategies to prevent cervical cancer, including the HPV test, cytology, and visual inspection with acetic acid. There are seven for treatment of CIN with cryotherapy, loop electrosurgical excision procedure, and cold knife conization. Recommendations have been produced on the basis of the best available evidence. However, high-quality evidence was not available. Such evidence is needed, in particular for screen-and-treat strategies that are relevant to low- and middle-income countries. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. Current guidelines for BRCA testing of breast cancer patients are insufficient to detect all mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindedal, Eli Marie; Heramb, Cecilie; Karsrud, Inga; Ariansen, Sarah Louise; Mæhle, Lovise; Undlien, Dag Erik; Norum, Jan; Schlichting, Ellen

    2017-06-21

    Identification of BRCA mutations in breast cancer (BC) patients influences treatment and survival and may be of importance for their relatives. Testing is often restricted to women fulfilling high-risk criteria. However, there is limited knowledge of the sensitivity of such a strategy, and of the clinical aspects of BC caused by BRCA mutations in less selected BC cohorts. The aim of this report was to address these issues by evaluating the results of BRCA testing of BC patients in South-Eastern Norway. 1371 newly diagnosed BC patients were tested with sequencing and Multi Ligation Probe Amplification (MLPA). Prevalence of mutations was calculated, and BC characteristics among carriers and non-carriers compared. Sensitivity and specificity of common guidelines for BRCA testing to identify carriers was analyzed. Number of identified female mutation positive relatives was evaluated. A pathogenic BRCA mutation was identified in 3.1%. Carriers differed from non-carriers in terms of age at diagnosis, family history, grade, ER/PR-status, triple negativity (TNBC) and Ki67, but not in HER2 and TNM status. One mutation positive female relative was identified per mutation positive BC patient. Using age of onset below 40 or TNBC as criteria for testing identified 32-34% of carriers. Common guidelines for testing identified 45-90%, and testing all below 60 years identified 90%. Thirty-seven percent of carriers had a family history of cancer that would have qualified for predictive BRCA testing. A Variant of Uncertain Significance (VUS) was identified in 4.9%. Mutation positive BC patients differed as a group from mutation negative. However, the commonly used guidelines for testing were insufficient to detect all mutation carriers in the BC cohort. Thirty-seven percent had a family history of cancer that would have qualified for predictive testing before they were diagnosed with BC. Based on our combined observations, we suggest it is time to discuss whether all BC patients

  2. DEGRO practical guidelines: radiotherapy of breast cancer III - radiotherapy of the lymphatic pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Staedtisches Klinikum Karlsruhe, Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sedlmayer, F.; Fussl, C. [LKH Salzburg, Paracelsus Medical University Hospital, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Salzburg (Austria); Budach, W. [University Hospital Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf (Germany); Dunst, J. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany); Feyer, P. [Klinikum Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Fietkau, R.; Sauer, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Harms, W. [St. Clara Hospital, Basel, Basel (Switzerland); Piroth, M.D. [Helios-Klinikum Wuppertal, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Wuppertal (Germany); Souchon, R. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Wenz, F. [University Hospital Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Haase, W.

    2014-04-15

    The purpose of this work is to update the practical guidelines for adjuvant radiotherapy of the regional lymphatics of breast cancer published in 2008 by the breast cancer expert panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO). A comprehensive survey of the literature concerning regional nodal irradiation (RNI) was performed using the following search terms: ''breast cancer'', ''radiotherapy'', ''regional node irradiation''. Recent randomized trials were analyzed for outcome as well as for differences in target definition. Field arrangements in the different studies were reproduced and superimposed on CT slices with individually contoured node areas. Moreover, data from recently published meta-analyses and guidelines of international breast cancer societies, yielding new aspects compared to 2008, provided the basis for defining recommendations according to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. In addition to the more general statements of the German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines updated in 2012, this paper addresses indications, targeting, and techniques of radiotherapy of the lymphatic pathways after surgery for breast cancer. International guidelines reveal substantial differences regarding indications for RNI. Patients with 1-3 positive nodes seem to profit from RNI compared to whole breast (WBI) or chest wall irradiation alone, both with regard to locoregional control and disease-free survival. Irradiation of the regional lymphatics including axillary, supraclavicular, and internal mammary nodes provided a small but significant survival benefit in recent randomized trials and one meta-analysis. Lymph node irradiation yields comparable tumor control in comparison to axillary lymph node dissection (ALND), while reducing the rate of lymph edema. Data concerning the impact of 1-2 macroscopically affected sentinel node (SN) or microscopic metastases on prognosis are conflicting. Recent data

  3. Hypertension Canada's 2017 Guidelines for Diagnosis, Risk Assessment, Prevention, and Treatment of Hypertension in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Alexander A; Daskalopoulou, Stella S; Dasgupta, Kaberi; McBrien, Kerry; Butalia, Sonia; Zarnke, Kelly B; Nerenberg, Kara; Harris, Kevin C; Nakhla, Meranda; Cloutier, Lyne; Gelfer, Mark; Lamarre-Cliche, Maxime; Milot, Alain; Bolli, Peter; Tremblay, Guy; McLean, Donna; Tobe, Sheldon W; Ruzicka, Marcel; Burns, Kevin D; Vallée, Michel; Prasad, G V Ramesh; Gryn, Steven E; Feldman, Ross D; Selby, Peter; Pipe, Andrew; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; McFarlane, Philip A; Oh, Paul; Hegele, Robert A; Khara, Milan; Wilson, Thomas W; Penner, S Brian; Burgess, Ellen; Sivapalan, Praveena; Herman, Robert J; Bacon, Simon L; Rabkin, Simon W; Gilbert, Richard E; Campbell, Tavis S; Grover, Steven; Honos, George; Lindsay, Patrice; Hill, Michael D; Coutts, Shelagh B; Gubitz, Gord; Campbell, Norman R C; Moe, Gordon W; Howlett, Jonathan G; Boulanger, Jean-Martin; Prebtani, Ally; Kline, Gregory; Leiter, Lawrence A; Jones, Charlotte; Côté, Anne-Marie; Woo, Vincent; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Trudeau, Luc; Tsuyuki, Ross T; Hiremath, Swapnil; Drouin, Denis; Lavoie, Kim L; Hamet, Pavel; Grégoire, Jean C; Lewanczuk, Richard; Dresser, George K; Sharma, Mukul; Reid, Debra; Lear, Scott A; Moullec, Gregory; Gupta, Milan; Magee, Laura A; Logan, Alexander G; Dionne, Janis; Fournier, Anne; Benoit, Geneviève; Feber, Janusz; Poirier, Luc; Padwal, Raj S; Rabi, Doreen M

    2017-05-01

    Hypertension Canada provides annually updated, evidence-based guidelines for the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension. This year, we introduce 10 new guidelines. Three previous guidelines have been revised and 5 have been removed. Previous age and frailty distinctions have been removed as considerations for when to initiate antihypertensive therapy. In the presence of macrovascular target organ damage, or in those with independent cardiovascular risk factors, antihypertensive therapy should be considered for all individuals with elevated average systolic nonautomated office blood pressure (non-AOBP) readings ≥ 140 mm Hg. For individuals with diastolic hypertension (with or without systolic hypertension), fixed-dose single-pill combinations are now recommended as an initial treatment option. Preference is given to pills containing an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker in combination with either a calcium channel blocker or diuretic. Whenever a diuretic is selected as monotherapy, longer-acting agents are preferred. In patients with established ischemic heart disease, caution should be exercised in lowering diastolic non-AOBP to ≤ 60 mm Hg, especially in the presence of left ventricular hypertrophy. After a hemorrhagic stroke, in the first 24 hours, systolic non-AOBP lowering to < 140 mm Hg is not recommended. Finally, guidance is now provided for screening, initial diagnosis, assessment, and treatment of renovascular hypertension arising from fibromuscular dysplasia. The specific evidence and rationale underlying each of these guidelines are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Hereditary breast cancer. Risk assessment of patients with a family history of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, E.; Heisey, R. E.; Goel, V.; Carroll, J. C.; McCready, D. R.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assist family physicians in stratifying women with a family history of breast cancer as being at low, moderate, or high risk of hereditary breast cancer (HBC). To present guidelines for managing each of these risk groups. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search was conducted from January 1976 to December 1997 using key words related to breast cancer risk factors, risk assessment, prevention, and screening. Risk stratification criteria were derived empirically and assessed using retrospective chart review. MAIN FINDINGS: Although up to 20% of women in the general population have a family history of breast cancer, less than 5% are at high risk for HBC. Certain features in a family history suggest increased risk. Women with none of these features are at low risk for HBC and should have annual clinical breast examinations and mammography at least every 2 years starting at age 50. Women with one or more features of increased risk who do not meet criteria for referral to a familial cancer clinic are at moderate risk for HBC and should begin annual mammography and clinical breast examination at age 40. Women who meet referral criteria are at high risk for HBC and should be counseled regarding referral to a familial cancer clinic for more detailed risk assessment and consideration for genetic testing. All women should be taught proper breast self-examination technique and encouraged but not pressured to practise it monthly for life. CONCLUSION: A simple algorithm can assist physicians in stratifying women into low, moderate, and high HBC risk groups. Management strategies for each group are given in this article and the two following (Heisey et al page 114 and Carroll et al page 126). PMID:10889863

  5. A medication assessment tool to evaluate prescribers' adherence to evidence-based guidelines in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Taweel, Dalal M; Alsuwaidan, Mohammad

    2017-08-01

    Background The goal of evidence-based clinical practice has led to an increased interest in the development of tools to measure adherence to national guidelines in different diseases. This aids in detecting and measuring inappropriate prescribing to specific patient groups by using quality standards extracted from evidence-based guidelines, and ultimately provide the basis of consistent standardized prescribing. Objective To design and validate a medication assessment tool to assess prescribers' adherence to international guideline recommendations in the management of bipolar disorder (MATBD). Setting Outpatient psychiatry clinic at a secondary healthcare setting in Kuwait. Method International guidelines concerned with the management of bipolar disorder were reviewed in order to develop MATBD. Face and content validity of the developed tool (MATBD) was performed with a research and expert group. A 4-point Likert scale was used to assess the expert group's level of agreement to individual criterion. Content validity ratio (CVR) was calculated for each criterion (n = 54) and the content validity index (CVI) was calculated for each section (n = 5) of the MATBD. Finally, feasibility testing was performed on 19 patient records to confirm the tool's fitness for purpose. Main Outcomes Measure Perceived relevance, utility, and clarity of individual criteria, and reliability of their application to clinical settings. Results Face validity and content validity were achieved with a research and expert group (n = 14). Content validity ratio (CVR) was demonstrated for 54 criteria; criteria with a negative CVR were removed. This resulted in a draft MATBD comprising of 52 criteria (CVI: 0.814). Feasibility testing on 19 patients' records resulted in a final MATBD comprising of 49 criteria divided into 3 sections: initial assessment, acute management and monitoring. Conclusion A medication assessment tool was developed and validated to be used as a means of profiling

  6. Are U.S. cancer screening test patterns consistent with guideline recommendations with respect to the age of screening initiation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadiyala Srikanth

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background U.S. cancer screening guidelines communicate important information regarding the ages for which screening tests are appropriate. Little attention has been given to whether breast, colorectal and prostate cancer screening test use is responsive to guideline age information regarding the age of screening initiation. Methods The 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Social Survey and the 2003 National Health Interview Surveys were used to compute breast, colorectal and prostate cancer screening test rates by single year of age. Graphical and logistic regression analyses were used to compare screening rates for individuals close to and on either side of the guideline recommended screening initiation ages. Results We identified large discrete shifts in the use of screening tests precisely at the ages where guidelines recommend that screening begin. Mammography screening in the last year increased from 22% [95% CI = 20, 25] at age 39 to 36% [95% CI = 33, 39] at age 40 and 47% [95% CI = 44, 51] at age 41. Adherence to the colorectal cancer screening guidelines within the last year increased from 18% [95% CI = 15, 22] at age 49 to 19% [95% CI = 15, 23] at age 50 and 34% [95% CI = 28, 39] at age 51. Prostate specific antigen screening in the last year increased from 28% [95% CI = 25, 31] at age 49 to 33% [95% CI = 29, 36] and 42% [95% CI = 38, 46] at ages 50 and 51. These results are robust to multivariate analyses that adjust for age, sex, income, education, marital status and health insurance status. Conclusion The results from this study suggest that cancer screening test utilization is consistent with guideline age information regarding the age of screening initiation. Screening test and adherence rates increased by approximately 100% at the breast and colorectal cancer guideline recommended ages compared to only a 50% increase in the screening test rate for prostate cancer screening. Since information regarding the age of cancer screening

  7. Quality and methods of developing practice guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clark Otavio

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is not known whether there are differences in the quality and recommendations between evidence-based (EB and consensus-based (CB guidelines. We used breast cancer guidelines as a case study to assess for these differences. Methods Five different instruments to evaluate the quality of guidelines were identified by a literature search. We also searched MEDLINE and the Internet to locate 8 breast cancer guidelines. These guidelines were classified in three categories: evidence based, consensus based and consensus based with no explicit consideration of evidence (CB-EB. Each guideline was evaluated by three of the authors using each of the instruments. For each guideline we assessed the agreement among 14 decision points which were selected from the NCCN (National Cancer Comprehensive Network guidelines algorithm. For each decision point we recorded the level of the quality of the information used to support it. A regression analysis was performed to assess if the percentage of high quality evidence used in the guidelines development was related to the overall quality of the guidelines. Results Three guidelines were classified as EB, three as CB-EB and two as CB. The EB guidelines scored better than CB, with the CB-EB scoring in the middle among all instruments for guidelines quality assessment. No major disagreement in recommendations was detected among the guidelines regardless of the method used for development, but the EB guidelines had a better agreement with the benchmark guideline for any decision point. When the source of evidence used to support decision were of high quality, we found a higher level of full agreement among the guidelines' recommendations. Up to 94% of variation in the quality score among guidelines could be explained by the quality of evidence used for guidelines development. Conclusion EB guidelines have a better quality than CB guidelines and CB-EB guidelines. Explicit use of high quality evidence

  8. Locally Advanced, Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Edward P; Mangu, Pamela B; Khorana, Alok A; Shah, Manish A; Mukherjee, Somnath; Crane, Christopher H; Javle, Milind M; Eads, Jennifer R; Allen, Peter; Ko, Andrew H; Engebretson, Anitra; Herman, Joseph M; Strickler, John H; Benson, Al B; Urba, Susan; Yee, Nelson S

    2016-08-01

    as an alternative. Patients with disease progression should be offered treatment per the ASCO Metastatic Pancreatic Cancer Treatment Guideline. Follow-up visits every 3 to 4 months are recommended. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/guidelines/LAPC and www.asco.org/guidelines/MetPC and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  9. Technical Guidelines on Performing a Sediment Erosion and Deposition Assessment (SEDA) at Superfund Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    ER D C TR -1 4- 9 Technical Guidelines on Performing a Sediment Erosion and Deposition Assessment (SEDA) at Superfund Sites En gi ne er... Superfund Sites Earl Hayter and Karl Gustavson Environmental Laboratory U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center 3909 Halls Ferry Road...Vicksburg, MS 39180-6199 Steve Ells Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation US Environmental Protection Agency, OSRTI 1200

  10. Assessing Palliative Care Content in Dementia Care Guidelines: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durepos, Pamela; Wickson-Griffiths, Abigail; Hazzan, Afeez Abiola; Kaasalainen, Sharon; Vastis, Vasilia; Battistella, Lisa; Papaioannou, Alexandra

    2017-04-01

    Families of persons with dementia continue to report unmet needs during end of life (EOL). Strategies to improve care and quality of life for persons with dementia include development of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) and an integrative palliative approach. We aimed to assess palliative care content in dementia CPGs to identify the presence or limitations of recommendations and discussion pertaining to common issues or domains affected by illness as described by the Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Association "Square of Care." A systematic review of databases and gray literature was conducted for recent CPGs. Guidelines meeting inclusion criteria were evaluated using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II instrument. Quality CPGs were analyzed through organizational template analysis using illness domains described by the "Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Association Model." The study protocol is registered at PROSPERO (CRD 42015025369). Eleven CPGs were selected and analyzed from 3779 citations. Nine guidelines demonstrated the maximum level of content regarding physical, psychological, and social care. Conversely, spiritual care was either absent (three) or minimal (three) in CPGs. Six CPGs did not address loss or grief, and seven CPGs did not address or had minimal content regarding EOL care. The lack of content surrounding grief represents a gap for this population at high risk for complicated grief and chronic sorrow. Results of this review require attention by CPG developers and researchers to develop evidence-based recommendations surrounding spiritual care, EOL, and grief. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ambiguity in guideline definitions introduces assessor bias and influences consistency in IUCN Red List status assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt W Hayward

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The IUCN Red List is the most widely used tool to measure extinction risk and report biodiversity trends. Accurate and standardised conservation status assessments for the IUCN Red List are limited by a lack of adequate information; and need consistent and unbiased interpretation of that information. Variable interpretation stems from a lack of quantified thresholds in certain areas of the Red List guidelines. Thus, even in situations with sufficient information to make a Red List assessment, inconsistency can occur when experts, especially from different regions, interpret the guidelines differently, thereby undermining the goals and credibility of the process. In such an information vacuum, assessors make assumptions depending on their level of Red List experience (subconscious bias and their personal values or agendas (conscious bias. We highlight two major issues where such bias influences assessments: relating to fenced subpopulations that require intensive management; and defining benchmark geographic distributions and thus the inclusion/exclusion of introduced subpopulations. We suggest assessor bias can be reduced by refining the Red List guidelines to include quantified thresholds for when to include fenced/intensively managed subpopulations or subpopulations outside the benchmark distribution; publishing case studies of difficult assessments to enhance cohesion between Specialist Groups; developing an online accreditation course on applying Red List criteria as a prerequisite for assessors; and ensuring that assessments of species subject to trade and utilisation are represented by all dissenting views (for example, both utilitarian and preservationist and reviewed by relevant Specialist Groups. We believe these interventions would ensure consistent, reliable assessments of threatened species between regions and across assessors with divergent views, and will thus improve comparisons between taxa and counteract the use of Red List

  12. Guideline appraisal with AGREE II: Systematic review of the current evidence on how users handle the 2 overall assessments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiebke Hoffmann-Eßer

    Full Text Available The Appraisal of Guidelines for Research & Evaluation (AGREE II instrument is the most commonly used guideline appraisal tool. It includes 23 appraisal criteria (items organized within 6 domains and 2 overall assessments (1. overall guideline quality; 2. recommendation for use. The aim of this systematic review was twofold. Firstly, to investigate how often AGREE II users conduct the 2 overall assessments. Secondly, to investigate the influence of the 6 domain scores on each of the 2 overall assessments.A systematic bibliographic search was conducted for publications reporting guideline appraisals with AGREE II. The impact of the 6 domain scores on the overall assessment of guideline quality was examined using a multiple linear regression model. Their impact on the recommendation for use (possible answers: "yes", "yes, with modifications", "no" was examined using a multinomial regression model.118 relevant publications including 1453 guidelines were identified. 77.1% of the publications reported results for at least one overall assessment, but only 32.2% reported results for both overall assessments. The results of the regression analyses showed a statistically significant influence of all domains on overall guideline quality, with Domain 3 (rigour of development having the strongest influence. For the recommendation for use, the results showed a significant influence of Domains 3 to 5 ("yes" vs. "no" and Domains 3 and 5 ("yes, with modifications" vs. "no".The 2 overall assessments of AGREE II are underreported by guideline assessors. Domains 3 and 5 have the strongest influence on the results of the 2 overall assessments, while the other domains have a varying influence. Within a normative approach, our findings could be used as guidance for weighting individual domains in AGREE II to make the overall assessments more objective. Alternatively, a stronger content analysis of the individual domains could clarify their importance in terms of

  13. Treatment guidelines for patients with thyroid nodules and well-differentiated thyroid cancer. American Thyroid Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, P A; Cooper, D S; Daniels, G H; Ladenson, P W; Greenspan, F S; Levy, E G; Braverman, L E; Clark, O H; McDougall, I R; Ain, K V; Dorfman, S G

    1996-10-28

    A set of minimum clinical guidelines for use by primary care physicians in the evaluation and management of patients with thyroid nodules or thyroid cancer was developed by consensus by an 11-member Standards of Care Committee (the authors of the article) of the American Thyroid Association, New York, NY. The participants were selected by the committee chairman and by the president of the American Thyroid Association based on their clinical experience. The committee members represented different geographic areas within the United States, to reflect different practice patterns. The guidelines were developed based on the expert opinion of the committee participants, as well as on previously published information. Each committee participant was initially assigned to write a section of the document and to submit it to the committee chairman, who revised and assembled the sections into a complete draft document, which was then circulated among all committee members for further revision. Several of the committee members further revised and refined the document, which was then submitted to the entire membership of the American Thyroid Association for written comments and suggestions, many of which were incorporated into a final draft document, which was reviewed and approved by the Executive Council of the American Thyroid Association.

  14. Mutation Detection in Patients With Advanced Cancer by Universal Sequencing of Cancer-Related Genes in Tumor and Normal DNA vs Guideline-Based Germline Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandelker, Diana; Zhang, Liying; Kemel, Yelena; Stadler, Zsofia K; Joseph, Vijai; Zehir, Ahmet; Pradhan, Nisha; Arnold, Angela; Walsh, Michael F; Li, Yirong; Balakrishnan, Anoop R; Syed, Aijazuddin; Prasad, Meera; Nafa, Khedoudja; Carlo, Maria I; Cadoo, Karen A; Sheehan, Meg; Fleischut, Megan H; Salo-Mullen, Erin; Trottier, Magan; Lipkin, Steven M; Lincoln, Anne; Mukherjee, Semanti; Ravichandran, Vignesh; Cambria, Roy; Galle, Jesse; Abida, Wassim; Arcila, Marcia E; Benayed, Ryma; Shah, Ronak; Yu, Kenneth; Bajorin, Dean F; Coleman, Jonathan A; Leach, Steven D; Lowery, Maeve A; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio; Kantoff, Philip W; Sawyers, Charles L; Dickler, Maura N; Saltz, Leonard; Motzer, Robert J; O'Reilly, Eileen M; Scher, Howard I; Baselga, Jose; Klimstra, David S; Solit, David B; Hyman, David M; Berger, Michael F; Ladanyi, Marc; Robson, Mark E; Offit, Kenneth

    2017-09-05

    Guidelines for cancer genetic testing based on family history may miss clinically actionable genetic changes with established implications for cancer screening or prevention. To determine the proportion and potential clinical implications of inherited variants detected using simultaneous sequencing of the tumor and normal tissue ("tumor-normal sequencing") compared with genetic test results based on current guidelines. From January 2014 until May 2016 at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 10 336 patients consented to tumor DNA sequencing. Since May 2015, 1040 of these patients with advanced cancer were referred by their oncologists for germline analysis of 76 cancer predisposition genes. Patients with clinically actionable inherited mutations whose genetic test results would not have been predicted by published decision rules were identified. Follow-up for potential clinical implications of mutation detection was through May 2017. Tumor and germline sequencing compared with the predicted yield of targeted germline sequencing based on clinical guidelines. Proportion of clinically actionable germline mutations detected by universal tumor-normal sequencing that would not have been detected by guideline-directed testing. Of 1040 patients, the median age was 58 years (interquartile range, 50.5-66 years), 65.3% were male, and 81.3% had stage IV disease at the time of genomic analysis, with prostate, renal, pancreatic, breast, and colon cancer as the most common diagnoses. Of the 1040 patients, 182 (17.5%; 95% CI, 15.3%-19.9%) had clinically actionable mutations conferring cancer susceptibility, including 149 with moderate- to high-penetrance mutations; 101 patients tested (9.7%; 95% CI, 8.1%-11.7%) would not have had these mutations detected using clinical guidelines, including 65 with moderate- to high-penetrance mutations. Frequency of inherited mutations was related to case mix, stage, and founder mutations. Germline findings led to discussion or initiation of

  15. EAU 2004 guidelines on assessment, therapy and follow-up of men with lower urinary tract symptoms suggestive of benign prostatic obstruction (BPH guidelines)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Madersbacher, Stephan; Alivizatos, Gerasimos; Nordling, Jorgen; Sanz, Carlos Rioja; Emberton, Mark; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To provide the first update of the EAU guidelines on assessment, therapy and follow-up of men with lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) suggestive of benign prostatic obstruction (BPO). Methods: A systematic literature review was conducted based on the results of a MEDLINE(R) search

  16. [The Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guideline 'Diagnosis of breast cancer': reaction from the field of general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, W.J.H.M. van den

    2003-01-01

    In the revised practice guideline on the diagnosis of breast cancer, the general practitioner has an important role when, during screening, a woman is found to have an abnormality, before, during and after treatment. Breast clinics allow the situation to be dealt with rapidly, but patients also need

  17. European guidelines for quality assurance in cervical cancer screening: recommendations for collecting samples for conventional and liquid-based cytology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arbyn, M.; Herbert, A.; Schenck, U.; Nieminen, P.; Jordan, J.; Mcgoogan, E.; Patnick, J.; Bergeron, C.; Baldauf, J.J.; Klinkhamer, P.; Bulten, J.; Martin-Hirsch, P.

