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Sample records for assessing potential radionuclide

  1. Potential radionuclide emissions from stacks on the Hanford site, Part 1: Dose assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, W.E.; Barnett, J.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    On February 3, 1993, the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Division of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10. The Compliance Order requires RL to evaluate all radionuclide emission points at the Hanford Site to determine which are subject to continuous emission monitoring requirements in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H, and to continuously monitor radionuclide emissions in accordance with requirements in 40 CFR 61.93. The Information Request required RL to provide a written Compliance Plan to meet the requirements of the Compliance Order. A Compliance Plan was submitted to EPA, Region 10, on April 30, 1993. The Compliance Plan specified that a dose assessment would be performed for 84 Westinghouse Hanford Company stacks registered with the Washington State Department of Health on the Hanford Site. Stacks that have the potential emissions to cause an effective dose equivalent to a maximum exposed individual greater than 0.1 mrem/y must be monitored continuously for radionuclide emissions. Five methods were approved by EPA, Region 10 for performing the assessments: Release Fractions from Appendix D of 40 CFR 61, Back Calculations Using A HEPA Filtration Factor, Nondestructive Assay of HEPA Filters, A Spill Release Fraction, and Upstream of HEPA Filter Air Concentrations. The first two methods were extremely conservative for estimating releases. The third method, which used a state-of-the-art portable gamma spectrometer, yielded surprising results from the distribution of radionuclides on the HEPA filters. All five methods are described. Assessments using a HEPA Filtration Factor for back calculations identified 32 stacks that would have emissions that would cause an EDE to the MEI greater than 0.1 mrem y{sup {minus}1}. The number was reduced to 15 stacks when the other methods were applied. The paper discusses reasons for the overestimates.

  2. Potential radionuclide emissions from stacks on the Hanford Site. Part 1: Dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W.E.; Barnett, J.M.

    1994-06-01

    On February 3, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Division of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. The Compliance Plan specified that a dose assessment would be performed for 84 Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) stacks registered with the Washington State Department of Health (WAC 246-247) on the Hanford Site. Stacks that have the potential emissions to cause an effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a maximum exposed individual (MEI) greater than 0.1 mrem y -1 must be monitored continuously for radionuclide emissions. Five methods were approved by EPA, Region 10 for performing the assessments: Release Fractions from Appendix D of 40 CFR 61, Back Calculations Using A HEPA Filtration Factor, Nondestructive Assay of HEPA Filters, A Spill Release Fraction, and Upstream of HEPA Filter Air Concentrations. The first two methods were extremely conservative for estimating releases. The third method which used a state-of-the-art portable gamma spectrometer, yielded surprising results from the distribution of radionuclides on the HEPA filters. All five methods are described

  3. Dose assessment from potential radionuclide emissions from stacks on the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W.E.; Barnett, J.M.

    1995-04-01

    On February 3, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL), received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Division of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. The Compliance Order required RL to (1) evaluate all radionuclide emission points at the Hanford Site to determine which points are subject to the continuous emission sampling requirements of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61 (40 CFR 61), Subpart H, and (2) continuously sample radionuclide emissions in accordance with requirements in 40 CFR 61.93. The Information Request required RL to provide a written Compliance Plan to meet the requirements of the Compliance Order. A Compliance Plan was submitted to EPA, Region 10, on April 30, 1993. The Compliance Plan specified that a dose assessment would be performed for 84 Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) stacks registered with the Washington State Department of Health on the Hanford Site. Any stack identified in the assessment as having potential emissions to cause an effective dose equivalent (EDE) to a maximum exposed individual (MEI) greater than 0.1 mrem y -1 must have a compliant sampling system. In addition, a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA) was signed on. February 7, 1994. The FFCA required that all unregistered stacks on the Hanford Site be assessed. This requirement increased the number of stacks to be assessed to 123 stacks. Six methods for performing the assessments are described. An initial assessment using only the HEPA filtration factor for back calculations identified 32 stacks that would have emissions which would cause an EDE to the MEI greater than 0.1 mrem y -1 . When the other methods were applied the number was reduced to 20 stacks. The paper discusses reasons for these overestimates

  4. Assessment of potential radionuclide transport in site-specific geologic formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dosch, R.G.

