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Sample records for assessing safety culture

  1. Assessment of Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A strong safety culture leads to more effective conduct of work and a sense of accountability among managers and employees, who should be given the opportunity to expand skills by training. The resources expended would thus result in tangible improvements in working practices and skills, which encourage further improvement of safety culture. In promoting an improved safety culture, NEK has emphasized both national and organizational culture with an appropriate balance of behavioural sciences and quality management systems approaches. In recent years there has been particular emphasis put on an increasing awareness of the contribution that human behavioural sciences can make to develop good safety practices. The purpose of an assessment of safety culture is to increase the awareness of the present culture, to serve as a basis for improvement and to keep track of the effects of change or improvement over a longer period of time. There is, however, no single approach that is suitable for all purposes and which can measure, simultaneously, all the intangible aspects of safety culture, i.e. the norms, values, beliefs, attitudes or the behaviours reflecting the culture. Various methods have their strengths and weaknesses. To prevent significant performance problems, self-assessment is used. Self-assessment is the process of identifying opportunities for improvement actively or, in some cases, weaknesses that could cause more serious errors or events. Self-assessments are an important input to the corrective action programme. NEK has developed questionnaires for safety culture self-assessment to obtain information that is representative of the whole organization. Questionnaires ensure a greater degree of anonymity, and create a less stressful situation for the respondent. Answers to questions represent the more apparent and conscious values and attitudes of the respondent. NEK proactively co-operates with WANO, INPO, IAEA in the areas of Safety Culture and Human

  2. Experiences in assessing safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on several Safety Culture self-assessment applications in nuclear organisations, the paper stresses relevant aspects to be considered when programming an assessment of this type. Reasons for assessing Safety Culture, basic principles to take into account, necessary resources, the importance of proper statistical analyses, the feed-back of results, and the setting up of action plans to enhance Safety Culture are discussed. (author)

  3. Human factors in safety assessment. Safety culture assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper analyses the present conditions and problems in enterprises safety assessment, and introduces the characteristics and effects of safety culture. The authors think that safety culture must be used as a 'soul' to form the pattern of modern safety management. Furthermore, they propose that the human safety and synthetic safety management assessment in a system should be changed into safety culture assessment. Finally, the assessment indicators are discussed

  4. Understanding and assessing safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 'Dalling' integrated model of organisational performance is introduced and described. A principal element of this model is culture, which is dynamically contrasted with the five other interacting critical elements, which comprise: the management system, the knowledge base, corporate leadership, stakeholders and consciousness. All six of these principal driving elements significantly influence health, safety, environmental, security, or any other aspect of organisational performance. It is asserted that the elements of organisational performance must be clearly defined and understood if meaningful measurements are to be carried out and sustained progress made in improving the knowledge of organisational performance. AEA Technology's safety culture research programme is then described together with the application of a safety culture assessment tool to organisations in the nuclear, electricity, transport, and oil and gas industries, both within and outside of the United Kingdom. (author)

  5. Method for assessing safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INSAG-4 by IAEA urged for the method which would deal with the organizational factors strongly affecting safety culture. ASCOT guidelines introduced the approach for safety culture assessment. The reason for new method development is based on the fact that we have to be prompt and very specific in order to find and fix the problems which originate in organization. The main objective is to focus on the components which have the greatest impact on safety regardless if they are classified as safety related or not. There are two distinct importance rating methods of components within PSA: Risk reduction worth and risk achievement worth. Our method concentrates on the second, RAW list, indicating components which should be closely watched in order to maintain the achieved level of safety. The further development of our method was governed by following rules: it should be simple and it should incorporate the results of the previous analyses so that it is possible to upgrade these by taking into account the organizational factors which influence strongly the performance of the systems as a whole. The method concentrates on finding if there is clear division of the responsibilities among the personnel which interacts with risk significant components and also on organizational factors like: redundancy, communication, procedures and control. The results are input in specially designed form where also the suggestions for actions are given. As the result we see level of safety culture and pinpoint which organizational factors are to be improved substantially and the information on the risk significant components which then serves as basic guidance for allocation of improvements and resources. (author)

  6. Safety culture assessment developed by JANTI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan's JCO accident in September 1999 provided a real-life example of what can happen when insufficient attention is paid to safety culture. This accident brought to light the importance of safety culture and reinforced the movement to foster a safety culture. Despite this, accidents and inappropriate conduct have continued to occur. Therefore, there is a strong demand to instill a safety culture throughout the nuclear power industry. In this context, Japan's nuclear power regulator, the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA), decided to include in its safety inspections assessments of the safety culture found in power utilities' routine safety operations to get signs of deterioration in the organizational climate. In 2007, NISA constructed guidelines for their inspectors to carry out these assessments. At the same time, utilities have embarked on their own independent safety culture initiatives, such as revising their technical specifications and building effective PDCA cycle to promote safety culture. In concert with these developments, JANTI has also instituted safety culture assessments. (author)

  7. A Methodology for Safety Culture Impact Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kiyoon; Jae, Moosung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The purpose of this study is to develop methodology for assessing safety culture impact on nuclear power plants. A new methodology for assessing safety culture impact index has been developed and applied for the reference nuclear power plants. The developed SCII model might contribute to comparing the level of safety culture among nuclear power plants as well as to improving the safety of nuclear power plants. Safety culture is defined to be fundamental attitudes and behaviors of the plant staff which demonstrate that nuclear safety is the most important consideration in all activities conducted in nuclear power operation. Through several accidents of nuclear power plant including the Fukusima Daiichi in 2011 and Chernovyl accidents in 1986, the safety of nuclear power plant is emerging into a matter of interest. From the accident review report, it can be easily found out that safety culture is important and one of dominant contributors to accidents. However, the impact methodology for assessing safety culture has not been established analytically yet. It is difficult to develop the methodology for assessing safety culture impact quantitatively.

  8. A Methodology for Safety Culture Impact Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to develop methodology for assessing safety culture impact on nuclear power plants. A new methodology for assessing safety culture impact index has been developed and applied for the reference nuclear power plants. The developed SCII model might contribute to comparing the level of safety culture among nuclear power plants as well as to improving the safety of nuclear power plants. Safety culture is defined to be fundamental attitudes and behaviors of the plant staff which demonstrate that nuclear safety is the most important consideration in all activities conducted in nuclear power operation. Through several accidents of nuclear power plant including the Fukusima Daiichi in 2011 and Chernovyl accidents in 1986, the safety of nuclear power plant is emerging into a matter of interest. From the accident review report, it can be easily found out that safety culture is important and one of dominant contributors to accidents. However, the impact methodology for assessing safety culture has not been established analytically yet. It is difficult to develop the methodology for assessing safety culture impact quantitatively

  9. Assessment of safety culture at INPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety Culture covers all main directions of plant activities and the plant departments involved through integration into the INPP Quality Assurance System. Safety Culture is represented by three components. The first is the clear INPP Safety and Quality Assurance Policy. Based on the Policy INPP is safely operated and managers' actions firstly aim at safety assurance. The second component is based on personal responsibility for safety and attitude of each employee of the plant. The third component is based on commitment to safety and competence of managers and employees of the plant. This component links the first two to ensure efficient management of safety at the plant. The above mentioned components including the elements which may significantly affect Safety Culture are also presented in the attachment. The concept of such model implies understanding of effect of different factors on the level of Safety Culture in the organization. In order to continuously correct safety problems, self-assessment of the Safety Culture level is performed at regular intervals. (author)

  10. Electronuclear's safety culture assessment and enhancement program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper describes the Eletronuclear's safety culture assessment and enhancement program. The program was launched by the company's top management one year after the creation of Eletronuclear in 1997, from the merging of two companies with different organizational cultures, the design and engineering company Nuclen and the nuclear directorate of the Utility Furnas, Operator of the Angra1 NPP. The program consisted of an assessment performed internally in 1999 with the support and advice of the IAEA. This assessment, performed with the help of a survey, pooled about 80% of the company's employees. The overall result of the assessment was that a satisfactory level of safety culture existed; however, a number of points with a considerable margin for improvement were also identified. These points were mostly related with behavioural matters such as motivation, stress in the workplace, view of mistakes, handling of conflicts, and last but not least a view by a considerable number of employees that a conflict between safety and production might exist. An Action Plan was established by the company managers to tackle these weak points. This Plan was issued as company guideline by the company's Directorate. The subsequent step was to detail and implement the different actions of the Plan, which is the phase that we are at present. In the detailing of the Action Plan, special care was taken to sum up efforts, avoiding duplication of work or competition with already existing programs. In this process it was identified that the company had a considerable number of initiatives directly related to organizational and safety culture improvement, already operational. These initiatives have been integrated in the detailed Action Plan. A new assessment, for checking the effectiveness of the undertaken actions, is planned for 2003. (author)

  11. Plant assessment system and safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The government, upon these events, keenly felt the necessity for developing the safety culture which was already forwarded in nuclear industries and started taking actions to propagate it to all parts of society. The government established a social safety director position under the Prime Minister's jurisdiction and also established a Safety Culture Promotion Headquarters in which 7 ministries and other organizations, such as Korea Economic Council, Federation of Korea Trade Union and Women's Federation Council were participating. In accordance with the government's strong will to enhance the safety consciousness of people, safety campaigns are being developed voluntarily in the private sector. The formation of non-governmental organizations, such as People's Central Council of Safety Culture Promotion, shows a good example of such movement

  12. Development of Safety Culture Assessment Strategy for Korean NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung Hwan; Kim, Jong Hyun [KEPCO, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    This paper aims at developing the requirements for a method to evaluate the operational safety culture, evaluating currently available methods based on the requirements, and suggesting a method to evaluate and improve the operational safety culture for Korean nuclear power plants. This paper reviews the widely-used methods to assess safety culture for NPPs and their basis. Then, this paper develops the requirements for the method to evaluate operational safety culture for Korean NPPs. Based on these requirements, Korean Safety Culture Indicators (KSCI) and evaluation measures are also suggested. Finally this paper proposes the guidelines to develop improvements to safety culture from the evaluation results.

  13. Development of Safety Culture Assessment Strategy for Korean NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper aims at developing the requirements for a method to evaluate the operational safety culture, evaluating currently available methods based on the requirements, and suggesting a method to evaluate and improve the operational safety culture for Korean nuclear power plants. This paper reviews the widely-used methods to assess safety culture for NPPs and their basis. Then, this paper develops the requirements for the method to evaluate operational safety culture for Korean NPPs. Based on these requirements, Korean Safety Culture Indicators (KSCI) and evaluation measures are also suggested. Finally this paper proposes the guidelines to develop improvements to safety culture from the evaluation results

  14. Safety culture assessment: a tool for improving patient safety in healthcare organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Nieva, V; Sorra, J.

    2003-01-01

    Increasingly, healthcare organizations are becoming aware of the importance of transforming organizational culture in order to improve patient safety. Growing interest in safety culture has been accompanied by the need for assessment tools focused on the cultural aspects of patient safety improvement efforts. This paper discusses the use of safety culture assessment as a tool for improving patient safety. It describes the characteristics of culture assessment tools presently available and dis...

  15. Assessing progress in the development of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of safety culture was introduced by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) in the Summary Report on the Post-Accident Meeting on the Chernobyl Accident in 1986. The concept was further expanded in the 1988 INSAG-3 report, Basic Safety Principles for Nuclear Power Plants, and again in 1991 in the INSAG-4 report. Recognizing the increasing role that safety culture is expected to play in nuclear installations worldwide, the Convention on Nuclear Safety states the Contracting Parties' desire 'to promote an effective nuclear safety culture'. The concept of safety culture is defined in INSAG-4 as follows: Safety culture is that assembly of characteristics and attitudes in organizations and individuals which establishes that, as an overriding priority, nuclear plant safety issues receive the attention warranted by their significance. Safety culture is also an amalgamation of values, standards, morals and norms of acceptable behaviour. These are aimed at maintaining a self disciplined approach to the enhancement of safety beyond legislative and regulatory requirements. Therefore, the safety culture has to be inherent in the thoughts and actions of all the individuals at every level in an organization. The leadership provided by top management is crucial. Safety culture applies to conventional and personal safety as well as nuclear safety. All safety consideration are affected by common points of beliefs, attitudes, behaviour, and cultural differences, closely linked to a shared system of values and standards. The paper poses questions and tries to find answers relative to issues like: - how to assess progress; - specific organizational indicators of a progressive safety culture; - detection of incipient weaknesses in safety culture (organizational issues, employee issues, technology issues); - revitalizing a weakened safety culture; - overall assesment of safety culture; - general evaluation model. In conclusion, there is no consistent and

  16. A Computer Program for Assessing Nuclear Safety Culture Impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kiyoon; Jae, Moosung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Through several accidents of NPP including the Fukushima Daiichi in 2011 and Chernobyl accidents in 1986, a lack of safety culture was pointed out as one of the root cause of these accidents. Due to its latent influences on safety performance, safety culture has become an important issue in safety researches. Most of the researches describe how to evaluate the state of the safety culture of the organization. However, they did not include a possibility that the accident occurs due to the lack of safety culture. Because of that, a methodology for evaluating the impact of the safety culture on NPP's safety is required. In this study, the methodology for assessing safety culture impact is suggested and a computer program is developed for its application. SCII model which is the new methodology for assessing safety culture impact quantitatively by using PSA model. The computer program is developed for its application. This program visualizes the SCIs and the SCIIs. It might contribute to comparing the level of the safety culture among NPPs as well as improving the management safety of NPP.

  17. A Computer Program for Assessing Nuclear Safety Culture Impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through several accidents of NPP including the Fukushima Daiichi in 2011 and Chernobyl accidents in 1986, a lack of safety culture was pointed out as one of the root cause of these accidents. Due to its latent influences on safety performance, safety culture has become an important issue in safety researches. Most of the researches describe how to evaluate the state of the safety culture of the organization. However, they did not include a possibility that the accident occurs due to the lack of safety culture. Because of that, a methodology for evaluating the impact of the safety culture on NPP's safety is required. In this study, the methodology for assessing safety culture impact is suggested and a computer program is developed for its application. SCII model which is the new methodology for assessing safety culture impact quantitatively by using PSA model. The computer program is developed for its application. This program visualizes the SCIs and the SCIIs. It might contribute to comparing the level of the safety culture among NPPs as well as improving the management safety of NPP

  18. Management of safety, safety culture and self assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety management is the term used for the measures required to ensure that an acceptable level of safety is maintained throughout the life of an installation, including decommissioning. The safety culture concept and its implementation are described in part one of the paper. The principles of safety are now quite well known and are implemented worldwide. It leads to a situation where harmonization is being achieved as indicated by the entry into force of the Convention on Nuclear Safety. To go beyond the present nuclear safety levels, management of safety and safety culture will be the means for achieving progress. Recent events which took place in major nuclear power countries have shown the importance of the management and the consequences on safety. At the same time, electricity deregulation is coming and will impact on safety through reductions in staffing and in operation and maintenance cost at nuclear installations. Management of safety as well as its control and monitoring by the safety authorities become a key to the future of nuclear energy.(author)

  19. Assessing progress in the development of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is focussed on the organizational culture and learning processes required for the implementation of all aspects of safety culture. There is no prescriptive formula for improving safety culture. However, some common characteristics and practices are emerging that can be adopted by organizations in order to make progress. The paper refers to some approaches that have been successful in a number of countries. The experience of the international nuclear industry in the development and improvement of safety culture could be extended and found useful in other nuclear activities, irrespective of scale. The examples given of specific practice cover a wide range of activities including analysis of events, the regulatory approach on safety culture, employee participation and safety performance measures. Many of these practices may be relevant to smaller organizations and could contribute to improving safety culture, whatever the size of the organization. The most effective approach is to pursue a range of practices that can be mutually supportive in the development of a progressive safety culture, supported by professional standards, organizational and management commitment. Some guidance is also given on the assessment of safety culture and on the detection of a weakening safety culture. Few suggestions for accelerating the safety culture development and improvement process are also provided. (author)

  20. Safety culture' is integrating 'human' into risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significance of Fukushima nuclear power accident requested reconsideration of safety standards, of which we had usually no doubt. Risk assessment standard (JIS B 9702), Which was used for repetition of database preparation and cumulative assessment, defined allowable risk and residual risk. However, work site and immediate assessment was indispensable beside such assessment so as to ensure safety. Risk of casualties was absolutely not acceptable in principle and judgments to approve allowable risk needed accountability, which was reminded by safety culture proposed by IAEA and also identified by investigation of organizational cause of Columbia accident. Actor of safety culture would be organization and individual, and mainly individual. Realization of safety culture was conducted by personnel having moral consciousness and firm sense of mission in the course of jobs and working daily with sweat pouring. Safety engineering/technology should have framework integrating human as such totality. (T. Tanaka)

  1. SAFETY CULTURE ASSESSMENT – OPTIMIZATION OF EXISTING PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Valenta Grebenšek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Improving aviation safety has always been a priority for the aviation industry. While in recent decades the reliability of machinery and computers dramatically improved the reliability of the people and the organizational aspect of safety did not change much. Many of air accident investigations have shown that one of the causal factors, which increase the probability and severity of accidents, is exactly poor safety culture. The purpose of this paper is to present the concept of safety culture assessment and the overview and review of different methods of measuring the safety culture in aviation. This research provides the suggestion that by use of different methods of assessment (evaluation of the results, more credible insight into the level of safety culture in the organization can be obtained. It also provides an understanding of how measurement systems in order to guide future performance can be used proactively.

  2. Assessment of the factors with significant influence on safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a qualitative and a quantitative evaluation of the factors with significant impact on safety culture were performed. These techniques were established and applied in accordance with IAEA standards. In order to show the applicability and opportunity of the methodology a specific case study was prepared: safety culture evaluation for INR Pitesti. The qualitative evaluation was performed using specific developed questionnaires. Through analysis of the completed questionnaires was established the development stage of safety culture at INR. The quantitative evaluation was performed using a guide to rate the influence factors. For each factor was identified the influence (negative or positive) and ranking score was estimated using scoring criteria. The results have emphasized safety culture stages. The paper demonstrates the fact that using both quantitative and qualitative assessment techniques, a practical value of the safety culture concept is given. (authors)

  3. Safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of Safety Culture was defined after Chernobyl's nuclear accident in 1986. It has not been exempt from discussion interpretations, adding riders, etc..., over the last 24 years because it has to do with human behavior and performance in the organizations. Safety Culture is not an easy task to define, assess and monitor. The proof of it is that today we still discussing and writing about it. How has been the evolution of Safety Culture at the Juzbado Factory since 1985 to today?. What is the strategy that we will be following in the future. (Author)

  4. Statistical analysis applied to safety culture self-assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interviews and opinion surveys are instruments used to assess the safety culture in an organization as part of the Safety Culture Enhancement Programme. Specific statistical tools are used to analyse the survey results. This paper presents an example of an opinion survey with the corresponding application of the statistical analysis and the conclusions obtained. Survey validation, Frequency statistics, Kolmogorov-Smirnov non-parametric test, Student (T-test) and ANOVA means comparison tests and LSD post-hoc multiple comparison test, are discussed. (author)

  5. Application of fuzzy set theory for safety culture and safety management assessment of Kartini research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety culture status of nuclear power plant is usually assessed through interview and/or discussions with personnel and management in plant, and an assessment of the pertinent documentation. The approach for safety culture assessment described in IAEA Safety Series, make uses of a questionnaire composed of questions which require 'Yes' or 'No' as an answer. Hence, it is basically a check-list approach which is quite common for safety assessments in industry. Such a procedure ignores the fact that the expert answering the question usually has knowledge which goes far beyond a mere binary answer. Additionally, many situations cannot readily be described in such restricted terms. Therefore, it was developed a checklist consisting of questions which are formulated such that they require more than a simple 'yes' or 'no' as an answer. This allows one to exploit the expert knowledge of the analyst appropriately by asking him to qualify the degree of compliance of each of the topics examined. The method presented has proved useful in assessing the safety culture and quality of safety management of the research reactor. The safety culture status and the quality of safety management of Kartini research reactor is rated as 'average'. The method is also flexible and allows one to add questions to existing areas or to introduce new areas covering related topics

  6. ASCOT guidelines revised 1996 edition. Guidelines for organizational self-assessment of safety culture and for reviews by the assessment of safety culture in organizations team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to properly assess safety culture, it is necessary to consider the contribution of all organizations which have an impact on it. Therefore, while assessing the safety culture in an operating organization it is necessary to address at least its interfaces with the local regulatory agency, utility corporate headquarters and supporting organizations. These guidelines are primarily intended for use by any organization wishing to conduct a self-assessment of safety culture. They should also serve as a basis for conducting an international peer review of the organization's self-assessment carried out by an ASCOT (Assessment of Safety Culture in Organizations Team) mission

  7. Assessment of safety culture in the Iranian nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deficient safety culture (S.C) is the center of safety issues of nuclear industry. To benefit from the advantages of nuclear technology and considering the fact of potential hazards of accidents in nuclear installations it is essential to view safety as the highest priority. S.C is an amalgamation of values, standards, morals and norms of acceptable behavior. Organizations having effective S.C show constant commitment to safety as a top level priority. Furthermore, the personnel of a nuclear facility shall recognize the safety significance of their tasks. Many people even those who work in the field of safety do not have a correct understanding of what S.C looks like in practical sense. In this study, by conducting a survey according to IAEA-TECDOC-1329 in some nuclear facilities, the S.C within the Iranian nuclear facilities is assessed. The human and organizational factors in Tehran Research Reactor are evaluated using a questionnaire method with active participation of the reactor operators. The results sho w that the operators are pretty aware of the subject. Also it has been identified some areas of improvement. (authors)

  8. Safety Management and Safety Culture Self Assessment of Kartini Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The self-assessment of safety culture and safety management status of Kartini research reactor is a step to foster safety culture and management by identifying good practices and areas for improvement, and also to improve reactor safety in a whole. The method used in this assessment is based on questionnaires provided by the Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia (FNCA), then reviewed by experts. Based on the assessment and evaluation results, it can be concluded that there were several good practices in maintaining the safety status of Kartini reactor such as: reactor operators and radiation protection workers were aware and knowledgeable of the safety standards and policies that apply to their operation, readily accept constructive criticism from their management and from the inspectors of regulatory body that address safety performance. As a proof, for the last four years the number of inspection/audit findings from Regulatory Body (BAPETEN) tended to decrease while the reactor utilization and its operating hour increased. On the other hands there were also some comments and recommendations for improvement of reactor safety culture, such as that there should be more frequent open dialogues between employees and managers, to grow and attain a mutual support to achieve safety goals. (author)

  9. Development of a New Safety Culture Assessment Method for Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) (A study to suggest a new safety culture assessment method in nuclear power plants)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sang Min; Seong, Poong Hyun [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    This study is conducted to suggest a new safety culture assessment method in nuclear power plants. Criteria with various existing safety culture analysis methods are united, and reliability analysis methods are applied. The concept of the most representative methods, Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) and Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA), are adopted to assess safety culture. Through this application, it is expected that the suggested method will bring results with convenience and objectiveness.

  10. Development of a New Safety Culture Assessment Method for Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) (A study to suggest a new safety culture assessment method in nuclear power plants)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is conducted to suggest a new safety culture assessment method in nuclear power plants. Criteria with various existing safety culture analysis methods are united, and reliability analysis methods are applied. The concept of the most representative methods, Fault Tree Analysis (FTA) and Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA), are adopted to assess safety culture. Through this application, it is expected that the suggested method will bring results with convenience and objectiveness

  11. An approach for risk informed safety culture assessment for Canadian nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most important components of effective safety and risk management for nuclear power stations is a healthy safety culture. DNV has developed an approach for risk informed safety culture assessment that combines two complementary paradigms for safety and risk management: loss prevention - for preventing and intervening in accidents; and critical function management - for achieving safety and performance goals. Combining these two paradigms makes it possible to provide more robust systems for safety management and to support a healthy safety culture. This approach is being applied to safety culture assessment in partnership with a Canadian nuclear utility. (author)

  12. An approach for risk informed safety culture assessment for Canadian nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, W.R. [Det Norske Veritas (U.S.A.), Inc., Katy, Texas (United States)

    2010-07-01

    One of the most important components of effective safety and risk management for nuclear power stations is a healthy safety culture. DNV has developed an approach for risk informed safety culture assessment that combines two complementary paradigms for safety and risk management: loss prevention - for preventing and intervening in accidents; and critical function management - for achieving safety and performance goals. Combining these two paradigms makes it possible to provide more robust systems for safety management and to support a healthy safety culture. This approach is being applied to safety culture assessment in partnership with a Canadian nuclear utility. (author)

  13. Assessing the relationship between patient safety culture and EHR strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Eric W; Silvera, Geoffrey A; Kazley, Abby S; Diana, Mark L; Huerta, Timothy R

    2016-07-11

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between hospitals' electronic health record (EHR) adoption characteristics and their patient safety cultures. The "Meaningful Use" (MU) program is designed to increase hospitals' adoption of EHR, which will lead to better care quality, reduce medical errors, avoid unnecessary cost, and promote a patient safety culture. To reduce medical errors, hospital leaders have been encouraged to promote safety cultures common to high-reliability organizations. Expecting a positive relationship between EHR adoption and improved patient safety cultures appears sound in theory, but it has yet to be empirically demonstrated. Design/methodology/approach - Providers' perceptions of patient safety culture and counts of patient safety incidents are explored in relationship to hospital EHR adoption patterns. Multi-level modeling is employed to data drawn from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's surveys on patient safety culture (level 1) and the American Hospital Association's survey and healthcare information technology supplement (level 2). Findings - The findings suggest that the early adoption of EHR capabilities hold a negative association to the number of patient safety events reported. However, this relationship was not present in providers' perceptions of overall patient safety cultures. These mixed results suggest that the understanding of the EHR-patient safety culture relationship needs further research. Originality/value - Relating EHR MU and providers' care quality attitudes is an important leading indicator for improved patient safety cultures. For healthcare facility managers and providers, the ability to effectively quantify the impact of new technologies on efforts to change organizational cultures is important for pinpointing clinical areas for process improvements. PMID:27298060

  14. ASCOT guidelines. Guidelines for organizational self-assessment of safety culture and for reviews by the Assessment of Safety Culture in Organizations Team

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These guidelines describe an approach used in conducting an Assessment of Safety Culture in Organizations Team (ASCOT) review. They are intended to assist the team members in conducting their reviews and at the same time provide guidance to hosts preparing to receive an ASCOT review. They may also be used by any organization wishing to conduct their own self-assessment of safety culture, independent of an ASCOT review

  15. Safety Culture Perceptions in a Collegiate Aviation Program: A Systematic Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Adjekum, Daniel Kwasi

    2014-01-01

    An assessment of the perceptions of respondents on the safety culture at an accredited Part 141 four year collegiate aviation program was conducted as part of the implementation of a safety management system (SMS). The Collegiate Aviation Program Safety Culture Assessment Survey (CAPSCAS), which was modified and revalidated from the existing Commercial Aviation Safety Survey (CASS), was used. Participants were drawn from flight students and certified flight instructors in the program. The sur...

  16. The role of engineering judgement, safety culture, and organizational factors in risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the role of engineering judgement, safety culture, and organizational factors in risk assessment by examining the reasons for human-based error. The need for more emphasis on producing engineers with good engineering judgement is described. The progress in quantifying the role of safety culture and organizational factors in risk assessment studies is summarized

  17. Safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response to a previous publication by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) indicated a broad international interest in expanding the concept of safety culture in such a way that its effectiveness in particular cases may be judged. This has two major components: the framework determined by organizational policy and by managerial action, and the response of individuals in working within and benefiting by the framework. (Z.S.) 1 fig

  18. SCART guidelines. Reference report for IAEA Safety Culture Assessment Review Team (SCART)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA Director General stressed the role of safety culture in his concluding remarks at the Meeting of the Contracting Parties to the Convention on Nuclear Safety in 2002: 'As we have learned in other areas, it is not enough simply to have a structure; it is not enough to say that we have the necessary laws and the appropriate regulatory bodies. All these are important, but equally important is that we have in place a safety culture that gives effect to the structure that we have developed. To me, effectiveness and transparency are keys. So, it is an issue which I am pleased to see, you are giving the attention it deserves and we will continue to work with you in clarifying, developing and applying safety culture through our programmes and through our technical cooperation activities.' The concept of safety culture was initially developed by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) after the Chernobyl accident in 1986. Since then the IAEA's perspective of safety culture has expanded with time as its recognition of the complexities of the concept developed. Safety culture is considered to be specific organizational culture in all types of organizations with activities that give rise to radiation risks. The aim is to make safety culture strong and sustainable, so that safety becomes a primary focus for all activities in such organizations, even for those, which might not look safety-related at first. SCART (Safety Culture Assessment Review Team) is a safety review service, which reflects the expressed interest of Members States for methods and tools for safety culture assessment. It is a replacement for the earlier service ASCOT (Assessment of Safety Culture in Organizations Team). The IAEA Safety Fundamentals, Requirements and Guides (Safety Standards) are the basis for the SCART Safety Review Service. The reports of INSAG, identifying important current nuclear safety issues, serve also as references during a SCART mission. SCART missions are based

  19. Patient safety culture in teaching hospitals in Iran: assessment by the hospital survey on patient safety culture (HSOPSC)

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Zakaria Kiaei; Amir Ziaee; Rafat Mohebbifar; Hamideh Khoshtarkib; Elnaz Ghanati; Azadeh Ahmadzadeh; Saeideh Teymoori; Omid Khosravizadeh; Masoumeh Zieaeeha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Patient safety culture is an important part of improvement in the safety of health care. Knowing its present status is required for development of safety culture. The present study aimed to evaluate the current status of Patient safety culture in hospitals of three central provinces of Iran. Method: The present cross-sectional study was performed in teaching hospitals of Tehran, Alborz, and Qazvin provinces. The standard HSOPSC questionnaire was used for evaluation of the pat...

  20. Assessing Resident Safety Culture in Nursing Homes: Using the Nursing Home Survey on Resident Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Nicholas G.; Wagner, Laura M.; Perera, Subashan; Ferguson, Jamie C.; Handler, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To examine the overall responses of nursing home staff to a newly developed nursing home specific survey instrument to assess patient safety culture (PSC) and to examine whether nursing home staff (including Administrator / Manager, Licensed Nurse, Nurse Aide, Direct Care Staff, and Support Staff) differ in their PSC ratings. Methods Data were collected in late 2007 through early 2008 using a survey administered to staff in each of 40 nursing homes. In four of these nursing homes the responses of different staff were identified. The Nursing Home Survey on Patient Safety Culture (NHSPSC) was used to assess 12 domains of the PSC and identify differences in PSC perceptions between staff. Results For the 40 nursing homes in the sample, the overall facility response rate was 72%. For the four nursing homes of interest, the overall facility response rate was 68.9%. The aggregate NHSPSC scores, using all staff types for all survey items, show that most respondents report a poor PSC. However, Administrators / Managers had more positive scores than the other staff types (pquality of care and quality of life for residents. PMID:22130345

  1. Self-assessment of safety culture in nuclear installations. Highlights and good practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the findings of two IAEA Technical Committee Meetings on Safety Culture Self-Assessment Highlights and Good Practices. The meetings took place on 3-5 June 1998 and 23-25 October 2000 in Vienna, and involved an international cross-section of representatives who participated both in plenary discussions and working groups. The purpose of the meetings was to discuss the practical implications of evolutionary changes in the development of safety culture, and to share international experience, particularly on the methods used for the assessment of safety culture and good practices for its enhancement in an organization. The working groups were allocated specific topics for discussion, which included the following: organizational factors influencing the implementation of actions to improve safety culture; how to measure, effectively, progress in implementing solutions to safety culture problems; the symptoms of a weakening safety culture; the suitability of different methods for assessing safety culture; the achievement of sustainable improvements in safety culture using the results of assessment; the potential threats to the continuation of a strong safety culture in an organization from the many challenges facing the nuclear industry. The working groups, when appropriate, considered issues from both the utility's and the regulator's perspectives. This report will be of interest to all organizations who wish to assess and achieve a strong and sustainable safety culture. This includes not only nuclear power plants, but also other sectors of the nuclear industry such as uranium mines and mills, nuclear fuel fabrication facilities, nuclear waste repositories, research reactors, accelerators, radiography facilities, etc. The report specifically supplements other IAEA publications on this subject

  2. ILK statement about the regulatory authorities' perception of operators' self-assessment of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past few years, German licensing and supervisory authorities have devoted increasing attention to safety management and safety culture issues. At present, German plant operators are introducing systems for self-assessment of the safety culture in their plants, such as the Safety Culture Assessment System developed by VGB Power Tech (VGB-SBS). In its statement, the International Committee on Nuclear Technology (ILK) addresses an effective approach of the authorities in evaluating the self-assessment of safety culture conducted by operators. ILK proposes a total of ten recommendations for evaluating the self-assessment system of the operators by the authority. The regulatory authorities should see to it that the operators establish a self-assessment system for aspects of organization and personnel, and use it continuously. The measures derived from this self-assessment by the operators, and the reasons underlying them, should be discussed with the authorities. In addition to the operators, also the regulatory authorities and the technical expert organizations commissioned by them should carry out self-assessments of their respective supervisory activities, taking into account also special events, such as changes in government, and develop appropriate programs of measures to be taken. In evaluating safety culture, the regulatory authorities should strive to support the activities of operators in improving their safety culture. A spirit of mutual confidence and cooperation should exist between operators and authorities. The recommendations expressed in the statement deliberately leave room for detailed implementation by the parties concerned. (orig.)

  3. New safety culture strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety culture is a term well known to and respected by nuclear power plant operators. Its principles, however, are applicable for conventional power plants, as well. The approaches to the safety culture management and assessment needed to be unified at the company level and to have the requirements uniformly defined and applied. (author)

  4. Effects of a team-based assessment and intervention on patient safety culture in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, B; Müller, V; Rochon, J;

    2014-01-01

    12 months, scores were allocated for safety culture as expressed in practice structure and processes (indicators), in safety climate and in patient safety incident reporting. The primary outcome was the indicator error management. Results: During the team sessions, practice teams reflected on their...... safety culture and decided on about 10 actions per practice to improve it. After 12 months, no significant differences were found between intervention and control groups in terms of error management (competing probability = 0.48, 95% CI 0.34 to 0.63, p = 0.823), 11 further patient safety culture...... control practices. Conclusions Applied as a team-based instrument to assess safety culture, FraTrix did not lead to measurable improvements in error management. Comparable studies with more positive results had less robust study designs. In future research, validated combined methods to measure safety...

  5. Assessing safety culture and safety performance in a high hazard industry

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Ceri

    2014-01-01

    In the UK 27 million working days are lost due to work-related illness or injury; at an estimate of £13.4 billion to the economy. Over the last 30 years researchers have examined safety culture and its relationship to poor safety performance. An organisation in the high hazard construction industry wanted to understand the factors that shaped and influenced safety performance and safety culture. This thesis details a research project which addresses that aim. A multi-method, triangulated appr...

  6. Development and applications of a safety assessment system for promoting safety culture in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For past five years, CRIEPI has been continuing efforts to develop and make applications of a 'safety assessment system' which enable to measure the safety level of organization. This report describe about frame of the system, assessment results and its reliability, and relation between labor accident rate in the site and total safety index (TSI), which can be obtained by the principal factors analysis. The safety assessment in this report is based on questionnaire survey of employee. The format and concrete questionnaires were developed using existing literatures including organizational assessment tools. The tailored questionnaire format involved 124 questionnaire items. The assessment results could be considered as a well indicator of the safety level of organization, safety management, and safety awareness of employee. (author)

  7. Implementing and measuring safety goals and safety culture. 3. Shifting to a Coaching Culture Through a 360-Degree Assessment Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Error-free operation is the ultimate objective of any safety culture. Ginna Training and Operations has embarked on an approach directed at further developing coaching skills, attitudes, and values. To accomplish this, a 360-deg assessment process designed to enhance coaching skills, attitudes, and values has been implemented. The process includes measuring participants based on a set of values and an individual self-development plan based on the feedback from the 360-deg assessment. The skills and experience of the people who make up that culture are irreplaceable. As nuclear organizations mature and generations retire, knowledge and skills must be transferred to the incoming generations without a loss in performance. The application of a 360- deg assessment process can shift the culture to include coaching in a strong command and control environment. It is a process of change management strengthened by experience while meeting the challenge to improve human performance by changing workplace attitudes. At Ginna, training programs and new processes were initiated to pursue the ultimate objective: error-free operation. The overall objective of the programs is to create a common knowledge base and the skill required to consistently incorporate ownership of 'coach and collaborate' responsibility into a strong existing 'command and control' culture. This involves the role of coach; the role of communications; and concept integration, which includes communications, coaching, and team dimensional training (TDT). The overall objective of the processes, TDT and shifting to a coaching culture through the application of a 360-deg assessment process, is to provide guidance for applying the skills learned in the programs. As depicted in Fig. 1, the TDT (a process that identifies 'strengths and challenges') can be greatly improved by applying good communications and coaching practices. As the training programs were implemented, the participants were observed and coached in

  8. A quantitative assessment of safety culture as part of the national programme on nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper seeks to give practical value to the concept of Safety Culture, proposing a method that may be used to judge the effectiveness of Safety Culture in all phases of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The paper describes the quantification of the Safety Culture assessment on statistical basis. The safety culture assessment is based on the IAEA ASCOT (Assessment of Safety Culture in Organizing Team) Guidelines. This Procedural Guide, used as an instrumental tool in addition to 'ASCOT Guidelines', could improve the ASCOT reviews and permit to give more accurate and objective conclusions at the end of these reviews. It would also reveal areas needing improvements, giving an overall rating of the Safety Culture level, which could be compared with a new result after implementing some corrective measures. This method could be applied in all phases of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (mining, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage, conditioning of spent fuel, final disposal of spent fuel, heavy water production, transport, etc.) and should be an all embracing characteristics which, when prevailing in a satisfactory measure, would eliminate accidents and reduce incidents to insignificant levels. Included as an Annex to the National Program on Nuclear Energy, the proposed method could contribute to the improvement of Safety Culture in all phases of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and at all levels. (author)

  9. The role of perceptions and attitudes in the assessment of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to present the argument that the most conveniently measurable and valid elements of a safety culture are the employee's perceptions of and attitudes towards safety. These are oriented towards the whole range of hazards and corresponding safety practices and procedures within the organisation. The concept of safety culture is discussed and this is followed by a short review of research evidence on the main characteristics of low accident plants. There follow brief reviews of research in industry on the perception of risks and attitudes towards safety and finally, a detailed account of a large scale survey of safety attitudes in a nuclear reprocessing plant. The aim is to identify those elements of safety culture that can establish priorities and provide order and structure for those site regulators whose task is to assess their health. (author)

  10. Some thoughts on problems associated with the assessing and strengthening of safety culture. An Indian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    India has nine operating reactors, one under commissioning, six under construction and ten in the planning stage. Of the nine operating nuclear power plants, seven are PHWR type reactors and two BWRs. India's reactors have accomplished more than hundred operating reactor years with an extremely satisfactory safety performance. India gives top priority to safety and there has been an overall increase in safety culture. However, it is recognised that improvement of safety culture is a continuous process and many areas require streamlining. The very name of 'culture' evokes strong emotions among Indians, as they feel they inherit a good ancient culture. Basically the concept of culture covers everything learnt or inherited by a society which is preserved and passed on to future generations. The word safety culture however needs to differ from the above referred meaning due to fast technological development which requires new safe methods to be developed and practised. In view of this difference in the meaning attached to safety culture, developing parameters to measure the same, devising techniques for its assessment and introducing programmes for strengthening safety culture. Apparently, the task is not easy since it involves cultivating right safety attitude and once achieved preserving and improving the same. Since the ultimate goal of safety culture is to bring in change towards right type of safety attitude of all concerned, it is important to realize that it is not an easy process. This is mainly because the change in attitude is internal in nature as it consists of values, thoughts and actions of an individual. Just by knowing the hazards of a process and also about the technique of reducing the risks from the same is not enough since safety culture requires an attitudinal change. The enormous efforts needed to bring in such a change can be gauged by an example of designing and effectively executing a campaign to eliminate cigarette smoking, which is known to

  11. Assessment of Human Performance and Safety Culture at the Paks Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of human performance and safety culture of the personnel at a Nuclear Power Plant is a very important element of the self assessment process. At the Paks NPP a systematic approach to this problem started in the early 90's. The first comprehensive analysis of the human performance of the personnel was performed by the Hungarian Research Institute for Electric Power (VEIKI). The analysis of human failures is also a part of the investigation and analysis of safety related reported events. This human performance analysis of events is carried out by the Laboratory of Psychology of the plant and a supporting organisation namely the Department of Ergonomics and Psychology of the Budapest University of Technical and Economical Sciences. The analysis of safety culture at the Paks NPP has been in the focus of attention since the implementation of the INSAG-4 document started world-wide. In 1993 an IAEA model project namely 'Strengthening Training for Operational Safety' was initiated with a sub-project called 'Enhancement of Safety Culture'. Within this project the first step was the initial assessment of the safety culture level at the Paks NPP. It was followed by some corrective actions and safety culture improvement programme. In 1999 the second assessment was performed in order to evaluate the progress as a result of the improvement programme. A few indicators reflecting the elements of safety culture were defined and compared. The assessment of the safety culture with a survey among the managers was performed in September 2000 and the results are being evaluated at the moment. The intention of the plant management is to repeat the assessment every 2-3 years and evaluate the trend of the indicator. (authors)

  12. Is Scores Derived from the Most Internationally Applied Patient Safety Culture Assessment Tool Correct?

    OpenAIRE

    Javad Moghri; Ali Akbari Sari; Mehdi Yousefi; Hasan Zahmatkesh; Ranjbar Mohammad Ezzatabadi; Pejman Hamouzadeh; Satar Rezaei; Jamil Sadeghifar

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture, known as HSOPS, is an internationally well known and widely used tool for measuring patient safety culture in hospitals. It includes 12 dimensions with positive and negative wording questions. The distribution of these questions in different dimensions is uneven and provides the risk of acquiescence bias. The aim of this study was to assess the questionnaire against this bias. Methods Three hundred nurses were assigned into study ...

  13. Assessment of patient safety culture in primary care setting, Al-Mukala, Yemen

    OpenAIRE

    Webair, Hana H; Al-assani, Salwa S.; Al-haddad, Reema H.; Al-Shaeeb, Wafa H.; Bin Selm, Manal A.; Alyamani, Abdulla S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient safety culture in primary care is the first step to achieve high quality health care. This study aims to provide a baseline assessment of patient safety culture in primary care settings in Al-Mukala, Yemen as a first published study from a least developed country. Methods A survey was conducted in primary healthcare centres and units in Al-Mukala District, Yemen. A comprehensive sample from the available 16 centres was included. An Arabic version of the Medical Office Surve...

  14. Assessment of safety culture from the INB organization: A case study for nuclear fuel cycle industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present article describes strategies, methodologies and first results on the Safety Culture Self-assessment Project under way at INB since August 2001. As a Brazilian Government company in charge of the nuclear fuel cycle activities,. the main purposes of the Project is to evaluate the present status of its safety culture and to propose actions to ensure continuous safety improvement at management level of its industrial processes. The proposed safety culture assessment describes INB's various production sites taking into account the different aspects of their activities, such as regional, social and technical issues. The survey was performed in March/2002 very good attendance (about 80%) the employees. The first global survey results are presented in item 4. (author)

  15. Self assessment of safety culture in HANARO using the code of conduct on the safety of research reactor by IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The safety culture in HANARO was self-assessed in accordance with the Code of Conduct on the Safety of Research Reactor drafted by IAEA. From 2002, IAEA has worked on the development of the Code of Conduct to achieve and maintain high level of nuclear safety in research reactors worldwide through the enhancement of national measures and international co-operation including, where appropriate, safety related technical cooperation. It defines the role of the state, the role of the regulatory body, the role of the operating organization and the role of the IAEA. As for the role of operating organization, the code specifies general requirements in assessment and verification of safety, financial and human resources, quality assurance, human factors, radiation protection and emergency preparedness. It also defines the role of operating organization for safety of research reactor in siting, design, operation, maintenance, modification and utilization as well. All of these items are the subjects for safety culture implementation, which means the Code could be a guideline for an operating organization to assess its safety culture. The self-assessment of safety culture in HANARO was made by using the sections of the Code describing the role of the operating organization for safety of research reactor. The major assessment items and the practices in HANARO for each items are as follow: The SAR of HANARO was reviewed by the regulatory body before the construction and the fuel loading of HANARO. Major design modifications and new installation of utilization facility needs the approval from regulatory body and safety assessment is a requirement for the approval. The Tech. Spec. for HANARO Operation specifies the analysis, surveillance, testing and inspection for HANARO operation. The reactor operation is mainly supported by the government and partly by nuclear R and D fund. The education and training of operation staff are one of major tasks of operating organization

  16. Safety culture in nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper after defining the term safety culture outlines the requirements at various levels of the plant management to ensure that safety culture pervades all activities related to the plant. Techniques are also indicated which can be used to assess the effectiveness of safety culture

  17. Characterization and improvement of the nuclear safety culture through self-assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organizational culture has a powerful influence on overall corporate performance. The ability to sustain superior results in ensuring the public's health and safety is predicated on an organization's deeply embedded values and behavioral norms and how these affect the ability to change and seek continuous improvement. The nuclear industry is developing increased recognition of the relationship of culture to nuclear safety performance as a critical element of corporate strategy. This paper describes a self-assessment methodology designed to characterize and improve the nuclear safety culture, including processes for addressing employee concerns. This methodology has been successfully applied on more than 30 occasions in the last several years, resulting in measurable improvements in safety performance and quality and employee motivation, productivity, and morale. Benefits and lessons learned are also presented

  18. Assessment of safety culture within the radiotherapy department of the Bordeaux University Hospital Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assessment of the safety culture within a radiotherapy department has been performed by using a Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). It assesses the safety environment, the team cooperation quality, the satisfaction related to professional activity, the approval of management actions, the perception of the work environment quality and of logistic support, and the acknowledgment of the influence of stress on performance. The survey has been performed before and after the support intervention of a hospital audit and expertise mission in relationship with the National cancer Institute (Inca). The comparison of results before and after this support intervention shows a general score improvement for the SAQ. Short communication

  19. Assessing and improving the safety culture of non-power nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development and application of safety culture principles has understandably focused on nuclear power plant and fuel cycle facilities and has been based on studies in Europe, North America, Japan and Korea. However, most radiation injuries and deaths have resulted from the mishandling of radioactive sources, inadvertent over-exposure to X-rays and critically incidents, unrelated to nuclear power plant. Within the Forum on Nuclear Cooperation in Asia (FNCA), Australia has been promoting initiatives to apply safety culture principles across all nuclear and radiation application activities and in a manner that is culturally appropriate for Asian countries. ANSTO initiated a Safety Culture Project in 1996 to develop methods for assessing and improving safety culture at nuclear and radiation installations other than power reactors and to trial these at ANSTO and in the Asian region. The project has sensibly drawn on experience from the nuclear power industry, particularly in Japan and Korea. There has been a positive response in the participating countries to addressing safety culture issues in non-power nuclear facilities. This paper reports on the main achievements of the project. Further goals of the project are also identified. (author)

  20. Safety Culture Assessment Tools in Nuclear and Non-Nuclear Domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last decades, in many domains especially in high risk industries, the authorities paid increasing attention to safety management systems and, in particular, to safety culture. Consequently, in the applied and academic literature a huge amount of studies explored the main challenges, issues and obstacles related with safety culture. We undertake a survey of safety culture experiences in the main safety-critical industries such as nuclear, railways, offshore, aviation, airlines, health care, etc. We review both academic and applied literature up to the year 2011. Our results help to establish a comprehensive view on the subject, its main terminologies, existing tools, and main difficulties. The purpose of this report is to raise awareness about the current tools of safety culture assessment, both in the nuclear as well as in the non-nuclear domain. The report provides also practical recommendations about the possible use of each tool given different circumstances and different factors. We do not aim to rank the tools pointing the best one, but we highlight instead the unique features of these tools, pointing their strong and weak sides

  1. Tools to quantify safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the notion of safety culture and then describes some of the tools that can be used to assess it. Required characteristics to obtain reliable tools and techniques are provided, along with a short summary of the most common and important tools and techniques used to assess safety culture at the nuclear field is described. At the end of this paper, the reader will better understand the importance of the safety culture of the organization and will have requirements to help him in choosing reliable tools and techniques. Further, there will be recommendations on how best to follow-up after an assessment of safety culture. (author)

  2. Safety culture survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety Culture Survey continues in September with its second phase. Specialised teams led by the Nuclear Oversight Manager Jozef Zlatnansky conducted interviews with the selected employees in the company and carried out observations at the power plants. This assessment was carried out in cooperation with foreign experts. (author)

  3. On personal safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper mainly expounds the personal safety culture, including the following aspects: the attitude to exploration, strict methods and the habit of exchange etc. It points out that straightening the education of safety culture and heightening the level of personal safety culture can get not only high-level safety but also high-level quality

  4. Overview of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project safety culture is considered at policy, management and individual levels. The primary objective of this work is to provide an overview of safety culture relevant to radiotherapy practices. The specific objectives are to review and analyze the causes of poor safety culture and provide recommendations on implementation of sound safety culture within radiotherapy facilities which will help to prevent radiological accidents or to mitigate their consequences. The methodology used is the review of published IAEA materials and other documents containing safety culture with specific reference to radiotherapy. The result of the review revealed that all accidents in radiotherapy facilities were due to poor safety culture practices including inadequate regulatory control over sight. Some recommendations are provided and if implemented could improve safety culture which will lead to good safety performance and excellent commitment to safety culture which will significantly reduce accidents and their consequences in radiotherapy. (au)

  5. Assessment of Patient Safety Culture in Primary Health Care Settings in Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha Mohamed Ghobashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Patient safety is critical component of health care quality. We aimed to assess the awareness of primary healthcare staff members about patient safety culture and explore the areas of deficiency and opportunities for improvement concerning this issue.Methods: This descriptive cross sectional study surveyed 369 staff members in four primary healthcare centers in Kuwait using self-administered “Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture” adopted questionnaire. The total number of respondents was 276 participants (response rate = 74.79%.Results: Five safety dimensions with lowest positivity (less than 50% were identified and these are; the non – punitive response to errors, frequency of event reporting, staffing, communication openness, center handoffs and transitions with the following percentages of positivity 24%, 32%, 41%, 45% and 47% respectively. The dimensions of highest positivity were teamwork within the center’s units (82% and organizational learning (75%.Conclusion: Patient safety culture in primary healthcare settings in Kuwait is not as strong as improvements for the provision of safe health care. Well-designed patient safety initiatives are needed to be integrated with organizational policies, particularly the pressing need to address the bioethical component of medical errors and their disclosure, communication openness and emotional issues related to them and investing the bright areas of skillful organizational learning and strong team working attitudes.    

