WorldWideScience

Sample records for assessing radiation dose

  1. Bio-indicators for radiation dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear facilities, such as Chalk River Laboratories, dose to the atomic radiation workers (ARWs) is assessed routinely by using physical dosimeters and bioassay procedures in accordance with regulatory recommendations. However, these procedures may be insufficient in some circumstances, e.g., in cases where the reading of the physical dosimeters is questioned, in cases of radiation accidents where the person(s) in question was not wearing a dosimeter, or in the event of a radiation emergency when an exposure above the dose limits is possible. The desirability of being able to assess radiation dose on the basis of radio-biological effects has prompted the Dosimetric Research Branch to investigate the suitability of biological devices and techniques that could be used for this purpose. Current biological dosimetry concepts suggest that there does not appear to be any bio-indicator that could reliably measure the very low doses that are routinely measured by the physical devices presently in use. Nonetheless, bio-indicators may be useful in providing valuable supplementary information in cases of unusual radiation exposures, such as when the estimated body doses are doubtful because of lack of proper physical measurements, or in cases where available results need to be confirmed for medical treatment plannings. This report evaluates the present state of biological dosimetry and, in particular, assesses the efficiency and limits of individual indicators. This has led to the recommendation of a few promising research areas that may result in the development of appropriate biological dosimeters for operational and emergency needs at Chalk River

  2. Development of radiation dose assessment system for radiation accident (RADARAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of radiation accident is very rare, but cannot be regarded as zero. Medical treatments are quite essential for a heavily exposed person in an occurrence of a radiation accident. Radiation dose distribution in a human body is useful information to carry out effectively the medical treatments. A radiation transport calculation utilizing the Monte Carlo method has an advantageous in the analysis of radiation dose inside of the body, which cannot be measured. An input file, which describes models for the accident condition and quantities of interest, should be prepared to execute the radiation transport calculation. Since the accident situation, however, cannot be prospected, many complicated procedures are needed to make effectively the input file soon after the occurrence of the accident. In addition, the calculated doses are to be given in output files, which usually include much information concerning the radiation transport calculation. Thus, Radiation Dose Assessment system for Radiation Accident (RADARAC) was developed to derive effectively radiation dose by using the MCNPX or MCNP code. RADARAC mainly consists of two parts. One part is RADARAC-INPUT, which involves three programs. A user can interactively set up necessary resources to make input files for the codes, with graphical user interfaces in a personnel computer. The input file includes information concerning the geometric structure of the radiation source and the exposed person, emission of radiations during the accident, physical quantities of interest and so on. The other part is RADARAC-DOSE, which has one program. The results of radiation doses can be effectively indicated with numerical tables, graphs and color figures visibly depicting dose distribution by using this program. These results are obtained from the outputs of the radiation transport calculations. It is confirmed that the system can effectively make input files with a few thousand lines and indicate more than 20

  3. Assessment of radiation dose awareness among pediatricians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is increasing awareness among pediatric radiologists of the potential risks associated with ionizing radiation in medical imaging. However, it is not known whether there has been a corresponding increase in awareness among pediatricians. To establish the level of awareness among pediatricians of the recent publicity on radiation risks in children, knowledge of the relative doses of radiological investigations, current practice regarding parent/patient discussions, and the sources of educational input. Multiple-choice survey. Of 220 respondents, 105 (48%) were aware of the 2001 American Journal of Roentgenology articles on pediatric CT and radiation, though only 6% were correct in their estimate of the quoted lifetime excess cancer risk associated with radiation doses equivalent to pediatric CT. A sustained or transient increase in parent questioning regarding radiation doses had been noticed by 31%. When estimating the effective doses of various pediatric radiological investigations in chest radiograph (CXR) equivalents, 87% of all responses (and 94% of CT estimates) were underestimates. Only 15% of respondents were familiar with the ALARA principle. Only 14% of pediatricians recalled any relevant formal teaching during their specialty training. The survey response rate was 40%. Awareness of radiation protection issues among pediatricians is generally low, with widespread underestimation of relative doses and risks. (orig.)

  4. Assessment of radiation dose awareness among pediatricians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Karen E.; Parnell-Parmley, June E.; Charkot, Ellen; BenDavid, Guila; Krajewski, Connie [The Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Haidar, Salwa [Mubarak Al-Kabeer Hospital, Department of Radiology, Salmiya (Kuwait); Moineddin, Rahim [University of Toronto, Department of Family and Community Medicine, Toronto (Canada)

    2006-08-15

    There is increasing awareness among pediatric radiologists of the potential risks associated with ionizing radiation in medical imaging. However, it is not known whether there has been a corresponding increase in awareness among pediatricians. To establish the level of awareness among pediatricians of the recent publicity on radiation risks in children, knowledge of the relative doses of radiological investigations, current practice regarding parent/patient discussions, and the sources of educational input. Multiple-choice survey. Of 220 respondents, 105 (48%) were aware of the 2001 American Journal of Roentgenology articles on pediatric CT and radiation, though only 6% were correct in their estimate of the quoted lifetime excess cancer risk associated with radiation doses equivalent to pediatric CT. A sustained or transient increase in parent questioning regarding radiation doses had been noticed by 31%. When estimating the effective doses of various pediatric radiological investigations in chest radiograph (CXR) equivalents, 87% of all responses (and 94% of CT estimates) were underestimates. Only 15% of respondents were familiar with the ALARA principle. Only 14% of pediatricians recalled any relevant formal teaching during their specialty training. The survey response rate was 40%. Awareness of radiation protection issues among pediatricians is generally low, with widespread underestimation of relative doses and risks. (orig.)

  5. Internal dose assessment in radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although numerous models have been developed for occupational and medical internal dosimetry, they may not be applicable to an accident situation. Published dose coefficients relate effective dose to intake, but if acute deterministic effects are possible, effective dose is not a useful parameter. Consequently, dose rates to the organs of interest need to be computed from first principles. Standard bioassay methods may be used to assess body contents, but, again, the standard models for bioassay interpretation may not be applicable because of the circumstances of the accident and the prompt initiation of decorporation therapy. Examples of modifications to the standard methodologies include adjustment of biological half-times under therapy, such as in the Goiania accident, and the same effect, complicated by continued input from contaminated wounds, in the Hanford 241Am accident. (author)

  6. Radiation dose assessment in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclides are used in nuclear medicine in a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Recently, interest has grown in therapeutic agents for a number of applications in nuclear medicine. Internal dose models and methods have been in use for many years, are well established and can give radiation doses to stylized models representing reference individuals. Kinetic analyses need to be carefully planned, and dose conversion factors should be chosen that are most similar to the subject in question and that can then be tailored to be more patient specific. Such calculations, however, are currently not relevant in patient management in internal emitter therapy, as they are not sufficiently accurate or detailed to guide clinical decision making. Great strides are being made at many centres regarding the use of patient image data to construct individualized voxel based models for more detailed and patient specific dose calculations.These recent advances make it likely that the relevance will soon change to be more similar to that of external beam treatment planning. (author)

  7. Radiation dose assessments for materials with elevated natural radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report provides practical information needed for evaluating the radiation dose to the general public and workers caused by materials containing elevated levels of natural radionuclides. The report presents criteria, exposure scenarios and calculations used to assess dose with respect to the safety requirements set for construction materials in accordance with the Finnish Radiation Act. A method for calculating external gamma exposure from building materials is presented in detail. The results for most typical cases are given as specific dose rates in table form to enable doses to be assessed without computer calculation. A number of such dose assessments is presented, as is the corresponding computer code. Practical investigation levels for the radioactivity of materials are defined. (23 refs.)

  8. The assessment of personal dose due to external radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fundamental basis of thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) is discussed and a number of considerations in the measurement of thermoluminescence described, with particular reference to CaSO4:Dy. The steps taken to convert a thermoluminescence measurement to an exposure and then an absorbed dose are outlined. The calculation of effective dose equivalents due to external exposure to γ-radiation in a number of situations commonly encountered in a uranium mine is discussed. Factors which may affect the accuracy of external dose assessments are described

  9. Biological dose assessment of 15 victims in Haerbin radiation accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: a) On July 5 and 8, 2005, Two patients with bone marrow suppression were successively hospitalized by the First Affiliated Hospital of Haerbin Medical University. Examination results showed that the patients seemed to get suspicious radiation disease. On July 13, 2005, a radioactive source was found in the patients' dwelling. The radiation source is Iridium-192 with 0.5 Ci(1.85 x 1010Bq) radioactivity. The radiation source is a metal bar which is a kind of radioactive industrial detection source for welding. The source is currently stored in the urban radioactive waste storehouse of Heilongjiang province. After finding the radioactive source on July 13, The Haerbin municipal government initiated an emergency response plan and developed medical rescue, radioactive source examination and case detection through organizing ministries involving health, environmental protection and public security. After receiving a report at 17:00 on July 14, 2005, Chinese Ministry of Health immediately sent experts to the spot for investigation, dose estimation and direction of patients' rescue. Health authority carried out physical examination twice on 113 residents within 30 meters to the source, among which 4 got radiation sickness, 5 showed abnormal hemotogram, and others showed no abnormal response. Of 4 patients with radiation sickness, one 81 year old patient has died of severe bone marrow form of sub acute radiation sickness coupled with lung infection and prostrate apparatus at 13:00 on Oct., 20. Two children have been treated in Beitaiping Road Hospital in Beijing, another patient has been treated in local hospital. b) Biological dosimetry using conventional chromosome aberration analysis in human peripheral blood lymphocytes has been shown as a reliable and useful tool in medical management of radiation accident victims. Peripheral blood lymphocytes of the victims were cultured using conventional culture medium with colchicine added at the beginning. Chromosome

  10. Cone beam computed tomography radiation dose and image quality assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofthag-Hansen, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology has undergone profound changes in the last 30 years. New technologies are available to the dental field, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as one of the most important. CBCT is a catch-all term for a technology comprising a variety of machines differing in many respects: patient positioning, volume size (FOV), radiation quality, image capturing and reconstruction, image resolution and radiation dose. When new technology is introduced one must make sure that diagnostic accuracy is better or at least as good as the one it can be expected to replace. The CBCT brand tested was two versions of Accuitomo (Morita, Japan): 3D Accuitomo with an image intensifier as detector, FOV 3 cm x 4 cm and 3D Accuitomo FPD with a flat panel detector, FOVs 4 cm x 4 cm and 6 cm x 6 cm. The 3D Accuitomo was compared with intra-oral radiography for endodontic diagnosis in 35 patients with 46 teeth analyzed, of which 41 were endodontically treated. Three observers assessed the images by consensus. The result showed that CBCT imaging was superior with a higher number of teeth diagnosed with periapical lesions (42 vs 32 teeth). When evaluating 3D Accuitomo examinations in the posterior mandible in 30 patients, visibility of marginal bone crest and mandibular canal, important anatomic structures for implant planning, was high with good observer agreement among seven observers. Radiographic techniques have to be evaluated concerning radiation dose, which requires well-defined and easy-to-use methods. Two methods: CT dose index (CTDI), prevailing method for CT units, and dose-area product (DAP) were evaluated for calculating effective dose (E) for both units. An asymmetric dose distribution was revealed when a clinical situation was simulated. Hence, the CTDI method was not applicable for these units with small FOVs. Based on DAP values from 90 patient examinations effective dose was estimated for three diagnostic tasks: implant planning in posterior mandible and

  11. Radiation-induced biomarkers for the detection and assessment of absorbed radiation doses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Rana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation incident involving living organisms is an uncommon but a very serious situation. The first step in medical management including triage is high-throughput assessment of the radiation dose received. Radiation exposure levels can be assessed from viability of cells, cellular organelles such as chromosome and different intermediate metabolites. Oxidative damages by ionizing radiation result in carcinogenesis, lowering of the immune response and, ultimately, damage to the hematopoietic system, gastrointestinal system and central nervous system. Biodosimetry is based on the measurement of the radiation-induced changes, which can correlate them with the absorbed dose. Radiation biomarkers such as chromosome aberration are most widely used. Serum enzymes such as serum amylase and diamine oxidase are the most promising biodosimeters. The level of gene expression and protein are also good biomarkers of radiation.

  12. Measurement and assessment of doses from external radiations required for revised radiation protection regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protection regulations based on the 1990 recommendations of ICRP have been revised and will take effect from Apr., 2001. The major changes concerning on the measurement and assessment of doses from external radiations are as follows. (1) Personal dose equivalent and ambient dose equivalent stated in ICRP Publication 74 are introduced as quantities to be measured with personal dosimeters and survey instruments, respectively. (2) For multiple dosimetry for workers, the compartment weighting factors used for a realistic assessment of effective dose are markedly changed. In advance of the introduction of the new radiation protection regulations, the impacts on workplace and personal monitoring for external radiations by these revisions were investigated. The following results were obtained. (1) A new ambient dose equivalent to neutrons is higher with a factor of 1.2 than the old one for moderated fission neutron spectra. Therefore, neutron dose equivalent monitors for workplace monitoring at MOX fuel for facilities should be recalibrated for measurement of the new ambient dose equivalent. (2) Annual effective doses of workers were estimated by applying new calibration factors to readings of personal dosimeters, worn by workers. Differences between effective doses and effective dose equivalents are small for workers engaged in the fabrication process of MOX fuel. (author)

  13. Source term calculations for assessing radiation dose to equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examines results of analyses performed with the Source Term Code Package to develop updated source terms using NUREG-0956 methods. The updated source terms are to be used to assess the adequacy of current regulatory source terms used as the basis for equipment qualification. Time-dependent locational distributions of radionuclides within a containment following a severe accident have been developed. The Surry reactor has been selected in this study as representative of PWR containment designs. Similarly, the Peach Bottom reactor has been used to examine radionuclide distributions in boiling water reactors. The time-dependent inventory of each key radionuclide is provided in terms of its activity in curies. The data are to be used by Sandia National Laboratories to perform shielding analyses to estimate radiation dose to equipment in each containment design. See NUREG/CR-5175, ''Beta and Gamma Dose Calculations for PWR and BWR Containments.'' 6 refs., 11 tabs

  14. Assessment of dose level of ionizing radiation in army scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation protection is the science of protecting people and the environment from the harmful effects of ionizing radiation, which includes both particle radiation and high energy radiation. Ionizing radiation is widely used in industry and medicine. Any human activity of nuclear technologies should be linked to the foundation of scientific methodology and baseline radiation culture to avoid risk of radiation and should be working with radioactive materials and expertise to understand, control practices in order to avoid risks that could cause harm to human and environment. The study was conducted in warehouses and building of Sudan air force Khartoum basic air force during September 2010. The goal of this study to estimate the radiation dose and measurement of radioactive contamination of aircraft scrap equipment and increase the culture of radiological safety as well as the concept of radiation protection. The results showed that there is no pollution observed in the contents of the aircraft and the spire part stores outside, levels of radiation dose for the all contents of the aircraft and spire part within the excitable level, except temperature sensors estimated radiation dose about 43 μSv/h outside of the shielding and 12 μSv/h inside the shielding that exceeded the internationally recommended dose level. One of the most important of the identification of eighteen (18) radiation sources used in temperature and fuel level sensors. These are separated from the scrap, collected and stored in safe place. (Author)

  15. KREAM: Korean Radiation Exposure Assessment Model for Aviation Route Dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, J.; Dokgo, K.; Choi, E. J.; Kim, K. C.; Kim, H. P.; Cho, K. S. F.

    2014-12-01

    Since Korean Air has begun to use the polar route from Seoul/ICN airport to New York/JFK airport on August 2006, there are explosive needs for the estimation and prediction against cosmic radiation exposure for Korean aircrew and passengers in South Korea from public. To keep pace with those needs of public, Korean government made the law on safety standards and managements of cosmic radiation for the flight attendants and the pilots in 2013. And we have begun to develop our own Korean Radiation Exposure Assessment Model (KREAM) for aviation route dose since last year funded by Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA). GEANT4 model and NRLMSIS 00 model are used for calculation of the energetic particles' transport in the atmosphere and for obtaining the background atmospheric neutral densities depending on altitude. For prediction the radiation exposure in many routes depending on the various space weather effects, we constructed a database from pre-arranged simulations using all possible combinations of R, S, and G, which are the space weather effect scales provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). To get the solar energetic particles' spectrum at the 100 km altitude which we set as a top of the atmospheric layers in the KREAM, we use ACE and GOES satellites' proton flux observations. We compare the results between KREAM and the other cosmic radiation estimation programs such as CARI-6M which is provided by the Federal Aviation Agency (FAA). We also validate KREAM's results by comparison with the measurement from Liulin-6K LET spectrometer onboard Korean commercial flights and Korean Air Force reconnaissance flights.

  16. Radiation dose assessment of musa acuminata - triploid (AAA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bananas are radioactive due to the presence of the radioisotope-40K. This imposes a possible health risk to the general public. This study intended to assess the annual equivalent dosages and the annual effective dosage committed by the body. This seeks to benefit the general public, students and researchers, and entrepreneurs. Using atomic absorption spectrophotometry, lakatan banana (Musa acuminata-triploid (AAA), the most purchased variety cultivated in Barangay Adlawon, Cebu City, Philippines, was found to contain 0.53 g of total potassium for every 100 g of its fresh fruit wherein 6.2 x 10-5 g of which is potassium-40. Based on its 40K content banana was calculated to have a radioactivity of 16 Bq/100 g. it was found out that the body is exposed to radiation dosages ranging from 2.8 x 10-3 rem annually by eating 100 g of lakatan bananas everyday. Conversely, it is equivalent to the annual effective dosage of 0.0043 rem; the amount at which the body of an individual is uniformly exposed. However, no or extremely minute health risk was determined by just eating bananas. In fact, to exceed the radiation dose limits set by the International Commission on Radiation Protection, an individual may eat 116 kg of lakatan bananas everyday for a year. Fertilizers may be the major source of the radioisotope - 40K and assimilated by the plants. (author)

  17. Radiation Dose-Response Relationships and Risk Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The notion of a dose-response relationship was probably invented shortly after the discovery of poisons, the invention of alcoholic beverages, and the bringing of fire into a confined space in the forgotten depths of ancient prehistory. The amount of poison or medicine ingested can easily be observed to affect the behavior, health, or sickness outcome. Threshold effects, such as death, could be easily understood for intoxicants, medicine, and poisons. As Paracelsus (1493-1541), the 'father' of modern toxicology said, 'It is the dose that makes the poison.' Perhaps less obvious is the fact that implicit in such dose-response relationships is also the notion of dose rate. Usually, the dose is administered fairly acutely, in a single injection, pill, or swallow; a few puffs on a pipe; or a meal of eating or drinking. The same amount of intoxicants, medicine, or poisons administered over a week or month might have little or no observable effect. Thus, before the discovery of ionizing radiation in the late 19th century, toxicology ('the science of poisons') and pharmacology had deeply ingrained notions of dose-response relationships. This chapter demonstrates that the notion of a dose-response relationship for ionizing radiation is hopelessly simplistic from a scientific standpoint. While useful from a policy or regulatory standpoint, dose-response relationships cannot possibly convey enough information to describe the problem from a quantitative view of radiation biology, nor can they address societal values. Three sections of this chapter address the concepts, observations, and theories that contribute to the scientific input to the practice of managing risks from exposure to ionizing radiation. The presentation begins with irradiation regimes, followed by responses to high and low doses of ionizing radiation, and a discussion of how all of this can inform radiation risk management. The knowledge that is really needed for prediction of individual risk is presented

  18. MOSFET assessment of radiation dose delivered to mice using the Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngwa, Wilfred; Korideck, Houari; Chin, Lee M; Makrigiorgos, G Mike; Berbeco, Ross I

    2011-12-01

    The Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) is a novel isocentric irradiation system that enables state-of-the-art image-guided radiotherapy research to be performed with animal models. This paper reports the results obtained from investigations assessing the radiation dose delivered by the SARRP to different anatomical target volumes in mice. Surgically implanted metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFET) dosimeters were employed for the dose assessment. The results reveal differences between the calculated and measured dose of -3.5 to 0.5%, -5.2 to -0.7%, -3.9 to 0.5%, -5.9 to 2.5%, -5.5 to 0.5%, and -4.3 to 0% for the left kidney, liver, pancreas, prostate, left lung, and brain, respectively. Overall, the findings show less than 6% difference between the delivered and calculated dose, without tissue heterogeneity corrections. These results provide a useful assessment of the need for tissue heterogeneity corrections in SARRP dose calculations for clinically relevant tumor model sites. PMID:21962005

  19. Improvements in extremity dose assessment in ionizing radiation medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Whole-body personal dosimetry is well established for the individual monitoring of radiation workers. Legal dosimetry is usually based on TL or film passive dosimeters worn on the trunk and evaluated by an authorised dosimetric service. However, although extremity and skin dosimetry is required by law for any practice where extremities or skin are the critical organs, the development of extremity dosemetry has not been as well established. Only a few European dosimetry services offer this service. Moreover, there is hardly any recommendation on the most suitable place for wearing this type of dosemeter. The present paper aims at testing the INTE-UPC ring dosemeter based on MCPNs and TLD-100 detectors on some users from the field of medicine, namely manual brachytherapy operators, nuclear medicine technologists from a radiopharmaceutical unit, personnel at a cyclotron facility with the corresponding FDG synthesis cells, radiographers and surgeons participating in interventional radiology. The staff were chosen due to the fact that they had a significantly high risk of exposure to their hands. According to previous results, MCPNs TL thin material is used in the radiology measurements, whereas TLD100 is preferred for the other applications. Prior to use, the dosemeters were tested for waterproof and cold sterilisation sensitivity. Preliminary results confirm the need to implement extremity dosimetry in the above- mentioned jobs, where finger dose can be of the order of 40 times the whole body dose and 3 times the wrist dose. Selection of an appropriate dosemeter can mean changes in the classification of the worker as category A or B. The study shows good correlation between workload and integrated dose, and small differences between experienced workers' dose. As a conclusion, some guidelines for radiation protection optimization are presented. (author)

  20. Assessment of medical occupational radiation doses in Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, P; Acuña, M

    2011-09-01

    Participation of the University of Costa Rica (UCR) in activities in an IAEA Regional Project RLA/9/066 through training, equipment and expert missions, has enabled to setting up of a national personal monitoring laboratory. Since 2007, the UCR has been in charge of monitoring around 1800 medical radiation workers of the Social Security System. Individual external doses are measured with thermoluminescent dosemeter using a Harshaw 6600 Plus reader. The service has accreditation with ISO/IEC 17025:2005. Distribution of monitored medical personnel is as follows: 83 % in diagnostic radiology, 6 % in nuclear medicine and 6 % in radiotherapy. Preliminary values for the 75 percentile of annual H(p)(10) in mSv are: radiology 0.37; interventional radiology 0.41; radiotherapy 0.53 and nuclear medicine 1.55. The service provided by the UCR in a steady and reliable way can help to implement actions to limit the doses received by the medical workers and optimise their radiation protection programs. PMID:21856694

  1. Technology Assessment and Roadmap for the Emergency Radiation Dose Assessment Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turteltaub, K W; Hartman-Siantar, C; Easterly, C; Blakely, W

    2005-10-03

    A Joint Interagency Working Group (JIWG) under the auspices of the Department of Homeland Security Office of Research and Development conducted a technology assessment of emergency radiological dose assessment capabilities as part of the overall need for rapid emergency medical response in the event of a radiological terrorist event in the United States. The goal of the evaluation is to identify gaps and recommend general research and development needs to better prepare the Country for mitigating the effects of such an event. Given the capabilities and roles for responding to a radiological event extend across many agencies, a consensus of gaps and suggested development plans was a major goal of this evaluation and road-mapping effort. The working group consisted of experts representing the Departments of Homeland Security, Health and Human Services (Centers for Disease Control and the National Institutes of Health), Food and Drug Administration, Department of Defense and the Department of Energy's National Laboratories (see appendix A for participants). The specific goals of this Technology Assessment and Roadmap were to: (1) Describe the general context for deployment of emergency radiation dose assessment tools following terrorist use of a radiological or nuclear device; (2) Assess current and emerging dose assessment technologies; and (3) Put forward a consensus high-level technology roadmap for interagency research and development in this area. This report provides a summary of the consensus of needs, gaps and recommendations for a research program in the area of radiation dosimetry for early response, followed by a summary of the technologies available and on the near-term horizon. We then present a roadmap for a research program to bring present and emerging near-term technologies to bear on the gaps in radiation dose assessment and triage. Finally we present detailed supporting discussion on the nature of the threats we considered, the status of

  2. Displaying 3D radiation dose on endoscopic video for therapeutic assessment and surgical guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jimmy; Hope, Andrew J.; Cho, B. C. John; Sharpe, Michael B.; Dickie, Colleen I.; DaCosta, Ralph S.; Jaffray, David A.; Weersink, Robert A.

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a method to register and display 3D parametric data, in particular radiation dose, on two-dimensional endoscopic images. This registration of radiation dose to endoscopic or optical imaging may be valuable in assessment of normal tissue response to radiation, and visualization of radiated tissues in patients receiving post-radiation surgery. Electromagnetic sensors embedded in a flexible endoscope were used to track the position and orientation of the endoscope allowing registration of 2D endoscopic images to CT volumetric images and radiation doses planned with respect to these images. A surface was rendered from the CT image based on the air/tissue threshold, creating a virtual endoscopic view analogous to the real endoscopic view. Radiation dose at the surface or at known depth below the surface was assigned to each segment of the virtual surface. Dose could be displayed as either a colorwash on this surface or surface isodose lines. By assigning transparency levels to each surface segment based on dose or isoline location, the virtual dose display was overlaid onto the real endoscope image. Spatial accuracy of the dose display was tested using a cylindrical phantom with a treatment plan created for the phantom that matched dose levels with grid lines on the phantom surface. The accuracy of the dose display in these phantoms was 0.8-0.99 mm. To demonstrate clinical feasibility of this approach, the dose display was also tested on clinical data of a patient with laryngeal cancer treated with radiation therapy, with estimated display accuracy of ˜2-3 mm. The utility of the dose display for registration of radiation dose information to the surgical field was further demonstrated in a mock sarcoma case using a leg phantom. With direct overlay of radiation dose on endoscopic imaging, tissue toxicities and tumor response in endoluminal organs can be directly correlated with the actual tissue dose, offering a more nuanced assessment of normal tissue

  3. Establishment of exposure dose assessment laboratory in National Radiation Emergency Medical Center (NREMC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As unclear industry grown, 432 of the nuclear power plants are operating and 52 of NPPs are under construction currently. Increasing use of radiation or radioisotopes in the field of industry, medical purpose and research such as non-destructive examination, computed tomography and x-ray, etc. constantly. With use of nuclear or radiation has incidence possibility for example the Fukushima NPP incident, the Goiania accident and the Chernobyl Nuclear accident. Also the risk of terror by radioactive material such as Radiological Dispersal Device(RDD) etc. In Korea, since the 'Law on protection of nuclear facilities and countermeasure for radioactive preparedness was enacted in 2003, the Korean institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences(KIRAMS) was established for the radiation emergency medical response in radiological disaster due to nuclear accident, radioactive terror and so on. Especially National Radiation Emergency Medical Center(NREMC) has the duty that is protect citizens from nuclear, radiological accidents or radiological terrors through the emergency medical preparedness. The NREMC was established by the 39-article law on physical protection of nuclear material and facilities and measures for radiological emergencies. Dose assessment or contamination survey should be performed which provide the radiological information for medical response. For this reason, the NREMC establish and re-organized dose assessment system based on the existing dose assessment system of the NREMC recently. The exposure dose could be measured by physical and biological method. With these two methods, we can have conservative dose assessment result. Therefore the NREMC established the exposure dose assessment laboratory which was re-organized laboratory space and introduced specialized equipment for dose assessment. This paper will report the establishment and operation of exposure dose assessment laboratory for radiological emergency response and discuss how to enhance

  4. Assessment of radiation protection awareness and knowledge about radiological examination doses among Italian radiographers

    OpenAIRE

    Paolicchi, F.; Miniati, F.; Bastiani, L; Faggioni, L; Ciaramella, A.; Creonti, I.; Sottocornola, C.; Dionisi, C.; Caramella, D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate radiation protection basic knowledge and dose assessment for radiological procedures among Italian radiographers Methods A validated questionnaire was distributed to 780 participants with balanced demographic characteristics and geographic distribution. Results Only 12.1 % of participants attended radiation protection courses on a regular basis. Despite 90 % of radiographers stating to have sufficient awareness of radiation protection issues, most of them underestimated...

  5. Improvements in extremity dose assessment for ionising radiation medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims at testing the INTE ring dosemeter based on MCP-Ns and TLD-100 detectors on users from the field of medical applications, namely radio-pharmacists, personnel at a cyclotron facility with corresponding FDG synthesis cells, interventional radiology technologists and radiologists. These users were chosen due to the fact that they have a significantly high risk of exposure to their hands. Following previous results, MCP-Ns TL thin material was used for radiology measurements, whereas TLD-100 was preferred for other applications. The dosemeters were tested to make sure that they were waterproof and that they could be sterilised properly prior to use. Results confirm the need to implement finger dosimetry, mainly for interventional radiologists as finger dose can be >50 times higher than whole-body dose and 3 times higher than wrist dose. (authors)

  6. Monitoring and assessment of individual doses of occupationally exposed workers due to external radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to external radiation occurs in many occupations. Any exposure to ionizing radiation has the tendency to change the biochemical make-up of the human body which may result in biological health effects of ionizing radiation. This study reviews the monitoring and assessment of external radiation doses in industrial radiography using thermoluminescence and direct reading dosimeters. Poor handling procedures such as inadequate engineering control of equipment, safety culture, management, and inadequate assessment and monitoring of doses are the causes of most of the reported cases of exposure to external radiation in industrial radiography. Occupational exposure data in industrial radiography taken from UNSCEAR report 2008 was discussed and recommendations were made to regulatory authorities, operating organizations and radiographers. (au)

  7. Monitoring and assessment of individual doses of occupationally exposed workers due to external radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to external radiation occurs in many occupations. Any exposure to ionizing radiation has the tendency to change the biochemical make-up of the human body which may result in biological health effects of ionizing radiation. This study reviews the monitoring and assessment of external radiation doses in industrial radiography using thermoluminescence and direct reading dosimeters. Poor handling procedures such as inadequate engineering control of equipment, safety culture, management, and inadequate assessment and monitoring of doses are the causes of most of the reported cases of exposure to external radiation in industrial radiography. Occupational exposure data in industrial radiography from UNSCEAR report 2008 was discussed and recommendations were made to regulatory authorities, operating organizations and radiographers. (au)

  8. Personal radiation monitoring and assessment of doses received by radiation workers (1996)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since late 1986, all persons monitored by the Australian Radiation Laboratory have been registered on a data base which maintains records of the doses received by each individual wearer. At present, the Service regularly monitors approximately 30,000 persons, which is roughly 90 percent of those monitored in Australia, and maintains dose histories of over 75,000 people. The skin dose for occupationally exposed workers can be measured by using one of the five types of monitor issued by the Service: Thermoluminescent Dosemeter (TLD monitor), Finger TLD 3, Neutron Monitor, Special TLD and Environmental monitor. The technical description of the monitors is provided along with the method for calculating the radiation dose. 5 refs., 7 tabs., 5 figs

  9. Personal radiation monitoring and assessment of doses received by radiation workers (1996)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, N.D.

    1996-12-01

    Since late 1986, all persons monitored by the Australian Radiation Laboratory have been registered on a data base which maintains records of the doses received by each individual wearer. At present, the Service regularly monitors approximately 30,000 persons, which is roughly 90 percent of those monitored in Australia, and maintains dose histories of over 75,000 people. The skin dose for occupationally exposed workers can be measured by using one of the five types of monitor issued by the Service: Thermoluminescent Dosemeter (TLD monitor), Finger TLD 3, Neutron Monitor, Special TLD and Environmental monitor. The technical description of the monitors is provided along with the method for calculating the radiation dose. 5 refs., 7 tabs., 5 figs.

  10. The Thule accident: Assessment of radiation doses from terrestrial radioactive contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulbak, K. (National Institute of Radiation Protection, Herlev (Denmark))

    2011-12-15

    Risoe DTU has carried out research on the terrestrial contamination in the Thule area after the radioactive contents of four nuclear weapons were dispersed following the crash of an American B-52 bomber in 1968. The results of Risoe DTU's studies are described in the report Thule-2007 - Investigation of radioactive pollution on land, which covers all measurements that were carried out on land in Thule in the years 2003, 2006, 2007 and 2008. The present report uses Risoe DTU's report as a basis for assessing radiation doses and consequently the risk for individuals as a result of terrestrial radioactive contamination in the Thule area. The assessment of radiation doses involves a number of conservative assumptions, estimates, and measurements, all of which are subject to considerable uncertainty. In some cases, models have been used based on experiences from other contaminated areas elsewhere in the world, which are subject to climatic and other conditions that diverge from those in the Thule area. The calculated doses are thus associated with considerable uncertainty, which must be taken into account when the results are used for comparison and when the risks of staying in the Thule area are assessed. It has therefore been chosen to provide the assessed radiation doses in the form of indicative orders of magnitude, which are applicable to everyone who might stay in the area, across various age groups. If the estimated doses in this report are combined with the National Institute of Radiation Protection's recommended reference level for contamination as a result of the Thule Accident of 1 mSv/year, the assessed magnitudes of radiation doses for inhalation and ingestion as exposure pathways are many orders of magnitude below the reference level (10,000-10 million times smaller). The wound contamination exposure pathway has a magnitude of radiation dose that is smaller than the reference level by a factor of 10-1000, and it should be recalled that the

  11. Radiation dose assessment from ingestion pathway in Saudi Arabia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdul-Majid, S.; Abdul-Fattah, A.R.A.F.; Abulfaraj, W.H. (King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia))

    1992-01-01

    Levels of radioactivities in foodstuffs in the local market have been measured for the period from November 1987 until end of June 1988. Out of the 674 samples analyzed there were 83 milk powder, 85 infant milk powder, 54 infant cereals, 89 meat, 16 lentils, 14 wheat, and 26 macaroni samples. The average radioactivity concentration of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 134}Cs, in these samples in Bq/kg were 19, 13, 18, 6, 10, 25 and 13 respectively. The rest adults and infant foodstuffs had negligible radioactivity levels. The calculated annual doses from ingestion pathway due to {sup 137}Cs and {sup 134}Cs for adults were 3.13 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} Sv and 2.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} Sv while for one year old infant they were 12 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} Sv and 8 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} Sv respectively. The estimated accumulated dose for 50 years from {sup 90}Sr due to one year food ingestion for adults and one year old infants were 3.76 {times} 3.76 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} Sv and 5.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} Sv respectively.

  12. Radionuclides in Animal Feed (Poultry) 'Assessment of Radiation Dose'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work a comprehensive study has been carried out for the determination of presents evaluation of effective dose due to consumption of chicken fed by fodders collected from four major Sudanese companies (Hader, Koudjs, Wifi and Preconex SPN.V). The concentrations of radionuclides in the thirty two (32) feed samples have been determined by gamma spectrometry using NaI(Tl) detector. Radionuclides observed were: Pb-212 (daughter of Th-238), Pb-214, Bi-214 (daughters of U-238), Cs-137 and K-40 concentration. In additives the activity concentration of these radionuclides has found in the following ranges: 0.81 - 22.06 Bq/kg, 0.59 - 32.07 Bq/kg, 0.64 - 15.77 Bq/kg, 0.01 - 2.02 Bq/kg and 33.58 - 204.61 Bq/kg respectively. In feed concentrates activity concentration ranges has: 0.73 - 13.79 Bq/kg, 0.33 - 20.04 Bq/kg, 0.01 - 1.67 Bq/kg, 0.01 - 0.28 Bq/kg, 26.86 - 99.21 Bq/kg respectively. In fodders the activity concentration ranges has: 1.25 - 1.52 Bq/kg, 0.12 - 1.24 Bq/kg, 0.51 - 1.25 Bq/kg, 0.01 - 0.61 Bq/kg, 11.94 - 127.88 Bq/kg respectively. The 'animal product' activity concentration ranges has: 0.31 - 1.65 Bq/kg, 0.22 - 1.11 Bq/kg, 0.26 - 1.07 Bq/kg, 0.03 - 0.51 Bq/kg, 14.07 - 79.93 Bq/kg respectively. High concentrations (233.3 Bq/Kg) has typically found in toxo(additive); the lowest concentration (27.9 Bq/Kg ) has found in concentrate for layers and animal product. The total average effective dose due to the different feed-stuff has estimated and found to be 5.89x10-6±3.11x10-6mSv/y and 13.9 x 10-7 ± 7.24 x 10-7mSv/y for age categories 7-12 y and >17 y respectively. If compared with the limits - Radioactivity Levels Permitted in foodstuffs Part 1 the Saudi Standards, Metrology and quality (300 Bq/Kg) and ICRP,FAO organization (5 mSv/y) - these values are very low. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  13. Assessment of radiation dose in nuclear cardiovascular imaging using realistic computational models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Tianwu; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley E.; Zaidi, Habib

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Nuclear cardiology plays an important role in clinical assessment and has enormous impact on the management of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Pediatric patients at different age groups are exposed to a spectrum of radiation dose levels and associated cancer risks different from those

  14. Radiation dose in vertebroplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehdizade, A.; Lovblad, K.O.; Wilhelm, K.E.; Somon, T.; Wetzel, S.G.; Kelekis, A.D.; Yilmaz, H.; Abdo, G.; Martin, J.B.; Viera, J.M.; Ruefenacht, D.A. [Neuroradiology DRRI, Geneva University Hospital, Rue Micheli-du-Crest 24, 1211, Geneva 14 (Switzerland)

    2004-03-01

    We wished to measure the absorbed radiation dose during fluoroscopically controlled vertebroplasty and to assess the possibility of deterministic radiation effects to the operator. The dose was measured in 11 consecutive procedures using thermoluminescent ring dosimeters on the hand of the operator and electronic dosimeters inside and outside of the operator's lead apron. We found doses of 0.022-3.256 mGy outside and 0.01-0.47 mGy inside the lead apron. Doses on the hand were higher, 0.5-8.5 mGy. This preliminary study indicates greater exposure to the operator's hands than expected from traditional apron measurements. (orig.)

  15. RADIATION HYGIENIC MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT OF POPULATION DOSES IN RADIOACTIVELY CONTAMINATED AREAS OF TULA REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Chichura

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal. The analyses of radiation hygienic monitoring conducted in Tula region territories affected by the Chernobyl NPP accident regarding cesium-137 and strontium- 90 in the local foodstuffs and the analyses of populational annual effective dose. The materials and methods. The survey was conducted in Tula Region since 1997 to 2015. Over that period, more than fifty thousand samples of the main foodstuffs from the post-Chernobyl contaminated area were analyzed. Simultaneously with that, the external gamma - radiation dose rate was measured in the fixed control points. The dynamics of cesium -137 and strontium-90 content in foodstuffs were assessed along with the maximum values of the mean annual effective doses to the population and the contribution of the collective dose from medical exposures into the structure of the annual effective collective dose to the population. The results. The amount of cesium-137 and strontium -90 in the local foodstuffs was identified. The external gamma- radiation dose rate values were found to be stable and not exceeding the natural fluctuations range typical for the middle latitudes of Russia’s European territory. The maximum mean annual effective dose to the population reflects the stable radiation situation and does not exceed the permissible value of 1 mSv. The contribution of the collective dose from medical exposures of the population has been continuously reducing as well as the average individual dose to the population per one medical treatment under the annual increase of the medical treatments quantities. The conclusion. There is no exceedance of the admissible levels of cesium-137 and strontium- 90 content in the local foodstuffs. The mean annual effective dose to the population has decreased which makes it possible to transfer the settlements affected by the Chernobyl NPP accident to normal life style. This is covered by the draft concept of the settlements’ transfer to normal life style.

  16. Assessment of the occupational radiation exposure doses to workers at INMOL Pakistan (2007-11)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assessment of occupationally exposed medical radiation workers at the Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Oncology (INMOL) (Pakistan)) has been performed. The whole-body radiation exposure doses of 120 workers in nuclear medicine (NM), radiotherapy (RT) and diagnostic radiology (DR) were measured by using the film badge dosimetry technique for the time interval (2007-11) and their results presented. The annual average effective doses in NM, RT and DR were found to be well below the permissible annual limit of 20 mSv (averaged over a period of 5 consecutive y). The declining trend observed in the annual average dose values during the time interval (2007-11) is an indication of ameliorated radiation protection practices at INMOL (Pakistan)). (authors)

  17. Quantification of micronuclei in blood lymphocytes of patients exposed to gamma radiation for dose absorbed assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose assessment in an important step to evaluate biological effects as a result of individual exposure to ionizing radiation. The use of cytogenetic dosimetry based on the quantification of micronuclei in lymphocytes is very important to complement physical dosimetry, since the measurement of absorbed dose cannot be always performed. In this research, the quantification of micronuclei was carried out in order to evaluate absorbed dose as a result of radiotherapy with 60Co, using peripheral blood samples from 5 patients with cervical uterine cancer. For this purpose, an aliquot of whole blood from the individual patients was added in culture medium RPMI 1640 supplemented with fetal calf serum and phytohaemagglutinin. The culture was incubated for 44 hours. Henceforth, cytochalasin B was added to block the dividing lymphocytes in cytokinesis. The culture was returned to the incubator for further of 28 hours. Thus, cells were harvested, processed and analyzed. Values obtained considering micronuclei frequency after pelvis irradiation with absorption of 0,08 Gy and 1,8 Gy were, respectively, 0,0021 and 0,052. These results are in agreement with some recent researches that provided some standard values related to micronuclei frequency induced by gamma radiation exposure in different exposed areas for the human body. The results presented in this report emphasizes biological dosimetry as an important tool for dose assessment of either total or partial-body exposure to ionizing radiation, mainly in retrospective dose investigation. (author)

  18. Radiation dose assessment in nuclear plants through virtual simulations using a game engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This paper reports an R and D which has the purpose of performing dose assessment of workers in nuclear plants, through virtual simulations using a game engine. The main objective of this R and D is to support the planning of operational and maintenance routines in nuclear plants, aiming to reduce the dose received by workers. Game engine is the core of a computer game, that is usually made independent of both the scenarios and the original applications, and thus can be adapted for any other purposes, including scientific or technological ones. Computer games have experienced a great development in the last years, regarding computer graphics, 3D image rendering and the representation of the physics needed for the virtual simulations, such as gravity effect and collision among virtual components within the games. Thus, researchers do not need to develop an entire platform for virtual simulations, what would be a hard work itself, but they can rather take advantage of such well developed platforms, adapting them for their own applications. The game engine used in this R and D is part of a computer game widely used, Unreal, that has its source code partially open, and can be pursued for low cost. A nuclear plant in our Institution, Argonauta research reactor, has been virtually modeled in 3D, and trainees can navigate virtually through it, with realistic walking velocity, and experiencing collision. The modified game engine computes and displays in real-time the dose received by a virtual person, the avatar, as it walks through the plant, from the radiation dose rate distribution assigned to the virtual environment. In the beginning of this R and D, radiation dose rate measurements were previously collected by the radiological protection service, and input off-line to the game engine. Currently, on-line measurements can be also input to it, by taking advantage of the game's networking capabilities. A real radiation monitor has been used to collect real

  19. EPR-assessment of soils radiation doses for Semipalatinsk test site's north-east trace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dose loads are an important characteristics of potential damage assessment for health of population suffered from nuclear incidents. Technique of retrospective dosimetry allows to evaluate of these loads, if to find in the soils samples the radiation detector - for example, some mineral - in which in the locality conditions the radiation defects are accumulating and keeping and giving the EPR signal. In the paper the results of searching of such detector to Semipalatinsk test site soils samples are expounded.The samples were taken along the north-east trace of radioactive cloud (step ∼2 km) on the distance 0.7-112 km from the air thermonuclear explosion epicenter. Te EPR performances were studied on the ESP 300E spectrometer of Brucker company (Germany). The tested methodic is perspective for determination of dose loads of soils with integral irradiation dose does not exceeds 10-15 kGy

  20. Assessment of radiation dose in nuclear cardiovascular imaging using realistic computational models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Nuclear cardiology plays an important role in clinical assessment and has enormous impact on the management of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Pediatric patients at different age groups are exposed to a spectrum of radiation dose levels and associated cancer risks different from those of adults in diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures. Therefore, comprehensive radiation dosimetry evaluations for commonly used myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and viability radiotracers in target population (children and adults) at different age groups are highly desired. Methods: Using Monte Carlo calculations and biological effects of ionizing radiation VII model, we calculate the S-values for a number of radionuclides (Tl-201, Tc-99m, I-123, C-11, N-13, O-15, F-18, and Rb-82) and estimate the absorbed dose and effective dose for 12 MPI radiotracers in computational models including the newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15-yr-old, and adult male and female computational phantoms. Results: For most organs, 201Tl produces the highest absorbed dose whereas 82Rb and 15O-water produce the lowest absorbed dose. For the newborn baby and adult patient, the effective dose of 82Rb is 48% and 77% lower than that of 99mTc-tetrofosmin (rest), respectively. Conclusions: 82Rb results in lower effective dose in adults compared to 99mTc-labeled tracers. However, this advantage is less apparent in children. The produced dosimetric databases for various radiotracers used in cardiovascular imaging, using new generation of computational models, can be used for risk-benefit assessment of a spectrum of patient population in clinical nuclear cardiology practice

  1. Assessment of radiation dose in nuclear cardiovascular imaging using realistic computational models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Tianwu [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva 4 CH-1211 (Switzerland); Lee, Choonsik [Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20852 (United States); Bolch, Wesley E. [Departments of Nuclear and Radiological and Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Zaidi, Habib, E-mail: habib.zaidi@hcuge.ch [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva 4 CH-1211 (Switzerland); Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva University, Geneva CH-1205 (Switzerland); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen 9700 RB (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Nuclear cardiology plays an important role in clinical assessment and has enormous impact on the management of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Pediatric patients at different age groups are exposed to a spectrum of radiation dose levels and associated cancer risks different from those of adults in diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures. Therefore, comprehensive radiation dosimetry evaluations for commonly used myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and viability radiotracers in target population (children and adults) at different age groups are highly desired. Methods: Using Monte Carlo calculations and biological effects of ionizing radiation VII model, we calculate the S-values for a number of radionuclides (Tl-201, Tc-99m, I-123, C-11, N-13, O-15, F-18, and Rb-82) and estimate the absorbed dose and effective dose for 12 MPI radiotracers in computational models including the newborn, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15-yr-old, and adult male and female computational phantoms. Results: For most organs, {sup 201}Tl produces the highest absorbed dose whereas {sup 82}Rb and {sup 15}O-water produce the lowest absorbed dose. For the newborn baby and adult patient, the effective dose of {sup 82}Rb is 48% and 77% lower than that of {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin (rest), respectively. Conclusions: {sup 82}Rb results in lower effective dose in adults compared to {sup 99m}Tc-labeled tracers. However, this advantage is less apparent in children. The produced dosimetric databases for various radiotracers used in cardiovascular imaging, using new generation of computational models, can be used for risk-benefit assessment of a spectrum of patient population in clinical nuclear cardiology practice.

  2. Assessment of the Technologies for Molecular Biodosimetry for Human Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthew A. Coleman Ph.D.; Narayani Ramakrishnan, Ph.D.; Sally A. Amundson; James D. Tucker, Ph.D.; Stephen D. Dertinger, Ph.D.; Natalia I. Ossetrova, Ph.D.; Tao Chen

    2009-11-16

    Exposure to ionizing radiation produces few immediate outwardly-visible clinical signs, yet, depending on dose, can severely damage vital physiological functions within days to weeks and produce long-lasting health consequences among survivors. In the event of a radiological accident, the rapid evaluation of the individual absorbed dose is paramount to discriminate the worried but unharmed from those individuals who must receive medical attention. Physical, clinical and biological dosimetry are usually combined for the best dose assessment. However, because of the practical limits of physical and clinical dosimetry, many attempts have been made to develop a dosimetry system based on changes in biological parameters, including techniques for hematology, biochemistry, immunology, cytogenetics, etc. Lymphocyte counts and chromosome aberrations analyses are among the methods that have been routinely used for estimating radiation dose. However, these assays require several days to a week to be completed and therefore cannot be used to obtain a fast estimate of the dose during the first few days after exposure when the information would be most critical for identifying victims of radiation accidents who could benefit the most by medical intervention. The steadily increasing sophistication in our understanding of the early biochemical responses of irradiated cells and tissues provides the opportunity for developing mechanism-based biosignatures of exposure. Compelling breakthroughs have been made in the technologies for genome-scale analysis of cellular transcriptional and proteomic profiles. There have also been major strides in the mechanistic understanding of the early events in DNA damage and radiation damage products, as well as in the cellular pathways that lead to radiation injury. New research with genomic- and proteomic-wide tools is showing that within minutes to hours after exposure to ionizing radiation protein machines are modified and activated, and large

  3. Occupational radiation dose of staff and workplace assessment at service des radioimmunodosages in Benin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Occupational radiation dose of staff handling 125 I and workplace assessment in nuclear medicine unit at Service des Radioimmunodosages (SeRiD) in Benin have been undertaken to determine levels of radiation safety. Firstly, three permanent workers and two students were provided with finger ring thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) to wear at index finger base of both hands. Ring dosimeters were used for four month in two sequences of two months and were evaluated with HARSHAW 4500. Secondly, three permanent workers and three students were provided with TLD badge to wear at the chest level for skin and deep dose measurement. TLD badges were used for six months in six sequences of one month. The exposed TLDs were evaluated with HARSHAW 6600. Ambient equivalent dose rate (μSv/h) was measured using microsieverts model dose rate meter. Sixteen control points closed to the source or situated where staff are exposed to ionizing radiation were chosen. Fixed and removable contamination were surveyed at six and three controlled points respectively. Results from the study showed that permanent workers highest index finger base average equivalent dose was 142.75± 89.54μSv/2months, while that of students was 34.69 ± 29.23 µSv/2months. The maximum annual skin dose of Permanent workers represent 0.46% of dose limit (500mSv/yr), while that of the student represent 0.37%of dose limit (150mSv/yr). Average ambient equivalent dose rate from radiation survey was lower than 20μSv/h. It was noted that the freezer door plays an inportant role in shielding. The result in waste disposal room confirm the decay in storage of radioactive waste principle. Data on removable and fixed contamination value was below the limits of 0.33 dps/100cm2 and 8.33dps/100cm2 respectively. The study indicated that SeRiD staff are not exposed to ionizing radiation at work in safe working environment. (au)

  4. A cost-effective technique for integrating personal radiation dose assessment with personal gravimetric sampling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During recent years there has been an increasing awareness internationally of radiation levels in the mining and milling of radioactive ores, including those from non-uranium mines. A major aspect of radiation control is concerned with the measurement of radiation levels and the assessment of radiation doses incurred by individual workers. Current techniques available internationally for personnel monitoring of radiation exposures are expensive and there is a particular need to reduce the cost of personal radiation monitoring in South African gold mines because of the large labour force employed. In this regard the obvious benefits of integrating personal radiation monitoring with existing personal monitoring systems already in place in South African gold mines should be exploited. A system which can be utilized for this purpose is personal gravimetric sampling. A new cost-effective technique for personal radiation monitoring, which can be fully integrated with the personal gravimetric sampling strategy being implemented on mines, has been developed in South Africa. The basic principles of this technique and its potential in South African mines are described. 9 refs., 7 figs

  5. Doses from radiation exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Practical implementation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection's (ICRP) system of protection requires the availability of appropriate methods and data. The work of Committee 2 is concerned with the development of reference data and methods for the assessment of internal and external radiation exposure of workers and members of the public. This involves the development of reference biokinetic and dosimetric models, reference anatomical models of the human body, and reference anatomical and physiological data. Following ICRP's 2007 Recommendations, Committee 2 has focused on the provision of new reference dose coefficients for external and internal exposure. As well as specifying changes to the radiation and tissue weighting factors used in the calculation of protection quantities, the 2007 Recommendations introduced the use of reference anatomical phantoms based on medical imaging data, requiring explicit sex averaging of male and female organ-equivalent doses in the calculation of effecti...

  6. Additional dose assessment from the activation of high-energy linear accelerators used in radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ateia Embarka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that medical linear accelerators generate activation products when operated above certain electron (photon energies. The aim of the present work is to assess the activation behavior of a medium-energy radiotherapy linear accelerator by applying in situ gamma-ray spectrometry and dose measurements, and to estimate the additional dose to radiotherapy staff on the basis of these results. Spectral analysis was performed parallel to dose rate measurements in the isocenter of the linear accelerator, immediately after the termination of irradiation. The following radioisotopes were detected by spectral analysis: 28Al, 62Cu, 56Mn, 64Cu, 187W, and 57Ni. The short-lived isotopes such as 28Al and 62Cu are the most important factors of the clinical routine, while the contribution to the radiation dose of medium-lived isotopes such as 56Mn, 57Ni, 64Cu, and 187W increases during the working day. Measured dose rates at the isocenter ranged from 2.2 µSv/h to 10 µSv/h in various measuring points of interest for the members of the radiotherapy staff. Within the period of 10 minutes, the dose rate decreased to values of 0.8 µSv/h. According to actual workloads in radiotherapy departments, a realistic exposure scenario was set, resulting in a maximal additional annual whole body dose to the radiotherapy staff of about 3.5 mSv.

  7. Blast overpressure and fallout radiation dose models for casualty assessment and other purposes. Rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of blast overpressures and fallout radiation doses at points on a sufficiently fine grid, for any part or for the whole of the UK, and for any postulated attack, is an essential element in the systematic assessment of casualties, the estimation of numbers of homeless, and the evaluation of life-saving measures generally. Models are described which provide the required blast and dose values and which are intended to supersede existing models which were introduced in 1971. The factors which affect blast and, more particularly, dose values are discussed, and the way in which various factors are modelled is described. The models are incorporated into separate computer programs which are described, the outputs of which are stored on magnetic tape for subsequent use as required. (author)

  8. Registration of radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Finland the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) is maintaining the register (called Dose Register) of the radiation exposure of occupationally exposed workers in order to ensure compliance with the principles of optimisation and individual protection. The guide contains a description of the Dose Register and specifies the responsibilities of the party running a radiation practice to report the relevant information to the Dose Register

  9. Radioactivity in food and the environment: calculations of UK radiation doses using integrated assessment methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method for estimating radiation doses to UK critical groups is proposed for discussion. Amongst others, the Food Standards Agency (FSA) and the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) undertake surveillance of UK food and the environment as a check on the effect of discharges of radioactive wastes. Discharges in gaseous and liquid form are made under authorisation by the Environment Agency and SEPA under powers in the Radioactive Substance Act. Results of surveillance by the FSA and SEPA are published in the Radioactivity in Food and the Environment (RIFE) report series. In these reports, doses to critical groups are normally estimated separately for gaseous and liquid discharge pathways. Simple summation of these doses would tend to overestimate doses actually received. Three different methods of combining the effects of both types of discharge in an integrated assessment are considered and ranked according to their ease of application, transparency, scientific rigour and presentational issues. A single integrated assessment method is then chosen for further study. Doses are calculated for surveillance data for the calendar year 2000 and compared with those from the existing RIFE method

  10. Assessment of radiation doses to the population in the environment of a nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This guide sets forth the principles to be followed in the assessment of the radiation exposure of the surrounding population of a nuclear power plant. The requirements of this guide apply to transient and safety analyses conducted in accordance with Guide YVL 2.2; to analyses assessing exposure from releases during normal operation; and to analyses in connection with emergency preparedness. In addition, they may be applied to other analyses for the operation of a nuclear power plant. This guide may be applied to other nuclear facilities as well. Guide YVL 7.3 deals with evaluation of the dispersion of radioactive substances in relation to radiation dose assessment. According to Recommendation 91/4/Euratom issued by the Commission of the European Communities on the application of Article 37 of the EURATOM Treaty, the member states shall provide the Commission with information about the environmental impacts of the use of nuclear energy. If need be, the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority will instruct separately on the application of the Recommendation. The licensee may use a simplified model that deviates from the detailed requirements of this guide. It shall then be justifiably demonstrated that the model is conservative

  11. Prenatal radiation doses from radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiopharmaceutical administration with diagnostic or therapeutic purpose during pregnancy implies a prenatal radiation dose. The dose assessment and the evaluation of the radiological risks become relevant due to the great radiosensitivity of the fetal tissues in development. This paper is a revision of the available data for estimating fetal doses in the cases of the more frequently used radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine, taking into account recent investigation in placental crossover. The more frequent diagnostic and therapeutic procedures were analyzed according to the radiation doses implied. (author)

  12. Radiation Dose Assessments of Solar Particle Events with Spectral Representation at High Energies for the Improvement of Radiation Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Atwell, William; Tylka, Allan J.; Dietrich, William F.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    For radiation dose assessments of major solar particle events (SPEs), spectral functional forms of SPEs have been made by fitting available satellite measurements up to approx.100 MeV. However, very high-energy protons (above 500 MeV) have been observed with neutron monitors (NMs) in ground level enhancements (GLEs), which generally present the most severe radiation hazards to astronauts. Due to technical difficulties in converting NM data into absolutely normalized fluence measurements, those functional forms were made with little or no use of NM data. A new analysis of NM data has found that a double power law in rigidity (the so-called Band function) generally provides a satisfactory representation of the combined satellite and NM data from approx.10 MeV to approx.10 GeV in major SPEs (Tylka & Dietrich 2009). We use the Band function fits to re-assess human exposures from large SPEs. Using different spectral representations of large SPEs, variations of exposure levels were compared. The results can be applied to the development of approaches of improved radiation protection for astronauts, as well as the optimization of mission planning and shielding for future space missions.

  13. Radiation Dose Assessments of Solar Particle Events with Spectral Representation at High Energies for the Improvement of Radiation Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Atwell, William; Tylka, Allan J.; Dietrich, William; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    For radiation dose assessments of major solar particle events (SPEs), spectral functional forms of SPEs have been made by fitting available satellite measurements up to 100 MeV. However, very high-energy protons (above 500 MeV) have been observed with neutron monitors (NMs) in ground level enhancements (GLEs), which generally present the most severe radiation hazards to astronauts. Due to technical difficulties in converting NM data into absolutely normalized fluence measurements, those functional forms were made with little or no use of NM data. A new analysis of NM data has found that a double power law in rigidity (the so-called Band function) generally provides a satisfactory representation of the combined satellite and NM data from 10 MeV to 10 GeV in major SPEs (Tylka and Dietrich, the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, Lodz, Poland, July 7-15, 2009). We use the Band function fits to re-assess human exposures from large SPEs. Using different spectral representations of large SPEs, variations of exposure levels were compared. The results can be applied to the development of approaches of improved radiation protection for astronauts, as well as the optimization of mission planning and shielding for future space missions.

  14. CT outperforms radiographs at a comparable radiation dose in the assessment for spondylolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadell, Michael F.; Stewart, Jaime R.; Harned, Roger K.; Ingram, James D.; Miller, Angie L.; Strain, John D.; Weinman, Jason P. [Children' s Hospital Colorado, Department of Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States); University of Colorado Hospital, Department of Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States); Gralla, Jane [University of Colorado Denver, Department of Pediatrics, Aurora, CO (United States); Bercha, Istiaq [Children' s Hospital Colorado, Department of Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Lumbar spondylolysis, a unilateral or bilateral fracture at pars interarticularis, is a common cause of low back pain in children. The initial imaging study in the diagnosis of lumbar spondylolysis has historically been lumbar spine radiographs; however, radiographs can be equivocal or false-negative. Definitive diagnosis can be achieved with computed tomography (CT), but its use has been limited due to the dose of ionizing radiation to the patient. By limiting the z-axis coverage to the relevant anatomy and optimizing the CT protocol, we are able to provide a definitive diagnosis of fractures of the pars interarticularis at comparable or lower radiation dose than commonly performed lumbar spine radiographs. As there is no gold standard for the diagnosis of spondylolysis besides surgery, we compared interobserver agreement and degree of confidence to determine which modality is preferable. Sixty-two patients with low back pain ages 5-18 years were assessed for the presence of spondylolysis. Forty-seven patients were evaluated by radiography and 15 patients were evaluated by limited field-of-view CT. Both radiographic and CT examinations were assessed anonymously in random order for the presence or absence of spondylolysis by six raters. Agreement was assessed among raters using a Fleiss Kappa statistic for multiple raters. CT provided a significantly higher level of agreement among raters than radiographs (P < 0.001). The overall Kappa for rater agreement with radiographs was 0.24, 0.34 and 0.40 for 2, 3 or 4 views, respectively, and 0.88 with CT. Interobserver agreement is significantly greater using limited z-axis coverage CT when compared with radiographs. Radiologist confidence improved significantly with CT compared to radiographs regardless of the number of views. (orig.)

  15. Assessment of fetal radiation dose to patients and staff in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A major source of uncertainty in the estimation of fetal absorbed radiation dose is the influence of fetal size and position as these change with gestational age. Consequently, dose to the fetus is related to gestational age. Most studies of fetal dose estimation during pregnancy assume that the uterus dose is equal to fetal dose. These dose estimates do not take account of gestational age and individual fetal depth, factors which are significant when calculating dose. To establish both positional and size data for estimation of fetal absorbed dose from radiological examinations, the depths from the mother's anterior surface to the mid-line of the fetal head and abdomen were measured from ultrasound scans in 215 pregnant women. Depths were measured along a ray path projected in the anterior-posterior direction from the mother's abdomen. The fetal size was estimated from measurements of the fetal abdominal and head circumference, femur length and the biparietal diameter. The effects of fetal presentation, maternal bladder volume, placenta location, gestational age and maternal AP thickness on fetal depth and size were analysed. A Monte Carlo (MC) model was developed, and used to derive factors for converting dose-area product and free-in-air entrance surface dose from medical exposure of a pregnant patient to absorbed dose to the uterus/embryo, and for converting uterus dose to fetal dose in the later stages of pregnancy. Also presented are factors for converting thermoluminescence dosimeter reading from occupational exposure of a pregnant worker to equivalent dose to the fetus. The MC model was verified experimentally by direct measurement of uterus depth dose in a female Rando phantom, and also by comparison with other experimental work and MC results in the literature. The application of the various conversion factors is demonstrated by a review of the dose estimation process in 50 cases of fetal irradiation from medical exposures. (author)

  16. Assessment of Environmental Gamma Radiation Dose Rate in Ardabil and Sarein in 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Alighadri

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Gamma rays, the most energetic photons within the any other wave in the electromagnetic spectrum, pose enough energy to form charged particles and adversely affect human health. Provided that the external exposure of human beings to natural environmental gamma radiation normally exceeds that from all man-made sources combined, environmental gamma dose rate and corresponding annual effective dose were determined in the cities of Ardabil and Sar Ein.Materials and Methods: Outdoor environmental gamma dose rates were measured using an Ion Chamber Survey Meter in 48 selected locations (one in city center and the remaining in cardinal and ordinal directions in Ardabil and Sar Ein. Ten more locations were monitored along the hot springs effluent in Sar Ein. Measurements of gamma radiation dose rate were performed at 20 and 100 cm above the ground for a period of one hour.Results: Average outdoor environmental gamma dose rate were determined as 265, 219, and 208  for Ardabil, Sar Ein, and along the hot spring effluent, respectively. The annual affective dose for Ardabil and Sar Ein residents were estimated to be 1.45 and 1.39 mSv, respectively.Conclusion: Calculated annual effective dose of 1.49 and 1.35 are appreciably higher than the population weighted average exposure to environmental gamma radiation worldwide and that analysis of soil content to different radionuclide is suggested.