    1980-08-01

    Associated with the development of deep, geologic repositories for nuclear waste isolation is a need for safety assessments of the potential for nuclide migration. Frequently used in estimating migration rates is a parameter generally known as a distribution coefficient, K/sub d/, which describes the distribution of a radionuclide between a solid (rock) and a liquid (groundwater) phase. This report is intended to emphasize that the use of K/sub d/ must be coupled with a knowledge of the geology and release scenarios applicable to a repository. Selected K/sub d/ values involving rock samples from groundwater/brine simulants typical of two potential repository sites, WIPP and NTS, are used to illustrate this concern. Experimental parameters used in K/sub d/ measurements including nuclide concentration, site sampling/rock composition, and liquid-to-solid ratios are discussed. The solubility of U(VI) in WIPP brine/groundwater was addressed in order to assess the potential contribution of this phenomena to K/sub d/ values. Understanding mehanisms of sorption of radionuclides on rocks would lead to a better predictive capability. Sorption is attributed to the presence of trace constituents (often unidentified) in rocks. An attempt was made to determine if this applied to WIPP dolomite rocks by comparing sorption behavior of the natural material with that of a synthetic dolomite prepared in the laboratory with reagent grade chemicals. The results were inconclusive. The results of a study of Tc sorption by an argillite sample from the Calico Hills formation at NTS under ambient laboratory conditions were more conclusive. The Tc sorption was found to be associated with elemental carbon. Available evidence points to a reduction mechanism leading to the apparent sorption of Tc on the solid phase

  5. Assessment of the potential for radionuclide migration from a nuclear explosion cavity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D.C.; Daniels, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    A field study of the distribution of radionuclides around an underground nuclear explosion cavity was initiated in 1974, about 9 years after detonation of the nuclear test. This study is part of the Radionuclide Migration (RNM) Project, a broad investigation to determine the rates of migration underground in various media at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and the potential for movement both on and off the NTS of radioactivity from underground nuclear explosions. It was also envisaged that the study might provide data applicable to the underground disposal of radioactive waste. The site of the 0.75 kiloton nuclear test Cambric was chosen for a number of reasons. The Cambric explosion cavity is within the NTS Area 5 water-supply aquifer, and there was particular interest in possible contamination of water supplies. Also, the Cambric detonation point is only 294 meters below the ground surface, and thus the re-entry drilling and sampling operations would be less difficult and expensive than from some of the more deeply buried tests. The Cambric cavity region was re-entered, and a well was completed to a depth of 370 meters. Samples were taken to determine the radionuclide distribution between the solid material and water at the time of the experiment was started. Water was then pumped from a nearby satellite well to induce an artificial gradient sufficient to draw water from the Cambric cavity and provide an opportunity for the study of radionuclide migration under field conditions

  6. Literature review supporting assessment of potential radionuclides in the 291-Z exhaust ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahoney, L.A.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Jette, S.J.; Thomas, L.M. Glissmeyer, J.A.; Davis, W.E.

    1994-08-01

    This literature review was prepared to support a study conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to assess the potential deposition and resuspension of radionuclides in the 291-Z ventilation exhaust building located in the 200 West Area of the US Department of Energy's Hanford Project near Richland, Washington. The filtered ventilation air from three of the facilities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) complex are combined together in the 291-Z building before discharge through a common stack. These three facilities contributing filtered exhaust air to the discharge stream are (1) the PFP, also known as the Z-Plant or 234-5Z, (2) the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF or 236-Z), and (3), the Waste Incinerator Building (WIB or 232-Z). The 291-Z building houses the exhaust fans that pull air from the 291-Z central collection plenum and exhausts the air to the stack. Section 2.0 of this report is a description of the physical characteristic of the ventilation system from the High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters to the exhaust stack. A description of the processes performed in the facilities that are vented through 291-Z is given in Section 3.0. The description focuses on the chemical and physical forms of potential aerosols given off from the unit operations. A timeline of the operations and events that may have affected the deposition of material in the ventilation system is shown. Aerosol and radiation measurements taken in previous studies are also discussed. Section 4.0 discusses the factors that influence particle deposition and adhesion. Mechanisms of attachment and resuspension are covered with specific attention to the PFP ducts. Conclusions and recommendations are given in Section 5.0