    2007-01-01

    The current paper presents an annex in the second edition of the European Guidelines for Quality Assurance in Cervical Cancer Screening. It provides guidance on how to make a satisfactory conventional Pap smear or a liquid-based cytology (LBC) sample. Practitioners taking samples for cytology should

  18. An analysis of Social Work Oncology Network Listserv Postings on the Commission of Cancer's distress screening guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burg, Mary Ann; Adorno, Gail; Hidalgo, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    This is a qualitative study of listserv postings by members of the Social Work Oncology Network (SWON) in response to the Commission on Cancer's 2011 guidelines for distress screening of cancer patients. Archived listserv postings for the period of December 2010 to November 2011 were deidentified and a sample was derived by a list of keywords for the analysis. Aims of the study included describing the general categories and themes of the postings devoted to the new distress screening standard and examining the process of facilitation of mutual support and information exchange by oncology social workers in response to the new screening standards. During the 12-month timeframe there were 242 unique listserv postings sampled for the analysis. Oncology social worker (OSW) discussion of the distress screening guidelines remained a constant topic over the 12 months, and major themes that emerged from the data included processes of implementation of distress screening in cancer centers, screening policies and protocols, screening tool choice, and oncology social worker professional identity. The SWON listserv members used the listserv as a mechanism to post their requests for information on screening, to share their experiences in the beginning stages of implementing the guidelines, and to build support for legitimizing oncology social workers as the lead profession in the implementation of the guidelines in member cancer centers.

  19. Genetic toxicology and cancer risk assessment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Choy, Wai Nang

    2001-01-01

    ... their risks to humans are obvious goals for the protection of public health. When exposure is unavoidable, an accurate estimation of human risk as a result of exposure is essential for making regulatory decisions. Quantitative cancer risk assessment is an intricate process that utilizes knowledge from many different scien...

  20. Assessment of fatigue in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Paul B

    2004-01-01

    Increased recognition of the problem of fatigue in cancer patients can be attributed, in part, to the development of measures that have provided researchers with the tools necessary for quantifying and characterizing fatigue and exploring its etiology and treatment. Although a consensus regarding the definition of fatigue is lacking, there is general agreement that it is a subjective and multidimensional phenomenon whose assessment requires the use of self-report methods. Consistent with this view, several multidimensional measures of fatigue have been developed and validated for use with cancer patients. These measures differ considerably in their format and content and, as with the definition of fatigue, there is no consensus at the present time regarding the dimensional structure of fatigue. In addition to measuring fatigue on a continuum along one or more dimensions, it may also be possible to assess a clinical syndrome of cancer-related fatigue. Criteria for assessing fatigue in this manner have been proposed and are currently undergoing evaluation. Despite the progress that has been made, there are several important unresolved issues in the assessment of fatigue in cancer patients. These include how to distinguish fatigue from depression, how to use self-reports of fatigue in clinical decision-making, how to capture temporal changes in fatigue, and how best to address the continuing lack of consensus regarding the conceptualization and measurement of fatigue.

  1. Systematic review of guidelines on cardiovascular risk assessment: Which recommendations should clinicians follow for a cardiovascular health check?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferket, Bart S.; Colkesen, Ersen B.; Visser, Jacob J.; Spronk, Sandra; Kraaijenhagen, Roderik A.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Hunink, M. G. Myriam

    2010-01-01

    To appraise guidelines on cardiovascular risk assessment to guide selection of screening interventions for a health check. Guidelines in the English language published between January 1, 2003, and May 2, 2009, were retrieved using MEDLINE and CINAHL. This was supplemented by searching the National

  2. Australasian Gastrointestinal Trials Group (AGITG) Contouring Atlas and Planning Guidelines for Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Anal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Michael, E-mail: mng@radoncvic.com.au [Radiation Oncology Victoria, Victoria (Australia); Leong, Trevor [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Victoria (Australia); University of Melbourne (Australia); Chander, Sarat; Chu, Julie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Victoria (Australia); Kneebone, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney (Australia); Carroll, Susan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, NSW (Australia); University of Sydney (Australia); Wiltshire, Kirsty [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Victoria (Australia); Ngan, Samuel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Victoria (Australia); University of Melbourne (Australia); Kachnic, Lisa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To develop a high-resolution target volume atlas with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) planning guidelines for the conformal treatment of anal cancer. Methods and Materials: A draft contouring atlas and planning guidelines for anal cancer IMRT were prepared at the Australasian Gastrointestinal Trials Group (AGITG) annual meeting in September 2010. An expert panel of radiation oncologists contoured an anal cancer case to generate discussion on recommendations regarding target definition for gross disease, elective nodal volumes, and organs at risk (OARs). Clinical target volume (CTV) and planning target volume (PTV) margins, dose fractionation, and other IMRT-specific issues were also addressed. A steering committee produced the final consensus guidelines. Results: Detailed contouring and planning guidelines and a high-resolution atlas are provided. Gross tumor and elective target volumes are described and pictorially depicted. All elective regions should be routinely contoured for all disease stages, with the possible exception of the inguinal and high pelvic nodes for select, early-stage T1N0. A 20-mm CTV margin for the primary, 10- to 20-mm CTV margin for involved nodes and a 7-mm CTV margin for the elective pelvic nodal groups are recommended, while respecting anatomical boundaries. A 5- to 10-mm PTV margin is suggested. When using a simultaneous integrated boost technique, a dose of 54 Gy in 30 fractions to gross disease and 45 Gy to elective nodes with chemotherapy is appropriate. Guidelines are provided for OAR delineation. Conclusion: These consensus planning guidelines and high-resolution atlas complement the existing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) elective nodal ano-rectal atlas and provide additional anatomic, clinical, and technical instructions to guide radiation oncologists in the planning and delivery of IMRT for anal cancer.

  3. Assessing Fidelity to Suicide Reporting Guidelines in Canadian News Media: The Death of Robin Williams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creed, Michael; Whitley, Rob

    2017-05-01

    Mindset is a short recently-published booklet funded by the Mental Health Commission of Canada outlining evidence-based guidelines and best practices for journalists writing about mental health and suicide. Our study aimed to assess fidelity to Mindset recommendations in Canadian newspaper reports of a recent celebrity suicide. A secondary aim is to identify common themes discussed in these newspaper articles. Articles about Robin Williams' suicide from major Canadian newspapers were gathered and coded for presence or absence of each of the 14 recommendations in the "Covering Suicide" section of Mindset. A threshold of 80% was set to test for high fidelity to the guidelines. A qualitative content analysis of the articles was also undertaken to discern common themes and social issues discussed in the articles. Fifty-five per cent of articles surpassed the 80% threshold for high fidelity, while 85% applied at least 70% of the recommendations. The recommendation most commonly overlooked was "Do tell others considering suicide how they can get help," which was absent in 73% of articles. The most common themes discussed were those of addictions and stigma. The news articles generally follow the evidence-based guidelines regarding the reporting of suicide set out in Mindset. This is a welcome development. Future research should continue to examine reporting of suicide to assess for further improvements, while also examining the wider impact of Mindset on the reporting of mental illness per se.

  4. APPLICATION OF SEDIMENT QUALITY GUIDELINES IN THE ASSESSMENT OF MANGROVE SURFACE SEDIMENT IN MENGKABONG LAGOON, SABAH, MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Praveena, M. Radojevic, M. H. Abdullah, A. Z. Aris

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been numerous sediment quality guidelines developed to monitor the sediments. Sediment quality guidelines are very useful to screen sediment contamination by comparing sediment contaminant concentration with the corresponding quality guideline, provide useful tools for screening sediment chemical data to identify pollutants of concern and prioritise problem sites and relatively good predictors of contaminations. However, these guidelines are chemical specific and do not include biological parameters. Aquatic ecosystems, including sediments, must be assessed in multiple components (biological data, toxicity, physicochemistry by using intregrated approaches in order to establish a complete and comprehensive set of sediment quality guidelines. Numerous sediment quality guidelines Washington Department of Ecology Sediment Quality Guideline, Australian and New Zealand Environment and Conservation Council, Swedish Environmental Sediment Quality, Screening Quick Reference Table, Portuguese Legislation on the Classification of Dredged Materials in Coastal Zones and Interim Sediment Quality Guideline for Hong Kong have been applied to the Mengkabong lagoon mangrove sediment and discussed. The most appropriate guideline that meets the prioritization criteria consistent with international initiatives and regulations is interim sediment quality values for Hong Kong. The guideline verifies that all the metals are below the Interim Sediment Quality Value-low. However, site-specific, biological testing and ecological analysis of exisiting benthics community structure related to sediment contamination are needed for final decision making in the case of Mengkabong lagoon.

  5. Preliminary Guideline for the High Temperature Structure Integrity Assessment Procedure Part I. High Temperature Structure Design Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Han; Kim, J. B.; Lee, H. Y.; Park, C. G.; Joo, Y. S.; Koo, G. H.; Kim, S. H

    2007-02-15

    A preliminary guideline for the design and evaluation of LMR high temperature structure is presented based upon ASME B and PV Code, Section III, Subsection NH. The main contents of this guideline are the materials, general design, vessel, piping, core support structure, pumps, valves, fabrication, examination, and testing for the class 1 components. The ratcheting evaluation, enhanced creep assessment, welds design and evaluation, inelastic analysis approach, piping design alternatives, and bellows design method are described in appendices. A user of this guideline should follow the essential procedures and may refer to other pertinent codes, standards, laws, regulations, or other pertinent documents when this guideline does not lead to proper design of the structure. While this guideline adopts major procedures of Subsection NH, it refers to the RCC-MR and/or DDS in some amount for the items where these codes have excellency to improve this guideline.

  6. ENRICH: A promising oncology nurse training program to implement ASCO clinical practice guidelines on fertility for AYA cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadaparampil, Susan T; Gwede, Clement K; Meade, Cathy; Kelvin, Joanne; Reich, Richard R; Reinecke, Joyce; Bowman, Meghan; Sehovic, Ivana; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2016-11-01

    We describe the impact of ENRICH (Educating Nurses about Reproductive Issues in Cancer Healthcare), a web-based communication-skill-building curriculum for oncology nurses regarding AYA fertility and other reproductive health issues. Participants completed an 8-week course that incorporated didactic content, case studies, and interactive learning. Each learner completed a pre- and post-test assessing knowledge and a 6-month follow-up survey assessing learner behaviors and institutional changes. Out of 77 participants, the majority (72%) scored higher on the post-test. Fifty-four participants completed the follow-up survey: 41% reviewed current institutional practices, 20% formed a committee, and 37% gathered patient materials or financial resources (22%). Participants also reported new policies (30%), in-service education (37%), new patient education materials (26%), a patient navigator role (28%), and workplace collaborations with reproductive specialists (46%). ENRICH improved nurses' knowledge and involvement in activities addressing fertility needs of oncology patients. Our study provides a readily accessible model to prepare oncology nurses to integrate American Society of Clinical Oncology guidelines and improve Quality Oncology Practice Initiative measures related to fertility. Nurses will be better prepared to discuss important survivorship issues related to fertility and reproductive health, leading to improved quality of life outcomes for AYAs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Staging of endometrial cancer with MRI: Guidelines of the European Society of Urogenital Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinkel, K. [Geneva University Hospital and Institut de Radiologie, Clinique des Grangettes, Chene-Bougeries/Geneva (Switzerland); Clinique des Grangettes, Institut de radiologie, Chene-Bougerie/Geneva (Switzerland); Forstner, R. [LandesklinikenSalzburg, Zentralroentgeninstitut, Salzburg (Austria); Danza, F.M. [Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Dipartimento di Bioimmagini e scienze radiologiche, Rome (Italy); Oleaga, L. [Hospital Clinic, Radiology Department, Barcelona (Spain); Cunha, T.M. [Instituto Portugues de Oncologia de Lisboa Francisco Gentil, Department of Radiology, Lisboa Codex (Portugal); Bergman, A. [Uppsala University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Uppsala (Sweden); Barentsz, J.O. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Balleyguier, C. [Institut de Cancerologie Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiology, Villejuif Cedex (France); Brkljacic, B. [University Hospital ' ' Dubrava' ' , Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zagreb (Croatia); University of Zagreb, Medical School, Zagreb (Croatia); Spencer, J.A. [St James' s Institute of Oncology, Department of Clinical Radiology, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to define guidelines for endometrial cancer staging with MRI. The technique included critical review and expert consensus of MRI protocols by the female imaging subcommittee of the European Society of Urogenital Radiology, from ten European institutions, and published literature between 1999 and 2008. The results indicated that high field MRI should include at least two T2-weighted sequences in sagittal, axial oblique or coronal oblique orientation (short and long axis of the uterine body) of the pelvic content. High-resolution post-contrast images acquired at 2 min {+-} 30 s after intravenous contrast injection are suggested to be optimal for the diagnosis of myometrial invasion. If cervical invasion is suspected, additional slice orientation perpendicular to the axis of the endocervical channel is recommended. Due to the limited sensitivity of MRI to detect lymph node metastasis without lymph node-specific contrast agents, retroperitoneal lymph node screening with pre-contrast sequences up to the level of the kidneys is optional. The likelihood of lymph node invasion and the need for staging lymphadenectomy are also indicated by high-grade histology at endometrial tissue sampling and by deep myometrial or cervical invasion detected by MRI. In conclusion, expert consensus and literature review lead to an optimized MRI protocol to stage endometrial cancer. (orig.)

  8. Improvement of Breast Cancer Patient Pathway Using EUSOMA Standards and European Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdag, Hatice Camgöz; Cantürk, Nuh Zafer

    2017-01-01

    Queues in hospitals are directly affecting the quality of human life, which should have priority compared to other types of queues. The aim of this paper is to design a future value stream map of the system and patient pathway in terms of quality improvement in order to decrease the non-value added activities for breast cancer patients, doctors and nurses for a radiology unit in a Training and Research University Hospital based in Kocaeli, Turkey. Nowadays, the increased demand versus insufficient sources affect healthcare services due to poor quality with long queues during the diagnosis and treatment processes. For this paper, data were collected from personal observations, information technologies units and authorized employees. Moreover, data tracking and keeping systems are too poor for revealing the current situation. This paper provides an example of a current and future value stream map showing step by step where the bottlenecks are and how it can be improved and what specific benefits it will bring to the healthcare system. In consideration of all these outcomes, it is highly suggested that the hospital apply European Guidelines for quality assurance in breast cancer screening and diagnosis together with the mentioned above improvement suggestions using lean applications. Celsius.

  9. A systematic review of recent clinical practice guidelines on the diagnosis, assessment and management of hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubna A Al-Ansary

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite the availability of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs, optimal hypertension control is not achieved in many parts of the world; one of the challenges is the volume of guidelines on this topic and their variable quality. To systematically review the quality, methodology, and consistency of recommendations of recently-developed national CPGs on the diagnosis, assessment and the management of hypertension. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MEDLINE, EMBASE, guidelines' websites and Google were searched for CPGs written in English on the general management of hypertension in any clinical setting published between January 2006 and September 2011. Four raters independently appraised each CPG using the AGREE-II instrument and 2 reviewers independently extracted the data. Conflicts were resolved by discussion or the involvement of an additional reviewer. Eleven CPGs were identified. The overall quality ranged from 2.5 to 6 out of 7 on the AGREE-II tool. The highest scores were for "clarity of presentation" (44.4%-88.9% and the lowest were for "rigour of development" (8.3%-30% for 9 CGPs. None of them clearly reported being newly developed or adapted. Only one reported having a patient representative in its development team. Systematic reviews were not consistently used and only 2 up-to-date Cochrane reviews were cited. Two CPGs graded some recommendations and related that to levels (but not quality of evidence. The CPGs' recommendations on assessment and non-pharmacological management were fairly consistent. Guidelines varied in the selection of first-line treatment, adjustment of therapy and drug combinations. Important specific aspects of care (e.g. resistant hypertension were ignored by 6/11 CPGs. The CPGs varied in methodological quality, suggesting that their implementation might not result in less variation of care or in better health-related outcomes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: More efforts are needed to promote the realistic

  10. Analysis of molecular subtypes for the increased HER2 equivocal cases caused by application of the updated 2013 ASCO/CAP HER2 testing guidelines in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lei; Yuan, Pei; Zhang, Jing; Ling, Yun; Li, Wenbin; Zhao, Bohui; Ying, Jianming; Xuan, Lixue

    2017-11-01

    Accurate testing of the status of human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) is a prerequisite for HER2-directed therapy. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and the College of American Pathologists (CAP) published joint guideline recommendations for HER2 testing in breast cancer in 2007 and it was updated in 2013. We compared the HER2 gene amplification status based on these two guidelines and analyzed the molecular characteristics of the equivocal cases. A total of 1894 patient samples were analyzed for both immunohistochemistry (IHC) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). HER2 FISH amplification was examined and re-assessed using 2013 guidelines. According to the 2013 ASCO/CAP recommendations, 763 (40.3%) cases were classified as HER2 positive compared with 729 (38.5%) cases defined by 2007 guidelines. There was a significant increase of 6.1% in the proportion of HER2 FISH equivocal cases that were interpreted using ASCO/CAP 2013 (7.3%) compared with 2007 (1.2%) guidelines (P HER2 negative cases and HER2 positive cases, the equivocal cases also showed no significant difference with these two subtypes in T stage and N stage. Our study suggested that implementation of the revised ASCO/CAP 2013 guidelines resulted in an increase of 1.7% in overall HER2 positivity rate and of 6.1% in equivocal cases. Pathological analysis revealed that these equivocal cases exhibit similar biological behavior with luminal B type tumors. Clinical utility data on targeted therapy in equivocal patients should be further investigated.

  11. Early breast cancer in the elderly: assessment and management considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrand, Gilles; Terret, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    or negative hormone receptors. Adjuvant hormone therapy remains a reasonable therapeutic option in elderly women with positive hormone receptor tumours. Aromatase inhibitors have demonstrated a better toxicity profile and effectiveness as adjuvant therapy than tamoxifen in young postmenopausal women but have not been specifically studied in the elderly population. The efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer has been established by meta-analysis and numerous randomized trials but, again, women aged > or = 70 years have rarely been included in such trials. At present, it is difficult to provide a validated recommendation for use of adjuvant chemotherapy in elderly patients with breast cancer. There are no follow-up recommendations specifically for elderly patients after treatment of early breast cancer. However, American Society of Clinical Oncology breast cancer surveillance guidelines suggest physician office visits every 3-6 months for 3 years, followed by visits every 6-12 months for 2 years, then annually. Women taking aromatase inhibitors should also undergo bone mineral density measurement every 2 years. The new approach to assessment and management of early breast cancer in the elderly outlined in this article should be considered an intermediate step because additional evidence to support clinical practice is still needed. Bearing this in mind, physicians should encourage enrollment of elderly breast cancer patients in clinical trials.

  12. Adherence to the Dutch Guidelines for a Healthy Diet and cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Netherlands (EPIC-NL) cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struijk, Ellen A; May, Anne M; Beulens, Joline W J; Fransen, Heidi P; de Wit, G Ardine; Boer, Jolanda M A; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Hoekstra, Jeljer; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Peeters, Petra H M

    2014-11-01

    To examine the association between adherence to the Dutch Guidelines for a Healthy Diet created by the Dutch Health Council in 2006 and overall and smoking-related cancer incidence. Prospective cohort study. Adherence to the guidelines, which includes one recommendation on physical activity and nine on diet, was measured using an adapted version of the Dutch Healthy Diet (DHD) index. The score ranged from 0 to 90 with a higher score indicating greater adherence to the guidelines. We estimated the hazard ratios (HR) and 95 % confidence intervals for the association between the DHD index (in tertiles and per 20-point increment) at baseline and cancer incidence at follow-up. We studied 35 608 men and women aged 20-70 years recruited into the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Netherlands (EPIC-NL) study during 1993-1997. After an average follow-up of 12·7 years, 3027 cancer cases were documented. We found no significant association between the DHD index (tertile 3 v. tertile 1) and overall (HR = 0·97; 95 % CI 0·88, 1·07) and smoking-related cancer incidence (HR = 0·89; 95 % CI 0·76, 1·06) after adjustment for relevant confounders. Excluding the components physical activity or alcohol from the score did not change the results. None of the individual components of the DHD index was significantly associated with cancer incidence. In the present study, participants with a high adherence to the Dutch Guidelines for a Healthy Diet were not at lower risk of overall or smoking-related cancer. This does not exclude that other components not included in the DHD index may be associated with overall cancer risk.

  13. Hereditary diffuse gastric cancer: updated clinical guidelines with an emphasis on germline CDH1 mutation carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Post, Rachel S; Vogelaar, Ingrid P; Carneiro, Fátima; Guilford, Parry; Huntsman, David; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Caldas, Carlos; Schreiber, Karen E Chelcun; Hardwick, Richard H; Ausems, Margreet G E M; Bardram, Linda; Benusiglio, Patrick R; Bisseling, Tanya M; Blair, Vanessa; Bleiker, Eveline; Boussioutas, Alex; Cats, Annemieke; Coit, Daniel; DeGregorio, Lynn; Figueiredo, Joana; Ford, James M; Heijkoop, Esther; Hermens, Rosella; Humar, Bostjan; Kaurah, Pardeep; Keller, Gisella; Lai, Jennifer; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J L; O'Donovan, Maria; Oliveira, Carla; Ragunath, Krish; Rasenberg, Esther; Richardson, Susan; Roviello, Franco; Schackert, Hans; Seruca, Raquel; Taylor, Amy; ter Huurne, Anouk; Tischkowitz, Marc; Joe, Sheena Tjon A; van Dijck, Benjamin; van Grieken, Nicole C T; van Hillegersberg, Richard; van Sandick, Johanna W; Vehof, Rianne; van Krieken, J Han; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C

    2015-01-01

    Germline CDH1 mutations confer a high lifetime risk of developing diffuse gastric (DGC) and lobular breast cancer (LBC). A multidisciplinary workshop was organised to discuss genetic testing, surgery, surveillance strategies, pathology reporting and the patient's perspective on multiple aspects, including diet post gastrectomy. The updated guidelines include revised CDH1 testing criteria (taking into account first-degree and second-degree relatives): (1) families with two or more patients with gastric cancer at any age, one confirmed DGC; (2) individuals with DGC before the age of 40 and (3) families with diagnoses of both DGC and LBC (one diagnosis before the age of 50). Additionally, CDH1 testing could be considered in patients with bilateral or familial LBC before the age of 50, patients with DGC and cleft lip/palate, and those with precursor lesions for signet ring cell carcinoma. Given the high mortality associated with invasive disease, prophylactic total gastrectomy at a centre of expertise is advised for individuals with pathogenic CDH1 mutations. Breast cancer surveillance with annual breast MRI starting at age 30 for women with a CDH1 mutation is recommended. Standardised endoscopic surveillance in experienced centres is recommended for those opting not to have gastrectomy at the current time, those with CDH1 variants of uncertain significance and those that fulfil hereditary DGC criteria without germline CDH1 mutations. Expert histopathological confirmation of (early) signet ring cell carcinoma is recommended. The impact of gastrectomy and mastectomy should not be underestimated; these can have severe consequences on a psychological, physiological and metabolic level. Nutritional problems should be carefully monitored. PMID:25979631

  14. Breast cancer risk in young women in the national breast screening programme: implications for applying NICE guidelines for additional screening and chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, D Gareth; Brentnall, Adam R; Harvie, Michelle; Dawe, Sarah; Sergeant, Jamie C; Stavrinos, Paula; Astley, Susan; Wilson, Mary; Ainsworth, John; Cuzick, Jack; Buchan, Iain; Donnelly, Louise S; Howell, Anthony

    2014-10-01

    In the United Kingdom, women at moderate and high risk of breast cancer between the ages of 40 and 49 years are eligible for annual mammographic screening and preventive therapy with tamoxifen. Here, we estimate the numbers of women in a population eligible for this service and the proportion of breast cancers detected in this group compared with the whole population. Women screening in the National Health Service Breast Screening Programme (NHSBSP) completed a risk questionnaire. The proportion at moderate and high risk according to National Institute of Health Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines was estimated. An estimate was also made using a different model of risk estimation (Tyrer-Cuzick). The numbers of cancers detected in the moderate/high risk groups were compared with numbers detected in the whole population. Completed questionnaires were available for 4,360 women between ages 46 and 49 years. Thirty women [0.7%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.5-1.0%] were at high risk and 130 (3.0%, 2.5-3.5%) were at moderate risk according to NICE guidelines. Thirty-seven cancers were detected by mammography in the whole group. Five of these were found in the moderate-/high-risk group giving a 3.2-fold increase in detection compared with the standard risk group. More women were assigned to the moderate- or high-risk group using the Tyrer-Cuzick model (N = 384), but the numbers of cancers in this group were not appreciably increased (N = 8). Systematic assessment of family history in primary care or through population-based screening will identify appreciable numbers of women in their forties, eligible for additional surveillance and chemoprevention. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Standard based deposit guideline for distribution of human biological materials in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hwa Jeong; Kim, Hye Hyeon; Im, Jeong Soo; Kim, Ju Han

    2014-01-01

    Human biological materials from cancer patients are linked directly with public health issues in medical science research as foundational resources so securing "human biological material" is truly important in bio-industry. However, because South Korea's national R and D project lacks a proper managing system for establishing a national standard for the outputs of certain processes, high-value added human biological material produced by the national R and D project could be lost or neglected. As a result, it is necessary to develop a managing process, which can be started by establishing operating guidelines to handle the output of human biological materials. The current law and regulations related to submitting research outcome resources was reviewed, and the process of data 'acquisition' and data 'distribution' from the point of view of big data and health 2.0 was examined in order to arrive at a method for switching paradigms to better utilize human biological materials. For the deposit of biological research resources, the original process was modified and a standard process with relative forms was developed. With deposit forms, research information, researchers, and deposit type are submitted. The checklist's 26 items are provided for publishing. This is a checklist of items that should be addressed in deposit reports. Lastly, XML-based deposit procedure forms were designed and developed to collect data in a structured form, to help researchers distribute their data in an electronic way. Through guidelines included with the plan for profit sharing between depositor and user it is possible to manage the material effectively and safely, so high-quality human biological material can be supplied and utilized by researchers from universities, industry and institutes. Furthermore, this will improve national competitiveness by leading to development in the national bio-science industry.