  17. Measurement and simulation of the radiation environment in the lower atmosphere for dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flying personnel is occupationally exposed to rather high radiation levels due to secondary cosmic radiation. Therefore, the radiation environment induced in the lower atmosphere by galactic and solar cosmic radiation was characterized by means of particle transport calculations using GEANT4. These calculations were validated with continuous measurements of the energy spectra of secondary neutrons with Bonner sphere spectrometers at the Zugspitze mountain and near the North Pole. The response of these instruments was determined with GEANT4 and for the first time experimentally verified at high neutron energies (244 and 387 MeV). Route doses for aircrews along typical long-haul flights were determined for galactic and solar cosmic radiation using most recent data on the magnetospheric field and primary cosmic radiation.

  18. Revised series of stylized anthropometric phantoms for internal and external radiation dose assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Eunyoung

    At present, the dosimetry systems of both the International Commission on Radiological Protection, and the Society of Nuclear Medicine's Medical Internal Radiation Dose Committee utilize a series of stylized or mathematical anthropometric models of patient anatomy developed in 1987 at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In this study, substantial revisions to the ORNL phantom series are reported with tissue compositions, tissue densities, and organ masses adjusted to match their most recent values in the literature. In addition, both the ICRP and MIRD systems of internal dosimetry implicitly consider that electron and beta-particle energy emitted within the source organs of the patient are fully deposited within these organs. With the development of the revised ORNL phantom series, three additional applications were explored as part of this dissertation research. First, the phantoms were used in combination to assess external radiation exposures to family members caring or interacting with patients released from the hospital following radionuclide therapy with I-131. Values of family member effective dose are then compared to values obtained using NRC guidance and based on a simple point-source methodology which ignores the effects of photon attenuation and scatter within both the source individual (patient) and the target individual (family member). Second, the anatomical structures of the extrathoracic airways and thoracic airways (exclusive of the lungs themselves) have been included in the entire revised ORNL phantom series of pediatric individuals. Values of cross-region photon dose are explored for use in radioactive aerosol inhalation exposures to members of the general public, and comparisons are made to values given by the ICRP in which surrogate organ assignments were made in the absence of explicit models of these airways. Finally, the revised ORNL phantoms of the adult male and adult female are used to determine internal photon exposures to

  19. Fluoroscopically Guided Percutaneous Vertebroplasty: Assessment of Radiation Doses and Implementation of Procedural Routines to Reduce Operator Exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wrangel, A. von; Cederblad, Aa. (Dept. of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden)); Rodriguez-Catarino, M. (Dept. of Radiology, Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Goeteborg (Sweden))

    2009-06-15

    Background: Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) is a fluoroscopically guided procedure for the treatment of painful vertebral compression fractures and metastases. Routine legal personal dosimetry repeatedly showed dosimeter doses exceeding 1 mSv/month for the only radiologist performing PVP at our hospital. Based on the nature of the procedure, this raised concern about potentially high doses to the eyes and fingers. Purpose: To assess radiation doses to the operator, and to evaluate possibilities for dose reduction. Material and Methods: Measurements of scattered radiation in simulated thoracic and lumbar PVP procedures were performed using two anatomical phantoms - thorax and lower trunk - and a radiation survey meter. The standard position of the operator was determined as being 50 cm from the irradiated area of the phantom. The protection ability of lead-free gloves was evaluated during the simulations. Operator doses to fingers and eyes during 10 clinical PVP procedures performed by a single operator were measured, and the annual dose was calculated. Routine personal dosimetry was performed using thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) badges beneath the lead apron, and doses to fingers and eyes were measured with small TLD tablets. Results: During simulations, the measured operator dose rate arising from lateral fluoroscopy at the thorax and lumbar level was reduced by a factor of 4-5 when the X-ray tube was moved from the operator's side of the patient to the opposite side. Wearing protective gloves reduced radiation dose to the hands by 30-40%. The mean doses arising from the 10 clinical PVP procedures to the right and left hands, using protection gloves, were 2.0 mSv and 4.8 mSv, respectively. The mean dose to the eyes was 0.23 mSv. The mean effective dose to the patients was 12 mSv. Conclusion: Placing the X-ray tube on the side of the patient opposite to the operator and the use of radiation protection gloves significantly reduces radiation exposure to the

  20. ISCORS ASSESSMENT OF RADIOACTIVITY IN SEWAGE SLUDGE: MODELING TO ASSESS RADIATION DOSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards (ISCORS) has recently completed a study of the occurrence within the United States of radioactive materials in sewage sludge and sewage incineration ash. One component of that effort was an examination of the possible tran...

  1. DNA damage-related gene expression as biomarkers to assess low dose radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. According to the UNSCEAR, the natural rays from the Sun and the Earth transmit about 2,4 mSv to each individual every year. Human activities expose us to an additional radiation dose (1,2 mSv/year), especially the techniques used in non-invasive medical imaging (radiography, CT scanners). Ionizing radiation can induce a large spectrum of DNA lesions, but under optimal DNA repair conditions, the principal residual lesions of importance are misrepaired doublestrand breaks. Predictive markers of intrinsic radio sensitivity in healthy individuals are needed in monitoring their occupational or environmental radiation exposure and may predict a patient's response to radiotherapy. Radiation protection requires a thorough understanding of low dose ionizing radiation. Currently extrapolation from high doses is necessary to estimate the effects of low doses. Furthermore, it is critically important to have an appreciation of the variation in individual responses to radiation among the human population. Present estimates of the risks from radiation exposure are based largely on the 'average' individual in an exposed population. However, clinical observations of adverse reactions to radiotherapy indicate large variations in individual radio sensitivity. Quantification of risk requires the identification of new parameters taking into account these differences in radiation responses. Therefore, a detailed knowledge of the mechanisms by which radiation induces cancer is essential. It is necessary to understand the various steps involved in the multistage process of radiation-induced tumor genesis and to answer the following specific question: Is there a link between radio sensitivity of individuals (short term) and susceptibility to cancer (late after exposure)? Appearance of mutations consist one of more prominent consequence of the radiation action. The aim of our study consisted in the restriction fragment's length polymorphism (RFLP

  2. Assessment of knowledge and awareness among radiology personnel regarding current computed tomography technology and radiation dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, M. K. A.; Hashim, S.; Bradley, D. A.; Bahruddin, N. A.; Ang, W. C.; Salehhon, N.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the level of knowledge and awareness among 120 radiology personnel working in 7 public hospitals in Johor, Malaysia, concerning Computed Tomography (CT) technology and radiation doses based on a set of questionnaires. Subjects were divided into two groups (Medical profession (Med, n=32) and Allied health profession (AH, n=88). The questionnaires are addressed: (1) demographic data (2) relative radiation dose and (3) knowledge of current CT technology. One-third of respondents from both groups were able to estimate relative radiation dose for routine CT examinations. 68% of the allied health profession personnel knew of the Malaysia regulations entitled ‘Basic Safety Standard (BSS) 2010’, although notably 80% of them had previously attended a radiation protection course. No significant difference (p < 0.05) in mean scores of CT technology knowledge detected between the two groups, with the medical professions producing a mean score of (26.7 ± 2.7) and the allied health professions a mean score of (25.2 ± 4.3). This study points to considerable variation among the respondents concerning their understanding of knowledge and awareness of risks of radiation and CT optimization techniques.

  3. Assessment of knowledge and awareness among radiology personnel regarding current computed tomography technology and radiation dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, M. K. A.; Hashim, S.; Bradley, D. A.; Bahruddin, N. A.; Ang, W. C.; Salehhon, N.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the level of knowledge and awareness among 120 radiology personnel working in 7 public hospitals in Johor, Malaysia, concerning Computed Tomography (CT) technology and radiation doses based on a set of questionnaires. Subjects were divided into two groups (Medical profession (Med, n=32) and Allied health profession (AH, n=88). The questionnaires are addressed: (1) demographic data (2) relative radiation dose and (3) knowledge of current CT technology. One-third of respondents from both groups were able to estimate relative radiation dose for routine CT examinations. 68% of the allied health profession personnel knew of the Malaysia regulations entitled ‘Basic Safety Standard (BSS) 2010’, although notably 80% of them had previously attended a radiation protection course. No significant difference (p technology knowledge detected between the two groups, with the medical professions producing a mean score of (26.7 ± 2.7) and the allied health professions a mean score of (25.2 ± 4.3). This study points to considerable variation among the respondents concerning their understanding of knowledge and awareness of risks of radiation and CT optimization techniques.

  4. Assessment of dose contribution to population exposure from the radiation sources in the alienated Chernobyl zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main dose load of Ukrainian population is caused by radionuclide-contamination of country territories, located outside the alienated zone, following Chernobyl accident. Besides, much attention could be devoted to the contribution of dose load on population, received from the radioactivity sources that were transferred out from the zone after accident. Present research and analysis of the available documents reflecting the transfer of radioactivity from the alienated zone, provided the estimates of dose load on population, resulting from transfer of the radioactivity sources via following channels: (1) direct surface flow; (2) underground waters; (3) wind-powdered route; (4) transfer with hydrobionts; (5) transfer during irrigation; (6) biogenic route; (7) transport routes and (8) route during wood transportation. Dynamics of radiation transfer through each channel was also studied for the post-accident period. Specific gravity of radioactivity transfer is determined in relation to dose load on Ukrainian population in different regions, in particular, in Dnipro river basin. The perspectives of radioactivity transfer via each of studied channels and its role in dose load on population were also analyzed. On the basis of present results the recommendations on possible arrangements are working out that aimed to reduce the dose contribution in population exposure by radioactivity source transfer from the alienated zone via channels that stipulate the largest dose loads and collective doses

  5. Assessing local patients' knowledge and awareness of radiation dose and risks associated with medical imaging: a questionnaire study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the awareness of radiation dose and associated risks caused by radiological procedures among local patients. All subjects were recruited by randomly sampling the patients receiving radiological examinations. These subjects were stratified on age, sex and education. The questionnaire was in Chinese and consisted of 28 questions mostly in multiple choice/true-or-false format, divided into three sections examining demographic data, radiation knowledge/awareness and expectations. A total of 173 questionnaires were returned (83 females and 84 females; mean age of 53). Of these, 32.6% had attended college, 32.6% had completed matriculation and 24.4% secondary school. Most subjects underwent CT (75), MRI (70) and PET-CT (18). Education significantly affected the radiation knowledge (P=0.013). 60.7% and 32.7% were not aware of the radiation-free nature of MRI and USG, respectively. Respectively, 45.4% and 43.5% were of the misconception that Barium enema and Barium swallow studies do not involve radiation. Moreover, 77.6% and 87.9% were aware of the radiation-laden nature of CT and plain X-rays, respectively. Furthermore, 34% and 50%, respectively, think that they are not exposed to radiation at home and on a plane. Regarding the fatal cancer risk from CT, 17.8% chose the correct answer and 62% underestimated the risk. 32.2% correctly estimated the equivalent dose of CT in terms of number of conventional X-rays and 43.2% underestimated the dose. Most (98.2%) were told of the indication, and 42.7% were told the associated radiation dose. Patient radiation awareness is unsatisfactory. There is need to increase patient radiation awareness, and to provide them with the necessary information.

  6. Assessment of internal doses

    CERN Document Server

    Rahola, T; Falk, R; Isaksson, M; Skuterud, L

    2002-01-01

    There is a definite need for training in dose calculation. Our first course was successful and was followed by a second, both courses were fully booked. An example of new tools for software products for bioassay analysis and internal dose assessment is the Integrated Modules for Bioassay Analysis (IMBA) were demonstrated at the second course. This suite of quality assured code modules have been adopted in the UK as the standard for regulatory assessment purposes. The intercomparison measurements are an important part of the Quality Assurance work. In what is known as the sup O utside workers ' directive it is stated that the internal dose measurements shall be included in the European Unions supervision system for radiation protection. The emergency preparedness regarding internal contamination was much improved by the training with and calibration of handheld instruments from participants' laboratories. More improvement will be gained with the handbook giving practical instructions on what to do in case of e...

  7. Radiation transport modeling and assessment to better predict radiation exposure, dose, and toxicological effects to human organs on long duration space flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denkins, Pamela; Badhwar, Gautam; Obot, Victor; Wilson, Bobby; Jejelewo, Olufisayo

    2001-08-01

    NASA is very interested in improving its ability to monitor and forecast the radiation levels that pose a health risk to space-walking astronauts as they construct the International Space Station and astronauts that will participate in long-term and deep-space missions. Human exploratory missions to the moon and Mars within the next quarter century, will expose crews to transient radiation from solar particle events which include high-energy galactic cosmic rays and high-energy protons. Because the radiation levels in space are high and solar activity is presently unpredictable, adequate shielding is needed to minimize the deleterious health effects of exposure to radiation. Today, numerous models have been developed and used to predict radiation exposure. Such a model is the Space Environment Information Systems (SPENVIS) modeling program, developed by the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronautics. SPENVIS, which has been assessed to be an excellent tool in characterizing the radiation environment for microelectronics and investigating orbital debris, is being evaluated for its usefulness with determining the dose and dose-equivalent for human exposure. Thus far, the calculations for dose-depth relations under varying shielding conditions have been in agreement with calculations done using HZETRN and PDOSE, which are well-known and widely used models for characterizing the environments for human exploratory missions. There is disagreement when assessing the impact of secondary radiation particles since SPENVIS does a crude estimation of the secondary radiation particles when calculating LET versus Flux. SPENVIS was used to model dose-depth relations for the blood-forming organs. Radiation sickness and cancer are life-threatening consequences resulting from radiation exposure. In space, exposure to radiation generally includes all of the critical organs. Biological and toxicological impacts have been included for discussion along with alternative risk mitigation

  8. Radiation transport modeling and assessment to better predict radiation exposure, dose, and toxicological effects to human organs on long duration space flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denkins, P.; Badhwar, G.; Obot, V.; Wilson, B.; Jejelewo, O.

    2001-01-01

    NASA is very interested in improving its ability to monitor and forecast the radiation levels that pose a health risk to space-walking astronauts as they construct the International Space Station and astronauts that will participate in long-term and deep-space missions. Human exploratory missions to the moon and Mars within the next quarter century, will expose crews to transient radiation from solar particle events which include high-energy galactic cosmic rays and high-energy protons. Because the radiation levels in space are high and solar activity is presently unpredictable, adequate shielding is needed to minimize the deleterious health effects of exposure to radiation. Today, numerous models have been developed and used to predict radiation exposure. Such a model is the Space Environment Information Systems (SPENVIS) modeling program, developed by the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronautics. SPENVIS, which has been assessed to be an excellent tool in characterizing the radiation environment for microelectronics and investigating orbital debris, is being evaluated for its usefulness with determining the dose and dose-equivalent for human exposure. Thus far. the calculations for dose-depth relations under varying shielding conditions have been in agreement with calculations done using HZETRN and PDOSE, which are well-known and widely used models for characterizing the environments for human exploratory missions. There is disagreement when assessing the impact of secondary radiation particles since SPENVIS does a crude estimation of the secondary radiation particles when calculating LET versus Flux. SPENVIS was used to model dose-depth relations for the blood-forming organs. Radiation sickness and cancer are life-threatening consequences resulting from radiation exposure. In space. exposure to radiation generally includes all of the critical organs. Biological and toxicological impacts have been included for discussion along with alternative risk mitigation

  9. Prenatal radiation exposure. Dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The unborn child requires special protection. In this context, the indication for an X-ray examination is to be checked critically. If thereupon radiation of the lower abdomen including the uterus cannot be avoided, the examination should be postponed until the end of pregnancy or alternative examination techniques should be considered. Under certain circumstances, either accidental or in unavoidable cases after a thorough risk assessment, radiation exposure of the unborn may take place. In some of these cases an expert radiation hygiene consultation may be required. This consultation should comprise the expected risks for the unborn while not perturbing the mother or the involved medical staff. For the risk assessment in case of an in-utero X-ray exposition deterministic damages with a defined threshold dose are distinguished from stochastic damages without a definable threshold dose. The occurrence of deterministic damages depends on the dose and the developmental stage of the unborn at the time of radiation. To calculate the risks of an in-utero radiation exposure a three-stage concept is commonly applied. Depending on the amount of radiation, the radiation dose is either estimated, roughly calculated using standard tables or, in critical cases, accurately calculated based on the individual event. The complexity of the calculation thereby increases from stage to stage. An estimation based on stage one is easily feasible whereas calculations based on stages two and especially three are more complex and often necessitate execution by specialists. This article demonstrates in detail the risks for the unborn child pertaining to its developmental phase and explains the three-stage concept as an evaluation scheme. It should be noted, that all risk estimations are subject to considerable uncertainties.

  10. ASSESSMENT OF UNCERTAINTY IN THE RADIATION DOSES FOR THE TECHA RIVER DOSIMETRY SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, Bruce A.; Degteva, M. O.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Shagina, N. B.

    2009-10-23

    In order to provide more accurate and precise estimates of individual dose (and thus more precise estimates of radiation risk) for the members of the ETRC, a new dosimetric calculation system, the Techa River Dosimetry System-2009 (TRDS-2009) has been prepared. The deterministic version of the improved dosimetry system TRDS-2009D was basically completed in April 2009. Recent developments in evaluation of dose-response models in light of uncertain dose have highlighted the importance of different types of uncertainties in the development of individual dose estimates. These include uncertain parameters that may be either shared or unshared within the dosimetric cohort, and also the nature of the type of uncertainty as aleatory or epistemic and either classical or Berkson. This report identifies the nature of the various input parameters and calculational methods incorporated in the Techa River Dosimetry System (based on the TRDS-2009D implementation), with the intention of preparing a stochastic version to estimate the uncertainties in the dose estimates. This report reviews the equations, databases, and input parameters, and then identifies the author’s interpretations of their general nature. It presents the approach selected so that the stochastic, Monte-Carlo, implementation of the dosimetry System - TRDS-2009MC - will provide useful information regarding the uncertainties of the doses.

  11. Influence of radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm in MDCT assessment of airway wall thickness: A phantom study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Wall thickness (WT) is an airway feature of great interest for the assessment of morphological changes in the lung parenchyma. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has recently been used to evaluate airway WT, but the potential risk of radiation-induced carcinogenesis—particularly in younger patients—might limit a wider use of this imaging method in clinical practice. The recent commercial implementation of the statistical model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm, instead of the conventional filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm, has enabled considerable radiation dose reduction in many other clinical applications of MDCT. The purpose of this work was to study the impact of radiation dose and MBIR in the MDCT assessment of airway WT. Methods: An airway phantom was scanned using a clinical MDCT system (Discovery CT750 HD, GE Healthcare) at 4 kV levels and 5 mAs levels. Both FBP and a commercial implementation of MBIR (VeoTM, GE Healthcare) were used to reconstruct CT images of the airways. For each kV–mAs combination and each reconstruction algorithm, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the airways was measured, and the WT of each airway was measured and compared with the nominal value; the relative bias and the angular standard deviation in the measured WT were calculated. For each airway and reconstruction algorithm, the overall performance of WT quantification across all of the 20 kV–mAs combinations was quantified by the sum of squares (SSQs) of the difference between the measured and nominal WT values. Finally, the particular kV–mAs combination and reconstruction algorithm that minimized radiation dose while still achieving a reference WT quantification accuracy level was chosen as the optimal acquisition and reconstruction settings. Results: The wall thicknesses of seven airways of different sizes were analyzed in the study. Compared with FBP, MBIR improved the CNR of the airways, particularly at low radiation dose

  12. Influence of radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm in MDCT assessment of airway wall thickness: A phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Cardona, Daniel [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Nagle, Scott K. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong, E-mail: gchen7@wisc.edu [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, 600 Highland Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Robinson, Terry E. [Department of Pediatrics, Stanford School of Medicine, 770 Welch Road, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Wall thickness (WT) is an airway feature of great interest for the assessment of morphological changes in the lung parenchyma. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has recently been used to evaluate airway WT, but the potential risk of radiation-induced carcinogenesis—particularly in younger patients—might limit a wider use of this imaging method in clinical practice. The recent commercial implementation of the statistical model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithm, instead of the conventional filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm, has enabled considerable radiation dose reduction in many other clinical applications of MDCT. The purpose of this work was to study the impact of radiation dose and MBIR in the MDCT assessment of airway WT. Methods: An airway phantom was scanned using a clinical MDCT system (Discovery CT750 HD, GE Healthcare) at 4 kV levels and 5 mAs levels. Both FBP and a commercial implementation of MBIR (Veo{sup TM}, GE Healthcare) were used to reconstruct CT images of the airways. For each kV–mAs combination and each reconstruction algorithm, the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the airways was measured, and the WT of each airway was measured and compared with the nominal value; the relative bias and the angular standard deviation in the measured WT were calculated. For each airway and reconstruction algorithm, the overall performance of WT quantification across all of the 20 kV–mAs combinations was quantified by the sum of squares (SSQs) of the difference between the measured and nominal WT values. Finally, the particular kV–mAs combination and reconstruction algorithm that minimized radiation dose while still achieving a reference WT quantification accuracy level was chosen as the optimal acquisition and reconstruction settings. Results: The wall thicknesses of seven airways of different sizes were analyzed in the study. Compared with FBP, MBIR improved the CNR of the airways, particularly at low radiation dose

  13. Introduction to the Australian study of low dose radiation assessing the effects of CT scans in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This project is assessing the effects of low dose radiation in a cohort of young Australians exposed to CT scans and other forms of medical irradiation. De-identified records of Medicare funded services (including CT scans, other radiological and nuclear medicine procedures) allow dose estimates for diagnostic medical radiation for I 1.4 million individuals aged 0-19 years in the period 1985-2005. For example, the data set details 907,905 CT services for 662,479 persons, and over 24 million other radiological and nuclear medicine services. Medical physicists are determining a dose matrix for organ dose and effective dose based on age of individual at scan, year of scan, gender and type of scan. The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) has made probability-based linkages between the cohort and the national records of cancer registrations and deaths; these outcomes are being linked to the exposure records and to the estimated radiation doses for all individuals in the cohort. Epidemiological models will be fitted to estimate effects on cancer incidence due to age, gender and length of follow-up, as well as any effects due to radiation exposures and dose, age at exposure, and confounding variables such as socioeconomic status. Australia is in a unique position with well documented records of medical irradiation funded through the universal Medicare system. Data integration for the cohort of young Australians exposed from 1985 to 2005 is virtually complete. The most challenging future task is to implement the best methodologies for calculation of individual doses.

  14. Assessment of terrestrial gamma radiation doses for some Egyptian granite samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    External exposures of population to ionising radiation due to naturally occurring radionuclides in sixty-three granite samples from three different locations in south eastern desert of Egypt were considered in this article. Average outdoor gamma dose rates in air were 190, 290 and 330 nGy h-1 for Elba, Qash Amir and Hamra Dome granites, respectively. The corresponding doses in indoor air are 270, 400 and 470 nGy h-1, respectively. These average values give rise to annual effective dose (outdoor, indoor and in total) 0.24, 1.4 and 1.6 mSv for Elba granite. For Qash Amir and Hamra Dome granites the corresponding values were 0.35, 2 and 2.3 mSv and 0.41, 2.3 and 2.7 mSv, respectively. (authors)

  15. Assessment of potential radiation dose rates to marine organisms around the Korean Peninsula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Myung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun Ho [University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    It is very difficult to set a regulatory guidance or criteria for the protection of non-human species from the ionizing radiation, because there are no generally or internationally accepted methods for demonstrating the compliance with such criteria. It is needed that Korea develop the primary dose rate standards for the protection of both aquatic and terrestrial biota in the near future. The potential dose rates due to both external and internal radiation exposures to marine organisms such as plaice/flounder, gray mullet, and brown seaweed collected within territorial seas around the Korean Peninsula were estimated. The total dose rates to plaice/flounder, gray mullet and brown seaweed due to {sup 40}K, a primordial radionuclide in marine environment, were found to be 0.2%, 0.08% and 0.3% of approximately the values of the Derived Consideration Reference Levels (DCRLs, i.e. 1-10 mGy d{sup -1}), respectively, as suggested by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) publication 124. The total dose rates to marine fishes and brown seaweed due to anthropogenic radionuclides such as {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 239+240}Pu were considered to be negligible compared to the total dose rate due to {sup 40}K. The external exposure to benthic fish due to all radionuclides was much higher than that of pelagic fish. From this study, it is recommended that the further study is required to develop a national regulatory guidance for the evaluation of doses to non-human species.

  16. Assessment of medical staff radiation doses received in some interventional examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to suggest a simple method for the estimation of cardiologist extremity doses. The extremity and effective doses The extremity and effective doses of nine cardiologists working at five different angiographic units were measured for 157 interventional examinations. Simultaneous measurement of patient doses were also carried out using a DAP meter separately for each projection. Fluoroscopy time (Tfl), number of radiographic frames (N) were recorded on-line during these measurements. A Rando phantom was exposed at similar projections with patient studies and one minute of fluoroscopic exposure (D150nTfln) and one frame of radiographic exposure (D150nNn) were determined for each projection. Scatter radiations from these exposures were also measured at 50, 100 and 150 cm above the floor level at the cardiologist positions for the estimation of legs, wrists and thyroid (or eye) doses. Weighting of projections were determined for the patient group of each cardiologist using the recorded values of Tfl and Nrf. Extremity doses, Dx were calculated with the following formula: D150=ΣnD150nTfln(Tfln)+ΣnD150nNn(Nn), n=4, 5, 6, 7, 10. n gives the projection numbert and x is the distance from the floor level. Measured and calculated extremity doses for each cardiologist were in good agreement. The calculated doses for 50cm and 100cm were found within the measured values of left and right legs and wrists. The use of dominant projection data alone still provided comparable results

  17. Geosciences help to protect human health: estimation of the adsorbed radiation doses while flight journeys, as important step to radiation risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernov, Anatolii; Shabatura, Olexandr

    2016-04-01

    Estimation of the adsorbed radiation dose while flight journeys is a complex problem, which should be solved to get correct evaluation of equivalent effective doses and radiation risk assessment. Direct measurements of the adsorbed dose in the aircrafts during regional flights (3-10 hours) has shown that the radiation in the plane may increase 10-15 times (to 2-4 mSv/h) compared to the values on the surface of the Earth (0.2-0.5 mSv/h). Results of instrumental research confirmed by the other investigations. It is a fact that adsorbed doses per year while flight journeys are less than doses from medical tests. However, while flight journeys passengers get the same doses as nuclear power plant staff, people in zones of natural radiation anomalies and so should be evaluated. According to the authors' research, flight journeys are safe enough, when solar activity is normal and if we fly under altitude of 18 km (as usual, while intercontinental flights). Most of people travel by plane not so often, but if flight is lasting in dangerous periods of solar activity (powerful solar winds and magnetic field storms), passengers and flight crew can adsorb great amount of radiation doses. People, who spend more than 500 hours in flight journeys (pilots, business oriented persons', government representatives, etc.) get amount of radiation, which can negatively influence on health and provoke diseases, such as cancer. Authors consider that problem actual and researches are still going on. It is revealed, that radiation can be calculated, using special equations. Great part of radiation depends on very variable outer-space component and less variable solar. Accurate calculations of doses will be possible, when we will take into account all features of radiation distribution (time, season of year and exact time of the day, duration of flight), technical features of aircraft and logistics of flight (altitude, latitude). Results of first attempts of radiation doses modelling confirmed

  18. Evaluation of doses from radiodiagnostic procedures performed in veterinary medicine and assessing of the doses of secondary radiation in the medical staff and animal owners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary goal in veterinary radiography is to produce radiographs of diagnostic quality on the first attempt. This goal serves three purposes: (1) to decrease radiation exposure to the patient and veterinary personnel; (2) to decrease the cost of the study for the client; and (3) to produce diagnostic data for rapid interpretation and treatment of the patient. This work aimed to determine the doses in dogs submitted to chest and abdomen X rays using the technique of thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetry. The radiation doses were assessed using thermoluminescent dosimeters of calcium sulphate doped with dysprosium (CaSO4:Dy) and lithium fluoride doped with magnesium and titanium (LiF:Mg,Ti). The obtained results indicate that is extremely important the assessment of radiation doses involved in veterinary diagnostic radiology procedures, to evaluate the delivered doses to the animals, to be used as a parameter in the individual monitoring of pet's owners, who assist the animal positioning, and to protect occupationally exposed workers at the Veterinary Radiology Clinics. (author)

  19. Assessment of natural radionuclide levels in Pakistan foodstuffs and associated radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A comprehensive study has been carried out for the assessment of the contents of natural radionuclides (40K, 238U, 226Ra, 228Ra, 232Th, and 210Pb) and related radiation doses in Pakistani food items (fruits, seasonal vegetables, beef, mutton, poultry meat and eggs) and drinks samples (milk, tap water and soft drinks) using high resolution gamma spectrometry. For detection analysis and data acquisition a high purity germanium (HPGe) detector was used. All the food items and drink samples showed detectable 40K activity, however, most of the other natural radionuclides in solid food were found to have contents below the minimum detectable activity (MDA). The range of 40K activity was found to be 9.2 to 110.5 Bq kg-1 for solid food and drink samples. The cumulative average value of 226Ra activity was found to be 1.2 Bq kg-1 in all the leafy/seasonal vegetables and fruit samples including turnip, potatoes, tomatoes, onion, brinjal, spinach, cauliflower, pumpkin, carrot, radish, cabbage, peas, cucumber, ladyfinger, beat, pepper, apple, banana, melon, mango etc. and 0.35 Bq kg-1 in beef, mutton, poultry meat and egg samples. In all water based drink samples the measured values of the mean activity of 238U, 226Ra, 228Ra, 232Th, and 210Pb were 0.22, 0.015, 0.026, 0.018 and 0.19 Bq kg-1 respectively. The annual effective dose due to the ingestion of these radionuclides was estimated to be 0.5 mSvy-1 from solid food and 0.3 mSvy-1 from drinks. These values are quite below than the upper limit of 1 mSv as specified by ICRP recommendations. The contribution from these radionuclides does not pose any significant radiological health problem to the general public. This study also provides baseline values and general background of the natural gamma emitting radionuclides in Pakistani foodstuffs. (author)

  20. GEOPHYSICS, ASTRONOMY, AND ASTROPHYSICS: Assessment of Primordial Radionuclides in Pakistani Red Bricks and Associated Radiation Doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, K.; Jabbar, A.; Akhter, P.; Tufail, M.; Khan M., H.

    2010-03-01

    Specific activity of primordial radionuclides and associated radiation hazards due to 40K, 226Ra, and 232Th have been measured in backed red brick samples, collected from five highly populated areas of the North West Frontier Province of Pakistan. For the detection, analysis and data acquisition, a high purity germanium detector was used. Associated external doses were calculated using a Monte Carlo neutron photon transport code. A theoretical model to determine the gamma dose rate at 1 m height from the floor, made of bricks, was employed for the calculation of mass attenuation coefficient and self-absorption in the floor for the gamma energies of these radionuclides and their progeny. Monte Carlo simulation shows that in this study the floor, having more than an effective thickness of 15 cm, contributes very little to the external gamma dose rate. The values of the external dose rate and annual effective dose are found to be much lower than the world average as well as from other countries of the world.

  1. The assessment of the natural radiation dose committed to the Hong Kong people

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural radionuclide (238U, 226Ra, 232Th and 40K) contents of soil samples at various locations in Hong Kong, building materials commonly used in Hong Kong and construction materials for roads have been determined by low background gamma-ray spectroscopy using an n-type high purity germanium detector. From the measured radionuclide contents, estimations have been made of the absorbed gamma dose rate in air and the indoor radon concentration in Hong Kong. Both are in good agreement with in-situ measurements. Finally, calculations have been made of the annual individual effective dose equivalent contributed by all kinds of natural background radiations. The total value is 3.2 mSv which is about 60% higher than the global average. Of this total value, 80% comes from the radiation from building materials. The present work suggests that building materials are the primary source of natural background radiation in Hong Kong. Therefore, more extensive studies and perhaps limitation of the radionuclide concentration of building materials in the near future seems necessary. (author)

  2. Evaluation of the Comet Assay for Assessing the Dose-Response Relationship of DNA Damage Induced by Ionizing Radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang Liu; Bing Wang; Takanori Katsube; Sai Jun Fan; Fei-Yue Fan; Hui Zhao; Xu Su; Jian Xiang Liu; Jia Cao; Li Qing Du; Chang Xu; Yan Wang

    2013-01-01

    Dose- and time-response curves were combined to assess the potential of the comet assay in radiation biodosimetry. The neutral comet assay was used to detect DNA double-strand breaks in lymphocytes caused by γ-ray irradiation. A clear dose-response relationship with DNA double-strand breaks using the comet assay was found at different times after irradiation (p < 0.001). A time-response relationship was also found within 72 h after irradiation (p < 0.001). The curves for DNA double-strand bre...

  3. Assessment of temporal trend of radiation dose to the public living in the large area contaminated with radioactive materials after a nuclear power plant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Go, A Ra; Kim, Min Jun; Kim, Kwang Pyo [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nam Chan; Seol, Jeung Gun [Radiation Safety Team, Korea Electric Power Corporation Nuclear Fuel, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    It has been about 5 years since the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident, which contaminated large area with radioactive materials. It is necessary to assess radiation dose to establish evacuation areas and to set decontamination goal for the large contaminated area. In this study, we assessed temporal trend of radiation dose to the public living in the large area contaminated with radioactive materials after the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident. The dose assessment was performed based on Chernobyl model and RESRAD model for two evacuation lift areas, Kawauchi and Naraha. It was reported that deposition densities in the areas were 4.3-96 kBq m{sup -2} for {sup 134}Cs, 1.4-300 kBq m{sup -2} for {sup 137}Cs, respectively. Radiation dose to the residents depended on radioactive cesium concentrations in the soil, ranging 0.11-2.4 mSv y{sup -1} at Kawauchi area and 0.69-1.1 mSv y{sup -1} at Naraha area in July 2014. The difference was less than 5% in radiation doses estimated by two different models. Radiation dose decreased with calendar time and the decreasing slope varied depending on dose assessment models. Based on the Chernobyl dosimetry model, radiation doses decreased with calendar time to about 65% level of the radiation dose in 2014 after 1 year, 11% level after 10 years, and 5.6% level after 30 years. RESRAD dosimetry model more slowly decreased radiation dose with time to about 85% level after 1 year, 40% level after 10 years, and 15% level after 30 years. The decrease of radiation dose can be mainly attributed into radioactive decays and environmental transport of the radioactive cesium. Only environmental transports of radioactive cesium without consideration of radioactive decays decreased radiation dose additionally 43% after 1 year, 72% after 3 years, 80% after 10 years, and 83% after 30 years. Radiation doses estimated with cesium concentration in the soil based on Chernobyl dosimetry model were compared with directly measured radiation doses

  4. Low-cost teleoperator-controlled vehicle for damage assessment and radiation dose measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low-cost, disposable, radio-controlled, remote-reading, ionizing radiation and surveillance teleoperator re-entry vehicle has been built. The vehicle carries equipment, measures radiation levels, and evaluates building conditions. The basic vehicle, radio control with amplifiers, telemetry, elevator, and video camera with monitor cost less than $2500. Velcro-mounted alpha, beta-gamma, and neutron sensing equipment is used in the present system. Many types of health physics radiation measuring equipment may be substituted on the vehicle. The system includes a black-and-white video camera to observe the environment surrounding the vehicle. The camera is mounted on a vertical elevator extendible to 11 feet above the floor. The present vehicle uses a video camera with an umbilical cord between the vehicle and the operators. Preferred operation would eliminate the umbilical. Video monitoring equipment is part of the operator control system. Power for the vehicle equipment is carried on board and supplied by sealed lead-acid batteries. Radios are powered by 9-V alkaline batteries. The radio control receiver, servo drivers, high-power amplifier and 49-MHz FM transceivers were irradiated at moderate rates with neutron and gamma doses to 3000 Rem and 300 Rem, respectively, to ensure system operation

  5. Evaluation of the Comet Assay for Assessing the Dose-Response Relationship of DNA Damage Induced by Ionizing Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Liu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Dose- and time-response curves were combined to assess the potential of the comet assay in radiation biodosimetry. The neutral comet assay was used to detect DNA double-strand breaks in lymphocytes caused by γ-ray irradiation. A clear dose-response relationship with DNA double-strand breaks using the comet assay was found at different times after irradiation (p < 0.001. A time-response relationship was also found within 72 h after irradiation (p < 0.001. The curves for DNA double-strand breaks and DNA repair in vitro of human lymphocytes presented a nice model, and a smooth, three-dimensional plane model was obtained when the two curves were combined.

  6. Occupational exposure assessment and radiation dose estimation of vegetable-plant farmers to 222Rn in greenhouses of Shouguang county, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims to: assess exposure levels of radon and explore seasonal variations of radon concentrations in greenhouses in Shouguang county. Estimate annual radon radiation dose level for vegetable-plant farmers working in greenhouses. During detection period, the annual mean radon concentration was approximately 286 Bq m-3. The annual radon radiation dose of farmers is 3.3 mSv a-1. Both obvious seasonal variations in average radon concentrations and radon radiation dose in greenhouses are observed. Both levels are much higher in winter and spring than in summer and autumn. (author)

  7. Radiation dose-rate resistivity degradation in ceramic insulators and assessment of the consequences in fusion reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under neutron and/or gamma absorbed dose-rates typical of fusion reactor conditions, common ceramic insulators such as Al2O3, MgO, MgAl2O3, etc., exhibit a significant instantaneous decrease in their dc resistivity. Ceramic insulators in lightly shielded normal-conducting magnets, direct convertors and first wall applications are shown to be the most affected. Depending on conductor design, magnet location, absorbed dose-rate and applied voltages, it is demonstrated that the resulting leakage currents in the ceramic material are potentially capable of producing significant Joule heating rates which may lead to thermal runaway and subsequent insulator destruction. The theoretical background for this effect is presented and the rather sparse experimental data base reviewed. Recommendations are given for computing worst case radiation-induced conductivity increases as a function of absorbed dose rate. The possible ameliorating influences of long term fluence damage are then discussed. The practical consequences of ceramic resistivity degradation are quantitatively assessed by consideration of resulting leakage current Joule heating in the extruded conductor of a typical normal-conducting magnet. Relationships are derived to compute dose-rate-dependent leakage currents and Joule heating rates as a function of several magnet parameters

  8. Assessment of ocular beta radiation dose distribution due to 106Ru/106Rh brachytherapy applicators using MCNPX Monte Carlo code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilseia Aparecida Barbosa

    2014-08-01

    heterogeneous eye model, indicating that the homogeneous water eye model is a reasonable one. The determined isodose curves give a good visualization of dose distributions inside the eye structures, pointing out their most exposed volume....................................................Cite this article as:Barbosa NA, da Rosa LAR, de Menezes AF, Reis JP, Facure A, Braz D. Assessment of ocular beta radiation dose distribution due to 106Ru/106Rh brachytherapy applicators using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(3:02038. DOI: 10.14319/ijcto.0203.8

  9. Assessment of uncertainties in radiation-induced cancer risk predictions at clinically relevant doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Department of Physics, Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg 69117 (Germany); Moteabbed, M.; Paganetti, H., E-mail: hpaganetti@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Theoretical dose–response models offer the possibility to assess second cancer induction risks after external beam therapy. The parameters used in these models are determined with limited data from epidemiological studies. Risk estimations are thus associated with considerable uncertainties. This study aims at illustrating uncertainties when predicting the risk for organ-specific second cancers in the primary radiation field illustrated by choosing selected treatment plans for brain cancer patients. Methods: A widely used risk model was considered in this study. The uncertainties of the model parameters were estimated with reported data of second cancer incidences for various organs. Standard error propagation was then subsequently applied to assess the uncertainty in the risk model. Next, second cancer risks of five pediatric patients treated for cancer in the head and neck regions were calculated. For each case, treatment plans for proton and photon therapy were designed to estimate the uncertainties (a) in the lifetime attributable risk (LAR) for a given treatment modality and (b) when comparing risks of two different treatment modalities. Results: Uncertainties in excess of 100% of the risk were found for almost all organs considered. When applied to treatment plans, the calculated LAR values have uncertainties of the same magnitude. A comparison between cancer risks of different treatment modalities, however, does allow statistically significant conclusions. In the studied cases, the patient averaged LAR ratio of proton and photon treatments was 0.35, 0.56, and 0.59 for brain carcinoma, brain sarcoma, and bone sarcoma, respectively. Their corresponding uncertainties were estimated to be potentially below 5%, depending on uncertainties in dosimetry. Conclusions: The uncertainty in the dose–response curve in cancer risk models makes it currently impractical to predict the risk for an individual external beam treatment. On the other hand, the ratio

  10. Comparison of two methods for assessing leakage radiation dose around the head of the medical linear accelerators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ehab M Attalla

    2013-01-01

    Objective:The aim of this study was to measure the leakage by two methods with ion chamber and ready packs film, and to investigate the feasibility and the advantages of using two dosimetry methods for assessing leakage radiation around the head of the linear accelerators. Methods:Measurements were performed using a 30 cm3 ion chamber;the gantry at 0°, the X-ray head at 0°, the field size at between the central axis and a plane surface at a FSD of 100 as a reference, a series of concentric circles having radi of 50, 75, and 100 cm with their common centre at the reference point. The absorbed dose was measured at the reference point, and this would be used as the reference dose. With the diaphragm closed, the measurements were taken along the circumference of the three circles and at 45° intervals. Results:Leakage radiations while the treatment head was in the vertical position varied between 0.016%–0.04%. With the head lying horizontal y, leak-age radiation was the same order magnitude and varied between 0.02%–0.07%. In the second method, the verification was accomplished by closing the col imator jaws and covering the head of the treatment unit with the ready pack films. The films were marked to permit the determination of their positions on the machine after exposed and processed. With the diaphragm closed, and the ready packs films around the linear accelerator the beam turned on for 2500 cGy (2500 MU). The optical den-sity of these films was measured and compared with this of the reference dose. Leakage radiation varied according to the film positions and the magnitude of leakage was between 0.005%–0.075%. Conclusion:The dif erences between the values of the leakage radiation levels observed at dif erent measurement points do not only reflect dif erences in the ef ective shielding thickness of the head wal , but are also related to dif erences in the distances between the target and the measurement points. The experimental errors involved in dosimetric

  11. Effective dose: a radiation protection quantity

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Modern radiation protection is based on the principles of justification, limitation, and optimisation. Assessment of radiation risks for individuals or groups of individuals is, however, not a primary objective of radiological protection. The implementation of the principles of limitation and optimisation requires an appropriate quantification of radiation exposure. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has introduced effective dose as the principal radiological protection quantity to be used for setting and controlling dose limits for stochastic effects in the regulatory context, and for the practical implementation of the optimisation principle. Effective dose is the tissue weighted sum of radiation weighted organ and tissue doses of a reference person from exposure to external irradiations and internal emitters. The specific normalised values of tissue weighting factors are defined by ICRP for individual tissues, and used as an approximate age- and sex-averaged representation of th...

  12. Enjebi Island dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have updeated the radiological dose assessment for Enjebi Island at Enewetak Atoll using data derived from analysis of food crops grown on Enjebi. This is a much more precise assessment of potential doses to people resettling Enjebi Island than the 1980 assessment in which there were no data available from food crops on Enjebi. Details of the methods and data used to evaluate each exposure pathway are presented. The terrestrial food chain is the most significant potential exposure pathway and 137Cs is the radionuclide responsible for most of the estimated dose over the next 50 y. The doses are calculated assuming a resettlement date of 1990. The average wholebody maximum annual estimated dose equivalent derived using our diet model is 166 mremy;the effective dose equivalent is 169 mremy. The estimated 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral whole-body dose equivalents are 3.5 rem, 5.1 rem, and 6.2 rem, respectively. Bone-marrow dose equivalents are only slightly higher than the whole-body estimates in each case. The bone-surface cells (endosteal cells) receive the highest dose, but they are a less sensitive cell population and are less sensitive to fatal cancer induction than whole body and bone marrow. The effective dose equivalents for 30, 50, and 70 y are 3.6 rem, 5.3 rem, and 6.6 rem, respectively. 79 refs., 17 figs., 24 tabs

  13. Radiation dose estimates for radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stabin, M.G.; Stubbs, J.B.; Toohey, R.E. [Oak Ridge Inst. of Science and Education, TN (United States). Radiation Internal Dose Information Center

    1996-04-01

    Tables of radiation dose estimates based on the Cristy-Eckerman adult male phantom are provided for a number of radiopharmaceuticals commonly used in nuclear medicine. Radiation dose estimates are listed for all major source organs, and several other organs of interest. The dose estimates were calculated using the MIRD Technique as implemented in the MIRDOSE3 computer code, developed by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Radiation Internal Dose Information Center. In this code, residence times for source organs are used with decay data from the MIRD Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes to produce estimates of radiation dose to organs of standardized phantoms representing individuals of different ages. The adult male phantom of the Cristy-Eckerman phantom series is different from the MIRD 5, or Reference Man phantom in several aspects, the most important of which is the difference in the masses and absorbed fractions for the active (red) marrow. The absorbed fractions for flow energy photons striking the marrow are also different. Other minor differences exist, but are not likely to significantly affect dose estimates calculated with the two phantoms. Assumptions which support each of the dose estimates appears at the bottom of the table of estimates for a given radiopharmaceutical. In most cases, the model kinetics or organ residence times are explicitly given. The results presented here can easily be extended to include other radiopharmaceuticals or phantoms.

  14. Is the Linear No-Threshold Dose-Response Paradigm Still Necessary for the Assessment of Health Effects of Low Dose Radiation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Ki Moon; Seo, Songwon; Lee, Dalnim; Kim, Min-Jeong; Lee, Seung-Sook; Park, Sunhoo; Jin, Young Woo

    2016-02-01

    Inevitable human exposure to ionizing radiation from man-made sources has been increased with the proceeding of human civilization and consequently public concerns focus on the possible risk to human health. Moreover, Fukushima nuclear power plant accidents after the 2011 East-Japan earthquake and tsunami has brought the great fear and anxiety for the exposure of radiation at low levels, even much lower levels similar to natural background. Health effects of low dose radiation less than 100 mSv have been debated whether they are beneficial or detrimental because sample sizes were not large enough to allow epidemiological detection of excess effects and there was lack of consistency among the available experimental data. We have reviewed an extensive literature on the low dose radiation effects in both radiation biology and epidemiology, and highlighted some of the controversies therein. This article could provide a reasonable view of utilizing radiation for human life and responding to the public questions about radiation risk. In addition, it suggests the necessity of integrated studies of radiobiology and epidemiology at the national level in order to collect more systematic and profound information about health effects of low dose radiation. PMID:26908982

  15. Sodium in man and the assessment of radiation dose after criticality accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent observations of human sodium content, using isotope dilution methods and neutron activation analysis, suggest that ICRP Reference Man is a misleading guide, and show that reasonable predictions of body sodium content can be made from body weight, height and age, or weight alone. Mean sodium in average man is about 1.04 g per kg and in average woman about 0.98 g per kg in British and N. American populations. Within each sex, mean tissue concentration is inversely related to body weight. Review of dosimetry for the criticality accident at Y-12 Oak Ridge shows dose estimates should be increased by about 10% because whole blood, not plasma values of 24Na were relied on. Taking account of body build reduces the range of dose amongst the four most heavily irradiated subjects. Absorbed doses reported for subjects exposed at the criticality accident at Vinca, Yugoslavia, need to be increased by about 30%, because of gross over-estimates of body sodium content. The more severe clinical picture at Vinca is now more easily understood in terms of dose differences. Other uncertainties in dosimetry at Y-12 and Vinca are unaltered. (U.K.)

  16. Assessment of Fukushima-Derived Radiation Doses and Effects on Wildlife in Japan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strand, P.; Aono, T.; Brown, J.E.; Garnier-Laplace, J.; Hosseini, A.; Sazykina, T.; Steenhuisen, F.; Vives i Battle, J.

    2014-01-01

    Following releases from the nuclear accident at the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS), contention has arisen over the potential radiological impact on wildlife. Under the auspices of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, a suite of recently develop

  17. Dose assessment by quantification of chromosome aberrations and micronuclei in peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients exposed to gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva-Barbosa, Isvania; Pereira-MagnataI, Simey; Amaral, Ademir [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear. Grupo de Estudos em Radioprotecao e Radioecologia - GERAR; Sotero, Graca [Fundacao de Hematologia e Hemoterapia, Recife, PE (Brazil); Melo, Homero Cavalcanti [Hospital do Cancer, Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Radioterapia de Pernambuco]. E-mail: isvania@uol.com.br

    2005-07-15

    Scoring of unstable chromosome aberrations (dicentrics, rings and fragments) and micronuclei in circulating lymphocytes are the most extensively studied biological means for estimating individual exposure to ionizing radiation (IR), which can be used as complementary methods to physical dosimetry or when the latter cannot be performed. In this work, the quantification of the frequencies of chromosome aberrations and micronuclei were carried out based on cytogenetic analyses of peripheral blood samples from 5 patients with cervical uterine cancer following radiotherapy in order to evaluate the absorbed dose as a result of partial-body exposure to 60Co source. Blood samples were collected from each patient in three phases of the treatment: before irradiation, 24 h after receiving 0.08 Gy and 1.8 Gy, respectively. The results presented in this report emphasize biological dosimetry, employing the quantification of chromosome aberrations and micronuclei in lymphocytes from peripheral blood, as an important methodology of dose assessment for either whole or partial-body exposure to IR.

  18. Radiation dose response of normal lung assessed by Cone Beam CT - a potential tool for biologically adaptive radiation therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Anders; Schytte, Tine; Bentzen, Søren M;

    2011-01-01

    Density changes of healthy lung tissue during radiotherapy as observed by Cone Beam CT (CBCT) might be an early indicator of patient specific lung toxicity. This study investigates the time course of CBCT density changes and tests for a possible correlation with locally delivered dose....

  19. Atmospheric radiation flight dose rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. K.

    2015-12-01

    Space weather's effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun's photons, particles, and fields. Of the domains that are affected by space weather, the coupling between the solar and galactic high-energy particles, the magnetosphere, and atmospheric regions can significantly affect humans and our technology as a result of radiation exposure. Space Environment Technologies (SET) has been conducting space weather observations of the atmospheric radiation environment at aviation altitudes that will eventually be transitioned into air traffic management operations. The Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) system and Upper-atmospheric Space and Earth Weather eXperiment (USEWX) both are providing dose rate measurements. Both activities are under the ARMAS goal of providing the "weather" of the radiation environment to improve aircraft crew and passenger safety. Over 5-dozen ARMAS and USEWX flights have successfully demonstrated the operation of a micro dosimeter on commercial aviation altitude aircraft that captures the real-time radiation environment resulting from Galactic Cosmic Rays and Solar Energetic Particles. The real-time radiation exposure is computed as an effective dose rate (body-averaged over the radiative-sensitive organs and tissues in units of microsieverts per hour); total ionizing dose is captured on the aircraft, downlinked in real-time, processed on the ground into effective dose rates, compared with NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) most recent Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation System (NAIRAS) global radiation climatology model runs, and then made available to end users via the web and smart phone apps. Flight altitudes now exceed 60,000 ft. and extend above commercial aviation altitudes into the stratosphere. In this presentation we describe recent ARMAS and USEWX results.

  20. Measurement of naturally occurring radionuclides in geothermal samples and assessment of radiological risks and radiation doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmaksiz, A

    2013-12-01

    The analysis of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K radionuclides has been carried out in geothermal water and residue samples collected from six wells of geothermal power plant and disposal site, using gamma-spectrometry system equipped with a high-purity germanium detector. The activity concentrations of nine geothermal water samples were found to be lower than minimum detectable activity (MDA) values. The activity concentration of the residue samples ranged from 40 ± 4 to 2694 ± 85 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, 33 ± 4 to 2388 ± 85 Bq kg(-1) for (232)Th, and MDA value to 967 ± 30 Bq kg(-1) for (40)K. In the study, some radiological indexes were examined and found to be higher than the reference values for majority of the residue samples. The annual effective doses arising from some residue samples were calculated to be higher than the permitted dose rate for the public, i.e. 1 mSv y(-1).

  1. Radiation Doses Received by the Irish Population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some chemical elements present in the environment since the Earth was formed are naturally radioactive and exposure to these sources of radiation cannot be avoided. There have also been additions to this natural inventory from artificial sources of radiation that did not exist before the 1940s. Other sources of radiation exposure include cosmic radiation from outer space and the use of radiation in medical diagnosis and treatment. There can be large variability in the dose received by invividual members of the population from any given source. Some sources of radiation expose every member of the population while, in other cases, only selected individuals may be exposed. For example, natural radioactivity is found in all soils and therefore everybody receives some radiation dose from this activity. On the other hand, in the case of medical exposures, only those who undergo a medical procedure using radiation will receive a radiation dose. The Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland (RPII) has undertaken a comprehensive review of the relevant data on radiation exposure in Ireland. Where no national data have been identified, the RPII has either undertaken its own research or has referred to the international literature to provide a best estimate of what the exposure in Ireland might be. This has allowed the relative contribution of each source to be quantified. This new evaluation is the most up-to-date assessment of radiation exposure and updates the assessment previously reported in 2004. The dose quoted for each source is the annual 'per caput' dose calculated on the basis of the most recently available data. This is an average value calculated by adding the doses received by each individual exposed to a given radiation source and dividing the total by the current population of 4.24 million. All figures have been rounded, consistent with the accuracy of the data. In line with accepted international practice, where exposure takes place both indoors and

  2. EXOMARS IRAS (DOSE) radiation measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federico, C.; Di Lellis, A. M.; Fonte, S.; Pauselli, C.; Reitz, G.; Beaujean, R.

    The characterization and the study of the radiations on their interaction with organic matter is of great interest in view of the human exploration on Mars. The Ionizing RAdiation Sensor (IRAS) selected in the frame of the ExoMars/Pasteur ESA mission is a lightweight particle spectrometer combining various techniques of radiation detection in space. It characterizes the first time the radiation environment on the Mars surface, and provide dose and dose equivalent rates as precursor information absolutely necessary to develop ways to mitigate the radiation risks for future human exploration on Mars. The Martian radiation levels are much higher than those found on Earth and they are relatively low for space. Measurements on the surface will show if they are similar or not to those seen in orbit (modified by the presence of ``albedo'' neutrons produced in the regolith and by the thin Martian atmosphere). IRAS consists of a telescope based on segmented silicon detectors of about 40\\userk\\milli\\metre\\user;k diameter and 300\\user;k\\micro\\metre\\user;k thickness, a segmented organic scintillator, and of a thermoluminescence dosimeter. The telescope will continuously monitor temporal variation of the particle count rate, the dose rate, particle and LET (Linear Energy Transfer) spectra. Tissue equivalent BC430 scintillator material will be used to measure the neutron dose. Neutrons are selected by a criteria requiring no signal in the anti-coincidence. Last, the passive thermoluminescence dosimeter, based on LiF:Mg detectors, regardless the on board operation timing, will measure the total dose accumulated during the exposure period and due to beta and gamma radiation, with a responsivity very close to that of a human tissue.

  3. Rapid assessment of high-dose radiation exposures through scoring of cell-fusion-induced premature chromosome condensation and ring chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamadrid Boada, A I; Romero Aguilera, I; Terzoudi, G I; González Mesa, J E; Pantelias, G; García, O

    2013-09-18

    Analysis of premature chromosome condensation (PCC) mediated by fusion of G0-lymphocytes with mitotic CHO cells in combination with rapid visualization and quantification of rings (PCC-Rf) is proposed as an alternative technique for dose assessment of radiation-exposed individuals. Isolated lymphocytes or whole blood from six individuals were γ-irradiated with 5, 10, 15 and 20Gy at a dose rate of 0.5Gy/min. Following either 8- or 24-h post-exposure incubation of irradiated samples at 37°C, chromosome spreads were prepared by standard PCC cytogenetic procedures. The protocol for PCC fusion proved to be effective at doses as high as 20Gy, enabling the analysis of ring chromosomes and excess PCC fragments. The ring frequencies remained constant during the 8-24-h repair time; the pooled dose relationship between ring frequency (Y) and dose (D) was linear: Y=(0.088±0.005)×D. During the repair time, excess fragments decreased from 0.91 to 0.59 chromatid pieces per Gy, revealing the importance of information about the exact time of exposure for dose assessment on the basis of fragments. Compared with other cytogenetic assays to estimate radiation dose, the PCC-Rf method has the following benefits: a 48-h culture time is not required, allowing a much faster assessment of dose in comparison with conventional scoring of dicentrics and rings in assays for chemically-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC-Rch), and it allows the analysis of heavily irradiated lymphocytes that are delayed or never reach mitosis, thus avoiding the problem of saturation at high doses. In conclusion, the use of the PCC fusion assay in conjunction with scoring of rings in G0-lymphocytes offers a suitable alternative for fast dose estimation following accidental exposure to high radiation doses.

  4. Occupational radiation doses to personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are presented of 2-year measurements of personnel doses performed according to the program of Personel Dosimetry Centre of Leningrad Scientific Research Institute of Radiation Hygiene. Investigations were carried out in 7 regions of the USSR. Thermoluminescent ''Harshow 2000 D'' dosemeter and lithium fluoride detector were used. Mean dose for all occupational groups (defectoscopists, personnel of radioactive waste disposal, medical radiologists) is found to be not exceeding 10% of maximum permissible dose. It is concluded that working conditions of personnel tested meet the requirements of RPG-76 and sanitary rules BSR-72/80

  5. internal radiation dose assessment due to ionizing radio contaminants in some local foodstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last 30 years, radioactivity has been monitored in foodstuffs in Egypt. The present work deals with the radioactivity monitored during two years (1990 - 1992) at eight major Egyptian governorates. Sampled food items were selected to cover most foodstuffs eaten by egyptian population according to their habits. The daily food consumption by egyptian population and the constituents of such consumption were estimated according to published international data and knowledge of the different feeding habits of the egyptians. About 1200 samples were collected from the markets of the main city of each governorate and prepared for counting according to the egyptian kitchen habits. The counting systems used in determination and indentification of radionuclides were : a 3 inch HPGe detector attached to 800 channel MCA and PC and a 3 inch phoswich detector attached to an anticoincidence circuit for low beta / gamma counting. The gamma spectroscopy system was calibrated using isotopic solution mixture while the low beta counting system was calibrated using H CI. Counting time for the first system was 20 - 72 hours and for the second system was half to one hour. The main radionuclides identified in foodstuffs were Cs - 137 and K - 40 . The radioactivity concentration of Cs - 137 was found to be in the range between 1.0 Bq / Kg for macaroni and 3.5 Bq / Kg for nile beans. The K - 40 concentration range between 19 Bq / Kg for macaroni to 363 Bq / Kg for nile beans. The population weighted values in case of Cs - 137 was found as 3.56 Bq /d and for K - 40 was 188 Bq /d. The resulted effective dose due to food intake was found be 16 . 4 U Sv /a for Cs-137 and 354 μSv / a for K -40 . This value for Cs - 137 is found in the exemption limit while that of K -40 is twice the published value. This may depend on the egyptian feeding habit which depends mainly on wheat (bread) and nile beans which are very rich in potassium.The resulted collective dose was found to be : 21323 person

  6. Radiological assessment of NORM industries in Ireland-radiation doses to workers and members of the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    only those industries with potential NORM issues were first published by the European Commission in 1997 and were followed by more specific guidance documents covering particular aspects of NORM: building materials, remediation of contaminated sites, NORM effluents and discharges, waste types produced by industries dealing with special metal and ceramics and NORM waste management and treatment options. Countries located outside Europe may follow and/or implement the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safety Standards requirements. As far as the identification of work activities involving NORM is concerned, the IAEA has equally produced a number of important and very helpful documents in the recent years, complementary to those published by the EC which capture the essential aspects of the approach advocated by the IAEA to identify NORM industries. Four large industries operating in Ireland and dealing with NORM were prioritised and investigated to determine the level of radiation to which workers and members of the public were exposed as a result of their work practices: the peat-fired power production, the coal-fired power production, the extraction of natural gas and the bauxite refining for the production of alumina. In each case, a thorough examination of the industrial process has been carried out to identify the potential radiation exposure situations arising from the occurrance of NORM at the different stages of the respective process. At the core of our assessment methodology, the following aspects were targeted. The potential for enhancement of radionuclide concentrations above their natural levels in products, by-products, residues and waste. Their availability to be released into the biosphere, due to physicochemical changes during processing or due to the method used to manage the residues and the waste produced. Occupational radiation doses were estimated based on field measurements and analysis of samples collected onsite. For particular scenarios

  7. Assessing radiation doses to the public from radionuclides in timber and wood products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the event of a nuclear accident involving the release of radionuclides to the biosphere the radioactive contamination of forests can become a significant potential source of public radiation exposure. Two of these accidents - the Kyshtim accident, Urals, USSR (now Russian Federation) in 1957 and the Chernobyl accident, USSR (now Ukraine), in 1986 - resulted in significant contamination of thousands of square kilometres of forested areas with mixtures of radionuclides including long lived fission products such as 137Cs and 90Sr. Measurements and modelling of forest ecosystems after both accidents have shown that, following initial contamination, the activity concentration of long lived radionuclides in wood gradually increases over one to two decades and then slowly decreases in the subsequent period. The longevity of the contamination is due to the slow migration and persistent bioavailability of radionuclides in the forest soil profile, which results in long term transfer into wood through the root system of the trees. Another source of contamination is from global radioactive fallout after nuclear weapons tests, but the level of contamination is much lower than that from, for example, the Chernobyl accident. For instance, the level of 137Cs in wood in Sweden is about 2-5 Bq kg-1 from global fallout. Global values are very similar to the Swedish levels. In contrast, the level of 137Cs in Swedish wood due to Chernobyl is around 50 Bq kg-1. Levels in wood from some contaminated areas located in countries of the Former Soviet Union (FSU) are about one to two orders of magnitude higher than this. The data on 137Cs soil contamination within European territories, originating mainly from the Chernobyl accident, illustrate the scale of the problem. For comparison, residual 137Cs soil deposition in Europe from global radioactive fallout was in the range 1-4 kBq m-2. There is concern in several countries about the potential radiation exposure of people from radionuclides

  8. Radionuclides in Animal Feed (Poultry) 'Assessment of Radiation Dose'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Algadi, S.; Salih, I. [Radiation Safety Institute (Sudan)

    2014-07-01

    In this work a comprehensive study has been carried out for the determination of presents evaluation of effective dose due to consumption of chicken fed by fodders collected from four major Sudanese companies (Hader, Koudjs, Wifi and Preconex SPN.V). The concentrations of radionuclides in the thirty two (32) feed samples have been determined by gamma spectrometry using NaI(Tl) detector. Radionuclides observed were: Pb-212 (daughter of Th-238), Pb-214, Bi-214 (daughters of U-238), Cs-137 and K-40 concentration. In additives the activity concentration of these radionuclides has found in the following ranges: 0.81 - 22.06 Bq/kg, 0.59 - 32.07 Bq/kg, 0.64 - 15.77 Bq/kg, 0.01 - 2.02 Bq/kg and 33.58 - 204.61 Bq/kg respectively. In feed concentrates activity concentration ranges has: 0.73 - 13.79 Bq/kg, 0.33 - 20.04 Bq/kg, 0.01 - 1.67 Bq/kg, 0.01 - 0.28 Bq/kg, 26.86 - 99.21 Bq/kg respectively. In fodders the activity concentration ranges has: 1.25 - 1.52 Bq/kg, 0.12 - 1.24 Bq/kg, 0.51 - 1.25 Bq/kg, 0.01 - 0.61 Bq/kg, 11.94 - 127.88 Bq/kg respectively. The 'animal product' activity concentration ranges has: 0.31 - 1.65 Bq/kg, 0.22 - 1.11 Bq/kg, 0.26 - 1.07 Bq/kg, 0.03 - 0.51 Bq/kg, 14.07 - 79.93 Bq/kg respectively. High concentrations (233.3 Bq/Kg) has typically found in toxo(additive); the lowest concentration (27.9 Bq/Kg ) has found in concentrate for layers and animal product. The total average effective dose due to the different feed-stuff has estimated and found to be 5.89x10{sup -6}±3.11x10{sup -6}mSv/y and 13.9 x 10{sup -7} ± 7.24 x 10{sup -7}mSv/y for age categories 7-12 y and >17 y respectively. If compared with the limits - Radioactivity Levels Permitted in foodstuffs Part 1 the Saudi Standards, Metrology and quality (300 Bq/Kg) and ICRP,FAO organization (5 mSv/y) - these values are very low. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  9. EDITORIAL Complexity of advanced radiation therapy necessitates multidisciplinary inquiry into dose reconstruction and risk assessment Complexity of advanced radiation therapy necessitates multidisciplinary inquiry into dose reconstruction and risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhauser, Wayne

    2010-07-01

    from the symposium are interrelated and focus on dose and risk assessments related to radiation exposures from advanced radiation therapies. These research topics have become increasingly complex and require the combined expertise of researchers with highly specialized and diverse investigational skills. Innovative multidisciplinary teams will be needed to achieve breakthroughs and, ultimately, to translate the research into clinical practice (Disis and Slattery 2010). The symposium's scientific goals included fostering and promoting such multidisciplinary teams, which will work to solve these complex problems and thereby improve cancer outcomes. To help clarify how the 13 articles each contribute to the goal of improving cancer outcomes, a brief digression is necessary. The proportion of patients surviving their cancers for five years or more is large and increasing (Jemal et al 2009). Unfortunately, in survivors who received radiation therapy, the prevalence of radiogenic late effects is likewise large and increasing (cf Altekruse et al 2010, Meadows et al 2009, Hudson et al 2009, Friedman et al 2010), with the potential to become a public health issue of considerable scale (Travis 2006). A multitude of late effects are associated with radiation exposure, including the development of second cancers, cardiac toxicity, cognitive deficits, and musculoskeletal growth abnormalities in children. In modern radiation therapy, much effort is devoted to developing personalized treatments that control the tumor while minimizing acute toxicities to surrounding healthy tissues; comparatively less attention has been paid to minimizing late effects (Durante and Loeffler 2010). In recent years, however, there has been an encouraging increase in research activities seeking to quantify radiation exposures (Stovall et al 2006) and the associated risks of late effects from modern external-beam therapies (Xu et al 2008). In this issue, Zhang et al (2010) report on Monte Carlo and

  10. Detection and assessment of genetic effects of low and very low doses of ionizing radiations using the a1+/a1 a2+/a2 system of Tobacco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main problem related to the detection and assessment of biological and genetic effects of low and very low doses of ionizing radiations concerns the statistical confidence. The a1+/a1 a2+/a2 system of Tobacco (Nicotania tabacum L. variety xanthi) is particularly well suited for evaluating genetic effects in this radiobiological field. (author). 7 refs., 1 tab

  11. Assessment of the image contrast improvement and dose reduction in mammography with synchrotron radiation compared to standard units

    CERN Document Server

    Moeckli, R; Fiedler, S; Pachoud, M; Hessler, C; Meuli, R; Valley, J F

    2001-01-01

    An objective method was used to evaluate image quality and dose in mammography with synchrotron radiation and to compare them to standard units. It was performed systematically in the energy range of interest for mammography through the evaluation of the contrast and the measurement of the mean glandular dose. Synchrotron radiation measurements were performed at the ESRF and a slit was placed between the test object and the screen-film system in order to reduce scatter. The conventional films were obtained on mammography units with an anti-scatter grid. In a recent paper, it was shown that the use of synchrotron radiation leads to a noticeable improvement of the image quality-dose relationship (Moeckli et al. Phys. Med. Biol. 45(12)3509). The reason of that enhancement is partly due to the monochromaticity of the synchrotron beam and partly due to the use of a slit instead of a grid. The dose reduction with synchrotron radiation can be attributed to a better X-ray total transmission of the slit and the contra...

