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Sample records for assessing safety culture

  1. Assessment of Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A strong safety culture leads to more effective conduct of work and a sense of accountability among managers and employees, who should be given the opportunity to expand skills by training. The resources expended would thus result in tangible improvements in working practices and skills, which encourage further improvement of safety culture. In promoting an improved safety culture, NEK has emphasized both national and organizational culture with an appropriate balance of behavioural sciences and quality management systems approaches. In recent years there has been particular emphasis put on an increasing awareness of the contribution that human behavioural sciences can make to develop good safety practices. The purpose of an assessment of safety culture is to increase the awareness of the present culture, to serve as a basis for improvement and to keep track of the effects of change or improvement over a longer period of time. There is, however, no single approach that is suitable for all purposes and which can measure, simultaneously, all the intangible aspects of safety culture, i.e. the norms, values, beliefs, attitudes or the behaviours reflecting the culture. Various methods have their strengths and weaknesses. To prevent significant performance problems, self-assessment is used. Self-assessment is the process of identifying opportunities for improvement actively or, in some cases, weaknesses that could cause more serious errors or events. Self-assessments are an important input to the corrective action programme. NEK has developed questionnaires for safety culture self-assessment to obtain information that is representative of the whole organization. Questionnaires ensure a greater degree of anonymity, and create a less stressful situation for the respondent. Answers to questions represent the more apparent and conscious values and attitudes of the respondent. NEK proactively co-operates with WANO, INPO, IAEA in the areas of Safety Culture and Human

  2. Understanding and assessing safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 'Dalling' integrated model of organisational performance is introduced and described. A principal element of this model is culture, which is dynamically contrasted with the five other interacting critical elements, which comprise: the management system, the knowledge base, corporate leadership, stakeholders and consciousness. All six of these principal driving elements significantly influence health, safety, environmental, security, or any other aspect of organisational performance. It is asserted that the elements of organisational performance must be clearly defined and understood if meaningful measurements are to be carried out and sustained progress made in improving the knowledge of organisational performance. AEA Technology's safety culture research programme is then described together with the application of a safety culture assessment tool to organisations in the nuclear, electricity, transport, and oil and gas industries, both within and outside of the United Kingdom. (author)

  3. Method for assessing safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INSAG-4 by IAEA urged for the method which would deal with the organizational factors strongly affecting safety culture. ASCOT guidelines introduced the approach for safety culture assessment. The reason for new method development is based on the fact that we have to be prompt and very specific in order to find and fix the problems which originate in organization. The main objective is to focus on the components which have the greatest impact on safety regardless if they are classified as safety related or not. There are two distinct importance rating methods of components within PSA: Risk reduction worth and risk achievement worth. Our method concentrates on the second, RAW list, indicating components which should be closely watched in order to maintain the achieved level of safety. The further development of our method was governed by following rules: it should be simple and it should incorporate the results of the previous analyses so that it is possible to upgrade these by taking into account the organizational factors which influence strongly the performance of the systems as a whole. The method concentrates on finding if there is clear division of the responsibilities among the personnel which interacts with risk significant components and also on organizational factors like: redundancy, communication, procedures and control. The results are input in specially designed form where also the suggestions for actions are given. As the result we see level of safety culture and pinpoint which organizational factors are to be improved substantially and the information on the risk significant components which then serves as basic guidance for allocation of improvements and resources. (author)

  4. A Methodology for Safety Culture Impact Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kiyoon; Jae, Moosung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The purpose of this study is to develop methodology for assessing safety culture impact on nuclear power plants. A new methodology for assessing safety culture impact index has been developed and applied for the reference nuclear power plants. The developed SCII model might contribute to comparing the level of safety culture among nuclear power plants as well as to improving the safety of nuclear power plants. Safety culture is defined to be fundamental attitudes and behaviors of the plant staff which demonstrate that nuclear safety is the most important consideration in all activities conducted in nuclear power operation. Through several accidents of nuclear power plant including the Fukusima Daiichi in 2011 and Chernovyl accidents in 1986, the safety of nuclear power plant is emerging into a matter of interest. From the accident review report, it can be easily found out that safety culture is important and one of dominant contributors to accidents. However, the impact methodology for assessing safety culture has not been established analytically yet. It is difficult to develop the methodology for assessing safety culture impact quantitatively.

  5. Assessment of safety culture at INPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety Culture covers all main directions of plant activities and the plant departments involved through integration into the INPP Quality Assurance System. Safety Culture is represented by three components. The first is the clear INPP Safety and Quality Assurance Policy. Based on the Policy INPP is safely operated and managers' actions firstly aim at safety assurance. The second component is based on personal responsibility for safety and attitude of each employee of the plant. The third component is based on commitment to safety and competence of managers and employees of the plant. This component links the first two to ensure efficient management of safety at the plant. The above mentioned components including the elements which may significantly affect Safety Culture are also presented in the attachment. The concept of such model implies understanding of effect of different factors on the level of Safety Culture in the organization. In order to continuously correct safety problems, self-assessment of the Safety Culture level is performed at regular intervals. (author)

  6. Electronuclear's safety culture assessment and enhancement program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper describes the Eletronuclear's safety culture assessment and enhancement program. The program was launched by the company's top management one year after the creation of Eletronuclear in 1997, from the merging of two companies with different organizational cultures, the design and engineering company Nuclen and the nuclear directorate of the Utility Furnas, Operator of the Angra1 NPP. The program consisted of an assessment performed internally in 1999 with the support and advice of the IAEA. This assessment, performed with the help of a survey, pooled about 80% of the company's employees. The overall result of the assessment was that a satisfactory level of safety culture existed; however, a number of points with a considerable margin for improvement were also identified. These points were mostly related with behavioural matters such as motivation, stress in the workplace, view of mistakes, handling of conflicts, and last but not least a view by a considerable number of employees that a conflict between safety and production might exist. An Action Plan was established by the company managers to tackle these weak points. This Plan was issued as company guideline by the company's Directorate. The subsequent step was to detail and implement the different actions of the Plan, which is the phase that we are at present. In the detailing of the Action Plan, special care was taken to sum up efforts, avoiding duplication of work or competition with already existing programs. In this process it was identified that the company had a considerable number of initiatives directly related to organizational and safety culture improvement, already operational. These initiatives have been integrated in the detailed Action Plan. A new assessment, for checking the effectiveness of the undertaken actions, is planned for 2003. (author)

  7. Plant assessment system and safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The government, upon these events, keenly felt the necessity for developing the safety culture which was already forwarded in nuclear industries and started taking actions to propagate it to all parts of society. The government established a social safety director position under the Prime Minister's jurisdiction and also established a Safety Culture Promotion Headquarters in which 7 ministries and other organizations, such as Korea Economic Council, Federation of Korea Trade Union and Women's Federation Council were participating. In accordance with the government's strong will to enhance the safety consciousness of people, safety campaigns are being developed voluntarily in the private sector. The formation of non-governmental organizations, such as People's Central Council of Safety Culture Promotion, shows a good example of such movement

  8. Development of Safety Culture Assessment Strategy for Korean NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung Hwan; Kim, Jong Hyun [KEPCO, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    This paper aims at developing the requirements for a method to evaluate the operational safety culture, evaluating currently available methods based on the requirements, and suggesting a method to evaluate and improve the operational safety culture for Korean nuclear power plants. This paper reviews the widely-used methods to assess safety culture for NPPs and their basis. Then, this paper develops the requirements for the method to evaluate operational safety culture for Korean NPPs. Based on these requirements, Korean Safety Culture Indicators (KSCI) and evaluation measures are also suggested. Finally this paper proposes the guidelines to develop improvements to safety culture from the evaluation results.

  9. Assessing progress in the development of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of safety culture was introduced by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) in the Summary Report on the Post-Accident Meeting on the Chernobyl Accident in 1986. The concept was further expanded in the 1988 INSAG-3 report, Basic Safety Principles for Nuclear Power Plants, and again in 1991 in the INSAG-4 report. Recognizing the increasing role that safety culture is expected to play in nuclear installations worldwide, the Convention on Nuclear Safety states the Contracting Parties' desire 'to promote an effective nuclear safety culture'. The concept of safety culture is defined in INSAG-4 as follows: Safety culture is that assembly of characteristics and attitudes in organizations and individuals which establishes that, as an overriding priority, nuclear plant safety issues receive the attention warranted by their significance. Safety culture is also an amalgamation of values, standards, morals and norms of acceptable behaviour. These are aimed at maintaining a self disciplined approach to the enhancement of safety beyond legislative and regulatory requirements. Therefore, the safety culture has to be inherent in the thoughts and actions of all the individuals at every level in an organization. The leadership provided by top management is crucial. Safety culture applies to conventional and personal safety as well as nuclear safety. All safety consideration are affected by common points of beliefs, attitudes, behaviour, and cultural differences, closely linked to a shared system of values and standards. The paper poses questions and tries to find answers relative to issues like: - how to assess progress; - specific organizational indicators of a progressive safety culture; - detection of incipient weaknesses in safety culture (organizational issues, employee issues, technology issues); - revitalizing a weakened safety culture; - overall assesment of safety culture; - general evaluation model. In conclusion, there is no consistent and

  10. Healthcare professionals’ views of feedback on patient safety culture assessment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijnenberg, N.C.; Hendriks, M.; Hoogervorst-Schilp, J.; Wagner, C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: By assessing patient safety culture, healthcare providers can identify areas for improvement in patient safety culture. To achieve this, these assessment outcomes have to be relevant and presented clearly. The aim of our study was to explore healthcare professionals’ views on the feedbac

  11. Management of safety, safety culture and self assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety management is the term used for the measures required to ensure that an acceptable level of safety is maintained throughout the life of an installation, including decommissioning. The safety culture concept and its implementation are described in part one of the paper. The principles of safety are now quite well known and are implemented worldwide. It leads to a situation where harmonization is being achieved as indicated by the entry into force of the Convention on Nuclear Safety. To go beyond the present nuclear safety levels, management of safety and safety culture will be the means for achieving progress. Recent events which took place in major nuclear power countries have shown the importance of the management and the consequences on safety. At the same time, electricity deregulation is coming and will impact on safety through reductions in staffing and in operation and maintenance cost at nuclear installations. Management of safety as well as its control and monitoring by the safety authorities become a key to the future of nuclear energy.(author)

  12. A Computer Program for Assessing Nuclear Safety Culture Impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kiyoon; Jae, Moosung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Through several accidents of NPP including the Fukushima Daiichi in 2011 and Chernobyl accidents in 1986, a lack of safety culture was pointed out as one of the root cause of these accidents. Due to its latent influences on safety performance, safety culture has become an important issue in safety researches. Most of the researches describe how to evaluate the state of the safety culture of the organization. However, they did not include a possibility that the accident occurs due to the lack of safety culture. Because of that, a methodology for evaluating the impact of the safety culture on NPP's safety is required. In this study, the methodology for assessing safety culture impact is suggested and a computer program is developed for its application. SCII model which is the new methodology for assessing safety culture impact quantitatively by using PSA model. The computer program is developed for its application. This program visualizes the SCIs and the SCIIs. It might contribute to comparing the level of the safety culture among NPPs as well as improving the management safety of NPP.

  13. Assessing progress in the development of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is focussed on the organizational culture and learning processes required for the implementation of all aspects of safety culture. There is no prescriptive formula for improving safety culture. However, some common characteristics and practices are emerging that can be adopted by organizations in order to make progress. The paper refers to some approaches that have been successful in a number of countries. The experience of the international nuclear industry in the development and improvement of safety culture could be extended and found useful in other nuclear activities, irrespective of scale. The examples given of specific practice cover a wide range of activities including analysis of events, the regulatory approach on safety culture, employee participation and safety performance measures. Many of these practices may be relevant to smaller organizations and could contribute to improving safety culture, whatever the size of the organization. The most effective approach is to pursue a range of practices that can be mutually supportive in the development of a progressive safety culture, supported by professional standards, organizational and management commitment. Some guidance is also given on the assessment of safety culture and on the detection of a weakening safety culture. Few suggestions for accelerating the safety culture development and improvement process are also provided. (author)

  14. SAFETY CULTURE ASSESSMENT – OPTIMIZATION OF EXISTING PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Valenta Grebenšek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Improving aviation safety has always been a priority for the aviation industry. While in recent decades the reliability of machinery and computers dramatically improved the reliability of the people and the organizational aspect of safety did not change much. Many of air accident investigations have shown that one of the causal factors, which increase the probability and severity of accidents, is exactly poor safety culture. The purpose of this paper is to present the concept of safety culture assessment and the overview and review of different methods of measuring the safety culture in aviation. This research provides the suggestion that by use of different methods of assessment (evaluation of the results, more credible insight into the level of safety culture in the organization can be obtained. It also provides an understanding of how measurement systems in order to guide future performance can be used proactively.

  15. Statistical analysis applied to safety culture self-assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interviews and opinion surveys are instruments used to assess the safety culture in an organization as part of the Safety Culture Enhancement Programme. Specific statistical tools are used to analyse the survey results. This paper presents an example of an opinion survey with the corresponding application of the statistical analysis and the conclusions obtained. Survey validation, Frequency statistics, Kolmogorov-Smirnov non-parametric test, Student (T-test) and ANOVA means comparison tests and LSD post-hoc multiple comparison test, are discussed. (author)

  16. Safety culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keen, L.J. [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    Safety culture has become a topic of increasing interest for industry and regulators as issues are raised on safety problems around the world. The keys to safety culture are organizational effectiveness, effective communications, organizational learning, and a culture that encourages the identification and resolution of safety issues. The necessity of a strong safety culture places an onus on all of us to continually question whether the safety measures already in place are sufficient, and are being applied. (author)

  17. Application of fuzzy set theory for safety culture and safety management assessment of Kartini research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety culture status of nuclear power plant is usually assessed through interview and/or discussions with personnel and management in plant, and an assessment of the pertinent documentation. The approach for safety culture assessment described in IAEA Safety Series, make uses of a questionnaire composed of questions which require 'Yes' or 'No' as an answer. Hence, it is basically a check-list approach which is quite common for safety assessments in industry. Such a procedure ignores the fact that the expert answering the question usually has knowledge which goes far beyond a mere binary answer. Additionally, many situations cannot readily be described in such restricted terms. Therefore, it was developed a checklist consisting of questions which are formulated such that they require more than a simple 'yes' or 'no' as an answer. This allows one to exploit the expert knowledge of the analyst appropriately by asking him to qualify the degree of compliance of each of the topics examined. The method presented has proved useful in assessing the safety culture and quality of safety management of the research reactor. The safety culture status and the quality of safety management of Kartini research reactor is rated as 'average'. The method is also flexible and allows one to add questions to existing areas or to introduce new areas covering related topics

  18. ASCOT guidelines revised 1996 edition. Guidelines for organizational self-assessment of safety culture and for reviews by the assessment of safety culture in organizations team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to properly assess safety culture, it is necessary to consider the contribution of all organizations which have an impact on it. Therefore, while assessing the safety culture in an operating organization it is necessary to address at least its interfaces with the local regulatory agency, utility corporate headquarters and supporting organizations. These guidelines are primarily intended for use by any organization wishing to conduct a self-assessment of safety culture. They should also serve as a basis for conducting an international peer review of the organization's self-assessment carried out by an ASCOT (Assessment of Safety Culture in Organizations Team) mission

  19. Safety Management and Safety Culture Self Assessment of Kartini Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The self-assessment of safety culture and safety management status of Kartini research reactor is a step to foster safety culture and management by identifying good practices and areas for improvement, and also to improve reactor safety in a whole. The method used in this assessment is based on questionnaires provided by the Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia (FNCA), then reviewed by experts. Based on the assessment and evaluation results, it can be concluded that there were several good practices in maintaining the safety status of Kartini reactor such as: reactor operators and radiation protection workers were aware and knowledgeable of the safety standards and policies that apply to their operation, readily accept constructive criticism from their management and from the inspectors of regulatory body that address safety performance. As a proof, for the last four years the number of inspection/audit findings from Regulatory Body (BAPETEN) tended to decrease while the reactor utilization and its operating hour increased. On the other hands there were also some comments and recommendations for improvement of reactor safety culture, such as that there should be more frequent open dialogues between employees and managers, to grow and attain a mutual support to achieve safety goals. (author)

  20. Assessment of safety culture in the Iranian nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deficient safety culture (S.C) is the center of safety issues of nuclear industry. To benefit from the advantages of nuclear technology and considering the fact of potential hazards of accidents in nuclear installations it is essential to view safety as the highest priority. S.C is an amalgamation of values, standards, morals and norms of acceptable behavior. Organizations having effective S.C show constant commitment to safety as a top level priority. Furthermore, the personnel of a nuclear facility shall recognize the safety significance of their tasks. Many people even those who work in the field of safety do not have a correct understanding of what S.C looks like in practical sense. In this study, by conducting a survey according to IAEA-TECDOC-1329 in some nuclear facilities, the S.C within the Iranian nuclear facilities is assessed. The human and organizational factors in Tehran Research Reactor are evaluated using a questionnaire method with active participation of the reactor operators. The results sho w that the operators are pretty aware of the subject. Also it has been identified some areas of improvement. (authors)

  1. A Methodology To Incorporate The Safety Culture Into Probabilistic Safety Assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sunghyun; Kim, Namyeong; Jae, Moosung [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In order to incorporate organizational factors into PSA, a methodology needs to be developed. Using the AHP to weigh organizational factors as well as the SLIM to rate those factors, a methodology is introduced in this study. The safety issues related to nuclear safety culture have occurred increasingly. The quantification tool has to be developed in order to include the organizational factor into Probabilistic Safety Assessments. In this study, the state-of-the-art for the organizational evaluation methodologies has been surveyed. This study includes the research for organizational factors, maintenance process, maintenance process analysis models, a quantitative methodology using Analytic Hierarchy Process, Success Likelihood Index Methodology. The purpose of this study is to develop a methodology to incorporate the safety culture into PSA for obtaining more objective risk than before. The organizational factor considered in nuclear safety culture might affect the potential risk of human error and hardware-failure. The safety culture impact index to monitor the plant safety culture can be assessed by applying the developed methodology into a nuclear power plant.

  2. Development of a New Safety Culture Assessment Method for Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) (A study to suggest a new safety culture assessment method in nuclear power plants)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sang Min; Seong, Poong Hyun [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    This study is conducted to suggest a new safety culture assessment method in nuclear power plants. Criteria with various existing safety culture analysis methods are united, and reliability analysis methods are applied. The concept of the most representative methods, Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) and Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA), are adopted to assess safety culture. Through this application, it is expected that the suggested method will bring results with convenience and objectiveness.

  3. Assessing the relationship between patient safety culture and EHR strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Eric W; Silvera, Geoffrey A; Kazley, Abby S; Diana, Mark L; Huerta, Timothy R

    2016-07-11

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between hospitals' electronic health record (EHR) adoption characteristics and their patient safety cultures. The "Meaningful Use" (MU) program is designed to increase hospitals' adoption of EHR, which will lead to better care quality, reduce medical errors, avoid unnecessary cost, and promote a patient safety culture. To reduce medical errors, hospital leaders have been encouraged to promote safety cultures common to high-reliability organizations. Expecting a positive relationship between EHR adoption and improved patient safety cultures appears sound in theory, but it has yet to be empirically demonstrated. Design/methodology/approach - Providers' perceptions of patient safety culture and counts of patient safety incidents are explored in relationship to hospital EHR adoption patterns. Multi-level modeling is employed to data drawn from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's surveys on patient safety culture (level 1) and the American Hospital Association's survey and healthcare information technology supplement (level 2). Findings - The findings suggest that the early adoption of EHR capabilities hold a negative association to the number of patient safety events reported. However, this relationship was not present in providers' perceptions of overall patient safety cultures. These mixed results suggest that the understanding of the EHR-patient safety culture relationship needs further research. Originality/value - Relating EHR MU and providers' care quality attitudes is an important leading indicator for improved patient safety cultures. For healthcare facility managers and providers, the ability to effectively quantify the impact of new technologies on efforts to change organizational cultures is important for pinpointing clinical areas for process improvements. PMID:27298060

  4. Patient safety culture in teaching hospitals in Iran: assessment by the hospital survey on patient safety culture (HSOPSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Zakaria Kiaei

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient safety culture is an important part of improvement in the safety of health care. Knowing its present status is required for development of safety culture. The present study aimed to evaluate the current status of Patient safety culture in hospitals of three central provinces of Iran. Method: The present cross-sectional study was performed in teaching hospitals of Tehran, Alborz, and Qazvin provinces. The standard HSOPSC questionnaire was used for evaluation of the patient safety culture from the viewpoint of 522(Qazvin: 200, Tehran: 312, Alborz: 40 individuals who were randomly selected as workers of the hospitals. The collected data were analyzed using Chi-square and ANOVA tests. Results:The mean positive response to 12 aspects of the patient safety was 62.9%. “Organizational learning” had the highest proportion of positive response (71.18% and “Handoffs & Transitions” had the lowest (54.49%. There was a statistically significant difference in scores of “Teamwork within Units”(p=0.006(,”Manager Expectations & actions promoting”(p=0.014,”organizational learning and continuous improvement”(p=0.001, “Management support”(p=0.007, “Feedback and communication”(p=0.012, and “Communication openness”(p=0.003 among the provinces, respectively. Conclusion: We performed a full assessment of the patient safety culture in the studied provinces. Organizational learning was satisfactory in the hospitals. The studied hospitals need arrangement of safety-based programs and supports of senior administrators to perform more sophisticated efforts and improve the patient safety culture.

  5. Effects of a team-based assessment and intervention on patient safety culture in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, B; Müller, V; Rochon, J;

    2014-01-01

    Background: The measurement of safety culture in healthcare is generally regarded as a first step towards improvement. Based on a self-assessment of safety culture, the Frankfurt Patient Safety Matrix (FraTrix) aims to enable healthcare teams to improve safety culture in their organisations....... In this study we assessed the effects of FraTrix on safety culture in general practice. Methods: We conducted an open randomised controlled trial in 60 general practices. FraTrix was applied over a period of 9 months during three facilitated team sessions in intervention practices. At baseline and after 12...... months, scores were allocated for safety culture as expressed in practice structure and processes (indicators), in safety climate and in patient safety incident reporting. The primary outcome was the indicator error management. Results: During the team sessions, practice teams reflected on their safety...

  6. The role of engineering judgement, safety culture, and organizational factors in risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the role of engineering judgement, safety culture, and organizational factors in risk assessment by examining the reasons for human-based error. The need for more emphasis on producing engineers with good engineering judgement is described. The progress in quantifying the role of safety culture and organizational factors in risk assessment studies is summarized

  7. SCART guidelines. Reference report for IAEA Safety Culture Assessment Review Team (SCART)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA Director General stressed the role of safety culture in his concluding remarks at the Meeting of the Contracting Parties to the Convention on Nuclear Safety in 2002: 'As we have learned in other areas, it is not enough simply to have a structure; it is not enough to say that we have the necessary laws and the appropriate regulatory bodies. All these are important, but equally important is that we have in place a safety culture that gives effect to the structure that we have developed. To me, effectiveness and transparency are keys. So, it is an issue which I am pleased to see, you are giving the attention it deserves and we will continue to work with you in clarifying, developing and applying safety culture through our programmes and through our technical cooperation activities.' The concept of safety culture was initially developed by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) after the Chernobyl accident in 1986. Since then the IAEA's perspective of safety culture has expanded with time as its recognition of the complexities of the concept developed. Safety culture is considered to be specific organizational culture in all types of organizations with activities that give rise to radiation risks. The aim is to make safety culture strong and sustainable, so that safety becomes a primary focus for all activities in such organizations, even for those, which might not look safety-related at first. SCART (Safety Culture Assessment Review Team) is a safety review service, which reflects the expressed interest of Members States for methods and tools for safety culture assessment. It is a replacement for the earlier service ASCOT (Assessment of Safety Culture in Organizations Team). The IAEA Safety Fundamentals, Requirements and Guides (Safety Standards) are the basis for the SCART Safety Review Service. The reports of INSAG, identifying important current nuclear safety issues, serve also as references during a SCART mission. SCART missions are based

  8. Self-assessment of safety culture in nuclear installations. Highlights and good practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the findings of two IAEA Technical Committee Meetings on Safety Culture Self-Assessment Highlights and Good Practices. The meetings took place on 3-5 June 1998 and 23-25 October 2000 in Vienna, and involved an international cross-section of representatives who participated both in plenary discussions and working groups. The purpose of the meetings was to discuss the practical implications of evolutionary changes in the development of safety culture, and to share international experience, particularly on the methods used for the assessment of safety culture and good practices for its enhancement in an organization. The working groups were allocated specific topics for discussion, which included the following: organizational factors influencing the implementation of actions to improve safety culture; how to measure, effectively, progress in implementing solutions to safety culture problems; the symptoms of a weakening safety culture; the suitability of different methods for assessing safety culture; the achievement of sustainable improvements in safety culture using the results of assessment; the potential threats to the continuation of a strong safety culture in an organization from the many challenges facing the nuclear industry. The working groups, when appropriate, considered issues from both the utility's and the regulator's perspectives. This report will be of interest to all organizations who wish to assess and achieve a strong and sustainable safety culture. This includes not only nuclear power plants, but also other sectors of the nuclear industry such as uranium mines and mills, nuclear fuel fabrication facilities, nuclear waste repositories, research reactors, accelerators, radiography facilities, etc. The report specifically supplements other IAEA publications on this subject

  9. Assessing safety culture and safety performance in a high hazard industry

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Ceri

    2014-01-01

    In the UK 27 million working days are lost due to work-related illness or injury; at an estimate of £13.4 billion to the economy. Over the last 30 years researchers have examined safety culture and its relationship to poor safety performance. An organisation in the high hazard construction industry wanted to understand the factors that shaped and influenced safety performance and safety culture. This thesis details a research project which addresses that aim. A multi-method, triangulated appr...

  10. Implementing and measuring safety goals and safety culture. 3. Shifting to a Coaching Culture Through a 360-Degree Assessment Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Error-free operation is the ultimate objective of any safety culture. Ginna Training and Operations has embarked on an approach directed at further developing coaching skills, attitudes, and values. To accomplish this, a 360-deg assessment process designed to enhance coaching skills, attitudes, and values has been implemented. The process includes measuring participants based on a set of values and an individual self-development plan based on the feedback from the 360-deg assessment. The skills and experience of the people who make up that culture are irreplaceable. As nuclear organizations mature and generations retire, knowledge and skills must be transferred to the incoming generations without a loss in performance. The application of a 360- deg assessment process can shift the culture to include coaching in a strong command and control environment. It is a process of change management strengthened by experience while meeting the challenge to improve human performance by changing workplace attitudes. At Ginna, training programs and new processes were initiated to pursue the ultimate objective: error-free operation. The overall objective of the programs is to create a common knowledge base and the skill required to consistently incorporate ownership of 'coach and collaborate' responsibility into a strong existing 'command and control' culture. This involves the role of coach; the role of communications; and concept integration, which includes communications, coaching, and team dimensional training (TDT). The overall objective of the processes, TDT and shifting to a coaching culture through the application of a 360-deg assessment process, is to provide guidance for applying the skills learned in the programs. As depicted in Fig. 1, the TDT (a process that identifies 'strengths and challenges') can be greatly improved by applying good communications and coaching practices. As the training programs were implemented, the participants were observed and coached in

  11. A quantitative assessment of safety culture as part of the national programme on nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper seeks to give practical value to the concept of Safety Culture, proposing a method that may be used to judge the effectiveness of Safety Culture in all phases of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The paper describes the quantification of the Safety Culture assessment on statistical basis. The safety culture assessment is based on the IAEA ASCOT (Assessment of Safety Culture in Organizing Team) Guidelines. This Procedural Guide, used as an instrumental tool in addition to 'ASCOT Guidelines', could improve the ASCOT reviews and permit to give more accurate and objective conclusions at the end of these reviews. It would also reveal areas needing improvements, giving an overall rating of the Safety Culture level, which could be compared with a new result after implementing some corrective measures. This method could be applied in all phases of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (mining, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage, conditioning of spent fuel, final disposal of spent fuel, heavy water production, transport, etc.) and should be an all embracing characteristics which, when prevailing in a satisfactory measure, would eliminate accidents and reduce incidents to insignificant levels. Included as an Annex to the National Program on Nuclear Energy, the proposed method could contribute to the improvement of Safety Culture in all phases of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and at all levels. (author)

  12. The role of perceptions and attitudes in the assessment of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to present the argument that the most conveniently measurable and valid elements of a safety culture are the employee's perceptions of and attitudes towards safety. These are oriented towards the whole range of hazards and corresponding safety practices and procedures within the organisation. The concept of safety culture is discussed and this is followed by a short review of research evidence on the main characteristics of low accident plants. There follow brief reviews of research in industry on the perception of risks and attitudes towards safety and finally, a detailed account of a large scale survey of safety attitudes in a nuclear reprocessing plant. The aim is to identify those elements of safety culture that can establish priorities and provide order and structure for those site regulators whose task is to assess their health. (author)

  13. Some thoughts on problems associated with the assessing and strengthening of safety culture. An Indian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    India has nine operating reactors, one under commissioning, six under construction and ten in the planning stage. Of the nine operating nuclear power plants, seven are PHWR type reactors and two BWRs. India's reactors have accomplished more than hundred operating reactor years with an extremely satisfactory safety performance. India gives top priority to safety and there has been an overall increase in safety culture. However, it is recognised that improvement of safety culture is a continuous process and many areas require streamlining. The very name of 'culture' evokes strong emotions among Indians, as they feel they inherit a good ancient culture. Basically the concept of culture covers everything learnt or inherited by a society which is preserved and passed on to future generations. The word safety culture however needs to differ from the above referred meaning due to fast technological development which requires new safe methods to be developed and practised. In view of this difference in the meaning attached to safety culture, developing parameters to measure the same, devising techniques for its assessment and introducing programmes for strengthening safety culture. Apparently, the task is not easy since it involves cultivating right safety attitude and once achieved preserving and improving the same. Since the ultimate goal of safety culture is to bring in change towards right type of safety attitude of all concerned, it is important to realize that it is not an easy process. This is mainly because the change in attitude is internal in nature as it consists of values, thoughts and actions of an individual. Just by knowing the hazards of a process and also about the technique of reducing the risks from the same is not enough since safety culture requires an attitudinal change. The enormous efforts needed to bring in such a change can be gauged by an example of designing and effectively executing a campaign to eliminate cigarette smoking, which is known to

  14. Assessment of Human Performance and Safety Culture at the Paks Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of human performance and safety culture of the personnel at a Nuclear Power Plant is a very important element of the self assessment process. At the Paks NPP a systematic approach to this problem started in the early 90's. The first comprehensive analysis of the human performance of the personnel was performed by the Hungarian Research Institute for Electric Power (VEIKI). The analysis of human failures is also a part of the investigation and analysis of safety related reported events. This human performance analysis of events is carried out by the Laboratory of Psychology of the plant and a supporting organisation namely the Department of Ergonomics and Psychology of the Budapest University of Technical and Economical Sciences. The analysis of safety culture at the Paks NPP has been in the focus of attention since the implementation of the INSAG-4 document started world-wide. In 1993 an IAEA model project namely 'Strengthening Training for Operational Safety' was initiated with a sub-project called 'Enhancement of Safety Culture'. Within this project the first step was the initial assessment of the safety culture level at the Paks NPP. It was followed by some corrective actions and safety culture improvement programme. In 1999 the second assessment was performed in order to evaluate the progress as a result of the improvement programme. A few indicators reflecting the elements of safety culture were defined and compared. The assessment of the safety culture with a survey among the managers was performed in September 2000 and the results are being evaluated at the moment. The intention of the plant management is to repeat the assessment every 2-3 years and evaluate the trend of the indicator. (authors)

  15. Assessment of patient safety culture in primary care setting, Al-Mukala, Yemen

    OpenAIRE

    Webair, Hana H; Al-assani, Salwa S.; Al-haddad, Reema H.; Al-Shaeeb, Wafa H.; Bin Selm, Manal A.; Alyamani, Abdulla S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient safety culture in primary care is the first step to achieve high quality health care. This study aims to provide a baseline assessment of patient safety culture in primary care settings in Al-Mukala, Yemen as a first published study from a least developed country. Methods A survey was conducted in primary healthcare centres and units in Al-Mukala District, Yemen. A comprehensive sample from the available 16 centres was included. An Arabic version of the Medical Office Surve...

  16. Assessment of safety culture from the INB organization: A case study for nuclear fuel cycle industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present article describes strategies, methodologies and first results on the Safety Culture Self-assessment Project under way at INB since August 2001. As a Brazilian Government company in charge of the nuclear fuel cycle activities,. the main purposes of the Project is to evaluate the present status of its safety culture and to propose actions to ensure continuous safety improvement at management level of its industrial processes. The proposed safety culture assessment describes INB's various production sites taking into account the different aspects of their activities, such as regional, social and technical issues. The survey was performed in March/2002 very good attendance (about 80%) the employees. The first global survey results are presented in item 4. (author)

  17. Characterization and improvement of the nuclear safety culture through self-assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organizational culture has a powerful influence on overall corporate performance. The ability to sustain superior results in ensuring the public's health and safety is predicated on an organization's deeply embedded values and behavioral norms and how these affect the ability to change and seek continuous improvement. The nuclear industry is developing increased recognition of the relationship of culture to nuclear safety performance as a critical element of corporate strategy. This paper describes a self-assessment methodology designed to characterize and improve the nuclear safety culture, including processes for addressing employee concerns. This methodology has been successfully applied on more than 30 occasions in the last several years, resulting in measurable improvements in safety performance and quality and employee motivation, productivity, and morale. Benefits and lessons learned are also presented

  18. Characterization and improvement of the nuclear safety culture through self-assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, H.A. [Synergy Consulting Services Corp., Great Falls, VA (United States); McGehee, R.B. [Wise Carter Child & Caraway, Jackson, MS (United States); Cottle, W.T. [Houston Lighting & Power, Wadsworth, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Organizational culture has a powerful influence on overall corporate performance. The ability to sustain superior results in ensuring the public`s health and safety is predicated on an organization`s deeply embedded values and behavioral norms and how these affect the ability to change and seek continuous improvement. The nuclear industry is developing increased recognition of the relationship of culture to nuclear safety performance as a critical element of corporate strategy. This paper describes a self-assessment methodology designed to characterize and improve the nuclear safety culture, including processes for addressing employee concerns. This methodology has been successfully applied on more than 30 occasions in the last several years, resulting in measurable improvements in safety performance and quality and employee motivation, productivity, and morale. Benefits and lessons learned are also presented.

  19. Assessing and improving the safety culture of non-power nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development and application of safety culture principles has understandably focused on nuclear power plant and fuel cycle facilities and has been based on studies in Europe, North America, Japan and Korea. However, most radiation injuries and deaths have resulted from the mishandling of radioactive sources, inadvertent over-exposure to X-rays and critically incidents, unrelated to nuclear power plant. Within the Forum on Nuclear Cooperation in Asia (FNCA), Australia has been promoting initiatives to apply safety culture principles across all nuclear and radiation application activities and in a manner that is culturally appropriate for Asian countries. ANSTO initiated a Safety Culture Project in 1996 to develop methods for assessing and improving safety culture at nuclear and radiation installations other than power reactors and to trial these at ANSTO and in the Asian region. The project has sensibly drawn on experience from the nuclear power industry, particularly in Japan and Korea. There has been a positive response in the participating countries to addressing safety culture issues in non-power nuclear facilities. This paper reports on the main achievements of the project. Further goals of the project are also identified. (author)

  20. Safety Culture Assessment Tools in Nuclear and Non-Nuclear Domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last decades, in many domains especially in high risk industries, the authorities paid increasing attention to safety management systems and, in particular, to safety culture. Consequently, in the applied and academic literature a huge amount of studies explored the main challenges, issues and obstacles related with safety culture. We undertake a survey of safety culture experiences in the main safety-critical industries such as nuclear, railways, offshore, aviation, airlines, health care, etc. We review both academic and applied literature up to the year 2011. Our results help to establish a comprehensive view on the subject, its main terminologies, existing tools, and main difficulties. The purpose of this report is to raise awareness about the current tools of safety culture assessment, both in the nuclear as well as in the non-nuclear domain. The report provides also practical recommendations about the possible use of each tool given different circumstances and different factors. We do not aim to rank the tools pointing the best one, but we highlight instead the unique features of these tools, pointing their strong and weak sides

  1. Assessment of Patient Safety Culture in Primary Health Care Settings in Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha Mohamed Ghobashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Patient safety is critical component of health care quality. We aimed to assess the awareness of primary healthcare staff members about patient safety culture and explore the areas of deficiency and opportunities for improvement concerning this issue.Methods: This descriptive cross sectional study surveyed 369 staff members in four primary healthcare centers in Kuwait using self-administered “Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture” adopted questionnaire. The total number of respondents was 276 participants (response rate = 74.79%.Results: Five safety dimensions with lowest positivity (less than 50% were identified and these are; the non – punitive response to errors, frequency of event reporting, staffing, communication openness, center handoffs and transitions with the following percentages of positivity 24%, 32%, 41%, 45% and 47% respectively. The dimensions of highest positivity were teamwork within the center’s units (82% and organizational learning (75%.Conclusion: Patient safety culture in primary healthcare settings in Kuwait is not as strong as improvements for the provision of safe health care. Well-designed patient safety initiatives are needed to be integrated with organizational policies, particularly the pressing need to address the bioethical component of medical errors and their disclosure, communication openness and emotional issues related to them and investing the bright areas of skillful organizational learning and strong team working attitudes.    

  2. Developing Measures for Assessing the Causality of Safety Culture in a Petrochemical Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses safety culture in the petrochemical sector and the causes and consequences of safety culture. A sample of 520 responses selected by simple random sampling completed questionnaires for this survey, the return rate was 86.75%. The research instrument comprises four sections: basic information, the safety leadership scale (SLS), the safety climate scale (SCS), and the safety performance scale (SPS). SPSS 12.0, a statistical software package, was used for item analysis, validity analysis, and reliability analysis. Exploratory factor analysis indicated that (1) SLS abstracted three factors such as safety caring, safety controlling, and safety coaching; (2) SCS comprised three factors such as emergency response, safety commitment, and risk perception; and (3) SPS was composed of accident investigation, safety training, safety inspections, and safety motivation. We conclude that the SLS, SCS, and SPS developed in this paper have good construct validity and internal consistency and can serve as the basis for future research.

  3. Resolving conflicting safety cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several nuclear power plant sites have been wounded in the crossfire between two distinct corporate cultures. The traditional utility culture lies on one side and that of the nuclear navy on the other. The two corporate cultures lead to different perceptions of open-quotes safety culture.close quotes This clash of safety cultures obscures a very important point about nuclear plant operations: Safety depends on organizational learning. Organizational learning provides the foundation for a perception of safety culture that transcends the conflict between utility and nuclear navy cultures. Corporate culture may be defined as the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs shared by employees of a given company. Safety culture is the part of corporate culture concerning shared attitudes and beliefs affecting individual or public safety. If the safety culture promotes behaviors that lead to greater safety, employees will tend to open-quotes do the right thingclose quotes even when circumstances and formal guidance alone do not ensure that actions will be correct. Safety culture has become particularly important to nuclear plant owners and regulators as they have sought to establish and maintain a high level of safety in today's plants

  4. Assessing Safety Culture in Pharmacies: The psychometric validation of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) in a national sample of community pharmacies in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Nordén-Hägg, Annika; Sexton, J Bryan; Kälvemark-Sporrong, Sofia; Ring, Lena; Kettis-Lindblad, Åsa

    2010-01-01

    Background Safety culture assessment is increasingly recognized as an important component in healthcare quality improvement, also in pharmacies. One of the most commonly used and rigorously validated tools to measure safety culture is the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire; SAQ. This study presents the validation of the SAQ for use in Swedish pharmacies. The psychometric properties of the translated questionnaire are presented Methods The original English language version of the SAQ was translate...

  5. Some cultural flavors of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety culture has got a wide acceptance in nuclear power operation. The concept is closely related to issues of management and organization. Safety culture is not a universal concept, but it has to be related to a national context and given anchoring in the specific environment of a nuclear power plant. In spite of its relativity it should still be possible for outsiders to assess manifestation of safety culture. The paper discusses aspects of safety culture with a special emphasis on the use of the concept as a management tool. Further development of the concept is also discussed. A conclusion of the paper is that safety culture needs further development and proper connections to management sciences and organizational theory. (author)

  6. Regulatory Expectations for Safety Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Su Jin; Oh, Jang Jin; Choi, Young Sung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The oversight of licensee's safety culture becomes an important issue that attracts great public and political concerns recently in Korea. Beginning from the intended violation of rules, a series of corruptions, documents forgery and disclosure of wrong-doings made the public think that the whole mindset of nuclear workers has been inadequate. Thus, they are demanding that safety culture shall be improved and that regulatory body shall play more roles and responsibilities for the improvements and oversight for them. This paper introduces, as an effort of regulatory side, recent changes in the role of regulators in safety culture, regulatory expectations on the desired status of licensee's safety culture, the pilot inspection program for safety culture and research activity for the development of oversight system. After the Fukushima accident in Japan 2011, many critics has searched for cultural factors that caused the unacceptable negligence pervaded in Japan nuclear society and the renewed emphasis has been placed on rebuilding safety culture by operators, regulators, and relevant institutions globally. Significant progress has been made in how to approach safety culture and led to a new perspective different from the existing normative assessment method both in operators and regulatory side. Regulatory expectations and oversight of them are based on such a new holistic concept for human, organizational and cultural elements to maintain and strengthen the integrity of defense in depth and consequently nuclear safety.

  7. Relationship of safety culture and process safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Throughout history, humans have gathered in groups for social, religious, and industrial purposes. As the conglomeration of people interact, a set of underlying values, beliefs, and principles begins to develop that serve to guide behavior within the group. These 'guidelines' are commonly referred to as the group culture. Modern-day organizations, including corporations, have developed their own unique cultures derived from the diversity of the organizational interests and the background of the employees. Safety culture, a sub-set of organizational culture, has been a major focus in recent years. This is especially true in the chemical industry due to the series of preventable, safety-related disasters that occurred in the late seventies and eighties. Some of the most notable disasters, during this time period, occurred at Bhopal, Flixborough, and Seveso. However, current events, like the September 11th terrorist attacks and the disintegration of the Columbia shuttle, have caused an assessment of safety culture in a variety of other organizations

  8. Management of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The strengthening of safety culture in an organization has become an increasingly important issue for nuclear industry. A high level of safety performance is essential for business success in intensely competitive global environment. This presentation offers a discussion of some principles and activities used in enhancing safety performance and appropriate safety behaviour at the Krsko NPP. Over the years a number of events have occurred in nuclear industry that have involved problems in human performance. A review of these and other significant events has identified recurring weaknesses in plant safety culture and policy. Focusing attention on the strengthening of relevant processes can help plants avoid similar undesirable events. The policy of the Krsko NPP is that all employees concerned shall constantly be alert to opportunities to reduce risks to the lowest practicable level and to achieve excellence in plant safety. The most important objective is to protect individuals, society and the environment by establishing and maintaining an effective defense against radiological hazard in the nuclear power plant. It is achieved through the use of reliable structures, components, systems, and procedures, as well as plant personnel committed to a strong safety culture. The elements of safety culture include both organizational and individual aspects. Elements commonly included at the organizational level are senior management commitment to safety, organizational effectiveness, effective communication, organizational learning, and a culture that encourages identification and resolution of safety issues. Elements identified at the individual level include personal accountability, a questioning attitude, communication, procedural adherence, etc.(author)

  9. Occupational Safety and Health culture assessment - A review of main approaches and selected tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, T.N.; Eeckeleaert, L.; Starren, A.; Scheppingen, A. van; Fox, D.; Bruck, C.

    2011-01-01

    Occupational safety and health culture, or more briefly 'OSH culture', can be seen as a concept for exploring how informal organisational aspects influence OSH in a positive or negative way. The aim is to convey up-to-date information on this complex topic in a straightforward, condensed way, trying

  10. Safety culture assessment programme: Statistical analysis of a survey conducted at the IEA-R1 Brazilian research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The present study describes the statistical analysis of a survey conducted among the employees of IEA-R1 research reactor to evaluate the current status of safety culture in this installation. IEA-R1 is a 5 MW pool type reactor, cooled and moderated by light water, and it uses graphite and beryllium as reflectors. First criticality was achieved on September 16, 1957 and the reactor has been operating regularly and safely for almost 46 years. The reactor building is located within the premises of IPEN/CNEN-SP, one of the Brazilian institutes for energy and nuclear research, inside the campus of the University of Sao Paulo. The operation, maintenance and irradiation services of IEA-R1 reactor are currently being administered by the Research Reactor Center. The safety culture assessment and enhancement programme of IEA-R1 was launched by the reactor management in 2002. An opinion survey was conducted in order to evaluate the employee's perception in relation to the safety culture of the organization. A questionnaire consisting, mainly, of statements about safety culture aspects was prepared. A total number of 34 individuals participated in the survey representing the personnel of the Operation and Maintenance Division, Irradiation Service Division as well as the technicians specialized in Radiation Protection. The statistical analysis of the survey was developed into three principal steps. In the first step, descriptive techniques were used to estimate parameters of the statistical distribution of the answers to each question of the questionnaire. In the second step, the aspects of safety culture to be investigated were defined by grouping these questions into issue areas. The safety culture aspects determined were: Priority to Safety, Top Management Involvement and Commitment to Safety, Employees' Attitude Towards Safety, Employees' Responsibilities and Commitment to Safety, Employees' Evaluation of Safety Culture Level, Conflict 'Absence of Safety x

  11. A literature review of safety culture.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Kerstan Suzanne; Stevens-Adams, Susan Marie; Wenner, Caren A.

    2013-03-01

    Workplace safety has been historically neglected by organizations in order to enhance profitability. Over the past 30 years, safety concerns and attention to safety have increased due to a series of disastrous events occurring across many different industries (e.g., Chernobyl, Upper Big-Branch Mine, Davis-Besse etc.). Many organizations have focused on promoting a healthy safety culture as a way to understand past incidents, and to prevent future disasters. There is an extensive academic literature devoted to safety culture, and the Department of Energy has also published a significant number of documents related to safety culture. The purpose of the current endeavor was to conduct a review of the safety culture literature in order to understand definitions, methodologies, models, and successful interventions for improving safety culture. After reviewing the literature, we observed four emerging themes. First, it was apparent that although safety culture is a valuable construct, it has some inherent weaknesses. For example, there is no common definition of safety culture and no standard way for assessing the construct. Second, it is apparent that researchers know how to measure particular components of safety culture, with specific focus on individual and organizational factors. Such existing methodologies can be leveraged for future assessments. Third, based on the published literature, the relationship between safety culture and performance is tenuous at best. There are few empirical studies that examine the relationship between safety culture and safety performance metrics. Further, most of these studies do not include a description of the implementation of interventions to improve safety culture, or do not measure the effect of these interventions on safety culture or performance. Fourth, safety culture is best viewed as a dynamic, multi-faceted overall system composed of individual, engineered and organizational models. By addressing all three components of

  12. KHNP Safety Culture Framework based on Global Standard, and Lessons learned from Safety Culture Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Younggab; Hur, Nam Young; Jeong, Hyeon Jong [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In order to eliminate the vague fears of the people about the nuclear power and operate continuously NPPs, a strong safety culture of NPPs should be demonstrated. Strong safety culture awareness of workers can overcome social distrust about NPPs. KHNP has been a variety efforts to improve and establish safety culture of NPPs. Safety culture framework applying global standards was set up and safety culture assessment has been carried out periodically to enhance safety culture of workers. In addition, KHNP developed various safety culture contents and they are being used in NPPs by workers. As a result of these efforts, safety culture awareness of workers is changed positively and the safety environment of NPPs is expected to be improved. KHNP makes an effort to solve areas for improvement derived from safety culture assessment. However, there are some areas to take a long time in completing the work. Therefore, these actions are necessary to be carried out consistently and continuously. KHNP also developed recently safety culture enhancement system based on web. All information related to safety culture in KHNP will be shared through this web system and this system will be used to safety culture assessment. In addition to, KHNP plans to develop safety culture indicators for monitoring the symptoms of safety culture weakening.

  13. KHNP Safety Culture Framework based on Global Standard, and Lessons learned from Safety Culture Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to eliminate the vague fears of the people about the nuclear power and operate continuously NPPs, a strong safety culture of NPPs should be demonstrated. Strong safety culture awareness of workers can overcome social distrust about NPPs. KHNP has been a variety efforts to improve and establish safety culture of NPPs. Safety culture framework applying global standards was set up and safety culture assessment has been carried out periodically to enhance safety culture of workers. In addition, KHNP developed various safety culture contents and they are being used in NPPs by workers. As a result of these efforts, safety culture awareness of workers is changed positively and the safety environment of NPPs is expected to be improved. KHNP makes an effort to solve areas for improvement derived from safety culture assessment. However, there are some areas to take a long time in completing the work. Therefore, these actions are necessary to be carried out consistently and continuously. KHNP also developed recently safety culture enhancement system based on web. All information related to safety culture in KHNP will be shared through this web system and this system will be used to safety culture assessment. In addition to, KHNP plans to develop safety culture indicators for monitoring the symptoms of safety culture weakening

  14. Organizational Culture and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Catherine A.

    2003-01-01

    '..only a fool perseveres in error.' Cicero. Humans will break the most advanced technological devices and override safety and security systems if they are given the latitude. Within the workplace, the operator may be just one of several factors in causing accidents or making risky decisions. Other variables considered for their involvement in the negative and often catastrophic outcomes include the organizational context and culture. Many organizations have constructed and implemented safety programs to be assimilated into their culture to assure employee commitment and understanding of the importance of everyday safety. The purpose of this paper is to examine literature on organizational safety cultures and programs that attempt to combat vulnerability, risk taking behavior and decisions and identify the role of training in attempting to mitigate unsafe acts.

  15. The awareness of employees in safety culture through the improved nuclear safety culture evaluation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986, nuclear safety culture terminology was at first introduced emphasizing the importance of employees' attitude and organizational safety. The concept of safety culture was spread by INSAG 4 published in 1991. From that time, IAEA had provided the service of ASCOT for the safety culture assessment. However, many people still are thinking that safety culture is abstract and is not clear. It is why the systematic and reliable assessment methodology was not developed. Assessing safety culture is to identify what is the basic assumption for any organization to accept unconsciously. Therefore, it is very difficult to reach a meaningful conclusion by a superficial investigation alone. KHNP had been doing the safety culture assessment which was based on ASCOT methodology every 2 years. And this result had contributed to improving safety culture. But this result could not represent the level of organization's safety culture due to the limitation of method. So, KHNP has improved the safety culture method by benchmarking the over sea assessment techniques in 2011. The effectiveness of this improved methodology was validated through a pilot assessment. In this paper, the level of employees' safety culture awareness was analyzed by the improved method and reviewed what is necessary for the completeness and objectivity of the nuclear safety culture assessment methodology

  16. Understanding and Exploring Safety Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Guldenmund, F.W.

    2010-01-01

    The match between safety and culture was made around 1986, when the INSAG delivered its initial report on the Chernobyl accident. Whether the marriage is a happy one is still a matter of debate, but it is most definitely a fruitful one. In the past twenty years, many researchers have devoted much effort to both the theoretical development of the concept as well as its assessment. Moreover, various attempts have been made to relate the concept of safety culture to several other concepts as wel...

  17. Objective and character of safety culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aastrand, K. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2005-07-01

    The main topics of the lecture include: (1) concepts of safety culture introduced in INSAG-4, (2) stages of development of safety culture, (3) general practises to develop organizational effectiveness as a means of implementing and improving safety culture, (4) specific practises to develop safety culture applying to all stages of a nuclear installation's life cycle, (5) suggestions on assessing the progress of development of safety culture in an organization and on evaluating the influence of major environmental and internal organizational factors on that culture, and (6) guidance on the detection of incipient weaknesses in safety culture that may be of particular interest to regulators and those responsible for self-assessment in organization.