  16. Reducing aquatic hazards of industrial chemicals: probabilistic assessment of sustainable molecular design guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Kristin A; Voutchkova-Kostal, Adelina M; Kostal, Jakub; Anastas, Paul; Zimmerman, Julie B; Brooks, Bryan W

    2014-08-01

    Basic toxicological information is lacking for the majority of industrial chemicals. In addition to increasing empirical toxicity data through additional testing, prospective computational approaches to drug development aim to serve as a rational basis for the design of chemicals with reduced toxicity. Recent work has resulted in the derivation of a "rule of 2," wherein chemicals with an octanol-water partition coefficient (log P) less than 2 and a difference between the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital and the highest occupied molecular orbital (ΔE) greater than 9 (log P9 eV) are predicted to be 4 to 5 times less likely to elicit acute or chronic toxicity to model aquatic organisms. The present study examines potential reduction of aquatic toxicity hazards from industrial chemicals if these 2 molecular design guidelines were employed. Probabilistic hazard assessment approaches were used to model the likelihood of encountering industrial chemicals exceeding toxicological categories of concern both with and without the rule of 2. Modeling predicted that utilization of these molecular design guidelines for log P and ΔE would appreciably decrease the number of chemicals that would be designated to be of "high" and "very high" concern for acute and chronic toxicity to standard model aquatic organisms and end points as defined by the US Environmental Protection Agency. For example, 14.5% of chemicals were categorized as having high and very high acute toxicity to the fathead minnow model, whereas only 3.3% of chemicals conforming to the design guidelines were predicted to be in these categories. Considerations of specific chemical classes (e.g., aldehydes), chemical attributes (e.g., ionization), and adverse outcome pathways in representative species (e.g., receptor-mediated responses) could be used to derive future property guidelines for broader classes of contaminants. © 2014 SETAC.

  17. Discrepancy Between European Association of Urology Guidelines and Daily Practice in the Management of Non-muscle-invasive Bladder Cancer: Results of a European Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricksen, Kees; Aziz, Atiqullah; Bes, Perrine; Chun, Felix K-H; Dobruch, Jakub; Kluth, Luis A; Gontero, Paolo; Necchi, Andrea; Noon, Aidan P; van Rhijn, Bas W G; Rink, Michael; Roghmann, Florian; Rouprêt, Morgan; Seiler, Roland; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Qvick, Brian; Babjuk, Marek; Xylinas, Evanguelos

    2017-10-23

    The European Association of Urology (EAU) non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) guidelines are meant to help minimise morbidity and improve the care of patients with NMIBC. However, there may be underuse of guideline-recommended care in this potentially curable cohort. To assess European physicians' current practice in the management of NMIBC and evaluate its concordance with the EAU 2013 guidelines. Initial 45-min telephone interviews were conducted with 20 urologists to develop a 26-item questionnaire for a 30-min online quantitative interview. A total of 498 physicians with predefined experience in treatment of NMIBC patients, from nine European countries, completed the online interviews. Descriptive statistics of absolute numbers and percentages of the use of diagnostic tools, risk group stratification, treatment options chosen, and follow-up regimens were used. Guidelines are used by ≥87% of physicians, with the EAU guidelines being the most used ones (71-100%). Cystoscopy (60-97%) and ultrasonography (42-95%) are the most used diagnostic techniques. Using EAU risk classification, 40-69% and 88-100% of physicians correctly identify all the prognostic factors for low- and high-risk tumours, respectively. Re-transurethral resection of the bladder tumour (re-TURB) is performed in 25-75% of low-risk and 55-98% of high-risk patients. Between 21% and 88% of patients received a single instillation of chemotherapy within 24h after TURB. Adjuvant intravesical treatment is not given to 6-62%, 2-33%, and 1-20% of the patients with low-, intermediate-, and high-risk NMIBC, respectively. Patients with low-risk NMIBC are likely to be overmonitored and those with high-risk NMIBC undermonitored. Our study is limited by the possible recall bias of the selected physicians. Although most European physicians claim to apply the EAU guidelines, adherence to them is low in daily practice. Our survey among European physicians investigated discrepancies between guidelines and

  18. Assessing the efficacy of cancer screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Jacklyn

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Population-based cancer screening has been established for several types of cancer in Australia and internationally. Screening may perform differently in practice from randomised controlled trials, which makes evaluating programs complex. Materials and methods: We discuss how to assess the evidence of benefits and harms of cancer screening, including the main biases that can mislead clinicians and policy makers (such as volunteer, lead-time, length-time and overdiagnosis bias. We also discuss ways in which communication of risks can inform or mislead the community. Results: The evaluation of cancer screening programs should involve balancing the benefits and harms. When considering the overall worth of an intervention and allocation of scarce health resources, decisions should focus on the net benefits and be informed by systematic reviews. Communication of screening outcomes can be misleading. Many messages highlight the benefits while downplaying the harms, and often use relative risks and 5-year survival to persuade people to screen rather than support informed choice. Lessons learned: An evidence based approach is essential when evaluating and communicating the benefits and harms of cancer screening, to minimise misleading biases and the reliance on intuition.

  19. Limitations of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network®(NCCN®) Guidelines for Prediction of Limited Life Expectancy in Men with Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskivich, Timothy J; Wood, Lauren N; Skarecky, Douglas; Ahlering, Thomas; Freedland, Stephen

    2017-02-01

    National Comprehensive Cancer Network prostate cancer guidelines for the prediction of life expectancy recommend subtracting 50% of life table predicted longevity for those in the lowest quartile of health. However, it is unclear how to identify these men and if their survival is uniform. We sampled records of 1,482 men diagnosed with prostate cancer from 1998 to 2004 at 2 VA hospitals. We identified men in the lowest quartile of health by age using Charlson scores, calculated their NCCN predicted life expectancy, and compared this with observed median survival in aggregate and across comorbidity subgroups. Men with Charlson scores of 2+ (age less than 75 years) and 3+ (age 75 years or older) comprised the lowest quartile of health. Among those younger than 65, 65 to 69, 70 to 74, 75 to 79 and 80 years or older, observed survival vs NCCN predicted life expectancy in years was similar at 10.4 vs 11.1, 10.0 vs 7.8, 6.2 vs 6.4, 4.4 vs 4.9 and 3.7 vs 3.3, respectively. Yet within the lowest quartile there was significant heterogeneity in survival among men with differing Charlson scores. For example, men age 65 to 69 years with Charlson scores 2, 3 and 4+ had an observed median survival greater than 13.3, 9.4 and 4.3 years, respectively. NCCN guidelines misclassified 10-year life expectancy in 24% and 56% of men age less than 65 and 65 to 69 years, and 5-year life expectancy in 18% of men age 70 to 74 years. While NCCN predictions matched observed survival on average for the lowest quartile of health, there was substantial heterogeneity in survival by Charlson scores. More granular assessments of life expectancy should be used for those at highest risk for mortality. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Appraisal of the Glasgow assessment and management of alcohol guideline: a comprehensive alcohol management protocol for use in general hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, A; Benson, G; Forrest, E H

    2012-07-01

    Guidelines exist for the management of alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) but few have been assessed as to their suitability for general hospitals. The Glasgow Assessment and Management guideline for alcohol has been specifically developed for use in this context. To determine if this alcohol assessment guideline aids the management of AWS in general hospitals. The four components of the Glasgow Assessment and Management of Alcohol guideline were evaluated. This included the use of the Fast Alcohol Screening Test (FAST) to identify at risk patients, a risk stratification strategy to indicate fixed dose or symptom-triggered benzodiazepine treatment, the Glasgow Modified Alcohol Withdrawal Scale (GMAWS) for symptom-triggered treatment and a clear recommendation for vitamin prophylaxis of Wernicke's encephalopathy. FAST scores were assessed along with the CAGE (cut down, annoyed, guilty and eye-opener) screening tool to ascertain if a single screening tool could identify hazardous and dependent drinking. The GMAWS and Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment for Alcohol (CIWA-Ar) were compared between two medical units. A staff survey of the two AWS tools was also carried out. FAST was able to identify both probable hazardous and dependent drinking. The GMAWS was reliable and gauged both physical and cognitive aspects of AWS. Staff generally preferred the GMAWS-based treatment as opposed to CIWA-Ar management and welcomed the Guideline as a whole. The Glasgow Guideline aids the management of patients with AWS in an acute hospital setting. It allows early identification of at risk patients and directs effective therapeutic intervention.

  1. Guidelines for the assessment and acceptance of potential brain-dead organ donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, Glauco Adrieno; Garcia, Valter Duro; Souza, Rafael Lisboa de; Franke, Cristiano Augusto; Vieira, Kalinca Daberkow; Birckholz, Viviane Renata Zaclikevis; Machado, Miriam Cristine; Almeida, Eliana Régia Barbosa de; Machado, Fernando Osni; Sardinha, Luiz Antônio da Costa; Wanzuita, Raquel; Silvado, Carlos Eduardo Soares; Costa, Gerson; Braatz, Vera; Caldeira Filho, Milton; Furtado, Rodrigo; Tannous, Luana Alves; Albuquerque, André Gustavo Neves de; Abdala, Edson

    2016-09-01

    Organ transplantation is the only alternative for many patients with terminal diseases. The increasing disproportion between the high demand for organ transplants and the low rate of transplants actually performed is worrisome. Some of the causes of this disproportion are errors in the identification of potential organ donors and in the determination of contraindications by the attending staff. Therefore, the aim of the present document is to provide guidelines for intensive care multi-professional staffs for the recognition, assessment and acceptance of potential organ donors.

  2. Guidelines for the Surgical Management of Laryngeal Cancer: Korean Society of Thyroid-Head and Neck Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Soon-Hyun; Hong, Hyun Jun; Kwon, Soon Young; Kwon, Kee Hwan; Roh, Jong-Lyel; Ryu, Junsun; Park, Jun Hee; Baek, Seung-Kuk; Lee, Guk Haeng; Lee, Sei Young; Lee, Jin Choon; Chung, Man Ki; Joo, Young Hoon; Ji, Yong Bae; Hah, Jeong Hun; Kwon, Minsu; Park, Young Min; Song, Chang Myeon; Shin, Sung-Chan; Ryu, Chang Hwan; Lee, Doh Young; Lee, Young Chan; Chang, Jae Won; Jeong, Ha Min; Cho, Jae-Keun; Cha, Wonjae; Chun, Byung Joon; Choi, Ik Joon; Choi, Hyo Geun; Lee, Kang Dae

    2017-01-01

    Korean Society of Thyroid-Head and Neck Surgery appointed a Task Force to develop clinical practice guidelines for the surgical treatment of laryngeal cancer. This Task Force conducted a systematic search of the EMBASE, MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and KoreaMed databases to identify relevant articles, using search terms selected according to the key questions. Evidence-based recommendations were then created on the basis of these articles. An external expert review and Delphi questionnaire were applied to reach consensus regarding the recommendations. The resulting guidelines focus on the surgical treatment of laryngeal cancer with the assumption that surgery is the selected treatment modality after a multidisciplinary discussion in any context. These guidelines do not, therefore, address non-surgical treatment such as radiation therapy or chemotherapy. The committee developed 62 evidence-based recommendations in 32 categories intended to assist clinicians during management of patients with laryngeal cancer and patients with laryngeal cancer, and counselors and health policy-makers. PMID:28043099

  3. Procedure guidelines for radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer (version 2); Verfahrensanweisung zur Radioiodtherapie (RIT) beim differenzierten Schilddruesenkarzinom (Version 2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Dressler, J.; Farahati, J.; Gruenwald, F.; Leisner, E.; Moser, E.; Reiners, C.; Schicha, H.; Schober, O. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin e.V., Hannover (Germany)

    2004-08-01

    The procedure guidelines for radioiodine therapy (RIT) of differentiated thyroid cancer (version 2) are the counterpart to the procedure guidelines for {sup 131}I whole-body scintigraphy (version 2) and specify the interdisciplinary guidelines for thyroid cancer of the Deutsche Krebsgesellschaft and the Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Chirurgie concerning the nuclear medicine part. Compared with version 1 facultative options for RIT can be chosen in special cases: ablative RIT for papillary microcarcinoma {<=} 1 cm, ablative RIT for mixed forms of anaplastic and differentiated thyroid cancer, and RIT in patients with a measurable or increasing thyroglobulin concentration but without detectable metastases by imaging. The description of the pretherapeutic dosimetry now includes the isotopes {sup 123}I and {sup 124}I as well as a broader range of the activity of {sup 131}I. Activities of 2-5 GBq {sup 131}I are recommended for the first ablative RIT. If high accumulative activities of {sup 131}I are expected, men who have not yet finished their family planning should be advised to the option of sperm cryoconservation. An interdisciplinary consensus is necessary whether the new TNM-classification (UICC, 6{sup th} edition, 2002) will lead to modified recommendations for surgical or nuclear medicine therapy, especially for the surgical completeness and for the ablative RIT of pT1 papillary cancer. (orig.)

  4. Assessing the IADC Space Debris Mitigation Guidelines: A Case for Ontology-based Data Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, R.; Gaylor, D.; Reddy, V.; Furfaro, R.; Jah, M.

    2016-09-01

    As the population of man-made debris orbiting the Earth increases, so does the risk of damaging collisions. The Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC) has issued space debris mitigation guidelines including a key recommendation that before mission's end, spacecraft should move far enough from GEO so as not to be an operational hazard to other objects in active missions. It can be extremely difficult to determine if a spacecraft or operator is in compliance with this guideline, as it requires prediction of future actions based upon many data types. Furthermore, there has been no comprehensive assessment of the adequacy or validity of the IADC recommendations. The EU strives for a Code of Conduct in space, the United Nations-Committee On Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UN-COPUOS) strives for guidelines to ensure the Long Term Sustainability of Space Activities (LTSSA), the FAA is concerned with Space Traffic Management (STM), etc. If rules, policies, guidelines, and laws are put in place, how can any entity know who and what is adhering to them, when we don't even know how to quantify and assess behavior of space objects? The University of Arizona aims to address this salient issue. As part of its new Space Object Behavioral Sciences (SOBS) initiative, the University of Arizona is developing an ontology-based system to support integration, use, and sharing of space domain data. As a first use-case, we will test the system's ability to assess compliance with the IADC recommendation to move beyond GEO at the end of a mission as well as the adequacy and validity of recommendations. We describe the relevant data types gathered for this use-case, present a prototype ontology, and outline methods for combining semantic analysis with astrodynamics modeling. Without loss of generality, we present this method as an approach that will form the foundation of SOBS and be used to address pressing challenges in Space Situational Awareness (SSA), Orbital Safety

  5. 78 FR 14510 - Notice of Availability of New Guidelines for Pest Risk Assessments of Imported Fruits and Vegetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    ... Assessments of Imported Fruits and Vegetables AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION... health pest risk assessments for imported fruit and vegetable commodities. These new guidelines are...-initiated, qualitative pest risk assessments (PRAs) for imports of fruits and vegetables. A PRA is defined...

  6. Committee opinion no. 634: Hereditary cancer syndromes and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    A hereditary cancer syndrome is a genetic predisposition to certain types of cancer, often with onset at an early age, caused by inherited mutations in one or more genes. Cases of cancer commonly encountered by obstetrician-gynecologists or other obstetric-gynecologic providers--such as breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and endometrial cancer--are features of specific hereditary cancer syndromes. The most common hereditary cancer syndromes related to gynecologic cancer include hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome, Lynch syndrome, Li-Fraumeni syndrome, Cowden syndrome, and Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. A hereditary cancer risk assessment is the key to identifying patients and families who may be at increased risk of developing certain types of cancer. Screening should include, at minimum, a personal cancer history and a first- and second-degree relative cancer history that includes a description of the type of primary cancer, the age of onset, and the lineage (paternal versus maternal) of the family member. In addition, a patient's ethnic background can influence her genetic risk. If a hereditary cancer risk assessment suggests an increased risk of a hereditary cancer syndrome, referral to a specialist in cancer genetics or a health care provider with expertise in genetics is recommended for expanded gathering of family history information, risk assessment, education, and counseling, which may lead to genetic testing.

  7. Adherence to nutrition-based cancer prevention guidelines and breast, prostate and colorectal cancer risk in the MCC-Spain case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaguera, Dora; Gracia-Lavedan, Esther; Molinuevo, Amaia; de Batlle, Jordi; Mendez, Michelle; Moreno, Victor; Vidal, Carmen; Castelló, Adela; Pérez-Gómez, Beatriz; Martín, Vicente; Molina, Antonio J; Dávila-Batista, Verónica; Dierssen-Sotos, Trinidad; Gómez-Acebo, Inés; Llorca, Javier; Guevara, Marcela; Castilla, Jesús; Urtiaga, Carmen; Llorens-Ivorra, Cristóbal; Fernández-Tardón, Guillermo; Tardón, Adonina; Lorca, José Andrés; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael; Huerta, José María; Olmedo-Requena, Rocío; Jimenez-Moleon, José Juan; Altzibar, Jone; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Pollán, Marina; Aragonés, Núria; Castaño-Vinyals, Gemma; Kogevinas, Manolis; Amiano, Pilar

    2017-07-01

    Prostate, breast and colorectal cancer are the most common tumours in Spain. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between adherence to nutrition-based guidelines for cancer prevention and prostate, breast and colorectal cancer, in the MCC-Spain case-control study. A total of 1,718 colorectal, 1,343 breast and 864 prostate cancer cases and 3,431 population-based controls recruited between 2007 and 2012, were included in the present study. The World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRC/AICR) score based on six recommendations for cancer prevention (on body fatness, physical activity, foods and drinks that promote weight gain, plant foods, animal foods and alcoholic drinks; score range 0-6) was constructed. We used unconditional logistic regression analysis adjusting for potential confounders. One-point increment in the WCRF/AICR score was associated with 25% (95% CI 19-30%) lower risk of colorectal, and 15% (95% CI 7-22%) lower risk of breast cancer; no association with prostate cancer was detected, except for cases with a Gleason score ≥7 (poorly differentiated/undifferentiated tumours) (OR 0.87, 95% CI 0.76-0.99). These results add to the wealth of evidence indicating that a great proportion of common cancer cases could be avoided by adopting healthy lifestyle habits. © 2017 UICC.

  8. Impact of an alternative chromosome 17 probe and the 2013 American Society of Clinical Oncology and College of American Pathologists guidelines on fluorescence in situ hybridization for the determination of HER2 gene amplification in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Alana R; Shetty, Shashirekha; Wang, Zhen; Rivera, Christine L; Portier, Bryce P; Budd, G Thomas; Downs-Kelly, Erinn; Lanigan, Christopher P; Calhoun, Benjamin C

    2017-06-15

    The dual-probe fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) assay for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) gene amplification in breast cancer provides an HER2:CEP17 (centromere enumeration probe for chromosome 17) ratio. Copy number alteration (CNA) in CEP17 may skew this ratio. The authors analyzed the impact of the 2013 American Society of Oncology/College of American Pathologists (ASCO/CAP) guidelines and an alternative chromosome 17 probe on HER2 status in tumor specimens with CEP17 CNA. Specimens with CEP17 CNA (n = 310) were selected from 3048 tumor samples that were received from January 2013 to June 2015 for testing with the alternative chromosome 17 probe D17S122. Reclassification of HER2 status was assessed using the 2007 and 2013 ASCO/CAP guidelines. The alternative chromosome 17 probe reclassified 82 of 310 (26.5%) and 87 of 310 (28.1%) tumors using the 2007 and 2013 guidelines, respectively. Of the 41 of 310 tumors (13.2%) that were reclassified from nonamplified to amplified according to 2007 guidelines, 28 of 41 (68.3%) had an average HER2 copy number ≥4.0 and Cancer 2017;123:2230-2239. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  9. Recommendations for breast cancer surveillance for female survivors of childhood, adolescent, and young adult cancer given chest radiation: a report from the International Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Guideline Harmonization Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Renée L.; Kremer, Leontien C. M.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Bhatia, Smita; Landier, Wendy; Levitt, Gill; Constine, Louis S.; Wallace, W. Hamish; van Leeuwen, Flora E.; Ronckers, Cécile M.; Henderson, Tara O.; Dwyer, Mary; Skinner, Roderick; Oeffinger, Kevin C.