  12. Evaluation of radiation doses delivered in different chest CT protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Gorycki, Tomasz; Lasek, Iwona; Kamiński, Kamil; Studniarek, Michał

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background There are differences in the reference diagnostic levels for the computed tomography (CT) of the chest as cited in different literature sources. The doses are expressed either in weighted CT dose index (CTDIVOL) used to express the dose per slice, dose-length product (DLP), and effective dose (E). The purpose of this study was to assess the radiation dose used in Low Dose Computer Tomography (LDCT) of the chest in comparison with routine chest CT examinations as well as to ...

  13. Assessment of natural radionuclide levels in Pakistani foodstuffs and associated radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive study for the assessment of natural radionuclides (40K, 238U, 226Ra, 228Ra, and 232Th) in Pakistani food items (fruits, seasonal vegetables, beef, mutton, poultry meat and eggs) and drinks samples (milk, tap water and soft drinks) was carried out in Pakistan using HPGe based high resolution gamma spectrometry. All the food items and drink samples showed detectable 40K activity, however, most of the other natural radionuclides in solid food were found to have contents below the minimum detectable activity (MDA). The range of 40K activity was found to be 0.02 to 110.5 Bq kg-1 for solid food and drink samples. The cumulative average value of 238U, 226Ra, 228Ra and 232Th were found to be 0.07, 0.03, 0.06 and 0.06 Bq kg-1 in fruits, vegetables, meat and egg samples respectively. In all milk and water based drinks the respective measured values of the mean activity of 238U, 226Ra, 228Ra and 232Th were 0.16, 0.06, 0.07 and 0.05 Bq kg-1. The annual ingestion/intakes of 40K 238U, 226Ra, 228Ra and 232Th were found to be only 0.06%, 0.007%, 0.02%, 0.03% and 0.05% of the Annual Limits on Intakes (ALIs) of these radionuclides as specified by IAEA, which shows that their contribution in Pakistani diet does not pose any significant radiological health problem. (author)

  14. Assessment of internal radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Tae Young; Chang, S. Y.; Lee, J. I.; Kim, J. S.; Song, M. Y. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-05-01

    This report describes the contents and results for implementation of internal radiation monitoring programme, measurement of uranium lung deposition by lung counter and assessment of committed effective dose for radiation workers of KNFC. The aim of radiation protection was achieved by implementing this activity. 9 refs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  15. Assessment of indoor radiation dose received by the residents of natural high background radiation areas of coastal villages of Kanyakumari district, Tamil Nadu, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation exposure and effective dose received through two routes of exposure, viz. external and internal, via inhalation, by residents of 10 villages belonging to Natural High Background Radiation Areas (NHBRA) of coastal regions of Kanyakumari District and Tamil Nadu in India were studied. While the indoor gamma radiation levels were monitored using Thermo Luminescent Dosimeters (TLDs), the indoor radon and thoron gas concentrations were measured using twin chamber dosimeters employing Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs, LR-115-II). The average total annual effective dose was estimated and found to be varying from 2.59 to 8.76 mSv. -- Highlights: → The effective dose received by the villages of Natural High Background Area (NHBRA) such as Enayam, Midalam and Mel Midalam is high when compared with other study areas. → The high dose indicates higher concentration of radioactive nuclides like Thorium and Uranium in the soil. → As radiation is harmful to human life, the external and internal doses can be reduced by removing the monazite content present in the soil by mineral separation. → Contribution from vegetables, fruits, fish and other non vegetarian items are also being examined. → These results along with other socio-economic factors can throw considerable light on the epidemiological impacts due to low levels of chronic exposure.

  16. Assessment of indoor radiation dose received by the residents of natural high background radiation areas of coastal villages of Kanyakumari district, Tamil Nadu, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deva Jayanthi, D., E-mail: d.devajayanthi@gmail.co [Department of Physics, Women' s Christian College, Nagercoil 629001 (India); Maniyan, C.G. [Environmental Assessment Division, BARC, Mumbai 400085 (India); Perumal, S. [Department of Physics and Research Centre, S.T.Hindu College, Nagercoil 629002 (India)

    2011-07-15

    Radiation exposure and effective dose received through two routes of exposure, viz. external and internal, via inhalation, by residents of 10 villages belonging to Natural High Background Radiation Areas (NHBRA) of coastal regions of Kanyakumari District and Tamil Nadu in India were studied. While the indoor gamma radiation levels were monitored using Thermo Luminescent Dosimeters (TLDs), the indoor radon and thoron gas concentrations were measured using twin chamber dosimeters employing Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs, LR-115-II). The average total annual effective dose was estimated and found to be varying from 2.59 to 8.76 mSv. -- Highlights: {yields} The effective dose received by the villages of Natural High Background Area (NHBRA) such as Enayam, Midalam and Mel Midalam is high when compared with other study areas. {yields} The high dose indicates higher concentration of radioactive nuclides like Thorium and Uranium in the soil. {yields} As radiation is harmful to human life, the external and internal doses can be reduced by removing the monazite content present in the soil by mineral separation. {yields} Contribution from vegetables, fruits, fish and other non vegetarian items are also being examined. {yields} These results along with other socio-economic factors can throw considerable light on the epidemiological impacts due to low levels of chronic exposure.

  17. Retirement memorial lecture. Review of studies on assessment of radiation exposed dose-exposure dose estimation in Hiroshima, Nagasaki, Semipalatinsk, Chernobyl and Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Described are following author's experiences about studies of dosimetry performed in such fields as in the title and concomitant thoughts of the health effect of radiation. The author expresses the degree of radiation risk, when simplified, with the equation, health effect/dose. The effect is either deterministic like alopecia/leucopenia or stochastic like carcinogenesis. DS02 (Dosimetry System 2002) leading to about 10% increase of the risk in the equation above is established with investigation of 120 thousands exposed people by Japanese and American reassessment study of A-bomb radiation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, where neutron dose has been problematic but solved. Exposed dose 4000 mGy of Dolon village 110 km afar from the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site has been said to be the highest among its nearest regions. However, the external exposure dose is estimated to be 400 mGy by dosimetry of bricks and other materials and factors concerned in radiation spread like soil Cs-137, Pu-239/240 against the reported dose above by old Soviet Union. Radioactive contamination in wide areas and in local spots is observed following the hydrogen explosions (Mar. 12-15, 2011) in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant and decontamination is in progress with a measure of Cs-137. As for Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents, following respective matters are different: the number of evacuated people of 400 thousands vs 85 thousands; 145 thousands people involved in contaminated area of >37 kBq/km2 vs 8 thousands in >30 thousands kBq/km2; areas subjected to forced evacuation of 13 thousands km2 vs areas to planned evacuation of 8 hundreds km2; and released radioactivity of 5200 thousands TBq vs 770 thousands TBq. In Fukushima, there are additional problems of contamination of sea and of waste of the Plant rubbles. The author thinks that all of information and standard criteria about contamination should be more easily disclosed to public for their self judgment and decision. (T.T.)

  18. Advances in environmental radiation protection: re-thinking animal-environment interaction modelling for wildlife dose assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Michael D. [School of Environment and Life Sciences, University of Salford, Manchester, M4 4WT (United Kingdom); Beresford, Nicholas A. [School of Environment and Life Sciences, University of Salford, Manchester, M4 4WT (United Kingdom); Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Bradshaw, Clare [Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Gashchak, Sergey [Chornobyl Centre for Nuclear Safety, Radioactive Waste and Radioecology, 07100 Slavutych (Ukraine); Hinton, Thomas G. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Centre de Cadarache, 13115 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2014-07-01

    Current wildlife dose assessment models adopt simplistic approaches to the representation of animal-environment interaction. The simplest approaches are to assume either that environmental media (e.g. soil, sediment or water) are uniformly contaminated or relating organism exposure to activity concentrations in media collected at the point of sampling of the animal. The external exposure of a reference organism is then estimated by defining the geometric relationship between the organism and the medium. For example, a reference organism within the soil would have a 4p exposure geometry and a reference organism on the soil would have a 2p exposure geometry. At best, the current modelling approaches recognise differences in media activity concentrations by calculating exposure for different areas of contamination and then estimating the fraction of time that an organism spends in each area. In other fields of pollution ecology, for example wildlife risk assessment for chemical pollution, more advanced approaches are being implemented to model animal-environment interaction and estimate exposure. These approaches include individual-based movement modelling and random walk modelling and a variety of software tools have been developed to facilitate the implementation of these models. Although there are more advanced animal-environment interaction modelling approaches that are available, it is questionable whether these should be adopted for use in environmental radiation protection. Would their adoption significantly reduce uncertainty within the assessment process and, if so, by how much? These questions are being addressed within the new TREE (TRansfer - Exposure - Effects) research programme funded by the United Kingdom Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and within Working Group (WG) 8 of the International Atomic Energy Agency's MODARIA programme. MODARIA WG8 is reviewing some of the alternative approaches that have been developed for animal

  19. Advances in environmental radiation protection: re-thinking animal-environment interaction modelling for wildlife dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current wildlife dose assessment models adopt simplistic approaches to the representation of animal-environment interaction. The simplest approaches are to assume either that environmental media (e.g. soil, sediment or water) are uniformly contaminated or relating organism exposure to activity concentrations in media collected at the point of sampling of the animal. The external exposure of a reference organism is then estimated by defining the geometric relationship between the organism and the medium. For example, a reference organism within the soil would have a 4p exposure geometry and a reference organism on the soil would have a 2p exposure geometry. At best, the current modelling approaches recognise differences in media activity concentrations by calculating exposure for different areas of contamination and then estimating the fraction of time that an organism spends in each area. In other fields of pollution ecology, for example wildlife risk assessment for chemical pollution, more advanced approaches are being implemented to model animal-environment interaction and estimate exposure. These approaches include individual-based movement modelling and random walk modelling and a variety of software tools have been developed to facilitate the implementation of these models. Although there are more advanced animal-environment interaction modelling approaches that are available, it is questionable whether these should be adopted for use in environmental radiation protection. Would their adoption significantly reduce uncertainty within the assessment process and, if so, by how much? These questions are being addressed within the new TREE (TRansfer - Exposure - Effects) research programme funded by the United Kingdom Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) and within Working Group (WG) 8 of the International Atomic Energy Agency's MODARIA programme. MODARIA WG8 is reviewing some of the alternative approaches that have been developed for animal

  20. Utirik Atoll Dose Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Bogen, K.T

    1999-10-06

    On March 1, 1954, radioactive fallout from the nuclear test at Bikini Atoll code-named BRAVO was deposited on Utirik Atoll which lies about 187 km (300 miles) east of Bikini Atoll. The residents of Utirik were evacuated three days after the fallout started and returned to their atoll in May 1954. In this report we provide a final dose assessment for current conditions at the atoll based on extensive data generated from samples collected in 1993 and 1994. The estimated population average maximum annual effective dose using a diet including imported foods is 0.037 mSv y{sup -1} (3.7 mrem y{sup -1}). The 95% confidence limits are within a factor of three of their population average value. The population average integrated effective dose over 30-, 50-, and 70-y is 0.84 mSv (84, mrem), 1.2 mSv (120 mrem), and 1.4 mSv (140 mrem), respectively. The 95% confidence limits on the population-average value post 1998, i.e., the 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral doses, are within a factor of two of the mean value and are independent of time, t, for t > 5 y. Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) is the radionuclide that contributes most of this dose, mostly through the terrestrial food chain and secondarily from external gamma exposure. The dose from weapons-related radionuclides is very low and of no consequence to the health of the population. The annual background doses in the U. S. and Europe are 3.0 mSv (300 mrem), and 2.4 mSv (240 mrem), respectively. The annual background dose in the Marshall Islands is estimated to be 1.4 mSv (140 mrem). The total estimated combined Marshall Islands background dose plus the weapons-related dose is about 1.5 mSv y{sup -1} (150 mrem y{sup -1}) which can be directly compared to the annual background effective dose of 3.0 mSv y{sup -1} (300 mrem y{sup -1}) for the U. S. and 2.4 mSv y{sup -1} (240 mrem y{sup -1}) for Europe. Moreover, the doses listed in this report are based only on the radiological decay of {sup 137}Cs (30.1 y half-life) and other

  1. Biology responses to low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biology responses to low dose radiation is the most important problem of medical radiation and radiation protection. The especial mechanism of low dose or low dose rate induced cell responses, has been found independent with linear no-threshold model. This article emphasize to introduce low dose or low dose rate induced biology responses of adaptive response, by-effect, super-sensitivity and genomic instability. (authors)

  2. Assessment of effective radiation dose of an extremity CBCT, MSCT and conventional X ray for knee area using MOSFET dosemeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivisto, Juha; Kiljunen, Timo; Wolff, Jan; Kortesniemi, Mika

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess and compare the organ and effective doses in the knee area resulting from different commercially available multislice computed tomography devices (MSCT), one cone beam computed tomography device (CBCT) and one conventional X-ray radiography device using MOSFET dosemeters and an anthropomorphic RANDO knee phantom. Measurements of the MSCT devices resulted in effective doses ranging between 27 and 48 µSv. The CBCT measurements resulted in an effective dose of 12.6 µSv. The effective doses attained using the conventional radiography device were 1.8 µSv for lateral and 1.2 µSv for anterior-posterior projections. The effective dose resulting from conventional radiography was considerably lower than those recorded for the CBCT and MSCT devices. The MSCT effective dose results were two to four times higher than those measured on the CBCT device. This study demonstrates that CBCT can be regarded as a potential low-dose 3D imaging technique for knee examinations. PMID:23825221

  3. Assessment of organ dose reduction and secondary cancer risk associated with the use of proton beam therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy in treatment of neuroblastomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare proton beam therapy (PBT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with conformal radiation therapy (CRT) in terms of their organ doses and ability to cause secondary cancer in normal organs. Five patients (median age, 4 years; range, 2–11 years) who underwent PBT for retroperitoneal neuroblastoma were selected for treatment planning simulation. Four patients had stage 4 tumors and one had stage 2A tumor, according to the International Neuroblastoma Staging System. Two patients received 36 Gy, two received 21.6 Gy, and one received 41.4 Gy of radiation. The volume structures of these patients were used for simulations of CRT and IMRT treatment. Dose–volume analyses of liver, stomach, colon, small intestine, pancreas, and bone were performed for the simulations. Secondary cancer risks in these organs were calculated using the organ equivalent dose (OED) model, which took into account the rates of cell killing, repopulation, and the neutron dose from the treatment machine. In all evaluated organs, the mean dose in PBT was 20–80% of that in CRT. IMRT also showed lower mean doses than CRT for two organs (20% and 65%), but higher mean doses for the other four organs (110–120%). The risk of secondary cancer in PBT was 24–83% of that in CRT for five organs, but 121% of that in CRT for pancreas. The risk of secondary cancer in IMRT was equal to or higher than CRT for four organs (range 100–124%). Low radiation doses in normal organs are more frequently observed in PBT than in IMRT. Assessments of secondary cancer risk showed that PBT reduces the risk of secondary cancer in most organs, whereas IMRT is associated with a higher risk than CRT

  4. Dose. Detriment. Limit assessment; Dosis. Schadensmass. Grenzwertsetzung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breckow, J. [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz (IMPS)

    2015-07-01

    One goal of radiation protection is the limitation of stochastic effects due to radiation exposure. The probability of occurrence of a radiation induced stochastic effect, however, is only one of several other parameters which determine the radiation detriment. Though the ICRP-concept of detriment is a quantitative definition, the kind of detriment weighting includes somewhat subjective elements. In this sense, the detriment-concept of ICRP represents already at the stage of effective dose a kind of assessment. Thus, by comparing radiation protection standards and concepts interconvertible or with those of environment or occupational protection one should be aware of the possibly different principles of detriment assessment.

  5. Quantification of micronuclei in blood lymphocytes of patients exposed to gamma radiation for dose absorbed assessment; Quantificacao de micronucleos em linfocitos de pacientes expostas a radiacao gama para a avaliacao da dose absorvida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Isvania Maria Serafim da Silva

    2003-02-15

    Dose assessment in an important step to evaluate biological effects as a result of individual exposure to ionizing radiation. The use of cytogenetic dosimetry based on the quantification of micronuclei in lymphocytes is very important to complement physical dosimetry, since the measurement of absorbed dose cannot be always performed. In this research, the quantification of micronuclei was carried out in order to evaluate absorbed dose as a result of radiotherapy with {sup 60}Co, using peripheral blood samples from 5 patients with cervical uterine cancer. For this purpose, an aliquot of whole blood from the individual patients was added in culture medium RPMI 1640 supplemented with fetal calf serum and phytohaemagglutinin. The culture was incubated for 44 hours. Henceforth, cytochalasin B was added to block the dividing lymphocytes in cytokinesis. The culture was returned to the incubator for further of 28 hours. Thus, cells were harvested, processed and analyzed. Values obtained considering micronuclei frequency after pelvis irradiation with absorption of 0,08 Gy and 1,8 Gy were, respectively, 0,0021 and 0,052. These results are in agreement with some recent researches that provided some standard values related to micronuclei frequency induced by gamma radiation exposure in different exposed areas for the human body. The results presented in this report emphasizes biological dosimetry as an important tool for dose assessment of either total or partial-body exposure to ionizing radiation, mainly in retrospective dose investigation. (author)

  6. Recent Update on Radiation Dose Assessment for the State-of-the-Art Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography Protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sock Keow; Yeong, Chai Hong; Ng, Kwan Hoong; Abdul Aziz, Yang Faridah; Sun, Zhonghua

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to measure the absorbed doses in selected organs for prospectively ECG-triggered coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) using five different generations CT scanners in a female adult anthropomorphic phantom and to estimate the effective dose (HE). Materials and Methods Prospectively ECG-triggered CCTA was performed using five commercially available CT scanners: 64-detector-row single source CT (SSCT), 2 × 32-detector-row-dual source CT (DSCT), 2 × 64-detector-row DSCT and 320-detector-row SSCT scanners. Absorbed doses were measured in 34 organs using pre-calibrated optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) placed inside a standard female adult anthropomorphic phantom. HE was calculated from the measured organ doses and compared to the HE derived from the air kerma-length product (PKL) using the conversion coefficient of 0.014 mSv∙mGy-1∙cm-1 for the chest region. Results Both breasts and lungs received the highest radiation dose during CCTA examination. The highest HE was received from 2 × 32-detector-row DSCT scanner (6.06 ± 0.72 mSv), followed by 64-detector-row SSCT (5.60 ± 0.68 and 5.02 ± 0.73 mSv), 2 × 64-detector-row DSCT (1.88 ± 0.25 mSv) and 320-detector-row SSCT (1.34 ± 0.48 mSv) scanners. HE calculated from the measured organ doses were about 38 to 53% higher than the HE derived from the PKL-to-HE conversion factor. Conclusion The radiation doses received from a prospectively ECG-triggered CCTA are relatively small and are depending on the scanner technology and imaging protocols. HE as low as 1.34 and 1.88 mSv can be achieved in prospectively ECG-triggered CCTA using 320-detector-row SSCT and 2 × 64-detector-row DSCT scanners. PMID:27552224

  7. Genotoxicity assessment of low-level doses of gamma radiation with the SOS chromotest and the Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolsunovsky, A Ya; Sinitsyna, O I; Frolova, T S; Vasyunina, E A; Dementyev, D V

    2016-07-01

    This is the first study to present data on the genotoxicity of low γ-irradiation doses for E. coli and S. typhimurium cells obtained using the SOS chromotest and the Ames test. The most pronounced effect was recorded in the first 24 h of γ-irradiation. After 72 h in the Ames test and after 96 h in the SOS chromotest, a significant effect of γ-irradiation on bacterial cells was detected. The absence of genotoxicity at the later stages can be explained by the adaptation of bacterial cells to the conditions of exposure. The findings allow the bacterial test system to be used for studying the effects of low doses at the early stages of exposure to radiation.

  8. Genotoxicity assessment of low-level doses of gamma radiation with the SOS chromotest and the Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolsunovsky, A Ya; Sinitsyna, O I; Frolova, T S; Vasyunina, E A; Dementyev, D V

    2016-07-01

    This is the first study to present data on the genotoxicity of low γ-irradiation doses for E. coli and S. typhimurium cells obtained using the SOS chromotest and the Ames test. The most pronounced effect was recorded in the first 24 h of γ-irradiation. After 72 h in the Ames test and after 96 h in the SOS chromotest, a significant effect of γ-irradiation on bacterial cells was detected. The absence of genotoxicity at the later stages can be explained by the adaptation of bacterial cells to the conditions of exposure. The findings allow the bacterial test system to be used for studying the effects of low doses at the early stages of exposure to radiation. PMID:27599519

  9. Modelling of Biota Dose Effects. Report of Working Group 6 Biota Dose Effects Modelling of EMRAS II Topical Heading Reference Approaches for Biota Dose Assessment. Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II) Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental assessment models are used for evaluating the radiological impact of actual and potential releases of radionuclides to the environment. They are essential tools for use in the regulatory control of routine discharges to the environment and in planning the measures to be taken in the event of accidental releases. They are also used for predicting the impact of releases which may occur far into the future, for example, from underground radioactive waste repositories. It is important to verify, to the extent possible, the reliability of the predictions of such models by a comparison with measured values in the environment or with the predictions of other models. The IAEA has been organizing programmes on international model testing since the 1980s. These programmes have contributed to a general improvement in models, in the transfer of data and in the capabilities of modellers in Member States. IAEA publications on this subject over the past three decades demonstrate the comprehensive nature of the programmes and record the associated advances which have been made. From 2009 to 2011, the IAEA organized a project entitled Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety (EMRAS II), which concentrated on the improvement of environmental transfer models and the development of reference approaches to estimate the radiological impacts on humans, as well as on flora and fauna, arising from radionuclides in the environment. Different aspects were addressed by nine working groups covering three themes: reference approaches for human dose assessment, reference approaches for biota dose assessment and approaches for addressing emergency situations. This publication describes the work of the Biota Effects Modelling Working Group

  10. Radiation doses and risks from internal emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, John [Health Protection Agency, Radiation Protection Division, CRCE, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0RQ (United Kingdom); Day, Philip [School of Chemistry, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)], E-mail: john.harrison@hpa.org.uk, E-mail: philip.day@manchester.ac.uk

    2008-06-01

    , the same is not true of the ICRP protection quantities equivalent and effective dose (i.e. those measured in sieverts). The ICRP quantities are intended for practical application in radiological protection and the choice of radiation and tissue weighting factors used in their calculation involves simplifying assumptions regarded as acceptable for this purpose. Best estimates of doses and risks to individuals and specific population groups may be calculated using ICRP biokinetic and dosimetric approaches, but would require the use of best available information on RBE and age-, sex- and population-specific risk factors. Consideration of uncertainties is important in applications such as the assessment of the probability of cancer causation for an individual and in estimating doses in epidemiological studies. While the ICRP system of protection does not take explicit account of uncertainties, an understanding of the various contributions to uncertainty can be seen to be of value when making judgments on the optimisation of protection. (review)

  11. Agriculture-related radiation dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimates of radiation dose to the public must be made at each stage in the identification and qualification process leading to siting a high-level nuclear waste repository. Specifically considering the ingestion pathway, this paper examines questions of reliability and adequacy of dose calculations in relation to five stages of data availability (geologic province, region, area, location, and mass balance) and three methods of calculation (population, population/food production, and food production driven). Calculations were done using the model PABLM with data for the Permian and Palo Duro Basins and the Deaf Smith County area. Extra effort expended in gathering agricultural data at succeeding environmental characterization levels does not appear justified, since dose estimates do not differ greatly; that effort would be better spent determining usage of food types that contribute most to the total dose; and that consumption rate and the air dispersion factor are critical to assessment of radiation dose via the ingestion pathway. 17 refs., 9 figs., 32 tabs

  12. Agriculture-related radiation dose calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furr, J.M.; Mayberry, J.J.; Waite, D.A.

    1987-10-01

    Estimates of radiation dose to the public must be made at each stage in the identification and qualification process leading to siting a high-level nuclear waste repository. Specifically considering the ingestion pathway, this paper examines questions of reliability and adequacy of dose calculations in relation to five stages of data availability (geologic province, region, area, location, and mass balance) and three methods of calculation (population, population/food production, and food production driven). Calculations were done using the model PABLM with data for the Permian and Palo Duro Basins and the Deaf Smith County area. Extra effort expended in gathering agricultural data at succeeding environmental characterization levels does not appear justified, since dose estimates do not differ greatly; that effort would be better spent determining usage of food types that contribute most to the total dose; and that consumption rate and the air dispersion factor are critical to assessment of radiation dose via the ingestion pathway. 17 refs., 9 figs., 32 tabs.

  13. Radiation doses from contaminant aerosol deposition to the human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nearly all assessments of radiation doses received following accidental airborne releases have focused on the contributions originating from the plume and from ground deposition. Very little thought has however been given to doses received from deposition directly onto humans. The results of recent experimental investigations of aerosol deposition to and clearance from human skin and clothing have been used to model the doses potentially received in an accident situation. It was found that both the skin dose from β-emitters and the whole body dose from γ-emitters may be significant compared with doses received through other pathways, such as external radiation from the environment. (au)

  14. Radiation Dose Assessment For The Biota Of Terrestrial Ecosystems In The Shoreline Zone Of The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation exposure of the biota in the shoreline area of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond was assessed to evaluate radiological consequences from the decommissioning of the Cooling Pond. The article addresses studies of radioactive contamination of the terrestrial faunal complex and radionuclide concentration ratios in bodies of small birds, small mammals, amphibians, and reptiles living in the area. The data were used to calculate doses to biota using the ERICA Tool software. Doses from 90Sr and 137Cs were calculated using the default parameters of the ERICA Tool and were shown to be consistent with biota doses calculated from the field data. However, the ERICA dose calculations for plutonium isotopes were much higher (2-5 times for small mammals and 10-14 times for birds) than the doses calculated using the experimental data. Currently, the total doses for the terrestrial biota do not exceed maximum recommended levels. However, if the Cooling Pond is allowed to drawdown naturally and the contaminants of the bottom sediments are exposed and enter the biological cycle, the calculated doses to biota may exceed the maximum recommended values. The study is important in establishing the current exposure conditions such that a baseline exists from which changes can be documented following the lowering of the reservoir water. Additionally, the study provided useful radioecological data on biota concentration ratios for some species that are poorly represented in the literature.

  15. RADIATION DOSE ASSESSMENT FOR THE BIOTA OF TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS IN THE SHORELINE ZONE OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COOLING POND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01

    Radiation exposure of the biota in the shoreline area of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond was assessed to evaluate radiological consequences from the decommissioning of the Cooling Pond. The article addresses studies of radioactive contamination of the terrestrial faunal complex and radionuclide concentration ratios in bodies of small birds, small mammals, amphibians, and reptiles living in the area. The data were used to calculate doses to biota using the ERICA Tool software. Doses from {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs were calculated using the default parameters of the ERICA Tool and were shown to be consistent with biota doses calculated from the field data. However, the ERICA dose calculations for plutonium isotopes were much higher (2-5 times for small mammals and 10-14 times for birds) than the doses calculated using the experimental data. Currently, the total doses for the terrestrial biota do not exceed maximum recommended levels. However, if the Cooling Pond is allowed to drawdown naturally and the contaminants of the bottom sediments are exposed and enter the biological cycle, the calculated doses to biota may exceed the maximum recommended values. The study is important in establishing the current exposure conditions such that a baseline exists from which changes can be documented following the lowering of the reservoir water. Additionally, the study provided useful radioecological data on biota concentration ratios for some species that are poorly represented in the literature.

  16. Radiation dose and subsequent risk for stomach cancer in long-term survivors of cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinerman, Ruth A; Smith, Susan A; Holowaty, Eric;

    2013-01-01

    To assess the dose-response relationship for stomach cancer after radiation therapy for cervical cancer.......To assess the dose-response relationship for stomach cancer after radiation therapy for cervical cancer....

  17. Radiation dose assessments to support evaluations of radiological control levels for recycling or reuse of materials and equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, R.L.; Aaberg, R.L.; Baker, D.A.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.

    1995-07-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is providing Environmental Protection Support and Assistance to the USDOE, Office of Environmental Guidance. Air, Water, and Radiation Division. As part of this effort, PNL is collecting data and conducting technical evaluations to support DOE analyses of the feasibility of developing radiological control levels for recycling or reuse of metals, concrete, or equipment containing residual radioactive contamination from DOE operations. The radiological control levels will be risk-based, as developed through a radiation exposure scenario and pathway analysis. The analysis will include evaluation of relevant radionuclides, potential mechanisms of exposure, and both health and non-health-related impacts. The main objective of this report is to develop a methodology for establishing radiological control levels for recycle or reuse. This report provides the results of the radiation exposure scenario and pathway analyses for 42 key radionuclides generated during DOE operations that may be contained in metals or equipment considered for either recycling or reuse. The scenarios and information developed by the IAEA. Application of Exemption Principles to the Recycle and Reuse of Materials from Nuclear Facilities, are used as the initial basis for this study. The analyses were performed for both selected worker populations at metal smelters and for the public downwind of a smelter facility. Doses to the public downwind were estimated using the US (EPA) CAP88-PC computer code with generic data on atmospheric dispersion and population density. Potential non-health-related effects of residual activity on electronics and on film were also analyzed.

  18. Radiation dose assessments to support evaluations of radiological control levels for recycling or reuse of materials and equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is providing Environmental Protection Support and Assistance to the USDOE, Office of Environmental Guidance. Air, Water, and Radiation Division. As part of this effort, PNL is collecting data and conducting technical evaluations to support DOE analyses of the feasibility of developing radiological control levels for recycling or reuse of metals, concrete, or equipment containing residual radioactive contamination from DOE operations. The radiological control levels will be risk-based, as developed through a radiation exposure scenario and pathway analysis. The analysis will include evaluation of relevant radionuclides, potential mechanisms of exposure, and both health and non-health-related impacts. The main objective of this report is to develop a methodology for establishing radiological control levels for recycle or reuse. This report provides the results of the radiation exposure scenario and pathway analyses for 42 key radionuclides generated during DOE operations that may be contained in metals or equipment considered for either recycling or reuse. The scenarios and information developed by the IAEA. Application of Exemption Principles to the Recycle and Reuse of Materials from Nuclear Facilities, are used as the initial basis for this study. The analyses were performed for both selected worker populations at metal smelters and for the public downwind of a smelter facility. Doses to the public downwind were estimated using the US (EPA) CAP88-PC computer code with generic data on atmospheric dispersion and population density. Potential non-health-related effects of residual activity on electronics and on film were also analyzed

  19. Dose assessment and environmental monitoring to demonstrate compliance with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's environmental radiation standards for nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued regulations in 1977 setting forth environmental radiation protection standards for uranium fuel cycle facilities. The regulations require that radioactivity in planned effluent releases from uranium fuel cycle facilities (radon and its daughters excepted) be limited so that no member of the public receives an annual dose equivalent of more than 25 mrem to the whole body, 75 mrem to the thyroid, or 25 mrem to any other organ. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for assuring that licensees' uranium fuel cycle facilities meet these requirements. Since issuing environmental radiation protection standards, NRC developed a method for radiological assessment to demonstrate compliance with standards covering uranium mills, UF6 conversion, and fuel fabrication facilities. Generally, this includes models for atmospheric transport, pathway analysis, and dose assessment. For certain unique facilities, the models may not be adequate to demonstrate compliance without using a supplemental environmental monitoring program, i.e., actual measurement of radionuclide concentration, particle size distribution, and solubility of particulates in air. We will discuss the dose assessment models; their inadequacies to demonstrate compliance for certain unique facilities; and the ways environmental monitoring can be used to provide reasonable assurance that standards are met. Design criteria for a cost-effective monitoring program will be discussed

  20. Biological effects of low doses of radiation at low dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report was to examine available scientific data and models relevant to the hypothesis that induction of genetic changes and cancers by low doses of ionizing radiation at low dose rate is a stochastic process with no threshold or apparent threshold. Assessment of the effects of higher doses of radiation is based on a wealth of data from both humans and other organisms. 234 refs., 26 figs., 14 tabs

  1. Determination of the dose of gamma radiation sterilization for assessment of biological parameters of male Ceratitis capitada (Diptera: Tephritidae), tsl - Vienna 8 strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Vienna-8, tsl (temperature sensitive lethal) strain of Ceratitis capitata, by presenting mutations that facilitate the mass rearing and release only of sterile males in the field, has been used in (Sterile Insect Technique) programmes. The objective of this study was to determine the radiation dose that provides the highest level of sterility for Vienna-8, tsl males assessing their biological parameters that indicate the quality of sterile males to be released. Brown pupae (males) of the tsl strain were obtained from the mass rearing of the Food Irradiation and Radio entomology laboratory of CENA/USP, and they were irradiated (with gamma radiation - 60Co) 24 hours before the emergence at rates of 0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 Gy. The determination of the sterilizing dose was based on fertility of sexually mature females of the bisexual strain and not irradiated, mated with males of different treatments. Eggs were collected daily during 6 days, were counted and it was possible to estimate fecundity, and assess the hatching rate. The emergence and flight ability were determined by following the protocol of quality control manual for FAO/IAEA/USDA (2003). To assess the longevity under nutritional stress, the insects were kept a period of 48 h after emergence in the absence of water and food, and after this period, mortality was recorded. The size of the testes (left and right) was obtained by dissecting irradiated and non-irradiated males at the eighth day of life, and measure the testes in an ocular micrometer, considering the maximum length and width of each sample. To determine the sperm number was necessary to dissect the males and break their testicles. No difference was observed in emergence rate, flight ability and longevity of irradiated and non-irradiated males, nor in the fecundity of females mated with males of different treatments. The sterilizing dose that resulted in lower fertility of females was 120 Gy, with 1.5% hatching. Considering the parameters of

  2. Thermoluminescent dosimetry and assessment of personal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermoluminescence is discussed in terms of the energy band structure of a crystalline solid and the trapping of charge carriers by point defects. Some general properties of thermoluminescent materials used for dosimetry are outlined, with thermoluminescence of CaSO4:Dy being described in detail. The energy response function and the modification of the energy response of a dosimeter by shielding are discussed. The final section covers the connection between exposure, as recorded by a TLD badge, and the absorbed dose to various organs from gamma radiation in a uranium mine; the conversion from absorbed dose to dose equivalent; and uncertainties in assessment of dose equivalent

  3. Doses from Medical Radiation Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Radiation Protection and Measurements; NCRP Report 124; 1996. United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. ... ionizing radiation, Vol. 1: Sources. New York, NY: United Nations Publishing; 2000. Russell JR, Stabin MG, Sparks RB, ...

  4. Evaluation of doses from radiodiagnostic procedures performed in veterinary medicine and assessing of the doses of secondary radiation in the medical staff and animal owners; Avaliacao das doses resultantes de procedimentos radiodiagnosticos realizados em medicina veterinaria e avaliacao das doses secundarias de radiacao espalhada no corpo clinico e nos proprietarios dos animais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veneziani, Glauco Rogerio

    2012-07-01

    The primary goal in veterinary radiography is to produce radiographs of diagnostic quality on the first attempt. This goal serves three purposes: (1) to decrease radiation exposure to the patient and veterinary personnel; (2) to decrease the cost of the study for the client; and (3) to produce diagnostic data for rapid interpretation and treatment of the patient. This work aimed to determine the doses in dogs submitted to chest and abdomen X rays using the technique of thermoluminescence (TL) dosimetry. The radiation doses were assessed using thermoluminescent dosimeters of calcium sulphate doped with dysprosium (CaSO{sub 4}:Dy) and lithium fluoride doped with magnesium and titanium (LiF:Mg,Ti). The obtained results indicate that is extremely important the assessment of radiation doses involved in veterinary diagnostic radiology procedures, to evaluate the delivered doses to the animals, to be used as a parameter in the individual monitoring of pet's owners, who assist the animal positioning, and to protect occupationally exposed workers at the Veterinary Radiology Clinics. (author)

  5. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several groups of human have been irradiated by accidental or medical exposure, if no gene defect has been associated to these exposures, some radioinduced cancers interesting several organs are observed among persons exposed over 100 to 200 mSv delivered at high dose rate. Numerous steps are now identified between the initial energy deposit in tissue and the aberrations of cell that lead to tumors but the sequence of events and the specific character of some of them are the subject of controversy. The stake of this controversy is the risk assessment. From the hypothesis called linear relationship without threshold is developed an approach that leads to predict cancers at any tiny dose without real scientific foundation. The nature and the intensity of biological effects depend on the quantity of energy absorbed in tissue and the modality of its distribution in space and time. The probability to reach a target (a gene) associated to the cancerating of tissue is directly proportional to the dose without any other threshold than the quantity of energy necessary to the effect, its probability of effect can be a more complex function and depends on the quality of the damage produced as well as the ability of the cell to repair the damage. These two parameters are influenced by the concentration of initial injuries in the target so by the quality of radiation and by the dose rate. The mechanisms of defence explain the low efficiency of radiation as carcinogen and then the linearity of effects in the area of low doses is certainly the least defensible scientific hypothesis for the prediction of the risks. (N.C.)

  6. Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Modulates Immune Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Gregory A. [Loma Linda Univ., CA (United States)

    2016-01-12

    In order to examine the effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the immune system we chose to examine an amplified adaptive cellular immunity response. This response is Type IV delayed-type hypersensitivity also called contact hypersensitivity. The agent fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) is a low molecular weight, lipophilic, reactive, fluorescent molecule that can be applied to the skin where it (hapten) reacts with proteins (carriers) to become a complete antigen. Exposure to FITC leads to sensitization which is easily measured as a hypersensitivity inflammatory reaction following a subsequent exposure to the ear. Ear swelling, eosinophil infiltration, immunoglobulin E production and cytokine secretion patterns characteristic of a “Th2 polarized” immune response are the components of the reaction. The reaction requires successful implementation of antigen processing and presentation by antigen presenting Langerhans cells, communication with naïve T lymphocytes in draining lymph nodes, expansion of activated T cell clones, migration of activated T cells to the circulation, and recruitment of memory T cells, macrophages and eosinophils to the site of the secondary challenge. Using this model our approach was to quantify system function rather than relying only on indirect biomarkers of cell. We measured the FITC-induced hypersensitivity reaction over a range of doses from 2 cGy to 2 Gy. Irradiations were performed during key events or prior to key events to deplete critical cell populations. In addition to quantifying the final inflammatory response, we assessed cell populations in peripheral blood and spleen, cytokine signatures, IgE levels and expression of genes associated with key processes in sensitization and elicitation/recall. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation would produce a biphasic effect on immune system function resulting in an enhancement at low doses and a depression at higher doses and suggested that this transition would occur in the

  7. Space Radiation Quality Factors and the Delta Ray Dose and Dose-Rate Reduction Effectiveness Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A; Cacao, Eliedonna; Alp, Murat

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the authors recommend that the dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor used for space radiation risk assessments should be based on a comparison of the biological effects of energetic electrons produced along a cosmic ray particles path in low fluence exposures to high dose-rate gamma-ray exposures of doses of about 1 Gy. Methods to implement this approach are described. PMID:26808878

  8. A Bayesian Semiparametric Model for Radiation Dose-Response Estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Kyoji; Misumi, Munechika; Cologne, John B; Cullings, Harry M

    2016-06-01

    In evaluating the risk of exposure to health hazards, characterizing the dose-response relationship and estimating acceptable exposure levels are the primary goals. In analyses of health risks associated with exposure to ionizing radiation, while there is a clear agreement that moderate to high radiation doses cause harmful effects in humans, little has been known about the possible biological effects at low doses, for example, below 0.1 Gy, which is the dose range relevant to most radiation exposures of concern today. A conventional approach to radiation dose-response estimation based on simple parametric forms, such as the linear nonthreshold model, can be misleading in evaluating the risk and, in particular, its uncertainty at low doses. As an alternative approach, we consider a Bayesian semiparametric model that has a connected piece-wise-linear dose-response function with prior distributions having an autoregressive structure among the random slope coefficients defined over closely spaced dose categories. With a simulation study and application to analysis of cancer incidence data among Japanese atomic bomb survivors, we show that this approach can produce smooth and flexible dose-response estimation while reasonably handling the risk uncertainty at low doses and elsewhere. With relatively few assumptions and modeling options to be made by the analyst, the method can be particularly useful in assessing risks associated with low-dose radiation exposures. PMID:26581473

  9. Multicenter study assessing ophthalmologist's knowledge towards radiation dose when prescribing CT scans for pediatric patients: A Saudi Arabian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain Almohiy

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Knowledge of Ophthalmologists towards the risk of radiation exposure in pediatric CT is poor and suggest a propensity of misappropriate radiation use and under-utilization of alternative radiation-free methods. Structured education sessions and deliberation of the radiation dangers with patients are recommended.

  10. Potential radiation doses from 1994 Hanford Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soldat, J.K.; Antonio, E.J.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the potential radiation doses to the public from releases originating at the Hanford Site. Members of the public are potentially exposed to low-levels of radiation from these effluents through a variety of pathways. The potential radiation doses to the public were calculated for the hypothetical MEI and for the general public residing within 80 km (50 mi) of the Hanford Site.

  11. Biological indicators for radiation absorbed dose: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological dosimetry has an important role to play in assessing the cumulative radiation exposure of persons working with radiation and also in estimating the true dose received during accidents involving external and internal exposure. Various biodosimetric methods have been tried to estimate radiation dose for the above purposes. Biodosimetric methods include cytogenetic, immunological and mutational assays. Each technique has certain advantages and disadvantages. We present here a review of each technique, the actual method used for detection of dose, the sensitivity of detection and its use in long term studies. (author)

  12. Radiation Doses Received by the Irish Population 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    People are constantly exposed to a variety of sources of both natural and artificial radioactivity. The radiation dose received by the population from such sources is periodically estimated by the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland RPII. This report is an update of a population dose assessment undertaken in 2008 and includes the most recent data available on the principal radiation exposure pathways. Wherever possible the collective dose and the resulting average annual dose to an individual living in Ireland, based on the most recently published figure for the population of Ireland, have been calculated for each of the pathways of exposure

  13. Occupational radiation doses during interventional procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuraeni, N.; Hiswara, E.; Kartikasari, D.; Waris, A.; Haryanto, F.

    2016-03-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is a type of fluoroscopy technique used in interventional radiology to clearly visualize blood vessels in a bony or dense soft tissue environment. The use of DSA procedures has been increased quite significantly in the Radiology departments in various cities in Indonesia. Various reports showed that both patients and medical staff received a noticeable radiation dose during the course of this procedure. A study had been carried out to measure these doses among interventionalist, nurse and radiographer. The results show that the interventionalist and the nurse, who stood quite close to the X-ray beams compared with the radiographer, received radiation higher than the others. The results also showed that the radiation dose received by medical staff were var depending upon the duration and their position against the X-ray beams. Compared tothe dose limits, however, the radiation dose received by all these three medical staff were still lower than the limits.

  14. Radioactivity measurements in the vicinity of the mine waste heap at Crossen and radiation dose assessment; Radioaktivitaetsmessungen in der Umgebung der Bergehalde Crossen und Abschaetzung der Strahlenexposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulzer, R.

    1998-09-01

    The radiation dose to the population living in the vicinity of the mine waste heap is assessed. The measurements carried out were to verify the dose relevance of ambient radioactivity on site, in particular the ingestion and inhalation pathways and the external exposure pathways. The nuclide Pb-210 was used as an indicator because of its large dose factor for assessment of ingestion and its airborne dispersion as an Rn-222 daughter product. The waste heap material releases large quantities of this nuclide. Ingestion of radioactivity from the waste heap may be caused by wind-borne erosion and activity deposition on plants in the area. Thererfore, the specific activities of Pb-210 and Ra-226 have been measured in soil and plant specimens sampled at various distances from the waste heap. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] Die Strahlenexposition der in der Naehe einer Bergehalde lebenden Bevoelkerung wird bestimmt. Zu diesem Zweck wurden Messungen realisiert, die den Ingestions- und Inhalationspfad sowie die externe Exposition fuer die vorgefundene Situation auf ihre Dosisrelevanz ueberpruefen sollten. Hierzu diente das Nuklid Pb-210 mit seinem grossen Dosisfaktor fuer die Ingestion und seiner besonderen Verbreitungsmoeglichkeit ueber die Luft als Tochter von Rn-222. Dieses wird aus dem Haldenmaterial in grossen Mengen freigesetzt. Haldenmaterial kann ueber den Ingestionspfad in den menschlichen Koerper aufgenommen werden, wenn es durch Winderosion auf Pflanzenoberflaechen in der Umgebung abgelagert wird.Deshalb wurden die spezifischen Aktivitaeten an Pb-210 und Ra-226 von Boden- und Pflanzenproben in verschiedenen Entfernungen zur Halde bestimmt.

  15. A new approach to radiopharmaceutical dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosimetry for bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals relies on an accurate measurement of the activity administered, a model for uptake of the pharmaceutical, and calculations of the dose to the target organ. The authors report here a new approach to experimental assessment of the radiation dose to bone using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometry. Ionizing radiations interact with mineralized bone tissue (hydroxyapatite) to produce dose-dependent concentrations of long-lived paramagnetic centers. They have successfully applied the EPR technique to bone tissues of an animal treated with a radiopharmaceutical to demonstrate its sensitivity towards radiation-induced centers in the mineralized tissue. Although the EPR bone dosimetry method is invasive, it does offer the first experimental technique for measuring and mapping the tissue response to the administered radioactivity

  16. Dose Assurance in Radiation Processing Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; Chadwick, K.H.; Nam, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Radiation processing relies to a large extent on dosimetry as control of proper operation. This applies in particular to radiation sterilization of medical products and food treatment, but also during development of any other process. The assurance that proper dosimetry is performed at the...... radiation processing plant can be obtained through the mediation of an international organization, and the IAEA is now implementing a dose assurance service for industrial radiation processing....

  17. Dose assurance in radiation processing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation processing relies to a large extent on dosimetry as control of proper operation. This applies in particular to radiation sterilization of medical products and food treatment, but also during development of any other process. The assurance that proper dosimetry is performed at the radiation processing plant can be obtained through the mediation of an international organization, and the IAEA is now implementing a dose assurance service for industrial radiation processing. (author)

  18. Dose assurance in radiation processing plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A.; Chadwick, K. H.; Nam, J. W.

    Radiation processing relies to a large extent on dosimetry as control of proper operation. This applies in particular to radiation sterilization of medical products and food treatment, but also during development of any other process. The assurance that proper dosimetry is performed at the radiation processing plant can be obtained through the mediation of an international organization, and the IAEA is now implementing a dose assurance service for industrial radiation processing.

  19. SU-E-I-89: Assessment of CT Radiation Dose and Image Quality for An Automated Tube Potential Selection Algorithm Using Pediatric Anthropomorphic and ACR Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmood, U; Erdi, Y; Wang, W [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, NY, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of General Electrics automated tube potential algorithm, kV assist (kVa) on radiation dose and image quality, with an emphasis on optimizing protocols based on noise texture. Methods: Radiation dose was assessed by inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLs) throughout the body of a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom (CIRS). The baseline protocol was: 120 kVp, 80 mA, 0.7s rotation time. Image quality was assessed by calculating the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and noise power spectrum (NPS) from the ACR CT accreditation phantom. CNRs were calculated according to the steps described in ACR CT phantom testing document. NPS was determined by taking the 3D FFT of the uniformity section of the ACR phantom. NPS and CNR were evaluated with and without kVa and for all available adaptive iterative statistical reconstruction (ASiR) settings, ranging from 0 to 100%. Each NPS was also evaluated for its peak frequency difference (PFD) with respect to the baseline protocol. Results: For the baseline protocol, CNR was found to decrease from 0.460 ± 0.182 to 0.420 ± 0.057 when kVa was activated. When compared against the baseline protocol, the PFD at ASiR of 40% yielded a decrease in noise magnitude as realized by the increase in CNR = 0.620 ± 0.040. The liver dose decreased by 30% with kVa activation. Conclusion: Application of kVa reduces the liver dose up to 30%. However, reduction in image quality for abdominal scans occurs when using the automated tube voltage selection feature at the baseline protocol. As demonstrated by the CNR and NPS analysis, the texture and magnitude of the noise in reconstructed images at ASiR 40% was found to be the same as our baseline images. We have demonstrated that 30% dose reduction is possible when using 40% ASiR with kVa in pediatric patients.

  20. TH-C-18A-06: Combined CT Image Quality and Radiation Dose Monitoring Program Based On Patient Data to Assess Consistency of Clinical Imaging Across Scanner Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: One of the principal challenges of clinical imaging is to achieve an ideal balance between image quality and radiation dose across multiple CT models. The number of scanners and protocols at large medical centers necessitates an automated quality assurance program to facilitate this objective. Therefore, the goal of this work was to implement an automated CT image quality and radiation dose monitoring program based on actual patient data and to use this program to assess consistency of protocols across CT scanner models. Methods: Patient CT scans are routed to a HIPPA compliant quality assurance server. CTDI, extracted using optical character recognition, and patient size, measured from the localizers, are used to calculate SSDE. A previously validated noise measurement algorithm determines the noise in uniform areas of the image across the scanned anatomy to generate a global noise level (GNL). Using this program, 2358 abdominopelvic scans acquired on three commercial CT scanners were analyzed. Median SSDE and GNL were compared across scanner models and trends in SSDE and GNL with patient size were used to determine the impact of differing automatic exposure control (AEC) algorithms. Results: There was a significant difference in both SSDE and GNL across scanner models (9–33% and 15–35% for SSDE and GNL, respectively). Adjusting all protocols to achieve the same image noise would reduce patient dose by 27–45% depending on scanner model. Additionally, differences in AEC methodologies across vendors resulted in disparate relationships of SSDE and GNL with patient size. Conclusion: The difference in noise across scanner models indicates that protocols are not optimally matched to achieve consistent image quality. Our results indicated substantial possibility for dose reduction while achieving more consistent image appearance. Finally, the difference in AEC methodologies suggests the need for size-specific CT protocols to minimize variability in image

  1. Radiation dose assessment for 137Cs from fish in the Aegean Sea before and after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effective doses in fish from the Aegean Sea were calculated for the nuclide 137Cs covering the period 1975-1982. The effective dose varies between 3x10-5 and 10x10-5 mSv y-1 for adults and 14x10-5 to 56x10-5 y-1 for children, while the cumulative effective dose for the period 1975-1982 equals to 40.86x10-5 and 229.57x10-5 for adults and children of 10 y old, resp. When compared to doses derived from the Chernobyl accident (May 1986) it was found that the additional dose incurred by Greek individuals in May 1986 was approximately equal to the cumulative dose of 8 y contribution period (1975-1982) for adults and to a year's contribution for children of 10 y old. (author) 9 refs.; 3 figs

  2. Assessment of shielding analysis methods, codes, and data for spent fuel transport/storage applications. [Radiation dose rates from shielded spent fuels and high-level radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, C.V.; Broadhead, B.L.; Hermann, O.W.; Tang, J.S.; Cramer, S.N.; Gauthey, J.C.; Kirk, B.L.; Roussin, R.W.

    1988-07-01

    This report provides a preliminary assessment of the computational tools and existing methods used to obtain radiation dose rates from shielded spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). Particular emphasis is placed on analysis tools and techniques applicable to facilities/equipment designed for the transport or storage of spent nuclear fuel or HLW. Applications to cask transport, storage, and facility handling are considered. The report reviews the analytic techniques for generating appropriate radiation sources, evaluating the radiation transport through the shield, and calculating the dose at a desired point or surface exterior to the shield. Discrete ordinates, Monte Carlo, and point kernel methods for evaluating radiation transport are reviewed, along with existing codes and data that utilize these methods. A literature survey was employed to select a cadre of codes and data libraries to be reviewed. The selection process was based on specific criteria presented in the report. Separate summaries were written for several codes (or family of codes) that provided information on the method of solution, limitations and advantages, availability, data access, ease of use, and known accuracy. For each data library, the summary covers the source of the data, applicability of these data, and known verification efforts. Finally, the report discusses the overall status of spent fuel shielding analysis techniques and attempts to illustrate areas where inaccuracy and/or uncertainty exist. The report notes the advantages and limitations of several analysis procedures and illustrates the importance of using adequate cross-section data sets. Additional work is recommended to enable final selection/validation of analysis tools that will best meet the US Department of Energy's requirements for use in developing a viable HLW management system. 188 refs., 16 figs., 27 tabs.

  3. Radiation Doses from Computed tomography in Iraq

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation doses to Patient during CT scanner and the radiological risk are significant. Patient dose survey has been conducted to investigate the Iraq patient radiation doses received in CT scanners in order to established reference dose levels. These doses are Entrance Surface Dose (ESD),computed tomography dose index(CTDI)), and dose length product (DLP). Two CT scanner were investigated in this study were, Siemens Somatom Plus 4, located in at medical city of Baghdad, and Philips, Optimus located in privet hospital at Baghdad. ESD were measured by TLD and Dosimax ionization chamber for head, chest, and abdomen for both sex and different weights. The TLD results were higher than that measured with Dosimax due to scattered radiation .The scattering factor which is the ratio between dose measured by TLD and that measured by ionization chamber range between (1.14-1.34) compare to international measurement which is range between (1.1-1.5).The (ESD) measured by the two methods were agree well after the subtraction of scattering dose, and have compered with original research. Dose profile were measured using array of TLD chips shows that its full width at half maximum is(7.99 mm) approximately equal the slice thickness(8 mm). Our results compare with reference level at U.K, European Guidelines and

  4. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. ARRRG and FOOD: computer programs for calculating radiation dose to man from radionuclides in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer programs ARRRG and FOOD were written to facilitate the calculation of internal radiation doses to man from the radionuclides in the environment and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. Using ARRRG, radiation doses to man may be calculated for radionuclides released to bodies of water from which people might obtain fish, other aquatic foods, or drinking water, and in which they might fish, swim or boat. With the FOOD program, radiation doses to man may be calculated from deposition on farm or garden soil and crops during either an atmospheric or water release of radionuclides. Deposition may be either directly from the air or from irrigation water. Fifteen crop or animal product pathways may be chosen. ARRAG and FOOD doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. Doses calculated are a one-year dose and a committed dose from one year of exposure. The exposure is usually considered as chronic; however, equations are included to calculate dose and dose commitment from acute (one-time) exposure. The equations for calculating internal dose and dose commitment are derived from those given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for body burdens and Maximum Permissible Concentration (MPC) of each radionuclide. The radiation doses from external exposure to contaminated farm fields or shorelines are calculated assuming an infinite flat plane source of radionuclides. A factor of two is included for surface roughness. A modifying factor to compensate for finite extent is included in the shoreline calculations

  5. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. ARRRG and FOOD: computer programs for calculating radiation dose to man from radionuclides in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, B.A.; Roswell, R.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Strenge, D.L.

    1980-06-01

    The computer programs ARRRG and FOOD were written to facilitate the calculation of internal radiation doses to man from the radionuclides in the environment and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. Using ARRRG, radiation doses to man may be calculated for radionuclides released to bodies of water from which people might obtain fish, other aquatic foods, or drinking water, and in which they might fish, swim or boat. With the FOOD program, radiation doses to man may be calculated from deposition on farm or garden soil and crops during either an atmospheric or water release of radionuclides. Deposition may be either directly from the air or from irrigation water. Fifteen crop or animal product pathways may be chosen. ARRAG and FOOD doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. Doses calculated are a one-year dose and a committed dose from one year of exposure. The exposure is usually considered as chronic; however, equations are included to calculate dose and dose commitment from acute (one-time) exposure. The equations for calculating internal dose and dose commitment are derived from those given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for body burdens and Maximum Permissible Concentration (MPC) of each radionuclide. The radiation doses from external exposure to contaminated farm fields or shorelines are calculated assuming an infinite flat plane source of radionuclides. A factor of two is included for surface roughness. A modifying factor to compensate for finite extent is included in the shoreline calculations.

  6. Irradiation dose assessment in persons exposed to ionizing radiation through extrapolation of data from clinic-chemical changes in irradiated laboratory animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt is made to determine the dose within 24,48 and 72 hours of eventual exposure of healthy individuals to ionizing radiation through extrapolation of data retrieved from rats exposed to irradiation with 1, 3, 6 and 9 Gy X-rays. Seven clinic-chemical parameters are used: urea in the urine, taurine in the urine, urea in the serum, serum alkaline phosphatase, total serum lipids, sialic acid and thromboxane in the serum. A special formula is worked out and used for extrapolation of the experimental data, retrieved from irradiated rats, with due consideration to differences in the intensity of metabolic processes and species' radiosensitivity of rats and humans. The values of the aforementioned parameters that could be obtained upon eventual exposure of persons to ionizing irradiation are determined through computerization of the experimental data. It is believed that an accessible model for radiation dose assessment in the first three days after accidental exposure of human beings to ionizing irradiation is created. 5 refs., 4 figs. (author)

  7. Near Real-Time Assessment of Anatomic and Dosimetric Variations for Head and Neck Radiation Therapy via Graphics Processing Unit–based Dose Deformation Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, X. Sharon, E-mail: xqi@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Santhanam, Anand; Neylon, John; Min, Yugang; Armstrong, Tess; Sheng, Ke [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Staton, Robert J.; Pukala, Jason [Department of Radiation Oncology, UF Health Cancer Center - Orlando Health, Orlando, Florida (United States); Pham, Andrew; Low, Daniel A.; Lee, Steve P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Steinberg, Michael; Manon, Rafael [Department of Radiation Oncology, UF Health Cancer Center - Orlando Health, Orlando, Florida (United States); Chen, Allen M.; Kupelian, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to systematically monitor anatomic variations and their dosimetric consequences during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck (H&N) cancer by using a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based deformable image registration (DIR) framework. Methods and Materials: Eleven IMRT H&N patients undergoing IMRT with daily megavoltage computed tomography (CT) and weekly kilovoltage CT (kVCT) scans were included in this analysis. Pretreatment kVCTs were automatically registered with their corresponding planning CTs through a GPU-based DIR framework. The deformation of each contoured structure in the H&N region was computed to account for nonrigid change in the patient setup. The Jacobian determinant of the planning target volumes and the surrounding critical structures were used to quantify anatomical volume changes. The actual delivered dose was calculated accounting for the organ deformation. The dose distribution uncertainties due to registration errors were estimated using a landmark-based gamma evaluation. Results: Dramatic interfractional anatomic changes were observed. During the treatment course of 6 to 7 weeks, the parotid gland volumes changed up to 34.7%, and the center-of-mass displacement of the 2 parotid glands varied in the range of 0.9 to 8.8 mm. For the primary treatment volume, the cumulative minimum and mean and equivalent uniform doses assessed by the weekly kVCTs were lower than the planned doses by up to 14.9% (P=.14), 2% (P=.39), and 7.3% (P=.05), respectively. The cumulative mean doses were significantly higher than the planned dose for the left parotid (P=.03) and right parotid glands (P=.006). The computation including DIR and dose accumulation was ultrafast (∼45 seconds) with registration accuracy at the subvoxel level. Conclusions: A systematic analysis of anatomic variations in the H&N region and their dosimetric consequences is critical in improving treatment efficacy. Nearly real

  8. Radiation doses to personnel during common angiographic procedures involving DSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the radiation doses received by the staff are monitored during common angiographic procedures involving digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Doses are assessed by direct measurement using lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs). The entrance surface dose (mGy) at the different locations on each of the staff for the three different procedures are given. As the result, on the whole, the main operator, who is standing closest to the x-ray tube and patient, receive the highest dose while the radiographer receives the lowest dose

  9. Radiation doses - maps and magnitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A NRPB leaflet in the 'At-a-Glance' Series presents information on the numerous sources and magnitude of exposure of man to radiation. These include the medical use of radiation, radioactive discharges to the environment, cosmic rays, gamma rays from the ground and buildings, radon gas and food and drink. A Pie chart represents the percentage contribution of each of those sources. Finally, the terms becquerel, microsievert and millisievert are explained. (U.K.)