  18. A Preliminary Study on the Measures to Assess the Organizational Safety: The Cultural Impact on Human Error Potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Hee; Lee, Yong Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    The Fukushima I nuclear accident following the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami on 11 March 2011 occurred after twelve years had passed since the JCO accident which was caused as a result of an error made by JCO employees. These accidents, along with the Chernobyl accident, associated with characteristic problems of various organizations caused severe social and economic disruptions and have had significant environmental and health impact. The cultural problems with human errors occur for various reasons, and different actions are needed to prevent different errors. Unfortunately, much of the research on organization and human error has shown widely various or different results which call for different approaches. In other words, we have to find more practical solutions from various researches for nuclear safety and lead a systematic approach to organizational deficiency causing human error. This paper reviews Hofstede's criteria, IAEA safety culture, safety areas of periodic safety review (PSR), teamwork and performance, and an evaluation of HANARO safety culture to verify the measures used to assess the organizational safety

  19. Use of the whole-embryo culture system in drug safety assessment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechter, R; Schön, H

    1988-01-01

    The embryotoxicity and, in particular, the teratogenic potential of three new drug combinations were investigated. The interactions of the single components (all already on the market) in the different drug mixtures were determined by testing the single components in addition to the drug combinations. In order to evaluate the usefulness of these results for safety assessment, the no-effect concentrations (NEC) of the single compounds or the mixed drug preparations, with respect to embryonic growth and differentiation and the presence of anomalies, were compared with human plasma/serum levels during therapeutic use. In addition, in vivo animal data of the single components were used to put into perspective the NEC values after direct in vitro exposure of embryos. Embryotoxicity, measured as a retardation of growth and of differentiation, as well as an increased percentage of cultured embryos with morphological abnormalities, was present at concentrations of 100 mug/ml for the preparation KT 1/300 (ketotifen/theophylline). These effects could be attributed to the component theophylline, as ketotifen was free of an embryotoxic/teratogenic potential in vitro. In the case of the compound mix VKB/BQ, a combination of pindolol, clopamide and endralazine, the in vitro effects of the mixture on embryonic development could also be attributed to one of the compounds (pindolol) in the mixture. In the case of HYCT 4520, the effects of the components hydergine (co-dergocrine mesylate), clopamide and triamterene on embryonic growth, differentiation and anomalies were additive in the drug mixture. None of the compounds was reported to be associated with human teratogenicity. The NEC of the components in the whole-embryo culture system, tested either as a mixture or as individual compounds, were higher than the human peak plasma levels measured during therapeutic use of the compounds. In addition, the single components were reported to be non-teratogenic in in vivo teratogenicity

  20. Safety culture in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, there are describe the activities already accomplished and the activities planned to be executed by the licensee and the regulator with the aim to develop, maintain and strength Safety Culture in all the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant activities. (author)

  1. Developing a safety culture survey instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    How does an organization assess its safety culture? Various organizations have tried different means to assess safety culture. One way is to ask every employee what their safety concerns are. This is a very desirable system because it gets all the employees involved in the process. Also needed within the organization is a means of measuring and comparing improvements or decrements in safety culture. A standardized written survey instrument can and should be used in addition to informal employee interviews to gain a broader understanding of the safety culture. This paper presents a methodology for successfully developing a safety culture survey instrument. The survey instrument serves as a tool to not only find out what the safety norms in an organization are but also as an aid to help elucidate weaker areas so they can be improved. (author)

  2. Preliminary study on improving safety culture in Malaysian nuclear industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents preliminary study on safety culture and its implementation in Malaysian nuclear industries by realizing the importance of safety culture; identification of important safety culture attributes; safety culture assessment and the practices to incorporate the identified safety culture attributes in organization. The first section of this paper explains the terms and definitions related to safety culture. Second, for the realization of importance of safety culture in organization, the international operational experiences emphasizing the importance of safety culture are described. Third, important safety culture attributes which are frequently cited in literature are provided. Fourth, methods to assess safety culture in operating organization are described. Finally, the practices to enhance the safety culture in an organization are discussed

  3. From Safety Culture to Safety Orientation - Developing a tool to measure safety in shipping

    OpenAIRE

    Håvold, Jon Ivar

    2007-01-01

    From Safety Culture to Safety Orientation.Developing a tool to measure safety in shippingThis study intend to develop a tool to measure safety orientation (SO) in shipping. SO should be considered a practical safety culture assessment instrument, indicating the degree of orientation towards safety in a group or an organisation. The scale can for example be used in benchmarking as a key performance indicator (KPI), or as an indicator in a balanced scorecard type of management tool.The definiti...

  4. Decreasing Ambiguity of the Safety Culture Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status of the concept of ''safety culture'' is reviewed. It has not sufficiently taken root. One cause for this is the abstract nature of the concept. Organizations must become aware of the necessity of improving safety and have sufficient power to promote this. The culture of safety must be instilled in each employee, so that each of them will feel responsible for identifying weak points in plant safety. The authors devised a tool for a self-assessment of the safety culture. The tool will bring to light information divides, communication gaps, etc. Recognizing the vulnerabilities of the organization by themselves and discussing these weak points among them is the first step to decrease the ambiguity of the safety culture. The next step is to make these gaps known along with agreed-upon countermeasures. The concept of safety culture will be greatly clarified in this way and lead to safer nuclear power plants

  5. Safety culture in nuclear installations. Guidance for the use in enhancement of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This guidance has been developed for use in the IAEA Safety Culture Services, which provides support to Member States in their efforts to develop a sound safety culture of their organizations. It will be of particular use in seminars and training workshops that are part of these services. Much of the information in this publication reflects the approach the IAEA has adopted to assist nuclear organizations in Member States in improving their safety culture. This guidance covers topics such as: what is culture, and in particular what is safety culture; what are the stages of development of safety culture, and how you can assess its development using employee surveys; what practices can be used to develop safety culture, and what indicators will help monitor progress. The symptoms of a weakening safety culture are described, as well as the lessons learned from organizations who have experienced safety culture problems. This guide also contains information on how to undertake the process of transforming the existing safety culture, and develop a learning culture in an organization that is based on continuous improvement. The relationship between quality and safety is discussed. The safety culture services offered by the IAEA are also described. The IAEA perspective of safety culture has expanded with time as its understanding of the complexities of the concept developed. The concept of safety culture was first introduced by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group formed by the IAEA. In their report (INSAG-4, 1991) they maintained that the establishment of a safety culture within an organization is one of the fundamental management principles necessary for the safe operation of a nuclear facility. The definition recognized that safety culture is both structural and attitudinal in nature and relates to the organization and its style, as well as to attitudes, approaches and the commitment of individuals at all levels in the organization. In the framework of the

  6. Measuring patient safety culture: an assessment of the clustering of responses at unit level and hospital level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.; Wagner, C.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Wal, van der G.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To test the claim that the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS) measures patient safety culture instead of mere individual attitudes and to determine the most appropriate level (individual, unit or hospital level) for interventions aimed at improving the culture of patient s

  7. IAEA Safety Standards on Management Systems and Safety Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.D. Persson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The IAEA has developed a new set of Safety Standards for applying an integrated Management System for facilities and activities. The objective of the new Safety Standards is to define requirements and provide guidance for establishing, implementing, assessing and continually improving a Management System that integrates safety, health, environmental, security, quality and economic related elements to ensure that safety is properly taken into account in all the activities of an organization. With an integrated approach to management systems it is also necessary to include the aspect of culture, where the organizational culture and safety culture is seen as crucial elements of the successful implementation of this management system and the attainment of all the goals and particularly the safety goals of the organization. The IAEA has developed a set of services aimed at assisting it’s Member States in establishing, implementing, assessing and continually improving an integrated management system.

  8. IAEA Safety Standards on Management Systems and Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA has developed a new set of Safety Standard for applying an integrated Management System for facilities and activities. The objective of the new Safety Standards is to define requirements and provide guidance for establishing, implementing, assessing and continually improving a Management System that integrates safety, health, environmental, security, quality and economic related elements to ensure that safety is properly taken into account in all the activities of an organization. With an integrated approach to management system it is also necessary to include the aspect of culture, where the organizational culture and safety culture is seen as crucial elements of the successful implementation of this management system and the attainment of all the goals and particularly the safety goals of the organization. The IAEA has developed a set of service aimed at assisting it's Member States in establishing. Implementing, assessing and continually improving an integrated management system. (author)

  9. A study to assess the influence of interprofessional point of care simulation training on safety culture in the operating theatre environment of a university teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinde, Theresa; Gale, Thomas; Anderson, Ian; Roberts, Martin; Sice, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional point of care or in situ simulation is used as a training tool in our operating theatre directorate with the aim of improving crisis behaviours. This study aimed to assess the impact of interprofessional point of care simulation on the safety culture of operating theatres. A validated Safety Attitude Questionnaire was administered to staff members before each simulation scenario and then re-administered to the same staff members after 6-12 months. Pre- and post-training Safety Attitude Questionnaire-Operating Room (SAQ-OR) scores were compared using paired sample t-tests. Analysis revealed a statistically significant perceived improvement in both safety (p culture) 6-12 months after interprofessional simulation training. A growing body of literature suggests that a positive safety culture is associated with improved patient outcomes. Our study supports the implementation of point of care simulation as a useful intervention to improve safety culture in theatres.

  10. Incorporating organisational safety culture within ergonomics practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Tim; Tappin, David

    2010-10-01

    This paper conceptualises organisational safety culture and considers its relevance to ergonomics practice. Issues discussed in the paper include the modest contribution that ergonomists and ergonomics as a discipline have made to this burgeoning field of study and the significance of safety culture to a systems approach. The relevance of safety culture to ergonomics work with regard to the analysis, design, implementation and evaluation process, and implications for participatory ergonomics approaches, are also discussed. A potential user-friendly, qualitative approach to assessing safety culture as part of ergonomics work is presented, based on a recently published conceptual framework that recognises the dynamic and multi-dimensional nature of safety culture. The paper concludes by considering the use of such an approach, where an understanding of different aspects of safety culture within an organisation is seen as important to the success of ergonomics projects. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: The relevance of safety culture to ergonomics practice is a key focus of this paper, including its relationship with the systems approach, participatory ergonomics and the ergonomics analysis, design, implementation and evaluation process. An approach to assessing safety culture as part of ergonomics work is presented.

  11. A Methodology for Evaluating Quantitative Nuclear Safety Culture Impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kiyoon; Jae, Moosung [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Through several accidents of NPPs including the Fukushima Daiichi in 2011 and Chernobyl accidents in 1986, nuclear safety culture has been emphasized in reactor safety world-widely. In Korea, KHNP evaluates the safety culture of NPP itself. KHNP developed the principles of the safety culture in consideration of the international standards. A questionnaire and interview questions are also developed based on these principles and it is used for evaluating the safety culture. However, existing methodology to evaluate the safety culture has some disadvantages. First, it is difficult to maintain the consistency of the assessment. Second, the period of safety culture assessment is too long (every two years) so it has limitations in preventing accidents occurred by a lack of safety culture. Third, it is not possible to measure the change in the risk of NPPs by weak safety culture since it is not clearly explains the effect of safety culture on the safety of NPPs. In this study, Safety Culture Impact Assessment Model (SCIAM) is developed overcoming these disadvantages. In this study, SCIAM which overcoming disadvantages of exiting safety culture assessment method is developed. SCIAM uses SCII to monitor the statues of the safety culture periodically and also uses RCDF to quantify the safety culture impact on NPP's safety. It is significant that SCIAM represents the standard of the healthy nuclear safety culture, while the exiting safety culture assessment presented only vulnerability of the safety culture of organization. SCIAM might contribute to monitoring the level of safety culture periodically and, to improving the safety of NPP.

  12. Assessment of Safety Culture within the Pakistan Nuclear Regulatory Authority (PNRA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afzal, Muhammad [Pakistan Nuclear Regulatory Authority, Islamabad (Pakistan); Choi, Kwang Sik [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The objective of this study is to assess the SC of the Pakistan Nuclear Regulatory Authority (PNRA) by developing a performance indicator-based questionnaire. Aspects that potentially play important roles in developing perceptions of SC, including age, type of job, gender and duty hours of regulatory staff, are given due importance in this study. The study also identifies the strengths and weaknesses in the SC of the PNRA and can be used as a model study to assess the SC of other RBs. The questionnaire, developed to assess the SC of the PNRA, was in line with the PNRA's own defined attributes for SC. In the past, significant efforts have been made to ensure the safe operation of NPPs by improving designs and operating procedures; however, the nuclear accident at the Fukushima NPP in Japan in March 2011 revealed that the currently allotted hardware safety margins are not sufficient, and much work is needed to improve safety management in terms of SC. Initially, the concept of SC was introduced for operating organizations to ensure safe operation of NPPs; nonetheless, more recent investigations of nuclear events and accidents, especially Fukushima, and at Davis-Besse, in the US, have revealed that a strong focus is required to address and improve the SC of Regulatory Bodies (RBs). Strong SC is considered a vital tool for RBs to achieve their objectives and discharge their responsibilities in an effective and efficient manner. Though the relationship between the SC of RBs and that of operating organizations is not straight forward, it is believed that the former has a strong influence over the latter. The questionnaire was consistent in terms of the credible nature of its questions, and the response group covered different levels of PNRA staff, from managers to lower level staff. The results show that the PNRA staff have a very good understanding of the nature and significance of attributes of SC and are doing their best to exercise the same within the

  13. Organizational culture, safety culture, and safety performance at research facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, William S.

    2000-07-30

    Organizational culture surveys of research facilities conducted several years ago and archival occupational injury reports were used to determine whether differences in safety performance are related to general organizational factors or to ''safety culture'' as reflected in specific safety-related dimensions. From among the organizations surveyed, a pair of facilities was chosen that were similar in size and scientific mission while differing on indices of work-related injuries. There were reliable differences in organizational style between the facilities, especially among workers in environment, safety, and health functions; differences between the facilities (and among job categories) on the safety scale were more modest and less regular.

  14. A report on developing a checklist to assess company plans focused on improving safety awareness, safe behaviour and safety culture : final report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steijger, N.; Starren, H.; Keus, M.; Gort, J.; Vervoort, M.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the process of developing a checklist to asses company plans focused on improving safety awareness, safe behaviour and safety culture. These plans are part of a programme initiated by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Employment aiming at improving the safety performance of co

  15. Safety culture management: safety culture and its context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The definition of safety culture adopted in the context of the nuclear industry following the Chernobyl incident focused upon administrative requirements for a safety culture. Successful implementation of such requirements, however, depends on wider changes requiring managerial awareness of characteristics of the context of nuclear safety management. A self-sustaining safety culture needs genuine commitment from each employee in an installation. To promote safety culture successfully, managers need to understand the more subtle aspects of cultural phenomena. To meet this requirement managers need to be sensitive to the development of a set of norms, beliefs, roles, attitudes and practices concerned with minimising the exposure of employees and others to injurious conditions, and with reinforcing an attitude of care. A range of managerial factors need to be taken into account in attaining an appropriate level of managerial responsiveness to the contextual features of a safety culture. A strong safety culture is fostered by: management concern and example; by appropriate recruitment policies; by rewards reinforcing caring attitudes; by the constructive use of employee's innate concerns; by the provision of appropriate information and the discretion to make use of it; and by fostering group pressures which can enhance care. Also, since protecting others from harm has moral implications, in-company arguments in the moral sphere are also relevant. Management strategies, however, need to be set in the context of both a consistent set of organisational policies and an appropriate form of organisational rhetoric. Options for shaping in-house features of company policy in relation to safety culture, outlined above, are separate from factors beyond the each of most individual managers. The regulatory environment, visibility and public susceptibility of the industry to safety concerns and the incidence of high-profile negative incidents all pose dilemmas for the individual

  16. Risk management and safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paper informs on the efforts to elaborate a feedback system for risk comprehensive evaluation and a system to improve structure safety foreseeing the possibility to control the latent risk, ensuring the qualitative evaluation of the safety level and improvement of safety culture in various branches of industry, first and foremost, in the electricity producing sector including the nuclear power industry

  17. Patient safety: Safety culture and patient safety ethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Marlene Dyrløv

    2006-01-01

    challenging issues of systemic, organisational, cultural and ethical relevance, which this dissertation seeks to address through the application of different disciplinary approaches. The main focus of researchis safety culture; through empirical and theoretical studies to comprehend the phenomenon, address......Patient safety - the prevention of medical error and adverse events - and the initiative of developing safety cultures to assure patients from harm have become one of the central concerns in quality improvement in healthcare both nationally andinternationally. This subject raises numerous...... the problems, and suggest possible solutions for improving patient safety through the promotion of safety culture and ethics. I seek to illuminate theissues of patient safety from several perspectives; the organizational healthcare system, in particular the healthcare workers perspectives and experiences...

  18. Instilling a Culture of Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In its 1999 report, To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System, the United States National Academy of Sciences recognized the necessity of establishing a culture of safety in any organization that wished to reduce patient morbidity and mortality caused by medical errors. The culture of an organization reflects its shared attitudes, values, goals and practices, and a safety culture requires that each employee accepts responsibility for improving patient and personnel safety, and that responsibility is shared and supported by the organization’s administration. There are seven ingredients of a safety culture: leadership, evidence based practice, teamwork, accountability, communication, continuous learning and justice. These ingredients require thoughtful integration within an organizational strategy if they are to contribute collectively to improved safety of patients and personnel. (author)

  19. Development and testing of an objective structured clinical exam (OSCE) to assess socio-cultural dimensions of patient safety competency

    OpenAIRE

    Ginsburg, Liane R; Tregunno, Deborah; Norton, Peter G.; Smee, Sydney; de Vries, Ingrid; Sebok, Stefanie S; VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth G.; Luctkar-Flude, Marian; Medves, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient safety (PS) receives limited attention in health professional curricula. We developed and pilot tested four Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) stations intended to reflect socio-cultural dimensions in the Canadian Patient Safety Institute's Safety Competency Framework. Setting and participants 18 third year undergraduate medical and nursing students at a Canadian University. Methods OSCE cases were developed by faculty with clinical and PS expertise with assis...

  20. Safety Culture Survey in Krsko NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high level of nuclear safety, stability and competitiveness of electricity production, and public acceptability are the main objectives of Krsko Nuclear Power Plant. This is achievable only in environment where strong Safety Culture is taking dominant place in the way how employees communicate, perform tasks, share their ideas and attitudes, and demonstrate their concern in all aspects of work and coexistence. To achieve these objectives, behaviour of all employees as well as specific ethical values must become more transparent and that must arise from the heart of organization. Continuous ongoing and periodic self assessments of Safety Culture in Krsko NPP present major tools in implementation process of this approach. Benefits from Periodic interdisciplinary focused self assessment approach, which main intention is finding the strengths and potential areas for improvements, was used second time to assess the area of Safety Culture in Krsko NPP. Main objectives of self assessment, performed in 2006, were to increase the awareness of the present culture, to serve as a basis for improvement and to keep track of the effects of change or improvement over a longer period of time. For the purpose of effective self assessment, extensive questionnaire was used to obtain information that is representative for whole organization. Wide range of questions was chosen to cover five major characteristics of safety culture: Accountability for safety is clear, Safety is integrated into all activities, Safety culture is learning-driven, Leadership for safety is clear and Safety is a clearly recognized value. 484 Krsko NPP employees and 96 contractors were participated in survey. 70-question survey provided information that was quantified and results compared between groups. Anonymity of participant, as well as their willingness to contribute in this assessment implicates the high level of their openness in answering the questions. High number of participant made analysis of

  1. Defining safety culture and the nexus between safety goals and safety culture. 2. Decreasing Ambiguity of the Safety Culture Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    hesitant to substantiate the concept for realization because it may force them to expose actual managerial behavior including past history. It can be said that they even take advantage of the ambiguity of the concept as convenient for them to maintain a defensive managerial way of thinking and suspicions toward the concept. We once again pay attention to the INSAG reports in order to change the status quo. The reports pointed out that 'personal attitude and habits of thought and the style of organizations are generally intangible; that nevertheless such qualities lead to tangible manifestations'. This clearly leads us to the challenges we have to face. The safety culture may end as an armchair concept unless an organization becomes aware of the necessity of improving safety and unless it has sufficient power to promote it. We, therefore, have to specify what power will generate 'awareness'. We would like to see the power in the individual thought of each plant employee; the thought should not be limited to a sort of loyalty to the organization but to the society in which they belong. Today, the safety of a plant can only be secured if shared with the society in which it belongs. We think that the organization must have such ways of thinking and processes that will examine it by plant employees themselves and that will check its weak points together with society because the culture must be characterized as a widely open and integrated system, and the safety culture cannot stay in a closed system as far as it is a culture. A sort of culture has already been there in the society. No doubt the ambiguity of the concept decreases if the plant employees' safety culture is thought about in terms of considering its integration with the external culture in the society. From this viewpoint, we made a supporting tool for a self-check-type assessment of the safety culture as the first step of grasping organizational culture. The indices we try to get through the use of this tool are

  2. Predictors and outcomes of patient safety culture in hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Jaafar Maha; Jamal Diana; Dimassi Hani; El-Jardali Fadi; Hemadeh Nour

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Developing a patient safety culture was one of the recommendations made by the Institute of Medicine to assist hospitals in improving patient safety. In recent years, a multitude of evidence, mostly originating from developed countries, has been published on patient safety culture. One of the first efforts to assess the culture of safety in the Eastern Mediterranean Region was by El-Jardali et al. (2010) in Lebanon. The study entitled "The Current State of Patient Safety C...

  3. Safety culture issues and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    indicators, the symptoms and significance of shortcomings and degradation in the safety management processes and safety culture and hence failed to take effective corrective actions at an early stage. Key performance issues such as critical oversight, self assessment processes and effective corrective action programmes were not fully appreciated by senior management even after performance deficiencies were identified by the regulator and other external agencies. The seeming inability of the regulator to influence this senior management level, especially at the early stages of safety performance degradation was a major contributing factor in the continuation of the performance decline to the point that regulatory intervention became a necessity. Recovery processes commonly used a new utility senior management team to kick-start the change process and corresponding regulatory resource increases focused on monitoring the recovery. A comprehensive recovery plan and an interactive relationship with the regulator were deemed essential for a successful recovery. A review of the developing safety culture was a factor considered necessary to ensure sustainability. Public involvement in the regulatory monitoring process helped restore their confidence in the regulator, utility and plant management. The group recommended IAEA continue work to develop guidance for senior corporate management and regulators in this area (author) (ml)

  4. Measuring patient safety culture in Taiwan using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen I-Chi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient safety is a critical component to the quality of health care. As health care organizations endeavour to improve their quality of care, there is a growing recognition of the importance of establishing a culture of patient safety. In this research, the authors use the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC questionnaire to assess the culture of patient safety in Taiwan and attempt to provide an explanation for some of the phenomena that are unique in Taiwan. Methods The authors used HSOPSC to measure the 12 dimensions of the patient safety culture from 42 hospitals in Taiwan. The survey received 788 respondents including physicians, nurses, and non-clinical staff. This study used SPSS 15.0 for Windows and Amos 7 software tools to perform the statistical analysis on the survey data, including descriptive statistics and confirmatory factor analysis of the structural equation model. Results The overall average positive response rate for the 12 patient safety culture dimensions of the HSOPSC survey was 64%, slightly higher than the average positive response rate for the AHRQ data (61%. The results showed that hospital staff in Taiwan feel positively toward patient safety culture in their organization. The dimension that received the highest positive response rate was "Teamwork within units", similar to the results reported in the US. The dimension with the lowest percentage of positive responses was "Staffing". Statistical analysis showed discrepancies between Taiwan and the US in three dimensions, including "Feedback and communication about error", "Communication openness", and "Frequency of event reporting". Conclusions The HSOPSC measurement provides evidence for assessing patient safety culture in Taiwan. The results show that in general, hospital staffs in Taiwan feel positively toward patient safety culture within their organization. The existence of discrepancies between the US data and the Taiwanese data

  5. Integrated Safety Culture Model and Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪磊; 孙瑞山; 刘汉辉

    2009-01-01

    A new safety culture model is constructed and is applied to analyze the correlations between safety culture and SMS. On the basis of previous typical definitions, models and theories of safety culture, an in-depth analysis on safety culture's structure, composing elements and their correlations was conducted. A new definition of safety culture was proposed from the perspective of sub-cuhure. 7 types of safety sub-culture, which are safety priority culture, standardizing culture, flexible culture, learning culture, teamwork culture, reporting culture and justice culture were defined later. Then integrated safety culture model (ISCM) was put forward based on the definition. The model divided safety culture into intrinsic latency level and extrinsic indication level and explained the potential relationship between safety sub-culture and all safety culture dimensions. Finally in the analyzing of safety culture and SMS, it concluded that positive safety culture is the basis of im-plementing SMS effectively and an advanced SMS will improve safety culture from all around.

  6. Assessing the Culture of Fresh Produce Safety within a Leafy Green Producing Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Kurt D.; Sanchez, Charles A.; Fonseca, Jorge M.

    2011-01-01

    The 2006 "Escherichia coli" outbreak in spinach prompted the implementation of unprecedented production strategies (Arizona Leafy Green Products Shipper Marketing Agreement) to minimize microbial risk in leafy greens. As the new procedures require assessments of physical intrusion and excrement in fields, outreach was initiated to educate adult…

  7. A human error taxonomy for analysing healthcare incident reports: assessing reporting culture and its effects on safety perfomance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Itoh, Kenji; Omata, N.; Andersen, Henning Boje

    2009-01-01

    The present paper reports on a human error taxonomy system developed for healthcare risk management and on its application to evaluating safety performance and reporting culture. The taxonomy comprises dimensions for classifying errors, for performance-shaping factors, and for the maturity...

  8. The spirit of safety: oriental safety culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, J. [Science Council of Japan, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-09-01

    Failure of a large system causes disasters. However, after an accident, the causes are frequently attributed to human error when the operators do not survive the accident. It might be difficult to prove that the real cause of the accident is human error. Process decision program chart (PDPC) would be a useful tool in indicating the causes of an accident since it can clearly show that if the operator made the correct choice, the safety of the system could be maintained. The case of the incident of the nuclear reactor at Mihama unit 2 is indicated by PDPC in which the sequence of events and the operations are indicated in this paper together with the safe operation. One can easily understand the cause of the incident and the way to avoid it. Also, PDPC for the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident is shown. Initially, in order to prevent an accident, mental training and safety culture is most important. The oriental safety culture based on Zentoism, a school of Buddhism is discussed. (orig.)

  9. Safeguards Culture: Analogies from Safety Culture and Security Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The terminology of 'safeguards culture' has been used loosely by safeguards experts as an essential element for establishing an organizational environment of stakeholders for the effective and efficient implementation of international safeguards. However, unlike the other two triplet brothers/ sisters of 3S's (Safety, Security, Safeguards), there is no formally established definition of safeguards culture. In the case of safety culture, INSAG (the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group) has extensively dealt with its concept, elaborating its definition and key characteristics, and published its report, INSAG-4, as the IAEA Safety Series 75. On the other hand, security culture has also been defined by AdSec (the Advisory Group on Nuclear Security). In this paper, a provisional definition of safeguards culture is made on the analogies of safety culture and security culture, and an effort is made to describe essential elements of safeguards culture. It is proposed for SAGSI (the Standing Advisory Group on Safeguards Implementation) to formally consider the definition of safeguards culture and its characteristics. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (author)

  10. Understanding and Exploring Safety Culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guldenmund, F.W.

    2010-01-01

    The match between safety and culture was made around 1986, when the INSAG delivered its initial report on the Chernobyl accident. Whether the marriage is a happy one is still a matter of debate, but it is most definitely a fruitful one. In the past twenty years, many researchers have devoted much ef

  11. Problems with quantification of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the qualitative part of the method for the Safety Culture assessment we quantitative part was developed based on expert judgement and statistical methods. The quantitative assessment should go in parallel with the qualitative part already presented. The essential part is based on expert opinion which organizational factors are the most important for certain risk significant components and how well are they implemented. The problems with getting the ratings are described in the paper. (author)

  12. ADSA Foundation Scholar Award: Trends in culture-independent methods for assessing dairy food quality and safety: emerging metagenomic tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Marie

    2012-12-01

    Enhancing the quality and safety of dairy food is critical to maintaining the competitiveness of dairy products in the food and beverage market and in reinforcing consumer confidence in the dairy industry. Raw milk quality has a significant effect on finished product quality. Several microbial groups found in raw milk have been shown to adversely affect the shelf life of pasteurized milk. Current microbiological criteria used to define milk quality are based primarily on culture-dependent methods, some of which are perceived to lack the desired sensitivity and specificity. To supplement traditional methods, culture-independent methods are increasingly being used to identify specific species or microbial groups, and to detect indicator genes or proteins in raw milk or dairy products. Some molecular subtyping techniques have been developed to track the transmission of microbes in dairy environments. The burgeoning "-omics" technologies offer new and exciting opportunities to enhance our understanding of food quality and safety in relation to microbes. Metagenomics has the potential to characterize microbial diversity, detect nonculturable microbes, and identify unique sequences or other factors associated with dairy product quality and safety. In this review, fluid milk will be used as the primary example to examine the adequacy and validity of conventional methods, the current trend of culture-independent methods, and the potential applications of metagenomics in dairy food research.

  13. Operating procedures and safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of new technologies in recent years has led to a tremendous increase in the information to be mastered by operators in industrial processes. The information at operators disposal both in routine situations and accidental ones needs to be well prepared and organized to ensure reliability and safety. The man-machine interface should give operators all the necessary and clear indications on the process status and evolution so that the operators can operate the installation through adequate procedures. Procedures represent the real interface and mode of action of the operators on the machine, and they are of prime importance. Although they are by essence quite different, the routine, accident, and emergency procedures have in common one attribute: They all require a good safety culture both in their development and their implementation. From the definition given by the members of the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG), open-quotes Safety culture is that assembly of characteristics and attitudes in organizations and individuals which establishes that, as an overriding priority, nuclear plant safety issues receive the attention warranted by their significance,close quotes one can see that two aspects are embedded, a collective attitude that in fact is reflected in the managerial framework and an individual one that is linked to personnel behavior and work practices

  14. Enhancement of nuclear safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Throughout the 40-year history of the commercial nuclear power industry, improvements have continually been made in the design of nuclear power plants and the equipment in them. In one sense, we have reached an enviable point -- in most plants, equipment failures have become relatively rare. Yet events continue to occur. Regardless of how much the plants are improved, that equipment is operated by people -- highly motivated, well-trained people -- but people nonetheless. And people occasionally make mistakes. By setting the right climate and by setting high standards, good plant management can reduce the number of mistakes made ? and also reduce their potential consequences. Another way to say this is that the proper safety culture must be established and continually improved upon in our nuclear plants. Safety culture is defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency as 'that assembly of characteristics and attitudes in organizations and individuals which establishes that, as an overriding priority, nuclear plant safety issues receive the attention that, as an overriding priority, nuclear plant safety issues receive the attention warranted by their significance.' In short, we must make safety our top priority

  15. Investigating safety culture according to a social science approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety culture generally focusses on human and organisational contributions to safety performance within organisations that are characterised by a high level of risk. The term safety culture is used in different sectors. The literature distinguishes between two visions on culture and safety culture. According to the first view, culture culture is considered as an organisational tool. This view is the predominant view in the nuclear sector and postulates that the organisation can develop, assess, enhance and rectify culture by organisational actions. The second view considers safety culture as a metaphor of the organisation. It is a kind of culture of facts. Within this anthropological approach, each organisation transports values and beliefs that are partly adopted by workers. The culture is seen as a source of description and understanding. As part of a PhD study, safety culture in the nuclear sector was investigated based on an exploratory approach that is used in social sciences. In particular, the Focus Group technique was used and fieldwork was applied to two sites: a nuclear power plant in France and the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN. The different groups of players that were taken into account include workers, safety officers and managers. Current results indicate that different safety cultures group similar components, in particular regulatory, organisational, mental, relational and informal components. The specificity of a safety culture is the result of the predominance of one or two components and their ranking

  16. Organizational culture and nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GPU Nuclear has become increasingly aware of the impact of culture on performance and therefore on nuclear safety. Culture is simply described as the way things are done around here. Senior management has developed a mission and a vision and values statement to guide this culture change. The company has embarked on a number of culture-influencing initiatives, including teamwork and leadership, the subject of this paper. This paper notes the functional initiatives that were one aspect of the evolution of the overall program. These functional initiatives were requests from line managers for assistance from in-house facilitators to help their areas become even more effective. Also, the overall program implementation has evolved to include use of additional materials and concepts

  17. Organizational culture, behavioral norms and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents two different but related topics related to the issue of how organizational culture influences safety. These issues are driven by the concept that human behavior is strongly influenced by culture, and that safety (for example, of nuclear power plants) is strongly influenced by human behavior. The paper first discusses the issue of quantitative assessment of organizanizational culture as it is manifested in behavior and behavioral norms. The paper then discusses a logic model that provides a way for describing how behavior in organizations can be related to the accomplishment of safety through performance of the various programs and functions in the plant (such as maintenance, operations, and training). Culture is something that is shared by members of an organization; it contains values (what' s important) and beliefs (how things work) as central components, and it encompasses behavioral norms and expectations that influence the way members act. Shared values and beliefs underlie the organization's oversight and control system and produce norms in people that provide a common reference point of how they should and should not behave. While the definitions of culture somewhat converge, the ways that culture is assessed vary considerably. While beliefs and values, being unconsciously held, are difficult to assess without qualitative techniques, norms regarding how members should or should not behave are far more accessible through quantitative measures. The work underlying this paper has been performed in a number of different settings, including nuclear power plants and aviation maintenance. In terms of safety, behavior can act as a 'common-mode' influence on the performance of people in all parts of the technical enterprise, be they power-plant operators, pilots, or maintenance technicians. (author)

  18. Excellent management safety culture. A prerequisite to safety culture management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Every organization has within its foundation, conditions that must be met if that organization is going to survive, thrive and be allowed to exist in a society. In the organization that I'm a part of, the United States Department of Energy, we call these conditions 'criticaI success factors.' While these conditions permeate the concept of the 'fixed costs of doing business,' they are also more fundamentaI than that concept. These conditions are so relevant to existence that the simpIe perception of their status by the workers or the comm unity can have a major impact on the success or failure of that organization. The logical consequences of this situation are such that the senior management of any nuclear installation, operation or organization (hereinafter referred to as 'organization') has the first and primary responsibility and obligation to assure that safety in that organization is both perceived and in actuality 'excellent.' This determination of 'exceIlence,' however, is momentary. The truly successful executive will stop at nothing until that excellence is translated into everyday behavior and thinking that assures that a culture exists where 'excellence in safety' is the custom. A culture is absoIutely necessary because if any organization is fortunate enough to be excellent at a given point in time, the integrated patterns of behavior and thinking that yielded this excellence must be passed on to the future. Work force attrition and turnover is the norm; configuration and equipment change is the norm. It is necessary to institutionalize 'excellence' so that it can withstand the regular changes in work and operating environments. Without the existence of a safety culture that demands excellence, management can be and is often lulled into the false assumption that operations are safe simply because there have been no major breaches in safety over a certain period of time. (author)

  19. Safety culture development at Daya Bay NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From view on Organization Behavior theory, the concept, development and affecting factors of safety culture are introduced. The focuses are on the establishment, development and management practice for safety culture at Daya Bay NPP. A strong safety culture, also demonstrated, has contributed greatly to improving performance at Daya Bay

  20. Managers’ Perceptions of Organizational Safety: Implication for the Development of Safety Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Jarvis, Marina; Virovere, Anu; Piia TINT

    2014-01-01

    A key feature of a company’s safety culture is shared perceptions between managers and employees concerning the importance of safety. The purpose of the study was to assess senior managers’ perceptions of the current safety culture in Estonian SMEs from different branches of industry, based on a sample of 463 senior managers. The relationships of different aspects of safety culture and safety management systems, senior managers’ and employees’ perceptions and attitudes to safety were explored...

  1. Safety Culture Enhancement Project. Final Report. A Field Study on Approaches to Enhancement of Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety Culture Perceptions Questionnaire conducted with site managers to access their opinions about the adequacy of the local safety culture; - a framework of safety-related competencies for managers, representing desirable actions for leading and promoting a positive safety culture; - results of an evaluation survey completed by participants at the conclusion of the Management Workshops to assess the utility of this activity. Section 4 of the report, Recommendations for Future Action, highlights nine proposed activities that could be undertaken to build on the outcomes from this project, to support the enhancement of safety culture within the Swedish nuclear industry in the longer term. Specifically, these recommendations propose actions to: 1. Introduce formal processes to ensure the ongoing development of safety related competencies amongst industry managers. 2. Strengthen the resources, contribution, value and profile of Man Technology Organisation (MTO) expertise within nuclear industry sites, in order to promote a better understanding of human performance issues, enhance error management and accident prevention capabilities. 3. Identify ways to embed existing positive safety culture attributes, in an environment of considerable workforce changes resulting from increasing use of contractors and (expected) retirements amongst an ageing industry employee population. 4. Standardise and improve aspects of incident and accident investigation processes and analysis methodologies currently used, to improve information sharing and optimise learning. 5. Implement harmonised MTO / human factors awareness training programs at appropriate levels for all nuclear industry personnel. 6. Formalise the application of applied teamwork training (as per the principles of Crew Resource Management training in aviation) for NPP Control Room Operators, Maintenance workers and other employees working in safety-critical teams. 7. Increase the use of simulation training to enhance non

  2. Safety Culture Enhancement Project. Final Report. A Field Study on Approaches to Enhancement of Safety Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, Andrew; Hayward, Brent (Dedale Asia Pacific, Albert Park VIC 3206 (Australia))

    2006-08-15

    results of the Safety Culture Perceptions Questionnaire conducted with site managers to access their opinions about the adequacy of the local safety culture; - a framework of safety-related competencies for managers, representing desirable actions for leading and promoting a positive safety culture; - results of an evaluation survey completed by participants at the conclusion of the Management Workshops to assess the utility of this activity. Section 4 of the report, Recommendations for Future Action, highlights nine proposed activities that could be undertaken to build on the outcomes from this project, to support the enhancement of safety culture within the Swedish nuclear industry in the longer term. Specifically, these recommendations propose actions to: 1. Introduce formal processes to ensure the ongoing development of safety related competencies amongst industry managers. 2. Strengthen the resources, contribution, value and profile of Man Technology Organisation (MTO) expertise within nuclear industry sites, in order to promote a better understanding of human performance issues, enhance error management and accident prevention capabilities. 3. Identify ways to embed existing positive safety culture attributes, in an environment of considerable workforce changes resulting from increasing use of contractors and (expected) retirements amongst an ageing industry employee population. 4. Standardise and improve aspects of incident and accident investigation processes and analysis methodologies currently used, to improve information sharing and optimise learning. 5. Implement harmonised MTO / human factors awareness training programs at appropriate levels for all nuclear industry personnel. 6. Formalise the application of applied teamwork training (as per the principles of Crew Resource Management training in aviation) for NPP Control Room Operators, Maintenance workers and other employees working in safety-critical teams. 7. Increase the use of simulation training to

  3. Safety culture and quality system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of the study conducted by a group of experts from EDF corporate departments on the conditions of the development of safety culture in the French nuclear power plants. The recommendations included in INSAG 4 sound rather like requirements concerning both the desirable attitudes of players and the operation of the organizations. The working group, referring to corporate and French culture, has deemed that the major leverage for cultural development was learning and understanding organization throughout its evolution. The quality system is one of the tools. Such a proposal should be placed against the background of some milestones of French nuclear power plant history. During the development phase, industrial challenge and safety requirements have led to putting a premium on the principles of industrial quality, on structured methods, working procedures, provisional risk and operating sequence analyses which resulted in effective mastery of technology and process. Within this strategy of production organization, human behaviour has been directed by strict guidelines and during this period, man has been perceived as a potential failure inducer. Quality remains the outstanding feature of nuclear industry. Design and plant operations activities as well as human behaviour are governed by quality requirements whose implementation methods are described in the QA manual. During this period, the structuring logics have been implementation, deviation, error. Currently, public opinion, safety authorities, government authorities, the nuclear industry itself are stepping up pressure on safety requirements and we are exploring paths of progress in the enhancement of human and organizational possibilities and resources. The ongoing in-depth transformation of the organization concerns operating methods, structures and management mode. A systemic approach should be a contributing factor to the reliability of this programme. This

  4. Is There Cultural Safety in Australian Universities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochecouste, Judith; Oliver, Rhonda; Bennell, Debra

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the cultural safety offered to Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students within their university environments. In the context of this paper, cultural safety includes cultural competency, as recently subscribed by Universities Australia, and "extends beyond (to) cultural awareness and cultural…

  5. Safety culture in the boardroom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the recent reorganization of Ontario Hydro, steps have been taken to improve the nuclear safety policy direction by senior management and by the board of directors. This was thought necessary because, while current and past safety performance has been generally good, many safety problems are not being solved quickly enough. A nuclear safety review committee of the board of directors was formed to oversee the implementation of the company' s newly adopted nuclear safety policy. That policy states: 'Ontario Hydro's nuclear facilities will be operated and maintained in a rigorous and vigilant manner to ensure that the radiological risk to workers, the public and the environment is acceptably low and in keeping with the best practices in the international nuclear community.' Within the management of the company several improvements were made. A nuclear safety directorate was formed to provide policy guidance and performance assessments to senior management. A committee was formed of the senior nuclear managers, representatives form the employees' unions and representatives of other utilities to review audit findings and progress on corrective actions and to make recommendations to the General Manager of Ontario hydro nuclear. Similar committees were formed at each station. The effect of these changes is to provide increased managernent attention to safety issues using unfiltered audit information, pertinent performance measurements and direct reporting of progress on key issues. It is expected that this will promote prompt attention to correcting long-standing problems and enhance awareness and emphasis on safety as an integral part of the business. Clear declarations from the boardroom of priorities and responsibilities are essential to achieving this. (author)

  6. Discussion on safety culture general contract model of consultation enterprises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With a high safety requirement, long construction period, a large amount of investment and many influencing factors of the preparation and implementation of project schedule, local nuclear power always is built through EPC. Safety level depends on EPC. Some measures should be taken for local consultation enterprises to improve situation of safety. Some suggestion as follows: safety culture should be received enough attention; management system should be established in according with requirement of safety culture; try to encourage employee involvement; to assess it in time; safety system should be entirely compatible with enterprises system. (authors)

  7. Organization and Nuclear Safety: Safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book presents the experience in nuclear safety and its influence in the exploitation on nuclear power plants. The safety organization and quality management before and after Chernobylsk and three mile island accidents

  8. Total safety management: An approach to improving safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A little over 4 yr ago, Admiral James D. Watkins became Secretary of Energy. President Bush, who had appointed him, informed Watkins that his principal task would be to clean up the nuclear weapons complex and put the US Department of Energy (DOE) back in the business of producing tritium for the nation's nuclear deterrent. Watkins recognized that in order to achieve these objectives, he would have to substantially improve the DOE's safety culture. Safety culture is a relatively new term. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) used it in a 1986 report on the root causes of the Chernobyl nuclear accident. In 1990, the IAEA's International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group issued a document focusing directly on safety culture. It provides guidelines to the international nuclear community for measuring the effectiveness of safety culture in nuclear organizations. Safety culture has two principal aspects: an organizational framework conducive to safety and the necessary organizational and individual attitudes that promote safety. These obviously go hand in hand. An organization must create the right framework to foster the right attitudes, but individuals must have the right attitudes to create the organizational framework that will support a good safety culture. The difficulty in developing such a synergistic relationship suggests that achieving and sustaining a strong safety culture is not easy, particularly in an organization whose safety culture is in serious disrepair

  9. Safety Cultural Competency Modeling in Nuclear Organizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sa Kil; Oh, Yeon Ju; Luo, Meiling; Lee, Yong Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The nuclear safety cultural competency model should be supplemented through a bottom-up approach such as behavioral event interview. The developed model, however, is meaningful for determining what should be dealt for enhancing safety cultural competency of nuclear organizations. The more details of the developing process, results, and applications will be introduced later. Organizational culture include safety culture in terms of its organizational characteristics.

  10. Guide for understanding and evaluation of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report was the guide of understanding and evaluation of safety culture. Operator's activities for enhancement of safety culture in nuclear installations became an object of safety regulation in the management system. Evaluation of operator's activities (including top management's involvement) to prevent degradation of safety culture and organization climate in daily works needed understanding of safety culture and diversity of operator's activities. This guide was prepared to check indications of degradation of safety culture and organization climate in operator's activities in daily works and encourage operator's activities to enhance safety culture improvement and good practice. Comprehensive evaluation of operator's activities to prevent degradation of safety culture and organization climate would be performed from the standpoints of 14 safety culture elements such as top management commitment, clear plan and implementation of upper manager, measures to avoid wrong decision making, questioning attitude, reporting culture, good communications, accountability and openness, compliance, learning system, activities to prevent accidents or incidents beforehand, self-assessment or third party evaluation, work management, change management and attitudes/motivation. Element-wise examples and targets for evaluation were attached with evaluation check tables. (T. Tanaka)

  11. Patient safety culture in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, N.J.

    2015-01-01

    Background A constructive patient safety culture is a main prerequisite for patient safety and improvement initiatives. Until now, patient safety culture (PSC) research was mainly focused on hospital care, however, it is of equal importance in primary care. Measuring PSC informs practices on their s

  12. Safety Culture Enhancement Project. Final Report. A Field Study on Approaches to Enhancement of Safety Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, Andrew; Hayward, Brent (Dedale Asia Pacific, Albert Park VIC 3206 (Australia))

    2006-08-15

    results of the Safety Culture Perceptions Questionnaire conducted with site managers to access their opinions about the adequacy of the local safety culture; - a framework of safety-related competencies for managers, representing desirable actions for leading and promoting a positive safety culture; - results of an evaluation survey completed by participants at the conclusion of the Management Workshops to assess the utility of this activity. Section 4 of the report, Recommendations for Future Action, highlights nine proposed activities that could be undertaken to build on the outcomes from this project, to support the enhancement of safety culture within the Swedish nuclear industry in the longer term. Specifically, these recommendations propose actions to: 1. Introduce formal processes to ensure the ongoing development of safety related competencies amongst industry managers. 2. Strengthen the resources, contribution, value and profile of Man Technology Organisation (MTO) expertise within nuclear industry sites, in order to promote a better understanding of human performance issues, enhance error management and accident prevention capabilities. 3. Identify ways to embed existing positive safety culture attributes, in an environment of considerable workforce changes resulting from increasing use of contractors and (expected) retirements amongst an ageing industry employee population. 4. Standardise and improve aspects of incident and accident investigation processes and analysis methodologies currently used, to improve information sharing and optimise learning. 5. Implement harmonised MTO / human factors awareness training programs at appropriate levels for all nuclear industry personnel. 6. Formalise the application of applied teamwork training (as per the principles of Crew Resource Management training in aviation) for NPP Control Room Operators, Maintenance workers and other employees working in safety-critical teams. 7. Increase the use of simulation training to

  13. Determinants for conducting food safety culture research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyarugwe, Shingai P.; Linnemann, Anita; Hofstede, Gert Jan; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Luning, Pieternel A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Foodborne outbreaks continue to occur regardless of existing food safety measures indicating the shortcomings of these measures to assure food safety. This has led to the recognition of food safety culture as a key contributory factor to the food safety performance of food establishmen

  14. Culture safety in the nuclear installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culture safety is aimed to empower all the personnel to contribute and responsible to the installation safety where they work in. Culture safety is important as there were so many accidents happened due to the little attention given to the safety, take as examples of what happened in Three Mille Island installation (1979) and Chernobyl (1986). These remind us that human factor gives a significant contribution to the failure of operational system which influences the safety. Therefore, as one of institutions which has nuclear installation. National Nuclear Energy Agency must apply the culture safety to guarantee the safety operation of nuclear installation to protect the personnel, community and environment from the hazard of radioactive radiation. Culture safety has two main components. The first component under the management responsibility is a framework needed in an organisation. The second component is the personnel attitude in al/ levels to respond and optimize those framework. (author)

  15. [Agricultural biotechnology safety assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Scott; Jones, Wendelyn; He, Xiaoyun; Ladics, Gregory; Bartholomaeus, Andrew; Raybould, Alan; Lutter, Petra; Xu, Haibin; Wang, Xue

    2015-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops were first introduced to farmers in 1995 with the intent to provide better crop yield and meet the increasing demand for food and feed. GM crops have evolved to include a thorough safety evaluation for their use in human food and animal feed. Safety considerations begin at the level of DNA whereby the inserted GM DNA is evaluated for its content, position and stability once placed into the crop genome. The safety of the proteins coded by the inserted DNA and potential effects on the crop are considered, and the purpose is to ensure that the transgenic novel proteins are safe from a toxicity, allergy, and environmental perspective. In addition, the grain that provides the processed food or animal feed is also tested to evaluate its nutritional content and identify unintended effects to the plant composition when warranted. To provide a platform for the safety assessment, the GM crop is compared to non-GM comparators in what is typically referred to as composition equivalence testing. New technologies, such as mass spectrometry and well-designed antibody-based methods, allow better analytical measurements of crop composition, including endogenous allergens. Many of the analytical methods and their intended uses are based on regulatory guidance documents, some of which are outlined in globally recognized documents such as Codex Alimentarius. In certain cases, animal models are recommended by some regulatory agencies in specific countries, but there is typically no hypothesis or justification of their use in testing the safety of GM crops. The quality and standardization of testing methods can be supported, in some cases, by employing good laboratory practices (GLP) and is recognized in China as important to ensure quality data. Although the number of recommended, in some cases, required methods for safety testing are increasing in some regulatory agencies, it should be noted that GM crops registered to date have been shown to be

  16. [Agricultural biotechnology safety assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Scott; Jones, Wendelyn; He, Xiaoyun; Ladics, Gregory; Bartholomaeus, Andrew; Raybould, Alan; Lutter, Petra; Xu, Haibin; Wang, Xue

    2015-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops were first introduced to farmers in 1995 with the intent to provide better crop yield and meet the increasing demand for food and feed. GM crops have evolved to include a thorough safety evaluation for their use in human food and animal feed. Safety considerations begin at the level of DNA whereby the inserted GM DNA is evaluated for its content, position and stability once placed into the crop genome. The safety of the proteins coded by the inserted DNA and potential effects on the crop are considered, and the purpose is to ensure that the transgenic novel proteins are safe from a toxicity, allergy, and environmental perspective. In addition, the grain that provides the processed food or animal feed is also tested to evaluate its nutritional content and identify unintended effects to the plant composition when warranted. To provide a platform for the safety assessment, the GM crop is compared to non-GM comparators in what is typically referred to as composition equivalence testing. New technologies, such as mass spectrometry and well-designed antibody-based methods, allow better analytical measurements of crop composition, including endogenous allergens. Many of the analytical methods and their intended uses are based on regulatory guidance documents, some of which are outlined in globally recognized documents such as Codex Alimentarius. In certain cases, animal models are recommended by some regulatory agencies in specific countries, but there is typically no hypothesis or justification of their use in testing the safety of GM crops. The quality and standardization of testing methods can be supported, in some cases, by employing good laboratory practices (GLP) and is recognized in China as important to ensure quality data. Although the number of recommended, in some cases, required methods for safety testing are increasing in some regulatory agencies, it should be noted that GM crops registered to date have been shown to be

  17. Utilizing the results of a safety culture survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When assessing safety culture all available forms of data should be collected and analyzed. For example, accident statistics, safety performance data, record of employee and management concerns, and other measures of product quality and organizational performance are good indicators of safety culture. A safety culture survey instrument is also useful because: 1) traditional safety audits often fail to determine the effectiveness of safety efforts, 2) employee perceptions need to be considered when determining the effectiveness of safety efforts, 3) a survey can effectively identify streng.ths and weaknesses of elements of a safety program, and 4) a survey can be used to help track the effectiveness of safety efforts. In addition, a properly designed survey can be a valuable tool to compare against other safety and quality indicators to help provide an overall picture of the safety culture of an organization. This paper discusses how best to administer, analyze, and distribute the results of a safety culture survey in order to extract the maximum benefits. Examples are presented on how to use and interpret the results of such a survey. (author)

  18. Advantages and disadvantages by using safety culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyhrberg, Mette Bang

    2003-01-01

    Safety culture is a major issue in accident research. A recently finished ph.d.-study has evaluated the symbolic safety culture approach and found four advantages and two disadvantages. These are presented and discussed in this contribution. It is concluded that the approach can be useful...... in the planning of accident prevention activities if focus is maintained on prevention of accidents and not on changing of the safety culture....

  19. Construction Workers Perceptions Toward Safety Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Andi Andi

    2008-01-01

    Efforts to reduce construction accidents can be initiated by building good safety culture. Researches concerning safety culture, however, are still limited. This research aims to empirically gauge workerâs perception toward safety culture in construction projects. Data were obtained through questionnaire survey to three large construction projects in Surabaya. Two hundreds and seven sets of questionnaires were gathered and used for subsequent analyses. Results show that in general workersâ pe...

  20. Safety assessment, safety performance indicators at the Paks Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Paks Nuclear Power Plant has been using different methods of safety assessment (event analysis, self-assessment, probabilistic safety analysis), including performance indicators characterizing both operational and safety performance since the early years of operation of the plant. Regarding the safety performance, the indicators include safety system performance, number of scrams, release of radioactive materials, number of safety significant events, industrial safety indicator, etc. The Paks NPP also reports a set of ten indicators to WANO Performance Indicator Programme which, among others, include safety related indicators as well. However, a more systematic approach to structuring and trending safety indicators is needed so that they can contribute to the enhancement of the operational safety. A more comprehensive set of indicators and a systematic evaluation process was introduced in 1996. The performance indicators framework proposed by the IAEA was adapted to Paks in this year to further improve the process. Safety culture assessment and characterizing safety culture is part of the assessment process. (author)

  1. Effects of patient safety culture interventions on incident reporting in general practice: a cluster randomised trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, N.J.; Langelaan, M.; Verheij, T.J.M.; Wagner, C.; Zwart, D.L.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background A constructive safety culture is essential for the successful implementation of patient safety improvements. Aim To assess the effect of two patient safety culture interventions on incident reporting as a proxy of safety culture. Design and setting A three-arm cluster randomised trial was

  2. A culture of safety: a business strategy for medical practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxton, James W; Finkelstein, Maggie M; Marles, Adam F

    2012-01-01

    Physician practices can enhance their economics by taking patient safety to a new level within their practices. Patient safety has a lot to do with systems and processes that occur not only at the hospital but also within a physician's practice. Historically, patient safety measures have been hospital-focused and -driven, largely due to available resources; however, physician practices can impact patient safety, efficiently and effectively, with a methodical plan involving assessment, prioritization, and compliance. With the ever-increasing focus of reimbursement on quality and patient safety, physician practices that implement a true culture of safety now could see future economic benefits using this business strategy.