    2013-01-01

    Female survivors of childhood, adolescent, and young adult (CAYA) cancer who were given radiation to fields that include breast tissue (ie, chest radiation) have an increased risk of breast cancer. Clinical practice guidelines are essential to ensure that these individuals receive optimum care and

  10. Clinical practice guidelines on the evidence-based use of integrative therapies during and after breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Heather; DuPont-Reyes, Melissa J; Balneaves, Lynda G; Carlson, Linda E; Cohen, Misha R; Deng, Gary; Johnson, Jillian A; Mumber, Matthew; Seely, Dugald; Zick, Suzanna M; Boyce, Lindsay M; Tripathy, Debu

    2017-05-06

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Patients with breast cancer commonly use complementary and integrative therapies as supportive care during cancer treatment and to manage treatment-related side effects. However, evidence supporting the use of such therapies in the oncology setting is limited. This report provides updated clinical practice guidelines from the Society for Integrative Oncology on the use of integrative therapies for specific clinical indications during and after breast cancer treatment, including anxiety/stress, depression/mood disorders, fatigue, quality of life/physical functioning, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, lymphedema, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, pain, and sleep disturbance. Clinical practice guidelines are based on a systematic literature review from 1990 through 2015. Music therapy, meditation, stress management, and yoga are recommended for anxiety/stress reduction. Meditation, relaxation, yoga, massage, and music therapy are recommended for depression/mood disorders. Meditation and yoga are recommended to improve quality of life. Acupressure and acupuncture are recommended for reducing chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting. Acetyl-L-carnitine is not recommended to prevent chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy due to a possibility of harm. No strong evidence supports the use of ingested dietary supplements to manage breast cancer treatment-related side effects. In summary, there is a growing body of evidence supporting the use of integrative therapies, especially mind-body therapies, as effective supportive care strategies during breast cancer treatment. Many integrative practices, however, remain understudied, with insufficient evidence to be definitively recommended or avoided. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:194-232. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  11. Methodology Guidelines on Life Cycle Assessment of Photovoltaic Electricity: 3rd Edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frischknecht, Rolf; Heath, Garvin; Raugei, Marco; Sinha, Parikhit; de Wild-Scholten, Mariska

    2016-01-01

    Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) is a structured, comprehensive method of quantifying material- and energy-flows and their associated emissions caused in the life cycle of goods and services. The ISO 14040 and 14044 standards provide the framework for LCA. However, this framework leaves the individual practitioner with a range of choices that can affect the results and thus the conclusions of an LCA study. The current IEA guidelines were developed to provide guidance on assuring consistency, balance, and quality to enhance the credibility and reliability of the results from LCAs on photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation systems. The guidelines represent a consensus among the authors - PV LCA experts in North America, Europe, and Asia - for assumptions made on PV performance, decisions on process input and emissions allocation, methods of analysis, and reporting of the results. Guidance is given on PV-specific parameters used as inputs in LCA and on choices and assumptions in life cycle inventory (LCI) data analysis and on implementation of modeling approaches. A consistent approach towards system modeling, the functional unit, the system boundaries, water use modeling and the allocation aspects enhances the credibility of PV electricity LCA studies and enables balanced LCA-based comparisons of different electricity producing technologies. The document discusses metrics like greenhouse gas emissions (GHG), cumulative energy demand (CED), acidification potential (AP), ozone depletion potential (ODP), human toxicity, ecotoxicity and ionizing radiation. Guidance is given for the definition of the energy payback time (EPBT), the nonrenewable energy payback time (NREPBT), and the impact mitigation potentials (IMP). The indicator energy return on investment (EROI) is described in a separate International Energy Agency (IEA) PV Power Systems (PVPS) Task 12 report (Raugei et al. 2015). The guidelines on the reporting and communication of the results serve the need for

  12. European guidelines for quality assurance in cervical cancer screening. Summary of the supplements on HPV screening and vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence von Karsa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In a project coordinated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC 31 experts from 11 European countries and IARC have developed supplements to the current European guidelines for quality assurance in cervical cancer screening. The supplements take into account the potential of primary testing for human papillomavirus (HPV and vaccination against HPV infection to improve cervical cancer prevention and control and will be published by the European Commission in book format. They include 62 recommendations or conclusions for which the strength of the evidence and the respective recommendations is graded. While acknowledging the available evidence for more efficacious screening using HPV primary testing compared to screening based on cytology, the authors and editors of the supplements emphasize that appropriate policy and programme organization remain essential to achieve an acceptable balance between benefit and harm of any screening or vaccination programme. A summary of the supplements and all of the graded recommendations are presented here in journal format to make key aspects of the updated and expanded guidelines known to a wider professional and scientific community. Keywords: Mass screening, Vaccination, Cervical neoplasms, Human papillomavirus, Evidence-based guidelines, Population-based programme

  13. Guideline and preliminary clinical practice results for dose specification and target delineation for postoperative radiotherapy for oral cavity cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shih-Hua; Chao, K S Clifford; Leu, Yi-Shing; Lee, Jehn-Chuan; Liu, Chung-Ji; Huang, Yu-Chuen; Chang, Yi-Fang; Chen, Hong-Wen; Tsai, Jo-Ting; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2015-07-01

    Surgery followed by radiotherapy (RT) is indicated for patients with high-risk oral cavity cancer (OCC). Based on multi-institutional reports, we developed a guideline for postoperative RT for patients with OCC. A multidisciplinary OCC team was recruited to develop a questionnaire concerning details of risk-factor categorization, target delineation, and dose specification. Thirty-one radiation oncologists from 18 institutions completed the questionnaire, and data were subjected to extensive review to establish the guideline by expert meeting. In this study, we also report the results for patients treated in accordance with the guideline at our institution between 2007 and 2011. Forty-one patients received RT compatible with this guideline with a median 26.8-month follow-up. Thirty-two patients (78%) remained disease-free, 6 (15%) developed locoregional recurrence (4 in-field, 1 marginal, and 1 out-field) and 4 (10%) developed distant metastasis. The overall 2-year survival rate was 86.7%. This guideline is promising and should be validated and refined in further clinical practice. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Guideline appraisal with AGREE II: Systematic review of the current evidence on how users handle the 2 overall assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siering, Ulrich; Neugebauer, Edmund A. M.; Brockhaus, Anne Catharina; Lampert, Ulrike; Eikermann, Michaela

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The Appraisal of Guidelines for Research & Evaluation (AGREE) II instrument is the most commonly used guideline appraisal tool. It includes 23 appraisal criteria (items) organized within 6 domains and 2 overall assessments (1. overall guideline quality; 2. recommendation for use). The aim of this systematic review was twofold. Firstly, to investigate how often AGREE II users conduct the 2 overall assessments. Secondly, to investigate the influence of the 6 domain scores on each of the 2 overall assessments. Materials and methods A systematic bibliographic search was conducted for publications reporting guideline appraisals with AGREE II. The impact of the 6 domain scores on the overall assessment of guideline quality was examined using a multiple linear regression model. Their impact on the recommendation for use (possible answers: “yes”, “yes, with modifications”, “no”) was examined using a multinomial regression model. Results 118 relevant publications including 1453 guidelines were identified. 77.1% of the publications reported results for at least one overall assessment, but only 32.2% reported results for both overall assessments. The results of the regression analyses showed a statistically significant influence of all domains on overall guideline quality, with Domain 3 (rigour of development) having the strongest influence. For the recommendation for use, the results showed a significant influence of Domains 3 to 5 (“yes” vs. “no”) and Domains 3 and 5 (“yes, with modifications” vs. “no”). Conclusions The 2 overall assessments of AGREE II are underreported by guideline assessors. Domains 3 and 5 have the strongest influence on the results of the 2 overall assessments, while the other domains have a varying influence. Within a normative approach, our findings could be used as guidance for weighting individual domains in AGREE II to make the overall assessments more objective. Alternatively, a stronger content analysis

  15. Sentinel lymph node biopsy for patients with early-stage breast cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline update

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lyman, Gary H; Temin, Sarah; Edge, Stephen B; Newman, Lisa A; Turner, Roderick R; Weaver, Donald L; Benson, 3rd, Al B; Bosserman, Linda D; Burstein, Harold J; Cody, 3rd, Hiram; Hayman, James; Perkins, Cheryl L; Podoloff, Donald A; Giuliano, Armando E

    2014-01-01

    ...) for patients with early-stage breast cancer. The American Society of Clinical Oncology convened an Update Committee of experts in medical oncology, pathology, radiation oncology, surgical oncology, guideline implementation, and advocacy...

  16. Molecular testing guideline for selection of lung cancer patients for EGFR and ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors: guideline from the College of American Pathologists, International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, and Association for Molecular Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindeman, Neal I; Cagle, Philip T; Beasley, Mary Beth; Chitale, Dhananjay Arun; Dacic, Sanja; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Jenkins, Robert Brian; Kwiatkowski, David J; Saldivar, Juan-Sebastian; Squire, Jeremy; Thunnissen, Erik; Ladanyi, Marc

    2013-07-01

    To establish evidence-based recommendations for the molecular analysis of lung cancers that are that are required to guide EGFR- and ALK-directed therapies, addressing which patients and samples should be tested, and when and how testing should be performed. Three cochairs without conflicts of interest were selected, one from each of the 3 sponsoring professional societies: College of American Pathologists, International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, and Association for Molecular Pathology. Writing and advisory panels were constituted from additional experts from these societies. Three unbiased literature searches of electronic databases were performed to capture articles published published from January 2004 through February 2012, yielding 1533 articles whose abstracts were screened to identify 521 pertinent articles that were then reviewed in detail for their relevance to the recommendations. Evidence was formally graded for each recommendation. Initial recommendations were formulated by the cochairs and panel members at a public meeting. Each guideline section was assigned to at least 2 panelists. Drafts were circulated to the writing panel (version 1), advisory panel (version 2), and the public (version 3) before submission (version 4). The 37 guideline items address 14 subjects, including 15 recommendations (evidence grade A/B). The major recommendations are to use testing for EGFR mutations and ALK fusions to guide patient selection for therapy with an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor, respectively, in all patients with advanced-stage adenocarcinoma, regardless of sex, race, smoking history, or other clinical risk factors, and to prioritize EGFR and ALK testing over other molecular predictive tests. As scientific discoveries and clinical practice outpace the completion of randomized clinical trials, evidence-based guidelines developed by expert practitioners are vital for communicating emerging

  17. Nutritional assessment of children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Terezie Tolar; Barr, Ronald D; Pencharz, Paul B

    2009-01-01

    Regardless of which parts of the world they live in, most children will develop and grow at a similar rate if proper nutrition is ensured. Children from developing countries are at risk for primary malnutrition. Children undergoing anticancer therapy are at higher risk for secondary malnutrition, including obesity and growth retardation. Periodic nutritional assessments are important for planning effective dietary interventions for such children. In this review, we describe malnutrition as it occurs in children with cancer and various ways of assessing the nutritional status of these children, depending on the availability of resources in their local hospitals. Objective and subjective data should be used to complete the nutritional assessment. We discuss screening methods, including the use of subjective global assessment. Different parts of nutritional assessment include medical history; physical examination; biochemical and hematological data, such as visceral proteins, blood glucose levels, and lipid profiles, hemoglobin and hematocrit, and the lymphocyte count; anthropometric measurements; and food and nutrition history. We review medical tests and procedures to determine nutritional status, including nitrogen balance, delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity, prognostic nutritional index, creatinine height index, maldigestion and malabsorption tests, indirect calorimetry, and dual energy X ray absorptiometry (DXA scan). Evaluation and interpretation of data and estimation of nutritional risk are discussed, including proper techniques and use of anthropometric measures, selection and use of growth charts, calculation of caloric and protein needs, and the percentage of calories ingested. These methods will enable local health care providers to accurately assess the nutritional status of children with cancer, identify children at risk, and plan adequate nutritional interventions.

  18. Assessment of medication errors and adherence to WHO prescription writing guidelines in a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilnasheen Sheikh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is to assess the medication errors and adherence to WHO prescription writing guidelines in a tertiary care hospital. A prospective observational study was carried out for a period of 8 months from June 2015 to February 2016 at tertiary care hospital. At inpatient department regular chart review of patient case records was carried out to assess the medication errors. The observed medication errors were assessed for level of harm by using NCCMERP index. The outpatient prescriptions were screened for adherence to WHO prescription writing guidelines. Out of 200 patients, 40 patients developed medication errors. Most of the medication errors were observed in the age group above 61 years (40%. Majority of the medication errors were observed with drug class of antibiotics 9 (22.5% and bronchodilators 9 (22.5%. Most of the errors were under the NCCMERP index category C. Out of 545 outpatient prescriptions, 51 (9.37% prescriptions did not have prescriber’s name and all of the prescriptions lack prescriber’s personal contact number. Eighteen prescriptions did not have patient’s name and 426 (78.2% prescriptions did not have patient’s age. The prevalence of medication errors in this study was relatively low (20% without any fatal outcome. Omission error was the most frequently observed medication errors 31 (77.5%. In the present study, the patient’s age was missing in 78.2% of the prescriptions and none of the prescriptions had patient’s address and the drug names were not mentioned by their generic names.

  19. Guideline for the Management of Fever and Neutropenia in Children With Cancer and Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation Recipients : 2017 Update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lehrnbecher, Thomas; Robinson, Paula; Fisher, Brian; Alexander, Sarah; Ammann, Roland A.; Beauchemin, Melissa; Carlesse, Fabianne; Groll, Andreas H.; Haeusler, Gabrielle M.; Santolaya, Maria; Steinbach, William J.; Castagnola, Elio; Davis, Bonnie L.; Dupuis, L. Lee; Gaur, Aditya H.; Tissing, Wim J. E.; Zaoutis, Theo; Phillips, Robert S.; Sung, Lillian

    2017-01-01

    PurposeTo update a clinical practice guideline (CPG) for the empirical management of fever and neutropenia (FN) in children with cancer and hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation recipients.MethodsThe International Pediatric Fever and Neutropenia Guideline Panel is a multidisciplinary and

  20. Guidelines for exposure assessment in health risk studies following a nuclear reactor accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouville, André; Linet, Martha S; Hatch, Maureen; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Simon, Steven L

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide concerns regarding health effects after the Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear power plant accidents indicate a clear need to identify short- and long-term health impacts that might result from accidents in the future. Fundamental to addressing this problem are reliable and accurate radiation dose estimates for the affected populations. The available guidance for activities following nuclear accidents is limited with regard to strategies for dose assessment in health risk studies. Here we propose a comprehensive systematic approach to estimating radiation doses for the evaluation of health risks resulting from a nuclear power plant accident, reflected in a set of seven guidelines. Four major nuclear reactor accidents have occurred during the history of nuclear power production. The circumstances leading to these accidents were varied, as were the magnitude of the releases of radioactive materials, the pathways by which persons were exposed, the data collected afterward, and the lifestyle factors and dietary consumption that played an important role in the associated radiation exposure of the affected populations. Accidents involving nuclear reactors may occur in the future under a variety of conditions. The guidelines we recommend here are intended to facilitate obtaining reliable dose estimations for a range of different exposure conditions. We recognize that full implementation of the proposed approach may not always be feasible because of other priorities during the nuclear accident emergency and because of limited resources in manpower and equipment. The proposed approach can serve as a basis to optimize the value of radiation dose reconstruction following a nuclear reactor accident.

  1. Audit of a tertiary heart failure outpatient service to assess compliance with NICE guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Kaushik; Allen, Christopher J; Chawla, Sumir; Pryse-Hawkins, Hayley; Fallon, Laura; Chambers, Vicki; Vazir, Ali; Lyon, Alex R; Cowie, Martin R; Sharma, Rakesh

    2016-10-01

    The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) updated its guidelines for chronic heart failure (HF) in 2010. This re-audit assessed interim improvement as compared with an audit in 2011. Patients with HF (preserved and reduced ejection fraction) attending a tertiary cardiac centre over a 2-year period (January 2013-December 2014) were audited. The data collected included demographics, HF aetiology, medications, clinical parameters and cardiac rehabilitation. In total, 513 patients were audited. Compared with 2011, male preponderance (71%) and age (68±14 years, (Mean ± SD)) were similar. 73% of patients lived outside of London. HF aetiologies included ischaemic heart disease (37% versus 40% in 2011), dilated cardiomyopathy (26% versus 20%) primary valve disease (13% versus 12%). For patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (n=434, 85% of patients audited) 89% were taking beta-blockers (compared with 77% in 2011), 91% an angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker (86% in 2011) and 56% a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist (44% in 2011); 6% were prescribed ivabradine. All patients were reviewed at least 6-monthly. Although 100% of patients were educated about exercise, only 21 (4%) enrolled in a supervised exercise programme. This audit demonstrated high rates of documentation, follow-up and compliance with guideline-based medical therapies. A consistent finding was poor access to cardiac rehabilitation. © Royal College of Physicians 2016. All rights reserved.

  2. Concordance with World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research (WCRF/AICR) guidelines for cancer prevention and obesity-related cancer risk in the Framingham Offspring cohort (1991-2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarem, Nour; Lin, Yong; Bandera, Elisa V; Jacques, Paul F; Parekh, Niyati

    2015-02-01

    This prospective cohort study evaluates associations between healthful behaviors consistent with WCRF/AICR cancer prevention guidelines and obesity-related cancer risk, as a third of cancers are estimated to be preventable. The study sample consisted of adults from the Framingham Offspring cohort (n = 2,983). From 1991 to 2008, 480 incident doctor-diagnosed obesity-related cancers were identified. Data on diet, measured by a food frequency questionnaire, anthropometric measures, and self-reported physical activity, collected in 1991 was used to construct a 7-component score based on recommendations for body fatness, physical activity, foods that promote weight gain, plant foods, animal foods, alcohol, and food preservation, processing, and preparation. Multivariable Cox regression models were used to estimate associations between the computed score, its components, and subcomponents in relation to obesity-related cancer risk. The overall score was not associated with obesity-related cancer risk after adjusting for age, sex, smoking, energy, and preexisting conditions (HR 0.94, 95 % CI 0.86-1.02). When score components were evaluated separately, for every unit increment in the alcohol score, there was 29 % lower risk of obesity-related cancers (HR 0.71, 95 % CI 0.51-0.99) and 49-71 % reduced risk of breast, prostate, and colorectal cancers. Every unit increment in the subcomponent score for non-starchy plant foods (fruits, vegetables, and legumes) among participants who consume starchy vegetables was associated with 66 % reduced risk of colorectal cancer (HR 0.44, 95 % CI 0.22-0.88). Lower alcohol consumption and a plant-based diet consistent with the cancer prevention guidelines were associated with reduced risk of obesity-related cancers in this population.

  3. Performance indicators evaluation of the population-based breast cancer screening programme in Northern Portugal using the European Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bento, Maria José; Gonçalves, Guilherme; Aguiar, Ana; Castro, Clara; Veloso, Vitor; Rodrigues, Vítor

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the first 10 years of operation of the population-based breast cancer screening programme implemented in the Northern Region of Portugal, using selected recommended standard performance indicators. Data from women aged 50-69 screened with two-view mammography, biennially, in the period 2000-2009, were included. Main performance indicators were compared with the recommended levels of the European Guidelines. A total of 202,039 screening examinations were performed, 71,731 (35.5%) in the initial screening and 130,308 (64.5%) in the subsequent screening. Coverage rate by examination reached 74.3% of the target population, in the last period evaluated. Recall rates were 8.1% and 2.4% and cancer detection rates were 4.4/1000 and 2.9/1000 respectively, for initial and subsequent screenings. The breast cancer detection rate, expressed as a multiple of the background expected incidence was 3.1 in initial screen and 2.2 in subsequent screen. The incidence of invasive interval cancers met the desirable recommended levels both the first and second years since last screening examination, in the initial and subsequent screenings. Invasive tumours screenings. Less favourable size, grading and biomarkers expression were found in interval cancers compared to screen-detected cancers. Breast cancer screening programme in the Northern Region of Portugal was well accepted by the population. Most of the performance indicators were consistent with the desirable levels of the European Guidelines, which indicate an effective screening programme. Future research should verify the consistency of some of these results by using updated information from a larger population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effectiveness of peer assessment for implementing a dutch physical therapy low back pain guideline: cluster randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulmen, S.A. van; Maas, Marjo; Staal, J.B.; Rutten, G.; Kiers, H.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.; Wees, P. van der

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Clinical practice guidelines are considered important instruments to improve quality of care. However, success is dependent on adherence, which may be improved using peer assessment, a strategy in which professionals assess performance of their peers in a simulated setting. OBJECTIVE:

  5. Interpretation of NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology: Cancer-Related Fatigue

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhen-hua YE; Fu-rong DU; Yin-ping WU; Xue YANG; Zi YI

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-related fatigue (CRF) is a distressing, persistent, subjective sense of physical, emotional, and/or cognitive tiredness or exhaustion related to cancer or cancer treatment that is not proportional to recent activity...

  6. Breast cancer care compared with clinical Guidelines: an observational study in France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daban Alain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Great variability in breast cancer (BC treatment practices according to patient, tumour or organisation of care characteristics has been reported but the relation between these factors is not well known. In two French regions, we measured compliance with Clinical Practice Guidelines for non-metastatic BC care management and identified factors associated with non-compliance at clinical and organisational levels. Methods Eligible patients had invasive unilateral BC without distant metastases and at least two contacts with one of the two regional healthcare systems (2003-2004 in the first year after diagnosis. Medical data were collected from patient medical records in all public and private hospitals (99 hospitals. The care process was defined by 20 criteria: clinical decisions for treatment and therapeutic procedures. Each criterion was classified according to level of compliance ("Compliant", "Justifiable" and "Not Compliant" and factors of non-compliance were identified (mixed effect logistic regression. Results 926 women were included. Non-compliance with clinical decisions for treatment was associated with older patient age (OR 2.1; 95%CI: 1.3-3.6 and region (OR 3.0; 95%CI: 1.2-7.4. Non-compliance with clinical decisions for radiotherapy was associated with lymph node involvement or the presence of peritumoural vascular invasion (OR 1.5; 95%CI: 1.01-2.3 and non-compliance with overall treatment (clinical decisions for treatment + therapeutic procedures was associated with the presence of positive lymph nodes (OR 2.0; 95%CI: 1.2-3.3, grade III versus grade I (OR 2.9; 95%CI: 1.4-6.2, and one region of care versus another (OR 3.5; 95%CI: 1.7-7.1. Finally, heterogeneity of compliance in overall treatment sequence was identified between local cancer units (p Conclusion This study provides interesting insights into factors of non-compliance in non-metastatic BC management and could lead to quality care improvements.

  7. Nutrition outcomes following implementation of validated swallowing and nutrition guidelines for patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Teresa; Ross, Lynda; Jones, Lee; Hughes, Brett; Banks, Merrilyn

    2014-09-01

    Head and neck cancer patients have a high risk of malnutrition and swallowing dysfunction. This study reports on adherence and nutrition outcomes with the use of local evidence-based guidelines for the nutrition management of patients with head and neck cancer, including placement of proactive gastrostomy tubes for high risk patients. This study is a prospective observational audit in patients treated for head and neck cancer at a tertiary hospital from 2007 to 2008 (n = 539). Nutrition outcomes (weight, nutritional status and type of nutrition support) were compared for each nutrition risk category. Primary outcome was 10 % or more weight loss at 3 months post-treatment (n = 219). Overall adherence to the guideline tube feeding recommendations was 81 %. High risk patients had mean weight loss of 6 % on completion of treatment and 9 % at 3 months post-treatment, despite the majority having a proactive gastrostomy tube. Medium and low risk patients also lost weight over this time. Univariate analysis found that non-adherence to the guidelines was associated with weight loss at 3 months (p = 0.013). Multivariate analysis found overweight patients had 1.82 greater odds, and obese patients had 3.49 greater odds of losing weight (p = 0.021). Patients with significant weight loss at diagnosis had decreased odds of losing weight later (p = 0.011). Clinically significant weight loss was still prevalent in this population despite proactive interventions. Predictors of weight loss support the evidence-based guidelines' risk categories, and adherence was important to improve outcomes. Further research is required to determine the impact of significant weight loss in patients with high body mass index (BMI).

  8. Availability of stage at diagnosis, cancer treatment delay and compliance with cancer guidelines as cancer registry indicators for cancer care in Europe: Results of EUROCHIP-3 survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; Kwast, A.; Gavin, A.; Baili, P.; Otter, R.

    2013-01-01

    EUROCHIP (European Cancer Health Indicators Project) focuses on understanding inequalities in the cancer burden, care and survival by the indicators “stage at diagnosis,” “cancer treatment delay” and “compliance with cancer guidelines” as the most important indicators. Our study aims at providing

  9. Factors controlling volume errors through 2D gully erosion assessment: guidelines for optimal survey design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Carlos; Pérez, Rafael

    2017-04-01

    The assessment of gully erosion volumes is essential for the quantification of soil losses derived from this relevant degradation process. Traditionally, 2D and 3D approaches has been applied for this purpose (Casalí et al., 2006). Although innovative 3D approaches have recently been proposed for gully volume quantification, a renewed interest can be found in literature regarding the useful information that cross-section analysis still provides in gully erosion research. Moreover, the application of methods based on 2D approaches can be the most cost-effective approach in many situations such as preliminary studies with low accuracy requirements or surveys under time or budget constraints. The main aim of this work is to examine the key factors controlling volume error variability in 2D gully assessment by means of a stochastic experiment involving a Monte Carlo analysis over synthetic gully profiles in order to 1) contribute to a better understanding of the drivers and magnitude of gully erosion 2D-surveys uncertainty and 2) provide guidelines for optimal survey designs. Owing to the stochastic properties of error generation in 2D volume assessment, a statistical approach was followed to generate a large and significant set of gully reach configurations to evaluate quantitatively the influence of the main factors controlling the uncertainty of the volume assessment. For this purpose, a simulation algorithm in Matlab® code was written, involving the following stages: - Generation of synthetic gully area profiles with different degrees of complexity (characterized by the cross-section variability) - Simulation of field measurements characterised by a survey intensity and the precision of the measurement method - Quantification of the volume error uncertainty as a function of the key factors In this communication we will present the relationships between volume error and the studied factors and propose guidelines for 2D field surveys based on the minimal survey

  10. Comprehensive geriatric assessment for older women with early breast cancer – a systematic review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parks Ruth M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA is an analytical tool increasingly implemented in clinical practice. Breast cancer is primarily a disease of older people; however, most evidence-based research is aimed at younger patients. Methods A systematic review of literature was carried out to assess the use of CGA in older breast cancer patients for clinical decision making. The PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases were searched. Results A total of nine useful full text article results were found. Only five of these were exclusively concerned with early breast cancer; thus, studies involving a variety of cancer types, stages and treatments were accepted, as long as they included early breast cancer.The results comprised a series of low sources of evidence. However, all results shared a common theme: the CGA has a use in determining patient suitability for different types of cancer treatment and subsequently maximizing the patient’s quality of life. Conclusions There is not yet sufficient high level evidence to instate CGA guidelines as a mandatory practice in the management of breast cancer, due to the heterogeneity of available studies. More studies need to be conducted to cement current work on the benefits of the CGA. An area of particular interest is with regard to treatment options, especially surgery and chemotherapy, and identifying patients who may be suitable for these treatments.

  11. European guidelines for quality assurance in colorectal cancer screening and diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Karsa, L; Patnick, J; Segnan, N

    2013-01-01

    -based guidelines for quality assurance in CRC screening and diagnosis have been developed by experts in a project co-financed by the European Union. The 450-page guidelines were published in book format by the European Commission in 2010.  They include 10 chapters and over 250 recommendations, individually graded...