  10. External radiation exposure of residents living close to the Mayak facility: main sources, dose estimates, and comparison with earlier assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokrov, Yury G

    2004-07-01

    In 1951 and 1952 specialists from the Mayak production association investigated the radiological situation in the area of the Metlinski reservoir that was located 5-7 km from the site of liquid radioactive waste (LRW) discharge. Based on their measurements of both the specific radioactivity in the water and the dose-rate above the water surface, the gamma-field above the water surface in 1951 was demonstrated to be mainly due to (95)Zr+(95)Nb. The dose-rate at the shore of the reservoir was calculated for the period 1949-1951. In November and December 1951, the gamma-field at the shore was mainly due to (140)Ba+(140)La. For the period 1949-1951, the external exposure of the Metlino population due to the decay of these radionuclides was about 200 R (2 Sv), most of the dose having been produced in 1951. The contribution of (137)Cs to external doses did at that time probably not exceed a fraction of several percent. This finding is in contradiction to the assumptions made in the most recent TRDS-2000 system that was developed to reconstruct the doses to the residents of the Techa river. The results presented here demonstrate that the reconstruction of external doses received by the Metlino population as well as by the Techa river residents can be improved for the most critical period between 1949 and 1954. PMID:15221313

  11. Dose mapping for documentation of radiation sterilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.

    1999-01-01

    The radiation sterilization standards EN 552 and ISO 11137 require that dose mapping in real or simulated product be carried in connection with the process qualification. This paper reviews the recommendations given in the standards and discusses the difficulties and limitations of practical dose...

  12. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ware, J.H.; Rusek, A.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C.; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X.S.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  13. Dose-effect relationship in radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberhausen, E.

    1983-01-01

    As criterion for the evaluation of risk in connection with nuclear accidents the diminishing of life expectance is assumed. This would allow a better weighting of the different detriments. The possible dose-effect relations for the different detriments caused by radiation are discussed. Some models for a realistic evaluation of the different radiation detriments are proposed.

  14. Radiation Doses from some Egyptian industrial products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual dose equivalent from exposures to radionuclides contained in some industrial ores and their waste products, were estimated using collective data from these industrial materials. This study takes in consideration industrial ores and their waste products. The materials studied were iron and steel products, cement manufacture, phosphate fertilizers, phosphoric acid production as well as ores used in ceramic production and waste. An integrated method was used in mathematical assumption form for the purpose of calculating the radiation dose equivalent. The calculated values of the annual radiation doses for workers were found to be significant. These results are discussed in the light of international exposure limits for workers

  15. Health effect of low dose/low dose rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The clarified and non-clarified scientific knowledge is discussed to consider the cause of confusion of explanation of the title subject. The low dose is defined roughly lower than 200 mGy and low dose rate, 0.05 mGy/min. The health effect is evaluated from 2 aspects of clinical symptom/radiation hazard protection. In the clinical aspect, the effect is classified in physical (early and late) and genetic ones, and is classified in stochastic (no threshold value, TV) and deterministic (with TV) ones from the radioprotection aspect. Although the absence of TV in the carcinogenic and genetic effects has not been proved, ICRP employs the stochastic standpoint from the safety aspect for radioprotection. The lowest human TV known now is 100 mGy, meaning that human deterministic effect would not be generated below this dose. Genetic deterministic effect can be observable only in animal experiments. These facts suggest that the practical risk of exposure to <100 mGy in human is the carcinogenesis. The relationship between carcinogenic risk in A-bomb survivors and their exposed dose are found fitted to the linear no TV model, but the epidemiologic data, because of restriction of subject number analyzed, do not always mean that the model is applicable even below the dose <100 mGy. This would be one of confusing causes in explanation: no carcinogenic risk at <100 mGy or risk linear to dose even at <100 mGy, neither of which is scientifically conclusive at present. Also mentioned is the scarce risk of cancer in residents living in the high background radiation regions in the world in comparison with that in the A-bomb survivors exposed to the chronic or acute low dose/dose rate. Molecular events are explained for the low-dose radiation-induced DNA damage and its repair, gene mutation and chromosome aberration, hypothesis of carcinogenesis by mutation, and non-targeting effect of radiation (bystander effect and gene instability). Further researches to elucidate the low dose

  16. SU-E-I-81: Assessment of CT Radiation Dose and Image Quality for An Automated Tube Potential Selection Algorithm Using Adult Anthropomorphic and ACR Phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmood, U; Erdi, Y; Wang, W [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, NY, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of General Electrics (GE) automated tube potential algorithm, kV assist (kVa) on radiation dose and image quality, with an emphasis on optimizing protocols based on noise texture. Methods: Radiation dose was assessed by inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLs) throughout the body of an adult anthropomorphic phantom (CIRS). The baseline protocol was: 120 kVp, Auto mA (180 to 380 mA), noise index (NI) = 14, adaptive iterative statistical reconstruction (ASiR) of 20%, 0.8s rotation time. Image quality was evaluated by calculating the contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and noise power spectrum (NPS) from the ACR CT accreditation phantom. CNRs were calculated according to the steps described in ACR CT phantom testing document. NPS was determined by taking the 3D FFT of the uniformity section of the ACR phantom. NPS and CNR were evaluated with and without kVa and for all available adaptive iterative statistical reconstruction (ASiR) settings, ranging from 0 to 100%. Each NPS was also evaluated for its peak frequency difference (PFD) with respect to the baseline protocol. Results: The CNR for the adult male was found to decrease from CNR = 0.912 ± 0.045 for the baseline protocol without kVa to a CNR = 0.756 ± 0.049 with kVa activated. When compared against the baseline protocol, the PFD at ASiR of 40% yielded a decrease in noise magnitude as realized by the increase in CNR = 0.903 ± 0.023. The difference in the central liver dose with and without kVa was found to be 0.07%. Conclusion: Dose reduction was insignificant in the adult phantom. As determined by NPS analysis, ASiR of 40% produced images with similar noise texture to the baseline protocol. However, the CNR at ASiR of 40% with kVa fails to meet the current ACR CNR passing requirement of 1.0.

  17. Radiation Dose and Risk Assessments from Polonium-210 in Green Mussels (Perna viridis) and Seafood Consumers Living nearby the Industrial Area in Chonburi Province, Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tumnoi, Y.; Phaopeng, N. [Office of Atoms for Peace - OAP (Thailand)

    2014-07-01

    Marine environmental samples including seawater (filtered and unfiltered), suspended particles, and green mussels (Perna viridis) were collected from Sriracha and Angsira areas located in Chonburi province in order to determine Po-210 radioactivity. The former was chosen because it is generally believed that this area has been contaminated by one of the largest industrial estates in Thailand and others human-activities (non-nuclear activities) nearby such as oil refineries and Coal Power Plants. Discharges, ashes, and wastes released from these activities may result in an increase of Po-210 concentration in marine environment when compared to other areas. The later was designated to serve as a control site in this study since this area is unlikely to be impacted by industrial activities. Our results revealed that, in the filtered seawater, averaged values of Po-210 level were 0.26 + 0.14 mBq/L (Sriracha) and 0.56 + 0.42 mBq/L (Angsira) and, in the unfiltered seawater, means of Po-210 radioactivity were 2.37 + 0.32 mBq/L (Sriracha) and 4.20 + 2.78 mBq/L (Angsira). Furthermore, the suspended particles contained Po-210 concentrations with averaged values of 14.11 + 8.87 Bq/kg dw (Sriracha) and 102.21 + 51.49 Bq/kg dw (Angsira) while averaged Po-210 levels of 35.74 + 17.53 Bq/kg dw (Sriracha) and 71.12 + 62.88 Bq/kg dw (Angsira) were found in the green mussels examined. The present finding indicates that there is no radiological impact caused by those human activities to the marine environment at Sriracha. Radiation dose assessment was also performed in both the green mussels and human who consume green mussels. The results show that the green mussels farmed at Sriracha and Angsira received averaged radiation dose rates from Po-210 at 0.0007 and 0.0015 mGy/d, respectively. In addition, our results reveal that populations living in Chonburi province and ingesting the green mussels from these 2 locations received radiation dose rates from Po-210 at the means of 44.25 and

  18. Estimation of radiation risks at low dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents a review of the effects caused by radiation in low doses, or at low dose rates. For the inheritable (or ''genetic''), as well as for the cancer producing effects of radiation, present evidence is consistent with: (a) a non-linear relationship between the frequency of at least some forms of these effects, with comparing frequencies caused by doses many times those received annually from natural sources, with those caused by lower doses; (b) a probably linear relationship, however, between dose and frequency of effects for dose rates in the region of that received from natural sources, or at several times this rate; (c) no evidence to indicate the existence of a threshold dose below which such effects are not produced, and a strong inference from the mode of action of radiation on cells at low dose rates that no such thresholds are likely to apply to the detrimental, cancer-producing or inheritable, effects resulting from unrepaired damage to single cells. 19 refs

  19. Program for rapid dose assessment in criticality accident, RADAPAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a criticality accident, a person near fissile material can receive extremely high dose which can cause acute health effect. For such a case, medical treatment should be carried out for the exposed person, according to severity of the exposure. Then, radiation dose should be rapidly assessed soon after an outbreak of an accident. Dose assessment based upon the quantity of induced 24Na in human body through neutron exposure is expected as one of useful dosimetry techniques in a criticality accident. A dose assessment program, called RADAPAS (RApid Dose Assessment Program from Activated Sodium in Criticality Accidents), was therefore developed to assess rapidly radiation dose to exposed persons from activity of induced 24Na. RADAPAS consists of two parts; one is a database part and the other is a part for execution of dose calculation. The database contains data compendiums of energy spectra and dose conversion coefficients from specific activity of 24Na induced in human body, which had been derived in a previous analysis using Monte Carlo calculation code. Information for criticality configuration or characteristics of radiation in the accident field is to be interactively given with interface displays in the dose calculation. RADAPAS can rapidly derive radiation dose to the exposed person from the given information and measured 24Na specific activity by using the conversion coefficient in database. This report describes data for dose conversions and dose calculation in RADAPAS and explains how to use the program. (author)

  20. The embryogenesis of dose assessment at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several significant events occurred between 1955 and 1960 that resulted in major changes in environmental monitoring at Hanford and in the initiation of comprehensive dose assessments. These included: (1) specification of dose limits for nonoccupational exposure (including internal emitters); (2) a national and international awakening to the need for managing the disposal of radioactive wastes; (3) identification of the most important radionuclides and their sources of exposure; (4) data that quantified the transfer coefficients of nuclides along environmental pathways; and (5) development of greatly improved radiation detection instrumentation. In response to a growing need, the Hanford Laboratories formed the Environmental Studies and Evaluation component. This group revamped the monitoring and sampling programs so that analytical results contributed directly to dose estimation. Special studies were conducted to ascertain local dietary and recreational habits that affected dose calculations and to calibrate the models. These studies involved extensive contact with the public and governmental agencies, which elicited a positive reaction

  1. Radiation doses from computed tomography in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent surveys in various countries have shown that computed tomography (CT) is a significant and growing contributor to the radiation dose from diagnostic radiology. Australia, with 332 CT scanners (18 per million people), is well endowed with CT equipment compared to European countries (6 to 13 per million people). Only Japan, with 8500 units (78 per million people), has a significantly higher proportion of CT scanners. In view of this, a survey of CT facilities, frequency of examinations, techniques and patient doses has been performed in Australia. It is estimated that there are 1 million CT examinations in Australia each year, resulting in a collective effective dose of 7000 Sv and a per caput dose of 0.39 mSv. This per caput dose is much larger than found in earlier studies in the UK and New Zealand but is less than 0.48 mSv in Japan. Using the ICRP risk factors, radiation doses from CT could be inducing about 280 fatal cancers per year in Australia. CT is therefore a significant, if not the major, single contributor to radiation doses and possible risk from diagnostic radiology. (authors)

  2. Radiation doses from computed tomography in Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, J.E.M.; Tingey, D.R.C

    1997-11-01

    Recent surveys in various countries have shown that computed tomography (CT) is a significant and growing contributor to the radiation dose from diagnostic radiology. Australia, with 332 CT scanners (18 per million people), is well endowed with CT equipment compared to European countries (6 to 13 per million people). Only Japan, with 8500 units (78 per million people), has a significantly higher proportion of CT scanners. In view of this, a survey of CT facilities, frequency of examinations, techniques and patient doses has been performed in Australia. It is estimated that there are 1 million CT examinations in Australia each year, resulting in a collective effective dose of 7000 Sv and a per caput dose of 0.39 mSv. This per caput dose is much larger than found in earlier studies in the UK and New Zealand but is less than 0.48 mSv in Japan. Using the ICRP risk factors, radiation doses from CT could be inducing about 280 fatal cancers per year in Australia. CT is therefore a significant, if not the major, single contributor to radiation doses and possible risk from diagnostic radiology. (authors) 28 refs., 11 tabs., 10 figs.

  3. Patient perspectives on radiation dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Joyce

    2014-03-01

    People with genetic cancer syndromes have a special interest in imaging. They also have special risk factors with respect to radiation. They need to utilize the potential of imaging while keeping in mind concerns about cumulative radiation exposure. Before imaging, early detection of problems was limited. With imaging, issues can be identified when they are small and a good plan of action can be developed early. Operations can be planned and metastatic cancer avoided. The positive contribution of imaging to the care of these patients can be profound. However, this additional surveillance is not without cost. An average patient with 1 of these syndromes will undergo 100 or more scans in their lifetime. Imaging professionals should be able to describe the risks and benefits of each scan in terms that the patient and the ordering physician can understand to make smart decisions about the ordering of scans. Why CT versus MRI? When are x-ray or ultrasound appropriate, and when are they not? What are the costs and the medical risks for the patient? What value does this picture add for the physician? Is there a way to answer the medical question with a test other than a scan? Medicine is a team sport, and the patient is an integral member of the team. PMID:24589397

  4. Radioactivity of cigarettes and the importance of (210)Po and thorium isotopes for radiation dose assessment due to smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubalek, Davor; Serša, Gregor; Štrok, Marko; Benedik, Ljudmila; Jeran, Zvonka

    2016-05-01

    Tobacco and tobacco smoke are very complex mixtures. In addition to various chemical and organic compounds they also contain natural radioactive elements (radionuclides). In this work, the natural radionuclide activity concentrations ((234)U, (238)U, (228)Th, (230)Th, (232)Th, (226)Ra, (210)Pb and (210)Po) of nine different cigarette samples available on the Slovenian market are reported. In addition to (210)Po, the transfer of thorium isotopes from a cigarette to a smoker's body and lungs have been determined for the first time. Cigarette smoke and exhaled air from smokers' lungs were collected from volunteer smokers (C-4 brand) to determinate what quantity of (210)Po and thorium isotopes is transferred from the tobacco to the smoker's lungs. Cigarette ash and smoked filters were also collected and analysed. Among the determined isotopes, (210)Pb and (210)Po showed the highest activity concentrations. During the smoking of one cigarette approximately 22% of (210)Po (and presumably its predecessor (210)Pb), 0.6% of (228)Th, 24% of (230)Th, and 31% of (232)Th are transferred from the cigarette and retained in the smoker's body. The estimated annual effective dose for smokers is 61 μSv/year from (210)Po; 9 μSv/year from (210)Pb; 6 μSv/year from (228)Th; 47 μSv/year from (230)Th, and 37 μSv/year from (232)Th. These results show the importance of thorium isotopes in contributing to the annual effective dose for smoking. PMID:26942842

  5. Radioactivity of cigarettes and the importance of (210)Po and thorium isotopes for radiation dose assessment due to smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubalek, Davor; Serša, Gregor; Štrok, Marko; Benedik, Ljudmila; Jeran, Zvonka

    2016-05-01

    Tobacco and tobacco smoke are very complex mixtures. In addition to various chemical and organic compounds they also contain natural radioactive elements (radionuclides). In this work, the natural radionuclide activity concentrations ((234)U, (238)U, (228)Th, (230)Th, (232)Th, (226)Ra, (210)Pb and (210)Po) of nine different cigarette samples available on the Slovenian market are reported. In addition to (210)Po, the transfer of thorium isotopes from a cigarette to a smoker's body and lungs have been determined for the first time. Cigarette smoke and exhaled air from smokers' lungs were collected from volunteer smokers (C-4 brand) to determinate what quantity of (210)Po and thorium isotopes is transferred from the tobacco to the smoker's lungs. Cigarette ash and smoked filters were also collected and analysed. Among the determined isotopes, (210)Pb and (210)Po showed the highest activity concentrations. During the smoking of one cigarette approximately 22% of (210)Po (and presumably its predecessor (210)Pb), 0.6% of (228)Th, 24% of (230)Th, and 31% of (232)Th are transferred from the cigarette and retained in the smoker's body. The estimated annual effective dose for smokers is 61 μSv/year from (210)Po; 9 μSv/year from (210)Pb; 6 μSv/year from (228)Th; 47 μSv/year from (230)Th, and 37 μSv/year from (232)Th. These results show the importance of thorium isotopes in contributing to the annual effective dose for smoking.

  6. Radiation doses in interventional radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the radiation doses for the patients undergoing interventional radiology and to analyze the dose - influencing factors. Methods: The clinical data of 461 patients undergoing interventional radiology, including cerebral angiography (CEA), cerebral aneurysm embolism (CAE), superselective hepatic arterial chemoembolization (SHAG), coronary angiography (COA), percutaneous intracoronary stent implantation (PISI), cardiac radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA), and permanent cardiac pacemaker implantation (PCPI) were collected to observe the cumulative air kerma (CAK), dose area product (DAP), and fluoroscopy time, and effective dose was estimated using the conversion factors. Results: The effective doses for CEA, CAE, SHAG, COA, PISI, RFCA, and PCPI were (0.33 ±0.20), (0.49 ±0.35), (6.92 ±4.19),(0.76 ±0.91), (2.35 ± 1.47), (0.50 ±0.74), and (0.67 ±0.70) Sv,respectively. In 126 of the 416 patients (26%), the effective doses were greater than 1 Sv, and the effective doses of 10 person-times were greater than 10 Sv, all of which were observed in the patients undergoing SHAG. The CAK values for CEA, CAE, SHAG, COA, PISI, RFCA, and PCPI were (0.55 ±0.43), (1.34 ± 1.11), (0.95 ±0.57), (0.32 ±0.31), (0.91 ±0.33), (0.16 ±0.22), and (0.15 ±0.14) Gy, respectively. The CAK values were greater than 1 Gy in 59 of the 461 patients (12.8%), greater than 2 Gy in 11 cases (2.4%), and greater than 3 Gy in 1 CEA cases and 1 CEA case, respectively. Conclusions: There is a wide variation range in radiation dose for different procedures. As most interventional radiology procedure can result in clinically significant radiation dose to the patient, stricter dose control should be carried out. (authors)

  7. Radiation dose in temporomandibular joint zonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coucke, M.E.; Bourgoignie, R.R.; Dermaut, L.R.; Bourgoignie, K.A.; Jacobs, R.J. (Department of Orthodontics, Universitair Ziekenhuis, Ghent (Belgium))

    1991-06-01

    Temporomandibular joint morphology and function can be evaluated by panoramic zonography. Thermoluminescent dosimetry was applied to evaluate the radiation dose to predetermined sites on a phantom eye, thyroid, pituitary, and parotid, and the dose distribution on the skin of the head and neck when the TMJ program of the Zonarc panoramic x-ray unit was used. Findings are discussed with reference to similar radiographic techniques.

  8. Epigenomic Adaptation to Low Dose Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gould, Michael N. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-30

    The overall hypothesis of this grant application is that the adaptive responses elicited by low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) result in part from heritable DNA methylation changes in the epigenome. In the final budget period at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, we will specifically address this hypothesis by determining if the epigenetically labile, differentially methylated regions (DMRs) that regulate parental-specific expression of imprinted genes are deregulated in agouti mice by low dose radiation exposure during gestation. This information is particularly important to ascertain given the 1) increased human exposure to medical sources of radiation; 2) increased number of people predicted to live and work in space; and 3) enhanced citizen concern about radiation exposure from nuclear power plant accidents and terrorist ‘dirty bombs.’

  9. Imaging of Radiation Dose for Stereotactic Radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Timothy Y; Almond, Peter R; Park, Hwan C; Lindberg, Robert D; Shields, Christopher B

    2015-01-01

    The distributions of radiation dose for stereotactic radiosurgery, using a modified linear accelerator (Philips SL-25 and SRS-200), have been studied by using three different dosimeters: (1) ferrous-agarose-xylenol orange (FAX) gels, (2) TLD, and (3) thick-emulsion GafChromic dye film. These dosimeters were loaded into a small volume of defect in a phantom head. A regular linac stereotactic radiosurgery treatment was then given to the phantom head for each type of dosimeter. The measured radiation dose and its distributions were found to be in good agreement with those calculated by the treatment planning computer. PMID:27421869

  10. High dose dosimetry for radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation processing today offers various advantages in the field of sterilization of medical and pharmaceutical products, food preservation, treatment of chemical materials and a variety of other products widely used in modern society, all of which are of direct relevance to health and welfare. The safety and economic importance of radiation processing is clearly recognized. It is understood that reliable dosimetry is a key parameter for quality assurance of radiation processing and irradiated products. Furthermore, the standardization of dosimetry can provide a justification for the regulatory approval of irradiated products and form the basis of international clearance for free trade. After the initiation of the Agency's high dose standardization programme (1977), the first IAEA Symposium on High Dose Dosimetry was organized in 1984. As a result, concern as to the necessity of reliable dosimetry has greatly escalated not only in the scientific community but also in the radiation processing industry. The second International Symposium on High Dose Dosimetry for Radiation Processing was held in Vienna from 5 to 9 November, 1990, with a view to providing an international forum for the exchange of technical information on up to date developments in this particular field. The scientific programme held promises for an authoritative account of the status of high dose dosimetry throughout the world in 1990. Forty-one papers presented at the meeting discussed the development of new techniques, the improvement of reference and routine dosimetry systems, and the quality control and assurance of dosimetry. Refs, figs and tabs

  11. Radiation doses to children with shunt-treated hydrocephalus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmedal, Lise J. [Helse Fonna, Department of Radiology, Stord Hospital, Stord (Norway); Friberg, Eva G.; Boerretzen, Ingelin; Olerud, Hilde [The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Oesteraas (Norway); Laegreid, Liv [Haukeland University Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Bergen (Norway); Rosendahl, Karen [University of Bergen, Department of Surgical Sciences, Radiology Section, Bergen (Norway); Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, London (United Kingdom)

    2007-12-15

    Children with shunt-treated hydrocephalus are still followed routinely with frequent head CT scans. To estimate the effective dose, brain and lens doses from these examinations during childhood, and to assess dose variation per examination. All children born between 1983 and 1995 and treated for hydrocephalus between 1983 and 2002 were included. We retrospectively registered the number of examinations and the applied scan parameters. The effective dose was calculated using mean conversion factors from the CT dose index measured free in air, while doses to the lens and brain were estimated using tabulated CT dose index values measured in a head phantom. A total of 687 CT examinations were performed in 67 children. The mean effective dose, lens dose and brain dose to children over 6 months of age were 1.2 mSv, 52 mGy and 33 mGy, respectively, and the corresponding doses to younger children were 3.2 mSv, 60 mGy and 48 mGy. The effective dose per CT examination varied by a factor of 64. None of the children was exposed to doses known to cause deterministic effects. However, since the threshold for radiation-induced damage is not known with certainty, alternative modalities such as US and MRI should be used whenever possible. (orig.)

  12. Radiation Leukemogenesis at Low Dose Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weil, Michael; Ullrich, Robert

    2013-09-25

    The major goals of this program were to study the efficacy of low dose rate radiation exposures for the induction of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and to characterize the leukemias that are caused by radiation exposures at low dose rate. An irradiator facility was designed and constructed that allows large numbers of mice to be irradiated at low dose rates for protracted periods (up to their life span). To the best of our knowledge this facility is unique in the US and it was subsequently used to study radioprotectors being developed for radiological defense (PLoS One. 7(3), e33044, 2012) and is currently being used to study the role of genetic background in susceptibility to radiation-induced lung cancer. One result of the irradiation was expected; low dose rate exposures are ineffective in inducing AML. However, another result was completely unexpected; the irradiated mice had a very high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), approximately 50%. It was unexpected because acute exposures are ineffective in increasing HCC incidence above background. This is a potential important finding for setting exposure limits because it supports the concept of an 'inverse dose rate effect' for some tumor types. That is, for the development of some tumor types low dose rate exposures carry greater risks than acute exposures.

  13. Errors and Uncertainties in Dose Reconstruction for Radiation Effects Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2008-04-14

    Dose reconstruction for studies of the health effects of ionizing radiation have been carried out for many decades. Major studies have included Japanese bomb survivors, atomic veterans, downwinders of the Nevada Test Site and Hanford, underground uranium miners, and populations of nuclear workers. For such studies to be credible, significant effort must be put into applying the best science to reconstructing unbiased absorbed doses to tissues and organs as a function of time. In many cases, more and more sophisticated dose reconstruction methods have been developed as studies progressed. For the example of the Japanese bomb survivors, the dose surrogate “distance from the hypocenter” was replaced by slant range, and then by TD65 doses, DS86 doses, and more recently DS02 doses. Over the years, it has become increasingly clear that an equal level of effort must be expended on the quantitative assessment of uncertainty in such doses, and to reducing and managing uncertainty. In this context, this paper reviews difficulties in terminology, explores the nature of Berkson and classical uncertainties in dose reconstruction through examples, and proposes a path forward for Joint Coordinating Committee for Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER) Project 2.4 that requires a reasonably small level of effort for DOSES-2008.

  14. Space Radiation Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, E.

    Evaluation of potential health effects from radiation exposure during and after deep space travel is important for the future of manned missions To date manned missions have been limited to near-Earth orbits with the moon our farthest distance from earth Historical space radiation career exposures for astronauts from all NASA Missions show that early missions involved total exposures of less than about 20 mSv With the advent of Skylab and Mir total career exposure levels increased to a maximum of nearly 200 mSv Missions in deep space with the requisite longer duration of the missions planned may pose greater risks due to the increased potential for exposure to complex radiation fields comprised of a broad range of radiation types and energies from cosmic and unpredictable solar sources The first steps in the evaluation of risks are underway with bio- and physical-dosimetric measurements on both commercial flight personnel and international space crews who have experience on near-earth orbits and the necessary theoretical modeling of particle-track traversal per cell including the contributing effects of delta-rays in particle exposures An assumption for biologic effects due to exposure of radiation in deep space is that they differ quantitatively and qualitatively from that on earth The dose deposition and density pattern of heavy charged particles are very different from those of sparsely ionizing radiation The potential risks resulting from exposure to radiation in deep space are cancer non-cancer and genetic effects Radiation from

  15. Assessment of radiation doses to the para-aortic, pelvic, and inguinal lymph nodes delivered by image-guided adaptive brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohamed, Sandy M I; Aagaard, Torben; Fokdal, Lars U;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study evaluated the dose delivered to lymph nodes (LNs) by brachytherapy (BT) and the effect of BT image-guided optimization on the LN dose. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Twenty-five patients with locally advanced cervical cancer were retrospectively analyzed, 16 patients of them had LN...... involvement. The patients received whole pelvis intensity-modulated radiation therapy (45-50 Gy/25-30 fx) to whole pelvis and two fractions of MRI pulsed-dose-rate BT. The delineated LN groups were para-aortic, inguinal, common iliac (CI), external iliac, internal iliac, obturator, and presacral. For each LN...

  16. Effects of Proton Radiation Dose, Dose Rate and Dose Fractionation on Hematopoietic Cells in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Ware, J.H.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X. S.; Rusek, A.; Kennedy, A R

    2010-01-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05–0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals...

  17. Radiation dose optimization in CT planning of corrective scoliosis surgery. A phantom study.

    OpenAIRE

    Abul-Kasim, Kasim; Gunnarsson, Mikael; Maly, Pavel; Ohlin, Acke; Sundgren, Pia

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the possibility of obtaining a helical CT scan of a long segment of vertebral column, optimally reduce the radiation dose, compare the radiation dose of the low dose helical CT with that of some of the CT protocols used in clinical practice and finally assess the impact of such a dose reduction on the image quality. A chest phantom was examined with a 16-slice CT scanner. Six scans were performed with different radiation doses. The lowest radiation dose whi...

  18. Space radiation absorbed dose distribution in a human phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badhwar, G D; Atwell, W; Badavi, F F; Yang, T C; Cleghorn, T F

    2002-01-01

    The radiation risk to astronauts has always been based on measurements using passive thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). The skin dose is converted to dose equivalent using an average radiation quality factor based on model calculations. The radiological risk estimates, however, are based on organ and tissue doses. This paper describes results from the first space flight (STS-91, 51.65 degrees inclination and approximately 380 km altitude) of a fully instrumented Alderson Rando phantom torso (with head) to relate the skin dose to organ doses. Spatial distributions of absorbed dose in 34 1-inch-thick sections measured using TLDs are described. There is about a 30% change in dose as one moves from the front to the back of the phantom body. Small active dosimeters were developed specifically to provide time-resolved measurements of absorbed dose rates and quality factors at five organ locations (brain, thyroid, heart/lung, stomach and colon) inside the phantom. Using these dosimeters, it was possible to separate the trapped-proton and the galactic cosmic radiation components of the doses. A tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and a charged-particle directional spectrometer (CPDS) were flown next to the phantom torso to provide data on the incident internal radiation environment. Accurate models of the shielding distributions at the site of the TEPC, the CPDS and a scalable Computerized Anatomical Male (CAM) model of the phantom torso were developed. These measurements provided a comprehensive data set to map the dose distribution inside a human phantom, and to assess the accuracy and validity of radiation transport models throughout the human body. The results show that for the conditions in the International Space Station (ISS) orbit during periods near the solar minimum, the ratio of the blood-forming organ dose rate to the skin absorbed dose rate is about 80%, and the ratio of the dose equivalents is almost one. The results show that the GCR model dose

  19. Patient radiation doses from neuroradiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the presentation of radiation-induced deterministic effects by some patients undergoing neuroradiological procedures during successive sessions, such as temporary epilation, in the 'Hospital Universitario de Canarias', measurements were made of dose to patients. The maximum dose-area product measured by ionization chamber during these procedures was 39617 cGy.cm2 in a diagnostic of aneurysm and the maximum dose to the skin measured by thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) was 462.53 mGy. This can justify certain deterministic effects but it is unlikely that the patients will suffer serious effects from this skin dose. Also, measurements were made of effective dose about two usual procedures, embolisation of tumour und embolisation of aneurysm. These procedures were reproduced with an anthropomorphic phantom Rando and doses were measured with TLDs. Effective doses obtained were 3.79 mSv and 4.11 mSv, respectively. The effective dose valued by the program EFFDOSE was less than values measured with TLDs. (author)

  20. Simple dose verification system for radiotherapy radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to investigate an accurate and convenient quality assurance programme that should be included in the dosimetry system of the radiotherapy level radiation. We designed a mailed solid phantom and used TLD-100 chips and a Rexon UL320 reader for the purpose of dosimetry quality assurance in Taiwanese radiotherapy centers. After being assembled, the solid polystyrene phantom weighted only 375 g which was suitable for mailing. The Monte Carlo BEAMnrc code was applied in calculations of the dose conversion factor of water and polystyrene phantom: the dose conversion factor measurements were obtained by switching the TLDs at the same calibration depth of water and the solid phantom to measure the absorbed dose and verify the accuracy of the theoretical calculation results. The experimental results showed that the dose conversion factors from TLD measurements and the calculation values from the BEAMnrc were in good agreement with a difference within 0.5%. Ten radiotherapy centers were instructed to deliver to the TLDs on central beam axis absorbed dose of 2 Gy. The measured doses were compared with the planned ones. A total of 21 beams were checked. The dose verification differences under reference conditions for 60Co, high energy X-rays of 6, 10 and 15 MV were truly within 4% and that proved the feasibility of applying the method suggested in this work in radiotherapy dose verification

  1. Systematic review on physician's knowledge about radiation doses and radiation risks of computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: The frequent use of computed tomography is a major cause of the increasing medical radiation exposure of the general population. Consequently, dose reduction and radiation protection is a topic of scientific and public concern. Aim: We evaluated the available literature on physicians' knowledge regarding radiation dosages and risks due to computed tomography. Methods: A systematic review in accordance with the Cochrane and PRISMA statements was performed using eight databases. 3091 references were found. Only primary studies assessing physicians' knowledge about computed tomography were included. Results: 14 relevant articles were identified, all focussing on dose estimations for CT. Overall, the surveys showed moderate to low knowledge among physicians concerning radiation doses and the involved health risks. However, the surveys varied considerably in conduct and quality. For some countries, more than one survey was available. There was no general trend in knowledge in any country except a slight improvement of knowledge on health risks and radiation doses in two consecutive local German surveys. Conclusions: Knowledge gaps concerning radiation doses and associated health risks among physicians are evident from published research. However, knowledge on radiation doses cannot be interpreted as reliable indicator for good medical practice.

  2. Dose assessments for SFR 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, Ulla (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)); Avila, Rodolfo; Ekstroem, Per-Anders; Cruz, Idalmis de la (Facilia AB, Bromma (Sweden))

    2008-06-15

    Following a review by the Swedish regulatory authorities of the safety analysis of the SFR 1 disposal facility for low and intermediate level waste, SKB has prepared an updated safety analysis, SAR-08. This report presents estimations of annual doses to the most exposed groups from potential radionuclide releases from the SFR 1 repository for a number of calculation cases, selected using a systematic approach for identifying relevant scenarios for the safety analysis. The dose estimates can be used for demonstrating that the long term safety of the repository is in compliance with the regulatory requirements. In particular, the mean values of the annual doses can be used to estimate the expected risks to the most exposed individuals, which can then be compared with the regulatory risk criteria for human health. The conversion from doses to risks is performed in the main report. For one scenario however, where the effects of an earthquake taking place close to the repository are analysed, risk calculations are presented in this report. In addition, prediction of concentrations of radionuclides in environmental media, such as water and soil, are compared with concentration limits suggested by the Erica-project as a base for estimating potential effects on the environment. The assessment of the impact on non-human biota showed that the potential impact is negligible. Committed collective dose for an integration period of 10,000 years for releases occurring during the first thousand years after closure are also calculated. The collective dose commitment was estimated to be 8 manSv. The dose calculations were carried out for a period of 100,000 years, which was sufficient to observe peak doses in all scenarios considered. Releases to the landscape and to a well were considered. The peaks of the mean annual doses from releases to the landscape are associated with C-14 releases to a future lake around year 5,000 AD. In the case of releases to a well, the peak annual doses

  3. Assessment of radiation doses due to normal operation, incidents and accidents of the final disposal facility; Kaeytetyn ydinpolttoaineen loppusijoituslaitoksen normaalikaeytoen, kaeyttoehaeirioeiden ja onnettomuustilanteiden aiheuttamien saeteilyannosten arviointi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, J.; Raiko, H.; Suolanen, V.; Ilvonen, M. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-03-01

    Radiation doses for workers of the encapsulation and disposal facility and for inhabitants in the environment caused by the facility during its operation were considered. The study covers both the normal operation of the plant and some hypothetical incidents and accidents. Occupational radiation doses inside the plant during normal operation are based on the design basis, assuming that highest permitted dose levels are prevailing in control rooms during fuel transfer and encapsulation processes. Release through the ventilation stack is assumed to be filtered both in normal operation and in hypothetical incident and accident cases. Calculation of the offsite doses from normal operation is based on the hypothesis that one fuel pin per 100 fuel bundles for all batches of spent fuel transported to the encapsulation facility is leaking. The release magnitude in incidents and accidents is based on the event chains, which lead to loss of fuel pin tightness followed by a discharge of radionuclides into the handling chamber and to some degree through the ventilation stack into atmosphere. The weather data measured at the Olkiluoto meteorological mast was employed for calculating of offsite doses. Therefore doses could be calculated in a large amount of different dispersion conditions, the statistical frequencies of which have, been measured. Finally doses were combined into cumulative distributions, from which a dose value representing the 99.5 % confidence level, is presented. The dose values represent the exposure of a critical group, which is assumed to live at the distance of 200 meters from the encapsulation and disposal plant and thus it will receive the largest doses in most dispersion conditions. Exposure pathways considered were: cloudsnine, inhalation, groundshine and nutrition (milk of cow, meat of cow, green vegetables, grain and root vegetables). Nordic seasonal variation is included in ingestion dose models. The results obtained indicate that offsite doses

  4. X-γ Radiation Dose Survey for HL-2A Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONGXiariying; LIXu; YANGJinwei

    2003-01-01

    X-γ radiation belong to the ionizing radiation. Ionizing radiation sinks to energy in organism but produce a disservice to the organism. Just as medicine, the disservice of the radiation towards Organism is decided by to accept radiation quantify, the radiation quantify was named dose. Radiation protection's basic missions is to want to result the dose to fix quantify. In this survey the dose at workplace and its surroundings environments of HL-2A device was measured and the assessment was given out.

  5. Radiation Dose Optimization For Critical Organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadadegan, Yasaman

    Ionizing radiation used in the patient diagnosis or therapy has negative effects on the patient body in short term and long term depending on the amount of exposure. More than 700,000 examinations are everyday performed on Interventional Radiology modalities, however; there is no patient-centric information available to the patient or the Quality Assurance for the amount of organ dose received. In this study, we are exploring the methodologies to systematically reduce the absorbed radiation dose in the Fluoroscopically Guided Interventional Radiology procedures. In the first part of this study, we developed a mathematical model which determines a set of geometry settings for the equipment and a level for the energy during a patient exam. The goal is to minimize the amount of absorbed dose in the critical organs while maintaining image quality required for the diagnosis. The model is a large-scale mixed integer program. We performed polyhedral analysis and derived several sets of strong inequalities to improve the computational speed and quality of the solution. Results present the amount of absorbed dose in the critical organ can be reduced up to 99% for a specific set of angles. In the second part, we apply an approximate gradient method to simultaneously optimize angle and table location while minimizing dose in the critical organs with respect to the image quality. In each iteration, we solve a sub-problem as a MIP to determine the radiation field size and corresponding X-ray tube energy. In the computational experiments, results show further reduction (up to 80%) of the absorbed dose in compare with previous method. Last, there are uncertainties in the medical procedures resulting imprecision of the absorbed dose. We propose a robust formulation to hedge from the worst case absorbed dose while ensuring feasibility. In this part, we investigate a robust approach for the organ motions within a radiology procedure. We minimize the absorbed dose for the critical

  6. Assessment of ambient dose equivalent rate performance of an automatic survey meter as an instrument to quantify the presence of radiation in soils

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshimura, E M; Okuno, E

    2002-01-01

    Those who work in radiation protection are faced with various quantities that were created to account for the effects of ionizing radiation in the human body. As far as the experimental point of view is concerned, each available equipment is planned to measure a distinct quantity, for a specific radiation protection application, and it is not always clear which one it is. This paper shows a series of tests, planned and applied to a portable gamma ray spectrometer, in order to assure that the monitoring low dose levels of radiation with it is reliable. The equipment is fully automated and does not allow modifications of the conversion factors from counts to ambient dose equivalent. It is therefore necessary to assure that the values provided by the equipment are correct and refer to the actual situation one expects to find in practice. The system is based on an NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, mounted with its electronics in a portable case, suitable for field measurements. It measures ambient dose equivalent r...

  7. Dose assessments for SFR 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following a review by the Swedish regulatory authorities of the safety analysis of the SFR 1 disposal facility for low and intermediate level waste, SKB has prepared an updated safety analysis, SAR-08. This report presents estimations of annual doses to the most exposed groups from potential radionuclide releases from the SFR 1 repository for a number of calculation cases, selected using a systematic approach for identifying relevant scenarios for the safety analysis. The dose estimates can be used for demonstrating that the long term safety of the repository is in compliance with the regulatory requirements. In particular, the mean values of the annual doses can be used to estimate the expected risks to the most exposed individuals, which can then be compared with the regulatory risk criteria for human health. The conversion from doses to risks is performed in the main report. For one scenario however, where the effects of an earthquake taking place close to the repository are analysed, risk calculations are presented in this report. In addition, prediction of concentrations of radionuclides in environmental media, such as water and soil, are compared with concentration limits suggested by the Erica-project as a base for estimating potential effects on the environment. The assessment of the impact on non-human biota showed that the potential impact is negligible. Committed collective dose for an integration period of 10,000 years for releases occurring during the first thousand years after closure are also calculated. The collective dose commitment was estimated to be 8 manSv. The dose calculations were carried out for a period of 100,000 years, which was sufficient to observe peak doses in all scenarios considered. Releases to the landscape and to a well were considered. The peaks of the mean annual doses from releases to the landscape are associated with C-14 releases to a future lake around year 5,000 AD. In the case of releases to a well, the peak annual doses

  8. Dose assessments for SFR 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, Ulla (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)); Avila, Rodolfo; Ekstroem, Per-Anders; Cruz, Idalmis de la (Facilia AB, Bromma (Sweden))

    2008-06-15

    Following a review by the Swedish regulatory authorities of the safety analysis of the SFR 1 disposal facility for low and intermediate level waste, SKB has prepared an updated safety analysis, SAR-08. This report presents estimations of annual doses to the most exposed groups from potential radionuclide releases from the SFR 1 repository for a number of calculation cases, selected using a systematic approach for identifying relevant scenarios for the safety analysis. The dose estimates can be used for demonstrating that the long term safety of the repository is in compliance with the regulatory requirements. In particular, the mean values of the annual doses can be used to estimate the expected risks to the most exposed individuals, which can then be compared with the regulatory risk criteria for human health. The conversion from doses to risks is performed in the main report. For one scenario however, where the effects of an earthquake taking place close to the repository are analysed, risk calculations are presented in this report. In addition, prediction of concentrations of radionuclides in environmental media, such as water and soil, are compared with concentration limits suggested by the Erica-project as a base for estimating potential effects on the environment. The assessment of the impact on non-human biota showed that the potential impact is negligible. Committed collective dose for an integration period of 10,000 years for releases occurring during the first thousand years after closure are also calculated. The collective dose commitment was estimated to be 8 manSv. The dose calculations were carried out for a period of 100,000 years, which was sufficient to observe peak doses in all scenarios considered. Releases to the landscape and to a well were considered. The peaks of the mean annual doses from releases to the landscape are associated with C-14 releases to a future lake around year 5,000 AD. In the case of releases to a well, the peak annual doses

  9. Radiation dose to physicians’ eye lens during interventional radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahruddin, N. A.; Hashim, S.; Karim, M. K. A.; Sabarudin, A.; Ang, W. C.; Salehhon, N.; Bakar, K. A.

    2016-03-01

    The demand of interventional radiology has increased, leading to significant risk of radiation where eye lens dose assessment becomes a major concern. In this study, we investigate physicians' eye lens doses during interventional procedures. Measurement were made using TLD-100 (LiF: Mg, Ti) dosimeters and was recorded in equivalent dose at a depth of 0.07 mm, Hp(0.07). Annual Hp(0.07) and annual effective dose were estimated using workload estimation for a year and Von Boetticher algorithm. Our results showed the mean Hp(0.07) dose of 0.33 mSv and 0.20 mSv for left and right eye lens respectively. The highest estimated annual eye lens dose was 29.33 mSv per year, recorded on left eye lens during fistulogram procedure. Five physicians had exceeded 20 mSv dose limit as recommended by international commission of radiological protection (ICRP). It is suggested that frequent training and education on occupational radiation exposure are necessary to increase knowledge and awareness of the physicians’ thus reducing dose during the interventional procedure.

  10. Low dose ionizing radiation exposure and cardiovascular disease mortality: cohort study based on Canadian national dose registry of radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of our study was to assess the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in a Canadian cohort of 337 397 individuals (169 256 men and 168 141 women) occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation and included in the National Dose Registry (NDR) of Canada. Material and Methods: Exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation, such as those received during radiotherapy, leads to increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. The emerging evidence of excess risk of CVDs after exposure to doses well below those previously considered as safe warrants epidemiological studies of populations exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation. In the present study, the cohort consisted of employees at nuclear power stations (nuclear workers) as well as medical, dental and industrial workers. The mean whole body radiation dose was 8.6 mSv for men and 1.2 mSv for women. Results: During the study period (1951 - 1995), as many as 3 533 deaths from cardiovascular diseases have been identified (3 018 among men and 515 among women). In the cohort, CVD mortality was significantly lower than in the general population of Canada. The cohort showed a significant dose response both among men and women. Risk estimates of CVD mortality in the NDR cohort, when expressed as excess relative risk per unit dose, were higher than those in most other occupational cohorts and higher than in the studies of Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Conclusions: The study has demonstrated a strong positive association between radiation dose and the risk of CVD mortality. Caution needs to be exercised when interpreting these results, due to the potential bias introduced by dosimetry uncertainties, the possible record linkage errors, and especially by the lack of adjustment for non-radiation risk factors. (authors)

  11. Dose assessment for the fetus considering scattered and secondary radiation from photon and proton therapy when treating a brain tumor of the mother

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Changran; Moteabbed, Maryam; Seco, Joao; Gao, Yiming; Xu, X. George; Ramos-Méndez, José; Faddegon, Bruce; Paganetti, Harald

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this work was to determine the scattered photon dose and secondary neutron dose and resulting risk for the sensitive fetus from photon and proton radiotherapy when treating a brain tumor during pregnancy. Anthropomorphic pregnancy phantoms with three stages (3-, 6-, 9-month) based on ICRP reference parameters were implemented in Monte Carlo platform TOPAS, to evaluate the scattered dose and secondary neutron dose and dose equivalent. To evaluate the dose equivalent, dose averaged quality factors were considered for neutrons. This study compared three treatment modalities: passive scattering and pencil beam scanning proton therapy (PPT and PBS) and 6-MV 3D conformal photon therapy. The results show that, for 3D conformal photon therapy, the scattered photon dose equivalent to the fetal body increases from 0.011 to 0.030 mSv per treatment Gy with increasing stage of gestation. For PBS, the neutron dose equivalent to the fetal body was significantly lower, i.e. increasing from 1.5  ×  10-3 to 2.5  ×  10-3 mSv per treatment Gy with increasing stage of gestation. For PPT, the neutron dose equivalent of the fetus decreases from 0.17 to 0.13 mSv per treatment Gy with the growing fetus. The ratios of dose equivalents to the fetus for a 52.2 Gy(RBE) course of radiation therapy to a typical CT scan of the mother’s head ranged from 3.4-4.4 for PBS, 30-41 for 3D conformal photon therapy and 180-500 for PPT, respectively. The attained dose to a fetus from the three modalities is far lower than the thresholds of malformation, severe mental retardation and lethal death. The childhood cancer excessive absolute risk was estimated using a linear no-threshold dose-response relationship. The risk would be 1.0 (95% CI: 0.6, 1.6) and 0.1 (95% CI:  -0.01, 0.52) in 105 for the 9-month fetus for PBS with a prescribed dose of 52.2 Gy(RBE). The increased risks for PPT and photon therapy are about two and one orders of magnitude larger than that for PBS

  12. Radiation doses to neonates and issues of radiation protection in a special care baby unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiographs are most commonly taken in the neonatal period to assist in the diagnosis and management of respiratory difficulties. Frequent accurate radiographic assessment is required and a knowledge of the radiation dose is necessary to make the justification of such exposures. A survey of radiation doses to neonates from diagnostic X-ray examinations (chest and abdomen) has been carried out in the special care baby unit (SCBU) of the Royal Free Hospital. Entrance surface dose (ESD) was calculated from Quality Control measurements on the X-ray set itself. Direct measurement of radiation doses was also performed using highly sensitive thermoluminescence dosimeters (LiF:Mg,Cu,P), calibrated and tested for consistency in sensitivity. The mean ESD per radiograph was calculated to be 36μGy (with a standard deviation of 6μGy), averaged over 95 X-ray examinations. The ESD's as derived from the TLD crystals, ranged from 18μGy to 60μGy. The mean energy imparted (EI) and the mean whole body dose per radiograph were estimated to be 14μJ and 10μGy respectively. Assuming that neonates and foetuses are equally susceptible to carcinogenic effects of radiation (it involves an overestimation of risk), the radiation risk of childhood cancer from a single radiograph was estimated to be of the order (0.3-1.3)x10-6. Radiation doses compared favourably with the reference value of 80μGy ESD published by CEC in 1996. (author)

  13. Prenatal radiation exposure. Dose calculation; Praenatale Strahlenexposition. Dosisermittlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharwaechter, C.; Schwartz, C.A.; Haage, P. [University Hospital Witten/Herdecke, Wuppertal (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Roeser, A. [University Hospital Witten/Herdecke, Wuppertal (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology

    2015-05-15

    The unborn child requires special protection. In this context, the indication for an X-ray examination is to be checked critically. If thereupon radiation of the lower abdomen including the uterus cannot be avoided, the examination should be postponed until the end of pregnancy or alternative examination techniques should be considered. Under certain circumstances, either accidental or in unavoidable cases after a thorough risk assessment, radiation exposure of the unborn may take place. In some of these cases an expert radiation hygiene consultation may be required. This consultation should comprise the expected risks for the unborn while not perturbing the mother or the involved medical staff. For the risk assessment in case of an in-utero X-ray exposition deterministic damages with a defined threshold dose are distinguished from stochastic damages without a definable threshold dose. The occurrence of deterministic damages depends on the dose and the developmental stage of the unborn at the time of radiation. To calculate the risks of an in-utero radiation exposure a three-stage concept is commonly applied. Depending on the amount of radiation, the radiation dose is either estimated, roughly calculated using standard tables or, in critical cases, accurately calculated based on the individual event. The complexity of the calculation thereby increases from stage to stage. An estimation based on stage one is easily feasible whereas calculations based on stages two and especially three are more complex and often necessitate execution by specialists. This article demonstrates in detail the risks for the unborn child pertaining to its developmental phase and explains the three-stage concept as an evaluation scheme. It should be noted, that all risk estimations are subject to considerable uncertainties.

  14. Stimulating effects of low doses of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different ionizing radiations cause biochemical and biophysical changes in the cells of the genotypes according to the application of the doses applied to different organs of the plants, and the manner of their application (acute, chronic, or acute and chronic). The sensitivity of different genotypes, and their tissues, depends on the stage at which their tissues were irradiated as well as on the environmental conditions under which the irradiation was made. Relatively strong doses usually cause some genetic changes in the somatic and generative cells. Small doses can, in some genotypes, stimulate the growth of some tissues to some extent. The stimulating effect on the growth of seedlings of the M2 generation, developed from acute seed irradiation of some genotypes of wheat, barley, and inbred lines of maize and their hybrids is described here. 3 refs, 5 tabs

  15. Radiation dose to the eye lens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baun, Christina; Falch Braas, Kirsten; D. Nielsen, Kamilla;

    2015-01-01

    might avoid including the eye in the CT scan without losing sufficient visualization of the scull base. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of decreasing the radiation dose to the eye lens, simply by changing the head position, when doing the PET/CT scan from the base of the scull...... to the proximal femur. Methods and materials: The study was performed using a human like whole body phantom with electronic dosimetry units placed upon each eye to detect the exact radiation dose to the eye lens during each scan. The phantom’s head was placed in two different positions, (a) elevated with a small...... pillow below the head (standard), and (b) kipped backwards with the pillow below the neck (kipped). For each head position, CT scans were repeated 5 times with both a low dose and a high dose CT protocol; in this way, a total of 20 CT scans were performed. Robust standard errors were used in order...

  16. The effects of small doses of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics were discussed in outline at a two day conference organized by I.B.C. Technical Services Ltd, February 1989, in London: radiation carcinogenesis mechanisms, environmental exposure, occupational exposure trends and comparisons, ICRP risk assessment and use of data including that of A-Bomb survivors, the ankylosing spondylitis study, UKAEA and AWE mortality studies, Sellafield, leukemia clusters and radiation hormesis. (UK)

  17. Low radiation doses - Book of presentations (slides)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document brings together all the available presentations (slides) of the conference on low radiation doses organised by the 'research and health' department of the French society of radiation protection (SFRP). Ten presentations are available and deal with he following topics: 1 - Cyto-toxicity, geno-toxicity: comparative approach between ionizing radiations and other geno-toxic agents (F. Nesslany, Institut Pasteur, Lille); Succession of events occurring after a radio-induced DNA damage (D. Averbeck, IRSN/CEA); Importance of stem cells in the response to ionizing radiations (J. Lebeau, CEA); Relation between energy deposition at the sub-cell scale and early biological effects (C. Villagrasa, IRSN); Natural history of breast cancer: predisposition, susceptibility with respect to irradiation (S. Rivera, IGR); Pediatrics scanner study and the EPI-CT project (M.O Bernier, IRSN); What future for an irradiated cell: survival or apoptosis? (E. Sage, Institut Curie); Differential effect of a 137Cs chronic contamination on the different steps of the atheromatous pathology (T. Ebrahimian, IRSN); Variability of the individual radiosensitivity (S. Chevillard, CEA); What definitions for individual sensitivity? (A. Schmidt, CEA); Low doses: some philosophical remarks (A. Grinbaum, CEA)

  18. SU-E-P-57: Radiation Doses Assessment to Paediatric Patients for Some Digital Diagnostic Radiology Examination in Emergency Department in Qatar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdallah, I; Aly, A; Al Naemi, H [Hamad Medical Corporation, Doha (Qatar)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation doses to pediatric patients undergoing standard radiographic examinations using Direct Digital Radiography (DDR) in Paediatric emergency center of Hamad General Hospital (HGH) in state of Qatar and compared with regional and international Dose Reference Levels (DRLs). Methods: Entrance Skin Dose (ESD) was measured for 2739 patients for two common X-ray examinations namely: Chest AP/PA, Abdomen. Exposure factors such as kV, mAs and Focal to Skin Distance (FSD) were recorded for each patient. Tube Output was measured for a range of selected kV values. ESD for each individual patient was calculated using the tube output and the technical exposure factors for each examination. The ESD values were compared with the some international Dose Reference Levels (DRL) for all types of examinations. Results: The most performed procedure during the time of this study was chest PA/PA (85%). The mean ESD values obtained from AP chest, PA chest and AP abdomen ranged 91–120, 80–84 and 209 – 659 µGy per radiograph for different age’s groups respectively. Two protocols have been used for chest AP and PA using different radiological parameters, and the different of ESD values for chest PA and were 41% for 1 years old child, 57% for 5 years old for chest AP. Conclusion: The mean ESD were compared with those found in literature and were found to be comparable. The radiation dose can be reduced more for Chest AP and PA examination by optimization of each investigation and hence more studies are required for this task. The results presented will serve as a baseline data needed for deriving local reference doses for pediatric X-ray examinations in this local department and hence it can be applied in the whole Qatar.

  19. SU-E-P-57: Radiation Doses Assessment to Paediatric Patients for Some Digital Diagnostic Radiology Examination in Emergency Department in Qatar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation doses to pediatric patients undergoing standard radiographic examinations using Direct Digital Radiography (DDR) in Paediatric emergency center of Hamad General Hospital (HGH) in state of Qatar and compared with regional and international Dose Reference Levels (DRLs). Methods: Entrance Skin Dose (ESD) was measured for 2739 patients for two common X-ray examinations namely: Chest AP/PA, Abdomen. Exposure factors such as kV, mAs and Focal to Skin Distance (FSD) were recorded for each patient. Tube Output was measured for a range of selected kV values. ESD for each individual patient was calculated using the tube output and the technical exposure factors for each examination. The ESD values were compared with the some international Dose Reference Levels (DRL) for all types of examinations. Results: The most performed procedure during the time of this study was chest PA/PA (85%). The mean ESD values obtained from AP chest, PA chest and AP abdomen ranged 91–120, 80–84 and 209 – 659 µGy per radiograph for different age’s groups respectively. Two protocols have been used for chest AP and PA using different radiological parameters, and the different of ESD values for chest PA and were 41% for 1 years old child, 57% for 5 years old for chest AP. Conclusion: The mean ESD were compared with those found in literature and were found to be comparable. The radiation dose can be reduced more for Chest AP and PA examination by optimization of each investigation and hence more studies are required for this task. The results presented will serve as a baseline data needed for deriving local reference doses for pediatric X-ray examinations in this local department and hence it can be applied in the whole Qatar

  20. Dose response curves for effects of low-level radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The linear dose-response model used by international committees to assess the genetic and carcinogenic hazards of low-level radiation appears to be the most reasonable interpretation of the available scientific data that are relevant to this topic. There are, of course, reasons to believe that this model may overestimate radiation hazards in certain instances, a fact acknowledged in recent reports of these committees. The linear model is now also being utilized to estimate the potential carcinogenic hazards of other agents such as asbestos and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. This model implies that there is no safe dose for any of these agents and that potential health hazards will increase in direct proportion to total accumulated dose. The practical implication is the recommendation that all exposures should be kept 'as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account'. (auth)

  1. One year follow-up reveals no difference in quality of life between high dose and conventional dose radiation: a quality of life assessment of RTOG 94-05

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study evaluated and compared the quality of life (QOL) outcomes for patients with esophageal cancer receiving combined modality therapy (CMT) with conventional dose radiation (RT) vs. high dose RT as used in RTOG study 94-05. Materials and Methods: Between June 12, 1995 and July 1, 1999, 236 patients with cT1-4NxM0 esophageal cancers were randomized on RTOG 94-05 to conventional dose (CD) CMT: 50.4 Gy RT + concurrent 5-FU and cisplatin administered on weeks 1 and 5 and repeated 4 weeks post RT vs. high dose (HD) CMT: 64.8 Gy RT + the same chemotherapy. QOL was assessed using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT) - Head and Neck (version 2). This questionnaire was administered to patients pre-treatment, post-treatment, at 8 months from the start of CMT, at 1 year and at 6-month intervals to year 5. Results: Of 209 eligible protocol patients, 169 (81%) participated in the pre-treatment QOL component of RTOG 94-05 (83 in the HD arm and 86 in the CD arm). The principle reason for non-participation was institutional error. The distribution of pre-treatment characteristics by participation in QOL assessment was similar in both treatment arms. African-Americans, patients with ≥ 10% weight loss, and patients with low performance status were significantly less likely to complete QOL forms (p=0.04, p=0.01 and p=0.004 respectively). Baseline QOL parameters were similar in the two treatment arms. Pulmonary symptoms were the most significant pre-treatment dysfunction reported. Female gender and ≥10% pre-treatment weight loss correlated with pre-treatment total QOL scores. Women reported lower overall QOL as well as worse physical and emotional well-being in the HD arm as compared to the CD arm (p=0.07, p=0.01 and p=0.03 respectively). Patients with ≥10% weight loss reported decreased QOL in nearly all domains in both treatment groups, although more pronounced in the 64.8 Gy arm. Treatment arm assignment, age, performance status, tumor size and

  2. Assessments of Coronary Artery Visibility and Radiation Dose in Infants with Congenital Heart Disease on Cardiac 128-slice CT and on Cardiac 64-slice CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Y; Huang, M; Zheng, J; Li, J; Liu, H; Liang, C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the coronary artery visibility and radiation dose in infants with CHD on cardiac 128-slice CT and on cardiac 64-slice CT. The images of 200 patients were analyzed in this study, 100 patients were selected randomly from a group of 789 infants (ECG-triggered axial scan, and 100 were selected randomly from 911 infants with CHD undergoing 64-slice CT retrospective ECG-gated spiral scan. The visibility of coronary artery segments was graded on a four-point scale. The coronary arteries were considered to be detected or visible when grade was 2 or higher. The visibility of the coronary artery segments and the radiation dose was compared between the two groups. Except for the rate of LM (96 vs. 99%), the detection rates of the total, LAD, LCX, RCA, and the proximal segment of the RCA in the 256-slice CT group were significantly higher than those in the 64-slice CT group (51.7, 53.33, 33.67, 53.33, and 99 vs. 34.8, 34.33, 18, 30.67, and 75%, respectively). The counts of visibility score (4/3/2/1) for the LM and the proximal segment of the RCA were 62/22/12/4 and 56/20/17/7, respectively, in the 128-slice CT group and 17/42/30/1 and 9/30/38/25, respectively, in the 64-slice CT group. There were significant differences, especially for score 4 and 3, between the two groups. The radiation dose in the 128-slice CT group was significantly decreased than those in the 64-slice CT group (CTDIvol 1.88 ± 0.51 vs. 5.61 ± 0.63 mGy; SSDE 4.48 ± 1.15 vs. 13.97 ± 1.52 mGy; effective radiation dose 1.36 ± 0.44 vs. 4.06 ± 0.7 mSv). With reduced radiation dose, the visibility of the coronary artery in infants with CHD via prospective ECG-triggered mode on a 128-slice CT is superior to that of the 64-slice CT using retrospective ECG-gated spiral mode. PMID:26271472

  3. Assessments of Coronary Artery Visibility and Radiation Dose in Infants with Congenital Heart Disease on Cardiac 128-slice CT and on Cardiac 64-slice CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Y; Huang, M; Zheng, J; Li, J; Liu, H; Liang, C

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the coronary artery visibility and radiation dose in infants with CHD on cardiac 128-slice CT and on cardiac 64-slice CT. The images of 200 patients were analyzed in this study, 100 patients were selected randomly from a group of 789 infants (coronary artery segments was graded on a four-point scale. The coronary arteries were considered to be detected or visible when grade was 2 or higher. The visibility of the coronary artery segments and the radiation dose was compared between the two groups. Except for the rate of LM (96 vs. 99%), the detection rates of the total, LAD, LCX, RCA, and the proximal segment of the RCA in the 256-slice CT group were significantly higher than those in the 64-slice CT group (51.7, 53.33, 33.67, 53.33, and 99 vs. 34.8, 34.33, 18, 30.67, and 75%, respectively). The counts of visibility score (4/3/2/1) for the LM and the proximal segment of the RCA were 62/22/12/4 and 56/20/17/7, respectively, in the 128-slice CT group and 17/42/30/1 and 9/30/38/25, respectively, in the 64-slice CT group. There were significant differences, especially for score 4 and 3, between the two groups. The radiation dose in the 128-slice CT group was significantly decreased than those in the 64-slice CT group (CTDIvol 1.88 ± 0.51 vs. 5.61 ± 0.63 mGy; SSDE 4.48 ± 1.15 vs. 13.97 ± 1.52 mGy; effective radiation dose 1.36 ± 0.44 vs. 4.06 ± 0.7 mSv). With reduced radiation dose, the visibility of the coronary artery in infants with CHD via prospective ECG-triggered mode on a 128-slice CT is superior to that of the 64-slice CT using retrospective ECG-gated spiral mode.