  6. Safety culture implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document develops the following subjects: analysis of the safety culture concept; function of safety culture in a quality system; reason for the appearance of the safety culture concept; comparison with the condition of conventional industry; practical difficulties that appear for its implementation and evaluation; its importance in radiation medical application; strategies for the implementation of safety culture; how to stimulate the participation and motivation of the personnel; application of the standards to be used

  7. Safety culture perceptions of pharmacists in Malaysian hospitals and health clinics: a multicentre assessment using the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsuri, Srima Elina; Pei Lin, Lua; Fahrni, Mathumalar Loganathan

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the safety attitudes of pharmacists, provide a profile of their domains of safety attitude and correlate their attitudes with self-reported rates of medication errors. Design A cross-sectional study utilising the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ). Setting 3 public hospitals and 27 health clinics. Participants 117 pharmacists. Main outcome measure(s) Safety culture mean scores, variation in scores across working units and between hospitals versus health clinics, predictors of safety culture, and medication errors and their correlation. Results Response rate was 83.6% (117 valid questionnaires returned). Stress recognition (73.0±20.4) and working condition (54.8±17.4) received the highest and lowest mean scores, respectively. Pharmacists exhibited positive attitudes towards: stress recognition (58.1%), job satisfaction (46.2%), teamwork climate (38.5%), safety climate (33.3%), perception of management (29.9%) and working condition (15.4%). With the exception of stress recognition, those who worked in health clinics scored higher than those in hospitals (p<0.05) and higher scores (overall score as well as score for each domain except for stress recognition) correlated negatively with reported number of medication errors. Conversely, those working in hospital (versus health clinic) were 8.9 times more likely (p<0.01) to report a medication error (OR 8.9, CI 3.08 to 25.7). As stress recognition increased, the number of medication errors reported increased (p=0.023). Years of work experience (p=0.017) influenced the number of medication errors reported. For every additional year of work experience, pharmacists were 0.87 times less likely to report a medication error (OR 0.87, CI 0.78 to 0.98). Conclusions A minority (20.5%) of the pharmacists working in hospitals and health clinics was in agreement with the overall SAQ questions and scales. Pharmacists in outpatient and ambulatory units and those in health clinics had better perceptions of safety

  8. Engineering approach to relative quantitative assessment of safety culture and related social issues in NPP operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is devoted to presentation of engineering approach and software tool developed for Safety Culture (SC) assessment as well as to the results of their implementation at Smolensk NPP. The engineering approach is logic evolution of the IAEA ASSET method broadly used at European NPPs in 90-s. It was implemented at Russian and other plants including Olkiluoto NPP in Finland. The approach allows relative quantitative assessing and trending the aspects of SC by the analysis of evens features and causes, calculation and trending corresponding indicators. At the same time plant's operational performances and related social issues, including efficiency of plant operation and personnel reliability, can be monitored. With the help of developed tool the joint team combined from personnel of Smolensk NPP and RRC 'Kurchatov Institute' ('KI') issued the SC self-assessment report, which identifies: families of recurrent events, main safety and operational problems ; their trends and importance to SC and plant efficiency; recommendations to enhance SC and operational performance

  9. Some cultural flavors of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety culture has got a wide acceptance in nuclear power operation. The concept is closely related to issues of management and organization. Safety culture is not a universal concept, but it has to be related to a national context and given anchoring in the specific environment of a nuclear power plant. In spite of its relativity it should still be possible for outsiders to assess manifestation of safety culture. The paper discusses aspects of safety culture with a special emphasis on the use of the concept as a management tool. Further development of the concept is also discussed. A conclusion of the paper is that safety culture needs further development and proper connections to management sciences and organizational theory. (author)

  10. Resolving conflicting safety cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several nuclear power plant sites have been wounded in the crossfire between two distinct corporate cultures. The traditional utility culture lies on one side and that of the nuclear navy on the other. The two corporate cultures lead to different perceptions of open-quotes safety culture.close quotes This clash of safety cultures obscures a very important point about nuclear plant operations: Safety depends on organizational learning. Organizational learning provides the foundation for a perception of safety culture that transcends the conflict between utility and nuclear navy cultures. Corporate culture may be defined as the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs shared by employees of a given company. Safety culture is the part of corporate culture concerning shared attitudes and beliefs affecting individual or public safety. If the safety culture promotes behaviors that lead to greater safety, employees will tend to open-quotes do the right thingclose quotes even when circumstances and formal guidance alone do not ensure that actions will be correct. Safety culture has become particularly important to nuclear plant owners and regulators as they have sought to establish and maintain a high level of safety in today's plants

  11. Developing Measures for Assessing the Causality of Safety Culture in a Petrochemical Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses safety culture in the petrochemical sector and the causes and consequences of safety culture. A sample of 520 responses selected by simple random sampling completed questionnaires for this survey, the return rate was 86.75%. The research instrument comprises four sections: basic information, the safety leadership scale (SLS), the safety climate scale (SCS), and the safety performance scale (SPS). SPSS 12.0, a statistical software package, was used for item analysis, validity analysis, and reliability analysis. Exploratory factor analysis indicated that (1) SLS abstracted three factors such as safety caring, safety controlling, and safety coaching; (2) SCS comprised three factors such as emergency response, safety commitment, and risk perception; and (3) SPS was composed of accident investigation, safety training, safety inspections, and safety motivation. We conclude that the SLS, SCS, and SPS developed in this paper have good construct validity and internal consistency and can serve as the basis for future research.

  12. Assessing Safety Culture in Pharmacies: The psychometric validation of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) in a national sample of community pharmacies in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Nordén-Hägg, Annika; Sexton, J Bryan; Kälvemark-Sporrong, Sofia; Ring, Lena; Kettis-Lindblad, Åsa

    2010-01-01

    Background Safety culture assessment is increasingly recognized as an important component in healthcare quality improvement, also in pharmacies. One of the most commonly used and rigorously validated tools to measure safety culture is the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire; SAQ. This study presents the validation of the SAQ for use in Swedish pharmacies. The psychometric properties of the translated questionnaire are presented Methods The original English language version of the SAQ was translate...

  13. A study on the assessment of safety culture impacts on risk of nuclear power plants using common uncertainty source model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since International Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) introduced term 'safety culture', it has been widely recognized that safety culture has an important role in safety of nuclear power plants. Research on the safety culture can be divided in the following two parts. 1) Assessment of safety culture (by interview, questionnaire, etc.) 2) Assessment of link between safety culture and safety of nuclear power plants. There is a substantial body of literature that addresses the first part, but there is much less work that addresses the second part. To address the second part, most work focused on the development of model incorporating safety culture into Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA). One of the most advanced methodology in the area of incorporating safety culture quantitatively into PSA is System Dynamics (SD) model developed by Kwak et al. It can show interactions among various factors which affect employees' productivity and job quality. Also various situations in nuclear power plant can be simulated and time-dependent risk can be recalculated with this model. But this model does not consider minimal cut set (MCS) dependency and uncertainty of risk. Another well-known methodology is Work Process Analysis Model (WPAM) developed by Davoudian. It considers MCS dependency by modifying conditional probability values using SLI methodology. But we found that the modified conditional probability values in WPAM are somewhat artificial and have no sound basis. WPAM tend to overestimate conditional probability of hardware failure, because it uses SLI methodology which is normally used in Human Reliability Analysis (HRA). WPAM also does not consider uncertainty of risk. In this study, we proposed methodology to incorporate safety culture into PSA quantitatively that can deal with MCS dependency and uncertainty of risk by applying the Common Uncertainty Source (CUS) model developed by Zhang. CUS is uncertainty source that is common to basic events, and this can be physical

  14. Global nuclear safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As stated in the Nuclear Safety Review 1996, three components characterize the global nuclear safety culture infrastructure: (i) legally binding international agreements; (ii) non-binding common safety standards; and (iii) the application of safety standards. The IAEA has continued to foster the global nuclear safety culture by supporting intergovernmental collaborative efforts; it has facilitated extensive information exchange, promoted the drafting of international legal agreements and the development of common safety standards, and provided for the application of safety standards by organizing a wide variety of expert services

  15. Regulatory Expectations for Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oversight of licensee's safety culture becomes an important issue that attracts great public and political concerns recently in Korea. Beginning from the intended violation of rules, a series of corruptions, documents forgery and disclosure of wrong-doings made the public think that the whole mindset of nuclear workers has been inadequate. Thus, they are demanding that safety culture shall be improved and that regulatory body shall play more roles and responsibilities for the improvements and oversight for them. This paper introduces, as an effort of regulatory side, recent changes in the role of regulators in safety culture, regulatory expectations on the desired status of licensee's safety culture, the pilot inspection program for safety culture and research activity for the development of oversight system. After the Fukushima accident in Japan 2011, many critics has searched for cultural factors that caused the unacceptable negligence pervaded in Japan nuclear society and the renewed emphasis has been placed on rebuilding safety culture by operators, regulators, and relevant institutions globally. Significant progress has been made in how to approach safety culture and led to a new perspective different from the existing normative assessment method both in operators and regulatory side. Regulatory expectations and oversight of them are based on such a new holistic concept for human, organizational and cultural elements to maintain and strengthen the integrity of defense in depth and consequently nuclear safety

  16. Regulatory Expectations for Safety Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Su Jin; Oh, Jang Jin; Choi, Young Sung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The oversight of licensee's safety culture becomes an important issue that attracts great public and political concerns recently in Korea. Beginning from the intended violation of rules, a series of corruptions, documents forgery and disclosure of wrong-doings made the public think that the whole mindset of nuclear workers has been inadequate. Thus, they are demanding that safety culture shall be improved and that regulatory body shall play more roles and responsibilities for the improvements and oversight for them. This paper introduces, as an effort of regulatory side, recent changes in the role of regulators in safety culture, regulatory expectations on the desired status of licensee's safety culture, the pilot inspection program for safety culture and research activity for the development of oversight system. After the Fukushima accident in Japan 2011, many critics has searched for cultural factors that caused the unacceptable negligence pervaded in Japan nuclear society and the renewed emphasis has been placed on rebuilding safety culture by operators, regulators, and relevant institutions globally. Significant progress has been made in how to approach safety culture and led to a new perspective different from the existing normative assessment method both in operators and regulatory side. Regulatory expectations and oversight of them are based on such a new holistic concept for human, organizational and cultural elements to maintain and strengthen the integrity of defense in depth and consequently nuclear safety.

  17. Relationship of safety culture and process safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Throughout history, humans have gathered in groups for social, religious, and industrial purposes. As the conglomeration of people interact, a set of underlying values, beliefs, and principles begins to develop that serve to guide behavior within the group. These 'guidelines' are commonly referred to as the group culture. Modern-day organizations, including corporations, have developed their own unique cultures derived from the diversity of the organizational interests and the background of the employees. Safety culture, a sub-set of organizational culture, has been a major focus in recent years. This is especially true in the chemical industry due to the series of preventable, safety-related disasters that occurred in the late seventies and eighties. Some of the most notable disasters, during this time period, occurred at Bhopal, Flixborough, and Seveso. However, current events, like the September 11th terrorist attacks and the disintegration of the Columbia shuttle, have caused an assessment of safety culture in a variety of other organizations

  18. Management of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The strengthening of safety culture in an organization has become an increasingly important issue for nuclear industry. A high level of safety performance is essential for business success in intensely competitive global environment. This presentation offers a discussion of some principles and activities used in enhancing safety performance and appropriate safety behaviour at the Krsko NPP. Over the years a number of events have occurred in nuclear industry that have involved problems in human performance. A review of these and other significant events has identified recurring weaknesses in plant safety culture and policy. Focusing attention on the strengthening of relevant processes can help plants avoid similar undesirable events. The policy of the Krsko NPP is that all employees concerned shall constantly be alert to opportunities to reduce risks to the lowest practicable level and to achieve excellence in plant safety. The most important objective is to protect individuals, society and the environment by establishing and maintaining an effective defense against radiological hazard in the nuclear power plant. It is achieved through the use of reliable structures, components, systems, and procedures, as well as plant personnel committed to a strong safety culture. The elements of safety culture include both organizational and individual aspects. Elements commonly included at the organizational level are senior management commitment to safety, organizational effectiveness, effective communication, organizational learning, and a culture that encourages identification and resolution of safety issues. Elements identified at the individual level include personal accountability, a questioning attitude, communication, procedural adherence, etc.(author)

  19. Experience in the implementation of quality assurance program and safety culture assessment of research reactor operation and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The implementation of quality assurance program and safety culture for research reactor operation are of importance to assure its safety status. It comprises an assessment of the quality of both technical and organizational aspects involved in safety. The method for the assessment is based on judging the quality of fulfillment of a number of essential issues for safety i.e. through audit, interview and/or discussions with personnel and management in plant. However, special consideration should be given to the data processing regarding the fuzzy nature of the data i.e. in answering the questionnaire. To accommodate this situation, the SCAP, a computer program based on fuzzy logic for assessing plant safety status, has been developed. As a case study, the experience in the assessment of Kartini research reactor safety status shows that it is strongly related to the implementation of quality assurance program in reactor operation and awareness of reactor operation staffs to safety culture practice. It is also shown that the application of the fuzzy rule in assessing reactor safety status gives a more realistic result than the traditional approach. (author)

  20. Assessing the status of airline safety culture and its relationship to key employee attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Edward L.

    The need to identify the factors that influence the overall safety environment and compliance with safety procedures within airline operations is substantial. This study examines the relationships between job satisfaction, the overall perception of the safety culture, and compliance with safety rules and regulations of airline employees working in flight operations. A survey questionnaire administered via the internet gathered responses which were converted to numerical values for quantitative analysis. The results were grouped to provide indications of overall average levels in each of the three categories, satisfaction, perceptions, and compliance. Correlations between data in the three sets were tested for statistical significance using two-sample t-tests assuming equal variances. Strong statistical significance was found between job satisfaction and compliance with safety rules and between perceptions of the safety environment and safety compliance. The relationship between job satisfaction and safety perceptions did not show strong statistical significance.

  1. Occupational Safety and Health culture assessment - A review of main approaches and selected tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, T.N.; Eeckeleaert, L.; Starren, A.; Scheppingen, A. van; Fox, D.; Bruck, C.

    2011-01-01

    Occupational safety and health culture, or more briefly 'OSH culture', can be seen as a concept for exploring how informal organisational aspects influence OSH in a positive or negative way. The aim is to convey up-to-date information on this complex topic in a straightforward, condensed way, trying

  2. Safety culture assessment programme: Statistical analysis of a survey conducted at the IEA-R1 Brazilian research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The present study describes the statistical analysis of a survey conducted among the employees of IEA-R1 research reactor to evaluate the current status of safety culture in this installation. IEA-R1 is a 5 MW pool type reactor, cooled and moderated by light water, and it uses graphite and beryllium as reflectors. First criticality was achieved on September 16, 1957 and the reactor has been operating regularly and safely for almost 46 years. The reactor building is located within the premises of IPEN/CNEN-SP, one of the Brazilian institutes for energy and nuclear research, inside the campus of the University of Sao Paulo. The operation, maintenance and irradiation services of IEA-R1 reactor are currently being administered by the Research Reactor Center. The safety culture assessment and enhancement programme of IEA-R1 was launched by the reactor management in 2002. An opinion survey was conducted in order to evaluate the employee's perception in relation to the safety culture of the organization. A questionnaire consisting, mainly, of statements about safety culture aspects was prepared. A total number of 34 individuals participated in the survey representing the personnel of the Operation and Maintenance Division, Irradiation Service Division as well as the technicians specialized in Radiation Protection. The statistical analysis of the survey was developed into three principal steps. In the first step, descriptive techniques were used to estimate parameters of the statistical distribution of the answers to each question of the questionnaire. In the second step, the aspects of safety culture to be investigated were defined by grouping these questions into issue areas. The safety culture aspects determined were: Priority to Safety, Top Management Involvement and Commitment to Safety, Employees' Attitude Towards Safety, Employees' Responsibilities and Commitment to Safety, Employees' Evaluation of Safety Culture Level, Conflict 'Absence of Safety x

  3. A literature review of safety culture.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Kerstan Suzanne; Stevens-Adams, Susan Marie; Wenner, Caren A.

    2013-03-01

    Workplace safety has been historically neglected by organizations in order to enhance profitability. Over the past 30 years, safety concerns and attention to safety have increased due to a series of disastrous events occurring across many different industries (e.g., Chernobyl, Upper Big-Branch Mine, Davis-Besse etc.). Many organizations have focused on promoting a healthy safety culture as a way to understand past incidents, and to prevent future disasters. There is an extensive academic literature devoted to safety culture, and the Department of Energy has also published a significant number of documents related to safety culture. The purpose of the current endeavor was to conduct a review of the safety culture literature in order to understand definitions, methodologies, models, and successful interventions for improving safety culture. After reviewing the literature, we observed four emerging themes. First, it was apparent that although safety culture is a valuable construct, it has some inherent weaknesses. For example, there is no common definition of safety culture and no standard way for assessing the construct. Second, it is apparent that researchers know how to measure particular components of safety culture, with specific focus on individual and organizational factors. Such existing methodologies can be leveraged for future assessments. Third, based on the published literature, the relationship between safety culture and performance is tenuous at best. There are few empirical studies that examine the relationship between safety culture and safety performance metrics. Further, most of these studies do not include a description of the implementation of interventions to improve safety culture, or do not measure the effect of these interventions on safety culture or performance. Fourth, safety culture is best viewed as a dynamic, multi-faceted overall system composed of individual, engineered and organizational models. By addressing all three components of

  4. KHNP Safety Culture Framework based on Global Standard, and Lessons learned from Safety Culture Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to eliminate the vague fears of the people about the nuclear power and operate continuously NPPs, a strong safety culture of NPPs should be demonstrated. Strong safety culture awareness of workers can overcome social distrust about NPPs. KHNP has been a variety efforts to improve and establish safety culture of NPPs. Safety culture framework applying global standards was set up and safety culture assessment has been carried out periodically to enhance safety culture of workers. In addition, KHNP developed various safety culture contents and they are being used in NPPs by workers. As a result of these efforts, safety culture awareness of workers is changed positively and the safety environment of NPPs is expected to be improved. KHNP makes an effort to solve areas for improvement derived from safety culture assessment. However, there are some areas to take a long time in completing the work. Therefore, these actions are necessary to be carried out consistently and continuously. KHNP also developed recently safety culture enhancement system based on web. All information related to safety culture in KHNP will be shared through this web system and this system will be used to safety culture assessment. In addition to, KHNP plans to develop safety culture indicators for monitoring the symptoms of safety culture weakening

  5. KHNP Safety Culture Framework based on Global Standard, and Lessons learned from Safety Culture Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Younggab; Hur, Nam Young; Jeong, Hyeon Jong [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In order to eliminate the vague fears of the people about the nuclear power and operate continuously NPPs, a strong safety culture of NPPs should be demonstrated. Strong safety culture awareness of workers can overcome social distrust about NPPs. KHNP has been a variety efforts to improve and establish safety culture of NPPs. Safety culture framework applying global standards was set up and safety culture assessment has been carried out periodically to enhance safety culture of workers. In addition, KHNP developed various safety culture contents and they are being used in NPPs by workers. As a result of these efforts, safety culture awareness of workers is changed positively and the safety environment of NPPs is expected to be improved. KHNP makes an effort to solve areas for improvement derived from safety culture assessment. However, there are some areas to take a long time in completing the work. Therefore, these actions are necessary to be carried out consistently and continuously. KHNP also developed recently safety culture enhancement system based on web. All information related to safety culture in KHNP will be shared through this web system and this system will be used to safety culture assessment. In addition to, KHNP plans to develop safety culture indicators for monitoring the symptoms of safety culture weakening.

  6. Organizational Culture and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Catherine A.

    2003-01-01

    '..only a fool perseveres in error.' Cicero. Humans will break the most advanced technological devices and override safety and security systems if they are given the latitude. Within the workplace, the operator may be just one of several factors in causing accidents or making risky decisions. Other variables considered for their involvement in the negative and often catastrophic outcomes include the organizational context and culture. Many organizations have constructed and implemented safety programs to be assimilated into their culture to assure employee commitment and understanding of the importance of everyday safety. The purpose of this paper is to examine literature on organizational safety cultures and programs that attempt to combat vulnerability, risk taking behavior and decisions and identify the role of training in attempting to mitigate unsafe acts.

  7. Relationship of safety culture and process safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, Claire; O'Connor, T Michael; Mannan, M Sam

    2006-03-17

    Throughout history, humans have gathered in groups for social, religious, and industrial purposes. As the conglomeration of people interact, a set of underlying values, beliefs, and principles begins to develop that serve to guide behavior within the group. These "guidelines" are commonly referred to as the group culture. Modern-day organizations, including corporations, have developed their own unique cultures derived from the diversity of the organizational interests and the background of the employees. Safety culture, a sub-set of organizational culture, has been a major focus in recent years. This is especially true in the chemical industry due to the series of preventable, safety-related disasters that occurred in the late seventies and eighties. Some of the most notable disasters, during this time period, occurred at Bhopal, Flixborough, and Seveso. However, current events, like the September 11th terrorist attacks and the disintegration of the Columbia shuttle, have caused an assessment of safety culture in a variety of other organizations. PMID:16314040

  8. The awareness of employees in safety culture through the improved nuclear safety culture evaluation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986, nuclear safety culture terminology was at first introduced emphasizing the importance of employees' attitude and organizational safety. The concept of safety culture was spread by INSAG 4 published in 1991. From that time, IAEA had provided the service of ASCOT for the safety culture assessment. However, many people still are thinking that safety culture is abstract and is not clear. It is why the systematic and reliable assessment methodology was not developed. Assessing safety culture is to identify what is the basic assumption for any organization to accept unconsciously. Therefore, it is very difficult to reach a meaningful conclusion by a superficial investigation alone. KHNP had been doing the safety culture assessment which was based on ASCOT methodology every 2 years. And this result had contributed to improving safety culture. But this result could not represent the level of organization's safety culture due to the limitation of method. So, KHNP has improved the safety culture method by benchmarking the over sea assessment techniques in 2011. The effectiveness of this improved methodology was validated through a pilot assessment. In this paper, the level of employees' safety culture awareness was analyzed by the improved method and reviewed what is necessary for the completeness and objectivity of the nuclear safety culture assessment methodology

  9. Understanding and Exploring Safety Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Guldenmund, F.W.

    2010-01-01

    The match between safety and culture was made around 1986, when the INSAG delivered its initial report on the Chernobyl accident. Whether the marriage is a happy one is still a matter of debate, but it is most definitely a fruitful one. In the past twenty years, many researchers have devoted much effort to both the theoretical development of the concept as well as its assessment. Moreover, various attempts have been made to relate the concept of safety culture to several other concepts as wel...

  10. Safety Reports Series No. 1. Examples of safety culture practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report illustrates the concepts and principles of safety culture produced by the International Safety Advisory Group as 75-INSAG-4. It provides a small selection of examples taken from a worldwide collection of safety performance evaluations such as IAEA safety services, national regulatory inspections, utility audits and plant assessments. (P.A.)

  11. Principal characteristics of good safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presentation briefly discusses the following aspects of safety culture: what is safety culture; universal features of safety culture; the main elements of safety culture; requirements at policy level; safety culture at government level, regulatory body, operators; requirements on managers

  12. Safety culture in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, there are describe the activities already accomplished and the activities planned to be executed by the licensee and the regulator with the aim to develop, maintain and strength Safety Culture in all the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Plant activities. (author)

  13. A Preliminary Study on the Measures to Assess the Organizational Safety: The Cultural Impact on Human Error Potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fukushima I nuclear accident following the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami on 11 March 2011 occurred after twelve years had passed since the JCO accident which was caused as a result of an error made by JCO employees. These accidents, along with the Chernobyl accident, associated with characteristic problems of various organizations caused severe social and economic disruptions and have had significant environmental and health impact. The cultural problems with human errors occur for various reasons, and different actions are needed to prevent different errors. Unfortunately, much of the research on organization and human error has shown widely various or different results which call for different approaches. In other words, we have to find more practical solutions from various researches for nuclear safety and lead a systematic approach to organizational deficiency causing human error. This paper reviews Hofstede's criteria, IAEA safety culture, safety areas of periodic safety review (PSR), teamwork and performance, and an evaluation of HANARO safety culture to verify the measures used to assess the organizational safety

  14. Developing a safety culture survey instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    How does an organization assess its safety culture? Various organizations have tried different means to assess safety culture. One way is to ask every employee what their safety concerns are. This is a very desirable system because it gets all the employees involved in the process. Also needed within the organization is a means of measuring and comparing improvements or decrements in safety culture. A standardized written survey instrument can and should be used in addition to informal employee interviews to gain a broader understanding of the safety culture. This paper presents a methodology for successfully developing a safety culture survey instrument. The survey instrument serves as a tool to not only find out what the safety norms in an organization are but also as an aid to help elucidate weaker areas so they can be improved. (author)

  15. The failure mechanisms of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been a widespread acknowledgement of the significance of organisational, management and socio-technical errors in the etiology of accidents. This paper describes an approach to assess the organisational, managerial and socio-technical influences on the Safety Culture of socio-technical systems such as nuclear power plants. A review of the Human Reliability Assessment (HRA) approach to risk evaluation and current safety culture evaluation methods has led to the development of a prototype Safety Culture Failure Mechanism (SCFM) approach. The SCFM framework is structured by drawing on a parallel approach used in HRA. Hence there are the safety culture equivalent of Psychological Error Mechanisms (Safety Culture Failure Mechanisms or SCFMs), Performance Shaping Factors (Safety Culture Influencing Factors or SCIFs) and External Error Modes (Safety Culture Error Modes or SCEMs). Also the approach uses Safety Management Error Modes (SMEMs) which show the p articular deficit in the safety protective system or function of the organisation. Examples are shown of the application of the SCFM framework. It is suggested that this type of approach is a relatively unexplored avenue in Safety Culture research and the possible relation of the approach to PSA and HRA in an assessment framework is described. (author)

  16. Preliminary study on improving safety culture in Malaysian nuclear industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, Sabariah Kader [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Y. E. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    This paper presents preliminary study on safety culture and its implementation in Malaysian nuclear industries by realizing the importance of safety culture; identification of important safety culture attributes; safety culture assessment and the practices to incorporate the identified safety culture attributes in organization. The first section of this paper explains the terms and definitions related to safety culture. Second, for the realization of importance of safety culture in organization, the international operational experiences emphasizing the importance of safety culture are described. Third, important safety culture attributes which are frequently cited in literature are provided. Fourth, methods to assess safety culture in operating organization are described. Finally, the practices to enhance the safety culture in an organization are discussed.

  17. Preliminary study on improving safety culture in Malaysian nuclear industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents preliminary study on safety culture and its implementation in Malaysian nuclear industries by realizing the importance of safety culture; identification of important safety culture attributes; safety culture assessment and the practices to incorporate the identified safety culture attributes in organization. The first section of this paper explains the terms and definitions related to safety culture. Second, for the realization of importance of safety culture in organization, the international operational experiences emphasizing the importance of safety culture are described. Third, important safety culture attributes which are frequently cited in literature are provided. Fourth, methods to assess safety culture in operating organization are described. Finally, the practices to enhance the safety culture in an organization are discussed

  18. Decreasing Ambiguity of the Safety Culture Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status of the concept of ''safety culture'' is reviewed. It has not sufficiently taken root. One cause for this is the abstract nature of the concept. Organizations must become aware of the necessity of improving safety and have sufficient power to promote this. The culture of safety must be instilled in each employee, so that each of them will feel responsible for identifying weak points in plant safety. The authors devised a tool for a self-assessment of the safety culture. The tool will bring to light information divides, communication gaps, etc. Recognizing the vulnerabilities of the organization by themselves and discussing these weak points among them is the first step to decrease the ambiguity of the safety culture. The next step is to make these gaps known along with agreed-upon countermeasures. The concept of safety culture will be greatly clarified in this way and lead to safer nuclear power plants

  19. From Safety Culture to Safety Orientation - Developing a tool to measure safety in shipping

    OpenAIRE

    Håvold, Jon Ivar

    2007-01-01

    From Safety Culture to Safety Orientation.Developing a tool to measure safety in shippingThis study intend to develop a tool to measure safety orientation (SO) in shipping. SO should be considered a practical safety culture assessment instrument, indicating the degree of orientation towards safety in a group or an organisation. The scale can for example be used in benchmarking as a key performance indicator (KPI), or as an indicator in a balanced scorecard type of management tool.The definiti...

  20. Safety culture in nuclear installations. Guidance for the use in enhancement of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This guidance has been developed for use in the IAEA Safety Culture Services, which provides support to Member States in their efforts to develop a sound safety culture of their organizations. It will be of particular use in seminars and training workshops that are part of these services. Much of the information in this publication reflects the approach the IAEA has adopted to assist nuclear organizations in Member States in improving their safety culture. This guidance covers topics such as: what is culture, and in particular what is safety culture; what are the stages of development of safety culture, and how you can assess its development using employee surveys; what practices can be used to develop safety culture, and what indicators will help monitor progress. The symptoms of a weakening safety culture are described, as well as the lessons learned from organizations who have experienced safety culture problems. This guide also contains information on how to undertake the process of transforming the existing safety culture, and develop a learning culture in an organization that is based on continuous improvement. The relationship between quality and safety is discussed. The safety culture services offered by the IAEA are also described. The IAEA perspective of safety culture has expanded with time as its understanding of the complexities of the concept developed. The concept of safety culture was first introduced by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group formed by the IAEA. In their report (INSAG-4, 1991) they maintained that the establishment of a safety culture within an organization is one of the fundamental management principles necessary for the safe operation of a nuclear facility. The definition recognized that safety culture is both structural and attitudinal in nature and relates to the organization and its style, as well as to attitudes, approaches and the commitment of individuals at all levels in the organization. In the framework of the

  1. Defining safety culture and the nexus between safety goals and safety culture. 4. Enhancing Safety Culture Through the Establishment of Safety Goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety culture is the perception of each individual and organization of a nuclear power plant that safety is the first priority, and at Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), we have been practicing it in everyday activities. On the other hand, with the demand for competitiveness of nuclear power becoming even more intense these days, we need to pursue efficient management while maintaining the safety level at the same time. Below, we discuss how to achieve compatibility between safety culture and efficient management as well as enhance safety culture. Discussion at Tepco: safety culture-nurturing activities such as the following are being implemented: 1. informing the employees of the 'Declaration of Safety Promotion' by handing out brochures and posting it on the intranet home page; 2. publishing safety culture reports covering stories on safety culture of other industry sectors, recent movements on safety culture, etc.; 3. conducting periodic questionnaires to employees to grasp how deeply safety culture is being established; 4. carrying out educational programs to learn from past cases inside and outside the nuclear industry; 5. committing to common ownership of information with the public. The current status of safety culture in Japan sometimes seems to be biased to the quest of ultimate safety; rephrasing it, there have been few discussions regarding the sufficiency of the quantitative safety level in conjunction with the safety culture. Safety culture is one of the most crucial foundations guaranteeing the plant's safety, and for example, the plant safety level evaluated by probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) could be said to be valid only on the ground that a sound and sufficient safety culture exists. Although there is no doubt that the safety culture is a fundamental and important attitude of an individual and organization that keeps safety the first priority, the safety culture in itself should not be considered an obstruction to efforts to implement

  2. Psychological resources for safety culture enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Psychological resources for safety culture enhancement in nuclear power engineering are presented. Theoretical aspects and a practical approach to the use of psychology in safety assessment and quality assurance of NPPs are discussed. The safety culture of the atomic industry includes such problems as general risks in power production, the quality level of technology, technical reliability, and also the personnel's living conditions, job organization and professional education. But these problems of each NPP energy cycle are solved by people. People's psychological willingness (attitudes to successful performance) is an integrated and important psychological factor for safety culture enhancement). (author). 1 fig., 1 tab

  3. IAEA Safety Standards on Management Systems and Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA has developed a new set of Safety Standard for applying an integrated Management System for facilities and activities. The objective of the new Safety Standards is to define requirements and provide guidance for establishing, implementing, assessing and continually improving a Management System that integrates safety, health, environmental, security, quality and economic related elements to ensure that safety is properly taken into account in all the activities of an organization. With an integrated approach to management system it is also necessary to include the aspect of culture, where the organizational culture and safety culture is seen as crucial elements of the successful implementation of this management system and the attainment of all the goals and particularly the safety goals of the organization. The IAEA has developed a set of service aimed at assisting it's Member States in establishing. Implementing, assessing and continually improving an integrated management system. (author)

  4. A study to assess the influence of interprofessional point of care simulation training on safety culture in the operating theatre environment of a university teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinde, Theresa; Gale, Thomas; Anderson, Ian; Roberts, Martin; Sice, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Interprofessional point of care or in situ simulation is used as a training tool in our operating theatre directorate with the aim of improving crisis behaviours. This study aimed to assess the impact of interprofessional point of care simulation on the safety culture of operating theatres. A validated Safety Attitude Questionnaire was administered to staff members before each simulation scenario and then re-administered to the same staff members after 6-12 months. Pre- and post-training Safety Attitude Questionnaire-Operating Room (SAQ-OR) scores were compared using paired sample t-tests. Analysis revealed a statistically significant perceived improvement in both safety (p culture) 6-12 months after interprofessional simulation training. A growing body of literature suggests that a positive safety culture is associated with improved patient outcomes. Our study supports the implementation of point of care simulation as a useful intervention to improve safety culture in theatres. PMID:26854195

  5. A Methodology for Evaluating Quantitative Nuclear Safety Culture Impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kiyoon; Jae, Moosung [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Through several accidents of NPPs including the Fukushima Daiichi in 2011 and Chernobyl accidents in 1986, nuclear safety culture has been emphasized in reactor safety world-widely. In Korea, KHNP evaluates the safety culture of NPP itself. KHNP developed the principles of the safety culture in consideration of the international standards. A questionnaire and interview questions are also developed based on these principles and it is used for evaluating the safety culture. However, existing methodology to evaluate the safety culture has some disadvantages. First, it is difficult to maintain the consistency of the assessment. Second, the period of safety culture assessment is too long (every two years) so it has limitations in preventing accidents occurred by a lack of safety culture. Third, it is not possible to measure the change in the risk of NPPs by weak safety culture since it is not clearly explains the effect of safety culture on the safety of NPPs. In this study, Safety Culture Impact Assessment Model (SCIAM) is developed overcoming these disadvantages. In this study, SCIAM which overcoming disadvantages of exiting safety culture assessment method is developed. SCIAM uses SCII to monitor the statues of the safety culture periodically and also uses RCDF to quantify the safety culture impact on NPP's safety. It is significant that SCIAM represents the standard of the healthy nuclear safety culture, while the exiting safety culture assessment presented only vulnerability of the safety culture of organization. SCIAM might contribute to monitoring the level of safety culture periodically and, to improving the safety of NPP.

  6. Organizational culture, safety culture, and safety performance at research facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, William S.

    2000-07-30

    Organizational culture surveys of research facilities conducted several years ago and archival occupational injury reports were used to determine whether differences in safety performance are related to general organizational factors or to ''safety culture'' as reflected in specific safety-related dimensions. From among the organizations surveyed, a pair of facilities was chosen that were similar in size and scientific mission while differing on indices of work-related injuries. There were reliable differences in organizational style between the facilities, especially among workers in environment, safety, and health functions; differences between the facilities (and among job categories) on the safety scale were more modest and less regular.

  7. Hospital Safety Culture in Taiwan: A Nationwide Survey Using Chinese Version Safety Attitude Questionnaire

    OpenAIRE

    Lee Wui-Chiang; Wung Hwei-Ying; Liao Hsun-Hsiang; Lo Chien-Ming; Chang Fei-Ling; Wang Pa-Chun; Fan Angela; Chen Hsin-Hsin; Yang Han-Chuan; Hou Sheng-Mou

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Safety activities have been initiated at many hospitals in Taiwan, but little is known about the safety culture at these hospitals. The aims of this study were to verify a safety culture survey instrument in Chinese and to assess hospital safety culture in Taiwan. Methods The Taiwan Patient Safety Culture Survey was conducted in 2008, using the adapted Safety Attitude Questionnaire in Chinese (SAQ-C). Hospitals and their healthcare workers participated in the survey on a v...

  8. A report on developing a checklist to assess company plans focused on improving safety awareness, safe behaviour and safety culture : final report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steijger, N.; Starren, H.; Keus, M.; Gort, J.; Vervoort, M.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the process of developing a checklist to asses company plans focused on improving safety awareness, safe behaviour and safety culture. These plans are part of a programme initiated by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Employment aiming at improving the safety performance of co

  9. Patient safety: Safety culture and patient safety ethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Marlene Dyrløv

    2006-01-01

    ,demonstrating significant, consistent and sometimes large differences in terms of safety culture factors across the units participating in the survey. Paper 5 is the results of a study of the relation between safety culture, occupational health andpatient safety using a safety culture questionnaire survey......, and those of patients who experience the physical effect of poor patient safety. The dissertationconsists of nine papers and an appendix. Paper 1 describes the results of doctors and nurses attitudes towards reporting and the handling of adverse events. Paper 2 is a study and “review” of the international...

  10. Safety culture management: safety culture and its context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The definition of safety culture adopted in the context of the nuclear industry following the Chernobyl incident focused upon administrative requirements for a safety culture. Successful implementation of such requirements, however, depends on wider changes requiring managerial awareness of characteristics of the context of nuclear safety management. A self-sustaining safety culture needs genuine commitment from each employee in an installation. To promote safety culture successfully, managers need to understand the more subtle aspects of cultural phenomena. To meet this requirement managers need to be sensitive to the development of a set of norms, beliefs, roles, attitudes and practices concerned with minimising the exposure of employees and others to injurious conditions, and with reinforcing an attitude of care. A range of managerial factors need to be taken into account in attaining an appropriate level of managerial responsiveness to the contextual features of a safety culture. A strong safety culture is fostered by: management concern and example; by appropriate recruitment policies; by rewards reinforcing caring attitudes; by the constructive use of employee's innate concerns; by the provision of appropriate information and the discretion to make use of it; and by fostering group pressures which can enhance care. Also, since protecting others from harm has moral implications, in-company arguments in the moral sphere are also relevant. Management strategies, however, need to be set in the context of both a consistent set of organisational policies and an appropriate form of organisational rhetoric. Options for shaping in-house features of company policy in relation to safety culture, outlined above, are separate from factors beyond the each of most individual managers. The regulatory environment, visibility and public susceptibility of the industry to safety concerns and the incidence of high-profile negative incidents all pose dilemmas for the individual

  11. Risk management and safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paper informs on the efforts to elaborate a feedback system for risk comprehensive evaluation and a system to improve structure safety foreseeing the possibility to control the latent risk, ensuring the qualitative evaluation of the safety level and improvement of safety culture in various branches of industry, first and foremost, in the electricity producing sector including the nuclear power industry

  12. Risk culture: an outgrowth of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper builds on the principal themes addressed in previous Accident Prevention Group (APG) papers on the subject of Nuclear Safety Culture: Nuclear Safety Imperatives including the Human Dimension, IAEA Safety Culture Initiatives, a U.S. Utility Safety Culture and Integrated Risk Management. It recognizes that the safety culture in the U.S. nuclear utility settings has been achieved in many instances with costly solutions. The U.S. National Energy Act, signed into law by President Bush, began deregulation of the electric utility industry creating a competitive climate heretofore never known and in particular affecting those utilities with large imbedded costs from nuclear generation units. The authors perceive that there are three major ingredients or a tripod for a survival strategy for the nuclear power plant option in the U.S. as a part of larger energy security strategy: (1) Integrated rather than fragmented Risk Management by nuclear utilities; (2) Risk Based Regulation by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to free up resources for more productive uses in nuclear safety regulation, and (3) Due emphasis to be placed in Operational Risk Management on controlling swings in the Core Damage Frequency with time by virtue of building an effective operational risk model. The paper makes an attempt to raise awareness regarding the human dimension component in the operational risk model. It concludes that the proposed tripod is achievable only if accompanied by a swift shift to a risk culture which is introduced in a conceptual form. (author)

  13. Instilling a Culture of Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In its 1999 report, To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System, the United States National Academy of Sciences recognized the necessity of establishing a culture of safety in any organization that wished to reduce patient morbidity and mortality caused by medical errors. The culture of an organization reflects its shared attitudes, values, goals and practices, and a safety culture requires that each employee accepts responsibility for improving patient and personnel safety, and that responsibility is shared and supported by the organization’s administration. There are seven ingredients of a safety culture: leadership, evidence based practice, teamwork, accountability, communication, continuous learning and justice. These ingredients require thoughtful integration within an organizational strategy if they are to contribute collectively to improved safety of patients and personnel. (author)

  14. SOS-1 seminar about safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the seminar was to discuss safety culture in nuclear power utilities, and to exchange experiences about how the term safety culture is accepted by the personnel. The titles of the presentations are: 1) Organisational culture. General ideas as basis for organising; 2) Safety culture - ability and will; 3) View on safety culture at Swedish and Finnish nuclear power plants; 4) Safety culture at Barsebaeck Power Company; 5) Safety culture at Olkiluoto Nuclear Power Plant; 6) How do we improve the safety culture at OKG AB?; 7) Safety culture activities at Ringhals; 8) Aspects in relation to safety culture; 9) Development of regulatory activities/effectiveness of STUK - development as an aspect of culture; 10) Organisational culture research at STUK's Department of Nuclear Reactor Regulation; 11) The IAEA safety culture services; 12) Industrial safety - different perspectives and cultures. (EHS)

  15. Nuclear power plants: safety management, safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting on Nuclear Power Plants: Safety Management, Safety Culture held in Munich on October 30-31, 2002 has made very important contributions to the exchange of ideas and to the analysis of the current situation with respect to this topic. Eighteen technical papers were presented in which the subject was treated and put up for discussion under a variety of aspects raised by nuclear power plant operators, regulatory authorities, expert consultants, experts, scientists, and consultants. The findings elaborated at the event will greatly help to strengthen safety further in electricity generation from nuclear power at its current high level. (orig.)

  16. Safety Culture Survey in Krsko NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high level of nuclear safety, stability and competitiveness of electricity production, and public acceptability are the main objectives of Krsko Nuclear Power Plant. This is achievable only in environment where strong Safety Culture is taking dominant place in the way how employees communicate, perform tasks, share their ideas and attitudes, and demonstrate their concern in all aspects of work and coexistence. To achieve these objectives, behaviour of all employees as well as specific ethical values must become more transparent and that must arise from the heart of organization. Continuous ongoing and periodic self assessments of Safety Culture in Krsko NPP present major tools in implementation process of this approach. Benefits from Periodic interdisciplinary focused self assessment approach, which main intention is finding the strengths and potential areas for improvements, was used second time to assess the area of Safety Culture in Krsko NPP. Main objectives of self assessment, performed in 2006, were to increase the awareness of the present culture, to serve as a basis for improvement and to keep track of the effects of change or improvement over a longer period of time. For the purpose of effective self assessment, extensive questionnaire was used to obtain information that is representative for whole organization. Wide range of questions was chosen to cover five major characteristics of safety culture: Accountability for safety is clear, Safety is integrated into all activities, Safety culture is learning-driven, Leadership for safety is clear and Safety is a clearly recognized value. 484 Krsko NPP employees and 96 contractors were participated in survey. 70-question survey provided information that was quantified and results compared between groups. Anonymity of participant, as well as their willingness to contribute in this assessment implicates the high level of their openness in answering the questions. High number of participant made analysis of

  17. Defining safety culture and the nexus between safety goals and safety culture. 2. Decreasing Ambiguity of the Safety Culture Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    hesitant to substantiate the concept for realization because it may force them to expose actual managerial behavior including past history. It can be said that they even take advantage of the ambiguity of the concept as convenient for them to maintain a defensive managerial way of thinking and suspicions toward the concept. We once again pay attention to the INSAG reports in order to change the status quo. The reports pointed out that 'personal attitude and habits of thought and the style of organizations are generally intangible; that nevertheless such qualities lead to tangible manifestations'. This clearly leads us to the challenges we have to face. The safety culture may end as an armchair concept unless an organization becomes aware of the necessity of improving safety and unless it has sufficient power to promote it. We, therefore, have to specify what power will generate 'awareness'. We would like to see the power in the individual thought of each plant employee; the thought should not be limited to a sort of loyalty to the organization but to the society in which they belong. Today, the safety of a plant can only be secured if shared with the society in which it belongs. We think that the organization must have such ways of thinking and processes that will examine it by plant employees themselves and that will check its weak points together with society because the culture must be characterized as a widely open and integrated system, and the safety culture cannot stay in a closed system as far as it is a culture. A sort of culture has already been there in the society. No doubt the ambiguity of the concept decreases if the plant employees' safety culture is thought about in terms of considering its integration with the external culture in the society. From this viewpoint, we made a supporting tool for a self-check-type assessment of the safety culture as the first step of grasping organizational culture. The indices we try to get through the use of this tool are

  18. Development and testing of an objective structured clinical exam (OSCE) to assess socio-cultural dimensions of patient safety competency

    OpenAIRE

    Ginsburg, Liane R; Tregunno, Deborah; Norton, Peter G.; Smee, Sydney; de Vries, Ingrid; Sebok, Stefanie S; VanDenKerkhof, Elizabeth G.; Luctkar-Flude, Marian; Medves, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient safety (PS) receives limited attention in health professional curricula. We developed and pilot tested four Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) stations intended to reflect socio-cultural dimensions in the Canadian Patient Safety Institute's Safety Competency Framework. Setting and participants 18 third year undergraduate medical and nursing students at a Canadian University. Methods OSCE cases were developed by faculty with clinical and PS expertise with assis...

  19. Predictors and outcomes of patient safety culture in hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Jaafar Maha; Jamal Diana; Dimassi Hani; El-Jardali Fadi; Hemadeh Nour

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Developing a patient safety culture was one of the recommendations made by the Institute of Medicine to assist hospitals in improving patient safety. In recent years, a multitude of evidence, mostly originating from developed countries, has been published on patient safety culture. One of the first efforts to assess the culture of safety in the Eastern Mediterranean Region was by El-Jardali et al. (2010) in Lebanon. The study entitled "The Current State of Patient Safety C...

  20. Seeking a safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human organisational failure has been shown to play a significant role in major accidents world-wide in both the nuclear and non-nuclear industries. A recent report called Organising for Safety, published by The Health and Safety Commission, suggests that the nuclear industry should give organisational factors the same emphasis as it does the reduction of equipment failures and individual error. (Author)

  1. Safety Culture Assessment Programme. Statistical Analysis of a Survey Conducted at the IEA-R1 Brazilian Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the statistical analysis of a survey conducted in September 2002 among the employees of the IEA-R1 Brazilian research reactor to evaluate the current status of the safety culture in this organization. A questionnaire was prepared consisting mainly of statements about safety issues. A total of 34 individuals participated in the survey representing the personnel of the Operation and Maintenance Division, the Irradiation Service Division, as well as the technicians in the Radiation Protection Division. The statistical analysis of the survey was developed into three principal steps. In the first step, descriptive techniques were used to estimate the parameters of the sampling distribution of the responses to each question of the questionnaire. In the second step, the aspects of safety culture to be investigated were defined by grouping these questions into issue areas. The final step of the analysis consisted of the calculation of the employees' satisfaction level regarding the safety culture aspects previously mentioned. (author)

  2. Safety culture issues and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    indicators, the symptoms and significance of shortcomings and degradation in the safety management processes and safety culture and hence failed to take effective corrective actions at an early stage. Key performance issues such as critical oversight, self assessment processes and effective corrective action programmes were not fully appreciated by senior management even after performance deficiencies were identified by the regulator and other external agencies. The seeming inability of the regulator to influence this senior management level, especially at the early stages of safety performance degradation was a major contributing factor in the continuation of the performance decline to the point that regulatory intervention became a necessity. Recovery processes commonly used a new utility senior management team to kick-start the change process and corresponding regulatory resource increases focused on monitoring the recovery. A comprehensive recovery plan and an interactive relationship with the regulator were deemed essential for a successful recovery. A review of the developing safety culture was a factor considered necessary to ensure sustainability. Public involvement in the regulatory monitoring process helped restore their confidence in the regulator, utility and plant management. The group recommended IAEA continue work to develop guidance for senior corporate management and regulators in this area (author) (ml)

  3. Safety culture at Ignalina NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In accordance with Article 27 of the Law on Nuclear Energy of the Republic of Lithuania, the organization operating the nuclear power facility must ensure adequate safety culture. Safety culture comprises specific features and characteristics of the organisation's activities as well as human behavior ensuring that the issues of a nuclear power facility's safety will be given attention consistent with their importance. To ensure adequate level of safety culture, Ignalina NPP has been following IAEA recommendations. The INPP draws up and implements plans of safety culture assurance every year. The Director General meets with IAEA personnel on a regular basis and discusses issues that hold most interest for them. In 2005, INPP management reviewed and approved on September 30 the new policy of safety and quality assurance. The document differs from the policy approved in 1995 in that priorities are set for INPP decommissioning. It is emphasized that INPP Unit 2 operation must be terminated in the most efficient and safest manner, with adequate social security of the personnel assured and effective management system of the facility maintained. The work commenced in 2004 at the Ignalina NPP on identification and application of safety culture indicators was continued in 2005. (author)

  4. Human errors and safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to focus attention on an apparent paradox: human errors can be a valuable source of safety experience if properly treated. From a punitive management and a climate of fear in reporting human errors toward a safety culture there is a long way but it is the right direction. (Author)

  5. Measuring patient safety culture in Taiwan using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen I-Chi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient safety is a critical component to the quality of health care. As health care organizations endeavour to improve their quality of care, there is a growing recognition of the importance of establishing a culture of patient safety. In this research, the authors use the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC questionnaire to assess the culture of patient safety in Taiwan and attempt to provide an explanation for some of the phenomena that are unique in Taiwan. Methods The authors used HSOPSC to measure the 12 dimensions of the patient safety culture from 42 hospitals in Taiwan. The survey received 788 respondents including physicians, nurses, and non-clinical staff. This study used SPSS 15.0 for Windows and Amos 7 software tools to perform the statistical analysis on the survey data, including descriptive statistics and confirmatory factor analysis of the structural equation model. Results The overall average positive response rate for the 12 patient safety culture dimensions of the HSOPSC survey was 64%, slightly higher than the average positive response rate for the AHRQ data (61%. The results showed that hospital staff in Taiwan feel positively toward patient safety culture in their organization. The dimension that received the highest positive response rate was "Teamwork within units", similar to the results reported in the US. The dimension with the lowest percentage of positive responses was "Staffing". Statistical analysis showed discrepancies between Taiwan and the US in three dimensions, including "Feedback and communication about error", "Communication openness", and "Frequency of event reporting". Conclusions The HSOPSC measurement provides evidence for assessing patient safety culture in Taiwan. The results show that in general, hospital staffs in Taiwan feel positively toward patient safety culture within their organization. The existence of discrepancies between the US data and the Taiwanese data

  6. Safety culture at Mochovce NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents the approach of Mochovce NPP to the Safety culture. It presents activities, which have been taken by Mochovce NPP up to date in the area of Safety culture enhancement with the aim of getting the term into the subconscious of each employee, and thus minimising the human factor impact on occurrence of operational events in all safety areas. The article furthermore presents the most essential information on how the elements characterising a continuous progress in reaching the planned Safety culture goals of the company management have been implemented at Mochovce NPP, as well as the management's efforts to get among the best nuclear power plant operators in this area and to be an example for the others. (author)

  7. Integrated Safety Culture Model and Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪磊; 孙瑞山; 刘汉辉

    2009-01-01

    A new safety culture model is constructed and is applied to analyze the correlations between safety culture and SMS. On the basis of previous typical definitions, models and theories of safety culture, an in-depth analysis on safety culture's structure, composing elements and their correlations was conducted. A new definition of safety culture was proposed from the perspective of sub-cuhure. 7 types of safety sub-culture, which are safety priority culture, standardizing culture, flexible culture, learning culture, teamwork culture, reporting culture and justice culture were defined later. Then integrated safety culture model (ISCM) was put forward based on the definition. The model divided safety culture into intrinsic latency level and extrinsic indication level and explained the potential relationship between safety sub-culture and all safety culture dimensions. Finally in the analyzing of safety culture and SMS, it concluded that positive safety culture is the basis of im-plementing SMS effectively and an advanced SMS will improve safety culture from all around.