  3. Defining safety culture and the nexus between safety goals and safety culture. 1. An Investigation Study on Practical Points of Safety Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    among those of existing questionnaires about safety culture, organizational climate, and individual safety consciousness. From the results of investigations, it was supposed that the establishment of a safety management system to which the whole organization is committed and that has top-down and bottom-up cycles is necessary to enhance organization safety. For example, it was clarified that employee safety consciousness is relevant to 'the action of safety management section' and to two kinds of organization climate, i.e., 'good human relationship' and 'frequent discussion on safety'. As for worker motivation for safety, it was clarified that commitment to safety activities was directly influenced by 'safety activities adhering to actual work sites', 'advance check', and 'frequent discussion on safety' as a result of correlation analysis among traits of safety activity, attitude during daily work, and organizational climate (Fig. 1). In addition, it was also supposed that the commitment was influenced by 'good human relationship', 'pride in work', and 'communication between head office and work sites' indirectly according to the result of the same analysis. Thus, it is supposed that ideas to make safety activities adhere to actual work sites and good human relationships are necessary for organization safety as well as for the establishment of the safety management system. The state of the organization and work sites before the safety system and activities are enforced must also be assessed. According to the results, the construction, chemical, and manufacturing industries differed in types of safety systems and activities conducted because the system types and activities to be conducted depended on the type of work or work site. Hence, to diagnose an organization and to provide an appropriate safety system and activities that reflect the diagnosis are important to enforce safety culture from the viewpoint of usability and interface of the safety management system

  4. Culturally sensitive assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, C P; Kumru, A

    1999-04-01

    Issues of cultural interaction and culturally sensitive assessment and treatment of young children have become prominent in recent years for mental health professionals, for reasons having to do with changing demographics, public values, and professional vision. "Culture" refers to the sociocultural adaptation of design for living shared by people as members of a community. Mental health professionals who work with culturally diverse populations need to become culturally self-aware and find abstract and experiential ways to build a useful body of professional knowledge concerning childrearing and discipline practices, health and illness beliefs, communication styles, and expectations about family or professional relations or other group interactions. They also need to learn how to work effectively in intercultural teams, use families as partners and resources, train and work with interpreters, and select and use formal and nonformal assessment procedures in appropriate, culturally sensitive ways. PMID:10202598

  5. Probabilistic safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This consists of three chapters. The contents of the first chapter are introduction and theory of PSA which includes summary of risk and probabilistic safety assessment, basic theory of reliability, data analysis of reliability, method of fault tree analysis and event tree analysis. The second chapter is about application and PSA steps which are three steps of PSA, PSA in external event, PSA of low power range trip and use of information of risk and application of PSA. The last port is about the initiative steps of PSA, which includes introduction, analysis of initiating event, event tree, fault tree, data of reliability, qualification of accident sequence, importance and uncertainty and practice of the initiative steps of PSA.

  6. Relationship between safety culture aspects - A work process to enable interpretation

    OpenAIRE

    Ek, Åsa; Runefors, Marcus; Borell, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge about the existing safety culture in a maritime organization such as in shipping companies or on board ships can enable the formulation of effective interventions to maintain and improve safety culture and safety in the organization. When assessing the safety culture, questionnaires developed for this purpose are often used. This paper proposes a work process that facilitates the analysis and interpretation of the relationships between safety culture aspects using questionnaire data...

  7. Research on Fuzzy Comprehensive Assessment Method of Nuclear Power Plant Safety Culture%核电厂安全文化的模糊综合评价方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    项媛媛; 陈徐坤; 许荣斌

    2012-01-01

    Considering the traits of safety culture in nuclear plant, 38 safety culture assessment inde-xes are established from 4 aspects such as safety values, safety institution, safety behavior and safety sub-stances. Based on it, a comprehensive assessment method for nuclear power plant safety culture is con-structed by using AHP (Analytic Hierarchy Process) approach and fuzzy mathematics. The comprehensive assessment method has the quality of high precision and high operability, which can support the decision making of safety culture development.%根据核电厂的特点,从安全文化四个形态层面——安全观念、安全制度、安全行为与安全物态出发,建立了38项安全文化评价指标,并应用层次分析法(AHP)和模糊数学理论,提出核电厂安全文化的模糊综合评价方法。该方法能较为准确地评价核电厂的安全文化水平,为核电厂营运单位确定安全文化建设战略目标提供有力依据。

  8. Safety culture in nuclear installations. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings of the International Topical Meeting on Safety Culture in Nuclear Installations held in Vienna, Austria from 24 to 28 April 1995 provide a wide forum of information exchange and discussions on the topic safety culture in nuclear power plants. Safety culture deals with human factors since it deals with attitudes, organization and management. It then means that it has a natural component in it which is linked to the national culture and education. There are about 95 contributions, some of them presented by title and abstract only. All of them are in the subject scope of INIS. (Botek)

  9. Integration, differentiation and ambiguity in safety cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Anne; Koch, Christian

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses safety cultures, drawing on the differentiation, integration and ambiguity-scheme introduced by scholars of organizational culture. An ethnographic approach has been applied in the study of meaning and symbols relating to work, hazards, occupational accidents and prevention....... Although some common elements are present across cultures, they are indeed a multiple configuration of cultures. The article illustrates this by providing one case showing a configuration of three cultures, metaphorically labelled Production, Welfare and Master. For example, the former views risk...

  10. 78 FR 53790 - Public Forum-Safety Culture: Enhancing Transportation Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... Culture; Organizational Leadership Perspectives on Safety Culture; Safety Culture Management and Oversight... effective safety cultures within their industries. There will also be a review of some recent organizational... SAFETY BOARD Public Forum--Safety Culture: Enhancing Transportation Safety On Tuesday and...

  11. Development of a Novel Nuclear Safety Culture Evaluation Method for an Operating Team Using Probabilistic Safety Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sangmin; Lee, Seung Min; Seong, Poong Hyun [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    IAEA defined safety culture as follows: 'Safety Culture is that assembly of characteristics and attitudes in organizations and individuals which establishes that, as an overriding priority, nuclear plant safety issues receive the attention warranted by their significance'. Also, celebrated behavioral scientist, Cooper, defined safety culture as,'safety culture is that observable degree of effort by which all organizational members direct their attention and actions toward improving safety on a daily basis' with his internal psychological, situational, and behavioral context model. With these various definitions and criteria of safety culture, several safety culture assessment methods have been developed to improve and manage safety culture. To develop a new quantitative safety culture evaluation method for an operating team, we unified and redefined safety culture assessment items. Then we modeled a new safety culture evaluation by adopting level 1 PSA concept. Finally, we suggested the criteria to obtain nominal success probabilities of assessment items by using 'operational definition'. To validate the suggested evaluation method, we analyzed the collected audio-visual recording data collected from a full scope main control room simulator of a NPP in Korea.

  12. Development of a Novel Nuclear Safety Culture Evaluation Method for an Operating Team Using Probabilistic Safety Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IAEA defined safety culture as follows: 'Safety Culture is that assembly of characteristics and attitudes in organizations and individuals which establishes that, as an overriding priority, nuclear plant safety issues receive the attention warranted by their significance'. Also, celebrated behavioral scientist, Cooper, defined safety culture as,'safety culture is that observable degree of effort by which all organizational members direct their attention and actions toward improving safety on a daily basis' with his internal psychological, situational, and behavioral context model. With these various definitions and criteria of safety culture, several safety culture assessment methods have been developed to improve and manage safety culture. To develop a new quantitative safety culture evaluation method for an operating team, we unified and redefined safety culture assessment items. Then we modeled a new safety culture evaluation by adopting level 1 PSA concept. Finally, we suggested the criteria to obtain nominal success probabilities of assessment items by using 'operational definition'. To validate the suggested evaluation method, we analyzed the collected audio-visual recording data collected from a full scope main control room simulator of a NPP in Korea

  13. Relationship between safety culture and PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A primary focus of nuclear safety is prevention of large releases of radioactivity in the case of low probability severe accidents. An analysis of the anatomy of nuclear (Chernobyl, TMI-2) and non-nuclear (Challenger, Bhopal, Piper Alpha, etc.) severe accidents yields four broad categories of root causes, or 4M (abbreviated 4M): man (operating crew response), machine (design with its basic flaws), media (natural phenomena, operational considerations, political environment, commercial pressures, etc.) providing triggering events and management (basic organization safety culture flaws). A strong management can minimize contributions of man, machine and media to the risk arising from operation of hazardous facilities. One way management can have powerful positive influence is through the establishment of a proper safety culture. The terms safety culture is defined by virtue of employing IAEA's International Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) and APG's (arrived through work sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission) definitions. An example of U.S. Nuclear Utility safety culture is discussed. Like any other human endeavor, the manner in which people act is conditioned by requirements set at a top level, i.e. CEO. Policies promoted at the CEO level create the working environment and condition behavior of individuals in the trenches. A summary of the safety culture initiatives within the nuclear utility illustrates commitment to the safety culture. Other powerful examples are the existence of independent safety oversight or risk group directly reported to the CEO and a requirement for submittal of annual nuclear safety assurance reports. The paper concludes by virtue of claiming that an integrated risk management program imbedded in an effective safety culture will lead management of a nuclear utility to achieve both economic and safety goals while reducing strain on management personnel and operating budgets, primarily through an effective integration process. (author

  14. Safety, Security and Safeguards (3S) Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A meaningful discussion of Safety, Security, and Safeguards (3S) Culture requires a review of the concepts related to the culture of the three components. The concept of culture can be confusing, and so careful use of terminology is needed to enable a focused and constructive dialogue. To this end, this paper will use the concept of organizational culture as a backdrop for a broader discussion about how the three subcultures of safety, security and safeguards come together to enhance the mission of an organization. Since the accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, the nuclear industry has embraced the concept of safety culture. The work on safety culture has been used to develop programs and concepts in the culture of Material Protection, Control, and Accounting and Nuclear Security Culture. More recently, some work has been done on defining an International Safeguards Culture. Others have spoken about a 3S Culture, but there has been little rigorous consideration of the concept. This paper attempts to address 3S Culture, to begin to evaluate the merit of the concept, and to propose a definition. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (authors)

  15. Safety culture in the maintenance of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety culture is the complexity of beliefs, shared values and behaviour reflected in making decisions and performing work in a nuclear power plant or nuclear facility. The definition of safety culture and the related concepts presented in the IAEA literature are widely known to experts. Since the publication of Safety Culture, issued by the IAEA as INSAG-4 in 1991, the IAEA has produced a number of publications on strengthening the safety culture in organizations that operate nuclear power plants and nuclear facilities. However, until now the focus has been primarily on the area of operations. Apart from operations, maintenance in plants and nuclear facilities is an aspect that deserves special attention, as maintenance activities can have both a direct and an indirect effect on equipment reliability. Adverse safety effects can arise, depending upon the level of skill of the personnel involved, safety awareness and the complexity of the work process. Any delayed effects resulting from challenges to maintenance can cause interruptions in operation, and hence affect the safety of a plant or facility. Building upon earlier IAEA publications on this topic, this Safety Report reviews how challenges to the maintenance of nuclear power plants can affect safety culture. It also highlights indications of a weakening safety culture. The challenges described are in areas such as maintenance management; human resources management; plant condition assessment and the business environment. The steps that some Member States have taken to address safety culture aspects are detailed and singled out as good practices, with a view to disseminating and exchanging experiences and lessons learned. Although this report is primarily directed at plant maintenance organizations, the subject matter is applicable to a wider audience, including plant contracting organizations and regulatory authorities

  16. Safety goals and safety culture opening plenary. 1. WANO's Role in Maintaining and Improving Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past several years, operators of the world's nuclear plants have compiled an increasingly impressive record of operational performance. Among the many factors that have led to this improvement are the unprecedented cooperation and information exchange among the world's nuclear operators. This paper presents the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) operating experience program and WANO peer review program as examples of the kinds of interaction that are occurring around the globe to maintain and improve the nuclear safety culture. In addition, some unique features of WANO are discussed. WANO has established four programs to help its members communicate effectively with each other. These include the exchange of operating experiences, voluntary peer reviews, professional and technical development, and technical support and exchange. The operating experience program alerts members to events that have occurred at other NPPs and enables members to take appropriate actions to prevent event recurrence. When an event occurs at a plant, management at that plant analyses the event and completes an event report, which is then sent to the WANO regional center to which the plant belongs. After a regional center review and necessary iteration, the report is posted onto the WANO Web site to make it available to all WANO members. By the end of 2000, more than 1500 event reports had been posted. The WANO Peer Review Program is a unique opportunity for members to learn and share the best worldwide insights into safe and reliable nuclear operations. The peer review program has become one of WANO's most important activities containing all essential elements of WANO's mission. A WANO peer review team consists of 15 to 16 people with NPP experience; most team members are from countries outside the one that they are visiting. These teams of peers from plants around the world visit host plants upon request to identify strengths and areas for improvement, with a strong

  17. Marketing across Cultures: Tools for Cultural Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffield, Barney T., III

    The concept of cultural universals, the basic needs shared by people around the world, is a critical concept in assessing the impact of culture on decisions about the international marketing of goods and services. In most cases, international marketers have little need to understand all the ways in which their culture differs from the culture of…

  18. The practical implementation of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When, during the review of the Chernobyl accident, the INSAG Committee introduced the term 'Safety Culture', it spread very quickly. Later on, as a result of activities sponsored by the IAEA, the original Safety Culture concept was extended to include a large number of issues that are typical requirements of Quality Assurance Unfortunately, the way in which certain organizations approached this subject has not helped to find the right way for it to be implemented. Safety Culture is not mentioned at all in ICRP-60 and in the new recommendations of 2005 it does not even appear in the principal body and only a minor reference exists. The IAEA's Basic Safety Standards deal with the requirements for Safety Culture and for Quality Assurance as absolutely individual issues; however, Safety Culture should be considered as a part of the Quality System. Very recently the situation was strongly improved by the release of the new standard 'The Management System for Facilities and Activities' Safety Requirements GS-R-3. The EURATOM 97/43 Directive, used in the European Community for the preparation of regulations for medical practice, which, while inspired by ICRP-73, does not even mention Safety Culture. Increasing personnel training is not enough if, at the same time, there are no activities aimed at improving their attitude towards quality and safety. To achieve a change in Culture in the organization or to implant the new concept, there must be a suitable supporting Methodology to allow it to be put into practice. If not, the Safety Culture will only be a simple expression of wishes without any chance of success. Criteria, methodology and effective practical tools must be available. Two basic principles for the management system (GSR-3): a) All the tasks may be considered as 'a system of interactive processes'; b) All persons must take part in order to achieve safety and quality. These two principles are the basis of the strategy for the development of a Safety Culture

  19. Current Activities on Nuclear Safety Culture in Korea. How to meet the challenges for Safety and Safety Culture?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Statement of Nuclear Safety Policy' declared by the Korean Government elucidates adherence to the principle of 'priority to safety'. The 3. Comprehensive Nuclear Energy Promotion Plan (2007-2011) more specifically addressed the necessity to develop and apply 'safety culture evaluation criteria' and to strengthen safety management of concerned organizations in an autonomous way. Putting these policies as a backdrop, Korean Government has taken diverse safety culture initiatives and has encouraged the relevant organizations to develop safety culture practices of their own accord. Accordingly, KHNP, the operating organization in Korea, developed a 'safety culture performance indicator', which has been used to evaluate safety mind of employees and the evaluation results have been continuously reflected in operational management and training programs. Furthermore, KHNP inserted 'nuclear safety culture subject' into every course of more than two week length, and provided employees with special lectures on safety culture. KINS, the regulatory organization, developed indicators for the safety culture evaluation based on the IAEA Guidelines. Also, KINS has hosted an annual Nuclear Safety Technology Information Meeting to share information between regulatory organizations and industries. Furthermore, KINS provided a nuclear safety culture class to the new employees and they are given a chance to participate in performance of a role-reversal socio-drama. Additionally, KINS developed a safety culture training program, published training materials and conducted a 'Nuclear Safety Culture Basic Course' in October 2007, 4 times of which are planed this year. In conclusion, from Government to relevant organizations, 'nuclear safety culture' concept is embraced as important and has been put into practice on a variety of forms. Specifically, 'education and training' is a starting line and sharing information and lessons learned through symposium, meeting, and etc are also done in a

  20. Nuclear safety culture and integrated risk management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A primary focus of nuclear safety is the prevention of large releases of radioactivity in the case of low-probability severe accidents. An analysis of the anatomy of nuclear (Chernobyl, Three Mile Island Unit 2) and nonnuclear (Challenger, Bhopal, Piper Alpha, etc.) severe accidents yields four broad categories of root causes: human (operating crew response), machine (design with its basic flaws), media (natural phenomena, operational considerations, political environment, commercial pressures, etc.)-providing triggering events, and management (basic organizational safety culture flaws). A strong management can minimize the contributions of humans, machines, and media to the risk arising from the operation of hazardous facilities. One way that management can have a powerful positive influence is through the establishment of a proper safety culture. The term safety culture is used as defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency's International Safety Advisory Group

  1. A qualification of the concept safety culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyhrberg, Mette Bang

    The number of accidents at work in Denmark has not declined in the last decade, despite different types of preventions methods. Traditionally preventions have been based on regulation of human behaviour or machinery. Recently safety culture has been presented as a new approach for the prevention ...... of occupational accidents. The implicit models of organisation and man within mainstream safety culture approaches seem to be too rationalistic compared with day to day life of organisations. A safety culture concept is presented where the basis is symbolism.......The number of accidents at work in Denmark has not declined in the last decade, despite different types of preventions methods. Traditionally preventions have been based on regulation of human behaviour or machinery. Recently safety culture has been presented as a new approach for the prevention...

  2. Patient and Facility Safety in Hemodialysis: Opportunities and Strategies to Develop a Culture of Safety

    OpenAIRE

    Garrick, Renee; Kliger, Alan; Stefanchik, Beth

    2012-01-01

    Patient safety is the foundation of high-quality health care. More than 350,000 patients receive dialysis in the United States, and the safety of their care is ultimately the responsibility of the facility medical director. The medical director must establish a culture of safety in the dialysis unit and lead the quality assessment and performance improvement process. Several lines of investigation, including surveys of patients and dialysis professionals, have helped to identify important are...

  3. 2013 Traffic Safety Culture Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... endorse products or manufacturers. ©2014, AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety Introduction In the quarter century from 1988 through 2012, the lives of 1,018,581 men, women, and children have ended violently as the result ...

  4. Safety culture in nuclear power plants. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a consequence of the INSAG-4 report on 'safety culture', published by the IAEA in 1991, the Federal Commission for the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants (KSA) decided to hold a one-day seminar as a first step in this field. The KSA is an advisory body of the Federal Government and the Federal Department of Transport and Energy (EVED). It comments on applications for licenses, observes the operation of nuclear power plants, assists with the preparation of regulations, monitors the progress of research in the field of nuclear safety, and makes proposals for research tasks. The objective of this seminar was to familiarise the participants with the principles of 'safety culture', with the experiences made in Switzerland and abroad with existing concepts, as well as to eliminate existing prejudices. The main points dealt with at this seminar were: - safety culture from the point of view of operators, - safety culture from the point of view of the authorities, - safety culture: collaboration between power plants, the authorities and research organisations, - trends and developments in the field of safety culture. Invitations to attend this seminar were extended to the management boards of companies operating Swiss nuclear power plants, and to representatives of the Swiss authorities responsible for the safety of nuclear power plants. All these organisations were represented by a large number of executive and specialist staff. We would like to express our sincerest thanks to the Head of the Federal Department of Transport and Energy for his kind patronage of this seminar. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  5. Safety Assessment of Probiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahtinen, Sampo J.; Boyle, Robert J.; Margolles, Abelardo; Frias, Rafael; Gueimonde, Miguel

    Viable microbes have been a natural part of human diet throughout the history of mankind. Today, different fermented foods and other foods containing live microbes are consumed around the world, including industrialized countries, where the diet has become increasingly sterile during the last decades. By definition, probiotics are viable microbes with documented beneficial effects on host health. Probiotics have an excellent safety record, both in humans and in animals. Despite the wide and continuously increasing consumption of probiotics, adverse events related to probiotic use are extremely rare. Many popular probiotic strains such as lactobacilli and bifidobacteria can be considered as components of normal healthy intestinal microbiota, and thus are not thought to pose a risk for the host health - in contrast, beneficial effects on health are commonly reported. Nevertheless, the safety of probiotics is an important issue, in particular in the case of new potential probiotics which do not have a long history of safe use, and of probiotics belonging to species for which general assumption of safety cannot be made. Furthermore, safety of probiotics in high-risk populations such as critically ill patients and immunocompromized subjects deserves particular attention, as virtually all reported cases of bacteremia and fungemia associated with probiotic use, involve subjects with underlying diseases, compromised immune system or compromised intestinal integrity.

  6. Enhancing safety culture. Experiences within Nuclear Electric plc. United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear electric inherited an enviable safety record over a thirty year period from its predecessor, the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB). However , the company has not been complacent, and continues to recognize that there are still many opportunities to improve safety culture within the company. This paper describes two separate aspects of safety culture enhancement that are current within the company. The first is a review of operational experience that has highlighted many organisational characteristics and issues that can affect safety culture. Standard audit and plant evaluation findings were aggregated and then assessed, leading to the identification of common problems and underlying issues. The findings have confirmed that the programme of change within the company, focused around continuous quality improvement concepts, embodies all the necessary elements to address the issues and enhance safety culture if used appropriately. The challenge is now to ensure that each units business planning process adequately addresses the underlying issues. The second part of the paper presents just one example of specific developments at NE's power stations. At hinkley point, there is a strong desire to enhance safety culture at all levels on the station. Various safety awareness raising workshops that have been developed, together with a programme designed to assist the team leaders (first line supervisors) foster an improved safety culture within their teams. The first phase of the programme is coming to completion, and appears to have had considerable effect in raising awareness of the issues amongst team leaders and their line management. It has identified several key issues for the senior management team to address. Methods of providing more detailed practical assistance to the team leaders are being developed to assist the change in attitudes and behaviours required to further enhance the station's safety culture. (author)

  7. Nuclear safety - Culture or obsession?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although nuclear activities are among the safest, having an enviable record in this respect, public perception is quite different. It is argued here that, regardless of the fact that environmental groups and the media in general look unfavourably towards the nuclear sector, the emphasis the sector places on safety matters is a liability rather than a asset. In short, public acceptance of a risky enterprise increases with the safety concerns shown by an entrepreneur up to a certain point. Beyond this threshold the enterprise is found too risky to be accepted, and it looks like the nuclear establishment has already crossed it. Ideas for further relationship with the public are then shown. (author)

  8. Safety culture and quality management of Kartini research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syarip [Yogyakarta Nuclear Research Centre, Yogyakarta (Indonesia); Hauptmanns, Ulrich [Department of Plant Design and Safety, Otto-Von-Guericke-University, Magdeburg (Germany)

    1999-10-01

    The evaluation for assessing the safety culture and quality of safety management of Kartini research reactor is presented. The method is based on the concept of management control of safety (audit) as well as by using the developed method i.e. the questionnaires concerning areas of relevance which have to be answered with value statements. There are seven statements or qualifiers in answering the questions. Since such statements are vague, they are represented by fuzzy numbers. The weaknesses can be identified from the different areas contemplated. The evaluation result show that the quality of safety management of Kartini research reactor is globally rated as 'Average'. The operator behavior in the implementation of 'safety culture' concept is found as a weakness, therefore this area should be improved. (author)

  9. Safety culture at pickering nuclear division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickering nuclear division is an 8 x 540 MWe CANDU generating station with a staff of about 2400. At the beginning of the 1990's management and employee representatives recognized the need for an improved nuclear safety culture. Pickering established a Nuclear Integrity Review Committee (PNIRC) which reviews nuclear safety performance and recommends policies strategies and programs to achieve excellence. Root cause analysis is used to identify problem areas. Members of PNIRC include employee representatives and managers of functions important to nuclear safety. PNIRC supports management by developing a nuclear safety objective for the strategic business plan. The objective is co mmunicated to employees so that all can understand how personal efforts contribute to Pickering's performance improvement. Pickering uses a simple management model with four elements - managed environment, people, procedures, and equipment. An early managed environment initiative stated ten simple reactor safety 'commandments' governing the conduct of all employees. Managers and supervisors declared themselves committed to 'conservative decision making' in nuclear safety matters. Root cause analysis identified that people needed more knowledge and training in operating policies and principles (OP and P's) that describe safe bounds of operation. A 'self checking' program helps staff avoid errors. Work important to safety is done according to procedures. A procedural compliance process helps ensure correct procedures are available and used. Employee teamwork and a performance improvement culture has assisted staff in making improvements to availability of special and standby safety system equipment. Improvements in nuclear safety culture at Pickering have contributed to improvements in nuclear safety performance. OP and P non-compliances have decreased and calculated availability of important safety systems has increased. (author)

  10. Safety Culture on radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It can be defined radiation protection culture as the set of technical and social standards applied to the management of the operation of a nuclear facility concerning the reduction of the exposure to radiation of workers and members of the public, together with the behaviour and attitudes of the individuals from the organization towards that objective. Because the basic principles of radiation protection are self-evident and are totally justified, and the thesis drawn from the article is that no effective radiation protection culture yet exists within the organization, it must be concluded that what is wrong from the system are the attitudes and behavior of the individuals. In this article some factors and elements needed to motivate all persons within the organization towards the creation of a radiation protection culture are delineated and presented. (Author)

  11. Institutional approach to power plant safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thesis of this paper is that the requirements for safety culture in nuclear power plants can be failing to recognize contradictions in the various pressures on the organization that have to be balanced in an optimal manner. Nuclear power plants are influenced by pressures from both external and internal sources, that can be viewed as comprising the two main institutionalizing influences on the organization. Most of the effort on safety culture definition and implementation has addressed the utility and the power plant, producing definitions of good practices and of hindrances to good utility safety culture. These often lack formal representation of the demands of the organization and of its environment that are related to institutional processes rather than to productivity. This paper adopts an institutional approach to organizations as a way of clarifying the nature of the interfaces between the power plant and its external agencies, and their respective safety culture requirements. The plant must respond to its own internal organizational demands that are both technical, related to efficiency and productivity, and institutionalizing in terms of organizational processes. External agencies create environmental demands that are primatily institutionalizing in nature, such as the legitimate requirements of society as represented by the regulatory body ; standards of practice desctibed by professional groups; or obligation to conform to international commitments. These inputs mu st be cognizant of all of the parameters of the plant's functioning if they are not to risk detracting from plant efficiency, and so safety. This is a measure of the safety culture of these external agencies. The utility's safety culture is dependent on its abi1ity to balance external demands , internal processes and technical imperatives. (author)

  12. Evaluation of Patient Safety Culture and Organizational Culture as a Step in Patient Safety Improvement in a Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afrisya Iriviranty

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Establishment of patient safety culture is the first step in the improvement of patient safety. As such, assessment of patient safety culture in hospitals is of paramount importance. Patient safety culture is an inherent component of organizational culture, so that the study of organizational culture is required in developing patient safety. This study aimed to evaluate patient safety culture among the clinical staff of a hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia and identify organizational culture profile. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional, descriptive, qualitative study was conducted in a hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia in 2014. Sample population consisted of nurses, midwives, physicians, pediatricians, obstetrics and gynecology specialists, laboratory personnel, and pharmacy staff (n=152. Data were collected using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ and Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI. Results: Teamwork within units” was the strongest dimension of patient safety culture (91.7%, while “staffing” and “non-punitive response to error” were the weakest dimensions (22.7%. Moreover, clan culture was the most dominant type of organizational culture in the studied hospital. This culture serves as a guide for the changes in the healthcare organization, especially in the development of patient safety culture. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, healthcare providers were positively inclined toward the patient safety culture within the organization. As such, the action plan was designed through consensus decision-making and deemed effective in articulating patient safety in the vision and mission of the organization.

  13. Safety culture in design. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report we approach design from a safety culture approach As this research area is new and understudied, we take a wide scope on the issue. Different theoretical perspectives that can be taken when improving safety of the design process are considered in this report. We suggest that in the design context the concept of safety culture should be expanded from an organizational level to the level of the network of organizations involved in the design activity. The implication of approaching the design process from a safety culture perspective are discussed and the results of the empirical part of the research are presented. In the interview study in Finland and Sweden we identified challenges and opportunities in the design process from safety culture perspective. Also, a small part of the interview study concentrated on state of the art human factors engineering (HFE) practices in Finland and the results relating to that are presented. This report provide a basis for future development of systematic good design practices and for providing guidelines that can lead to safe and robust technical solutions. (Author)

  14. Safety culture in design. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macchi, L.; Pietikaeinen, E.; Liinasuo, M.; Savioja, P.; Reiman, T.; Wahlstroem, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Kahlbom, U. [Risk Pilot AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Rollenhagen, C. [Vattenfall, Stockholm, (Sweden)

    2013-04-15

    In this report we approach design from a safety culture approach As this research area is new and understudied, we take a wide scope on the issue. Different theoretical perspectives that can be taken when improving safety of the design process are considered in this report. We suggest that in the design context the concept of safety culture should be expanded from an organizational level to the level of the network of organizations involved in the design activity. The implication of approaching the design process from a safety culture perspective are discussed and the results of the empirical part of the research are presented. In the interview study in Finland and Sweden we identified challenges and opportunities in the design process from safety culture perspective. Also, a small part of the interview study concentrated on state of the art human factors engineering (HFE) practices in Finland and the results relating to that are presented. This report provide a basis for future development of systematic good design practices and for providing guidelines that can lead to safe and robust technical solutions. (Author)

  15. Safety culture at ANAV; Cultura de seguridad en ANAV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Madrid, B.

    2010-07-01

    Recent safety culture assessments detected various actions, paractices and behaviours that did not follow the standards, expectations and guidelines that are essentiall for all safe and highly reliable companies, as we aim to be. For this reason, as parto of the PROCURA project, a wide range of actions have been undertaken o reinforce certain individual, group and organisational behaviours. (Author).

  16. Patient safety culture measurement in general care: clinimetric properties of 'SCOPE'.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwart, D.L.M.; Langelaan, M.; Vooren, R.C. van de; Kuyvenhoven, M.M.; Kalkman, C.J.; Verheij, T.J.M.; Wagner, C.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A supportive patient safety culture is considered to be an essential condition for improving patient safety. Assessing the current safety culture in general practice may be a first step to target improvements. To that end, we studied internal consistency and construct validity of a safet

  17. Effects of patient safety culture interventions on incident reporting in general practice : A cluster randomised trial a cluster randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, Natasha J.; Langelaan, Maaike; Verheij, Theo J M; Wagner, Cordula; Zwart, Dorien L M

    2015-01-01

    Background: A constructive safety culture is essential for the successful implementation of patient safety improvements. Aim: To assess the effect of two patient safety culture interventions on incident reporting as a proxy of safety culture. Design and setting: A three-arm cluster randomised trial

  18. Managing for safety and safety culture within the UK nuclear industry. A regulator's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper outlines the basis of the legal system for the regulation of health and safety at work within the United Kingdom (UK), and in particular, the regulation of the nuclear industry. The framework, formulated by the regulator, which has been published as a practical guide for directors, managers, health and safety professionals and employee representatives for the successful management of health and safety is explained. This guidance, however, concentrates, to a large extent, on management systems and only addresses in part the types of issues, such as behaviours, values, attitudes and beliefs which contribute to the safety culture of an organization. The regulator of the UK nuclear industry has considered research, and other work, carried out by several organizations in this area, notably the Advisory Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (ACSNI) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and produced its own framework for managing for safety at nuclear installations. As a regulator, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), and its inspectorate responsible for regulation of the nuclear industry, HM Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (HMNII), are not the appropriate organization to assess the safety culture of an organization, but positively encourage organizations to both carry out this assessment themselves and to monitor their performance. To this end, HSE has developed, and made available, the Health and Safety Climate Tool which is aimed at providing organizations with information which can be used as part of a continuous improvement process. (author)

  19. Current Activities on Nuclear Safety Culture in Korea. How to meet the challenges for Safety and Safety Culture?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Chaewoon [International Policy Department Policy and Standard Division, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19 Gusung-Dong Yuseong-Ku, 305-338 DAEJEON (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    'Statement of Nuclear Safety Policy' declared by the Korean Government elucidates adherence to the principle of 'priority to safety'. The 3. Comprehensive Nuclear Energy Promotion Plan (2007-2011) more specifically addressed the necessity to develop and apply 'safety culture evaluation criteria' and to strengthen safety management of concerned organizations in an autonomous way. Putting these policies as a backdrop, Korean Government has taken diverse safety culture initiatives and has encouraged the relevant organizations to develop safety culture practices of their own accord. Accordingly, KHNP, the operating organization in Korea, developed a 'safety culture performance indicator', which has been used to evaluate safety mind of employees and the evaluation results have been continuously reflected in operational management and training programs. Furthermore, KHNP inserted 'nuclear safety culture subject' into every course of more than two week length, and provided employees with special lectures on safety culture. KINS, the regulatory organization, developed indicators for the safety culture evaluation based on the IAEA Guidelines. Also, KINS has hosted an annual Nuclear Safety Technology Information Meeting to share information between regulatory organizations and industries. Furthermore, KINS provided a nuclear safety culture class to the new employees and they are given a chance to participate in performance of a role-reversal socio-drama. Additionally, KINS developed a safety culture training program, published training materials and conducted a 'Nuclear Safety Culture Basic Course' in October 2007, 4 times of which are planed this year. In conclusion, from Government to relevant organizations, 'nuclear safety culture' concept is embraced as important and has been put into practice on a variety of forms. Specifically, 'education and training' is a starting line and sharing

  20. Development and formation of safety cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP) is the largest project ever undertaken by British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) and its success is important for the future of the company. The company recognised at the planning stage that to be profitable, THORP had to operate both safely and with a smaller workforce. The establishment of an appropriate culture which saw safety and productivity as essential and complimentary at the beginning of the life of the plant was therefore vital for the future success of THORP The key factors in the THORP Culture formation were : The recruitment policy; the training policy; measures taken to ensure participation from the workforce; teamworking support; communication initiatives; clear statement of cultural principles; clear and demonstrable leadership. The current stage of evolution has seen some positive results namely: A clear commitment to involving all personnel in problem solving and task organisation, including safety; a confident workforce with an improved ability to communicate; the capability of the majority of the workforce to work as a team; safety awareness of the workforce is generally high along with an awareness of environmental, commercial and (political) external issues affecting the THORP business; a commitment to continuous improvement. The development of the safety culture within THORP has also had challenges, some as a result of the composite nature of the workforce, and others as side effects of the culture shaping measures. Management have recognised these, and using the results of attitude surveys, are working with the workforce to overcome their effects. Clear recognition has been achieved that the establishment of positive behaviours is a key. step in generating the culture required summarising, there is recognition that the design of safety management systems and improvement programmes, should be based on the principles of human psychology and behaviour. which includes wide participation by the workforce

  1. Resilience Safety Culture in Aviation Organisations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akselsson, R.; Koornneef, F.; Stewart, S.; Ward, M.

    2009-01-01

    Chapter 2: Resilience Safety Culture in Aviation Organisations The European Commission HILAS project (Human Integration into the Lifecycle of Aviation Systems - a project supported by the European Commission’s 6th Framework between 2005-2009) was focused on using human factors knowledge and methodo

  2. SURVEYS OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AND SAFETY CULTURE IN NUCLEAR POWER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a survey of organizational culture at a nuclear power plant are summarized and compared with those of a similar survey which has been described in the literature on high-reliability organizations. A general-purpose cultural inventory showed a profile of organizational style similar to that reported in the literature; the factor structure for the styles was also similar to that of the plant previously described. A specialized scale designed to measure safety culture did not distinguish among groups within the organization that would be expected to differ

  3. Surveys of organizational culture and safety culture in nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Walter S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2000-07-30

    The results of a survey of organizational culture at a nuclear power plant are summarized and compared with those of a similar survey which has been described in the literature on ''high-reliability organizations''. A general-purpose cultural inventory showed a profile of organizational style similar to that reported in the literature; the factor structure for the styles was also similar to that of the plant previously described. A specialized scale designed to measure ''safety culture'' did not distinguished among groups within the organization that would be expected to differ.

  4. Development of safety culture - A Chinese traditional cultural perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Living in a social community, the culture of an enterprise is certainly under the influence of that society. Safety culture of nuclear utilities is the core of the enterprise culture. As a formal expression as defined in INSAG 3 and 4 by IAEA, it as a matter of fact originated from the summing up of the experiences of western nuclear industry, particularly after such epoch-making accidents of Three Miles Island and Chernobyl. In view of the geographical culture theory, whether or not this conception of western industrial culture will be absorbed and assimilated by Chinese Nuclear Industry is a challenging issue. This is because, on the one hand, Nuclear Power is comparatively speaking a newly developing industry in China and, on the other hand, China has enjoyed an uninterrupted history of traditional culture over five thousand years. In other words, whether the new and alien values will conflict with or be constructively assimilated by our traditional mindset is a critical question to be answered in any development program of safety culture. (author)

  5. Safety culture evaluation and asset root cause analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines the role of organizational and management factors in nuclear power plant safety through the use of operating experiences. The ASSET (Assessment of Safety Significant Events Team) reports of thirteen plants (total thirty events) have been analyzed in term of twenty organizational dimensions (factors) identified by Brookhaven National Laboratory and Pennsylvania State University. For three plants detailed results are reported in this paper. The results of thirteen plants are summarized in the form of a table. The study tends to confirm that organizational and management factors play an important role in plant safety. The twenty organizational dimensions and their definitions, in general, were adequate in this study. Formalization, Safety Culture, Technical Knowledge, Training, Roles-Responsibilities and Problem Identification appear to be key organizational factors which influence the safety of nuclear power plants studied

  6. LNG Safety Assessment Evaluation Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muna, Alice Baca [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); LaFleur, Angela Christine [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories evaluated published safety assessment methods across a variety of industries including Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), hydrogen, land and marine transportation, as well as the US Department of Defense (DOD). All the methods were evaluated for their potential applicability for use in the LNG railroad application. After reviewing the documents included in this report, as well as others not included because of repetition, the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Safety Plan Checklist is most suitable to be adapted to the LNG railroad application. This report was developed to survey industries related to rail transportation for methodologies and tools that can be used by the FRA to review and evaluate safety assessments submitted by the railroad industry as a part of their implementation plans for liquefied or compressed natural gas storage ( on-board or tender) and engine fueling delivery systems. The main sections of this report provide an overview of various methods found during this survey. In most cases, the reference document is quoted directly. The final section provides discussion and a recommendation for the most appropriate methodology that will allow efficient and consistent evaluations to be made. The DOE Hydrogen Safety Plan Checklist was then revised to adapt it as a methodology for the Federal Railroad Administration’s use in evaluating safety plans submitted by the railroad industry.

  7. Measuring and benchmarking safety culture: application of the safety attitudes questionnaire to an acute medical admissions unit.

    OpenAIRE

    Relihan, E; Glynn, S; Daly, D.; Silke, B; Ryder, Sheila Anne

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the safety culture in an acute medical admissions unit (AMAU) of a teaching hospital in order to benchmark results against international data and guide a unit-based, integrated, risk management strategy. Methods: The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ), a validated instrument for the measurement of safety culture, was applied to an AMAU. All AMAU healthcare staff (n = 92) were surveyed: doctors, nurses, healthcare assistants (HCAs) and allied healthcare professiona...

  8. The establishment of the safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first step in the establishment of the Safety Culture is splitting this concept into the elements involved in the same, so as to facilitate and approach to the issue. Then, two methodologies must be introduced, which shall perform independently, although synergically: (1) an 'updated' Quality Assurance Program and (2) a Program of Non-Technical (psychological and social) Activities aimed at stimulating motivation among the individuals in the Organization and at facilitating team work. Later on, once the necessary experience has been gained, the management of the organization must be based, essentially, on continuous development and on making full use of the skills of the individuals involved. In order to be successful, the establishment of a new culture of business management requires three key elements: 1) a working method containing the adequate indicators for measuring progress; 2) the commitment of the managers and the participation of all the staff; 3) the attainment of a net economical benefit that is made evident through an increase in productivity. However, all these actions refer only to one of the components of the system: the Operator of a Nuclear Power Plant, while Safety Culture must involve the whole National System, including the Government and the Regulatory Authority. The introduction of a new culture must necessarily bring along the acceptance of new concepts, new criteria and new methodologies among all the decision makers in the National System. Therefore, a change in culture must include a change in the culture of the Regulatory Authority. For instance, an evaluation of the Safety Culture is not workable by means of a conventional audit or a regulatory inspection. The fact is that what is easy to measure is not the main thing and what is difficult to measure is the only thing that actually matters. Summarizing: 'The Regulatory Authority shall be unable to verify the results because the evidences are intangible', but it shall indeed be able

  9. Review of regulatory activities associated with safety culture and management of safety at UK nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The management of health and safety and the culture of the people who participate in the process have been fundamental to the development of the United Kingdom's nuclear power programme. In the early years of development, the organizations and systems set up in companies which designed, manufactured, constructed and operated nuclear power stations were based upon the best practices needed to ensure, not only the operability of the plant, but also the safety of the workers at the power stations and the public. Over the years the nuclear industry in the UK has changed as has the regulatory body responsible for licensing. The economic environment within which the nuclear electricity generators operate has caused them to review their business and organizational structures. The UK nuclear industry has developed its approach to health and safety management and it is generally recognized that commercially successful companies have excellent health and safety records. This paper discusses the importance of effective health and safety management to the maintenance of high safety standards and the delivery of business goals. It also discusses the model that has been developed to help assess safety management in the changing UK nuclear industry. Finally, it comments upon regulatory developments in management of safety and safety culture. (author)

  10. The Safety Culture of an Effective Nuclear Regulatory Body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fundamental objective of all nuclear safety regulatory bodies is to ensure that activities related to the peaceful use of nuclear energy are carried out in a safe manner within their respective countries. In order to effectively achieve this objective, the nuclear regulatory body requires specific characteristics, one of which is a healthy safety culture. This regulatory guidance report describes five principles that support the safety culture of an effective nuclear regulatory body. These principles concern leadership for safety, individual responsibility and accountability, co-operation and open communication, a holistic approach, and continuous improvement, learning and self-assessment. The report also addresses some of the challenges to a regulatory body's safety culture that must be recognised, understood and overcome. It provides a unique resource to countries with existing, mature regulators and can be used for benchmarking as well as for training and developing staff. It will also be useful for new entrant countries in the process of developing and maintaining an effective nuclear safety regulator. (authors)

  11. Relationship of hospital organizational culture to patient safety climate in the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Christine W; Meterko, Mark; Rosen, Amy K; Shibei Zhao; Shokeen, Priti; Singer, Sara; Gaba, David M

    2009-06-01

    Improving safety climate could enhance patient safety, yet little evidence exists regarding the relationship between hospital characteristics and safety climate. This study assessed the relationship between hospitals' organizational culture and safety climate in Veterans Health Administration (VA) hospitals nationally. Data were collected from a sample of employees in a stratified random sample of 30 VA hospitals over a 6-month period (response rate = 50%; n = 4,625). The Patient Safety Climate in Healthcare Organizations (PSCHO) and the Zammuto and Krakower surveys were used to measure safety climate and organizational culture, respectively. Higher levels of safety climate were significantly associated with higher levels of group and entrepreneurial cultures, while lower levels of safety climate were associated with higher levels of hierarchical culture. Hospitals could use these results to design specific interventions aimed at improving safety climate.

  12. Measurement tools and process indicators of patient safety culture in primary care. A mixed methods study by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Dianne; Wensing, Michel; Esmail, Aneez; Valderas, Jose M

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: There is little guidance available to healthcare practitioners about what tools they might use to assess the patient safety culture. Objective: To identify useful tools for assessing patient safety culture in primary care organizations in Europe; to identify those aspects of performance that should be assessed when investigating the relationship between safety culture and performance in primary care. Methods: Two consensus-based studies were carried out, in which subject ...

  13. Safety culture and networks of influence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Carlos Henrique V.; Barroso, Antonio C.O.; Vieira Neto, Antonio S., E-mail: carloshvp@usp.br, E-mail: barroso@ipen.br, E-mail: asvneto@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This paper analyzes the social networks that influence the formation and maintenance of the safety culture within the Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN-CNEN/SP). From the mapping and analysis of social networks, actors with a significant degree of influence were identified. Later using a questionnaire, the beliefs of the population sample were mapped. Thus, the importance of key actors in the network analysis could be confirmed statistically. Therefore, based on the mentioned methods we could demonstrate our hypothesis, that there are some social networks that are important in the formation of safety culture, as well as the fact that the influence of some distinguished actors plays an essential role in this amalgam. (author)

  14. Safety culture and networks of influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper analyzes the social networks that influence the formation and maintenance of the safety culture within the Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN-CNEN/SP). From the mapping and analysis of social networks, actors with a significant degree of influence were identified. Later using a questionnaire, the beliefs of the population sample were mapped. Thus, the importance of key actors in the network analysis could be confirmed statistically. Therefore, based on the mentioned methods we could demonstrate our hypothesis, that there are some social networks that are important in the formation of safety culture, as well as the fact that the influence of some distinguished actors plays an essential role in this amalgam. (author)

  15. Safety culture measurements results in the agricultural sector

    OpenAIRE

    Terjék, László

    2013-01-01

    The author examined the safety culture and in relation to that the safety and health-related human factors. The examination was conducted primarily in the agricultural sector. Safety culture is also a key factor in business life especially in productive sectors. Basically, it determines the general work safety and occupational hazard situations, which may have an impact on business, competitiveness, and efficiency, and also employee satisfaction.The concept of safety culture is new in the app...

  16. Safety sans Frontières: An International Safety Culture Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reader, Tom W; Noort, Mark C; Shorrock, Steven; Kirwan, Barry

    2015-05-01

    The management of safety culture in international and culturally diverse organizations is a concern for many high-risk industries. Yet, research has primarily developed models of safety culture within Western countries, and there is a need to extend investigations of safety culture to global environments. We examined (i) whether safety culture can be reliably measured within a single industry operating across different cultural environments, and (ii) if there is an association between safety culture and national culture. The psychometric properties of a safety culture model developed for the air traffic management (ATM) industry were examined in 17 European countries from four culturally distinct regions of Europe (North, East, South, West). Participants were ATM operational staff (n = 5,176) and management staff (n = 1,230). Through employing multigroup confirmatory factor analysis, good psychometric properties of the model were established. This demonstrates, for the first time, that when safety culture models are tailored to a specific industry, they can operate consistently across national boundaries and occupational groups. Additionally, safety culture scores at both regional and national levels were associated with country-level data on Hofstede's five national culture dimensions (collectivism, power distance, uncertainty avoidance, masculinity, and long-term orientation). MANOVAs indicated safety culture to be most positive in Northern Europe, less so in Western and Eastern Europe, and least positive in Southern Europe. This indicates that national cultural traits may influence the development of organizational safety culture, with significant implications for safety culture theory and practice.

  17. Improving patient safety culture in general practice: An interview study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.J. Verbakel (Natasha J.); A.A. de Bont (Antoinette); T.J. Verheij; C. Wagner (Cordula); D.L.M. Zwart (Dorien Lyd Marieke)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground When improving patient safety a positive safety culture is key. As little is known about improving patient safety culture in primary care, this study examined whether administering a culture questionnaire with or without a complementary workshop could be used as an interventio

  18. 78 FR 27419 - Final Safety Culture Policy Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... complexity of their organizations and functions. The BSEE defines safety culture as the core values and... culture commitment throughout all levels of the organization. The BSEE agrees with the comments that there... safety and all organization personnel, the definition of safety culture and several parts of...

  19. Does the concept of safety culture help or hinder systems thinking in safety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiman, Teemu; Rollenhagen, Carl

    2014-07-01

    The concept of safety culture has become established in safety management applications in all major safety-critical domains. The idea that safety culture somehow represents a "systemic view" on safety is seldom explicitly spoken out, but nevertheless seem to linger behind many safety culture discourses. However, in this paper we argue that the "new" contribution to safety management from safety culture never really became integrated with classical engineering principles and concepts. This integration would have been necessary for the development of a more genuine systems-oriented view on safety; e.g. a conception of safety in which human, technological, organisational and cultural factors are understood as mutually interacting elements. Without of this integration, researchers and the users of the various tools and methods associated with safety culture have sometimes fostered a belief that "safety culture" in fact represents such a systemic view about safety. This belief is, however, not backed up by theoretical or empirical evidence. It is true that safety culture, at least in some sense, represents a holistic term-a totality of factors that include human, organisational and technological aspects. However, the departure for such safety culture models is still human and organisational factors rather than technology (or safety) itself. The aim of this paper is to critically review the various uses of the concept of safety culture as representing a systemic view on safety. The article will take a look at the concepts of culture and safety culture based on previous studies, and outlines in more detail the theoretical challenges in safety culture as a systems concept. The paper also presents recommendations on how to make safety culture more systemic. PMID:24275532

  20. WANO Actions to Reinforce the Operators’ Safety Culture Worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: WANO’s mission is to maximize the safety and reliability of nuclear power plants worldwide by working together to assess, to benchmark and improve performance through mutual support, exchange of information and emulation of best practices. Fukushima accident strongly impacted the nuclear community and it also brought WANO to question its positioning and scope of activities. Five strategic actions have hence been decided to strengthen WANO’s role, aiming to bring a more consistent, transparent and integrated response to the nuclear operators. WANO peer review process, which constitutes its core-business, has been intensified including corporate and pre start up peer reviews and, for Japanese plants, restart reviews. WANO also decided to expand its scope of activity to include elements of design, based on the principle that the role of a nuclear operator is not only to operate safely, but also to be sure that the plant he is operating is safe. WANO aims to cooperate strongly at both regional and international levels with all international safety organizations, being convinced that trust can be recovered with a strong safety commitment and credibility of both regulators and operators. All operators, without exception, are WANO members; if membership is voluntary, members have to fulfil strict obligations. Safety supposes that no operator feels isolated, or refuses openness and permanent self-questioning; it requests as well for WANO to ensure that cultural and sometimes political barriers do not hinder safety culture – the accident of Fukushima is from this perspective rich in teachings. In WANO, we believe that management system and practices are at the centre of safety culture, and a full involvement of top management (CEOs) of our members is absolutely requested. Through its commitments and rules, WANO pressures its members and help them reaching the highest possible standard of safety. We consider that we rely on each other to improve safety

  1. Towards an occupational safety and health culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwetsloot, G.I.J.M.; Steijger, N.

    2014-01-01

    Occupational safety and health (OSH) is a highly regulated area that appears to be based on rational planning and logical management approaches, e.g. OSM Management Systems: employers and employees of organisations should be aware of OSH risks, assess these risks systematically, provide the necessar

  2. Safety assessment for spent fuel storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Practice has been prepared as part of the IAEA's programme on the safety assessment of interim spent fuel storage facilities which are not an integral part of an operating nuclear power plant. This report provides general guidance on the safety assessment process, discussing both deterministic and probabilistic assessment methods. It describes the safety assessment process for normal operation and anticipated operational occurrences and also related to accident conditions. 10 refs, 2 tabs

  3. Defining safety culture and the nexus between safety goals and safety culture. 3. A Methodology for Identifying Deficiencies in Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, the drivers of performance problems at nuclear power plants (NPPs) are organizational in nature. Organizational deficiencies and other 'latent' conditions cause human errors, resulting in incidents that impact the performance of NPPs. Therefore, the human reliability community, regulators, and others concerned with NPP safety express the view that safety culture and organizational factors play an important role in plant safety. However, we have yet to identify one complete set of organizational factors, establish links between deficient safety culture and performance, or develop adequate tools to measure safety culture. This paper will contribute to the resolution of these issues. Safety culture is not a single factor but rather is a collection of several distinct factors. This paper asserts that in order to pro-actively manage safety culture at NPPs, leading indicators and appropriate measurements must be identified and developed. Central to this effort are the identification of the distinct factors comprising safety culture and the relationships between those factors and performance. We have identified several factors important to safety culture. We have developed a methodology that is a combination of traditional root-cause analysis and theories of human error, most notably Reason's theory of accident causation. In addition to this methodology's usefulness in identifying deficiencies in safety culture, it could also be used as a starting point to identify leading indicators of deteriorating safety performance. We have identified six organizational factors as being important: communication, formalization, goal prioritization, problem identification, roles and responsibilities, and technical knowledge. In addition, we have found that certain organizational factors, although pervasive throughout the organization, have a much greater influence on the successful outcome of particular tasks of work processes, rather than being equally important to all

  4. Activities on safety culture study. Study status in public and private sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Around after entering in the 21st century, organizational accidents had occurred in Japan at various industries including nuclear industry, which were caused directly by unsafe action, human error and illegal conduct of personnel but there were problems in safety culture of organization such as slow retreat of safety system stimulated by management, schedule control and procedure management becoming a dead letter, lack of safety education, and workplace climate of schedule priority. This article referred to organizational factors common to many severe accidents and introduced safety culture study in public and private sectors to overcome those factors. Safety Culture Evaluation Support Tool (SCEST) was developed for self-evaluation of safety culture of organization as well as Organizational Reliability model (OR model) for analysis of initiation and propagation process of risk event. Safety diagnosis system and feedback type risk assessment system for promoting safe organizational climate and culture were also developed. (T. Tanaka)

  5. The impact of organizational culture on Concurrent Engineering, Design-for-Safety, and product safety performance.

    OpenAIRE

    A. Zhu; von Zedtwitz, M.; Assimakopoulos, D.; Fernandes, K

    2016-01-01

    This paper empirically extends the research on the relationships between organizational culture, new product development (NPD) practices, and product safety performance (PSP). Using Schein's conceptualization of culture (i.e., underlying assumptions, espoused values, and artifacts), we build and test a model among five variables: top management commitment to safety (MCS), group level product safety culture (PSC) at NPD, Concurrent Engineering (CE), Design-for-Safety (DFS), and product safety ...