  4. Italian intercomparison exercise on internal dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2001, the Radiation Protection Institute of ENEA promoted an Italian intercomparison exercise on internal dose assessment addressed to the qualified experts in radiation protection, following the coming into force in Italian law of the EURATOM 96/29 Directive. Five case studies of occupational exposure related to the Italian situation are used. The considered radioisotopes are: 60Co, 89Sr, 125I, 131I, and 222Rn + NORM (238U-235U-232Th). Data related to WBC, thyroid and urine excretion measurements, as well as radionuclide air concentration in the workplace are provided to the participants. The results related to medical, industrial and Rn occupational exposure are well represented as means of log-normal distributions with values of the geometric standard deviation less than 2. A wider spread of results is present for the evaluation of occupational exposure to NORM. (author)

  5. TH-E-BRF-03: A Multivariate Interaction Model for Assessment of Hippocampal Vascular Dose-Response and Early Prediction of Radiation-Induced Neurocognitive Dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farjam, R; Pramanik, P; Srinivasan, A; Chapman, C; Tsien, C; Lawrence, T; Cao, Y [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Vascular injury could be a cause of hippocampal dysfunction leading to late neurocognitive decline in patients receiving brain radiotherapy (RT). Hence, our aim was to develop a multivariate interaction model for characterization of hippocampal vascular dose-response and early prediction of radiation-induced late neurocognitive impairments. Methods: 27 patients (17 males and 10 females, age 31–80 years) were enrolled in an IRB-approved prospective longitudinal study. All patients were diagnosed with a low-grade glioma or benign tumor and treated by 3-D conformal or intensity-modulated RT with a median dose of 54 Gy (50.4–59.4 Gy in 1.8− Gy fractions). Six DCE-MRI scans were performed from pre-RT to 18 months post-RT. DCE data were fitted to the modified Toft model to obtain the transfer constant of gadolinium influx from the intravascular space into the extravascular extracellular space, Ktrans, and the fraction of blood plasma volume, Vp. The hippocampus vascular property alterations after starting RT were characterized by changes in the hippocampal mean values of, μh(Ktrans)τ and μh(Vp)τ. The dose-response, Δμh(Ktrans/Vp)pre->τ, was modeled using a multivariate linear regression considering integrations of doses with age, sex, hippocampal laterality and presence of tumor/edema near a hippocampus. Finally, the early vascular dose-response in hippocampus was correlated with neurocognitive decline 6 and 18 months post-RT. Results: The μh(Ktrans) increased significantly from pre-RT to 1 month post-RT (p<0.0004). The multivariate model showed that the dose effect on Δμh(Ktrans)pre->1M post-RT was interacted with sex (p<0.0007) and age (p<0.00004), with the dose-response more pronounced in older females. Also, the vascular dose-response in the left hippocampus of females was significantly correlated with memory function decline at 6 (r = − 0.95, p<0.0006) and 18 (r = −0.88, p<0.02) months post-RT. Conclusion: The hippocampal vascular

  6. BCC and Childhood Low Dose Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Beiraghi Toosi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Skin cancer is a late complication of ionizing radiation. Two skin neoplasms prominent Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC and Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC are the most famous complications of radiotherapy. Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC is the most common human malignant neoplasm. Many genetic and environmental factors are involved in its onset. BCC is observed in sun-exposed areas of skin. Some patients with scalp BCC have had a history of scalp radiation for the treatment of tinea capitis in childhood. Evidence that ionizing radiation is carcinogenic first came from past reports of nonmelanoma skin cancers on the hands of workers using radiation devices. The total dose of radiation and irradiated site exposed to sunlight can lead to a short incubation period. It is not clear whether BCC in these cases has a more aggressive nature and requires a more aggressive resection of the lesion. The aim of this review was to evaluate the differences between BCC specification and treatment results between irradiated and nonirradiated patients.

  7. Ultraviolet radiation therapy and UVR dose models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, David Robert, E-mail: davidrobert.grimes@oncology.ox.ac.uk [School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin 9, Ireland and Cancer Research UK/MRC Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratory, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Oxford OX3 7DQ (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-15

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) has been an effective treatment for a number of chronic skin disorders, and its ability to alleviate these conditions has been well documented. Although nonionizing, exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is still damaging to deoxyribonucleic acid integrity, and has a number of unpleasant side effects ranging from erythema (sunburn) to carcinogenesis. As the conditions treated with this therapy tend to be chronic, exposures are repeated and can be high, increasing the lifetime probability of an adverse event or mutagenic effect. Despite the potential detrimental effects, quantitative ultraviolet dosimetry for phototherapy is an underdeveloped area and better dosimetry would allow clinicians to maximize biological effect whilst minimizing the repercussions of overexposure. This review gives a history and insight into the current state of UVR phototherapy, including an overview of biological effects of UVR, a discussion of UVR production, illness treated by this modality, cabin design and the clinical implementation of phototherapy, as well as clinical dose estimation techniques. Several dose models for ultraviolet phototherapy are also examined, and the need for an accurate computational dose estimation method in ultraviolet phototherapy is discussed.

  8. Methionine Uptake and Required Radiation Dose to Control Glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iuchi, Toshihiko, E-mail: tiuchi@chiba-cc.jp [Division of Neurological Surgery, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan); Hatano, Kazuo [Division of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Bay Advanced Imaging and Radiation Oncology Clinic, Makuhari, Chiba (Japan); Uchino, Yoshio [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Chiba Ryogo Center, Chiba (Japan); Itami, Makiko [Division of Surgical Pathology, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan); Hasegawa, Yuzo; Kawasaki, Koichiro; Sakaida, Tsukasa [Division of Neurological Surgery, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan); Hara, Ryusuke [Division of Radiation Oncology, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to retrospectively assess the feasibility of radiation therapy planning for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) based on the use of methionine (MET) positron emission tomography (PET), and the correlation among MET uptake, radiation dose, and tumor control. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with GBM who underwent MET-PET prior to radiation therapy were enrolled. MET uptake in 30 regions of interest (ROIs) from 22 GBMs, biologically effective doses (BEDs) for the ROIs and their ratios (MET uptake:BED) were compared in terms of whether the ROIs were controlled for >12 months. Results: MET uptake was significantly correlated with tumor control (odds ratio [OR], 10.0; P=.005); however, there was a higher level of correlation between MET uptake:BED ratio and tumor control (OR, 40.0; P<.0001). These data indicated that the required BEDs for controlling the ROIs could be predicted in terms of MET uptake; BED could be calculated as [34.0 × MET uptake] Gy from the optimal threshold of the MET uptake:BED ratio for tumor control. Conclusions: Target delineation based on MET-PET was demonstrated to be feasible for radiation therapy treatment planning. MET-PET could not only provide precise visualization of infiltrating tumor cells but also predict the required radiation doses to control target regions.

  9. Low doses effects of ionizing radiation on Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The exposure of living cells to low doses of ionizing radiation induce in response the activation of cellular protection mechanisms against subsequent larger doses of radiation. This cellular adaptive response may vary depending on radiation intensity and time of exposure, and also on the testing probes used whether they were mammalian cells, yeast, bacteria and other organisms or cell types. The mechanisms involved are the genome activation, followed by DNA repair enzymes synthesis. Due to the prompt cell response, the cell cycle can be delayed, and the secondary detoxification of free radicals and/or activation of membrane bound receptors may proceed. All these phenomena are submitted to intense scientific research nowadays, and their elucidation will depend on the complexity of the organism under study. In the present work, the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation (gamma rays) over a suspension of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) was studied, mainly in respect to survival rate and radio-adaptive response. At first, the yeast surviving curve was assessed towards increasing doses, and an estimation of Lethal Dose 50 (LD50) was made. The irradiation tests were performed at LINAC (electrons Linear Accelerator) where electron energy reached approximately 2.65 MeV, and gamma-radiation was produced for bremsstrahlung process over an aluminium screen target. A series of experiments of conditioning doses was performed and an increment surviving fraction was observed when the dose was 2.3 Gy and a interval time between this and a higher dose (challenging dose) of 27 Gy was 90 minutes. A value of 58 ± 4 Gy was estimated for LD50, at a dose rate of 0.44 ± 0.03 Gy/min These quantities must be optimized. Besides data obtained over yeast survival, an unusual increasing amount of tiny yeast colonies appeared on the agar plates after incubation, and this number increased as increasing the time exposure. Preliminary results indicate these colonies as

  10. Therapeutic effects of low radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This editorial explores the scientific basis of radiotherapy with doses of < 1 Gy for various non-malignant conditions, in particular dose-effect relationships, risk-benefit considerations and biological mechanisms. A review of the literature, particularly clinical and experimental reports published more than 50 years ago was conducted to clarify the following problems. 1. The dose-response relationships for the therapeutic effects on three groups of conditions: non-malignant skin disease, arthrosis and other painful degenerative joint disorders and anti-inflammatory radiotherapy; 2. risks after radiotherapy and after the best alternative treatments; 3. the biological mechanisms of the different therapeutic effects. Radiotherapy is very effective in all three groups of disease. Few dose-finding studies have been performed, all demonstrating that the optimal doses are considerable lower than the generally recommended doses, yet few of these studies meet the required standard. In different conditions, risk-benefit analysis of radiotherapy versus the best alternative treatment yields very different results: whereas radiotherapy for acute postpartum mastitis may not be justified any more, the risk-benefit ratio of radiotherapy of other conditions and particularly so in dermatology and some anti-inflammatory radiotherapy appears to be more favourable than the risk-benefit ratio of the best alternative treatments. Radiotherapy can be very effective treatment for various non-malignant conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, periarthritis humeroscapularis, epicondylitis, knee arthrosis, hydradenitis, parotitis and panaritium and probably be associated with less acute and long-term side effects than similarly effective other treatments. Randomized clinical studies are required to find the optimal dosage which, at present, may be unnecessarily high. Since no adequate experimental studies have been performed nothing is known about the mechanisms of these therapeutic radiation

  11. Radiation doses from mammography in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During 1989-90 the Australian Radiation Laboratory conducted a postal survey of at least 90% of the mammographic facilities in Australia. The primary aim of the survey was to measure the mean glandular dose (MGD) and the X-ray beam half value layer (HVL) for a typical mammograph. The MGD and HVL were measured with a specially designed tissue equivalent monitor. In all, 258 mammographic centres were surveyed. It was found that for centres using film-screen imaging, the average mean glandular dose was 1.83 mGy for centres using grids and 0.84 mGy for centres not using grids. In addition to the MGD and HVL, comprehensive statistical information was collected and data is presented on the types of equipment and techniques used, the number and age of patients and demographic distribution of centres. Results indicate that the use of a grid is the major factor determining dose and several other factors appear to have minor effects. In view of the distribution of MGD, it is recommended that the mean glandular dose per image, for a 5 cm compressed breast thickness, should not exceed 2.0 mGy when a grid is used and 1.0 mGy without a grid. 63 refs., 11 tabs., 15 figs

  12. To understand the radiation dose in color

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation is particles or electromagnetic waves having high energy, causing health damage to the human body, but cannot be perceived by the five senses of human. For enabling the visual sensing of radiation, the research and development of the functional dye material that changes from colorless body to colored body through irradiation is being promoted. This paper introduces the phenoxazine-based color former of solution type using the color former that changes color to blue through irradiation. The authors examined two types of phenoxazine-based color formers protected with alkyl oxycarbonyl group (-COOR), and mono-alkyl carbamoyl group (CONHR). Phenoxazine-based color former in acetonitrile solvent was revealed to be able to visually confirm the gamma irradiation dose of 10 Gy, but there is a problem of low temporal stability of the solution. (A.O.)

  13. Automated size-specific CT dose monitoring program: Assessing variability in CT dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christianson, Olav; Li Xiang; Frush, Donald; Samei, Ehsan [Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: The potential health risks associated with low levels of ionizing radiation have created a movement in the radiology community to optimize computed tomography (CT) imaging protocols to use the lowest radiation dose possible without compromising the diagnostic usefulness of the images. Despite efforts to use appropriate and consistent radiation doses, studies suggest that a great deal of variability in radiation dose exists both within and between institutions for CT imaging. In this context, the authors have developed an automated size-specific radiation dose monitoring program for CT and used this program to assess variability in size-adjusted effective dose from CT imaging. Methods: The authors radiation dose monitoring program operates on an independent health insurance portability and accountability act compliant dosimetry server. Digital imaging and communication in medicine routing software is used to isolate dose report screen captures and scout images for all incoming CT studies. Effective dose conversion factors (k-factors) are determined based on the protocol and optical character recognition is used to extract the CT dose index and dose-length product. The patient's thickness is obtained by applying an adaptive thresholding algorithm to the scout images and is used to calculate the size-adjusted effective dose (ED{sub adj}). The radiation dose monitoring program was used to collect data on 6351 CT studies from three scanner models (GE Lightspeed Pro 16, GE Lightspeed VCT, and GE Definition CT750 HD) and two institutions over a one-month period and to analyze the variability in ED{sub adj} between scanner models and across institutions. Results: No significant difference was found between computer measurements of patient thickness and observer measurements (p= 0.17), and the average difference between the two methods was less than 4%. Applying the size correction resulted in ED{sub adj} that differed by up to 44% from effective dose

  14. Radiation Risk Associated with Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Irrational Fear or Real Danger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The established worldwide practice of protecting people from radiation based on the assessments of radiation risk received in the researches carried out earlier costs hundreds of billions of dollars a year to implement. In the opinion of the well-known experts, the maintenance of the existing radiation protection regulations or moreover acceptance of more tough regulations can influence the development of nuclear power engineering. The accepted practice of assessment of human health risk from radiation may also significantly affect our perception of threats of radiation terrorism. In this work, the critical analysis of publications on the assessment of the effects of small doses of radiation on human health is carried out. In our analysis, we especially emphasize the data on cancer mortality among survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki who received instantaneous radiation doses of less than 200 mSv including the data on leukemia and solid cancer, as well as epidemiological studies in the regions of India and China with high level of natural radiation. Since the investigations of radiation risk is a base for formulating modern radiation protection regulations, their reliability and validity are of great importance. As follows from the analysis, the subsequent, during three decades, toughening of radiation protection regulations has already led to exceedingly prohibitive standards and impractical recommendations the science-based validity of which can cause serious doubts. Now, a number of world-wide known scientists and authoritative international organizations call for revision of these standards and of the radiation safety concept itself. (author)

  15. Assessment of internal doses in emergency situations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahola, T.; Muikku, M. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority - STUK (Finland); Falk, R.; Johansson, J. [Swedish Radiation Protection Authority - SSI (Sweden); Liland, A.; Thorshaug, S. [NRPA (Norway)

    2006-04-15

    The need for assessing internal radiation doses in emergency situations was demonstrated after accidents in Brazil, Ukraine and other countries. Lately more and more concern has been expressed regarding malevolent use of radiation and radioactive materials. The scenarios for such use are more difficult to predict than for nuclear power plant or weapons accidents. Much of the results of the work done in the IRADES project can be adopted for use in various accidental situations involving radionuclides that are not addressed in this report. If an emergency situation occurs in only one or a few of the Nordic countries, experts from the other countries could be called upon to assist in monitoring. A big advantage is then our common platform. In the Nordic countries much work has been put down on quality assurance of measurements and on training of dose assessment calculations. Attention to this was addressed at the internal dosimetry course in October 2005. Nordic emergency preparedness exercises have so far not included training of direct measurements of people in the early phase of an emergency. The aim of the IRADES project was to improve the preparedness especially for thyroid measurements. The modest financial support did not enable the participants to make big efforts but certainly acted as a much appreciated reminder of the importance of being prepared also to handle situations with malevolent use of radioactive materials. It was left to each country to decide to which extent to improve the practical skills. There is still a need for detailed national implementation plans. Measurement strategies need to be developed in each country separately taking into account national regulations, local circumstances and resources. End users of the IRADES report are the radiation protection authorities. (au)

  16. PRDC - A software package for personnel radiation dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine effective dose, we usually need to use a very complicated human body model and a sophisticated computer code to transport radiations in the body model and surrounding medium, which is not very easy to practicing health physicists in the field. This study develops and tests a software package, called PRDC (Personnel Radiation Dose Calculation), which calculates effective dose and radiation doses to various organs/tissues and personal dosemeters based on a series of interpolations. (authors)

  17. Solid tumor risks after high doses of ionizing radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Sachs, Rainer K; Brenner, David J.

    2005-01-01

    There is increasing concern regarding radiation-related second-cancer risks in long-term radiotherapy survivors and a corresponding need to be able to predict cancer risks at high radiation doses. Although cancer risks at moderately low radiation doses are reasonably understood from atomic bomb survivor studies, there is much more uncertainty at the high doses used in radiotherapy. It has generally been assumed that cancer induction decreases rapidly at high doses due to cell killing. However...

  18. The dose-area product and assessment of the occupational dose in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study used dose-area product (DAP) data to determine the relationship between the dose received by radiologists and the DAP. The working conditions were simulated by phantom measurements. The doses of scattered radiation were measured using various scattering angles, distances and tube voltages. The calculated doses of scattered radiation were compared with the measured doses of scattered radiation. To test the validity of using such data for assessing occupational doses, the scatter dose on the radiologist or cardiologist was calculated from the DAP using the measured scatter factors. The dose to the lenses of the eyes may exceed the annual limit, and may therefore restrict the number of interventional procedures. A relation between the DAP and the occupational dose is difficult to establish, especially because staff doses are associated with the use of protective devices, positions of projections with respect to the patient, and working methods. However, the DAP may provide a good reference value for the dosimetric monitoring of staff. (author)

  19. Attributability of Health Effects at Low Radiation Doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A controversy still persists on whether health effects can be alleged from radiation exposure situations involving low radiation doses (e.g. below the international dose limits for the public). Arguments have evolved around the validity of the dose response representation that is internationally used for radiation protection purposes, namely the so-called linear-non-threshold (LNT) model. The debate has been masked by the intrinsic randomness of radiation interaction at the cellular level and also by gaps in the relevant scientific knowledge on the development and expression of health effects. There has also been a vague use, abuse, and misuse of radiation-related risk concepts and quantities and their associated uncertainties. As a result, there is some ambiguity in the interpretation of the phenomena and a general lack of awareness of the implications for a number of risk-causation qualities, namely its attributes and characteristics. In particular, the LNT model has been used not only for protection purposes but also for blindly attributing actual effects to specific exposure situations. The latter has been discouraged as being a misuse of the model, but the supposed incorrectness has not been clearly proven. The paper will endeavour to demonstrate unambiguously the following thesis in relation to health effects due to low radiation doses: (i) Their existence is highly plausible. A number of epidemiological statistical assessments of sufficiently large exposed populations show that, under certain conditions, the prevalence of the effects increases with dose. From these assessments, it can be hypothesized that the occurrence of the effects at any dose, however small, appears decidedly worthy of belief. While strictly the evidence does not allow to conclude that a threshold dose level does not exist either In fact, a formal quantitative uncertainty analysis, combining the different uncertain components of estimated radiation-related risk, with and

  20. Attributability of health effects at low radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A controversy still persists on whether health effects can be alleged from radiation exposure situations involving low radiation doses (e.g. below the international dose limits for the public). Arguments have evolved around the validity of the dose-response representation that is internationally used for radiation protection purposes, namely the so-called linear-non-threshold (LNT) model. The debate has been masked by the intrinsic randomness of radiation interaction at the cellular level and also by gaps in the relevant scientific knowledge on the development and expression of health effects. There has also been a vague use, abuse, and misuse of radiation-related risk concepts and quantities and their associated uncertainties. As a result, there is some ambiguity in the interpretation of the phenomena and a general lack of awareness of the implications for a number of risk-causation qualities, namely its attributes and characteristics. In particular, the LNT model has been used not only for protection purposes but also for blindly attributing actual effects to specific exposure situations. The latter has been discouraged as being a misuse of the model, but the supposed incorrectness has not been clearly proven. The paper will endeavour to demonstrate unambiguously the following thesis in relation to health effects due to low radiation doses: 1) Their existence is highly plausible. A number of epidemiological statistical assessments of sufficiently large exposed populations show that, under certain conditions, the prevalence of the effects increases with dose. From these assessments, it can be hypothesized that the occurrence of the effects at any dose, however small, appears decidedly worthy of belief. While strictly the evidence does not allow to conclude that a threshold dose level does not exist either. In fact, a formal quantitative uncertainty analysis, combining the different uncertain components of estimated radiation-related risk, with and

  1. Design of radiation dose tumor response assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficient utilization of animals in a radiation dose response assay for tumor control requires a definition of the goal, e.g., TCD50 or slope. A series of computer modelled ''experiments'' have been performed for each of a number of allocations of dose levels (DL) and number of animals/DL. The authors stipulated that the assumed TCD50 was .85 of true value; assumed slope was correct. They stipulated a binominal distribution of observed tumor control results at each dose level. A pilot assay used 6 tumors at 7 DL (from TCD1-TCD97). The second assay used 30 tumors assigned to 2,3,5 or 9 DL and to selected tumor control probabilities (TCP derived from the pilot run. Results from 100 test runs were combined with the pilot run for each of the combination of DL and TCP values. Logit regression lines were fitted through these ''data'' and the 95% CL around the TCD50 and the TCD37 values and the variances of the slopes were computed. These experiments were repeated using the method suggested by Porter (1980). Results show that a different strategy is needed depending upon the goal, viz. TCD50 or TCD37 vs slope. The differences between the two approaches are discussed

  2. Radiation dose and radiation risk to foetuses and newborns during X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to determine the way in which the demands set by degree 423/2000 by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health are fulfilled with respect to the most radiosensitive groups, the foetus and the child, by estimating the radiation dose and radiation risk to the foetus from x-ray examinations of an expectant mother's pelvic region, finding out the practice involved in preventing doses to embryos and foetuses and assessing dose practices in cases where an embryo or foetus is or shall be exposed, and by estimating radiation dose and risk due to the radiation received by a new-born being treated in a paediatric intensive care unit. No statistics are available in Finland to indicate how many x-ray examinations of the pelvic region and lower abdomen are made to pregnant patients or to show the dose and risk to the foetus due these examinations. In order to find out the practices in radiological departments concerning the pelvic x-ray examination of fertile woman and the number of foetuses exposed, a questionnaire was sent to all radiation safety officers responsible for the safe use of radiation (n = 290). A total of 173 questionnaires were returned. This study recorded the technique and Dose-Area Product of 118 chest examinations of newborns in paediatric intensive care units. Entrance surface doses and effective doses were calculated separately to each newborn. Based on the patient records, the number of all x-ray examinations during the study was calculated and the effective doses were estimated retrospectively to each child. The radiation risk was estimated both for the foetuses and for the newborns. According to this study, it is rare in Finland to expose a pregnant woman to radiation. On the other hand, with the exception of pelvimetry examinations, there are no compiled statistics concerning the number of pelvic x-ray examinations of a pregnant woman. There was no common practice on how to exclude the possibility of pregnancy. The dose to a

  3. Radiation dose and radiation risk to foetuses and newborns during X-ray examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kettunen, A. [Oulu Univ. (Finland)

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the way in which the demands set by degree 423/2000 by the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health are fulfilled with respect to the most radiosensitive groups, the foetus and the child, by estimating the radiation dose and radiation risk to the foetus from x-ray examinations of an expectant mother's pelvic region, finding out the practice involved in preventing doses to embryos and foetuses and assessing dose practices in cases where an embryo or foetus is or shall be exposed, and by estimating radiation dose and risk due to the radiation received by a new-born being treated in a paediatric intensive care unit. No statistics are available in Finland to indicate how many x-ray examinations of the pelvic region and lower abdomen are made to pregnant patients or to show the dose and risk to the foetus due these examinations. In order to find out the practices in radiological departments concerning the pelvic x-ray examination of fertile woman and the number of foetuses exposed, a questionnaire was sent to all radiation safety officers responsible for the safe use of radiation (n = 290). A total of 173 questionnaires were returned. This study recorded the technique and Dose-Area Product of 118 chest examinations of newborns in paediatric intensive care units. Entrance surface doses and effective doses were calculated separately to each newborn. Based on the patient records, the number of all x-ray examinations during the study was calculated and the effective doses were estimated retrospectively to each child. The radiation risk was estimated both for the foetuses and for the newborns. According to this study, it is rare in Finland to expose a pregnant woman to radiation. On the other hand, with the exception of pelvimetry examinations, there are no compiled statistics concerning the number of pelvic x-ray examinations of a pregnant woman. There was no common practice on how to exclude the possibility of pregnancy. The dose

  4. Effects of Low Dose Radiation on Mammals 1

    OpenAIRE

    Okumura, Yutaka; Mine, Mariko; Kishikawa, Masao

    1991-01-01

    Radiation has been applied widely to clinics, researches and industries nowadays. Irradiation by atomic bomb produced many victims in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Radiation effects on animals and human belings have been reported extensively, especially at a dose range of high amount of radiation. As radiation effects at low dose have not been well studied, it is believed that even a small amount of radiation produces hazardous effects. However, it might not be true. Beneficial effects of a low dos...

  5. Preliminary dose assessment of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the major accident at Unit 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear power station, a plume of airborne radioactive fission products was initially carried northwesterly toward Poland, thence toward Scandinavia and into Central Europe. Reports of the levels of radioactivity in a variety of media and of external radiation levels were collected in the Department of Energy's Emergency Operations Center and compiled into a data bank. Portions of these and other data which were obtained directly from published and official reports were utilized to make a preliminary assessment of the extent and magnitude of the external dose to individuals downwind from Chernobyl. Radioactive 131I was the predominant fission product. The time of arrival of the plume and the maximum concentrations of 131I in air, vegetation and milk and the maximum reported depositions and external radiation levels have been tabulated country by country. A large amount of the total activity in the release was apparently carried to a significant elevation. The data suggest that in areas where rainfall occurred, deposition levels were from ten to one-hundred times those observed in nearby ''dry'' locations. Sufficient spectral data were obtained to establish average release fractions and to establish a reference spectra of the other nuclides in the release. Preliminary calculations indicated that the collective dose equivalent to the population in Scandinavia and Central Europe during the first year after the Chernobyl accident would be about 8 x 106 person-rem. From the Soviet report, it appears that a first year population dose of about 2 x 107 person-rem (2 x 105 Sv) will be received by the population who were downwind of Chernobyl within the U.S.S.R. during the accident and its subsequent releases over the following week. 32 refs., 14 figs., 20 tabs

  6. Health Risks From Low Doses and Low Dose-Rates of Ionizing Radiation. Session 5: Future of Radiation Protection Regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cool, Donald A

    2016-03-01

    The system of radiological protection is a prospective approach to protection of individuals in all exposure situations. It must be applied equitably across all age groups and all populations. This is a very different circumstance from dose assessment for a particular individual where the unique characteristics of the individual and the exposure can be taken into account. Notwithstanding the ongoing discussions on the possible shape of the dose response at low doses and dose rates, the prospective system of protection has therefore historically used a linear assumption as a pragmatic, prudent and protective approach. These radiation protection criteria are not intended to be a demarcation between "safe" and "unsafe" and are the product of a risk-informed judgement that includes inputs from science, ethics, and experience. There are significant implications for different dose response relationships. A linear model allows for equal treatment of an exposure, irrespective of the previously accumulated exposure. In contrast, other models would predict different implications. Great care is therefore needed in separating the thinking around risk assessment from risk management, and prospective protection for all age groups and genders from retrospective assessment for a particular individual. In the United States, the prospective regulatory structure functions effectively because of assumptions that facilitate independent treatment of different types of exposures, and which provide pragmatic and prudent protection. While the a linear assumption may, in fact, not be consistent with the biological reality, the implications of a different regulatory model must be considered carefully. PMID:26808877

  7. SU-E-J-269: Assessing the Precision of Dose Delivery in CBCT-Guided Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Lung and Soft Tissue Metastatic Lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsai, S; Dalhart, A; Chen, C; Parsai, E; Pearson, D; Sperling, N; Reddy, K [University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Ensuring reproducibility of target localization is critical to accurate stereotactic body radiation treatment (SBRT) for lung and soft tissue metastatic lesions. To characterize interfraction variability in set-up and evaluate PTV margins utilized for SBRT, daily CBCTs were used to calculate delivered target and OAR doses compared to those expected from planning. Methods: CBCT images obtained prior to each fraction of SBRT for a lung and thyroid metastatic lesion were evaluated. The target CTV/ITV and OARs on each of 8 CBCT data sets were contoured. Using MIM fusion software and Pinnacle{sup 3} RTP system, delivered dose distribution was reconstructed on each CBCT, utilizing translational shifts performed prior to treatment. Actual delivered vs. expected doses received by target CTV/ITV and adjacent critical structures were compared to characterize accuracy of pre-treatment translational shifts and PTV margins. Results: The planned CTV/ITV D95% and V100% were 4595cGy and 91.47% for the lung lesion, and 3010cGy and 96.34% for the thyroid lesion. Based on CBCT analysis, actual mean D95% and V100% for lung ITV were 4542±344.4cGy and 91.54±3.45%; actual mean D95% and V100% for thyroid metastasis CTV were 3005±25.98cGy and 95.20±2.522%. For the lung lesion, ipsilateral lung V20, heart V32 (cc) and spinal cord (.03 cc) max were 110.15cc, 3.33cc, and 1680cGy vs. 110.27±14.79cc, 6.74±3.76cc, and 1711±46.56cGy for planned vs. delivered doses, respectively. For the thyroid metastatic lesion, esophagus V18, trachea (.03 cc) max, and spinal cord (.03 cc) max were 0.35cc, 2555cGy, and 850cGy vs. 0.16±0.13cc, 2147±367cGy, and 838±45cGy for planned vs. delivered treatments, respectively. Conclusion: Minimal variability in SBRT target lesion dose delivered based on pre-treatment CBCT-based translational shifts suggests tighter PTV margins may be considered to further decrease dose to surrounding critical structures. Guidelines for optimal target alignment during

  8. Population dose assessment: characteristics of PC CREAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the main features of the PC CREAM, a program for performing radiological impact assessments due to radioactive discharges into the environment during the operation of radioactive and nuclear facilities. PC CREAM is a suite of six programs that can be used to estimate individual and collective radiation doses. The methodology of PC CREAM is based on updated environmental and dosimetric models, including ICRP 60 recommendations. The models include several exposure pathways and the input files are easy to access. The ergonomics of the program improves the user interaction and makes easier the input of local data. This program is useful for performing sensitivity analysis, siting studies and validation of model comparing the activity concentration output data with environmental monitoring data. The methodology of each module is described as well as the output data. (author)

  9. Stable chromosome aberrations in the reconstruction of radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromosome-type aberrations, such as dicentric and translocation chromosomes, are biomarkers of exposure to ionizing radiation. So far, analysis of dicentric chromosomes in peripheral blood lymphocytes has been the only method routinely used in biological dose assessment. During division of T cell precursors, proliferative death of cells containing dicentric chromosomes reduces the number of such lymphocytes in peripheral blood. Dicentrics are thus suitable for dose calculations during a reasonably short period after exposure to radiation. Unlike dicentrics, translocations persist in cell division and enable dose estimation over long time periods following exposure. A recent development in molecular biology, the FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) chromosome-painting technique, has opened the possibility for accurate recognition of translocations and thus retrospective determination of dose. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the applicability of translocation analysis by means of FISH chromosome painting for retrospective dosimetry. In the construction of acute dose-effect curves for 60Co g-ray-induced chromosomal aberrations using FISH chromosome painting, translocations showed a linear-quadratic relationship to dose, similar to that seen in dicentrics. Donor-dependent translocation frequencies at control level and at low doses were observed. The linear part of the calibration curve for two way translocations, i.e. both translocation chromosomes present, proved to be more reliable than the comparable low-dose response for total translocations, which include both two- and one-way translocations. The results indicate that the linear part of the curve requires precise determination, particularly since application of the technique will probably cover mainly chronically exposed subjects. An opportunity to gain direct information on translocation persistence over time was opened by obtaining repeated samples from subjects accidentally exposed to

  10. MO-G-18A-01: Radiation Dose Reducing Strategies in CT, Fluoroscopy and Radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advances in medical x-ray imaging have provided significant benefits to patient care. According to NCRP 160, there are more than 400 million x-ray procedures performed annually in the United States alone that contributes to nearly half of all the radiation exposure to the US population. Similar growth trends in medical x-ray imaging are observed worldwide. Apparent increase in number of medical x-ray imaging procedures, new protocols and the associated radiation dose and risk has drawn considerable attention. This has led to a number of technological innovations such as tube current modulation, iterative reconstruction algorithms, dose alerts, dose displays, flat panel digital detectors, high efficient digital detectors, storage phosphor radiography, variable filters, etc. that are enabling users to acquire medical x-ray images at a much lower radiation dose. Along with these, there are number of radiation dose optimization strategies that users can adapt to effectively lower radiation dose in medical x-ray procedures. The main objectives of this SAM course are to provide information and how to implement the various radiation dose optimization strategies in CT, Fluoroscopy and Radiography. Learning Objectives: To update impact of technological advances on dose optimization in medical imaging. To identify radiation optimization strategies in computed tomography. To describe strategies for configuring fluoroscopic equipment that yields optimal images at reasonable radiation dose. To assess ways to configure digital radiography systems and recommend ways to improve image quality at optimal dose

  11. The 20th L H Gray Conference - Radiation Cancer Analysis and Low Dose Risk Assessment: New Developments and Perspectives (Ede, the Netherlands, February 2002)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are few international venues where scientists in vastly different fields working on a common problem, or on a number of closely related problems, can get together in an intimate setting to present the results of their research and to discuss their approaches and views in a collegial atmosphere, and without the trappings of a huge convention with its conflicting parallel sessions and distracting events. Over the years, the L H Gray Conferences have provided an ideal setting for such intimate gatherings. This year the 20th L H Gray Conference, held in Ede, the Netherlands, was no exception. Convened for the first time outside the United Kingdom and hosted by the Dutch National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM). Paramount in all the participants' minds was the emerging information from molecular radiation biology on the recently recognised 'new' processes such as genomic instability, bystander effects, hypersensitivity, and the adaptive response. A novel aspect this year was the introduction of the opportunity, both at the beginning and at the end of the meeting, to participate in a 'vote' on controversial subjects by answering electronically such questions as: 'does radiation hormesis occur at low doses?' and 'should an age-dependence of radiological risk be incorporated into recommendations for radiation protectionThere appears to be no evidence for radiation-induced genomic instability, at least in this tumour. If this model holds for other tumour types, it would suggest that there is no 'radiation fingerprint' and that no special mechanism lies behind radiation-induced cancer. The major social event of the meeting was an afternoon devoted to a delightful excursion to the renowned Kroeller-Mueller Museum in the nearby national park (De Hoge Veluwe). Our Dutch hosts were even able to order up some sunshine for the day. After an afternoon of strolling through the museum and surrounding park, we were bussed to a hotel on the precipitous

  12. Predicted effects of countermeasures on radiation doses from contaminated food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantitative assessments of the effects on radiation-dose reductions from nine typical countermeasures against accidental fod contamination have been carried out with dynamic radioecological models. The foodstuffs are assumed to be contaminated with iodine-131, caesium-134 and caesium-137 after a release of radioactive materials from the Ringhals nuclear power station in Sweden resulting from a hypothetical core melt accident. The release of activity of these radionuclides is assumed at 0.07% of the core inventory of the unit 1 reactor (1600 TBq of I-131, 220 TBq of Cs-134 and 190 TBq of Cs-137). Radiation doses are estimated for the 55,000 affected inhabitants along the south-eastern coast of Sweden eating locally produced foodstuffs. The average effective dose equivalent to an individual in the critical group is predicted to be 2.9 mSv from food consumption contaminated with I-131. An accident occurring during winter is estimated to cause average individual doses of 0.32 mSv from Cs-134 and 0.47 mSv from Cs-137, and 9.4 mSv and 6.8 mSv from Cs-134 and Cs-137, respectively, for an accident occurring during summer. Doses from the intake of radioiodine may be reduced by up to a factor of 60 by rejecting contaminated food for 30 days. For the doses from radiocaesium, the largest effect is found form deep ploughing which may reduce the dose by up to a factor of 80. (au) (12 tabs., 6 ills., 19 refs.)

  13. CANISTER HANDLING FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.T. Dexheimer

    2004-02-27

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the Canister Handling Facility (CHF) performing operations to receive transportation casks, transfer wastes, prepare waste packages, perform associated equipment maintenance. The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation. The results of this calculation will be used to support the design of the CHF and provide occupational dose estimates for the License Application.

  14. CANISTER HANDLING FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the Canister Handling Facility (CHF) performing operations to receive transportation casks, transfer wastes, prepare waste packages, perform associated equipment maintenance. The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation. The results of this calculation will be used to support the design of the CHF and provide occupational dose estimates for the License Application

  15. FUEL HANDLING FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this design calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the Fuel Handling Facility (FHF) of the Monitored Geological Repository (MGR). The FHF is a surface facility supporting waste handling operations i.e. receive transportation casks, transfer wastes, prepare waste packages, and ship out loaded waste packages and empty casks. The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers both collective doses and individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation. The results are also limited to normal operations only. Results of this calculation will be used to support the FHF design and License Application

  16. Improvement of quantification of somatic radiation risks at low doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research contract several selected topics of basic relevancy for assessment models of radiological consequences of hypothetical reactor accidents have been considered. The investigations focussed on the following areas: 1) Age dependent dose conversion factors for members of the public and their variability for radioisotopes of iodine, strontium, and caesium, - improvement of the accuracy of dose calculations for external gamma irradiation from cloud- and ground-shine; 2) analysis of data and models relevant for the assessment of exposure-time-effect relationships for lethal somatic late effects of lung and breast cancer and of leukemia; 3) analysis of various health status indices (e.g. ''loss of healthy life span'') with respect to their usefulness in addition to incidence, mortality, etc. for the evaluation of the magnitude of a health detriment due to a previous radiation exposure. (orig./HP)

  17. Direct determination of internal radiation dose in human blood

    CERN Document Server

    Tanır, Ayse Güneş

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to measure the internal radiation dose using a human blood sample. In the literature, there is no process that allows the direct measurement of the internal radiation dose received by a person. The luminescence counts from a blood sample having a laboratory-injected radiation dose and the waste blood of the patient injected with a radiopharmaceutical for diagnostic purposes were both measured. The decay and dose-response curves were plotted for the different doses. The doses received by the different blood aliquots can be determined by interpolating the luminescence counts to the dose-response curve. This study shows that the dose received by a person can be measured directly, simply and retrospectively by using only a very small amount of blood sample. The results will have important ramifications for the medicine and healthcare fields in particular. This will also be very important in cases of suspicion of radiation poisoning, malpractice and so on.

  18. Response of pig skin to fractionated radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The individual components of a fractionated course of irradiation treatment have been considered separately. Methods of accurate measurement of individual parameters has brought to light different interpretations of the observations. Reasons are given for the necessity of having a radiobiological model which has a direct relevance to the clinical situation. Results are reported for fractionated regimes of irradiation in which the dose has been varied above and below normal tissue tolerance which has been equated with clinical skin necrosis. The components of the acute skin reaction, erythema, pigmentation and desquamation have been analysed separately and their contribution as a method of measurement assessed. Initially, the range of numerical scores attributed to erythema did not reach the scores attributed to necrosis but we now believe that radiation damage expressed as erythema can move directly into necrosis without passing through desquamation. Desquamation, on the other hand, only became a useful parameter at higher dose levels; it has also been shown to be a component associated with skin breakdown. Pigmentation showed no dose response at the dose levels employed in our experiments and it is our belief that this is due to this system being fully saturated under these circumstances. Measurement of the late radiation reaction in the skin has been considered in detail and our results have been expressed by comparing the relative lengths of irradiated and control fields in the same pig. From these findings iso-effect graphs have been constructed and time and fractionation factors have been derived. (author)

  19. Current issues in carcinogenic effect of low-dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of publications dealing with study of radiation sources and biological evaluation of increasing doses of people irradiation under occupational and usual living conditions is presented. The existing natural and artifial irradiation sources are considered. It is noted that all types of ionizing radiations are characterized by high carcinogenic efficiency and can induce benign and malignant tumors practically in all organs. Statistically reliable data in experimental and epidemiological investigations were recorded under the effect of large and mean doses. Minor radiation doses not responsible for visible functional and morphological changes in early periods can cause pathological changes in delayed periods. The data on carcinogenic effect of relatively small radiation doses are available

  20. Alternative Physical Quality Parameters Influences Effectiveness of Lower Doses Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Abubaker Ali; Bahari, Ismail Bin; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi

    2011-03-01

    It has been proved in many studied that the absorbed dose is not good physical quality parameter to quantify the radiation effects at lower doses. However relative biological effect (RBE) is still used as a major parameter of radiation effectiveness. Whereas linear energy transfer (LET) is inadequate physical parameter, therefore the weaknesses in using RBE-LET system for radiation protection have been investigated. Secondary data of V79 has reanalyzed to help complement the inadequacy current method in assessing cell inactivation at lower doses. Results of analysis show that the effectiveness of densely ionizing radiation is better quantified using mean free path (λ).

  1. Acute radiation enteritis caused by dose-dependent radiation exposure in dogs: experimental research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenda; Chen, Jiang; Xu, Liu; Li, Hongyu; Guo, Xiaozhong

    2014-12-01

    Accidental or intended radiation exposure in mass casualty settings presents a serious and on-going threat. The development of mitigating and treating agents requires appropriate animal models. Unfortunately, the majority of research on radiation enteritis in animals has lacked specific assessments and targeted therapy. Our study showed beagle dogs, treated by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for abdominal irradiation, were administered single X-ray doses of 8-30 Gy. The degree of intestinal tract injury for all of the animals after radiation exposure was evaluated with regard to clinical syndrome, endoscopic findings, histological features, and intestinal function. The range of single doses (8 Gy, 10-14 Gy, and 16-30 Gy) represented the degree of injury (mild, moderate, and severe, respectively). Acute radiation enteritis included clinical syndrome with fever, vomiting, diarrhea, hemafecia, and weight loss; typical endoscopic findings included edema, bleeding, mucosal abrasions, and ulcers; and intestinal biopsy results revealed mucosal necrosis, erosion, and loss, inflammatory cell infiltration, hemorrhage, and congestion. Changes in serum diamine oxides (DAOs) and d-xylose represented intestinal barrier function and absorption function, respectively, and correlated with the extent of damage (P enteritis, thus obtaining a relatively objective evaluation of intestinal tract injury based on clinical performance and laboratory examination. The method of assessment of the degree of intestinal tract injury after abdominal irradiation could be beneficial in the development of novel and effective therapeutic strategies for acute radiation enteritis.

  2. Image-Based Assessment and Clinical Significance of Absorbed Radiation Dose to Tumor in Repeated High-Dose {sup 131}I Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody (Rituximab) Radioimmunotherapy for Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Byung Hyun; Kim, Kyeong Min; Woo, Sang Keun; Choi, Tae Hyun; Kang, Hye Jin; Oh, Dong Hyun; Kim, Byeong Il; Choen, Gi Jeong; Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, Sang Moo [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-15

    We assessed the absorbed dose to the tumor (Dose tumor) by using pretreatment FDG-PET and whole-body (WB) planar images in repeated radioimmunotherapy (RIT) with {sup 131}I rituximab for NHL. Patients with NHL (n=4) were administered a therapeutic dose of {sup 131}I rituximab. Serial WB planar images after RIT were acquired and overlaid to the coronal maximum intensity projection (MIP) PET image before RIT. On registered MIP PET and WB planar images, 2D-ROIs were drawn on the region of tumor (n=7) and left medial thigh as background, and Dosetumor was calculated. The correlation between Dosetumor and the CT-based tumor volume change after RIT was analyzed. The differences of Dosetumor and the tumor volume change according to the number of RIT were also assessed. The values of absorbed dose were 397.7{+-}646.2cGy (53.0{approx}2853.0cGy). The values of CT-based tumor volume were 11.3{+-}9.1 cc (2.9{approx}34.2cc), and the % changes of tumor volume before and after RIT were -29.8{+-}44.3% (-100.0%{approx}+42.5%), respectively. Dosetumor and the tumor volume change did not show the linear relationship (p>0.05). Dosetumor and the tumor volume change did not correlate with the number of repeated administration (p>0.05). We could determine the position and contour of viable tumor by MIP PET image. And, registration of PET and gamma camera images was possible to estimate the quantitative values of absorbed dose to tumor.

  3. Individual monitoring of external radiation - dose quantities and their relevance to radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    External exposures due to the use of ionising radiation are the major contributor to doses to radiation workers. X-and gamma rays from radiation sources and radiation generating equipment's from the main component of dose. This is because of their penetrating power and wider abundance due to their use in medical, industrial research and agriculture fields. Although in some cases, beta radiation and neutrons also form some significant component to dose, their overall contribution remains much lower

  4. Radiation Dose Risk and Diagnostic Benefit in Imaging Investigations

    CERN Document Server

    Dobrescu, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents many facets of medical imaging investigations radiological risks. The total volume of prescribed medical investigations proves a serious lack in monitoring and tracking of the cumulative radiation doses in many health services. Modern radiological investigations equipment is continuously reducing the total dose of radiation due to improved technologies, so a decrease in per caput dose can be noticed, but the increasing number of investigations has determined a net increase of the annual collective dose. High doses of radiation are cumulated from Computed Tomography investigations. An integrated system for radiation safety of the patients investigated by radiological imaging methods, based on smart cards and Public Key Infrastructure allow radiation absorbed dose data storage.

  5. Mechanistic Basis for Nonlinear Dose-Response Relationships for Low-Dose Radiation-Induced Stochastic Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, Bobby R.; Walker, Dale M.; Tesfaigzi, Yohannes; Schöllnberger, Helmut; Walker, Vernon

    2003-01-01

    The linear nonthreshold (LNT) model plays a central role in low-dose radiation risk assessment for humans. With the LNT model, any radiation exposure is assumed to increase one’s risk of cancer. Based on the LNT model, others have predicted tens of thousands of deaths related to environmental exposure to radioactive material from nuclear accidents (e.g., Chernobyl) and fallout from nuclear weapons testing. Here, we introduce a mechanism-based model for low-dose, radiation-induced, stochastic ...

  6. Radiation dose evaluation in patients submitted to conventional radiological examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents the results of the evaluation of radiation dose delivered to the patients undergoing conventional radiological procedures. Based in the realized measurement some indicators are settled to quantitative appraisal of the radiological protection conditions offered to the population. Data assessment was done in the county of Curitiba, in Parana State, Brazil, from 12/95 to 04/96, in ten rooms of three different institutions, under 101 patients, adults with 70 ± 10 kg, during real examinations of chest PA, chest LAT and abdomen AP. (author)

  7. Knowledge of medical imaging radiation dose and risk among doctors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth of computed tomography (CT) and nuclear medicine (NM) scans has revolutionised healthcare but also greatly increased population radiation doses. Overuse of diagnostic radiation is becoming a feature of medical practice, leading to possible unnecessary radiation exposures and lifetime-risks of developing cancer. Doctors across all medical specialties and experience levels were surveyed to determine their knowledge of radiation doses and potential risks associated with some diagnostic imaging. A survey relating to knowledge and understanding of medical imaging radiation was distributed to doctors at 14 major Queensland public hospitals, as well as fellows and trainees in radiology, emergency medicine and general practice. From 608 valid responses, only 17.3% correctly estimated the radiation dose from CT scans and almost 1 in 10 incorrectly believed that CT radiation is not associated with any increased lifetime risk of developing cancer. There is a strong inverse relationship between a clinician's experience and their knowledge of CT radiation dose and risks, even among radiologists. More than a third (35.7%) of doctors incorrectly believed that typical NM imaging either does not use ionising radiation or emits doses equal to or less than a standard chest radiograph. Knowledge of CT and NM radiation doses is poor across all specialties, and there is a significant inverse relationship between experience and awareness of CT dose and risk. Despite having a poor understanding of these concepts, most doctors claim to consider them prior to requesting scans and when discussing potential risks with patients.

  8. Problems with the assessment of internal radiation doses from radioactive tumortracers; Probleme bei der Bestimmung der durch radioaktive Tumormarker bedingten internen Strahlendosen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havlik, E. [Wien Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Biomedizinische Technik und Physik]|[Ludwig-Boltzmann-Institut fuer Nuklearmedizin, Vienna (Austria); Kurtaran, A.; Smith-Jones, P. [Vienna Univ. (Austria). Universitaetsklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Virgolini, I. [Ludwig-Boltzmann-Institut fuer Nuklearmedizin, Vienna (Austria)]|[Vienna Univ. (Austria). Universitaetsklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    1998-12-31

    In the field of nuclear medicine, various radioactive compounds are taken up by tumors and their metastases. Several computer programs (e.g. MIRDOSE, LUDEP) are available for the calculation of internal radiation doses. These programs require the determination of the time based activity distribution of the radiotracer in individual organs. The determination of organ doses can be problematic due to the interpretation of the measurement data, the biokinetics of the tracer and the morphology of the target organs. Calculations based on scintigraphic data can have high errors associated with the background subtraction method. Additionally, the determination of the residence times are important. They are derived from the time-activity courses. However, a problematic area is the accurate determination of the sizes of both the tumor and its metastases. These aspects will be discussed using actual examples based on such new tumor tracers as VIP and DOTA-lanreotide. (orig.) [Deutsch] In der Nuklearmedizin werden radioaktiv markierte, in Tumoren und Metastasen gespeicherte Substanzen eingesetzt. Voraussetzung fuer die Berechnung der internen Strahlendosen im Zielgewebe und in anderen Geweben bzw. Organen sind Daten ueber die Verteilung und ueber das zeitliche Verhalten der Tracer. Computerprogramme unterstuetzen diese Berechnungen (z.B. MIRDOSE, LUDEP). Bei der Bestimmung der Gewebedosen ergeben sich Probleme, die in der Interpretation der Messdaten, in er Biokinetik der Substanzen und in der Morphologie der Zielgewebe liegen. Bei der Auswertung von szintigraphischen Aufnahmen stellt die Hintergrundsubtraktion einen wesentlichen Unsicherheitsfaktor dar. Weiters werden die Strahlendosen in den Geweben von den mittleren Aufenthaltsdauern der radioaktiven Substanzen bestimmt, welche wiederum ueber Zeit-Aktivitaets-Verlaeufe bestimmt werden muessen, die in eine mathematische Form gezwaengt werden. Schliesslich ist die Bestimmung der Masse von Tumoren/Metastasen oft problematisch

  9. Offsite radiation doses summarized from Hanford environmental monitoring reports for the years 1957-1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1957, evaluations of offsite impacts from each year of operation have been summarized in publicly available, annual environmental reports. These evaluations included estimates of potential radiation exposure to members of the public, either in terms of percentages of the then permissible limits or in terms of radiation dose. The estimated potential radiation doses to maximally exposed individuals from each year of Hanford operations are summarized in a series of tables and figures. The applicable standard for radiation dose to an individual for whom the maximum exposure was estimated is also shown. Although the estimates address potential radiation doses to the public from each year of operations at Hanford between 1957 and 1984, their sum will not produce an accurate estimate of doses accumulated over this time period. The estimates were the best evaluations available at the time to assess potential dose from the current year of operation as well as from any radionuclides still present in the environment from previous years of operation. There was a constant striving for improved evaluation of the potential radiation doses received by members of the public, and as a result the methods and assumptions used to estimate doses were periodically modified to add new pathways of exposure and to increase the accuracy of the dose calculations. Three conclusions were reached from this review: radiation doses reported for the years 1957 through 1984 for the maximum individual did not exceed the applicable dose standards; radiation doses reported over the past 27 years are not additive because of the changing and inconsistent methods used; and results from environmental monitoring and the associated dose calculations reported over the 27 years from 1957 through 1984 do not suggest a significant dose contribution from the buildup in the environment of radioactive materials associated with Hanford operations

  10. Energies, health, medicine. Low radiation doses; Energies, sante, medecine. Les faibles doses de rayonnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This file concerns the biological radiation effects with a special mention for low radiation doses. The situation of knowledge in this area and the mechanisms of carcinogenesis are detailed, the different directions of researches are given. The radiation doses coming from medical examinations are given and compared with natural radioactivity. It constitutes a state of the situation on ionizing radiations, known effects, levels, natural radioactivity and the case of radon, medicine with diagnosis and radiotherapy. (N.C.)

  11. Metrics, Dose, and Dose Concept: The Need for a Proper Dose Concept in the Risk Assessment of Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrtill Simkó

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to calculate the dose for nanoparticles (NP, (i relevant information about the dose metrics and (ii a proper dose concept are crucial. Since the appropriate metrics for NP toxicity are yet to be elaborated, a general dose calculation model for nanomaterials is not available. Here we propose how to develop a dose assessment model for NP in analogy to the radiation protection dose calculation, introducing the so-called “deposited and the equivalent dose”. As a dose metric we propose the total deposited NP surface area (SA, which has been shown frequently to determine toxicological responses e.g. of lung tissue. The deposited NP dose is proportional to the total surface area of deposited NP per tissue mass, and takes into account primary and agglomerated NP. By using several weighting factors the equivalent dose additionally takes into account various physico-chemical properties of the NP which are influencing the biological responses. These weighting factors consider the specific surface area, the surface textures, the zeta-potential as a measure for surface charge, the particle morphology such as the shape and the length-to-diameter ratio (aspect ratio, the band gap energy levels of metal and metal oxide NP, and the particle dissolution rate. Furthermore, we discuss how these weighting factors influence the equivalent dose of the deposited NP.

  12. Measuring radiation dose to patients undergoing fluoroscopically-guided interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubis, L. E.; Badawy, M. K.

    2016-03-01

    The increasing prevalence and complexity of fluoroscopically guided interventions (FGI) raises concern regarding radiation dose to patients subjected to the procedure. Despite current evidence showing the risk to patients from the deterministic effects of radiation (e.g. skin burns), radiation induced injuries remain commonplace. This review aims to increase the awareness surrounding radiation dose measurement for patients undergoing FGI. A review of the literature was conducted alongside previous researches from the authors’ department. Studies pertaining to patient dose measurement, its formalism along with current advances and present challenges were reviewed. Current patient monitoring techniques (using available radiation dosimeters), as well as the inadequacy of accepting displayed dose as patient radiation dose is discussed. Furthermore, advances in real-time patient radiation dose estimation during FGI are considered. Patient dosimetry in FGI, particularly in real time, remains an ongoing challenge. The increasing occurrence and sophistication of these procedures calls for further advances in the field of patient radiation dose monitoring. Improved measuring techniques will aid clinicians in better predicting and managing radiation induced injury following FGI, thus improving patient care.

  13. Small Bowel Dose Tolerance for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaCouture, Tamara A; Xue, Jinyu; Subedi, Gopal; Xu, Qianyi; Lee, Justin T; Kubicek, Gregory; Asbell, Sucha O

    2016-04-01

    Inconsistencies permeate the literature regarding small bowel dose tolerance limits for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatments. In this review, we organized these diverse published limits with MD Anderson at Cooper data into a unified framework, constructing the dose-volume histogram (DVH) Risk Map, demonstrating low-risk and high-risk SBRT dose tolerance limits for small bowel. Statistical models of clinical data from 2 institutions were used to assess the safety spectrum of doses used in the exposure of the gastrointestinal tract in SBRT; 30% of the analyzed cases had vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors (VEGFI) or other biological agents within 2 years before or after SBRT. For every dose tolerance limit in the DVH Risk Map, the probit dose-response model was used to estimate the risk level from our clinical data. Using the current literature, 21Gy to 5cc of small bowel in 3 fractions has low toxicity and is reasonably safe, with 6.5% estimated risk of grade 3 or higher complications, per Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. In the same fractionation for the same volume, if lower risk is required, 16.2Gy has an estimated risk of only 2.5%. Other volumes and fractionations are also reviewed; for all analyzed high-risk small bowel limits, the risk is 8.2% or less, and the low-risk limits have 4% or lower estimated risk. The results support current clinical practice, with some possibility for dose escalation. PMID:27000513

  14. The researches of medical and environmental radiation protection dose

    OpenAIRE

    盧, 暁光

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, with the development of modern radiation science, application of radiation exposure has been paid more and more attention in various fields. Although there are many benefits for human by the use of radiation in such as medical diagnose and treatment, utilization of nuclear power, more efforts should be made to radiation hazards and their control that are often neglected. The researches in this study were intended to meet the requirements with the center of radiation protection dose ...

  15. Radiation dose distributions due to sudden ejection of cobalt device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhady, Amr

    2016-09-01

    The evaluation of the radiation dose during accident in a nuclear reactor is of great concern from the viewpoint of safety. One of important accident must be analyzed and may be occurred in open pool type reactor is the rejection of cobalt device. The study is evaluating the dose rate levels resulting from upset withdrawal of co device especially the radiation dose received by the operator in the control room. Study of indirect radiation exposure to the environment due to skyshine effect is also taken into consideration in order to evaluate the radiation dose levels around the reactor during the ejection trip. Microshield, SHLDUTIL, and MCSky codes were used in this study to calculate the radiation dose profiles during cobalt device ejection trip inside and outside the reactor building. PMID:27423021

  16. Calculation of the dose caused by internal radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    For the purposes of monitoring radiation exposure it is necessary to determine or to estimate the dose caused by both external and internal radiation. When comparing the value of exposure to the dose limits, account must be taken of the total dose incurred from different sources. This guide explains how to calculate the committed effective dose caused by internal radiation and gives the conversion factors required for the calculation. Application of the maximum values for radiation exposure is dealt with in ST guide 7.2, which also sets out the definitions of the quantities and concepts most commonly used in the monitoring of radiation exposure. The monitoring of exposure and recording of doses are dealt with in ST Guides 7.1 and 7.4.

  17. Low dose radiation and plant growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Jae; Lee, Hae Youn; Park, Hong Sook

    2001-03-01

    Ionizing radiation includes cosmic radiation, earth radiation, radionuclides for the medical purpose and nuclear industry, fallout radiation. From the experimental results of various radiation effects on seeds or seedlings, it was found that germination rate, development, respiration rate, reproduction and blooming were accelerated compared with the control. In mammal, hormesis phenomenon manifested itself in increased disease resistance, lifespan, and decreased rate of tumor incidence. In plants, it was shown that germination, sprouting, growth, development, blooming and resistance to disease were accelerated.

  18. Low dose radiation and plant growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation includes cosmic radiation, earth radiation, radionuclides for the medical purpose and nuclear industry, fallout radiation. From the experimental results of various radiation effects on seeds or seedlings, it was found that germination rate, development, respiration rate, reproduction and blooming were accelerated compared with the control. In mammal, hormesis phenomenon manifested itself in increased disease resistance, lifespan, and decreased rate of tumor incidence. In plants, it was shown that germination, sprouting, growth, development, blooming and resistance to disease were accelerated

  19. Radiation dose rates from UF{sub 6} cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friend, P.J. [Urenco, Capenhurst (United Kingdom)

    1991-12-31

    This paper describes the results of many studies, both theoretical and experimental, which have been carried out by Urenco over the last 15 years into radiation dose rates from uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) cylinders. The contents of the cylinder, its history, and the geometry all affect the radiation dose rate. These factors are all examined in detail. Actual and predicted dose rates are compared with levels permitted by IAEA transport regulations.

  20. Radiation dose estimates for copper-64 citrate in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumor imaging agents suitable for use with positron emission tomographs are constantly sought. The authors have performed studies with animal-tumor-bearing models that have demonstrated the rapid uptake of copper-64. The radiation dose estimates for man indicate that the intravenous administration of 7.0 mCi would result in radiation doses to the kidney of 9.8 to 10.5 rads with other organs receiving substantially less radiations. 5 references, 3 tables

  1. Reduction of the radiation dose received by interventional cardiologists following training in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University General Hospital of Alexandroupolis was established in 2003 to cover Eastern Macedonia and Thrace Districts of Northern Greece. The hospital has two interventional cardiology units and the occupational radiation exposure of the cardiologists was the highest of all specialties using ionising radiation. In order to aid in decreasing the radiation dose levels, a seminar was organised for all personnel working in interventional radiology field. After this, an important reduction of the radiation dose of the cardiologists was noted. Training in radiation protection is essential to reduce the radiation doses and consequently the deterministic and stochastic effects of ionising radiation of cardiologists working in interventional radiology. (authors)

  2. Ionizing radiation population doses at Sao Paulo city, Brazil: open-pit gamma dose measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of ionizing radiation to the human beings are well known for high and intermediate doses. As far as low level) radiation doses are concerned, there is no consensus. In order to get a better understanding of such effects it is necessary to assess the low doses with better accuracy. In this work, it was made an estimate of the annual ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) to which the people are exposed in the city of Sao Paulo. Until now there are no data about it available in the literature. For the purpose of this evaluation, a map with various routes covering the largest and more representative area of the city was designed. The choice of points for data collection was made taking into account mainly the occupancy of the region. A portable gamma spectrometry system was used. It furnishes the rate of H*(10) and the measured gamma spectrum (in the range from 50 to 1670 keV) in the place of interest. The measurements were performed in a short time interval, since the gamma radiation arrives from a great extent of soil. Each measurement was done 1 m above the soil during 300 s. The rates of H*(10) varied from 33.1 to 152.3 nSv.h-1, net values, obtained after subtraction of the cosmic rays contribution. The standard deviation was 22 n Sv.h-1 for an average for the city of Sao Paulo of 96.1(24) nSv.h-1. In addition, average values of H*(10) rates for the city Health Divisions were calculated. Those values are not statistically equivalent and the whole set of data could not be treated as one, as the statistical Student test indicated a non homogeneity of the group of data. Hence it is necessary the accomplishment of a more detailed survey in order to verify the origin of the discrepancy. The mean value of H*(10) rate obtained for the city of Sao Paulo as converted to effective dose. in order to be compared with other places results It could be noticed that the annual average of effective dose for the city of Sao Paulo, 0.522(13) mSv, is superior to the world

  3. Long-term radiation dose reduction plan of KHNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Saeng-Ki; Shin, Sang-Woon; Lim, Byoung-Chan [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    Annual radiation dose limit to radiation worker was substantially lowered in Korea by the adoption of 1990 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP 60) in its legislation. On the other hand, radiation management environment in nuclear power plants is getting more worse because of the accumulation of radiation sources inside the system and the frequent need for maintenance according as the operation years of nuclear power plants increase. Therefore, Korea Hydro and Nuclear power Co., Ltd. (KHNP) has established a long-term 10 years' plan from 2001 to 2010 for the reduction of radiation dose to workers. The plan is aimed for the reduction of annual dose per unit averaged over 5 years from 0.9 man-Sv in 2001 to 0.75 man- Sv in 2010 by radiation source reduction, equipment/tool improvement or new equipment development for easy maintenance, and the improvement of administration and system.

  4. Dose-dependent hepatic transcriptional responses in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) exposed to sublethal doses of gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, You, E-mail: you.song@niva.no [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Gaustadalléen 21, N-0349 Oslo (Norway); Salbu, Brit; Teien, Hans-Christian; Heier, Lene Sørlie [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Rosseland, Bjørn Olav [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Department of Ecology and Natural Resource Management, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Tollefsen, Knut Erik [Norwegian University of Life Sciences (NMBU), Faculty of Environmental Science and Technology, Department of Environmental Sciences (IMV), Centre for Environmental Radioactivity - CERAD, P.O. Box 5003, N-1432 Ås (Norway); Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA), Gaustadalléen 21, N-0349 Oslo (Norway)

    2014-11-15

    affected DEGs associated with cellular signaling and immune response; 70 mGy radiation affected cell cycle regulation and DNA damage repair, cellular energy production; and 280 mGy radiation affected pathways related to cell cycle regulation and DNA repair, mitochondrial dysfunction and immune functions. Twelve genes representative of key pathways found in this study were verified by qPCR. Potential common MoAs of low-dose gamma radiation may include induction of oxidative stress, DNA damage and disturbance of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Although common MoAs were proposed, a number of DEGs and pathways were still found to be dose-specific, potentially indicating multiple mechanisms of action (MOAs) of low-dose gamma radiation in fish. In addition, plasma glucose displayed an apparent increase with increasing radiation doses, although the results were not significantly different from the control. These findings suggested that sublethal doses of gamma radiation may cause dose-dependent transcriptional changes in the liver of Atlantic salmon after short-term exposure. The current study predicted multiple MoA for gamma radiation and may aid future impact assessment of environmental radioactivity in fish.