  8. Role of the regulatory authority in preparation of the NPP self assessment of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We believe that with the assistance of the IAEA(ASSET Training Mission) the plant personnel will be able to prepare high quality Self Assessment Report. The main role of the Regulatory Body is to ensure correspondence with the IAEA requirements and to provide clear guidance for the most important items of the Plant Self Assessment Report. The involvement of the Operating Organization is also desirable in order to ensure the necessary resources for the implementation of the action plan. Figs

  9. Development and application of nuclear safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety Culture has made a significant impact on nuclear safety. The author analyses the background under which nuclear safety culture came into being, introduces its application and development in some countries and organizations. Several problems one should pay attention to in popularizing nuclear safety culture are put forward. Besides, the principle of evaluating the effects on nuclear culture is also discussed

  10. Safeguards Culture: Analogies from Safety Culture and Security Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The terminology of 'safeguards culture' has been used loosely by safeguards experts as an essential element for establishing an organizational environment of stakeholders for the effective and efficient implementation of international safeguards. However, unlike the other two triplet brothers/ sisters of 3S's (Safety, Security, Safeguards), there is no formally established definition of safeguards culture. In the case of safety culture, INSAG (the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group) has extensively dealt with its concept, elaborating its definition and key characteristics, and published its report, INSAG-4, as the IAEA Safety Series 75. On the other hand, security culture has also been defined by AdSec (the Advisory Group on Nuclear Security). In this paper, a provisional definition of safeguards culture is made on the analogies of safety culture and security culture, and an effort is made to describe essential elements of safeguards culture. It is proposed for SAGSI (the Standing Advisory Group on Safeguards Implementation) to formally consider the definition of safeguards culture and its characteristics. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (author)

  11. Experience with strengthening safety culture in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper outlines the many initiatives current within Nuclear Electric which support the development of a strong safety culture. These include methods for the assessment of Safety Culture, training and awareness issues and collaborations and exchanges. Two specific topics in the assessment of Safety culture are covered in more detail. These are: (i) the qualitative assessment through staff interviews of the Safety Culture at a power station, and (ii) the analysis of audit and evaluation findings to identify a common set of root causes. (author)

  12. A human error taxonomy for analysing healthcare incident reports: assessing reporting culture and its effects on safety perfomance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Itoh, Kenji; Omata, N.; Andersen, Henning Boje

    2009-01-01

    The present paper reports on a human error taxonomy system developed for healthcare risk management and on its application to evaluating safety performance and reporting culture. The taxonomy comprises dimensions for classifying errors, for performance-shaping factors, and for the maturity of...

  13. Safety culture in plant operation and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety culture is used as a synonym for safety consciousness of the operating personnel and safety-oriented management of all activities inside a nuclear power plant. Establishing safety culture in nuclear power plant operation and maintenance calls for the existence of a safe and reliable reactor safety concept, derived from a reactor safety analysis and nuclear power plant operation experience. Competence of plant personnel and safety culture in the operation, maintenance and repair of nuclear power plants are discussed. (Z.S.)

  14. The spirit of safety: oriental safety culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, J. [Science Council of Japan, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-09-01

    Failure of a large system causes disasters. However, after an accident, the causes are frequently attributed to human error when the operators do not survive the accident. It might be difficult to prove that the real cause of the accident is human error. Process decision program chart (PDPC) would be a useful tool in indicating the causes of an accident since it can clearly show that if the operator made the correct choice, the safety of the system could be maintained. The case of the incident of the nuclear reactor at Mihama unit 2 is indicated by PDPC in which the sequence of events and the operations are indicated in this paper together with the safe operation. One can easily understand the cause of the incident and the way to avoid it. Also, PDPC for the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident is shown. Initially, in order to prevent an accident, mental training and safety culture is most important. The oriental safety culture based on Zentoism, a school of Buddhism is discussed. (orig.)

  15. Safety Assessment for Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past few decades, international guidance has been developed on methods for assessing the safety of predisposal and disposal facilities for radioactive waste. More recently, it has been recognized that there is also a need for specific guidance on safety assessment in the context of decommissioning nuclear facilities. The importance of safety during decommissioning was highlighted at the International Conference on Safe Decommissioning for Nuclear Activities held in Berlin in 2002 and at the First Review Meeting of the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management in 2003. At its June 2004 meeting, the Board of Governors of the IAEA approved the International Action Plan on Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities (GOV/2004/40), which called on the IAEA to: ''establish a forum for the sharing and exchange of national information and experience on the application of safety assessment in the context of decommissioning and provide a means to convey this information to other interested parties, also drawing on the work of other international organizations in this area''. In response, in November 2004, the IAEA launched the international project Evaluation and Demonstration of Safety for Decommissioning of Facilities Using Radioactive Material (DeSa) with the following objectives: -To develop a harmonized approach to safety assessment and to define the elements of safety assessment for decommissioning, including the application of a graded approach; -To investigate the practical applicability of the methodology and performance of safety assessments for the decommissioning of various types of facility through a selected number of test cases; -To investigate approaches for the review of safety assessments for decommissioning activities and the development of a regulatory approach for reviewing safety assessments for decommissioning activities and as a basis for regulatory decision making; -To provide a forum

  16. Safety culture and public acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the Chernobyl NPP accident a public acceptance has become a key factor in nuclear power development all over the world. Therefore, nuclear safety culture should be based not only on technical principles, responsibilities, supervision, regulatory provisions, emergency preparedness, but the public awareness of minimum risk during the operation and decommissioning of NPPs, radioactive waste management, etc. (author)

  17. Problems with quantification of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the qualitative part of the method for the Safety Culture assessment we quantitative part was developed based on expert judgement and statistical methods. The quantitative assessment should go in parallel with the qualitative part already presented. The essential part is based on expert opinion which organizational factors are the most important for certain risk significant components and how well are they implemented. The problems with getting the ratings are described in the paper. (author)

  18. Safety culture - Is it important?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A strong and improving safety culture provides the foundation for building long term success for a company. It is a cultural change for most organizations and requires years not months to achieve. Short term successes are typically achieved and the smart companies build upon and communicate those successes. For long term success, these companies never deviate or become complacent about maintaining a strong safety culture. There are several lessons learned from the nuclear industry that support the need to maintain a strong safety culture: 1)prevention of human errors costs less than dealing with the consequences 2)poorly designed processes cause the majority of human errors 3)quality supervision is a powerful tool in human error reduction 4)performance monitoring/trending and technology based root cause analysis are essential to human error reduction 5)human errors caused by misjudgment need special attention 6)procedural non-compliance needs a focused solution based on organizational psychology 7)the benefits of a well designed accountability system are very significant 8)knowledge and skills, more rules, are the last line of defense against problems. (authors)

  19. Investigating safety culture according to a social science approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety culture generally focusses on human and organisational contributions to safety performance within organisations that are characterised by a high level of risk. The term safety culture is used in different sectors. The literature distinguishes between two visions on culture and safety culture. According to the first view, culture culture is considered as an organisational tool. This view is the predominant view in the nuclear sector and postulates that the organisation can develop, assess, enhance and rectify culture by organisational actions. The second view considers safety culture as a metaphor of the organisation. It is a kind of culture of facts. Within this anthropological approach, each organisation transports values and beliefs that are partly adopted by workers. The culture is seen as a source of description and understanding. As part of a PhD study, safety culture in the nuclear sector was investigated based on an exploratory approach that is used in social sciences. In particular, the Focus Group technique was used and fieldwork was applied to two sites: a nuclear power plant in France and the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN. The different groups of players that were taken into account include workers, safety officers and managers. Current results indicate that different safety cultures group similar components, in particular regulatory, organisational, mental, relational and informal components. The specificity of a safety culture is the result of the predominance of one or two components and their ranking

  20. Operating procedures and safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of new technologies in recent years has led to a tremendous increase in the information to be mastered by operators in industrial processes. The information at operators disposal both in routine situations and accidental ones needs to be well prepared and organized to ensure reliability and safety. The man-machine interface should give operators all the necessary and clear indications on the process status and evolution so that the operators can operate the installation through adequate procedures. Procedures represent the real interface and mode of action of the operators on the machine, and they are of prime importance. Although they are by essence quite different, the routine, accident, and emergency procedures have in common one attribute: They all require a good safety culture both in their development and their implementation. From the definition given by the members of the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG), open-quotes Safety culture is that assembly of characteristics and attitudes in organizations and individuals which establishes that, as an overriding priority, nuclear plant safety issues receive the attention warranted by their significance,close quotes one can see that two aspects are embedded, a collective attitude that in fact is reflected in the managerial framework and an individual one that is linked to personnel behavior and work practices

  1. Enhancement of nuclear safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Throughout the 40-year history of the commercial nuclear power industry, improvements have continually been made in the design of nuclear power plants and the equipment in them. In one sense, we have reached an enviable point -- in most plants, equipment failures have become relatively rare. Yet events continue to occur. Regardless of how much the plants are improved, that equipment is operated by people -- highly motivated, well-trained people -- but people nonetheless. And people occasionally make mistakes. By setting the right climate and by setting high standards, good plant management can reduce the number of mistakes made ? and also reduce their potential consequences. Another way to say this is that the proper safety culture must be established and continually improved upon in our nuclear plants. Safety culture is defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency as 'that assembly of characteristics and attitudes in organizations and individuals which establishes that, as an overriding priority, nuclear plant safety issues receive the attention that, as an overriding priority, nuclear plant safety issues receive the attention warranted by their significance.' In short, we must make safety our top priority

  2. Organizational culture and nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GPU Nuclear has become increasingly aware of the impact of culture on performance and therefore on nuclear safety. Culture is simply described as the way things are done around here. Senior management has developed a mission and a vision and values statement to guide this culture change. The company has embarked on a number of culture-influencing initiatives, including teamwork and leadership, the subject of this paper. This paper notes the functional initiatives that were one aspect of the evolution of the overall program. These functional initiatives were requests from line managers for assistance from in-house facilitators to help their areas become even more effective. Also, the overall program implementation has evolved to include use of additional materials and concepts

  3. Organizational culture, behavioral norms and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents two different but related topics related to the issue of how organizational culture influences safety. These issues are driven by the concept that human behavior is strongly influenced by culture, and that safety (for example, of nuclear power plants) is strongly influenced by human behavior. The paper first discusses the issue of quantitative assessment of organizanizational culture as it is manifested in behavior and behavioral norms. The paper then discusses a logic model that provides a way for describing how behavior in organizations can be related to the accomplishment of safety through performance of the various programs and functions in the plant (such as maintenance, operations, and training). Culture is something that is shared by members of an organization; it contains values (what' s important) and beliefs (how things work) as central components, and it encompasses behavioral norms and expectations that influence the way members act. Shared values and beliefs underlie the organization's oversight and control system and produce norms in people that provide a common reference point of how they should and should not behave. While the definitions of culture somewhat converge, the ways that culture is assessed vary considerably. While beliefs and values, being unconsciously held, are difficult to assess without qualitative techniques, norms regarding how members should or should not behave are far more accessible through quantitative measures. The work underlying this paper has been performed in a number of different settings, including nuclear power plants and aviation maintenance. In terms of safety, behavior can act as a 'common-mode' influence on the performance of people in all parts of the technical enterprise, be they power-plant operators, pilots, or maintenance technicians. (author)

  4. Feedback from peer review missions of the self-assessment of operational events reflecting safety culture (Leningrad, Smolemsk and Balakovo NPP's, the Russian Federation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presentation discusses the following issues: criteria for reporting events inside NPP; screening of the plant operational events; third safety culture indicator; list of the pending safety problems; significance of the safety problems for plant reliability; prioritization of the safety culture issues. Tabs

  5. Excellent management safety culture. A prerequisite to safety culture management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Every organization has within its foundation, conditions that must be met if that organization is going to survive, thrive and be allowed to exist in a society. In the organization that I'm a part of, the United States Department of Energy, we call these conditions 'criticaI success factors.' While these conditions permeate the concept of the 'fixed costs of doing business,' they are also more fundamentaI than that concept. These conditions are so relevant to existence that the simpIe perception of their status by the workers or the comm unity can have a major impact on the success or failure of that organization. The logical consequences of this situation are such that the senior management of any nuclear installation, operation or organization (hereinafter referred to as 'organization') has the first and primary responsibility and obligation to assure that safety in that organization is both perceived and in actuality 'excellent.' This determination of 'exceIlence,' however, is momentary. The truly successful executive will stop at nothing until that excellence is translated into everyday behavior and thinking that assures that a culture exists where 'excellence in safety' is the custom. A culture is absoIutely necessary because if any organization is fortunate enough to be excellent at a given point in time, the integrated patterns of behavior and thinking that yielded this excellence must be passed on to the future. Work force attrition and turnover is the norm; configuration and equipment change is the norm. It is necessary to institutionalize 'excellence' so that it can withstand the regular changes in work and operating environments. Without the existence of a safety culture that demands excellence, management can be and is often lulled into the false assumption that operations are safe simply because there have been no major breaches in safety over a certain period of time. (author)

  6. Safety culture of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is a summary on the basis of DNMC safety culture training material for managerial personnel. It intends to explain the basic contents of safety, design, management, enterprise culture, safety culture of nuclear power plant and the relationship among them. It explains especially the constituent elements of safety culture system, the basic requirements for the three levels of commitments: policy level, management level and employee level. It also makes some analyses and judgments for some typical safety culture cases, for example, transparent culture and habitual violation of procedure. (authors)

  7. A global nuclear safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article discusses three components characterizing the infrastructure of a global nuclear safety culture, each one satisfying special needs. These are: (a) legally binding international agreements, which were drawn up at an accelerated pace in the 1980s following the Chernobyl accident, with its transboundary implications; (b) non-binding common safety standards, which were developed rapidly during the 1960s and 1970s, a period which saw a desire for harmonized safety approaches as nuclear power and the use of radiation and radioactive materials expanded globally; and (c) review and advisory services, which are provided by international experts, the need for which was underscored by the accident at Chernobyl. 5 refs, 1 fig

  8. Safety culture development at Daya Bay NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From view on Organization Behavior theory, the concept, development and affecting factors of safety culture are introduced. The focuses are on the establishment, development and management practice for safety culture at Daya Bay NPP. A strong safety culture, also demonstrated, has contributed greatly to improving performance at Daya Bay

  9. Safety Culture Enhancement Project. Final Report. A Field Study on Approaches to Enhancement of Safety Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, Andrew; Hayward, Brent (Dedale Asia Pacific, Albert Park VIC 3206 (Australia))

    2006-08-15

    results of the Safety Culture Perceptions Questionnaire conducted with site managers to access their opinions about the adequacy of the local safety culture; - a framework of safety-related competencies for managers, representing desirable actions for leading and promoting a positive safety culture; - results of an evaluation survey completed by participants at the conclusion of the Management Workshops to assess the utility of this activity. Section 4 of the report, Recommendations for Future Action, highlights nine proposed activities that could be undertaken to build on the outcomes from this project, to support the enhancement of safety culture within the Swedish nuclear industry in the longer term. Specifically, these recommendations propose actions to: 1. Introduce formal processes to ensure the ongoing development of safety related competencies amongst industry managers. 2. Strengthen the resources, contribution, value and profile of Man Technology Organisation (MTO) expertise within nuclear industry sites, in order to promote a better understanding of human performance issues, enhance error management and accident prevention capabilities. 3. Identify ways to embed existing positive safety culture attributes, in an environment of considerable workforce changes resulting from increasing use of contractors and (expected) retirements amongst an ageing industry employee population. 4. Standardise and improve aspects of incident and accident investigation processes and analysis methodologies currently used, to improve information sharing and optimise learning. 5. Implement harmonised MTO / human factors awareness training programs at appropriate levels for all nuclear industry personnel. 6. Formalise the application of applied teamwork training (as per the principles of Crew Resource Management training in aviation) for NPP Control Room Operators, Maintenance workers and other employees working in safety-critical teams. 7. Increase the use of simulation training to

  10. Safety Culture Enhancement Project. Final Report. A Field Study on Approaches to Enhancement of Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety Culture Perceptions Questionnaire conducted with site managers to access their opinions about the adequacy of the local safety culture; - a framework of safety-related competencies for managers, representing desirable actions for leading and promoting a positive safety culture; - results of an evaluation survey completed by participants at the conclusion of the Management Workshops to assess the utility of this activity. Section 4 of the report, Recommendations for Future Action, highlights nine proposed activities that could be undertaken to build on the outcomes from this project, to support the enhancement of safety culture within the Swedish nuclear industry in the longer term. Specifically, these recommendations propose actions to: 1. Introduce formal processes to ensure the ongoing development of safety related competencies amongst industry managers. 2. Strengthen the resources, contribution, value and profile of Man Technology Organisation (MTO) expertise within nuclear industry sites, in order to promote a better understanding of human performance issues, enhance error management and accident prevention capabilities. 3. Identify ways to embed existing positive safety culture attributes, in an environment of considerable workforce changes resulting from increasing use of contractors and (expected) retirements amongst an ageing industry employee population. 4. Standardise and improve aspects of incident and accident investigation processes and analysis methodologies currently used, to improve information sharing and optimise learning. 5. Implement harmonised MTO / human factors awareness training programs at appropriate levels for all nuclear industry personnel. 6. Formalise the application of applied teamwork training (as per the principles of Crew Resource Management training in aviation) for NPP Control Room Operators, Maintenance workers and other employees working in safety-critical teams. 7. Increase the use of simulation training to enhance non

  11. Managers’ Perceptions of Organizational Safety: Implication for the Development of Safety Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Jarvis, Marina; Virovere, Anu; Piia TINT

    2014-01-01

    A key feature of a company’s safety culture is shared perceptions between managers and employees concerning the importance of safety. The purpose of the study was to assess senior managers’ perceptions of the current safety culture in Estonian SMEs from different branches of industry, based on a sample of 463 senior managers. The relationships of different aspects of safety culture and safety management systems, senior managers’ and employees’ perceptions and attitudes to safety were explored...

  12. Safety culture and quality system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of the study conducted by a group of experts from EDF corporate departments on the conditions of the development of safety culture in the French nuclear power plants. The recommendations included in INSAG 4 sound rather like requirements concerning both the desirable attitudes of players and the operation of the organizations. The working group, referring to corporate and French culture, has deemed that the major leverage for cultural development was learning and understanding organization throughout its evolution. The quality system is one of the tools. Such a proposal should be placed against the background of some milestones of French nuclear power plant history. During the development phase, industrial challenge and safety requirements have led to putting a premium on the principles of industrial quality, on structured methods, working procedures, provisional risk and operating sequence analyses which resulted in effective mastery of technology and process. Within this strategy of production organization, human behaviour has been directed by strict guidelines and during this period, man has been perceived as a potential failure inducer. Quality remains the outstanding feature of nuclear industry. Design and plant operations activities as well as human behaviour are governed by quality requirements whose implementation methods are described in the QA manual. During this period, the structuring logics have been implementation, deviation, error. Currently, public opinion, safety authorities, government authorities, the nuclear industry itself are stepping up pressure on safety requirements and we are exploring paths of progress in the enhancement of human and organizational possibilities and resources. The ongoing in-depth transformation of the organization concerns operating methods, structures and management mode. A systemic approach should be a contributing factor to the reliability of this programme. This

  13. Is There Cultural Safety in Australian Universities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochecouste, Judith; Oliver, Rhonda; Bennell, Debra

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the cultural safety offered to Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students within their university environments. In the context of this paper, cultural safety includes cultural competency, as recently subscribed by Universities Australia, and "extends beyond (to) cultural awareness and cultural…

  14. Safety culture in the boardroom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the recent reorganization of Ontario Hydro, steps have been taken to improve the nuclear safety policy direction by senior management and by the board of directors. This was thought necessary because, while current and past safety performance has been generally good, many safety problems are not being solved quickly enough. A nuclear safety review committee of the board of directors was formed to oversee the implementation of the company' s newly adopted nuclear safety policy. That policy states: 'Ontario Hydro's nuclear facilities will be operated and maintained in a rigorous and vigilant manner to ensure that the radiological risk to workers, the public and the environment is acceptably low and in keeping with the best practices in the international nuclear community.' Within the management of the company several improvements were made. A nuclear safety directorate was formed to provide policy guidance and performance assessments to senior management. A committee was formed of the senior nuclear managers, representatives form the employees' unions and representatives of other utilities to review audit findings and progress on corrective actions and to make recommendations to the General Manager of Ontario hydro nuclear. Similar committees were formed at each station. The effect of these changes is to provide increased managernent attention to safety issues using unfiltered audit information, pertinent performance measurements and direct reporting of progress on key issues. It is expected that this will promote prompt attention to correcting long-standing problems and enhance awareness and emphasis on safety as an integral part of the business. Clear declarations from the boardroom of priorities and responsibilities are essential to achieving this. (author)

  15. Discussion on safety culture general contract model of consultation enterprises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With a high safety requirement, long construction period, a large amount of investment and many influencing factors of the preparation and implementation of project schedule, local nuclear power always is built through EPC. Safety level depends on EPC. Some measures should be taken for local consultation enterprises to improve situation of safety. Some suggestion as follows: safety culture should be received enough attention; management system should be established in according with requirement of safety culture; try to encourage employee involvement; to assess it in time; safety system should be entirely compatible with enterprises system. (authors)

  16. Safety Cultural Competency Modeling in Nuclear Organizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sa Kil; Oh, Yeon Ju; Luo, Meiling; Lee, Yong Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The nuclear safety cultural competency model should be supplemented through a bottom-up approach such as behavioral event interview. The developed model, however, is meaningful for determining what should be dealt for enhancing safety cultural competency of nuclear organizations. The more details of the developing process, results, and applications will be introduced later. Organizational culture include safety culture in terms of its organizational characteristics.

  17. Integration, differentiation and ambiguity in safety cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richter, Anne; Koch, Christian

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses safety cultures, drawing on the differentiation, integration and ambiguity-scheme introduced by scholars of organizational culture. An ethnographic approach has been applied in the study of meaning and symbols relating to work, hazards, occupational accidents and prevention....... The application of this approach is demonstrated through a multifacetted analysis of safety cultures. Case studies in Danish manufacturing show that it usually is necessary to differentiate between several safety cultures dispersed throughout the shop floor and other parts of the manufacturing...

  18. Safety Cultural Competency Modeling in Nuclear Organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear safety cultural competency model should be supplemented through a bottom-up approach such as behavioral event interview. The developed model, however, is meaningful for determining what should be dealt for enhancing safety cultural competency of nuclear organizations. The more details of the developing process, results, and applications will be introduced later. Organizational culture include safety culture in terms of its organizational characteristics

  19. Implementation of the safety culture for HANARO Safety Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety is the fundamental principal upon which the management system is based. The IAEA INSAG(International Nuclear Safety Group) states the general aims of the safety management system. One of which is to foster and support a strong safety culture through the development and reinforcement of good safety attitudes and behavior in individuals and teams so as to allow them to carry out their tasks safety. The safety culture activities have been implemented and the importance of safety management in nuclear activities for a reactor application and utilization has also been emphasized more than 10 years in HANARO which is a 30 MW multi-purpose research reactor and achieved its first criticality in February 1995. The safety culture activities and implementations have been conducted continuously to enhance its safe operation like the seminars and lectures related to safety matters, participation in international workshops, the development of safety culture indicators, the survey on the attitude of safety culture, the development of operational safety performance indicators (SPIs), the preparation of a safety text book and the development of an e-Learning program for safety education. (author)

  20. Safety culture. Keys for sustaining progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Principles of nuclear safety are now well known and being put into practice around the world, leading to a degree of international harmonization in safety standards. Continued improvement in levels of safety requires the development of a comprehensive 'safety culture' at all levels of an organization, with visible and consistent leadership from senior management. This article reviews the main elements required for establishing and sustaining a good safety culture at nuclear installations that involves staff at all levels

  1. Total safety management: An approach to improving safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A little over 4 yr ago, Admiral James D. Watkins became Secretary of Energy. President Bush, who had appointed him, informed Watkins that his principal task would be to clean up the nuclear weapons complex and put the US Department of Energy (DOE) back in the business of producing tritium for the nation's nuclear deterrent. Watkins recognized that in order to achieve these objectives, he would have to substantially improve the DOE's safety culture. Safety culture is a relatively new term. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) used it in a 1986 report on the root causes of the Chernobyl nuclear accident. In 1990, the IAEA's International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group issued a document focusing directly on safety culture. It provides guidelines to the international nuclear community for measuring the effectiveness of safety culture in nuclear organizations. Safety culture has two principal aspects: an organizational framework conducive to safety and the necessary organizational and individual attitudes that promote safety. These obviously go hand in hand. An organization must create the right framework to foster the right attitudes, but individuals must have the right attitudes to create the organizational framework that will support a good safety culture. The difficulty in developing such a synergistic relationship suggests that achieving and sustaining a strong safety culture is not easy, particularly in an organization whose safety culture is in serious disrepair

  2. Extending Safety Culture Development through Communication - 12366

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority has been implementing a regulatory support program in the Russian Federation for over 10 years, as part of the Norwegian government's Plan of Action for enhancing nuclear and radiation safety in northwest Russia. The overall long-term objective is the enhancement of safety culture. The project outputs have included appropriate regulatory threat assessments, to determine the hazardous activities which are most in need of enhanced regulatory supervision; and development of the norms, standards and regulatory procedures, necessary to address the often abnormal conditions at nuclear legacy sites. Project outputs have been prepared and subsequently confirmed as official regulatory documents of the Russian Federation. The continuing program of work focuses on practical application of the enhanced regulatory framework as applied to legacy sites, including safe management of radioactive wastes arising in the process of site remediation. One of the lessons learnt from this practical application is the importance of effective communication at all levels: - between managers and shop workers; - between different operators - e.g. waste producers and waste disposal organisations; - between operators and regulators; - between nuclear safety regulators, radiation protection regulators and other pollution and safety regulators; - between scientists, policy makers and wider stakeholders; and - between all of those mentioned above. A key message from this work is that it is not just an issue of risk communication; rather all aspects of communication can contribute to safety culture enhancement to support effective and efficient risk management, including the role of regulatory supervision. (authors)

  3. Organization and Nuclear Safety: Safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book presents the experience in nuclear safety and its influence in the exploitation on nuclear power plants. The safety organization and quality management before and after Chernobylsk and three mile island accidents

  4. Safety and culture? Regulatory understanding and approach of nuclear safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety and culture? The provocative question is deliberate. How can we understand and deal with these words, which are diametrically opposed, and which represent two notions so far from each other. The terms 'Culture' and 'Safety' are defined in Webster dictionary: - as training and refining of mind, emotions, manners, taste, e.c., and - as the quality or condition of being safe. Though the safety goals can be (and must be) accomplished by means of law and authority, the term 'safety' contains additional, subjective elements, which always depend on person and era. The common root of these two basically different words can be found in the field of human subjective elements. This common root is the 'human being', implying behaviour and risk of error. It leads to combine the terms culture and safety into a very new notion, which is known now as cafety culture. According to probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) studies human error gives considerable contribution to core melt probabilities. It should be noted that uncertainties are mainly associated with human error and actual frequency of the initiating events, considered in the PSA. Sequences containing at least one human error contribute to 80-90 % of the global core melt probability. While the figure is nearly 80 % in French PSA, in Hungary it is 97 % according to the latest PSA studies. (author)

  5. Guide for understanding and evaluation of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report was the guide of understanding and evaluation of safety culture. Operator's activities for enhancement of safety culture in nuclear installations became an object of safety regulation in the management system. Evaluation of operator's activities (including top management's involvement) to prevent degradation of safety culture and organization climate in daily works needed understanding of safety culture and diversity of operator's activities. This guide was prepared to check indications of degradation of safety culture and organization climate in operator's activities in daily works and encourage operator's activities to enhance safety culture improvement and good practice. Comprehensive evaluation of operator's activities to prevent degradation of safety culture and organization climate would be performed from the standpoints of 14 safety culture elements such as top management commitment, clear plan and implementation of upper manager, measures to avoid wrong decision making, questioning attitude, reporting culture, good communications, accountability and openness, compliance, learning system, activities to prevent accidents or incidents beforehand, self-assessment or third party evaluation, work management, change management and attitudes/motivation. Element-wise examples and targets for evaluation were attached with evaluation check tables. (T. Tanaka)

  6. Safety culture: modern slogan or effective contribution to safety?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety culture is defined and its impact on nuclear power plants is documented using the words of the INSAG of IAEA. Two examples from the field of aviation and space flight testify, that the upper management, by its sheer image, may considerably influence actions of the lower levels of the hierarchy. Management therefore can do a lot more for safety than is commonly assumed. Two examples, although separated by 57 years, show that the mentioned influence remains unchanged inspire of progress in management- and organisation-methods as well as in safety-engineering. Safety culture is an overriding element of safety, acting at all levels of a hierarchy. Its action is most important on those levels, for which precise reglementation is hardly possible. The chain of technical and organisational measures guarantees safety only under the condition, that it is embedded in 'safety culture'. Safety culture therefore merits our full attention. (author) 1 fig

  7. Safety culture competition - expectations of a regulatory authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power station on April 26, 1986 influenced the development of reactor safety and promulgated two basic concepts especially in Germany. On the one hand, extensive measures of in-plant accident management have greatly reduced the so-called residual risk. On the other hand, a comprehensive safety approach has been initiated which comprises the nuclear power plant as a system together with people, technology, and organization and also includes safety culture. In a modern regulatory concept based on the dynamic development of safety, the authority's classical regulatory function of controlling is supplemented by the objective of promoting safety. While preserving the division of responsibilities between the regulatory authority and plant operators, the authority uses 'constructive critical dialog' as a tool to enhance safety. Besides the regulatory assessment of safety culture on the basis of indications or indicators, also the continuous promotion of safety culture in a dialog with plant operators is seen as one of the duties of a regulatory authority. Continued efforts are necessary to maintain the high level of safety culture in German nuclear power plants. Operators are expected to establish a safety management which assigns top priority to safety issues, and which pursues the goal of supervising and promoting safety culture. Developments on the deregulated electricity markets must not lead to safety aspects ranking second to economic aspects. Moreover, also under changed boundary conditions, only the safe operation of nuclear power plants ensures economic viability. (orig.)

  8. Safety culture issues raised in the SAR of the INPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following aspects of safety culture promotion at Ignalina NPP are discussed: performance objectives and expectations; current applicable Lithuanian standards; current plant practice; validation of plant function; assessment of plant function and non-compliances

  9. Safety Culture Enhancement Project. Final Report. A Field Study on Approaches to Enhancement of Safety Culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowe, Andrew; Hayward, Brent (Dedale Asia Pacific, Albert Park VIC 3206 (Australia))

    2006-08-15

    results of the Safety Culture Perceptions Questionnaire conducted with site managers to access their opinions about the adequacy of the local safety culture; - a framework of safety-related competencies for managers, representing desirable actions for leading and promoting a positive safety culture; - results of an evaluation survey completed by participants at the conclusion of the Management Workshops to assess the utility of this activity. Section 4 of the report, Recommendations for Future Action, highlights nine proposed activities that could be undertaken to build on the outcomes from this project, to support the enhancement of safety culture within the Swedish nuclear industry in the longer term. Specifically, these recommendations propose actions to: 1. Introduce formal processes to ensure the ongoing development of safety related competencies amongst industry managers. 2. Strengthen the resources, contribution, value and profile of Man Technology Organisation (MTO) expertise within nuclear industry sites, in order to promote a better understanding of human performance issues, enhance error management and accident prevention capabilities. 3. Identify ways to embed existing positive safety culture attributes, in an environment of considerable workforce changes resulting from increasing use of contractors and (expected) retirements amongst an ageing industry employee population. 4. Standardise and improve aspects of incident and accident investigation processes and analysis methodologies currently used, to improve information sharing and optimise learning. 5. Implement harmonised MTO / human factors awareness training programs at appropriate levels for all nuclear industry personnel. 6. Formalise the application of applied teamwork training (as per the principles of Crew Resource Management training in aviation) for NPP Control Room Operators, Maintenance workers and other employees working in safety-critical teams. 7. Increase the use of simulation training to

  10. Determinants for conducting food safety culture research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyarugwe, Shingai P.; Linnemann, Anita; Hofstede, Gert Jan; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Luning, Pieternel A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Foodborne outbreaks continue to occur regardless of existing food safety measures indicating the shortcomings of these measures to assure food safety. This has led to the recognition of food safety culture as a key contributory factor to the food safety performance of food establishmen

  11. Culture safety in the nuclear installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culture safety is aimed to empower all the personnel to contribute and responsible to the installation safety where they work in. Culture safety is important as there were so many accidents happened due to the little attention given to the safety, take as examples of what happened in Three Mille Island installation (1979) and Chernobyl (1986). These remind us that human factor gives a significant contribution to the failure of operational system which influences the safety. Therefore, as one of institutions which has nuclear installation. National Nuclear Energy Agency must apply the culture safety to guarantee the safety operation of nuclear installation to protect the personnel, community and environment from the hazard of radioactive radiation. Culture safety has two main components. The first component under the management responsibility is a framework needed in an organisation. The second component is the personnel attitude in al/ levels to respond and optimize those framework. (author)

  12. Analysis of safety culture at Rovno NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main concepts of safety culture which relate to safety increase in reactor unit operation, their reliable work, high qualification of personnel and personal responsibility of operators are developed. They will be introduced at the Rovno NPP

  13. Construction Workers Perceptions Toward Safety Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Andi Andi

    2008-01-01

    Efforts to reduce construction accidents can be initiated by building good safety culture. Researches concerning safety culture, however, are still limited. This research aims to empirically gauge workerâs perception toward safety culture in construction projects. Data were obtained through questionnaire survey to three large construction projects in Surabaya. Two hundreds and seven sets of questionnaires were gathered and used for subsequent analyses. Results show that in general workersâ pe...

  14. Regulatory Initiative to Oversee Licensees' Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the regulatory initiative of regulator's engagement into safety culture and suggests a systematic scheme to implement it for the operation of nuclear power plants in Korea. In recent years, international discussions relating to regulatory oversight of licensees' safety culture have taken place and several attempts have been made to establish practical approaches to the oversight. The event at Kori unit 1 in February 2012 made a new stage of regulator's engaging in licensee's safety culture in Korea

  15. Utilizing the results of a safety culture survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When assessing safety culture all available forms of data should be collected and analyzed. For example, accident statistics, safety performance data, record of employee and management concerns, and other measures of product quality and organizational performance are good indicators of safety culture. A safety culture survey instrument is also useful because: 1) traditional safety audits often fail to determine the effectiveness of safety efforts, 2) employee perceptions need to be considered when determining the effectiveness of safety efforts, 3) a survey can effectively identify streng.ths and weaknesses of elements of a safety program, and 4) a survey can be used to help track the effectiveness of safety efforts. In addition, a properly designed survey can be a valuable tool to compare against other safety and quality indicators to help provide an overall picture of the safety culture of an organization. This paper discusses how best to administer, analyze, and distribute the results of a safety culture survey in order to extract the maximum benefits. Examples are presented on how to use and interpret the results of such a survey. (author)

  16. The Operationalisation of Safety Culture for the Malaysian Construction Organisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faridah Ismail

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the operationalisation of safety culture for the Malaysian construction organisations. Operationalisation is the process of converting a concept into a measure. This measure can be a variable, constant or scale depending upon the situation. Hence, operationalisation will enable the concept to be uniformly understood as there is no measurement has yet been established to enable the industry players to gauge their current state of safety culture. Both qualitative and quantitative methods have unique potential for assessment and a combination of both methods is beneficial towards a comprehensive understanding of safety culture. A mixed methodology is adopted; the preliminary survey and the main survey as an instrument to measure safety culture were developed. The findings revealed that safety culture comprised of the psychological, behavioural and the situational factors’ characteristics created by the senior management.

  17. Human Factors and Safety Culture in Maritime Safety (revised

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz Peter Berg

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available As in every industry at risk, the human and organizational factors constitute the main stakes for maritime safety. Furthermore, several events at sea have been used to develop appropriate risk models. The investigation on maritime accidents is, nowadays, a very important tool to identify the problems related to human factor and can support accident prevention and the improvement of maritime safety. Part of this investigation should in future also be near misses. Operation of ships is full of regulations, instructions and guidelines also addressing human factors and safety culture to enhance safety. However, even though the roots of a safety culture have been established, there are still serious barriers to the breakthrough of the safety management. One of the most common deficiencies in the case of maritime transport is the respective monitoring and documentation usually lacking of adequacy and excellence. Nonetheless, the maritime area can be exemplified from other industries where activities are ongoing to foster and enhance safety culture.

  18. Safety culture development in nuclear electric plc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Electric plc (NE) has always given the highest priority to safety. However, past emphasis has been directed towards ensuring safety thorough engineering design and hazard control procedures. Whilst the company did achieve high safety standards, particularly with respect to accidents, it was recognized that further improvements could be obtained. Analysis of the safety performance across a wide range of industries showed that the key to improving safety performance lay in developing a strong safety culture within the company. Over the last five years, NE has made great strides to improve its safety culture. This has resulted in a considerable improvement in its measured safety performance indicators, such as the number of incidents at international nuclear event scale (INES) rating 1, the number of lost time accidents and the collective radiation dose. However, despite this success, the company is committed to further improvement and a means by which this process becomes self-sustaining. In this way the company will achieve its prime goal, to ''ensure the safety of people, plant and the environment''. The paper provides an overview of the development of safety culture in NE since its formation in November 1989. It describes the research and international developments that have influenced the company's understanding of safety culture, the key initiatives that the company has undertaken to enhance its safety culture and the future initiatives being considered to ensure continual improvement. (author). 5 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  19. Safety assessment, safety performance indicators at the Paks Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Paks Nuclear Power Plant has been using different methods of safety assessment (event analysis, self-assessment, probabilistic safety analysis), including performance indicators characterizing both operational and safety performance since the early years of operation of the plant. Regarding the safety performance, the indicators include safety system performance, number of scrams, release of radioactive materials, number of safety significant events, industrial safety indicator, etc. The Paks NPP also reports a set of ten indicators to WANO Performance Indicator Programme which, among others, include safety related indicators as well. However, a more systematic approach to structuring and trending safety indicators is needed so that they can contribute to the enhancement of the operational safety. A more comprehensive set of indicators and a systematic evaluation process was introduced in 1996. The performance indicators framework proposed by the IAEA was adapted to Paks in this year to further improve the process. Safety culture assessment and characterizing safety culture is part of the assessment process. (author)

  20. [Agricultural biotechnology safety assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Scott; Jones, Wendelyn; He, Xiaoyun; Ladics, Gregory; Bartholomaeus, Andrew; Raybould, Alan; Lutter, Petra; Xu, Haibin; Wang, Xue

    2015-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops were first introduced to farmers in 1995 with the intent to provide better crop yield and meet the increasing demand for food and feed. GM crops have evolved to include a thorough safety evaluation for their use in human food and animal feed. Safety considerations begin at the level of DNA whereby the inserted GM DNA is evaluated for its content, position and stability once placed into the crop genome. The safety of the proteins coded by the inserted DNA and potential effects on the crop are considered, and the purpose is to ensure that the transgenic novel proteins are safe from a toxicity, allergy, and environmental perspective. In addition, the grain that provides the processed food or animal feed is also tested to evaluate its nutritional content and identify unintended effects to the plant composition when warranted. To provide a platform for the safety assessment, the GM crop is compared to non-GM comparators in what is typically referred to as composition equivalence testing. New technologies, such as mass spectrometry and well-designed antibody-based methods, allow better analytical measurements of crop composition, including endogenous allergens. Many of the analytical methods and their intended uses are based on regulatory guidance documents, some of which are outlined in globally recognized documents such as Codex Alimentarius. In certain cases, animal models are recommended by some regulatory agencies in specific countries, but there is typically no hypothesis or justification of their use in testing the safety of GM crops. The quality and standardization of testing methods can be supported, in some cases, by employing good laboratory practices (GLP) and is recognized in China as important to ensure quality data. Although the number of recommended, in some cases, required methods for safety testing are increasing in some regulatory agencies, it should be noted that GM crops registered to date have been shown to be

  1. Defining safety culture and the nexus between safety goals and safety culture. 1. An Investigation Study on Practical Points of Safety Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    among those of existing questionnaires about safety culture, organizational climate, and individual safety consciousness. From the results of investigations, it was supposed that the establishment of a safety management system to which the whole organization is committed and that has top-down and bottom-up cycles is necessary to enhance organization safety. For example, it was clarified that employee safety consciousness is relevant to 'the action of safety management section' and to two kinds of organization climate, i.e., 'good human relationship' and 'frequent discussion on safety'. As for worker motivation for safety, it was clarified that commitment to safety activities was directly influenced by 'safety activities adhering to actual work sites', 'advance check', and 'frequent discussion on safety' as a result of correlation analysis among traits of safety activity, attitude during daily work, and organizational climate (Fig. 1). In addition, it was also supposed that the commitment was influenced by 'good human relationship', 'pride in work', and 'communication between head office and work sites' indirectly according to the result of the same analysis. Thus, it is supposed that ideas to make safety activities adhere to actual work sites and good human relationships are necessary for organization safety as well as for the establishment of the safety management system. The state of the organization and work sites before the safety system and activities are enforced must also be assessed. According to the results, the construction, chemical, and manufacturing industries differed in types of safety systems and activities conducted because the system types and activities to be conducted depended on the type of work or work site. Hence, to diagnose an organization and to provide an appropriate safety system and activities that reflect the diagnosis are important to enforce safety culture from the viewpoint of usability and interface of the safety management system

  2. Relationship between safety culture aspects - A work process to enable interpretation

    OpenAIRE

    Ek, Åsa; Runefors, Marcus; Borell, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge about the existing safety culture in a maritime organization such as in shipping companies or on board ships can enable the formulation of effective interventions to maintain and improve safety culture and safety in the organization. When assessing the safety culture, questionnaires developed for this purpose are often used. This paper proposes a work process that facilitates the analysis and interpretation of the relationships between safety culture aspects using questionnaire data...

  3. Advantages and disadvantages by using safety culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyhrberg, Mette Bang

    2003-01-01

    Safety culture is a major issue in accident research. A recently finished ph.d.-study has evaluated the symbolic safety culture approach and found four advantages and two disadvantages. These are presented and discussed in this contribution. It is concluded that the approach can be useful in the...

  4. Towards a global nuclear safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the evolution of the global nuclear safety culture and the role in which the IAEA has played in encouraging its development. There is also a look ahead to what the future challenges of the world-wide nuclear industry might be and to the need for a continued and improved global nuclear safety culture to meet these changing needs. (Author)

  5. Safety culture in Ignalina NPP, regulatory view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presentation describes how success on the way to a high level Safety Culture in Ignalina NPP may be achieved by daily, well motivated activities with good attitude and proper management participation, ensuring the development and proper implementation of Safety Culture principles within the activities of Operational organization of Ignalina NPP

  6. Good safety culture maintenance at Leningrad nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evidence in favour of the Leningrad NPP commitment to safety tasks, as the case is in the international practice, is The Safety Policy Statement document where safety is declared to be more significant than the power generation related issues, with the entire responsibility for the safety provision taken over by the operating utility. To avoid the situation when the stated safety tasks and policy remain only a declaration, the organizational structure of the operating utility was expanded to include The Safety Control Department and The Quality Control Department whose tasks encompass the control of the achieved safety level, development of recommendations, measures and actions aimed at the safety culture improvement, assessment and revision of the criteria and requirements to the personnel and management. Each individual at LNPP whose activity affects the plant safety has been familiarized with The Safety Policy Statement document

  7. Strengthening the culture of safety and performance in nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In mid-1995, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna brought together a group of safety culture experts from around the world to explore and summarize those practices they viewed as important in establishing sound safety cultures in nuclear installations. This paper will summarize key findings of the Vienna team and also expand those ideas based on related work in which the authors are engaged. The paper includes a definition of safety culture, a description of three stages of safety culture, and five key practices essential to establishing and maintaining a sound safety culture. Additionally, the authors contradicts the conventional view of safety and production as trade-offs, supporting the Vienna team's conclusion that the principles, attitudes, and practices which bring about sustained levels of high performance are the same as those which enhance safety. Based on input from colleagues in several countries, this appears to hold true across geographical and ethnic boundaries. The authors also discuss how this information can be put to practical use to obtain an objective, measurable, and repeated assessment of the current state of the safety culture within a company, plant or work unit. With that information, leaders are then in the position to act on any of the several parameters which affect both safety and performance effectiveness. (author)

  8. Safety culture in nuclear installations. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings of the International Topical Meeting on Safety Culture in Nuclear Installations held in Vienna, Austria from 24 to 28 April 1995 provide a wide forum of information exchange and discussions on the topic safety culture in nuclear power plants. Safety culture deals with human factors since it deals with attitudes, organization and management. It then means that it has a natural component in it which is linked to the national culture and education. There are about 95 contributions, some of them presented by title and abstract only. All of them are in the subject scope of INIS. (Botek)

  9. Marketing across Cultures: Tools for Cultural Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffield, Barney T., III

    The concept of cultural universals, the basic needs shared by people around the world, is a critical concept in assessing the impact of culture on decisions about the international marketing of goods and services. In most cases, international marketers have little need to understand all the ways in which their culture differs from the culture of…

  10. Safety culture in the nuclear field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The council of IAEA governors ratified twelve elemental principles of physical protection of nuclear matters and installations. These principles will be included in the future updating of the international convention on the physical protection. The F basic principle proposes a definition of the safety culture and recommends that its implementation and its perenniality to be a reality in the concerned organisms.It appears as necessary to precise the concept of safety culture. The twelve principles are as follow: A State liability, B liability during international transports, C legislative and regulatory framework, D competent authority, E operators liability, F safety culture, G threats, H graduated approach, I deep defence, J assurance of the quality, K emergency plan, L confidentiality. The present document is complementary of INSAG-4, 1991 (safety series number 75, INSAG-4 safety culture, a report by the international nuclear safety advisory group, IAEA, 1991) that presents a concept of safety culture. It proposes also, in a particular chapter, the comparisons( common points and specificities) between safety culture and security culture. (N.C.)

  11. Developing safety culture in nuclear power engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new issue (no. 11) of the IAEA publications series Safety Reports, devoted to the safety culture in nuclear engineering Safety culture development in the nuclear activities. Practical recommendations to achieve success, is analyzed. A number of recommendations of international experts is presented and basic general indicators of satisfactory and insufficient safety culture in the nuclear engineering are indicated. It is shown that the safety culture has two foundations: human behavior and high quality of the control system. The necessity of creating the confidence by the management at all levels of the enterprise, development of individual initiative and responsibility of the workers, which make it possible to realize the structural hierarchic system, including technical, human and organizational constituents, is noted. Three stages are traced in the process of introducing the safety culture. At the first stage the require,emts of scientific-technical documentation and provisions of the governmental, regional and control organs are fulfilled. At the second stage the management of the organization accepts the safety as an important direction in its activities. At the third stage the organization accomplishes its work, proceeding from the position of constant safety improvement. The general model of the safety culture development is considered

  12. Safety culture in nuclear installations. Management of safety and safety culture in Indian NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Power Corporation Of India Ltd. (NPCIL) is a company owned by Government of India and is responsible for Design, Construction, Commissioning, Operation and Decommissioning of Nuclear Power plants in India. Presently, a total of 13 Nuclear power Stations are in operation with an installed capacity of 2620 MWe and 2 VVR type PWR Units of 1000 MWe capacity each, 2 PHWR type units of 500 MWe capacity each and 4 PHWR type 220 MWe capacity each are under construction. NPPs generation capacity has been increased from 70% to 85% in the span Of last 7 years with high level of safety standards. This could be achieved through Management commitment towards building a strong Safety Culture. Safety culture is that assembly of characteristics and attitudes in organisation and individuals which establishes that as an overriding priority nuclear plant safety issues receives the attention warranted by their significance. This definition of safety culture brings out two major components in its manifestation. The framework within which individuals within the organisation works.The attitude and response of individual towards the safety issues over productivity and economics in the organisational work practices. The two attributes of safety culture are built in and upgraded in each individuals through special training at the time of entry in the organisation and later through in built procedures in the work practices, motivation and encouragement for free participation of each individuals. Individuals are encouraged to participate in Quality circle teams at the sectional level and review of safety proposal originated by individuals in Station operation Review Committee at Station level, in addition to this to continuously enhance the safety culture, refresher training courses are being organised at regular intervals. The safety related proposals are categorised in to two namely: Proposals from Operating Plants, and Proposals from projects and Design. The concept of safety

  13. Research on the Maturity of Real Estate Enterprises Safety Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, F.; Y. Zhang; Jun Liu; Hanbin Luo

    2013-01-01

    Safety culture plays an important role in enterprise safety production. The paper analyzed the factors of real estate enterprise safety culture construction and then designed the questionnaire and did research on real estate enterprise safety culture. The questionnaire consists of workers information and seven safety culture dimensions, including safety management system level, publicity and education training level, security issues and management participa...

  14. 78 FR 53790 - Public Forum-Safety Culture: Enhancing Transportation Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-30

    ... Culture; Organizational Leadership Perspectives on Safety Culture; Safety Culture Management and Oversight... SAFETY BOARD Public Forum--Safety Culture: Enhancing Transportation Safety On Tuesday and Wednesday... Culture: Enhancing Transportation Safety.'' The forum will begin at 9:00 a.m. on both days and is open...

  15. Relationship between safety culture and PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A primary focus of nuclear safety is prevention of large releases of radioactivity in the case of low probability severe accidents. An analysis of the anatomy of nuclear (Chernobyl, TMI-2) and non-nuclear (Challenger, Bhopal, Piper Alpha, etc.) severe accidents yields four broad categories of root causes, or 4M (abbreviated 4M): man (operating crew response), machine (design with its basic flaws), media (natural phenomena, operational considerations, political environment, commercial pressures, etc.) providing triggering events and management (basic organization safety culture flaws). A strong management can minimize contributions of man, machine and media to the risk arising from operation of hazardous facilities. One way management can have powerful positive influence is through the establishment of a proper safety culture. The terms safety culture is defined by virtue of employing IAEA's International Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) and APG's (arrived through work sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission) definitions. An example of U.S. Nuclear Utility safety culture is discussed. Like any other human endeavor, the manner in which people act is conditioned by requirements set at a top level, i.e. CEO. Policies promoted at the CEO level create the working environment and condition behavior of individuals in the trenches. A summary of the safety culture initiatives within the nuclear utility illustrates commitment to the safety culture. Other powerful examples are the existence of independent safety oversight or risk group directly reported to the CEO and a requirement for submittal of annual nuclear safety assurance reports. The paper concludes by virtue of claiming that an integrated risk management program imbedded in an effective safety culture will lead management of a nuclear utility to achieve both economic and safety goals while reducing strain on management personnel and operating budgets, primarily through an effective integration process. (author

  16. Probabilistic safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This consists of three chapters. The contents of the first chapter are introduction and theory of PSA which includes summary of risk and probabilistic safety assessment, basic theory of reliability, data analysis of reliability, method of fault tree analysis and event tree analysis. The second chapter is about application and PSA steps which are three steps of PSA, PSA in external event, PSA of low power range trip and use of information of risk and application of PSA. The last port is about the initiative steps of PSA, which includes introduction, analysis of initiating event, event tree, fault tree, data of reliability, qualification of accident sequence, importance and uncertainty and practice of the initiative steps of PSA.