  7. Literature review supporting assessment of potential radionuclides in the 291-Z exhaust ventilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, L.A.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Jette, S.J.; Thomas, L.M. Glissmeyer, J.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Davis, W.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    This literature review was prepared to support a study conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to assess the potential deposition and resuspension of radionuclides in the 291-Z ventilation exhaust building located in the 200 West Area of the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Project near Richland, Washington. The filtered ventilation air from three of the facilities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) complex are combined together in the 291-Z building before discharge through a common stack. These three facilities contributing filtered exhaust air to the discharge stream are (1) the PFP, also known as the Z-Plant or 234-5Z, (2) the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF or 236-Z), and (3), the Waste Incinerator Building (WIB or 232-Z). The 291-Z building houses the exhaust fans that pull air from the 291-Z central collection plenum and exhausts the air to the stack. Section 2.0 of this report is a description of the physical characteristic of the ventilation system from the High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters to the exhaust stack. A description of the processes performed in the facilities that are vented through 291-Z is given in Section 3.0. The description focuses on the chemical and physical forms of potential aerosols given off from the unit operations. A timeline of the operations and events that may have affected the deposition of material in the ventilation system is shown. Aerosol and radiation measurements taken in previous studies are also discussed. Section 4.0 discusses the factors that influence particle deposition and adhesion. Mechanisms of attachment and resuspension are covered with specific attention to the PFP ducts. Conclusions and recommendations are given in Section 5.0.

  8. Assessment of Unabated Facility Emission Potentials for Evaluating Airborne Radionuclide Monitoring Requirements at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory - 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Sula, Monte J.; Gervais, Todd L.; Shields, Keith D.; Edwards, Daniel R.

    2001-09-28

    Assessments were performed to evaluate compliance with the airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subpart H) and Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247: Radiation Protection - Air Emissions. In these assessments, potential unabated offsite doses were evaluated for emission locations at facilities owned by the U.S. Department of Energy and operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Hanford Site. This report describes the inventory-based methods, and provides the results, for the assessment performed in 2001.

  9. Dose assessment for potential radionuclide emissions from stacks on the Hanford Site: NESHAP compliance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W.E.; Barnett, J.M.; Kenoyer, J.L.

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of this document is to present the assessment results for the registered stacks on the Hanford Site for potential emissions, i.e. emissions with no control devices in place. Further, the document will identify those stacks requiring continuous monitoring, i.e. the effective dose equivalent from potential emissions >0.1 mrem/yr. The stack assessment of potential emissions was performed on 84 registered stacks on the Hanford Site. These emission sources represent individual point sources presently registered under Washington Administrative code 246-247 with the Washington Department of Health. The methods used in assessing the potential emissions from the stacks are described

  10. Assessment for potential radionuclide emissions from stacks and diffuse and fugitive sources on the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W.E.; Schmidt, J.W.; Gleckler, B.P.; Rhoads, K.

    1995-06-01

    By using the six EPA-approved methods, instead of only the original back calculation method for assessing the 84 WHC registered stacks, the number of stacks requiring continuous monitoring was reduced from 32 to 19 stacks. The intercomparison between results showed that no correlation existed between back calculations and release fractions. Also the NDA, upstream air samples, and powder release fraction method results were at least three orders of magnitude lower then the back calculations results. The most surprising results of the assessment came from NDA. NDA was found to be an easy method for assessing potential emissions. For the nine stacks assessed by NDA, all nine of the stacks would have required continuous monitoring when assessed by back calculations. However, when NDA was applied all stacks had potential emissions that would cause an EDE below the > 0.1 mrem/y standard. Apparent DFs for the HEPA filter systems were calculated for eight nondesignated stacks with emissions above the detection limit. These apparent DFs ranged from 0.5 to 250. The EDE dose to the MEI was calculated to be 0.028 mrem/y for diffuse and fugitive emissions from the Hanford Sited. This is well below the > 0.1 mrem/y standard