  5. Doses and biological effect of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic values and their symbols as well as units of physical dosimetry are given. The most important information about biological radiation effects is presented. Polish radiation protection standards are cited. (A.S.)

  6. Calculational Tool for Skin Contamination Dose Assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, R L

    2002-01-01

    Spreadsheet calculational tool was developed to automate the calculations preformed for dose assessment of skin contamination. This document reports on the design and testing of the spreadsheet calculational tool.

  7. Gastrointestinal Dose-Histogram Effects in the Context of Dose-Volume–Constrained Prostate Radiation Therapy: Analysis of Data From the RADAR Prostate Radiation Therapy Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, Martin A., E-mail: Martin.Ebert@health.wa.gov.au [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Foo, Kerwyn [Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Haworth, Annette [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Gulliford, Sarah L. [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden National Health Service Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Kennedy, Angel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); Joseph, David J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia (Australia); Denham, James W. [School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To use a high-quality multicenter trial dataset to determine dose-volume effects for gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity following radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma. Influential dose-volume histogram regions were to be determined as functions of dose, anatomical location, toxicity, and clinical endpoint. Methods and Materials: Planning datasets for 754 participants in the TROG 03.04 RADAR trial were available, with Late Effects of Normal Tissues (LENT) Subjective, Objective, Management, and Analytic (SOMA) toxicity assessment to a median of 72 months. A rank sum method was used to define dose-volume cut-points as near-continuous functions of dose to 3 GI anatomical regions, together with a comprehensive assessment of significance. Univariate and multivariate ordinal regression was used to assess the importance of cut-points at each dose. Results: Dose ranges providing significant cut-points tended to be consistent with those showing significant univariate regression odds-ratios (representing the probability of a unitary increase in toxicity grade per percent relative volume). Ranges of significant cut-points for rectal bleeding validated previously published results. Separation of the lower GI anatomy into complete anorectum, rectum, and anal canal showed the impact of mid-low doses to the anal canal on urgency and tenesmus, completeness of evacuation and stool frequency, and mid-high doses to the anorectum on bleeding and stool frequency. Derived multivariate models emphasized the importance of the high-dose region of the anorectum and rectum for rectal bleeding and mid- to low-dose regions for diarrhea and urgency and tenesmus, and low-to-mid doses to the anal canal for stool frequency, diarrhea, evacuation, and bleeding. Conclusions: Results confirm anatomical dependence of specific GI toxicities. They provide an atlas summarizing dose-histogram effects and derived constraints as functions of anatomical region, dose, toxicity, and endpoint for

  8. Dose Assurance in Radiation Processing Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Arne; Chadwick, K.H.; Nam, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Radiation processing relies to a large extent on dosimetry as control of proper operation. This applies in particular to radiation sterilization of medical products and food treatment, but also during development of any other process. The assurance that proper dosimetry is performed at the radiat...

  9. Effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; Effets des faibles doses de rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, R. [Office de Protection contre les Rayonnements Ionisants, 78 - le Vesinet (France)

    2006-07-01

    Several groups of human have been irradiated by accidental or medical exposure, if no gene defect has been associated to these exposures, some radioinduced cancers interesting several organs are observed among persons exposed over 100 to 200 mSv delivered at high dose rate. Numerous steps are now identified between the initial energy deposit in tissue and the aberrations of cell that lead to tumors but the sequence of events and the specific character of some of them are the subject of controversy. The stake of this controversy is the risk assessment. From the hypothesis called linear relationship without threshold is developed an approach that leads to predict cancers at any tiny dose without real scientific foundation. The nature and the intensity of biological effects depend on the quantity of energy absorbed in tissue and the modality of its distribution in space and time. The probability to reach a target (a gene) associated to the cancerating of tissue is directly proportional to the dose without any other threshold than the quantity of energy necessary to the effect, its probability of effect can be a more complex function and depends on the quality of the damage produced as well as the ability of the cell to repair the damage. These two parameters are influenced by the concentration of initial injuries in the target so by the quality of radiation and by the dose rate. The mechanisms of defence explain the low efficiency of radiation as carcinogen and then the linearity of effects in the area of low doses is certainly the least defensible scientific hypothesis for the prediction of the risks. (N.C.)

  10. Development of MAAP5.0.3 Dose Model for Radiation Environment Effect Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Mi Ro [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The equipment survivability assessment under the severe accident conditions should be performed. For the environmental conditions such as the pressure and temperature, they can be calculated using MAAP (Modular Accident Analysis Program) code. However, since MAAP itself cannot calculate the radiation DOSE, MAAP5 DOSE model should be developed in order to calculate the DOSE rate during the severe accidents. In this study, we developed the MAAP5 DOSE model for spent fuel pool of OPR1000 type NPP and calculated the DOSE to assess the survivability of the facilities in spent fuel pool and fuel handling region. Until now, there are so many uncertainties in the analysis for radiation effect during the severe accident. However, in terms of the establishment of the severe accident management strategy, quantitative analysis in order to find the general trend for radiation increase during the severe accident is useful. For the radiation environmental effect analysis, the previous studies are mainly focused inside the containment. However, after the Fukushima accident, the severe accident phenomena in the SFP have been the great issues in the nuclear industry including Korea. So, in this study, the dose rate for spent fuel building when the severe accident happens in the SFP is calculated using MAAP5 DOSE. As expected, the dose rate is increased right after the spent fuel is partially uncovered. However, the amount of dose is less significant since the rate of temperature increase is much faster than the rate of dose increase.

  11. Audit of radiation dose during balloon mitral valvuloplasty procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livingstone, Roshan S [Department of Radiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore-632004, TN (India); Chandy, Sunil [Department of Cardiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore-632004, TN (India); Peace, B S Timothy [Department of Radiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore-632004, TN (India); George, Paul [Department of Cardiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore-632004, TN (India); John, Bobby [Department of Cardiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore-632004, TN (India); Pati, Purendra [Department of Cardiology, Christian Medical College, Vellore-632004, TN (India)

    2006-12-15

    Radiation doses to patients during cardiological procedures are of concern in the present day scenario. This study was intended to audit the radiation dose imparted to patients during the balloon mitral valvuloplasty (BMV) procedure. Thirty seven patients who underwent the BMV procedure performed using two dedicated cardiovascular machines were included in the study. The radiation doses imparted to patients were measured using a dose area product (DAP) meter. The mean DAP value for patients who underwent the BMV procedure from one machine was 19.16 Gy cm{sup 2} and from the other was 21.19 Gy cm{sup 2}. Optimisation of exposure parameters and radiation doses was possible for one machine with the use of appropriate copper filters and optimised exposure parameters, and the mean DAP value after optimisation was 9.36 Gy cm{sup 2}.

  12. Mesorad dose assessment model. Volume 1. Technical basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MESORAD is a dose assessment model for emergency response applications. Using release data for as many as 50 radionuclides, the model calculates: (1) external doses resulting from exposure to radiation emitted by radionuclides contained in elevated or deposited material; (2) internal dose commitment resulting from inhalation; and (3) total whole-body doses. External doses from airborne material are calculated using semi-infinite and finite cloud approximations. At each stage in model execution, the appropriate approximation is selected after considering the cloud dimensions. Atmospheric processes are represented in MESORAD by a combination of Lagrangian puff and Gaussian plume dispersion models, a source depletion (deposition velocity) dry deposition model, and a wet deposition model using washout coefficients based on precipitation rates

  13. An updated dose assessment for Rongelap Island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Bogen, K.T.

    1994-07-01

    We have updated the radiological dose assessment for Rongelap Island at Rongelap Atoll using data generated from field trips to the atoll during 1986 through 1993. The data base used for this dose assessment is ten fold greater than that available for the 1982 assessment. Details of each data base are presented along with details about the methods used to calculate the dose from each exposure pathway. The doses are calculated for a resettlement date of January 1, 1995. The maximum annual effective dose is 0.26 mSv y{sup {minus}1} (26 mrem y{sup {minus}1}). The estimated 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral effective doses are 0.0059 Sv (0.59 rem), 0.0082 Sv (0.82 rem), and 0.0097 Sv (0.97 rem), respectively. More than 95% of these estimated doses are due to 137-Cesium ({sup 137}Cs). About 1.5% of the estimated dose is contributed by 90-Strontium ({sup 90}Sr), and about the same amount each by 239+240-Plutonium ({sup 239+240}PU), and 241-Americium ({sup 241}Am).

  14. Commentary 2 to Cox and Little: radiation-induced oncogenic transformation: the interplay between dose, dose protraction, and radiation quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, D. J.; Hall, E. J.

    1992-01-01

    There is now a substantial body of evidence for end points such as oncogenic transformation in vitro, and carcinogenesis and life shortening in vivo, suggesting that dose protraction leads to an increase in effectiveness relative to a single, acute exposure--at least for radiations of medium linear energy transfer (LET) such as neutrons. Table I contains a summary of the pertinent data from studies in which the effect is seen. [table: see text] This phenomenon has come to be known as the "inverse dose rate effect," because it is in marked contrast to the situation at low LET, where protraction in delivery of a dose of radiation, either by fractionation or low dose rate, results in a decreased biological effect; additionally, at medium and high LET, for radiobiological end points such as clonogenic survival, the biological effectiveness is independent of protraction. The quantity and quality of the published reports on the "inverse dose rate effect" leaves little doubt that the effect is real, but the available evidence indicates that the magnitude of the effect is due to a complex interplay between dose, dose rate, and radiation quality. Here, we first summarize the available data on the inverse dose rate effect and suggest that it follows a consistent pattern in regard to dose, dose rate, and radiation quality; second, we describe a model that predicts these features; and, finally, we describe the significance of the effect for radiation protection.

  15. Development of Plant Application Technique of Low Dose Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jae Sung; Lim, Yong Taek (and others)

    2007-07-15

    The project was carried out to achieve three aims. First, development of application techniques of cell-stimulating effects by low-dose radiation. Following irradiation with gamma-rays of low doses, beneficial effects in crop germination, early growth, and yield were investigated using various plant species and experimental approaches. For the actual field application, corroborative studies were also carried out with a few concerned experimental stations and farmers. Moreover, we attempted to establish a new technique of cell cultivation for industrial mass-production of shikonin, a medicinal compound from Lithospermum erythrorhizon and thereby suggested new application fields for application techniques of low-dose radiation. Second, elucidation of action mechanisms of ionizing radiation in plants. By investigating changes in plant photosynthesis and physiological metabolism, we attempted to elucidate physiological activity-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation and to search for radiation-adaptive cellular components. Besides, analyses of biochemical and molecular biological mechanisms for stimulus-stimulating effects of low-dose radiation were accomplished by examining genes and proteins inducible by low-dose radiation. Third, development of functional crop plants using radiation-resistant factors. Changes in stress-tolerance of plants against environmental stress factors such as light, temperature, salinity and UV-B stress after exposed to low-dose gamma-rays were investigated. Concerned reactive oxygen species, antioxidative enzymes, and antioxidants were also analyzed to develop high value-added and environment-friendly functional plants using radiation-resistant factors. These researches are important to elucidate biological activities increased by low-dose radiation and help to provide leading technologies for improvement of domestic productivity in agriculture and development of high value-added genetic resources.

  16. External dose assessment in the Ukraine following the Chernobyl accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Remi Jordan Lesartre

    While the physiological effects of radiation exposure have been well characterized in general, it remains unclear what the relationship is between large-scale radiological events and psychosocial behavior outcomes in individuals or populations. To investigate this, the National Science Foundation funded a research project in 2008 at the University of Colorado in collaboration with Colorado State University to expand the knowledge of complex interactions between radiation exposure, perception of risk, and psychosocial behavior outcomes by modeling outcomes for a representative sample of the population of the Ukraine which had been exposed to radiocontaminant materials released by the reactor accident at Chernobyl on 26 April 1986. In service of this project, a methodology (based substantially on previously published models specific to the Chernobyl disaster and the Ukrainian population) was developed for daily cumulative effective external dose and dose rate assessment for individuals in the Ukraine for as a result of the Chernobyl disaster. A software platform was designed and produced to estimate effective external dose and dose rate for individuals based on their age, occupation, and location of residence on each day between 26 April 1986 and 31 December 2009. A methodology was developed to transform published 137Cs soil deposition contour maps from the Comprehensive Atlas of Caesium Deposition on Europe after the Chernobyl Accident into a geospatial database to access these data as a radiological source term. Cumulative effective external dose and dose rate were computed for each individual in a 703-member cohort of Ukrainians randomly selected to be representative of the population of the country as a whole. Error was estimated for the resulting individual dose and dose rate values with Monte Carlo simulations. Distributions of input parameters for the dose assessment methodology were compared to computed dose and dose rate estimates to determine which

  17. Risk estimation of benzene-induced leukemia by radiation equivalent dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the Hiroshima and Nagasaki epidemiological study, risk assessment system for radiation has been well developed and is practically applied to the international protection standards. Hence, defining the radiation equivalent dose for chemical agents could place in the order of their risk. As well as the radiation, benzene causes leukemia to humans. Therefore, we evaluated the radiation-equivalent dose for benzene based on chromosome aberration rates induced by its metabolites and low-dose rate radiation because chromosome aberration is thought to be closely related to the leukemogenesis. Using radiation risk coefficient, the leukemia risk caused by 1 mg/m3 benzene inhalation was estimated 5.5 - 7.3 x 10-8, which is underestimated compared to other studies based on human epidemiological researches. (author)

  18. Eye dose assessment and management: overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some publications have shown that Hp(0.07) or even Hp(10) can be used as good operational quantities for X-rays in view of difficulties with Hp(3). With increasing awareness, there is tendency to use whatever dosimeter is available with correction factor to estimate eye lens dose. The best position for an eye lens dosimeter has been reported to be at the side of the head nearest to the radiation source, close to the eye. Recent studies have reported eye doses with cone beam CT (CBCT) both for patients and staff, and there are many papers reporting eye lens doses to staff in nuclear medicine. To minimise the dose to eyes, the user can take advantage of a feature of CBCT of projections acquired over an angular span of 1808 plus cone angle of the X-ray tube and with tube under scan arcs. (authors)

  19. How to understand the radiation effects of small dose - some critical comments on ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The widespread feeling of 'radiophobia' by the general public has its basis on the ICRP's 'linear no-threshold' hypothesis in dose-response relationship for low dose radiation from the standpoint of radiation protection. Although this common feeling served as a merit for constructing the 'safety culture' of society, it has now become a large obstacle for the development of peaceful uses of nuclear technology as a demerit. Recently many data have been accumulated for the radiation effects of low dose, both epidemiologically and experimentally. Although in general it is very difficult to obtain clear evidence of presence or absence of threshold, it seems to be true that the risk by radiation exposure at low level (the definition of which is below 0.2 Gy) is not so large as that of extrapolation from the high or medium dose range. In fact, many data suggest that some quite different mechanisms are working in low dose from high dose, such as 'adaptive response', and a new concept, 'radiation hormesis', has emerged, that the low level radiation is not only quite harmless but is rather necessary for living cells or beneficial for human health. In this paper, some critical comments on ICRP recommendations are given as a personal view by the author. These include: (1) a question of exact assessment of exposed dose by A-bomb survivors used for the epidemiological data, which are regarded to be the most authentic and important; (2) a brief summary of effects at the natural radiation level, including the high background area data; (3) the importance of dose rate effect, which reflects the living matter's repairability from radiation injury, and (4) the proposal of new paradigm by adopting the reasonable 'de minimis' level (below which there is no harm) both for low dose and at low dose rate. A simple mathematical analysis for representative data of dose rate effect was shown as an appendix

  20. Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956)- An Assessment of Quantities released, Off-Site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer, Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the early 1990s, concern about the Oak Ridge Reservation's past releases of contaminants to the environment prompted Tennessee's public health officials to pursue an in-depth study of potential off-site health effects at Oak Ridge. This study, the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction, was supported by an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Tennessee, and was overseen by a 12-member panel appointed by Tennessee's Commissioner of Health. One of the major contaminants studied in the dose reconstruction was radioactive iodine, which was released to the air by X-10 (now called Oak Ridge National Laboratory) as it processed spent nuclear reactor fuel from 1944 through 1956. The process recovered radioactive lanthanum for use in weapons development. Iodine concentrates in the thyroid gland so health concerns include various diseases of the thyroid, such as thyroid cancer. The large report, ''Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956) - An Assessment of Quantities Released, Off-site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer,'' is in two volumes. Volume 1 is the main body of the report, and Volume 1A, which has the same title, consists of 22 supporting appendices. Together, these reports serve the following purposes: (1) describe the methodologies used to estimate the amount of iodine-131 (I-131) released; (2) evaluate I-131's pathway from air to vegetation to food to humans; (3) estimate doses received by human thyroids; (4) estimate excess risk of acquiring a thyroid cancer during ones lifetime; and (5) provide equations, examples of historical documents used, and tables of calculated values. Results indicate that females born in 1952 who consumed milk from a goat pastured a few miles east of X-10 received the highest doses from I-131 and would have had the highest risks of contracting thyroid cancer. Doses from cow's milk are considerably less . Detailed

  1. Radiation doses to rodents inhabiting a radioactive waste receiving area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was conducted of the gamma ray doses to four species of native rodents inhabiting a low level radioactive liquid waste disposal area. Absorbed doses of radiation were measured with lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters that were implanted subcutaneously. The absorbed radiation doses and 137Cs body burdens were significantly higher for western harvest mice (Reithrodontomys megalotis) than for deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus), pinon mice (P. truei) and the least chipmunk (Eutamias minimus), reflecting differences in mobility and habitat preferences of the respective species. The average dose received by harvest mice was 26 mrad/day, which was 26% of the highest gamma dose detected at the ground surface in the study plot, although the maximum dose received by individual mice was as high as 45% of the maximum dose rates in the plot. (author)

  2. Assessing dose rate distributions in VMAT plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackeprang, P.-H.; Volken, W.; Terribilini, D.; Frauchiger, D.; Zaugg, K.; Aebersold, D. M.; Fix, M. K.; Manser, P.

    2016-04-01

    Dose rate is an essential factor in radiobiology. As modern radiotherapy delivery techniques such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) introduce dynamic modulation of the dose rate, it is important to assess the changes in dose rate. Both the rate of monitor units per minute (MU rate) and collimation are varied over the course of a fraction, leading to different dose rates in every voxel of the calculation volume at any point in time during dose delivery. Given the radiotherapy plan and machine specific limitations, a VMAT treatment plan can be split into arc sectors between Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine control points (CPs) of constant and known MU rate. By calculating dose distributions in each of these arc sectors independently and multiplying them with the MU rate, the dose rate in every single voxel at every time point during the fraction can be calculated. Independently calculated and then summed dose distributions per arc sector were compared to the whole arc dose calculation for validation. Dose measurements and video analysis were performed to validate the calculated datasets. A clinical head and neck, cranial and liver case were analyzed using the tool developed. Measurement validation of synthetic test cases showed linac agreement to precalculated arc sector times within  ±0.4 s and doses  ±0.1 MU (one standard deviation). Two methods for the visualization of dose rate datasets were developed: the first method plots a two-dimensional (2D) histogram of the number of voxels receiving a given dose rate over the course of the arc treatment delivery. In similarity to treatment planning system display of dose, the second method displays the dose rate as color wash on top of the corresponding computed tomography image, allowing the user to scroll through the variation over time. Examining clinical cases showed dose rates spread over a continuous spectrum, with mean dose rates hardly exceeding 100 cGy min-1 for conventional

  3. Estimating radiation doses from reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to plan for emergency response to reactor accidents involving large radiation releases, it is necessary to determine the medical resources, such as diagnostic laboratory tests, hospital facilities and convalescent care, needed to care for a large population exposed to radiation. A determination of the needed medical resources is difficult because of the widely varying sensitivity humans exhibit to radiation exposure and because of the large number of assumptions involved in predicting radiation dispersion. This paper demonstrates a simple method for approximating medical needs in response to a severe reactor accident. The method requires a model for radiation dispersion from the accident and data for population distribution surrounding the reactor. With this information, tables developed in this paper may be used to project medical needs. The needs identified by this methodology may be compared against the actual medical resources of nearby communities to determine the size of the area impacted

  4. DRY TRANSFER FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the Dry Transfer Facility No.1 (DTF-1) performing operations to receive transportation casks, transfer wastes, prepare waste packages, and ship out loaded waste packages and empty casks. Doses received by workers due to maintenance operations are also included in this revision. The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers both collective doses and individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation from normal operation, excluding the remediation area of the building. The results of this calculation will be used to support the design of the DTF-1 and to provide occupational dose estimates for the License Application. The calculations contained in this document were developed by Environmental and Nuclear Engineering of the Design and Engineering Organization and are intended solely for the use of the Design and Engineering Organization in its work regarding facility operation. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering should be consulted before use of the calculations for purposes other than those stated herein or use by individuals other than authorized personnel in the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering

  5. A family of statistical distributions for modelling occupational radiation doses in low dose occupations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New statistical distributions have been defined to describe occupational exposures to ionising radiation. These distributions are particularly useful in modelling occupations where most doses are low. The maximum likelihood method was used for parameter estimation and has been adapted to allow doses that are recorded as zero to be included in the calculations. The method can then be applied to estimate true doses from the complete set of recorded dose values when the a priori dose distribution and the dose measurement distributions have been derived previously. This application is important in epidemiological cohort studies where it can improve the accuracy of excess relative risk estimates. (authors)

  6. Online Radiation Dose Measurement System for ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Mandić, I; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Particle detectors and readout electronics in the high energy physics experiment ATLAS at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN operate in radiation field containing photons, charged particles and neutrons. The particles in the radiation field originate from proton-proton interactions as well as from interactions of these particles with material in the experimental apparatus. In the innermost parts of ATLAS detector components will be exposed to ionizing doses exceeding 100 kGy. Energetic hadrons will also cause displacement damage in silicon equivalent to fluences of several times 10e14 1 MeV-neutrons per cm2. Such radiation doses can have severe influence on the performance of detectors. It is therefore very important to continuously monitor the accumulated doses to understand the detector performance and to correctly predict the lifetime of radiation sensitive components. Measurements of doses are important also to verify the simulations and represent a crucial input into the models used for predicting future ...

  7. Low dose ionizing radiation induced acoustic neuroma: A putative link?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin A Borkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Although exposure to high dose ionizing radiation (following therapeutic radiotherapy has been incriminated in the pathogenesis of many brain tumors, exposure to chronic low dose ionizing radiation has not yet been shown to be associated with tumorigenesis. The authors report a case of a 50-year-old atomic reactor scientist who received a cumulative dose of 78.9 mSv over a 10-year period and was detected to have an acoustic neuroma another 15 years later. Although there is no proof that exposure to ionizing radiation was the cause for the development of the acoustic neuroma, this case highlights the need for extended follow-up periods following exposure to low dose ionizing radiation.

  8. Radiation dose measurement of paediatric patients in Estonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kepler, K. [Training Centre of Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, University of Tartu (Estonia); Lintrop, M. [Department of Radiology, Tartu University Hospital, Tartu (Estonia); Servomaa, A.; Parviainen, T. [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Eek, V.; Filippova, I. [Estonian Radiation Protection Centre, Tallinn (Estonia)

    2003-06-01

    According to the Medical Exposure Directive (97/43/Euratom) the radiation doses to patients should be measured in every hospital and doses should be compared to the reference doses established by the competent authorities. Special attention should be paid to the paediatric x-ray examinations, because the paediatric patients are more radiosensitive than adult patients. The requirement of measurements of radiation dose to patients is not yet included in the Estonian radiation act, but the purpose to join the European Communities makes the quality control in radiology very actual in Estonia. The necessity exists to introduce suitable measurement methods in the Xray departments of Estonian hospitals for establishing feedback system for radiologists, radiographers and medical physicists in optimising the radiation burden of patients and image quality. (orig.)

  9. Biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Few weeks ago, when the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) submitted to the U.N. General Assembly the UNSCEAR 1994 report, the international community had at its disposal a broad view of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation. The 1994 report (272 pages) specifically addressed the epidemiological studies of radiation carcinogenesis and the adaptive responses to radiation in cells and organisms. The report was aimed to supplement the UNSCEAR 1993 report to the U.N. General Assembly- an extensive document of 928 pages-which addressed the global levels of radiation exposing the world population, as well as some issues on the effects of ionizing radiation, including: mechanisms of radiation oncogenesis due to radiation exposure, influence of the level of dose and dose rate on stochastic effects of radiation, hereditary effects of radiation effects on the developing human brain, and the late deterministic effects in children. Those two UNSCEAR reports taken together provide an impressive overview of current knowledge on the biological effects of ionizing radiation. This article summarizes the essential issues of both reports, although it cannot cover all available information. (Author)

  10. CHROMOSOMAL ABERRATIONS AND MICRONUCLEI IN LYMPHOCYTES OF MEDICAL RADIATION WORKERS EXPOSED TO LONIZING RADIATION BELOW DOSE LIMIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOZDARANI H

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ionizing radiation induces various kinds of DNA damage in which may lead to chromosomal aberrations (CA. Inspite of growing importance in the risk assessment, the dose yield kinetics of CA and their implications for dose assessment are not well established in exposures to low level radiation. In the present study, cytochalasin-B blocked micronucleus assay and metaphase analysis were used as test system to monitor hospital radiation workers who received chronic low dose ionizing radiation below dose limit. Materials and Methods: Heparinized blood samples were taken from healthy non-smoker radiology and radiotherapy workers occupationally exposed to X and gamma rays and healty population whose duties do not expose them to radiation sources and chemical agents. The whole body dose was measured by film badge. Lymphocytes were cultured in RPMI-1640 supplemented with 15% FBS, and metaphase spread was prepared using standard cytogenetic method. Cytochalasine-B (3 mg/mltreatment was used for binuclei micronuclei assay. 100 mitoses and 1000 binuclei lymphocytes were scored for CA and micronuclei (MN respectively. Results: Results show a high frequency of CA mainly deletions and simple breaks in radiation workers compared to control (p<0.001. Also results show the mean MN/cell was significantly (p<0.001 higher in radiation workers(0.035 when compared to non exposed individuals(0.022. Conclusion: A relatively high frequency of MN and CA formation in lymphocytes of radiation workers compared to non exposed individuals might be due to an accumulation of initial DNA damage in people exposed to chronic doses of radiation leading to detectable genetic damages. These observations might imply that the current occupational exposure levels might be inadequate to prevent an increase in chromosome damage rate.

  11. KERMA-based radiation dose management system for real-time patient dose measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyo-Tae; Heo, Ye-Ji; Oh, Kyung-Min; Nam, Sang-Hee; Kang, Sang-Sik; Park, Ji-Koon; Song, Yong-Keun; Park, Sung-Kwang

    2016-07-01

    Because systems that reduce radiation exposure during diagnostic procedures must be developed, significant time and financial resources have been invested in constructing radiation dose management systems. In the present study, the characteristics of an existing ionization-based system were compared to those of a system based on the kinetic energy released per unit mass (KERMA). Furthermore, the feasibility of using the KERMA-based system for patient radiation dose management was verified. The ionization-based system corrected the effects resulting from radiation parameter perturbations in general radiography whereas the KERMA-based system did not. Because of this difference, the KERMA-based radiation dose management system might overestimate the patient's radiation dose due to changes in the radiation conditions. Therefore, if a correction factor describing the correlation between the systems is applied to resolve this issue, then a radiation dose management system can be developed that will enable real-time measurement of the patient's radiation exposure and acquisition of diagnostic images.

  12. Depth dose and angular dose distribution experiments with high energy electron-photon radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    India's first synchrotron radiation source, Indus-1, is commissioned at the Centre for Advanced Technology (CAT), Indore. Radiation environment of this facility is quite different in comparison to that of nuclear or irradiator facilities and proton or heavy ion accelerator facilities. The primary particle accelerated being the electron, the radiation environment mainly comprises of Bremsstrahlung photons followed by photo-neutrons, whereas electron contamination too exists within the containment area. Due to the complex nature of the radiation viz. high energy, broad energy spectrum, pulsed, mixed field, sharp angular distribution etc. quantification of radiation dose becomes a difficult task. In this paper, experiments on depth dose and angular dose distribution done with 450 MeV electron-photon radiation are described

  13. Evaluation of occupational and patient radiation doses in orthopedic surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulieman, A. [Salman bin Abdulaziz University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiology and Medical Imaging Department, P.O. Box 422, Alkharj (Saudi Arabia); Habiballah, B.; Abdelaziz, I. [Sudan Univesity of Science and Technology, College of Medical Radiologic Sciences, P.O. Box 1908, Khartoum (Sudan); Alzimami, K. [King Saud University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiological Sciences Department, P.O. Box 10219, 11433 Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Osman, H. [Taif University, College of Applied Medical Science, Radiology Department, Taif (Saudi Arabia); Omer, H. [University of Dammam, Faculty of Medicine, Dammam (Saudi Arabia); Sassi, S. A., E-mail: Abdelmoneim_a@yahoo.com [Prince Sultan Medical City, Department of Medical Physics, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-08-15

    Orthopedists are exposed to considerable radiation dose during orthopedic surgeries procedures. The staff is not well trained in radiation protection aspects and its related risks. In Sudan, regular monitoring services are not provided for all staff in radiology or interventional personnel. It is mandatory to measure staff and patient exposure in order to radiology departments. The main objectives of this study are: to measure the radiation dose to patients and staff during (i) Dynamic Hip Screw (Dhs) and (i i) Dynamic Cannula Screw (Dcs); to estimate the risk of the aforementioned procedures and to evaluate entrance surface dose (ESD) and organ dose to specific radiosensitive patients organs. The measurements were performed in Medical Corps Hospital, Sudan. The dose was measured for unprotected organs of staff and patient as well as scattering radiation. Calibrated Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-Gr-200) of lithium fluoride (LiF:Mg, Cu,P) were used for ESD measurements. TLD signal are obtained using automatic TLD Reader model (Plc-3). The mean patients doses were 0.46 mGy and 0.07 for Dhs and Dcs procedures, respectively. The mean staff doses at the thyroid and chest were 4.69 mGy and 1.21 mGy per procedure. The mean radiation dose for staff was higher in Dhs compared to Dcs. This can be attributed to the long fluoroscopic exposures due to the complication of the procedures. Efforts should be made to reduce radiation exposure to orthopedic patients, and operating surgeons especially those with high work load. Staff training and regular monitoring will reduce the radiation dose for both patients and staff. (Author)

  14. Monitoring of radiation exposure and registration of doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The guide defines the concepts relevant to the monitoring of radiation exposure and working conditions and provides guidelines for determining the necessity of monitoring and subsequently organizing it. In addition, instructions are given for reporting doses to the Dose Register of the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK). Also the procedures are described for situations leading to exceptional exposures. (10 refs., 1 tab.).

  15. Iodine 131 therapy patients: radiation dose to staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metastasis to the skeletal system from follicular thyroid carcinoma may be treated with an oral dose of 131I-NaI. Radiation exposures to hospital personnel attending these patients were calculated as a function of administered dose, distance from the patient and time after administration. Routine or emergency patient handling tasks would not exceed occupational radiation protection guidelines for up to 30 min immediately after administration. The emergency handling of several patients presents the potential for exceeding these guidelines. (author)

  16. Bayesian approach in MN low dose of radiation counting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Micronucleus assay in lymphocytes is a well established technique for the assessment of genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. Due to the presence of a natural background of MN the net MN is obtained by subtracting this value to the gross value. When very low doses of radiation are given the induced MN is close even lower than the predetermined background value. Furthermore, the damage distribution induced by the radiation follows a Poisson probability distribution. These two facts pose a difficult task to obtain the net counting rate in the exposed situations. It is possible to overcome this problem using a bayesian approach, in which the selection of a priori distributions for the background and net counting rate plays an important role. In the present work we make a detailed analysed using bayesian theory to infer the net counting rate in two different situations: a) when the background is known for an individual sample, using exact value value for the background and Jeffreys prior for the net counting rate, and b) when the background is not known and we make use of a population background distribution as background prior function and constant prior for the net counting rate. (Author)

  17. Dose assessment in pediatric computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this work was the evaluation of radiation doses in paediatric computed tomography scans, considering the high doses usually involved and the absence of any previous evaluation in Brazil. Dose values were determined for skull and abdomen examinations, for different age ranges, by using the radiographic techniques routinely used in the clinical centers investigated. Measurements were done using pencil shape ionization chambers inserted in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantoms. These were compact phantoms of different diameters were specially designed and constructed for this work, which simulate different age ranges. Comparison of results with published values showed that doses were lower than the diagnostic reference levels established to adults exams by the European Commission. Nevertheless, doses in paediatric phantoms were higher than those obtained in adult phantoms. The paediatric dose values obtained in Hospitals A and B were lower than the reference level (DRL) adopted by SHIMPTON for different age ranges. In the range 0 - 0.5 year (neonatal), the values of DLP in Hospital B were 94 por cent superior to the DRL For the 10 years old children the values of CTDIw obtained were inferior in 89 por cent for skull and 83 por cent for abdomen examinations, compared to the values published by SHRIMPTON and WALL. Our measured CTDIw values were inferior to the values presented for SHRIMPTON and HUDA, for all the age ranges and types of examinations. It was observed that the normalized dose descriptors values in children in the neonatal range were always superior to the values of doses for the adult patient. In abdomen examinations, the difference was approximately 90% for the effective dose (E) and of 57%.for CTDIw . (author)

  18. ESR dose assessment in irradiated chicken legs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bordi, F. [II Universita, Rome (Italy). Dipartimento di Medicina Interna; Fattibene, P.; Onori, S.; Pantaloni, M. [Istituto Superiore di Santia, Rome (Italy)]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Rome (Italy). Sezione Sanita

    1994-05-01

    The electron spin resonance technique has received a wide consensus for dose assessment in irradiated chicken bone. Nevertheless, some practical problems are still open like the most suitable mathematical expression to be used for dose evaluation with the re-irradiation method. In the present paper the linear and exponential approximations were analyzed using 40 bone chicken samples and a reproducible readout procedure. The results suggested the use of the exponential dose-effect relationship and gave some indications on the procedure to be practically adopted. (author).

  19. Biological dosimetry: chromosomal aberration analysis for dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of the growing importance of chromosomal aberration analysis as a biological dosimeter, the present report provides a concise summary of the scientific background of the subject and a comprehensive source of information at the technical level. After a review of the basic principles of radiation dosimetry and radiation biology basic information on the biology of lymphocytes, the structure of chromosomes and the classification of chromosomal aberrations are presented. This is followed by a presentation of techniques for collecting blood, storing, transporting, culturing, making chromosomal preparations and scaring of aberrations. The physical and statistical parameters involved in dose assessment are discussed and examples of actual dose assessments taken from the scientific literature are given

  20. Does Vertebroplasty Affect Radiation Dose Distribution?: Comparison of Spatial Dose Distributions in a Cement-Injected Vertebra as Calculated by Treatment Planning System and Actual Spatial Dose Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Komemushi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess differences in dose distribution of a vertebral body injected with bone cement as calculated by radiation treatment planning system (RTPS and actual dose distribution. Methods. We prepared two water-equivalent phantoms with cement, and the other two phantoms without cement. The bulk density of the bone cement was imported into RTPS to reduce error from high CT values. A dose distribution map for the phantoms with and without cement was calculated using RTPS with clinical setting and with the bulk density importing. Actual dose distribution was measured by the film density. Dose distribution as calculated by RTPS was compared to the dose distribution measured by the film dosimetry. Results. For the phantom with cement, dose distribution was distorted for the areas corresponding to inside the cement and on the ventral side of the cement. However, dose distribution based on film dosimetry was undistorted behind the cement and dose increases were seen inside cement and around the cement. With the equivalent phantom with bone cement, differences were seen between dose distribution calculated by RTPS and that measured by the film dosimetry. Conclusion. The dose distribution of an area containing bone cement calculated using RTPS differs from actual dose distribution.

  1. Study on External Exposure Doses Received by the Cuban Population from Environmental Radiation Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results are described of the study carried out with the aim of assessing doses received by the Cuban population due to the external exposure to environmental radiation sources. Contributions of cosmic radiation's ionising and indirectly ionising components to these doses, as well as the fraction resulting from terrestrial radiation, were also assessed as part of this study. Measurements made enabled us to estimate representative effective average doses received by the Cuban population from external exposure to cosmic and terrestrial radiation. Both outdoor and indoor permanency were taken into account for this estimate as well as the distribution of the Cuban population by altitude. The average representative dose due to cosmic radiation was estimated to be 298 ± 17 μSv per year, while the dose received by terrestrial radiation represented 180 ± 14 μSv per year, for a total annual dose of 78 ± 20 μSv. These values are within the range of those reported throughout the world by other authors. (author)

  2. Evaluation of radiation dose to anthropomorphic paediatric models from positron-emitting labelled tracers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tianwu; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-03-01

    PET uses specific molecules labelled with positron-emitting radionuclides to provide valuable biochemical and physiological information. However, the administration of radiotracers to patients exposes them to low-dose ionizing radiation, which is a concern in the paediatric population since children are at a higher cancer risk from radiation exposure than adults. Therefore, radiation dosimety calculations for commonly used positron-emitting radiotracers in the paediatric population are highly desired. We evaluate the absorbed dose and effective dose for 19 positron-emitting labelled radiotracers in anthropomorphic paediatric models including the newborn, 1-, 5-, 10- and 15-year-old male and female. This is achieved using pre-calculated S-values of positron-emitting radionuclides of UF-NCI paediatric phantoms and published biokinetic data for various radiotracers. The influence of the type of anthropomorphic model, tissue weight factors and direct human- versus mouse-derived biokinetic data on the effective dose for paediatric phantoms was also evaluated. In the case of 18F-FDG, dosimetry calculations of reference paediatric patients from various dose regimens were also calculated. Among the considered radiotracers, 18F-FBPA and 15O-water resulted in the highest and lowest effective dose in the paediatric phantoms, respectively. The ICRP 103 updated tissue-weighting factors decrease the effective dose in most cases. Substantial differences of radiation dose were observed between direct human- versus mouse-derived biokinetic data. Moreover, the effect of using voxel- versus MIRD-type models on the calculation of the effective dose was also studied. The generated database of absorbed organ dose and effective dose for various positron-emitting labelled radiotracers using new generation computational models and the new ICRP tissue-weighting factors can be used for the assessment of radiation risks to paediatric patients in clinical practice. This work also contributes

  3. Radiation dose-response relationship of micronucleus occurrence in pollen mother cells of tradescantia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was carried out to investigate the radiation dose-response of micronucleus frequencies in Tradescantia pollen mother cells. The number of micronuclei increased in the tetrads as a result of chromosome deletion after irradiation. The maximal frequency of micronucleus showed a good dose-response relationship in the range of dose 0∼50 cGy. On the basis of the relationship, a dose of 1 cGy resulted in two additional micronuclei in 100 tetrads. The radiation dose-response relationship of micronucleus occurrence is prerequisite to biological monitoring of radiation and can be modified for biological risk assessment of toxicants, and to safety test of water or soil integrity

  4. The dose makes the poison. Even for radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dose makes the poison, a quote by Paracelsus a doctor who lived half a millennium ago, is still valid today. Nevertheless this general accepted fact is being excluded in relation to ionizing radiation, which is wrongly considered as radioactive radiation. Here applies the LNT-Hypothesis (Linear No Threshold), agreed on by the ICRP, the Commission on Radiological Protection, a dose-to-effect relationship, which is based on the EU directives and the German Radiation Protection Ordinance. The LNT-hypothesis states, that even every smallest dose of radiation already provides a potentiality of danger and was introduced as precaution assuming that self-healing mechanisms even through weak radiation of damaged cells can be excluded and every damage caused by radiation inevitably leads to cell mutation and with it to cancer development. Without any further knowledge assumptions were made, that the same mechanism for cancer development applies for high and small doses. This assumption turned out to be wrong, as it is increasingly reported on findings which show, that smaller doses of ionized radiation demonstrably does not cause any damage, but on the contrary can even be healthy.

  5. Mutation process at low or high radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A concise review is given of the status of research on the genetic effects of low-level radiation in general. The term ''low dose'' is defined and current theories on low dose are set out. Problems and their solutions are discussed. (author)

  6. Radiation Dose-Volume Effects in the Esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Publications relating esophageal radiation toxicity to clinical variables and to quantitative dose and dose-volume measures derived from three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer are reviewed. A variety of clinical and dosimetric parameters have been associated with acute and late toxicity. Suggestions for future studies are presented.

  7. Environmental policy. Ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses in 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is intended as information for the German Bundestag and Bundesrat as well as for the general population interested in issues of radiological protection. The information presented in the report shows that in 1996, the radiation dose to the population was low and amounted to an average of 4 millisievert (mSv), with 60% contributed by natural radiation sources, and 40% by artificial sources. The major natural source was the radioactive gas radon in buildings. Anthropogenic radiation exposure almost exclusively resulted from application of radioactive substances and ionizing radiation in the medical field, for diagnostic purposes. There still is a potential for reducing radiation doses due to these applications. In the reporting year, there were 340 000 persons occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation. Only 15% of these received a dose different from zero, the average dose was 1.8 mSv. The data show that the anthropogenic radiation exposure emanating from the uses of atomic energy or applications of ionizing radiation in technology is very low. (orig./CB)

  8. Sensors of absorbed dose of ionizing radiation based on mosfet

    OpenAIRE

    Perevertaylo V. L.

    2010-01-01

    The requirements to technology and design of p-channel and n-channel MOS transistors with a thick oxide layer designed for use in the capacity of integral dosimeters of absorbed dose of ionizing radiation are defined. The technology of radiation-sensitive MOS transistors with a thick oxide in the p-channel and n-channel version is created.

  9. Therapeutic effects of low radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trott, K.R. (Dept. of Radiation Biology, St. Bartholomew' s Medical College, London (United Kingdom))

    1994-01-01

    This editorial explores the scientific basis of radiotherapy with doses of < 1 Gy for various non-malignant conditions, in particular dose-effect relationships, risk-benefit considerations and biological mechanisms. A review of the literature, particularly clinical and experimental reports published more than 50 years ago was conducted to clarify the following problems. 1. The dose-response relationships for the therapeutic effects on three groups of conditions: non-malignant skin disease, arthrosis and other painful degenerative joint disorders and anti-inflammatory radiotherapy; 2. risks after radiotherapy and after the best alternative treatments; 3. the biological mechanisms of the different therapeutic effects. Radiotherapy is very effective in all three groups of disease. Few dose-finding studies have been performed, all demonstrating that the optimal doses are considerable lower than the generally recommended doses. In different conditions, risk-benefit analysis of radiotherapy versus the best alternative treatment yields very different results: whereas radiotherapy for acute postpartum mastitis may not be justified any more, the risk-benefit ratio of radiotherapy of other conditions and particularly so in dermatology and some anti-inflammatory radiotherapy appears to be more favourable than the risk-benefit ratio of the best alternative treatments. Radiotherapy can be very effective treatment for various non-malignant conditions such as eczema, psoriasis, periarthritis humeroscapularis, epicondylitis, knee arthrosis, hydradenitis, parotitis and panaritium and probably be associated with less acute and long-term side effects than similarly effective other treatments. Randomized clinical studies are required to find the optimal dosage which, at present, may be unnecessarily high.

  10. Two pediatric cases of high dose radiation-induced meningiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagai, Miho [National Yokosuka Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan); Nagashima, Goro; Fujimoto, Tsukasa; Aoyagi, Masaru; Takasato, Yoshio

    2001-10-01

    There have been many reports of low dose radiation-induced meningiomas, and the number of reports of high dose radiation-induced meningiomas has been increasing recently. In this report, we present two cases of pediatric radiation-induced meningiomas, one 14 years after 36 Gy of radiation therapy for medulloblastoma and the other 8 years after 20 Gy of local radiation therapy for germinoma. Both patients underwent surgical removal of the meningiomas. The case of medulloblastoma was later revealed to be basal cell phacomatosis syndrome. Basal cell phacomatosis syndrome is a disease that occurs as a result of abnormality of chromosome 9. We speculate that the occurrence of radiation-induced meningioma may have been related to the basic genetic vulnerability of the patients. (author)

  11. Radiation Dose from Lunar Neutron Albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J. H., Jr.; Bhattacharya, M.; Lin, Zi-Wei; Pendleton, G.

    2006-01-01

    The lunar neutron albedo from thermal energies to 8 MeV was measured on the Lunar Prospector Mission in 1998-1999. Using GEANT4 we have calculated the neutron albedo due to cosmic ray bombardment of the moon and found a good-agreement with the measured fast neutron spectra. We then calculated the total effective dose from neutron albedo of all energies, and made comparisons with the effective dose contributions from both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events to be expected on the lunar surface.

  12. Determination of the dose of gamma radiation sterilization for assessment of biological parameters of male Ceratitis capitada (Diptera: Tephritidae), tsl - Vienna 8 strain; Determinacao da dose de radiacao gama esterilizante pela avaliacao dos parametros biologicos de machos de Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae), linhagem tsl - Vienna 8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Aline Cristina Pereira da

    2011-07-01

    The Vienna-8, tsl (temperature sensitive lethal) strain of Ceratitis capitata, by presenting mutations that facilitate the mass rearing and release only of sterile males in the field, has been used in (Sterile Insect Technique) programmes. The objective of this study was to determine the radiation dose that provides the highest level of sterility for Vienna-8, tsl males assessing their biological parameters that indicate the quality of sterile males to be released. Brown pupae (males) of the tsl strain were obtained from the mass rearing of the Food Irradiation and Radio entomology laboratory of CENA/USP, and they were irradiated (with gamma radiation - {sup 60}Co) 24 hours before the emergence at rates of 0, 30, 60, 90 and 120 Gy. The determination of the sterilizing dose was based on fertility of sexually mature females of the bisexual strain and not irradiated, mated with males of different treatments. Eggs were collected daily during 6 days, were counted and it was possible to estimate fecundity, and assess the hatching rate. The emergence and flight ability were determined by following the protocol of quality control manual for FAO/IAEA/USDA (2003). To assess the longevity under nutritional stress, the insects were kept a period of 48 h after emergence in the absence of water and food, and after this period, mortality was recorded. The size of the testes (left and right) was obtained by dissecting irradiated and non-irradiated males at the eighth day of life, and measure the testes in an ocular micrometer, considering the maximum length and width of each sample. To determine the sperm number was necessary to dissect the males and break their testicles. No difference was observed in emergence rate, flight ability and longevity of irradiated and non-irradiated males, nor in the fecundity of females mated with males of different treatments. The sterilizing dose that resulted in lower fertility of females was 120 Gy, with 1.5% hatching. Considering the parameters

  13. Radiation Dose from Medical Imaging: A Primer for Emergency Physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Jesse G.A; Mills, Christopher N.; Mogensen, Monique A.; Lee, Christoph I.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Medical imaging now accounts for most of the US population’s exposure to ionizing radiation. A substantial proportion of this medical imaging is ordered in the emergency setting. We aim to provide a general overview of radiation dose from medical imaging with a focus on computed tomography, as well as a literature review of recent efforts to decrease unnecessary radiation exposure to patients in the emergency department setting. Methods: We conducted a literature revie...

  14. Molecular targets for radioprotection by low dose radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adaptive response is a reduced effect from a higher challenging dose of a stressor after a smaller inducing dose had been applied a few hrs earlier. Radiation induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) cells did not show such an adaptive response, i.e. a reduced effect from a higher challenging dose (2 Gy) of a radiation after a priming dose (1 cGy) had been applied 4 or 7 hrs earlier, but its thermoresistant clone (TR) did. Since inducible HSP70 and HSP25 expressions were different between these two cell lines, the role of inducible HSP70 and HSP25 in adaptive response was examined. When inducible hsp70 or hsp25 genes were transfected to RIF cells, radioresistance in clonogenic survival and reduction of apoptosis was detected. The adaptive response was also acquired in these two cell lines, and inducible hsp70 transfectant showed more pronounced adaptive response than hsp25 transfectant. From these results, inducible HSP70 and HSP25 are at least partly responsible for the induction of adaptive response in these cells. Moreover, when inducible HSP70 or HSP25 genes were transfected to RIF cells, coregulation of each gene was detected and heat shock factor (HSF) was found to be responsible for these phenomena. In continuation of our earlier study on the involvement of heat shock protein (HSP) 25 and HSP70 in the induction of adaptive response, we have now examined the involvement of these proteins in the induction of the adaptive response, using an animal model system. C57BL6 mice were irradiated with 5 cGy of gamma radiation 3 times for a week (total of 15cGy) and a high challenge dose (6Gy) was given on the day following the last low dose irradiation. Survival rate of the low dose pre-irradiated mice was increased to 30%. Moreover, high dose-mediated induction of apoptosis was also reduced by low dose pre-irradiation. To elucidate any link existing between HSP and induction of the adaptive response, reverse transcriptase (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis was performed

  15. Effective UV radiation dose in polyethylene exposed to weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Mota, R.; Soto-Bernal, J. J.; Rosales-Candelas, I.; Calero Marín, S. P.; Vega-Durán, J. T.; Moreno-Virgen, R.

    2009-09-01

    In this work we quantified the effective UV radiation dose in orange and colorless polyethylene samples exposed to weather in the city of Aguascalientes, Ags. Mexico. The spectral distribution of solar radiation was calculated using SMART 2.9.5.; the samples absorption properties were measured using UV-Vis spectroscopy and the quantum yield was calculated using samples reflectance properties. The determining factor in the effective UV dose is the spectral distribution of solar radiation, although the chemical structure of materials is also important.

  16. The effect of introduction of axial cineangiography and echocardiography on contrast and radiation doses during cardiac catheterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of routine preliminary echocardiography and adoption of axial cine angiography in a Paediatric Cardiac Investigation Centre were assessed in relation to contrast volume, fluoroscopy time and radiation dose. The results showed a significant increase in radiation dose with some reduction in fluoroscopy time in neonates and some increase in contrast volume used in infants

  17. Inhalation dose assessment for Maralinga and Emu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose assessments for the inhalation of artificial radionuclides are presented for all types of contaminated areas at Maralinga and Emu. These enable Committed Effective Dose Equivalent (CEDE), to be estimated by scaling at any area of interest where activity concentrations are known. In the case of Aborigines, these dose are estimated assuming respirable dust loadings of 1 mg/m3 for adults and 1.5 mg/m3 for children and infants. Details of the calculations are presented in the appendix. The model of the respiratory system used in this assessment is that described in Interantional Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 30 (ICRP, 1979a). With the exception of Kuli, which is contaminated with uranium, at all other sites it is only the inhalation of plutonium and americium that contributes significantly to the dose, and of these 239Pu is the largest contributor. Therefore, considering the long half lives of the radionuclides concerned, it appears that the inhalation problems highlighted by this dose assessment will not diminish significantly within any reasonable period of time and hence management strategies must be developed to deal with such problems. 32 refs., 5 tabs., 1 fig

  18. Dose received by radiation workers in Australia, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, N.D.

    1994-07-01

    Exposure to radiation can cause genetic defects or cancer. People who use sources of radiation as part of their employment are potentially at a greater risk than others owing to the possibility of their being continually exposed to small radiation doses over a long period. In Australia, the National Health and Medical Research Council has established radiation protection standards and set annual effective dose limits for radiation workers in order to minimise the chance of adverse effects occurring. These standards are based on the the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 1990). In order to ensure that the prescribed limits are not exceeded and to ensure that doses are kept to a minimum, some sort of monitoring is necessary. The primary purpose of this report is to provide data on the distribution of effective doses for different occupational categories of radiation worker in Australia. The total collective effective dose was found to be of the order of 4.9 Sv for a total of 34750 workers. 9 refs., 16 tabs., 6 figs.

  19. Radiation dose estimates for carbon-11-labelled PET tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Carbon-11-labelled positron emission tomography (PET) tracers commonly used in biomedical research expose subjects to ionising radiation. Dosimetry is the measurement of radiation dose, but also commonly refers to the estimation of health risk associated with ionising radiation. This review describes radiation dosimetry of carbon-11-labelled molecules in the context of current PET research and the most widely used regulatory guidelines. Methods: A MEDLINE literature search returned 42 articles; 32 of these were based on human PET data dealing with radiation dosimetry of carbon-11 molecules. Radiation burden expressed as effective dose and maximum absorbed organ dose was compared between tracers. Results: All but one of the carbon-11-labelled PET tracers have an effective dose under 9 μSv/MBq, with a mean of 5.9 μSv/MBq. Data show that serial PET scans in a single subject are feasible for the majority of radiotracers. Conclusion: Although differing in approach, the two most widely used regulatory frameworks (those in the USA and the EU) do not differ substantially with regard to the maximum allowable injected activity per PET study. The predictive validity of animal dosimetry models is critically discussed in relation to human dosimetry. Finally, empirical PET data are related to human dose estimates based on homogenous distribution, generic models and maximum cumulated activities. Despite the contribution of these models to general risk estimation, human dosimetry studies are recommended where continued use of a new PET tracer is foreseen.

  20. Status of eye lens radiation dose monitoring in European hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A questionnaire was developed by the members of WG12 of EURADOS in order to establish an overview of the current status of eye lens radiation dose monitoring in hospitals. The questionnaire was sent to medical physicists and radiation protection officers in hospitals across Europe. Specific topics were addressed in the questionnaire such as: knowledge of the proposed eye lens dose limit; monitoring and dosimetry issues; training and radiation protection measures. The results of the survey highlighted that the new eye lens dose limit can be exceeded in interventional radiology procedures and that eye lens protection is crucial. Personnel should be properly trained in how to use protective equipment in order to keep eye lens doses as low as reasonably achievable. Finally, the results also highlighted the need to improve the design of eye dosemeters in order to ensure satisfactory use by workers. (paper)

  1. Frequency of chromosome aberration and dose/dose rate effects in the mouse exposed to long-term low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Authors have been conducting long term irradiation experiments in the mouse with the dose rate as low as unreported hitherto and have shown with highly sensitive methods to detect chromosomal aberration, that there is the positive dose rate effect under even such a condition, of which details are described herein. According to the definition of United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCER) (1993), the low dose rate is 137Cs-gamma-ray at the low dose rate of 1 or 20 mGy/22 h/day (total, 125-615 or 100-8000 mGy, respectively). Other groups received radiations of 0 Gy (non-irradiated, age-matched control), 200-8000 mGy at 200 mGy/22 h/day, 400-8000 mGy at 400 mGy/22 h/day, or 250-2000 mGy at 890 mGy/min. At the defined days after exposure, mice were sacrificed, their spleens were dissected out, splenic cells were cultured for 48 hr, and their chromosome specimens were prepared to be stained with Giemsa or FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization). Dicentric (dic) and translocation chromosomal aberrations were found to increase even with the lowest total (accumulated) dose, where the frequency was significantly higher than that in control. Comparison of the regression slopes at each dose rate of the relation between dose and aberration revealed the difference dependent on the rate, thus demonstrating the presence of dose rate effect. Dose/dose rate effect factor (DDREF) calculated by authors' procedure (at 1000-100 mGy: DDREF=17.8-4.5 for dic by FISH; 24.5-5.2 for dic+ring chromosome by Giemsa) was thought important in the risk assessment of low dose radiation and also revealed a problem in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) (1991) calculation of the factor. (K.T.)

  2. Direct determination of radiation dose in human blood

    CERN Document Server

    Tanir, Ayse Gunes; Sahiner, Eren; Bolukdemir, Mustafa Hicabi; Koc, Kemal; Meric, Niyazi; Kelec, Sule Kaya

    2014-01-01

    Our purpose is to measure the internal radiation dose (ID) using human blood sample. In the literature, there is no process that allows the direct measurement of ID received by a person. This study has shown that it is possible to determine ID in human blood exposed to internal or external ionizing radiation treatment both directly and retrospectively. OSL technique was used to measure the total dose from the blood sample. OSL counts from the waste blood of the patient injected with a radiopharmaceutical for diagnostic or treatment purposes and from a blood sample having a laboratory-injected radiation dose were both used for measurements. The decay and dose-response curves (DRC) were plotted for different doses. The doses received by different blood aliquots have been determined by interpolating the natural luminescence counts to DRC. In addition, OSL counts from a healthy blood sample exposed to an external radiation source were measured. The blood aliquots were given different 0-200Gy beta doses and their ...

  3. Investigation of radiation doses in open space using TLD detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitz, G.; Facius, R.; Bilski, P.; Olko, P

    2002-07-01

    The low energy component of the cosmic radiation field is strongly modified by the shielding of the spacecraft and it is time and location dependent. Thermoluminescent lithium fluoride detectors have been applied to determine the radiation doses inside the ESA-Facility BIOPAN. The BIOPAN facility was mounted outside and launched on a Foton spacecraft and opened to space to allow exposure of several experiments to open space. Standard TLD-600, TLD-700 chips, two layers MTS-Ns sintered pellets with different effective thickness of the sensitive layer and MTS-N of different thickness have been exposed with different shielding thickness in front of them. The measured TL signal in the 0.1 mm thick detector just shielded by an aluminised Kapton foil of 25 {mu}m thickness in front yielded a dose of 29.8 Gy (calibrated with {sup 137}Cs gamma rays) for an exposure time of 12.7 days; after 2.5 gcm{sup -2} shielding the doses dropped to 3 mGy. The monitoring of radiation doses and its depth dose distribution outside the spacecraft are of great interest for radiation protection of astronauts working in the open space. The knowledge of depth-dose distribution is a prerequisite to determine the organ doses an astronaut will receive during an extravehicular activity. The BIOPAN experiments are to be continued in the future. (author)

  4. Investigation of radiation doses in open space using TLD detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, G; Facius, R; Bilski, P; Olko, P

    2002-01-01

    The low energy component of the cosmic radiation field is strongly modified by the shielding of the spacecraft and it is time and location dependent. Thermoluminescent lithium fluoride detectors have been applied to determine the radiation doses inside the ESA-Facility BIOPAN. The BIOPAN facility was mounted outside and launched on a Foton spacecraft and opened to space to allow exposure of several experiments to open space. Standard TLD-600. TLD-700 chips, two layers MTS-Ns sintered pellets with different effective thickness of the sensitive layer and MTS-N of different thickness have been exposed with different shielding thicknesses in front of them. The measured TL signal in the 0.1 mm thick detector just shielded by an aluminised Kapton foil of 25 microm thickness in front yielded a dose of 29.8 Gy (calibrated with 137Cs gamma rays) for an exposure time of 12.7 days: after 2.5 g.cm(-2) shielding the doses dropped to 3 mGy. The monitoring of radiation doses and its depth dose distribution outside the spacecraft are of great interest for radiation protection of astronauts working in open space. The knowledge of depth-dose distribution is a prerequisite to determine the organ doses an astronaut will receive during an extravehicular activity (EVA). The BIOPAN experiments are to be continued in the future. PMID:12382937

  5. What can be learned from epidemiologic studies of persons exposed to low doses of radiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of radiation risk assessment is to determine the risk of various adverse health effects associated with exposure to low doses and low dose rates. Extrapolation of risks from studies of persons exposed at high doses (generally exceeding 1 Sv) and dose rates has been the primary approach used to achieve this objective. The study of Japanese atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki has played an especially important role in risk assessment efforts. A direct assessment of the dose-response function based on studies of persons exposed at low doses and dose rates is obviously desirable. This paper focuses on the potential of both current and future nuclear workers studies for investigating the dose-response functions at low doses, and also discusses analyses making use of the low dose portion of the atomic bomb survivor data. Difficulties in using these data are the statistical imprecision of estimated dose-response parameters, and potential bias resulting from confounding factors and from uncertainties in dose estimates

  6. Assessment of external dose indoors in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper was an assessment of external exposure indoors and its dependence on construction materials and indoor radon concentrations in Lithuanian living houses. Relationship of absorbed dose rate in air indoors and activity indexes of the most commonly used construction materials (wood, concrete and bricks) have been studied using results received in measurements done in >4700 rooms in 1995-2005. Possible connections of dose rate indoors with indoor radon concentrations are also discussed. Findings of this study helped to make an assessment of the mean value of effective dose of Lithuanian population due to external exposure indoors which is equal to 0.58 mSv y-1. The received data might also be used in improvement of quality of personal dosimetric measurements done in premises constructed of different construction materials. (authors)

  7. Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleiman, Norman Jay [Columbia University

    2013-11-30

    The lens of the eye is one of the most radiosensitive tissues in the body. Ocular ionizing radiation exposure results in characteristic, dose related, progressive lens changes leading to cataract formation. While initial, early stages of lens opacification may not cause visual disability, the severity of such changes progressively increases with dose until vision is impaired and cataract extraction surgery may be required. Because of the transparency of the eye, radiation induced lens changes can easily be followed non-invasively over time. Thus, the lens provides a unique model system in which to study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly organized tissue. Despite this observation, considerable uncertainties remain surrounding the relationship between dose and risk of developing radiation cataract. For example, a growing number of human epidemiological findings suggest significant risk among various groups of occupationally and accidentally exposed individuals and confidence intervals that include zero dose. Nevertheless, questions remain concerning the relationship between lens opacities, visual disability, clinical cataract, threshold dose and/or the role of genetics in determining radiosensitivity. Experimentally, the response of the rodent eye to radiation is quite similar to that in humans and thus animal studies are well suited to examine the relationship between radiation exposure, genetic determinants of radiosensitivity and cataractogenesis. The current work has expanded our knowledge of the low-dose effects of X-irradiation or high-LET heavy ion exposure on timing and progression of radiation cataract and has provided new information on the genetic, molecular, biochemical and cell biological features which contribute to this pathology. Furthermore, findings have indicated that single and/or multiple haploinsufficiency for various genes involved in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, such as Atm, Brca1 or Rad9

  8. Occupational radiation doses in Portugal from 1994 to 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work reports on the occupational radiation doses for external radiation received in 1994-1998 by the radiation workers monitored by the Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety Department (DPRSN) in Portugal. Individual monitoring for external radiation is carried out in Portugal by DPRSN since the 60s, and the workers are monitored on a monthly or quarterly bases. In 1995 DPRSN monitored approximately 8000 people and was the only laboratory carrying out this sort of activity in Portugal. In 1998 the number of monitored people increased to nearly 8500 from 860 facilities, which leads us to state that the results shown in this work are well representative of the universe of radiation workers in Portugal. Until 1996, the dose measurement procedure was based only on film dosimetry and the results reported for the 1994-1995 period were obtained with this methodology. Since 1996, thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) was gradually introduced and since then an effort has been made to transfer the monitored workers from film to TLD. In 1998, both film and TLD dosimetry systems were running simultaneously, with average numbers of 4500 workers monitored with film dosimetry, while 4000 were monitored with TLD. The data presented from 1996 to 1998 were obtained with both methodologies. This work reports the annual mean effective doses received from external radiation, for the monitored and exposed workers in the different fields of activity, namely, industry, research laboratories, health and mining. The distribution of the annual effective dose by dose intervals is also reported. The collective annual dose by field of activity is estimated and the contribution to the total annual collective dose is determined. The collective dose estimates for the period 1994 to 1998 demonstrated that the health sector is the most representative exposed group in Portugal. (author)

  9. Time-dependent radiation dose simulations during interplanetary space flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobynde, Mikhail; Shprits, Yuri; Drozdov, Alexander; Hoffman, Jeffrey; Li, Ju

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation is one of the main concerns in planning long-term interplanetary human space missions. There are two main types of hazardous radiation - Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) and Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). Their intensities and evolution depend on the solar activity. GCR activity is most enhanced during solar minimum, while the most intense SEPs usually occur during the solar maximum. SEPs are better shielded with thick shields, while GCR dose is less behind think shields. Time and thickness dependences of the intensity of these two components encourage looking for a time window of flight, when radiation intensity and dose of SEP and GCR would be minimized. In this study we combine state-of-the-art space environment models with GEANT4 simulations to determine the optimal shielding, geometry of the spacecraft, and launch time with respect to the phase of the solar cycle. The radiation environment was described by the time-dependent GCR model, and the SEP spectra that were measured during the period from 1990 to 2010. We included gamma rays, electrons, neutrons and 27 fully ionized elements from hydrogen to nickel. We calculated the astronaut's radiation doses during interplanetary flights using the Monte-Carlo code that accounts for the primary and the secondary radiation. We also performed sensitivity simulations for the assumed spacecraft size and thickness to find an optimal shielding. In conclusion, we present the dependences of the radiation dose as a function of launch date from 1990 to 2010, for flight durations of up to 3 years.