  17. Development of a Novel Nuclear Safety Culture Evaluation Method for an Operating Team Using Probabilistic Safety Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IAEA defined safety culture as follows: 'Safety Culture is that assembly of characteristics and attitudes in organizations and individuals which establishes that, as an overriding priority, nuclear plant safety issues receive the attention warranted by their significance'. Also, celebrated behavioral scientist, Cooper, defined safety culture as,'safety culture is that observable degree of effort by which all organizational members direct their attention and actions toward improving safety on a daily basis' with his internal psychological, situational, and behavioral context model. With these various definitions and criteria of safety culture, several safety culture assessment methods have been developed to improve and manage safety culture. To develop a new quantitative safety culture evaluation method for an operating team, we unified and redefined safety culture assessment items. Then we modeled a new safety culture evaluation by adopting level 1 PSA concept. Finally, we suggested the criteria to obtain nominal success probabilities of assessment items by using 'operational definition'. To validate the suggested evaluation method, we analyzed the collected audio-visual recording data collected from a full scope main control room simulator of a NPP in Korea

  18. Development of a Novel Nuclear Safety Culture Evaluation Method for an Operating Team Using Probabilistic Safety Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sangmin; Lee, Seung Min; Seong, Poong Hyun [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    IAEA defined safety culture as follows: 'Safety Culture is that assembly of characteristics and attitudes in organizations and individuals which establishes that, as an overriding priority, nuclear plant safety issues receive the attention warranted by their significance'. Also, celebrated behavioral scientist, Cooper, defined safety culture as,'safety culture is that observable degree of effort by which all organizational members direct their attention and actions toward improving safety on a daily basis' with his internal psychological, situational, and behavioral context model. With these various definitions and criteria of safety culture, several safety culture assessment methods have been developed to improve and manage safety culture. To develop a new quantitative safety culture evaluation method for an operating team, we unified and redefined safety culture assessment items. Then we modeled a new safety culture evaluation by adopting level 1 PSA concept. Finally, we suggested the criteria to obtain nominal success probabilities of assessment items by using 'operational definition'. To validate the suggested evaluation method, we analyzed the collected audio-visual recording data collected from a full scope main control room simulator of a NPP in Korea.

  19. Safety culture concept. Human factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The program on analysis and elimination of causes of violating the NPP operation reliability and safety, related to a human factor, is described. The necessity of creating atmosphere of systematic attention to safety problems and personal responsibility for NPPs safety is noted

  20. Challenges in promoting radiation safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety has quickly become an industry performance measure, and the emphasis on its reliability has always been part of a strategic commitment. This paper presents an approach taken by Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) and authority to develop and implement safety culture for industries that uses radioactive material and radiation sources. Maintaining and improving safety culture is a continuous process. There is a need to establish a program to measure, review and audit health and safety performance against predetermined standards. Proper safety audit will help to identify the non-compliance of safety culture as well as the deviation of management, individual and policy level commitment; review of radiation protection program and activities should be preceded. (author)

  1. Safety, Security and Safeguards (3S) Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A meaningful discussion of Safety, Security, and Safeguards (3S) Culture requires a review of the concepts related to the culture of the three components. The concept of culture can be confusing, and so careful use of terminology is needed to enable a focused and constructive dialogue. To this end, this paper will use the concept of organizational culture as a backdrop for a broader discussion about how the three subcultures of safety, security and safeguards come together to enhance the mission of an organization. Since the accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, the nuclear industry has embraced the concept of safety culture. The work on safety culture has been used to develop programs and concepts in the culture of Material Protection, Control, and Accounting and Nuclear Security Culture. More recently, some work has been done on defining an International Safeguards Culture. Others have spoken about a 3S Culture, but there has been little rigorous consideration of the concept. This paper attempts to address 3S Culture, to begin to evaluate the merit of the concept, and to propose a definition. The paper is followed by the slides of the presentation. (authors)

  2. Safety culture in the maintenance of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety culture is the complexity of beliefs, shared values and behaviour reflected in making decisions and performing work in a nuclear power plant or nuclear facility. The definition of safety culture and the related concepts presented in the IAEA literature are widely known to experts. Since the publication of Safety Culture, issued by the IAEA as INSAG-4 in 1991, the IAEA has produced a number of publications on strengthening the safety culture in organizations that operate nuclear power plants and nuclear facilities. However, until now the focus has been primarily on the area of operations. Apart from operations, maintenance in plants and nuclear facilities is an aspect that deserves special attention, as maintenance activities can have both a direct and an indirect effect on equipment reliability. Adverse safety effects can arise, depending upon the level of skill of the personnel involved, safety awareness and the complexity of the work process. Any delayed effects resulting from challenges to maintenance can cause interruptions in operation, and hence affect the safety of a plant or facility. Building upon earlier IAEA publications on this topic, this Safety Report reviews how challenges to the maintenance of nuclear power plants can affect safety culture. It also highlights indications of a weakening safety culture. The challenges described are in areas such as maintenance management; human resources management; plant condition assessment and the business environment. The steps that some Member States have taken to address safety culture aspects are detailed and singled out as good practices, with a view to disseminating and exchanging experiences and lessons learned. Although this report is primarily directed at plant maintenance organizations, the subject matter is applicable to a wider audience, including plant contracting organizations and regulatory authorities

  3. The practical implementation of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When, during the review of the Chernobyl accident, the INSAG Committee introduced the term 'Safety Culture', it spread very quickly. Later on, as a result of activities sponsored by the IAEA, the original Safety Culture concept was extended to include a large number of issues that are typical requirements of Quality Assurance Unfortunately, the way in which certain organizations approached this subject has not helped to find the right way for it to be implemented. Safety Culture is not mentioned at all in ICRP-60 and in the new recommendations of 2005 it does not even appear in the principal body and only a minor reference exists. The IAEA's Basic Safety Standards deal with the requirements for Safety Culture and for Quality Assurance as absolutely individual issues; however, Safety Culture should be considered as a part of the Quality System. Very recently the situation was strongly improved by the release of the new standard 'The Management System for Facilities and Activities' Safety Requirements GS-R-3. The EURATOM 97/43 Directive, used in the European Community for the preparation of regulations for medical practice, which, while inspired by ICRP-73, does not even mention Safety Culture. Increasing personnel training is not enough if, at the same time, there are no activities aimed at improving their attitude towards quality and safety. To achieve a change in Culture in the organization or to implant the new concept, there must be a suitable supporting Methodology to allow it to be put into practice. If not, the Safety Culture will only be a simple expression of wishes without any chance of success. Criteria, methodology and effective practical tools must be available. Two basic principles for the management system (GSR-3): a) All the tasks may be considered as 'a system of interactive processes'; b) All persons must take part in order to achieve safety and quality. These two principles are the basis of the strategy for the development of a Safety Culture

  4. Safety evaluation by living probabilistic safety assessment and safety indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A continuous monitoring and follow-up of the risks involved in the operation of a nuclear power plant is an important part of the operational safety management. In living probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), the plant specific PSA is applied in daily safety work to support solving of short-term problems, and maintaining as well as enhancing safety in the long term. A quicker and more problem oriented feedback of operating experience can be achieved by well defined safety indicators, highlighting important trends and possible recurrence of operational problems at the plant. Living PSA and safety indicators should be used in combination to effectively support decision making on safety related issues. The Nordic NKS/SIK-1 project also showed how a more systematic and clear basis for such decisions can be formulated by the method of decision analysis. (au) 18 refs

  5. Safety goals and safety culture opening plenary. 1. WANO's Role in Maintaining and Improving Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past several years, operators of the world's nuclear plants have compiled an increasingly impressive record of operational performance. Among the many factors that have led to this improvement are the unprecedented cooperation and information exchange among the world's nuclear operators. This paper presents the World Association of Nuclear Operators (WANO) operating experience program and WANO peer review program as examples of the kinds of interaction that are occurring around the globe to maintain and improve the nuclear safety culture. In addition, some unique features of WANO are discussed. WANO has established four programs to help its members communicate effectively with each other. These include the exchange of operating experiences, voluntary peer reviews, professional and technical development, and technical support and exchange. The operating experience program alerts members to events that have occurred at other NPPs and enables members to take appropriate actions to prevent event recurrence. When an event occurs at a plant, management at that plant analyses the event and completes an event report, which is then sent to the WANO regional center to which the plant belongs. After a regional center review and necessary iteration, the report is posted onto the WANO Web site to make it available to all WANO members. By the end of 2000, more than 1500 event reports had been posted. The WANO Peer Review Program is a unique opportunity for members to learn and share the best worldwide insights into safe and reliable nuclear operations. The peer review program has become one of WANO's most important activities containing all essential elements of WANO's mission. A WANO peer review team consists of 15 to 16 people with NPP experience; most team members are from countries outside the one that they are visiting. These teams of peers from plants around the world visit host plants upon request to identify strengths and areas for improvement, with a strong

  6. Current Activities on Nuclear Safety Culture in Korea. How to meet the challenges for Safety and Safety Culture?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Statement of Nuclear Safety Policy' declared by the Korean Government elucidates adherence to the principle of 'priority to safety'. The 3. Comprehensive Nuclear Energy Promotion Plan (2007-2011) more specifically addressed the necessity to develop and apply 'safety culture evaluation criteria' and to strengthen safety management of concerned organizations in an autonomous way. Putting these policies as a backdrop, Korean Government has taken diverse safety culture initiatives and has encouraged the relevant organizations to develop safety culture practices of their own accord. Accordingly, KHNP, the operating organization in Korea, developed a 'safety culture performance indicator', which has been used to evaluate safety mind of employees and the evaluation results have been continuously reflected in operational management and training programs. Furthermore, KHNP inserted 'nuclear safety culture subject' into every course of more than two week length, and provided employees with special lectures on safety culture. KINS, the regulatory organization, developed indicators for the safety culture evaluation based on the IAEA Guidelines. Also, KINS has hosted an annual Nuclear Safety Technology Information Meeting to share information between regulatory organizations and industries. Furthermore, KINS provided a nuclear safety culture class to the new employees and they are given a chance to participate in performance of a role-reversal socio-drama. Additionally, KINS developed a safety culture training program, published training materials and conducted a 'Nuclear Safety Culture Basic Course' in October 2007, 4 times of which are planed this year. In conclusion, from Government to relevant organizations, 'nuclear safety culture' concept is embraced as important and has been put into practice on a variety of forms. Specifically, 'education and training' is a starting line and sharing information and lessons learned through symposium, meeting, and etc are also done in a

  7. A qualification of the concept safety culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyhrberg, Mette Bang

    The number of accidents at work in Denmark has not declined in the last decade, despite different types of preventions methods. Traditionally preventions have been based on regulation of human behaviour or machinery. Recently safety culture has been presented as a new approach for the prevention ...... occupational accidents. The implicit models of organisation and man within mainstream safety culture approaches seem to be too rationalistic compared with day to day life of organisations. A safety culture concept is presented where the basis is symbolism.......The number of accidents at work in Denmark has not declined in the last decade, despite different types of preventions methods. Traditionally preventions have been based on regulation of human behaviour or machinery. Recently safety culture has been presented as a new approach for the prevention of...

  8. Nuclear safety culture and integrated risk management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A primary focus of nuclear safety is the prevention of large releases of radioactivity in the case of low-probability severe accidents. An analysis of the anatomy of nuclear (Chernobyl, Three Mile Island Unit 2) and nonnuclear (Challenger, Bhopal, Piper Alpha, etc.) severe accidents yields four broad categories of root causes: human (operating crew response), machine (design with its basic flaws), media (natural phenomena, operational considerations, political environment, commercial pressures, etc.)-providing triggering events, and management (basic organizational safety culture flaws). A strong management can minimize the contributions of humans, machines, and media to the risk arising from the operation of hazardous facilities. One way that management can have a powerful positive influence is through the establishment of a proper safety culture. The term safety culture is used as defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency's International Safety Advisory Group

  9. Safety culture - The way of thinking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Safety Series No. 75-INSAG-4 published by the International Atomic Energy Agency in 1991 points out, in clear-cut terms, that 'the human mind is very effective in detecting and eliminating potential problems, and this has an important positive impact on safety. For these reasons, individuals carry a heavy responsibility. Beyond adherence to defined procedures, they must act in accordance with a Safety Culture. The organizations operating nuclear plants, and all other organizations with a safety responsibility, must so develop safety culture as to prevent human error and to benefit from the positive aspects of human action'. This paper showcases the implementation of nuclear safety culture at China Guangdong Nuclear Power Holding Co., Ltd. (CGNPC) in relation to the operation of the Guangdong Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station (GNPS) and the Ling Ao Nuclear Power Station (LNPS) comprising 4 Pressurized Water Reactors of 1000 MWe in Shenzhen, Guangdong, China. It emphasizes that the cultivation of a nuclear safety mentality or mindset is essential to the safe and stable operation of the nuclear plant. To this end, compliance with the rules and practices fully consistent with the nuclear safety culture requirements must be put into place at all times such that it becomes second nature to the staff of the nuclear plant. As a result, human error can be forestalled to avoid maloperations or malpractices in operating the nuclear plant. This paper highlights the need for a keen sense of nuclear safety culture from top to bottom at the nuclear plant, and emphasizes that, without safety, there is no viable nuclear plant, as there would be no economic return for the operator. A safe nuclear plant is undoubtedly an economically competitive plant. To ensure safety, operators must operate the plant in a way that is free from human error, viz. nuclear safety culture has become a way of thinking tantamount to second nature for the operating crews. As is well known

  10. Safety culture improvement. An adaptive management framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) established the safety culture concept as a proactive mean to contribute to safety improvement, starting a worldwide safety culture enhancement program within nuclear organizations mainly focused on nuclear power plants. More recently, the safety culture concept has been extended to non-power applications such as nuclear research reactors and nuclear technological research and development organizations. In 1999, the Nuclear Engineering Institute (IEN), a research and technological development unit of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), started a management change program aiming at improving its performance level of excellence. This change program has been developed assuming the occurrence of complex causal inter-relationships between the organizational culture and the implementation of the management process. A systematic and adaptive management framework comprised of a safety culture improvement practice integrated to a management process based on the Criteria for Excellence of the Brazilian Quality Award Model, has been developed and implemented at IEN. The case study has demonstrated that the developed framework makes possible an effective safety culture improvement and simultaneously facilitates an effective implementation of the management process, thus providing some governance to the change program. (author)

  11. 2013 Traffic Safety Culture Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... endorse products or manufacturers. ©2014, AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety Introduction In the quarter century from 1988 through 2012, the lives of 1,018,581 men, women, and children have ended violently as the result ...

  12. Patient and Facility Safety in Hemodialysis: Opportunities and Strategies to Develop a Culture of Safety

    OpenAIRE

    Garrick, Renee; Kliger, Alan; Stefanchik, Beth

    2012-01-01

    Patient safety is the foundation of high-quality health care. More than 350,000 patients receive dialysis in the United States, and the safety of their care is ultimately the responsibility of the facility medical director. The medical director must establish a culture of safety in the dialysis unit and lead the quality assessment and performance improvement process. Several lines of investigation, including surveys of patients and dialysis professionals, have helped to identify important are...

  13. Safety culture in nuclear power plants. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a consequence of the INSAG-4 report on 'safety culture', published by the IAEA in 1991, the Federal Commission for the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants (KSA) decided to hold a one-day seminar as a first step in this field. The KSA is an advisory body of the Federal Government and the Federal Department of Transport and Energy (EVED). It comments on applications for licenses, observes the operation of nuclear power plants, assists with the preparation of regulations, monitors the progress of research in the field of nuclear safety, and makes proposals for research tasks. The objective of this seminar was to familiarise the participants with the principles of 'safety culture', with the experiences made in Switzerland and abroad with existing concepts, as well as to eliminate existing prejudices. The main points dealt with at this seminar were: - safety culture from the point of view of operators, - safety culture from the point of view of the authorities, - safety culture: collaboration between power plants, the authorities and research organisations, - trends and developments in the field of safety culture. Invitations to attend this seminar were extended to the management boards of companies operating Swiss nuclear power plants, and to representatives of the Swiss authorities responsible for the safety of nuclear power plants. All these organisations were represented by a large number of executive and specialist staff. We would like to express our sincerest thanks to the Head of the Federal Department of Transport and Energy for his kind patronage of this seminar. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  14. Enhancing safety culture. Experiences within Nuclear Electric plc. United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear electric inherited an enviable safety record over a thirty year period from its predecessor, the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB). However , the company has not been complacent, and continues to recognize that there are still many opportunities to improve safety culture within the company. This paper describes two separate aspects of safety culture enhancement that are current within the company. The first is a review of operational experience that has highlighted many organisational characteristics and issues that can affect safety culture. Standard audit and plant evaluation findings were aggregated and then assessed, leading to the identification of common problems and underlying issues. The findings have confirmed that the programme of change within the company, focused around continuous quality improvement concepts, embodies all the necessary elements to address the issues and enhance safety culture if used appropriately. The challenge is now to ensure that each units business planning process adequately addresses the underlying issues. The second part of the paper presents just one example of specific developments at NE's power stations. At hinkley point, there is a strong desire to enhance safety culture at all levels on the station. Various safety awareness raising workshops that have been developed, together with a programme designed to assist the team leaders (first line supervisors) foster an improved safety culture within their teams. The first phase of the programme is coming to completion, and appears to have had considerable effect in raising awareness of the issues amongst team leaders and their line management. It has identified several key issues for the senior management team to address. Methods of providing more detailed practical assistance to the team leaders are being developed to assist the change in attitudes and behaviours required to further enhance the station's safety culture. (author)

  15. Safety culture in Bayesian and legal contexts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While contemplating the similarities between the law of torts and concepts of safety, the author realized that there was a close correspondence between the law of negligence and the way safety ought to be generally defined. This definition of safety is provided herein. A safety culture must have an adequate definition of safety in order to function most effectively. This paper provides a practical definition of safety that answers the question 'How safe is safe enough? The development rests on two bases: the subjectivistic-Bayesian definition of probability and certain legal definitions primarily from the tort law of negligence. The development also leads to the conclusion that one cannot generally expect greater specificity in determining how safe is safe enough than one finds in the legal definition of liability under the tort of negligence. It then follows that some of the public's aversion to complex technical undertakings is rooted in its typically intuitive and vague notions concerning safety

  16. Nuclear safety - Culture or obsession?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although nuclear activities are among the safest, having an enviable record in this respect, public perception is quite different. It is argued here that, regardless of the fact that environmental groups and the media in general look unfavourably towards the nuclear sector, the emphasis the sector places on safety matters is a liability rather than a asset. In short, public acceptance of a risky enterprise increases with the safety concerns shown by an entrepreneur up to a certain point. Beyond this threshold the enterprise is found too risky to be accepted, and it looks like the nuclear establishment has already crossed it. Ideas for further relationship with the public are then shown. (author)

  17. Safety Culture on radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It can be defined radiation protection culture as the set of technical and social standards applied to the management of the operation of a nuclear facility concerning the reduction of the exposure to radiation of workers and members of the public, together with the behaviour and attitudes of the individuals from the organization towards that objective. Because the basic principles of radiation protection are self-evident and are totally justified, and the thesis drawn from the article is that no effective radiation protection culture yet exists within the organization, it must be concluded that what is wrong from the system are the attitudes and behavior of the individuals. In this article some factors and elements needed to motivate all persons within the organization towards the creation of a radiation protection culture are delineated and presented. (Author)

  18. Safety culture and quality management of Kartini research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation for assessing the safety culture and quality of safety management of Kartini research reactor is presented. The method is based on the concept of management control of safety (audit) as well as by using the developed method i.e. the questionnaires concerning areas of relevance which have to be answered with value statements. There are seven statements or qualifiers in answering the questions. Since such statements are vague, they are represented by fuzzy numbers. The weaknesses can be identified from the different areas contemplated. The evaluation result show that the quality of safety management of Kartini research reactor is globally rated as 'Average'. The operator behavior in the implementation of 'safety culture' concept is found as a weakness, therefore this area should be improved. (author)

  19. Safety culture and quality management of Kartini research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syarip [Yogyakarta Nuclear Research Centre, Yogyakarta (Indonesia); Hauptmanns, Ulrich [Department of Plant Design and Safety, Otto-Von-Guericke-University, Magdeburg (Germany)

    1999-10-01

    The evaluation for assessing the safety culture and quality of safety management of Kartini research reactor is presented. The method is based on the concept of management control of safety (audit) as well as by using the developed method i.e. the questionnaires concerning areas of relevance which have to be answered with value statements. There are seven statements or qualifiers in answering the questions. Since such statements are vague, they are represented by fuzzy numbers. The weaknesses can be identified from the different areas contemplated. The evaluation result show that the quality of safety management of Kartini research reactor is globally rated as 'Average'. The operator behavior in the implementation of 'safety culture' concept is found as a weakness, therefore this area should be improved. (author)

  20. Safety culture at pickering nuclear division

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickering nuclear division is an 8 x 540 MWe CANDU generating station with a staff of about 2400. At the beginning of the 1990's management and employee representatives recognized the need for an improved nuclear safety culture. Pickering established a Nuclear Integrity Review Committee (PNIRC) which reviews nuclear safety performance and recommends policies strategies and programs to achieve excellence. Root cause analysis is used to identify problem areas. Members of PNIRC include employee representatives and managers of functions important to nuclear safety. PNIRC supports management by developing a nuclear safety objective for the strategic business plan. The objective is co mmunicated to employees so that all can understand how personal efforts contribute to Pickering's performance improvement. Pickering uses a simple management model with four elements - managed environment, people, procedures, and equipment. An early managed environment initiative stated ten simple reactor safety 'commandments' governing the conduct of all employees. Managers and supervisors declared themselves committed to 'conservative decision making' in nuclear safety matters. Root cause analysis identified that people needed more knowledge and training in operating policies and principles (OP and P's) that describe safe bounds of operation. A 'self checking' program helps staff avoid errors. Work important to safety is done according to procedures. A procedural compliance process helps ensure correct procedures are available and used. Employee teamwork and a performance improvement culture has assisted staff in making improvements to availability of special and standby safety system equipment. Improvements in nuclear safety culture at Pickering have contributed to improvements in nuclear safety performance. OP and P non-compliances have decreased and calculated availability of important safety systems has increased. (author)

  1. Institutional approach to power plant safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thesis of this paper is that the requirements for safety culture in nuclear power plants can be failing to recognize contradictions in the various pressures on the organization that have to be balanced in an optimal manner. Nuclear power plants are influenced by pressures from both external and internal sources, that can be viewed as comprising the two main institutionalizing influences on the organization. Most of the effort on safety culture definition and implementation has addressed the utility and the power plant, producing definitions of good practices and of hindrances to good utility safety culture. These often lack formal representation of the demands of the organization and of its environment that are related to institutional processes rather than to productivity. This paper adopts an institutional approach to organizations as a way of clarifying the nature of the interfaces between the power plant and its external agencies, and their respective safety culture requirements. The plant must respond to its own internal organizational demands that are both technical, related to efficiency and productivity, and institutionalizing in terms of organizational processes. External agencies create environmental demands that are primatily institutionalizing in nature, such as the legitimate requirements of society as represented by the regulatory body ; standards of practice desctibed by professional groups; or obligation to conform to international commitments. These inputs mu st be cognizant of all of the parameters of the plant's functioning if they are not to risk detracting from plant efficiency, and so safety. This is a measure of the safety culture of these external agencies. The utility's safety culture is dependent on its abi1ity to balance external demands , internal processes and technical imperatives. (author)

  2. Safety Assessment of Probiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahtinen, Sampo J.; Boyle, Robert J.; Margolles, Abelardo; Frias, Rafael; Gueimonde, Miguel

    Viable microbes have been a natural part of human diet throughout the history of mankind. Today, different fermented foods and other foods containing live microbes are consumed around the world, including industrialized countries, where the diet has become increasingly sterile during the last decades. By definition, probiotics are viable microbes with documented beneficial effects on host health. Probiotics have an excellent safety record, both in humans and in animals. Despite the wide and continuously increasing consumption of probiotics, adverse events related to probiotic use are extremely rare. Many popular probiotic strains such as lactobacilli and bifidobacteria can be considered as components of normal healthy intestinal microbiota, and thus are not thought to pose a risk for the host health - in contrast, beneficial effects on health are commonly reported. Nevertheless, the safety of probiotics is an important issue, in particular in the case of new potential probiotics which do not have a long history of safe use, and of probiotics belonging to species for which general assumption of safety cannot be made. Furthermore, safety of probiotics in high-risk populations such as critically ill patients and immunocompromized subjects deserves particular attention, as virtually all reported cases of bacteremia and fungemia associated with probiotic use, involve subjects with underlying diseases, compromised immune system or compromised intestinal integrity.

  3. Evaluation of Patient Safety Culture and Organizational Culture as a Step in Patient Safety Improvement in a Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afrisya Iriviranty

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Establishment of patient safety culture is the first step in the improvement of patient safety. As such, assessment of patient safety culture in hospitals is of paramount importance. Patient safety culture is an inherent component of organizational culture, so that the study of organizational culture is required in developing patient safety. This study aimed to evaluate patient safety culture among the clinical staff of a hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia and identify organizational culture profile. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional, descriptive, qualitative study was conducted in a hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia in 2014. Sample population consisted of nurses, midwives, physicians, pediatricians, obstetrics and gynecology specialists, laboratory personnel, and pharmacy staff (n=152. Data were collected using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture developed by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ and Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI. Results: Teamwork within units” was the strongest dimension of patient safety culture (91.7%, while “staffing” and “non-punitive response to error” were the weakest dimensions (22.7%. Moreover, clan culture was the most dominant type of organizational culture in the studied hospital. This culture serves as a guide for the changes in the healthcare organization, especially in the development of patient safety culture. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, healthcare providers were positively inclined toward the patient safety culture within the organization. As such, the action plan was designed through consensus decision-making and deemed effective in articulating patient safety in the vision and mission of the organization.

  4. The establishment and implementation of safety culture policy in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the progress in the establishment and implementation of safety culture in Indonesia, especially in BATAN, with special attention given to the development of safety culture indicators. The spirit of safety culture implementation is marked firstly by declaration of Policy Statement by the Head of BATAN. In order to monitor the implementation of safety culture, six indicators are established. Based on those indicators, it is seemed that at present the progress of implementation of safety culture is quite good enough. (author)

  5. Safety culture at the Mochovce nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The approach taken by the Mochovce NPP management to safety culture is described. Activities implemented at the plant since 1986 with the aim to enhance the safety culture level through each employee's firm awareness of the safety culture issue and so to minimize the impact of the human factor on operational events in all safety areas are highlighted. The approach to safety culture at the plant was ultimately reflected in the culture of the whole company. (orig.)

  6. Safety culture and goals of the Dukovany nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics are dealt with in relation to the safety culture at the Dukovany nuclear power plant: Management strategy, involving people in a change, measuring how the goals are being met, and company culture; safety culture. (author)

  7. Safety culture at ANAV; Cultura de seguridad en ANAV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Madrid, B.

    2010-07-01

    Recent safety culture assessments detected various actions, paractices and behaviours that did not follow the standards, expectations and guidelines that are essentiall for all safe and highly reliable companies, as we aim to be. For this reason, as parto of the PROCURA project, a wide range of actions have been undertaken o reinforce certain individual, group and organisational behaviours. (Author).

  8. Safety culture in design. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macchi, L.; Pietikaeinen, E.; Liinasuo, M.; Savioja, P.; Reiman, T.; Wahlstroem, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Kahlbom, U. [Risk Pilot AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Rollenhagen, C. [Vattenfall, Stockholm, (Sweden)

    2013-04-15

    In this report we approach design from a safety culture approach As this research area is new and understudied, we take a wide scope on the issue. Different theoretical perspectives that can be taken when improving safety of the design process are considered in this report. We suggest that in the design context the concept of safety culture should be expanded from an organizational level to the level of the network of organizations involved in the design activity. The implication of approaching the design process from a safety culture perspective are discussed and the results of the empirical part of the research are presented. In the interview study in Finland and Sweden we identified challenges and opportunities in the design process from safety culture perspective. Also, a small part of the interview study concentrated on state of the art human factors engineering (HFE) practices in Finland and the results relating to that are presented. This report provide a basis for future development of systematic good design practices and for providing guidelines that can lead to safe and robust technical solutions. (Author)

  9. Safety culture in design. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report we approach design from a safety culture approach As this research area is new and understudied, we take a wide scope on the issue. Different theoretical perspectives that can be taken when improving safety of the design process are considered in this report. We suggest that in the design context the concept of safety culture should be expanded from an organizational level to the level of the network of organizations involved in the design activity. The implication of approaching the design process from a safety culture perspective are discussed and the results of the empirical part of the research are presented. In the interview study in Finland and Sweden we identified challenges and opportunities in the design process from safety culture perspective. Also, a small part of the interview study concentrated on state of the art human factors engineering (HFE) practices in Finland and the results relating to that are presented. This report provide a basis for future development of systematic good design practices and for providing guidelines that can lead to safe and robust technical solutions. (Author)

  10. Effects of patient safety culture interventions on incident reporting in general practice : A cluster randomised trial a cluster randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, Natasha J.; Langelaan, Maaike; Verheij, Theo J M; Wagner, Cordula; Zwart, Dorien L M

    2015-01-01

    Background: A constructive safety culture is essential for the successful implementation of patient safety improvements. Aim: To assess the effect of two patient safety culture interventions on incident reporting as a proxy of safety culture. Design and setting: A three-arm cluster randomised trial

  11. Moving towards a new safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the advent of nuclear power over fifty years ago, the design, licensing, operation, and maintenance of nuclear power plants have been based on prescriptive, deterministic criteria. During this time period, rapidly evolving regulations and a lack of operating experience created a culture that resulted in regulatory over-prescription and little consideration for operational flexibility and experiences. Consequently, this safety culture has had a significant impact on the rising operation and maintenance costs of nuclear power plants. 1 fig

  12. Development and formation of safety cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP) is the largest project ever undertaken by British Nuclear Fuels plc (BNFL) and its success is important for the future of the company. The company recognised at the planning stage that to be profitable, THORP had to operate both safely and with a smaller workforce. The establishment of an appropriate culture which saw safety and productivity as essential and complimentary at the beginning of the life of the plant was therefore vital for the future success of THORP The key factors in the THORP Culture formation were : The recruitment policy; the training policy; measures taken to ensure participation from the workforce; teamworking support; communication initiatives; clear statement of cultural principles; clear and demonstrable leadership. The current stage of evolution has seen some positive results namely: A clear commitment to involving all personnel in problem solving and task organisation, including safety; a confident workforce with an improved ability to communicate; the capability of the majority of the workforce to work as a team; safety awareness of the workforce is generally high along with an awareness of environmental, commercial and (political) external issues affecting the THORP business; a commitment to continuous improvement. The development of the safety culture within THORP has also had challenges, some as a result of the composite nature of the workforce, and others as side effects of the culture shaping measures. Management have recognised these, and using the results of attitude surveys, are working with the workforce to overcome their effects. Clear recognition has been achieved that the establishment of positive behaviours is a key. step in generating the culture required summarising, there is recognition that the design of safety management systems and improvement programmes, should be based on the principles of human psychology and behaviour. which includes wide participation by the workforce

  13. Hospital Safety Culture in Taiwan: A Nationwide Survey Using Chinese Version Safety Attitude Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Wui-Chiang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Safety activities have been initiated at many hospitals in Taiwan, but little is known about the safety culture at these hospitals. The aims of this study were to verify a safety culture survey instrument in Chinese and to assess hospital safety culture in Taiwan. Methods The Taiwan Patient Safety Culture Survey was conducted in 2008, using the adapted Safety Attitude Questionnaire in Chinese (SAQ-C. Hospitals and their healthcare workers participated in the survey on a voluntary basis. The psychometric properties of the five SAQ-C dimensions were examined, including teamwork climate, safety climate, job satisfaction, perception of management, and working conditions. Additional safety measures were asked to assess healthcare workers' attitudes toward their collaboration with nurses, physicians, and pharmacists, respectively, and perceptions of hospitals' encouragement of safety reporting, safety training, and delivery delays due to communication breakdowns in clinical areas. The associations between the respondents' attitudes to each SAQ-C dimension and safety measures were analyzed by generalized estimating equations, adjusting for the clustering effects at hospital levels. Results A total of 45,242 valid questionnaires were returned from 200 hospitals with a mean response rate of 69.4%. The Cronbach's alpha was 0.792 for teamwork climate, 0.816 for safety climate, 0.912 for job satisfaction, 0.874 for perception of management, and 0.785 for working conditions. Confirmatory factor analyses demonstrated a good model fit for each dimension and the entire construct. The percentage of hospital healthcare workers holding positive attitude was 48.9% for teamwork climate, 45.2% for perception of management, 42.1% for job satisfaction, 37.2% for safety climate, and 31.8% for working conditions. There were wide variations in the range of SAQ-C scores in each dimension among hospitals. Compared to those without positive attitudes

  14. Current Activities on Nuclear Safety Culture in Korea. How to meet the challenges for Safety and Safety Culture?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Chaewoon [International Policy Department Policy and Standard Division, Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19 Gusung-Dong Yuseong-Ku, 305-338 DAEJEON (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    'Statement of Nuclear Safety Policy' declared by the Korean Government elucidates adherence to the principle of 'priority to safety'. The 3. Comprehensive Nuclear Energy Promotion Plan (2007-2011) more specifically addressed the necessity to develop and apply 'safety culture evaluation criteria' and to strengthen safety management of concerned organizations in an autonomous way. Putting these policies as a backdrop, Korean Government has taken diverse safety culture initiatives and has encouraged the relevant organizations to develop safety culture practices of their own accord. Accordingly, KHNP, the operating organization in Korea, developed a 'safety culture performance indicator', which has been used to evaluate safety mind of employees and the evaluation results have been continuously reflected in operational management and training programs. Furthermore, KHNP inserted 'nuclear safety culture subject' into every course of more than two week length, and provided employees with special lectures on safety culture. KINS, the regulatory organization, developed indicators for the safety culture evaluation based on the IAEA Guidelines. Also, KINS has hosted an annual Nuclear Safety Technology Information Meeting to share information between regulatory organizations and industries. Furthermore, KINS provided a nuclear safety culture class to the new employees and they are given a chance to participate in performance of a role-reversal socio-drama. Additionally, KINS developed a safety culture training program, published training materials and conducted a 'Nuclear Safety Culture Basic Course' in October 2007, 4 times of which are planed this year. In conclusion, from Government to relevant organizations, 'nuclear safety culture' concept is embraced as important and has been put into practice on a variety of forms. Specifically, 'education and training' is a starting line and sharing

  15. Experience of IPEN - CNEN/SP in the execution of the first phase of the safety culture enhancement programme at IEA-R1 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the methodology applied and the main results achieved in the implementation of the first phase of the safety culture enhancement programme at IEA-R1 research reactor. This methodology consisted of the following steps: safety culture assessment; identification of weak points related to safety; elaboration and implementation of an action plan aiming at the enhancement of safety culture in the organization. The safety culture assessment was performed using a triangulated approach. The safety culture assessment was carried out in two stages: safety perception survey and safety culture self assessment. (author)

  16. SURVEYS OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AND SAFETY CULTURE IN NUCLEAR POWER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a survey of organizational culture at a nuclear power plant are summarized and compared with those of a similar survey which has been described in the literature on high-reliability organizations. A general-purpose cultural inventory showed a profile of organizational style similar to that reported in the literature; the factor structure for the styles was also similar to that of the plant previously described. A specialized scale designed to measure safety culture did not distinguish among groups within the organization that would be expected to differ

  17. Surveys of organizational culture and safety culture in nuclear power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Walter S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2000-07-30

    The results of a survey of organizational culture at a nuclear power plant are summarized and compared with those of a similar survey which has been described in the literature on ''high-reliability organizations''. A general-purpose cultural inventory showed a profile of organizational style similar to that reported in the literature; the factor structure for the styles was also similar to that of the plant previously described. A specialized scale designed to measure ''safety culture'' did not distinguished among groups within the organization that would be expected to differ.

  18. Managing for safety and safety culture within the UK nuclear industry. A regulator's perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper outlines the basis of the legal system for the regulation of health and safety at work within the United Kingdom (UK), and in particular, the regulation of the nuclear industry. The framework, formulated by the regulator, which has been published as a practical guide for directors, managers, health and safety professionals and employee representatives for the successful management of health and safety is explained. This guidance, however, concentrates, to a large extent, on management systems and only addresses in part the types of issues, such as behaviours, values, attitudes and beliefs which contribute to the safety culture of an organization. The regulator of the UK nuclear industry has considered research, and other work, carried out by several organizations in this area, notably the Advisory Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (ACSNI) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and produced its own framework for managing for safety at nuclear installations. As a regulator, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE), and its inspectorate responsible for regulation of the nuclear industry, HM Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (HMNII), are not the appropriate organization to assess the safety culture of an organization, but positively encourage organizations to both carry out this assessment themselves and to monitor their performance. To this end, HSE has developed, and made available, the Health and Safety Climate Tool which is aimed at providing organizations with information which can be used as part of a continuous improvement process. (author)

  19. Analysis of safety culture components based on site interviews

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety culture of an organization is influenced by many factors such as employee's moral, safety policy of top management and questioning attitude among site staff. First this paper analyzes key factors of safety culture on the basis of site interviews. Then the paper presents a safety culture composite model and its applicability in various contexts. (author)

  20. Development of safety culture - A Chinese traditional cultural perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Living in a social community, the culture of an enterprise is certainly under the influence of that society. Safety culture of nuclear utilities is the core of the enterprise culture. As a formal expression as defined in INSAG 3 and 4 by IAEA, it as a matter of fact originated from the summing up of the experiences of western nuclear industry, particularly after such epoch-making accidents of Three Miles Island and Chernobyl. In view of the geographical culture theory, whether or not this conception of western industrial culture will be absorbed and assimilated by Chinese Nuclear Industry is a challenging issue. This is because, on the one hand, Nuclear Power is comparatively speaking a newly developing industry in China and, on the other hand, China has enjoyed an uninterrupted history of traditional culture over five thousand years. In other words, whether the new and alien values will conflict with or be constructively assimilated by our traditional mindset is a critical question to be answered in any development program of safety culture. (author)

  1. AGR core safety assessment methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To demonstrate the safety of its gas-cooled graphite-moderated AGR reactors, nuclear safety assessments of the cores are based upon a methodology which demonstrates no component failures, geometrical stability of the structure and material properties bounded by a database. All AGRs continue to meet these three criteria. However, predictions of future core behaviour indicate that the safety case methodology will eventually need to be modified to deal with new phenomena. A new approach to the safety assessment of the cores is currently under development, which can take account of these factors while at the same time providing the same level of protection for the cores. This approach will be based on the functionality of the core: unhindered movement of control rods, continued adequate cooling of the fuel and the core, continued ability to charge and discharge fuel. (author). 5 figs

  2. Nuclear safety culture evaluation model based on SSE-CMM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety culture, which is of great significance to establish safety objectives, characterizes level of enterprise safety production and development. Traditional safety culture evaluation models emphasis on thinking and behavior of individual and organization, and pay attention to evaluation results while ignore process. Moreover, determining evaluation indicators lacks objective evidence. A novel multidimensional safety culture evaluation model, which has scientific and completeness, is addressed by building an preliminary mapping between safety culture and SSE-CMM's (Systems Security Engineering Capability Maturity Model) process area and generic practice. The model focuses on enterprise system security engineering process evaluation and provides new ideas and scientific evidences for the study of safety culture. (authors)

  3. Safety assessments for potential exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety Assessment of potential exposures have been carried out in major practices, namely: industrial radiography, gamma irradiators and electron accelerators used in industry and research, and radiotherapy. This paper focuses on reviewing safety assessment methodologies and using developed software to analyse radiological accidents, also review, and discuss these past accidents.The primary objective of the assessment is to assess the adequacy of planned or existing measures for protection and safety and to identify any additional measures that should be put in place. As such, both routine use of the source and the probability and magnitude of potential exposures arising from accidents or incidents should be considered. Where the assessment indicates that there is a realistic possibility of an accident affecting workers or members of the public or having consequences for the environment, the registrant or licensee should prepare a suitable emergency plan. A safety assessment for normal operation addresses all the conditions under which the radiation source operates as expected, including all phases of the lifetime of the source. Due account needs to be taken of the different factors and conditions that will apply during non-operational phases, such as installation, commissioning and maintenance. (author)

  4. Confidence building in safety assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Future generations should be adequately protected from damage caused by the present disposal of radioactive waste. This presentation discusses the core of safety and performance assessment: The demonstration and building of confidence that the disposal system meets the safety requirements stipulated by society. The major difficulty is to deal with risks in the very long time perspective of the thousands of years during which the waste is hazardous. Concern about these problems has stimulated the development of the safety assessment discipline. The presentation concentrates on two of the elements of safety assessment: (1) Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis, and (2) validation and review. Uncertainty is associated both with respect to what is the proper conceptual model and with respect to parameter values for a given model. A special kind of uncertainty derives from the variation of a property in space. Geostatistics is one approach to handling spatial variability. The simplest way of doing a sensitivity analysis is to offset the model parameters one by one and observe how the model output changes. The validity of the models and data used to make predictions is central to the credibility of safety assessments for radioactive waste repositories. There are several definitions of model validation. The presentation discusses it as a process and highlights some aspects of validation methodologies

  5. Safety culture evaluation and asset root cause analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines the role of organizational and management factors in nuclear power plant safety through the use of operating experiences. The ASSET (Assessment of Safety Significant Events Team) reports of thirteen plants (total thirty events) have been analyzed in term of twenty organizational dimensions (factors) identified by Brookhaven National Laboratory and Pennsylvania State University. For three plants detailed results are reported in this paper. The results of thirteen plants are summarized in the form of a table. The study tends to confirm that organizational and management factors play an important role in plant safety. The twenty organizational dimensions and their definitions, in general, were adequate in this study. Formalization, Safety Culture, Technical Knowledge, Training, Roles-Responsibilities and Problem Identification appear to be key organizational factors which influence the safety of nuclear power plants studied

  6. The establishment of the safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first step in the establishment of the Safety Culture is splitting this concept into the elements involved in the same, so as to facilitate and approach to the issue. Then, two methodologies must be introduced, which shall perform independently, although synergically: (1) an 'updated' Quality Assurance Program and (2) a Program of Non-Technical (psychological and social) Activities aimed at stimulating motivation among the individuals in the Organization and at facilitating team work. Later on, once the necessary experience has been gained, the management of the organization must be based, essentially, on continuous development and on making full use of the skills of the individuals involved. In order to be successful, the establishment of a new culture of business management requires three key elements: 1) a working method containing the adequate indicators for measuring progress; 2) the commitment of the managers and the participation of all the staff; 3) the attainment of a net economical benefit that is made evident through an increase in productivity. However, all these actions refer only to one of the components of the system: the Operator of a Nuclear Power Plant, while Safety Culture must involve the whole National System, including the Government and the Regulatory Authority. The introduction of a new culture must necessarily bring along the acceptance of new concepts, new criteria and new methodologies among all the decision makers in the National System. Therefore, a change in culture must include a change in the culture of the Regulatory Authority. For instance, an evaluation of the Safety Culture is not workable by means of a conventional audit or a regulatory inspection. The fact is that what is easy to measure is not the main thing and what is difficult to measure is the only thing that actually matters. Summarizing: 'The Regulatory Authority shall be unable to verify the results because the evidences are intangible', but it shall indeed be able

  7. Measuring and benchmarking safety culture: application of the safety attitudes questionnaire to an acute medical admissions unit.

    OpenAIRE

    Relihan, E; Glynn, S; Daly, D.; Silke, B; Ryder, Sheila Anne

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the safety culture in an acute medical admissions unit (AMAU) of a teaching hospital in order to benchmark results against international data and guide a unit-based, integrated, risk management strategy. Methods: The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ), a validated instrument for the measurement of safety culture, was applied to an AMAU. All AMAU healthcare staff (n = 92) were surveyed: doctors, nurses, healthcare assistants (HCAs) and allied healthcare professiona...

  8. The Safety Culture of an Effective Nuclear Regulatory Body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fundamental objective of all nuclear safety regulatory bodies is to ensure that activities related to the peaceful use of nuclear energy are carried out in a safe manner within their respective countries. In order to effectively achieve this objective, the nuclear regulatory body requires specific characteristics, one of which is a healthy safety culture. This regulatory guidance report describes five principles that support the safety culture of an effective nuclear regulatory body. These principles concern leadership for safety, individual responsibility and accountability, co-operation and open communication, a holistic approach, and continuous improvement, learning and self-assessment. The report also addresses some of the challenges to a regulatory body's safety culture that must be recognised, understood and overcome. It provides a unique resource to countries with existing, mature regulators and can be used for benchmarking as well as for training and developing staff. It will also be useful for new entrant countries in the process of developing and maintaining an effective nuclear safety regulator. (authors)

  9. Review of regulatory activities associated with safety culture and management of safety at UK nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The management of health and safety and the culture of the people who participate in the process have been fundamental to the development of the United Kingdom's nuclear power programme. In the early years of development, the organizations and systems set up in companies which designed, manufactured, constructed and operated nuclear power stations were based upon the best practices needed to ensure, not only the operability of the plant, but also the safety of the workers at the power stations and the public. Over the years the nuclear industry in the UK has changed as has the regulatory body responsible for licensing. The economic environment within which the nuclear electricity generators operate has caused them to review their business and organizational structures. The UK nuclear industry has developed its approach to health and safety management and it is generally recognized that commercially successful companies have excellent health and safety records. This paper discusses the importance of effective health and safety management to the maintenance of high safety standards and the delivery of business goals. It also discusses the model that has been developed to help assess safety management in the changing UK nuclear industry. Finally, it comments upon regulatory developments in management of safety and safety culture. (author)

  10. Safety culture and networks of influence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Carlos Henrique V.; Barroso, Antonio C.O.; Vieira Neto, Antonio S., E-mail: carloshvp@usp.br, E-mail: barroso@ipen.br, E-mail: asvneto@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This paper analyzes the social networks that influence the formation and maintenance of the safety culture within the Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN-CNEN/SP). From the mapping and analysis of social networks, actors with a significant degree of influence were identified. Later using a questionnaire, the beliefs of the population sample were mapped. Thus, the importance of key actors in the network analysis could be confirmed statistically. Therefore, based on the mentioned methods we could demonstrate our hypothesis, that there are some social networks that are important in the formation of safety culture, as well as the fact that the influence of some distinguished actors plays an essential role in this amalgam. (author)

  11. Safety culture and networks of influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper analyzes the social networks that influence the formation and maintenance of the safety culture within the Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research (IPEN-CNEN/SP). From the mapping and analysis of social networks, actors with a significant degree of influence were identified. Later using a questionnaire, the beliefs of the population sample were mapped. Thus, the importance of key actors in the network analysis could be confirmed statistically. Therefore, based on the mentioned methods we could demonstrate our hypothesis, that there are some social networks that are important in the formation of safety culture, as well as the fact that the influence of some distinguished actors plays an essential role in this amalgam. (author)

  12. Measurement tools and process indicators of patient safety culture in primary care. A mixed methods study by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Parker, Dianne; Wensing, Michel; Esmail, Aneez; Valderas, Jose M

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: There is little guidance available to healthcare practitioners about what tools they might use to assess the patient safety culture. Objective: To identify useful tools for assessing patient safety culture in primary care organizations in Europe; to identify those aspects of performance that should be assessed when investigating the relationship between safety culture and performance in primary care. Methods: Two consensus-based studies were carried out, in which subject ...

  13. Safety culture measurements results in the agricultural sector

    OpenAIRE

    Terjék, László

    2013-01-01

    The author examined the safety culture and in relation to that the safety and health-related human factors. The examination was conducted primarily in the agricultural sector. Safety culture is also a key factor in business life especially in productive sectors. Basically, it determines the general work safety and occupational hazard situations, which may have an impact on business, competitiveness, and efficiency, and also employee satisfaction.The concept of safety culture is new in the app...

  14. Checklists, safety, my culture and me.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunathan, Karthik

    2012-07-01

    The world is not flat. Hierarchy is a fact of life in society and in healthcare institutions. National, specialty-specific and institutional cultures may play an important role in shaping today's patient-safety climate. The influence of power distance on safety interventions is under-studied. Checklists may make power distance-hampered negotiations easier by providing a standardised aviation-like framework for communications and by democratising the environment. By using surveys and simulation, we might discover patterns of potentially hidden yet problematic interactions that might foster maintenance of the error swamp. We need to understand how people interact as members of a group as this is crucial for the development of generalisable safety interventions. PMID:22491530

  15. Living probabilistic safety assessment (LPSA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past few years many nuclear power plant organizations have performed probabilistic safety assessments (PSAs) to identify and understand key plant vulnerabilities. As a result of the availability of these PSA studies, there is a desire to use them to enhance plant safety and to operate the nuclear stations in the most efficient manner. PSA is an effective tool for this purpose as it assists plant management to target resources where the largest benefit to plant safety can be obtained. However, any PSA which is to be used in this way must have a credible and defensible basis. Thus, it is very important to have a high quality 'living PSA' accepted by the plant and the regulator. With this background in mind, the IAEA has prepared this report on Living Probabilistic Safety Assessment (LPSA) which addresses the updating, documentation, quality assurance, and management and organizational requirements for LPSA. Deficiencies in the areas addressed in this report would seriously reduce the adequacy of the LPSA as a tool to support decision making at NPPs. This report was reviewed by a working group during a Technical Committee Meeting on PSA Applications to Improve NPP Safety held in Madrid, Spain, from 23 to 27 February 1998

  16. LNG Safety Assessment Evaluation Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muna, Alice Baca [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); LaFleur, Angela Christine [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Sandia National Laboratories evaluated published safety assessment methods across a variety of industries including Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), hydrogen, land and marine transportation, as well as the US Department of Defense (DOD). All the methods were evaluated for their potential applicability for use in the LNG railroad application. After reviewing the documents included in this report, as well as others not included because of repetition, the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Safety Plan Checklist is most suitable to be adapted to the LNG railroad application. This report was developed to survey industries related to rail transportation for methodologies and tools that can be used by the FRA to review and evaluate safety assessments submitted by the railroad industry as a part of their implementation plans for liquefied or compressed natural gas storage ( on-board or tender) and engine fueling delivery systems. The main sections of this report provide an overview of various methods found during this survey. In most cases, the reference document is quoted directly. The final section provides discussion and a recommendation for the most appropriate methodology that will allow efficient and consistent evaluations to be made. The DOE Hydrogen Safety Plan Checklist was then revised to adapt it as a methodology for the Federal Railroad Administration’s use in evaluating safety plans submitted by the railroad industry.