  11. A biomonitoring plan for assessing potential radionuclide exposure using Amchitka Island in the Aleutian chain of Alaska as a case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, Joanna [Division of Life Sciences, Rutgers University, 604 Allison Road, Nelson Hall, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8082 (United States); Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), Nashville, TN, and Piscataway, NJ (United States); Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Piscataway, NJ (United States)], E-mail: burger@biology.rutgers.edu; Gochfeld, Michael [Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), Nashville, TN, and Piscataway, NJ (United States); Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Piscataway, NJ (United States); Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ - Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Kosson, D.S. [Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), Nashville, TN, and Piscataway, NJ (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Powers, Charles W. [Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP), Nashville, TN, and Piscataway, NJ (United States); Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute (EOHSI), Piscataway, NJ (United States); Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ - Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2007-12-15

    With the ending of the Cold War, the US and other nations were faced with a legacy of nuclear wastes. For some sites where hazardous nuclear wastes will remain in place, methods must be developed to protect human health and the environment. Biomonitoring is one method of assessing the status and trends of potential radionuclide exposure from nuclear waste sites, and of providing the public with early warning of any potential harmful exposure. Amchitka Island (51{sup o} N lat, 179{sup o} E long) was the site of three underground nuclear tests from 1965 to 1971. Following a substantive study of radionuclide levels in biota from the marine environment around Amchitka and a reference site, we developed a suite of bioindicators (with suggested isotopes) that can serve as a model for other sites contaminated with radionuclides. Although the species selection was site-specific, the methods can provide a framework for other sites. We selected bioindicators using five criteria: (1) occurrence at all three test shots (and reference site), (2) receptor groups (subsistence foods, commercial species, and food chain nodes), (3) species groups (plants, invertebrates, fish, and birds), (4) trophic levels, and (5) an accumulator of one or several radionuclides. Our major objective was to identify bioindicators that could serve for both human health and the ecosystem, and were abundant enough to collect adjacent to the three test sites and at the reference site. Site-specific information on both biota availability and isotope levels was essential in the final selection of bioindicators. Actinides bioaccumulated in algae and invertebrates, while radiocesium accumulated in higher trophic level birds and fish. Thus, unlike biomonitoring schemes developed for heavy metals or other contaminants, top-level predators are not sufficient to evaluate potential radionuclide exposure at Amchitka. The process described in this paper resulted in the selection of Fucus, Alaria fistulosa, blue

  12. A biomonitoring plan for assessing potential radionuclide exposure using Amchitka Island in the Aleutian chain of Alaska as a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Kosson, D.S.; Powers, Charles W.

    2007-01-01

    With the ending of the Cold War, the US and other nations were faced with a legacy of nuclear wastes. For some sites where hazardous nuclear wastes will remain in place, methods must be developed to protect human health and the environment. Biomonitoring is one method of assessing the status and trends of potential radionuclide exposure from nuclear waste sites, and of providing the public with early warning of any potential harmful exposure. Amchitka Island (51 o N lat, 179 o E long) was the site of three underground nuclear tests from 1965 to 1971. Following a substantive study of radionuclide levels in biota from the marine environment around Amchitka and a reference site, we developed a suite of bioindicators (with suggested isotopes) that can serve as a model for other sites contaminated with radionuclides. Although the species selection was site-specific, the methods can provide a framework for other sites. We selected bioindicators using five criteria: (1) occurrence at all three test shots (and reference site), (2) receptor groups (subsistence foods, commercial species, and food chain nodes), (3) species groups (plants, invertebrates, fish, and birds), (4) trophic levels, and (5) an accumulator of one or several radionuclides. Our major objective was to identify bioindicators that could serve for both human health and the ecosystem, and were abundant enough to collect adjacent to the three test sites and at the reference site. Site-specific information on both biota availability and isotope levels was essential in the final selection of bioindicators. Actinides bioaccumulated in algae and invertebrates, while radiocesium accumulated in higher trophic level birds and fish. Thus, unlike biomonitoring schemes developed for heavy metals or other contaminants, top-level predators are not sufficient to evaluate potential radionuclide exposure at Amchitka. The process described in this paper resulted in the selection of Fucus, Alaria fistulosa, blue mussel