  10. Radiation-dose consequences of acid rain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acid rain causes accelerated mobilization of many materials in soils. Natural and anthropogenic radionuclides, especially Ra and Cs, are among these materials. Generally, a decrease in soil pH by 1 unit will cause increases in mobility and plant uptake by factors of 2 to 7. Several simulation models were tested with most emphasis on an atmospherically driven soil model that predicts water and nuclide flow through a soil profile. We modelled a typical, acid rain sensitive soil using meterological data from Geraldton, Ontario. The results, within the range of effects on the soil expected from acidification, showed direct proportionality between the mobility of the nuclides and dose. Based on the literature available, a decrease in pH of 1 unit may increase the mobility of Ra and Cs by a factor or 2 or more. This will lead to increases in plant uptake and ultimate dose to man of about the same extent

  11. Human data and internal dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent data on physical and anatomical and physiological or metabolic data regarding Japanese Reference Man is briefly reviewed. This includes reference values for masses of all organs and tissues proposed for a Japanese Reference male adult. Part of the data is used to assess alpha doses to bone tissues from naturally occurring 226Ra in bone of Japanese adult. (author)

  12. Dose dependent rearrangement of cellular membranes induced by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation-induced effects at dose rate of 0.35 Gy/min (in vivo) and of ultra-low doses (in vitro) on the cell membranes structural state were shown. The modifications of the membrane protein and lipid components and their dynamic state were revealed at experimental irradiation conditions by fluorescent probe analysis. The principal component analysis of the research data indicates the dose-dependent decrease of plasma membrane structural orderliness of the small intestine enterocytes with the increase of the ionizing irradiation acute dose of 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 Gy at dose rate of 0.35 Gy/min. The complex response of the biological structure - the erythrocytes plasma membrane, on the ionizing radiation action at ultra-low doses that occurred through macromolecular structural rearrangements was also demonstrated. The features of the structural rearrangement of the cellular membranes depending on the ionizing radiation dose (dose rate) are found out

  13. Biological dosimetry of ionizing radiation in the high dose range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report reviews briefly methods of dose evaluation after exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation. Validation of two methods also is described: micronucleus (Mn) frequency estimation according Muller and Rode and premature chromosome condensation (PCC) combined with painting of 3 pairs of chromosomes in human lymphocytes. According to Muller and Rode, micronucleus frequency per binucleated cells with at least one Mn linearly increases with dose up to 15 Gy and is suitable end-point for biological dosimetry. These authors, however, examined cells from only one donor. The data reported below were obtained for 5 donors; they point to a considerable individual variation of thus measured response to irradiation. Due to the high degree of inter-donor variability, there is no possibility to apply this approach in biological dosimetry in the dose range 5 - 20 Gy gamma 60Co radiation. A linear response up to 10 Gy was observed only in the case of certain donors. In contrast, determination of the dose-effect relationship with the PCC method gave good results (small inter-individual variation, no plateau effect up to dose 10 Gy), so that with a calibration curve it could be used for dose estimation after exposure to doses up to 10 Gy of X or gamma 60Co radiation. (author)

  14. Is There a Dose-Response Relationship for Heart Disease With Low-Dose Radiation Therapy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Eugene [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Corbett, James R. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Moran, Jean M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Marsh, Robin B.; Feng, Mary; Jagsi, Reshma; Kessler, Marc L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ficaro, Edward C. [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Pierce, Lori J., E-mail: ljpierce@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify cardiac radiation therapy (RT) exposure using sensitive measures of cardiac dysfunction; and to correlate dysfunction with heart doses, in the setting of adjuvant RT for left-sided breast cancer. Methods and Materials: On a randomized trial, 32 women with node-positive left-sided breast cancer underwent pre-RT stress single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT-CT) myocardial perfusion scans. Patients received RT to the breast/chest wall and regional lymph nodes to doses of 50 to 52.2 Gy. Repeat SPECT-CT scans were performed 1 year after RT. Perfusion defects (PD), summed stress defects scores (SSS), and ejection fractions (EF) were evaluated. Doses to the heart and coronary arteries were quantified. Results: The mean difference in pre- and post-RT PD was −0.38% ± 3.20% (P=.68), with no clinically significant defects. To assess for subclinical effects, PD were also examined using a 1.5-SD below the normal mean threshold, with a mean difference of 2.53% ± 12.57% (P=.38). The mean differences in SSS and EF before and after RT were 0.78% ± 2.50% (P=.08) and 1.75% ± 7.29% (P=.39), respectively. The average heart Dmean and D95 were 2.82 Gy (range, 1.11-6.06 Gy) and 0.90 Gy (range, 0.13-2.17 Gy), respectively. The average Dmean and D95 to the left anterior descending artery were 7.22 Gy (range, 2.58-18.05 Gy) and 3.22 Gy (range, 1.23-6.86 Gy), respectively. No correlations were found between cardiac doses and changes in PD, SSS, and EF. Conclusions: Using sensitive measures of cardiac function, no clinically significant defects were found after RT, with the average heart Dmean <5 Gy. Although a dose response may exist for measures of cardiac dysfunction at higher doses, no correlation was found in the present study for low doses delivered to cardiac structures and perfusion, SSS, or EF.

  15. Is There a Dose-Response Relationship for Heart Disease With Low-Dose Radiation Therapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To quantify cardiac radiation therapy (RT) exposure using sensitive measures of cardiac dysfunction; and to correlate dysfunction with heart doses, in the setting of adjuvant RT for left-sided breast cancer. Methods and Materials: On a randomized trial, 32 women with node-positive left-sided breast cancer underwent pre-RT stress single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT-CT) myocardial perfusion scans. Patients received RT to the breast/chest wall and regional lymph nodes to doses of 50 to 52.2 Gy. Repeat SPECT-CT scans were performed 1 year after RT. Perfusion defects (PD), summed stress defects scores (SSS), and ejection fractions (EF) were evaluated. Doses to the heart and coronary arteries were quantified. Results: The mean difference in pre- and post-RT PD was −0.38% ± 3.20% (P=.68), with no clinically significant defects. To assess for subclinical effects, PD were also examined using a 1.5-SD below the normal mean threshold, with a mean difference of 2.53% ± 12.57% (P=.38). The mean differences in SSS and EF before and after RT were 0.78% ± 2.50% (P=.08) and 1.75% ± 7.29% (P=.39), respectively. The average heart Dmean and D95 were 2.82 Gy (range, 1.11-6.06 Gy) and 0.90 Gy (range, 0.13-2.17 Gy), respectively. The average Dmean and D95 to the left anterior descending artery were 7.22 Gy (range, 2.58-18.05 Gy) and 3.22 Gy (range, 1.23-6.86 Gy), respectively. No correlations were found between cardiac doses and changes in PD, SSS, and EF. Conclusions: Using sensitive measures of cardiac function, no clinically significant defects were found after RT, with the average heart Dmean <5 Gy. Although a dose response may exist for measures of cardiac dysfunction at higher doses, no correlation was found in the present study for low doses delivered to cardiac structures and perfusion, SSS, or EF

  16. [Use of ionizing radiation sources in metallurgy: risk assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giugni, U

    2012-01-01

    Use of ionizing radiation sources in the metallurgical industry: risk assessment. Radioactive sources and fixed or mobile X-ray equipment are used for both process and quality control. The use of ionizing radiation sources requires careful risk assessment. The text lists the characteristics of the sources and the legal requirements, and contains a description of the documentation required and the methods used for risk assessment. It describes how to estimate the doses to operators and the relevant classification criteria used for the purpose of radiation protection. Training programs must be organized in close collaboration between the radiation protection expert and the occupational physician.

  17. A radiation dose study based on analysis of primary color chrominance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jianyue; LI Jianghong; LI Jianwei; JIN Jian

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to assess the possibility of measuring radiation dose based on primary color chrominance in chemical solutions. METHODS: We used an aqueous solution with different concentrations of Alphaurine A and Tracid Brilliant Red B. This was irradiated by 1.5-13.5kGy 60Co γ radiation. Data were collected by an instrument that can detect information on the three primary colors. Data were analyzed and manipulated for each experiment. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The result shows that three primary colors chrominance in the aqueous solutions change with different doses of 60Co γ-rays and different concentrations of Alphaurine A and Tracid Brilliant Red B. For Alphaurine A, the red chrominance is gradually reduced as a function of radiation dose. The blue chrominance gradually increases concurrently. The red and green chrominance changes obviously and inversely, but the green chrominance changes little. In Tracid Brilliant Red B solution, the red chrominance and green chrominance gradually decreases as the radiation dose increases. And the changes are obvious and inverted. The blue chrominance changed little. Our experiments demonstrate that radiation dose can be studied based on three primary colors chrominance. This may be a new tool to measure radiation dose.

  18. Assessment of radiation dose to infants from breast milk following the administration of /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate to nursing mothers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogunleye, O.T.

    1983-07-01

    Results of measurements of /sup 99m/Tc activity in the milk samples of nursing mothers who received /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate for thyroid scans are presented. The maximum concentration is found around 2 hours after injection. The total body dose to a 3-month-old infant feeding on the assayed milk varied with time from about 685 mrad to 0.5 mrad.

  19. Biological impact of high-dose and dose-rate radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental anti-radiation vaccine is a power tool of immune - prophylaxis of the acute radiation disease. Existing principles of treatment of the acute radiation dis ease are based on a correction of developing patho-physiological and biochemical processes within the first days after irradiation. Protection from radiation is built on the general principles of immunology and has two main forms - active and passive immunization. Active immunization by the essential radiation toxins of specific radiation determinant (S.D.R.) group allows significantly reduce the lethality and increase duration of life among animals that are irradiated by lethal and sub-lethal doses of gamma radiation.The radiation toxins of S.D.R. group have antigenic properties that are specific for different forms of acute radiation disease. Development of the specific and active immune reaction after intramuscular injection of radiation toxins allows optimize a manifestation of a clinical picture and stabilize laboratory parameters of the acute radiation syndromes. Passive immunization by the anti-radiation serum or preparations of immune-globulins gives a manifestation of the radioprotection effects immediately after this kind of preparation are injected into organisms of mammals. Providing passive immunization by preparations of anti-radiations immune-globulins is possible in different periods of time after radiation. Providing active immunization by preparations of S.D.R. group is possible only to achieve a prophylaxis goal and form the protection effects that start to work in 18 - 35 days after an injection of biological active S.D.R. substance has been administrated. However active and passive immunizations by essential anti-radiation toxins and preparations of gamma-globulins extracted from a hyper-immune serum of a horse have significantly different medical prescriptions for application and depend on many factors like a type of radiation, a power of radiation, absorption doses, a time of

  20. Biological impact of high-dose and dose-rate radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maliev, V.; Popov, D. [Russian Academy of Science, Vladicaucas (Russian Federation); Jones, J.; Gonda, S. [NASA -Johnson Space Center, Houston (United States); Prasad, K.; Viliam, C.; Haase, G. [Antioxida nt Research Institute, Premier Micronutrient Corporation, Novato (United States); Kirchin, V. [Moscow State Veterinary and Biotechnology Acade my, Moscow (Russian Federation); Rachael, C. [University Space Research Association, Colorado (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Experimental anti-radiation vaccine is a power tool of immune - prophylaxis of the acute radiation disease. Existing principles of treatment of the acute radiation dis ease are based on a correction of developing patho-physiological and biochemical processes within the first days after irradiation. Protection from radiation is built on the general principles of immunology and has two main forms - active and passive immunization. Active immunization by the essential radiation toxins of specific radiation determinant (S.D.R.) group allows significantly reduce the lethality and increase duration of life among animals that are irradiated by lethal and sub-lethal doses of gamma radiation.The radiation toxins of S.D.R. group have antigenic properties that are specific for different forms of acute radiation disease. Development of the specific and active immune reaction after intramuscular injection of radiation toxins allows optimize a manifestation of a clinical picture and stabilize laboratory parameters of the acute radiation syndromes. Passive immunization by the anti-radiation serum or preparations of immune-globulins gives a manifestation of the radioprotection effects immediately after this kind of preparation are injected into organisms of mammals. Providing passive immunization by preparations of anti-radiations immune-globulins is possible in different periods of time after radiation. Providing active immunization by preparations of S.D.R. group is possible only to achieve a prophylaxis goal and form the protection effects that start to work in 18 - 35 days after an injection of biological active S.D.R. substance has been administrated. However active and passive immunizations by essential anti-radiation toxins and preparations of gamma-globulins extracted from a hyper-immune serum of a horse have significantly different medical prescriptions for application and depend on many factors like a type of radiation, a power of radiation, absorption doses, a time of

  1. Radiation doses to the staff of a nuclear cardiology department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The last years, new radiopharmaceuticals are used in a Nuclear Medicine (NM) Department. Nowadays, Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is a method of routine imaging, a fact that has required increased levels of radioactivity in certain patient examinations. The staff that is more likely to receive the greatest radiation dose in a NM Department is the technologist who deals with performance of patient examination and injection of radioactive material and the nurse who is caring for the patients visiting the Department some of which being totally helpless. The fact that each NM Dept possesses equipment with certain specifications, deals with various kind of patients, has specific design and radiation protection measures which can differ from other NM Depts and uses various examination protocols, makes essential the need to investigate the radiation doses received by each member of the staff, so as to continuously monitor doses and take protective measures if required, control less experienced staff and ensure that radiation dose levels are kept as low as possible at all times. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate radiation dose to the nuclear cardiology department staff by thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) placed on the the skin at thyroid and abdominal region as well as evaluating protection measures taken currently in the Dept

  2. A method of estimating fetal dose during brain radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To develop a simple method of estimating fetal dose during brain radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: An anthropomorphic phantom was modified to simulate pregnancy at 12 and 24 weeks of gestation. Fetal dose measurements were carried out using thermoluminescent dosimeters. Brain radiation therapy was performed with two lateral and opposed fields using 6 MV photons. Three sheets of lead, 5.1-cm-thick, were positioned over the phantom's abdomen to reduce fetal exposure. Linear and nonlinear regression analysis was used to investigate the dependence of radiation dose to an unshielded and/or shielded fetus upon field size and distance from field isocenter. Results: Formulas describing the exponential decrease of radiation dose to an unshielded and/or shielded fetus with distance from the field isocenter are presented. All fitted parameters of the above formulas can be easily derived using a set of graphs showing their correlation with field size. Conclusion: This study describes a method of estimating fetal dose during brain radiotherapy, accounting for the effects of gestational age, field size and distance from field isocenter. Accurate knowledge of absorbed dose to the fetus before treatment course allows for the selection of the proper irradiation technique in order to achieve the maximum patient benefit with the least risk to the fetus

  3. Techniques and radiation dose in CT examinations of adult patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of CT in medical diagnosis delivers radiation dose to patients that are higher than those from other radiological procedures. Lake of optimized protocols could be an additional source of increased dose. The aim of this study was to measure radiation doses in CT examination of the adults in three Sudanese hospitals. Details were obtained from approximately 160 CT examination carried out in 3 hospitals (3 CT scanners). Effective dose was calculated for each examination using CT dose indices. exposure related parameters and CT D1- to- effective dose conversion factors. CT air kerma index (CT D1) and dose length products (DLP) determined were below the established international reference dose levels. The mean effective doses in this study for the head, chest, and abdomen are 0.82, 3.7 and 5.4 mGy respectively. These values were observed that the effective dose per examination was lower in Sudan than in other countries. The report of a CT survey done in these centers indicates that the mean DLP values for adult patients were ranged from 272-460 mGy cm (head) 195-995 mGy cm (chest), 270-459 mGy cm (abdomen). There are a number of observed parameters that greatly need optimization, such as minimize the scan length, without missing any vital anatomical regions, modulation of exposure parameters (kV, mA, exposure time, and slice thickness) based on patient size and age. Another possible method is through use of contrast media only to optimize diagnostic yield. The last possible method is the use of radio protective materials for protection however, in order to achieve the above optimization strategies: there is great demand to educate CT personnel on the effects of scan parameter settings on radiation dose to patients and image quality required for accurate diagnosis. (Author)

  4. Construction of average adult Japanese voxel phantoms for dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) adopted the adult reference voxel phantoms based on the physiological and anatomical reference data of Caucasian on October, 2007. The organs and tissues of these phantoms were segmented on the basis of ICRP Publication 103. In future, the dose coefficients for internal dose and dose conversion coefficients for external dose calculated using the adult reference voxel phantoms will be widely used for the radiation protection fields. On the other hand, the body sizes and organ masses of adult Japanese are generally smaller than those of adult Caucasian. In addition, there are some cases that the anatomical characteristics such as body sizes, organ masses and postures of subjects influence the organ doses in dose assessment for medical treatments and radiation accident. Therefore, it was needed to use human phantoms with average anatomical characteristics of Japanese. The authors constructed the averaged adult Japanese male and female voxel phantoms by modifying the previously developed high-resolution adult male (JM) and female (JF) voxel phantoms. It has been modified in the following three aspects: (1) The heights and weights were agreed with the Japanese averages; (2) The masses of organs and tissues were adjusted to the Japanese averages within 10%; (3) The organs and tissues, which were newly added for evaluation of the effective dose in ICRP Publication 103, were modeled. In this study, the organ masses, distances between organs, specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) and dose conversion coefficients of these phantoms were compared with those evaluated using the ICRP adult reference voxel phantoms. This report provides valuable information on the anatomical and dosimetric characteristics of the averaged adult Japanese male and female voxel phantoms developed as reference phantoms of adult Japanese. (author)

  5. Reduction of patient radiation dose in Spiral CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To optimize patient radiation dose in Spiral CT scan of dento-maxillo-facial region by measuring the absorbed dose in the phantom and to evaluate reliability of dose estimation methods using CTDI (CT Dose Index, FDA, USA). Spiral CT scanning with 'pitchs' (ratio of table speed to slice thickness per rotation) more than 1 was used for dose measurements. The dose was measured using a human phantom (Alderson Research Laboratories, USA) in the CT scan with a 3rd generation CT scanner of Somatom Plus (Siemens, Germany) for bone imaging. CTDI for this CT scanner were 9.2 mGy/100 mA at the center in an acrylic resin phantom with diameter of 16 cm and 8.5 mGy/100 mA at 1 cm depth from the phantom surface. X-ray tube voltage of 120 kV and tube current of 85 mA was used. Slice thickness was varied from 1 to 3 mm and table speed per rotation was also varied from 1 to 5 mm per rotation. X-Omat-V (Eastman Kodak, USA) films and TLD (Thermo-Luminescent-Dosimetry) dosimeters of the type of MSO-S (Kyokko, Japan) were used in the dosimetry. Patients radiation dose reduced with increasing the pitch of SPIRAL scan. Measured dose was uniformly distributed and well corresponded to the dose calculated using CTDI. However, measured doses on scanning with 1 mm slice thickness were always higher than those with 2 to 5 mm slice thickness. The lowest radiation dose was obtained with scanning with 2 mm slice thickness and table speed of 4 mm per rotation which give the dose of about 4 mGy per one CT examination in the imaged tissues. The highest dose per one CT examination was measured in 'dental CT' for the mandibular region with 1 mm slice thickness and table speed of 1 mm per rotation which gave 12 mGy by film dosimetry and 9 mGy by TLD dosimetry. SPIRAL scan with pitch more than 1 was effective for reduction of patient radiation dose without reducing the image quality. CTDI was also useful to estimate the dose except scans with 1 mm slice thickness. (author)

  6. Exposure pathways and environmental dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclides released into the environment from various nuclear facilities during normal operating conditions and under accident conditions eventually reach man through various pathways of exposure. It is required to assess the dose received by members of the public at various stages of nuclear facility. At the design stage of the nuclear facility such assessment is necessary for determining the adequacy of design provisions. During the operational phase, the assessment is needed to establish compliance with the standards and limits laid down for the facility and site

  7. Study of External Radiation Expose Dose on Hands of Nuclear Medicine Workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aims of this study are to assess external radiation exposed doses of body and hands of nuclear medicine workers who handle radiation sources, and to measure radiation exposed doses of the hands induced by a whole body bone scan with high frequency and handling a radioactive sources like 99mTc-HDP and 18F-FDG in the PET/CT examination. Skillful workers, who directly dispense and inject from radiation sources, were asked to wear a TLD on the chest and ring finger. Then, radiation exposed dose and duration exposed from daily radiation sources for each section were measured by using a pocket dosimeter for the accumulated external doses and the absorbed dose to the hands. In the survey of four medical institutions in Incheon Metropolitan City, only one of four institutions has a radiation dosimeter for local area like hands. Most of institutions uses radiation shielding devices for the purpose of protecting the body trunk, not local area. Even some institutions were revealed not to use such a shielding device. The exposed doses on the hands of nuclear medicine workers who directly handles radioactive sources were approximately twice as much as those on the body. The radiation exposure level for each section of the whole body bone scan with high frequency and that of the PET/CT examination showed that radiation doses were revealed in decreasing order of synthesis of radioactive medicine and installation to a dispensing container, dispensing, administering and transferring. Furthermore, there were statistically significant differences of radiation exposure doses of the hands before and after wearing a syringe shielder in administration of a radioactive sources. In this study, although it did not reach the permissible effective dose for nuclear medicine, the occupational workers were exposed by relatively higher dose level than the non-occupational workers. Therefore, the workers, who closely exposed to radioactive sources should be in compliance with safety management

  8. Environmental standards for ionizing radiation: theoretical basis for dose-response curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, A C

    1983-10-01

    The types of injury attributable to ionizing radiation are subdivided, for purposes of risk assessment and radiological protection, into two broad categories: stochastic effects and nonstochastic effects. Stochastic effects are viewed as probablistic phenomena, varying in frequency but not severity as a function of the dose, without any threshold; nonstochastic effects are viewed as deterministic phenomena, varying in both frequency and severity as a function of the dose, with clinical thresholds. Included among stochastic effects are heritable effects (mutations and chromosome aberrations) and carcinogenic effects. Both types of effects are envisioned as unicellular phenomena which can result from nonlethal injury of individual cells, without the necessity of damage to other cells. For the induction of mutations and chromosome aberrations in the low-to-intermediate dose range, the dose-response curve with high-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation generally conforms to a linear nonthreshold relationship and varies relatively little with the dose rate. In contrast, the curve with low-LET radiation generally conforms to a linear-quadratic relationship, rising less steeply than the curve with high-LET radiation and increasing in slope with increasing dose and dose rate. The dose-response curve for carcinogenic effects varies widely from one type of neoplasm to another in the intermediate-to-high dose range, in part because of differences in the way large doses of radiation can affect the promotion and progression of different neoplasms. Information about dose-response relations for low-level irradiation is fragmentary but consistent, in general, with the hypothesis that the neoplastic transformation may result from mutation, chromosome aberration or genetic recombination in a single susceptible cell.

  9. Health Effects of Exposure to Low Dose of Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human beings are exposed to natural radiation from external sources include radionuclides in the earth and cosmic radiation, and by internal radiation from radionuclides, mainly uranium and thorium series, incorporated into the body. Living systems have adapted to the natural levels of radiation and radioactivity. But some industrial practices involving natural resources enhance these radionuclides to a degree that they may pose risk to humans and the environment if they are not controlled. Biological effects of ionizing radiation are the outcomes of physical and chemical processes that occur immediately after the exposure, then followed by biological process in the body. These processes will involve successive changes in the molecular, cellular, tissue and whole organism levels. Any dose of radiation, no matter how small, may produce health effects since even a single ionizing event can result in DNA damage. The damage to DNA in the nucleus is considered to be the main initiating event by which radiation causes damage to cells that results in the development of cancer and hereditary disease. It has also been indicated that cytogenetic damage can occur in cells that receive no direct radiation exposure, known as bystander effects. This paper reviews health risks of low dose radiation exposure to human body causing stochastic effects, i.e. cancer induction in somatic cells and hereditary disease in genetic cells. (author)

  10. Assessment of organ equivalent doses and effective doses from diagnostic X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MIRD-type adult male, female and age 10 phantoms were constructed to evaluate organ equivalent dose and effective dose of patient due to typical diagnostic X-ray examination. These phantoms were constructed with external and internal dimensions of Korean. The X-ray energy spectra were generated with SPEC78. MCNP4B ,the general-purposed Monte Carlo code, was used. Information of chest PA , chest LAT, and abdomen AP diagnostic X-ray procedures was collected on the protocol of domestic hospitals. The results showed that patients pick up approximate 0.02 to 0.18 mSv of effective dose from a single chest PA examination, and 0.01 to 0.19 mSv from a chest LAT examination depending on the ages. From an abdomen AP examination, patients pick up 0.17 to 1.40 mSv of effective dose. Exposure time, organ depth from the entrance surface and X-ray beam field coverage considerably affect the resulting doses. Deviation among medical institutions is somewhat high, and this indicated that medical institutions should interchange their information and the need of education for medical staff. The methodology and the established system can be applied, with some expansion, to dose assessment for other medical procedures accompanying radiation exposure of patients like nuclear medicine or therapeutic radiology

  11. Radiation dose reduction efficiency of buildings after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Monzen

    Full Text Available Numerous radionuclides were released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (F1-NPS in Japan following the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Local residents have been eager to calculate their individual radiation exposure. Thus, absorbed dose rates in the indoor and outdoor air at evacuation sites in the Fukushima Prefecture were measured using a gamma-ray measuring devices, and individual radiation exposure was calculated by assessing the radiation dose reduction efficiency (defined as the ratio of absorbed dose rate in the indoor air to the absorbed dose rate in the outdoor air of wood, aluminum, and reinforced concrete buildings. Between March 2011 and July 2011, dose reduction efficiencies of wood, aluminum, and reinforced concrete buildings were 0.55 ± 0.04, 0.15 ± 0.02, and 0.19 ± 0.04, respectively. The reduction efficiency of wood structures was 1.4 times higher than that reported by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The efficiency of reinforced concrete was similar to previously reported values, whereas that of aluminum structures has not been previously reported. Dose reduction efficiency increased in proportion to the distance from F1-NPS at 8 of the 18 evacuation sites. Time variations did not reflect dose reduction efficiencies at evacuation sites although absorbed dose rates in the outdoor air decreased. These data suggest that dose reduction efficiency depends on structure types, levels of contamination, and evacuee behaviors at evacuation sites.

  12. Low-level radiation doses - a hazard to health?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The health hazard induced by low radiation doses can be understood only if we gain an understanding of the fate of the radiation-sensitive structural element within the biological system which it undergoes in the radiation field, and its significance for the total system. In the low-level dose range, single absorption events occur in individual cells as sensitive elements; such single events cause an acute, temporary thymidine kinase inhibition. During this reaction, the affected cell reveals to be resistant to a second event. These observations question the generality of a linear realation between dose and biological effect. We may even have to consider a beneficial effect of single absorption events in the affected cells. (orig./HP)

  13. Local dose enhancement in radiation therapy: Monte Carlo simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of nanotechnology has boosted the use of nanoparticles in radiation therapy in order to achieve greater therapeutic ratio between tumor and healthy tissues. Gold has been shown to be most suitable to this task due to the high biocompatibility and high atomic number, which contributes to a better in vivo distribution and for the local energy deposition. As a result, this study proposes to study, nanoparticle in the tumor cell. At a range of 11 nm from the nanoparticle surface, results have shown an absorbed dose 141 times higher for the medium with the gold nanoparticle compared to the water for an incident energy spectrum with maximum photon energy of 50 keV. It was also noted that when only scattered radiation is interacting with the gold nanoparticles, the dose was 134 times higher compared to enhanced local dose that remained significant even for scattered radiation. (author)

  14. Dose Definition and Physical Dose Evaluation for the Human Body in External Radiation Accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the bone marrow type of radiation sickness, it is possible to describe the injury to whole-body haematopoietic tissue using stem cell dose. In the case of highly non-uniform exposure, an extra-high local dose to certain parts of the body or absorbed dose to critical organs should be additionally described. To obtain objective dosimetric data from objects carried by the irradiated victims, the watch is an easily available accident dosemeter. Watch rubies can be used as thermoluminescence dosemeters, and the watch glass can be used in electron spin resonance dose measurement. (author)

  15. ASSESSMENT OF COLLECTIVE DOSE FOR TRAVELLERS BY WATERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳清宇; 姜萍; 等

    1995-01-01

    People travelling by air will receive more exposure dose and by water will receive less one.According to statistic data from the Ministry of Communications in 1988,the turnover in that year was about 2×1010 man.km.The total number of fishermen for inshore fishing was nearly two million reported by Ministry of Agriculture,Animal Husbandry and Fishery.Based on measured data on 212 points in six typical shipping lines of inshore lines and inland rivers,and the total voyage is 5625km,the average natural radiation dose rate received by travellers was calculated.From that assessment of collective effective dose for passengers by water and fishermen was derived.The value is 32.7man.Sv for passengers and 265.3man.Sv for fishermen.

  16. An airborne dispersion/dose assessment computer program. Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) staff have a need for an airborne dispersion-dose assessment computer programme for a microcomputer. The programme must be capable of analyzing the dispersion of both radioactive and non-radioactive materials. A further requirement of the programme is that it be implemented on the AECB complex of microcomputers and that it have an advanced graphical user interface. A survey of computer programs was conducted to determine which, if any, could meet the AECB's requirements in whole or in part. Ten programmes were selected for detailed review including programs for nuclear and non-radiological emergencies. None of the available programmes for radiation dose assessment meets all the requirements for reasons of user interaction, method of source term estimation or site specificity. It is concluded that the best option for meeting the AECB requirements is to adopt the CAMEO programme (specifically the ALOHA portion) which has a superior graphical user interface and add the necessary models for radiation dose assessment

  17. Radiation-induced stress effects following low dose exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Recent advances in our understanding of effects of radiation on living cells suggest that fundamentally different mechanisms are operating at low doses compared with high doses. Also, acute low doses appear to involve different response mechanisms compared with chronic low doses. Both genomic instability and so called 'bystander effects' show many similarities with well known cellular responses to oxidative stress. These predominate following low dose exposures and are maximally expressed at doses as low as 5mGy. At the biological level this is not surprising. Chemical toxicity has been known for many years to show these patterns of dose response. Cell signaling and coordinated stress mechanisms appear to dominate acute low dose exposure to chemicals. Adaptation to chemical exposures is also well documented although mechanisms of adaptive responses are less clear. In the radiation field adaptive responses also become important when low doses are protracted or fractionated. Recent data from our group concerning bystander effects following multiple low dose exposures suggest that adaptive responses can be induced in cells which only receive signals from irradiated neighbours. We have data showing delayed and bystander effects in humans, rodents 3 fish species and in prawns following in vitro and/or in vivo irradiation of haematopoietic tissues and, from the aquatic groups, gill and skin/fin tissue. Bystander signals induced by radiation can be communicated from fish to fish in vivo and are detectable as early as the eyed egg stage, i.e. as soon as tissue starts to develop. Using proteomic approaches we have determined that the bystander and the direct irradiation proteomes are different. The former show significant upregulation of 5 proteins with anti-oxidant, regenerative and restorative functions while the direct radiation proteome has 2 upregulated proteins both involved in proliferation. These data have implications for

  18. Uncertainty of dose measurement in radiation processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.

    1996-01-01

    The major standard organizations of the world have addressed the issue of reporting uncertainties in measurement reports and certificates. There is, however, still some ambiguity in the minds of many people who try to implement the recommendations in real life. This paper is a contribution...... that contribute to the observable uncertainty of repeated measurements and those that do not. Examples of the use of these principles are presented in the paper....... to the running debate and presents the author's view, which is based upon experience in radiation processing dosimetry. The origin of all uncertainty components must be identified and can be classified according to Type A and Type B, but it is equally important to separate the uncertainty components into those...

  19. Internal dose assessment in nuclear medicine: fetal doses due to radiopharmaceutical administration to the mother

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this publication is to present a guideline for the dose assessment through a comprehensive introduction of knowledge on ionizing radiation, radiation protection during pregnancy and fetal dosimetry for physician and other professionals involved in nuclear medicine practices. It contains tables with recommended dose estimates at all stages of pregnancy for many radiopharmaceuticals. Compounds for which some information was available regarding placental crossover are shown in shaded rows. It includes the most common diagnostic and therapy practices in nuclear medicine considering the four radioactive isotopes selected: 99mTc, 131I, 201Tl and 67Ga. There is a special case included, it is when conception occurs after the iodine has been administered. In almost every case, the diagnostic benefit to the mother outweighs the risk of any irradiation of the fetus. However, there is one situation in which severe fetal injury can be incurred from administering a radiopharmaceutical to the mother, and that is use of iodine-131 therapy for ablation of the thyroid in cases of hyperthyroidism or carcinoma. Radioactive iodine readily crosses the placenta and concentrates in the fetal thyroid, where, because of its small organ mass, high radiation doses are received. (author)

  20. Terrestrial gamma radiation dose measurement and health hazard along river Alaknanda and Ganges in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prerna Sharma

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Direct measurement of absorbed dose rate in air due to exposure from outdoor terrestrial γ radiation and assessment of consequent public health hazard continues to be of environmental and public concern. Present study was aimed to establish a baseline data of annual effective dose and to assess the associated health risk from outdoor terrestrial γ radiation along the river Alaknanda and Ganges of India. Terrestrial γ radiation exposure doses (excluding cosmic radiation were measured using a Plastic Scintillation Counter. Absorbed dose rates in air were measured at eight designated locations from Nandprayag to Allahabad along the river. From the average absorbed dose rates, annual effective dose (AED and excess life time cancer risks (ELCR were calculated by standard method. Results showed that absorbed dose rates in air ranged between 81.33 ± 2.34 nSv.h−1 and 144 ± 5.77 nSv.h−1 and calculated AED ranged between 0.10 ± 0.012 mSv.y−1 to 0.18 ± 0.007 mSv.y−1 at the designated locations along these rivers. Calculated ELCR were found in the range of 0.375 × 10−3 to 0.662 × 10−3. Present study measured the outdoor γ radiation levels along the rivers. The calculated annual effective doses and life time cancer risk were found higher than the world average value at higher altitudes. But the measured doses and calculated risks at plains were close to that of reported average values.

  1. Early radiation dose-response in lung: an ultrastructural study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systematic fine-structural study of dog lungs was undertaken to ascertain the radiation dose response in the lungs of large animals. The capillary endothelium appeared to be the initial site of the post-irradiation pulmonary damage. This subpheural response included diffuse septal thickening, fibrosis, edema, and reduced alveolar lumina. The deep parenchymal response involved perivascular fibrosis, which was associated with perivascular hyperplasia of Type II pneumocytes, increased number and sizes of lamellar bodies, increased production and release of lamellar surfactant. No changes of alveolar luminar size were noted. The most significant changes were observed in those dose zones exposed to greater than 2400 rad, suggesting the possibility of an identifiable dose-response relationship. Early detection of radiation pneumonitis by electron microscopy is demonstrated, and qualitative and quantitative correlation of injury with both postirradiation time and dose is presented

  2. Cytogenetic effects of low ionising radiation doses and biological dosimetry

    OpenAIRE

    Gricienė, Birutė

    2010-01-01

    The intensive use of ionising radiation (IR) sources and development of IR technology is related to increased exposure and adverse health risk to workers and public. The unstable chromosome aberration analysis in the group of nuclear energy workers (N=84) has shown that doses below annual dose limit (50 mSv) can induce chromosome aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Significantly higher frequencies of the total chromosome aberrations were determened in the study group when compa...

  3. Management of pediatric radiation dose using Agfa computed radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaetzing, R. [Agfa Corp., Greenville, SC (United States)

    2004-10-01

    Radiation dose to patients and its management have become important considerations in modern radiographic imaging procedures, but they acquire particular significance in the imaging of children. Because of their longer life expectancy, children exposed to radiation are thought to have a significantly increased risk of radiation-related late sequelae compared to adults first exposed to radiation later in life. Therefore, current clinical thinking dictates that dose in pediatric radiography be minimized, while simultaneously ensuring sufficient diagnostic information in the image, and reducing the need for repeat exposures. Dose management obviously starts with characterization and control of the exposure technique. However, it extends farther through the imaging chain to the acquisition system, and even to the image processing techniques used to optimize acquired images for display. Further, other factors, such as quality control procedures and the ability to handle special pediatric procedures, like scoliosis exams, also come into play. The need for dose management in modern radiography systems has spawned a variety of different solutions, some of which are similar across different manufacturers, and some of which are unique. This paper covers the techniques used in Agfa Computed Radiography (CR) systems to manage dose in a pediatric environment. (orig.)

  4. Update on radiation safety and dose reduction in pediatric neuroradiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number of medical X-ray imaging procedures is growing exponentially across the globe. Even though the overall benefit from medical X-ray imaging procedures far outweighs any associated risks, it is crucial to take all necessary steps to minimize radiation risks to children without jeopardizing image quality. Among the X-ray imaging studies, except for interventional fluoroscopy procedures, CT studies constitute higher dose and therefore draw considerable scrutiny. A number of technological advances have provided ways for better and safer CT imaging. This article provides an update on the radiation safety of patients and staff and discusses dose optimization in medical X-ray imaging within pediatric neuroradiology. (orig.)

  5. Update on radiation safety and dose reduction in pediatric neuroradiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahesh, Mahadevappa [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, The Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The number of medical X-ray imaging procedures is growing exponentially across the globe. Even though the overall benefit from medical X-ray imaging procedures far outweighs any associated risks, it is crucial to take all necessary steps to minimize radiation risks to children without jeopardizing image quality. Among the X-ray imaging studies, except for interventional fluoroscopy procedures, CT studies constitute higher dose and therefore draw considerable scrutiny. A number of technological advances have provided ways for better and safer CT imaging. This article provides an update on the radiation safety of patients and staff and discusses dose optimization in medical X-ray imaging within pediatric neuroradiology. (orig.)

  6. Radiation dose evaluation during X-ray examinations in human medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine and border controls using ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report on radiation dose evaluation during X-ray examinations includes the following chapters: (1) Scope of the project. (2) Measuring instruments. (3) Part I: Radiation dose evaluation during X-ray examinations in human medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine. (4) Radiation dose evaluation during X-ray examinations during border controls using ionizing radiation. (5) Summary of results.

  7. Human evidence on the shape of the dose-response curves for radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carcinogenic effects of high levels of ionizing radiation are better understood than those of any other environmental agent. However, the somatic risk from low doses is highly disputed. The uncertainties stem from the fact that a direct estimation of small risks requires impracticably large samples. Therefore, risk estimates for low doses have to be derived indirectly by extrapolation from high exposure data and are heavily dependent on assumptions about the form of the dose-response curve. Although radiobiological theories tested on in vitro systems predict a quadratic term in the dose-response equation which should, at least for sparsely ionizing radiation, dominate the shape of the curve, the epidemiological data available cannot exclude the possibility of a pure linear relationship. In some cases, apparent thresholds may result from latent periods inversely related to dose. Besides depending on the quality of the radiation, the shape seems also to differ with the type of cancer induced. Studies on uranium miners, atomic bomb survivors and on irradiated patients are reviewed with emphasis on the shape of the dose-response. The credibility of the most publicized reports claiming a large cancer risk from low levels of radiation is assessed. The feasibility of a new study in an area of high natural background is explored. Finally, the influence of the uncertainties concerning the effect of low level radiation on future exposure limits set by regulatory bodies is discussed. (Auth.)

  8. Thoron in the air: assessment of the occupational dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The occupational dose due to inhalation of thoron was assessed through the committed effective dose and the committed equivalent dose received by workers exposed to the radionuclide at the nuclear materials storage site and the thorium purification plant of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP). The radiation doses were performed by compartmental analysis following the compartmental model of the lung and biokinetic model of the lead, through the thoron equilibrium equivalent concentrations. These values were obtained by gamma ray spectrometry, total alpha count and alpha particle spectrometry of air samples glass fiber filters. The results of the thoron equilibrium equivalent concentration varied from 0.3 to 0,67 Bq/m3 at the nuclear materials storage site and from 0.9 to 249.8 Bq/m3 at the thorium purification plant. The committed effective dose due to thoron inhalation varied from 0.03 mSv/a to 0.67 mSv/a at the nuclear materials storage site and from 0.12 mSv/a to 6.0 mSv/a at the thorium purification plant. The risk assessment of lung cancer and fatal cancers for the workers exposed to thoron at the nuclear materials storage site and the thorium purification plant showed an increment for both risk cancer. (author)

  9. Measurement of radiation dose in paediatric micturating cystourethrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paediatrics and children have been recognized that they have a higher risk of developing cancer from the radiation than adults. Therefor, increased attention has been directed towards the dose to the patients. Micturating Cystourethrography (MCU) is a commonly use ed fluoroscopic procedure in children and commonly used to detect the vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) and show urethral and bladder and abnormalities. This study aims to measure the pediatric patients undergoing MCU. The study was carried out in two hospitals in Khartoum. The entrance surface dose (ESD) was determined determined by indirect method for 45 children. Furthermore, the mean ESD, sd and range resulting from MCU procedures has been estimated to be 0.7±.5 (0.2-2.5) mGy for the total patient population. The radiation dose to the patients is well within established safety limits, in the light of the current practice. The radiation dose results of this study are appropriate for adoption as the local initial dose reference level (DRL) value for this technique. The data presented in this study showed our doses to be approximately 50% lower than the lower mean values presented in the literature.(Author)

  10. Sensors of absorbed dose of ionizing radiation based on mosfet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perevertaylo V. L.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The requirements to technology and design of p-channel and n-channel MOS transistors with a thick oxide layer designed for use in the capacity of integral dosimeters of absorbed dose of ionizing radiation are defined. The technology of radiation-sensitive MOS transistors with a thick oxide in the p-channel and n-channel version is created.

  11. Nuclear energy and health: and the benefits of low-dose radiation hormesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttler, Jerry M; Pollycove, Myron

    2009-01-01

    Energy needs worldwide are expected to increase for the foreseeable future, but fuel supplies are limited. Nuclear reactors could supply much of the energy demand in a safe, sustainable manner were it not for fear of potential releases of radioactivity. Such releases would likely deliver a low dose or dose rate of radiation, within the range of naturally occurring radiation, to which life is already accustomed. The key areas of concern are discussed. Studies of actual health effects, especially thyroid cancers, following exposures are assessed. Radiation hormesis is explained, pointing out that beneficial effects are expected following a low dose or dose rate because protective responses against stresses are stimulated. The notions that no amount of radiation is small enough to be harmless and that a nuclear accident could kill hundreds of thousands are challenged in light of experience: more than a century with radiation and six decades with reactors. If nuclear energy is to play a significant role in meeting future needs, regulatory authorities must examine the scientific evidence and communicate the real health effects of nuclear radiation. Negative images and implications of health risks derived by unscientific extrapolations of harmful effects of high doses must be dispelled.

  12. Environmental policy. Ambient radioactivity levels and radiation doses in 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report contains information on the natural (background) radiation exposure (chapter II), the natural radiation exposure as influenced by anthropogenic effects (chapter III), the anthropogenic radiation exposure (chapter IV), and the radiation doses to the environment and the population emanating from the Chernobyl fallout (chapter V). The natural radiation exposure is specified referring to the contributions from cosmic and terrestrial background radiation and intake of natural radioactive substances. Changes of the natural environment resulting from anthropogenic effects (technology applications) inducing an increase in concentration of natural radioactive substances accordingly increase the anthropogenic radiation exposure. Indoor air radon concentration in buildings for instance is one typical example of anthropogenic increase of concentration of natural radioactivity, primarily caused by the mining industry or by various materials processing activities, which may cause an increase in the average radiation dose to the population. Measurements so far show that indoor air concentration of radon exceeds a level of 200 Bq/m3 in less than 2% of the residential buildings; the EUropean Commission therefore recommends to use this concentration value as a maximum value for new residential buildings. Higher concentrations are primarily measured in areas with relevant geological conditions and abundance of radon, or eg. in mining areas. (orig./CB)

  13. Calibration of high-dose radiation facilities (Handbook)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In India at present several high intensity radiation sources are used. There are 135 teletheraphy machines and 65 high intensity cobalt-60 sources in the form of gamma chambers (2.5 Ci) and PANBIT (50 Ci). Several food irradiation facilities and a medical sterilization plant ISOMED are also in operation. The application of these high intensity sources involve a wide variation of dose from 10 Gy to 100 kGy. Accurate and reproducible radiation dosimetry is essential in the use of these sources. This handbook is especially compiled for calibration of high-dose radiation facilities. The first few chapters discuss such topics as interaction of radiation with matter, radiation chemistry, radiation processing, commonly used high intensity radiation sources and their special features, radiation units and dosimetry principles. In the chapters which follow, chemical dosimeters are discussed in detail. This discussion covers Fricke dosimeter, FBX dosimeter, ceric sulphate dosimeter, free radical dosimetry, coloured indicators for irrdiation verification. A final chapter is devoted to practical hints to be followed in calibration work. (author)

  14. Effect of staff training on radiation dose in pediatric CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hojreh, Azadeh, E-mail: azadeh.hojreh@meduniwien.ac.at [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biological Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of General and Paediatric Radiology, Waehringer Guertel 18–20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Weber, Michael, E-mail: michael.Weber@Meduniwien.Ac.At [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Division of General and Paediatric Radiology, Waehringer Guertel 18–20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Homolka, Peter, E-mail: peter.Homolka@Meduniwien.Ac.At [Medical University of Vienna, Centre for Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Waehringer Guertel 18–20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Pediatric patient CT doses were compared before and after staff training. • Staff training increasing dose awareness resulted in patient dose reduction. • Application of DRL reduced number of CT's with unusually high doses. • Continuous education and training are effective regarding dose optimization. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of staff training on radiation doses applied in pediatric CT scans. Methods: Pediatric patient doses from five CT scanners before (1426 scans) and after staff training (2566 scans) were compared statistically. Examinations included cranial CT (CCT), thoracic, abdomen–pelvis, and trunk scans. Dose length products (DLPs) per series were extracted from CT dose reports archived in the PACS. Results: A pooled analysis of non-traumatic scans revealed a statistically significant reduction in the dose for cranial, thoracic, and abdomen/pelvis scans (p < 0.01). This trend could be demonstrated also for trunk scans, however, significance could not be established due to low patient frequencies (p > 0.05). The percentage of scans performed with DLPs exceeding the German DRLs was reduced from 41% to 7% (CCT), 19% to 5% (thorax-CT), from 9% to zero (abdominal–pelvis CT), and 26% to zero (trunk; DRL taken as summed DRLs for thorax plus abdomen–pelvis, reduced by 20% accounting for overlap). Comparison with Austrian DRLs – available only for CCT and thorax CT – showed a reduction from 21% to 3% (CCT), and 15 to 2% (thorax CT). Conclusions: Staff training together with application of DRLs provide an efficient approach for optimizing radiation dose in pediatric CT practice.

  15. Effect of staff training on radiation dose in pediatric CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Pediatric patient CT doses were compared before and after staff training. • Staff training increasing dose awareness resulted in patient dose reduction. • Application of DRL reduced number of CT's with unusually high doses. • Continuous education and training are effective regarding dose optimization. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of staff training on radiation doses applied in pediatric CT scans. Methods: Pediatric patient doses from five CT scanners before (1426 scans) and after staff training (2566 scans) were compared statistically. Examinations included cranial CT (CCT), thoracic, abdomen–pelvis, and trunk scans. Dose length products (DLPs) per series were extracted from CT dose reports archived in the PACS. Results: A pooled analysis of non-traumatic scans revealed a statistically significant reduction in the dose for cranial, thoracic, and abdomen/pelvis scans (p < 0.01). This trend could be demonstrated also for trunk scans, however, significance could not be established due to low patient frequencies (p > 0.05). The percentage of scans performed with DLPs exceeding the German DRLs was reduced from 41% to 7% (CCT), 19% to 5% (thorax-CT), from 9% to zero (abdominal–pelvis CT), and 26% to zero (trunk; DRL taken as summed DRLs for thorax plus abdomen–pelvis, reduced by 20% accounting for overlap). Comparison with Austrian DRLs – available only for CCT and thorax CT – showed a reduction from 21% to 3% (CCT), and 15 to 2% (thorax CT). Conclusions: Staff training together with application of DRLs provide an efficient approach for optimizing radiation dose in pediatric CT practice

  16. The relevance of radiation induced bystander effects for low dose radiation carcinogenic risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Where epidemiology studies lack the ability to prescribe radiation doses, customise sample sizes and replicate findings, radiobiology experiments provide greater flexibility to control experimental conditions. This control simplifies the process of answering questions concerning carcinogenic risk after low dose radiation exposures. However, the flexibility requires critical evaluation of radiobiology findings to ensure that the right questions are being asked, the experimental conditions are relevant to human exposure scenarios and that the data are cautiously interpreted in the context of the experimental model. In particular, low dose radiobiology phenomena such as adaptive responses, genomic instability and bystander effects need to be investigated thoroughly, with continual reference to the way these phenomena might occur in the real world. Low dose radiation induced bystander effects are of interest since their occurrence in vivo could complicate the shape of the radiation dose-response curve in the low dose range for a number of biological endpoints with subsequent effects on radiation-induced cancer risk. Conversely, radiation-induced abscopal effects implicate biological consequences of radiation exposure outside irradiated volumes, and complicate the notion of effective dose calculations. Achieving a consensus on the boundaries that distinguish the radiobiology phenomena of bystander and abscopal effects will aid progress towards understanding their relevance to in vivo radiation exposures. A proposed framework for discussing bystander effects and abscopal effects in their appropriate context will be outlined, with a discussion on the future investigation of radiation-induced bystander effects. Such frameworks can assist the integration of results from experimental radiobiology to risk evaluation and management practice. This research was funded by the Low Dose Radiation Research Program, BioI. and Environ. Research, US Dept. of Energy, Grant DE

  17. Assessment of age - dependent radiation dose due to intake of uranium and thorium in drinking water from Sikar district, Rajasthan, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concentrations of 238U and 231Th have been determined in drinking water samples collected from the Sikar district of Rajasthan State, India. The samples have been analyzed by using high resolution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR-ICP-MS). The sources of water comprise hand pumps and electric motors. 238U content in water samples ranged from 8.20 to 202.63 μgl-1, and 232Th ranged from 0.57 to 1.46 μg-1. The measured 238U content in 25% of the analyzed samples exceeded the World Health Organization and United States Environmental Protection Agency drinking water guidelines of 30 μg l-1, and 12.5% of the samples exceeded the 60 μg l-1 Indian maximum acceptable concentration recommended by the Atomic Energy Regulatory Board, India. The annual effective doses (μSv y-1) due to ingestion of 238U and 232Th for different age groups were also calculated. The results compared with the recommended value reported by World Health Organization. (author)

  18. TSD-DOSE: A radiological dose assessment model for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfingston, M.; Arnish, J.; LePoire, D.; Chen, S.-Y.

    1998-10-14

    Past practices at US Department of Energy (DOE) field facilities resulted in the presence of trace amounts of radioactive materials in some hazardous chemical wastes shipped from these facilities. In May 1991, the DOE Office of Waste Operations issued a nationwide moratorium on shipping all hazardous waste until procedures could be established to ensure that only nonradioactive hazardous waste would be shipped from DOE facilities to commercial treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. To aid in assessing the potential impacts of shipments of mixed radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes, a radiological assessment computer model (or code) was developed on the basis of detailed assessments of potential radiological exposures and doses for eight commercial hazardous waste TSD facilities. The model, called TSD-DOSE, is designed to incorporate waste-specific and site-specific data to estimate potential radiological doses to on-site workers and the off-site public from waste-handling operations at a TSD facility. The code is intended to provide both DOE and commercial TSD facilities with a rapid and cost-effective method for assessing potential human radiation exposures from the processing of chemical wastes contaminated with trace amounts of radionuclides.

  19. Characteristics of radiation dose rate distribution in living environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural radiation survey has been performed to characterize the gamma and cosmic ray dose rate distribution in living environment. Various places/environments which we encounter in our daily life were measured with high precision dose rate meter equipped with a pulse height spectrum-to-dose rate converter and a 7.6 cm diameter spherical NaI (Tl) scintillation detector. Several aspects of dose rate distribution have been found through these data; typical and interesting examples are as follows. (1) Gamma ray dose rates were measured inside and outside wooden houses in snowy season and in snowless season to see the effect of snow cover to the diminution of terrestrial gamma ray dose rate. The snow cover turned to be less effective inside a house than outside for the diminution of gamma ray dose rate. (2) Gamma ray dose rates were measured in a 2-storied concrete residence during its construction. The dose rate increased with progressing the construction, which implies that the indoor gamma ray dose rate depends not only on the building material but also on the building structure, that is the solid angle to the natural gamma ray sources such as the floor, ceiling and walls. (3) Continuous measurement was performed while a person made a business trip to Tokyo. Both gamma and cosmic ray dose rate showed a marked variation from place to place, which was found to be caused by the change of environmental conditions such as the nature and geometrical arrangement of the surrounding materials. Based on these data it was known that the gamma ray dose rate generally shows upward tendency and the cosmic ray dose rate downward in artificial environment compared with natural environment. (author)

  20. Cellular response to low dose radiation: Role of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balajee, A.S.; Meador, J.A.; Su, Y.

    2011-03-24

    It is increasingly realized that human exposure either to an acute low dose or multiple chronic low doses of low LET radiation has the potential to cause different types of cancer. Therefore, the central theme of research for DOE and NASA is focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms and pathways responsible for the cellular response to low dose radiation which would not only improve the accuracy of estimating health risks but also help in the development of predictive assays for low dose radiation risks associated with tissue degeneration and cancer. The working hypothesis for this proposal is that the cellular mechanisms in terms of DNA damage signaling, repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation are different for low and high doses of low LET radiation and that the mode of action of phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase like kinases (PIKK: ATM, ATR and DNA-PK) determines the dose dependent cellular responses. The hypothesis will be tested at two levels: (I) Evaluation of the role of ATM, ATR and DNA-PK in cellular response to low and high doses of low LET radiation in simple in vitro human cell systems and (II) Determination of radiation responses in complex cell microenvironments such as human EpiDerm tissue constructs. Cellular responses to low and high doses of low LET radiation will be assessed from the view points of DNA damage signaling, DNA double strand break repair and cell cycle checkpoint regulation by analyzing the activities (i.e. post-translational modifications and kinetics of protein-protein interactions) of the key target proteins for PI-3 kinase like kinases both at the intra-cellular and molecular levels. The proteins chosen for this proposal are placed under three categories: (I) sensors/initiators include ATM ser1981, ATR, 53BP1, gamma-H2AX, MDC1, MRE11, Rad50 and Nbs1; (II) signal transducers include Chk1, Chk2, FANCD2 and SMC1; and (III) effectors include p53, CDC25A and CDC25C. The primary goal of this proposal is to elucidate the

  1. Effect of low dose ionizing radiation upon concentration of

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viliae, M.; Kraljeviae, P.; Simpraga, M.; Miljaniae, S.

    2004-07-01

    It is known that low dose ionizing radiation might have stimulating effects (Luckey, 1982, Kraljeviae, 1988). This fact has also been confirmed in the previous papers of Kraljeviae et al. (2000-2000a; 2001). Namely, those authors showed that irradiation of chicken eggs before incubation by a low dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation increases the activity aspartateaminotrasferases (AST) and alanine-aminotransferases (ALT) in blood plasma of chickens hatched from irradiated eggs, as well as growth of chickens during the fattening period. Low doses might also cause changes in the concentration of some biochemical parameters in blood plasma of the same chickens such as changes in the concentration of total proteins, glucose and cholesterol. In this paper, an attempt was made to investigate the effects of low dose gamma radiation upon the concentration of sodium and potassium in the blood plasma of chickens which were hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy. Obtained results were compared with the results from the control group (chickens hatched from nonirradiated eggs). After hatching, all other conditions were the same for both groups. Blood samples were drawn from heart, and later from the wing vein on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, 20, 30 and 42. The concentration of sodium and potassium was determined spectrophotometrically by atomic absorbing spectrophotometer Perkin-Elmer 1100B. The concentration of sodium and potassium in blood plasma of chickens hatched from eggs irradiated on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy indicated a statistically significant increase (P>0.01) only on the first day of the experiment. Obtained results showed that irradiation of eggs on the 19th day of incubation by dose of 0.15 Gy gamma radiation could have effects upon the metabolism of electrolytes in chickens. (Author)

  2. Problems in radiation absorbed dose estimation from positron emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The positron emitters commonly used in clinical imaging studies for the most part are short-lived, so that when they are distributed in the body the radiation absorbed dose is low even though most of the energy absorbed is from the positrons themselves rather than the annihilation radiation. These considerations do not apply to the administration pathway for a radiopharmaceutical where the activity may be highly concentrated for a brief period rather than distributed in the body. Thus, high local radiation absorbed doses to the vein for an intravenous administration and to the upper airways during administration by inhalation can be expected. For these geometries, beta point source functions (FPS's) have been employed to estimate the radiation absorbed dose in the present study. Physiologic measurements were done to determine other exposure parameters for intravenous administration of O-15 and Rb-82 and for administration of O-15-CO2 by continuous breathing. Using FPS's to calculate dose rates to the vein wall from O-15 and Rb-82 injected into a vein having an internal radius of 1.5 mm yielded dose rates of 0.51 and 0.46 (rad x g/μCi x h), respectively. The dose gradient in the vein wall and surrounding tissues was also determined using FPS's. Administration of O-15-CO2 by continuous breathing was also investigated. Using ultra-thin thermoluninescent dosimeters (TLD's) having the effective thickness of normal tracheal mucosa, experiments were performed in which 6 dosimeters were exposed to known concentrations of O-15 positrons in a hemicylindrical tracheal phantom having an internal radius of 0.96 cm and an effective length of 14 cm. The dose rate for these conditions was 3.4 (rads/h)/(μCi/cm3). 15 references, 7 figures, 6 tables

  3. Application of maximum values for radiation exposure and principles for the calculation of radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The guide sets out the mathematical definitions and principles involved in the calculation of the equivalent dose and the effective dose, and the instructions concerning the application of the maximum values of these quantities. further, for monitoring the dose caused by internal radiation, the guide defines the limits derived from annual dose limits (the Annual Limit on Intake and the Derived Air Concentration). Finally, the guide defines the operational quantities to be used in estimating the equivalent dose and the effective dose, and also sets out the definitions of some other quantities and concepts to be used in monitoring radiation exposure. The guide does not include the calculation of patient doses carried out for the purposes of quality assurance.

  4. Cancer risk from low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to estimate cancer risk from small doses of ionizing radiation from various sources, including both external and internal exposure. The types of radiation included alpha, gamma, and neutron radiation. A nationwide follow-up study covering the years up to 1992 revealed no significant association between fallout from the Chernobyl accident and incidence of childhood leukemia. An excess of eight cases or more per year could be excluded. However, some indication of an increase was evident in the most heavily affected areas. Furthermore, the risk estimates were in accordance with those reported from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, although the confidence intervals were wide. (282 refs.)

  5. A consideration of low dose radiation effects on human health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On March 11, 2011, an earthquake categorized as 9 Mw occurred off the northeast coast of Japan. The subsequent destructive tsunami disabled emergency units of Fukushima Dai'ichi Nuclear Power Plant and caused partial meltdown of reactors and explosions. Resulting radiation releases forced large evacuations, bore concerns about food and water and fears against human health. In this manuscript, we described the effect of radiation, especially low dose radiation below 100 mSv, on cancer risk, focusing on fetuses and children. (author)

  6. Cancer risk from low doses of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auvinen, A.

    1997-06-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate cancer risk from small doses of ionizing radiation from various sources, including both external and internal exposure. The types of radiation included alpha, gamma, and neutron radiation. A nationwide follow-up study covering the years up to 1992 revealed no significant association between fallout from the Chernobyl accident and incidence of childhood leukemia. An excess of eight cases or more per year could be excluded. However, some indication of an increase was evident in the most heavily affected areas. Furthermore, the risk estimates were in accordance with those reported from Hiroshima and Nagasaki, although the confidence intervals were wide. (282 refs.).

  7. Doses of radiation in the environment of patients undergoing treatment of ophthalmic brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents results for measures of dose made to different patient undergoing treatment with ophthalmic brachytherapy. The aim of these measures has been, on the one hand, verify assessments relating to radiation protection in the memory of the installation and, on the other hand, experimental measures that can serve to reduce the perception of the radiological risk professionals have. (Author)

  8. Results of the IAEA-CEC coordinated research programme on radiation doses in diagnostic radiology and methods for reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1991, a Coordinated Research Programme on assessment of radiation doses in diagnostic radiology and studying methods for reduction was started in IAEA Member States in cooperation with the CEC Radiation Protection Research Action. It was agreed to carry out a pilot exercise consisting of assessing patients' Entrance Surface Doses, followed by: analysis of the relevant parameters; quality control and corrections, and reassessment of doses where applicable. The results show that dose reduction was achieved without deterioration of the diagnostic information of the images, by applying simple and inexpensive methods. (Author)

  9. Evaluation of radiation doses and dose conversion coefficients for pediatric cardiac catheterization procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pediatric cardiac catheterization covers both diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that range from simple to complex and can subject pediatric patients to varying radiation doses. There is limited information on radiation doses delivered by pediatric cardiac catheterization procedures and there is no recommended reference dose levels established yet. The study aims to determine the variation in patient radiation doses in terms of dose area product values and effective doses; determine factors that contribute to high doses to optimize protection; and determine the effective dose conversion coefficient. It is also aimed to provide data to help in the establishment of reference dose levels. A total of 761 pediatric patients belonging to age groups 0, 1, 5 and 10 years who undergo diagnostic and three selected therapeutic procedures at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia are included in the study. Therapeutic procedures include COA, PDA and pulmonary procedures. Fluoroscopy and cine radiography are used in all procedures. Patient demography (weight, age, gender and height), radiographic technique factors, fluoroscopy and cine time, frame rate, and dose area product values are taken from patients records. Results show that the kVp varies by ± 1 kVp between procedures and by ± 6 kVp between AP and oblique + lateral projection for all procedures. The mA for lateral and oblique is about 40-70% higher than for AP. Effective doses for each procedure are estimated from the DAP values. The mean DAP and effective dose per procedure are analyzed for correlation with patient equivalent cylindrical diameter, weight, fluoroscopy time and number of frames. Initial results show that age group 0 and 1 year old have the highest mean value for effective dose (11.3 and 13.8 mSv respectively) for pulmonary procedure. Pooling all ages for each procedure, the pulmonary and PDA procedures gave the highest mean values for effective dose (10 and 8.2 m

  10. Radiation Dose from Medical Imaging: A Primer for Emergency Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse G.A. Jones, MD

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical imaging now accounts for most of the US population’s exposure to ionizingradiation. A substantial proportion of this medical imaging is ordered in the emergency setting. We aimto provide a general overview of radiation dose from medical imaging with a focus on computedtomography, as well as a literature review of recent efforts to decrease unnecessary radiation exposureto patients in the emergency department setting.Methods: We conducted a literature review through calendar year 2010 for all published articlespertaining to the emergency department and radiation exposure.Results: The benefits of imaging usually outweigh the risks of eventual radiation-induced cancer inmost clinical scenarios encountered by emergency physicians. However, our literature review identified3 specific clinical situations in the general adult population in which the lifetime risks of cancer mayoutweigh the benefits to the patient: rule out pulmonary embolism, flank pain, and recurrent abdominalpain in inflammatory bowel disease. For these specific clinical scenarios, a physician-patientdiscussion about such risks and benefits may be warranted.Conclusion: Emergency physicians, now at the front line of patients’ exposure to ionizing radiation,should have a general understanding of the magnitude of radiation dose from advanced medicalimaging procedures and their associated risks. Future areas of research should include thedevelopment of protocols and guidelines that limit unnecessary patient radiation exposure.