  17. Improving patient safety culture in general practice: An interview study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.J. Verbakel (Natasha J.); A.A. de Bont (Antoinette); T.J. Verheij; C. Wagner (Cordula); D.L.M. Zwart (Dorien Lyd Marieke)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground When improving patient safety a positive safety culture is key. As little is known about improving patient safety culture in primary care, this study examined whether administering a culture questionnaire with or without a complementary workshop could be used as an interventio

  18. WANO Actions to Reinforce the Operators’ Safety Culture Worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: WANO’s mission is to maximize the safety and reliability of nuclear power plants worldwide by working together to assess, to benchmark and improve performance through mutual support, exchange of information and emulation of best practices. Fukushima accident strongly impacted the nuclear community and it also brought WANO to question its positioning and scope of activities. Five strategic actions have hence been decided to strengthen WANO’s role, aiming to bring a more consistent, transparent and integrated response to the nuclear operators. WANO peer review process, which constitutes its core-business, has been intensified including corporate and pre start up peer reviews and, for Japanese plants, restart reviews. WANO also decided to expand its scope of activity to include elements of design, based on the principle that the role of a nuclear operator is not only to operate safely, but also to be sure that the plant he is operating is safe. WANO aims to cooperate strongly at both regional and international levels with all international safety organizations, being convinced that trust can be recovered with a strong safety commitment and credibility of both regulators and operators. All operators, without exception, are WANO members; if membership is voluntary, members have to fulfil strict obligations. Safety supposes that no operator feels isolated, or refuses openness and permanent self-questioning; it requests as well for WANO to ensure that cultural and sometimes political barriers do not hinder safety culture – the accident of Fukushima is from this perspective rich in teachings. In WANO, we believe that management system and practices are at the centre of safety culture, and a full involvement of top management (CEOs) of our members is absolutely requested. Through its commitments and rules, WANO pressures its members and help them reaching the highest possible standard of safety. We consider that we rely on each other to improve safety

  19. Does the concept of safety culture help or hinder systems thinking in safety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiman, Teemu; Rollenhagen, Carl

    2014-07-01

    The concept of safety culture has become established in safety management applications in all major safety-critical domains. The idea that safety culture somehow represents a "systemic view" on safety is seldom explicitly spoken out, but nevertheless seem to linger behind many safety culture discourses. However, in this paper we argue that the "new" contribution to safety management from safety culture never really became integrated with classical engineering principles and concepts. This integration would have been necessary for the development of a more genuine systems-oriented view on safety; e.g. a conception of safety in which human, technological, organisational and cultural factors are understood as mutually interacting elements. Without of this integration, researchers and the users of the various tools and methods associated with safety culture have sometimes fostered a belief that "safety culture" in fact represents such a systemic view about safety. This belief is, however, not backed up by theoretical or empirical evidence. It is true that safety culture, at least in some sense, represents a holistic term-a totality of factors that include human, organisational and technological aspects. However, the departure for such safety culture models is still human and organisational factors rather than technology (or safety) itself. The aim of this paper is to critically review the various uses of the concept of safety culture as representing a systemic view on safety. The article will take a look at the concepts of culture and safety culture based on previous studies, and outlines in more detail the theoretical challenges in safety culture as a systems concept. The paper also presents recommendations on how to make safety culture more systemic. PMID:24275532

  20. Activities on safety culture study. Study status in public and private sectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Around after entering in the 21st century, organizational accidents had occurred in Japan at various industries including nuclear industry, which were caused directly by unsafe action, human error and illegal conduct of personnel but there were problems in safety culture of organization such as slow retreat of safety system stimulated by management, schedule control and procedure management becoming a dead letter, lack of safety education, and workplace climate of schedule priority. This article referred to organizational factors common to many severe accidents and introduced safety culture study in public and private sectors to overcome those factors. Safety Culture Evaluation Support Tool (SCEST) was developed for self-evaluation of safety culture of organization as well as Organizational Reliability model (OR model) for analysis of initiation and propagation process of risk event. Safety diagnosis system and feedback type risk assessment system for promoting safe organizational climate and culture were also developed. (T. Tanaka)

  1. Defining safety culture and the nexus between safety goals and safety culture. 3. A Methodology for Identifying Deficiencies in Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present, the drivers of performance problems at nuclear power plants (NPPs) are organizational in nature. Organizational deficiencies and other 'latent' conditions cause human errors, resulting in incidents that impact the performance of NPPs. Therefore, the human reliability community, regulators, and others concerned with NPP safety express the view that safety culture and organizational factors play an important role in plant safety. However, we have yet to identify one complete set of organizational factors, establish links between deficient safety culture and performance, or develop adequate tools to measure safety culture. This paper will contribute to the resolution of these issues. Safety culture is not a single factor but rather is a collection of several distinct factors. This paper asserts that in order to pro-actively manage safety culture at NPPs, leading indicators and appropriate measurements must be identified and developed. Central to this effort are the identification of the distinct factors comprising safety culture and the relationships between those factors and performance. We have identified several factors important to safety culture. We have developed a methodology that is a combination of traditional root-cause analysis and theories of human error, most notably Reason's theory of accident causation. In addition to this methodology's usefulness in identifying deficiencies in safety culture, it could also be used as a starting point to identify leading indicators of deteriorating safety performance. We have identified six organizational factors as being important: communication, formalization, goal prioritization, problem identification, roles and responsibilities, and technical knowledge. In addition, we have found that certain organizational factors, although pervasive throughout the organization, have a much greater influence on the successful outcome of particular tasks of work processes, rather than being equally important to all

  2. Assessing Culturally Competent Scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendias, Elnora P.; Guevara, Edilma B.

    2001-01-01

    Eight criteria for culturally competent scholarship (contextuality, relevance, communication styles, awareness of identity and power differences, disclosure, reciprocation, empowerment, time) were applied to an international education/research nursing program. Appropriate measures for each were developed and ways to improve the program were…

  3. Validity and reliability of Turkish version of "Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture" and perception of patient safety in public hospitals in Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    Filiz Emel; Bodur Said

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS) is used to assess safety culture in many countries. Accordingly, the questionnaire has been translated into Turkish for the study of patient safety culture in Turkish hospitals. The aim of this study is threefold: to determine the validity and reliability of the translated form of HSOPS, to evaluate physicians' and nurses' perceptions of patient safety in Turkish public hospitals, and to compare finding with U.S. hospit...

  4. Post-closure safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the approach under development by UK Nirex Ltd to assess the post-closure safety performance of a deep geological repository for radioactive waste. The term ''post-closure'' refers to the period following operation of the repository, when it has been filled with packaged wastes, backfilled and sealed. Assessment deals with the identification and modelling of the processes and pathways by which radionuclides from the repository may eventually return to the human environment. Post-closure performance assessment forms one element of the comprehensive case that must be developed by UK Nirex Ltd before a repository can be licensed and authorized for construction and operation. The paper outlines the demanding safety requirements for the post-closure period and indicates how they have played a significant part in the development of the Nirex disposal concept. Performance assessment makes extensive use of computer modelling. The models used to assess radionuclide migration from the underground repository to the surface environment are outlined. (author)

  5. Public education through safety culture demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities relating to nuclear energy have been world widely opposed against, because there have existed scars in the past; atomic bombs and a few accidents in nuclear facilities. It cannot be denied that the most effective education of public is through Medias such as news or documentary on newspaper and television. Once such cases appeared to public, it is difficult to erase the bad pictures from their memory. Since education for public is mainly depending on media, it is recommended putting harder effort on dissemination of information on regulation and regulatory function to public. The regulatory function of each country is the key of safe utilization of nuclear energy. Since prime responsibility of maintenance and operation are rested on the operators. To achieve the goal of safety, regulatory authority's task now is emphasized on encouraging operators of nuclear facilities to implement their safety culture. This will reduce the probability of unwanted events and therefore raising credit of nuclear energy. (author)

  6. Safety culture in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of a good safety culture within the organisation and for the individual poses a sine qua non condition for the operator in the cause of the functioning of his plant. This task must be understood as a linking of the human into a daily management of the safety and quality. Everyone has his role to play at the level of his accountability and his field of responsibility in routine operations and in crisis situations. However, success depends on how management has understood, on the one hand, to convince the staff of the importance of the efforts and the usefulness of the measures taken within the organisation and, on the other hand, to keep this same staff applied to the carrying out of these measures and thus to take account of the anxieties and proposals in the spirit of responsibility and transparency. (author)

  7. Safe patient care - safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology

    OpenAIRE

    St. Pierre, M

    2013-01-01

    Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organization's vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture ("top-down process"). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organization's maturity in respect to safety is information flo...

  8. Enhancing the Flight Safety Culture Through Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanki, Barbara G.; Rosekind, Mark R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    In the 1970's, flight safety professionals became profoundly concerned about the prevalence of crew-caused accidents and incidents, and the role of human error in flight operations. As result, they initiated a change in the flight safety culture which has grown to significant proportions today. At the heart of the evolution were crew concepts such as flightdeck management, crew coordination, and cockpit resource management, concepts which seemed to target critical deficiencies. In themselves, the concepts were not new but their incorporation into training as a direct means of changing the flight safety culture was an untried, almost 'grassroots' approach. The targeted crew concepts and skills were not an integral part of the typical training program; the methods, curriculum, media, and even course content itself, would have to be developed and implemented from the bottom up. A familiar truism in the pilot culture is that you should 'Train the way you fly; Fly the way you train'. In short, training was expected to provide the pilot with practical operational skills that were consistent with the performance standards they were required to maintain and the operational demands they met on a daily basis. In short, one could not simply command crews to use good CRM; one would have to research and define these skills operationally as well as develop and implement a consistent and effective training program. Furthermore, one would need active support and collaboration among the research, industry and government communities in order to ensure acceptance and continued commitment. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. The impact of organizational culture on Concurrent Engineering, Design-for-Safety, and product safety performance.

    OpenAIRE

    A. Zhu; von Zedtwitz, M.; Assimakopoulos, D.; Fernandes, K

    2016-01-01

    This paper empirically extends the research on the relationships between organizational culture, new product development (NPD) practices, and product safety performance (PSP). Using Schein's conceptualization of culture (i.e., underlying assumptions, espoused values, and artifacts), we build and test a model among five variables: top management commitment to safety (MCS), group level product safety culture (PSC) at NPD, Concurrent Engineering (CE), Design-for-Safety (DFS), and product safety ...

  10. Safety assessment for spent fuel storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Practice has been prepared as part of the IAEA's programme on the safety assessment of interim spent fuel storage facilities which are not an integral part of an operating nuclear power plant. This report provides general guidance on the safety assessment process, discussing both deterministic and probabilistic assessment methods. It describes the safety assessment process for normal operation and anticipated operational occurrences and also related to accident conditions. 10 refs, 2 tabs

  11. Cultural safety and its importance for Australian midwifery practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phiri, Jasten; Dietsch, Elaine; Bonner, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Cultural safety is an important concept in health care that originated in Aotearoa (New Zealand) to address Maori consumer dissatisfaction with health care. In Australia and internationally, midwives are now expected to provide culturally safe midwifery care to all women. Historically, Australia has received large numbers of immigrants from the United Kingdom, European countries and the Middle East. There have also been refugees and immigrants from South-East Asia, and most recently, from Africa. Australia continues to become more culturally diverse and yet to date no studies have explored the application of cultural safety in Australian midwifery practice. This paper explores how cultural safety has evolved from cultural awareness and cultural sensitivity. It examines the importance of cultural safety in nursing and midwifery practice. Finally, it explores the literature to determine how midwives can apply the concept of cultural safety to ensure safe and woman centred care. PMID:21046963

  12. From the safety culture to the culture of risk, people. A key to safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several issues are summarized resulting from reviews carried out in 1994 by the Nuclear Plant Operations Corporate Resources of Electricite de France, in view of expanding the notions behind the INSAG 4 report and identifying potential levers within the company for developing the safety culture. Introducing the notion of risk and fostering discussion of risks among operators will contribute to further safety progress. This also provides a perception of safety which could become a shared goal for all actors and thus contribute to social cohesion. (author)

  13. Stringent cost management and preservation of safety culture, a contradiction?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Competition in the deregulated electricity market does not leave nuclear power plants unaffected. Hence the question is to answer, whether the safety is going to suffer under the cost pressure on the market. Therefore the target of NPP operator's cost management is to run plants at maximum availability and with optimized cost structures that lead to minimized specific generating costs. The costs of safety, with their fixed-cost character, are elements of this cost structure. The process of economic optimization of the cost structure does not permit cost minimization on its own sake in the area of operation cost and fuel cost (front and back end). The basis of economical assessment rather must be the minimization of potential risks which could entail losses of availability. However, many investments like plant modifications or preventive maintenance efforts made in order to avoid losses of availability to a large extent also imply at least a preservation or even higher levels of safety. Thus, economic efficiency and safety are closely correlated. Public opinion is very sensible as soon as the high level of plant safety seems to be touched by economic pressure. But realizing that German NPP are endowed with mature design and safety features, improvements of safety standards can only marginally be increased by further technical optimizations. Therefore plant management, man-machine-interface and the individual behaviour of the employees are targets for improvement of nuclear safety and economic efficiency by increasing the efficiency of processes. An even more efficient use of scarce funds and a tolerable political environment should allow the safety level of NPP to be upheld, and safety culture could be maintained and even be improved. (author)

  14. Evaluation of Safety Culture Implementation and Socialization Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of safety culture implementation and socialization results has been perform. Evaluation is carried out with specifying safety culture indicators, namely: Meeting between management and employee, system for incidents analysis, training activities related to improving safety, meeting with regulator, contractors, surveys on behavioural attitudes, and resources allocated to promote safety culture. Evaluation is based on observation and visiting the facilities to show the compliance indicator in term of good practices in the frame of safety culture implementation. For three facilities of research reactors, Kartini Yogyakarta, TRIGA Mark II Bandung and MPR-GAS Serpong, implementation of safety culture is considered good enough and progressive. Furthermore some indicator should be considered more intensive, for example the allocated resources, self assesment based on own questionnaire in the frame of improving the safety culture implementation. (author)

  15. Safety Culture in Pre-operational Phases of Nuclear Power Plant Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An abundance of information exists on safety culture related to the operational phases of nuclear power plants; however, pre-operational phases present unique challenges. This publication focuses on safety culture during pre-operational phases that span the interval from before a decision to launch a nuclear power programme to first fuel load. It provides safety culture insights and focuses on eight generic issues: safety culture understanding; multicultural aspects; leadership; competencies and resource competition; management systems; learning and feedback; cultural assessments; and communication. Each issue is discussed in terms of: specific challenges; desired state; approaches and methods; and examples and resources. This publication will be of interest to newcomers and experienced individuals faced with the opportunities and challenges inherent in safety culture programmes aimed at pre-operational activities.

  16. Safety culture in operation of nuclear power plants in CSFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three aspects are discussed of safety culture in the operation of nuclear power plants in Czechoslovakia, namely, the rewards and sanctions, the individual attitudes and procedures, and plant safety experience as defined in Sections 3.2.4, 4.2.2.2 and 4.2.2.3, respectively, of the IAEA report on Safety Culture by the INSAG, 1991. (Z.S.)

  17. The safety culture change process performed in Polish research reactor MARIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Safety Culture Change Process Performed in research reactor MARIA is described in this paper. The essential issues fulfilled in realization of the Safety Culture Enhancement Programme are related to the attitude and behaviour of top management, co-operating groups, operational personnel, relations between the operating organization and the supervising and advising organizations. Realization of this programme is based on changing the employees understanding of safety, changing their attitudes and behaviours by means of adequate training, requalification process and performing the broad self-assessment programme. Also a high level Quality Assurance Programme helps in development of the Safety Culture. (author)

  18. Measurement tools and process indicators of patient safety culture in primary care. A mixed methods study by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parker, D.; Wensing, M.; Esmail, A.; Valderas, J.M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There is little guidance available to healthcare practitioners about what tools they might use to assess the patient safety culture. OBJECTIVE: To identify useful tools for assessing patient safety culture in primary care organizations in Europe; to identify those aspects of performance

  19. Recent developments in the study of safety culture and its correlates: the role of leadership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessing safety culture is a key element in the strategies of reliability assurance in nuclear facilities. A diagnosis that provides a return on investment (ROI) requires a scientifically based conceptualization of the most relevant variables in safety culture and outcomes expected from it. Furthermore, it is important to develop assessment tools and designs which allow, not only checking the state of safety culture but evaluating the correlates in the different productive levels of analysis, taking into account the temporal dimensional that allows us to analyze the change and thereby identify the main determinants and mechanisms for improvement. (Author)

  20. Probabilistic safety assessment - regulatory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Nuclear power plants (NPPs) have been designed, constructed and operated mainly based on deterministic safety analysis philosophy. In this approach, a substantial amount of safety margin is incorporated in the design and operational requirements. Additional margin is incorporated by applying the highest quality engineering codes, standards and practices, and the concept of defence-in-depth in design and operating procedures, by including conservative assumptions and acceptance criteria in plant response analysis of postulated initiating events (PIEs). However, as the probabilistic approach has been improved and refined over the years, it is possible for the designer, operator and regulator to get a more detailed and realistic picture of the safety importance of plant design features, operating procedures and operational practices by using probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) along with the deterministic methodology. At present, many countries including USA, UK and France are using PSA insights in their decision making along with deterministic basis. India has also made substantial progress in the development of methods for carrying out PSA. However, consensus on the use of PSA in regulatory decision-making has not been achieved yet. This paper emphasises on the requirements (e.g.,level of details, key modelling assumptions, data, modelling aspects, success criteria, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis) for improving the quality and consistency in performance and use of PSA that can facilitate meaningful use of the PSA insights in the regulatory decision-making in India. This paper also provides relevant information on international scenario and various application areas of PSA along with progress made in India. The PSA perspective presented in this paper may help in achieving consensus on the use of PSA for regulatory / utility decision-making in design and operation of NPPs

  1. International conference on safety culture in nuclear installations. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety culture is that assembly of characteristics and attitudes in organisation and individuals which establishes that as an overriding priority nuclear plant safety issues receives the attention warranted by their significance. This definition of safety culture brings out two major components in its manifestation. The framework within which individuals within the organisation works.The attitude and response of individual towards the safety issues over productivity and economics in the organisational work practices. The industry literature provides a great deal of insight at the artefact and espoused value levels, although as yet it remains somewhat disorganized. There is, however, an overall lack of understanding of the assumption level of safety culture. The IAEA has organised the conference on safety culture for better understanding of the safety culture issues on the international level

  2. 78 FR 27419 - Final Safety Culture Policy Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... prescribing a safety culture policy. Differences Between Occupational and Process Safety Many commenters stated that the policy statement should acknowledge a difference between occupational and process safety. Some commenters noted that the measures taken to advance occupational and process safety each...

  3. Looking for safety culture implementation. A regulatory body view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short explanation of subjects under the NRA SR regulation and the new Slovak nuclear regulatory authority responsibilities is given. The safety culture Implementation in the regulatory process itself and in regulated organizations is the high priority task. The assistance in the safety culture principles implementation is used for the regulatory body level as well as for the operating organization level. The close cooperation with the IAEA and CEC on strengthening of NRA SR is explained from the point of safety culture principles implementation. The operating organization safety culture implementation measures using different technical assistance from international organizations and countries are described. These actions are useful instruments but they are not usually systematic enough. NRA SR is looking for systematic approach and for full safety culture implementation in operating organizations. The NUSS documents are used as the basis for national regulatory documents. The QA programmes of NPPs are in the phase of development or fundamental upgrading. Comparing the Safety Culture principles and NUSS codes and guides the most of safety culture principles are covered as requirements in NUSS documents. As the managerial tool the revised set of QA NUSS documents can be used to implement safety culture in an organized way into the operating organization practices through adequately modified QA programmes for NPP operation. These programmes have to be approved by the NRA SR and their implementation is subject of NRA SR inspection. Then nuclear safety culture implementation could be under the continued control. (author)

  4. Development of an expert system and software agent for aviation safety assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Flowers, Thomas R.; Dowler, David M.

    2000-01-01

    The primary goal of this thesis is to design, develop and test an internet based prototype model for using expert system and software agent technologies to automate some of the analytical tasks in conducting aviation safety assessments using the data collected by the automated Aviation Command Safety Assessment (ACSA) system. The Aviation Command Safety Assessment is a questionnaire survey methodology developed to evaluate a Naval Aviation Command's safety climate, culture, and safety program...

  5. Professional attitudes toward patient safety culture in a bone marrow transplant unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermo, Vivian Costa; Radünz, Vera; Rosa, Luciana Martins da; Marinho, Monique Mendes

    2016-03-01

    Objective To identify the attitude of health professionals toward the patient safety culture at a bone marrow transplant unit. Methods Quantitative research approach, cross-sectional survey conducted at a bone marrow transplant unit in Santa Catarina, Brazil. Data were collected using a Safety Attitudes Questionnaire with 33 health professionals in August and September of 2013. A total of 37 attitudes were assessed according to six safety dimensions of patient safety culture. Data were analysed by applying descriptive and inferential statistics, ANOVA and the Kruskal-Wallis test with a p value equal to or under 0.05. Results Attitudes regarding the dimension "job satisfaction" were positive for the patient safety culture, and there was a significant difference between the professionals in this dimension (p-value 0.05). The other dimensions were not assessed positively. Conclusion The attitudes of health professionals toward patient safety must be strengthened. PMID:26934614

  6. Probabilistic safety assessment for seismic events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Technical Document on Probabilistic Safety Assessment for Seismic Events is mainly associated with the Safety Practice on Treatment of External Hazards in PSA and discusses in detail one specific external hazard, i.e. earthquakes

  7. Safety assessment and verification for nuclear power plants. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Guide was prepared under the IAEA programme for safety standards for nuclear power plants. The present publication is a revision of the IAEA Safety Guide on Management of Nuclear Power Plants for Safe Operation issued in 1984. It supplements Section 2 of the Safety Requirements publication on Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation. Nuclear power technology is different from the customary technology of power generation from fossil fuel and by hydroelectric means. One major difference between the management of nuclear power plants and that of conventional generating plants is the emphasis that should be placed on nuclear safety, quality assurance, the management of radioactive waste and radiological protection, and the accompanying national regulatory requirements. This Safety Guide highlights the important elements of effective management in relation to these aspects of safety. The attention to be paid to safety requires that the management recognize that personnel involved in the nuclear power programme should understand, respond effectively to, and continuously search for ways to enhance safety in the light of any additional requirements socially and legally demanded of nuclear energy. This will help to ensure that safety policies that result in the safe operation of nuclear power plants are implemented and that margins of safety are always maintained. The structure of the organization, management standards and administrative controls should be such that there is a high degree of assurance that safety policies and decisions are implemented, safety is continuously enhanced and a strong safety culture is promoted and supported. The objective of this publication is to guide Member States in setting up an operating organization which facilitates the safe operation of nuclear power plants to a high level internationally. The second objective is to provide guidance on the most important organizational elements in order to contribute to a strong safety

  8. Procedures for self-assessment of operational safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Self-assessment processes have been continuously developed by nuclear organizations, including nuclear power plants. Currently, the nuclear industry and governmental organizations are showing an increasing interest in the implementation of this process as an effective way for improving safety performance. Self-assessment involves the use of different types of tools and mechanisms to assist the organizations in assessing their own safety performance against given standards. This helps to enhance the understanding of the need for improvements, the feeling of ownership in achieving them and and the safety culture as a whole. The concepts developed in this report present the basic approach to self-assessment taking into consideration experience gained during Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) missions, from organizations and utilities which have successfully implemented parts of a self-assessment programme and from meetings organized to discuss the subject

  9. Consideration of aging in probabilistic safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Probabilistic safety assessment is a standardised tool for assessment of safety of nuclear power plants. It is a complement to the safety analyses. Standard probabilistic models of safety equipment assume component failure rate as a constant. Ageing of systems, structures and components can theoretically be included in new age-dependent probabilistic safety assessment, which generally causes the failure rate to be a function of age. New age-dependent probabilistic safety assessment models, which offer explicit calculation of the ageing effects, are developed. Several groups of components are considered which require their unique models: e.g. operating components e.g. stand-by components. The developed models on the component level are inserted into the models of the probabilistic safety assessment in order that the ageing effects are evaluated for complete systems. The preliminary results show that the lack of necessary data for consideration of ageing causes highly uncertain models and consequently the results. (author)

  10. Safety Cultures in Water-Based Outdoor Activities in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andkjær, Søren; Arvidsen, Jan

    2015-01-01

    water-based outdoor activities: small boat fishing, sea kayaking, and kite surfing. The theoretical framework used was cultural analysis and the methodological approach was mixed methods using case studies with survey and qualitative interviews. The study indicates that safety is a complex matter and......In this paper, we report on the study Safe in Nature (Tryg i naturen) in which the aim was to analyze and discuss risk and safety related to outdoor recreation in the coastal regions of Denmark. A cultural perspective is applied to risk management and the safety cultures related to three selected...... that safety culture can be understood as the sum and interaction among six categories. The safety culture is closely related to the activity and differs widely among activities. We suggest a broad perspective be taken on risk management wherein risk and safety can be managed at different levels. Small...

  11. Safety culture: the concept and its practical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper draws together a number of topics concerned with safety culture: the first part of the paper describe the characteristics of an organisation giving rise to a good safety culture as suggested in INSAG-4. The second part of the paper examines sources of information on the characteristics of organisations giving rise to good and poor safety performance including a study into the causes of a number of recent severe accidents such as Clapham Junction and Piper Alpha. The final part of the paper describes the means by which safety culture within an organisation may be measured and therefore controlled. This enables an organisation to provide for a good safety culture and improve commercial performance by a process of continuous safety improvement eliminating the losses arising from poor safety standards. (author) 6 tabs., 5 refs

  12. Effectiveness evaluation methodology for safety processes to enhance organisational culture in hazardous installations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengolini, A; Debarberis, L

    2008-06-30

    Safety performance indicators are widely collected and used in hazardous installations. The IAEA, OECD and other international organisations have developed approaches that strongly promote deployment of safety performance indicators. These indicators focus mainly on operational performance, but some of them also address organisational and safety culture aspects. However, operators of hazardous installations, in particular those with limited resources and time constraints, often find it difficult to collect the large number of different safety performance indicators. Moreover, they also have difficulties with giving a meaning to the numbers and trends recorded, especially to those that should reflect a positive safety culture. In this light, the aim of this article is to address the need to monitor and assess progress on implementation of a programme to enhance safety and organisational culture. It proposes a specific process-view approach to effectiveness evaluation of organisational and safety culture indicators by means of a multi-level system in which safety processes and staff involvement in defining improvement activities are central. In this way safety becomes fully embedded in staff activities. Key members of personnel become directly involved in identifying and supplying leading indicators relating to their own daily activity and become responsible and accountable for keeping the measurement system alive. Besides use of lagging indicators, particular emphasis is placed on the importance of identifying and selecting leading indicators which can be used to drive safety performance for organisational and safety culture aspects as well. PMID:18241983

  13. Effectiveness evaluation methodology for safety processes to enhance organisational culture in hazardous installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety performance indicators are widely collected and used in hazardous installations. The IAEA, OECD and other international organisations have developed approaches that strongly promote deployment of safety performance indicators. These indicators focus mainly on operational performance, but some of them also address organisational and safety culture aspects. However, operators of hazardous installations, in particular those with limited resources and time constraints, often find it difficult to collect the large number of different safety performance indicators. Moreover, they also have difficulties with giving a meaning to the numbers and trends recorded, especially to those that should reflect a positive safety culture. In this light, the aim of this article is to address the need to monitor and assess progress on implementation of a programme to enhance safety and organisational culture. It proposes a specific process-view approach to effectiveness evaluation of organisational and safety culture indicators by means of a multi-level system in which safety processes and staff involvement in defining improvement activities are central. In this way safety becomes fully embedded in staff activities. Key members of personnel become directly involved in identifying and supplying leading indicators relating to their own daily activity and become responsible and accountable for keeping the measurement system alive. Besides use of lagging indicators, particular emphasis is placed on the importance of identifying and selecting leading indicators which can be used to drive safety performance for organisational and safety culture aspects as well

  14. Training the next generation of nuclear engineers in safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents how undergraduate and graduate nuclear engineering students at the PennsyIvania State University are trained to develop a safety ethic or 'culture' during their coursework. This safety culture is instilled in terms of nuclear safety analysis, design, and licensing issues. various aspects of reactor safety are described either directly or indirectly in each Penn State nuclear engineering course by the development of particular theory and practical applications. A graduate level reactor safety course serves to tie in all the student's previous knowledge into a focused study of safety analysis, licensing, and accident scenarios. With each Penn State nuclear engineering course, there is a focus, and an expected level of understanding of the impact of analysis and design on reactor safety. Foundational to all courses is the knowledge of atomic, health, and reactor physics, mathematics, and general engineering principles. This paper describes the progression of courses related to reactor safety in the Penn State curriculum. The objectives for each course is given in terms of its importance in reactor safety. A detailed description of the graduate level reactor safety course is given to demonstrate how to assemble safety topics into a course that directly addresses safety, licensing, and accident analyses. This safety course serves to provide students with an comprehension of the current 'safety culture' in the United States, and hopefully, instills a proper understanding of safety issues and ethics. (author)

  15. Safety culture management: the importance of organizational factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of safety culture has been used extensively to explain the underlying causes of performance based events, both positive and negative, across the nuclear industry. Yet attempts to operationally define the concept of safety culture and assess it have been less apparent. The work described in this paper represents several years of effort to identify, define and assess the organizational factors important to safe performance in nuclear power plants (NPPs). The research discussed in this paper is primarily conducted in support of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) efforts in understanding the impact of organizational performance on safety. As a result of a series of research activities undertaken by numerous NRC contractors, a collection of organizational dimensions has been identified and defined. These dimensions represent what is believed to be a comprehensive taxonomy of organizational elements that relate to the safe operation of nuclear power plants. Techniques were also developed by which to measure these organizational dimensions, and include structured interview protocols, behavioral checklists, and behavioral anchored rating scales (BARS). Recent efforts have focussed on devising a methodology for the extraction of information related to the identified organizational dimensions from existing NRC documentation. This type of effort would assess the applicability of the organizational dimensions to existing NRC inspection and evaluation reports, refine the organizational dimensions previously developed so they are more relevant to the task of retrospective analysis , and attempt to rate plants based on the review of existing NRC documentation using the techniques previously developed for the assessment of organizational dimensions. (author)

  16. Inter-comparison of safety culture within selected practices in Ghana utilising ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety culture of selected practices and facilities in Ghana utilising radiation sources or radiation emitting devices has been assessed using a performance indicator, which provided status information on management and operating staff commitment to safety. The questionnaire was based on the following broad areas: general safety considerations, safety policy at the facility level, safety practices at the facility level, definition of responsibility, staff training, safety of the physical structure of the facility and the emergency plans. The analysis showed that the percentage levels of commitment to safety for the respective practices are as follows: conventional radiography, 23.3-90.0%; research reactor, 73.3 %; gamma irradiation facility, 53.3%; radiotherapy, 76.7%; X-ray scanner, 80.0%; gamma scanner, 76.7%; industrial radiography 86.7% and nuclear density practice, 78%. None of the practices or facilities was able to satisfy all the requirements that will ensure a 100% level of safety culture. (authors)

  17. Radiological safety and risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief radiological safety and risk assessment of a nuclear power generation center with an adjacent on-site waste disposal facility at a specific site in the State of Utah is presented. The assessment was conducted to assist in determining the feasibility and practicality of developing a nuclear energy center (NEC) in Utah consisting of nine 1250 MWe nuclear pressurized water reactor (PWR) electrical generating units arranged in 3 clusters of 3 units each known as triads. The site selected for this conceptual study is in the Horse Bench area about 15 miles directly south of the town of Green River, Utah. The radiological issues included direct radiation exposures to on-site workers and the off-site population, release of radioactive material, and effects of these releases for both normal operations and accidental occurrences. The basic finding of this study is that the concept of an NEC in the Green River area, specifically at the Horse Bench site, is radiologically feasible

  18. Safety culture at the Bohunice nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The approach of the Bohunice nuclear power plant to the safety culture issue is highlighted. Activities performed so far at the plant to improve the plant safety culture with a view to enhancing the awareness of each employee and thus to minimize the effect of the human factor on the evolution of incidents and accidents at the plant are described. (author)

  19. Safety culture at the Mochovce nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The approach of the Mochovce nuclear power plant to the safety culture issue is highlighted. Activities performed so far at the plant to improve the plant safety culture with a view to enhancing the awareness of each employee and thus to minimize the effect of the human factor on the evolution of incidents and accidents at the plant are described. (author)

  20. 76 FR 34773 - Final Safety Culture Policy Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-14

    ... Power Plant Operations'' (54 FR 3424; January 24, 1989), applies to all individuals engaged in..., Federal Register notice (FRN) (74 FR 6433) entitled ``Safety Culture Policy Statement Development: Public... draft safety culture policy statement (ADAMS Accession No. ML102500563) on September 17, 2010 (75...

  1. Organizational Climate Determinants of Resident Safety Culture in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnetz, Judith E.; Zhdanova, Ludmila S.; Elsouhag, Dalia; Lichtenberg, Peter; Luborsky, Mark R.; Arnetz, Bengt B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: In recent years, there has been an increasing focus on the role of safety culture in preventing costly adverse events, such as medication errors and falls, among nursing home residents. However, little is known regarding critical organizational determinants of a positive safety culture in nursing homes. The aim of this study…

  2. Self-assessment of operational safety for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Self-assessment processes have been continuously developed by nuclear organizations, including nuclear power plants. Currently, the nuclear industry and governmental organizations are showing an increasing interest in the implementation of this process as an effective way for improving safety performance. Self-assessment involves the use of different types of tools and mechanisms to assist the organizations in assessing their own safety performance against given standards. This helps to enhance the understanding of the need for improvements, the feeling of ownership in achieving them and the safety culture as a whole. Although the primary beneficiaries of the self-assessment process are the plant and operating organization, the results of the self-assessments are also used, for example, to increase the confidence of the regulator in the safe operation of an installation, and could be used to assist in meeting obligations under the Convention on Nuclear Safety. Such considerations influence the form of assessment, as well as the type and detail of the results. The concepts developed in this report present the basic approach to self-assessment, taking into consideration experience gained during Operational Safety Review Team (OSART) missions, from organizations and utilities which have successfully implemented parts of a self-assessment programme and from meetings organized to discuss the subject. This report will be used in IAEA sponsored workshops and seminars on operational safety that include the topic of self-assessment

  3. Regulatory Oversight of Safety Culture in Nuclear Installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experience across the international nuclear industry and in other technical fields over the past few decades has demonstrated the importance of a healthy safety culture in maintaining the safety of workers, the public and the environment. Both regulators and the nuclear industry recognize the need for licensees to develop a strong safety culture in order to support successful and sustainable nuclear safety performance. Progress over recent years can be observed in the rapid development of approaches to overseeing licensees' safety culture. This publication follows on and complements earlier publications on safety culture, from the publication Safety Culture (Safety Series No. 75-INSAG-4 (1991)), published after the Chernobyl accident, to the more recently published Safety Requirements on The Management System for Facilities and Activities (IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GS-R-3 (2006)), which states that the management system is to be used to promote and support a strong safety culture. A number of attempts have been made at both the international and national levels to establish practical approaches to regulatory oversight of safety culture. During 2010 and 2011, two projects were conducted by the IAEA under the scope of the Safe Nuclear Energy - Regional Excellence Programme within the Norwegian Cooperation Programme with Bulgaria and Romania. These projects were implemented at the Bulgarian and Romanian regulatory bodies. They encompassed the development of a specific process to oversee licensees' safety culture, and involved 30 experts from 17 countries and 22 organizations. The IAEA continues to support Member States in the area of safety culture through its projects on safety management and capacity building. This publication addresses the basics of regulatory oversight of safety culture, describes the approaches currently implemented at several regulatory bodies around the world and, based on these examples, proposes a path to developing such a process

  4. Lessons Learned from the Past Accidents for Safety Culture Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All nuclear organizations strive to sustain and improve safety. There is diversity in the way organizations understand the concept of safety and the actions that can help to drive improvements. This paper presents an overview of the lessons to be learned from past nuclear accidents and their relevance for the development of nuclear safety culture. Although the term Safety Culture emerged after the Chernobyl accident, the factors that contributed to earlier accidents, of which the most notable was the accident of Three Mile Island Unit 2 , are also relevant for nuclear safety culture. As regards the Fukushima accident from 2011, safety culture was once again brought into discussion. It is easier to manage the workplaces and the organizations than the minds of employees, as it is not possible to change the human condition, but changing the conditions under which people work. For this, the commitment of the top management is important, without which, it is not possible to make the necessary changes. (author)

  5. A framework for the organizational assumptions underlying safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety culture of the nuclear organization can be addressed at the three levels of culture proposed by Edgar Schein. The industry literature provides a great deal of insight at the artefact and espoused value levels, although as yet it remains somewhat disorganized. There is, however, an overall lack of understanding of the assumption level of safety culture. This paper describes a possible framework for conceptualizing the assumption level, suggesting that safety culture is grounded in unconscious beliefs about the nature of the safety problem, its solution and how to organize to achieve the solution. Using this framework, the organization can begin to uncover the assumptions at play in its normal operation, decisions and events and, if necessary, engage in a process to shift them towards assumptions more supportive of a strong safety culture. (author)

  6. Safety culture in a major nuclear fuel cycle facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human factor plays an important role in development of safety culture in any nuclear fuel cycle facility. This is more relevant in major nuclear facility such as a reactor or a reprocessing plant. In Indian reprocessing plants, an effective worker's training, education and certification program is in place to sensitize the worker's response to safety and safe work procedures. The methodology followed to self evaluation of safety culture and the benefits in a reprocessing plant is briefly discussed. Various indicators of safety performance and visible signs of a good safety management are also qualitatively analyzed. (author)

  7. Safety culture: personal considerations of an owner/operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety culture with nuclear energy is above all a people's business. This means that all you can do is attempting to create the type of ideal environment that helps all plant people to perform their safety-related tasks in an optimum way. This is a continuous challenge for all who are involved. In the last years the political environment has exhibited the most noteworthy shortcomings regarding safety culture. (author) figs

  8. Producing health, producing safety. Developing a collective safety culture in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis aims at a better understanding of safety management in radiotherapy and at proposing improvements for patient safety through the development of a collective safety culture. A first part presents the current context in France and abroad, addresses the transposition of other safety methods to the medical domain, and discusses the peculiarities of radiotherapy in terms of risks and the existing quality-assurance approaches. The second part presents the theoretical framework by commenting the intellectual evolution with respect to system safety and the emergence of the concept of safety culture, and by presenting the labour collective aspects and their relationship with system safety. The author then comments the variety of safety cultures among the different professions present in radiotherapy, highlights the importance of the collective dimension in correcting discrepancies at the end of the treatment process, and highlights how physicians take their colleagues work into account. Recommendations are made to improve patient safety in radiotherapy

  9. Regulatory review of safety cases and safety assessments - associated challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulatory reviews of safety cases and safety assessments are essential for credible decision-making on the licensing or authorization of radioactive waste disposal facilities. Regulatory review also plays an important role in developing the safety case and in establishing stakeholders' confidence in the safety of the facility. Reviews of safety cases for radioactive waste disposal facilities need to be conducted by suitably qualified and experienced staff, following systematic and well-planned review processes. Regulatory reviews should be sufficiently comprehensive in their coverage of issues potentially affecting the safety of the disposal system, and should assess the safety case against clearly established criteria. The conclusions drawn from a regulatory review, and the rationale for them should be reproducible and documented in a transparent and traceable way. Many challenges are faced when conducting regulatory reviews of safety cases. Some of these relate to issues of project and programme management, and resources, while others derive from the inherent difficulties of assessing the potential long-term future behaviour of engineered and environmental systems. This paper describes approaches to the conduct of regulatory reviews and discusses some of the challenges faced. (author)

  10. Promotion of good safety culture at a Canadian HWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    People work at a nuclear plant within a structured environment. It is the programs, procedures and other ''tools'' that are used in the workplace that actually guide behaviours, and behaviours then guide performance. The safety culture in the workplace is ''the way we do things around here''. This culture is created by structures, behaviours and performance, and is characterized by three attributes: A questioning attitude; a rigorous and prudent approach; open 2-way communication. This paper discusses a model of safety culture which puts the operating experience or learning cycle program at the heart of the endeavor. This cycle also consists of three elements: Observation; reporting; learning. It is more of a theoretical paper than a report of success at this stage. However, the ideas presented are being used to design and implement a strong safety culture at Ontario Hydro's Darlington Nuclear Station (4 x 932 Mwe CANDU units), and are beginning to show results. Programs designed for excellence in human performance have to provide clear simple structure, and draw people into alignment with the required behaviours. By making the structural elements and the alignment activities explicit an attempt can be made to ''design'' programs that will create and reinforce the required safety culture. The paper places the learning cycle at the heart of safety culture because the cycle aligns with the three attributes of safety culture. If an organization cannot learn from experience (i.e. change behaviours based on experience) it is doubtful whether it can build a strong safety culture. 2 refs

  11. Nirex Safety Assessment Research Programme bibliography, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography lists reports and papers written as part of the Nirex Safety Assessment Research Programme, which is concerned with disposal of low-level and intermediate-level waste (LLW and ILW) and associated radiological assessments. (author)

  12. ATMX System Safety Assessment report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the course of the ATMX System Safety Assessment (SSA) activity, it was determined that the ATMX structural integrity would be severely impaired technically unacceptable, a major redirection of the SSA effort involving structural modifications was outlined. The redirected effort culminated into four modifications three of which are structural in nature and the fourth is thermal modification. The first structural modification involves strengthening the ATMX hatch covers with 60 tension bolts and stiffening the same with tubular cross bracings. The second modification involves attaching a 3/16 inch plate to bulkhead at the end to prevent intrusion of triangular end frame into cargo compartment. The third modification involves welding the inner side plate to the cast steel underframe. The fourth and the final modification involves thermal insulation of ATMX. The thermal analysis of ATMX indicates that without any insulation, the shell, fiberboard, dunnage bags, and waste boxes and drums will reach temperatures well above the decomposition temperatures of fiberboard and waste products. We have reviewed the QA/QC and fracture testing plans submitted by RFP Rocky Flats Plant and generally agree with their plans. We have noted few exceptions in the QA/QC plans; we have also suggested an alternate fracture testing plan. 10 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Why some labs were successful in changing their safety cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes a laboratory safety benchmarking initiative conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Several private and government research laboratories were assessed with respect to their safety systems, management controls, and employee involvement. The laboratories with the best safety records were compared to those with average to poor safety histories

  14. Seismic safety design and risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adequacy and sufficiency of NPP seismic safety design are confirmed by the defense-in-depth safety performance and the risk profile. Seismic safety design and risk assessment are now inseparable for safety assurance of nuclear facilities. Applying the defense-in-depth principle to NPP seismic safety is a difficult issue with respect to the current seismic design philosophy in Japan. The defense-in-depth seismic safety of NPP requires not only resisting seismic events but also assuring safety when safety measures do not function as designed in the seismic events. The current deterministic design practice is not appropriate for the defense-in-depth principle when earthquake shaking demand increases because of new knowledge. Probabilistic risk assessment allows application of the defense-in-depth principle to NPP seismic safety design in these cases. The probability of failure, the maximum conditional probability of failure and the ground motion at the condition derived with the relationship between the realistic seismic load and seismic capacity are the three important indexes for safety design. Performing the safety performance analyses considering maximum conditional probability of failure and the risk assessment complying the probability of failure is essential to satisfy the necessary and sufficiently conditions for the defense-in-depth safety requirements of NPPs. (author)

  15. Intermediate probabilistic safety assessment approach for safety critical digital systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even though the conventional probabilistic safety assessment methods are immature for applying to microprocessor-based digital systems, practical needs force to apply it. In the Korea, UCN 5 and 6 units are being constructed and Korean Next Generation Reactor is being designed using the digital instrumentation and control equipment for the safety related functions. Korean regulatory body requires probabilistic safety assessment. This paper analyzes the difficulties on the assessment of digital systems and suggests an intermediate framework for evaluating their safety using fault tree models. The framework deals with several important characteristics of digital systems including software modules and fault-tolerant features. We expect that the analysis result will provide valuable design feedback. (authors)

  16. Intermediate probabilistic safety assessment approach for safety critical digital systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taeyong, Sung; Hyun Gook, Kang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Integrated Safety Assessment Team, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-01

    Even though the conventional probabilistic safety assessment methods are immature for applying to microprocessor-based digital systems, practical needs force to apply it. In the Korea, UCN 5 and 6 units are being constructed and Korean Next Generation Reactor is being designed using the digital instrumentation and control equipment for the safety related functions. Korean regulatory body requires probabilistic safety assessment. This paper analyzes the difficulties on the assessment of digital systems and suggests an intermediate framework for evaluating their safety using fault tree models. The framework deals with several important characteristics of digital systems including software modules and fault-tolerant features. We expect that the analysis result will provide valuable design feedback. (authors)

  17. A fragmented patient safety concept: the structure and culture of safety management in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Gerald R

    2004-01-01

    The uniform and visible commitment to safety management is a cultural and structural change that health care organizations have not typically attempted. Committee structures are just one example of how culture drives structure in managing health care safety. The question is: "Are we interested in making nonpatient safety programs as well understood and as culturally significant as patient safety programs?" Models exist to institutionalize safety management in health care. We need only look to the JCAHO or OSHA and other high-hazard industry models for examples of safety management. Change requires a focus on safety, not occupational safety or patient safety, but just safety. In health care, safety would be a key characteristic of organizational culture. The organizational expectation is then that all employees will work safely and practice safety. Employees will apply safe practices when handling chemicals, in lifting, and when giving medications. Only when safety imbues the work and decisions of each employee in this way will the highest level of safety be attained. PMID:15000050

  18. Influence of safety culture on the safety level in chosen enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Wolany

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In this paper was carried out the analysis of influence of safety culture, connected with implementation Occupational Health and Safety Management System, on safety level in chosen enterprise. The organizational practices necessary for the effective formulation and maintenance of high safety culture were characterized.Design/methodology/approach: The concept of health and safety at work legislation was defined and the idea of safety culture was discussed. Moreover, the necessity of continuous improvement according to PN-N-18001 standard was showed. In this paper was talked over the problem of accidents and occupational diseases among coal miners, who work in a huge and rich in dangers area.Findings: According to continuous improvement principles is the necessity of monitoring work conditions, conducting regular audits and organizing training courses, which lead to developing high safety culture.Practical implications: Developing of the safety culture brings some profits as reducing numbers of heavy and fatal accidents, increasing the number of detect occupational diseases. The enterprise, which developing high safety culture can expect from employees greater caution and respect for rules and instructions bench.Originality/value: The article indicated that the coal mines needs effective actions which should be directed on increase supervision in workplaces and reducing threats causing industrial accidents. The essence of safety culture was presented.

  19. Event Safety-A Culture of Responsibility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian Alexander Buschhoff

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the author introduces the concept of events and the importance of safety. And what is emphasized is that guests must set up the safety awareness in the process of the implementation of the safety, to ensure that every guest can move in the area according to their will, and won't produce any risk.

  20. Nuclear safety culture in Finland and Sweden - Developments and challenges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiman, T.; Pietikaeinen, E. (Technical Research Centre of Finland, VTT (Finland)); Kahlbom, U. (RiskPilot AB (Sweden)); Rollenhagen, C. (Royal Institute of Technology (KTH) (Sweden))

    2011-02-15

    The project aimed at studying the concept of nuclear safety culture and the Nordic nuclear branch safety culture. The project also aimed at looking how the power companies and the regulators view the current responsibilities and role of subcontractors in the Nordic nuclear safety culture as well as to inspect the special demands for safety culture in subcontracting chains. Interview data was collected in Sweden (n = 14) and Finland (n = 16) during 2009. Interviewees represented the major actors in the nuclear field (regulators, power companies, expert organizations, waste management organizations). Results gave insight into the nature and evaluation of safety culture in the nuclear industry. Results illustrated that there is a wide variety of views on matters that are considered important for nuclear safety within the Nordic nuclear community. However, the interviewees considered quite uniformly such psychological states as motivation, mindfulness, sense of control, understanding of hazards and sense of responsibility as important for nuclear safety. Results also gave insight into the characteristics of Nordic nuclear culture. Various differences in safety cultures in Finland and Sweden were uncovered. In addition to the differences, historical reasons for the development of the nuclear safety cultures in Finland and Sweden were pointed out. Finally, results gave implications that on the one hand subcontractors can bring new ideas and improvements to the plants' practices, but on the other hand the assurance of necessary safety attitudes and competence of the subcontracting companies and their employees is considered as a challenge. The report concludes that a good safety culture requires a deep and wide understanding of nuclear safety including the various accident mechanisms of the power plants as well as a willingness to continuously develop one's competence and understanding. An effective and resilient nuclear safety culture has to foster a constant

  1. Nuclear safety culture in Finland and Sweden - Developments and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project aimed at studying the concept of nuclear safety culture and the Nordic nuclear branch safety culture. The project also aimed at looking how the power companies and the regulators view the current responsibilities and role of subcontractors in the Nordic nuclear safety culture as well as to inspect the special demands for safety culture in subcontracting chains. Interview data was collected in Sweden (n = 14) and Finland (n = 16) during 2009. Interviewees represented the major actors in the nuclear field (regulators, power companies, expert organizations, waste management organizations). Results gave insight into the nature and evaluation of safety culture in the nuclear industry. Results illustrated that there is a wide variety of views on matters that are considered important for nuclear safety within the Nordic nuclear community. However, the interviewees considered quite uniformly such psychological states as motivation, mindfulness, sense of control, understanding of hazards and sense of responsibility as important for nuclear safety. Results also gave insight into the characteristics of Nordic nuclear culture. Various differences in safety cultures in Finland and Sweden were uncovered. In addition to the differences, historical reasons for the development of the nuclear safety cultures in Finland and Sweden were pointed out. Finally, results gave implications that on the one hand subcontractors can bring new ideas and improvements to the plants' practices, but on the other hand the assurance of necessary safety attitudes and competence of the subcontracting companies and their employees is considered as a challenge. The report concludes that a good safety culture requires a deep and wide understanding of nuclear safety including the various accident mechanisms of the power plants as well as a willingness to continuously develop one's competence and understanding. An effective and resilient nuclear safety culture has to foster a constant sense of

  2. The nuclear safety culture approach at Angra 1 NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TMI-2 and Chernobyl accidents. What did they have in common? TMI-2 was an American design Reactor, with full steel containment and several special design characteristics such as independent and separated safety and protection sets, with a hard licensing process through US NRC and even though suffered an accident that completely destroyed the primary plant, with the melting of the greatest portion of the nuclear fuel. Chernobyl 4 was a Soviet design reactor, type RBMK, with no containment, a questionable design, and exploded in 1986, aproximately seven years after TMI-2 accident. If a sound safety culture would have be presented during the design and the operation of both plants, those accidents would have never occurred. The post-accidents findings: The Kemmeny commission and the required action plants to implement the lessons learned post TMI-2 focused on design and operational problems. Safety culture in Angra 1: We translated to Portuguese the document INSAG-4 and INSAG-6 and included those topics as subjects to be tought during the annual general retraining for all personnel. We choose one area-chemistry section- to undergo a pilot program for self assessment/self checking. We developed a series of safety indicators that are collected monthly and discussed in a regular meeting with the heads of the divisions. Some examples are: number of alarms lit at MCB; number of controllers in manual; Rate of installation and removal of temporary modifications; calculated alowable time within a LCO and attendance to recommendations according to internal event reports and to QA findings. It is a continuous, on going task. Everyone in the organization must understand that and shall be part of it. We at Angra 1, are giving some important steps towards that objective. There are still room for improvements. We are aware of that. (author)

  3. A Study on the Construct Validity of Safety Culture Oversight Model for Nuclear Power Operating Organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Korea, the safety policy statement declared in 1994 by government stressed the importance of safety culture and licensees were encouraged to manage and conduct their self-assessments. A change in regulatory position about safety culture oversight was made after the event of SBO cover-up in Kori unit 1 and several subsequent falsification events. Since then KINS has been developing licensee's safety culture oversight system including conceptual framework of oversight, prime focus area for oversight, and specific details on regulatory expectations, all of which are based on defence-in-depth (DiD) safety enhancement approach. Development and gathering of performance data which is related to actual 'safety' of nuclear power plant are needed to identify the relationship between safety culture and safety performance. Authors consider this study as pilot which has a contribution on verifying the construct validity of the model and the effectiveness of survey based research. This is the first attempt that the validity of safety culture oversight model has been investigated with empirical data obtained from Korean nuclear power operating organization

  4. A Study on the Construct Validity of Safety Culture Oversight Model for Nuclear Power Operating Organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Su Jin; Choi, Young Sung; Oh, Jang Jin [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In Korea, the safety policy statement declared in 1994 by government stressed the importance of safety culture and licensees were encouraged to manage and conduct their self-assessments. A change in regulatory position about safety culture oversight was made after the event of SBO cover-up in Kori unit 1 and several subsequent falsification events. Since then KINS has been developing licensee's safety culture oversight system including conceptual framework of oversight, prime focus area for oversight, and specific details on regulatory expectations, all of which are based on defence-in-depth (DiD) safety enhancement approach. Development and gathering of performance data which is related to actual 'safety' of nuclear power plant are needed to identify the relationship between safety culture and safety performance. Authors consider this study as pilot which has a contribution on verifying the construct validity of the model and the effectiveness of survey based research. This is the first attempt that the validity of safety culture oversight model has been investigated with empirical data obtained from Korean nuclear power operating organization.