  6. Probabilistic safety assessment - regulatory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Nuclear power plants (NPPs) have been designed, constructed and operated mainly based on deterministic safety analysis philosophy. In this approach, a substantial amount of safety margin is incorporated in the design and operational requirements. Additional margin is incorporated by applying the highest quality engineering codes, standards and practices, and the concept of defence-in-depth in design and operating procedures, by including conservative assumptions and acceptance criteria in plant response analysis of postulated initiating events (PIEs). However, as the probabilistic approach has been improved and refined over the years, it is possible for the designer, operator and regulator to get a more detailed and realistic picture of the safety importance of plant design features, operating procedures and operational practices by using probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) along with the deterministic methodology. At present, many countries including USA, UK and France are using PSA insights in their decision making along with deterministic basis. India has also made substantial progress in the development of methods for carrying out PSA. However, consensus on the use of PSA in regulatory decision-making has not been achieved yet. This paper emphasises on the requirements (e.g.,level of details, key modelling assumptions, data, modelling aspects, success criteria, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis) for improving the quality and consistency in performance and use of PSA that can facilitate meaningful use of the PSA insights in the regulatory decision-making in India. This paper also provides relevant information on international scenario and various application areas of PSA along with progress made in India. The PSA perspective presented in this paper may help in achieving consensus on the use of PSA for regulatory / utility decision-making in design and operation of NPPs

  7. Stringent cost management and preservation of safety culture, a contradiction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Competition in the deregulated electricity market does not leave nuclear power plants unaffected. Hence the question is to answer, whether the safety is going to suffer under the cost pressure on the market. Therefore the target of NPP operator's cost management is to run plants at maximum availability and with optimized cost structures that lead to minimized specific generating costs. The costs of safety, with their fixed-cost character, are elements of this cost structure. The process of economic optimization of the cost structure does not permit cost minimization on its own sake in the area of operation cost and fuel cost (front and back end). The basis of economical assessment rather must be the minimization of potential risks which could entail losses of availability. However, many investments like plant modifications or preventive maintenance efforts made in order to avoid losses of availability to a large extent also imply at least a preservation or even higher levels of safety. Thus, economic efficiency and safety are closely correlated. Public opinion is very sensible as soon as the high level of plant safety seems to be touched by economic pressure. But realizing that German NPP are endowed with mature design and safety features, improvements of safety standards can only marginally be increased by further technical optimizations. Therefore plant management, man-machine-interface and the individual behaviour of the employees are targets for improvement of nuclear safety and economic efficiency by increasing the efficiency of processes. An even more efficient use of scarce funds and a tolerable political environment should allow the safety level of NPP to be upheld, and safety culture could be maintained and even be improved. (author)

  8. Evaluation of Safety Culture Implementation and Socialization Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of safety culture implementation and socialization results has been perform. Evaluation is carried out with specifying safety culture indicators, namely: Meeting between management and employee, system for incidents analysis, training activities related to improving safety, meeting with regulator, contractors, surveys on behavioural attitudes, and resources allocated to promote safety culture. Evaluation is based on observation and visiting the facilities to show the compliance indicator in term of good practices in the frame of safety culture implementation. For three facilities of research reactors, Kartini Yogyakarta, TRIGA Mark II Bandung and MPR-GAS Serpong, implementation of safety culture is considered good enough and progressive. Furthermore some indicator should be considered more intensive, for example the allocated resources, self assesment based on own questionnaire in the frame of improving the safety culture implementation. (author)

  9. Assessing Culturally Competent Scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendias, Elnora P.; Guevara, Edilma B.

    2001-01-01

    Eight criteria for culturally competent scholarship (contextuality, relevance, communication styles, awareness of identity and power differences, disclosure, reciprocation, empowerment, time) were applied to an international education/research nursing program. Appropriate measures for each were developed and ways to improve the program were…

  10. 我国医务人员患者安全文化测评结果系统评价%Patient safety culture assessment outcomes of medical workers in China:a systematic review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖清平; 张燕; 魏莎; 江颖; 赵庆华; 肖明朝

    2016-01-01

    目的:系统描述并分析我国医务人员的患者安全文化测评结果,为制定针对性的干预策略提供科学依据。方法计算机检索 Web of Science、PubMed、Ovid、EBSCO、Google Scholar、CBM、VIP、CNKI和 WanFang Data截至2014年12月发表的中、英文文献,纳入关于我国医务人员的患者安全文化测评研究。由2名研究者独立进行文献筛选、资料提取并交叉核对,如有分歧通过讨论或参考第三方意见达成一致,采用定性研究方法系统总结纳入文献的信息和结果。结果共检索到1721条记录,经筛选后最终纳入65篇文献,绝大部分研究为横断面研究。52篇文献的测评工具是参考国外量表经翻译修订后的中文版,其余13篇使用的是自编问卷。影响我国医务人员患者安全文化的主要因素有工龄、科室、学历、接受患者安全培训等。结论目前我国医务人员患者安全文化领域已开展了较多研究,但测评对象主要为护理人员,其他专业医务人员的研究开展得不够广泛。医院应加强人员配备,加强患者安全相关培训并建立公平公正、学习的患者安全文化,以保障患者安全。%Objective To systematically describe and analyze the patient safety culture assessment outcomes of medical workers in China,so as to provide scientific evidence for developing corresponding intervention measures.Methods Such databases as Web of Science,PubMed,Ovid,EBSCO,Google Scholar,CBM,VIP,CNKi and WanFang Data were used to collect studies published before December 2014,on patient safety culture assessment of medical workers in mainland China.Two reviewers independently screened,extracted and cross-checked the data,and the disagreements were resolved by discussion or by consulting a third reviewer.The qualitative synthesis method was used to analyze the study results.Results Of the total 1 721 records,65 studies were included,and most of them were cross

  11. Safety assessment and verification for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for safety standards for nuclear power plants. The present publication is a revision of the IAEA Safety Guide on Management of Nuclear Power Plants for Safe Operation issued in 1984. It supplements Section 2 of the Safety Requirements publication on Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation. Nuclear power technology is different from the customary technology of power generation from fossil fuel and by hydroelectric means. One major difference between the management of nuclear power plants and that of conventional generating plants is the emphasis that should be placed on nuclear safety, quality assurance, the management of radioactive waste and radiological protection, and the accompanying national regulatory requirements. This Safety Guide highlights the important elements of effective management in relation to these aspects of safety. The attention to be paid to safety requires that the management recognize that personnel involved in the nuclear power programme should understand, respond effectively to, and continuously search for ways to enhance safety in the light of any additional requirements socially and legally demanded of nuclear energy. This will help to ensure that safety policies that result in the safe operation of nuclear power plants are implemented and that margins of safety are always maintained. The structure of the organization, management standards and administrative controls should be such that there is a high degree of assurance that safety policies and decisions are implemented, safety is continuously enhanced and a strong safety culture is promoted and supported. The objective of this publication is to guide Member States in setting up an operating organization which facilitates the safe operation of nuclear power plants to a high level internationally. The second objective is to provide guidance on the most important organizational elements in order to contribute to a strong safety

  12. Measurement tools and process indicators of patient safety culture in primary care. A mixed methods study by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parker, D.; Wensing, M.; Esmail, A.; Valderas, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is little guidance available to healthcare practitioners about what tools they might use to assess the patient safety culture. OBJECTIVE: To identify useful tools for assessing patient safety culture in primary care organizations in Europe; to identify those aspects of performance

  13. The safety culture change process performed in Polish research reactor MARIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Safety Culture Change Process Performed in research reactor MARIA is described in this paper. The essential issues fulfilled in realization of the Safety Culture Enhancement Programme are related to the attitude and behaviour of top management, co-operating groups, operational personnel, relations between the operating organization and the supervising and advising organizations. Realization of this programme is based on changing the employees understanding of safety, changing their attitudes and behaviours by means of adequate training, requalification process and performing the broad self-assessment programme. Also a high level Quality Assurance Programme helps in development of the Safety Culture. (author)

  14. Procedures for self-assessment of operational safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Self-assessment processes have been continuously developed by nuclear organizations, including nuclear power plants. Currently, the nuclear industry and governmental organizations are showing an increasing interest in the implementation of this process as an effective way for improving safety performance. Self-assessment involves the use of different types of tools and mechanisms to assist the organizations in assessing their own safety performance against given standards. This helps to enhance the understanding of the need for improvements, the feeling of ownership in achieving them and and the safety culture as a whole. The concepts developed in this report present the basic approach to self-assessment taking into consideration experience gained during Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) missions, from organizations and utilities which have successfully implemented parts of a self-assessment programme and from meetings organized to discuss the subject

  15. Recent developments in the study of safety culture and its correlates: the role of leadership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessing safety culture is a key element in the strategies of reliability assurance in nuclear facilities. A diagnosis that provides a return on investment (ROI) requires a scientifically based conceptualization of the most relevant variables in safety culture and outcomes expected from it. Furthermore, it is important to develop assessment tools and designs which allow, not only checking the state of safety culture but evaluating the correlates in the different productive levels of analysis, taking into account the temporal dimensional that allows us to analyze the change and thereby identify the main determinants and mechanisms for improvement. (Author)

  16. International conference on safety culture in nuclear installations. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety culture is that assembly of characteristics and attitudes in organisation and individuals which establishes that as an overriding priority nuclear plant safety issues receives the attention warranted by their significance. This definition of safety culture brings out two major components in its manifestation. The framework within which individuals within the organisation works.The attitude and response of individual towards the safety issues over productivity and economics in the organisational work practices. The industry literature provides a great deal of insight at the artefact and espoused value levels, although as yet it remains somewhat disorganized. There is, however, an overall lack of understanding of the assumption level of safety culture. The IAEA has organised the conference on safety culture for better understanding of the safety culture issues on the international level

  17. Radiological safety and risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief radiological safety and risk assessment of a nuclear power generation center with an adjacent on-site waste disposal facility at a specific site in the State of Utah is presented. The assessment was conducted to assist in determining the feasibility and practicality of developing a nuclear energy center (NEC) in Utah consisting of nine 1250 MWe nuclear pressurized water reactor (PWR) electrical generating units arranged in 3 clusters of 3 units each known as triads. The site selected for this conceptual study is in the Horse Bench area about 15 miles directly south of the town of Green River, Utah. The radiological issues included direct radiation exposures to on-site workers and the off-site population, release of radioactive material, and effects of these releases for both normal operations and accidental occurrences. The basic finding of this study is that the concept of an NEC in the Green River area, specifically at the Horse Bench site, is radiologically feasible

  18. Looking for safety culture implementation. A regulatory body view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short explanation of subjects under the NRA SR regulation and the new Slovak nuclear regulatory authority responsibilities is given. The safety culture Implementation in the regulatory process itself and in regulated organizations is the high priority task. The assistance in the safety culture principles implementation is used for the regulatory body level as well as for the operating organization level. The close cooperation with the IAEA and CEC on strengthening of NRA SR is explained from the point of safety culture principles implementation. The operating organization safety culture implementation measures using different technical assistance from international organizations and countries are described. These actions are useful instruments but they are not usually systematic enough. NRA SR is looking for systematic approach and for full safety culture implementation in operating organizations. The NUSS documents are used as the basis for national regulatory documents. The QA programmes of NPPs are in the phase of development or fundamental upgrading. Comparing the Safety Culture principles and NUSS codes and guides the most of safety culture principles are covered as requirements in NUSS documents. As the managerial tool the revised set of QA NUSS documents can be used to implement safety culture in an organized way into the operating organization practices through adequately modified QA programmes for NPP operation. These programmes have to be approved by the NRA SR and their implementation is subject of NRA SR inspection. Then nuclear safety culture implementation could be under the continued control. (author)

  19. Professional attitudes toward patient safety culture in a bone marrow transplant unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermo, Vivian Costa; Radünz, Vera; Rosa, Luciana Martins da; Marinho, Monique Mendes

    2016-03-01

    Objective To identify the attitude of health professionals toward the patient safety culture at a bone marrow transplant unit. Methods Quantitative research approach, cross-sectional survey conducted at a bone marrow transplant unit in Santa Catarina, Brazil. Data were collected using a Safety Attitudes Questionnaire with 33 health professionals in August and September of 2013. A total of 37 attitudes were assessed according to six safety dimensions of patient safety culture. Data were analysed by applying descriptive and inferential statistics, ANOVA and the Kruskal-Wallis test with a p value equal to or under 0.05. Results Attitudes regarding the dimension "job satisfaction" were positive for the patient safety culture, and there was a significant difference between the professionals in this dimension (p-value 0.05). The other dimensions were not assessed positively. Conclusion The attitudes of health professionals toward patient safety must be strengthened. PMID:26934614

  20. Self-assessment of operational safety for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Self-assessment processes have been continuously developed by nuclear organizations, including nuclear power plants. Currently, the nuclear industry and governmental organizations are showing an increasing interest in the implementation of this process as an effective way for improving safety performance. Self-assessment involves the use of different types of tools and mechanisms to assist the organizations in assessing their own safety performance against given standards. This helps to enhance the understanding of the need for improvements, the feeling of ownership in achieving them and the safety culture as a whole. Although the primary beneficiaries of the self-assessment process are the plant and operating organization, the results of the self-assessments are also used, for example, to increase the confidence of the regulator in the safe operation of an installation, and could be used to assist in meeting obligations under the Convention on Nuclear Safety. Such considerations influence the form of assessment, as well as the type and detail of the results. The concepts developed in this report present the basic approach to self-assessment, taking into consideration experience gained during Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) missions, from organizations and utilities which have successfully implemented parts of a self-assessment programme and from meetings organized to discuss the subject. This report will be used in IAEA sponsored workshops and seminars on operational safety that include the topic of self-assessment

  1. Safety Cultures in Water-Based Outdoor Activities in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andkjær, Søren; Arvidsen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the study Safe in Nature (Tryg i naturen) in which the aim was to analyze and discuss risk and safety related to outdoor recreation in the coastal regions of Denmark. A cultural perspective is applied to risk management and the safety cultures related to three selected...... water-based outdoor activities: small boat fishing, sea kayaking, and kite surfing. The theoretical framework used was cultural analysis and the methodological approach was mixed methods using case studies with survey and qualitative interviews. The study indicates that safety is a complex matter...... and that safety culture can be understood as the sum and interaction among six categories. The safety culture is closely related to the activity and differs widely among activities. We suggest a broad perspective be taken on risk management wherein risk and safety can be managed at different levels. Small boat...

  2. Safety culture: the concept and its practical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper draws together a number of topics concerned with safety culture: the first part of the paper describe the characteristics of an organisation giving rise to a good safety culture as suggested in INSAG-4. The second part of the paper examines sources of information on the characteristics of organisations giving rise to good and poor safety performance including a study into the causes of a number of recent severe accidents such as Clapham Junction and Piper Alpha. The final part of the paper describes the means by which safety culture within an organisation may be measured and therefore controlled. This enables an organisation to provide for a good safety culture and improve commercial performance by a process of continuous safety improvement eliminating the losses arising from poor safety standards. (author) 6 tabs., 5 refs

  3. Regulatory review of safety cases and safety assessments - associated challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulatory reviews of safety cases and safety assessments are essential for credible decision-making on the licensing or authorization of radioactive waste disposal facilities. Regulatory review also plays an important role in developing the safety case and in establishing stakeholders' confidence in the safety of the facility. Reviews of safety cases for radioactive waste disposal facilities need to be conducted by suitably qualified and experienced staff, following systematic and well-planned review processes. Regulatory reviews should be sufficiently comprehensive in their coverage of issues potentially affecting the safety of the disposal system, and should assess the safety case against clearly established criteria. The conclusions drawn from a regulatory review, and the rationale for them should be reproducible and documented in a transparent and traceable way. Many challenges are faced when conducting regulatory reviews of safety cases. Some of these relate to issues of project and programme management, and resources, while others derive from the inherent difficulties of assessing the potential long-term future behaviour of engineered and environmental systems. This paper describes approaches to the conduct of regulatory reviews and discusses some of the challenges faced. (author)

  4. Effectiveness evaluation methodology for safety processes to enhance organisational culture in hazardous installations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengolini, A; Debarberis, L

    2008-06-30

    Safety performance indicators are widely collected and used in hazardous installations. The IAEA, OECD and other international organisations have developed approaches that strongly promote deployment of safety performance indicators. These indicators focus mainly on operational performance, but some of them also address organisational and safety culture aspects. However, operators of hazardous installations, in particular those with limited resources and time constraints, often find it difficult to collect the large number of different safety performance indicators. Moreover, they also have difficulties with giving a meaning to the numbers and trends recorded, especially to those that should reflect a positive safety culture. In this light, the aim of this article is to address the need to monitor and assess progress on implementation of a programme to enhance safety and organisational culture. It proposes a specific process-view approach to effectiveness evaluation of organisational and safety culture indicators by means of a multi-level system in which safety processes and staff involvement in defining improvement activities are central. In this way safety becomes fully embedded in staff activities. Key members of personnel become directly involved in identifying and supplying leading indicators relating to their own daily activity and become responsible and accountable for keeping the measurement system alive. Besides use of lagging indicators, particular emphasis is placed on the importance of identifying and selecting leading indicators which can be used to drive safety performance for organisational and safety culture aspects as well.

  5. Effectiveness evaluation methodology for safety processes to enhance organisational culture in hazardous installations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengolini, A; Debarberis, L

    2008-06-30

    Safety performance indicators are widely collected and used in hazardous installations. The IAEA, OECD and other international organisations have developed approaches that strongly promote deployment of safety performance indicators. These indicators focus mainly on operational performance, but some of them also address organisational and safety culture aspects. However, operators of hazardous installations, in particular those with limited resources and time constraints, often find it difficult to collect the large number of different safety performance indicators. Moreover, they also have difficulties with giving a meaning to the numbers and trends recorded, especially to those that should reflect a positive safety culture. In this light, the aim of this article is to address the need to monitor and assess progress on implementation of a programme to enhance safety and organisational culture. It proposes a specific process-view approach to effectiveness evaluation of organisational and safety culture indicators by means of a multi-level system in which safety processes and staff involvement in defining improvement activities are central. In this way safety becomes fully embedded in staff activities. Key members of personnel become directly involved in identifying and supplying leading indicators relating to their own daily activity and become responsible and accountable for keeping the measurement system alive. Besides use of lagging indicators, particular emphasis is placed on the importance of identifying and selecting leading indicators which can be used to drive safety performance for organisational and safety culture aspects as well. PMID:18241983

  6. Nirex Safety Assessment Research Programme bibliography, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography lists reports and papers written as part of the Nirex Safety Assessment Research Programme, which is concerned with disposal of low-level and intermediate-level waste (LLW and ILW) and associated radiological assessments. (author)

  7. Training the next generation of nuclear engineers in safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents how undergraduate and graduate nuclear engineering students at the PennsyIvania State University are trained to develop a safety ethic or 'culture' during their coursework. This safety culture is instilled in terms of nuclear safety analysis, design, and licensing issues. various aspects of reactor safety are described either directly or indirectly in each Penn State nuclear engineering course by the development of particular theory and practical applications. A graduate level reactor safety course serves to tie in all the student's previous knowledge into a focused study of safety analysis, licensing, and accident scenarios. With each Penn State nuclear engineering course, there is a focus, and an expected level of understanding of the impact of analysis and design on reactor safety. Foundational to all courses is the knowledge of atomic, health, and reactor physics, mathematics, and general engineering principles. This paper describes the progression of courses related to reactor safety in the Penn State curriculum. The objectives for each course is given in terms of its importance in reactor safety. A detailed description of the graduate level reactor safety course is given to demonstrate how to assemble safety topics into a course that directly addresses safety, licensing, and accident analyses. This safety course serves to provide students with an comprehension of the current 'safety culture' in the United States, and hopefully, instills a proper understanding of safety issues and ethics. (author)

  8. Intermediate probabilistic safety assessment approach for safety critical digital systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taeyong, Sung; Hyun Gook, Kang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Integrated Safety Assessment Team, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    Even though the conventional probabilistic safety assessment methods are immature for applying to microprocessor-based digital systems, practical needs force to apply it. In the Korea, UCN 5 and 6 units are being constructed and Korean Next Generation Reactor is being designed using the digital instrumentation and control equipment for the safety related functions. Korean regulatory body requires probabilistic safety assessment. This paper analyzes the difficulties on the assessment of digital systems and suggests an intermediate framework for evaluating their safety using fault tree models. The framework deals with several important characteristics of digital systems including software modules and fault-tolerant features. We expect that the analysis result will provide valuable design feedback. (authors)

  9. An implementation evaluation of a qualitative culture assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappin, D C; Bentley, T A; Ashby, L E

    2015-03-01

    Safety culture has been identified as a critical element of healthy and safe workplaces and as such warrants the attention of ergonomists involved in occupational health and safety (OHS). This study sought to evaluate a tool for assessing organisational safety culture as it impacts a common OHS problem: musculoskeletal disorders (MSD). The level of advancement across nine cultural aspects was assessed in two implementation site organisations. These organisations, in residential healthcare and timber processing, enabled evaluation of the tool in contrasting settings, with reported MSD rates also high in both sectors. Interviews were conducted with 39 managers and workers across the two organisations. Interview responses and company documentation were compared by two researchers to the descriptor items for each MSD culture aspect. An assignment of the level of advancement, using a five stage framework, was made for each aspect. The tool was readily adapted to each implementation site context and provided sufficient evidence to assess their levels of advancement. Assessments for most MSD culture aspects were in the mid to upper levels of advancement, although the levels differed within each organisation, indicating that different aspects of MSD culture, as with safety culture, develop at a different pace within organisations. Areas for MSD culture improvement were identified for each organisation. Reflections are made on the use and merits of the tool by ergonomists for addressing MSD risk. PMID:25479977

  10. An implementation evaluation of a qualitative culture assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappin, D C; Bentley, T A; Ashby, L E

    2015-03-01

    Safety culture has been identified as a critical element of healthy and safe workplaces and as such warrants the attention of ergonomists involved in occupational health and safety (OHS). This study sought to evaluate a tool for assessing organisational safety culture as it impacts a common OHS problem: musculoskeletal disorders (MSD). The level of advancement across nine cultural aspects was assessed in two implementation site organisations. These organisations, in residential healthcare and timber processing, enabled evaluation of the tool in contrasting settings, with reported MSD rates also high in both sectors. Interviews were conducted with 39 managers and workers across the two organisations. Interview responses and company documentation were compared by two researchers to the descriptor items for each MSD culture aspect. An assignment of the level of advancement, using a five stage framework, was made for each aspect. The tool was readily adapted to each implementation site context and provided sufficient evidence to assess their levels of advancement. Assessments for most MSD culture aspects were in the mid to upper levels of advancement, although the levels differed within each organisation, indicating that different aspects of MSD culture, as with safety culture, develop at a different pace within organisations. Areas for MSD culture improvement were identified for each organisation. Reflections are made on the use and merits of the tool by ergonomists for addressing MSD risk.

  11. Safety culture management: the importance of organizational factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of safety culture has been used extensively to explain the underlying causes of performance based events, both positive and negative, across the nuclear industry. Yet attempts to operationally define the concept of safety culture and assess it have been less apparent. The work described in this paper represents several years of effort to identify, define and assess the organizational factors important to safe performance in nuclear power plants (NPPs). The research discussed in this paper is primarily conducted in support of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) efforts in understanding the impact of organizational performance on safety. As a result of a series of research activities undertaken by numerous NRC contractors, a collection of organizational dimensions has been identified and defined. These dimensions represent what is believed to be a comprehensive taxonomy of organizational elements that relate to the safe operation of nuclear power plants. Techniques were also developed by which to measure these organizational dimensions, and include structured interview protocols, behavioral checklists, and behavioral anchored rating scales (BARS). Recent efforts have focussed on devising a methodology for the extraction of information related to the identified organizational dimensions from existing NRC documentation. This type of effort would assess the applicability of the organizational dimensions to existing NRC inspection and evaluation reports, refine the organizational dimensions previously developed so they are more relevant to the task of retrospective analysis , and attempt to rate plants based on the review of existing NRC documentation using the techniques previously developed for the assessment of organizational dimensions. (author)

  12. Organizational Climate Determinants of Resident Safety Culture in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnetz, Judith E.; Zhdanova, Ludmila S.; Elsouhag, Dalia; Lichtenberg, Peter; Luborsky, Mark R.; Arnetz, Bengt B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: In recent years, there has been an increasing focus on the role of safety culture in preventing costly adverse events, such as medication errors and falls, among nursing home residents. However, little is known regarding critical organizational determinants of a positive safety culture in nursing homes. The aim of this study…

  13. Regulatory Oversight of Safety Culture in Nuclear Installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experience across the international nuclear industry and in other technical fields over the past few decades has demonstrated the importance of a healthy safety culture in maintaining the safety of workers, the public and the environment. Both regulators and the nuclear industry recognize the need for licensees to develop a strong safety culture in order to support successful and sustainable nuclear safety performance. Progress over recent years can be observed in the rapid development of approaches to overseeing licensees' safety culture. This publication follows on and complements earlier publications on safety culture, from the publication Safety Culture (Safety Series No. 75-INSAG-4 (1991)), published after the Chernobyl accident, to the more recently published Safety Requirements on The Management System for Facilities and Activities (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-3 (2006)), which states that the management system is to be used to promote and support a strong safety culture. A number of attempts have been made at both the international and national levels to establish practical approaches to regulatory oversight of safety culture. During 2010 and 2011, two projects were conducted by the IAEA under the scope of the Safe Nuclear Energy - Regional Excellence Programme within the Norwegian Cooperation Programme with Bulgaria and Romania. These projects were implemented at the Bulgarian and Romanian regulatory bodies. They encompassed the development of a specific process to oversee licensees' safety culture, and involved 30 experts from 17 countries and 22 organizations. The IAEA continues to support Member States in the area of safety culture through its projects on safety management and capacity building. This publication addresses the basics of regulatory oversight of safety culture, describes the approaches currently implemented at several regulatory bodies around the world and, based on these examples, proposes a path to developing such a process

  14. Producing health, producing safety. Developing a collective safety culture in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis aims at a better understanding of safety management in radiotherapy and at proposing improvements for patient safety through the development of a collective safety culture. A first part presents the current context in France and abroad, addresses the transposition of other safety methods to the medical domain, and discusses the peculiarities of radiotherapy in terms of risks and the existing quality-assurance approaches. The second part presents the theoretical framework by commenting the intellectual evolution with respect to system safety and the emergence of the concept of safety culture, and by presenting the labour collective aspects and their relationship with system safety. The author then comments the variety of safety cultures among the different professions present in radiotherapy, highlights the importance of the collective dimension in correcting discrepancies at the end of the treatment process, and highlights how physicians take their colleagues work into account. Recommendations are made to improve patient safety in radiotherapy

  15. Lessons Learned from the Past Accidents for Safety Culture Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All nuclear organizations strive to sustain and improve safety. There is diversity in the way organizations understand the concept of safety and the actions that can help to drive improvements. This paper presents an overview of the lessons to be learned from past nuclear accidents and their relevance for the development of nuclear safety culture. Although the term Safety Culture emerged after the Chernobyl accident, the factors that contributed to earlier accidents, of which the most notable was the accident of Three Mile Island Unit 2 , are also relevant for nuclear safety culture. As regards the Fukushima accident from 2011, safety culture was once again brought into discussion. It is easier to manage the workplaces and the organizations than the minds of employees, as it is not possible to change the human condition, but changing the conditions under which people work. For this, the commitment of the top management is important, without which, it is not possible to make the necessary changes. (author)

  16. A framework for the organizational assumptions underlying safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety culture of the nuclear organization can be addressed at the three levels of culture proposed by Edgar Schein. The industry literature provides a great deal of insight at the artefact and espoused value levels, although as yet it remains somewhat disorganized. There is, however, an overall lack of understanding of the assumption level of safety culture. This paper describes a possible framework for conceptualizing the assumption level, suggesting that safety culture is grounded in unconscious beliefs about the nature of the safety problem, its solution and how to organize to achieve the solution. Using this framework, the organization can begin to uncover the assumptions at play in its normal operation, decisions and events and, if necessary, engage in a process to shift them towards assumptions more supportive of a strong safety culture. (author)

  17. Safety culture: personal considerations of an owner/operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety culture with nuclear energy is above all a people's business. This means that all you can do is attempting to create the type of ideal environment that helps all plant people to perform their safety-related tasks in an optimum way. This is a continuous challenge for all who are involved. In the last years the political environment has exhibited the most noteworthy shortcomings regarding safety culture. (author) figs

  18. Patient safety culture: the nursing unit leader's role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammer, Christine Elizabeth; James, Barbara R

    2011-09-30

    Discussions about a culture of patient safety abound, yet nurse leaders continue to struggle to achieve such a culture in today's complex and fast-paced healthcare environment. In this article the authors discuss the concept of a patient safety culture, present a fictional scenario describing what happened in a hospital that lacked a culture of patient safety, and explain what should have happened in the above scenario. This discussion is offered within a framework consisting of seven driving factors of patient safety. These factors include leadership, evidence-based practice, teamwork, communication, and a learning, just, and patient-centered culture. Throughout, an emphasis is placed on leadership at the unit level. Nurse managers will find practical examples illustrating how leaders can help their teams establish a culture that offers the patient quality care in a safe environment.

  19. Use of probabilistic safety assessment for operational safety. PSA '91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Around 250 participants, representing 32 IAEA Member States and 4 international organizations, reviewed recent developments and discussed directions for future efforts in the area of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) and particularly on its use for operational safety. During the symposium 61 papers and 27 posters were presented covering a wide spectrum of activities in areas such as: experience with ''living'' PSAs, PSA applications in decision making, the use of PSA for evaluating operating experience for operator training and for accident management, and probabilistic safety criteria. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these presentations. Refs, figs and tabs

  20. Promotion of good safety culture at a Canadian HWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    People work at a nuclear plant within a structured environment. It is the programs, procedures and other ''tools'' that are used in the workplace that actually guide behaviours, and behaviours then guide performance. The safety culture in the workplace is ''the way we do things around here''. This culture is created by structures, behaviours and performance, and is characterized by three attributes: A questioning attitude; a rigorous and prudent approach; open 2-way communication. This paper discusses a model of safety culture which puts the operating experience or learning cycle program at the heart of the endeavor. This cycle also consists of three elements: Observation; reporting; learning. It is more of a theoretical paper than a report of success at this stage. However, the ideas presented are being used to design and implement a strong safety culture at Ontario Hydro's Darlington Nuclear Station (4 x 932 Mwe CANDU units), and are beginning to show results. Programs designed for excellence in human performance have to provide clear simple structure, and draw people into alignment with the required behaviours. By making the structural elements and the alignment activities explicit an attempt can be made to ''design'' programs that will create and reinforce the required safety culture. The paper places the learning cycle at the heart of safety culture because the cycle aligns with the three attributes of safety culture. If an organization cannot learn from experience (i.e. change behaviours based on experience) it is doubtful whether it can build a strong safety culture. 2 refs

  1. Influence of safety culture on the safety level in chosen enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Wolany

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In this paper was carried out the analysis of influence of safety culture, connected with implementation Occupational Health and Safety Management System, on safety level in chosen enterprise. The organizational practices necessary for the effective formulation and maintenance of high safety culture were characterized.Design/methodology/approach: The concept of health and safety at work legislation was defined and the idea of safety culture was discussed. Moreover, the necessity of continuous improvement according to PN-N-18001 standard was showed. In this paper was talked over the problem of accidents and occupational diseases among coal miners, who work in a huge and rich in dangers area.Findings: According to continuous improvement principles is the necessity of monitoring work conditions, conducting regular audits and organizing training courses, which lead to developing high safety culture.Practical implications: Developing of the safety culture brings some profits as reducing numbers of heavy and fatal accidents, increasing the number of detect occupational diseases. The enterprise, which developing high safety culture can expect from employees greater caution and respect for rules and instructions bench.Originality/value: The article indicated that the coal mines needs effective actions which should be directed on increase supervision in workplaces and reducing threats causing industrial accidents. The essence of safety culture was presented.

  2. Event Safety-A Culture of Responsibility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian Alexander Buschhoff

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the author introduces the concept of events and the importance of safety. And what is emphasized is that guests must set up the safety awareness in the process of the implementation of the safety, to ensure that every guest can move in the area according to their will, and won't produce any risk.

  3. Management of safety and safety culture at the NPPs of Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report contains general aspects of safety and safety culture. The brief description of operational characteristics and basic indexes of atomic power plants at the Ukraine are represented. The information referring to structure of NPPs of Operation organization license-holder, safety responsibility of both Regulatory and Utility Bodies also is given. The main part of the report include seven sections: 1. Practical application of safety management models; 2. erspective on the relationship between safety management and safety culture; 3. The role of leadership in achieving high standards of safety; 4. Current and future challengers that impact on safety culture and safety management (e.g. the impact of competition, changing, economic and political circumstances, workforce demographics, etc.); 5. Key lessons learned from major events; 6. Practical applications of safety culture concepts (e.g. learning organizations, training staff communications, etc.); 7. dvance in human performance. Some of the main pending safety and safety culture problems that are necessary to achieve in the near future are mentioned

  4. Nuclear safety culture in Finland and Sweden - Developments and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiman, T.; Pietikaeinen, E. (Technical Research Centre of Finland, VTT (Finland)); Kahlbom, U. (RiskPilot AB (Sweden)); Rollenhagen, C. (Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) (Sweden))

    2011-02-15

    The project aimed at studying the concept of nuclear safety culture and the Nordic nuclear branch safety culture. The project also aimed at looking how the power companies and the regulators view the current responsibilities and role of subcontractors in the Nordic nuclear safety culture as well as to inspect the special demands for safety culture in subcontracting chains. Interview data was collected in Sweden (n = 14) and Finland (n = 16) during 2009. Interviewees represented the major actors in the nuclear field (regulators, power companies, expert organizations, waste management organizations). Results gave insight into the nature and evaluation of safety culture in the nuclear industry. Results illustrated that there is a wide variety of views on matters that are considered important for nuclear safety within the Nordic nuclear community. However, the interviewees considered quite uniformly such psychological states as motivation, mindfulness, sense of control, understanding of hazards and sense of responsibility as important for nuclear safety. Results also gave insight into the characteristics of Nordic nuclear culture. Various differences in safety cultures in Finland and Sweden were uncovered. In addition to the differences, historical reasons for the development of the nuclear safety cultures in Finland and Sweden were pointed out. Finally, results gave implications that on the one hand subcontractors can bring new ideas and improvements to the plants' practices, but on the other hand the assurance of necessary safety attitudes and competence of the subcontracting companies and their employees is considered as a challenge. The report concludes that a good safety culture requires a deep and wide understanding of nuclear safety including the various accident mechanisms of the power plants as well as a willingness to continuously develop one's competence and understanding. An effective and resilient nuclear safety culture has to foster a constant

  5. Nuclear safety culture in Finland and Sweden - Developments and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project aimed at studying the concept of nuclear safety culture and the Nordic nuclear branch safety culture. The project also aimed at looking how the power companies and the regulators view the current responsibilities and role of subcontractors in the Nordic nuclear safety culture as well as to inspect the special demands for safety culture in subcontracting chains. Interview data was collected in Sweden (n = 14) and Finland (n = 16) during 2009. Interviewees represented the major actors in the nuclear field (regulators, power companies, expert organizations, waste management organizations). Results gave insight into the nature and evaluation of safety culture in the nuclear industry. Results illustrated that there is a wide variety of views on matters that are considered important for nuclear safety within the Nordic nuclear community. However, the interviewees considered quite uniformly such psychological states as motivation, mindfulness, sense of control, understanding of hazards and sense of responsibility as important for nuclear safety. Results also gave insight into the characteristics of Nordic nuclear culture. Various differences in safety cultures in Finland and Sweden were uncovered. In addition to the differences, historical reasons for the development of the nuclear safety cultures in Finland and Sweden were pointed out. Finally, results gave implications that on the one hand subcontractors can bring new ideas and improvements to the plants' practices, but on the other hand the assurance of necessary safety attitudes and competence of the subcontracting companies and their employees is considered as a challenge. The report concludes that a good safety culture requires a deep and wide understanding of nuclear safety including the various accident mechanisms of the power plants as well as a willingness to continuously develop one's competence and understanding. An effective and resilient nuclear safety culture has to foster a constant sense of

  6. A Study on the Construct Validity of Safety Culture Oversight Model for Nuclear Power Operating Organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Su Jin; Choi, Young Sung; Oh, Jang Jin [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In Korea, the safety policy statement declared in 1994 by government stressed the importance of safety culture and licensees were encouraged to manage and conduct their self-assessments. A change in regulatory position about safety culture oversight was made after the event of SBO cover-up in Kori unit 1 and several subsequent falsification events. Since then KINS has been developing licensee's safety culture oversight system including conceptual framework of oversight, prime focus area for oversight, and specific details on regulatory expectations, all of which are based on defence-in-depth (DiD) safety enhancement approach. Development and gathering of performance data which is related to actual 'safety' of nuclear power plant are needed to identify the relationship between safety culture and safety performance. Authors consider this study as pilot which has a contribution on verifying the construct validity of the model and the effectiveness of survey based research. This is the first attempt that the validity of safety culture oversight model has been investigated with empirical data obtained from Korean nuclear power operating organization.

  7. A Study on the Construct Validity of Safety Culture Oversight Model for Nuclear Power Operating Organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Korea, the safety policy statement declared in 1994 by government stressed the importance of safety culture and licensees were encouraged to manage and conduct their self-assessments. A change in regulatory position about safety culture oversight was made after the event of SBO cover-up in Kori unit 1 and several subsequent falsification events. Since then KINS has been developing licensee's safety culture oversight system including conceptual framework of oversight, prime focus area for oversight, and specific details on regulatory expectations, all of which are based on defence-in-depth (DiD) safety enhancement approach. Development and gathering of performance data which is related to actual 'safety' of nuclear power plant are needed to identify the relationship between safety culture and safety performance. Authors consider this study as pilot which has a contribution on verifying the construct validity of the model and the effectiveness of survey based research. This is the first attempt that the validity of safety culture oversight model has been investigated with empirical data obtained from Korean nuclear power operating organization

  8. Complementary safety assessments - Report by the French Nuclear Safety Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an immediate consequence of the Fukushima accident, the French Authority of Nuclear Safety (ASN) launched a campaign of on-site inspections and asked operators (mainly EDF, AREVA and CEA) to make complementary assessments of the safety of the nuclear facilities they manage. The approach defined by ASN for the complementary safety assessments (CSA) is to study the behaviour of nuclear facilities in severe accidents situations caused by an off-site natural hazard according to accident scenarios exceeding the current baseline safety requirements. This approach can be broken into 2 phases: first conformity to current design and secondly an approach to the beyond design-basis scenarios built around the principle of defence in depth. 38 inspections were performed on issues linked to the causes of the Fukushima crisis. It appears that some sites have to reinforce the robustness of the heat sink. The CSA confirmed that the processes put into place at EDF to detect non-conformities were satisfactory. The complementary safety assessments demonstrated that the current seismic margins on the EDF nuclear reactors are satisfactory. With regard to flooding, the complementary safety assessments show that the complete reassessment carried out following the flooding of the Le Blayais nuclear power plant in 1999 offers the installations a high level of protection against the risk of flooding. Concerning the loss of electrical power supplies and the loss of cooling systems, the analysis of EDF's CSA reports showed that certain heat sink and electrical power supply loss scenarios can, if nothing is done, lead to core melt in just a few hours in the most unfavourable circumstances. As for nuclear facilities that are not power or experimental reactors, some difficulties have appeared to implement the CSA approach that was initially devised for reactors. Generally speaking, ASN considers that the safety of nuclear facilities must be made more robust to improbable risks which are not

  9. Cultural safety as an ethic of care: a praxiological process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEldowney, Rose; Connor, Margaret J

    2011-10-01

    New writings broadening the construct of cultural safety, a construct initiated in Aotearoa New Zealand, are beginning to appear in the literature. Therefore, it is considered timely to integrate these writings and advance the construct into a new theoretical model. The new model reconfigures the constructs of cultural safety and cultural competence as an ethic of care informed by a postmodern perspective. Central to the new model are three interwoven, co-occurring components: an ethic of care, which unfolds within a praxiological process shaped by the context. Context is expanded through identifying the three concepts of relationality, generic competence, and collectivity, which are integral to each client-nurse encounter. The competence associated with cultural safety as an ethic of care is always in the process of development. Clients and nurses engage in a dialogue to establish the level of cultural safety achieved at given points in a care trajectory.

  10. Promotion of good safety culture at a Swedish BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the nuclear industry there are two events which have had a significant impact on the way of thinking and attitudes to safety, although in different ways. The TMI accident at Harrisburg, USA put the focus on Man-Machine interface, the way of working and attitudes to safety. The accident at Chernobyl focused on Safety Management and Safety Culture. Before the TMI accident, technology was believed to be the solutions to all kinds of problems. Technical solutions should compensate for human behaviour. After the TMI accident the focus was put on Man-Machine issues and a lot of the resources within the Nuclear Industry was allocated to Man-Machine-Interfaces, Procedures, Training, etc. After the Chernobyl accident, safety culture (IAEA INSAG-4) became a commonly used concept which included an overall perspective on safety and an understanding of the interaction between Man, Technology and Organizational matters (MTO). The Safety Culture within an organization is the sum of all attitudes, qualities and experiences influencing safety. Safety Culture is consequently not only a single quality or a single property but a generic term representing the promotion of safety in many areas

  11. Safety culture and safety management within the Norwegian-controlled shipping industry ; State of art, interrelationships, and influencing factors

    OpenAIRE

    Oltedal, Helle Asgjerd

    2011-01-01

    This research focuses attention on safety challenges within the Norwegian shipping industry. A status picture of the shipboard safety culture and the interrelationships with safety management and organizational factors is given. Three research questions are explored: (1) What characterizes safety culture and safety management within the shipping industry? (2) What is the relationship between safety culture and safety performance within the shipping industry? (3) What charact...

  12. Human Factors and Safety Culture in Maritime Safety (revised)

    OpenAIRE

    Heinz Peter Berg

    2013-01-01

    As in every industry at risk, the human and organizational factors constitute the main stakes for maritime safety. Furthermore, several events at sea have been used to develop appropriate risk models. The investigation on maritime accidents is, nowadays, a very important tool to identify the problems related to human factor and can support accident prevention and the improvement of maritime safety. Part of this investigation should in future also be near misses. Operation of ships is full of ...

  13. Safety culture management: The importance of organizational factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of safety culture has been used extensively to explain the underlying causes of performance based events, both positive and negative, across the nuclear industry. The work described in this paper represents several years of effort to identify, define and assess the organizational factors important to safe performance in nuclear power plants (NPPs). The research discussed in this paper is primarily conducted in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) efforts in understanding the impact of organizational performance on safety. As a result of a series of research activities undertaken by numerous NRC contractors, a collection of organizational dimensions has been identified and defined. These dimensions represent what is believed to be a comprehensive taxonomy of organizational elements that relate to the safe operation of nuclear power plants. Techniques were also developed by which to measure these organizational dimensions, and include structured interview protocols, behavioral checklists, and behavioral anchored rating scales (BARS). Recent efforts have focused on devising a methodology for the extraction of information related to the identified organizational dimensions from existing NRC documentation. This type of effort would assess the applicability of the organizational dimensions to existing NRC inspection and evaluation reports, refine the organizational dimensions previously developed so they are more relevant to the task of retrospective analysis, and attempt to rate plants based on the review of existing NRC documentation using the techniques previously developed for the assessment of organizational dimensions

  14. The effect of organisational culture on patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Gerri; McCaughan, Dorothy

    This article explores the links between organisational culture and patient safety. The key elements associated with a safety culture, most notably effective leadership, good teamwork, a culture of learning and fairness, and fostering patient-centred care, are discussed. The broader aspects of a systems approach to promoting quality and safety, with specific reference to clinical governance, human factors, and ergonomics principles and methods, are also briefly explored, particularly in light of the report of the public inquiry into care failings at Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust.

  15. Health Technology Assessment and patient safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Mulcahy

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Health Technology Assessment (HTA is a process used to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and costeffectiveness of health technologies by a systematic review of clinical, economic, and utilization research.

    Despite widespread investment in patient safety technologies in the U.K., U.S., and elsewhere, little HTA has been done to establish the clinical or cost-effectiveness of these technologies. The HTA and patient safety literature suggests there are four categories of patient safety HTA, including HTA for existing safety technologies, underutilized safety technologies, emerging safety technologies, as well as safety aspects of technologies with a non-safety primary purpose.

    Recent HTA and other research, including a 2002 evidencebased evaluation of patient safety technologies from the U.S. Agency for Health Research and Quality, provide an important foundation for a more comprehensive approach to patient safety HTA. However, HTA programs must address prioritization, methodology, and dissemination challenges introduced by patient safety technologies before significant progress can Te made.

  16. Promoting safety culture in radiation industry through radiation audit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper illustrates the Malaysian experience in implementing and promoting effective radiation safety program. Current management practice demands that an organization inculcate culture of safety in preventing radiation hazard. The aforementioned objectives of radiation protection can only be met when it is implemented and evaluated continuously. Commitment from the workforce to treat safety as a priority and the ability to turn a requirement into a practical language is also important to implement radiation safety policy efficiently. Maintaining and improving safety culture is a continuous process. There is a need to establish a program to measure, review and audit health and safety performance against predetermined standards. This program is known as radiation safety audit and is able to reveal where and when action is needed to make improvements to the systems of controls. A structured and proper radiation self-auditing system is seen as the sole requirement to meet the current and future needs in sustainability of radiation safety. As a result safety culture, which has been a vital element on safety in many industries can be improved and promote changes, leading to good safety performance and excellence. (author)

  17. Safety Assessment for Facilities and Activities. General Safety Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication describes the generally applicable requirements to be fulfilled in safety assessments for facilities and activities, with special attention paid to defence in depth, quantitative analyses and the application of a graded approach to the ranges of facilities and of activities that are addressed. The requirements provide a consistent and coherent basis for safety assessments, facilitating the transfer of good practices between organizations. A review of Safety Requirements publications was commenced in 2011 following the accident in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. The review revealed no significant areas of weakness and resulted in just a small set of amendments to strengthen the requirements and facilitate their implementation, which are contained in the present publication

  18. Culture of safety: A foundation for patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, KuoJen; Browne, Marybeth

    2015-12-01

    The 1999 IOM report on patient safety identified the house of medicine as a culture that tolerated injury at a frightening level. Identifying other industries that had cultures that would not tolerate such levels of error has begun to change the culture of healthcare to a more "high-reliability" culture. Various organizational and standardized communication tools have been imported from the military, airline, and energy industries to flatten the hierarchy and improve the reliability of communication and handoffs in healthcare. Reporting structures that focus on the effectiveness of the team and the system, more than blaming the individual, have demonstrated noticeable improvements in safety and changed culture. Further sustained efforts in developing a culture focused on safety as a priority is needed for sustainable reduction of harm, and improve the reliability of care. PMID:26653161

  19. Patient Safety Culture: Nurses’ Attitude in Marvdasht Shahid Motahary Hospital, 1392

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarei M

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives:Improving the safety culture has been implemented as a key strategy to improve patient safety in health care systems. Several surveys have shown that assessment of patient safety attitude and examining to what extent these attitudes exist could be used as an effective tool for promoting patient safety and such data meet the managers’ information needs over time. Thus, considering the importance of patient safety as a basic principle in improving the quality of clinical services and patient satisfaction, this study was aimed to examine nurse’s attitudes towards the safety culture. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study the study population included nurses who were working in Marvdasht Shahid Motahary hospital, 2013. The sample size was selected by using a stratified randomization method as 114. The data were collected through HSOPSC questionnaire that has been introduced by the Health Care Research and Quality agency in 2004. The questionnaire is composed of eight parts. One part is about demographic and career information and other parts are about different dimensions of the patient safety culture. The collected data were then analyzed using the SPSS software and descriptive statistical tests. Results: The obtained results showed that the manager and supervisor expectations and actions in order to promote patient safety and the overall understanding of patient safety dimensions received the highest rating. On the other hand, staffing and non-punitive response to errors dimensions received the lowest score among the 12 dimensions of patient safety culture. Nonetheless, 44% of the studied population considered the patient safety status in their units as acceptable. However, 39% of the population had not reported any errors in the past 12 months. Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, the need to improve the safety culture at different dimensions seems necessary. Also, the culture of error reporting

  20. Cultural context of the safety culture: a conceptual model and experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two general components of the safety culture are 'the necessary framework within an organization and the attitude of staff at all different levels in responding to and benefiting from the framework.' Also, the requirements from individual employees for achieving safety culture at installations are 'a questioning attitude, a rigorous and prudent approach and necessary communication.' Recent studies have highlighted the critical role of cultural factors in the safety of nuclear power plants. This paper contends that an organization's safety culture, as a system composed of behaviors, practices, policies, and structural components, cannot flourish or succeed without interactions and harmony with its environment - the societal or national culture. In other words, safety culture should be considered in the context of national culture. All dimensions of national culture, (power distance, uncertainty avoidance, individualism-collectivism, and masculinity-femininity), while interacting with foregoing general components and requirements could either resonate with and strengthen, or attenuate the safety culture. Questioning attitude (of operators) is greatly influenced by the power distance, rule orientation and uncertainty avoidance of the societal environment, and the openness in the organizational culture of the plant. A rigorous and prudent approach is moderated by power distance and uncertainty avoidance in the culture; and is also affected by the sacredness of procedures, the criticality of step-by-step compliance, and a definite organizational system at the plant. Communication is a function of all the dimensions of national culture as well as the organizational structure ,s hierarchy and rigidity. Thus, it is concluded that the necessary conditions for creating and nourishing safety culture in a nuclear installation include (but are not limited to): (1) A thorough understanding of the dimensions of the local national culture; (2) determination of the extent of

  1. Geographic Localization of Housestaff Inpatients Improves Patient-Provider Communication, Satisfaction, and Culture of Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Douglas P; Fields, Barry G; Windish, Donna M

    2015-01-01

    This study assesses whether geographic localization of housestaff patients contributes to improved patient knowledge of diagnosis, patient satisfaction, provider satisfaction, and workplace culture of safety. Due to national changes to graduate medical education, housestaff patients were localized to a single general medicine ward. Ninety-three patients prelocalization, 64 patients postlocalization, 26 localized physicians, and 10 localized nurses were surveyed. Validated questionnaires assessed patients' experiences during hospitalization, and physician and nurse job satisfaction. Fifty-seven percent of patients knew their diagnosis prior to localization, compared to 80% postlocalization (p teamwork, patient safety, appropriate handling of errors, and culture of safety. The average length of stay was unchanged and the change in 30-day readmission rate was not statistically significant. Localization of patients to a single inpatient ward improved patient knowledge and satisfaction, and some aspects of interprofessional communication and workplace culture of safety. PMID:26042748

  2. Implementing and measuring safety goals and safety culture. 4. Utility's Activities for Better Safety Culture After the JCO Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The criticality accident at the JCO plant prompted the Government to enact a law for nuclear emergency preparedness. The nuclear industry established NSnet to facilitate opportunities for peer review among its members. This paper describes the activities by NSnet and TEPCO's Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power station (NPS) for a better safety culture. Created as a voluntary organization by the nuclear industry in 1999, NSnet has 35 members and is assisted by CRIEPI and NUPEC for its activities relevant to human factors. Given the fact that nuclear facility operators not belonging to WANO had no institutional system available for exchange of experiences and good practices for better safety among themselves, NSnet's activities focus on peer review by member organizations and onsite seminars. Starting April 2000 with visits to three fuel fabricators, NSnet intends to have 23 peer-review visits in 2 yr (Ref. 1). The six-member review team stays on-site for 4 days, during which time they review-using guidelines available from WANO and IAEA-OSART-six areas: organization/management, emergency preparedness, education/training, operation/ maintenance, protection against occupational radiation exposure, and prevention of accidents. A series of on-site seminars is held at members' nuclear facilities, to which NSnet dispatches experts for lectures. NSnet plans to hold such seminars twice per month. Other activities include information-sharing through a newsletter, a Web site (www. nsnet.gr.jp), and others. Although considerable differences exist in the design and the practices in operation/maintenance between power reactors and JCO, utilities can extract lessons from the accident that will be worth consideration for their own facilities in the areas of safety culture, education and training, and interface between design and operation. This thinking prompted the Nuclear Safety Promotion Center at Kashiwazaki-Kariwa NPS, to which the author belonged at that time, to launch the

  3. Developing safety culture-rocket science or common sense?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite evidence of significant management contributions to the causes of major accidents, recent events at Millstone Nuclear Power Station in the US and Ontario Hydro in Canada might lead one to conclude that the significance of safety culture, and the role of management in developing and maintaining an appropriate safety culture, is either not being understood or not being taken serious as integral to the safe operation of some complex, high-reliability operations. It is the purpose of this paper to address four aspects of management that are particularly important to safety culture, and to illustrate how development of an appropriate safety culture is more a matter of common sense than rocket science

  4. Developing safety culture-rocket science or common sense?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahn, J.A.

    1998-08-01

    Despite evidence of significant management contributions to the causes of major accidents, recent events at Millstone Nuclear Power Station in the US and Ontario Hydro in Canada might lead one to conclude that the significance of safety culture, and the role of management in developing and maintaining an appropriate safety culture, is either not being understood or not being taken serious as integral to the safe operation of some complex, high-reliability operations. It is the purpose of this paper to address four aspects of management that are particularly important to safety culture, and to illustrate how development of an appropriate safety culture is more a matter of common sense than rocket science.

  5. Activities of nuclear safety culture in foreign organizations such as IAEA, etc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety of nuclear facilities is guaranteed with the safety of instrument and equipment and of human, organization, management and system. In the guarantee, especially the encouragement and the growth of nuclear safety culture which is the basis of the safety of the latter are very important. In recent years, severe accidents and transients due to organizational issues have increased. Then, international organizations, regulatory organizations of each country and nuclear enterprises promote positively the developments of self-assessment methods of safety culture and safety management systems. The activities in the international organizations of IAEA and OECD/NEA and in the foreign regulatory organizations of US NRC and UK NII are described. (K. Kato)

  6. Safety culture in the nuclear versus non-nuclear organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haber, S.B.; Shurberg, D.A.