  13. A biomonitoring plan for assessing potential radionuclide exposure using Amchitka Island in the Aleutian chain of Alaska as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Kosson, D S; Powers, Charles W

    2007-01-01

    With the ending of the Cold War, the US and other nations were faced with a legacy of nuclear wastes. For some sites where hazardous nuclear wastes will remain in place, methods must be developed to protect human health and the environment. Biomonitoring is one method of assessing the status and trends of potential radionuclide exposure from nuclear waste sites, and of providing the public with early warning of any potential harmful exposure. Amchitka Island (51 degrees N lat, 179 degrees E long) was the site of three underground nuclear tests from 1965 to 1971. Following a substantive study of radionuclide levels in biota from the marine environment around Amchitka and a reference site, we developed a suite of bioindicators (with suggested isotopes) that can serve as a model for other sites contaminated with radionuclides. Although the species selection was site-specific, the methods can provide a framework for other sites. We selected bioindicators using five criteria: (1) occurrence at all three test shots (and reference site), (2) receptor groups (subsistence foods, commercial species, and food chain nodes), (3) species groups (plants, invertebrates, fish, and birds), (4) trophic levels, and (5) an accumulator of one or several radionuclides. Our major objective was to identify bioindicators that could serve for both human health and the ecosystem, and were abundant enough to collect adjacent to the three test sites and at the reference site. Site-specific information on both biota availability and isotope levels was essential in the final selection of bioindicators. Actinides bioaccumulated in algae and invertebrates, while radiocesium accumulated in higher trophic level birds and fish. Thus, unlike biomonitoring schemes developed for heavy metals or other contaminants, top-level predators are not sufficient to evaluate potential radionuclide exposure at Amchitka. The process described in this paper resulted in the selection of Fucus, Alaria fistulosa, blue

  14. An exposure assessment of radionuclide emissions associated with potential mixed-low level waste disposal facilities at fifteen DOE sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lombardi, D.A.; Socolof, M.L.

    1996-05-01

    A screening method was developed to compare the doses received via the atmospheric pathway at 15 potential DOE MLLW (mixed low-level waste) sites. Permissible waste concentrations were back calculated using the radioactivity NESHAP (National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants) in 40 FR 61 (DOE Order 5820.2A performance objective). Site-specific soil and meteorological data were used to determine permissible waste concentrations (PORK). For a particular radionuclide, perks for each site do not vary by more than one order of magnitude. perks of {sup 14}C are about six orders of magnitude more restrictive than perks of {sup 3}H because of differences in liquid/vapor partitioning, decay, and exposure dose. When comparing results from the atmospheric pathway to the water and intruder pathways, {sup 14}C disposal concentrations were limited by the atmospheric pathway for most arid sites; for {sup 3}H, the atmospheric pathway was not limiting at any of the sites. Results of this performance evaluation process are to be used for planning for siting of disposal facilities.

  15. An exposure assessment of radionuclide emissions associated with potential mixed-low level waste disposal facilities at fifteen DOE sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardi, D.A.; Socolof, M.L.

    1996-01-01

    A screening method was developed to compare the doses received via the atmospheric pathway at 15 potential DOE MLLW (mixed low-level waste) sites. Permissible waste concentrations were back calculated using the radioactivity NESHAP (National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants) in 40 FR 61 (DOE Order 5820.2A performance objective). Site-specific soil and meteorological data were used to determine permissible waste concentrations (PORK). For a particular radionuclide, perks for each site do not vary by more than one order of magnitude. perks of 14 C are about six orders of magnitude more restrictive than perks of 3 H because of differences in liquid/vapor partitioning, decay, and exposure dose. When comparing results from the atmospheric pathway to the water and intruder pathways, 14 C disposal concentrations were limited by the atmospheric pathway for most arid sites; for 3 H, the atmospheric pathway was not limiting at any of the sites. Results of this performance evaluation process are to be used for planning for siting of disposal facilities

  16. The saturated zone at Yucca Mountain: An overview of the characterization and assessment of the saturated zone as a barrier to potential radionuclide migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddebbarh, A.-A.; Zyvoloski, G.A.; Robinson, B.A.; Kwicklis, E.M.; Reimus, P.W.; Arnold, B.W.; Corbet, T.; Kuzio, S.P.; Faunt, C.