  5. Management of safety and safety culture at the NPPs of Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report contains general aspects of safety and safety culture. The brief description of operational characteristics and basic indexes of atomic power plants at the Ukraine are represented. The information referring to structure of NPPs of Operation organization license-holder, safety responsibility of both Regulatory and Utility Bodies also is given. The main part of the report include seven sections: 1. Practical application of safety management models; 2. erspective on the relationship between safety management and safety culture; 3. The role of leadership in achieving high standards of safety; 4. Current and future challengers that impact on safety culture and safety management (e.g. the impact of competition, changing, economic and political circumstances, workforce demographics, etc.); 5. Key lessons learned from major events; 6. Practical applications of safety culture concepts (e.g. learning organizations, training staff communications, etc.); 7. dvance in human performance. Some of the main pending safety and safety culture problems that are necessary to achieve in the near future are mentioned

  6. Promotion of good safety culture at a Swedish BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the nuclear industry there are two events which have had a significant impact on the way of thinking and attitudes to safety, although in different ways. The TMI accident at Harrisburg, USA put the focus on Man-Machine interface, the way of working and attitudes to safety. The accident at Chernobyl focused on Safety Management and Safety Culture. Before the TMI accident, technology was believed to be the solutions to all kinds of problems. Technical solutions should compensate for human behaviour. After the TMI accident the focus was put on Man-Machine issues and a lot of the resources within the Nuclear Industry was allocated to Man-Machine-Interfaces, Procedures, Training, etc. After the Chernobyl accident, safety culture (IAEA INSAG-4) became a commonly used concept which included an overall perspective on safety and an understanding of the interaction between Man, Technology and Organizational matters (MTO). The Safety Culture within an organization is the sum of all attitudes, qualities and experiences influencing safety. Safety Culture is consequently not only a single quality or a single property but a generic term representing the promotion of safety in many areas

  7. Safety culture management: The importance of organizational factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of safety culture has been used extensively to explain the underlying causes of performance based events, both positive and negative, across the nuclear industry. The work described in this paper represents several years of effort to identify, define and assess the organizational factors important to safe performance in nuclear power plants (NPPs). The research discussed in this paper is primarily conducted in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) efforts in understanding the impact of organizational performance on safety. As a result of a series of research activities undertaken by numerous NRC contractors, a collection of organizational dimensions has been identified and defined. These dimensions represent what is believed to be a comprehensive taxonomy of organizational elements that relate to the safe operation of nuclear power plants. Techniques were also developed by which to measure these organizational dimensions, and include structured interview protocols, behavioral checklists, and behavioral anchored rating scales (BARS). Recent efforts have focused on devising a methodology for the extraction of information related to the identified organizational dimensions from existing NRC documentation. This type of effort would assess the applicability of the organizational dimensions to existing NRC inspection and evaluation reports, refine the organizational dimensions previously developed so they are more relevant to the task of retrospective analysis, and attempt to rate plants based on the review of existing NRC documentation using the techniques previously developed for the assessment of organizational dimensions

  8. Cultural context of the safety culture: a conceptual model and experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two general components of the safety culture are 'the necessary framework within an organization and the attitude of staff at all different levels in responding to and benefiting from the framework.' Also, the requirements from individual employees for achieving safety culture at installations are 'a questioning attitude, a rigorous and prudent approach and necessary communication.' Recent studies have highlighted the critical role of cultural factors in the safety of nuclear power plants. This paper contends that an organization's safety culture, as a system composed of behaviors, practices, policies, and structural components, cannot flourish or succeed without interactions and harmony with its environment - the societal or national culture. In other words, safety culture should be considered in the context of national culture. All dimensions of national culture, (power distance, uncertainty avoidance, individualism-collectivism, and masculinity-femininity), while interacting with foregoing general components and requirements could either resonate with and strengthen, or attenuate the safety culture. Questioning attitude (of operators) is greatly influenced by the power distance, rule orientation and uncertainty avoidance of the societal environment, and the openness in the organizational culture of the plant. A rigorous and prudent approach is moderated by power distance and uncertainty avoidance in the culture; and is also affected by the sacredness of procedures, the criticality of step-by-step compliance, and a definite organizational system at the plant. Communication is a function of all the dimensions of national culture as well as the organizational structure ,s hierarchy and rigidity. Thus, it is concluded that the necessary conditions for creating and nourishing safety culture in a nuclear installation include (but are not limited to): (1) A thorough understanding of the dimensions of the local national culture; (2) determination of the extent of

  9. Culture of safety: A foundation for patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, KuoJen; Browne, Marybeth

    2015-12-01

    The 1999 IOM report on patient safety identified the house of medicine as a culture that tolerated injury at a frightening level. Identifying other industries that had cultures that would not tolerate such levels of error has begun to change the culture of healthcare to a more "high-reliability" culture. Various organizational and standardized communication tools have been imported from the military, airline, and energy industries to flatten the hierarchy and improve the reliability of communication and handoffs in healthcare. Reporting structures that focus on the effectiveness of the team and the system, more than blaming the individual, have demonstrated noticeable improvements in safety and changed culture. Further sustained efforts in developing a culture focused on safety as a priority is needed for sustainable reduction of harm, and improve the reliability of care. PMID:26653161

  10. Promoting safety culture in radiation industry through radiation audit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper illustrates the Malaysian experience in implementing and promoting effective radiation safety program. Current management practice demands that an organization inculcate culture of safety in preventing radiation hazard. The aforementioned objectives of radiation protection can only be met when it is implemented and evaluated continuously. Commitment from the workforce to treat safety as a priority and the ability to turn a requirement into a practical language is also important to implement radiation safety policy efficiently. Maintaining and improving safety culture is a continuous process. There is a need to establish a program to measure, review and audit health and safety performance against predetermined standards. This program is known as radiation safety audit and is able to reveal where and when action is needed to make improvements to the systems of controls. A structured and proper radiation self-auditing system is seen as the sole requirement to meet the current and future needs in sustainability of radiation safety. As a result safety culture, which has been a vital element on safety in many industries can be improved and promote changes, leading to good safety performance and excellence. (author)

  11. Safety culture and safety management within the Norwegian-controlled shipping industry ; State of art, interrelationships, and influencing factors

    OpenAIRE

    Oltedal, Helle Asgjerd

    2011-01-01

    This research focuses attention on safety challenges within the Norwegian shipping industry. A status picture of the shipboard safety culture and the interrelationships with safety management and organizational factors is given. Three research questions are explored: (1) What characterizes safety culture and safety management within the shipping industry? (2) What is the relationship between safety culture and safety performance within the shipping industry? (3) What charact...

  12. Safety culture in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experience shows that German nuclear power plants have always been operated reliably and safely. Over the years, the safety level in these plants has been raised considerably so that they can stand any comparison with other countries. This is confirmed by the two reports published by the Federal Ministry for the Environment on the nuclear safety convention. Behind this, there must obviously stand countless appropriate 'good practices' and a safety management system in nuclear power plants. (orig.)

  13. Patient Safety Culture: Nurses’ Attitude in Marvdasht Shahid Motahary Hospital, 1392

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarei M

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives:Improving the safety culture has been implemented as a key strategy to improve patient safety in health care systems. Several surveys have shown that assessment of patient safety attitude and examining to what extent these attitudes exist could be used as an effective tool for promoting patient safety and such data meet the managers’ information needs over time. Thus, considering the importance of patient safety as a basic principle in improving the quality of clinical services and patient satisfaction, this study was aimed to examine nurse’s attitudes towards the safety culture. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study the study population included nurses who were working in Marvdasht Shahid Motahary hospital, 2013. The sample size was selected by using a stratified randomization method as 114. The data were collected through HSOPSC questionnaire that has been introduced by the Health Care Research and Quality agency in 2004. The questionnaire is composed of eight parts. One part is about demographic and career information and other parts are about different dimensions of the patient safety culture. The collected data were then analyzed using the SPSS software and descriptive statistical tests. Results: The obtained results showed that the manager and supervisor expectations and actions in order to promote patient safety and the overall understanding of patient safety dimensions received the highest rating. On the other hand, staffing and non-punitive response to errors dimensions received the lowest score among the 12 dimensions of patient safety culture. Nonetheless, 44% of the studied population considered the patient safety status in their units as acceptable. However, 39% of the population had not reported any errors in the past 12 months. Conclusion: Based on the results of the present study, the need to improve the safety culture at different dimensions seems necessary. Also, the culture of error reporting

  14. Human Factors and Safety Culture in Maritime Safety (revised)

    OpenAIRE

    Heinz Peter Berg

    2013-01-01

    As in every industry at risk, the human and organizational factors constitute the main stakes for maritime safety. Furthermore, several events at sea have been used to develop appropriate risk models. The investigation on maritime accidents is, nowadays, a very important tool to identify the problems related to human factor and can support accident prevention and the improvement of maritime safety. Part of this investigation should in future also be near misses. Operation of ships is full of ...

  15. Use of probabilistic safety assessment for operational safety. PSA '91

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Around 250 participants, representing 32 IAEA Member States and 4 international organizations, reviewed recent developments and discussed directions for future efforts in the area of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) and particularly on its use for operational safety. During the symposium 61 papers and 27 posters were presented covering a wide spectrum of activities in areas such as: experience with ''living'' PSAs, PSA applications in decision making, the use of PSA for evaluating operating experience for operator training and for accident management, and probabilistic safety criteria. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these presentations. Refs, figs and tabs

  16. Geographic Localization of Housestaff Inpatients Improves Patient-Provider Communication, Satisfaction, and Culture of Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Douglas P; Fields, Barry G; Windish, Donna M

    2015-01-01

    This study assesses whether geographic localization of housestaff patients contributes to improved patient knowledge of diagnosis, patient satisfaction, provider satisfaction, and workplace culture of safety. Due to national changes to graduate medical education, housestaff patients were localized to a single general medicine ward. Ninety-three patients prelocalization, 64 patients postlocalization, 26 localized physicians, and 10 localized nurses were surveyed. Validated questionnaires assessed patients' experiences during hospitalization, and physician and nurse job satisfaction. Fifty-seven percent of patients knew their diagnosis prior to localization, compared to 80% postlocalization (p teamwork, patient safety, appropriate handling of errors, and culture of safety. The average length of stay was unchanged and the change in 30-day readmission rate was not statistically significant. Localization of patients to a single inpatient ward improved patient knowledge and satisfaction, and some aspects of interprofessional communication and workplace culture of safety. PMID:26042748

  17. ALARP considerations in criticality safety assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demonstrating that the risk to the public and workers is As Low As Reasonably Practicable (ALARP) is a fundamental requirement of safety cases for nuclear facilities in the United Kingdom. This is embodied in the Safety Assessment Principles (SAPs) published by the Regulator, the essence of which is incorporated within the safety assessment processes of the various nuclear site licensees. The concept of ALARP within criticality safety assessments has taken some time to establish in the United Kingdom. In principle, the licensee is obliged to search for a deterministic criticality safety solution, such as safe geometry vessels and passive control features, rather than placing reliance on active measurement devices and plant administrative controls. This paper presents a consideration of some ALARP issues in relation to the development of criticality safety cases. The paper utilises some idealised examples covering a range of issues facing the criticality safety assessor, including new plant design, operational plant and decommissioning activities. These examples are used to outline the elements of the criticality safety cases and present a discussion of ALARP in the context of criticality safety assessments. (author)

  18. Patient safety culture at neonatal intensive care units: perspectives of the nursing and medical team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Tomazoni

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to verify the assessment of the patient safety culture according to the function and length of experience of the nursing and medical teams at Neonatal Intensive Care Units.METHOD: quantitative survey undertaken at four Neonatal Intensive Care Units in Florianópolis, Brazil. The sample totaled 141 subjects. The data were collected between February and April 2013 through the application of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. For analysis, the Kruskal-Wallis and Chi-Square tests and Cronbach's Alpha coefficient were used. Approval for the research project was obtained from the Ethics Committee, CAAE: 05274612.7.0000.0121.RESULTS: differences in the number of positive answers to the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture, the safety grade and the number of reported events were found according to the professional characteristics. A significant association was found between a shorter Length of work at the hospital and Length of work at the unit and a larger number of positive answers; longer length of experience in the profession represented higher grades and less reported events. The physicians and nursing technicians assessed the patient safety culture more positively. Cronbach's alpha demonstrated the reliability of the instrument.CONCLUSION: the differences found reveal a possible relation between the assessment of the safety culture and the subjects' professional characteristics at the Neonatal Intensive Care Units.

  19. Patient safety culture at neonatal intensive care units: perspectives of the nursing and medical team 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomazoni, Andréia; Rocha, Patrícia Kuerten; de Souza, Sabrina; Anders, Jane Cristina; de Malfussi, Hamilton Filipe Correia

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to verify the assessment of the patient safety culture according to the function and length of experience of the nursing and medical teams at Neonatal Intensive Care Units. METHOD: quantitative survey undertaken at four Neonatal Intensive Care Units in Florianópolis, Brazil. The sample totaled 141 subjects. The data were collected between February and April 2013 through the application of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. For analysis, the Kruskal-Wallis and Chi-Square tests and Cronbach's Alpha coefficient were used. Approval for the research project was obtained from the Ethics Committee, CAAE: 05274612.7.0000.0121. RESULTS: differences in the number of positive answers to the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture, the safety grade and the number of reported events were found according to the professional characteristics. A significant association was found between a shorter Length of work at the hospital and Length of work at the unit and a larger number of positive answers; longer length of experience in the profession represented higher grades and less reported events. The physicians and nursing technicians assessed the patient safety culture more positively. Cronbach's alpha demonstrated the reliability of the instrument. CONCLUSION: the differences found reveal a possible relation between the assessment of the safety culture and the subjects' professional characteristics at the Neonatal Intensive Care Units. PMID:25493670

  20. Safety goals and safety culture opening plenary. 2. Safety Regulation Implemented by Gosatomnadzor of Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes principles and approaches used by Gosatomnadzor of Russia in establishing safety goals. The link between safety goals and safety culture is demonstrated. The paper also contains information on nuclear regulatory activities in Russia. Regulatory documents of Gosatomnadzor of Russia do not provide precise definitions of safety goals as IAEA documents INSAG-3 or INSAG-12 do. However, overall activities of Gosatomnadzor of Russia are directed to the achievement of these safety goals, as Gosatomnadzor of Russia is a federal executive authority responsible for the regulation of nuclear and radiation safety in accordance with the Russian Federal Law 'On the Use of Nuclear Energy'. Thus, in the Statement of the Policy of the Russian Regulatory Authority, enacted in 1992, it was established that the overall activities of Gosatomnadzor of Russia are directed to the achievement of the main goal. This goal is to establish conditions that ensure that personnel, the public, and the environment are protected from unacceptable radiation and nonproliferation of nuclear materials. The practical application of such a method as given by the publication of Statements of Policy of Gosatomnadzor of Russia may be considered as a safety culture element. 'General Provisions of NPP Safety Ensuring' (OPB-88/ 97) is a regulatory document of the highest level in the hierarchy of regulatory documents of Gosatomnadzor of Russia. It establishes quantitative values of safety goals as do the foregoing IAEA documents. Thus, this regulatory document sets up the following: 1. The estimated total probability of severe accidents should not exceed 105/reactor.yr. 2. The estimated probability of the worst possible radioactive release to the environment specified in the standards should not exceed 10-7/reactor.yr in the case of severe beyond-design-basis accidents. 3. The probability of a reactor vessel failure should not exceed 10-7/reactor.yr. The foregoing values are somehow more

  1. Developing safety culture-rocket science or common sense?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite evidence of significant management contributions to the causes of major accidents, recent events at Millstone Nuclear Power Station in the US and Ontario Hydro in Canada might lead one to conclude that the significance of safety culture, and the role of management in developing and maintaining an appropriate safety culture, is either not being understood or not being taken serious as integral to the safe operation of some complex, high-reliability operations. It is the purpose of this paper to address four aspects of management that are particularly important to safety culture, and to illustrate how development of an appropriate safety culture is more a matter of common sense than rocket science

  2. Developing safety culture-rocket science or common sense?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahn, J.A.

    1998-08-01

    Despite evidence of significant management contributions to the causes of major accidents, recent events at Millstone Nuclear Power Station in the US and Ontario Hydro in Canada might lead one to conclude that the significance of safety culture, and the role of management in developing and maintaining an appropriate safety culture, is either not being understood or not being taken serious as integral to the safe operation of some complex, high-reliability operations. It is the purpose of this paper to address four aspects of management that are particularly important to safety culture, and to illustrate how development of an appropriate safety culture is more a matter of common sense than rocket science.

  3. Implementing and measuring safety goals and safety culture. 4. Utility's Activities for Better Safety Culture After the JCO Accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The criticality accident at the JCO plant prompted the Government to enact a law for nuclear emergency preparedness. The nuclear industry established NSnet to facilitate opportunities for peer review among its members. This paper describes the activities by NSnet and TEPCO's Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power station (NPS) for a better safety culture. Created as a voluntary organization by the nuclear industry in 1999, NSnet has 35 members and is assisted by CRIEPI and NUPEC for its activities relevant to human factors. Given the fact that nuclear facility operators not belonging to WANO had no institutional system available for exchange of experiences and good practices for better safety among themselves, NSnet's activities focus on peer review by member organizations and onsite seminars. Starting April 2000 with visits to three fuel fabricators, NSnet intends to have 23 peer-review visits in 2 yr (Ref. 1). The six-member review team stays on-site for 4 days, during which time they review-using guidelines available from WANO and IAEA-OSART-six areas: organization/management, emergency preparedness, education/training, operation/ maintenance, protection against occupational radiation exposure, and prevention of accidents. A series of on-site seminars is held at members' nuclear facilities, to which NSnet dispatches experts for lectures. NSnet plans to hold such seminars twice per month. Other activities include information-sharing through a newsletter, a Web site (www. nsnet.gr.jp), and others. Although considerable differences exist in the design and the practices in operation/maintenance between power reactors and JCO, utilities can extract lessons from the accident that will be worth consideration for their own facilities in the areas of safety culture, education and training, and interface between design and operation. This thinking prompted the Nuclear Safety Promotion Center at Kashiwazaki-Kariwa NPS, to which the author belonged at that time, to launch the

  4. The role of probabilistic safety assessment and probabilistic safety criteria in nuclear power plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this Safety Report is to provide guidelines on the role of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) and a range of associated reference points, collectively referred to as probabilistic safety criteria (PSC), in nuclear safety. The application of this Safety Report and the supporting Safety Practice publication should help to ensure that PSA methodology is used appropriately to assess and enhance the safety of nuclear power plants. The guidelines are intended for use by nuclear power plant designers, operators and regulators. While these guidelines have been prepared with nuclear power plants in mind, the principles involved have wide application to other nuclear and non-nuclear facilities. In Section 2 of this Safety Report guidelines are established on the role PSA can play as part of an overall safety assurance programme. Section 3 summarizes guidelines for the conduct of PSAs, and in Section 4 a PSC framework is recommended and guidance is provided for the establishment of PSC values

  5. Assessment of safety of the nuclear installations of the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incidents and accidents periodically remind us that preventive measures at nuclear installations are not fully reliable. Although sound design is widely recognized to be prerequisite for safe operation, it is not sufficient. An active management that compensates for the weak aspects of the installations design by redundant operational provisions, is the key factor to ensure safe operation. Safety of nuclear installations cannot be assessed on an emotional basis. Since 1986, accurate safety assessment techniques based on an integrated approach to operational safety have been made available by the ASSET services and are applicable to any industrial process dealing with nuclear materials. The ASSET methodology enables to eliminate in advance the Root Causes of the future accidents by introducing practical safety culture principles in the current managerial practices

  6. Safety culture in the nuclear versus non-nuclear organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of safety culture in the safe and reliable operation of nuclear organizations is not a new concept. The greatest barriers to this area of research are twofold: (1) the definition and criteria of safety culture for a nuclear organization and (2) the measurement of those attributes in an objective and systematic fashion. This paper will discuss a proposed resolution of those barriers as demonstrated by the collection of data across nuclear and non-nuclear facilities over a two year period

  7. Knowledge basis in safety culture for researchers and practitioners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the main characteristics of the knowledge basis in safety culture which is being developed at the IPEN-CNEN/SP, one of the Brazilian nuclear institutes of research. The main objective of this basis is to organize the information about safety culture found in the literature and to make it available to researchers and practitioners. The first stage of the development of this basis is already finished being the subject of this work. (author)

  8. Safety culture in the nuclear versus non-nuclear organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haber, S.B.; Shurberg, D.A.

    1996-10-01

    The importance of safety culture in the safe and reliable operation of nuclear organizations is not a new concept. The greatest barriers to this area of research are twofold: (1) the definition and criteria of safety culture for a nuclear organization and (2) the measurement of those attributes in an objective and systematic fashion. This paper will discuss a proposed resolution of those barriers as demonstrated by the collection of data across nuclear and non-nuclear facilities over a two year period.

  9. Activities of nuclear safety culture in foreign organizations such as IAEA, etc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety of nuclear facilities is guaranteed with the safety of instrument and equipment and of human, organization, management and system. In the guarantee, especially the encouragement and the growth of nuclear safety culture which is the basis of the safety of the latter are very important. In recent years, severe accidents and transients due to organizational issues have increased. Then, international organizations, regulatory organizations of each country and nuclear enterprises promote positively the developments of self-assessment methods of safety culture and safety management systems. The activities in the international organizations of IAEA and OECD/NEA and in the foreign regulatory organizations of US NRC and UK NII are described. (K. Kato)

  10. Complementary safety assessments - Report by the French Nuclear Safety Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an immediate consequence of the Fukushima accident, the French Authority of Nuclear Safety (ASN) launched a campaign of on-site inspections and asked operators (mainly EDF, AREVA and CEA) to make complementary assessments of the safety of the nuclear facilities they manage. The approach defined by ASN for the complementary safety assessments (CSA) is to study the behaviour of nuclear facilities in severe accidents situations caused by an off-site natural hazard according to accident scenarios exceeding the current baseline safety requirements. This approach can be broken into 2 phases: first conformity to current design and secondly an approach to the beyond design-basis scenarios built around the principle of defence in depth. 38 inspections were performed on issues linked to the causes of the Fukushima crisis. It appears that some sites have to reinforce the robustness of the heat sink. The CSA confirmed that the processes put into place at EDF to detect non-conformities were satisfactory. The complementary safety assessments demonstrated that the current seismic margins on the EDF nuclear reactors are satisfactory. With regard to flooding, the complementary safety assessments show that the complete reassessment carried out following the flooding of the Le Blayais nuclear power plant in 1999 offers the installations a high level of protection against the risk of flooding. Concerning the loss of electrical power supplies and the loss of cooling systems, the analysis of EDF's CSA reports showed that certain heat sink and electrical power supply loss scenarios can, if nothing is done, lead to core melt in just a few hours in the most unfavourable circumstances. As for nuclear facilities that are not power or experimental reactors, some difficulties have appeared to implement the CSA approach that was initially devised for reactors. Generally speaking, ASN considers that the safety of nuclear facilities must be made more robust to improbable risks which are not

  11. Patient safety culture improvement tool: development and guidelines for use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Mark; Wentzell, Natasha

    2008-01-01

    The Patient Safety Culture Improvement Tool (PSCIT) was developed to assist healthcare organizations in identifying practical actions to improve their culture. This article describes the development process of the PSCIT and provides a guide to using the PSCIT. The tool is based on a safety culture maturity model, which describes five stages of cultural evolution, from pathological to generative. The PSCIT consists of nine elements that cover five patient safety culture dimensions, namely, leadership, risk analysis, workload management, sharing and learning and resource management. Each element describes the systems in place at each level of maturity, enabling organizations to identify their current level of maturity and actions to move to the next level. The PSCIT should be used with caution as there is currently a lack of reliability and validity data. PMID:18382154

  12. Safe patient care - safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Pierre, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organization's vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture ("top-down process"). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organization's maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization's general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed "informed culture". An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. "Incident reporting systems" are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organization's safe surgery checklist" is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality. Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate stimulation based team trainings into their

  13. [Safe patient care: safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Pierre, M

    2013-04-01

    Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organisation's vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture ("top-down process"). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organizations maturity in respect to safety is information flow and in particular an organization's general way of coping with information that suggests anomaly. As all values and beliefs, relationships, learning, and other aspects of organizational safety culture are about sharing and processing information, safety culture has been termed "informed culture". An informed culture is free of blame and open for information provided by incidents. "Incident reporting systems" are the backbone of a reporting culture, where good information flow is likely to support and encourage other kinds of cooperative behavior, such as problem solving, innovation, and inter-departmental bridging. Another facet of an informed culture is the free flow of information during perioperative patient care. The World Health Organisation's "safe surgery checklist" is the most prevalent example of a standardized information exchange aimed at preventing patient harm due to information deficit. In routine tasks mandatory standard operating procedures have gained widespread acceptance in guaranteeing the highest possible process quality.Technical and non-technical skills of healthcare professionals are the decisive human resource for an efficient and safe delivery of patient care and the avoidance of errors. The systematic enhancement of staff qualification by providing training opportunities can be a major investment in patient safety. In recent years several otorhinolaryngology departments have started to incorporate simulation based team trainings into their curriculum

  14. Development and psychometric test of the Assessment Scale for Patient Safety Culture in ICU%ICU患者安全文化测评量表的研制及信效度检验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄光琴; 夏建萍; 高春华; 蔡灵芝; 朱明丽; 王薇

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop the Assessment Scale for Patient Safety Culture in ICU and do psychometric test.Methods The Assessment Scale for Patient Safety Culture in ICU was developed based on literature review,qualitative interview,and two-round Delphi consultation.The reliability and validity were tested among 235 chnical nurses and doctors in ICU.Results A 45-item questionnaire was originally developed and eleven of them were deleted after subjective screening,project analysis and exploratory factor analysis.Seven factors were extracted with cumulative contribution rate of 59.347%.The scale of total Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.909; the split half reliability was 0.832.Each dimension of Cronbach's alpha coefficient was between 0.481~0.909,and the split half reliability was 0.481~0.866.All had significance in statistics above.Conclusions The Assessment Scale for Patient Safety Culture in ICU has good reliability and validity,which can be used to evaluate the ICU patient safety culture atmosphere domestically.%目的 研制ICU患者安全文化测评量表,并对所研制的量表进行信效度检验.方法 通过文献分析、质性访谈、2轮德尔菲(Delphi)专家咨询,形成“ICU患者安全文化测评量表”的原始量表.然后对235名医护人员进行预调查,评价其信效度.结果 初步形成45个条目,经初步主观筛选、项目分析、探索性因子分析后删除11个条目.应用主成分分析法,提取了特征值>1的7个公因子,其累积贡献率为59.347%.该量表总的Cronbach α系数为0.909,折半信度为0.832.各维度的Cronbach α系数在0.481~0.909,折半信度为0.481~0.866.以上均具有统计学意义.结论 编制的《ICU患者安全文化测评量表》具有较好的信效度,可用于评价ICU患者安全文化氛围.

  15. Relationship between organisational safety culture dimensions and crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varmazyar, Sakineh; Mortazavi, Seyed Bagher; Arghami, Shirazeh; Hajizadeh, Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    Knowing about organisational safety culture in public transportation system can provide an appropriate guide to establish effective safety measures and interventions to improve safety at work. The aim of this study was investigation of association between safety culture dimensions (leadership styles and company values, usage of crashes information and prevention programmes, management commitment and safety policy, participation and control) with involved self-reported crashes. The associations were considered through Spearman correlation, Pearson chi-square test and logistic regression. The results showed an association among self-reported crashes (occurrence or non-occurrence) and factors including leadership styles and company values; management commitment and safety policy; and control. Moreover, it was found a negative correlation and an odds ratio less than one between control and self-reported crashes. PMID:25494102

  16. Interface of Nuclear Safety and Security, Safety and Security Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of nuclear power engineering is related to the need to satisfy the increasing demands for electric power. This is currently being intensively implemented by increasing the number of the power units, which are basically single-unit plants. While ensuring the same level of equipment reliability and operation quality at every power unit, the potential of an accident generally increases in proportion to the number of the power units. Nuclear facilities are highly sophisticated systems, operated under conditions of various hazards, the consequences of which may be disastrous for the life and health of the public and the environment if the arrangements for safety assurance prove insufficient. Therefore, safety assurance is an imperative for the activities carried out at nuclear facilities, which must be regulated by the state and implemented by the operators. The objectives of this paper are to provide a general outlook of the existing hazards and the safety systems that are required to counteract them, and to exchange ideas both on the existing challenges related to the formulation of a uniform safety concept and on the possible solutions to these problems. (author)

  17. Psychological aspect of safety culture and motivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluations of motivation related to safety of personnel in NPPs and other nuclear facilities is made using the results from a study involving 606 persons from Kursk NPP, Physics and Power Engineering Institute (Russia), Obninsk Institute od Nuclear Power and Engineering and Training Centre of Russian Federation Navy. The results show the predominant role of safety motivation as an independent component in the structure of labor activity of nuclear workers and its dynamics in forming the motivation structure

  18. Safety assessment and the software requirements specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although much work has been done on assessing safety in programmable systems, one very important aspect, the integration of hazard analysis and requirements engineering, has been somewhat neglected. The problems associated with this integration are discussed and the HAZAPS methodology is proposed as a means of solving some of these. HAZAPS was developed for identifying hazards in programmable systems, constructing and modelling safety requirements, and assessing these requirements. A computer support tool for HAZAPS is also described

  19. Safety Assessment for Facilities and Activities. General Safety Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication describes the generally applicable requirements to be fulfilled in safety assessments for facilities and activities, with special attention paid to defence in depth, quantitative analyses and the application of a graded approach to the ranges of facilities and of activities that are addressed. The requirements provide a consistent and coherent basis for safety assessments, facilitating the transfer of good practices between organizations. A review of Safety Requirements publications was commenced in 2011 following the accident in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. The review revealed no significant areas of weakness and resulted in just a small set of amendments to strengthen the requirements and facilitate their implementation, which are contained in the present publication

  20. Investigation of radiation safety and safety culture of medical sanitation vocation in Suzhou

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the construction of radiation safety and safety culture of medical sanitation vocation in Suzhou. Methods: All medical units registered in administration center of Suzhou were included. The above selected medical units were completely investigated, district and county under the same condition of quality control. Results: The radiation safety and safety culture are existing differences among different property and grade hospitals of medicai sanitation vocation in Suzhou. Conclusion: The construction of radiation safety and safety culture is generally occupying in good level in suhzou, but there are obvious differences among different property and grade hospitals. The main reason for the differences in the importance attached to by the hospital decision-making and department management officials as well as the staff personal. (authors)

  1. Summary of the Safety Culture Activities in HANARO of KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The definition of safety culture in HANARO takes the IAEA's definition and it is the assembly of characteristics of attitudes in the HANARO center and individuals which establishes that, as an overriding priority, the HANARO safety issues receive the attention warranted by their significance. Since the power operation of HANARO started in 1996, HANARO has been operated for about 11 years and its degree of utilization and the number of experimental facilities have increased. This achievement is partly due to the spread of safety culture to the operators and the reactor users. In this paper, the safety culture activities done by the HANARO center of KAERI are described, and its efforts necessary for an improvement of it are presented

  2. Indicators for assessing the safety level of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the political opening of the states of Central and Eastern Europe roughly one decade ago, Western industrialized countries in particular have been striving to achieve sustainable improvements in the safety of nuclear reactors in those countries. One objective of these efforts is to ensure a high level of nuclear safety and safety culture in line with worldwide endeavors. The enlargement of the European Union in the very near future offers an opportunity for reaching this goal in the participating countries. Existing international framework agreements refer to the appropriate safety guidelines. At EU level, the harmonization of nuclear safety standards has been an important topic for years, with specific constructive activities being initiated, e.g., by the industry and by regulatory authorities. Uniform safety standards should not be the basis of proven reviews conducted by the national licensing and supervisory authorities. The objective should be the development of key requirements as framework conditions, irrespective of their practical implementation. They could be applied to any nuclear power plant in an accession country, but likewise to plants in member states, in order to provide an overview of the current safety status of a nuclear power plant and the rules by which it is run. As deriving uniform safety standards is a very expensive and lengthy procedure, the approach shown here identifies six main areas of review for light water reactors (safety systems; integrity of the safety barriers; risk assessment; radiation exposure of the plant personnel and the environment; plant operations management; plant safety) and the associated safety indicators, with reference criteria formulated as concretely as possible. This proposal also lends itself to international individual evaluations of safety levels and could facilitate the review process already under way for the EU candidate countries. (orig.)

  3. Safety Culture Improvement Activities of YGN 3 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear power industry all over the world, we can never overemphasize the importance of nuclear safety. After the Chernobyl accident occurred in 1986, Korean nuclear energy industry had made every effort to enhance nuclear safety culture further. And, as a result of the efforts, Korean government declared the five principles for the nuclear energy safety regulation, which were included in the Nuclear Energy Safety Policy Statement published in 1994. In 2001, through the announcement of Nuclear Safety Charter for the peaceful use of nuclear energy, the Ministry of Science and Technology proclaimed at home and abroad that the protection of citizens and environment by securing nuclear safety should be the highest priority in nuclear energy industry. Occupying almost 40% share of domestic electricity generation, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. decided 'Safety Top Priority Management' as president's management policy, and clearly presented the safety goal to the personnel. By this, the management can effectively place stress on securing safety, which is our highest priority and the only way to win public confidence toward nuclear energy industry. This is prepared to shortly introduce the activities for improving safety culture in Yonggwang Nuclear Power unit 3 and 4 (YGN 3 and 4)

  4. A Framework for Culture Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Tomasz Lenartowicz; Kendall Roth

    1999-01-01

    Understanding the nature and influences of culture is central to international business. Such inquiry presupposes knowing that the cultural grouping(s) of a study is a valid unit of analysis, which is critical in that the estimation of culture effects can vary based on the unit definition. Unfortunately, perhaps out of convenience, international studies often simply use a country-based definition of culture. In a desire to facilitate further development in understanding culture effects, in th...

  5. Creating a safety culture in the regulatory authority: The Cuban experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cuban regulatory authority has been working during several years for the fostering and development of a high Safety Culture level in nuclear activities in the country. As starting point to achieve this objective the assessment of the Safety Culture level in the regulatory authority performance was considered an important issue. For this purpose a preliminary diagnosis was carried out by means of a national survey that allowed identifying some areas of the regulatory activity that required improvements in order to achieve a higher Safety Culture and to immediately implement appropriate actions. Two of the most important actions undertaken were: the statement of the regulatory authority Safety Policy which governs and determines the performance of this organization and its staff and also the implementation of a new interaction practice at top level between the regulatory authority and the utilities of the nuclear sector through the Annual Regulatory Conference. The present paper summarizes these two introduced practices into the Cuban regulatory activity. (author)

  6. Developments in safety and operations culture in BNFL's thorp reprocessing plant, Sellafield, Cumbria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the best descriptions of Culture is 'how we do things around here'. In a stable organisation it is extremely difficult to change any type of culture, whether it is an operations, customer service or safety culture. To change culture one of two elements are essential. There must be either a significant external pressure felt by all in the organisation or a change in senior management, with authority to set a new direction for the organisation. BNFL had a unique opportunity through the commissioning and operation of the Thorp Reprocessing Plant at Sellafield to shape a new Safety and Operations Culture. Both the key elements for change were present. Thorp was a high profile flagship plant that had attracted multinational investment. It incorporated new technology. The workforce had volunteered to operate the plant. A strong senior management team was specially selected. The plant was being commissioned in an environment where there was significant opposition by 'anti nuclear' groups. It was essential to both BNFL and the wider international nuclear community that Thorp was commissioned and operated safely. A strong operating culture was developed with safety as the corner stone. The culture comprises three key components. Rigorous plant safety case and risk assessments before work commences and modifications to the plant occur; A high level of involvement by all levels of the workforce in both operations and safety matters; Strong supportive leadership which does not allow safety standards to be compromised and encourages open debate on how to improve. During commissioning and early operation of Thorp the robustness of the Safety and Operations Culture was demonstrated. On several occasions, despite intense commercial pressure, operations were halted until the situation was resolved both technically and procedurally. This paper describes how the Safety and Operations Culture was developed. The key factors for success include recruitment, team selection

  7. Safety culture and subcontractor network governance in a complex safety critical project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In safety critical industries many activities are currently carried out by subcontractor networks. Nevertheless, there are few studies where the core dimensions of resilience would have been studied in safety critical network activities. This paper claims that engineering resilience into a system is largely about steering the development of culture of the system towards better ability to anticipate, monitor, respond and learn. Thus, safety culture literature has relevance in resilience engineering field. This paper analyzes practical and theoretical challenges in applying the concept of safety culture in a complex, dynamic network of subcontractors involved in the construction of a new nuclear power plant in Finland, Olkiluoto 3. The concept of safety culture is in focus since it is widely used in nuclear industry and bridges the scientific and practical interests. This paper approaches subcontractor networks as complex systems. However, the management model of the Olkiluoto 3 project is to a large degree a traditional top-down hierarchy, which creates a mismatch between the management approach and the characteristics of the system to be managed. New insights were drawn from network governance studies. - Highlights: • We studied a relevant topical subject safety culture in nuclear new build project. • We integrated safety science challenges and network governance studies. • We produced practicable insights in managing safety of subcontractor networks

  8. A Socio-cultural Perspective on Patient Safety

    CERN Document Server

    Rowley, Emma

    2011-01-01

    This edited volume of original chapters brings together researchers from around the world who are exploring the facets of health care organization and delivery that are sometimes marginal to mainstream patient safety theories and methodologies but offer important insights into the socio-cultural and organizational context of patient safety. By examining these critical insights or perspectives and drawing upon theories and methodologies often neglected by mainstream safety researchers, this collection shows we can learn more about not only the barriers and drivers to implementing patient safety

  9. Probabilistic safety assessment in radioactive waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Probabilistic safety assessment codes are now widely used in radioactive waste disposal assessments. This report gives an overview of the current state of the field. The relationship between the codes and the regulations covering radioactive waste disposal is discussed and the characteristics of current codes is described. The problems of verification and validation are considered. (author)

  10. Patient safety culture measurement in general practice. Clinimetric properties of 'SCOPE'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwart Dorien LM

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A supportive patient safety culture is considered to be an essential condition for improving patient safety. Assessing the current safety culture in general practice may be a first step to target improvements. To that end, we studied internal consistency and construct validity of a safety culture questionnaire for general practice (SCOPE which was derived from a comparable questionnaire for hospitals (Dutch-HSOPS. Methods The survey was conducted among caregivers of Dutch general practice as part of an ongoing quality accreditation process using a 46 item questionnaire. We conducted factor analyses and studied validity by calculating correlations between the subscales and testing the hypothesis that respondents' patient safety grade of their practices correlated with their scores on the questionnaire. Results Of 72 practices 294 respondents completed the questionnaire. Eight factors were identified concerning handover and teamwork, support and fellowship, communication openness, feedback and learning from error, intention to report events, adequate procedures and staffing, overall perceptions of patient safety and expectations and actions of managers. Cronbach's alpha of the factors rated between 0.64 and 0.85. The subscales intercorrelated moderately, except for the factor about intention to report events. Respondents who graded patient safety highly scored significantly higher on the questionnaire than those who did not. Conclusions The SCOPE questionnaire seems an appropriate instrument to assess patient safety culture in general practice. The clinimetric properties of the SCOPE are promising, but future research should confirm the factor structure and construct of the SCOPE and delineate its responsiveness to changes in safety culture over time.

  11. An Empirical Analysis of Human Performance and Nuclear Safety Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this analysis, which was conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), was to test whether an empirical connection exists between human performance and nuclear power plant safety culture. This was accomplished through analyzing the relationship between a measure of human performance and a plant's Safety Conscious Work Environment (SCWE). SCWE is an important component of safety culture the NRC has developed, but it is not synonymous with it. SCWE is an environment in which employees are encouraged to raise safety concerns both to their own management and to the NRC without fear of harassment, intimidation, retaliation, or discrimination. Because the relationship between human performance and allegations is intuitively reciprocal and both relationship directions need exploration, two series of analyses were performed. First, human performance data could be indicative of safety culture, so regression analyses were performed using human performance data to predict SCWE. It also is likely that safety culture contributes to human performance issues at a plant, so a second set of regressions were performed using allegations to predict HFIS results

  12. Further activities of safety culture toward nuclear transportation industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On September 30, 1999, a criticality accident occurred at the uranium processing facility of the JCO Co. Ltd. (hereinafter referred to as ''JCO'') Tokai plant, located in Tokaimura, Ibaraki Prefecture. This was an unprecedented accident in Japan's history of peaceful use of nuclear power, resulting in three workers exposed to severe radiation, two of whom died, and the evacuation and enforced indoor confinement of local residents. Nuclear power suppliers must take personal responsibility for ensuring safety. In this connection, the electric power industry, heavy electric machinery manufacturers, fuel fabricators, and nuclear power research organizations gathered together to establish the Nuclear Safety Network (NSnet) in December 1999, based on the resolve to share and improve the level of the safety culture across the entire nuclear power industry and to assure that such an accident never occurs again. NSnet serves as a link between nuclear power enterprises, research organizations, and other bodies, based on the principles of equality and reciprocity. A variety of activities are pursued, such as diffusing a safety culture, implementing mutual evaluation among members, and exchanging safety-related information. Aiming to share and improve the safety culture throughout the entire nuclear power industry, NSnet thoroughly implements the principle of safety first, while at the same time making efforts to restore trust in nuclear power

  13. Preliminary Study on the Development of Quantitative Safety Culture Index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety culture is that assembly of characteristics and attitudes in organizations and individuals which establishes that, as an overriding priority, nuclear plant safety issues receive the attention warranted by their significance. Because it needs to be recognized as the most significant consciousness to achieve the nuclear safety performance, Korean government and nuclear power generation company have tried to develop the practical method to improve the safety culture from the long term point view. In this study, based on the site interviews to define the potential issues on organizational behavior for the safe operation and the survey on the level of safety culture of occupied workers are conducted. Survey results are quantified as a few indicators of nuclear safety by the statistical method and it can be simulated by the dynamic modeling as time goes on. Currently index and dynamic modeling are still being developed, however, results can be used to suggest the long term strategy which safety is clearly integrated into all activities in the nuclear organization

  14. Agent-based organizational modelling for analysis of safety culture at an air navigation service provider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessment of safety culture is done predominantly by questionnaire-based studies, which tend to reveal attitudes on immaterial characteristics (values, beliefs, norms). There is a need for a better understanding of the implications of the material aspects of an organization (structures, processes, etc.) for safety culture and their interactions with the immaterial characteristics. This paper presents a new agent-based organizational modelling approach for integrated and systematic evaluation of material and immaterial characteristics of socio-technical organizations in safety culture analysis. It uniquely considers both the formal organization and the value- and belief-driven behaviour of individuals in the organization. Results are presented of a model for safety occurrence reporting at an air navigation service provider. Model predictions consistent with questionnaire-based results are achieved. A sensitivity analysis provides insight in organizational factors that strongly influence safety culture indicators. The modelling approach can be used in combination with attitude-focused safety culture research, towards an integrated evaluation of material and immaterial characteristics of socio-technical organizations. By using this approach an organization is able to gain a deeper understanding of causes of diverse problems and inefficiencies both in the formal organization and in the behaviour of organizational agents, and to systematically identify and evaluate improvement options.

  15. Safe operation of nuclear power plants - Is safety culture an adequate management method?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the characteristics of a good safety culture is a definable commitment to the improvement of safety behaviours and attitudes at all organisational levels. A second characteristic of an organisation with excellent safety culture is free and open communication. The general understanding has been that safety culture is a part of organisation culture. In addition to safety culture thinking, proactive programmes and displays of proactive work to improve safety are required. This work needs to include, qt a minimum, actions aiming at reducing human errors, the development of human error prevention tools, improvements in training, and the development of working methods and the organisation's activities. Safety depends not only on the technical systems, but also on the organisation. There is a need for better methods and tools for organisational assessment and development. Today there is universal acceptance of the significant impact that management and organisational factors have over the safety significance of complex industrial installations such as nuclear power plants. Many events with significant economic and public impact had causes that have been traced to management deficiencies. The objective of this study is development of new methods to increase safety of nuclear power plant operation. The research has been limited to commercial nuclear power plants that are intended for electrical power generation in Finland. Their production activities, especially operation and maintenance, are primarily reviewed from a safety point of view, as well as human performance and organisational factors perspective. This defines the scope and focus of the study. The research includes studies related to knowledge management and tacit knowledge in the project management context and specific studies related to transfer of tacit knowledge in the maintenance organization and transfer of tacit knowledge between workers of old generation and young generation. The empirical results

  16. Safe operation of nuclear power plants - Is safety culture an adequate management method?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piirto, A.

    2012-07-01

    One of the characteristics of a good safety culture is a definable commitment to the improvement of safety behaviours and attitudes at all organisational levels. A second characteristic of an organisation with excellent safety culture is free and open communication. The general understanding has been that safety culture is a part of organisation culture. In addition to safety culture thinking, proactive programmes and displays of proactive work to improve safety are required. This work needs to include, qt a minimum, actions aiming at reducing human errors, the development of human error prevention tools, improvements in training, and the development of working methods and the organisation's activities. Safety depends not only on the technical systems, but also on the organisation. There is a need for better methods and tools for organisational assessment and development. Today there is universal acceptance of the significant impact that management and organisational factors have over the safety significance of complex industrial installations such as nuclear power plants. Many events with significant economic and public impact had causes that have been traced to management deficiencies. The objective of this study is development of new methods to increase safety of nuclear power plant operation. The research has been limited to commercial nuclear power plants that are intended for electrical power generation in Finland. Their production activities, especially operation and maintenance, are primarily reviewed from a safety point of view, as well as human performance and organisational factors perspective. This defines the scope and focus of the study. The research includes studies related to knowledge management and tacit knowledge in the project management context and specific studies related to transfer of tacit knowledge in the maintenance organization and transfer of tacit knowledge between workers of old generation and young generation. The empirical

  17. Culture and safety culture: Individual and collective attitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with some of the recommendations made in INSAG-4, those placing most importance on certain individual and collective attitudes important for safety. The modest bibliography which begins this communication, places these attitudes into a wider context which must be accounted for if effective safety measures are to take care of the irrational or non-Cartesian side of our actions, communication activities and thoughts. The purpose is to provide a fuller description of the ways in which people ensure safety by focusing on their know-how, the communication activities needed for their activity and the learned and unconscious mechanisms governing the actions determined by the temporal and organizational context in which these people find themselves. Similarly, the validity of their final judgement on the quality of the installation and the availability of the safeguard systems depends on the methods used to transfer and compile information. Knowledge of the transfer methods and the points at which the information becomes blocked could be helpful. (author)

  18. Safety culture: a survey of the state-of-the-art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the evolution of the term 'safety culture' and the perceived relationship between safety culture and safety of operations in nuclear power generation and other hazardous technologies. There is a widespread belief that safety culture is an important contributor to safety of operations. Empirical evidence that safety culture and other management and organizational factors influence operational safety is more readily available for the chemical process industry than for nuclear power plant operations. The commonly accepted attributes of safety culture include good organizational communications, good organizational learning, and senior management commitment to safety. Safety culture may be particularly important in reducing latent errors in complex, well-defended systems. The role of regulatory bodies in fostering strong safety cultures remains unclear, and additional work is required to define the essential attributes of safety culture and to identify reliable performance indicators

  19. Safety culture as an element of contact and cooperation between utilities, research and safety authorities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety culture approach may simply be seen as a recognition of the close interdependence between safety and organisational processes: achievement of technical safety objectives will largely depend on the quality of the implementation processes in the organisations concerned. With a slight modification of the original INSAG formulation, SKI defines safety culture as 'a consciously formulated and implemented set of values in an organisation, which establishes that, as an overriding priority, safety issues receive the attention warranted by their significance'. In practice, a high level of safety culture means the systematic organisation and implementation of a number of activities aimed at creating a high quality defence in depth against both technical and human failures that may cause accidents. An enquiring and learning attitude is a key element of such a safety culture. For example, to prevent accidents, the organisation always needs to be reactive to incidents, by performing proper root cause analysis of both technical and organisational factors, and taking appropriate corrective actions. The long term organisational objective should be to be proactive and identify deficiencies in technology and organisation that may lead to serious incidents or, at worst, accidents and take corrective action even before actual occurrence of incidents of substantial safety significance. (author) 13 refs

  20. Health Technology Assessment and patient safety

    OpenAIRE

    Andrew Mulcahy; Tom Walley

    2005-01-01

    Health Technology Assessment (HTA) is a process used to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and costeffectiveness of health technologies by a systematic review of clinical, economic, and utilization research.