  12. Accuracy of revised Bethesda guidelines, microsatellite instability, and immunohistochemistry for the identification of patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñol, Virgínia; Castells, Antoni; Andreu, Montserrat; Castellví-Bel, Sergi; Alenda, Cristina; Llor, Xavier; Xicola, Rosa M; Rodríguez-Moranta, Francisco; Payá, Artemio; Jover, Rodrigo; Bessa, Xavier

    2005-04-27

    The selection of individuals for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) genetic testing is challenging. Recently, the National Cancer Institute outlined a new set of recommendations, the revised Bethesda guidelines, for the identification of individuals with HNPCC who should be tested for microsatellite instability. To establish the most effective and efficient strategy for the detection of MSH2/MLH1 gene carriers. A prospective, multicenter, nationwide study (the EPICOLON study) in 20 hospitals in the general community in Spain of 1222 patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer between November 1, 2000, and October 31, 2001. Microsatellite instability testing and MSH2/MLH1 immunostaining in all patients regardless of age, personal or family history, and tumor characteristics. Patients whose tumors exhibited microsatellite instability and/or lack of protein expression underwent MSH2/MLH1 germline testing. Effectiveness and efficiency of both microsatellite instability testing and immunostaining, either directly or previous selection of patients according to the revised Bethesda guidelines, were evaluated with respect to the presence of MSH2/MLH1 germline mutations. Two hundred eighty-seven patients (23.5%) fulfilled the revised Bethesda guidelines. Ninety-one patients (7.4%) had a mismatch repair deficiency, with tumors exhibiting either microsatellite instability (n = 83) or loss of protein expression (n = 81). Germline testing identified 11 mutations (0.9%) in either MSH2 (7 cases) or MLH1 (4 cases) genes. Strategies based on either microsatellite instability testing or immunostaining previous selection of patients according to the revised Bethesda guidelines were the most effective (sensitivity, 81.8% and 81.8%; specificity, 98.0% and 98.2%; positive predictive value, 27.3% and 29.0%, respectively) to identify MSH2/MLH1 gene carriers. Logistic regression analysis confirmed the revised Bethesda guidelines as the most discriminating set of clinical

  13. Comparison of test specific sediment effect concentrations with marine sediment quality assessment guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, R.S.; Biedenbach, J.M. [National Biological Service, Corpus Christi, TX (United States). Marine Ecotoxicology Research Station; Long, E.R. [NOAA, Seattle, WA (United States); MacDonald, D.D. [MacDonald Environmental Sciences Ltd., Ladysmith, British Columbia (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    As part of NOAA`s National Status and Trends (NS and T) Bioeffects Assessment program and studies conducted by the National Biological Service, numerous sediment quality assessment surveys have recently been conducted along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts of the US using the sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) fertilization and embryological development tests with pore water. Additional toxicity tests were also conducted in conjunction with most of these studies. The areas that have been sampled include Boston harbor, Massachusetts; Charleston Harbor, Winyah Bay, and Savannah River, South Carolina; St. Simon Sound, Georgia; Biscayne Bay, Tampa Bay, Choctawhatchee Bay, Apalachicola Bay, St. Andrew Bay, and Pensacola Bay, Florida; Galveston Bay, Lavaca Bay, and Sabine Lake, Texas, and 200 stations in the vicinity of offshore oil and gas production platforms in the Gulf of Mexico. Sufficient data are now available from this series of surveys to calculate test specific sediment effect concentrations (SECs). Based on these recent studies, SECs were developed for the sea urchin porewater and amphipod tests and compared with existing marine sediment quality assessment guidelines.

  14. HAS Should Not Be NICE: Rejecting Imaginary Worlds in the French Technology Assessment Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul C Langley

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pricing decisions and access to pharmaceuticals should be evidence based. Unfortunately, the French guidelines for technology assessment, in their adoption of the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE reference case modeling standard ensure that this is not the case. Rather than requiring the submission of claims that are credible, evaluable and replicable, the Haute Autorité de Sante (HAS mandates the creation of imaginary worlds to support comparative effectiveness and cost-outcome claims. The purpose of this commentary is to make the case that HAS should reconsider this commitment to standards for health technology assessment that are more appropriately seen as pseudoscience. The recommendation is that HAS should put to one side mandating lifetime cost-per-quality adjusted life year (QALY or life years saved claims in favor of short-term claims that can be evaluated and reported to health system decision makers as part of a provisional assessment of new products as well as supporting ongoing disease area and therapeutic class reviews.   Type: Commentary

  15. The development and validation of the guidelines for stalking assessment and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropp, P Randall; Hart, Stephen D; Lyon, David R; Storey, Jennifer E

    2011-01-01

    International research has established that stalking is a prevalent problem with serious and often life-threatening consequences for victims. Stalking is also a unique form of violence due to its nature and diversity, making it difficult for criminal justice and health professionals to establish which perpetrators and victims have the greatest need for services and protection. Risk assessment is one way to address these problems but few tools exist. This article describes the development of the Guidelines for Stalking Assessment and Management (SAM), the first risk assessment instrument designed specifically for the stalking situation. Preliminary data are presented, indicating that the SAM has promise for use by professionals working with stalkers and their victims. Results indicated that interrater reliabilities for the SAM risk factors and total scores range from fair to good, and the structural reliability of the SAM is sound. Moreover, the SAM showed good concurrent validity when compared with two other measures of violence propensity: the Psychopathy Checklist Screening Version (PCL:SV) and the Violence Risk Appraisal Guide (VRAG). Limitations of the study are discussed, especially those related to the difficulties inherent in file-based research, and suggestions for future research are offered. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Less is More: Comparing the 2015 and 2009 American Thyroid Association Guidelines for Thyroid Nodules and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Brian W; Yousman, Wina; Wong, Wei Xiang; Cheng, Cheng; McAninch, Elizabeth A

    2016-06-01

    The American Thyroid Association (ATA) has recently revised its guidance pertaining to thyroid nodules and follicular cell-derived thyroid cancer. The 2015 guidelines are massive in both scope and scale, with changes in the organizational approach to risk stratification of nodules and cancer, as well as multiple sections covering new material. This review highlights the major structural and organizational changes, focusing attention on the most dramatically changed recommendations, that is, those recommendations that clinicians will find striking because they call for significant divergence from prior clinical practice. The revised approach to thyroid nodule risk stratification is based on sonographic pattern, with an emphasis on pattern rather than growth in the long-term surveillance of nodules. Accumulating data have also been incorporated into an updated risk stratification scheme for thyroid cancer that increases the size of the low-risk pool, in part because low-volume lymph nodal metastases are now considered low risk. The most fundamentally altered recommendation is that lobectomy might be considered as the initial surgical approach for follicular cell-derived thyroid cancers from 1 to 4 cm in size. The underlying theme of the 2015 ATA guidelines is that "less is more." As these new recommendations are adopted, fewer fine-needle aspiration biopsies will need to be done, less extensive surgeries will become more common, less radioactive iodine will be used either for treatment or for diagnostics, and less stimulated thyroglobulin testing will be done. Mastery of these guidelines will help clinicians know when it is reasonable to do less, thus providing responsibly individualized therapy for their patients.

  17. Clinical practice guidelines on the use of integrative therapies as supportive care in patients treated for breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenlee, Heather; Balneaves, Lynda G; Carlson, Linda E; Cohen, Misha; Deng, Gary; Hershman, Dawn; Mumber, Matthew; Perlmutter, Jane; Seely, Dugald; Sen, Ananda; Zick, Suzanna M; Tripathy, Debu

    2014-11-01

    The majority of breast cancer patients use complementary and/or integrative therapies during and beyond cancer treatment to manage symptoms, prevent toxicities, and improve quality of life. Practice guidelines are needed to inform clinicians and patients about safe and effective therapies. Following the Institute of Medicine's guideline development process, a systematic review identified randomized controlled trials testing the use of integrative therapies for supportive care in patients receiving breast cancer treatment. Trials were included if the majority of participants had breast cancer and/or breast cancer patient results were reported separately, and outcomes were clinically relevant. Recommendations were organized by outcome and graded based upon a modified version of the US Preventive Services Task Force grading system. The search (January 1, 1990-December 31, 2013) identified 4900 articles, of which 203 were eligible for analysis. Meditation, yoga, and relaxation with imagery are recommended for routine use for common conditions, including anxiety and mood disorders (Grade A). Stress management, yoga, massage, music therapy, energy conservation, and meditation are recommended for stress reduction, anxiety, depression, fatigue, and quality of life (Grade B). Many interventions (n = 32) had weaker evidence of benefit (Grade C). Some interventions (n = 7) were deemed unlikely to provide any benefit (Grade D). Notably, only one intervention, acetyl-l-carnitine for the prevention of taxane-induced neuropathy, was identified as likely harmful (Grade H) as it was found to increase neuropathy. The majority of intervention/modality combinations (n = 138) did not have sufficient evidence to form specific recommendations (Grade I). Specific integrative therapies can be recommended as evidence-based supportive care options during breast cancer treatment. Most integrative therapies require further investigation via well-designed controlled trials with meaningful

  18. Clinical Practice Guidelines on the Use of Integrative Therapies as Supportive Care in Patients Treated for Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balneaves, Lynda G.; Carlson, Linda E.; Cohen, Misha; Deng, Gary; Hershman, Dawn; Mumber, Matthew; Perlmutter, Jane; Seely, Dugald; Sen, Ananda; Zick, Suzanna M.; Tripathy, Debu

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of breast cancer patients use complementary and/or integrative therapies during and beyond cancer treatment to manage symptoms, prevent toxicities, and improve quality of life. Practice guidelines are needed to inform clinicians and patients about safe and effective therapies. Methods Following the Institute of Medicine’s guideline development process, a systematic review identified randomized controlled trials testing the use of integrative therapies for supportive care in patients receiving breast cancer treatment. Trials were included if the majority of participants had breast cancer and/or breast cancer patient results were reported separately, and outcomes were clinically relevant. Recommendations were organized by outcome and graded based upon a modified version of the US Preventive Services Task Force grading system. Results The search (January 1, 1990–December 31, 2013) identified 4900 articles, of which 203 were eligible for analysis. Meditation, yoga, and relaxation with imagery are recommended for routine use for common conditions, including anxiety and mood disorders (Grade A). Stress management, yoga, massage, music therapy, energy conservation, and meditation are recommended for stress reduction, anxiety, depression, fatigue, and quality of life (Grade B). Many interventions (n = 32) had weaker evidence of benefit (Grade C). Some interventions (n = 7) were deemed unlikely to provide any benefit (Grade D). Notably, only one intervention, acetyl-l-carnitine for the prevention of taxane-induced neuropathy, was identified as likely harmful (Grade H) as it was found to increase neuropathy. The majority of intervention/modality combinations (n = 138) did not have sufficient evidence to form specific recommendations (Grade I). Conclusions Specific integrative therapies can be recommended as evidence-based supportive care options during breast cancer treatment. Most integrative therapies require further investigation via well

  19. [Absolute risk for fracture and WHO guideline. Fracture risk assessments recommended by World Health Organization and Japanese guidelines for prevention and treatment of osteoporosis 2006].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Toshitaka

    2007-07-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is a strong predictor of osteoporotic fractures. However, the increase in fracture risk is not steep, rather gentle, for the decline in BMD values. Postmenopausal women with osteopenia (T scores between - 2.5 and - 1.0) may also be at risk. Case finding strategies such as the combination of BMD and appropriate clinical risk factors for fracture are shown to identify subjects at high fracture risk. World Health Organization developed a fracture risk assessment tool, recommending its exploitation in the case findings. Under these circumstances, Japan guideline 2006 provided new criteria for the pharmacological intervention to prevent fragility fracture, besides the conventional criteria for diagnosing osteoporosis.

  20. Response to the National Cancer Institute Alert. The effect of practice guidelines on two hospitals in the same medical community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studnicki, J; Schapira, D V; Bradham, D D; Clark, R A; Jarrett, A

    1993-11-15

    Despite the recent increase in medical practice guideline development and dissemination, physician compliance with the guidelines has often been low. Previous research has suggested that physicians at hospitals with low volumes of cases and weakened financial status were more likely to omit indicated diagnostic testing or appropriate treatment. The authors sought to determine whether differences in compliance to a widely disseminated set of guidelines would exist even among the most dominant hospital providers within the same medical community. Two hospitals, together providing nearly half of the cancer surgery within a metropolitan area, were studied for their compliance to the May 1988 National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Alert regarding adjuvant therapy after primary treatment for node negative breast cancer. A case series consecutive collection of 549 women treated at the study hospitals for 2 years before and two years after the Alert determined those patients who had received any form or combination of adjuvant therapy after primary surgical treatment (lumpectomy or modified radical mastectomy). Following modified radical mastectomy, for women age 50 and older, the university hospital (U) provided adjuvant therapy to a higher percentage of patients than the community hospital (C) both before (25.6% versus 4.7%, P < 0.005) and after (58.9% versus 23.2%, P < 0.001) the Alert. For women younger than 50 years of age, the two hospitals were equally likely to provide adjuvant therapy both before and after the Alert. Following lumpectomy, hospital U increased the percentage of women receiving adjuvant therapy following the Alert in women younger than 50 years of age (25-75.8%, P < 0.001) and in women age 50 and older (33.3-56.5%, P < 0.025). Hospital C provided no adjuvant therapy before or after the Alert. Preferences for breast conserving surgical treatment were significantly (P < 0.001) different with hospital U performing a higher percentage of lumpectomies

  1. A multiple-scenario assessment of the effect of a continuous-care, guideline-based decision support system on clinicians' compliance to clinical guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalom, Erez; Shahar, Yuval; Parmet, Yisrael; Lunenfeld, Eitan

    2015-04-01

    To quantify the effect of a new continuous-care guideline (GL)-application engine, the Picard decision support system (DSS) engine, on the correctness and completeness of clinicians' decisions relative to an established clinical GL, and to assess the clinicians' attitudes towards a specific DSS. Thirty-six clinicians, including residents at different training levels and board-certified specialists at an academic OB/GYN department that handles around 15,000 deliveries annually, agreed to evaluate our continuous-care guideline-based DSS and to perform a cross-over assessment of the effects of using our guideline-based DSS. We generated electronic patient records that realistically simulated the longitudinal course of six different clinical scenarios of the preeclampsia/eclampsia/toxemia (PET) GL, encompassing 60 different decision points in total. Each clinician managed three scenarios manually without the Picard DSS engine (Non-DSS mode) and three scenarios when assisted by the Picard DSS engine (DSS mode). The main measures in both modes were correctness and completeness of actions relative to the PET GL. Correctness was further decomposed into necessary and redundant actions, relative to the guideline and the actual patient data. At the end of the assessment, a questionnaire was administered to the clinicians to assess their perceptions regarding use of the DSS. With respect to completeness, the clinicians applied approximately 41% of the GL's recommended actions in the non-DSS mode. Completeness increased to the performance of approximately 93% of the guideline's recommended actions, when using the DSS mode. With respect to correctness, approximately 94.5% of the clinicians' decisions in the non-DSS mode were correct. However, these included 68% of the actions that were correct but redundant, given the patient's data (e.g., repeating tests that had been performed), and 27% of the actions, which were necessary in the context of the GL and of the given scenario

  2. American Society of Clinical Oncology clinical practice guideline for the use of larynx-preservation strategies in the treatment of laryngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, David G; Laurie, Scott A; Weinstein, Gregory S; Mendenhall, William M; Adelstein, David J; Ang, K Kian; Clayman, Gary L; Fisher, Susan G; Forastiere, Arlene A; Harrison, Louis B; Lefebvre, Jean-Louis; Leupold, Nancy; List, Marcy A; O'Malley, Bernard O; Patel, Snehal; Posner, Marshall R; Schwartz, Michael A; Wolf, Gregory T

    2006-08-01

    To develop a clinical practice guideline for treatment of laryngeal cancer with the intent of preserving the larynx (either the organ itself or its function). This guideline is intended for use by oncologists in the care of patients outside of clinical trials. A multidisciplinary Expert Panel determined the clinical management questions to be addressed and reviewed the literature available through November 2005, with emphasis given to randomized controlled trials of site-specific disease. Survival, rate of larynx preservation, and toxicities were the principal outcomes assessed. The guideline underwent internal review and approval by the Panel, as well as external review by additional experts, members of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Health Services Committee, and the ASCO Board of Directors. Evidence supports the use of larynx-preservation approaches for appropriately selected patients without a compromise in survival; however, no larynx-preservation approach offers a survival advantage compared with total laryngectomy and adjuvant therapy with rehabilitation as indicated. All patients with T1 or T2 laryngeal cancer, with rare exception, should be treated initially with intent to preserve the larynx. For most patients with T3 or T4 disease without tumor invasion through cartilage into soft tissues, a larynx-preservation approach is an appropriate, standard treatment option, and concurrent chemoradiotherapy therapy is the most widely applicable approach. To ensure an optimum outcome, special expertise and a multidisciplinary team are necessary, and the team should fully discuss with the patient the advantages and disadvantages of larynx-preservation options compared with treatments that include total laryngectomy.

  3. Procedure guidelines for radioiodine therapy of differentiated thyroid cancer (version 3); Verfahrensanweisung zur Radioiodtherapie (RIT) beim differenzierten Schilddruesenkarzinom (Version 3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietlein, M.; Schicha, H. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Dressler, J. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Nuklearmedizinsiche Klinik der Henriettenstiftung, Hannover (Germany); Eschner, W. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Medizinische Physik (DGMP) (Germany); Koeln Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Gruenwald, F. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Lassmann, M. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Medizinische Physik (DGMP) (Germany); Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Leisner, B. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Allgemeines Krankenhaus St. Georg, Hamburg (Germany); Luster, M.; Reiners, C. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Moser, E. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Radiologische Universitaetsklinik Freiburg (Germany); Schober, O. [Deutsche Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin (DGN) (Germany); Muenster Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2007-07-01

    The procedure guideline for radioiodine therapy (RIT) of differentiated thyroid cancer (version 3) is the counterpart to the procedure guideline for {sup 131}I whole-body scintigraphy (version 3) and specify the interdisciplinary guideline for thyroid cancer of the Deutsche Krebsgesellschaft concerning the nuclear medicine part. Recommendation for ablative {sup 131}I therapy is given for all differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC) >1 cm. Regarding DTC {<=}1 cm {sup 131}I ablation may be helpful in an individual constellation. Preparation for {sup 131}I ablation requires low iodine diet for two weeks and TSH stimulation by withdrawal of thyroid hormone medication or by use of recombinant human TSH (rhTSH). The advantages of rhTSH (no symptoms of hypothyroidism, lowerblood activity) and the advantages of endogenous TSH stimulation (necessary for {sup 131}I-therapy in patients with metastases, higher sensitivity of {sup 131}I whole-body scan) are discussed. In most centers standard activities are used for {sup 131}I ablation. If pretherapeutic dosimetry is planned, the diagnostic administration of {sup 131}I should not exceed 1-10MBq, alternative tracers are {sup 123}I or {sup 124}I. The recommendations for contraception and family planning are harmonized with the recommendation of ATA and ETA. Regarding the best possible protection of salivary glands the evidence is insufficient to recommend a specific setting. To minimize the risk of dental caries due to xerostomia patients should use preventive strategies for dental hygiene. (orig.)

  4. Guidelines for the clinical management of Lynch syndrome (hereditary non-polyposis cancer).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, H.F.; Moslein, G.; Alonso, A.; Bernstein, I.; Bertario, L.; Blanco, I.; Burn, J.; Capella, G.; Engel, C.; Frayling, I.; Friedl, W.; Hes, F.J.; Hodgson, S.; Mecklin, J.P.; Moller, P.; Nagengast, F.M.; Parc, Y.; Renkonen-Sinisalo, L.; Sampson, J.R.; Stormorken, A.; Wijnen, J.

    2007-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer) is characterised by the development of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer and various other cancers, and is caused by a mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes: MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. The discovery of these genes, 15 years ago,

  5. European guidelines for quality assurance in colorectal cancer screening and diagnosis: Overview and introduction to the full Supplement publication

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Karsa, L.; Patnick, J.; Segnan, N.; Atkin, W.; Halloran, S.; Lansdorp-Vogelaar, I.; Malila, N.; Minozzi, S.; Moss, S.; Quirke, P.; Steele, R. J.; Vieth, M.; Aabakken, L.; Altenhofen, L.; Ancelle-Park, R.; Antoljak, N.; Anttila, A.; Armaroli, P.; Arrossi, S.; Austoker, J.; Banzi, R.; Bellisario, C.; Blom, J.; Brenner, H.; Bretthauer, M.; Camargo Cancela, M.; Costamagna, G.; Cuzick, J.; Dai, M.; Daniel, J.; Dekker, E.; Delicata, N.; Ducarroz, S.; Erfkamp, H.; Espinàs, J. A.; Faivre, J.; Faulds Wood, L.; Flugelman, A.; Frkovic-Grazio, S.; Geller, B.; Giordano, L.; Grazzini, G.; Green, J.; Hamashima, C.; Herrmann, C.; Hewitson, P.; Hoff, G.; Holten, I.; Jover, R.; Kaminski, M. F.; Kuipers, E. J.; Kurtinaitis, J.; Lambert, R.; Launoy, G.; Lee, W.; Leicester, R.; Leja, M.; Lieberman, D.; Lignini, T.; Lucas, E.; Lynge, E.; Mádai, S.; Marinho, J.; Maučec Zakotnik, J.; Minoli, G.; Monk, C.; Morais, A.; Muwonge, R.; Nadel, M.; Neamtiu, L.; Peris Tuser, M.; Pignone, M.; Pox, C.; Primic-Zakelj, M.; Psaila, J.; Rabeneck, L.; Ransohoff, D.; Rasmussen, M.; Regula, J.; Ren, J.; Rennert, G.; Rey, J.; Riddell, R. H.; Risio, M.; Rodrigues, V.; Saito, H.; Sauvaget, C.; Scharpantgen, A.; Schmiegel, W.; Senore, C.; Siddiqi, M.; Sighoko, D.; Smith, R.; Smith, S.; Suchanek, S.; Suonio, E.; Tong, W.; Törnberg, S.; Van Cutsem, E.; Vignatelli, L.; Villain, P.; Voti, L.; Watanabe, H.; Watson, J.; Winawer, S.; Young, G.; Zaksas, V.; Zappa, M.; Valori, R.

    2015-01-01

    Population-based screening for early detection and treatment of colorectal cancer (CRC) and precursor lesions, using evidence-based methods, can be effective in populations with a significant burden of the disease provided the services are of high quality. Multidisciplinary, evidence-based guidelines for quality assurance in CRC screening and diagnosis have been developed by experts in a project co-financed by the European Union. The 450-page guidelines were published in book format by the European Commission in 2010.They include 10 chapters and over 250 recommendations, individually graded according to the strength of the recommendation and the supporting evidence. Adoption of the recommendations can improve and maintain the quality and effectiveness of an entire screening process, including identification and invitation of the target population, diagnosis and management of the disease and appropriate surveillance in people with detected lesions. To make the principles, recommendations and standards in the guidelines known to a wider professional and scientific community and to facilitate their use in the scientific literature, the original content is presented in journal format in an open-access Supplement of Endoscopy. The editors have prepared the present overview to inform readers of the comprehensive scope and content of the guidelines. PMID:23212726

  6. Guideline development and impact assessment for registration of medical, dental and veterinary x-ray apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colgan, P.; Harrison, D. [NSW Environment Protection Authority, Lidcombe, NSW, (Australia). Radiation Control Centre; Moore, W. [NSW Environmental Protection Authority, Chatswood, NSW, (Australia). Economics and Environmental Reporting Branch

    1996-10-01

    Under the NSW Radiation Control Act 1990, radiation apparatus used for diagnostic medical, dental and veterinary purposes will be required to become registered. The inspection required prior to registration will be conducted by a Consulting Radiation Expert who has been accredited by the Environment Protection Authority (EPA) as being competent in the field of quality assurance assessment of radiation apparatus used for diagnostic medical, dental and veterinary purposes. When regulating any activity in NSW, there is a requirement to undertake a regulatory impact statement of the proposed regulation. In addition, the introduction of any accompanying guideline requires a cost-benefit analysis. Costs may include enforcement, administrative and compliance activities. The calculation of benefit relies heavily on the improvement in apparatus performance (and hence dose reduction) that can be obtained with the introduction of a mandatory practice such as apparatus registration. This paper discusses the development of the registration guideline for NSW, including a summary of the public comments received. It further discusses the methodology and data used for the accompanying cost-benefit analysis. Information in this paper is presented in three parts: EPA field survey, cost analysis, and benefit analysis. For NSW it was estimated that the introduction of registration of these apparatus, over a two year period, would result in early replacement and repair costs (present values) to the medical industry of between $5.7 and $11.0 million, with an additional $2.5 million in EPA enforcement costs. The introduction of the proposed system of registration is expected to result in an estimated savings in quantifiable health detriment costs to NSW of between $11.8 and $17.7 million, and reduce the risk of radiation induced mortality. (authors). 4 refs., 11 tabs.