    1996-10-01

    The importance of safety culture in the safe and reliable operation of nuclear organizations is not a new concept. The greatest barriers to this area of research are twofold: (1) the definition and criteria of safety culture for a nuclear organization and (2) the measurement of those attributes in an objective and systematic fashion. This paper will discuss a proposed resolution of those barriers as demonstrated by the collection of data across nuclear and non-nuclear facilities over a two year period.

  7. Safety culture in the nuclear versus non-nuclear organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of safety culture in the safe and reliable operation of nuclear organizations is not a new concept. The greatest barriers to this area of research are twofold: (1) the definition and criteria of safety culture for a nuclear organization and (2) the measurement of those attributes in an objective and systematic fashion. This paper will discuss a proposed resolution of those barriers as demonstrated by the collection of data across nuclear and non-nuclear facilities over a two year period

  8. Knowledge basis in safety culture for researchers and practitioners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the main characteristics of the knowledge basis in safety culture which is being developed at the IPEN-CNEN/SP, one of the Brazilian nuclear institutes of research. The main objective of this basis is to organize the information about safety culture found in the literature and to make it available to researchers and practitioners. The first stage of the development of this basis is already finished being the subject of this work. (author)

  9. Relationship between organisational safety culture dimensions and crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varmazyar, Sakineh; Mortazavi, Seyed Bagher; Arghami, Shirazeh; Hajizadeh, Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Knowing about organisational safety culture in public transportation system can provide an appropriate guide to establish effective safety measures and interventions to improve safety at work. The aim of this study was investigation of association between safety culture dimensions (leadership styles and company values, usage of crashes information and prevention programmes, management commitment and safety policy, participation and control) with involved self-reported crashes. The associations were considered through Spearman correlation, Pearson chi-square test and logistic regression. The results showed an association among self-reported crashes (occurrence or non-occurrence) and factors including leadership styles and company values; management commitment and safety policy; and control. Moreover, it was found a negative correlation and an odds ratio less than one between control and self-reported crashes. PMID:25494102

  10. Relationship between organisational safety culture dimensions and crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varmazyar, Sakineh; Mortazavi, Seyed Bagher; Arghami, Shirazeh; Hajizadeh, Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Knowing about organisational safety culture in public transportation system can provide an appropriate guide to establish effective safety measures and interventions to improve safety at work. The aim of this study was investigation of association between safety culture dimensions (leadership styles and company values, usage of crashes information and prevention programmes, management commitment and safety policy, participation and control) with involved self-reported crashes. The associations were considered through Spearman correlation, Pearson chi-square test and logistic regression. The results showed an association among self-reported crashes (occurrence or non-occurrence) and factors including leadership styles and company values; management commitment and safety policy; and control. Moreover, it was found a negative correlation and an odds ratio less than one between control and self-reported crashes.

  11. Development and psychometric test of the Assessment Scale for Patient Safety Culture in ICU%ICU患者安全文化测评量表的研制及信效度检验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄光琴; 夏建萍; 高春华; 蔡灵芝; 朱明丽; 王薇

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop the Assessment Scale for Patient Safety Culture in ICU and do psychometric test.Methods The Assessment Scale for Patient Safety Culture in ICU was developed based on literature review,qualitative interview,and two-round Delphi consultation.The reliability and validity were tested among 235 chnical nurses and doctors in ICU.Results A 45-item questionnaire was originally developed and eleven of them were deleted after subjective screening,project analysis and exploratory factor analysis.Seven factors were extracted with cumulative contribution rate of 59.347%.The scale of total Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.909; the split half reliability was 0.832.Each dimension of Cronbach's alpha coefficient was between 0.481~0.909,and the split half reliability was 0.481~0.866.All had significance in statistics above.Conclusions The Assessment Scale for Patient Safety Culture in ICU has good reliability and validity,which can be used to evaluate the ICU patient safety culture atmosphere domestically.%目的 研制ICU患者安全文化测评量表,并对所研制的量表进行信效度检验.方法 通过文献分析、质性访谈、2轮德尔菲(Delphi)专家咨询,形成“ICU患者安全文化测评量表”的原始量表.然后对235名医护人员进行预调查,评价其信效度.结果 初步形成45个条目,经初步主观筛选、项目分析、探索性因子分析后删除11个条目.应用主成分分析法,提取了特征值>1的7个公因子,其累积贡献率为59.347%.该量表总的Cronbach α系数为0.909,折半信度为0.832.各维度的Cronbach α系数在0.481~0.909,折半信度为0.481~0.866.以上均具有统计学意义.结论 编制的《ICU患者安全文化测评量表》具有较好的信效度,可用于评价ICU患者安全文化氛围.

  12. [Safe patient care: safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Pierre, M

    2013-04-01

    Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organisation's vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture ("top-down process"). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organizations maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization's general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed "informed culture". An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. "Incident reporting systems" are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organisation's "safe surgery checklist" is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality.Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate simulation based team trainings into their curriculum

  13. Safe patient care - safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Pierre, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organization's vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture ("top-down process"). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organization's maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization's general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed "informed culture". An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. "Incident reporting systems" are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organization's safe surgery checklist" is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality. Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate stimulation based team trainings into their

  14. Variations in hospital worker perceptions of safety culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Listyowardojo, Tita Alissa; Nap, Raoul E.; Johnson, Addie

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To compare the attitudes toward and perceptions of institutional practices that can influence patient safety between all professional groups at a university medical center. Design. A questionnaire measuring nine dimensions of organizational and safety culture was distributed to all hospit

  15. Strengthening leadership as a catalyst for enhanced patient safety culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Solvejg; Christensen, Karl Bang; Jaquet, Annette;

    2016-01-01

    in the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire. To broaden knowledge and strengthen leadership skills, a multicomponent programme consisting of academic input, exercises, reflections and discussions, networking, and action learning was implemented among the clinical area level leaders. RESULTS: In total, 358 and 325...... over time. 6 patient safety culture dimensions became more positive (increase in mean) (pstress recognition (p

  16. Psychological aspect of safety culture and motivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluations of motivation related to safety of personnel in NPPs and other nuclear facilities is made using the results from a study involving 606 persons from Kursk NPP, Physics and Power Engineering Institute (Russia), Obninsk Institute od Nuclear Power and Engineering and Training Centre of Russian Federation Navy. The results show the predominant role of safety motivation as an independent component in the structure of labor activity of nuclear workers and its dynamics in forming the motivation structure

  17. Probabilistic safety assessment in radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Probabilistic safety assessment codes are now widely used in radioactive waste disposal assessments. This report gives an overview of the current state of the field. The relationship between the codes and the regulations covering radioactive waste disposal is discussed and the characteristics of current codes is described. The problems of verification and validation are considered. (author)

  18. Health Technology Assessment and patient safety

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Mulcahy; Tom Walley

    2005-01-01

    Health Technology Assessment (HTA) is a process used to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and costeffectiveness of health technologies by a systematic review of clinical, economic, and utilization research.

    Despite widespread investment in patient safety technologies in the U.K., U.S., and elsewhere, little HTA has been done to establish the clinical or cost-effectiveness of these technologies. The HTA and patient safety literature suggests there are four categori...

  19. Fire safety assessment of tunnel structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gkoumas, Konstantinos; Giuliani, Luisa; Petrini, Francesco;

    2011-01-01

    .g. structural and non structural, organizational, human behavior). This is even more truth for the fire safety design of such structures. Fire safety in tunnels is challenging because of the particular environment, bearing in mind also that a fire can occur in different phases of the tunnel’s lifecycle. Plans...... for upgrading fire safety provisions and tunnel management are also important for existing tunnels. In this study, following a brief introduction of issues regarding the above mentioned aspects, the structural performance of a steel rib for a tunnel infrastructure subject to fire is assessed by means...

  20. Integrated Deterministic-Probabilistic Safety Assessment Methodologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudinov, P.; Vorobyev, Y.; Sanchez-Perea, M.; Queral, C.; Jimenez Varas, G.; Rebollo, M. J.; Mena, L.; Gomez-Magin, J.

    2014-02-01

    IDPSA (Integrated Deterministic-Probabilistic Safety Assessment) is a family of methods which use tightly coupled probabilistic and deterministic approaches to address respective sources of uncertainties, enabling Risk informed decision making in a consistent manner. The starting point of the IDPSA framework is that safety justification must be based on the coupling of deterministic (consequences) and probabilistic (frequency) considerations to address the mutual interactions between stochastic disturbances (e.g. failures of the equipment, human actions, stochastic physical phenomena) and deterministic response of the plant (i.e. transients). This paper gives a general overview of some IDPSA methods as well as some possible applications to PWR safety analyses. (Author)

  1. Integrated Deterministic-Probabilistic Safety Assessment Methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IDPSA (Integrated Deterministic-Probabilistic Safety Assessment) is a family of methods which use tightly coupled probabilistic and deterministic approaches to address respective sources of uncertainties, enabling Risk informed decision making in a consistent manner. The starting point of the IDPSA framework is that safety justification must be based on the coupling of deterministic (consequences) and probabilistic (frequency) considerations to address the mutual interactions between stochastic disturbances (e.g. failures of the equipment, human actions, stochastic physical phenomena) and deterministic response of the plant (i.e. transients). This paper gives a general overview of some IDPSA methods as well as some possible applications to PWR safety analyses. (Author)

  2. Safety culture and subcontractor network governance in a complex safety critical project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In safety critical industries many activities are currently carried out by subcontractor networks. Nevertheless, there are few studies where the core dimensions of resilience would have been studied in safety critical network activities. This paper claims that engineering resilience into a system is largely about steering the development of culture of the system towards better ability to anticipate, monitor, respond and learn. Thus, safety culture literature has relevance in resilience engineering field. This paper analyzes practical and theoretical challenges in applying the concept of safety culture in a complex, dynamic network of subcontractors involved in the construction of a new nuclear power plant in Finland, Olkiluoto 3. The concept of safety culture is in focus since it is widely used in nuclear industry and bridges the scientific and practical interests. This paper approaches subcontractor networks as complex systems. However, the management model of the Olkiluoto 3 project is to a large degree a traditional top-down hierarchy, which creates a mismatch between the management approach and the characteristics of the system to be managed. New insights were drawn from network governance studies. - Highlights: • We studied a relevant topical subject safety culture in nuclear new build project. • We integrated safety science challenges and network governance studies. • We produced practicable insights in managing safety of subcontractor networks

  3. Cultural safety: a vital element for nursing ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    This paper argues that the globalisation of nursing and the internationalisation of nursing education have lead to Western values being embedded into nursing curricula in nations where the cultural values and beliefs may be based in quite different philosophies. It argues for critical examination of assumptions underpinning ethics education in nursing and proposes that the principles of cultural safety need to be incorporated into ethics education to create a culturally safe ethic for both nurses and patients in a multicultural healthcare environment.

  4. HANFORD SAFETY ANALYSIS & RISK ASSESSMENT HANDBOOK (SARAH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EVANS, C B

    2004-12-21

    The purpose of the Hanford Safety Analysis and Risk Assessment Handbook (SARAH) is to support the development of safety basis documentation for Hazard Category 2 and 3 (HC-2 and 3) U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 830, ''Nuclear Safety Management''. Subpart B, ''Safety Basis Requirements.'' Consistent with DOE-STD-3009-94, Change Notice 2, ''Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses'' (STD-3009), and DOE-STD-3011-2002, ''Guidance for Preparation of Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) Documents'' (STD-3011), the Hanford SARAH describes methodology for performing a safety analysis leading to development of a Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and derivation of Technical Safety Requirements (TSR), and provides the information necessary to ensure a consistently rigorous approach that meets DOE expectations. The DSA and TSR documents, together with the DOE-issued Safety Evaluation Report (SER), are the basic components of facility safety basis documentation. For HC-2 or 3 nuclear facilities in long-term surveillance and maintenance (S&M), for decommissioning activities, where source term has been eliminated to the point that only low-level, residual fixed contamination is present, or for environmental remediation activities outside of a facility structure, DOE-STD-1120-98, ''Integration of Environment, Safety, and Health into Facility Disposition Activities'' (STD-1120), may serve as the basis for the DSA. HC-2 and 3 environmental remediation sites also are subject to the hazard analysis methodologies of this standard.

  5. Environment, safety and health progress assessment manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On June 27, 1989, the Secretary of Energy announced a 1O-Point Initiative to strengthen environment,safety, and health (ES ampersand H) programs, and waste management activities at involved conducting DOE production, research, and testing facilities. One of the points independent Tiger Team Assessments of DOE operating facilities. The Office of Special Projects (OSP), EH-5, in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health, EH-1, was assigned the responsibility to conduct the Tiger Team Assessments. Through June 1992, a total of 35 Tiger Team Assessments were completed. The Secretary directed that Corrective Action Plans be developed and implemented to address the concerns identified by the Tiger Teams. In March 1991, the Secretary approved a plan for assessments that are ''more focused, concentrating on ES ampersand H management, ES ampersand H corrective actions, self-assessment programs, and root-cause related issues.'' In July 1991, the Secretary approved the initiation of ES ampersand H Progress Assessments, as a followup to the Tiger Team Assessments, and in the continuing effort to institutionalize the self-assessment process and line management accountability in the ES ampersand H areas. This volume contains appendices to the Environment, Safety and Health Progress Assessment Manual

  6. Culture, language, and patient safety: Making the link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Megan-Jane; Kanitsaki, Olga

    2006-10-01

    It has been well recognized internationally that hospitals are not as safe as they should be. In order to redress this situation, health care services around the world have turned their attention to strategically implementing robust patient safety and quality care programmes to identify circumstances that put patients at risk of harm and then acting to prevent or control those risks. Despite the progress that has been made in improving hospital safety in recent years, there is emerging evidence that patients of minority cultural and language backgrounds are disproportionately at risk of experiencing preventable adverse events while in hospital compared with mainstream patient groups. One reason for this is that patient safety programmes have tended to underestimate and understate the critical relationship that exists between culture, language, and the safety and quality of care of patients from minority racial, ethno-cultural, and language backgrounds. This article suggests that the failure to recognize the critical link between culture and language (of both the providers and recipients of health care) and patient safety stands as a 'resident pathogen' within the health care system that, if not addressed, unacceptably exposes patients from minority ethno-cultural and language backgrounds to preventable adverse events in hospital contexts. It is further suggested that in order to ensure that minority as well as majority patient interests in receiving safe and quality care are properly protected, the culture-language-patient-safety link needs to be formally recognized and the vulnerabilities of patients from minority cultural and language backgrounds explicitly identified and actively addressed in patient safety systems and processes.

  7. A Socio-cultural Perspective on Patient Safety

    CERN Document Server

    Rowley, Emma

    2011-01-01

    This edited volume of original chapters brings together researchers from around the world who are exploring the facets of health care organization and delivery that are sometimes marginal to mainstream patient safety theories and methodologies but offer important insights into the socio-cultural and organizational context of patient safety. By examining these critical insights or perspectives and drawing upon theories and methodologies often neglected by mainstream safety researchers, this collection shows we can learn more about not only the barriers and drivers to implementing patient safety

  8. Engineering safety assessment. An introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There have been several major industrial accidents in recent years, notably the Chernobyl reactor accident, the Bhopal disaster and the Mexico City gas explosions. It is essential that engineers should understand the natures of the hazards and risks of industrial plant. This book is intended to give an introduction to this subject. Determining the risks associated with hazardous plant such as a chemical plant or a nuclear power station requires knowledge of the probability of a given accident, as well as knowledge of the likely consequences in terms of human lives or damaged property. In this book, the author explains these two main themes in assessing overall risk. He introduces basic probability theory, the assessment of systems reliabilities and structural reliabilities, and the means used to estimate the consequences of hypothetical major accidents. In particular, the methodologies for estimating the consequences of accidental explosion and accidents involving the release of airborne toxic materials (including chemical toxins, carcinogens, and radioactive materials) are explained. A final chapter explores the difficult question of 'acceptable' risk, and how much can justifiably be spent on risk reduction. Intended for use by final year students of chemical, mechanical or nuclear engineering, this book will also be suitable for postgraduate students and practising engineers and scientists whose work involves them in risk assessment. (author)

  9. Developments in safety and operations culture in BNFL's thorp reprocessing plant, Sellafield, Cumbria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the best descriptions of Culture is 'how we do things around here'. In a stable organisation it is extremely difficult to change any type of culture, whether it is an operations, customer service or safety culture. To change culture one of two elements are essential. There must be either a significant external pressure felt by all in the organisation or a change in senior management, with authority to set a new direction for the organisation. BNFL had a unique opportunity through the commissioning and operation of the Thorp Reprocessing Plant at Sellafield to shape a new Safety and Operations Culture. Both the key elements for change were present. Thorp was a high profile flagship plant that had attracted multinational investment. It incorporated new technology. The workforce had volunteered to operate the plant. A strong senior management team was specially selected. The plant was being commissioned in an environment where there was significant opposition by 'anti nuclear' groups. It was essential to both BNFL and the wider international nuclear community that Thorp was commissioned and operated safely. A strong operating culture was developed with safety as the corner stone. The culture comprises three key components. Rigorous plant safety case and risk assessments before work commences and modifications to the plant occur; A high level of involvement by all levels of the workforce in both operations and safety matters; Strong supportive leadership which does not allow safety standards to be compromised and encourages open debate on how to improve. During commissioning and early operation of Thorp the robustness of the Safety and Operations Culture was demonstrated. On several occasions, despite intense commercial pressure, operations were halted until the situation was resolved both technically and procedurally. This paper describes how the Safety and Operations Culture was developed. The key factors for success include recruitment, team selection

  10. Indirect Lightning Safety Assessment Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ong, M M; Perkins, M P; Brown, C G; Crull, E W; Streit, R D

    2009-04-24

    Lightning is a safety hazard for high-explosives (HE) and their detonators. In the However, the current flowing from the strike point through the rebar of the building The methodology for estimating the risk from indirect lighting effects will be presented. It has two parts: a method to determine the likelihood of a detonation given a lightning strike, and an approach for estimating the likelihood of a strike. The results of these two parts produce an overall probability of a detonation. The probability calculations are complex for five reasons: (1) lightning strikes are stochastic and relatively rare, (2) the quality of the Faraday cage varies from one facility to the next, (3) RF coupling is inherently a complex subject, (4) performance data for abnormally stressed detonators is scarce, and (5) the arc plasma physics is not well understood. Therefore, a rigorous mathematical analysis would be too complex. Instead, our methodology takes a more practical approach combining rigorous mathematical calculations where possible with empirical data when necessary. Where there is uncertainty, we compensate with conservative approximations. The goal is to determine a conservative estimate of the odds of a detonation. In Section 2, the methodology will be explained. This report will discuss topics at a high-level. The reasons for selecting an approach will be justified. For those interested in technical details, references will be provided. In Section 3, a simple hypothetical example will be given to reinforce the concepts. While the methodology will touch on all the items shown in Figure 1, the focus of this report is the indirect effect, i.e., determining the odds of a detonation from given EM fields. Professor Martin Uman from the University of Florida has been characterizing and defining extreme lightning strikes. Using Professor Uman's research, Dr. Kimball Merewether at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque calculated the EM fields inside a Faraday-cage type

  11. Environment, safety and health progress assessment manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On June 27, 1989, the Secretary of Energy announced a 10-Point Initiative to strengthen environment, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) programs, and waste management activities at DOE production, research, and testing facilities. One of the points involved conducting dent Tiger Team Assessments of DOE operating facilities. The Office of Special independent Projects (OSP), EH-5, in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health, EH-1, was assigned the responsibility to conduct the Tiger Team Assessments. Through June 1992, a total of 35 Tiger Team Assessments were completed. The Secretary directed that Corrective Action Plans be developed and implemented to address the concerns identified by the Tiger Teams. In March 1991, the Secretary approved a plan for assessments that are ''more focused, concentrating on ES ampersand H management, ES ampersand H corrective actions, self-assessment programs, and root-cause related issues.'' In July 1991, the Secretary approved the initiation of ES ampersand H Progress Assessments, as a followup to the Tiger Team Assessments, and in the continuing effort to institutionalize the self-assessment process and line management accountability in the ES ampersand H areas. This manual documents the processes to be used to perform the ES ampersand H Progress Assessments. It was developed based upon the lessons learned from Tiger Team Assessments, the two pilot Progress Assessments, and Progress Assessments that have been completed. The manual will be updated periodically to reflect lessons learned or changes in policy

  12. Industrial irradiator radiation safety program assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark A.

    2000-03-01

    Considerable attention is typically given to radiation safety in the design of irradiators and initially establishing the program. However, one component that may not receive enough attention is applying the continuous improvement philosophy to the radiation safety program. Periodic total program assessments of radiation safety can ensure that the design and implementation of the program continues to be applicable to the operations. The first step in the process must be to determine what is to be covered in the program assessment. While regulatory compliance audits are a component, the most useful evaluation will extend beyond looking only at compliance and determine whether the radiation safety program is the most appropriate for the particular operation. Several aspects of the irradiator operation, not all of which may routinely be considered "radiation safety", per se, should be included: Design aspects of the irradiator and operating system, system controls, and maintenance procedures, as well as the more traditional radiation safety program components such as surveys, measurements and training.

  13. Further activities of safety culture toward nuclear transportation industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On September 30, 1999, a criticality accident occurred at the uranium processing facility of the JCO Co. Ltd. (hereinafter referred to as ''JCO'') Tokai plant, located in Tokaimura, Ibaraki Prefecture. This was an unprecedented accident in Japan's history of peaceful use of nuclear power, resulting in three workers exposed to severe radiation, two of whom died, and the evacuation and enforced indoor confinement of local residents. Nuclear power suppliers must take personal responsibility for ensuring safety. In this connection, the electric power industry, heavy electric machinery manufacturers, fuel fabricators, and nuclear power research organizations gathered together to establish the Nuclear Safety Network (NSnet) in December 1999, based on the resolve to share and improve the level of the safety culture across the entire nuclear power industry and to assure that such an accident never occurs again. NSnet serves as a link between nuclear power enterprises, research organizations, and other bodies, based on the principles of equality and reciprocity. A variety of activities are pursued, such as diffusing a safety culture, implementing mutual evaluation among members, and exchanging safety-related information. Aiming to share and improve the safety culture throughout the entire nuclear power industry, NSnet thoroughly implements the principle of safety first, while at the same time making efforts to restore trust in nuclear power

  14. Psychometric properties of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture for hospital management (HSOPS_M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfeiffer Yvonne

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background From a management perspective, it is necessary to examine how a hospital's top management assess the patient safety culture in their organisation. This study examines whether the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture for hospital management (HSOPS_M has the same psychometric properties as the HSOPS for hospital employees does. Methods In 2008, a questionnaire survey including the HSOPS_M was conducted with 1,224 medical directors from German hospitals. When assessing the psychometric properties, we performed a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA. Additionally, we proved construct validity and internal consistency. Results A total of 551 medical directors returned the questionnaire. The results of the CFA suggested a satisfactory global data fit. The indices of local fit indicated a good, but not satisfactory convergent validity. Analyses of construct validity indicated that not all safety culture dimensions were readily distinguishable. However, Cronbach's alpha indicated that the dimensions had an acceptable level of reliability. Conclusion The analyses of the psychometric properties of the HSOPS_M resulted in reasonably good levels of property values. Although the set of dimensions within the HSOPS_M needs further scale refinement, the questionnaire covers a broad range of sub-dimensions and supplies important information on safety culture. The HSOPS_M, therefore, is eligible to measure safety culture from the hospital management's points of view and could be used in nationwide hospital surveys to make inter-organisational comparisons.

  15. Safe operation of nuclear power plants - Is safety culture an adequate management method?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piirto, A.

    2012-07-01

    One of the characteristics of a good safety culture is a definable commitment to the improvement of safety behaviours and attitudes at all organisational levels. A second characteristic of an organisation with excellent safety culture is free and open communication. The general understanding has been that safety culture is a part of organisation culture. In addition to safety culture thinking, proactive programmes and displays of proactive work to improve safety are required. This work needs to include, qt a minimum, actions aiming at reducing human errors, the development of human error prevention tools, improvements in training, and the development of working methods and the organisation's activities. Safety depends not only on the technical systems, but also on the organisation. There is a need for better methods and tools for organisational assessment and development. Today there is universal acceptance of the significant impact that management and organisational factors have over the safety significance of complex industrial installations such as nuclear power plants. Many events with significant economic and public impact had causes that have been traced to management deficiencies. The objective of this study is development of new methods to increase safety of nuclear power plant operation. The research has been limited to commercial nuclear power plants that are intended for electrical power generation in Finland. Their production activities, especially operation and maintenance, are primarily reviewed from a safety point of view, as well as human performance and organisational factors perspective. This defines the scope and focus of the study. The research includes studies related to knowledge management and tacit knowledge in the project management context and specific studies related to transfer of tacit knowledge in the maintenance organization and transfer of tacit knowledge between workers of old generation and young generation. The empirical

  16. Agent-based organizational modelling for analysis of safety culture at an air navigation service provider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessment of safety culture is done predominantly by questionnaire-based studies, which tend to reveal attitudes on immaterial characteristics (values, beliefs, norms). There is a need for a better understanding of the implications of the material aspects of an organization (structures, processes, etc.) for safety culture and their interactions with the immaterial characteristics. This paper presents a new agent-based organizational modelling approach for integrated and systematic evaluation of material and immaterial characteristics of socio-technical organizations in safety culture analysis. It uniquely considers both the formal organization and the value- and belief-driven behaviour of individuals in the organization. Results are presented of a model for safety occurrence reporting at an air navigation service provider. Model predictions consistent with questionnaire-based results are achieved. A sensitivity analysis provides insight in organizational factors that strongly influence safety culture indicators. The modelling approach can be used in combination with attitude-focused safety culture research, towards an integrated evaluation of material and immaterial characteristics of socio-technical organizations. By using this approach an organization is able to gain a deeper understanding of causes of diverse problems and inefficiencies both in the formal organization and in the behaviour of organizational agents, and to systematically identify and evaluate improvement options.

  17. Safety culture: a survey of the state-of-the-art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the evolution of the term 'safety culture' and the perceived relationship between safety culture and safety of operations in nuclear power generation and other hazardous technologies. There is a widespread belief that safety culture is an important contributor to safety of operations. Empirical evidence that safety culture and other management and organizational factors influence operational safety is more readily available for the chemical process industry than for nuclear power plant operations. The commonly accepted attributes of safety culture include good organizational communications, good organizational learning, and senior management commitment to safety. Safety culture may be particularly important in reducing latent errors in complex, well-defended systems. The role of regulatory bodies in fostering strong safety cultures remains unclear, and additional work is required to define the essential attributes of safety culture and to identify reliable performance indicators

  18. Safety analysis and risk assessment handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Analysis and Risk Assessment Handbook (SARAH) provides guidance to the safety analyst at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in the preparation of safety analyses and risk assessments. Although the older guidance (the Rocky Flats Risk Assessment Guide) continues to be used for updating the Final Safety Analysis Reports developed in the mid-1980s, this new guidance is used with all new authorization basis documents. With the mission change at RFETS came the need to establish new authorization basis documents for its facilities, whose functions had changed. The methodology and databases for performing the evaluations that support the new authorization basis documents had to be standardized, to avoid the use of different approaches and/or databases for similar accidents in different facilities. This handbook presents this new standardized approach. The handbook begins with a discussion of the requirements of the different types of authorization basis documents and how to choose the one appropriate for the facility to be evaluated. It then walks the analyst through the process of identifying all the potential hazards in the facility, classifying them, and choosing the ones that need to be analyzed further. It then discusses the methods for evaluating accident initiation and progression and covers the basic steps in a safety analysis, including consequence and frequency binning and risk ranking. The handbook lays out standardized approaches for determining the source terms of the various accidents (including airborne release fractions, leakpath factors, etc.), the atmospheric dispersion factors appropriate for Rocky Flats, and the methods for radiological and chemical consequence assessments. The radiological assessments use a radiological open-quotes templateclose quotes, a spreadsheet that incorporates the standard values of parameters, whereas the chemical assessments use the standard codes ARCHIE and ALOHA

  19. Critical Ethnography, Cultural Safety, and International Nursing Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean N. Harrowing PhD

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Critical qualitative methodology provides a strategy to examine the human experience and its relationship to power and truth. Cultural safety is a concept that has been applied to nursing education and practice and refers to interactions that acknowledge and respect the unique cultural background of patients. It recognizes power inequities between caregivers who belong to dominant cultures and patients who may belong to oppressed groups. Culture is interpreted from a critical constructivist perspective as a fluid relational process that is enacted contextually. The purpose of this paper is to examine the congruence between and

  20. A Framework for Culture Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Tomasz Lenartowicz; Kendall Roth

    1999-01-01

    Understanding the nature and influences of culture is central to international business. Such inquiry presupposes knowing that the cultural grouping(s) of a study is a valid unit of analysis, which is critical in that the estimation of culture effects can vary based on the unit definition. Unfortunately, perhaps out of convenience, international studies often simply use a country-based definition of culture. In a desire to facilitate further development in understanding culture effects, in th...

  1. Safety assessment of plant food supplements (PFS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den S.J.P.L.; Serra-Majem, L.; Coppens, P.; Rietjens, I.

    2011-01-01

    Botanicals and botanical preparations, including plant food supplements (PFS), are widely used in Western diets. The growing use of PFS is accompanied by an increasing concern because the safety of these PFS is not generally assessed before they enter the market. Regulatory bodies have become more a

  2. Safety assessment of genetically modified foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleter, G.A.; Noordam, M.Y.

    2016-01-01

    The cultivation of genetically modified (GM) crops has steadily increased since their introduction to the market in the mid-1990s. Before these crops can be grown and sold they have to obtain regulatory approval in many countries, the process of which includes a pre-market safety assessment. The foo

  3. Counseling Muslim Americans: Cultural and Spiritual Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Farah A.; Dykeman, Cass

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors identify the cultural and spiritual assessments needed to conduct counseling with Muslim Americans and Muslim immigrants to the United States. Assessment processes are outlined that include cultural identity (which subsumes several variables); worldview; spiritual assessment along with acculturation level and migration…

  4. Safety culture and the accident at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior to the accident at Three Mile Island, little attention was being paid to the human role in the safe operation of civilian nuclear power plants. The investigation of the TMI accident showed that its root causes were primarily human-related. The Kemeny Report on the TMI accident does not use the term 'safety culture'; however, it fully identifies all relevant aspects of safety culture. It was only after the accident at Chernobyl that the term 'safety culture' came into widespread use. However, it should be noted that, during the years after TMI and before Chernobyl, already major changes had been instituted concerning human factors and human reliability in the civilian nuclear energy programs of many countries. Greater credit should be given to the remarkable insights developed by the Kemeny Commission as contained in the Kemeny Report. (author)

  5. Inclusion and Exclusion in the safety culture at sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøn, Sisse

    The acceleration of the globalization faces us as a nation with the challenge of adjusting our procedures and policies to accommodate foreign citizens working in Danish workplaces. In this paper I analyse data from field work voyages at sea. The data is presented in categories of bonding, bridging...... and linking acts inspired from research in social capital, and supplemented with acts of exclusion, all to describe the power conflicts which includes and excludes members in the unitary, divided or fragmented safety cultures that I met on board. The data shows that foreign seafarers are treated equally...... as long as the basic structures are not addressed. They are however treated equally on the majority´s terms, which still lead to a minority position even in the safety culture. A shared safety culture is therefore difficult to achieve....

  6. Organizational Culture and Safety Performance in the Manufacturing Companies in Malaysia: A Conceptual Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ong Choon Hee; Lim Lee Ping

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a conceptual analysis of organizational culture and safety performance in the manufacturing companies in Malaysia. Our conceptual analysis suggests that manufacturing companies that adopt group culture or hierarchical culture are more likely to demonstrate safety compliance and safety participation. Manufacturing companies that adopt rational culture or developmental culture are less likely to demonstrate safety compliance and safety participation. Give...

  7. How organizational, technical and cultural processes work together for safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global principles of 'safety culture' have to become embedded in the local policies and implementing practices of hundreds of 'plant cultures' around the world in order to affect their safe performance. Through self-analysis, nuclear organizations can understand how they currently respond socially, culturally, and technically to such system characteristics of complexity, density, obscured signals, and delayed feedback in order to assure their capacities for anticipating, preventing, and recovering from threats to safety. To be carried out by executives, managers, and employees and across all functions, self-analysis has three steps: Developing 'activities analyses' of operations and maintenance work, using that analysis to create a 'gap map' of needed but missing relationships and communications, and using the evidence revealed in both self-studies to understand details of their local safety culture and acknowledge differences in priorities, values, and assumptions among specialists. Organizational safety policies need to foster respect for differences and ways of managing conflict and diversity. Nuclear organizations can use their self-studies as the basis for discussing safety management strategies with peers and with organizational researchers and safety scholars and practitioners. The first priority of safety management is to strengthen or change the collective conditions under which people understand, organize, and carry out very complicated, potentially hazardous work. When the men and women operating and maintaining nuclear installations change their approaches to their work in accordance with their activities analyses and the new understandings their gap maps provide, their active participation in self-studies is likely to also change their attitudes and make them more aware of their own proclivities to error and misinterpretation, hence of their need to learn. Such motivational and cognitive changes are also likely to be more enduring when organizational

  8. Evaluation of patient safety culture among Malaysian retail pharmacists: results of a self-reported survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivanandy P

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Palanisamy Sivanandy,1 Mari Kannan Maharajan,1 Kingston Rajiah,1 Tan Tyng Wei,2 Tan Wee Loon,2 Lim Chong Yee2 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy, 2School of Pharmacy, International Medical University, Wilayah Persekutuan Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia Background: Patient safety is a major public health issue, and the knowledge, skills, and experience of health professionals are very much essential for improving patient safety. Patient safety and medication error are very much associated. Pharmacists play a significant role in patient safety. The function of pharmacists in the medication use process is very different from medical and nursing colleagues. Medication dispensing accuracy is a vital element to ensure the safety and quality of medication use.Objective: To evaluate the attitude and perception of the pharmacist toward patient safety in retail pharmacies setup in Malaysia.Methods: A Pharmacy Survey on Patient Safety Culture questionnaire was used to assess patient safety culture, developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the convenience sampling method was adopted.Results: The overall positive response rate ranged from 31.20% to 87.43%, and the average positive response rate was found to be 67%. Among all the eleven domains pertaining to patient safety culture, the scores of “staff training and skills” were less. Communication openness, and patient counseling are common, but not practiced regularly in the Malaysian retail pharmacy setup compared with those in USA. The overall perception of patient safety of an acceptable level in the current retail pharmacy setup.Conclusion: The study revealed that staff training, skills, communication in patient counseling, and communication across shifts and about mistakes are less in current retail pharmacy setup. The overall perception of patient safety should be improved by educating the pharmacists about the significance and essential of patient safety. Keywords

  9. Safety assessment of high consequence robotics system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, D.G.; Atcitty, C.B.

    1996-08-01

    This paper outlines the use of a failure modes and effects analysis for the safety assessment of a robotic system being developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The robotic system, the weigh and leak check system, is to replace a manual process for weight and leakage of nuclear materials at the DOE Pantex facility. Failure modes and effects analyses were completed for the robotics process to ensure that safety goals for the systems have been met. Due to the flexible nature of the robot configuration, traditional failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) were not applicable. In addition, the primary focus of safety assessments of robotics systems has been the protection of personnel in the immediate area. In this application, the safety analysis must account for the sensitivities of the payload as well as traditional issues. A unique variation on the classical FMEA was developed that permits an organized and quite effective tool to be used to assure that safety was adequately considered during the development of the robotic system. The fundamental aspects of the approach are outlined in the paper.

  10. Colorectal Cancer Screening at the Nexus of HIV, Minority Statuses, and Cultural Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ka'opua, Lana Sue I.; Diaz, Tressa P.; Park, Soon H.; Bowen, Talita; Patrick, Kevin; Tamang, Suresh; Braun, Kathryn L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The incidence of non-AIDS-defining cancers has increased significantly among persons living with HIV (PLHIV). Screening education is recommended. Purpose: Social learning, minority stress, and cultural safety theories informed this pilot to assess the feasibility of a colorectal cancer screening intervention targeted to PLHIV, with…

  11. Complementary Safety Margin Assessment. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-10-15

    On March 11, 2011, a large part of the Japanese eastern coastal area was devastated by an earthquake, followed by an immense tsunami. As a result, thousands of people were killed, injured or made homeless. In the days that followed, the situation was further complicated because of the failing nuclear reactors on the Fukushima coast. The local environment suffered from radioactive releases, requiring evacuation zones, and generating international concerns about nuclear safety. In the wake of this disaster the European Union decided to assess safety on all operating nuclear reactors in its member states. This safety evaluation initiated by the European Union focusses on extreme natural hazards, beyond the standard safety evaluations which regularly have to be performed to demonstrate the safety of a nuclear power plant. Consequences of these extreme hazards for the Borssele NPP have been evaluated based on available safety analyses, supplemented by engineering judgement. In this way, the robustness of the existing plant has been assessed and possible measures to further increase the safety margins have been identified. This document presents the results of the Complementary Safety margin Assessment (CSA) performed for the NPP Borssele. The distinct difference between this report and former risk analysis reports in general and the existing Safety Report of the NPP Borssele is that the maximum resistance of the plant against redefined and more challenging events has been investigated, whereas traditionally the plant design is investigated against certain events that are determined on a historical basis. This different approach requires different analyses and studies, which in turn presents new insights into the robustness of the plant. This document has been prepared in the short time period between June 1 and October 31, 2011. If more time had been granted for this study, some of the subjects could have been pursued in greater depth. The EPZ project team has been

  12. Human Reliability in Probabilistic Safety Assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays a growing interest in environmental aspects is detected in our country. It implies an assessment of the risk involved in the industrial processes and installations in order to determine if those are into the acceptable limits. In these safety assessments, among which PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessments), can be pointed out the role played by the human being in the system is one of the more relevant subjects (This relevance has been demonstrated in the accidents happened) . However, in Spain there aren't manuals specifically dedicated to asses the human contribution to risk in the frame of PSAs. This report aims to improve this situation providing: a) a theoretical background to help the reader in the understanding of the nature of the human error, b) a quid to carry out a Human Reliability Analysis and c) a selected overview of the techniques and methodologies currently applied in this area. (Author) 20 refs

  13. Human reliability in probabilistic safety assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays a growing interest in medioambiental aspects is detected in our country. It implies an assessment of the risk involved in the industrial processess and installations in order to determine if those are into the acceptable limits. In these safety assessments, among which PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessments), can be pointed out the role played by the human being in the system is one of the more relevant subjects. (This relevance has been demostrated in the accidents happenned). However in Spain there aren't manuals specifically dedicated to asses the human contribution to risk in the frame of PSAs. This report aims to improve this situation providing: a) a theoretical background to help the reader in the understanding of the nature of the human error, b) a guide to carry out a Human Reliability Analysis and c) a selected overwiev of the techniques and methodologies currently applied in this area. (Author)

  14. Predicting and preventing organizational failure: learning, stability and safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physical definition of 'safety culture' is the creation of an organizational and operational structure that places unending emphasis on safety at every level. We propose and prefer the use of the term and the objective of sustaining a 'Learning Environment', where mistakes, outcomes and errors are used as learning vehicles to improve, and we can now define why that is true. Therefore we can manage and quantify safety effectively tracking and analyzing outcomes, using the trends to guide our needed organizational behaviors. (author)

  15. Safety assessment of genetically modified crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of genetically modified (GM) crops has prompted widespread debate regarding both human safety and environmental issues. Food crops produced by modern biotechnology using recombinant techniques usually differ from their conventional counterparts only in respect of one or a few desirable genes, as opposed to the use of traditional breeding methods which mix thousands of genes and require considerable efforts to select acceptable and robust hybrid offspring. The difficulties of applying traditional toxicological testing and risk assessment procedures to whole foods are discussed along with the evaluation strategies that are used for these new food products to ensure the safety of these products for the consumer

  16. Enhancing the safety culture in nuclear installations through efficient regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety culture of a nuclear installation is greatly influenced by the external regulatory agencies with which it relates or interacts. These external regulatory agencies create demands for compliance with national industry or governmental regulatory standards and requirements imposed to provide for the public health and safety. While these national regulations can influence nuclear safety, no amount of regulation can ensure safety if those who operate the nuclear installations do not or cannot take it upon themselves to operate as safely as possible. It is not possible, nor is it desirable, for a regulatory agency to have the ultimate responsibility for the safety of nuclear installations. Good judgement and safe operating philosophy cannot be legislated. There must exist a safety culture in nuclear installations which recognizes the primary and ultimate responsibility for nuclear safety lies with those who manage and operate the installation. Thus, effective regulation must exist which promotes an environment that provides the nuclear installation the latitude it needs to apply innovative solutions to improve maintenance, operations, and training, and fosters a quest for excellence. (author)

  17. Indicators of safety culture - selection and utilization of leading safety performance indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety indicators play a role in providing information on organizational performance, motivating people to work on safety and increasing organizational potential for safety. The aim of this report is to provide an overview on leading safety indicators in the domain of nuclear safety. The report explains the distinction between lead and lag indicators and proposes a framework of three types of safety performance indicators - feedback, monitor and drive indicators. Finally the report provides guidance for nuclear energy organizations for selecting and interpreting safety indicators. It proposes the use of safety culture as a leading safety performance indicator and offers an example list of potential indicators in all three categories. The report concludes that monitor and drive indicators are so called lead indicators. Drive indicators are chosen priority areas of organizational safety activity. They are based on the underlying safety model and potential safety activities and safety policy derived from it. Drive indicators influence control measures that manage the socio technical system; change, maintain, reinforce, or reduce something. Monitor indicators provide a view on the dynamics of the system in question; the activities taking place, abilities, skills and motivation of the personnel, routines and practices - the organizational potential for safety. They also monitor the efficacy of the control measures that are used to manage the socio technical system. Typically the safety performance indicators that are used are lagging (feedback) indicators that measure the outcomes of the socio technical system. Besides feedback indicators, organizations should also acknowledge the important role of monitor and drive indicators in managing safety. The selection and use of safety performance indicators is always based on an understanding (a model) of the socio technical system and safety. The safety model defines what risks are perceived. It is important that the safety

  18. Safety review, assessment and inspection on research reactors, experimental reactors and nuclear heating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NNSA and its regional office step further strengthened the regulation on the safety of in-service research reactors in 1996. A lot of work has been done on the supervision of safe in rectifying the review and assessment of modified items, the review of operational documents, the treatment of accidents, the establishment of the system for operational experience feedback, daily and routine inspection on nuclear safety. The internal management of the operating organization on nuclear safety was further strengthened, nuclear safety culture was further enhanced, the promotion in nuclear safety and the safety situation for in-service research reactors were improved

  19. Safety culture program for the Cofrentes nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IBERDROLA (who is the owner of the Cofrentes NPS and shared other Spanish nuclear units) has paid careful attention through his nuclear safety and quality unit to safety and quality culture concepts and methodologies developed during the second half of the past decade and the beginning of the 90's. Moreover, a good management as well as work-men responsability and motivation should conform a good level of safety culture. We thus felt that we needed to combine a safety culture plan and a continuous quality improvement program so as to obtain the best possible safety and culture results. Consequently, IBERDROLA established a pilot program for his Cofrentes NPS in 1992 to drive for quality, as a top management policy, actively pursued by corporate and station managers. In summary, the pilot program consists of a 'Safety Culture Plan' which establishes the vision, mission, principles, global obj ectives and especific obj ectives and tasks, and of a 'continuous quality improvement plan' in which three phases have been set ut: phase I - learn to work as a team, fix the methodology and look for results; phase II - focused toward objectives, simplification and improvement of work processes, phase III - look toward supporting recommendations and achieving the policy goals. However, we may already say that we have preceived greater management and workmen involvement, better planning of significant issues and an improvement in the team-work environment. Nevertheless, we are in the process of changing certain mechanisms and ways of behaviour that we have detected as drawbacks in the past, in order to further improve in this area. (author)

  20. Patient Safety Culture Status From The Perspective Medical Staff Of Yasuj Hospitals In 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rezaean

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: One of the most important problems in the health sector, particularly in clinical centers, is the quality of healthcare. Patient safety is one of the most important elements in creating health care quality due to the fact that it is a critical component to the quality of health care and many errors are present in patient care and treatment practices..                                                               Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the status of the patient safety culture and its relationship with events reported in Yasuj hospitals. Methods: The present descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 361 medical staff of Yasuj hospitals. The data were collected through a hospital survey on patient safety culture. The collected data were analyzed by using SPSS statistics soft ware version 21, using Descriptive methods, Pearson Coefficient, ANOVA, and T-Test. Results: The results of the present study revealed that the teamwork among hospital units (71/89percent, with expectations and management measures (66/38% in the case of safety obtained the most score and non-punitive response to errors (48/79% and manager support (55/88 percent obtained the least score. 73/7% of employees of three hospitals in the past 12 months did not report any event. In addition, there was a meaningful statistical relationship between the total score of safety culture and reporting the events. In this study, 15.5 % of respondents assess their safety culture in work as good, 44.3 % as acceptable and 30.5 percent reported poor. The overall safety culture among the three studied hospitals was 61.81 %. Results confirmed that the culture safety of patient in studied hospitals was average. Conclusions: The hospitals may rely on their strong points in terms of patient safety culture and try to remove their weak points to form a safe environment and appropriate

  1. Safety culture in the reactor vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For several years Ontario Hydro has been striving to improve safety, and other aspects of its operation, through the involvement of workers, supervisors, and managers in making decisions. At the time of the recent reorganization of Ontario Hydro a 'Business Improvement Process' was estabIished, based on several quality improvement processes used before the reorganization. This process is jointly sponsored by management and the two main employees' unions. One part of the process supports the formation of multidisciplinary teams to solve defined probIems. This paper describes the success of one such team ('The Dose Busters') in reducing radiation dose to fuel handling workers at the Bruce B Nuclear Generating station. The team had been formed several years ago, with members from mechanical maintenance, control maintenance, operations, and engineering support, Ied by a mechanicaI maintainer. lt had made some improvements that reduced dose but its members feIt limited by the lack of a structured probIem-solving process. The team was revitalized through training in structured problem solving provided as part of the Business lmprovement Process. This process leads the team to a cIear definition of the main problem to be solved. After getting support from their leadership team to solve the problem, the team develops a good solution, impIements their solution, and checks its effectiveness, making further corrections if needed. AnaIysis of dose data showed that the greatest opportunity for improvement was by reducing work time for repetitive jobs on the reactor face. The team devised and impIemented improvements expected to save a totaI dose of 36 Rem (0.36 Sv) over the station life. An important secondary benefit has come from the team's careful analysis of their own work practices. They discovered and corrected other industrial safety problems that normal practices had not detected. This has helped keep the enthusiasm on the team high as the members could see they are

  2. IAEA/USDOE senior management workshop on promotion of safety culture for the NPPS with RBMK reactors. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current workshop, co-sponsored by the IAEA and USDOE, was a continuation of the previous effort for further promotion of safety culture at RBMK NPPs. The objective of the workshop was to provide a forum for senior managers from governmental organizations and operating organizations to further exchange experience in understanding the factors influencing safety culture, in assessing safety culture at their own organizations and developing safety culture at RBMK NPPs. The workshop consisted of a broad scope of presentations to review the basic concepts and major elements of safety culture (ownership, accountability, pride, job satisfaction, trust, openness, etc.), to identify and discuss the various approaches used in different countries in attaining a strong safety culture, and to explain, through the use of practical examples, what the benefits of a strong safety culture are; how to improve the behavior of people, how to gain trust and openness, how to overcome difficulties in changing staff's attitudes, and how to manage safety culture. 2 figs

  3. Safety culture of complex risky systems: the Nuclear Engineering Institute case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of industrial accidents have demonstrated that safe and reliable operation of complex industrial processes that use risky technology and/or hazard material depends not only on technical factors but on human and organizational factors as well. After the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986, the International Atomic Energy Agency established the safety culture concept and started a safety culture enhancement program within nuclear organizations worldwide. The Nuclear Engineering Institute, IEN, is a research and technological development unit of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission, CNEN, characterized as a nuclear and radioactive installation where processes presenting risks to operators and to the environment are executed. In 1999, IEN started a management change program, aiming to achieve excellence of performance, based on the Model of Excellence of the National Quality Award. IEN's safety culture project is based on IAEA methodology and has been incorporated to the organizational management process. This work presents IEN's safety culture project; the results obtained on the initial safety culture assessment and the following project actions. (author)

  4. Towards a radiation safety culture at Universidad Nacional de Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: During the 20th century, nuclear and radiation techniques for research, teaching, and medical and engineering practice slowly appeared at the National University of Colombia, mainly at the Bogota, Medellin and Manizales branches. Each individual laboratory or researcher obtained the license for the use of the radioactive source, or radiation emitting apparatus. However, the University as a whole does not have as yet a Radiation Safety Manual, nor an inventory of laboratories using radiation. From the viewpoint of radiation safety and culture, this situation is undesirable, and may easily lead to inappropriate waste management practices, including the possibility of orphan sources (one such source has been already found). As part of the program of environmental management of dangerous wastes promoted by the National Division of Laboratories of our University, an office of radiation safety was created in the year 2006. This paper describes the situation that was found, the activities that have been carried out, some of the difficulties that we have met, and the plans that we have to help shape a safety culture at our institution. Currently we are pursuing an inventory of laboratories using radioactive sources and radiation emitting apparatuses, starting with the branches in Bogota and Manizales which are perceived as the most urgent to deal with. Fortunately, the branch in Medellin has been for about a decade under the care of a former radiation safety officer of our national Institute of Nuclear Affairs, who presently teaches there. During 2006 and 2007, 13 laboratories using radioactive sources were visited in the Bogota branch. Safety procedures and waste handling protocols were checked, safety manuals prepared and/or revised, and recommendations for safety culture provided. During 2008 we will visit Manizales, and will continue visiting a number of X-ray machines used in the Bogota branch for engineering, veterinary, and diagnostic, and surgery medical

  5. Safety Culture Perspective. Managing the pre Managing the pre-operational phases of new NPPs and creating the safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear safety is a key for the revival of nuclear energy future programmes. Lots of competent people will be needed worldwide for ensuring the safety of the installations both existing ones and future ones. Their expertise should range from design to operation, from regulatory role to operators, from fuel fabrication to waste disposal. The challenge in front of us will be to prepare for the right recruitment, the development of the needed expertise in order to face the demand in developed countries, in countries with economies in transition and in developing countries. Time allocated for the panel does not allow for covering all aspects but the panelists will cover some of the important aspects of the challenge in terms of needs, of new competencies, of learning from operation and licensing requirements including for new designs. The key objectives of the panel are: 1- Maintaining safe operation, learning from experience, licensing including aging management and re-licensing with safety improvements for existing installations: - Presentation by Junko Ogawa of the experience and lessons learned from the earthquake on Kashiwasaki Kariwa NPP: effects in terms of manpower involved in the investigation, effects on regulations and licensing, expertise used. - Presentation by Pamela Cowan of her experience in preparing licensing actions, regulatory compliance and interface with the Regulator for both operating plants and modern requirements for constructing new ones. 2 - Special training needed for the human aspect of safety: what are the challenges in areas of safety culture and management of safety: - Presentation by Chae Woon Oh of the Korean safety culture features developed nationally, at the regulator and at the operating organizations and their integration within the safety training programmes. - Presentation by Kerstin Dahlgren Person of the needs in terms of safety culture and safety management, in terms of expertise, practitioners and assessors. 3 - How to

  6. Exploring patient safety culture in Dutch primary care.

    OpenAIRE

    Verbakel, N. J.; Melle, M. van; Langelaan, M.; Verheij, T.J.M.; Wagner, C.; Zwart, D.L.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore perceptions of safety culture in nine different types of primary care professions and to study possible differences. Design Cross-sectional survey: Setting: Three hundred and thirteen practices from nine types of primary care profession groups in the Netherlands. Participants: Professional staff from primary care practices. Nine professions participated: dental care, dietetics, exercise therapy, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, midwifery, anticoagulation clinics, ski...

  7. Exploring patient safety culture in Dutch primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, N.J.; Melle, M. van; Langelaan, M.; Verheij, T.J.M.; Wagner, C.; Zwart, D.L.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore perceptions of safety culture in nine different types of primary care professions and to study possible differences. Design Cross-sectional survey: Setting: Three hundred and thirteen practices from nine types of primary care profession groups in the Netherlands. Participants:

  8. Safety culture in a Swiss group of pharmaceutical companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of a successful company policy for safety and environmental protection (S+U in German) is the carrying out of the corresponding principles within the framework of a living, self-evidence. The elements for the structuring of a (S+U) company culture are presented. (author) 3 figs

  9. 77 FR 75443 - Draft Safety Culture Policy Statement: Request for Public Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-20

    ... regulatory agency for the nuclear industry, began initiatives to help influence the safety culture of the... Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement Draft Safety Culture Policy Statement: Request for Public... by BSEE establish and maintain a positive safety culture commensurate with the significance of...