    Despite widespread investment in patient safety technologies in the U.K., U.S., and elsewhere, little HTA has been done to establish the clinical or cost-effectiveness of these technologies. The HTA and patient safety literature suggests there are four categori...

  1. Study of seismic probabilistic safety assessment methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are two Seismic Risk Assessment Methodologies in the world, Seismic Margin Assessment (SMA) and Seismic Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA). SMA can provide the risk insights qualitatively and it is helpful in risk informed decision making for nuclear power plant, while Seismic PSA can provide more comprehensive and detailed risk insights quantitatively. The study of the Seismic PSA methodology is carried out, based on the AP1000 SMA, which is mastered. (authors)

  2. Integrated Deterministic-Probabilistic Safety Assessment Methodologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudinov, P.; Vorobyev, Y.; Sanchez-Perea, M.; Queral, C.; Jimenez Varas, G.; Rebollo, M. J.; Mena, L.; Gomez-Magin, J.

    2014-02-01

    IDPSA (Integrated Deterministic-Probabilistic Safety Assessment) is a family of methods which use tightly coupled probabilistic and deterministic approaches to address respective sources of uncertainties, enabling Risk informed decision making in a consistent manner. The starting point of the IDPSA framework is that safety justification must be based on the coupling of deterministic (consequences) and probabilistic (frequency) considerations to address the mutual interactions between stochastic disturbances (e.g. failures of the equipment, human actions, stochastic physical phenomena) and deterministic response of the plant (i.e. transients). This paper gives a general overview of some IDPSA methods as well as some possible applications to PWR safety analyses. (Author)

  3. Integrated Deterministic-Probabilistic Safety Assessment Methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IDPSA (Integrated Deterministic-Probabilistic Safety Assessment) is a family of methods which use tightly coupled probabilistic and deterministic approaches to address respective sources of uncertainties, enabling Risk informed decision making in a consistent manner. The starting point of the IDPSA framework is that safety justification must be based on the coupling of deterministic (consequences) and probabilistic (frequency) considerations to address the mutual interactions between stochastic disturbances (e.g. failures of the equipment, human actions, stochastic physical phenomena) and deterministic response of the plant (i.e. transients). This paper gives a general overview of some IDPSA methods as well as some possible applications to PWR safety analyses. (Author)

  4. Environment, safety and health progress assessment manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On June 27, 1989, the Secretary of Energy announced a 1O-Point Initiative to strengthen environment,safety, and health (ES ampersand H) programs, and waste management activities at involved conducting DOE production, research, and testing facilities. One of the points independent Tiger Team Assessments of DOE operating facilities. The Office of Special Projects (OSP), EH-5, in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health, EH-1, was assigned the responsibility to conduct the Tiger Team Assessments. Through June 1992, a total of 35 Tiger Team Assessments were completed. The Secretary directed that Corrective Action Plans be developed and implemented to address the concerns identified by the Tiger Teams. In March 1991, the Secretary approved a plan for assessments that are ''more focused, concentrating on ES ampersand H management, ES ampersand H corrective actions, self-assessment programs, and root-cause related issues.'' In July 1991, the Secretary approved the initiation of ES ampersand H Progress Assessments, as a followup to the Tiger Team Assessments, and in the continuing effort to institutionalize the self-assessment process and line management accountability in the ES ampersand H areas. This volume contains appendices to the Environment, Safety and Health Progress Assessment Manual

  5. Safety culture and the accident at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior to the accident at Three Mile Island, little attention was being paid to the human role in the safe operation of civilian nuclear power plants. The investigation of the TMI accident showed that its root causes were primarily human-related. The Kemeny Report on the TMI accident does not use the term 'safety culture'; however, it fully identifies all relevant aspects of safety culture. It was only after the accident at Chernobyl that the term 'safety culture' came into widespread use. However, it should be noted that, during the years after TMI and before Chernobyl, already major changes had been instituted concerning human factors and human reliability in the civilian nuclear energy programs of many countries. Greater credit should be given to the remarkable insights developed by the Kemeny Commission as contained in the Kemeny Report. (author)

  6. Inclusion and Exclusion in the safety culture at sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøn, Sisse

    and linking acts inspired from research in social capital, and supplemented with acts of exclusion, all to describe the power conflicts which includes and excludes members in the unitary, divided or fragmented safety cultures that I met on board. The data shows that foreign seafarers are treated......The acceleration of the globalization faces us as a nation with the challenge of adjusting our procedures and policies to accommodate foreign citizens working in Danish workplaces. In this paper I analyse data from field work voyages at sea. The data is presented in categories of bonding, bridging...... equally as long as the basic structures are not addressed. They are however treated equally on the majority´s terms, which still lead to a minority position even in the safety culture. A shared safety culture is therefore difficult to achieve....

  7. Evaluation of Health, Safety and Environment (HSE Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iraj Mohammadfam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have determined that the application of technical safety measures is not adequate to protect human, economic and environmental assets in industries. Therefore, promoting Health, Safety and Environment (HSE culture, as an alternative approach, is of great importance. The aim of this study was to evaluate and manage HSE culture among employees of an industrial sector in Iran. This descriptive-analytic research was carried out during the years 2009 and 2010. The statistical population included ten subsidiaries of the industry. To gather the required data, an HSE culture questionnaire was developed. SPSS software was also applied to analyze the data gathered. Data analysis determined that the mean of HSE culture scores was 262.7. Considering the borderline between the negative and positive HSE culture (279, it is inferred that 79.4% of personnel culture scores was negative. Finally, the study concluded that to improve safety culture in an organization, not only psychological and personal factors but also organizational and environmental factors should thoroughly be investigated. In this way, the actual problems would be identified, appropriate problem-solving methodologies be implemented and, ultimately incidents rate be reduced.

  8. Organizational Culture and Safety Performance in the Manufacturing Companies in Malaysia: A Conceptual Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ong Choon Hee; Lim Lee Ping

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a conceptual analysis of organizational culture and safety performance in the manufacturing companies in Malaysia. Our conceptual analysis suggests that manufacturing companies that adopt group culture or hierarchical culture are more likely to demonstrate safety compliance and safety participation. Manufacturing companies that adopt rational culture or developmental culture are less likely to demonstrate safety compliance and safety participation. Give...

  9. HANFORD SAFETY ANALYSIS & RISK ASSESSMENT HANDBOOK (SARAH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EVANS, C B

    2004-12-21

    The purpose of the Hanford Safety Analysis and Risk Assessment Handbook (SARAH) is to support the development of safety basis documentation for Hazard Category 2 and 3 (HC-2 and 3) U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 830, ''Nuclear Safety Management''. Subpart B, ''Safety Basis Requirements.'' Consistent with DOE-STD-3009-94, Change Notice 2, ''Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses'' (STD-3009), and DOE-STD-3011-2002, ''Guidance for Preparation of Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) Documents'' (STD-3011), the Hanford SARAH describes methodology for performing a safety analysis leading to development of a Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and derivation of Technical Safety Requirements (TSR), and provides the information necessary to ensure a consistently rigorous approach that meets DOE expectations. The DSA and TSR documents, together with the DOE-issued Safety Evaluation Report (SER), are the basic components of facility safety basis documentation. For HC-2 or 3 nuclear facilities in long-term surveillance and maintenance (S&M), for decommissioning activities, where source term has been eliminated to the point that only low-level, residual fixed contamination is present, or for environmental remediation activities outside of a facility structure, DOE-STD-1120-98, ''Integration of Environment, Safety, and Health into Facility Disposition Activities'' (STD-1120), may serve as the basis for the DSA. HC-2 and 3 environmental remediation sites also are subject to the hazard analysis methodologies of this standard.

  10. Overview of the ISAM safety assessment methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ISAM safety assessment methodology consists of the following key components: specification of the assessment context description of the disposal system development and justification of scenarios formulation and implementation of models running of computer codes and analysis and presentation of results. Common issues run through two or more of these assessment components, including: use of methodological and computer tools, collation and use of data, need to address various sources of uncertainty, building of confidence in the individual components, as well as the overall assessment. The importance of the iterative nature of the assessment should be recognised

  11. Engineering safety assessment. An introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There have been several major industrial accidents in recent years, notably the Chernobyl reactor accident, the Bhopal disaster and the Mexico City gas explosions. It is essential that engineers should understand the natures of the hazards and risks of industrial plant. This book is intended to give an introduction to this subject. Determining the risks associated with hazardous plant such as a chemical plant or a nuclear power station requires knowledge of the probability of a given accident, as well as knowledge of the likely consequences in terms of human lives or damaged property. In this book, the author explains these two main themes in assessing overall risk. He introduces basic probability theory, the assessment of systems reliabilities and structural reliabilities, and the means used to estimate the consequences of hypothetical major accidents. In particular, the methodologies for estimating the consequences of accidental explosion and accidents involving the release of airborne toxic materials (including chemical toxins, carcinogens, and radioactive materials) are explained. A final chapter explores the difficult question of 'acceptable' risk, and how much can justifiably be spent on risk reduction. Intended for use by final year students of chemical, mechanical or nuclear engineering, this book will also be suitable for postgraduate students and practising engineers and scientists whose work involves them in risk assessment. (author)

  12. Environment, safety and health progress assessment manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On June 27, 1989, the Secretary of Energy announced a 10-Point Initiative to strengthen environment, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) programs, and waste management activities at DOE production, research, and testing facilities. One of the points involved conducting dent Tiger Team Assessments of DOE operating facilities. The Office of Special independent Projects (OSP), EH-5, in the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health, EH-1, was assigned the responsibility to conduct the Tiger Team Assessments. Through June 1992, a total of 35 Tiger Team Assessments were completed. The Secretary directed that Corrective Action Plans be developed and implemented to address the concerns identified by the Tiger Teams. In March 1991, the Secretary approved a plan for assessments that are ''more focused, concentrating on ES ampersand H management, ES ampersand H corrective actions, self-assessment programs, and root-cause related issues.'' In July 1991, the Secretary approved the initiation of ES ampersand H Progress Assessments, as a followup to the Tiger Team Assessments, and in the continuing effort to institutionalize the self-assessment process and line management accountability in the ES ampersand H areas. This manual documents the processes to be used to perform the ES ampersand H Progress Assessments. It was developed based upon the lessons learned from Tiger Team Assessments, the two pilot Progress Assessments, and Progress Assessments that have been completed. The manual will be updated periodically to reflect lessons learned or changes in policy

  13. Colorectal Cancer Screening at the Nexus of HIV, Minority Statuses, and Cultural Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ka'opua, Lana Sue I.; Diaz, Tressa P.; Park, Soon H.; Bowen, Talita; Patrick, Kevin; Tamang, Suresh; Braun, Kathryn L.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The incidence of non-AIDS-defining cancers has increased significantly among persons living with HIV (PLHIV). Screening education is recommended. Purpose: Social learning, minority stress, and cultural safety theories informed this pilot to assess the feasibility of a colorectal cancer screening intervention targeted to PLHIV, with…

  14. Safety culture and organizational climate in air traffic control

    OpenAIRE

    Ek, Åsa; Akselsson, Roland; Arvidsson, Marcus; Johansson, Curt R

    2003-01-01

    Due to organizational changes in the Swedish air navigation services (ANS), which in extension could impact flight safety, the safety culture (SC), organizational climate (OC), and related areas are monitored. Study locations are the two main air traffic control centers in Sweden and parts of the central ANS office. This paper reports on a first attempt to investigate whether relationships exist between SC and OC. The findings show that such relationships exist.

  15. How organizational, technical and cultural processes work together for safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global principles of 'safety culture' have to become embedded in the local policies and implementing practices of hundreds of 'plant cultures' around the world in order to affect their safe performance. Through self-analysis, nuclear organizations can understand how they currently respond socially, culturally, and technically to such system characteristics of complexity, density, obscured signals, and delayed feedback in order to assure their capacities for anticipating, preventing, and recovering from threats to safety. To be carried out by executives, managers, and employees and across all functions, self-analysis has three steps: Developing 'activities analyses' of operations and maintenance work, using that analysis to create a 'gap map' of needed but missing relationships and communications, and using the evidence revealed in both self-studies to understand details of their local safety culture and acknowledge differences in priorities, values, and assumptions among specialists. Organizational safety policies need to foster respect for differences and ways of managing conflict and diversity. Nuclear organizations can use their self-studies as the basis for discussing safety management strategies with peers and with organizational researchers and safety scholars and practitioners. The first priority of safety management is to strengthen or change the collective conditions under which people understand, organize, and carry out very complicated, potentially hazardous work. When the men and women operating and maintaining nuclear installations change their approaches to their work in accordance with their activities analyses and the new understandings their gap maps provide, their active participation in self-studies is likely to also change their attitudes and make them more aware of their own proclivities to error and misinterpretation, hence of their need to learn. Such motivational and cognitive changes are also likely to be more enduring when organizational

  16. Five years of simulator evaluation - a contribution to safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simulator training has been an important component in education and advanced training at a high level of nuclear power plant personnel for more than 25 years. From the beginning of simulator training, checking on the objectives of learning and feedback have been part and parcel of the effort. In the course of the revision of the 1990 Directive on Expertise of Licensed Personnel in Nuclear Power Plants composed by the German Federal Ministry for the Environment (BMU), the type and organization of evaluations and the inclusion of qualified simulator trainers were expressed in even more concrete terms. Simulator evaluation serves the purpose of assessing, on the basis of the goals of practical exercises and courses established jointly with nuclear power plant operators, the performance and the behavior of individual participants so as to obtain information and guidance for further work. In addition, both simulator trainers, the Simulator Center, and the operators are to receive feedback with respect to the courses held and for checking against plans. First experience since the introduction of simulator evaluation has shown a basically positive assessment by all participants, i.e. attendees, operators, and the Simulator Center, expressing important aspects in support of training. As new simulators were commissioned in the mid-nineties, this met one of the major requests by course participants for a realistic model of their working environment. The experience accumulated also helps optimum training by means of simulators and thus ultimately also contributes to the safety culture in German nuclear technology. (orig.)

  17. Indirect Lightning Safety Assessment Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ong, M M; Perkins, M P; Brown, C G; Crull, E W; Streit, R D

    2009-04-24

    Lightning is a safety hazard for high-explosives (HE) and their detonators. In the However, the current flowing from the strike point through the rebar of the building The methodology for estimating the risk from indirect lighting effects will be presented. It has two parts: a method to determine the likelihood of a detonation given a lightning strike, and an approach for estimating the likelihood of a strike. The results of these two parts produce an overall probability of a detonation. The probability calculations are complex for five reasons: (1) lightning strikes are stochastic and relatively rare, (2) the quality of the Faraday cage varies from one facility to the next, (3) RF coupling is inherently a complex subject, (4) performance data for abnormally stressed detonators is scarce, and (5) the arc plasma physics is not well understood. Therefore, a rigorous mathematical analysis would be too complex. Instead, our methodology takes a more practical approach combining rigorous mathematical calculations where possible with empirical data when necessary. Where there is uncertainty, we compensate with conservative approximations. The goal is to determine a conservative estimate of the odds of a detonation. In Section 2, the methodology will be explained. This report will discuss topics at a high-level. The reasons for selecting an approach will be justified. For those interested in technical details, references will be provided. In Section 3, a simple hypothetical example will be given to reinforce the concepts. While the methodology will touch on all the items shown in Figure 1, the focus of this report is the indirect effect, i.e., determining the odds of a detonation from given EM fields. Professor Martin Uman from the University of Florida has been characterizing and defining extreme lightning strikes. Using Professor Uman's research, Dr. Kimball Merewether at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque calculated the EM fields inside a Faraday-cage type

  18. Predicting and preventing organizational failure: learning, stability and safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physical definition of 'safety culture' is the creation of an organizational and operational structure that places unending emphasis on safety at every level. We propose and prefer the use of the term and the objective of sustaining a 'Learning Environment', where mistakes, outcomes and errors are used as learning vehicles to improve, and we can now define why that is true. Therefore we can manage and quantify safety effectively tracking and analyzing outcomes, using the trends to guide our needed organizational behaviors. (author)

  19. Associations between safety culture and employee engagement over time: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugherty Biddison, Elizabeth Lee; Paine, Lori; Murakami, Peter; Herzke, Carrie; Weaver, Sallie J

    2016-01-01

    With the growth of the patient safety movement and development of methods to measure workforce health and success have come multiple modes of assessing healthcare worker opinions and attitudes about work and the workplace. Safety culture, a group-level measure of patient safety-related norms and behaviours, has been proposed to influence a variety of patient safety outcomes. Employee engagement, conceptualised as a positive, work-related mindset including feelings of vigour, dedication and absorption in one's work, has also demonstrated an association with a number of important worker outcomes in healthcare. To date, the relationship between responses to these two commonly used measures has been poorly characterised. Our study used secondary data analysis to assess the relationship between safety culture and employee engagement over time in a sample of >50 inpatient hospital units in a large US academic health system. With >2000 respondents in each of three time periods assessed, we found moderate to strong positive correlations (r=0.43-0.69) between employee engagement and four Safety Attitudes Questionnaire domains. Independent collection of these two assessments may have limited our analysis in that minimally different inclusion criteria resulted in some differences in the total respondents to the two instruments. Our findings, nevertheless, suggest a key area in which healthcare quality improvement efforts might be streamlined. PMID:26041813

  20. Enhancing the safety culture in nuclear installations through efficient regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety culture of a nuclear installation is greatly influenced by the external regulatory agencies with which it relates or interacts. These external regulatory agencies create demands for compliance with national industry or governmental regulatory standards and requirements imposed to provide for the public health and safety. While these national regulations can influence nuclear safety, no amount of regulation can ensure safety if those who operate the nuclear installations do not or cannot take it upon themselves to operate as safely as possible. It is not possible, nor is it desirable, for a regulatory agency to have the ultimate responsibility for the safety of nuclear installations. Good judgement and safe operating philosophy cannot be legislated. There must exist a safety culture in nuclear installations which recognizes the primary and ultimate responsibility for nuclear safety lies with those who manage and operate the installation. Thus, effective regulation must exist which promotes an environment that provides the nuclear installation the latitude it needs to apply innovative solutions to improve maintenance, operations, and training, and fosters a quest for excellence. (author)

  1. A novel tool for organisational learning and its impact on safety culture in a hospital dispensary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incident reporting as a key mechanism for organisational learning and the establishment of a stronger safety culture are pillars of the current patient safety movement. Studies have suggested that incident reporting in healthcare does not achieve its full potential due to serious barriers to reporting and that sometimes staff may feel alienated by the process. The aim of the work reported in this paper was to prototype a novel approach to organisational learning that allows an organisation to assess and to monitor the status of processes that often give rise to latent failure conditions in the work environment, and to assess whether and through which mechanisms participation in this approach affects local safety culture. The approach was prototyped in a hospital dispensary using Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA) cycles, and the effect on safety culture was described qualitatively through semi-structured interviews. The results suggest that the approach has had a positive effect on the safety culture within the dispensary, and that staff perceive the approach to be useful and usable.

  2. Safety culture program for the Cofrentes nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IBERDROLA (who is the owner of the Cofrentes NPS and shared other Spanish nuclear units) has paid careful attention through his nuclear safety and quality unit to safety and quality culture concepts and methodologies developed during the second half of the past decade and the beginning of the 90's. Moreover, a good management as well as work-men responsability and motivation should conform a good level of safety culture. We thus felt that we needed to combine a safety culture plan and a continuous quality improvement program so as to obtain the best possible safety and culture results. Consequently, IBERDROLA established a pilot program for his Cofrentes NPS in 1992 to drive for quality, as a top management policy, actively pursued by corporate and station managers. In summary, the pilot program consists of a 'Safety Culture Plan' which establishes the vision, mission, principles, global obj ectives and especific obj ectives and tasks, and of a 'continuous quality improvement plan' in which three phases have been set ut: phase I - learn to work as a team, fix the methodology and look for results; phase II - focused toward objectives, simplification and improvement of work processes, phase III - look toward supporting recommendations and achieving the policy goals. However, we may already say that we have preceived greater management and workmen involvement, better planning of significant issues and an improvement in the team-work environment. Nevertheless, we are in the process of changing certain mechanisms and ways of behaviour that we have detected as drawbacks in the past, in order to further improve in this area. (author)

  3. Risk assessment and improving nuclear plant safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper activities of the Relko, Ltd. are described. The Relko team is an distinguished group of engineers, applied scientists and management consultants who are widely recognised for their problem solving capabilities in the field of safety of nuclear power plants equipped with WWER type reactors. Relko Ltd. was founded in February 1993. The company performs safety analyses and evaluation of operational experience as well as consulting on matters of plant safety. Relko Ltd. provides for nuclear power plants the following services: Preparing of level 1 and level 2 full power and shutdown PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment) studies; Support decision making in plant safety upgrading using PSA; Support plant operation based on PSA applications: - risk monitoring by EOOS Risk Monitor (Equipment Out Of Service), - optimization of technical specifications (allowed outage times and test intervals of safety systems), - optimization of maintenance activities based on the RCM (Reliability Centered Maintenance) approach; Reliability analyses for computerized reactor protection systems, control and instrumentation systems (software and hardware); Deterministic fire risk analyses; Deterministic flood risk analysis; High energy piping break analysis; Further development of accident management measures, drafting of safety requirements, emergency operating procedures and guides

  4. IAEA/USDOE senior management workshop on promotion of safety culture for the NPPS with RBMK reactors. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current workshop, co-sponsored by the IAEA and USDOE, was a continuation of the previous effort for further promotion of safety culture at RBMK NPPs. The objective of the workshop was to provide a forum for senior managers from governmental organizations and operating organizations to further exchange experience in understanding the factors influencing safety culture, in assessing safety culture at their own organizations and developing safety culture at RBMK NPPs. The workshop consisted of a broad scope of presentations to review the basic concepts and major elements of safety culture (ownership, accountability, pride, job satisfaction, trust, openness, etc.), to identify and discuss the various approaches used in different countries in attaining a strong safety culture, and to explain, through the use of practical examples, what the benefits of a strong safety culture are; how to improve the behavior of people, how to gain trust and openness, how to overcome difficulties in changing staff's attitudes, and how to manage safety culture. 2 figs

  5. Building a culture of safety through team training and engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Lily; Galla, Catherine

    2013-05-01

    Medical errors continue to occur despite multiple strategies devised for their prevention. Although many safety initiatives lead to improvement, they are often short lived and unsustainable. Our goal was to build a culture of patient safety within a structure that optimised teamwork and ongoing engagement of the healthcare team. Teamwork impacts the effectiveness of care, patient safety and clinical outcomes, and team training has been identified as a strategy for enhancing teamwork, reducing medical errors and building a culture of safety in healthcare. Therefore, we implemented Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (TeamSTEPPS), an evidence-based framework which was used for team training to create transformational and/or incremental changes; facilitating transformation of organisational culture, or solving specific problems. To date, TeamSTEPPS (TS) has been implemented in 14 hospitals, two Long Term Care Facilities, and outpatient areas across the North Shore LIJ Health System. 32 150 members of the healthcare team have been trained. TeamSTEPPS was piloted at a community hospital within the framework of the health system's organisational care delivery model, the Collaborative Care Model to facilitate sustainment. AHRQ's Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture, (HSOPSC), was administered before and after implementation of TeamSTEPPS, comparing the perception of patient safety by the heathcare team. Pilot hospital results of HSOPSC show significant improvement from 2007 (pre-TeamSTEPPS) to 2010. System-wide results of HSOPSC show similar trends to those seen in the pilot hospital. Valuable lessons for organisational success from the pilot hospital enabled rapid spread of TeamSTEPPS across the rest of the health system. PMID:23211280

  6. Patient Safety Culture Status From The Perspective Medical Staff Of Yasuj Hospitals In 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rezaean

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: One of the most important problems in the health sector, particularly in clinical centers, is the quality of healthcare. Patient safety is one of the most important elements in creating health care quality due to the fact that it is a critical component to the quality of health care and many errors are present in patient care and treatment practices..                                                               Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the status of the patient safety culture and its relationship with events reported in Yasuj hospitals. Methods: The present descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted on 361 medical staff of Yasuj hospitals. The data were collected through a hospital survey on patient safety culture. The collected data were analyzed by using SPSS statistics soft ware version 21, using Descriptive methods, Pearson Coefficient, ANOVA, and T-Test. Results: The results of the present study revealed that the teamwork among hospital units (71/89percent, with expectations and management measures (66/38% in the case of safety obtained the most score and non-punitive response to errors (48/79% and manager support (55/88 percent obtained the least score. 73/7% of employees of three hospitals in the past 12 months did not report any event. In addition, there was a meaningful statistical relationship between the total score of safety culture and reporting the events. In this study, 15.5 % of respondents assess their safety culture in work as good, 44.3 % as acceptable and 30.5 percent reported poor. The overall safety culture among the three studied hospitals was 61.81 %. Results confirmed that the culture safety of patient in studied hospitals was average. Conclusions: The hospitals may rely on their strong points in terms of patient safety culture and try to remove their weak points to form a safe environment and appropriate

  7. Safety culture of complex risky systems: the Nuclear Engineering Institute case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of industrial accidents have demonstrated that safe and reliable operation of complex industrial processes that use risky technology and/or hazard material depends not only on technical factors but on human and organizational factors as well. After the Chernobyl nuclear accident in 1986, the International Atomic Energy Agency established the safety culture concept and started a safety culture enhancement program within nuclear organizations worldwide. The Nuclear Engineering Institute, IEN, is a research and technological development unit of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission, CNEN, characterized as a nuclear and radioactive installation where processes presenting risks to operators and to the environment are executed. In 1999, IEN started a management change program, aiming to achieve excellence of performance, based on the Model of Excellence of the National Quality Award. IEN's safety culture project is based on IAEA methodology and has been incorporated to the organizational management process. This work presents IEN's safety culture project; the results obtained on the initial safety culture assessment and the following project actions. (author)

  8. Safety culture in the reactor vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For several years Ontario Hydro has been striving to improve safety, and other aspects of its operation, through the involvement of workers, supervisors, and managers in making decisions. At the time of the recent reorganization of Ontario Hydro a 'Business Improvement Process' was estabIished, based on several quality improvement processes used before the reorganization. This process is jointly sponsored by management and the two main employees' unions. One part of the process supports the formation of multidisciplinary teams to solve defined probIems. This paper describes the success of one such team ('The Dose Busters') in reducing radiation dose to fuel handling workers at the Bruce B Nuclear Generating station. The team had been formed several years ago, with members from mechanical maintenance, control maintenance, operations, and engineering support, Ied by a mechanicaI maintainer. lt had made some improvements that reduced dose but its members feIt limited by the lack of a structured probIem-solving process. The team was revitalized through training in structured problem solving provided as part of the Business lmprovement Process. This process leads the team to a cIear definition of the main problem to be solved. After getting support from their leadership team to solve the problem, the team develops a good solution, impIements their solution, and checks its effectiveness, making further corrections if needed. AnaIysis of dose data showed that the greatest opportunity for improvement was by reducing work time for repetitive jobs on the reactor face. The team devised and impIemented improvements expected to save a totaI dose of 36 Rem (0.36 Sv) over the station life. An important secondary benefit has come from the team's careful analysis of their own work practices. They discovered and corrected other industrial safety problems that normal practices had not detected. This has helped keep the enthusiasm on the team high as the members could see they are

  9. Safety Factors in Pesticide Risk Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmegaard, N.; Jagers op Akkerhuis, G. A. J. M.

    to secure that the methodology is adequate. As new knowledge surfaces the risk assessment procedures develops. The present report is a contribution to the development of safety factors used to account for the uncertainty when · extrapolating from the results of test with a single species in the......Foreword It has become common practice to protect the environment from hazardous chemicals by use of risk assessment to establish environmental concentration at which only limited damage to the ecosystem can be expected. The methods and tools applied in the risk assessment need constant evaluation...... safety factors used in pesticide risk assessment: the variability in species sensitivities, and the relationship between acute LC50's and chronic NOEC's....

  10. The new IAEA safety standards on probabilistic safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasingly wide application of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) to support a variety of issues dealing with operation and design of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) imposes certain requirements on PSA quality in terms of its scope, level of detail, approaches, assumptions, and data used. If a unified set of balanced requirements is developed and consistently implemented, it would give confidence in using PSA results and insights in different applications and risk-informed decision making (RIDM); in addition, it would be possible to consistently compare PSA results for different plants. Such requirements are currently developed or being developed in several countries. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is in the process of development of several publications in the IAEA safety standards series that would provide guidance on the standard technical content of PSA. The paper discusses the latest developments at the IAEA in the area of PSA and provides a brief overview of the publications. (orig.)

  11. Safety analysis and risk assessment handbook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Analysis and Risk Assessment Handbook (SARAH) provides guidance to the safety analyst at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in the preparation of safety analyses and risk assessments. Although the older guidance (the Rocky Flats Risk Assessment Guide) continues to be used for updating the Final Safety Analysis Reports developed in the mid-1980s, this new guidance is used with all new authorization basis documents. With the mission change at RFETS came the need to establish new authorization basis documents for its facilities, whose functions had changed. The methodology and databases for performing the evaluations that support the new authorization basis documents had to be standardized, to avoid the use of different approaches and/or databases for similar accidents in different facilities. This handbook presents this new standardized approach. The handbook begins with a discussion of the requirements of the different types of authorization basis documents and how to choose the one appropriate for the facility to be evaluated. It then walks the analyst through the process of identifying all the potential hazards in the facility, classifying them, and choosing the ones that need to be analyzed further. It then discusses the methods for evaluating accident initiation and progression and covers the basic steps in a safety analysis, including consequence and frequency binning and risk ranking. The handbook lays out standardized approaches for determining the source terms of the various accidents (including airborne release fractions, leakpath factors, etc.), the atmospheric dispersion factors appropriate for Rocky Flats, and the methods for radiological and chemical consequence assessments. The radiological assessments use a radiological open-quotes templateclose quotes, a spreadsheet that incorporates the standard values of parameters, whereas the chemical assessments use the standard codes ARCHIE and ALOHA

  12. Towards a radiation safety culture at Universidad Nacional de Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: During the 20th century, nuclear and radiation techniques for research, teaching, and medical and engineering practice slowly appeared at the National University of Colombia, mainly at the Bogota, Medellin and Manizales branches. Each individual laboratory or researcher obtained the license for the use of the radioactive source, or radiation emitting apparatus. However, the University as a whole does not have as yet a Radiation Safety Manual, nor an inventory of laboratories using radiation. From the viewpoint of radiation safety and culture, this situation is undesirable, and may easily lead to inappropriate waste management practices, including the possibility of orphan sources (one such source has been already found). As part of the program of environmental management of dangerous wastes promoted by the National Division of Laboratories of our University, an office of radiation safety was created in the year 2006. This paper describes the situation that was found, the activities that have been carried out, some of the difficulties that we have met, and the plans that we have to help shape a safety culture at our institution. Currently we are pursuing an inventory of laboratories using radioactive sources and radiation emitting apparatuses, starting with the branches in Bogota and Manizales which are perceived as the most urgent to deal with. Fortunately, the branch in Medellin has been for about a decade under the care of a former radiation safety officer of our national Institute of Nuclear Affairs, who presently teaches there. During 2006 and 2007, 13 laboratories using radioactive sources were visited in the Bogota branch. Safety procedures and waste handling protocols were checked, safety manuals prepared and/or revised, and recommendations for safety culture provided. During 2008 we will visit Manizales, and will continue visiting a number of X-ray machines used in the Bogota branch for engineering, veterinary, and diagnostic, and surgery medical

  13. Using the IAEA Safety Culture Model as a Basis for Security Culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last ten years, the practice of nuclear material physical protection control and accounting (MPC and A) in Russia has significantly changed. Under the cooperative US-Russian MPC and A Program, the MPC and A Culture Project team has developed the fundamentals of a pilot program to strengthen MPC and A Culture at nuclear sites. The pilot program is based on the IAEA Safety Culture Principles and Model Characteristics. There has been some debate on how easily these are transferable to Security Culture. While there may be operational differences, culture characteristics remain the same. This paper will compare and contrast the two cultures of Safety and Security, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each discipline

  14. Safety assessment of genetically modified foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleter, G.A.; Noordam, M.Y.

    2016-01-01

    The cultivation of genetically modified (GM) crops has steadily increased since their introduction to the market in the mid-1990s. Before these crops can be grown and sold they have to obtain regulatory approval in many countries, the process of which includes a pre-market safety assessment. The foo

  15. Safety assessment for Dragon fuel element production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report shall be the Safety Assessment covering the manufacture of the First Charge of Fuel and Fuel Elements for the Dragon Reactor Experiment. It is issued in two parts, of which Part I is descriptive and Part II gives the Hazards Analysis, the Operating Limitations, the Standing Orders and the Emergency Drill. (author)

  16. Indicators of safety culture - selection and utilization of leading safety performance indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety indicators play a role in providing information on organizational performance, motivating people to work on safety and increasing organizational potential for safety. The aim of this report is to provide an overview on leading safety indicators in the domain of nuclear safety. The report explains the distinction between lead and lag indicators and proposes a framework of three types of safety performance indicators - feedback, monitor and drive indicators. Finally the report provides guidance for nuclear energy organizations for selecting and interpreting safety indicators. It proposes the use of safety culture as a leading safety performance indicator and offers an example list of potential indicators in all three categories. The report concludes that monitor and drive indicators are so called lead indicators. Drive indicators are chosen priority areas of organizational safety activity. They are based on the underlying safety model and potential safety activities and safety policy derived from it. Drive indicators influence control measures that manage the socio technical system; change, maintain, reinforce, or reduce something. Monitor indicators provide a view on the dynamics of the system in question; the activities taking place, abilities, skills and motivation of the personnel, routines and practices - the organizational potential for safety. They also monitor the efficacy of the control measures that are used to manage the socio technical system. Typically the safety performance indicators that are used are lagging (feedback) indicators that measure the outcomes of the socio technical system. Besides feedback indicators, organizations should also acknowledge the important role of monitor and drive indicators in managing safety. The selection and use of safety performance indicators is always based on an understanding (a model) of the socio technical system and safety. The safety model defines what risks are perceived. It is important that the safety

  17. DOE/EM Criticality Safety Needs Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westfall, Robert Michael [ORNL; Hopper, Calvin Mitchell [ORNL

    2011-02-01

    The issue of nuclear criticality safety (NCS) in Department of Energy Environmental Management (DOE/EM) fissionable material operations presents challenges because of the large quantities of material present in the facilities and equipment that are committed to storage and/or material conditioning and dispositioning processes. Given the uncertainty associated with the material and conditions for many DOE/EM fissionable material operations, ensuring safety while maintaining operational efficiency requires the application of the most-effective criticality safety practices. In turn, more-efficient implementation of these practices can be achieved if the best NCS technologies are utilized. In 2002, DOE/EM-1 commissioned a survey of criticality safety technical needs at the major EM sites. These needs were documented in the report Analysis of Nuclear Criticality Safety Technology Supporting the Environmental Management Program, issued May 2002. Subsequent to this study, EM safety management personnel made a commitment to applying the best and latest criticality safety technology, as described by the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP). Over the past 7 years, this commitment has enabled the transfer of several new technologies to EM operations. In 2008, it was decided to broaden the basis of the EM NCS needs assessment to include not only current needs for technologies but also NCS operational areas with potential for improvements in controls, analysis, and regulations. A series of NCS workshops has been conducted over the past years, and needs have been identified and addressed by EM staff and contractor personnel. These workshops were organized and conducted by the EM Criticality Safety Program Manager with administrative and technical support by staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This report records the progress made in identifying the needs, determining the approaches for addressing these needs, and assimilating new NCS technologies into EM

  18. Safety Culture Perspective. Managing the pre Managing the pre-operational phases of new NPPs and creating the safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear safety is a key for the revival of nuclear energy future programmes. Lots of competent people will be needed worldwide for ensuring the safety of the installations both existing ones and future ones. Their expertise should range from design to operation, from regulatory role to operators, from fuel fabrication to waste disposal. The challenge in front of us will be to prepare for the right recruitment, the development of the needed expertise in order to face the demand in developed countries, in countries with economies in transition and in developing countries. Time allocated for the panel does not allow for covering all aspects but the panelists will cover some of the important aspects of the challenge in terms of needs, of new competencies, of learning from operation and licensing requirements including for new designs. The key objectives of the panel are: 1- Maintaining safe operation, learning from experience, licensing including aging management and re-licensing with safety improvements for existing installations: - Presentation by Junko Ogawa of the experience and lessons learned from the earthquake on Kashiwasaki Kariwa NPP: effects in terms of manpower involved in the investigation, effects on regulations and licensing, expertise used. - Presentation by Pamela Cowan of her experience in preparing licensing actions, regulatory compliance and interface with the Regulator for both operating plants and modern requirements for constructing new ones. 2 - Special training needed for the human aspect of safety: what are the challenges in areas of safety culture and management of safety: - Presentation by Chae Woon Oh of the Korean safety culture features developed nationally, at the regulator and at the operating organizations and their integration within the safety training programmes. - Presentation by Kerstin Dahlgren Person of the needs in terms of safety culture and safety management, in terms of expertise, practitioners and assessors. 3 - How to

  19. Exploring patient safety culture in Dutch primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbakel, N.J.; Melle, M. van; Langelaan, M.; Verheij, T.J.M.; Wagner, C.; Zwart, D.L.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore perceptions of safety culture in nine different types of primary care professions and to study possible differences. Design Cross-sectional survey: Setting: Three hundred and thirteen practices from nine types of primary care profession groups in the Netherlands. Participants:

  20. Exploring patient safety culture in Dutch primary care.

    OpenAIRE

    Verbakel, N. J.; Melle, M. van; Langelaan, M.; Verheij, T.J.M.; Wagner, C.; Zwart, D.L.M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore perceptions of safety culture in nine different types of primary care professions and to study possible differences. Design Cross-sectional survey: Setting: Three hundred and thirteen practices from nine types of primary care profession groups in the Netherlands. Participants: Professional staff from primary care practices. Nine professions participated: dental care, dietetics, exercise therapy, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, midwifery, anticoagulation clinics, ski...

  1. Safety culture in a Swiss group of pharmaceutical companies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of a successful company policy for safety and environmental protection (S+U in German) is the carrying out of the corresponding principles within the framework of a living, self-evidence. The elements for the structuring of a (S+U) company culture are presented. (author) 3 figs

  2. Safety culture from a regulatory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, SKI, has in its regulatory approach to the area of management and organization focussed on the process of continuous improvement and have in collaboration with Battelle Human Affairs Research Center, Seattle, developed a conceptual model of the important characteristics of a continuous improvement organization and how to assess it. In this work SKI has also recognized the importance of the regulatory goals and strategies adopted by SKI for promoting an improvement process on the part of the utilities, which will be further discussed below. 15 refs

  3. Safety assessment of high consequence robotics system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper outlines the use of a failure modes and effects analysis for the safety assessment of a robotic system being developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The robotic system, the weigh and leak check system, is to replace a manual process for weight and leakage of nuclear materials at the DOE Pantex facility. Failure modes and effects analyses were completed for the robotics process to ensure that safety goals for the systems have been met. Due to the flexible nature of the robot configuration, traditional failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) were not applicable. In addition, the primary focus of safety assessments of robotics systems has been the protection of personnel in the immediate area. In this application, the safety analysis must account for the sensitivities of the payload as well as traditional issues. A unique variation on the classical FMEA was developed that permits an organized and quite effective tool to be used to assure that safety was adequately considered during the development of the robotic system. The fundamental aspects of the approach are outlined in the paper

  4. The probabilistic safety assessment of HIFAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Research Reactor Review set up by the government in 1993, recommended that a probabilistic safety study should be performed for the High Flux Australian reactor (HIFAR). This study commenced in 1996 and is being managed by the Department of Industry, Science and Tourism. with advice from a Technical Reference Committee. An US consultant, Pickard Lowe and Garrick, was commissioned to undertake both a probabilistic safety assessment, to look at the effectiveness of safety systems in the event of an accident and a Remaining Life Study, to look at potential life-limiting components. A Probabilistic Safety Assessment study was also commissioned to measure the compliance of HIFAR with a number of safety criteria. Both internal and external events as well as all power states of the reactor and all the irradiated fuel facilities were considered. In addition to the review given by the Technical Reference Committee, the IAEA was asked to provide an independent peer review and this took place in February 1997. The scope, process and status of these studies are discussed in this paper

  5. A nationwide Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture in Belgian Hospitals: Analysis and Benchmarking

    OpenAIRE

    Vlayen, Annemie; Hellings, Johan; Claes, Neree; Schrooten, Ward

    2010-01-01

    Objective To measure patient safety culture in Belgian hospitals and to examine the homogeneous grouping of underlying safety culture dimensions. Methods The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture was distributed organisation-wide in 180 Belgian hospitals participating in the federal program on quality and safety between 2007 and 2009. Participating hospitals were invited to submit their data to a comparative database. Homogeneous groups of underlying safety culture dimensions were sou...

  6. Factors Contribute to Safety Culture in the Manufacturing Industry in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Ong Choon Hee

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explain the role of safety culture in the manufacturing industry in Malaysia and identify factors contribute to safety culture. It is suggested in this study that leadership support, management commitment and safety management system are important factors that contribute to safety culture. This study also provides theoretical implications to guide future research and offers practical implications to the managers in the development of safety culture. Given that ...

  7. Safety culture in nuclear installations. A society-driven issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ever since safety culture was first named by INSAG as an assembly of characteristics and attitudes in organisations and individuals that establish an overriding priority of nuclearpowerplant safety issues, there has been a continuous process of elaborating the terminology, its meaningfulness and applicability in different cases. There have been a number of attempts to analyse the etymology of the expression safety culture but the one offered here gives the possibility to make several very interesting conclusions. In most of the important dictionaries' safety has been described as a state of being free from danger or as a condition of being safe from causing or suffering hurt injury or loss. There are different approaches in determining culture, but two of them may be very useful for this case: culture can be looked upon as the expression of the intellectual development in the society or the socially transmitted pattern of human behaviour that includes thought, speech, action, institutions and man-made objects. If we try to apply this type of approach when assesing the operation of the nuclear power plants in Eastern Europe and former Soviet Union, many interesting conclusions can be drawn, which may somewhat differ from the initially made statements, as they started to appear in 1991 and later on, after caring out the first safety review missions by IAEA and others. On the other hand one can also find a reasonable explanation of the deterioration of safety again applying this type of approach. In the paper, these problems are discussed on the example of the Kozloduy nuclear power plant and the situation in Bulgaria. (author)

  8. The Safety Assessment Advisory Programme (SAAP). Design and Safety Assessment Review Service (DSARS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    • The DSARS provides a comprehensive set of reviews to assist and advise Member States in achieving and maintaining a high level of safety of nuclear power plants; • Its new Safety Assessment Advisory Programme will assist NPP newcomer countries in building the capacity and competency needed for successful independent risk-informed decision-making; Delivery mechanisms for DSARS tailored modules: TC Projects; Extra Budgetary Programmes; Safety Networks/Forums (GNSSN, ANSN, RCF, GSAN etc.)

  9. Safety review, assessment and inspection on research reactors, experimental reactors and nuclear heating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NNSA and its regional office step further strengthened the regulation on the safety of in-service research reactors in 1996. A lot of work has been done on the supervision of safe in rectifying the review and assessment of modified items, the review of operational documents, the treatment of accidents, the establishment of the system for operational experience feedback, daily and routine inspection on nuclear safety. The internal management of the operating organization on nuclear safety was further strengthened, nuclear safety culture was further enhanced, the promotion in nuclear safety and the safety situation for in-service research reactors were improved

  10. Human Reliability in Probabilistic Safety Assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays a growing interest in environmental aspects is detected in our country. It implies an assessment of the risk involved in the industrial processes and installations in order to determine if those are into the acceptable limits. In these safety assessments, among which PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessments), can be pointed out the role played by the human being in the system is one of the more relevant subjects (This relevance has been demonstrated in the accidents happened) . However, in Spain there aren't manuals specifically dedicated to asses the human contribution to risk in the frame of PSAs. This report aims to improve this situation providing: a) a theoretical background to help the reader in the understanding of the nature of the human error, b) a quid to carry out a Human Reliability Analysis and c) a selected overview of the techniques and methodologies currently applied in this area. (Author) 20 refs

  11. Human reliability in probabilistic safety assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays a growing interest in medioambiental aspects is detected in our country. It implies an assessment of the risk involved in the industrial processess and installations in order to determine if those are into the acceptable limits. In these safety assessments, among which PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessments), can be pointed out the role played by the human being in the system is one of the more relevant subjects. (This relevance has been demostrated in the accidents happenned). However in Spain there aren't manuals specifically dedicated to asses the human contribution to risk in the frame of PSAs. This report aims to improve this situation providing: a) a theoretical background to help the reader in the understanding of the nature of the human error, b) a guide to carry out a Human Reliability Analysis and c) a selected overwiev of the techniques and methodologies currently applied in this area. (Author)

  12. Developing the radiation protection safety culture in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the UK, as elsewhere, there is potential to improve how radiological challenges are addressed through improvement in, or development of, a strong radiation protection (RP) safety culture. In preliminary work in the UK, two areas have been identified as having a strong influence on UK society: the healthcare and nuclear industry sectors. Each has specific challenges, but with many overlapping common factors. Other sectors will benefit from further consideration. In order to make meaningful comparisons between these two principal sectors, this paper is primarily concerned with cultural aspects of RP in the working environment and occupational exposures rather than patient doses. The healthcare sector delivers a large collective dose to patients each year, particularly for diagnostic purposes, which continues to increase. Although patient dose is not the focus, it must be recognised that collective patient dose is inevitably linked to collective occupational exposure, especially in interventional procedures. The nuclear industry faces major challenges as work moves from operations to decommissioning on many sites. This involves restarting work in the plants responsible for the much higher radiation doses of the 1960/70s, but also performing tasks that are considerably more difficult and hazardous than those original performed in these plants. Factors which influence RP safety culture in the workplace are examined, and proposals are considered for a series of actions that may lead to an improvement in RP culture with an associated reduction in dose in many work areas. These actions include methods to improve knowledge and awareness of radiation safety, plus ways to influence management and colleagues in the workplace. The exchange of knowledge about safety culture between the nuclear industry and medical areas may act to develop RP culture in both sectors, and have a wider impact in other sectors where exposures to ionising radiations can occur. (memorandum)

  13. Complementary Safety Margin Assessment. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-10-15

    On March 11, 2011, a large part of the Japanese eastern coastal area was devastated by an earthquake, followed by an immense tsunami. As a result, thousands of people were killed, injured or made homeless. In the days that followed, the situation was further complicated because of the failing nuclear reactors on the Fukushima coast. The local environment suffered from radioactive releases, requiring evacuation zones, and generating international concerns about nuclear safety. In the wake of this disaster the European Union decided to assess safety on all operating nuclear reactors in its member states. This safety evaluation initiated by the European Union focusses on extreme natural hazards, beyond the standard safety evaluations which regularly have to be performed to demonstrate the safety of a nuclear power plant. Consequences of these extreme hazards for the Borssele NPP have been evaluated based on available safety analyses, supplemented by engineering judgement. In this way, the robustness of the existing plant has been assessed and possible measures to further increase the safety margins have been identified. This document presents the results of the Complementary Safety margin Assessment (CSA) performed for the NPP Borssele. The distinct difference between this report and former risk analysis reports in general and the existing Safety Report of the NPP Borssele is that the maximum resistance of the plant against redefined and more challenging events has been investigated, whereas traditionally the plant design is investigated against certain events that are determined on a historical basis. This different approach requires different analyses and studies, which in turn presents new insights into the robustness of the plant. This document has been prepared in the short time period between June 1 and October 31, 2011. If more time had been granted for this study, some of the subjects could have been pursued in greater depth. The EPZ project team has been

  14. Safety assessment of genetically modified crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of genetically modified (GM) crops has prompted widespread debate regarding both human safety and environmental issues. Food crops produced by modern biotechnology using recombinant techniques usually differ from their conventional counterparts only in respect of one or a few desirable genes, as opposed to the use of traditional breeding methods which mix thousands of genes and require considerable efforts to select acceptable and robust hybrid offspring. The difficulties of applying traditional toxicological testing and risk assessment procedures to whole foods are discussed along with the evaluation strategies that are used for these new food products to ensure the safety of these products for the consumer

  15. On the role of safety culture in risk-informed regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a widespread belief that safety culture is an important contributor to safety of operations. The commonly accepted attributes of safety culture include good organizational communications, good organizational learning, and senior management commitment to safety. Safety culture may be particularly important in reducing latent errors in complex, well-defended systems. The role of regulatory bodies in fostering strong safety cultures remains unclear, and additional work is required to define the essential attributes of safety culture and to identify reliable performance indicators. (author)

  16. Safety culture evaluation and asset root cause analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines the role of organizational and management factors in nuclear power plant safety through the use of operating experiences. The ASSET reports of thirteen plants (total thirty events) have been analyzed in term of twenty organizational dimensions (factors) identified by Brookhaven National Laboratory and Pennsylvania State University. For three plants detailed results are reported in this paper. The results of thirteen plants are summarized in the form of a table. The study tends to confirm that organizational and management factors play an important role in plant safety. The twenty organizational dimensions and their definitions, in general, were adequate in this study. Formalization, safety culture, technical knowledge, training, roles-responsibilities and problem identification appear to be key organizational factors which influence the safety of nuclear power plants studied. (author)

  17. The Impact of Language and Culture Diversity in Occupational Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesus-Rivas, Mayra; Conlon, Helen Acree; Burns, Candace

    2016-01-01

    Occupational health nursing plays a critical part in improving the safety of foreign labor workers. The development and implementation of safety training programs do not always regularly take into account language barriers, low literacy levels, or cultural elements. This oversight can lead to more injuries and fatalities among this group. Despite established health and safety training programs, a significant number of non-native English speakers are injured or killed in preventable, occupation-related accidents. Introducing safety programs that use alternative teaching strategies such as pictograms, illustrations, and hands-on training opportunities will assist in addressing challenges for non-English laborers. Occupational health nursing has an opportunity to provide guidance on this subject and assist businesses in creating a safer and more productive work environment. PMID:26800895

  18. Validation of the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument

    OpenAIRE

    Brody Heritage; Clare Pollock; Lynne Roberts

    2014-01-01

    Organizational culture is a commonly studied area in industrial/organizational psychology due to its important role in workplace behaviour, cognitions, and outcomes. Jung et al.'s [1] review of the psychometric properties of organizational culture measurement instruments noted many instruments have limited validation data despite frequent use in both theoretical and applied situations. The Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI) has had conflicting data regarding its psychometric ...

  19. DISPELLING MYTHS AND MISCONCEPTIONS TO IMPLEMENT A SAFETY CULTURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potts, T. Todd; Smith, Ken; Hylko, James M.