  7. Needs assessment of primary care physicians in the management of chronic pain in cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Ronald; Saunders, Kevin; Burke, Howard; Belanger, Andre; Chow, Edward

    2017-06-07

    Cancer patients live longer with effective anti-cancer therapy and supportive care. About 30% of cancer survivors (non-palliative cancer patients who completed treatment) suffer from chronic pain, which will be managed by their primary care physician (PCP). The aim of this study was to assess practice patterns and treatment barriers in the management of chronic pain in cancer survivors among PCPs. A survey using a 16-item questionnaire was sent to PCPs across Canada. A total of 162 responses were collected. The majority of participants were in group (59%) or solo (33%) practice, with an average of 25 years of clinical experience. Seventy-one percent of PCPs were practicing in communities of 10,000 to 100,000 people. Respondents were treating approximately 10 cancer survivors with chronic pain per month. The majority of PCPs (59%) reported having "little knowledge" or "some understanding" of chronic pain management in cancer survivors. They did not usually refer these patients to other specialists. Patient comorbidities (79%), pain medication side effects (78%), previous pain treatment (76%), effect of pain on daily functioning (75%), and drug interactions (71%) were identified as factors that guided PCP treatment choices. Major barriers included medication cost (54%), concerns about opioid abuse (51%), and patient non-compliance (46%). PCPs indicated that treatment guidelines (74%) and knowledge of pharmacological (64%) and non-pharmacological (62%) treatment options would help their chronic pain management. Most PCPs report a lack of knowledge in the management of chronic pain in cancer survivors but are keen to receive medical education on treatment options and clinical practice guidelines.

  8. Design and implementation of a decision support system for breast cancer treatment based on clinical practice guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skevofilakas, M.T.; Nikita, K.S. [Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece); Templaleksis, P.H.; Birbas, K.N.; Kaklamanos, I.G.; Bonatsos, G.N. [School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Nursing, Dept. of Surgery Nursing (Greece)

    2007-06-15

    Evidence based medicine is the clinical practice that uses medical data and proof in order to make efficient clinical decisions. Information technology (IT) can play a crucial role in exploiting the huge size of raw medical data involved. In an attempt to improve clinical efficacy, health care society nowadays also utilizes a new assistant, clinical guidelines. Our research concerns the medical domain of the breast cancer disease. Our research's focus is twofold; our primary goal is to ensure consistency in clinical practice by importing clinical guidelines in an IT driven decision support system (DSS). Furthermore, we seek to improve visualization of disease specific, clinical data, providing for it's faster and more efficient use. (orig.)

  9. Adherence to cervical cancer screening guidelines for U.S. women aged 25-64: data from the 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Wendy; Moser, Richard P; Gaffey, Allison; Waldron, William

    2009-11-01

    Although it is widely accepted that Papanicolaou (Pap) screening can reduce cervical cancer mortality, many women still do not maintain regular cervical cancer screenings. To describe the prevalence of cervical cancer screening and the demographic, behavioral, psychological, and cancer-related knowledge factors associated with adherence to U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) cervical cancer screening guidelines among women in the United States. Data for women aged 25-64 were obtained from the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) 2005 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS). Women were considered adherent to screening guidelines if they had two consecutive, on-schedule screenings and planned to have another within the next 3 years. The sample comprised 2070 women. Ninety-eight percent of women reported ever having a Pap smear, 90% reported having had a recent Pap smear (within 3 years), and 84% were adherent to USPSTF screening guidelines. Maintaining regular cervical cancer screening was significantly associated with having health insurance, normal body mass index (BMI), smoking status (nonsmoker), mood (absence of a mood disturbance), and being knowledgeable about cervical cancer screening and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Based on the observation that women who were current smokers, obese, or experiencing a substantial degree of psychological distress were significantly less likely to adhere to recommended screening guidelines, we suggest that healthcare providers pay particular attention to the screening needs of these more vulnerable women.

  10. Spinal opioids in adult patients with cancer pain: a systematic review: a European Palliative Care Research Collaborative (EPCRC) opioid guidelines project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, Geana Paula; Kaasa, Stein; Sjøgren, Per

    2011-01-01

    A systematic review, undertaken according to an initiative to revise European Association for Palliative Care guidelines on the use of opioids for cancer pain, which aimed to analyse analgesic efficacy and side effects of spinal opioids in adult cancer patients previously treated with systemic...... opioids....

  11. Spinal opioids in adult patients with cancer pain: a systematic review: a European Palliative Care Research Collaborative (EPCRC) opioid guidelines project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurita, Geana Paula; Kaasa, Stein; Sjøgren, Per

    2011-01-01

    A systematic review, undertaken according to an initiative to revise European Association for Palliative Care guidelines on the use of opioids for cancer pain, which aimed to analyse analgesic efficacy and side effects of spinal opioids in adult cancer patients previously treated with systemic...

  12. Assessment of drug induced genotoxicity in gastric cancer patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of drug induced genotoxicity in gastric cancer patients. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... Blood samples were collected from gastric cancer patients receiving chemotherapy with the cytotoxic drugs epirubicin, cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil, and 100 controls from recognized cancer hospitals under the ...

  13. Questionnaires used to assess barriers of clinical guideline use among physicians are not comprehensive, reliable, or valid: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Melina L; Vernooij, Robin W M; Gagliardi, Anna R

    2017-06-01

    This study described the number and characteristics of questionnaires used to assess barriers of guideline use among physicians. A scoping review was conducted. MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched from 2005 to June 2016. English-language studies that administered a questionnaire to assess barriers of guideline use among practicing physicians were eligible. Summary statistics were used to report study and questionnaire characteristics. Questionnaire content was assessed with a checklist of 57 known barriers. Each of the 178 included studies administered a unique questionnaire. The number of questionnaires increased yearly from 2005 to 2015. Few were pilot-tested (50, 28.1%) or tested for psychometric properties (3, 1.7%). Two were based on theory. None probed for the full range of known barriers. Ten included a free-text option. The majority assessed professional barriers (177, 99.4%) but few of the 14 factors within this domain. Questionnaire characteristics did not change over time. Organizations administered questionnaires that were not reliable or valid and did not comprehensively assess barriers and may have selected interventions unlikely to promote guideline use. Research is needed to construct a questionnaire that is practical, adaptable, and robust and leads to the selection of interventions that support guideline use. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Implementation of an Evidence Based Guideline for Assessment and Documentation of the Civil Commitment Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrigo, Tabitha L; Williams, Kimberly A

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this quality improvement project was to implement an evidence-based practice guideline for assessment and documentation of the civil commitment process. Participants included six civil commitment examiners who conduct court ordered psychiatric evaluations at two crisis intervention centers in rural area of southeaster state. Data collection was conducted utilizing a chart audit tool both pre and post intervention of 100 civil commitment evaluations. The intervention included the development of an evidenced based form for documentation of civil commitment evaluations and a one on one educational training session was conducted for each participant. Descriptive statistics (t test) was utilized to analyze the data collected. The project demonstrated a significant increase as 25.5 % of evaluations contained the America Psychiatric Association's recommended 11 domains of assessment prior to implementation compared to 65.6 % (p value = 0.018) post implementation. Moreover, participants with family practice training showed an increase in commitment rates from 60 to 77.3 % (p value = 0.066). Whereas, psychiatric trained participants showed a decrease from 83.75 to 77.66 % (p value = 0.38). Demonstrating that court ordered evaluations guided by a standardized form based on evidence affected examiners recommendations for commitments.

  15. Comprehensive geriatric assessment in the older cancer patient: coming of age in clinical cancer care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu, Cynthia; Berger, Nathan A

    2015-01-01

    Cancer care at the extremes of life, in the young and the old, is characterized by unique issues associated with pediatrics and geriatric medicine, accentuated by the special vulnerabilities of these groups. In response to these needs, the field of pediatric oncology has been well honed to deal with the special problems associated with juvenile cancer patients. While most adult oncologists consider themselves well prepared to deal with older cancer patients, the current expansion of the geriatric population – their variable levels of fitness, frailty and vulnerability, the fact that cancer is primarily a disease of older adults, the significant expansion of agents and approaches to treat cancer, as well as their resultant toxicities and complications – has led to the development of specialized geriatric oncologists. Moreover, the special characteristics and needs of these patients have led to the evolution of new guidelines for evaluation, management and the conduct of research in older patients with cancer. PMID:25642321

  16. Better Late than Never? Adherence to Adjuvant Therapy Guidelines for Stage III Colon Cancer in an Underserved Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Whitney; Wise, Amy; Lim, Garrett; Dong, Lei; Wan, Jim; Deneve, Jeremiah; Glazer, Evan; Dickson, Paxton; Daugherty, R Scott; Fleming, Martin; Shibata, David

    2018-01-01

    In 2008, the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer (CoC) issued a quality guideline for stage III colon cancer (CC) recommending adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) within 120 days of diagnosis. We examined adherence in a healthcare system serving a region with disparities in CC outcomes. In a retrospective analysis of patients (2005-2014) with stage III CC in a multi-hospital healthcare system, the associations between adherence, clinicopathologic, demographic, geographic, and socioeconomic data and overall survival (OS) were examined. Of 1171 CC patients, 438 (37.4%) had stage III disease with 63% (n = 276) receiving AC and 37% (n = 162) not. AC conferred a 5-year OS advantage (62.4 vs. 42.5%, p < 0.0001). Younger age independently predicted AC receipt (OR = 0.95, p < 0.0001). Of 252 AC patients < 80 years, 75.8% were CoC guideline compliant (GC) whereas 24.2% were not (nGC). Although there was no OS difference between GC and nGC, both had superior survival (p < 0.0001) compared to non-AC patients. Surgical complications trended towards independent association with non-compliance (p = 0.07) CONCLUSION: Guideline compliance in our system (63%) is lower than the CoC Estimated Performance Rate (72.4%). Age influenced absolute receipt of AC while surgical complications may impact guideline compliance. Even when administered beyond 120 days, AC was associated with a survival benefit.

  17. Oral Health-Related Complications of Breast Cancer Treatment: Assessing Dental Hygienists’ Knowledge and Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taichman, L. Susan; Gomez, Grace; Inglehart, Marita Rohr

    2017-01-01

    Objective Approximately 200,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer in the U.S. every year. These patients commonly suffer from oral complications of their cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to assess dental hygienists’ knowledge and professional practice related to providing care for breast cancer patients. Methods A pre-tested 43-item survey was mailed to a random sample of 10% of all licensed dental hygienists in the State of Michigan (N=962). The survey assessed the respondents’ knowledge of potential oral complications of breast cancer treatments as well as their professional practices when treating patients with breast cancer. After two mailings, the response rate was 37% (N=331). Descriptive and inferential analyses were conducted using SAS. Results Many dental hygienists were unaware of the recommended clinical guidelines for treating breast cancer patients and lacked specific knowledge pertaining to the commonly prescribed anti-estrogen medications for pre-and postmenopausal breast cancer patients. Over 70% of the respondents indicated they were unfamiliar with the AI class of medications. Only 13% of dental hygienists correctly identified the mechanism of action of anti-estrogen therapy. Dental hygienists reported increased gingival inflammation, gingival bleeding, periodontal pocketing, xerostomia and burning tissues in patients receiving anti-estrogen therapies. Less than 10% believed that their knowledge of breast cancer treatments and the oral side effects is up to date. Conclusions Results indicate a need for more education about the potential oral effects of breast cancer therapies and about providing the best possible care for patients undergoing breast cancer treatment. PMID:26338905

  18. Symptom management in patients with lung cancer: Diagnosis and management of lung cancer, 3rd ed: American College of Chest Physicians evidence-based clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoff, Michael J; Lally, Brian; Slade, Mark G; Goldberg, Wendy G; Lee, Pyng; Michaud, Gaetane C; Wahidi, Momen M; Chawla, Mohit

    2013-05-01

    Many patients with lung cancer will develop symptoms related to their disease process or the treatment they are receiving. These symptoms can be as debilitating as the disease progression itself. To many physicians these problems can be the most difficult to manage. A detailed review of the literature using strict methodologic review of article quality was used in the development of this article. MEDLINE literature reviews, in addition to Cochrane reviews and other databases, were used for this review. The resulting article lists were then reviewed by experts in each area for quality and finally interpreted for content. We have developed recommendations for the management of many of the symptom complexes that patients with lung cancer may experience: pain, dyspnea, airway obstruction, cough, bone metastasis, brain metastasis, spinal cord metastasis, superior vena cava syndrome, hemoptysis, tracheoesophageal fistula, pleural effusions, venous thromboembolic disease, depression, fatigue, anorexia, and insomnia. Some areas, such as dyspnea, are covered in considerable detail in previously created high-quality evidence-based guidelines and are identified as excellent sources of reference. The goal of this guideline is to provide the reader recommendations based on evidence supported by scientific study. Improved understanding and recognition of cancer-related symptoms can improve management strategies, patient compliance, and quality of life for all patients with lung cancer.

  19. Summary guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halsnaes, K.; Painuly, J.P.; Turkson, J.; Meyer, H.J.; Markandya, A.

    1999-09-01

    This document is a summary version of the methodological guidelines for climate change mitigation assessment developed as part of the Global Environment Facility (GEF) project Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations; Methodological Guidelines. The objectives of this project have been to develop a methodology, an implementing framework and a reporting system which countries can use in the construction of national climate change mitigation policies and in meeting their future reporting obligations under the FCCC. The methodological framework developed in the Methodological Guidelines covers key economic concepts, scenario building, modelling tools and common assumptions. It was used by several country studies included in the project. (au) 13 refs.

  20. Use of Larynx-Preservation Strategies in the Treatment of Laryngeal Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forastiere, Arlene A; Ismaila, Nofisat; Lewin, Jan S; Nathan, Cherie Ann; Adelstein, David J; Eisbruch, Avraham; Fass, Gail; Fisher, Susan G; Laurie, Scott A; Le, Quynh-Thu; O'Malley, Bernard; Mendenhall, William M; Patel, Snehal; Pfister, David G; Provenzano, Anthony F; Weber, Randy; Weinstein, Gregory S; Wolf, Gregory T

    2017-11-27

    Purpose To update the guideline recommendations on the use of larynx-preservation strategies in the treatment of laryngeal cancer. Methods An Expert Panel updated the systematic review of the literature for the period from January 2005 to May 2017. Results The panel confirmed that the use of a larynx-preservation approach for appropriately selected patients does not compromise survival. No larynx-preservation approach offered a survival advantage compared with total laryngectomy and adjuvant therapy as indicated. Changes were supported for the use of endoscopic surgical resection in patients with limited disease (T1, T2) and for initial total laryngectomy in patients with T4a disease or with severe pretreatment laryngeal dysfunction. New recommendations for positron emission tomography imaging for the evaluation of regional nodes after treatment and best measures for evaluating voice and swallowing function were added. Recommendations Patients with T1, T2 laryngeal cancer should be treated initially with intent to preserve the larynx by using endoscopic resection or radiation therapy, with either leading to similar outcomes. For patients with locally advanced (T3, T4) disease, organ-preservation surgery, combined chemotherapy and radiation, or radiation alone offer the potential for larynx preservation without compromising overall survival. For selected patients with extensive T3 or large T4a lesions and/or poor pretreatment laryngeal function, better survival rates and quality of life may be achieved with total laryngectomy. Patients with clinically involved regional cervical nodes (N+) who have a complete clinical and radiologic imaging response after chemoradiation do not require elective neck dissection. All patients should undergo a pretreatment baseline assessment of voice and swallowing function and receive counseling with regard to the potential impact of treatment options on voice, swallowing, and quality of life. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/head-neck-cancer-guidelines

  1. Physiotherapy in hip and knee osteoarthritis: development of a practice guideline concerning initial assessment, treatment and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, W F; Jansen, M J; Hurkmans, E J; Bloo, H; Dekker, J; Dilling, R G; Hilberdink, W; Kersten-Smit, C; de Rooij, M; Veenhof, C; Vermeulen, H M; de Vos, R J; Schoones, J W; Vliet Vlieland, T P

    2011-01-01

    An update of a Dutch physiotherapy practice guideline in Hip and Knee Osteoarthritis (HKOA) was made, based on current evidence and best practice. A guideline steering committee, comprising 10 expert physiotherapists, selected topics concerning the guideline chapters: initial assessment, treatment and evaluation. With respect to treatment a systematic literature search was performed using various databases, and the evidence was graded (1-4). For the initial assessment and evaluation mainly review papers and textbooks were used. Based on evidence and expert opinion, recommendations were formulated. A first draft of the guideline was reviewed by 17 experts from different professional backgrounds. A second draft was field-tested by 45 physiotherapists. In total 11 topics were selected. For the initial assessment, three recommendations were formulated, pertaining to history taking, red flags, and formulating treatment goals. Concerning treatment, 7 recommendations were formulated; (supervised) exercise therapy, education and self management interventions, a combination of exercise and manual therapy, postoperative exercise therapy and taping of the patella were recommended. Balneotherapy and hydrotherapy in HKOA, and thermotherapy, TENS, and Continuous Passive Motion in knee OA were neither recommended nor discouraged. Massage therapy, ultrasound, electrotherapy, electromagnetic field, Low Level Laser Therapy, preoperative physiotherapy and education could not be recommended. For the evaluation of treatment goals the following measurement instruments were recommended: Lequesne index, Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index, Hip disability and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score and Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, 6-minute walktest, Timed Up and Go test, Patient Specific Complaint list, Visual Analoge Scale for pain, Intermittent and Constant OsteoArthritis Pain Questionnaire, goniometry, Medical Research Council for strength, handheld

  2. Reliability and accuracy assessment of radiation therapy oncology group-endorsed guidelines for brachial plexus contouring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velde, Joris van de [Ghent University, Department of Anatomy, Ghent (Belgium); Ghent University, Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent (Belgium); Vercauteren, Tom; Gersem, Werner de; Vandecasteele, Katrien; Vuye, Philippe; Vanpachtenbeke, Frank; Neve, Wilfried de [Ghent University, Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent (Belgium); Wouters, Johan; Herde, Katharina d' ; Kerckaert, Ingrid; Hoof, Tom van [Ghent University, Department of Anatomy, Ghent (Belgium)

    2014-07-15

    The goal of this work was to validate the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)-endorsed guidelines for brachial plexus (BP) contouring by determining the intra- and interobserver agreement. Accuracy of the delineation process was determined using anatomically validated imaging datasets as a gold standard. Five observers delineated the right BP on three cadaver computed tomography (CT) datasets. To assess intraobserver variation, every observer repeated each delineation three times with a time interval of 2 weeks. The BP contours were divided into four regions for detailed analysis. Inter- and intraobserver variation was verified using the Computerized Environment for Radiation Research (CERR) software. Accuracy was measured using anatomically validated fused CT-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets by measuring the BP inclusion of the delineations. The overall kappa (κ) values were rather low (mean interobserver overall κ: 0.29, mean intraobserver overall κ: 0.45), indicating poor inter- and intraobserver reliability. In general, the κ coefficient decreased gradually from the medial to lateral BP regions. The total agreement volume (TAV) was much smaller than the union volume (UV) for all delineations, resulting in a low Jaccard index (JI; interobserver agreement 0-0.124; intraobserver agreement 0.004-0.636). The overall accuracy was poor, with an average total BP inclusion of 38 %. Inclusions were insufficient for the most lateral regions (region 3: 21.5 %; region 4: 12.6 %). The inter- and intraobserver reliability of the RTOG-endorsed BP contouring guidelines was poor. BP inclusion worsened from the medial to lateral regions. Accuracy assessment of the contours showed an average BP inclusion of 38 %. For the first time, this was assessed using the original anatomically validated BP volume. The RTOG-endorsed BP guidelines have insufficient accuracy and reliability, especially for the lateral head-and-neck regions. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Studie war

  3. Optimizing HER2 assessment in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holten-Rossing, Henrik; Møller Talman, Maj-Lis; Kristensson, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In breast cancer, analysis of HER2 expression is pivotal for treatment decision. This study aimed at comparing digital, automated image analysis with manual reading using the HER2-CONNECT algorithm (Visiopharm) in order to minimize the number of equivocal 2+ scores and the need for reflex...... staining (IHC) was performed with Roche/Ventana's HER2 ready-to-use kit. TMAs were scanned in a Zeiss Axio Z1 scanner, and one batch analysis of the HER2-CONNECT algorithm including all core samples was run using Visiopharm's cloud-based software. The automated reading was compared to conventional manual....... With HER2-CONNECT, sensitivity increased to 100 % and specificity to 95.5% with less than 4.5% equivocal. Total agreement when comparing HER2-CONNECT with manual IHC assessment supplemented by FISH for borderline (2+) cases was 93.6%. Application of automated image analysis for HER2 protein expression...

  4. Common breast cancer risk alleles and risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Näslund-Koch, C; Nordestgaard, B G; Bojesen, S E

    2017-01-01

    general population were followed in Danish health registries for up to 21 years after blood sampling. After genotyping 72 breast cancer risk loci, each with 0-2 alleles, the sum for each individual was calculated. We used the simple allele sum instead of the conventional polygenic risk score...... cancer risks ≤ 1.5%. Using polygenic risk score led to similar results. CONCLUSION: Common breast cancer risk alleles are associated with incidence and mortality of breast cancer in the general population, but not with other cancers. After including breast cancer allele sum in risk assessment, 25......BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that common breast cancer risk alleles are associated with incidences of breast cancer and other cancers in the general population, and identify low risk women among those invited for screening mammography. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: 35,441 individuals from the Danish...

  5. Contribution of extended family history in assessment of risk for breast and colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Benjamin L; Whitman, Todd; Wood, Marie E

    2016-09-01

    Family history is important for identifying candidates for high risk cancer screening and referral for genetic counseling. We sought to determine the percentage of individuals who would be eligible for high risk cancer screening or genetic referral and testing if family history includes an extended (vs limited) family history. Family histories were obtained from 626 women at UVMMC associated mammography centers from 2001 to 2002. ACS guidelines were used to determine eligibility for high risk breast or colon cancer screening. Eligibility for referral for genetic counseling for hereditary breast and colon cancer was determined using the Referral Screening Tool and Amsterdam II screening criteria, respectively. All family histories were assessed for eligibility by a limited history (first degree relatives only) and extended history (first and second degree relatives). Four hundred ninety-nine histories were eligible for review. 18/282 (3.6 %) and 62/123 (12 %) individuals met criteria for high risk breast and colon cancer screening, respectively. 13/18 (72 %) in the high risk breast cancer screening group and 12/62 (19 %) in the high risk colon cancer screening group met criteria based upon an extended family history. 9/282 (1.8 %) and 31/123 (6.2 %) individuals met criteria for genetic counseling referral and testing for breast and colon cancer, respectively. 2/9 (22 %) of individuals in the genetic breast cancer screening group and 21/31 (68 %) individuals in the genetic colon cancer screening group met criteria based upon extended family history. This is one of the first studies to suggest that first degree family history alone is not adequate for identification of candidates for high risk screening and referral for genetic counseling for hereditary breast and colon cancer syndromes. A larger population is needed to further validate this data.

  6. 76 FR 44586 - Notice of Availability of the External Review Draft of the Microbial Risk Assessment Guideline...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... genetically modified microorganisms with the potential for environmental exposure. USDA/FSIS is charged with...: Pathogenic Microorganisms With Focus on Food and in Water AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... Risk Assessment Guideline: Pathogenic Microorganisms with Focus on Food and in Water.'' EPA developed...