  11. Mechanisms underlying cellular responses of cells from haemopoietic tissue to low dose/low LET radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munira A Kadhim

    2010-03-05

    To accurately define the risks associated with human exposure to relevant environmental doses of low LET ionizing radiation, it is necessary to completely understand the biological effects at very low doses (i.e., less than 0.1 Gy), including the lowest possible dose, that of a single electron track traversal. At such low doses, a range of studies have shown responses in biological systems which are not related to the direct interaction of radiation tracks with DNA. The role of these “non-targeted” responses in critical tissues is poorly understood and little is known regarding the underlying mechanisms. Although critical for dosimetry and risk assessment, the role of individual genetic susceptibility in radiation risk is not satisfactorily defined at present. The aim of the proposed grant is to critically evaluate radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander responses in key stem cell populations from haemopoietic tissue. Using stem cells from two mouse strains (CBA/H and C57BL/6J) known to differ in their susceptibility to radiation effects, we plan to carefully dissect the role of genetic predisposition on two non-targeted radiation responses in these models; the bystander effect and genomic instability, which we believe are closely related. We will specifically focus on the effects of low doses of low LET radiation, down to doses approaching a single electron traversal. Using conventional X-ray and γ-ray sources, novel dish separation and targeted irradiation approaches, we will be able to assess the role of genetic variation under various bystander conditions at doses down to a few electron tracks. Irradiations will be carried out using facilities in routine operation for bystander targeted studies. Mechanistic studies of instability and the bystander response in different cell lineages will focus initially on the role of cytokines which have been shown to be involved in bystander signaling and the initiation of instability. These studies also aim

  12. Use of glasses as radiation detectors for high doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass samples were tested in relation to the possibility of use in high dose dosimetry in medical and industrial areas. The main characteristics were determined: detection threshold, reproducibility, response to gamma radiation of 137Cs and 6 Co and thermal decay at ambient temperature, with the use of optical absorption and thermoluminesce techniques. (author)

  13. Population doses from naturally occurring radiation in Norway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of this work was to study the radiological consequences of the introduction of building materials with high concentrations of radioactivity and to analyse the impact of a reduction of the ventilation rates in houses on the population dose from inhalation of natural airborne radioactivity. The general problems of radioactivity in building materials are discussed. Measurements of radioactivity in building materials from different parts of the country are reported, together with theoretical calculations of the gamma doses in houses. These calculations are compared with experimental results and earlier measurements of the indoor gamma radiation in Norway. Measurements of the outdoor gamma radiation in different parts of Norway are presented. These results are used together with earlier measurements of the gamma radiation inside houses to calculate the average, and variations of population dose from this radiation. An experimental study on the radon concentrations inside different types of dwellings, and a discussion of the respiratory dose received by the inhalation of radon daughters is presented. Some factors that may have influence upon the radon concentrations are also discussed. A method for measurement of radon and thoron daughters in air is discussed. The possible radiological effects of an increased radon concentration in houses are discussed. (Auth.)

  14. Dose loading mathematical modelling of moving through heterogeneous radiation fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Software component for management of data on gamma exposition dose spatial distribution was created in the frameworks of the Ukryttya information model creation. Availability of state-of-the-art programming technologies (NET., ObjectARX) for integration of different models of radiation-hazardous condition to digital engineer documentation system (AutoCAD) was shown on the basis of the component example

  15. On the radiation dose required to cure intracranial germinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibamoto, Yuta [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Inst. for Frontier Medical Sciences

    1999-09-01

    Despite its high radiosensitivity, intracranial germinoma has most often been treated with a radiation dose of 50 Gy. Relatively old literature suggested that 50 Gy was appropriate, but several newer studies indicate that 40-45 Gy may be sufficient. Regarding this issue, we conducted a phase II study in which the total dose to the primary site was planned to be 40 Gy to tumors <2.5 cm in diameter, 45 Gy to 2.5-4 cm tumors, and 50 Gy to tumors >4 cm, using 1.6-1.8 Gy daily fractions. Thirty-eight patients were enrolled. Within a median follow-up period of 116 months, no patients developed local recurrence, and only two developed CSF dissemination. Intracranial germinoma <4 cm in diameter can be cured with radiation doses of 40-45 Gy. Radiotherapy alone with these reduced doses should be compared with the ongoing protocols of chemotherapy plus further reduced dose (24-30 Gy) radiation in future studies. (author)

  16. Individual radiation doses registration, management and information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: One of the important parts of dose monitoring is proper recording of radiation doses and share of information with responsible personal and customers. International organizations stressing the necessity for harmonization of dose record keeping systems and specifying the data they may contain. Constant control on process of dosimeters issue, return, reading, data evaluation and personal dose calculation is essential part of quality system in dosimetry service. Keeping records of dosimeters wearing terms and conditions, damages, and other discharges can help dosimetry service to work with customers more efficiently. Analytical information, including time of analyses, the analyst names and analytical techniques used, analytical results, and quality assurance/quality control of such analyses could be used to improve quality of dosimetry service. The individual radiation doses registration, management and information system is developed and now is under implementation in Latvian Radiation Safety Centre. This system is more than just a computer based data storage system and displays results of all analyses, including laboratory reports and different summary tables or interpretive reports. Each step of dosimeters processing in the dosimetric laboratory is controlled and recorded. Contract and the other customer related information is stored in the system. Database uses standard MS Windows software, which makes it fully compatible with most computers. System is flexible, has friendly interface, possibility for modification of reports according to user requirements. Internet access option implemented in the system simplifies process information delivery to the customers. (author)

  17. Experimental measurement of radiation dose in a dedicated breast CT system

    CERN Document Server

    Shan-Wei, Shen; Hang, Shu; Xiao, Tang; Cun-Feng, Wei; Yu-Shou, Song; Rong-Jian, Shi; Long, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Radiation dose is an important performance indicator of a dedicated breast CT (DBCT). In this paper, the method of putting thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) into a breast shaped PMMA phantom to study the dose distribution in breasts was improved by using smaller TLDs and a new half-ellipsoid PMMA phantom. Then the weighted CT dose index (CTDIw) was introduced to average glandular assessment in DBCT for the first time and two measurement modes were proposed for different sizes of breasts. The dose deviations caused by using cylindrical phantoms were simulated using the Monte Carlo method and a set of correction factors were calculated. The results of the confirmatory measurement with a cylindrical phantom (11cm/8cm) show that CTDIw gives a relatively conservative overestimate of the average glandular dose comparing to the results of Monte Carlo simulation and TLDs measurement. But with better practicability and stability, the CTDIw is suitable for dose evaluations in daily clinical practice. Both of the TLDs ...

  18. Impact of dose calculation algorithm on radiation therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Zhou; Chen; Ying; Xiao; Jun; Li

    2014-01-01

    The quality of radiation therapy depends on the ability to maximize the tumor control probability while minimizing the normal tissue complication probability.Both of these two quantities are directly related to the accuracy of dose distributions calculated by treatment planning systems.The commonly used dose calculation algorithms in the treatment planning systems are reviewed in this work.The accuracy comparisons among these algorithms are illustrated by summarizing the highly cited research papers on this topic.Further,the correlation between the algorithms and tumor control probability/normal tissue complication probability values are manifested by several recent studies from different groups.All the cases demonstrate that dose calculation algorithms play a vital role in radiation therapy.

  19. Vertical distribution of radiation dose rates in the water of a brackish lake in Aomori Prefecture, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seasonal radiation dose rates were measured with glass dosemeters housed in watertight cases at various depths in the water of Lake Obuchi, a brackish lake in Aomori Prefecture, Japan, during fiscal years 2011-2013 to assess the background external radiation dose to aquatic biota in the lake. The mean radiation dose in the surface water of the lake was found to be 27 nGy h-1, which is almost the same as the absorption dose rate due to cosmic ray reported in the literature. Radiation dose rates decreased exponentially with water depth down to a depth of 1 m above the bottom sediment. In the water near the sediment, the dose rate increased with depth owing to the emission of γ-rays from natural radionuclides in the sediment. (authors)

  20. In vitro cell culture lethal dose submitted to gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Carolina S.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Rogero, Jose Roberto [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: carolina_sm@hotmail.com; Ikeda, Tamiko I.; Cruz, Aurea S. [Instituto Adolfo Lutz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro effect of gamma radiation in cell culture of mouse connective tissue exposed to different doses of gamma radiation and under several conditions. The cell viability was analyzed by neutral red uptake methodology. This assay was developed for establish a methodology to be used in the future in the study of resveratrol radioprotection. Resveratrol (3,4',5- trihydroxystilbene), a phenolic phytoalexin that occurs naturally in some spermatophytes, such as grapevines, in response to injury as fungal infections and exposure to ultraviolet light. In the wines this compound is found at high levels and is considered one of the highest antioxidant constituents. The intense antioxidant potential of resveratrol provides many pharmacological activities including cardioprotection, chemoprevention and anti-tumor effects. Our results demonstrated that {sup 60}Co gamma radiation lethal dose (LD50) on NCTC clone 929 cells was about 340Gy. (author)

  1. In vitro cell culture lethal dose submitted to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro effect of gamma radiation in cell culture of mouse connective tissue exposed to different doses of gamma radiation and under several conditions. The cell viability was analyzed by neutral red uptake methodology. This assay was developed for establish a methodology to be used in the future in the study of resveratrol radioprotection. Resveratrol (3,4',5- trihydroxystilbene), a phenolic phytoalexin that occurs naturally in some spermatophytes, such as grapevines, in response to injury as fungal infections and exposure to ultraviolet light. In the wines this compound is found at high levels and is considered one of the highest antioxidant constituents. The intense antioxidant potential of resveratrol provides many pharmacological activities including cardioprotection, chemoprevention and anti-tumor effects. Our results demonstrated that 60Co gamma radiation lethal dose (LD50) on NCTC clone 929 cells was about 340Gy. (author)

  2. PET/CT-guided Interventions: Personnel Radiation Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, E. Ronan, E-mail: ronan@ronanryan.com; Thornton, Raymond; Sofocleous, Constantinos T.; Erinjeri, Joseph P. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States); Hsu, Meier [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics (United States); Quinn, Brian; Dauer, Lawrence T. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics (United States); Solomon, Stephen B. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2013-08-01

    PurposeTo quantify radiation exposure to the primary operator and staff during PET/CT-guided interventional procedures.MethodsIn this prospective study, 12 patients underwent PET/CT-guided interventions over a 6 month period. Radiation exposure was measured for the primary operator, the radiology technologist, and the nurse anesthetist by means of optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters. Radiation exposure was correlated with the procedure time and the use of in-room image guidance (CT fluoroscopy or ultrasound).ResultsThe median effective dose was 0.02 (range 0-0.13) mSv for the primary operator, 0.01 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the nurse anesthetist, and 0.02 (range 0-0.05) mSv for the radiology technologist. The median extremity dose equivalent for the operator was 0.05 (range 0-0.62) mSv. Radiation exposure correlated with procedure duration and with the use of in-room image guidance. The median operator effective dose for the procedure was 0.015 mSv when conventional biopsy mode CT was used, compared to 0.06 mSv for in-room image guidance, although this did not achieve statistical significance as a result of the small sample size (p = 0.06).ConclusionThe operator dose from PET/CT-guided procedures is not significantly different than typical doses from fluoroscopically guided procedures. The major determinant of radiation exposure to the operator from PET/CT-guided interventional procedures is time spent in close proximity to the patient.

  3. Quantitative Proteomic Profiling of Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Effects in a Human Skin Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hengel, Shawna; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Waters, Katrina M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Stenoien, David L.

    2014-07-29

    To assess molecular responses to low doses of radiation that may be encountered during medical diagnostic procedures, nuclear accidents, or terrorist acts, a quantitative global proteomic approach was used to identify protein alterations in a reconstituted human skin tissue treated with 10 cGy of ionizing radiation. Subcellular fractionation was employed to remove highly abundant structural proteins and provide insight on radiation induced alterations in protein abundance and localization. In addition, peptides were post-fractionated using high resolution 2-dimensional liquid chromatography to increase the dynamic range of detection of protein abundance and translocation changes. Quantitative data was obtained by labeling peptides with 8-plex isobaric iTRAQ tags. A total of 207 proteins were detected with statistically significant alterations in abundance and/or subcellular localization compared to sham irradiated tissues. Bioinformatics analysis of the data indicated that the top canonical pathways affected by low dose radiation are related to cellular metabolism. Among the proteins showing alterations in abundance, localization and proteolytic processing was the skin barrier protein filaggrin which is consistent with our previous observation that ionizing radiation alters profilaggrin processing with potential effects on skin barrier functions. In addition, a large number of proteases and protease regulators were affected by low dose radiation exposure indicating that altered proteolytic activity may be a hallmark of low dose radiation exposure. While several studies have demonstrated altered transcriptional regulation occurs following low dose radiation exposures, the data presented here indicates post-transcriptional regulation of protein abundance, localization, and proteolytic processing play an important role in regulating radiation responses in complex human tissues.

  4. The effect of radiation dose on mouse skeletal muscle remodeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of two clinically relevant radiation doses on the susceptibility of mouse skeletal muscle to remodeling. Alterations in muscle morphology and regulatory signaling were examined in tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscles after radiation doses that differed in total biological effective dose (BED). Female C57BL/6 (8-wk) mice were randomly assigned to non-irradiated control, four fractionated doses of 4 Gy (4x4 Gy; BED 37 Gy), or a single 16 Gy dose (16 Gy; BED 100 Gy). Mice were sacrificed 2 weeks after the initial radiation exposure. The 16 Gy, but not 4x4 Gy, decreased total muscle protein and RNA content. Related to muscle regeneration, both 16 Gy and 4x4 Gy increased the incidence of central nuclei containing myofibers, but only 16 Gy increased the extracellular matrix volume. However, only 4x4 Gy increased muscle 4-hydroxynonenal expression. While both 16 Gy and 4x4 Gy decreased IIB myofiber mean cross-sectional area (CSA), only 16 Gy decreased IIA myofiber CSA. 16 Gy increased the incidence of small diameter IIA and IIB myofibers, while 4x4 Gy only increased the incidence of small diameter IIB myofibers. Both treatments decreased the frequency and CSA of low succinate dehydrogenase activity (SDH) fibers. Only 16 Gy increased the incidence of small diameter myofibers having high SDH activity. Neither treatment altered muscle signaling related to protein turnover or oxidative metabolism. Collectively, these results demonstrate that radiation dose differentially affects muscle remodeling, and these effects appear to be related to fiber type and oxidative metabolism

  5. Radiation doses from computed tomography practice in Johor Bahru, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, M. K. A.; Hashim, S.; Bradley, D. A.; Bakar, K. A.; Haron, M. R.; Kayun, Z.

    2016-04-01

    Radiation doses for Computed Tomography (CT) procedures have been reported, encompassing a total of 376 CT examinations conducted in one oncology centre (Hospital Sultan Ismail) and three diagnostic imaging departments (Hospital Sultanah Aminah, Hospital Permai and Hospital Sultan Ismail) at Johor hospital's. In each case, dose evaluations were supported by data from patient questionnaires. Each CT examination and radiation doses were verified using the CT EXPO (Ver. 2.3.1, Germany) simulation software. Results are presented in terms of the weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw), dose length product (DLP) and effective dose (E). The mean values of CTDIw, DLP and E were ranged between 7.6±0.1 to 64.8±16.5 mGy, 170.2±79.2 to 943.3±202.3 mGy cm and 1.6±0.7 to 11.2±6.5 mSv, respectively. Optimization techniques in CT are suggested to remain necessary, with well-trained radiology personnel remaining at the forefront of such efforts.

  6. Offsite radiation doses summarized from Hanford environmental monitoring reports for the years 1957-1984. [Contains glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soldat, J.K.; Price, K.R.; McCormack, W.D.

    1986-02-01

    Since 1957, evaluations of offsite impacts from each year of operation have been summarized in publicly available, annual environmental reports. These evaluations included estimates of potential radiation exposure to members of the public, either in terms of percentages of the then permissible limits or in terms of radiation dose. The estimated potential radiation doses to maximally exposed individuals from each year of Hanford operations are summarized in a series of tables and figures. The applicable standard for radiation dose to an individual for whom the maximum exposure was estimated is also shown. Although the estimates address potential radiation doses to the public from each year of operations at Hanford between 1957 and 1984, their sum will not produce an accurate estimate of doses accumulated over this time period. The estimates were the best evaluations available at the time to assess potential dose from the current year of operation as well as from any radionuclides still present in the environment from previous years of operation. There was a constant striving for improved evaluation of the potential radiation doses received by members of the public, and as a result the methods and assumptions used to estimate doses were periodically modified to add new pathways of exposure and to increase the accuracy of the dose calculations. Three conclusions were reached from this review: radiation doses reported for the years 1957 through 1984 for the maximum individual did not exceed the applicable dose standards; radiation doses reported over the past 27 years are not additive because of the changing and inconsistent methods used; and results from environmental monitoring and the associated dose calculations reported over the 27 years from 1957 through 1984 do not suggest a significant dose contribution from the buildup in the environment of radioactive materials associated with Hanford operations.

  7. Digital radiography of scoliosis with a scanning method: radiation dose optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geijer, Haakan; Andersson, Torbjoern [Department of Radiology, Oerebro University Hospital, 701 85 Oerebro (Sweden); Verdonck, Bert [Philips Medical Systems, P.O. Box 10,000, 5680 Best (Netherlands); Beckman, Karl-Wilhelm; Persliden, Jan [Department of Medical Physics, Oerebro University Hospital, 701 85 Oerebro (Sweden)

    2003-03-01

    The aim of this study was optimization of the radiation dose-image quality relationship for a digital scanning method of scoliosis radiography. The examination is performed as a digital multi-image translation scan that is reconstructed to a single image in a workstation. Entrance dose was recorded with thermoluminescent dosimeters placed dorsally on an Alderson phantom. At the same time, kerma area product (KAP) values were recorded. A Monte Carlo calculation of effective dose was also made. Image quality was evaluated with a contrast-detail phantom and Visual Grading. The radiation dose was reduced by lowering the image intensifier entrance dose request, adjusting pulse frequency and scan speed, and by raising tube voltage. The calculated effective dose was reduced from 0.15 to 0.05 mSv with reduction of KAP from 1.07 to 0.25 Gy cm{sup 2} and entrance dose from 0.90 to 0.21 mGy. The image quality was reduced with the Image Quality Figure going from 52 to 62 and a corresponding reduction in image quality as assessed with Visual Grading. The optimization resulted in a dose reduction to 31% of the original effective dose with an acceptable reduction in image quality considering the intended use of the images for angle measurements. (orig.)

  8. Complexity analysis of the UV radiation dose time series

    CERN Document Server

    Mihailovic, Dragutin T

    2013-01-01

    We have used the Lempel-Ziv and sample entropy measures to assess the complexity in the UV radiation activity in the Vojvodina region (Serbia) for the period 1990-2007. In particular, we have examined the reconstructed daily sum (dose) of the UV-B time series from seven representative places in this region and calculated the Lempel-Ziv Complexity (LZC) and Sample Entropy (SE) values for each time series. The results indicate that the LZC values in some places are close to each other while in others they differ. We have devided the period 1990-2007 into two subintervals: (a) 1990-1998 and (b) 1999-2007 and calculated LZC and SE values for the various time series in these subintervals. It is found that during the period 1999-2007, there is a decrease in their complexities, and corresponding changes in the SE, in comparison to the period 1990-1998. This complexity loss may be attributed to increased (i) human intervention in the post civil war period (land and crop use and urbanization) and military activities i...

  9. Contribution of maternal radionuclide burdens to prenatal radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes approaches to calculating and expressing radiation doses to the embryo/fetus from internal radionuclides. Information was obtained for selected, occupationally significant radioelements that provide a spectrum of metabolic and dosimetric characteristics. Evaluations are also presented for inhaled inert gases and for selected radiopharmaceuticals. Fractional placental transfer and/or ratios of concentration in the embryo/fetus to that in the woman were calculated for these materials. The ratios were integrated with data from biokinetic transfer models to estimate radioactivity levels in the embryo/fetus as a function of stage of pregnancy and time after entry into the transfer compartment or blood of the pregnant woman. These results are given as tables of deposition and retention in the embryo/fetus as a function of gestational age at exposure and elapsed time following exposure. Methodologies described by MIRD were extended to formalize and describe details for calculating radiation absorbed doses to the embryo/fetus. Calculations were performed using a model situation that assumed a single injection of 1 μCi into a woman's blood; independent calculations were performed for administration at successive months of pregnancy. Gestational -stage-dependent dosimetric tabulations are given together with tables of correlations and relationships. Generalized surrogate dose factors and categorizations are provided in the report to provide for use in operational radiological protection situations. These approaches to calculation yield radiation absorbed doses that can be converted to dose equivalent by multiplication by quality factor. Dose equivalent is the most common quantity for stating prenatal dose limits in the United States and is appropriate for the types of effect that are usually associated with prenatal exposure. If it is desired to obtain alternatives for other purposes, this value can be multiplied by appropriate weighting factors

  10. Contribution of maternal radionuclide burdens to prenatal radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikov, M.R.; Hui, T.E.

    1996-05-01

    This report describes approaches to calculating and expressing radiation doses to the embryo/fetus from internal radionuclides. Information was obtained for selected, occupationally significant radioelements that provide a spectrum of metabolic and dosimetric characteristics. Evaluations are also presented for inhaled inert gases and for selected radiopharmaceuticals. Fractional placental transfer and/or ratios of concentration in the embryo/fetus to that in the woman were calculated for these materials. The ratios were integrated with data from biokinetic transfer models to estimate radioactivity levels in the embryo/fetus as a function of stage of pregnancy and time after entry into the transfer compartment or blood of the pregnant woman. These results are given as tables of deposition and retention in the embryo/fetus as a function of gestational age at exposure and elapsed time following exposure. Methodologies described by MIRD were extended to formalize and describe details for calculating radiation absorbed doses to the embryo/fetus. Calculations were performed using a model situation that assumed a single injection of 1 {mu}Ci into a woman`s blood; independent calculations were performed for administration at successive months of pregnancy. Gestational -stage-dependent dosimetric tabulations are given together with tables of correlations and relationships. Generalized surrogate dose factors and categorizations are provided in the report to provide for use in operational radiological protection situations. These approaches to calculation yield radiation absorbed doses that can be converted to dose equivalent by multiplication by quality factor. Dose equivalent is the most common quantity for stating prenatal dose limits in the United States and is appropriate for the types of effect that are usually associated with prenatal exposure. If it is desired to obtain alternatives for other purposes, this value can be multiplied by appropriate weighting factors.

  11. Radiation Dose Estimation for Pediatric Patients Undergoing Cardiac Catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chu

    Patients undergoing cardiac catheterization are potentially at risk of radiation-induced health effects from the interventional fluoroscopic X-ray imaging used throughout the clinical procedure. The amount of radiation exposure is highly dependent on the complexity of the procedure and the level of optimization in imaging parameters applied by the clinician. For cardiac catheterization, patient radiation dosimetry, for key organs as well as whole-body effective, is challenging due to the lack of fixed imaging protocols, unlike other common X-ray based imaging modalities. Pediatric patients are at a greater risk compared to adults due to their greater cellular radio-sensitivities as well as longer remaining life-expectancy following the radiation exposure. In terms of radiation dosimetry, they are often more challenging due to greater variation in body size, which often triggers a wider range of imaging parameters in modern imaging systems with automatic dose rate modulation. The overall objective of this dissertation was to develop a comprehensive method of radiation dose estimation for pediatric patients undergoing cardiac catheterization. In this dissertation, the research is divided into two main parts: the Physics Component and the Clinical Component. A proof-of-principle study focused on two patient age groups (Newborn and Five-year-old), one popular biplane imaging system, and the clinical practice of two pediatric cardiologists at one large academic medical center. The Physics Component includes experiments relevant to the physical measurement of patient organ dose using high-sensitivity MOSFET dosimeters placed in anthropomorphic pediatric phantoms. First, the three-dimensional angular dependence of MOSFET detectors in scatter medium under fluoroscopic irradiation was characterized. A custom-made spherical scatter phantom was used to measure response variations in three-dimensional angular orientations. The results were to be used as angular dependence

  12. Effects of radiation types and dose rates on selected cable-insulating materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanisch, F.; Maier, P.; Okada, S.; Schönbacher, H.

    A series of radiation tests have been carried out on halogen-free cable-insulating and cable-sheathing materials comprising commercial LDPE, EPR, EVA and SIR compounds. samples were irradiated at five different radiation sources, e.g. a nuclear reactor, fuel elements, a 60Co source, and in the stray radiation field of high-energy proton and electron accelerators at CERN and DESY. The integrated doses were within 50-5000 kGy and the dose rates within 10 mGy/s-70 Gy/s. Tensile tests and gel-fraction measurements were carried out. The results confirm that LDPEs are very sensitive to long-term ageing effects, and that important errors exceeding an order of magnitude can be made when assessing radiation damage by accelerated tests. On the other hand, well-stabilized LDPEs and the cross-linked rubber compounds do not show large dose-rate effects for the values given above. Furthermore, the interpretation of the elongation-at-break data and their relation to gel-fraction measurements show that radiation damage is related to the total absorbed dose irrespective of the different radiation types used in this experiment.

  13. The radiation dose to accompanying nurses, relatives and other patients in a nuclear medicine department waiting room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation dose to accompanying nurses, relatives and other patients in a nuclear medicine department waiting room was assessed at 5 min intervals by observing the seating arrangement. The total radiation dose to each person was calculated, using fixed values of dose rate per 100 MBq activity for radionuclides, and applying the inverse square law. Radioactive decay and attenuation effects due to intervening persons were also taken into account. The median radiation doses to accompanying nurses, relatives and other patients were 2.3, 2.0 and 0.2 μSv with maximum values of 17, 33 and 5 μSv respectively. In all cases, the radiation dose received by patients was less than 0.2% of the radiation dose resulting from their own investigation. Also, the maximum radiation dose received by an accompanying norse or friend was less than 1% of their appropriate annual dose limit. Similar values were obtained with calculations based on a 15 min time interval. The radiation doses received by those in a nuclear medicine department waiting room are small, and separate waiting room facilities for radioactive patients are unnecessary. (author)

  14. Effects of low dose gamma radiation on the early growth of red pepper and the resistance to subsquent high dose of radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. S.; Baek, M. H.; Kim, D. H.; Lee, Y. K. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Y. B. [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-05-01

    Red pepper (capsicum annuum L. cv. Jokwang and cv. Johong) seeds were irradiated with the dose of 0{approx}50 Gy to investigated the effect of the low dose gamma radiation on the early growth and resistance to subsequent high dose of radiation. The effect of the low dose gamma radiation on the early growth and resistance to subsequenct high dose of radiation were enhanced in Johong cultivar but not in Jokwang cultivar. Germination rate and early growth of Johong cultivar were noticeably increased at 4 Gy-, 8 Gy- and 20 Gy irradiation group. Resistance to subsequent high dose of radiation of Johong cultivar were increased at almost all of the low dose irradiation group. Especially it was highest at 4 Gy irradiation group. The carotenoid contents and enzyme activity on the resistance to subsequent high dose of radiation of Johong cultivar were increased at the 4 Gy and 8 Gy irradiation group.

  15. Assessment of out-of-field absorbed dose and equivalent dose in proton fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clasie, Ben; Wroe, Andrew; Kooy, Hanne; Depauw, Nicolas; Flanz, Jay; Paganetti, Harald; Rosenfeld, Anatoly [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California 92354 (United States) and Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, 2522 (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, 2522 (Australia)

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: In proton therapy, as in other forms of radiation therapy, scattered and secondary particles produce undesired dose outside the target volume that may increase the risk of radiation-induced secondary cancer and interact with electronic devices in the treatment room. The authors implement a Monte Carlo model of this dose deposited outside passively scattered fields and compare it to measurements, determine the out-of-field equivalent dose, and estimate the change in the dose if the same target volumes were treated with an active beam scanning technique. Methods: Measurements are done with a thimble ionization chamber and the Wellhofer MatriXX detector inside a Lucite phantom with field configurations based on the treatment of prostate cancer and medulloblastoma. The authors use a GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation, demonstrated to agree well with measurements inside the primary field, to simulate fields delivered in the measurements. The partial contributions to the dose are separated in the simulation by particle type and origin. Results: The agreement between experiment and simulation in the out-of-field absorbed dose is within 30% at 10-20 cm from the field edge and 90% of the data agrees within 2 standard deviations. In passive scattering, the neutron contribution to the total dose dominates in the region downstream of the Bragg peak (65%-80% due to internally produced neutrons) and inside the phantom at distances more than 10-15 cm from the field edge. The equivalent doses using 10 for the neutron weighting factor at the entrance to the phantom and at 20 cm from the field edge are 2.2 and 2.6 mSv/Gy for the prostate cancer and cranial medulloblastoma fields, respectively. The equivalent dose at 15-20 cm from the field edge decreases with depth in passive scattering and increases with depth in active scanning. Therefore, active scanning has smaller out-of-field equivalent dose by factors of 30-45 in the entrance region and this factor decreases with depth

  16. Radiation doses to staff on a department of nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of data concerning radiation protection of staff working in the Nuclear Medicine Department and associated sections of the Physics Department at the Royal Marsden Hospital (Surrey Branch) is given for the period 1972 to 1975 inclusive. Results of routine film monitoring and whole-body counting are presented. Additional film monitors were used to check working areas, finger doses and any discrepancies between doses to the upper and lower trunk of personnel. In general, exposure to staff in the Nuclear Medicine Department is below 220 mrad per person per year, and below 1,000 mrad per person per year in the Radioisotope Dispensary. The dose received by radiographers is primarily due to spending time close to patients. Since about 5,000 intravenous injections of radionuclides are given each year in this department, the resulting finger doses to the staff involved may give rise to concern unless the task is shared. (author)

  17. Computed tomography to diagnose coronary artery disease: A reduction in radiation dose increases applicability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To assess the effects of dose-saving algorithms on the radiation dose in an established computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) clinical service. Materials and methods: A 3 year retrospective analysis of all patients attending for a clinically indicated CTCA was performed. The effective dose was calculated using a cardiac-specific conversion factor [0.028 mSv(mGy·cm)−1]. Patients were stratified by the advent of new scanning technology and dose-saving protocols. Results: Between September 2007 and August 2010, 1736 examinations were performed. In the first 6 months, 150 examinations were performed with a mean effective dose of 29.6 mSv (99% CI 26.6–33 mSv). In March 2008 prospective electrocardiogram (ECG) gating was installed; reducing the effective dose to 13.6 mSv (99% CI 12.5–14.9 mSv). In March 2009, the scanner parameters were set to a minimal exposure time and 100 kV in patients with a body mass index (BMI) of <30. This reduced the mean dose to 7.4 mSv (99% CI 6.8–8 mSv). For the final six months the mean radiation dose for a cardiac scan was 5.9 mSv (99% CI 5.4–6.5 mSv) this figure incorporates all examinations performed irrespective of the protocol used. Conclusion: With the implementation of evidence-based protocols, the effective dose from cardiac CT has significantly reduced. As CTCA services develop dose-saving algorithms should be adopted to keep the radiation dose as low as reasonably practical

  18. Low doses effects and gamma radiations low dose rates; Les effets des faibles doses et des faibles debits de doses de rayons gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Averbeck, D. [Institut Curie, CNRS UMR 2027, 75 - Paris (France)

    1999-07-01

    This expose wishes for bringing some definitions and base facts relative to the problematics of low doses effects and low dose rates effects. It shows some already used methods and some actual experimental approaches by focusing on the effects of ionizing radiations with a low linear energy transfer. (N.C.)

  19. Multi-Level Effects of Low Dose Rate Ionizing Radiation on Southern Toad, Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Stark

    Full Text Available Despite their potential vulnerability to contaminants from exposure at multiple life stages, amphibians are one of the least studied groups of vertebrates in ecotoxicology, and research on radiation effects in amphibians is scarce. We used multiple endpoints to assess the radiosensitivity of the southern toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris during its pre-terrestrial stages of development -embryonic, larval, and metamorphic. Toads were exposed, from several hours after oviposition through metamorphosis (up to 77 days later, to four low dose rates of 137Cs at 0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d-1, resulting in total doses up to 15.8 Gy. Radiation treatments did not affect hatching success of embryos, larval survival, or the length of the larval period. The individual family variation in hatching success of embryos was larger than the radiation response. In contrast, newly metamorphosed individuals from the higher dose-rate treatments had higher mass and mass/length body indices, a measure which may relate to higher post-metamorphic survival. The increased mass and index at higher dose rates may indicate that the chronic, low dose rate radiation exposures triggered secondary responses. Additionally, the increases in growth were linked to a decrease in DNA damage (as measured by the Comet Assay in red blood cells at a dose rate of 21 mGy d-1 and a total dose of 1.1 Gy. In conclusion, the complex effects of low dose rates of ionizing radiation may trigger growth and cellular repair mechanisms in amphibian larvae.

  20. Multi-level effects of low dose rate ionizing radiation on southern toad, Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite their potential vulnerability to contaminants from exposure at multiple life stages, amphibians are one of the least studied groups of vertebrates in ecotoxicology, and research on radiation effects in amphibians is scarce. We used multiple endpoints to assess the radiosensitivity of the southern toad (Anaxyrus [Bufo] terrestris) during its pre-terrestrial stages of development -embryonic, larval, and metamorphic. Toads were exposed, from several hours after oviposition through metamorphosis (up to 77 days later), to four low dose rates of 137Cs at 0.13, 2.4, 21, and 222 mGy d-1, resulting in total doses up to 15.8 Gy. Radiation treatments did not affect hatching success of embryos, larval survival, or the length of the larval period. The individual family variation in hatching success of embryos was larger than the radiation response. In contrast, newly metamorphosed individuals from the higher dose-rate treatments had higher mass and mass/length body indices, a measure which may relate to higher post-metamorphic survival. The increased mass and index at higher dose rates may indicate that the chronic, low dose rate radiation exposures triggered secondary responses. Additionally, the increases in growth were linked to a decrease in DNA damage (as measured by the Comet Assay) in red blood cells at a dose rate of 21mGy d-1 and a total dose of 1.1 Gy. In conclusion, the complex effects of low dose rates of ionizing radiation may trigger growth and cellular repair mechanisms in amphibian larvae

  1. Radiation doses and correlated late effects in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patient irradiation in diagnostic radiology was estimated from measurements of absorbed doses in different organs, assessment of the energy imparted and retrospective calculations based on literature data. Possible late biological effects, with special aspects on children, were surveyed. The dose to the lens of the eye and the possibility of shielding in carotid angiography was studied as was the absorbed dose to the thyroid gland at cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography in children. Calculations of the mean bone marrow dose and gonad doses were performed in children with chronic skeletal disease revealing large contributions from examinations of organs other than the skeleton. The dose distribution in the breast in mammography was investigated. Comparison of the energy imparted in common roentgen examinations in 1960 and 1975 showed an unexpected low decrease in spite of technical improvements. Reasons for the failing decrease are discussed. The energy imparted to children in urological examinations was reduced significantly due to introduction of high sensitivity screens and omission of dose demanding projections. Contributions to the possible late effects were estimated on the basis of the organ doses assessed. (author)

  2. Assessment of dose during an SGTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission requires utilities to determine the response of a pressurized water reactor to a steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) as part of the safety analysis for the plant. The SGTR analysis includes assumptions regarding the iodine concentration in the reactor coolant system (RCS) due to iodine spikes, primary flashing and bypass fractions, and iodine partitioning in the secondary coolant system (SCS). Experimental and analytical investigations have recently been completed wherein these assumptions were tested to determine whether and to what degree they were conservative (that is, whether they result in a calculated iodine source term/dose that is at least as large or larger than that expected during an actual event). The current study has the objective to assess the overall effects of the results of these investigations on the calculated iodine dose to the environment during an SGTR. To assist in this study, a computer program, DOSE, was written. This program uses a simple, non-mechanistic model to calculate the iodine source term to the environment during an SGTR as a function of water mass inventories and flow rates and iodine concentrations in the RCS and SCS. The principal conclusion of this study is that the iodine concentration in the RCS is the dominant parameter, due to the dominance of primary flashing on the iodine source term

  3. Evaluation of the effective dose in an anthropomorphic phantom in radiation emergencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims to perform a modeling of the human anatomy using Voxel models applied to Monte Carlo code and the Visual Monte Carlo software, simulating irradiation of the human body, so you can make the dose assessment in individuals who have been exposed to any external ionizing radiation source. Making the future, an assessment of both results with limits of validity of TECDOC-1162 expressions of the IAEA in case of point source

  4. Radiation doses to children during modified barium swallow studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are minimal data on radiation doses to infants and children undergoing a modified barium swallow (MBS) study. To document screening times, dose area product (DAP) and effective doses to children undergoing MBS and to determine factors associated with increased screening times and effective dose. Fluoroscopic data (screening time, DAP, kVp) for 90 consecutive MBS studies using pulse fluoroscopy were prospectively recorded; effective dose was calculated and data were analyzed for effects of behavior, number of swallow presentations, swallowing dysfunction and medical problems. Mean effective dose for the entire group was 0.0826 ± 0.0544 mSv, screening time 2.48 ± 0.81 min, and DAP 28.79 ± 41.72 cGy cm2. Significant differences were found across three age groups (≤1.0, >1.0-3.0 and >3.0 years) for effective dose (mean 0.1188, 0.0651 and 0.0529 mSv, respectively; P < 0.001), but not for screening time or DAP. Effective dose was correlated with screening time (P 0.007), DAP (P < 0.001), number of swallow presentations (P = 0.007), lower age (P = 0.017), female gender (P = 0.004), and height (P < 0.001). Screening time was correlated with total number of swallow presentations (P < 0.001) and DAP (P < 0.001). Screening times, DAP, effective dose, and child and procedural factors associated with higher effective doses are presented for children undergoing MBS studies. (orig.)

  5. Radiation doses to children during modified barium swallow studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, Kelly A. [University of Queensland, Discipline of Paediatrics and Child Health, School of Medicine, Herston, Queensland (Australia); McMahon, Sandra M. [SpeechNet Speech Pathology Services, Brisbane (Australia); Long, Gillian; Bunch, Judith A. [Royal Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Herston (Australia); Pandeya, Nirmala [Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Herston (Australia); Coakley, Kerry S. [Biomedical Technology Services, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Herston (Australia); Chang, Anne B. [Royal Children' s Hospital, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Herston (Australia)

    2007-03-15

    There are minimal data on radiation doses to infants and children undergoing a modified barium swallow (MBS) study. To document screening times, dose area product (DAP) and effective doses to children undergoing MBS and to determine factors associated with increased screening times and effective dose. Fluoroscopic data (screening time, DAP, kVp) for 90 consecutive MBS studies using pulse fluoroscopy were prospectively recorded; effective dose was calculated and data were analyzed for effects of behavior, number of swallow presentations, swallowing dysfunction and medical problems. Mean effective dose for the entire group was 0.0826 {+-} 0.0544 mSv, screening time 2.48 {+-} 0.81 min, and DAP 28.79 {+-} 41.72 cGy cm{sup 2}. Significant differences were found across three age groups ({<=}1.0, >1.0-3.0 and >3.0 years) for effective dose (mean 0.1188, 0.0651 and 0.0529 mSv, respectively; P < 0.001), but not for screening time or DAP. Effective dose was correlated with screening time (P = 0.007), DAP (P < 0.001), number of swallow presentations (P = 0.007), lower age (P = 0.017), female gender (P = 0.004), and height (P < 0.001). Screening time was correlated with total number of swallow presentations (P < 0.001) and DAP (P < 0.001). Screening times, DAP, effective dose, and child and procedural factors associated with higher effective doses are presented for children undergoing MBS studies. (orig.)

  6. Assessment of radiation safety in well logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation safety assessments required by current regulations are a means to verify compliance with the requirements. Different methods have been used for this purpose. In the paper the results of applying the method of risk matrices, applied for the first time in the practice of well logging are exposed. For each initiating event frequency of occurrence, the severity of its consequences and the probability of failure of the barriers identified were evaluated. Starting from these assumptions, the risk associated is determined for each of the identified accident sequences, using for this the SEVRRA code 'Risk Assessment System', originally designed for use in radiotherapy. As an result sequences increased risk associated with the practice of well logging were identified, which is the starting point for the further implementation of a coherent program of dose optimization in practice.

  7. Radiation doses from Hanford site releases to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation doses to individuals were estimated for the years 1944-1992. The dose estimates were based on the radioactive-releases from the Hanford Site in south central Washington. Conceptual models and computer codes were used to reconstruct doses through the early 1970s. The published Hanford Site annual environmental data were used to complete the does history through 1992. The most significant exposure pathway was found to be the consumption of cow's milk containing iodine-131. For the atmospheric pathway, median cumulative dose estimates to the thyroid of children ranged from < 0.1 to 235 rad throughout the area studied. The geographic distribution of the dose levels was directly related to the pattern of iodine-131 deposition and was affected by the distribution of commercial milk and leafy vegetables. For the atmospheric pathway, the-highest estimated cumulative-effective-dose-equivalent (EDE) to an adult was estimated to be 1 rem at Ringold, Washington for the period 1944-1992. For the Columbia River pathway, cumulative EDE estimates ranged from <0.5 to l.5 rem cumulative dose to maximally exposed adults downriver from the Hanford Site for the years 1944-1992. The most significant river exposure pathway was consumption of resident fish containing phosphorus-32 and zinc-65

  8. Spine stereotactic body radiation therapy plans: Achieving dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report our experience of establishing planning objectives to achieve dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff for spine stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) plans. Patients with spine lesions were treated using SBRT in our institution since September 2009. Since September 2011, we established the following planning objectives for our SBRT spine plans in addition to the cord dose constraints: (1) dose coverage—prescription dose (PD) to cover at least 95% planning target volume (PTV) and 90% PD to cover at least 99% PTV; (2) conformity index (CI)—ratio of prescription isodose volume (PIV) to the PTV < 1.2; (3) dose falloff—ratio of 50% PIV to the PTV (R50%); (4) and maximum dose in percentage of PD at 2 cm from PTV in any direction (D2cm) to follow Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0915. We have retrospectively reviewed 66 separate spine lesions treated between September 2009 and December 2012 (31 treated before September 2011 [group 1] and 35 treated after [group 2]). The χ2 test was used to examine the difference in parameters between groups. The PTV V100% PD ≥ 95% objective was met in 29.0% of group 1 vs 91.4% of group 2 (p < 0.01) plans. The PTV V90% PD ≥ 99% objective was met in 38.7% of group 1 vs 88.6% of group 2 (p < 0.01) plans. Overall, 4 plans in group 1 had CI > 1.2 vs none in group 2 (p = 0.04). For D2cm, 48.3% plans yielded a minor violation of the objectives and 16.1% a major violation for group 1, whereas 17.1% exhibited a minor violation and 2.9% a major violation for group 2 (p < 0.01). Spine SBRT plans can be improved on dose coverage, conformity, and dose falloff employing a combination of RTOG spine and lung SBRT protocol planning objectives

  9. Strategies to reduce radiation dose in cardiac PET/CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tung Hsin; Wu, Nien-Yun; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Wu, Jay; S. P. Mok, Greta; Yang, Ching-Ching; Huang, Tzung-Chi

    2011-08-01

    Our aim was to investigate CT dose reduction strategies on a hybrid PET/CT scanner for cardiac applications.MaterialsImage quality and dose estimation of different CT scanning protocols for CT coronary angiography (CTCA), and CT-based attenuation correction for PET imaging were investigated. Fifteen patients underwent CTCA, perfusion PET imaging at rest and under stress, and FDG PET for myocardial viability. These patients were divided into three groups based on the CTCA technique performed: retrospectively gated helical (RGH), ECG tube current modulation (ETCM), and prospective gated axial (PGA) acquisitions. All emission images were corrected for photon attenuation using CT images obtained by default setting and an ultra-low dose CT (ULDCT) scan.ResultsRadiation dose in RGH technique was 22.2±4.0 mSv. It was reduced to 10.95±0.82 and 4.13±0.31 mSv using ETCM and PGA techniques, respectively. Radiation dose in CT transmission scan was reduced by 96.5% (from 4.53±0.5 to 0.16±0.01 mSv) when applying ULDCT as compared to the default CT. No significant difference in terms of image quality was found among various protocols.ConclusionThe proposed CT scanning strategies, i.e. ETCM or PGA for CTCA and ULDCT for PET attenuation correction, could reduce radiation dose up to 47% without degrading imaging quality in an integrated cardiac PET/CT coronary artery examination.

  10. Radiation doses from medical diagnostic procedures in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document sets out to record and analyze the doses incurred in Canada from medical procedures involving the use of ionizing radiation in a typical year. Excluded are those doses incurred during therapeutic irradiation, since they differ in scale to such a large degree and because they are used almost exclusively in treating cancer. In this we are following a precedent set by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Ionizing Radiation. Although the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) notes that dose limits should not be applied to medical exposures, it also observes that doses in different settings for the same procedure may vary by as much as two orders of magnitude, and that there are considerable opportunities for dose reductions in diagnostic radiology. Because these data do not stand in isolation the report also encompasses a review of the relevant literature and some background comment on the evolving technology of the radiological sciences. Because there is a somewhat incomplete perception of the changes taking place in diagnostic methods we have also provided some introductory explanations of the relevant technologies. In addition, there is an analysis of at least some of the limitations on the completeness of the data which are reported here. (author)

  11. Optimization of radiation protection exemplified by job-related doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For recurrent work on nuclear steam generators it is demonstrated, what factors have dominated the radiation exposures in nuclear power plants and how dose increasing effects were counteracted. As primary influencing factors, besides the dose rate in the working place, the extent of inspections and the occurrence of defects at steam generator tubes can be shown. The evaluated radiation level is characteristic for all work at the primary circuit. Possibilities for reducing the dose rate have been recognized and realized rather early (coolant chemistry). An increasing extent of inspection as dose influencing parameter can be noticed especially for the ultrasonic/surface inspection of the steam generators. A solution was sought and found in the reduction of preparation work and in automatisation. Defects by corrosion at the steam generator tubes are presumably the strongest influencing factor. Counter-measures were here especially the change of the tube material, improvement of methods for repairs and inspections as well as constructive changes at new steam generators. All works have in common a dose reduction by increasing experience and training, what can be clearly shown especially for the eddy current test of tubes. (orig./HP)

  12. Low dose radiation enhances the Locomotor activity of D. melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Ki Moon; Lee, Buyng Sub; Nam Seon Young; Kim, Ji Young; Yang, Kwang Hee; Choi, Tae In; Kim, Cha Soon [Radiation Effect Research Team, Radiation Health Research Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd., Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    Mild stresses at low level including radiation can induce the beneficial effects in many vertebrate and invertebrate species. However, a large amount of studies in radiation biology have focused on the detrimental effects of high dose radiation (HDR) such as the increased incidence of cancers and developmental diseases. Low dose radiation (LDR) induces biologically favorable effects in diverse fields, for example, cancer development, genomic instability, immune response, and longevity. Our previous data indicated that LDR promotes cells proliferation of which degree is not much but significant, and microarray data explained that LDR irradiated fruit flies showing the augmented immunity significantly changed the program for gene expression of many genes in Gene Ontology (GO) categories related to metabolic process. Metabolic process in development one of major contributors in organism growth, interbreeding, motility, and aging. Therefore, it is valuable to examine whether LDR change the physiological parameters related to metabolism, and how LDR regulates the metabolism in D. melanogaster. In this study, to investigate that LDR influences change of the metabolism, a representative parameter, locomotor activity. In addition, the activation of several cellular signal molecules was determined to investigate the specific molecular mechanism of LDR effects on the metabolism. We explored whether ionizing radiation affects the motility activity. We performed the RING assays to evaluate the locomotor activity, a representative parameter presenting motility of fruit flies. HDR dramatically decreased the motor activity of irradiated flies. Surprisingly, the irradiated flies at low dose radiation in both acute and chronic showed the significantly increased locomotor activity, compared to non-irradiated flies. Irradiation would induce change of the several signal pathways for flies to respond to it. The activation of some proteins involved in the cells proliferation and stress

  13. Radiological assessment of worker doses during sludge mobilization and removal at the Melton Valley storage tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, G.D.; Coleman, R.L.; Kocher, D.C.; Wynn, C.C.

    1996-12-17

    This report presents an assessment of potential radiation doses to workers during mobilization and removal of contaminated sludges from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The assessment is based on (1) measurements of radionuclide concentrations in sludge and supernatant liquid samples from the waste storage tanks, (2) measurements of gamma radiation levels in various areas that will be accessed by workers during normal activities, (3) calculations of gamma radiation levels for particular exposure situations, especially when the available measurements are not applicable, and (4) assumed scenarios for worker activities in radiation areas. Only doses from external exposure are estimated in this assessment. Doses from internal exposure are assumed to be controlled by containment of radioactive materials or respiratory protection of workers and are not estimated.

  14. Radiation leakage dose from Elekta electron collimation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitcher, Garrett M; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Carver, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    This study provided baseline data required for a greater project, whose objective was to design a new Elekta electron collimation system having significantly lighter electron applicators with equally low out-of field leakage dose. Specifically, off-axis dose profiles for the electron collimation system of our uniquely configured Elekta Infinity accelerator with the MLCi2 treatment head were measured and calculated for two primary purposes: 1) to evaluate and document the out-of-field leakage dose in the patient plane and 2) to validate the dose distributions calculated using a BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC) model for out-of-field dose profiles. Off-axis dose profiles were measured in a water phantom at 100 cm SSD for 1 and 2 cm depths along the in-plane, cross-plane, and both diagonal axes using a cylindrical ionization chamber with the 10 × 10 and 20 × 20 cm2 applicators and 7, 13, and 20 MeV beams. Dose distributions were calculated using a previously developed BEAMnrc MC model of the Elekta Infinity accelerator for the same beam energies and applicator sizes and compared with measurements. Measured results showed that the in-field beam flatness met our acceptance criteria (± 3% on major and ±4% on diagonal axes) and that out-of-field mean and maximum percent leakage doses in the patient plane met acceptance criteria as specified by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Cross-plane out-of-field dose profiles showed greater leakage dose than in-plane profiles, attributed to the curved edges of the upper X-ray jaws and multileaf collimator. Mean leakage doses increased with beam energy, being 0.93% and 0.85% of maximum central axis dose for the 10 × 10 and 20 × 20 cm2 applicators, respectively, at 20 MeV. MC calculations predicted the measured dose to within 0.1% in most profiles outside the radiation field; however, excluding model-ing of nontrimmer applicator components led to calculations exceeding measured data by as much as 0.2% for some regions

  15. Response of radiation monitors for ambient dose equivalent, H*(10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation monitors are used all over the world to evaluate if places with presence of ionising radiation present safe conditions for people. Radiation monitors should be tested according to international or national standards in order to be qualified for use. This work describes a methodology and procedures to evaluate the energy and angular responses of any radiation monitor for ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), according to the recommendations of ISO and IEC standards. The methodology and the procedures were applied to the Monitor Inteligente de Radiacao MIR 7026, developed by the Instituto em Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), to evaluate and to adjust its response for H*(10), characterizing it as an ambient dose equivalent meter. The tests were performed at the Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes (LNMRI), at Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), and results showed that the Monitor Inteligente de Radiacao MIR 7026 can be used as an EI*(10) meter, in accordance to the IEC 60846 standard requirements. The overall estimated uncertainty for the determination of the MIR 7026 response, in all radiation qualities used in this work, was 4,5 % to a 95 % confidence limit. (author)

  16. Non-uniform dose distributions in cranial radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Edward T.

    Radiation treatments are often delivered to patients with brain metastases. For those patients who receive radiation to the entire brain, there is a risk of long-term neuro-cognitive side effects, which may be due to damage to the hippocampus. In clinical MRI and CT scans it can be difficult to identify the hippocampus, but once identified it can be partially spared from radiation dose. Using deformable image registration we demonstrate a semi-automatic technique for obtaining an estimated location of this structure in a clinical MRI or CT scan. Deformable image registration is a useful tool in other areas such as adaptive radiotherapy, where the radiation oncology team monitors patients during the course of treatment and adjusts the radiation treatments if necessary when the patient anatomy changes. Deformable image registration is used in this setting, but there is a considerable level of uncertainty. This work represents one of many possible approaches at investigating the nature of these uncertainties utilizing consistency metrics. We will show that metrics such as the inverse consistency error correlate with actual registration uncertainties. Specifically relating to brain metastases, this work investigates where in the brain metastases are likely to form, and how the primary cancer site is related. We will show that the cerebellum is at high risk for metastases and that non-uniform dose distributions may be advantageous when delivering prophylactic cranial irradiation for patients with small cell lung cancer in complete remission.

  17. Evaluation of the detriment associated with exposure at low doses and low dose rates in the radiation protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Questions about quantifying the radiological risk associated with exposure to ionising radiation have been debated repeatedly for a variety of exposure situations, including, among others, medical irradiation, discharges from nuclear facilities, transportation of radioactive waste, and potential nuclear accidents. This paper aims to shed light on the link between exposure and risk, focusing on the items that constitute the detriment associated with this exposure. The management of the risk associated with it relies on a cautious hypothesis of a linear no-threshold relation between exposure and risk of death or detriment. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) published General Recommendations in 1966 that recognised this relation, but did not publish a quantification of the risk until 1977. The Commission introduced the concept of effective dose as a risk indicator that makes it possible to determine dose limits according to the risk associated with them. In 1990, the Commission proposed a revision of the quantification and construction of detriment. New limits, based on risk quantification and, for the first time, risk tolerability, were proposed. The optimisation of radiation protection - keeping radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable in light of the economic and social context - became the key principle of the radiation protection system. The use of detriment makes it possible to use economic tools to guide the decision process for this optimisation - by assessing the monetary value of human life. This concept, widely used in health economics during the 1980's, has been criticised by many and must be used cautiously. ICRP published the latest quantifications of detriment in 2007. Detriment is thus an indicator that assesses the risk of death associated with exposure to ionising radiation for an average individual. Its construction relies on simplifying assumptions that are needed to implement a robust and effective radiation

  18. Radiation doses inside industrial irradiation installation with linear electron accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Alexandre R., E-mail: alexandre.lima@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pelegrineli, Samuel Q.; Alo, Gabriel F., E-mail: samuelfisica@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: gabriel.alo@aceletron.com.br [Aceletron Irradiacao Industrial, Aceletrica Comercio e Representacoes Ltda, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Francisco C.A. Da, E-mail: dasilva@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Aceletron Industrial Irradiation Company is the unique installation in South America to provide industrial irradiation service using two linear electron accelerators of 18 kW and 10 MeV energy. The electron beam technology allows using electrons to irradiate many goods and materials, such as hospital and medical equipment, cosmetics, herbal products, polymers, peat, gemstones and food. Aceletron Company uses a concrete bunker with 3.66 m of thickness to provide the necessary occupational and environmental radiation protection of X-rays produced. The bunker is divided in main four areas: irradiation room, maze, tower and pit. Inside the irradiation room the x-rays radiation rates are measured in two ways: direct beam and 90 deg C. The rates produced in the conveyor system using 10 MeV energy are 500 Gy/min/mA and 15 Gy/min/mA, respectively. For a 1.8 mA current, the rates produced are 900 Gy/min and 27 Gy/min, respectively. Outside the bunker the radiation rate is at background level, but in the tower door and modulation room the radiation rate is 10 μSv/h. In 2014, during a routine operation, an effective dose of 30.90 mSv was recorded in a monthly individual dosimeter. After the investigation, it was concluded that the dose was only in the dosimeter because it felt inside the irradiation room. As Aceletron Company follows the principles of safety culture, it was decided to perform the radiation isodose curves, inside the four areas of the installation, to know exactly the hotspots positions, exposure times and radiation doses. Five hotspots were chosen taking into account worker's routes and possible operational places. The first experiment was done using a package with three TLD and OSLD dosimeters to obtain better statistical results. The first results for the five hotspots near the accelerator machine showed that the radiation dose rates were between 26 Gy/h and 31 Gy/h. The final measurements were performed using a package with one TLD and one OSLD

  19. Radiological mapping of Kelantan, Malaysia, using terrestrial radiation dose rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garba, Nuraddeen Nasiru; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Sanusi, Syazwan Mohd; Gabdo, Hamman Tukur

    2016-06-01

    Measurements of the environmental terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate (TGRD) in each district of Kelantan state, Malaysia, were carried out using a portable hand-held radiation survey meter and global positioning system. The measurements were done based on geology and soil types of the area. The mean TGRD was found to be 209 nGy h(-1). Few areas of relatively enhanced activity were observed in Pasir Mas, Tanah Merah and Jeli districts, which have a mean TGRD between 300 and 500 nGy h(-1). An isodose map of the area was produced using ArcGIS software version 9.3. PMID:26540360

  20. Radiological mapping of Kelantan, Malaysia, using terrestrial radiation dose rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garba, Nuraddeen Nasiru; Ramli, Ahmad Termizi; Saleh, Muneer Aziz; Sanusi, Syazwan Mohd; Gabdo, Hamman Tukur

    2016-06-01

    Measurements of the environmental terrestrial gamma radiation dose rate (TGRD) in each district of Kelantan state, Malaysia, were carried out using a portable hand-held radiation survey meter and global positioning system. The measurements were done based on geology and soil types of the area. The mean TGRD was found to be 209 nGy h(-1). Few areas of relatively enhanced activity were observed in Pasir Mas, Tanah Merah and Jeli districts, which have a mean TGRD between 300 and 500 nGy h(-1). An isodose map of the area was produced using ArcGIS software version 9.3.

  1. Radiation dose reduction in digital plain radiography of the knee after total knee arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To reduce radiation exposure of frequently performed radiographs of the knee in follow-up of total-knee arthroplasty ensuring accurate assessment by using objective quality control criteria. In this prospective randomized study 278 radiographs of the knee in follow-up of total-knee arthroplasty were performed with standard and 37 % reduced radiation dose. The evaluation of the plain-radiographs was conducted using the following criteria: bone-implant interface, implant-surface character, implant-implant discrimination and periarticular heterotopic ossification. Two radiologists evaluated these criteria using a score ranging from 1 (definitely assessable) to 4 (not assessable). If a single criterion had been evaluated with a score ≥ 3 or more than 2 criteria with ≥ 2 points, the radiograph was score das ''not assessable''. The study was designed as non-inferiority-trial. 100 % of examined radiographs were scored as assessable, hence no statistical inferiority between the examinations with standard and reduced dose could be observed. Singular assessment of the defined criteria was likewise dose-independent. Plain-radiography of the knee following total-knee arthroplasty can be performed with 63 % of standard dose without loss of diagnostic validity.

  2. Blood compounds irradiation process: assessment of absorbed dose using Fricke and Thermoluminescent dosimetric systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Gabriela de Amorim; Squair, Peterson Lima; Pinto, Fausto Carvalho; Belo, Luiz Claudio Meira; Grossi, Pablo Andrade [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN-CNEN/MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: gas@cdtn.br, e-mail: pls@cdtn.br, e-mail: fcp@cdtn.br, e-mail: lcmb@cdtn.br, e-mail: pabloag@cdtn.br

    2009-07-01

    The assessment of gamma absorbed doses in irradiation facilities allows the quality assurance and control of the irradiation process. The liability of dose measurements is assign to the metrological procedures adopted including the uncertainty evaluation. Fricke and TLD 800 dosimetric systems were used to measure absorbed dose in the blood compounds using the methodology presented in this paper. The measured absorbed doses were used for evaluating the effectiveness of the irradiation procedure and the gamma dose absorption inside the irradiation room of a gamma irradiation facility. The radiation eliminates the functional and proliferative capacities of donor T-lymphocytes, preventing Transfusion associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD), a possible complication of blood transfusions. The results show the applicability of such dosimetric systems in quality assurance programs, assessment of absorbed doses in blood compounds and dose uniformity assign to the blood compounds irradiation process by dose measurements in a range between 25 Gy and 100 Gy. (author)

  3. Dose conversion factors for radiation doses at normal operation discharges. F. Methods report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study has been performed in order to develop and extend existing models for dose estimations at emissions of radioactive substances from nuclear facilities in Sweden. This report gives a review of the different exposure pathways that have been considered in the study. Radioecological data that should be used in calculations of radiation doses are based on the actual situation at the nuclear sites. Dose factors for children have been split in different age groups. The exposure pathways have been carefully re-examined, like the radioecological data; leading to some new pathways (e.g. doses from consumption of forest berries, mushrooms and game) for cesium and strontium. Carbon 14 was given a special treatment by using a model for uptake of carbon by growing plants. For exposure from aquatic emissions, a simplification was done by focussing on the territory for fish species, since consumption of fish is the most important pathway

  4. Amifostine ameliorates recognition memory defect in acute radiation syndrome caused by relatively low-dose of gamma radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hae-June; Kim, Joong-Sun; Song, Myoung-Sub; Seo, Heung-Sik; Yang, Miyoung; Kim, Jong Choon; Jo, Sung-Kee; Shin, Taekyun; Moon, Changjong; Kim, Sung-Ho

    2010-01-01

    This study examined whether amifostine (WR-2721) could attenuate memory impairment and suppress hippocampal neurogenesis in adult mice with the relatively low-dose exposure of acute radiation syndrome (ARS). These were assessed using object recognition memory test, the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay, and immunohistochemical markers of neurogenesis [Ki-67 and doublecortin (DCX)]. Amifostine treatment (214 mg/kg, i.p.) prior to irradiation significan...

  5. Radiation dose optimization in routine computed tomography: a study of feasibility in a University Hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalmazo, Jucileia [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina; Elias Junior, Jorge; Azevedo-Marques, Paulo Mazzoncini de, E-mail: jejunior@fmrp.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Centro de Ciencias das Imagens e Fisica Medica; Brocchi, Marco Aurelio Corte [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hosptital das Clinicas; Costa, Paulo Roberto [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Dept. de Fisica Nuclear

    2010-07-15

    Objective: to study the feasibility of reducing radiation dose in protocols for acquisition of helical computed tomography images in a University Hospital. Materials and methods: a survey of radiation doses in computed tomography protocols was performed with phantoms and ionization chamber. Changes in kVp and mAs were proposed, determining the average noise. Protocols with noise values 1% were submitted to qualitative assessment of contrast and spatial resolution by three observers. Results: tests of variations were performed with 22 protocols for pediatric skulls, 26 for adult skulls, 28 for abdomen, and 18 for chest. The reduction in dose achieved ranged between 7.4% and 13% for pediatric skull, 3.8% and 25% for adult skull, 9.6% and 34.3% for abdomen, 6.4% and 12% for chest. It was also noted that the use of windowing and zoom tools supported the acceptance of images by the observers. Conclusion: radiation dose levels can be reduced by up to 34.4% in comparison with routine protocols, keeping the noise at acceptable levels. The use of digital manipulation tools allowed the acceptance of images with higher noise levels, thus resulting in radiation dose reduction (author)