    2003-02-27

    Industrial accidents are typically reported in terms of technological malfunctions, ignoring the human element in accident causation. However, over two-thirds of all accidents are attributable to human and organizational factors (e.g., planning, written procedures, job factors, training, communication, and teamwork), thereby affecting risk perception, behavior and attitudes. This paper reviews the development of WESKEM, LLC's Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Program that addresses human and organizational factors from a top-down, bottom-up approach. This approach is derived from the Department of Energy's Integrated Safety Management System. As a result, dispelling common myths and misconceptions about safety, while empowering employees to ''STOP work'' if necessary, have contributed to reducing an unusually high number of vehicle, ergonomic and slip/trip/fall incidents successfully. Furthermore, the safety culture that has developed within WESKEM, LLC's workforce consists of three common characteristics: (1) all employees hold safety as a value; (2) each individual feels responsible for the safety of their co-workers as well as themselves; and (3) each individual is willing and able to ''go beyond the call of duty'' on behalf of the safety of others. WESKEM, LLC as a company, upholds the safety culture and continues to enhance its existing ES&H program by incorporating employee feedback and lessons learned collected from other high-stress industries, thereby protecting its most vital resource - the employees. The success of this program is evident by reduced accident and injury rates, as well as the number of safe work hours accrued while performing hands-on field activities. WESKEM, LLC (Paducah + Oak Ridge) achieved over 800,000 safe work hours through August 2002. WESKEM-Paducah has achieved over 665,000 safe work hours without a recordable injury or lost workday case since it started operations on

  20. Effect of national cultural values on safety climate, and safety management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper investigates the critical role played by the national culture in influencing how workers safely or otherwise behave (mainly in risky situations) on construction sites, and how site managers implement safety management processes and practices. The paper presents the findings of an empirical research study based on a questionnaire survey, administered in Pakistan, targeting construction site managers and workers to gauge the effect national culture has on managers preferences for and perceptions of safety management systems (policies and practices) and than linking this effect to predict workers attitudes and intentional behaviors. (author)

  1. Safety issues in cultural heritage management and critical infrastructures management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Masini, Nicola; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica; Dumoulin, Jean

    2013-12-01

    This special issue is the fourth of its kind in Journal of Geophysics and Engineering , containing studies and applications of geophysical methodologies and sensing technologies for the knowledge, conservation and security of products of human activity ranging from civil infrastructures to built and cultural heritage. The first discussed the application of novel instrumentation, surface and airborne remote sensing techniques, as well as data processing oriented to both detection and characterization of archaeological buried remains and conservation of cultural heritage (Eppelbaum et al 2010). The second stressed the importance of an integrated and multiscale approach for the study and conservation of architectural, archaeological and artistic heritage, from SAR to GPR to imaging based diagnostic techniques (Masini and Soldovieri 2011). The third enlarged the field of analysis to civil engineering structures and infrastructures, providing an overview of the effectiveness and the limitations of single diagnostic techniques, which can be overcome through the integration of different methods and technologies and/or the use of robust and novel data processing techniques (Masini et al 2012). As a whole, the special issue put in evidence the factors that affect the choice of diagnostic strategy, such as the material, the spatial characteristics of the objects or sites, the value of the objects to be investigated (cultural or not), the aim of the investigation (knowledge, conservation, restoration) and the issues to be addressed (monitoring, decay assessment). In order to complete the overview of the application fields of sensing technologies this issue has been dedicated to monitoring of cultural heritage and critical infrastructures to address safety and security issues. Particular attention has been paid to the data processing methods of different sensing techniques, from infrared thermography through GPR to SAR. Cascini et al (2013) present the effectiveness of a

  2. Assessment of Native Languages for Food Safety Training Programs for Meat Industry Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Sherrlyn S.; Cordray, Joseph C.; Sapp, Stephen; Sebranek, Joseph G.; Anderson, Barbara; Wenger, Matt

    2012-01-01

    Challenges arise when teaching food safety to culturally diverse employees working in meatpacking and food manufacturing industries. A food safety training program was developed in English, translated into Spanish, and administered to 1,265 adult learners. Assessments were conducted by comparing scores before and immediately following training.…

  3. Safety culture as a key to human factor regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety culture includes two general components the first of which is a framework within an organization, i.e. working environment in a collective and is a responsibility of the managers. Second element is attitude of staff at all levels set up by the above-mentioned framework. These are two components dialectically interacting and mutually stipulating one another. The basic elements of safety culture are common to all kinds of activities of organizations and individuals at all levels: individual awareness of the safety importance; knowledge and competence ensured via training and personnel instructions and also through self-education; commitment, requiring demonstration of safety high priority at senior management and recognition of common safety goals by individuals; motivation by management, set up of goals and setting up of reward/sanction system, and also by the attitude of individuals; supervision including the practice of audit and review, and readiness to respond to individuals questioning attitudes; responsibility through formal assignment and description of formal duties and their understanding by individuals. (author)

  4. Safety assessment of various operation modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various operation modes of RB heavy water critical assembly have been realised during the last 42 years. These modes were consequences of wide flexibility of the core lattices and usage of three types of fuel elements: natural U rods, LEU and HEU slugs. More than 600 different cores are changed up to now, setting, sometimes, special requirements to the control, safety and dosimetry systems. These cores with different dominant neutron spectra include the simplest thermal cores, various coupled fast-thermal and thermal-to-fast neutron converters inside or outside the reactor tank. Power excursion accident, in which six personnel were heavy irradiated, occurred at the reactor only six months after the first start-up. From that time, safety assessment of the reactor operation with different cores became a regular practice. It requires updates often to the safety analysis report(s), regulation and operation rules and assessment of radiation protection practice and in-situ monitoring, due to the fact that the RB reactor is designed without biological shielding with staff offices and laboratories surrounding the reactor hall. This paper summarises general experiences of nuclear safety and radiation protection analyses, underlining a few basic results for some of the unusual modes of the RB reactor operation. (author)

  5. Guidelines for the review research reactor safety. Reference document for IAEA Integrated Safety Assessment of Research Reactors (INSARR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1992, the IAEA published new safety standards for research reactors as part of the set of publications considered by its Research Reactor Safety Programme (RRSP). This set also includes publications giving guidance for all safety aspects related to the lifetime of a research reactor. In addition, the IAEA has also revised the Safety Standards for radiation protection. Consequently, it was considered advisable to revise the Integrated Safety Assessment of Research Reactors (INSARR) procedures to incorporate the new requirements and guidance as well as to extend the scope of the safety reviews to currently operating research reactors. The present report is the result of this revision. The purpose of this report is to give guidance on the preparation, execution, reporting and follow-up of safety review mission to research reactors as conducted by the IAEA under its INSARR missions safety service. However, it will also be of assistance to operators and regulators in conducting: (a) ad hoc safety assessments of research reactors to address individual issues such as ageing or safety culture; and (b) other types of safety reviews such as internal and peer reviews and regulatory inspections

  6. A Guidebook for Evaluating Organizations in the Nuclear Industry - an example of safety culture evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organizations in the nuclear industry need to maintain an overview on their vulnerabilities and strengths with respect to safety. Systematic periodical self assessments are necessary to achieve this overview. This guidebook provides suggestions and examples to assist power companies but also external evaluators and regulators in carrying out organizational evaluations. Organizational evaluation process is divided into five main steps. These are: 1) planning the evaluation framework and the practicalities of the evaluation process, 2) selecting data collection methods and conducting the data acquisition, 3) structuring and analysing the data, 4) interpreting the findings and 5) reporting the evaluation results with possible recommendations. The guidebook emphasises the importance of a solid background framework when dealing with multifaceted phenomena like organisational activities and system safety. The validity and credibility of the evaluation stem largely from the evaluation team's ability to crystallize what they mean by organization and safety when they conduct organisational safety evaluations - and thus, what are the criteria for the evaluation. Another important and often under-considered phase in organizational evaluation is interpretation of the findings. In this guidebook a safety culture evaluation in a Nordic nuclear power plant is presented as an example of organizational evaluation. With the help of the example, challenges of each step in the organizational evaluation process are described. Suggestions for dealing with them are presented. In the case example, the DISC (Design for Integrated Safety culture) model is used as the evaluation framework. The DISC model describes the criteria for a good safety culture and the organizational functions necessary to develop a good safety culture in the organization

  7. Animal-Free Chemical Safety Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizou, George D

    2016-01-01

    The exponential growth of the Internet of Things and the global popularity and remarkable decline in cost of the mobile phone is driving the digital transformation of medical practice. The rapidly maturing digital, non-medical world of mobile (wireless) devices, cloud computing and social networking is coalescing with the emerging digital medical world of omics data, biosensors and advanced imaging which offers the increasingly realistic prospect of personalized medicine. Described as a potential "seismic" shift from the current "healthcare" model to a "wellness" paradigm that is predictive, preventative, personalized and participatory, this change is based on the development of increasingly sophisticated biosensors which can track and measure key biochemical variables in people. Additional key drivers in this shift are metabolomic and proteomic signatures, which are increasingly being reported as pre-symptomatic, diagnostic and prognostic of toxicity and disease. These advancements also have profound implications for toxicological evaluation and safety assessment of pharmaceuticals and environmental chemicals. An approach based primarily on human in vivo and high-throughput in vitro human cell-line data is a distinct possibility. This would transform current chemical safety assessment practice which operates in a human "data poor" to a human "data rich" environment. This could also lead to a seismic shift from the current animal-based to an animal-free chemical safety assessment paradigm. PMID:27493630

  8. Animal-Free Chemical Safety Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizou, George D.

    2016-01-01

    The exponential growth of the Internet of Things and the global popularity and remarkable decline in cost of the mobile phone is driving the digital transformation of medical practice. The rapidly maturing digital, non-medical world of mobile (wireless) devices, cloud computing and social networking is coalescing with the emerging digital medical world of omics data, biosensors and advanced imaging which offers the increasingly realistic prospect of personalized medicine. Described as a potential “seismic” shift from the current “healthcare” model to a “wellness” paradigm that is predictive, preventative, personalized and participatory, this change is based on the development of increasingly sophisticated biosensors which can track and measure key biochemical variables in people. Additional key drivers in this shift are metabolomic and proteomic signatures, which are increasingly being reported as pre-symptomatic, diagnostic and prognostic of toxicity and disease. These advancements also have profound implications for toxicological evaluation and safety assessment of pharmaceuticals and environmental chemicals. An approach based primarily on human in vivo and high-throughput in vitro human cell-line data is a distinct possibility. This would transform current chemical safety assessment practice which operates in a human “data poor” to a human “data rich” environment. This could also lead to a seismic shift from the current animal-based to an animal-free chemical safety assessment paradigm. PMID:27493630

  9. Research on Athletic Food Safety Assessment and Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Chunlei Ci

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the current state and problem of China’s food safety risk assessment and food safety supervision by drawing on the experience of developed countries Combined with Chinese situations. It provides suggestions for establishing a well-structured food safety supervision system. This study frames a Chinese food safety risk assessment system.

  10. Considering lessons learned about safety culture and their reflection to activity. After Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident forced neighboring residents to evacuate for a long time and gave Public anxieties greatly and significant effects to social activities in Japan. Public trust of nuclear power was lost by not preventing the accident and future of nuclear power became reconsidered, which nuclear industry people regretted deeply. Japan Nuclear Technology Institute (JANTI) had conducted activities enhancing safety culture in nuclear industry. It would be necessary to consider improvements of accident prevention and mitigation measures after evaluating the accident in a viewpoint of 'safety culture'. Based on published information and knowledge accumulated by activities of JANTI, the accident was examined taking account of greatness of nuclear accident and its effects from the side of safety culture. Lessons learned about safety culture were pointed out as; (1) reconfirmation of specialty of nuclear technology. (2) reinforcement of questioning and learning attitudes and (3) improvement of evaluation capability of nuclear safety and safety assurance against external event. These were reflected in activities such as; (1) reconsideration of safety culture assessment, (2) strengthening further support to improve safety culture consciousness and (3) improvement of peer review activity. (T. Tanaka)

  11. Role of management in the development of safety culture at the operating organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Role of management in the development of safety culture at the operating organization to offer practical suggestions to assist in the development or improvement of a progressive safety culture. 2 figs

  12. Discussion on establishment and improvement of the nuclear safety culture system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By discussion of the problems in the manufacture process of nuclear power equipment enterprisers, puts forwards the tentative idea of establishment the nuclear safety culture system, meanwhile, gives some suggestions in order to improving the nuclear safety culture system. (authors)

  13. A situational approach to the measurement of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Values and social norms are the main target of most approaches to the study of safety culture and many existing survey methodologies directly ask for these norms and values. However, a number of considerations point to the dangers of limiting the evaluation of safety culture to the analysis of these responses. Therefore the necessity is stressed to also consider how actual situations activate norms and behaviours. This relates to the fact that in any given situation both aspects of the appraisal of reality are present: the objective definition of the situation and its personal evaluation. The latter not only reflects the ''official'' norms and values but also ''basic underlying assumptions''. The situational approach introduced in this paper confronts people with situations which contain a dilemma with conflicting social norms and where various costs and benefits are associated with different types of behaviour. In addition, the prerequisites and limitations of the situational approach are discussed. (author). 9 refs, 1 fig

  14. Enhancement of radiological safety culture within Ignalina NPP and contractors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lithuanian Hygiene Standard HN 83:1998 'Radiation Protection of Outside Workers' (1998), that is based on requirements set out in the Law on Radiation Protection of the Republic of Lithuania (No. VIII-1190 of 12 January 1999), and other legal acts, establishes the radiation protection requirements for contractors (hereinafter - outside workers) when they are performing their activities within the controlled areas. The principal requirement of the Lithuanian Hygiene Standard HN 83:1998 is that the radiation protection of outside workers shall be at the same scale as of permanent workers. One of crucial points for ensuring the high radiological safety culture between the license holder, employer and outside workers is the clear allocation of tasks and distribution of' responsibilities in the field of radiation protection. The basic requirements for radiation protection of outside workers and main factors that help to enhance the radiological safety culture within Ignalina NPP and outside workers are discussed in the paper. (authors)

  15. Team climate and safety culture in air traffic control

    OpenAIRE

    Arvidsson, Marcus; Johansson, Curt R; Ek, Åsa; Akselsson, Roland

    2003-01-01

    In a joint project – Human Factors in ANS, HUFA - between the Swedish Civil Aviation Administration and Lund University the aim is to find out how a new team-based organization and the introduction of a new air traffic control system will affect safety culture and psychosocial working environment by changes in organizational climate, team climate and leadership. All in all, four studies will be conducted, before and after the system introduction, involving the two air traffic control centers ...

  16. Safety culture implementation in organizations through the lens of sensemaiking

    OpenAIRE

    Idoeta Fogelqvist, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Even though safety culture in health care has been on the agenda for more than a decade, the implementations have been difficult. The aim of this study was to out of the sensemaking perspective, examine the process behind implementing safety culture. The present study tested a hypothetical model where open communication, clear information and leader safety attitude predict reporting incidents (part of safety culture) which in turn mediate to safety performance. Survey data was obtained from 1...

  17. Empirically Exploring Higher Education Cultures of Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Matthew B.; Skidmore, Susan T.; Bustamante, Rebecca M.; Holzweiss, Peggy C.

    2016-01-01

    Although touted as beneficial to student learning, cultures of assessment have not been examined adequately using validated instruments. Using data collected from a stratified, random sample (N = 370) of U.S. institutional research and assessment directors, the models tested in this study provide empirical support for the value of using the…

  18. Automating the aviation command safety assessment survey as an Enterprise Information System (EIS)

    OpenAIRE

    Held, Jonathan S.; Mingo, Fred J.

    1999-01-01

    The Aviation Command Safety Assessment (ACSA) is a questionnaire survey methodology developed to evaluate a Naval Aviation Command's safety climate, culture, and safety program effectiveness. This survey was a manual process first administered in the fall of 1996. The primary goal of this thesis is to design, develop, and test an Internet-based, prototype model for administering this survey using new technologies that allow automated survey submission and analysis. The result of this thesis i...

  19. Development of a Safety Assessment Information System for the Management of Periodic Safety Assessment Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Tae Young [Nuclear Engineering and Technology Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01

    At present, the 10-year Periodic Safety Review(PSR) has been performing to confirm all the aspects of safety issues for all the operating plants in compliance with domestic nuclear law of article 23, subarticle 3. For each plant, in addition, Probabilistic Safety Assessment(PSA) and Severe Accident Management Guideline(SAMG) are being implemented and revised periodically to reflect the latest safety level according to principle fulfillment of severe accident policy statement. The assessment reports, as one of outcomes from these activities, are submitted into and reviewed by domestic regulatory body. During reviewing (in-office duty) and licensing (regulatory duty) process, a large number of outcomes of which most are the formal technical reports and licensing materials, are inevitably produced. Moreover, repeated review process over the plants can make them accumulated and produce a variety of documents additionally. This circumstance motivates to develop effective tool or system for the management of these reports and related technical documents for the future use in licensing process and for subsequent plant assessments. This paper presents the development status of Safety Assessment Information System(SAIS) which manages safety-related documents of PSR, PSA and SAMG for practical use for experienced engineers in charge of these areas.

  20. Radiological safety in petroleum industry. Towards prevention culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the frame of regulatory control of industrial applications the audit of sealed and open radioactive sources in oil uses is one of the most relevant. The handling of radioactive sources, the requirement of procedures and training are just a few examples among all those that make up the radiological safety culture. A number of requirements divided into three main groups: operational safety at the storage area of radioactive sources, during transportation and during the applications (Cementation, well logging and use of radiotracers) are highlighted. Due to the great number of aspects that have to be taken in account as well as the interrelation of all control processes it is highly recommended that aspects of safety culture and quality should be considered and improvements regarding prevention, should be introduced so as to correct deviations that could arise in order to avoid radiological risk situations, emphasizing risk perception situations, attitude training, implementation of audit and level of safety in the facilities and control of duties, involving radiological material handling, described in the present work. (author)

  1. Integrity assessment for safety relevant nuclear piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The failure behavior of pipes and piping components (e.g. straight pipe, pipe bend, T-joint) with and without cracks under different loading conditions has been investigated in numerous experimental and analytical/numerical research projects. The results of these projects were used to adjust and to verify different methodologies and procedures to calculate the failure loads, the respective critical crack sizes as well as the leak area and the leak rates. On the basis of the actual material characteristics, the actual as-built configurations and design of the piping systems, the knowledge of possible failure mechanism, concepts for the assessment of the integrity of the systems could be developed for the different actual as well as for postulated loading conditions. Based on the integrity assessment the leak before break behavior and break preclusion of safety relevant nuclear piping can be demonstrated. Examples are presented of the German assessment procedure for a main feed water line of a PWR as well as for the Indian assessment procedure for the primary heat transport system piping of a PHWR. - Highlights: • Description of the German Basis Safety Concept and Integrity Concept is presented. • Application is demonstrated for the main feed water line of a PWR plant. • Leak-before-break qualification of nuclear power plants in India. • Practical application to PHT system piping of a pressurized heavy water reactor. • Evaluation of leakage size crack and stability analysis verified by experiment

  2. A guideline for comprehensive evaluation of a licensee's effort to cultivate safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear industry in Japan had held excellent performance in safety in the world during 90's. However recent events stem from organizational factors and defects of safety culture are pointed out in their contexts. In order to reduce accidents caused by organizational factors, the Japanese Regulatory body NISA (Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency) decided to evaluate a licensee's effort for the cultivation of safety culture, and to order all licensses to add the provision of cultivating safety culture to their safety preservation rules. The inspection for the new safety preservation rules started in December, 2007. For a measure of evaluation by resident inspectors, NISA and the Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) prepared a guideline for the prevention of degradation of safety culture and organizational climate. In this guideline, 14 items were defined as the components of the safety culture or as the viewpoints to evaluate the effort made to prevent any degradation of safety culture and organizational climate in the daily safety preservation activities. The 14 items are also used to establish the method to comprehensively evaluate the effort to prevent degradation of safety culture and organizational climate. This method consists of 10 steps: two steps to taken prior to start of the evaluation, two steps to be taken during the evaluation period, 5 steps to be taken during a comprehensive evaluation period and a final step to be taken for comprehensive findings for safety culture. This paper mainly describes the viewpoints to evaluate comprehensively a licensee's effort for cultivation of safety culture. (author)

  3. Safety assessment for TA-48 radiochemical operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to document an assessment performed to evaluate the safety of the radiochemical operations conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory operations area designated as TA-48. This Safety Assessment for the TA-48 radiochemical operations was prepared to fulfill the requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5481.1B, ''Safety Analysis and Review System.'' The area designated as TA-48 is operated by the Chemical Science and Technology (CST) Division and is involved with radiochemical operations associated with nuclear weapons testing, evaluation of samples collected from a variety of environmental sources, and nuclear medicine activities. This report documents a systematic evaluation of the hazards associated with the radiochemical operations that are conducted at TA-48. The accident analyses are limited to evaluation of the expected consequences associated with a few bounding accident scenarios that are selected as part of the hazard analysis. Section 2 of this report presents an executive summary and conclusions, Section 3 presents pertinent information concerning the TA-48 site and surrounding area, Section 4 presents a description of the TA-48 radiochemical operations, and Section 5 presents a description of the individual facilities. Section 6 of the report presents an evaluation of the hazards that are associated with the TA-48 operations and Section 7 presents a detailed analysis of selected accident scenarios

  4. Safety culture aspects of managing for safety. Experience of a large nuclear reprocessing site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Industry is going through turbulent times both in terms of public acceptance and business issues. Safety is one area which impacts on whether the business is allowed to continue, and how an organisation organizes itself. The need to cut costs to make nuclear power a viable energy resource, has forced the nuclear utilities to review manning policies, and management style, and in particular how to maintain safety standards during a period of change, and ultimately support continuing improvement of standards. The shrinking workforce requires a new style of management, one that depends more on the people of the organisation taking responsibility for safety at all levels of the organisation. Not only personal safety but the safety of their colleagues, general public and the environment. The safety culture of an organisation is indivisible from the company culture, each aspect of a culture influences the whole and so the balance between business, safety and quality, has to be managed. BNFL provides a full fuel cycle service to nuclear power plants, and associated services to many national and international organisations. The following notes are taken from the work carried out in the company, and mostly at the Nuclear Reprocessing and Waste storage Site at Sellafield, based in the North West of England. Following the recent re-organisation, the site now employs 6200 people and has a further 1500 contractors working on construction activities on the site. Activities on the site range from remote handling to hands on tasks, involving highly active materials to low level waste. (author)

  5. Safety assessment of foods derived from genetically modified crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleter, G.A.; Kuiper, H.A.

    2003-01-01

    The pre-market safety assessment of foods derived from genetically modified crops is carried out according to the consensus approach of "substantial equivalence", in other words: the comparative safety assessment. Currently, the safety assessment of genetically modified foods is harmonized at the in

  6. Use of generic safety assessment in demonstration of safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety assessment is made for the proposed Afra project for borehole disposal facility for disused sealed sources. ISAM technology is used. Different types of biosphere and geosphere are considered and five variations of the normal scenario are assessed. Conceptual and mathematical models are established and 63 combinations using AMBER code are calculated. For the vast majority of disposal system combinations the peak dose for the design scenario is below 3E-4 Sv.y-1Near field provides an effective barrier to the release of radionuclides even for the poor quality control scenario. The use of lead and copper as a containment barrier does not reduces peak doses for the most restrictive case and they increase in an order of magnitude for the poor quality control scenario. Four of the six calculation cases for the alternative scenarios (other than the poor quality control scenario) result in the dose constraint being exceeded by up a factor of 30. They are for the seismic event, societal change (fish farmer) and human intrusion (site dweller) scenarios. However, these calculations have been undertaken for the most restrictive combination of disposal system characteristics. It can be expected that for many of the other combinations of disposal system characteristics, the dose constraint will not be exceeded

  7. Relationship between organizational factors, safety culture and PSA in nuclear power plant operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are four nuclear safety imperatives or ''4Ms'': machine (hardware, design, QA/QC), milieux (operating conditions, environment, natural phenomena), man (human reliability) and management (organizational and management influences). Nuclear safety evaluations as well as evolution of its most powerful tool, Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA), followed chronologically the 4M constituents. The nuclear industry worldwide, and the nuclear safety regulators in particular, have been preoccupied with the first M almost to the point of obsession with belated and only intuitive interest in the third and fourth M (human dimension). Human factors or economics in the nuclear industry was an afterthought. Human reliability was essentially born in the aftermath of the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident. Impact of organizational factors on nuclear safety is only in the early stages of R and D. This paper describes some of the concepts being pursued by APG to link organizational factors and safety culture to Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) and to integrate such into probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), e.g. [APG, 1993]. (author). 11 refs, 4 figs, 1 tab

  8. Views on safety culture at Swedish and Finnish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents the results of interviews about safety culture at Swedish and Finnish nuclear power plants. The aim is to promote the safety work and increase the debate about safety in nuclear power plants, by showing that the safety culture is an important safety factor. The interviews point out different threats, which may become real. It is therefor necessary that the safety aspects get support from of the society and the power plant owners. (EHS)

  9. The complementary safety assessments of CEA's facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety assessments of CEA's facilities was made in 2 steps. The first step that was performed end 2011 involved facilities that had priority according to the French Safety Authority among them the Jules Horowitz reactor being built in Cadarache, the Masurca reactor (being upgraded in Cadarache), the Plutonium workshop (being dismantled in Cadarache), the Osiris reactor (that operates in Saclay) and the Phenix reactor (decommissioned at Marcoule). The second step was performed in 2012. The main conclusion is the setting of a hard core of measures concerning equipment and organization that is able to sustain the vital functions of each facility in any accidental situation. Another consequence is the reinforcement of the emergency means (equipment and organization) in the Cadarache site. (A.C.)

  10. Safety issues in cultural heritage management and critical infrastructures management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldovieri, Francesco; Masini, Nicola; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica; Dumoulin, Jean

    2013-12-01

    This special issue is the fourth of its kind in Journal of Geophysics and Engineering , containing studies and applications of geophysical methodologies and sensing technologies for the knowledge, conservation and security of products of human activity ranging from civil infrastructures to built and cultural heritage. The first discussed the application of novel instrumentation, surface and airborne remote sensing techniques, as well as data processing oriented to both detection and characterization of archaeological buried remains and conservation of cultural heritage (Eppelbaum et al 2010). The second stressed the importance of an integrated and multiscale approach for the study and conservation of architectural, archaeological and artistic heritage, from SAR to GPR to imaging based diagnostic techniques (Masini and Soldovieri 2011). The third enlarged the field of analysis to civil engineering structures and infrastructures, providing an overview of the effectiveness and the limitations of single diagnostic techniques, which can be overcome through the integration of different methods and technologies and/or the use of robust and novel data processing techniques (Masini et al 2012). As a whole, the special issue put in evidence the factors that affect the choice of diagnostic strategy, such as the material, the spatial characteristics of the objects or sites, the value of the objects to be investigated (cultural or not), the aim of the investigation (knowledge, conservation, restoration) and the issues to be addressed (monitoring, decay assessment). In order to complete the overview of the application fields of sensing technologies this issue has been dedicated to monitoring of cultural heritage and critical infrastructures to address safety and security issues. Particular attention has been paid to the data processing methods of different sensing techniques, from infrared thermography through GPR to SAR. Cascini et al (2013) present the effectiveness of a

  11. The Making of discussion groups in a combined process of internal evaluation of safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to show the design and evaluation of safety culture conducted in the Cofrentes nuclear plant. The process has combined the use of different methodologies and techniques and has allowed the participation of different internal and external stake holders. For internal assessment discussion groups were conducted. These groups, which were designed and analyzed by the CIEMAT, were led by employees from different levels of Cofrentes.

  12. Hanford safety analysis and risk assessment handbook (SARAH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the Hanford Safety Analysis and Risk Assessment Handbook (SARAH) is to support the development of safety basis documentation for Hazard Category 1,2, and 3 U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities. SARAH describes currently acceptable methodology for development of a Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and derivation of technical safety requirements (TSR) based on 10 CFR 830, ''Nuclear Safety Management,'' Subpart B, ''Safety Basis Requirements,'' and provides data to ensure consistency in approach

  13. Validation of the organizational culture assessment instrument.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brody Heritage

    Full Text Available Organizational culture is a commonly studied area in industrial/organizational psychology due to its important role in workplace behaviour, cognitions, and outcomes. Jung et al.'s [1] review of the psychometric properties of organizational culture measurement instruments noted many instruments have limited validation data despite frequent use in both theoretical and applied situations. The Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI has had conflicting data regarding its psychometric properties, particularly regarding its factor structure. Our study examined the factor structure and criterion validity of the OCAI using robust analysis methods on data gathered from 328 (females = 226, males = 102 Australian employees. Confirmatory factor analysis supported a four factor structure of the OCAI for both ideal and current organizational culture perspectives. Current organizational culture data demonstrated expected reciprocally-opposed relationships between three of the four OCAI factors and the outcome variable of job satisfaction but ideal culture data did not, thus indicating possible weak criterion validity when the OCAI is used to assess ideal culture. Based on the mixed evidence regarding the measure's properties, further examination of the factor structure and broad validity of the measure is encouraged.

  14. Validation of the organizational culture assessment instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heritage, Brody; Pollock, Clare; Roberts, Lynne

    2014-01-01

    Organizational culture is a commonly studied area in industrial/organizational psychology due to its important role in workplace behaviour, cognitions, and outcomes. Jung et al.'s [1] review of the psychometric properties of organizational culture measurement instruments noted many instruments have limited validation data despite frequent use in both theoretical and applied situations. The Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI) has had conflicting data regarding its psychometric properties, particularly regarding its factor structure. Our study examined the factor structure and criterion validity of the OCAI using robust analysis methods on data gathered from 328 (females = 226, males = 102) Australian employees. Confirmatory factor analysis supported a four factor structure of the OCAI for both ideal and current organizational culture perspectives. Current organizational culture data demonstrated expected reciprocally-opposed relationships between three of the four OCAI factors and the outcome variable of job satisfaction but ideal culture data did not, thus indicating possible weak criterion validity when the OCAI is used to assess ideal culture. Based on the mixed evidence regarding the measure's properties, further examination of the factor structure and broad validity of the measure is encouraged. PMID:24667839

  15. Validity and reliability of Turkish version of "Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture" and perception of patient safety in public hospitals in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Emel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS is used to assess safety culture in many countries. Accordingly, the questionnaire has been translated into Turkish for the study of patient safety culture in Turkish hospitals. The aim of this study is threefold: to determine the validity and reliability of the translated form of HSOPS, to evaluate physicians' and nurses' perceptions of patient safety in Turkish public hospitals, and to compare finding with U.S. hospital settings. Methods Physicians and nurses working in all public hospitals in Konya, a large city in Turkey, were asked to complete a self-administrated patient safety culture survey (n = 309. Data collection was carried out using the Turkish version of HSOPS, developed by Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ. Data were summarized as percentages, means, and SD values. Factor analysis, correlation coefficient, Cronbach's alpha, ANOVA, and t tests were employed in statistical analyses. Items on patient safety were categorized into 10 factors. Factor loadings and internal consistencies of dimension items were high. Results Most of the scores related to dimensions, and the overall patient safety score (44% were lower than the benchmark score. "Teamwork within hospital units" received the highest score (70%, and the lowest score belonged to the "frequency of events reported" (15%. The study revealed that more than three quarters of the physicians and nurses were not reporting errors. Conclusion The Turkish version of HSOPS was found to be valid and reliable in determining patient safety culture. This tool will be helpful in tracking improvements and in heightening awareness on patient safety culture in Turkey.

  16. Retained gas sampler interim safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This safety assessment addresses the proposed action to install, operate, and remove a Retained Gas Sampler (RGS) in Tank 101-SY at Hanford. Purpose of the RGS is to help characterize the gas species retained in the tank waste; the information will be used to refine models that predict the gas-producing behavior of the waste tank. The RGS will take samples of the tank from top to bottom; these samples will be analyzed for gas constituents. The proposed action is required as part of an evaluation of mitigation concepts for eliminating episodic gas releases that result in high hydrogen concentrations in the tank dome space

  17. Retained gas sampler interim safety assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasamehmetoglu, K.O.; Miller, W.O.; Unal, C.; Fujita, R.K.

    1995-01-13

    This safety assessment addresses the proposed action to install, operate, and remove a Retained Gas Sampler (RGS) in Tank 101-SY at Hanford. Purpose of the RGS is to help characterize the gas species retained in the tank waste; the information will be used to refine models that predict the gas-producing behavior of the waste tank. The RGS will take samples of the tank from top to bottom; these samples will be analyzed for gas constituents. The proposed action is required as part of an evaluation of mitigation concepts for eliminating episodic gas releases that result in high hydrogen concentrations in the tank dome space.

  18. Environmental, health and safety assessment of photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, E. C.

    1983-01-01

    The environmental, health, and safety (E, H and S) concerns associated with the fabrication, deployment, and decommissioning of photovoltaic (PV) systems in terrestial applications are identified and assessed. Discussion is limited to crystalline silicon technologies. The primary E, H, and S concerns that arise during collector fabrication are associated with occupational exposure to materials of undetermined toxicity or to materials that are known to be hazardous, but for which process control technology may be inadequate. Stricter exposure standards are anticipated for some materials and may indicate a need for further control technology development. Minimizing electric shock hazards is a significant concern during system construction, operation and maintenance, and decommissioning.

  19. Safety assessment of outdoor live fire range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-05-01

    The following Safety Assessment (SA) pertains to the outdoor live fire range facility (LFR). The purpose of this facility is to supplement the indoor LFR. In particular it provides capacity for exercises that would be inappropriate on the indoor range. This SA examines the risks that are attendant to the training on the outdoor LFR. The outdoor LFR used by EG&G Mound is privately owned. It is identified as the Miami Valley Shooting Grounds. Mondays are leased for the exclusive use of EG&G Mound.

  20. Objective Assessments of Temperature Maintenance Using In Vitro Culture Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Cooke, Simon; Tyler, John P. P.; Driscoll, Geoff

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the ability of various facets of embryo culture (microscope stage warmers, volumes of culture media, culture vessel lids, and type of culture incubator) to maintain a constant temperature in vitro.

  1. Examination on establishment of safety culture for operating nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For safely operating nuclear power facilities, in addition to the technical countermeasures, the performance of the organizations that operate and manage them is important. In this paper, the spontaneous cooperation type management system that supported the introduction and development of nuclear power generation in electric power business is analyzed from the viewpoints of organization science and behavioral psychology, and based on the results of the investigation of the sense of value and psychological characteristics of young organization members who bear future nuclear power generation, on how to foster and establish safety culture which is called second safety principle in organizations, the subjects for hereafter are discussed from the viewpoints of respect of individuals and their integration with organizations, upbringing of talents and systematic learning. The factors which compose the safety culture are shown. The form of operating and managing the organizations are seen in first generation nuclear power generation, the similarity to Japanese type enterprise operation system, the change of the prerequisite of spontaneous cooperation type management and the difference of conscience among the generations of organization members are discussed. The above subjects for hereafter are discussed. (K.I.)

  2. Cultural influences on safety and health education among Vietnamese fishermen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruth, Ann K; Levin, Jeffrey L; Gilmore, Karen; Bui, Thu; Gallardo, Gilbert; Evert, William; Sealey, Lorinda

    2010-10-01

    Every ethnic group has its own cultural background and history that influences how it views health behaviors. By virtue of their work history, many Vietnamese have pursued the fishing industry when migrating to the United States. Even though the fishing trades are among the most dangerous jobs in the world, there has been little attention in the literature to the significant role that culture plays in the expression and experience of occupational health practices among Vietnamese shrimp fishermen. Three focus group sessions were conducted to identify factors that hinder or facilitate receptivity to available training and to guide culturally appropriate content. Participants were recruited using purposive sampling among various Vietnamese shrimp fishermen communities in Texas. Utilizing a series of open-ended questions, sessions were conducted in their native language among owners/captains/deckhands; support infrastructure--adult family members and religious/community leaders; and industry management and insurance representatives. Translations of transcribed documents were compared with simultaneous translations to ensure thematic consistency. Conducting hands-on training among Vietnamese by experienced fishermen, specifically targeting captains, was considered key to safety culture on the vessels. Findings of the study support that training should occur in a variety of formats (hands-on), but should be periodic, current, practical, convenient, taught in the primary language of the audience by an experienced individual, culminate in a certificate of completion, and target captains first. These findings illustrate the importance of considering cultural factors in the design of workplace interventions that focus on changes in safety and occupational health behaviors. PMID:20954033

  3. Safety Culture as a Pillar of Defense-in-Depth Implementation at the Experimental Fuel Element Installation, Batan Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defence-in-depth (DID) needs to be implemented not only in a nuclear power plant, but also in a non-reactor nuclear facility. The application of safety culture in a nuclear facility is one way of DID implementation. Safety culture aims at the performance of safe works, the prevention of deviation, and the accomplishment of quality operation. It is in accordance with the first level of DID concept which is the prevention of abnormal operation and failures that is done through conservative design and high quality in construction and operation. Experimental Fuel Element Installation (EFEI) is a nonreactor nuclear facility that belongs to BATAN (the National Nuclear Energy Agency of the Republic of Indonesia) that functions as its research and development facility on power reactor fuel production. The objective of safety culture implementation in the EFEI is to encourage workers to have a stronger sense of responsibility on safety and to contribute actively for its development. The enhancement of safety culture in the EFEI refers to the attributes of a strong safety culture listed in the IAEA Safety Standard Series No.GS-G-3.5 (The Management System for Nuclear Installations Safety Guide). The strategies performed were: a) Internalization of safety values through activities such as briefings, “coffee morning”, visual management, workshops, and training; b) Enhancement of leadership effectiveness through activities such as senior management visits, safety leadership training, and personnel qualification training; c) Integration of safety into all work processes through activities such as setting up HIRADC (hazard identification, risk assessment, and determining controls) documents, setting up WHA (workplace hazard assessment), and routine housekeeping; d) Learning about safety through activities such as occupational health and safety inspections, safety self-assessments, open reporting on safety incidents, and participation in the FINAS (fuel incident notification

  4. Organizational cultural assessment of the Sandia National Laboratories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-05-01

    An Organizational Cultural Assessment (OCA) was performed at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) by administering an Organizational Culture Survey (OCS) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental concerns, hazardous nature of work, safety, and overall job satisfaction. The purpose of the OCS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. The OCS administration at SNL was the fifth to occur at a DOE facility. The sample was randomly selected from each Vice Presidency group, the largest organizational unit at SNL. Scores and significance are discussed and statistically significant differences between groups are identified and discussed.

  5. Safety culture in nuclear installations: Summary of an international topical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An international topical meeting, Safety Culture in Nuclear Installations, was organized by the American Nuclear Society (ANS) Austria Local Section, cosponsored by the ANS Nuclear Reactor Safety and Human Factors Divisions in cooperation with the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (NEA/OECD) and held in Vienna April 24-28, 1995. Some 250 experts from 30 different countries and organizations took part in the 85 paper presentations and two workshops. The concept of safety culture was initially used in the first International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (INSAG) report on the Chernobyl accident analysis report in 1986. Although some elements of safety culture have been used over the years in nuclear safety activities, the new phrase safety culture and the concept were found interesting as highlighting the 'soft' aspects of safety and as encompassing more than human errors. Unfortunately, for many years it was used more in the way of identifying lack of safety culture. Conscious of this application, INSAG further developed the safety culture concept in the INSAG 4 report: The report contains a definition, the universal aspects of safety culture, the two main components of safety culture management and individual behaviour, and performance indicators of a good safety culture. This report is now quite famous and adopted with some additions or complementary definitions by many institutes and organizations for their daily activities

  6. Safety Culture in the Maternity Units: a census survey using the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savva Nicos

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient safety has been a priority for many societies and health care systems in the last decades. Identification of preventable risks and aversion of potentially unsafe situations and fatal complications in maternity units is life saving. The explicit need to focus on quality of care underpins the aim of the study to initially evaluate the safety culture and teamwork climate in the public Maternity Units of the 5 Regional Hospitals in Cyprus as measured by a validated safety attitudes tool. Methods Data were collected from 140 midwives working in the public sector all over Cyprus by the Greek Version of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire-Labor version. Results One hundred and six (75.71% registered midwives completed the questionnaire fully. The median of total work experience as a registered midwife was 3 years (IQR: 2-18.25; whereas the median of total working experience in the nursing and maternity units was 5 years (IQR: 2-21.75. Experienced midwives rated the following domains higher: team work, safety climate, job satisfaction and working conditions as opposed to the midwives with less experience. Additionally those with a longer working life in the current maternity units rated these domains higher: safety climate, job satisfaction and working conditions as opposed to the less experienced midwives. Conclusions The high mean total score on team work and safety climate in the more experienced group of midwives is a predominant finding for the maternity units of Cyprus. In Cyprus where facilities are small in size and midwives know each other, share more responsibility towards patient safety. It could be suggested that younger midwives need more support and teamwork practice to enhance the safety and teamwork climate towards self-confidence.

  7. The role of attitudes in the safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The UK Advisory Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations has recently published a comprehensive review of the organisational variables shown by research to be associated with strong safety cultures. A pervasive theme is that favourable attitudes towards, for example, the safety regulations, line management of safety, risk taking, team working, job satisfaction etc. are quintessential features of a healthy safety culture. An attitude is a relatively enduring predisposition to behave safely in a very wide range of situations. This paper reports an extensive empirical study in support of this argument. It is claimed that what we need to do, now that so many potential accidents have been engineered out of the system, is to address the hearts and minds of the workforce. It is the diffuse inefficiencies, mistakes, lapses and violations on the part of management and workers that now lie behind the large majority of remaining accidents. The study was carried out in the Sellafield nuclear reprocessing plant. A series of focus groups was held with all levels of the workforce in order to elicit the main issues and concerns affecting safety at the plant. These were incorporated in a draft questionnaire that was piloted on a representative sample. The final version included 172 statements covering every aspect of safety, with which respondents were invited to agree or disagree on a 7-point scale. The questionnaire was designed to be answerable, in the same form, by employees at every level in the organisation. A final sample of 5,297 was obtained, about 85% of the workforce. Principal components analysis resulted in 1 9 subscales. The most critical finding relates to the validation of these sub-scales. It was found that 17 of the attitudes discriminate, at high levels of significance, between those who have had an accident at some time while working at the plant and those who have not. Further analysis reveals differences between departments, shift versus day workers

  8. Assessment of radiation safety in well logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation safety assessments required by current regulations are a means to verify compliance with the requirements. Different methods have been used for this purpose. In the paper the results of applying the method of risk matrices, applied for the first time in the practice of well logging are exposed. For each initiating event frequency of occurrence, the severity of its consequences and the probability of failure of the barriers identified were evaluated. Starting from these assumptions, the risk associated is determined for each of the identified accident sequences, using for this the SEVRRA code 'Risk Assessment System', originally designed for use in radiotherapy. As an result sequences increased risk associated with the practice of well logging were identified, which is the starting point for the further implementation of a coherent program of dose optimization in practice.

  9. Assessing probability of safety criteria exceeding according to probabilistic safety analysis results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper considers the general task on checking compliance of probabilistic safety indicators with regulatory criteria. It presents correlations to assess probable exceeding of safety criterion for different laws of distribution of the numerical results of the probabilistic safety analysis (PSA). The paper presents the scale for rationing probability of safety criteria exceeding.

  10. Safe patient care – safety culture and risk management in otorhinolaryngology

    OpenAIRE

    St. Pierre, Michael

    2013-01-01

    [english] Safety culture is positioned at the heart of an organization’s vulnerability to error because of its role in framing organizational awareness to risk and in providing and sustaining effective strategies of risk management. Safety related attitudes of leadership and management play a crucial role in the development of a mature safety culture (“top-down process”). A type marker for organizational culture and thus a predictor for an organization’s maturity in respect to safety is infor...

  11. Studying the Relationship between Individual and Organizational Factors and Nurses' Perception of Patient Safety Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Farahnaz Abdolahzadeh; Vahid Zamanzadeh; Aniroda Boroumand

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Safety culture is considered as an important factor in improving patient safety. Therefore, identifying individual and organizational factors affecting safety culture is crucial. This study was carried out to determine individual and organizational factors associated with nurses' perception of patient safety culture. Methods: The present descriptive study included 940 nurses working in four training hospitals affiliated with Urmia University of Medical Sciences (Iran). Data was ...

  12. Employee Engagement and a Culture of Safety in the Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Susan L; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J; Siedlecki, Sandra L; Dolansky, Mary A

    2016-01-01

    A descriptive, retrospective design was used to explore the relationship between employee engagement and culture of safety in ICUs within a large Midwestern healthcare system. Results demonstrated a strong positive relationship between total engagement score and total patient safety score (r = 0.645, P engagement score and the 12 safety culture dimensions. These findings have implications for improving managerial strategies relative to employee engagement that may ultimately impact perceptions of a safety culture. PMID:26641471

  13. The Safety Case and Safety Assessment for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Guide provides guidance and recommendations on meeting the safety requirements in respect of the safety case and supporting safety assessment for the disposal of radioactive waste. The safety case and supporting safety assessment provide the basis for demonstration of safety and for licensing of radioactive waste disposal facilities and assist and guide decisions on siting, design and operations. The safety case is also the main basis on which dialogue with interested parties is conducted and on which confidence in the safety of the disposal facility is developed. This Safety Guide is relevant for operating organizations preparing the safety case as well as for the regulatory body responsible for developing the regulations and regulatory guidance that determine the basis and scope of the safety case. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Demonstrating the safety of radioactive waste disposal; 3. Safety principles and safety requirements; 4. The safety case for disposal of radioactive waste; 5. Radiological impact assessment for the period after closure; 6. Specific issues; 7. Documentation and use of the safety case; 8. Regulatory review process.

  14. Safety Assessment and Countermeasures of Genetically Modified Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of science-biotechnology, the safety of genetically modified organisms has become some of the most controversial issues in our society. This study aims to review the safety assessment and countermeasures of Genetically Modified (GM foods. Firstly, the research status and the main contents of GM foods safety assessment are discussed. What’s more, the countermeasures of GM foods safety assessment are proposed. This study tries to summarize and discuss the safety assessment of GM foods.

  15. Regulatory review of safety cases and safety assessments for near surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of the ASAM Regulatory Review Working Group are presented. Regulatory review of the safety assessment is made. It includes the regulatory review of post-closure safety assessment; safety case development and confidence building. The ISAM methodology is reviewed and SA system description is presented. Recommendations on the review process management are given

  16. Integration of safety culture in transient analyses for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the nuclear field Safety Culture is the arrangement of attitudes and characteristics in individuals and organisations which determines first and foremost that nuclear power plant safety issues receive adequate attention due to their outstanding significance. It differs from general Corporate Culture via its concept of core hazards and the potentially large effects associated with the release of radioactivity. One can talk about positive and negative Safety Cultures. A positive Safety Culture assumes that the whole is more than the sum of the parts. The different parts interact to increase the overall effectiveness. In a negative Safety Culture the opposite is the case, with the action of some individuals restricted by the cynicism of others. Some examples of issues that contribute to a negative safety culture are: non-adherence to the established instructions and procedures, unclear definition of responsibilities, disinterest and inattentiveness, overestimation of own capabilities and arrogance, unclear rules, and mistrust between involved organisations. In addition to differentiation and importance of Safety Culture, necessary commitment levels, safety management framework, the paper discusses integration of Safety Culture in transient analyses of nuclear power plants. In this course the commitment to Safety Culture is defined as: a good Safety Culture depends on the continuous commitment and fulfilment of all involved organizations, persons and processes without any exception. (author)

  17. Training people in the safety approach and safety culture. What should the keynote be?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A speaker with the task of providing a general outline of the safety approach can consider that he is disseminating information and food for thought which will help to induce safety culture attitudes in all persons concerned (operators, designers, inspectors and analysts). What then should he choose to say in a short space of time? In the ten years in which I have been giving speeches on this subject, both in France and abroad, I have come to view the following topics as essential: 1) To show how the safety approach has been developing during the last 25 years by taking into account progressively new elements and new information. An inquisitive and questioning mind is therefore a constant necessity. 2) To show that human actions have an important contribution not only to the initiation and development of incidents or accidents but also to their control. To show also that human errors do not necessarily mean that the individual who performed the last action was at fault. Development of incident and accident analyses involving human factors is essential so that their findings can be published to ensure that the traps into which workers have fallen can be avoided by others. 3 - To show that openness is essential for all those involved in safety so that they can be aware of any problems which may arise and that safety organizations may have a key role to play in promoting such openness. This means that the concept of punishing errors must be handled with extreme caution. There will never, however, be a sure-fire way of saying that a particular speech prevented a specific incident. This is preventing speakers from complacency, which is another sign of the safety culture. (author)

  18. Physical protection: his contribution to the safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: As a contribution to the safety culture improvement, the present paper aims at raising awareness about the importance of physical protection measures and, this way, increase the commitment of those responsible for the materials or nuclear installations safety that can cause severe radiological consequences to the public. To that purpose, a brief description is made of the basic criteria used for the design of a Physical Protection System and the introduction of our own computational tool designed and developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority to evaluate this type of systems. Likewise, comments are made on the illicit traffic events occurred during the last years involving nuclear materials and other radioactive sources out of some States control, showing that these type of materials are easily accessible and that there are always individuals willing to selling and buying it. Even though events like these won't grant enough uranium or plutonium to fabricate a nuclear weapon, but non-stables isotope and conventional explosives could be mixed to produce a huge contamination. These reported cases had built some public concern and threatened to set a lack of trust on the control systems in use. Even though, no nuclear material diversion and equipment of nuclear interest within the nuclear installations where it is in force the AR 10.13.1 Standard -Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials and Facilities-, have been detected as of today, as a conclusion we must say that only a permanent strengthening of each link of the safety chain will allow a level of an adequate safety. This requires that the already established politics set by the safety authorities reach a high level of commitment by the individuals involved. (author)

  19. Intrusion resistant underground structure (IRUS) - safety assessment and licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the safety goals, human exposure scenarios and critical groups, the syvac-nsure performance assessment code, groundwater pathway safety results, and inadvertent human intrusion of the IRUS. 2 tabs

  20. Organizational Cultural Assessment of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-06-01

    An Organizational Cultural Assessment (OCA) was performed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) by administering an Organizational Culture Survey (OCS) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental concerns, hazardous nature of work, safety and overall job satisfaction. Many of these subjects are assessed in the OCS through highly developed and validated scales that have been administered in many different types of organizations. The purpose of the OCS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the notion of culture;'' that is, the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In addition, through the OCS, a broad sample of individuals can be reached that would probably not be interviewed or observed during the course of a typical assessment. The OCS also provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time that can then be compared to a profile taken at a different point in time to assess changes in the culture of the organization. The OCS administration at the INEL was the sixth to occur at a Department of Energy (DOE) facility. The INEL Organization is somewhat different from other DOE facilities are which the OCS was administered, due to the presence of six different major operating contractors. The seven organizations assessed at the INEL are: (1) Argonne National Laboratory -- West; (2) DOE Fire Department/Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory; (3) EG G Idaho Incorporated; (4) MK Ferguson; (5) Protection Technology Incorporated; (6) Rockwell; and (7) Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company Incorporated. All data from the OCS is presented in group summaries by organization, Supervisory Level, Staff Classification, and department within organization. Statistically significant differences between groups are identified and discussed.