  7. Assessment of the Policy Guidelines for the Teaching and Learning of Geography at the Senior High School Level in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ababio, Bethel T.; Dumba, Hillary

    2014-01-01

    This article empirically assessed the extent to which geography teachers adhered to the Ghana Education Service policy guidelines on the teaching of geography at the Senior High School Level in Ghana. Census survey was used to collect data from seven geography teachers because of the researchers' objective of gaining a quick insight into the…

  8. Definitive and Adjuvant Radiotherapy in Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement of the American Society for Radiation Oncology Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezjak, Andrea; Temin, Sarah; Franklin, Gregg; Giaccone, Giuseppe; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Johnson, Melissa L; Rimner, Andreas; Schneider, Bryan J; Strawn, John; Azzoli, Christopher G

    2015-06-20

    The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) produced an evidence-based guideline on external-beam radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Because of its relevance to the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) membership, ASCO endorsed the guideline after applying a set of procedures and a policy that are used to critically examine and endorse guidelines developed by other guideline development organizations. The ASTRO guideline was reviewed by ASCO content experts for clinical accuracy and by ASCO methodologists for developmental rigor. On favorable review, an ASCO expert panel was convened and endorsed the guideline. The ASCO guideline approval body, the Clinical Practice Guideline Committee, approved the final endorsement. The recommendations from the ASTRO guideline, published in Practical Radiation Oncology, are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence. The ASCO Endorsement Panel endorsed the guideline and added qualifying statements. For curative-intent treatment of locally advanced NSCLC, concurrent chemoradiotherapy improves local control and overall survival compared with sequential chemotherapy followed by radiation. The standard dose-fractionation of radiation is 60 Gy given in 2-Gy once-daily fractions over 6 weeks. There is no role for the routine use of induction therapy before chemoradiotherapy. Current data fail to support a clear role for consolidation therapy after chemoradiotherapy; however, consolidation therapy remains an option for patients who did not receive full systemic chemotherapy doses during radiotherapy. Important questions remain about the ideal concurrent chemotherapy regimen and optimal management of patients with resectable stage III disease. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  9. The Norwegian dietary guidelines and colorectal cancer survival (CRC-NORDIET) study: a food-based multicentre randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Hege Berg; Ræder, Hanna; Bøhn, Siv Kjølsrud; Paur, Ingvild; Kværner, Ane Sørlie; Billington, Siv Åshild; Eriksen, Morten Tandberg; Wiedsvang, Gro; Erlund, Iris; Færden, Arne; Veierød, Marit Bragelien; Zucknick, Manuela; Smeland, Sigbjørn; Blomhoff, Rune

    2017-01-30

    Colorectal cancer survivors are not only at risk for recurrent disease but also at increased risk of comorbidities such as other cancers, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension and functional decline. In this trial, we aim at investigating whether a diet in accordance with the Norwegian food-based dietary guidelines and focusing at dampening inflammation and oxidative stress will improve long-term disease outcomes and survival in colorectal cancer patients. This paper presents the study protocol of the Norwegian Dietary Guidelines and Colorectal Cancer Survival study. Men and women aged 50-80 years diagnosed with primary invasive colorectal cancer (Stage I-III) are invited to this randomized controlled, parallel two-arm trial 2-9 months after curative surgery. The intervention group (n = 250) receives an intensive dietary intervention lasting for 12 months and a subsequent maintenance intervention for 14 years. The control group (n = 250) receives no dietary intervention other than standard clinical care. Both groups are offered equal general advice of physical activity. Patients are followed-up at 6 months and 1, 3, 5, 7, 10 and 15 years after baseline. The study center is located at the Department of Nutrition, University of Oslo, and patients are recruited from two hospitals within the South-Eastern Norway Regional Health Authority. Primary outcomes are disease-free survival and overall survival. Secondary outcomes are time to recurrence, cardiovascular disease-free survival, compliance to the dietary recommendations and the effects of the intervention on new comorbidities, intermediate biomarkers, nutrition status, physical activity, physical function and quality of life. The current study is designed to gain a better understanding of the role of a healthy diet aimed at dampening inflammation and oxidative stress on long-term disease outcomes and survival in colorectal cancer patients. Since previous research on the role of diet for

  10. GPs' adherence to guidelines for structured assessments of stroke survivors in the community and care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves-Bradley, Daniela C; Boylan, Anne-Marie; Koshiaris, Constantinos; Vazquez Montes, Maria; Ford, Gary A; Lasserson, Daniel S

    2015-12-01

    Clinical practice guidelines recommend that stroke survivors' needs be assessed at regular intervals after stroke. The extent to which GPs comply with national guidance particularly for patients in care homes who have greatest clinical complexity is unknown. This study aimed to establish the current clinical practice in the UK of needs assessment by GPs for stroke survivors after hospital discharge for acute stroke. Cross-sectional online survey of current practice of GPs, using the national doctors.net network. The survey was completed by 300 GPs who had on average been working for 14 years. The structured assessment of stroke survivors' needs was not offered by 31% of GPs, with no significant difference for level of provision in community or care home settings. The outputs of reviews were added to patients' notes by 89% of GPs and used to change management by 57%. Only half the GPs reported integrating the information obtained into care plans and only a quarter of GPs had a protocol for follow-up of identified needs. Analysis of free-text comments indicated that patients in some care homes may receive more regular and structured reviews. This survey suggests that at least one-third of GPs provide no formal review of the needs of stroke patients and that in only a minority are identified needs addressed in a structured way. Standardization is required for what is included in reviews and how needs are being identified and met. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. A mixed methods assessment of coping with pediatric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderfer, Melissa A.; Deatrick, Janet A.; Marsac, Meghan L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe child coping and parent coping assistance with cancer-related stressors during treatment. Fifteen children (aged 6-12) with cancer and their parents (N = 17) completed semi-structured interviews and self-report measures to assess coping and coping assistance. Results suggest families utilized a broad array of approach and avoidance strategies to manage cancer and its treatment. Quantitative and qualitative assessments provided complementary and unique contributions to understanding coping among children with cancer and their parents. Using a mixed methods approach to assess coping provides a richer understanding of families’ experiences, which can better inform clinical practice. PMID:24428250

  12. Evaluation of individuals with pulmonary nodules: when is it lung cancer? Diagnosis and management of lung cancer, 3rd ed: American College of Chest Physicians evidence-based clinical practice guidelines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gould, Michael K; Donington, Jessica; Lynch, William R; Mazzone, Peter J; Midthun, David E; Naidich, David P; Wiener, Renda Soylemez

    2013-01-01

    ... for those with nonsolid nodules. We updated prior literature reviews, synthesized evidence, and formulated recommendations by using the methods described in the "Methodology for Development of Guidelines for Lung Cancer...

  13. Recommendations for gonadotoxicity surveillance in male childhood, adolescent, and young adult cancer survivors: a report from the International Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Guideline Harmonization Group in collaboration with the PanCareSurFup Consortium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skinner, Roderick; Mulder, Renee L.; Kremer, Leontien C.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Constine, Louis S.; Bardi, Edit; Boekhout, Annelies; Borgmann-Staudt, Anja; Brown, Morven C.; Cohn, Richard; Dirksen, Uta; Giwercman, Alexsander; Ishiguro, Hiroyuki; Jahnukainen, Kirsi; Kenney, Lisa B.; Loonen, Jacqueline J.; Meacham, Lilian; Neggers, Sebastian; Nussey, Stephen; Petersen, Cecilia; Shnorhavorian, Margarett; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; van Santen, Hanneke M.; Wallace, William H. B.; Green, Daniel M.

    2017-01-01

    Treatment with chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or surgery that involves reproductive organs can cause impaired spermatogenesis, testosterone deficiency, and physical sexual dysfunction in male pubertal, adolescent, and young adult cancer survivors. Guidelines for surveillance and management of potential

  14. ICF linked Dutch physiotherapy guidelines concerning initial assessment, treatment and evaluation in hip and knee osteoarthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peter, W.; Jansen, M.J.; Hurkmans, E.J.; Bloo, H.; Dekker-Bakker, L.M.M.C.J.; Dilling, R.G.; Hilberdink, W.K.H.A.; Kersten-Smit, C.; Rooij, M. de; Veenhof, C.; Vermeulen, E.M.; Vos, I. de; Schoones, J.W.; Vliet Vlieland, T.P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: In 2001 the Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF) Guideline for hip and knee osteoarthritis (HKOA) was developed. Since then, many scientific papers on physical therapy interventions as well as national and international guidelines were published. Relevance: An update of the

  15. New diagnostic criteria and severity assessment of acute cholangitis in revised Tokyo guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiriyama, Seiki; Takada, Tadahiro; Strasberg, Steven M.; Solomkin, Joseph S.; Mayumi, Toshihiko; Pitt, Henry A.; Gouma, Dirk J.; Garden, O. James; Büchler, Markus W.; Yokoe, Masamichi; Kimura, Yasutoshi; Tsuyuguchi, Toshio; Itoi, Takao; Yoshida, Masahiro; Miura, Fumihiko; Yamashita, Yuichi; Okamoto, Kohji; Gabata, Toshifumi; Hata, Jiro; Higuchi, Ryota; Windsor, John A.; Bornman, Philippus C.; Fan, Sheung-Tat; Singh, Harijt; de Santibanes, Eduardo; Gomi, Harumi; Kusachi, Shinya; Murata, Atsuhiko; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Jagannath, Palepu; Lee, Sunggyu; Padbury, Robert; Chen, Miin-Fu

    2012-01-01

    Background The Tokyo Guidelines for the management of acute cholangitis and cholecystitis were published in 2007 (TG07) and have been widely cited in the world literature. Because of new information that has been published since 2007, we organized the Tokyo Guidelines Revision Committee to conduct a

  16. The clinical database and the treatment guidelines of the Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group (DBCG); its 30-years experience and future promise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, S.; Jensen, M.B.; Ejlertsen, B.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction. Since 30 years, DBCG (Danish Breast Cancer Cooperative Group) has maintained a clinical database allowing the conduct of quality control studies, of randomised trials, examination of the epidemiology of breast cancer and of prognostic and predictive factors. Material and methods....... The original database included patients with invasive breast cancer, but has later been expanded to patients with in situ breast cancer and hereditary breast and ovarian cancer families. Results. The multidisciplinary cooperative group has provided successive treatment guidelines and 70% of the 77284...

  17. Work disability assessment of cancer survivors: insurance physicians ' perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Muijen, P.; Duijts, S.F.A.; van der Aa, D.A.; van der Beek, A.J.; Anema, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Assessing work disability in cancer survivors is a complex decision-making process. In the Netherlands, physicians employed by the Dutch Social Security Agency (SSA) play a key role in assessing work disability of cancer survivors on long-term sick leave. Aims: To investigate the aspects

  18. Multisite assessment of NIA-AA guidelines for the neuropathologic evaluation of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montine, Thomas J; Monsell, Sarah E; Beach, Thomas G; Bigio, Eileen H; Bu, Yunqi; Cairns, Nigel J; Frosch, Matthew; Henriksen, Jonathan; Kofler, Julia; Kukull, Walter A; Lee, Edward B; Nelson, Peter T; Schantz, Aimee M; Schneider, Julie A; Sonnen, Joshua A; Trojanowski, John Q; Vinters, Harry V; Zhou, Xiao-Hua; Hyman, Bradley T

    2016-02-01

    Neuropathologic assessment is the current "gold standard" for evaluating the Alzheimer's disease (AD), but there is no consensus on the methods used. Fifteen unstained slides (8 brain regions) from each of the 14 cases were prepared and distributed to 10 different National Institute on Aging AD Centers for application of usual staining and evaluation following recently revised guidelines for AD neuropathologic change. Current practice used in the AD Centers Program achieved robustly excellent agreement for the severity score for AD neuropathologic change (average weighted κ = .88, 95% confidence interval: 0.77-0.95) and good-to-excellent agreement for the three supporting scores. Some improvement was observed with consensus evaluation but not with central staining of slides. Evaluation of glass slides and digitally prepared whole-slide images was comparable. AD neuropathologic evaluation as performed across AD Centers yields data that have high agreement with potential modifications for modest improvements. Copyright © 2016 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The opportunity of tracking food waste in school canteens: Guidelines for self-assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derqui, Belén; Fernandez, Vicenc

    2017-11-01

    Reducing food waste is one of the key challenges of the food system and addressing it in the institutional catering industry can be a quick win. In particular, school canteens are a significant source of food waste and therefore embody a great opportunity to address food waste. The goal of our research is the development of guidelines for audit and self-assessment in measuring and managing food waste produced at school canteens. The purpose of the tool is to standardise food waste audits to be executed either by scholars, school staff or by catering companies with the objective of measuring and reducing food waste at schools. We performed a research among public and private schools and catering companies from which we obtained the key performance indicators to be measured and then pilot-tested the resulting tool in four schools with over 2900 pupil participants, measuring plate waste from over 10,000 trays. This tool will help managers in their efforts towards more sustainable organisations at the same time as the standardisation of food waste audits will provide researchers with comparable data. The study suggests that although there is low awareness on the amount of food wasted at school canteens, managers and staff are highly interested in the topic and would be willing to implement audits and reduction measures. The case study also showed that our tool is easy to implement and not disruptive. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A novel means of assessing institutional adherence to blood transfusion guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Caitlin W; Frank, Steven M; Wasey, Jack O; Efron, Jonathan; Gearhart, Susan; Fang, Sandy; Safar, Bashar; Makary, Martin A; Wick, Elizabeth C

    2015-01-01

    Risk-adjusted institutional transfusion rates are not currently available on a national level. A surrogate means of benchmarking transfusion practices to use for internal quality improvement was studied. Blood utilization was prospectively studied among all colorectal surgery patients at the study institution (July 2010-November 2012), and these data were benchmarked with transfusion data from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) database by hospital type and size. Using NSQIP, the study institution's colorectal surgery transfusion rate was 16.3% (150/920 cases), which was slightly higher than the 14.3% national mean transfusion rate (12 191/85 507 cases; P = .08). When broken down by hospital type and size, the study hospital had a similar rate of blood transfusion compared with academic hospitals (P = .35) but a significantly higher rate than community hospitals, regardless of patient volume (P = .03). Benchmarking blood utilization compared with similar-type hospitals using NSQIP may be a surrogate method to assess adherence to evidence-based transfusion guidelines and identify areas for structured quality improvement initiatives. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Guidelines for harmonized vulnerability and risk assessment for non-nuclear critical infrastructure: STREST Reference Report 3

    OpenAIRE

    Anastasiadis, Anastasios; Argyroudis, Sotiris; BABIČ Anže; Basco, Anna; CASOTTO Chiara; Crowley, Helen; Dolšek, Matjaž; FOTOPOULOU Stavroula; GALBUSERA LUCA; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Giardini, Domenico; KAKDERI Kalliopi; KARAFAGKA Stella; Matos, José Pedro; PITILAKIS Kyriazis

    2016-01-01

    Loss assessment of critical infrastructures (CIs) subject to natural hazards is fundamental to stress tests. The systemic approach that lifelines require for performance modelling is an open research topic, given their logical and physical complexity. The Work Package 4 (WP4) of STREST focused on the guidelines for the vulnerability assessment of critical infrastructures categorized as: A Individual, single-site infrastructures with high risk and potential for high local impact and regiona...

  2. Recommendations for Cardiomyopathy Surveillance for Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Report from the International Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Guideline Harmonization Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenian, Saro H.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Mulder, Renee L.; Chen, Ming Hui; Constine, Louis S.; Dwyer, Mary; Nathan, Paul C.; Tissing, Wim J.E.; Shankar, Sadhna; Sieswerda, Elske; Skinner, Rod; Steinberger, Julia; van Dalen, Elvira C.; van der Pal, Helena; Wallace, W. Hamish; Levitt, Gill; Kremer, Leontien C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Childhood cancer survivors treated with anthracycline chemotherapy or chest radiation are at an increased risk of developing congestive heart failure (CHF). In this population, CHF is well-recognized as a progressive disorder, with a variable period of asymptomatic cardiomyopathy which precedes signs and symptoms. As a result, a number of practice guidelines have been developed to facilitate detection and treatment of asymptomatic cardiomyopathy. These guidelines differ with regards to definitions of at risk populations, surveillance modality and frequency, and recommendations for interventions. These differences may hinder the effective implementation of these recommendations. We report on the results of an international collaboration to harmonize existing cardiomyopathy surveillance recommendations, using an evidence-based approach that relied on standardized definitions for outcomes of interest and transparent presentation of the quality of the evidence. The resultant recommendations were graded according to the quality of the evidence and the potential benefit gained from early detection and intervention. PMID:25752563

  3. [Suicide Risk Assessment in the Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Depression in Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez Restrepo, Carlos; Bohórquez Peñaranda, Adriana Patricia; Gil Lemus, Laura Marcela; Jaramillo, Luis Eduardo; García Valencia, Jenny; Bravo Narváez, Eliana; de la Hoz Bradford, Ana María; Palacio, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Suicide is the most serious complications of depression. It has high associated health costs and causes millions of deaths worldwide per year. Given its implications, it is important to know the factors that increase the risk of its occurrence and the most useful tools for addressing it. To identify the signs and symptoms that indicate an increased risk of suicide, and factors that increase the risk in patients diagnosed with depression. To establish the tools best fitted to identify suicide risk in people with depression. Clinical practice guidelines were developed, following those of the methodmethodological guidelines of the Ministry of Social Protection, to collect evidence and to adjust recommendations. Recommendations from the NICE90 and CANMAT guidelines were adopted and updated for questions found in these guidelines, while new recommendations were developed for questions not found in them. Basic points and recommendations are presented from a chapter of the clinical practice guidelines on depressive episodes and recurrent depressive disorder related to suicide risk assessment. Their corresponding recommendation levels are included. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Preventive vaccination against cervical cancer: Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology Guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Seong, Seok Ju; Shin, Jin Woo; Ju, Woong; Hong, Jin Hwa; Bae, Duk-Soo

    2016-01-01

    After human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine guidelines published by Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology (KSGO) in 2011, new studies have been published, leading to additional data regarding efficacy, safety, number of vaccination rounds, and ideal age of vaccine administration. We searched and reviewed the literatures focused on the efficacy of 2-dose schedule vaccination, the efficacy of 3-dose schedule vaccination in middle-aged women, the ideal age of 3-dose schedule vaccination, the safety of HPV preventive vaccine, and the ability of cross-protection of each HPV preventive vaccine. The KSGO has revised the previous guideline based on the results of the above studies. PMID:27029751

  5. Preventive vaccination against cervical cancer: Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Kyung-Jin; Kwon, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Hyun Jung; Seong, Seok Ju; Song, Yong Jung; Shin, Jin Woo; Lee, Keun-Ho; Lim, Myong Cheol; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Ju, Woong; Hong, Jin Hwa; Lee, Jeong-Won; Kim, Jae-Weon; Bae, Duk-Soo; Lee, Jae-Kwan

    2016-05-01

    After human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine guidelines published by Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology (KSGO) in 2011, new studies have been published, leading to additional data regarding efficacy, safety, number of vaccination rounds, and ideal age of vaccine administration. We searched and reviewed the literatures focused on the efficacy of 2-dose schedule vaccination, the efficacy of 3-dose schedule vaccination in middle-aged women, the ideal age of 3-dose schedule vaccination, the safety of HPV preventive vaccine, and the ability of cross-protection of each HPV preventive vaccine. The KSGO has revised the previous guideline based on the results of the above studies.

  6. Practical Performance of the 2015 American Thyroid Association Guidelines for Predicting Tumor Recurrence in Patients with Papillary Thyroid Cancer in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seul Gi; Lee, Woo Kyung; Lee, Hye Sun; Moon, Jieun; Lee, Cho Rok; Kang, Sang Wook; Jeong, Jong Ju; Nam, Kee-Hyun; Chung, Woong Youn; Jo, Young Suk; Lee, Jandee

    2017-02-01

    The 2015 American Thyroid Association (ATA) management guidelines for adult patients with differentiated thyroid cancer propose the use of the modified initial risk stratification and response to therapy re-stratification systems. This study was conducted to validate the practicality of the revised guidelines for predicting tumor recurrence in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. Patients with papillary thyroid cancer (n = 2425) who underwent total thyroidectomy with central neck node dissection with or without modified radical neck node dissection at a single institution between October 1985 and July 2009 were retrospectively enrolled. The accuracy of three different risk-stratification strategies for predicting disease-free survival, set out in the 2009 and 2015 ATA management guidelines, was assessed: the initial risk stratification (ATA 2009-RSS), the modified initial risk stratification (ATA 2015-RSS), and the response to therapy re-stratification (ATA 2015-RTR). After applying the ATA 2015-RSS, 258/1913 (13.5%) of patients originally designated as intermediate risk by the ATA 2009-RSS were designated as low risk. This was mainly due to the small number of metastatic lymph nodes. Recurrence was detected in 136 (5.6%) patients during follow-up. Of the 2425 cases examined, 375 were designated as low risk by the ATA 2009-RSS, with a recurrence rate of 1.1%. However, the ATA 2015-RSS designated 633 (26.1%) cases as low risk, with a recurrence rate of 0.9%. Implementing the ATA 2015-RTR predicted an excellent response in 1597 (65.9%) cases, with a recurrence rate of 1.1%. According to the proportion of variance explained (PVE), the Akaike information criterion, Harrell's c index, and integrated area under the curve, comparing the predictive accuracy of the ATA 2009-RSS, ATA 2015-RSS, and ATA 2015-RTR revealed that the ATA 2015-RTR was a superior predictor of recurrence. A proportion of patients designated as intermediate risk by the ATA 2009-RSS were

  7. Breast reconstruction following prophylactic or therapeutic mastectomy for breast cancer: Recommendations from an evidence-based provincial guideline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea-Budgell, Melissa; Quan, May Lynn; Mehling, Blair; Temple-Oberle, Claire

    2014-01-01

    The side effects of mastectomy can be significant. Breast reconstruction may alleviate some distress; however, there are currently no provincial recommendations regarding the integration of reconstruction with breast cancer therapy. The purpose of the present article is to provide evidence-based strategies for the management of patients who are candidates for reconstruction. A systematic review of meta-analyses, guidelines, clinical trials and comparative studies published between 1980 and 2013 was conducted using the PubMed and EMBASE databases. Reference lists of publications were manually searched for additional literature. The National Guidelines Clearinghouse and SAGE directory, as well as guideline developers’ websites, were also searched. Recommendations were developed based on the available evidence. Reconstruction consultation should be made available for patients undergoing mastectomy. Tumour characteristics, cancer therapy, patient comorbidities, body habitus and smoking history may affect reconstruction outcomes. Although immediate reconstruction should be considered whenever possible, delayed reconstruction is acceptable when immediate is not available or appropriate. The integration of reconstruction and postmastectomy radiotherapy should be addressed in a multidisciplinary setting. The decision as to which type of procedure to perform (autologous or alloplastic with or without acellular dermal matrices) should be left to the discretion of the surgeons and the patient after providing counselling. Skin-sparing mastectomy is safe and appropriate. Nipple-sparing is generally not recommended for patients with malignancy, but could be considered for carefully selected patients. Immediate reconstruction requires resources to coordinate operating room time between the general and plastic surgeons, to provide supplies including acellular dermal matrices, and to develop the infrastructure needed to facilitate multidisciplinary discussions. PMID:25114623

  8. Revised Bethesda Guidelines for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (Lynch syndrome) and microsatellite instability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Umar, Asad; Boland, C Richard; Terdiman, Jonathan P; Syngal, Sapna; de la Chapelle, Albert; Rüschoff, Josef; Fishel, Richard; Lindor, Noralane M; Burgart, Lawrence J; Hamelin, Richard; Hamilton, Stanley R; Hiatt, Robert A; Jass, Jeremy; Lindblom, Annika; Lynch, Henry T; Peltomaki, Païvi; Ramsey, Scott D; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Vasen, Hans F A; Hawk, Ernest T; Barrett, J Carl; Freedman, Andrew N; Srivastava, Sudhir

    2004-01-01

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), also known as Lynch syndrome, is a common autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by early age at onset, neoplastic lesions, and microsatellite instability (MSI...