  10. Safety culture from a regulatory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, SKI, has in its regulatory approach to the area of management and organization focussed on the process of continuous improvement and have in collaboration with Battelle Human Affairs Research Center, Seattle, developed a conceptual model of the important characteristics of a continuous improvement organization and how to assess it. In this work SKI has also recognized the importance of the regulatory goals and strategies adopted by SKI for promoting an improvement process on the part of the utilities, which will be further discussed below. 15 refs

  11. A nationwide Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture in Belgian Hospitals: Analysis and Benchmarking

    OpenAIRE

    Vlayen, Annemie; Hellings, Johan; Claes, Neree; Schrooten, Ward

    2010-01-01

    Objective To measure patient safety culture in Belgian hospitals and to examine the homogeneous grouping of underlying safety culture dimensions. Methods The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture was distributed organisation-wide in 180 Belgian hospitals participating in the federal program on quality and safety between 2007 and 2009. Participating hospitals were invited to submit their data to a comparative database. Homogeneous groups of underlying safety culture dimensions were sou...

  12. Factors Contribute to Safety Culture in the Manufacturing Industry in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Ong Choon Hee

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explain the role of safety culture in the manufacturing industry in Malaysia and identify factors contribute to safety culture. It is suggested in this study that leadership support, management commitment and safety management system are important factors that contribute to safety culture. This study also provides theoretical implications to guide future research and offers practical implications to the managers in the development of safety culture. Given that ...

  13. Assessment of Native Languages for Food Safety Training Programs for Meat Industry Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Sherrlyn S.; Cordray, Joseph C.; Sapp, Stephen; Sebranek, Joseph G.; Anderson, Barbara; Wenger, Matt

    2012-01-01

    Challenges arise when teaching food safety to culturally diverse employees working in meatpacking and food manufacturing industries. A food safety training program was developed in English, translated into Spanish, and administered to 1,265 adult learners. Assessments were conducted by comparing scores before and immediately following training.…

  14. Research on Athletic Food Safety Assessment and Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Chunlei Ci

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the current state and problem of China’s food safety risk assessment and food safety supervision by drawing on the experience of developed countries Combined with Chinese situations. It provides suggestions for establishing a well-structured food safety supervision system. This study frames a Chinese food safety risk assessment system.

  15. Animal-Free Chemical Safety Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizou, George D

    2016-01-01

    The exponential growth of the Internet of Things and the global popularity and remarkable decline in cost of the mobile phone is driving the digital transformation of medical practice. The rapidly maturing digital, non-medical world of mobile (wireless) devices, cloud computing and social networking is coalescing with the emerging digital medical world of omics data, biosensors and advanced imaging which offers the increasingly realistic prospect of personalized medicine. Described as a potential "seismic" shift from the current "healthcare" model to a "wellness" paradigm that is predictive, preventative, personalized and participatory, this change is based on the development of increasingly sophisticated biosensors which can track and measure key biochemical variables in people. Additional key drivers in this shift are metabolomic and proteomic signatures, which are increasingly being reported as pre-symptomatic, diagnostic and prognostic of toxicity and disease. These advancements also have profound implications for toxicological evaluation and safety assessment of pharmaceuticals and environmental chemicals. An approach based primarily on human in vivo and high-throughput in vitro human cell-line data is a distinct possibility. This would transform current chemical safety assessment practice which operates in a human "data poor" to a human "data rich" environment. This could also lead to a seismic shift from the current animal-based to an animal-free chemical safety assessment paradigm. PMID:27493630

  16. Animal-Free Chemical Safety Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizou, George D.

    2016-01-01

    The exponential growth of the Internet of Things and the global popularity and remarkable decline in cost of the mobile phone is driving the digital transformation of medical practice. The rapidly maturing digital, non-medical world of mobile (wireless) devices, cloud computing and social networking is coalescing with the emerging digital medical world of omics data, biosensors and advanced imaging which offers the increasingly realistic prospect of personalized medicine. Described as a potential “seismic” shift from the current “healthcare” model to a “wellness” paradigm that is predictive, preventative, personalized and participatory, this change is based on the development of increasingly sophisticated biosensors which can track and measure key biochemical variables in people. Additional key drivers in this shift are metabolomic and proteomic signatures, which are increasingly being reported as pre-symptomatic, diagnostic and prognostic of toxicity and disease. These advancements also have profound implications for toxicological evaluation and safety assessment of pharmaceuticals and environmental chemicals. An approach based primarily on human in vivo and high-throughput in vitro human cell-line data is a distinct possibility. This would transform current chemical safety assessment practice which operates in a human “data poor” to a human “data rich” environment. This could also lead to a seismic shift from the current animal-based to an animal-free chemical safety assessment paradigm. PMID:27493630

  17. Developing the radiation protection safety culture in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the UK, as elsewhere, there is potential to improve how radiological challenges are addressed through improvement in, or development of, a strong radiation protection (RP) safety culture. In preliminary work in the UK, two areas have been identified as having a strong influence on UK society: the healthcare and nuclear industry sectors. Each has specific challenges, but with many overlapping common factors. Other sectors will benefit from further consideration. In order to make meaningful comparisons between these two principal sectors, this paper is primarily concerned with cultural aspects of RP in the working environment and occupational exposures rather than patient doses. The healthcare sector delivers a large collective dose to patients each year, particularly for diagnostic purposes, which continues to increase. Although patient dose is not the focus, it must be recognised that collective patient dose is inevitably linked to collective occupational exposure, especially in interventional procedures. The nuclear industry faces major challenges as work moves from operations to decommissioning on many sites. This involves restarting work in the plants responsible for the much higher radiation doses of the 1960/70s, but also performing tasks that are considerably more difficult and hazardous than those original performed in these plants. Factors which influence RP safety culture in the workplace are examined, and proposals are considered for a series of actions that may lead to an improvement in RP culture with an associated reduction in dose in many work areas. These actions include methods to improve knowledge and awareness of radiation safety, plus ways to influence management and colleagues in the workplace. The exchange of knowledge about safety culture between the nuclear industry and medical areas may act to develop RP culture in both sectors, and have a wider impact in other sectors where exposures to ionising radiations can occur. (memorandum)

  18. The Impact of Language and Culture Diversity in Occupational Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesus-Rivas, Mayra; Conlon, Helen Acree; Burns, Candace

    2016-01-01

    Occupational health nursing plays a critical part in improving the safety of foreign labor workers. The development and implementation of safety training programs do not always regularly take into account language barriers, low literacy levels, or cultural elements. This oversight can lead to more injuries and fatalities among this group. Despite established health and safety training programs, a significant number of non-native English speakers are injured or killed in preventable, occupation-related accidents. Introducing safety programs that use alternative teaching strategies such as pictograms, illustrations, and hands-on training opportunities will assist in addressing challenges for non-English laborers. Occupational health nursing has an opportunity to provide guidance on this subject and assist businesses in creating a safer and more productive work environment.

  19. Safety culture evaluation and asset root cause analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines the role of organizational and management factors in nuclear power plant safety through the use of operating experiences. The ASSET reports of thirteen plants (total thirty events) have been analyzed in term of twenty organizational dimensions (factors) identified by Brookhaven National Laboratory and Pennsylvania State University. For three plants detailed results are reported in this paper. The results of thirteen plants are summarized in the form of a table. The study tends to confirm that organizational and management factors play an important role in plant safety. The twenty organizational dimensions and their definitions, in general, were adequate in this study. Formalization, safety culture, technical knowledge, training, roles-responsibilities and problem identification appear to be key organizational factors which influence the safety of nuclear power plants studied. (author)

  20. The Impact of Language and Culture Diversity in Occupational Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesus-Rivas, Mayra; Conlon, Helen Acree; Burns, Candace

    2016-01-01

    Occupational health nursing plays a critical part in improving the safety of foreign labor workers. The development and implementation of safety training programs do not always regularly take into account language barriers, low literacy levels, or cultural elements. This oversight can lead to more injuries and fatalities among this group. Despite established health and safety training programs, a significant number of non-native English speakers are injured or killed in preventable, occupation-related accidents. Introducing safety programs that use alternative teaching strategies such as pictograms, illustrations, and hands-on training opportunities will assist in addressing challenges for non-English laborers. Occupational health nursing has an opportunity to provide guidance on this subject and assist businesses in creating a safer and more productive work environment. PMID:26800895

  1. Safety Factors in Pesticide Risk Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmegaard, N.; Jagers op Akkerhuis, G. A. J. M.

    Foreword It has become common practice to protect the environment from hazardous chemicals by use of risk assessment to establish environmental concentration at which only limited damage to the ecosystem can be expected. The methods and tools applied in the risk assessment need constant evaluation...... to secure that the methodology is adequate. As new knowledge surfaces the risk assessment procedures develops. The present report is a contribution to the development of safety factors used to account for the uncertainty when · extrapolating from the results of test with a single species in the laboratory...... factors used in pesticide risk assessment: the variability in species sensitivities, and the relationship between acute LC50's and chronic NOEC's....

  2. DISPELLING MYTHS AND MISCONCEPTIONS TO IMPLEMENT A SAFETY CULTURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potts, T. Todd; Smith, Ken; Hylko, James M.

    2003-02-27

    Industrial accidents are typically reported in terms of technological malfunctions, ignoring the human element in accident causation. However, over two-thirds of all accidents are attributable to human and organizational factors (e.g., planning, written procedures, job factors, training, communication, and teamwork), thereby affecting risk perception, behavior and attitudes. This paper reviews the development of WESKEM, LLC's Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Program that addresses human and organizational factors from a top-down, bottom-up approach. This approach is derived from the Department of Energy's Integrated Safety Management System. As a result, dispelling common myths and misconceptions about safety, while empowering employees to ''STOP work'' if necessary, have contributed to reducing an unusually high number of vehicle, ergonomic and slip/trip/fall incidents successfully. Furthermore, the safety culture that has developed within WESKEM, LLC's workforce consists of three common characteristics: (1) all employees hold safety as a value; (2) each individual feels responsible for the safety of their co-workers as well as themselves; and (3) each individual is willing and able to ''go beyond the call of duty'' on behalf of the safety of others. WESKEM, LLC as a company, upholds the safety culture and continues to enhance its existing ES&H program by incorporating employee feedback and lessons learned collected from other high-stress industries, thereby protecting its most vital resource - the employees. The success of this program is evident by reduced accident and injury rates, as well as the number of safe work hours accrued while performing hands-on field activities. WESKEM, LLC (Paducah + Oak Ridge) achieved over 800,000 safe work hours through August 2002. WESKEM-Paducah has achieved over 665,000 safe work hours without a recordable injury or lost workday case since it started operations on

  3. Development of a Safety Assessment Information System for the Management of Periodic Safety Assessment Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Tae Young [Nuclear Engineering and Technology Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    At present, the 10-year Periodic Safety Review(PSR) has been performing to confirm all the aspects of safety issues for all the operating plants in compliance with domestic nuclear law of article 23, subarticle 3. For each plant, in addition, Probabilistic Safety Assessment(PSA) and Severe Accident Management Guideline(SAMG) are being implemented and revised periodically to reflect the latest safety level according to principle fulfillment of severe accident policy statement. The assessment reports, as one of outcomes from these activities, are submitted into and reviewed by domestic regulatory body. During reviewing (in-office duty) and licensing (regulatory duty) process, a large number of outcomes of which most are the formal technical reports and licensing materials, are inevitably produced. Moreover, repeated review process over the plants can make them accumulated and produce a variety of documents additionally. This circumstance motivates to develop effective tool or system for the management of these reports and related technical documents for the future use in licensing process and for subsequent plant assessments. This paper presents the development status of Safety Assessment Information System(SAIS) which manages safety-related documents of PSR, PSA and SAMG for practical use for experienced engineers in charge of these areas.

  4. Safety issues in cultural heritage management and critical infrastructures management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Masini, Nicola; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica; Dumoulin, Jean

    2013-12-01

    This special issue is the fourth of its kind in Journal of Geophysics and Engineering , containing studies and applications of geophysical methodologies and sensing technologies for the knowledge, conservation and security of products of human activity ranging from civil infrastructures to built and cultural heritage. The first discussed the application of novel instrumentation, surface and airborne remote sensing techniques, as well as data processing oriented to both detection and characterization of archaeological buried remains and conservation of cultural heritage (Eppelbaum et al 2010). The second stressed the importance of an integrated and multiscale approach for the study and conservation of architectural, archaeological and artistic heritage, from SAR to GPR to imaging based diagnostic techniques (Masini and Soldovieri 2011). The third enlarged the field of analysis to civil engineering structures and infrastructures, providing an overview of the effectiveness and the limitations of single diagnostic techniques, which can be overcome through the integration of different methods and technologies and/or the use of robust and novel data processing techniques (Masini et al 2012). As a whole, the special issue put in evidence the factors that affect the choice of diagnostic strategy, such as the material, the spatial characteristics of the objects or sites, the value of the objects to be investigated (cultural or not), the aim of the investigation (knowledge, conservation, restoration) and the issues to be addressed (monitoring, decay assessment). In order to complete the overview of the application fields of sensing technologies this issue has been dedicated to monitoring of cultural heritage and critical infrastructures to address safety and security issues. Particular attention has been paid to the data processing methods of different sensing techniques, from infrared thermography through GPR to SAR. Cascini et al (2013) present the effectiveness of a

  5. Safety assessment for TA-48 radiochemical operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to document an assessment performed to evaluate the safety of the radiochemical operations conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory operations area designated as TA-48. This Safety Assessment for the TA-48 radiochemical operations was prepared to fulfill the requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5481.1B, ''Safety Analysis and Review System.'' The area designated as TA-48 is operated by the Chemical Science and Technology (CST) Division and is involved with radiochemical operations associated with nuclear weapons testing, evaluation of samples collected from a variety of environmental sources, and nuclear medicine activities. This report documents a systematic evaluation of the hazards associated with the radiochemical operations that are conducted at TA-48. The accident analyses are limited to evaluation of the expected consequences associated with a few bounding accident scenarios that are selected as part of the hazard analysis. Section 2 of this report presents an executive summary and conclusions, Section 3 presents pertinent information concerning the TA-48 site and surrounding area, Section 4 presents a description of the TA-48 radiochemical operations, and Section 5 presents a description of the individual facilities. Section 6 of the report presents an evaluation of the hazards that are associated with the TA-48 operations and Section 7 presents a detailed analysis of selected accident scenarios

  6. Safety assessment of foods derived from genetically modified crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleter, G.A.; Kuiper, H.A.

    2003-01-01

    The pre-market safety assessment of foods derived from genetically modified crops is carried out according to the consensus approach of "substantial equivalence", in other words: the comparative safety assessment. Currently, the safety assessment of genetically modified foods is harmonized at the in

  7. A Guidebook for Evaluating Organizations in the Nuclear Industry - an example of safety culture evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organizations in the nuclear industry need to maintain an overview on their vulnerabilities and strengths with respect to safety. Systematic periodical self assessments are necessary to achieve this overview. This guidebook provides suggestions and examples to assist power companies but also external evaluators and regulators in carrying out organizational evaluations. Organizational evaluation process is divided into five main steps. These are: 1) planning the evaluation framework and the practicalities of the evaluation process, 2) selecting data collection methods and conducting the data acquisition, 3) structuring and analysing the data, 4) interpreting the findings and 5) reporting the evaluation results with possible recommendations. The guidebook emphasises the importance of a solid background framework when dealing with multifaceted phenomena like organisational activities and system safety. The validity and credibility of the evaluation stem largely from the evaluation team's ability to crystallize what they mean by organization and safety when they conduct organisational safety evaluations - and thus, what are the criteria for the evaluation. Another important and often under-considered phase in organizational evaluation is interpretation of the findings. In this guidebook a safety culture evaluation in a Nordic nuclear power plant is presented as an example of organizational evaluation. With the help of the example, challenges of each step in the organizational evaluation process are described. Suggestions for dealing with them are presented. In the case example, the DISC (Design for Integrated Safety culture) model is used as the evaluation framework. The DISC model describes the criteria for a good safety culture and the organizational functions necessary to develop a good safety culture in the organization

  8. Automating the aviation command safety assessment survey as an Enterprise Information System (EIS)

    OpenAIRE

    Held, Jonathan S.; Mingo, Fred J.

    1999-01-01

    The Aviation Command Safety Assessment (ACSA) is a questionnaire survey methodology developed to evaluate a Naval Aviation Command's safety climate, culture, and safety program effectiveness. This survey was a manual process first administered in the fall of 1996. The primary goal of this thesis is to design, develop, and test an Internet-based, prototype model for administering this survey using new technologies that allow automated survey submission and analysis. The result of this thesis i...

  9. Culture related to road traffic safety: a comparison of eight countries using two conceptualizations of culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordfjærn, Trond; Şimşekoğlu, Özlem; Rundmo, Torbjorn

    2014-01-01

    The majority of previous cross-country studies of human factors relevant to traffic safety have not operationalized and measured culture. Also studies in this vein have mostly been carried out in Europe and the United States. The aim of the study was to examine country cluster differences, based on the Culture's Consequences framework, in road traffic risk perception, attitudes towards traffic safety and driver behaviour in samples from Norway, Russia, India, Ghana, Tanzania, Uganda, Turkey and Iran. An additional aim was to examine cluster differences in road traffic culture as symbol use and to investigate whether this theoretical cultural framework predicts risk perception, attitudes towards traffic safety and driver behaviour in the country clusters. The sample consisted of a total of 2418 individuals who were obtained by convenience sampling in the different countries. The countries segmented into four Culture's Consequences clusters; Norway, Russia and India, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Near East countries. The findings showed that Norwegians reported overall safer attitudes towards traffic safety and driver behaviour than the remaining country clusters. Individuals in Africa reported the highest risk perception. The countries also differed substantially in road traffic culture as symbol use. Contrary to established cultural theory, prediction models revealed that cultural factors were stronger predictors of driver behaviour than of risk perception. Also, the social cognitive risk constructs (i.e. risk perception and attitudes) solely explained variance in driver behaviour in the Norwegian and Russia/India clusters. Previous empirical efforts, which aimed to demonstrate that culture is important for the risk perception criterion, may have focused on a criterion variable that is not strongly related to driver behaviour. Furthermore, countermeasures aimed to influence social cognition may have stronger applicability in countries with a more individualistic western

  10. Role of management in the development of safety culture at the operating organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Role of management in the development of safety culture at the operating organization to offer practical suggestions to assist in the development or improvement of a progressive safety culture. 2 figs

  11. A situational approach to the measurement of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Values and social norms are the main target of most approaches to the study of safety culture and many existing survey methodologies directly ask for these norms and values. However, a number of considerations point to the dangers of limiting the evaluation of safety culture to the analysis of these responses. Therefore the necessity is stressed to also consider how actual situations activate norms and behaviours. This relates to the fact that in any given situation both aspects of the appraisal of reality are present: the objective definition of the situation and its personal evaluation. The latter not only reflects the ''official'' norms and values but also ''basic underlying assumptions''. The situational approach introduced in this paper confronts people with situations which contain a dilemma with conflicting social norms and where various costs and benefits are associated with different types of behaviour. In addition, the prerequisites and limitations of the situational approach are discussed. (author). 9 refs, 1 fig

  12. Environmental, health and safety assessment of photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, E. C.

    1983-01-01

    The environmental, health, and safety (E, H and S) concerns associated with the fabrication, deployment, and decommissioning of photovoltaic (PV) systems in terrestial applications are identified and assessed. Discussion is limited to crystalline silicon technologies. The primary E, H, and S concerns that arise during collector fabrication are associated with occupational exposure to materials of undetermined toxicity or to materials that are known to be hazardous, but for which process control technology may be inadequate. Stricter exposure standards are anticipated for some materials and may indicate a need for further control technology development. Minimizing electric shock hazards is a significant concern during system construction, operation and maintenance, and decommissioning.

  13. Retained gas sampler interim safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This safety assessment addresses the proposed action to install, operate, and remove a Retained Gas Sampler (RGS) in Tank 101-SY at Hanford. Purpose of the RGS is to help characterize the gas species retained in the tank waste; the information will be used to refine models that predict the gas-producing behavior of the waste tank. The RGS will take samples of the tank from top to bottom; these samples will be analyzed for gas constituents. The proposed action is required as part of an evaluation of mitigation concepts for eliminating episodic gas releases that result in high hydrogen concentrations in the tank dome space

  14. Safety assessment of outdoor live fire range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-05-01

    The following Safety Assessment (SA) pertains to the outdoor live fire range facility (LFR). The purpose of this facility is to supplement the indoor LFR. In particular it provides capacity for exercises that would be inappropriate on the indoor range. This SA examines the risks that are attendant to the training on the outdoor LFR. The outdoor LFR used by EG&G Mound is privately owned. It is identified as the Miami Valley Shooting Grounds. Mondays are leased for the exclusive use of EG&G Mound.

  15. Validation of the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument

    OpenAIRE

    Brody Heritage; Clare Pollock; Lynne Roberts

    2014-01-01

    Organizational culture is a commonly studied area in industrial/organizational psychology due to its important role in workplace behaviour, cognitions, and outcomes. Jung et al.'s [1] review of the psychometric properties of organizational culture measurement instruments noted many instruments have limited validation data despite frequent use in both theoretical and applied situations. The Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI) has had conflicting data regarding its psychometric ...

  16. Safety culture implementation in organizations through the lens of sensemaiking

    OpenAIRE

    Idoeta Fogelqvist, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Even though safety culture in health care has been on the agenda for more than a decade, the implementations have been difficult. The aim of this study was to out of the sensemaking perspective, examine the process behind implementing safety culture. The present study tested a hypothetical model where open communication, clear information and leader safety attitude predict reporting incidents (part of safety culture) which in turn mediate to safety performance. Survey data was obtained from 1...

  17. Safety culture aspects of managing for safety. Experience of a large nuclear reprocessing site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Industry is going through turbulent times both in terms of public acceptance and business issues. Safety is one area which impacts on whether the business is allowed to continue, and how an organisation organizes itself. The need to cut costs to make nuclear power a viable energy resource, has forced the nuclear utilities to review manning policies, and management style, and in particular how to maintain safety standards during a period of change, and ultimately support continuing improvement of standards. The shrinking workforce requires a new style of management, one that depends more on the people of the organisation taking responsibility for safety at all levels of the organisation. Not only personal safety but the safety of their colleagues, general public and the environment. The safety culture of an organisation is indivisible from the company culture, each aspect of a culture influences the whole and so the balance between business, safety and quality, has to be managed. BNFL provides a full fuel cycle service to nuclear power plants, and associated services to many national and international organisations. The following notes are taken from the work carried out in the company, and mostly at the Nuclear Reprocessing and Waste storage Site at Sellafield, based in the North West of England. Following the recent re-organisation, the site now employs 6200 people and has a further 1500 contractors working on construction activities on the site. Activities on the site range from remote handling to hands on tasks, involving highly active materials to low level waste. (author)

  18. Radiological safety in petroleum industry. Towards prevention culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the frame of regulatory control of industrial applications the audit of sealed and open radioactive sources in oil uses is one of the most relevant. The handling of radioactive sources, the requirement of procedures and training are just a few examples among all those that make up the radiological safety culture. A number of requirements divided into three main groups: operational safety at the storage area of radioactive sources, during transportation and during the applications (Cementation, well logging and use of radiotracers) are highlighted. Due to the great number of aspects that have to be taken in account as well as the interrelation of all control processes it is highly recommended that aspects of safety culture and quality should be considered and improvements regarding prevention, should be introduced so as to correct deviations that could arise in order to avoid radiological risk situations, emphasizing risk perception situations, attitude training, implementation of audit and level of safety in the facilities and control of duties, involving radiological material handling, described in the present work. (author)

  19. A guideline for comprehensive evaluation of a licensee's effort to cultivate safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear industry in Japan had held excellent performance in safety in the world during 90's. However recent events stem from organizational factors and defects of safety culture are pointed out in their contexts. In order to reduce accidents caused by organizational factors, the Japanese Regulatory body NISA (Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency) decided to evaluate a licensee's effort for the cultivation of safety culture, and to order all licensses to add the provision of cultivating safety culture to their safety preservation rules. The inspection for the new safety preservation rules started in December, 2007. For a measure of evaluation by resident inspectors, NISA and the Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) prepared a guideline for the prevention of degradation of safety culture and organizational climate. In this guideline, 14 items were defined as the components of the safety culture or as the viewpoints to evaluate the effort made to prevent any degradation of safety culture and organizational climate in the daily safety preservation activities. The 14 items are also used to establish the method to comprehensively evaluate the effort to prevent degradation of safety culture and organizational climate. This method consists of 10 steps: two steps to taken prior to start of the evaluation, two steps to be taken during the evaluation period, 5 steps to be taken during a comprehensive evaluation period and a final step to be taken for comprehensive findings for safety culture. This paper mainly describes the viewpoints to evaluate comprehensively a licensee's effort for cultivation of safety culture. (author)

  20. 75 FR 57081 - Revised Draft Safety Culture Policy Statement: Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    ... draft policy statement,'' Safety Culture Policy Statement,'' in the Federal Register (FRN) (74 FR 57525... areas important to safety culture. Experience has shown that certain personal and organizational traits... safety culture by fostering these traits as they apply to their organizational environments. IV....

  1. Relationship between organizational factors, safety culture and PSA in nuclear power plant operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are four nuclear safety imperatives or ''4Ms'': machine (hardware, design, QA/QC), milieux (operating conditions, environment, natural phenomena), man (human reliability) and management (organizational and management influences). Nuclear safety evaluations as well as evolution of its most powerful tool, Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA), followed chronologically the 4M constituents. The nuclear industry worldwide, and the nuclear safety regulators in particular, have been preoccupied with the first M almost to the point of obsession with belated and only intuitive interest in the third and fourth M (human dimension). Human factors or economics in the nuclear industry was an afterthought. Human reliability was essentially born in the aftermath of the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident. Impact of organizational factors on nuclear safety is only in the early stages of R and D. This paper describes some of the concepts being pursued by APG to link organizational factors and safety culture to Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) and to integrate such into probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), e.g. [APG, 1993]. (author). 11 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  2. The role of patient safety culture in the causation of unintended events in hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.; Wagner, C.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Timmermans, D.R.; Wal, G. van der; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2012-01-01

    Aims and objectives. To examine whether the relationship between specialty and patient safety is mediated by safety culture. Background. Research has shown that patient safety in hospitals varies by specialty. The safety culture among healthcare professionals in hospital units is believed to influen

  3. The role of patient safety culture in the causation of unintended events in hospitals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, M.; Wagner, C.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Timmermans, D.R.M.; Wal, G. van der; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2012-01-01

    Aims and objectives: To examine whether the relationship between specialty and patient safety is mediated by safety culture. Background: Research has shown that patient safety in hospitals varies by specialty. The safety culture among healthcare professionals in hospital units is believed to influen

  4. Assessment of radiation safety in well logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation safety assessments required by current regulations are a means to verify compliance with the requirements. Different methods have been used for this purpose. In the paper the results of applying the method of risk matrices, applied for the first time in the practice of well logging are exposed. For each initiating event frequency of occurrence, the severity of its consequences and the probability of failure of the barriers identified were evaluated. Starting from these assumptions, the risk associated is determined for each of the identified accident sequences, using for this the SEVRRA code 'Risk Assessment System', originally designed for use in radiotherapy. As an result sequences increased risk associated with the practice of well logging were identified, which is the starting point for the further implementation of a coherent program of dose optimization in practice.

  5. The Safety Case and Safety Assessment for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Guide provides guidance and recommendations on meeting the safety requirements in respect of the safety case and supporting safety assessment for the disposal of radioactive waste. The safety case and supporting safety assessment provide the basis for demonstration of safety and for licensing of radioactive waste disposal facilities and assist and guide decisions on siting, design and operations. The safety case is also the main basis on which dialogue with interested parties is conducted and on which confidence in the safety of the disposal facility is developed. This Safety Guide is relevant for operating organizations preparing the safety case as well as for the regulatory body responsible for developing the regulations and regulatory guidance that determine the basis and scope of the safety case. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Demonstrating the safety of radioactive waste disposal; 3. Safety principles and safety requirements; 4. The safety case for disposal of radioactive waste; 5. Radiological impact assessment for the period after closure; 6. Specific issues; 7. Documentation and use of the safety case; 8. Regulatory review process.

  6. Regulatory review of safety cases and safety assessments for near surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of the ASAM Regulatory Review Working Group are presented. Regulatory review of the safety assessment is made. It includes the regulatory review of post-closure safety assessment; safety case development and confidence building. The ISAM methodology is reviewed and SA system description is presented. Recommendations on the review process management are given

  7. Safety Assessment and Countermeasures of Genetically Modified Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of science-biotechnology, the safety of genetically modified organisms has become some of the most controversial issues in our society. This study aims to review the safety assessment and countermeasures of Genetically Modified (GM foods. Firstly, the research status and the main contents of GM foods safety assessment are discussed. What’s more, the countermeasures of GM foods safety assessment are proposed. This study tries to summarize and discuss the safety assessment of GM foods.

  8. Safety issues in cultural heritage management and critical infrastructures management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Masini, Nicola; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica; Dumoulin, Jean

    2013-12-01

    This special issue is the fourth of its kind in Journal of Geophysics and Engineering , containing studies and applications of geophysical methodologies and sensing technologies for the knowledge, conservation and security of products of human activity ranging from civil infrastructures to built and cultural heritage. The first discussed the application of novel instrumentation, surface and airborne remote sensing techniques, as well as data processing oriented to both detection and characterization of archaeological buried remains and conservation of cultural heritage (Eppelbaum et al 2010). The second stressed the importance of an integrated and multiscale approach for the study and conservation of architectural, archaeological and artistic heritage, from SAR to GPR to imaging based diagnostic techniques (Masini and Soldovieri 2011). The third enlarged the field of analysis to civil engineering structures and infrastructures, providing an overview of the effectiveness and the limitations of single diagnostic techniques, which can be overcome through the integration of different methods and technologies and/or the use of robust and novel data processing techniques (Masini et al 2012). As a whole, the special issue put in evidence the factors that affect the choice of diagnostic strategy, such as the material, the spatial characteristics of the objects or sites, the value of the objects to be investigated (cultural or not), the aim of the investigation (knowledge, conservation, restoration) and the issues to be addressed (monitoring, decay assessment). In order to complete the overview of the application fields of sensing technologies this issue has been dedicated to monitoring of cultural heritage and critical infrastructures to address safety and security issues. Particular attention has been paid to the data processing methods of different sensing techniques, from infrared thermography through GPR to SAR. Cascini et al (2013) present the effectiveness of a

  9. Organizational culture and climate for patient safety in Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Thaiana Helena Roma; Turrini, Ruth Natalia Teresa

    2015-02-01

    Objective To assess the perception of health professionals about patient safety climate and culture in different intensive care units (ICUs) and the relationship between scores obtained on the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC) and the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). Method A cross-sectional study conducted at a teaching hospital in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, in March and April 2014. As data gathering instruments, the HSOPSC, SAQ and a questionnaire with sociodemographic and professional information about the staff working in an adult, pediatric and neonatal ICU were used. Data analysis was conducted with descriptive statistics. Results The scales presented good reliability. Greater weaknesses in patient safety were observed in the Working conditions andPerceptions of management domains of the SAQ and in the Nonpunitive response to error domain of the HSOPSC. The strengths indicated by the SAQ wereTeamwork climate and Job satisfactionand by the HSOPC, Supervisor/manager expectations and actions promoting safety and Organizational learning-continuous improvement. Job satisfaction was higher among neonatal ICU workers when compared with the other ICUs. The adult ICU presented lower scores for most of the SAQ and HSOPSC domains. The scales presented moderate correlation between them (r=0.66). Conclusion There were differences in perception regarding patient safety among ICUs, which corroborates the existence of local microcultures. The study did not demonstrate equivalence between the SAQ and the HSOPSC.

  10. 75 FR 20009 - Development of NRC's Safety Culture Policy Statement: Cancellation of Public Workshops Scheduled...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-16

    ... culture common terminology effort comprised of: (1) Development of a common safety culture definition; and... workshop was to: (1) Obtain input regarding a high-level safety culture definition that could apply to all... culture definition and a group of traits. While the NRC anticipated that it might take three workshops...

  11. Intrusion resistant underground structure (IRUS) - safety assessment and licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the safety goals, human exposure scenarios and critical groups, the syvac-nsure performance assessment code, groundwater pathway safety results, and inadvertent human intrusion of the IRUS. 2 tabs

  12. Safety Culture as a Pillar of Defense-in-Depth Implementation at the Experimental Fuel Element Installation, Batan Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defence-in-depth (DID) needs to be implemented not only in a nuclear power plant, but also in a non-reactor nuclear facility. The application of safety culture in a nuclear facility is one way of DID implementation. Safety culture aims at the performance of safe works, the prevention of deviation, and the accomplishment of quality operation. It is in accordance with the first level of DID concept which is the prevention of abnormal operation and failures that is done through conservative design and high quality in construction and operation. Experimental Fuel Element Installation (EFEI) is a nonreactor nuclear facility that belongs to BATAN (the National Nuclear Energy Agency of the Republic of Indonesia) that functions as its research and development facility on power reactor fuel production. The objective of safety culture implementation in the EFEI is to encourage workers to have a stronger sense of responsibility on safety and to contribute actively for its development. The enhancement of safety culture in the EFEI refers to the attributes of a strong safety culture listed in the IAEA Safety Standard Series No.GS-G-3.5 (The Management System for Nuclear Installations Safety Guide). The strategies performed were: a) Internalization of safety values through activities such as briefings, “coffee morning”, visual management, workshops, and training; b) Enhancement of leadership effectiveness through activities such as senior management visits, safety leadership training, and personnel qualification training; c) Integration of safety into all work processes through activities such as setting up HIRADC (hazard identification, risk assessment, and determining controls) documents, setting up WHA (workplace hazard assessment), and routine housekeeping; d) Learning about safety through activities such as occupational health and safety inspections, safety self-assessments, open reporting on safety incidents, and participation in the FINAS (fuel incident notification

  13. Examination on establishment of safety culture for operating nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For safely operating nuclear power facilities, in addition to the technical countermeasures, the performance of the organizations that operate and manage them is important. In this paper, the spontaneous cooperation type management system that supported the introduction and development of nuclear power generation in electric power business is analyzed from the viewpoints of organization science and behavioral psychology, and based on the results of the investigation of the sense of value and psychological characteristics of young organization members who bear future nuclear power generation, on how to foster and establish safety culture which is called second safety principle in organizations, the subjects for hereafter are discussed from the viewpoints of respect of individuals and their integration with organizations, upbringing of talents and systematic learning. The factors which compose the safety culture are shown. The form of operating and managing the organizations are seen in first generation nuclear power generation, the similarity to Japanese type enterprise operation system, the change of the prerequisite of spontaneous cooperation type management and the difference of conscience among the generations of organization members are discussed. The above subjects for hereafter are discussed. (K.I.)

  14. Development of Behavioral Indicators of Competences for Safety Culture of Nuclear Power Plants: A Preliminary Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Kwangsu; Kim, Sa Kil; Oh, Yeon Ju; Shin, Youmin; Lee, Yong-Hee; Jang, Tong Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The term of safety competency in nuclear field was presented in the OECD/NEA workshop held in 1999. A model of the safety culture competencies in nuclear power plants was developed by KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). In general, a competency (competence) is defined as 'cluster of employee's attribute, knowledge, skill, ability or other characteristic that contributes to successful job performance'. We also defined safety culture competency as 'cluster of various internal characteristics (e.g., knowledge, skill, ability, motive, attitude and etc.) of employee that contribute to perform job safely and shape a healthy and strong safety culture.' By this definition, the safety culture competency is the broader construct including job competency. An employee having high level of safety culture competency shows extra discretionary effort to improve safety of peer, team and organization in addition to the individual's successful and safe job accomplishment. The behavioral indicators for each of the competencies are focal points of conversations on progress and are monitored continuously by self-assessment and managers or supervisors' intervention. Deficiencies in any of these indicators can point to coaching, training or other learning opportunities that employees may be required in order to improve. The purpose of this study was to derive a model of safety competencies for improving safety culture of NPPs and develop a set of behavioral indicators of each competency. In addition, the method of measuring behavioral indicators was suggested. For the application of developed safety culture competences and behavioral indicators, the most suitable measuring method for behavioral indicators must be developed. In the case of behavioral observations, behavioral dimensions (frequency, persistence and latency), observation possibility, occurrence basis of behavior (daily job performance, situational dependent) are considered to

  15. The role of attitudes in the safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The UK Advisory Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations has recently published a comprehensive review of the organisational variables shown by research to be associated with strong safety cultures. A pervasive theme is that favourable attitudes towards, for example, the safety regulations, line management of safety, risk taking, team working, job satisfaction etc. are quintessential features of a healthy safety culture. An attitude is a relatively enduring predisposition to behave safely in a very wide range of situations. This paper reports an extensive empirical study in support of this argument. It is claimed that what we need to do, now that so many potential accidents have been engineered out of the system, is to address the hearts and minds of the workforce. It is the diffuse inefficiencies, mistakes, lapses and violations on the part of management and workers that now lie behind the large majority of remaining accidents. The study was carried out in the Sellafield nuclear reprocessing plant. A series of focus groups was held with all levels of the workforce in order to elicit the main issues and concerns affecting safety at the plant. These were incorporated in a draft questionnaire that was piloted on a representative sample. The final version included 172 statements covering every aspect of safety, with which respondents were invited to agree or disagree on a 7-point scale. The questionnaire was designed to be answerable, in the same form, by employees at every level in the organisation. A final sample of 5,297 was obtained, about 85% of the workforce. Principal components analysis resulted in 1 9 subscales. The most critical finding relates to the validation of these sub-scales. It was found that 17 of the attitudes discriminate, at high levels of significance, between those who have had an accident at some time while working at the plant and those who have not. Further analysis reveals differences between departments, shift versus day workers

  16. Probabilistic safety assessment activities at Ignalina NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Barselina Project was initiated in the summer 1991. The project was a multilateral co-operation between Lithuania, Russia and Sweden up until phase 3, and phase 4 has been performed as a bilateral between Lithuania and Sweden. The long-range objective is to establish common perspectives and unified bases for assessment of severe accident risks and needs for remedial measures for the RBMK reactors. During phase 3, from 1993 to 1994, a full scope Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) model of the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant unit 2 was developed to identify possible safety improvement of risk importance. The probabilistic methodology was applied on a plant specific basis for a channel type reactor of RBMK design. During phase 4, from 1994 to 1996, the PSA was further developed, taking into account plant changes, improved modelling methods and extended plant information concerning dependencies (area events, dynamic effects, electrical and signal dependencies). The model reflected the plant status before the outage 1996. During phase 4+, 1998 to 1999 the PSA model was upgraded taking into account the newest plant modifications. The new PSA model of CPS/AZRT was developed. Modelling was based on the Single Failure Analysis

  17. Nirex Safety Assessment Research Programme bibliography, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography lists reports and papers written as part of the Nirex Safety Assessment Research programme, which is concerned with disposal of low-level and intermediate-level waste (LLW and ILW). All work referred to has been funded, or partly funded, by UK Nirex Limited, previously known as the Nuclear Industry Radioactive Waste Executive (NIREX). The bibliography has been divided into two sections, a List of Publications in roughly chronological order and an Author Index. The topics involved include near-field and far-field studies. The near-field includes the waste, its immobilising medium, its container, the engineered structure in which the containers are emplaced, and the immediately adjacent geological formation disturbed by the construction of the repository. The far-field is the undisturbed geological formation between the near-field and the biosphere. (author)

  18. Assessing Hmong farmers' safety and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, A B; Krenz, Jennifer; Neitzel, Richard L

    2014-05-01

    This pilot project investigated agricultural-related safety and health issues among Hmong refugees working on family-operated farms. Novel approaches, namely participatory rural appraisal and photovoice, were used to conduct a qualitative occupational hazard assessment with a group of Hmong farmers in Washington State. These two methods were useful in gathering participants' own perspectives about priority concerns. Several identified problems were related to musculoskeletal disorders, handling and operating heavy machinery, heat and cold stress, respiratory exposures, pest management, and socioeconomic and language concerns. Findings from this study provide insight into the work-related challenges that Hmong refugee farmers encounter and can serve as a basis for occupational health professionals to develop interventions to assist this underserved group.

  19. Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (Project W-296) Safety Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Assessment is based on information derived from the Conceptual Design Report for the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (DOE/RL 1994) and ancillary documentation developed during the conceptual design phase of Project W-296. The Safety Assessment has been prepared to support the Solid Waste Burial Ground Interim Safety Basis document. The purpose of the Safety Assessment is to provide an evaluation of the design to determine if the process, as proposed, will comply with US Department of Energy (DOE) Limits for radioactive and hazardous material exposures and be acceptable from an overall health and safety standpoint. The evaluation considered affects on the worker, onsite personnel, the public, and the environment

  20. Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (Project W-296) Safety Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, D.L.

    1994-08-01

    This Safety Assessment is based on information derived from the Conceptual Design Report for the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (DOE/RL 1994) and ancillary documentation developed during the conceptual design phase of Project W-296. The Safety Assessment has been prepared to support the Solid Waste Burial Ground Interim Safety Basis document. The purpose of the Safety Assessment is to provide an evaluation of the design to determine if the process, as proposed, will comply with US Department of Energy (DOE) Limits for radioactive and hazardous material exposures and be acceptable from an overall health and safety standpoint. The evaluation considered affects on the worker, onsite personnel, the public, and the environment.

  1. Theoretical study on safety assessment indexes system of coal mines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Shi-liang(施式亮); LI Run-qiu(李润求); XIE Jian-xiang(谢建湘)

    2003-01-01

    The safety status of the coal mines is closely correlated with the operating status and its changes of the whole working system in the coal mines, and the safety system is the sub-system of the whole production system. In this paper, based on the analysis of the complicacy of the safety sub-system and its affecting factors, the theory basis of the indexes system of the safety assessment was studied, including the establishing principles of the indexes system , the structure of the indexes system, the determining methods of the assessment indexes. The complete indexes system was established for the safety assessment of the coal mines in the paper.

  2. Does health care role and experience influence perception of safety culture related to preventing infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Barbara I; Harris, Anthony D; Richards, Cheryl L; Belton, Beverly M; Dembry, Louise-Marie; Morton, David J; Xiao, Yan

    2013-07-01

    Growing evidence reveals the importance of improving safety culture in efforts to eliminate health care-associated infections. This multisite, cross-sectional survey examined the association between professional role and health care experience on infection prevention safety culture at 5 hospitals. The findings suggest that frontline health care technicians are less directly engaged in improvement efforts and safety education than other staff and that infection prevention safety culture varies more by hospital than by staff position and experience.

  3. Geosphere process report for the safety assessment SR-Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skagius, Kristina (ed.) (Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-11-15

    This report documents geosphere processes identified as relevant to the long-term safety of a KBS-3 repository, and forms an important part of the reporting of the safety assessment SR-Site. The detailed assessment methodology, including the role of the process reports in the assessment, is described in the SR-Site Main report /SKB 2011/

  4. Geosphere process report for the safety assessment SR-Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents geosphere processes identified as relevant to the long-term safety of a KBS-3 repository, and forms an important part of the reporting of the safety assessment SR-Site. The detailed assessment methodology, including the role of the process reports in the assessment, is described in the SR-Site Main report /SKB 2011/

  5. [Organisational responsibility versus individual responsibility: safety culture? About the relationship between patient safety and medical malpractice law].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Dieter

    2009-01-01

    The contribution is concerned with the correlations between risk information, patient safety, responsibility and liability, in particular in terms of liability law. These correlations have an impact on safety culture in healthcare, which can be evaluated positively if--in addition to good quality of medical care--as many sources of error as possible can be identified, analysed, and minimised or eliminated by corresponding measures (safety or risk management). Liability influences the conduct of individuals and enterprises; safety is (probably) also a function of liability; this should also apply to safety culture. The standard of safety culture does not only depend on individual liability for damages, but first of all on strict enterprise liability (system responsibility) and its preventive effects. Patient safety through quality and risk management is therefore also an organisational programme of considerable relevance in terms of liability law.

  6. Complementary safety assessment assessment of nuclear facilities - Tricastin facility - AREVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This complementary safety assessment analyses the robustness of the Areva part of the Tricastin nuclear site to extreme situations such as those that led to the Fukushima accident. This study includes the following facilities: Areva NC Pierrelatte, EURODIF production, Comurhex Pierrelatte, Georges Besse II plant and Socatri. Robustness is the ability for the plant to withstand events beyond which the plant was designed. Robustness is linked to safety margins but also to the situations leading to a sudden deterioration of the accidental sequence. Moreover, safety is not only a matter of design or engineered systems but also a matter of organizing: task organization (including subcontracting) as well as the setting of emergency plans or the inventory of nuclear materials are taken into consideration in this assessment. This report is divided into 10 main chapters: 1) the feedback experience of the Fukushima accident; 2) description of the site and its surroundings; 3) featuring of the site's activities and installations; 4) accidental sequences; 5) protection from earthquakes; 6) protection from floods; 7) protection from other extreme natural disasters; 8) the loss of electrical power and of the heat sink; 9) the management of severe accidents; and 10) subcontracting policy. This analysis has identified 5 main measures to be taken to limit the risks linked to natural disasters: -) continuing the program for replacing the current conversion plant and the enrichment plant; -) renewing the storage of hydrofluoric acid at the de-fluorination workshop; -) assessing the seismic behaviour of some parts of the de-fluorination workshop and of the fluorine fabrication workshop; -) improving the availability of warning and information means in case of emergency; and -) improving the means to mitigate accidental gaseous releases. (A.C.)

  7. Probabilistic safety assessment in nuclear power plant management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) techniques have been widely used over the past few years to assist in understanding how engineered systems respond to abnormal conditions, particularly during a severe accident. The use of PSAs in the design and operation of such systems thus contributes to the safety of nuclear power plants. Probabilistic safety assessments can be maintained to provide a continuous up-to-date assessment (Living PSA), supporting the management of plant operations and modifications

  8. Integration of safety culture in transient analyses for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the nuclear field Safety Culture is the arrangement of attitudes and characteristics in individuals and organisations which determines first and foremost that nuclear power plant safety issues receive adequate attention due to their outstanding significance. It differs from general Corporate Culture via its concept of core hazards and the potentially large effects associated with the release of radioactivity. One can talk about positive and negative Safety Cultures. A positive Safety Culture assumes that the whole is more than the sum of the parts. The different parts interact to increase the overall effectiveness. In a negative Safety Culture the opposite is the case, with the action of some individuals restricted by the cynicism of others. Some examples of issues that contribute to a negative safety culture are: non-adherence to the established instructions and procedures, unclear definition of responsibilities, disinterest and inattentiveness, overestimation of own capabilities and arrogance, unclear rules, and mistrust between involved organisations. In addition to differentiation and importance of Safety Culture, necessary commitment levels, safety management framework, the paper discusses integration of Safety Culture in transient analyses of nuclear power plants. In this course the commitment to Safety Culture is defined as: a good Safety Culture depends on the continuous commitment and fulfilment of all involved organizations, persons and processes without any exception. (author)

  9. Validation of the organizational culture assessment instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heritage, Brody; Pollock, Clare; Roberts, Lynne

    2014-01-01

    Organizational culture is a commonly studied area in industrial/organizational psychology due to its important role in workplace behaviour, cognitions, and outcomes. Jung et al.'s [1] review of the psychometric properties of organizational culture measurement instruments noted many instruments have limited validation data despite frequent use in both theoretical and applied situations. The Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI) has had conflicting data regarding its psychometric properties, particularly regarding its factor structure. Our study examined the factor structure and criterion validity of the OCAI using robust analysis methods on data gathered from 328 (females = 226, males = 102) Australian employees. Confirmatory factor analysis supported a four factor structure of the OCAI for both ideal and current organizational culture perspectives. Current organizational culture data demonstrated expected reciprocally-opposed relationships between three of the four OCAI factors and the outcome variable of job satisfaction but ideal culture data did not, thus indicating possible weak criterion validity when the OCAI is used to assess ideal culture. Based on the mixed evidence regarding the measure's properties, further examination of the factor structure and broad validity of the measure is encouraged.

  10. Validation of the organizational culture assessment instrument.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brody Heritage

    Full Text Available Organizational culture is a commonly studied area in industrial/organizational psychology due to its important role in workplace behaviour, cognitions, and outcomes. Jung et al.'s [1] review of the psychometric properties of organizational culture measurement instruments noted many instruments have limited validation data despite frequent use in both theoretical and applied situations. The Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI has had conflicting data regarding its psychometric properties, particularly regarding its factor structure. Our study examined the factor structure and criterion validity of the OCAI using robust analysis methods on data gathered from 328 (females = 226, males = 102 Australian employees. Confirmatory factor analysis supported a four factor structure of the OCAI for both ideal and current organizational culture perspectives. Current organizational culture data demonstrated expected reciprocally-opposed relationships between three of the four OCAI factors and the outcome variable of job satisfaction but ideal culture data did not, thus indicating possible weak criterion validity when the OCAI is used to assess ideal culture. Based on the mixed evidence regarding the measure's properties, further examination of the factor structure and broad validity of the measure is encouraged.

  11. Validation of the organizational culture assessment instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heritage, Brody; Pollock, Clare; Roberts, Lynne

    2014-01-01

    Organizational culture is a commonly studied area in industrial/organizational psychology due to its important role in workplace behaviour, cognitions, and outcomes. Jung et al.'s [1] review of the psychometric properties of organizational culture measurement instruments noted many instruments have limited validation data despite frequent use in both theoretical and applied situations. The Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI) has had conflicting data regarding its psychometric properties, particularly regarding its factor structure. Our study examined the factor structure and criterion validity of the OCAI using robust analysis methods on data gathered from 328 (females = 226, males = 102) Australian employees. Confirmatory factor analysis supported a four factor structure of the OCAI for both ideal and current organizational culture perspectives. Current organizational culture data demonstrated expected reciprocally-opposed relationships between three of the four OCAI factors and the outcome variable of job satisfaction but ideal culture data did not, thus indicating possible weak criterion validity when the OCAI is used to assess ideal culture. Based on the mixed evidence regarding the measure's properties, further examination of the factor structure and broad validity of the measure is encouraged. PMID:24667839

  12. Constantly evolving safety assessment protocols for GM foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesikeran, B; Vasanthi, Siruguri

    2008-01-01

    he introduction of GM foods has led to the evolution of a food safety assessment paradigm that establishes safety of the GM food relative to its conventional counterpart. The GM foods currently approved and marketed in several countries have undergone extensive safety testing under a structured safety assessment framework evolved by international organizations like FAO, WHO, Codex and OECD. The major elements of safety assessment include molecular characterization of inserted genes and stability of the trait, toxicity and allergenicity potential of the expressed substances, compositional analysis, potential for gene transfer to gut microflora and unintentional effects of the genetic modification. As more number and type of food crops are being brought under the genetic modification regime, the adequacy of existing safety assessment protocols for establishing safety of these foods has been questioned. Such crops comprise GM crops with higher agronomic vigour, nutritional or health benefit/ by modification of plant metabolic pathways and those expressing bioactive substances and pharmaceuticals. The safety assessment challenges of these foods are the potential of the methods to detect unintentional effects with higher sensitivity and rigor. Development of databases on food compositions, toxicants and allergens is currently seen as an important aid to development of safety protocols. With the changing global trends in genetic modification technology future challenge would be to develop GM crops with minimum amount of inserted foreign DNA so as to reduce the burden of complex safety assessments while ensuring safety and utility of the technology.

  13. Organizational cultural assessment of the Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-05-01

    An Organizational Cultural Assessment (OCA) was performed at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) by administering an Organizational Culture Survey (OCS) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental concerns, hazardous nature of work, safety, and overall job satisfaction. The purpose of the OCS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. The OCS administration at SNL was the fifth to occur at a DOE facility. The sample was randomly selected from each Vice Presidency group, the largest organizational unit at SNL. Scores and significance are discussed and statistically significant differences between groups are identified and discussed.

  14. Multifunctional encoding system for assessment of movable cultural heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornari, V.; Bernikola, E.; Osten, W.; Groves, R. M.; Marc, G.; Hustinx, G. M.; Kouloumpi, E.; Hackney, S.

    2007-07-01

    This is an introductory paper of a recent EC project dealing with research in cultural heritage and aiming to communicate new fields of application for optical metrology techniques. The project is in its initial state and more conclusive information is expected to be available at the time of the perspective conference. Nowadays safety, ethical, economical and security issues as well as the increase demand for loaning of art objects for exhibitions in transit, are forcing the Conservation Community to undertake strong initiatives and actions against various types of mistreatment, damage or fraud, during transportation of movable Cultural Heritage. Therefore the interest directs to the development of innovative methodologies and instrumentation to respond to critical aspects of increased importance in cultural heritage preservation, among which of prior consideration are: to secure proper treatment, assess probable damage, fight fraud actions in transportation.