  9. Skin cancer screening: recommendations for data-driven screening guidelines and a review of the US Preventive Services Task Force controversy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mariah M; Leachman, Sancy A; Aspinwall, Lisa G; Cranmer, Lee D; Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara; Sondak, Vernon K; Stemwedel, Clara E; Swetter, Susan M; Vetto, John; Bowles, Tawnya; Dellavalle, Robert P; Geskin, Larisa J; Grossman, Douglas; Grossmann, Kenneth F; Hawkes, Jason E; Jeter, Joanne M; Kim, Caroline C; Kirkwood, John M; Mangold, Aaron R; Meyskens, Frank; Ming, Michael E; Nelson, Kelly C; Piepkorn, Michael; Pollack, Brian P; Robinson, June K; Sober, Arthur J; Trotter, Shannon; Venna, Suraj S; Agarwala, Sanjiv; Alani, Rhoda; Averbook, Bruce; Bar, Anna; Becevic, Mirna; Box, Neil; E Carson, William; Cassidy, Pamela B; Chen, Suephy C; Chu, Emily Y; Ellis, Darrel L; Ferris, Laura K; Fisher, David E; Kendra, Kari; Lawson, David H; Leming, Philip D; Margolin, Kim A; Markovic, Svetomir; Martini, Mary C; Miller, Debbie; Sahni, Debjani; Sharfman, William H; Stein, Jennifer; Stratigos, Alexander J; Tarhini, Ahmad; Taylor, Matthew H; Wisco, Oliver J; Wong, Michael K

    2017-01-01

    Melanoma is usually apparent on the skin and readily detected by trained medical providers using a routine total body skin examination, yet this malignancy is responsible for the majority of skin cancer-related deaths. Currently, there is no national consensus on skin cancer screening in the USA, but dermatologists and primary care providers are routinely confronted with making the decision about when to recommend total body skin examinations and at what interval. The objectives of this paper are: to propose rational, risk-based, data-driven guidelines commensurate with the US Preventive Services Task Force screening guidelines for other disorders; to compare our proposed guidelines to recommendations made by other national and international organizations; and to review the US Preventive Services Task Force's 2016 Draft Recommendation Statement on skin cancer screening. PMID:28758010

  10. [Guidelines for the early diagnosis of lung cancer for primary care physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a serious/medical and social problem. It belongs to the most common cancers. In the past decades, lung cancer has steadily held a leading place in the structure of cancer morbidity and mortality in our country and in the majority of European countries. Cigarette smoking remains to be the major if not only risk factor for lung cancer. Many attempts were previously made to set up systems for the early (timely) lung cancerdetection in risk groups through cytological and radiological examinations. Prophylactic fluorography and X-ray study have long been an important screening procedure in Russia and foreign countries. Recently this procedure has transformed into digital lung radiography. However, there have been no conclusive proofs for its efficiency in the early detection of lung cancer for a few decades. In the past decade, large-scale prospective randomized trials of low-dose computed tomography (CT) have been performed to screen lung cancer. These have shown that this technology can potentially reduce mortality from this disease. This encouraging result has caused a substantial change in the tactics of examining people at high risk for lung cancer. CT has fully replaced linear tomography and all others special X-ray procedures in the verified diagnosis of lung cancer. The indications for pre-examination CT have been considerably expanded in patients with X-ray detected pathology. The tactics for estimating the small lung tissue foci found at CT has been changed. Availability of CT, clear clinical indications for the study, and observance of the standard procedure have become important elements of the entire system for the early identification of lung cancer. These clinical recommendations largely deal just with organizational and methodological issues. The authors hope that the recommendations will serve as a guide for primary care physicians (therapists, pulmonologists,and radiologists) in the early diagnosis of lung cancer and in the optimization

  11. European guidelines for quality assurance in cervical cancer screening: recommendations for cytology laboratories.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiener, H.G.; Klinkhamer, P.; Schenck, U.; Arbyn, M.; Bulten, J.; Bergeron, C.; Herbert, A.

    2007-01-01

    The quality of a cervical cytology laboratory depends on adequate handling and staining of the samples, screening and interpretation of the slides and reporting of the results. These guidelines give an overview of procedures recommended in Europe to manage the balance between best patient care

  12. Saudi oncology society and Saudi urology association combined clinical management guidelines for urothelial urinary bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mubarak Al-mansour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this report, updated guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder are resented. They are categorized according the stage of the disease using the TNM staging system 7 th edition. The recommendations are presented with supporting level of evidence.

  13. Suitability Assessment of Printed Dietary Guidelines for Pregnant Women and Parents of Infants and Toddlers From 7 European Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnweidner-Holme, Lisa Maria; Dolvik, Stina; Frisvold, Cathrine; Mosdøl, Annhild

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate selected European printed dietary guidelines for pregnant women and parents of infants and toddlers using the suitability assessment of materials (SAM) method. A descriptive study to determine the suitability of 14 printed dietary guidelines from 7 European countries based on deductive quantitative analyses. Materials varied greatly in format and content: 35.7% of materials were rated superior and 64.3% were rated adequate according to the overall SAM score for patient education material. None of the materials were scored not suitable. Among the categories, the highest average scores were for layout and typography and the lowest average scores were for cultural appropriateness and learning stimulation and motivation. Interrater reliability ranged from Cohen's kappa of 0.37 to 0.62 (mean, 0.41), indicating fair to moderate agreement among the 3 investigators. Overall, the suitability of the assessed printed dietary guidelines was adequate. Based on the SAM methodology, printed dietary guidelines may increase in suitability by emphasizing aspects related to health literacy and accommodating the needs of different food cultures within a population. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Assessment of nutritional status in patients with primary lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chermiti Ben Abdallah, Fatma; Ben Saïd, Hanène; Chamkhi, Najiba; Ferchichi, Marwa; Chtourou, Amel; Taktak, Sofia; Ben Kheder, Ali

    2013-10-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Malnutrition is a common problem among patients with cancer, affecting up to 85% of patients with certain cancers and represents a risk factor for poor prognosis. aim: evaluate nutritional status in patients with lung cancer before and during treatment using nutritional risk index. it's a prospective study conducted in pneumology IV department in Abderahman Mami hospital, from January to May 2011. 30 male patients with a lung cancer were included. Nutritional status was assessed before and during treatment based on anthropometric measures, biological markers and nutritional risk index (NRI). Mean age of patients was 58 ± 12 years, ranging from 19 to 82 years. 29 patients had non small cell lung cancer and one patient had small cell cancer. Malnutrition was noted in 14 patients (47%) before treatment according to the NRI. It was noted in 23 patients (77%) after three cycles of chemotherapy with severe malnutrition in 8 patients. Relationship between body mass index (BMI) and the NRI was linear, but NRI tends to evaluate more objectively risk of malnutrition in patients with lung cancer. Nutritional assessment in patient with lung cancer should be performed systematically, early and repeatedly. Several markers can be used such as BMI and NRI. Nutritional support will reduce morbidity and improve quality of life in patients with lung cancer.

  15. Multidisciplinary team conferences promote treatment according to guidelines in rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brännström, Fredrik; Bjerregaard, Jon K; Winbladh, Anders

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multidisciplinary team (MDT) conferences have been introduced into standard cancer care, though evidence that it benefits the patient is weak. We used the national Swedish Rectal Cancer Register to evaluate predictors for case discussion at a MDT conference and its impact on treatment...

  16. Clinical Usage of Different Guidelines in Routine Management, Therapy and Follow-Up of Patients with Renal Cell Cancer in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spek, A; Szabados, B; Ziegelmüller, B; Stief, C; D'Anastasi, M; Staehler, M

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the usage of different guidelines and to estimate the impact of changed recommendation in routine management, therapy and follow-up of patients with renal cell cancer (RCC). An anonymous questionnaire was sent to 600 urologists in Germany. Twenty-seven percent of them were included in the analysis. The questions were about the practice setting, surgical and medical treatment of RCC, follow-up modalities, knowledge and usage of RCC guidelines. Results were correlated with the recommendations of the EAU-guideline. Sixty-eight percent of the urologists were office based. Sixty percent were located in bigger cities. Ninety-eight percent of the colleagues reported to be knowledgeable about the EAU-guidelines, 62% reported to know the American Urological Association, 59% DGU/AWMF, 19% National Comprehensive Cancer Network, 19% European Society for Medical Oncology, 13% Onkopedia, and 3% British Association of Urological Surgeons-guidelines. Eighty-seven percent reported that partial nephrectomy (Nx) was performed in tumours with diameter guidelines. Other guidelines are rarely used. Follow-up is performed in discordance with the EAU-recommendations. Interestingly, only 84% with metastatic disease are introduced to systemic therapy. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Clinical Practice Guideline for Physical Therapy Assessment and Treatment in Patients With Nonspecific Neck Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bier, Jasper D; Scholten-Peeters, Wendy G M; Staal, J Bart; Pool, Jan; van Tulder, Maurits W; Beekman, Emmylou; Knoop, Jesper; Meerhoff, Guus; Verhagen, Arianne P

    2018-03-01

    The Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF) issued a clinical practice guideline for physical therapists that addresses the assessment and treatment of patients with nonspecific neck pain, including cervical radiculopathy, in Dutch primary care. Recommendations were based on a review of published systematic reviews.During the intake, the patient is screened for serious pathologies and corresponding patterns. Patients with cervical radiculopathy can be included or excluded through corresponding signs and symptoms and possibly diagnostic tests (Spurling test, traction/distraction test, and Upper Limb Tension Test). History taking is done to gather information about patients' limitations, course of pain, and prognostic factors (eg, coping style) and answers to health-related questions.In case of a normal recovery (treatment profile A), management should be hands-off, and patients should receive advice from the physical therapist and possibly some simple exercises to supplement "acting as usual."In case of a delayed/deviant recovery (treatment profile B), the physical therapist is advised to use, in addition to the recommendations for treatment profile A, forms of mobilization and/or manipulation in combination with exercise therapy. Other interventions may also be considered. The physical therapist is advised not to use dry needling, low-level laser, electrotherapy, ultrasound, traction, and/or a cervical collar.In case of a delayed/deviant recovery with clear and/or dominant psychosocial prognostic factors (treatment profile C), these factors should first be addressed by the physical therapist, when possible, or the patient should be referred to a specialist, when necessary.In case of neck pain grade III (treatment profile D), the therapy resembles that for profile B, but the use of a cervical collar for pain reduction may be considered. The advice is to use it sparingly: only for a short period per day and only for a few weeks.

  18. Incorporating patient perspectives in health technology assessments and clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hämeen-Anttila, K; Komulainen, J; Enlund, H; Mäkelä, M; Mäkinen, E; Rannanheimo, P; Sipilä, R

    Ensuring patient involvement in health technology assessments (HTAs) and clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) is important. However, the goals and methods of such involvement are not always clear. The aim of this study was to 1) discover ways to involve patients in HTA and CPG processes, 2) describe challenges, and 3) find ways of informing patients about HTAs and CPGs in Finland. As part of a one-day seminar targeted at representatives of patient organizations (POs), 3, 1-h focus group discussions were held (n = 20, with 14 PO representatives). PO representatives included real patients and health care professionals working in the organizations. The discussions were tape-recorded, transcribed, and thematically analyzed. Focus group participants highlighted the importance of gathering patient views from a group of patients, rather than individuals. Surveys through POs were the most frequently mentioned means of gathering patients' views. PO representatives reported interest in cooperating in HTA and CPG processes. The most often mentioned challenges were finding appropriate representatives for the target group and conveying information about HTAs and CPGs to patients. Multichannel communication was seen as essential. Furthermore the information should be readable, comprehensible, tailored, reliable, reusable, complementary, and timely. Possible strategies to involve patients in HTA and CPG processes were incorporating patient representatives in the CPG and HTA groups, offering timely possibility to participate, and ensuring reporting with clear and unambiguous language. The main identified challenge was finding appropriate representatives of the target group. The role of POs was seen as important particularly when informing the patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. How useful is ultrasound in the assessment of local advancement of laryngeal cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzepakowska, Anna; Osuch-Wójcikiewicz, Ewa; Bruzgielewicz, Antoni; Niemczyk, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the presented study was to examine the possibility of assessing the advancement of laryngeal cancer by ultrasound (USG) in patients qualified for laryngectomy. Ultrasound examination of the larynx was performed in 25 patients before the planned surgery. The staging of larynx tumor was evaluated according to the guidelines of the American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC). Laryngectomy was performed eventually in 22 patients. The results of histopathological examination of the excised larynx and lymph nodes were compared with the results obtained by ultrasound examination performed prior to surgery using McNemar test to estimate the accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of the method. The evaluation of tumor location with ultrasound was appropriate in all patients in the presented study. The accuracy of staging tumor advancement was 81% for USG (18/22). The sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound in detecting infiltration of paraglottic space was 91.7% and 83.3%, respectively, and in detecting subglottic infiltration - 100% and 95.2%, respectively. The sensitivity of ultrasound in the assessment of preepiglotic space infiltration and invasion of the laryngeal cartilage was 75% and specificity - 100% and 88.9%, respectively. The sensitivity of ultrasound in the assessment of extralaryngeal infiltration was 50% and the specificity 100%. Ultrasound can provide a valuable complement to laryngoscopy and tomography in patients with laryngeal cancer. It enables the real-time evaluation of cancer advancement before planned surgery. Moreover, it can also be used in screening.

  20. Bone Health in Patients with Breast Cancer: Recommendations from an Evidence-Based Canadian Guideline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander H. G. Paterson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bone loss is common in patients with breast cancer. Bone modifying agents (BMAs, such as bisphosphonates and denosumab, have been shown to reverse or stabilize bone loss and may be useful in the primary and metastatic settings. The purpose of this review is to provide clear evidence-based strategies for the management of bone loss and its symptoms in breast cancer. A systematic review of clinical trials and meta-analyses published between 1996 and 2012 was conducted of MEDLINE and EMBASE. Reference lists were hand-searched for additional publications. Recommendations were developed based on the best available evidence. Zoledronate, pamidronate, clodronate, and denosumab are recommended for metastatic breast cancer patients; however, no one agent can be recommended over another. Zoledronate or any oral bisphosphonate and denosumab should be considered in primary breast cancer patients who are postmenopausal on aromatase inhibitor therapy and have a high risk of fracture and/or a low bone mineral density and in premenopausal primary breast cancer patients who become amenorrheic after therapy. No one agent can be recommended over another. BMAs are not currently recommended as adjuvant therapy in primary breast cancer for the purpose of improving survival, although a major Early Breast Cancer Cooperative Trialists’ Group meta-analysis is underway which may impact future practice. Adverse events can be managed with appropriate supportive care.

  1. Adherence to treatment guidelines and survival for older patients with stage II or III colon cancer in Texas from 2001 through 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hui; Zhang, Ning; Ho, Vivian; Ding, Minming; He, Weiguo; Niu, Jiangong; Yang, Ming; Du, Xianglin L; Zorzi, Daria; Chavez-MacGregor, Mariana; Giordano, Sharon H

    2017-11-15

    Treatment guidelines for colon cancer recommend colectomy with lymphadenectomy of at least 12 lymph nodes for patients with stage I to stage III disease as surgery adherence (SA) and adjuvant chemotherapy for individuals with stage III disease. Herein, the authors evaluated adherence to these guidelines among older patients in Texas with colon cancer and the associated survival outcomes. Using Texas Cancer Registry data linked with Medicare data, the authors included patients with AJCC stage II and III colon cancer who were aged ≥66 years and diagnosed between 2001 and 2011. SA and adjuvant chemotherapy adherence rates to treatment guidelines were estimated. The chi-square test, general linear regression, survival probability, and Cox regression were used to identify factors associated with adherence and survival. The rate of SA increased from 47.2% to 84% among 6029 patients with stage II or stage III disease from 2001 to 2011, and the rate of adjuvant chemotherapy increased from 48.9% to 53.1% for patients with stage III disease during the same time period. SA was associated with marital status, tumor size, surgeon specialty, and year of diagnosis. Patient age, sex, marital status, Medicare state buy-in status, comorbidity status, and year of diagnosis were found to be associated with adjuvant chemotherapy. The 5-year survival probability for patients receiving guideline-concordant treatment was the highest at 87% for patients with stage II disease and was 73% for those with stage III disease. After adjusting for demographic and tumor characteristics, improved cancer cause-specific survival was associated with the receipt of stage-specific, guideline-concordant treatment for patients with stage II or stage III disease. The adherence to guideline-concordant treatment among older patients with colon cancer residing in Texas improved over time, and was associated with better survival outcomes. Future studies should be focused on identifying interventions to

  2. Assessing the readiness of a school system to adopt food allergy management guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldredge, Christina; Patterson, Leslie; White, Brenda; Schellhase, Kenneth

    2014-08-01

    The prevalence of potentially fatal food allergies in school-aged children is rising. It is important for schools to have a food allergy management policy and an emergency action plan for each affected student. To examine the current status of food allergy guideline and/or policy implementation and adoption in a large school system in southeastern Wisconsin. A 24-item anonymous electronic survey was developed and completed by school principals and administrators in the Archdiocese of Milwaukee School System (approximately 125 schools) in southeastern Wisconsin. One in 4 responding schools reported no guidelines or policy. Schools that reported having students with special needs due to food allergy were more likely to have a local food allergy policy compared to schools that did not report having students with food allergy special needs (OR 6.3, 1.5-26, P = 0.01). Schools with food allergy guidelines/policies were 3.5 times more likely to require student individual action plans than schools with no guidelines or policies (OR 3.5, 1.00-12.2, P = 0.05). Gaps in evidence-based food allergy policy implementation were found in this school system. Schools with food-allergic children with special needs were more likely to have guidelines/policy, however, they were not more likely to require emergency action plans. The majority of schools (66, 90%) reported interest in receiving further information or training on food allergy management.

  3. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of breast cancer V. Therapy for locally advanced and inflammatory breast cancer, as well as local therapy in cases with synchronous distant metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budach, Wilfried; Matuschek, Christiane; Boelke, Edwin [University Hospital, Heinrich-Heine-University Duesseldorf, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Duesseldorf (Germany); Dunst, Juergen [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany); Feyer, Petra [Vivantes Hospital Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Fietkau, Rainer; Sauer, Rolf [University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Harms, Wolfgang [St. Clara Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Piroth, Marc D. [Helios Hospital, Wuppertal (Germany); Sautter-Bihl, Marie-Luise [Municipal Hospital, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sedlmayer, Felix [Paracelsus Medical University Hospital, Salzburg (Austria); Wenz, Frederick [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Haase, Wulf; Souchon, Rainer; Collaboration: Breast Cancer Expert Panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO)

    2015-08-15

    The purpose of this work is to give practical guidelines for radiotherapy of locally advanced, inflammatory and metastatic breast cancer at first presentation. A comprehensive survey of the literature using the search phrases ''locally advanced breast cancer'', ''inflammatory breast cancer'', ''breast cancer and synchronous metastases'', ''de novo stage IV and breast cancer'', and ''metastatic breast cancer'' and ''at first presentation'' restricted to ''clinical trials'', ''randomized trials'', ''meta-analysis'', ''systematic review'', and ''guideline'' was performed and supplemented by using references of the respective publications. Based on the German interdisciplinary S3 guidelines, updated in 2012, this publication addresses indications, sequence to other therapies, target volumes, dose, and fractionation of radiotherapy. International and national guidelines are in agreement that locally advanced, at least if regarded primarily unresectable and inflammatory breast cancer should receive neoadjuvant systemic therapy first, followed by surgery and radiotherapy. If surgery is not amenable after systemic therapy, radiotherapy is the treatment of choice followed by surgery, if possible. Surgery and radiotherapy should be administered independent of response to neoadjuvant systemic treatment. In patients with a de novo diagnosis of breast cancer with synchronous distant metastases, surgery and radiotherapy result in considerably better locoregional tumor control. An improvement in survival has not been consistently proven, but may exist in subgroups of patients. Radiotherapy is an important part in the treatment of locally advanced and inflammatory breast cancer that should be given to all patients regardless to the intensity and effect of

  4. DEGRO practice guidelines for palliative radiotherapy of metastatic breast cancer. Bone metastases and metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souchon, Rainer [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, UKT Tuebingen (Germany); Wenz, Frederik [Univ. Hospital Mannheim (Germany); Sedlmayer, Felix [Univ. Hospital, Salzburger Landeskliniken, Salzburg (Austria); Budach, Wilfried [Univ. Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany); Dunst, Juergen [Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany); Feyer, Petra [Klinikum Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Haase, Wulf [St.-Vincentius-Kliniken, Karlsruhe (Germany); Harms, Wolfgang [St. Clara Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Sautter-Bihl, Marie-Luise [Municipal Hospital, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sauer, Rolf [Univ. Hospital Erlangen (Germany)

    2009-07-15

    To provide practice guidelines and clinical recommendations on preferred standard palliative radiation therapy of bone metastases as well as metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) for metastatic breast cancer patients. Methods: The breast cancer expert panel of the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO) performed a comprehensive survey of the literature comprising recently published data from clinical controlled trials. The literature search encompassed the period 1995-2008 using databases of PubMed and Guidelines International Network (G-I-N). Search terms were ''breast cancer'', ''bone metastasis'', ''osseous metastasis'', ''metastatic spinal cord compression'' as well as ''radiotherapy'' and ''radiation therapy''. Clinical recommendations were formulated based on the panel's interpretation of the level of evidence referring to the criteria of evidence-based medicine. Results: Different therapeutic goals (pain relief, local tumor control, prevention or improvement of motor deficits, stabilization of the spine or other bones) require complex approaches considering individual factors (i.e. life expectancy, tumor progression at other sites). Best results are achieved by close interdisciplinary cooperation minimizing the interval between diagnosis and onset of treatment. Most important criteria for prognosis and choice of treatment (mostly combined multimodal therapy) are neurologic status at diagnosis of MSCC, time course of duration and progression of the neurologic symptoms. Radiation therapy is effective and regarded as treatment of choice for MSCC with or without motor deficits and/or bone metastases, which do not need immediate surgical intervention. It may be used either postoperatively or as primary treatment in case of inoperability. An optimal dose fractionation schedule or optimal standard dose for treatment of bone

  5. North American Population-Based Validation of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network Practice Guideline Recommendation of Pelvic Lymphadenectomy in Contemporary Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyh-Bannurah, Sami-Ramzi; Budäus, Lars; Pompe, Raisa; Zaffuto, Emanuele; Briganti, Alberto; Abdollah, Firas; Montorsi, Francesco; Schiffmann, Jonas; Menon, Mani; Shariat, Shahrokh F; Fisch, Margit; Chun, Felix; Huland, Hartwig; Graefen, Markus; Karakiewicz, Pierre I

    2017-04-01

    National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines recommend a pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) in prostate cancer (PCa) patients treated with radical prostatectomy (RP) if a nomogram predicted risk of lymph node invasion (LNI) is ≥2%. We examined this and other thresholds, including nomogram validation. We examined records of 26,713 patients treated with RP and PLND between 2010 and 2013, within the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. Nomogram thresholds of 2-5% were tested and external validation was performed. LNI was recorded in 4.7% of patients. Nomogram accuracy was 80.4% and maintained minimum accuracy of 75.6% in subgroup analyses, according to age, race, and nodal yield >10. With the NCCN recommended 2% nomogram threshold, PLND could be avoided in 22.3% of patients at the expense of missing 3.0% of individuals with LNI. Alternative thresholds of 3%, 4%, and 5% yielded respective PLND avoidance rates of 60.4%, 71.0%, and 79.8% at the expense of missing 17.8%, 27.2%, and 36.6% of patients with LNI. NCCN cut-off recommendation was best satisfied with a threshold of ratio of avoided pelvic lymph node dissections (49.5%) and missed LNIs (11.2%), as recommended by NCCN guideline. Prostate 77:542-548, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Adherence to Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer guidelines in field-practice: results of Progetto Epatocarcinoma Campania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Maria; Tortora, Raffaella; de Stefano, Giorgio; Coppola, Carmine; Morisco, Filomena; Megna, Angelo Salomone; Izzo, Francesco; Nardone, Gerardo; Piai, Guido; Adinolfi, Luigi Elio; D'Adamo, Giuseppe; Gaeta, Giovanni Battista; Messina, Vincenzo; Francica, Giampiero; De Girolamo, Vincenzo; Coppola, Nicola; Persico, Marcello; Di Costanzo, Giovan Giuseppe

    2017-10-10

    The BCLC algorithm is the standard system for clinical management of HCC. Data on adherence to this therapeutic paradigm are scarce. This field-practice study aimed to provide a description of HCC cirrhotic patients in Southern Italy, to evaluate the adherence to BCLC guidelines and its impact on patients' survival. We analyzed the region-wide Italian database of Progetto Epatocarcinoma Campania, which includes data of HCC cirrhotic patients, prospectively collected from January 2013 to December 2015 in 16 regional centers. Overall 1008 HCC patients were enrolled: 70.6% patients received therapies recommended by BCLC algorithm, while 29.4% underwent different treatments. Among patients who were treated in adherence to guidelines, a higher rate of diagnosis on surveillance programs, better liver function, lower rate of AFP >200ng/ml, more early stage and monofocal HCC, lower frequency of nodules >5cm, portal vein thrombosis and metastases were observed. The overall survival was evaluated according to HCC stage and no differences between group and patients managed differently were found. The multivariate analysis showed that non-adherence to treatment guidelines was independently associated to the BCLC stage B, Child-Pugh classes B-C, and to the presence of neoplastic thrombosis and metastases. Adherence to BCLC algorithm in field-practice was high in early and end stage HCC patients, but it was poor in intermediate and advanced patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Guidelines and recommendations for assessment of somatosensory function in oro-facial pain conditions - a taskforce report

    OpenAIRE

    Svensson, P; Ettlin, Dominik A.; Matsuka, Y

    2011-01-01

    Summary  The goals of an international taskforce on somatosensory testing established by the Special Interest Group of Oro-facial Pain (SIG-OFP) under the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) were to (i) review the literature concerning assessment of somatosensory function in the oro-facial region in terms of techniques and test performance, (ii) provide guidelines for comprehensive and screening examination procedures, and (iii) give recommendations for future development o...

  8. Guidelines for Establishing Monitoring Programs to Assess the Success of Riparian Restoration Efforts in Arid and Semi-Arid Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    ERDC TN-EMRRP-SR-50 1 Guidelines for Establishing Monitoring Programs to Assess the Success of Riparian Restoration Efforts in Arid and Semi ...Management and Restoration Research Program (EMRRP) work unit titled “Techniques for Reestablishing Riparian Hardwoods in Arid and Semi - arid