  15. Safety culture and accident analysis-A socio-management approach based on organizational safety social capital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the biggest challenges for organizations in today's competitive business environment is to create and preserve a self-sustaining safety culture. Typically, Key drivers of safety culture in many organizations are regulation, audits, safety training, various types of employee exhortations to comply with safety norms, etc. However, less evident factors like networking relationships and social trust amongst employees, as also extended networking relationships and social trust of organizations with external stakeholders like government, suppliers, regulators, etc., which constitute the safety social capital in the Organization-seem to also influence the sustenance of organizational safety culture. Can erosion in safety social capital cause deterioration in safety culture and contribute to accidents? If so, how does it contribute? As existing accident analysis models do not provide answers to these questions, CAMSoC (Curtailing Accidents by Managing Social Capital), an accident analysis model, is proposed. As an illustration, five accidents: Bhopal (India), Hyatt Regency (USA), Tenerife (Canary Islands), Westray (Canada) and Exxon Valdez (USA) have been analyzed using CAMSoC. This limited cross-industry analysis provides two key socio-management insights: the biggest source of motivation that causes deviant behavior leading to accidents is 'Faulty Value Systems'. The second biggest source is 'Enforceable Trust'. From a management control perspective, deterioration in safety culture and resultant accidents is more due to the 'action controls' rather than explicit 'cultural controls'. Future research directions to enhance the model's utility through layering are addressed briefly

  16. Safety culture and accident analysis--a socio-management approach based on organizational safety social capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Suman

    2007-04-11

    One of the biggest challenges for organizations in today's competitive business environment is to create and preserve a self-sustaining safety culture. Typically, the key drivers of safety culture in many organizations are regulation, audits, safety training, various types of employee exhortations to comply with safety norms, etc. However, less evident factors like networking relationships and social trust amongst employees, as also extended networking relationships and social trust of organizations with external stakeholders like government, suppliers, regulators, etc., which constitute the safety social capital in the Organization--seem to also influence the sustenance of organizational safety culture. Can erosion in safety social capital cause deterioration in safety culture and contribute to accidents? If so, how does it contribute? As existing accident analysis models do not provide answers to these questions, CAMSoC (Curtailing Accidents by Managing Social Capital), an accident analysis model, is proposed. As an illustration, five accidents: Bhopal (India), Hyatt Regency (USA), Tenerife (Canary Islands), Westray (Canada) and Exxon Valdez (USA) have been analyzed using CAMSoC. This limited cross-industry analysis provides two key socio-management insights: the biggest source of motivation that causes deviant behavior leading to accidents is 'Faulty Value Systems'. The second biggest source is 'Enforceable Trust'. From a management control perspective, deterioration in safety culture and resultant accidents is more due to the 'action controls' rather than explicit 'cultural controls'. Future research directions to enhance the model's utility through layering are addressed briefly.

  17. Nirex safety assessment research programme bibliography, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography lists reports and papers written as part of the Nirex Safety Assessment Research Programme, which is concerned with disposal of low-level and intermediate-level waste (LLW and ILW) and associated radiological assessments. The bibliography has been divided into two sections, a list of Publications in roughly chronological order and an Author Index. The topics involved include near-field and far-field studies. The near-field includes the waste package, filling or sealing materials, and those parts of the host medium whose characteristics have been or could be altered by the repository or its content. The far-field is the rock formation outside the repository, including the surrounding strata, at a distance from the waste disposal site such that, for modelling purposes, the site may be considered as a single entity, and the effects of individual waste packages are indistinguishable in the effects of the whole. The far-field includes also the biosphere, into which radionuclides from the waste could conceivably migrate in the future. (author)

  18. The Nirex safety assessment research programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes progress on the Nirex Safety Assessment Research Programme in 1987/88. The programme is concerned with research into the disposal of low-level waste (LLW) and intermediate-level waste (ILW) into underground repositories. At the beginning of 1987/88 a range of techniques for measuring and modelling far-field phenomena were being applied to near-surface disposal of low-level waste in clay. However, during the year the far-field studies were redirected to consider generic geological materials of interest for deep disposal of low and intermediate-level waste, which is now the preferred option in the UK. A substantial part of the programme is concerned with the effectiveness of near-field barriers to water-borne leakage of radionuclides from cementitious repositories. Considerable progress has been made in quantifying this and laying the foundations for robust and reliable radiological assessments to be made with appropriate models. New projects have also been initiated to study the evolution and migration of gases from an underground repository and to consider the contribution of the biosphere to the retardation of radionuclides. (author)

  19. A management system integrating radiation protection and safety supporting safety culture in the hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quality assurance has been identified as an important part of radiation protection and safety for a considerable time period. A rational expansion and improvement of quality assurance is to integrate radiation protection and safety in a management system. The aim of this study was to explore factors influencing the implementing strategy when introducing a management system including radiation protection and safety in hospitals and to outline benefits of such a system. The main experience from developing a management system is that it is possible to create a vast number of common policies and routines for the whole hospital, resulting in a cost-efficient system. One of the key benefits is the involvement of management at all levels, including the hospital director. Furthermore, a transparent system will involve staff throughout the organisation as well. A management system supports a common view on what should be done, who should do it and how the activities are reviewed. An integrated management system for radiation protection and safety includes key elements supporting a safety culture. (authors)

  20. Safety Assessment in Installation of Precast Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashrri S.N.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to identify the safety aspects and the level of safety during the installation process in construction sites. A questionnaire survey and interviews were done to provide data on safety requirements in precast concrete construction. All of the interviews and the research questionnaire survey were conducted among contractors that are registered as class 1 to class 7 with the Construction Industry Development Board (CIDB and class A to class G with Pusat Khidmat Kontraktor (PKK in Penang. Returned questionnaires were analysed with the use of simple percentages and the Likert Scale analysis method to identify safety aspects of precast construction. The results indicate that the safety aspect implemented by companies involved in the precast construction process is at a good level in the safety aspect during bracing, propping, welding and grouting processes and at a very good level of safety in general aspects and safety aspects during lifting processes.

  1. System safety assessment by maintenance indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Maintenance Indicator was applied to evaluate the safety of nuclear power plants. A method was proposed to evaluate the reliability for 'a function' required for the system safety from the viewpoint of maintenance. (author)

  2. Objective Assessments of Temperature Maintenance Using In Vitro Culture Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Cooke, Simon; Tyler, John P. P.; Driscoll, Geoff

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the ability of various facets of embryo culture (microscope stage warmers, volumes of culture media, culture vessel lids, and type of culture incubator) to maintain a constant temperature in vitro.

  3. Safety assessment for Area 5 radioactive-waste-management site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Safety Assessment Document contains evaluations of site characteristics, facilities, and operating practices that contribute to the safe handling, storage, and disposal of low-level radioactive wastes at the Nevada Test Site. Physical geography, cultural factors, climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology (with emphasis on radionuclide migration), ecology, natural phenomena, and natural resources are discussed and determined to be suitable for effective containment of radionuclides. A separate section considers facilities and operating practices such as monitoring, storage/disposal criteria, site maintenance, equipment, and support. The section also considers the transportation and waste handling requirements supporting the new Greater Confinement Disposal Facility (GCDF), GCDF demonstration project, and other requirements for the safe handling, storage, and disposal of low-level radioactive wastes. Finally, the document provides an analysis of releases and an assessment of the near-term operational impacts and dose commitments to operating personnel and the general public from normal operations and anticipated accidental occurrences. The conclusion of this report is that the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site is suitable for low-level radioactive waste handling, storage, and disposal. Also, the new GCDF demonstration project will not affect the overall safety of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site

  4. Is culture associated with patient safety in the emergency department? A study of staff perspectives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek-van Noord, I.; Wagner, C.; Dyck, C. van; Twisk, J.W.R.; Bruijne, M.C. de

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe the patient safety culture of Dutch emergency departments (EDs), to examine associations between safety culture dimensions and patient safety grades as reported by ED staff and to compare these associations between nurses and physicians. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey conducte

  5. Identification of differences between rural and urban safety cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakauskas, Michael E; Ward, Nicholas J; Gerberich, Susan G

    2009-09-01

    The prevailing risk of traffic fatalities is much larger in rural areas compared to urban areas. A number of explanations have been offered to explain this including road design, emergency medical service proximity, and human factors. This research explored the potential contribution of rural driver attitudes that may underlie the increased fatal crash risk in rural environments. This analysis examined differences between rural and urban drivers in terms of self-reported risk taking for driving behaviors associated with fatal crashes and attitudes toward safety interventions using a large-scale survey. The results suggested that rural drivers engage in riskier behavior, such as not wearing seatbelts, because they have lower perceptions of the risks associated with such behaviors. Results also suggested that vehicle type (e.g., pickup trucks versus passenger vehicles) may be related to seatbelt compliance and frequency of driving under the influence of alcohol. Rural drivers perceived the utility of government-sponsored traffic safety interventions to be lower than their urban counterparts. This study provides insights into the role of the human factor in rural fatal crashes and provides policy suggestions for developing safety interventions that are designed with respect to the psychosocial factors that define the rural culture. PMID:19664429

  6. Challenges and Enhancements to the Safety Culture of the Regulatory Body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop opened with presentations by both the NEA Director-General and the chair of the three committees directly involved with the safety culture of the regulatory body (SCRB). The opening session set the scene and gave an overview of the SCRB together with presentations and discussions on priorities and challenges. The main session focused on the principles of the SCRB, its implementation and the challenges and enhancements that are being raised and considered. The workshop concluded with a session that looked at findings and conclusions, the way forward and an agreed position on the SCRB. This document brings together the available presentations (slides) given at the workshop: 1 - Introduction: Challenges and Enhancements to the Safety Culture of the Regulatory Body (J-C. Niel); 2 - Thoughts on Safety Culture from a CSNI Perspective (B. Sheron); 3 - Radiological Protection Culture: CRPPH Work (M. Boyd); 4 - Challenges and Enhancements to Safety Culture of the Regulatory Body (L. Carlsson); 5 - Principles for the safety culture of the regulatory body (P. Tiippana); 6 - NRC's Internal Safety Culture: Successes, Challenges, and the Path Forward (S.G. Burns); 7 - Insights on the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's Safety Culture Journey (T. Jamieson); 8 - Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Accident regarding Safety Culture of Regulatory Body (T. Fuketa); 9 - Challenges to Regulatory Bodies' safety culture (P-F. Chevet); 10 - Regulatory Safety Culture: International Perspective (G. Rzentkowski); 11 - Integration of Safety Research into Safety Culture Concepts (F-P. Weiss); 12 - Radiation Protection and Emergency Management Aspects: Culture drawn up by RP professionals (B. Le Guen); 13 - Closing session panel (L. Carlsson)

  7. Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Safety Assessment Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Safety Assessment Document evaluates site characteristics, facilities and operating practices which contribute to the safe handling and storage/disposal of radioactive wastes at the Nevada Test Site. Physical geography, cultural factors, climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology (with emphasis on radionuclide migration), ecology, natural phenomena, and natural resources are discussed and determined to be suitable for effective containment of radionuclides. Also considered, as a separate section, are facilities and operating practices such as monitoring; storage/disposal criteria; site maintenance, equipment, and support; transportation and waste handling; and others which are adequate for the safe handling and storage/disposal of radioactive wastes. In conclusion, the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site is suitable for radioactive waste handling and storage/disposal for a maximum of twenty more years at the present rate of utilization

  8. Integrated deterministic and probabilistic safety analysis for safety assessment of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present special issue contains an overview of the research in the field of Integrated Deterministic and Probabilistic Safety Assessment (IDPSA) of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Traditionally, safety regulation for NPPs design and operation has been based on Deterministic Safety Assessment (DSA) methods to verify criteria that assure plant safety in a number of postulated Design Basis Accident (DBA) scenarios. Referring to such criteria, it is also possible to identify those plant Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs) and activities that are most important for safety within those postulated scenarios. Then, the design, operation, and maintenance of these 'safety-related' SSCs and activities are controlled through regulatory requirements and supported by Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA)

  9. Quantitative Assessment of Safety Integrity Level of Message Transmission Between Safety-Related Equipment

    OpenAIRE

    Karol Rástočný; Mária Franeková; Iveta Zolotová; Karol Rástočný, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes and analyses the possibilities of a quantitative assessment of message transmission between safety-related equipment for control and communication systems with a guarantee of a higher safety integrity level (SIL). The theoretical methods and standards recommended for industrial safety-related control, information and communication systems with SIL3 are described. The main part of the contribution covers theoretical methods and practical procedures used within a safety ana...

  10. Radionuclide transport report for the safety assessment SR-Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document compiles radionuclide transport calculations of a KBS-3 repository for the safety assessment SR-Site. The SR-Site assessment supports the licence application for a final repository at Forsmark, Sweden

  11. Radionuclide transport report for the safety assessment SR-Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-12-15

    This document compiles radionuclide transport calculations of a KBS-3 repository for the safety assessment SR-Site. The SR-Site assessment supports the licence application for a final repository at Forsmark, Sweden

  12. Key practical issues in strengthening safety culture. INSAG-15. A report by the International Safety Advisory Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the essential practical issues to be considered by organizations aiming to strengthen safety culture. It is intended for senior executives, managers and first line supervisors in operating organizations. Although safety culture cannot be directly regulated, it is important that members of regulatory bodies understand how their actions affect the development of attempts to strengthen safety culture and are sympathetic to the need to improve the less formal human related aspects of safety. The report is therefore of relevance to regulators, although not intended primarily for them. The International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) introduced the concept of safety culture in its INSAG-4 report in 1991. Since then, many papers have been written on safety culture, as it relates to organizations and individuals, its improvement and its underpinning prerequisites. Variations in national cultures mean that what constitutes a good approach to enhancing safety culture in one country may not be the best approach in another. However, INSAG seeks to provide pragmatic and practical advice of wide applicability in the principles and issues presented in this report. Nuclear and radiological safety are the prime concerns of this report, but the topics discussed are so general that successful application of the principles should lead to improvements in other important areas, such as industrial safety, environmental performance and, in some respects, wider business performance. This is because many of the attitudes and practices necessary to achieve good performance in nuclear safety, including visible commitment by management, openness, care and thoroughness in completing tasks, good communication and clarity in recognizing major issues and dealing with them as a priority, have wide applicability

  13. Safety Assessment of Dialkyl Malates as Used in Cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Lillian C; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2015-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of 6 dialkyl malate compounds used in cosmetics. These ingredients function mostly as skin-conditioning agents-emollients. The Panel reviewed relevant animal and human data related to the ingredients along with a previous safety assessment of malic acid. The similar structure, properties, functions, and uses of these ingredients enabled grouping them and using the available toxicological data to assess the safety of the entire group. The Panel concluded that these dialkyl maleate compounds are safe in the present practices of use and concentration as given in this safety assessment.

  14. Safety assessment and detection methods of genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rong; Zheng, Zhe; Jiao, Guanglian

    2014-01-01

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs), are gaining importance in agriculture as well as the production of food and feed. Along with the development of GMOs, health and food safety concerns have been raised. These concerns for these new GMOs make it necessary to set up strict system on food safety assessment of GMOs. The food safety assessment of GMOs, current development status of safety and precise transgenic technologies and GMOs detection have been discussed in this review. The recent patents about GMOs and their detection methods are also reviewed. This review can provide elementary introduction on how to assess and detect GMOs.

  15. Systematic assessment of laser safety in otolaryngology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswal, V. H.

    2001-01-01

    Risk management of lasers can be broadly define das a process of identification of the risk, assessment of the risk and steps taken to avert the risk. The risk management may be divided into: Risk inherent to the technology and risk in clinical use. Within the National Health Service in the UK, a useful document, which provides hospital laser users with advice on safety, is the 'Guidance on the Safe Use of Lasers in Medical and Dental Practice' issued by the Medical Devices Agency for the Department of Health in the UK. It recommends the appointment of a Laser Protection Adviser (LPA) who is knowledgeable in the evaluation of laser hazards. One of the duties LPA is to ensure that Local Rules are drawn up for each specific application of a laser. A Laser Protection Supervisor (LPS) should also be appointed with responsibility to ensure that the Local Rules are observed. It is a sensible precaution that laser users should be those approved by the Laser Protection Supervisor in consultation with the Laser Protection Advisor. All laser users should sign a statement that they have read and understood the Local Rules.

  16. An overview on development of safety culture of regulatory body in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Myunghyun; Choi, Young Sung; Yi, Kyungjoo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Fukushima accident revealed not only licensees but also regulatory bodies' (RBs) establishment of robust safety culture (SC) is crucial to implement effective safety regulation. Result of the IAEA IRRS held in 2011 required regulatory body in Korea to make improvement measure for the enhancement of safety culture of regulatory body (SCRB). Compared to works done to assess SC focused on working organizations of nuclear industry, not enough attention has been paid to assess the RBs. To achieve this goal, long-term comprehensive drive plan has to be made. The IAEA is putting great effort to establish and enhance SC in RBs. OECD/NEA CNRA is planning to produce Green Booklet on SCRB for regulatory guidance. SCRB is an organization's culture, RBs ultimately has to possess in order to assure secure use of nuclear energy. An organization's culture emerges from, and is manifested in, the interplay of its members' emotion, cognition, attitudes, behaviors and interaction patterns. As a result of this mechanism, organizational structures and culture influence individual's attitude and behavior when entered into a situation. Each organization has its strengths and weakness in SC. Safety culture defective components of the Fukushima accident was analyzed by JNES in 2012. According to the casual factors indicated in the investigation report, Nuclear Regulatory Organizations (NROs) of Korea also had weakness of the SCRB in terms of questioning attitude, continuous learning, issue identification and resolution and safety leadership. It doesn't have to be same but necessary for both NSSC and KINS to be consistent in building SC traits to carry out a coherent policy with synergy effect. NROs should communicated and convey consistent message to the stakeholders. Not limited to development of SCRB itself, influence of SCRB on licensee's SC is recommended for further study. Also, what behaviors are expected to make positive effects and whether they can

  17. Organizational Cultural Assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-06-01

    An Organizational Cultural Assessment (OCA) was performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by administering an Organizational Culture Survey (OCS) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental concerns, hazardous nature of work, safety and overall job satisfaction. Many of these subjects are assessed in the OCS through highly developed and validated scales that have been administered in many different types of organizations. The purpose of the OCS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the notion of culture;'' that is, the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In addition, through the OCS, a broad sample of individuals can be reached that would probably not be interviewed or observed during the course of a typical assessment. The OCS also provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time that can then be compared to a profile taken at a different point in time to assess changes in the culture of the organization. The OCS administration at the INEL was the sixth to occur at a Department of Energy (DOE) facility. The INEL Organization is somewhat different from other DOE facilities are which the OCS was administered, due to the presence of six different major operating contractors. The seven organizations assessed at the INEL are: (1) Argonne National Laboratory -- West; (2) DOE Fire Department/Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory; (3) EG G Idaho Incorporated; (4) MK Ferguson; (5) Protection Technology Incorporated; (6) Rockwell; and (7) Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company Incorporated. All data from the OCS is presented in group summaries by organization, Supervisory Level, Staff Classification, and department within organization. Statistically significant differences between groups are identified and discussed.

  18. Safety Assessment of Synthetic Fluorphlogopite as Used in Cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Lillian C; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2015-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (the Panel) reviewed the safety of synthetic fluorphlogopite as used in cosmetics. Synthetic fluorphlogopite functions as a bulking agent and a viscosity-increasing agent. The Panel reviewed available animal and human data related to this ingredient along with a previous safety assessment of other magnesium silicates. The Panel concluded that synthetic fluorphlogopite was safe as cosmetic ingredients in the practices of use and concentration as given in this safety assessment. PMID:26684795

  19. Safety Assessment of Synthetic Fluorphlogopite as Used in Cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Lillian C; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2015-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (the Panel) reviewed the safety of synthetic fluorphlogopite as used in cosmetics. Synthetic fluorphlogopite functions as a bulking agent and a viscosity-increasing agent. The Panel reviewed available animal and human data related to this ingredient along with a previous safety assessment of other magnesium silicates. The Panel concluded that synthetic fluorphlogopite was safe as cosmetic ingredients in the practices of use and concentration as given in this safety assessment.

  20. Risk measures in living probabilistic safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objectives of the study are: to define risk measures and suggested uses of them in various living PSA applications for the operational safety management and to describe specific model features required for living PSA applications. The report is based on three case studies performed within the Nordic research project Safety Evaluation by Use of Living PSA and Safety Indicators. (48 refs., 11 figs., 17 tabs.)

  1. The Effect of Individual and Organizational Variables on Patient Safety Culture (PSC: A Case Study on Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Khandan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: The purpose of the hospital accreditation program is to improve the patients' safety. Prevention of mistakes in medical procedures, patients' safety risk identification and infection prevention besides the patients' safety culture (PSC are the key factors that must be considered in a successful patients' safety program.This study aimed to assess PSC and its association with demographic factors among nurses of a hospital in Qom, Iran. Materials & Methods: This research as a descriptive-analytical andcross-sectional study on the effect of individual and organizational variables on patients' safety culture among nurses was conducted in 2015. The final sample included 106 employees from one of the hospitals located in Qom province of Iran. The questionnaires consisted demographic questions and a valid questionnaire about patients' safety culture. T-test, ANOVA and Pearson correlation were conducted to analyze the data by SPSS V20. Results:The age of nurses was 35.15±10.33 (Mean±SD years. Results showed that the patients' safety climate scoreamongnurseswas 70.15±7.23. In addition, there are significant differences between groups of work shift and also education levels in the viewpoints of patients' safety (p0.05. Conclusions: Although, based on our finding,considered hospital had a suitable situation of patients' safety culture, but it is important to pay attention to continuous improvement in the scope of health care workers and patient safety to achieve criticalmission and visions of organizing. Job selection on the basis of demographic considerations and implementation of an accreditation plan for health care systems are two examples of how occupational safety and health tools can be used to provide quality improvement information for health care organizations such as hospitals.

  2. A New approach to the spread of safety culture. The trend of studies and practice in the foreign nuclear power industry, and future approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to clarify organizational factors influencing on safety and to suggest future approach for the spread of safety culture. As the results of investigations on safety companies, characteristics of organizational policies, those of safety activities' purposes, and organizational factors which encourage workers to take a positive attitude toward the safety activities were clarified. Based on the clarified characteristics and the trend of studies and practice in the foreign nuclear power industry, it was suggested that it would be necessary for the spread of safety culture in an organization to learn lessons for the prevention of accidents' recurring and to maintain safety behavior and attitude for the prevention of accidents' occurring. For support of this, it is desired to develop the assessment system of organizational safety and the planning system of safety management. The new approach was also suggested with the process model for influence of organizational factors which include workers' psychological aspects. (author)

  3. On integration and innovation of sino-foreign safety culture in Haiyang AP1000 Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The undergoing Haiyang Nuclear Power Plant is not only introducing the top-advanced AP1000 nuclear technology, but also the mature HSE management system from U.S.A. It's very important for both sides to communicate, comprehend and acculturation of both different culture. After over 1 year discussion and practice, the experts of Westinghouse Consortium and Chinese HSE engineers have established an distinctive safety culture of AP1000 Project initially, demonstrating the followings: Exemplary actions of the expat experts and the SNPTC leaders, the high level standard HSE procedures, HSE audit, various training, HSE inspection all-around, the safety performance assessment for prospective index, JHA/JSA , emergency system, humanism rewards and punishment etc.. Haiyang SPMO has made Three-Step master plan for AP1000 project HSE Routine by analysis the site problems and the difference between Chinese and American, that is, from 2008 to 2020, when nuclear power achieve to independent, safety culture of Haiyang AP1000 will change from 'dependent' to 'independent', until the last 'interdependent'. (authors)

  4. The First Study of Patient Safety Culture in Iranian Primary Health Centers

    OpenAIRE

    Mojtaba Sedaghat; Narges Tabrizchi

    2012-01-01

    Although the error in health care has received attention recently, patient safety culture in health centers has been relatively neglected. To measure the patient safety culture in primary health centers. A cross-sectional study, utilizing the modified version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC) developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) and a demographic questionnaire. Healthcare staffs from health centers were participated in the survey. The pati...

  5. Key issues on safety design basis selection and safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In current fast reactor design in Japan, four design accident conditions and four design seismic conditions are adopted as the design base classifications. These are classified by the considerations on both likelihood of occurrence and the severeness of the consequences. There are several major problem areas in safety design consideration such as core accident problems which include fuel sodium interaction, fuel failure propagation and residual decay heat removal, and decay heat removal systems problems which is more or less the problem of selection of appropriate system and of assurance of high reliability of the system. In view of licensing, two kinds of accidents are postulated in evaluating the adequacy of a reactor site. The one is the ''major accident'' which is the accident to give most severe radiation hazard to the public from technical point of view. The other is the ''hypothetical accident'', induced public accident of which is severer than that of major accident. While the concept of the former is rather unique to Japanese licensing, the latter is almost equivalent to design base hypothetical accident of the US practice. In this paper, design bases selections, key safety issues and some of the licensing considerations in Japan are described

  6. Nurses' perceptions of and factors promoting patient safety culture in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkmen, Emine; Baykal, Ulku; Intepeler, Seyda Seren; Altuntas, Serap

    2013-01-01

    This descriptive and cross-sectional study included 561 nurses in hospitals located in Istanbul, Turkey. The Patient Safety Questionnaire was used for data collection. The type of hospital and the amount of education nurses obtained about patient safety and quality improvement were positively associated with patient safety culture. Conversely, the type of work unit negatively affected workers' behaviors and adverse event reporting in terms of patient safety culture.

  7. Safe Management of Research Reactor MARIA with Special Emphasis on Safety Culture Enhancement Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is focused on the presentation what is the role of the State, Regulatory Body and Operating Organization in the assurance of research reactor MARIA safety. Also the significance of high level of safety culture for safety assurance and the process of its improvement has been highlighted. The process of development and improvement of safety culture contains the issues described in this paper, which we're considerated as the most important and our efforts are focused on their achievement. (author)

  8. Beyond self-assessment--assessing organizational cultural responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    While there is growing recognition of the need for health care organizations to provide culturally responsive care, appropriate strategies for assessing organizational responsiveness have not been determined. A document review assessment instrument was designed to assess best practice within eight domains, and along seven dimensions of organizational approach to diversity. Results obtained from the pilot of the instrument were congruent with data collected from key informant interviews, a focus group, observational methods and organizational feedback session; however, they were not consistent with self-assessment results at the same site. A larger pilot is required to determine generalizability of results. PMID:19172974

  9. Fuzzy synthetic assessment of building fire safety system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Gao-shang; PENG Li-min

    2005-01-01

    A multistage assessment index set is chosen based on the analysis of building fire safety system, whereby the weight of each index is determined through an analy tie.hierarchy process; a fuzzy synthetic assessment model for the building fire safety system is constructed, and the quantified result was obtained by using hierarchy parameter judgment. This fuzzy synthetic assessment method can quantify assessment result of the building fire safety system, so thatthe fire precautions may be accurately adopted, and the serious potential risk may be avoided. The application shows that this method possesses both objectivity and feasibility.

  10. Attitude toward the Patient Safety Culture in healthcare systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fereydoon Laal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patient Safety Culture (PSC involves a harmonious pattern of individual and organization behaviors based on common beliefs and values. This study aimed to evaluate the attitude of healthcare providers toward PSC in the hospitals and clinics of Zabol city, Iran. Materials and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in 2015. Sample population consisted of the physicians, nurses, and paraclinical staff (radiologists and laboratory experts engaged in different healthcare centers of Zabol city, Iran. Data were collected using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC questionnaire. Data analysis was performed in SPSS V.22 at the significance level of 0.05. Results: In total, 231 healthcare practitioners were enrolled in this study. Participants were divided into three groups of physicians, nurses, and paraclinical staff (n=77, 33.33%. Mean of age and clinical experience was 29.94 and 6.23 years, respectively. Among the main aspects of PSC, “general understanding of patient safety” had the highest mean score (13.53, and the lowest mean score was achieved in “non-punitive response to error” (8.89. In the aspect of “manager expectations and actions promoting safety”, a significant difference was observed in the mean scores of the study groups (P=0.030. Moreover, our results showed a significant difference between the mean scores of physicians and nurses in the aspect of “openness and honesty in communication” (P=0.023. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, improvement of PSC is necessary for the efficient management of hospitals and clinics. This is attainable through collaborative and instructive workshops, developing educational programs, and designing incident reporting systems.

  11. The safety culture of the nuclear plants of Sydkraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study, commanded by the Swedish utility Sydkraft, aimed at strengthening the ability of the organisation and its personnel to maintain and operate their five nuclear power plants safely, taking particular account of the dedication shown by the personnel and their attitudes to safety requirements. Assessment of the design of the plants and the status of the equipment was not included in the study. Information was obtained through informal interviews with managers and specialists, and through more than 130 systematic interviews with operating, maintenance and contractor personnel. Views were obtained from a number of external experts, including the safety regulators. A number of proposals are made in the study, regarding ways to achieve: A clear and strong commitment to safety matters from the company executives; A simpler structure regarding responsibilities and goals; A more uniform and understandable system of rules; Increased communication between levels and groups; Measures to conserve and develop competence for operating and maintaining the plants regarding: Personnel recruiting and education, R and D, Government contacts, Negative effects from the nuclear phaseout decision. The book includes a 33 p english summary

  12. Developing Expert Teams with a Strong Safety Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Would you like to lead a world renowned team that draws out all the talents and expertise of its members and consistently out performs all others in the industry? Ever wonder why so many organizations fail to truly learn from past mistakes only to repeat the same ones at a later date? Are you a program/project manager or team member in a high-risk organization where the decisions made often carry the highest of consequences? Leadership, communication, team building, critical decision-making and continuous team improvement skills and behaviors are mere talking points without the attitudes, commitment and strategies necessary to make them the very fabric of a team. Developing Expert Teams with a Strong Safety Culture, will provide you with proven knowledge and strategies to take your team soaring to heights you may have not thought possible. A myriad of teams have applied these strategies and techniques within their organization team environments: military and commercial aviation, astronaut flight crews, Shuttle flight controllers, members of the Space Shuttle Program Mission Management Team, air traffic controllers, nuclear power control teams, surgical teams, and the fire service report having spectacular success. Many industry leaders are beginning to realize that although the circumstances and environments of these teams may differ greatly to their own, the core elements, governing principles and dynamics involved in managing and building a stellar safety conscious team remain identical.

  13. Processes of technology assessment: The National Transportation Safety Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, E.

    1972-01-01

    The functions and operations of the Safety Board as related to technology assessment are described, and a brief history of the Safety Board is given. Recommendations made for safety in all areas of transportation and the actions taken are listed. Although accident investigation is an important aspect of NTSB's activity, it is felt that the greatest contribution is in pressing for development of better accident prevention programs. Efforts of the Safety Board in changing transportation technology to improve safety and prevent accidents are illustrated.

  14. Safety Assessment of Genetically Modified Foods

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Steve L

    2001-01-01

    The development of novel foods produced through agricultural biotechnology is a complex three-stage process: gene discovery, line selection, and product advancement to commercialization. The safety of genetically modified foods is an integral part of the overall developmental process throughout all of the stages. In the discovery stage, the safety of the gene, its source, and the gene products must be considered. If any questions arise at this stage, these questions must be answered later in ...

  15. A Model for Safety Case Confidence Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Guiochet, Jérémie; Do Hoang, Quynh Anh; Kaâniche, Mohamed; Kaaniche, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Building a safety case is a common approach to make expert judgement explicit about safety of a system. The issue of confidence in such argumen-tation is still an open research field. Providing quantitative estimation of confidence is an interesting approach to manage complexity of arguments. This paper explores the main current approaches, and proposes a new model for quantitative confidence estimation based on Belief Theory for its definition, and on Bayesian Belief Networks for its propaga...

  16. Patient safety in organizational culture as perceived by leaderships of hospital institutions with different types of administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Dejigov Monteiro da Silva

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To identify the perceptions of leaderships toward patient safety culture dimensions in the routine of hospitals with different administrative profiles: government, social and private organizations, and make correlations among participating institutions regarding dimensions of patient safety culture used. METHOD A quantitative cross-sectional study that used the Self Assessment Questionnaire 30 translated into Portuguese. The data were processed by analysis of variance (ANOVA in addition to descriptive statistics, with statistical significance set at p-value ≤ 0.05. RESULTS According to the participants' perceptions, the significant dimensions of patient safety culture were 'patient safety climate' and 'organizational learning', with 81% explanatory power. Mean scores showed that among private organizations, higher values were attributed to statements; however, the correlation between dimensions was stronger among government hospitals. CONCLUSION Different hospital organizations present distinct values for each dimension of patient safety culture and their investigation enables professionals to identify which dimensions need to be introduced or improved to increase patient safety.

  17. Organizational Cultural Assessment of the Solar Energy Research Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1991-06-01

    An Organizational Cultural Assessment (OCA) was performed at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) by administering an Organizational Culture Survey (OCS) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental concerns, hazardous nature of work, safety and overall job satisfaction. The purpose of the OCS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the notion of culture;'' that is, the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In addition, through the OCS, a broad simple of individuals can be reached that would probably not be interviewed or observed during the course of a typical assessment. The OCS also provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time that can then be compared to a profile taken at a different point in time to assess changes in the culture of the organization. All data from the OCS is presented in group summaries, by division, supervisory level, and staff classification. Statistically significant differences between groups are identified and discussed. The most notable finding which emerges from the OCA conducted at SERI is that it is a very homogeneous organization as indicated by the few statistically significant differences found between divisions/offices, staff classifications, and supervisory levels. The results also indicate SERI to be an organization which places a large amount of emphasis on those behaviors which are considered constructive'' (i.e., Humanistic-Encouraging, Affiliative, Achievement, Self-Actualizing) and, although to a lesser extent, on those behaviors which could be regarded as passive/defensive'' (i.e., Approval, Conventional, Dependent, Avoidance). 9 refs., 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. [Ecological safety assessment of Manas River Basin oasis, Xinjiang].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Hong-bo; Xu, Hai-liang; Shi, Wei; Zhang, Qing-qing

    2009-09-01

    By using analytic hierarchy process and fuzzy comprehensive evaluation, an index system for ecological safety assessment was built, and 18 indices in the aspects of water resource, environment, and social economy were selected to assess the ecological safety of Manas River Basin oasis in 2006. In the study area, the ecological situation in 2006 was basically safe, with the membership degree being 0. 3347 and the integrated evaluation score being 0. 551. The water resource safety index, social economy index, and environmental safety index were in the levels of relatively safe, extremely safe, and unsafe, respectively. Water resource index could represent the sustainable development degree of oasis, while social economy index and environment safety index could indicate the oasis development level and environment situation, respectively. These three indices could most reflect the ecological safety level of the oasis. PMID:20030146

  19. Safety culture and accident analysis-A socio-management approach based on organizational safety social capital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Suman [Risk Analyst (India)]. E-mail: sumanashokrao@yahoo.co.in

    2007-04-11

    One of the biggest challenges for organizations in today's competitive business environment is to create and preserve a self-sustaining safety culture. Typically, Key drivers of safety culture in many organizations are regulation, audits, safety training, various types of employee exhortations to comply with safety norms, etc. However, less evident factors like networking relationships and social trust amongst employees, as also extended networking relationships and social trust of organizations with external stakeholders like government, suppliers, regulators, etc., which constitute the safety social capital in the Organization-seem to also influence the sustenance of organizational safety culture. Can erosion in safety social capital cause deterioration in safety culture and contribute to accidents? If so, how does it contribute? As existing accident analysis models do not provide answers to these questions, CAMSoC (Curtailing Accidents by Managing Social Capital), an accident analysis model, is proposed. As an illustration, five accidents: Bhopal (India), Hyatt Regency (USA), Tenerife (Canary Islands), Westray (Canada) and Exxon Valdez (USA) have been analyzed using CAMSoC. This limited cross-industry analysis provides two key socio-management insights: the biggest source of motivation that causes deviant behavior leading to accidents is 'Faulty Value Systems'. The second biggest source is 'Enforceable Trust'. From a management control perspective, deterioration in safety culture and resultant accidents is more due to the 'action controls' rather than explicit 'cultural controls'. Future research directions to enhance the model's utility through layering are addressed briefly.

  20. Environment, Safety and Health progress assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ES ampersand H Progress Assessments are part of the Department's continuous improvement process throughout DOE and its contractor organizations. The purpose of the INEL ES ampersand H Progress Assessment is to provide the Department with concise independent information on the following: (1) change in culture and attitude related to ES ampersand H activities; (2) progress and effectiveness of the ES ampersand H corrective actions resulting from previous Tiger Team Assessments; (3) adequacy and effectiveness of the ES ampersand H self-assessment programs of the DOE line organizations and the site management and operating contractor; and (4) effectiveness of DOE and contractor management structures, resources, and systems to effectively address ES ampersand H problems. It is not intended that this Progress Assessment be a comprehensive compliance assessments of ES ampersand H activities. The points of reference for assessing programs at the INEL were, for the most part, the 1991 INEL Tiger Team Assessment, the INEL Corrective Action Plan, and recent appraisals and self-assessments of INEL. Horizontal and vertical reviews of the following programmatic areas were conducted: Management: Corrective action program; self-assessment; oversight; directives, policies, and procedures; human resources management; and planning, budgeting, and resource allocation. Environment: Air quality management, surface water management, groundwater protection, and environmental radiation. Safety and Health: Construction safety, worker safety and OSHA, maintenance, packaging and transportation, site/facility safety review, and industrial hygiene

  1. Environment, Safety and Health progress assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-01

    The ES&H Progress Assessments are part of the Department`s continuous improvement process throughout DOE and its contractor organizations. The purpose of the INEL ES&H Progress Assessment is to provide the Department with concise independent information on the following: (1) change in culture and attitude related to ES&H activities; (2) progress and effectiveness of the ES&H corrective actions resulting from previous Tiger Team Assessments; (3) adequacy and effectiveness of the ES&H self-assessment programs of the DOE line organizations and the site management and operating contractor; and (4) effectiveness of DOE and contractor management structures, resources, and systems to effectively address ES&H problems. It is not intended that this Progress Assessment be a comprehensive compliance assessments of ES&H activities. The points of reference for assessing programs at the INEL were, for the most part, the 1991 INEL Tiger Team Assessment, the INEL Corrective Action Plan, and recent appraisals and self-assessments of INEL. Horizontal and vertical reviews of the following programmatic areas were conducted: Management: Corrective action program; self-assessment; oversight; directives, policies, and procedures; human resources management; and planning, budgeting, and resource allocation. Environment: Air quality management, surface water management, groundwater protection, and environmental radiation. Safety and Health: Construction safety, worker safety and OSHA, maintenance, packaging and transportation, site/facility safety review, and industrial hygiene.

  2. Nuclear safety and security culture - an integrated approach to regulatory oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the development and implementation of regulatory guidelines for the oversight of safety and security culture within licensees organizations. CNCAN (the National Commission for Nuclear Activities of Romania) has used the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) attributes for a strong safety culture as the basis for its regulatory guidelines providing support to the reviewers and inspectors for recognizing and gathering information relevant to safety culture. These guidelines are in process of being extended to address also security culture, based on the IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 7 document Nuclear Security Culture: Implementing Guide. Recognizing that safety and security cultures coexist and need to reinforce each other because they share the common objective of limiting risk and that similar regulatory review and inspection processes are in place for nuclear security oversight, an integrated approach is considered justified, moreover since the common elements of these cultures outweigh the differences. (authors)

  3. Nirex safety assessment research programme: 1987/88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nirex Safety Assessment Research programme's objective is to provide information for the radiological safety case for disposing low-level and intermediate-level radioactive wastes in underground repositories. The programme covers a wide range of experimental studies and mathematical modelling for the near and far field. It attempts to develop a quantitative understanding of events and processes which have an impact on the safety of radioactive waste disposal. (U.K.)

  4. Safety Assessment for the Decommissioning of Facilities Using Radioactive Material. Safety Guide (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA's Statute authorizes the Agency to establish safety standards to protect health and minimize danger to life and property - standards which the IAEA must use in its own operations, and which a State can apply by means of its regulatory provisions for nuclear and radiation safety. A comprehensive body of safety standards under regular review, together with the IAEA's assistance in their application, has become a key element in a global safety regime. In the mid-1990s, a major overhaul of the IAEA's safety standards programme was initiated, with a revised oversight committee structure and a systematic approach to updating the entire corpus of standards. The new standards that have resulted are of a high calibre and reflect best practices in Member States. With the assistance of the Commission on Safety Standards, the IAEA is working to promote the global acceptance and use of its safety standards. Safety standards are only effective, however, if they are properly applied in practice. The IAEA's safety services - which range in scope from engineering safety, operational safety, and radiation, transport and waste safety to regulatory matters and safety culture in organizations - assist Member States in applying the standards and appraise their effectiveness. These safety services enable valuable insights to be shared and I continue to urge all Member States to make use of them. Regulating nuclear and radiation safety is a national responsibility, and many Member States have decided to adopt the IAEA's safety standards for use in their national regulations. For the Contracting Parties to the various international safety conventions, IAEA standards provide a consistent, reliable means of ensuring the effective fulfilment of obligations under the conventions. The standards are also applied by designers, manufacturers and operators around the world to enhance nuclear and radiation safety in power generation, medicine, industry, agriculture, research and education

  5. Complementary assessment of the safety of French nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an immediate consequence of the Fukushima accident the French nuclear safety Authority (ASN) asked EDF to perform a complementary safety assessment for each nuclear power plant dealing with 3 points: 1) the consequences of exceptional natural disasters, 2) the consequences of total loss of electrical power, and 3) the management of emergency situations. The safety margin has to be assessed considering 3 main points: first a review of the conformity to the initial safety requirements, secondly the resistance to events overdoing what the facility was designed to stand for, and the feasibility of any modification susceptible to improve the safety of the facility. This article details the specifications of such assessment, the methodology followed by EDF, the task organization and the time schedule. (A.C.)

  6. Building patient safety in intensive care nursing : Patient safety culture, team performance and simulation-based training

    OpenAIRE

    Ballangrud, Randi

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The overall aim of the thesis was to investigate patient safety culture, team performance and the use of simulation-based team training for building patient safety in intensive care nursing. Methods: Quantitative and qualitative methods were used. In Study I, 220 RNs from ten ICUs responded to a patient safety culture questionnaire analysed with statistics. Studies II-IV were based on an evaluation of a simulation-based team training programme. Studies II-III included 53 RNs from seven I...

  7. Knowledge Management – a Neglected Dimension in Discourse on Safety Management and Safety Culture – Evidence from Estonia

    OpenAIRE

    Jarvis, Marina; Virovere, Anu; Tint, Piia

    2014-01-01

    The current study proposes a model for a positive safety culture with a knowledge management dimension and tests this on a sample of 1757 employees from Estonian SMEs in different branches of industry, using the factor analysis. Despite conceptual and empirical justification, researchers have not consistently included concepts of knowledge management in safety culture studies. This paper explores the possibility of using Knowledge Management in the Occupational Health and Safety Management Sy...

  8. Studying the Relationship between Individual and Organizational Factors and Nurses' Perception of Patient Safety Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Abdolahzadeh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Safety culture is considered as an important factor in improving patient safety. Therefore, identifying individual and organizational factors affecting safety culture is crucial. This study was carried out to determine individual and organizational factors associated with nurses' perception of patient safety culture. Methods: The present descriptive study included 940 nurses working in four training hospitals affiliated with Urmia University of Medical Sciences (Iran. Data was collected through the self-report questionnaire of patient safety culture. Descriptive (number, percent, mean, and standard deviation and inferential (t-test and analysis of variance statistics were used to analyze the data in SPSS. Results: Nurses' perception of patient safety culture was significantly correlated with marital status, workplace, and overtime hours. Conclusion: The results of this study revealed that some individual and organizational factors can impact on nurses' perception of patient safety culture. Nursing authorities should thus pay more attention to factors which promote patient safety culture and ultimately the safety of provided services.

  9. Assessing propensity to learn from safety-related events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drupsteen, L.; Wybo, J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Most organisations aim to use experience from the past to improve safety, for instance through learning from safety-related incidents and accidents. Whether an organisation is able to learn successfully can however only be determined afterwards. So far, there are no proactive measures to assess whet

  10. Eimpact: Impact assessment of in-vehicle safety systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malone, K.; Wilmink, I.; Noort, M. van; Klunder, G.

    2007-01-01

    eIMPACT, a project in the EU's Sixth Framework Programme for Information Society Technologies and Media, assesses the socio-economic effects of Intelligent Vehicle Safety Systems (IVSS), their impact on traffic safety and efficiency. It addresses policy options and the views of the different stakeho

  11. Safety assessment of 6-hydroxyindole as used in cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Christina L; Heldreth, Bart; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2014-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of 6-hydroxyindole, which functions as an oxidative hair dye ingredient. The Panel considered relevant animal and human data provided in this safety assessment and concluded that 6-hydroxyindole is safe for use in oxidative hair dye formulations.

  12. Safety assessment of smoke flavouring primary products by the European Food Safety Authority

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theobald, A.; Arcella, D.; Carere, A.; Croera, C.; Engel, K.H.; Gott, D.; Gurtler, R.; Meier, D.; Pratt, I.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Simon, R.; Walker, R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarises the safety assessments of eleven smoke flavouring primary products evaluated by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). Data on chemical composition, content of polyaromatic hydrocarbons and results of genotoxicity tests and subchronic toxicity studies are presented and disc

  13. Safety culture: the perspective of a lawyer on its necessity and weaknesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reflection is presented on the acceptance and extension of the concept of safety culture in radiation protection. Safety culture, a basic attitude to guard against nuclear accidents, radiological hazards or radiological accidents, is predicated on the prevention of complacency. (author)

  14. Contextual assessment of organisational culture - methodological development in two case studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite the acknowledged significance of organisational culture in the nuclear field, previous cultural studies have concentrated on purely safety related matters, or been only descriptive in nature. New kinds of methods, taking into account the overall objectives of the organisation, were needed to assess culture and develop its working practices appropriately. VTT developed the Contextual Assessment of Organisational Culture (CAOC) methodology during the FINNUS programme. The methodology utilises two concepts, organisational culture and core task. The core task can be defined as the core demands and content of work that the organisation has to accomplish in order to be effective. The core task concept is used in assessing the central dimensions of the organisation's culture. Organisational culture is defined as a solution the company has generated in order to fulfil the perceived demands of its core task. The CAOC-methodology was applied in two case studies, in the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority of Finland and in the maintenance unit of Loviisa NPP. The aim of the studies was not only to assess the given culture, but also to give the personnel new concepts and new tools for reflecting on their organisation, their jobs and on appropriate working practices. The CAOC-methodology contributes to the design and redesign of work in complex sociotechnical systems. It strives to enhance organisations' capability to assess their current working practices and the meanings attached to them and compare these to the actual demands of their basic mission and so change unadaptive practices. (orig.)

  15. Safety assessment of the liquid-fed ceramic melter process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of its development program for the solidification of high-level nuclear waste, Pacific Northwest Laboratory assessed the safety issues for a complete liquid-fed ceramic melter (LFCM) process. The LFCM process, an adaption of commercial glass-making technology, is being developed to convert high-level liquid waste from the nuclear fuel cycle into glass. This safety assessment uncovered no unresolved or significant safety problems with the LFCM process. Although in this assessment the LFCM process was not directly compared with other solidification processes, the safety hazards of the LFCM process are comparable to those of other processes. The high processing temperatures of the glass in the LFCM pose no additional significant safety concerns, and the dispersible inventory of dried waste (calcine) is small. This safety assessment was based on the nuclear power waste flowsheet, since power waste is more radioactive than defense waste at the time of solidification, and all accident conditions for the power waste would have greater radiological consequences than those for defense waste. An exhaustive list of possible off-standard conditions and equipment failures was compiled. These accidents were then classified according to severity of consequence and type of accident. Radionuclide releases to the stack were calculated for each group of accidents using conservative assumptions regarding the retention and decontamination features of the process and facility. Two recommendations that should be considered by process designers are given in the safety assessment

  16. Safety assessment of the liquid-fed ceramic melter process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buelt, J.L.; Partain, W.L.

    1980-08-01

    As part of its development program for the solidification of high-level nuclear waste, Pacific Northwest Laboratory assessed the safety issues for a complete liquid-fed ceramic melter (LFCM) process. The LFCM process, an adaption of commercial glass-making technology, is being developed to convert high-level liquid waste from the nuclear fuel cycle into glass. This safety assessment uncovered no unresolved or significant safety problems with the LFCM process. Although in this assessment the LFCM process was not directly compared with other solidification processes, the safety hazards of the LFCM process are comparable to those of other processes. The high processing temperatures of the glass in the LFCM pose no additional significant safety concerns, and the dispersible inventory of dried waste (calcine) is small. This safety assessment was based on the nuclear power waste flowsheet, since power waste is more radioactive than defense waste at the time of solidification, and all accident conditions for the power waste would have greater radiological consequences than those for defense waste. An exhaustive list of possible off-standard conditions and equipment failures was compiled. These accidents were then classified according to severity of consequence and type of accident. Radionuclide releases to the stack were calculated for each group of accidents using conservative assumptions regarding the retention and decontamination features of the process and facility. Two recommendations that should be considered by process designers are given in the safety assessment.

  17. Assessment of worker and nonworker radiological safety of a repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary assessments of worker and nonworker radiological safety for both normal and accident conditions during the preclosure period have been performed for the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. The accident-conditions assessment estimated off-site doses resulting form credible accidents at the repository. Since the purpose of the accident-conditions assessment was to support the development of an initial Q list, worker doses were not calculated. The normal-conditions assessment estimated off-site public doses as well as on-site worker doses resulting form the various anticipated routine radioactive releases and sources. The purpose of the normal-conditions assessment was to evaluate the preliminary Yucca Mountain repository design and identify those operations and aspects that are most important to radiation safety for the repository (e.g., those operations that are the largest contributors to the occupational doses of individual workers). The general approach and some of the results of these safety assessments are summarized

  18. Is culture associated with patient safety in the emergency department? A study of staff perspectives.

    OpenAIRE

    Verbeek-van Noord, I.; Wagner, C.; Van Dyck, C.; Twisk, J.W.R.; de Bruijne, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe the patient safety culture of Dutch emergency departments (EDs), to examine associations between safety culture dimensions and patient safety grades as reported by ED staff and to compare these associations between nurses and physicians. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey conducted in 2007. Setting: Thirty-three non-academic EDs in the Netherlands. Participants: Four hundred and eighty nurses, 159 physicians and 91 other professionals. Main outcome measure: Self-reported le...

  19. The radiological accident in Goiania A safety culture problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In September 1987, the unauthorized removal of the rotating assembly of the shielding head of a teletherapy unit and the dismantling of the capsule containing 50.9 TBq (1375 Ci) of Cs-137 resulted in a widespread contamination of central Goiania, a Brazilian City, of one million inhabitants, Capita of the State of Goias, 180 km. far from Brasilia, Capital of Brazil. This accident presents lessons which cover the pre-accident period, the emergency phase, and the post-accident phase up to the present. Each of those phases taking into consideration errors, omissions and correct actions by people and organizations must be analyzed in terms of Safety Culture Problems identification because, notwithstanding the recommendations presented in publications concerning emergency planning and preparedness, this radiological accident showed that several adverse vectors, not mentioned in the literature, were a reality. Not only social, political, economic and technical problems had to be faced but also psychological aspects had to be dealt with. Of these the treatment of the victims and handling of the main products of the city were the most important. This deals also with some lessons learned, specially the influence of legislation and rules applied; the interfaces between the State, the Province and the National Nuclear Energy Commission and the different aspects involved in providing information and reports to the government, to the organizations and to the community. (author). 5 refs

  20. Selected Component Failure Rate Values from Fusion Safety Assessment Tasks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwallader, Lee Charles

    1998-09-01

    This report is a compilation of component failure rate and repair rate values that can be used in magnetic fusion safety assessment tasks. Several safety systems are examined, such as gas cleanup systems and plasma shutdown systems. Vacuum system component reliability values, including large vacuum chambers, have been reviewed. Values for water cooling system components have also been reported here. The report concludes with the examination of some equipment important to personnel safety, atmospheres, combustible gases, and airborne releases of radioactivity. These data should be useful to system designers to calculate scoping values for the availability and repair intervals for their systems, and for probabilistic safety or risk analysts to assess fusion systems for safety of the public and the workers.

  1. Selected component failure rate values from fusion safety assessment tasks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadwallader, L.C.

    1998-09-01

    This report is a compilation of component failure rate and repair rate values that can be used in magnetic fusion safety assessment tasks. Several safety systems are examined, such as gas cleanup systems and plasma shutdown systems. Vacuum system component reliability values, including large vacuum chambers, have been reviewed. Values for water cooling system components have also been reported here. The report concludes with the examination of some equipment important to personnel safety, atmospheres, combustible gases, and airborne releases of radioactivity. These data should be useful to system designers to calculate scoping values for the availability and repair intervals for their systems, and for probabilistic safety or risk analysts to assess fusion systems for safety of the public and the workers.

  2. Selected component failure rate values from fusion safety assessment tasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a compilation of component failure rate and repair rate values that can be used in magnetic fusion safety assessment tasks. Several safety systems are examined, such as gas cleanup systems and plasma shutdown systems. Vacuum system component reliability values, including large vacuum chambers, have been reviewed. Values for water cooling system components have also been reported here. The report concludes with the examination of some equipment important to personnel safety, atmospheres, combustible gases, and airborne releases of radioactivity. These data should be useful to system designers to calculate scoping values for the availability and repair intervals for their systems, and for probabilistic safety or risk analysts to assess fusion systems for safety of the public and the workers

  3. Safety assessment of modified terephthalate polymers as used in cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Lillian C; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2014-01-01

    The safety of 6 modified terephthalate polymers as cosmetic ingredients was assessed. These ingredients mostly function as exfoliants, bulking agents, hair fixatives, and viscosity-increasing agents-nonaqueous. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) is used in leave-on products up to 100% and in rinse-off products up to 2%. The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) considered that the PET used in cosmetics is chemically equivalent to that used in medical devices. The Panel determined that the Food and Drug Administration's determination of safety of PET in several medical devices, which included human and animal safety data, can be used as the basis for the determination of safety of PET and related polymers used in cosmetics. Use studies of cosmetic eye products that contain PET demonstrated no ocular irritation or dermal sensitization. The Panel concluded that modified terephthalate polymers were safe as cosmetic ingredients in the practices of use and concentration described in this safety assessment.

  4. The development and enhancement of safety culture within an evolving organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper discusses the use of the knowledge gained from reviewing safety culture and conducting attitude surveys. The review of past safety performance and measures taken to improve is also discussed. The findings from the safety attitude survey conducted on the Sellafield Site in 1991 , provided BNFL management with information to confirm that the changes to the way safety was being managed were broadly correct, and that the commitment of BNFL to total quality management was the correct strategy for improvement of safety. It also provided the opportunity for management to think about safety as part of the management process, rather than as a separate specialist subject or part of nuclear design engineering. Local Safety Culture Review were conducted, paying attention to the area's sub-culture, how it interacts within the site, identifies its cultural strengths and weaknesses, whilst at the same time involving the management and workforce, aiding them to recognize their own organisation. Recommendations were then be written which the plant/department managers agreed with, owned and were fully committed to implementing. The difficulty of changing attitudes and culture should not be underestimated. The paper concludes that the direct involvement of the workforce and management, with full control over the development and performance of actions required to improve safety culture is vital to the success of the change process. It is important to fit the solutions to the culture under development to gain improvement, and only by demonstrating benefit to the workforce an the changes/enhancements be maintained. (author)

  5. Savannah River Site K-Reactor Probabilistic Safety Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report gives the results of a Savannah River Site (SRS) K-Reactor Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA). Measures of adverse consequences to health and safety resulting from representations of severe accidents in SRS reactors are presented. In addition, the report gives a summary of the methods employed to represent these accidents and to assess the resultant consequences. The report is issued to provide useful information to the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) on the risk of operation of SRS reactors, for insights into severe accident phenomena that contribute to this risk, and in support of improved bases for other DOE programs in Heavy Water Reactor safety

  6. Safety Assessment of Pentaerythrityl Tetraesters as Used in Cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Lillian C; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2015-09-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review (CIR) Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of 16 pentaerythrityl tetraester compounds as used in cosmetics. These ingredients mostly function as hair-conditioning agents, skin-conditioning agents-miscellaneous and binders, skin-conditioning agents-occlusive, viscosity-increasing agents-nonaqueous, and skin-conditioning agents-emollient. The Panel reviewed the available animal and human data related to these ingredients and previous safety assessments of the fatty acid moieties. The Panel concluded that pentaerythrityl tetraisostearate and the other pentaerythrityl tetraester compounds were safe in the practices of use and concentration as given in this safety assessment.

  7. Savannah River Site K-Reactor Probabilistic Safety Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandyberry, M.D.; Bailey, R.T.; Baker, W.H.; Kearnaghan, D.P.; O`Kula, K.R.; Wittman, R.S.; Woody, N.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Amos, C.N.; Weingardt, J.J. [Science Applications International Corp. (United States)

    1992-12-01

    This report gives the results of a Savannah River Site (SRS) K-Reactor Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA). Measures of adverse consequences to health and safety resulting from representations of severe accidents in SRS reactors are presented. In addition, the report gives a summary of the methods employed to represent these accidents and to assess the resultant consequences. The report is issued to provide useful information to the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) on the risk of operation of SRS reactors, for insights into severe accident phenomena that contribute to this risk, and in support of improved bases for other DOE programs in Heavy Water Reactor safety.

  8. Safety Assessment - Swedish Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kjellstroem, B. [Luleaa Univ. of Technology (Sweden)

    1996-12-31

    After the reactor accident at Three Mile Island, the Swedish nuclear power plants were equipped with filtered venting of the containment. Several types of accidents can be identified where the filtered venting has no effect on the radioactive release. The probability for such accidents is hopefully very small. It is not possible however to estimate the probability accurately. Experiences gained in the last years, which have been documented in official reports from the Nuclear Power Inspectorate indicate that the probability for core melt accidents in Swedish reactors can be significantly larger than estimated earlier. A probability up to one in a thousand operating years can not be excluded. There are so far no indications that aging of the plants has contributed to an increased accident risk. Maintaining the safety level with aging nuclear power plants can however be expected to be increasingly difficult. It is concluded that the 12 Swedish plants remain a major threat for severe radioactive pollution of the Swedish environment despite measures taken since 1980 to improve their safety. Closing of the nuclear power plants is the only possibility to eliminate this threat. It is recommended that until this is done, quantitative safety goals, same for all Swedish plants, shall be defined and strictly enforced. It is also recommended that utilities distributing misleading information about nuclear power risks shall have their operating license withdrawn. 37 refs.

  9. Safety Assessment - Swedish Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the reactor accident at Three Mile Island, the Swedish nuclear power plants were equipped with filtered venting of the containment. Several types of accidents can be identified where the filtered venting has no effect on the radioactive release. The probability for such accidents is hopefully very small. It is not possible however to estimate the probability accurately. Experiences gained in the last years, which have been documented in official reports from the Nuclear Power Inspectorate indicate that the probability for core melt accidents in Swedish reactors can be significantly larger than estimated earlier. A probability up to one in a thousand operating years can not be excluded. There are so far no indications that aging of the plants has contributed to an increased accident risk. Maintaining the safety level with aging nuclear power plants can however be expected to be increasingly difficult. It is concluded that the 12 Swedish plants remain a major threat for severe radioactive pollution of the Swedish environment despite measures taken since 1980 to improve their safety. Closing of the nuclear power plants is the only possibility to eliminate this threat. It is recommended that until this is done, quantitative safety goals, same for all Swedish plants, shall be defined and strictly enforced. It is also recommended that utilities distributing misleading information about nuclear power risks shall have their operating license withdrawn. 37 refs

  10. A probabilistic safety assessment PEER review: Case study on the use of probabilistic safety assessment for safety decisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this case study is to illustrate, using an actual example, the organizing and carrying out of an independent peer review of a draft full-scope (level 3) probabilistic safety assessment. The specific findings of the peer review are of less importance than the approach taken, the interaction between sponsor and study team, and the technical and administrative issues that can arise during a peer review. This case study will examine the following issues: how the scope of the peer review was established, based on how it was to be used by the review sponsoring body; how the level of effort was determined, and what this determination meant for the technical quality of the review; how the team of peer reviewers was selected; how the review itself was carried out; what findings were made; what was done with these findings by both the review sponsoring body and the PSA analysis team. 9 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  11. Flightdeck Automation Problems (FLAP) Model for Safety Technology Portfolio Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancel, Ersin; Shih, Ann T.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Aviation Safety Program (AvSP) develops and advances methodologies and technologies to improve air transportation safety. The Safety Analysis and Integration Team (SAIT) conducts a safety technology portfolio assessment (PA) to analyze the program content, to examine the benefits and risks of products with respect to program goals, and to support programmatic decision making. The PA process includes systematic identification of current and future safety risks as well as tracking several quantitative and qualitative metrics to ensure the program goals are addressing prominent safety risks accurately and effectively. One of the metrics within the PA process involves using quantitative aviation safety models to gauge the impact of the safety products. This paper demonstrates the role of aviation safety modeling by providing model outputs and evaluating a sample of portfolio elements using the Flightdeck Automation Problems (FLAP) model. The model enables not only ranking of the quantitative relative risk reduction impact of all portfolio elements, but also highlighting the areas with high potential impact via sensitivity and gap analyses in support of the program office. Although the model outputs are preliminary and products are notional, the process shown in this paper is essential to a comprehensive PA of NASA's safety products in the current program and future programs/projects.

  12. Relationship between Nuclear Security Culture and Nuclear Safety Culture and Their Role in Safe Operation of Nuclear Power Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On an example of nuclear security culture and safety culture, the report will show the link between nuclear security and nuclear safety, the importance of their interaction for the safe operation of nuclear power plants. The report will also cover the goals achieved through adherence to norms, rules and procedures of nuclear security and nuclear safety, the differences between them as well as factors that link these two areas to achieve a common goal – the use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes and non-proliferation

  13. An Approach to Enhancement of the Safety Culture of Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The culture of an organization is very complex to study and evaluate, but it is possible to examine the specific norms that figure out the culture for the safety of a system. This paper describes an initiation plan to study the safety culture issue in Korean NPPs. Recently there happened successively events that turned out to be socially prominent in Korea. Many issues on the safety culture aspect of NPPs have been raised including the types of errors such as violations, an intended concealment of safety-related information, counterfeit items, forgery process in procurement, and so on. Those were investigated in detail for the root causes of these issues as human and organizational errors and for the countermeasures to prevent those events. They are integrated into a correspondent long-term plan including the establishment of a fundamental infrastructure of safety culture management for operating NPPs in Korea. A monitoring system with analysis functions utilizing system dynamics simulation and data mining is proposed to be incorporated into a safety culture management system. Additionally, a set of training and support programs are to be developed for the enhancement of some selected competence of the operating personnel in Korean NPPs. The safe operation of NPPs requires the typical safety culture characteristics of the high reliability organization (HRO). The culture of an organization is very complex to study and evaluate, but it is possible to examine the specific norms that figure out the culture for the safety of a system. This paper describes an integrated systems approach as an initiating plan to study the safety culture issue in Korean NPPs.

  14. An Approach to Enhancement of the Safety Culture of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The culture of an organization is very complex to study and evaluate, but it is possible to examine the specific norms that figure out the culture for the safety of a system. This paper describes an initiation plan to study the safety culture issue in Korean NPPs. Recently there happened successively events that turned out to be socially prominent in Korea. Many issues on the safety culture aspect of NPPs have been raised including the types of errors such as violations, an intended concealment of safety-related information, counterfeit items, forgery process in procurement, and so on. Those were investigated in detail for the root causes of these issues as human and organizational errors and for the countermeasures to prevent those events. They are integrated into a correspondent long-term plan including the establishment of a fundamental infrastructure of safety culture management for operating NPPs in Korea. A monitoring system with analysis functions utilizing system dynamics simulation and data mining is proposed to be incorporated into a safety culture management system. Additionally, a set of training and support programs are to be developed for the enhancement of some selected competence of the operating personnel in Korean NPPs. The safe operation of NPPs requires the typical safety culture characteristics of the high reliability organization (HRO). The culture of an organization is very complex to study and evaluate, but it is possible to examine the specific norms that figure out the culture for the safety of a system. This paper describes an integrated systems approach as an initiating plan to study the safety culture issue in Korean NPPs

  15. A structured approach to the assessment of the quality culture in nuclear installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INSAG has emphasized that safety culture has two general components: the organizational framework and the attitude of the staff. To develop a structured approach to the assessment of safety culture, we propose that the highly formalized nature of nuclear power plant organizations be exploited. The prime coordinating mechanism of NPP organizations is the standardization of work processes, where a work process is defined as a standardized sequence of tasks designed to achieve a specific goal (an example is the maintenance work process). The predictable nature of work processes is exploited by the Work Process Analysis Model (WPAM) to conduct a systematic analysis that identifies the desirable characteristics of work processes and develops performance measures for their strengths and weaknesses. These can provide a set of tangible characteristics of a good safety culture. It is argued in this paper that the analysis of normal power production and investment protection and the analysis of safety cannot be separated when culture is investigated. The organizational dependencies are too strong for such a division. It is proposed that the plant should be viewed as an integrated sociotechnical system and that the broader concept of quality culture should replace the more limited one of safety culture. (author)

  16. Safety assessment of dairy microorganisms: coagulase-negative staphylococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irlinger, Françoise

    2008-09-01

    The genus Staphylococcus is made up of 36 validated species which contain strains that are pathogenic, saprophytic, or used as starter cultures for the food industry. Staphylococci species used in cheese-making are novobiocin-resistant, coagulase-negative and are not usually identified at species level by routine laboratories. A bibliographic survey was conducted to assess safety status of CNS used in fermented dairy foods. Commercial kits based on phenotypic discrimination can't reliably identify these species because of the variable expression of some phenotypic traits. Several molecular targets, including 16S rRNA, hsp60, tuf, SodA and rpoB genes can be used for identifying species of the Staphylococcus genus. No coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from milk or dairy products has ever been involved in a case of food poisoning or human pathology following ingestion of dairy products. Nevertheless, a few case of nosocomial infection caused by some species (S. caprae, S. capitis, S. sciuri) have been reported in patients with depressed immune systems or who have undergone long severe hospital treatments, or in the presence of an indwelling catheter or foreign materials such as cardiac prostheses. They may therefore be regarded as exceptional opportunistic pathogens in certain clinical situations. PMID:17869361

  17. Safety assessment of genetically modified plants with deliberately altered composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, Nigel G; Hudson, Elizabeth; Gimson, Amy; Weightman, Richard; Shewry, Peter R; Tompkins, Steven

    2014-08-01

    The development and marketing of 'novel' genetically modified (GM) crops in which composition has been deliberately altered poses a challenge to the European Union (EU)'s risk assessment processes, which are based on the concept of substantial equivalence with a non-GM comparator. This article gives some examples of these novel GM crops and summarizes the conclusions of a report that was commissioned by the European Food Safety Authority on how the EU's risk assessment processes could be adapted to enable their safety to be assessed. PMID:24735114

  18. Safety assessment of genetically modified plants with deliberately altered composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halford, Nigel G; Hudson, Elizabeth; Gimson, Amy; Weightman, Richard; Shewry, Peter R; Tompkins, Steven

    2014-08-01

    The development and marketing of 'novel' genetically modified (GM) crops in which composition has been deliberately altered poses a challenge to the European Union (EU)'s risk assessment processes, which are based on the concept of substantial equivalence with a non-GM comparator. This article gives some examples of these novel GM crops and summarizes the conclusions of a report that was commissioned by the European Food Safety Authority on how the EU's risk assessment processes could be adapted to enable their safety to be assessed.

  19. Emerging frontier technologies for food safety analysis and risk assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Yi-yang; LIU Jia-hui; WANG Sai; CHEN Qi-long; GUO Tian-yang; ZHANG Li-ya; JIN Yong; SU Hai-jia; TAN Tian-wei

    2015-01-01

    Access to security and safe food is a basic human necessity and essential for a sustainable world. To perform hi-end food safety analysis and risk assessment with state of the art technologies is of utmost importance thereof. With applications as exempliifed by microlfuidic immunoassay, aptasensor, direct analysis in real time, high resolution mass spectrometry, benchmark dose and chemical speciifc adjustment factor, this review presents frontier food safety analysis and risk assess-ment technologies, from which both food quality and public health wil beneift undoubtedly in a foreseeable future.

  20. The Impact of Companies’ Age on Safety Culture in the Metal Products Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ooshaksaraie

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Safety culture is a complex structure in an organization that includes values and attitudes, most of which are potentially changeable and related to actual accident behavior. In this study, the components of safety culture included organizational commitment, management involvement, employee empowerment, reporting system and rewarding system. Approach: The numbers of occupational injuries in industries have steadily increased during recent years. The major objectives of this study were to evaluate the safety culture and to analyze the difference in safety culture in the metal products industry in Iran (Guilan province with regard to companies’ age. Metal products industry was chosen because of the higher occupational injuries rates amongst the industries in Iran. Results: The companies were chosen based on their age. A total of 714 respondents from 14 companies participated in the survey. The method used in this study was a questionnaires quantitative type based on a Lickert scale and the data collected were analyzed statistically. The one-way ANOVA was used to test for significant difference in safety culture in the metal products industry with regard to companies’ age. The results showed that safety culture was not strong based on the mean for average score of 2.58 which was less than 3 compared to the possible maximum of 5. One-way ANOVA analysis revealed that there was a significant difference among safety culture with respect to companies’ age. New companies had stronger safety culture compared to older one. Conclusion: Based on the findings the hypothesis of this study is accepted. This study also indicated that the safety culture in the metal products industry in target population group was not strong however, can be improved through improvement of its five components.

  1. Safety assessment of platform loadout procedures based on unascertained measures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Safety assessment of offshore platforms is an urgent task. Such assessments are now focusing on the structure,maintenance, and retirement of a platform. Some methods employed have many shortcomings. For example, they cannot make the reliability adequately explicable. Therefore, a mathematical tool, the unascertained measure, was introduced. First, the basic knowledge of the unascertained sets was introduced briefly. Second, the unascertained measure was defined and credible identification was set up. The method has been introduced into the fields for safety assessment of a jacket loadout procedure.Engineering practices showed that it can complete the safety assessment systematically and scientifically without any assumption. The work should have significance in theory and practice for offshore engineering.

  2. Safety assessment of dairy microorganisms: the Lactobacillus genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardeau, Marion; Vernoux, Jean Paul; Henri-Dubernet, Ségolène; Guéguen, Micheline

    2008-09-01

    Lactobacilli are Gram positive rods belonging to the Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) group. Their phenotypic traits, such as each species' obligate/facultative, homo/heterofermentation abilities play a crucial role in souring raw milk and in the production of fermented dairy products such as cheese, yoghurt and fermented milk (including probiotics). An up to date safety analysis of these lactobacilli is needed to ensure consumer safety. Lactobacillus genus is a heterogeneous microbial group containing some 135 species and 27 subspecies, whose classification is constantly being reshuffled. With the recent use of advanced molecular methods it has been suggested that the extreme diversity of the Lactobacillus genomes would justify recognition of new subgeneric divisions. A combination of genotypic and phenotypic tests, for example DNA-based techniques and conventional carbohydrate tests, is required to determine species. Pulsed-Field gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) has been successfully applied to strains of dairy origin and is the most discriminatory and reproducible method for differentiating Lactobacillus strains. The bibliographical data support the hypothesis that the ingestion of Lactobacillus is not at all hazardous since lactobacillemia induced by food, particularly fermented dairy products, is extremely rare and only occurs in predisposed patients. Some metabolic features such as the possible production of biogenic amines in fermented products could generate undesirable adverse effects. A minority of starter and adjunct cultures and probiotic Lactobacillus strains may exceptionally show transferable antibiotic resistance. However, this may be underestimated as transferability studies are not systematic. We consider that transferable antibiotic resistance is the only relevant cause for caution and justifies performing antibiotic-susceptibility assays as these strains have the potential to serve as hosts of antibiotic-resistance genes, with the risk of transferring these

  3. Safety assessment of dairy microorganisms: the Lactobacillus genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardeau, Marion; Vernoux, Jean Paul; Henri-Dubernet, Ségolène; Guéguen, Micheline

    2008-09-01

    Lactobacilli are Gram positive rods belonging to the Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB) group. Their phenotypic traits, such as each species' obligate/facultative, homo/heterofermentation abilities play a crucial role in souring raw milk and in the production of fermented dairy products such as cheese, yoghurt and fermented milk (including probiotics). An up to date safety analysis of these lactobacilli is needed to ensure consumer safety. Lactobacillus genus is a heterogeneous microbial group containing some 135 species and 27 subspecies, whose classification is constantly being reshuffled. With the recent use of advanced molecular methods it has been suggested that the extreme diversity of the Lactobacillus genomes would justify recognition of new subgeneric divisions. A combination of genotypic and phenotypic tests, for example DNA-based techniques and conventional carbohydrate tests, is required to determine species. Pulsed-Field gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) has been successfully applied to strains of dairy origin and is the most discriminatory and reproducible method for differentiating Lactobacillus strains. The bibliographical data support the hypothesis that the ingestion of Lactobacillus is not at all hazardous since lactobacillemia induced by food, particularly fermented dairy products, is extremely rare and only occurs in predisposed patients. Some metabolic features such as the possible production of biogenic amines in fermented products could generate undesirable adverse effects. A minority of starter and adjunct cultures and probiotic Lactobacillus strains may exceptionally show transferable antibiotic resistance. However, this may be underestimated as transferability studies are not systematic. We consider that transferable antibiotic resistance is the only relevant cause for caution and justifies performing antibiotic-susceptibility assays as these strains have the potential to serve as hosts of antibiotic-resistance genes, with the risk of transferring these

  4. Safety studies on Korean fusion DEMO plant using integrated safety assessment methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Kyemin; Kang, Myoung-suk [Kyung Hee University, Youngin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Gyunyoung, E-mail: gheo@khu.ac.kr [Kyung Hee University, Youngin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoung-chan [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon-si 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •The purpose of this paper is to suggest methodology that can investigate safety issues and provides a case study for Korean fusion DEMO plant. •The concepts of integrated safety assessment methodology (ISAM) that can be applied in addressing regulatory requirements and recognizing safety issues for K-DEMO were emphasized. •Phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) was proposed. It can recognize vulnerabilities of systems and identify the gaps in technical areas requiring additional researches. •This work is expected to contribute on the conceptual design of safety features for K-DEMO to design engineers and the guidance for regulatory requirements to licensers. -- Abstract: The purpose of this paper is to suggest methodology that can investigate safety issues and provides a case study for Korean fusion DEMO plant (K-DEMO) as a part of R and D program through the National Fusion Research Institute of Korea. Even though nuclear regulation and licensing framework is well setup due to the operating and design experience of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) since 1970s, the regulatory authority of South Korea has concerns on the challenge of facing new nuclear facilities including K-DEMO due to the differences in systems, materials, and inherent safety feature from conventional PWRs. Even though the follow-up of the ITER license process facilitates to deal with significant safety issues of fusion facilities, a licensee as well as a licenser should identify the gaps between ITER and DEMO in terms of safety issues. First we reviewed the methods of conducting safety analysis for unprecedented nuclear facilities such as Generation IV reactors, particularly very high temperature reactor (VHTR), which is called as integrated safety assessment methodology (ISAM). Second, the analysis for the conceptual design of K-DEMO on the basis of ISAM was conducted. The ISAM consists of five analytical tools to develop the safety requirements from licensee

  5. Computer Aided Safety Assessment(CASA) Tool for ISS Payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstein, Jason; Festa, Fabrizio

    2010-09-01

    In an effort to streamline the processes established by the partners of the International Space Station(ISS) to certify the safety of hardware and experiments destined for the Station, the European Space Agency’s(ESA) ISS System Safety Team is developing the Computer Aided Safety Assessment(CASA) tool suite. These software tools guide payload developers through the creation process of two types of standard payload hazard reports via a series of questions following a predetermined logic. The responses provided by the user are used by the CASA system to complete the majority of each hazard report requisite for payload flight safety reviews, employing consistent, approved descriptions of most hazards, hazard causes, controls and verification methods. Though some manual inputs will still be required to complete these reports, working with CASA will considerably reduce the amount of time necessary to review the documentation by agency safety authorities.

  6. Applying Theory to Assess Cultural Competency

    OpenAIRE

    Blue, Amy V.; Thiedke, Carolyn; Chessman, Alexander W.; Kern, Donna H.; Keller, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Using a theoretical cultural competency model, the effectiveness of a cultural competency learning assignment was examined to determine: 1) students’ cultural competency levels as reflected through the assignment, and 2) the effectiveness of the assignment as a cultural competency learning activity. Third-year family medicine clerkship students completed a required project to research and reflect upon a patient’s “cultural belief.” Applying a model of cultural competence development, a conten...

  7. Safety margin assessment in handling fissile material using probabilistic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessment of safety margin of non-reactor system is important to achieve high confidence in design and associated process control. In this paper, criticality safety margin has been assessed due to the random variation of uncertain input parameters. Monte-Carlo based sampling technique has been used for variability analysis of criticality safety parameter that is neutron multiplication factor. Large number of sample generated with deterministic response surface is formed with limited number of computer code runs. The regression is carried out with both the first order and second order response surface respectively. It is found that goodness of fitting improves in second order fitting compared to first order fitting. However, safety margin reduces In second order fitting compared to the first order. (author)

  8. 75 FR 11988 - Notice of Request for Approval To Collect New Information: Collection of Safety Culture Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ...: Collection of Safety Culture Data AGENCY: Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), Research and Innovative..., information about changes to the safety culture of the affected workplaces will be used as one of several data... for the following BTS information collection activity: Title: Collection of Safety Culture Data....

  9. 75 FR 52046 - Development of U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Safety Culture Policy Statement: Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ... headquarters in which participants were asked to reach alignment on (1) a common definition of safety culture... common definition of safety culture and developed a list of traits that they believe exist in a positive... COMMISSION Development of U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Safety Culture Policy Statement: Public...

  10. Safety Assessment of Microbial Polysaccharide Gums as Used in Cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiume, Monice M; Heldreth, Bart; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2016-07-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel assessed the safety of 34 microbial polysaccharide gums for use in cosmetics, finding that these ingredients are safe in cosmetic formulations in the present practices of use and concentration. The microbial polysaccharide gums named in this report have a variety of reported functions in cosmetics, including emulsion stabilizer, film former, binder, viscosity-increasing agent, and skin-conditioning agent. The Panel reviewed available animal and clinical data in making its determination of safety. PMID:27383198

  11. Safety Assessment of Galactomannans as Used in Cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Wilbur; Heldreth, Bart; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2015-01-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) reviewed the safety of 16 galactomannans as used in cosmetics. These ingredients are legume polysaccharides that function mostly as hair/skin-conditioning agents and viscosity-increasing agents in cosmetic products. Their substantial molecular sizes suggest that skin penetration of these ingredients would be unlikely. The Panel concluded that these galactomannans are safe in the present practices of use and concentration described in this safety assessment.

  12. Safety Assessment of Foods Derived from Genetically Modified Microorganisms

    OpenAIRE

    Schlundt, J

    2011-01-01

    Microorganisms have a long history of use in food production, e.g. in the production of sausages, cheeses, etc. Roughly one quarter of all food products rely on microbiological processes, and the safe use of microorganisms for food production is essential. The transfer of novel traits to food microorganisms through recombinant gene technology will result in new potential food safety issues. This requires the elaboration of criteria for safety assessment of foods derived from genetic microorga...

  13. Initial development of a practical safety audit tool to assess fleet safety management practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Rebecca; Friswell, Rena; Mooren, Lori

    2012-07-01

    Work-related vehicle crashes are a common cause of occupational injury. Yet, there are few studies that investigate management practices used for light vehicle fleets (i.e. vehicles less than 4.5 tonnes). One of the impediments to obtaining and sharing information on effective fleet safety management is the lack of an evidence-based, standardised measurement tool. This article describes the initial development of an audit tool to assess fleet safety management practices in light vehicle fleets. The audit tool was developed by triangulating information from a review of the literature on fleet safety management practices and from semi-structured interviews with 15 fleet managers and 21 fleet drivers. A preliminary useability assessment was conducted with 5 organisations. The audit tool assesses the management of fleet safety against five core categories: (1) management, systems and processes; (2) monitoring and assessment; (3) employee recruitment, training and education; (4) vehicle technology, selection and maintenance; and (5) vehicle journeys. Each of these core categories has between 1 and 3 sub-categories. Organisations are rated at one of 4 levels on each sub-category. The fleet safety management audit tool is designed to identify the extent to which fleet safety is managed in an organisation against best practice. It is intended that the audit tool be used to conduct audits within an organisation to provide an indicator of progress in managing fleet safety and to consistently benchmark performance against other organisations. Application of the tool by fleet safety researchers is now needed to inform its further development and refinement and to permit psychometric evaluation.

  14. Need for an "integrated safety assessment" of GMOs, linking food safety and environmental considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslberger, Alexander G

    2006-05-01

    Evidence for substantial environmental influences on health and food safety comes from work with environmental health indicators which show that agroenvironmental practices have direct and indirect effects on human health, concluding that "the quality of the environment influences the quality and safety of foods" [Fennema, O. Environ. Health Perspect. 1990, 86, 229-232). In the field of genetically modified organisms (GMOs), Codex principles have been established for the assessment of GM food safety and the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety outlines international principles for an environmental assessment of living modified organisms. Both concepts also contain starting points for an assessment of health/food safety effects of GMOs in cases when the environment is involved in the chain of events that could lead to hazards. The environment can act as a route of unintentional entry of GMOs into the food supply, such as in the case of gene flow via pollen or seeds from GM crops, but the environment can also be involved in changes of GMO-induced agricultural practices with relevance for health/food safety. Examples for this include potential regional changes of pesticide uses and reduction in pesticide poisonings resulting from the use of Bt crops or influences on immune responses via cross-reactivity. Clearly, modern methods of biotechnology in breeding are involved in the reasons behind the rapid reduction of local varieties in agrodiversity, which constitute an identified hazard for food safety and food security. The health/food safety assessment of GM foods in cases when the environment is involved needs to be informed by data from environmental assessment. Such data might be especially important for hazard identification and exposure assessment. International organizations working in these areas will very likely be needed to initiate and enable cooperation between those institutions responsible for the different assessments, as well as for exchange and analysis of

  15. Report for spreading culture of medical radiation safety in Korea: Mainly the activities of the Korean alliance for radiation safety and culture in medicine (KARSM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are many concerns about radiation exposure in Korea after Fukushima Nuclear Plant Accident on 2011 in Japan. As some isotope materials are detected in Korea, people get worried about the radioactive material. In addition, the mass media create an air of anxiety that jump on the people’s fear instead of scientific approach. Therefore, for curbing this flow, health, medical institute from the world provide a variety of information about medical radiation safety and hold the campaign which can give people the image that medical radiation is safe. At this, the Korean Food and Drug Administration(KFDA) suggested that make the alliance of medical radiation safety and culture on August, 2011. Seven societies and institutions related medical radiation started to research and advertise the culture of medical radiation safety in Korea. In this report, mainly introduce the activities of the Korean Alliance for Radiation Safety and Culture in Medicine(KARSM) for spreading culture of medical radiation safety from 2011 to 2012

  16. Report for spreading culture of medical radiation safety in Korea: Mainly the activities of the Korean alliance for radiation safety and culture in medicine (KARSM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yong Su; Kim, Jung Min; Kim, Ji Hyun; Choi, In Seok [Dept. of Radiologic Science, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Dong Wook [Dept. of Radiology, Kyunghee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Do, Kyung Hyun [Dept. of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Seung Eun [Dept. of Radiology, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyung Soo [Dept. of Radiation Safety, National Institute of Food and Drug Safety Evaluation, Korea Food and Drug Administration, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    There are many concerns about radiation exposure in Korea after Fukushima Nuclear Plant Accident on 2011 in Japan. As some isotope materials are detected in Korea, people get worried about the radioactive material. In addition, the mass media create an air of anxiety that jump on the people’s fear instead of scientific approach. Therefore, for curbing this flow, health, medical institute from the world provide a variety of information about medical radiation safety and hold the campaign which can give people the image that medical radiation is safe. At this, the Korean Food and Drug Administration(KFDA) suggested that make the alliance of medical radiation safety and culture on August, 2011. Seven societies and institutions related medical radiation started to research and advertise the culture of medical radiation safety in Korea. In this report, mainly introduce the activities of the Korean Alliance for Radiation Safety and Culture in Medicine(KARSM) for spreading culture of medical radiation safety from 2011 to 2012.

  17. Safety culture in the Finnish and Swedish nuclear industries - history and present

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiman, T.; Pietikaeinen, E. (Technical Research Centre of Finland, VTT (Finland)); Kahlbom, U. (RiskPilot AB (Sweden)); Rollenhagen, C. (Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) (Sweden))

    2010-03-15

    The report presents results from an interview study that examined the characteristics of the Nordic nuclear branch safety culture. The study also tested the theoretical model of safety culture developed by the authors. The interview data was collected in Sweden (n = 14) and Finland (n = 16). Interviewees represented the major actors in the nuclear field (regulators, power companies, expert organizations, waste management organizations). The study gave insight into the nature of safety culture in the nuclear industry. It provided an overview on the variety of factors that people in the industry consider important for safety. The respondents rather coherently saw such psychological states as motivation, mindfulness, sense of control, understanding of hazards and safety and sense of responsibility as important for nuclear safety. Some of the respondents described a certain Nordic orientation towards safety. One characteristic was a sense of personal responsibility for safety. However, there was no clear agreement on the existence of a shared Nordic nuclear safety culture. Sweden and Finland were seen different for example in the way the co-operation between plants and nuclear safety authorities was arranged and re-search activities organized. There were also perceived differences in the way everyday activities like decision making were carried out in the organizations. There are multiple explanations for the differences. The industry in Sweden has been driven by the strong supplier. In Finland the regulator's role in shaping the culture has been more active. Other factors creating differences are e.g. national culture and company culture and the type of the power plant. Co-operation between Nordic nuclear power organizations was viewed valuable yet challenging from safety point of view. The report concludes that a good safety culture requires a deep and wide under-standing of nuclear safety including the various accident mechanisms of the power plants as well as

  18. Safety culture in the Finnish and Swedish nuclear industries - history and present

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents results from an interview study that examined the characteristics of the Nordic nuclear branch safety culture. The study also tested the theoretical model of safety culture developed by the authors. The interview data was collected in Sweden (n = 14) and Finland (n = 16). Interviewees represented the major actors in the nuclear field (regulators, power companies, expert organizations, waste management organizations). The study gave insight into the nature of safety culture in the nuclear industry. It provided an overview on the variety of factors that people in the industry consider important for safety. The respondents rather coherently saw such psychological states as motivation, mindfulness, sense of control, understanding of hazards and safety and sense of responsibility as important for nuclear safety. Some of the respondents described a certain Nordic orientation towards safety. One characteristic was a sense of personal responsibility for safety. However, there was no clear agreement on the existence of a shared Nordic nuclear safety culture. Sweden and Finland were seen different for example in the way the co-operation between plants and nuclear safety authorities was arranged and re-search activities organized. There were also perceived differences in the way everyday activities like decision making were carried out in the organizations. There are multiple explanations for the differences. The industry in Sweden has been driven by the strong supplier. In Finland the regulator's role in shaping the culture has been more active. Other factors creating differences are e.g. national culture and company culture and the type of the power plant. Co-operation between Nordic nuclear power organizations was viewed valuable yet challenging from safety point of view. The report concludes that a good safety culture requires a deep and wide under-standing of nuclear safety including the various accident mechanisms of the power plants as well as a

  19. Safety assessment of emergency power systems for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication is intended to assist the safety assessor within a regulatory body, or one working as a consultant, in assessing the safety of a given design of the emergency power systems (EPS) for a nuclear power plant. The present publication refers closely to the NUSS Safety Guide 50-SG-D7 (Rev. 1), Emergency Power Systems at Nuclear Power Plants. It covers therefore exactly the same technical subject as that Safety Guide. In view of its objective, however, it attempts to help in the evaluation of possible technical solutions which are intended to fulfill the safety requirements. Section 2 clarifies the scope further by giving an outline of the assessment steps in the licensing process. After a general outline of the assessment process in relation to the licensing of a nuclear power plant, the publication is divided into two parts. First, all safety issues are presented in the form of questions that have to be answered in order for the assessor to be confident of a safe design. The second part presents the same topics in tabulated form, listing the required documentation which the assessor has to consult and those international and national technical standards pertinent to the topics. An extensive reference list provides information on standards. 1 tab

  20. Cultural safety, diversity and the servicer user and carer movement in mental health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Leonie G; Simpson, Alan

    2015-12-01

    This study will be of interest to anyone concerned with a critical appraisal of mental health service users' and carers' participation in research collaboration and with the potential of the postcolonial paradigm of cultural safety to contribute to the service user research (SUR) movement. The history and nature of the mental health field and its relationship to colonial processes provokes a consideration of whether cultural safety could focus attention on diversity, power imbalance, cultural dominance and structural inequality, identified as barriers and tensions in SUR. We consider these issues in the context of state-driven approaches towards SUR in planning and evaluation and the concurrent rise of the SUR movement in the UK and Australia, societies with an intimate involvement in processes of colonisation. We consider the principles and motivations underlying cultural safety and SUR in the context of the policy agenda informing SUR. We conclude that while both cultural safety and SUR are underpinned by social constructionism constituting similarities in principles and intent, cultural safety has additional dimensions. Hence, we call on researchers to use the explicitly political and self-reflective process of cultural safety to think about and address issues of diversity, power and social justice in research collaboration.

  1. Safety culture system of construction enterprise%建筑施工企业安全文化体系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余成柱

    2013-01-01

    Construction of safety culture system of construction enterprise is the embodiment of the social culture construction and the need of safety management in economic construction.At present,detailed study on the construction enterprise safety culture system in different developing levels and system contents is deficient.Accordingly,it should be researched in order to analyze status and shortcomings in construction of safety culture system of construction enterprise more accurately.The developing level of construction enterprise is defined according to the type of business and scale.Then,developing level of safety culture system of construction enterprise is introduced according to assessment standard in construction enterprise safety culture.Through investigating status of safety culture system of construction enterprises,the great insufficiency of spiritual culture is excavated in view of system contents,and the greater insufficiency in the system of construction enterprise safety culture system in the lower level enterprise is exposed in terms of developing level.Accordingly,concept should be refined for safe atmosphere and spiritual culture construction in addition to continue strengthening material culture and system culture in terms of the national,industrial and regional standards and specifications.According to different developing level,system construction should be deepened in large and extra large-sized enterprises on the existing sound basis,and a qualified safety culture system should be established in medium and small sized enterprise by building spiritual culture.%建筑施工企业安全文化体系的建设,既是社会文化建设的体现,也是经济建设中施工安全管理的需要.针对不同发展层次与不同体系内容的建筑施工企业安全文化体系细化研究的现状及不足,根据企业类型和规模界定了建筑施工企业的发展层次,根据企业安全文化建设评价标准,引入建筑施工企业安全文化

  2. University Safety Culture: A Work-in-Progress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Safety management systems in Australian higher education organisations are under-researched. Limited workplace safety information can be found in the various reports on university human resources benchmarking programs, and typically they show only descriptive statistics. With the commencement of new consultation-focused regulations applying to…

  3. Safety Assessment of Alkyl Esters as Used in Cosmetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiume, Monice M; Heldreth, Bart A; Bergfeld, Wilma F; Belsito, Donald V; Hill, Ronald A; Klaassen, Curtis D; Liebler, Daniel C; Marks, James G; Shank, Ronald C; Slaga, Thomas J; Snyder, Paul W; Andersen, F Alan

    2015-09-01

    The Cosmetic Ingredient Review Expert Panel (Panel) assessed the safety of 237 alkyl esters for use in cosmetics. The alkyl esters included in this assessment have a variety of reported functions in cosmetics, with skin-conditioning agent being the most common function. The Panel reviewed available animal and clinical data in making its determination of safety on these ingredients, and where there were data gaps, similarity in structure, properties, functions, and uses of these ingredients allowed for extrapolation of the available toxicological data to assess the safety of the entire group. The Panel concluded that these ingredients are safe in cosmetic formulations in the present practices of use and concentration when formulated to be nonirritating.

  4. Evaluation of safety assessment methodologies in Rocky Flats Risk Assessment Guide (1985) and Building 707 Final Safety Analysis Report (1987)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, B.; Fisher, C.; Zigler, G.; Clark, R.A. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1990-11-09

    FSARs. Rockwell International, as operating contractor at the Rocky Flats plant, conducted a safety analysis program during the 1980s. That effort resulted in Final Safety Analysis Reports (FSARs) for several buildings, one of them being the Building 707 Final Safety Analysis Report, June 87 (707FSAR) and a Plant Safety Analysis Report. Rocky Flats Risk Assessment Guide, March 1985 (RFRAG85) documents the methodologies that were used for those FSARs. Resources available for preparation of those Rocky Flats FSARs were very limited. After addressing the more pressing safety issues, some of which are described below, the present contractor (EG&G) intends to conduct a program of upgrading the FSARs. This report presents the results of a review of the methodologies described in RFRAG85 and 707FSAR and contains suggestions that might be incorporated into the methodology for the FSAR upgrade effort.

  5. Introduction of systematic safety assessment techniques to underground coal industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Beirne, T.; Napper, A. (Australian Coal Association, Sydney, NSW (Australia))

    1990-08-01

    Statistics show the mining industry to be one of the most hazardous industries in Australia. The use of formal system safety and risk assessment techniques could do much to supplement existing safety management techniques, helping to identify and offer solutions to reduce the hazardous and loss creating situations commonly encountered. The concepts of system safety (also known as systematic safety assessment) and risk assessment have been analysed and numerous attempts (mostly successful) made to introduce various investigative techniques into operational mines. Most of these techniques were developed in other high risk industries and needed various adaptions to be useful in a mine operation where many of the losses fall into the high frequency low severity class. A balance must be found between technical excellence and the relatively simple detail required by mine staff when using these techniques. The key objectives of this project were to review the applicability of system safety and risk assessment techniques via case studies, and to deposit within the industry a skill base to continue such work. These key objectives have been fully met.

  6. Interim process report for the safety assessment SR-Can

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sellin, Patrick (ed.)

    2004-08-01

    This report is a documentation of buffer processes identified as relevant to the long-term safety of a KBS-3 repository. The report is part of the interim reporting of the safety assessment SR-Can, see further the Interim main report. The final SR-Can reporting will support SKB's application to build an Encapsulation plant for spent nuclear fuel and is to be produced in 2006. The purpose of this report is to document the scientific knowledge of the processes to a level required for an adequate treatment in the safety assessment. The documentation is thus from a scientific point of not exhaustive since such a treatment is neither necessary for the purposes of the safety assessment nor possible within the scope of an assessment. The purpose is further to determine the handling of each process in the safety assessment and to demonstrate how uncertainties are taken care of, given the suggested handling. The process documentation in the SR 97 version of the Process report is a starting point for this SR-Can interim version. As further described in the Interim main report, the list of relevant processes has been reviewed and slightly extended by comparison to other databases. Furthermore, the backfill has been included as a system part of its own, rather than being described together with the buffer as in SR 97. Apart from giving an interim account of the documentation and handling of buffer processes in SR-Can, this report is meant to serve as a template for the forthcoming documentation of processes occurring in other parts of the repository system. A complete list of processes can be found in the Interim FEP report for the safety assessment SR-Can. All material presented in this document is preliminary in nature and will possibly be updated as the SR-Can project progresses.

  7. Organizational Culture Assessment of Small & Medium-Sized Enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Arshad Zaheer; Kashif ur Rehman; Abrar Ahmad

    2006-01-01

    This paper is an ethnographic study defining and assessing the organizational culture exhibited by Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs). It primarily focuses on four cultural categories: clan, adhocracy, hierarchy and market-driven. These conceptual domains have been examined by the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument. Results from a sample of 162 SMEs in the Rawalpindi/Islamabad area indicate that SME culture lacks creativity, innovation, freedom and risk taking. SMEs are not looking...

  8. An evaluation of a new instrument to measure organisational safety culture values and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Cabrera, D; Hernández-Fernaud, E; Isla-Díaz, R

    2007-11-01

    The main aim of this research is to evaluate a safety culture measuring instrument centred upon relevant organisational values and practices related to the safety management system. Seven dimensions that reflect underlying safety meanings are proposed. A second objective is to explore the four cultural orientations in the field of safety arising from the competing values framework. The study sample consisted of 299 participants from five companies in different sectors. The results show six dimensions of organisational values and practices and different company profiles in the organisations studied. The four cultural orientations proposed by the competing values framework are not confirmed. Nevertheless, a coexistence of diverse cultural orientations or paradoxes in the companies is observed. PMID:17920844

  9. Safety culture in a Belgian nuclear research centre from a social science point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is the result of a reflection within the framework of a Ph.D. research at SCK-CEN (Belgian Nuclear Research Centre) in collaboration with the University of Liege. The starting point of the work was the 'safety culture' model presented in the IAEA report 75-INSAG-4. This model is applied to the working organization of the SCK-CEN, also considering the safety culture as an open concept given its multi dimensionality. The methodology is based on three methods: observations, focus groups and interviews. The fieldwork was limited to two main installations: a research reactor, and a dismantling site. The preliminary findings are based on the data resulting from 4 Focus Groups. The most prominent components of a safety culture and the multiplicity of safety cultures in a large organization such as SCK-CEN will be discussed. (author)

  10. An evaluation of a new instrument to measure organisational safety culture values and practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Cabrera, D; Hernández-Fernaud, E; Isla-Díaz, R

    2007-11-01

    The main aim of this research is to evaluate a safety culture measuring instrument centred upon relevant organisational values and practices related to the safety management system. Seven dimensions that reflect underlying safety meanings are proposed. A second objective is to explore the four cultural orientations in the field of safety arising from the competing values framework. The study sample consisted of 299 participants from five companies in different sectors. The results show six dimensions of organisational values and practices and different company profiles in the organisations studied. The four cultural orientations proposed by the competing values framework are not confirmed. Nevertheless, a coexistence of diverse cultural orientations or paradoxes in the companies is observed.

  11. Redirecting traditional professional values to support safety: changing organisational culture in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, J S; Quijada, M A

    2004-12-01

    Professionals in healthcare organisations who seek to enhance safety and quality in an increasingly demanding industry environment often identify culture as a barrier to change. The cultural focus on individual autonomy, for example, seems to conflict with desired norms of teamwork, problem reporting, and learning. We offer a definition and explication of why culture is important to change efforts. A cultural analysis of health care suggests professional values that can be redirected to support change. We offer examples of organisations that drew upon cultural strengths to create new ways of working and gradually shifted the culture. PMID:15576686

  12. Safety Culture and Best Practices at Japan's Fusion Research Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rule, Keith [PPPL

    2014-05-01

    The Safety Monitor Joint Working Group (JWG) is one of the magnetic fusion research collaborations between the US Department of Energy and the government of Japan. Visits by occupational safety personnel are made to participating institutions on a biennial basis. In the 2013 JWG visit of US representatives to Japan, the JWG members noted a number of good safety practices in the safety walkthroughs. These good practices and safety culture topics are discussed in this paper. The JWG hopes that these practices for worker safety can be adopted at other facilities. It is a well-known, but unquantified, safety principle that well run, safe facilities are more productive and efficient than other facilities (Rule, 2009). Worker safety, worker productivity, and high quality in facility operation all complement each other (Mottel, 1995).

  13. Safety Culture And Best Practices At Japan's Fusion Research Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rule, K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton, NJ (United States); King, M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Takase, Y. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Oshima, Y. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Nishimura, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki (Japan); Sukegawa, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka (Japan)

    2014-04-01

    The Safety Monitor Joint Working Group (JWG) is one of the magnetic fusion research collaborations between the US Department of Energy and the government of Japan. Visits by occupational safety personnel are made to participating institutions on a biennial basis. In the 2013 JWG visit of US representatives to Japan, the JWG members noted a number of good safety practices in the safety walkthroughs. These good practices and safety culture topics are discussed in this paper. The JWG hopes that these practices for worker safety can be adopted at other facilities. It is a well-known, but unquantified, safety principle that well run, safe facilities are more productive and efficient than other facilities (Rule, 2009). Worker safety, worker productivity, and high quality in facility operation all complement each other (Mottel, 1995).

  14. Data report for the safety assessment SR-Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-12-15

    This report compiles, documents, and qualifies input data identified as essential for the long-term safety assessment of a KBS-3 repository, and forms an important part of the reporting of the safety assessment project SR-Site. The input data concern the repository system, broadly defined as the deposited spent nuclear fuel, the engineered barriers surrounding it, the host rock, and the biosphere in the proximity of the repository. The input data also concern external influences acting on the system, in terms of climate related data. Data are provided for a selection of relevant conditions and are qualified through traceable standardised procedures

  15. Creating a safety culture at the Children's and Women's Health Centre of British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschoor, Katrina N; Taylor, Annemarie; Northway, Tracie L; Hudson, Denise G; Van Stolk, Dori E; Shearer, Kim J; McDougall, Debbie L; Miller, Georgene

    2007-02-01

    The Children's' and Women's Health Centre of British Columbia (C&W) is the largest hospital providing specialized care to women and children across the province of British Columbia in Canada. The values of quality and safety are threaded throughout the C&W strategic plan which emphasizes that safety is vital for better health. At C&W, a multifaceted approach is used to create and sustain a culture of safety. The Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) has developed tools to facilitate the development of safety cultures within hospital settings. This article describes the implementation of some of these tools, such as the Safety Briefings Model and Patient Safety Leadership Walkrounds. We will discuss how we adapted these strategies to our pediatric settings; what we learned through the implementation process-our successes and challenges; and implications for future success.

  16. Technical Issues and Proposes on the Legislation of Probabilistic Safety Assessment in Periodic Safety Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korean Nuclear Power Plants have performed a comprehensive safety assessment reflecting design and procedure changes and using the latest technology every 10 years. In Korea, safety factors of PSR are revised to 14 by revision of IAEA Safety Guidelines in 2003. In the revised safety guidelines, safety analysis field was subdivided into deterministic safety analysis, PSA (Probabilistic safety analysis), and hazard analysis. The purpose to examine PSA as a safety factor on PSR is to make sure that PSA results and assumptions reflect the latest state of NPPs, validate the level of computer codes and analytical models, and evaluate the adequacy of PSA instructions. In addition, its purpose is to derive the plant design change, operating experience of other plants and safety enhancement items as well. In Korea, PSA is introduced as a new factor. Thus, the overall guideline development and long-term implementation strategy are needed. Today in Korea, full-power PSA model revision and low-power and shutdown (LPSD) PSA model development is being performed as a part of the post Fukushima action items for operating plants. The scope of the full-power PSA is internal/external level 1, 2 PSA. But in case of fire PSA, the scope is level 1 PSA using new method, NUREG/CR-6850. In case of LPSD PSA, level 1 PSA for all operating plants, and level 2 PSA for 2 demonstration plants are under development. The result of the LPSD PSA will be used as major input data for plant specific SAMG (Severe Accident Management Guideline). The scope of PSA currently being developed in Korea cannot fulfill 'All Mode, All Scope' requirements recommended in the IAEA Safety Guidelines. Besides the legislation of PSA, step-by-step development strategy for non-performed scopes such as level 3 PSA and new fire PSA is one of the urgent issues in Korea. This paper suggests technical issues and development strategies for each PSA technical elements.

  17. Technical Issues and Proposes on the Legislation of Probabilistic Safety Assessment in Periodic Safety Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Seok-Won; Jeon, Ho-Jun; Na, Jang-Hwan [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. Ltd., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Korean Nuclear Power Plants have performed a comprehensive safety assessment reflecting design and procedure changes and using the latest technology every 10 years. In Korea, safety factors of PSR are revised to 14 by revision of IAEA Safety Guidelines in 2003. In the revised safety guidelines, safety analysis field was subdivided into deterministic safety analysis, PSA (Probabilistic safety analysis), and hazard analysis. The purpose to examine PSA as a safety factor on PSR is to make sure that PSA results and assumptions reflect the latest state of NPPs, validate the level of computer codes and analytical models, and evaluate the adequacy of PSA instructions. In addition, its purpose is to derive the plant design change, operating experience of other plants and safety enhancement items as well. In Korea, PSA is introduced as a new factor. Thus, the overall guideline development and long-term implementation strategy are needed. Today in Korea, full-power PSA model revision and low-power and shutdown (LPSD) PSA model development is being performed as a part of the post Fukushima action items for operating plants. The scope of the full-power PSA is internal/external level 1, 2 PSA. But in case of fire PSA, the scope is level 1 PSA using new method, NUREG/CR-6850. In case of LPSD PSA, level 1 PSA for all operating plants, and level 2 PSA for 2 demonstration plants are under development. The result of the LPSD PSA will be used as major input data for plant specific SAMG (Severe Accident Management Guideline). The scope of PSA currently being developed in Korea cannot fulfill 'All Mode, All Scope' requirements recommended in the IAEA Safety Guidelines. Besides the legislation of PSA, step-by-step development strategy for non-performed scopes such as level 3 PSA and new fire PSA is one of the urgent issues in Korea. This paper suggests technical issues and development strategies for each PSA technical elements.

  18. Safety assessment of gamma-cyclodextrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, I C; Newberne, P M; Young, V R; Bär, A

    2004-06-01

    Gamma-cyclodextrin (gamma-CD) is a cyclic alpha-(1,4)-linked oligosaccharide consisting of eight glucose molecules. Like other cyclodextrins, gamma-CD can form inclusion complexes with a variety of organic molecules because the inner side of the torus-like molecule is less polar than the outer side. In foods, gamma-CD may be used as a carrier for flavors, vitamins, polyunsaturated fatty acids, and other ingredients. It also has useful properties as a stabilizer in different food systems. The daily intake from all its intended uses in food at highest feasible concentrations has been estimated at 4.1g/person/day for consumers of gamma-CD containing foods. The present review summarizes the safety data of gamma-CD. The toxicity studies consist of standard genotoxicity tests, subchronic rat studies with oral and intravenous administration of gamma-CD for up to 3 months, a subchronic (3-month) toxicity study in dogs, a (1-year) oral toxicity study in rats, and embryotoxicity/teratogenicity studies in rats and rabbits. In the studies with oral administration, gamma-CD was given at dietary concentrations of up to 20%. All these studies demonstrated that gamma-CD is well tolerated and elicits no toxicological effects. Metabolic studies in rats showed that gamma-CD is rapidly and essentially completely digested by salivary and pancreatic amylase. Therefore, the metabolism of gamma-CD closely resembles that of starch and linear dextrins. A human study with ingestion of single doses of 8 g gamma-CD or 8 g maltodextrin did not reveal a difference in gastrointestinal tolerance of these two products. An interaction of ingested gamma-CD with the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins or other lipophilic nutrients is not to be expected because the formation of inclusion complexes is a reversible process, gamma-CD is readily digested in the small intestine, and studies with beta-CD, a non-digestible cyclodextrin, have shown that the bioavailability of vitamins (A, D, and E) is not

  19. The role of the regulator in promoting and evaluating safety culture. Operating experience feedback programme approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Promoting and Evaluating Safety Culture (S.C.) in Operating Organizations must be one of the main Nuclear Regulator goals to achieve. This can be possible only if each and every one of the regulatory activities inherently involves S.C. It can be seen throughout attitudes, values, uses and practices in both individuals and the whole regulatory organization. One among all the regulatory tools commonly used by regulators to promote and evaluate the commitment of the licensees with safety culture as a whole involves organizational factors and particular attention is directed to the operating organization. This entailed a wide range of activities, including all those related with management of safety performance. Operating Experience Feedback Programme as a tool to enhance safety operation is particularly useful for regulators in the evaluation of the role of S.C. in operating organization. Safety Culture is recognized as a subset of the wider Organizational Culture. Practices that improve organizational effectiveness can also contribute to enhance safety. An effective event investigation methodology is a specific practice, which contributes to a healthy Safety Culture. (author)

  20. Cross-cultural competencies in the psychiatric assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhui, K; Bhugra, D

    We live in an increasingly multicultural society and thus the cross-cultural application of assessment procedures is likely to become more common. However, little attention has been directed to the limitations of such unconditional application of what are essentially ethnocentric procedures. This article outlines the limitations of the psychiatric assessment when applied across cultures and presents the template for a culture sensitive assessment. PMID:9329996