    2003-01-01

    The US Department of Energy is pursuing Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for the development of a geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, if the repository is able to meet applicable radiation protection standards established by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Effective performance of such a repository would rely on a number of natural and engineered barriers to isolate radioactive waste from the accessible environment. Groundwater beneath Yucca Mountain is the primary medium through which most radionuclides might move away from the potential repository. The saturated zone (SZ) system is expected to act as a natural barrier to this possible movement of radionuclides both by delaying their transport and by reducing their concentration before they reach the accessible environment. Information obtained from Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project activities is used to estimate groundwater flow rates through the site-scale SZ flow and transport model area and to constrain general conceptual models of groundwater flow in the site-scale area. The site-scale conceptual model is a synthesis of what is known about flow and transport processes at the scale required for total system performance assessment of the site. This knowledge builds on and is consistent with knowledge that has accumulated at the regional scale but is more detailed because more data are available at the site-scale level. The mathematical basis of the site-scale model and the associated numerical approaches are designed to assist in quantifying the uncertainty in the permeability of rocks in the geologic framework model and to represent accurately the flow and transport processes included in the site-scale conceptual model. Confidence in the results of the mathematical model was obtained by comparing calculated to observed hydraulic heads, estimated to measured permeabilities, and lateral flow rates

  17. Assessment of the important radionuclides in nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerrisk, J.F.

    1985-10-01

    The relative importance of the various radionuclides contained in nuclear waste has been assessed by consideration of (1) the quantity of each radionuclide present, (2) the Environmental Protection Agency's release limits for radionuclides, (3) how retardation processes such as solubility and sorption affect radionuclie transport, and (4) the physical and chemical forms of radionuclides in the waste. Three types of waste were reviewed: spent fuel, high-level waste, and defense high-level waste. Conditions specific to the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations project potential site at Yucca Mountain were used to describe radionuclide transport. The actinides Am, Pu, Np, and U were identified as the waste elements for which solubility and sorption data were most urgently needed. Other important waste elements were identified as Sr, Cs, C, Ni, Zr, Tc, Th, Ra, and Sn. Under some conditions, radionuclides of three elements (C, Tc, and I) may have high solubility and negligible sorption. The potential for transport of some waste elements (C and I) in the gas phase must also be evaluated for the Yucca Mountain Site. 12 refs., 17 tabs

  18. Assessment of esophageal dynamics by radionuclide scintigraphy; a potential method for early diagnosis of aperistalsis in patients with Chagas disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marioni Filho, H.; Martins, L.R.F.; Thom, A.F. (Instituto Dante Pazzanese de Cardiologia. Setor de Medicina Nuclear); Boainain, E. (Instituto Dante Pazzanese de Cardiologia. Setor de Miocardiopatias; Goias Univ., Goiania (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina)

    The esophageal transit time of a sup(99m) Tc labelled test drink (swallow to arrival at the cardia) - TTE - and the time elapsed from swallow to opening of the cardia - TDAC - were assessed by scintigraphy in 40 healthy volunteers (Group I) and in 106 patients with Chagas disease. Sequential images of tracer esophageal transit were obtained by scintigraphy chamber. A time/activity curve in the region of the cardia was obtained by a multichannel analyzer, from which the 2 parameters were calculated. The assessment of TTE and TDAC by scintigraphic technique is proposed as a screening test for early recognition of esophageal motor disorders as well as for follow-up studies after treatment.

  19. Assessment of esophageal dynamics by radionuclide scintigraphy a potential method for early diagnosis of aperistalsis in patients with Chagas disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marioni Filho, H.; Martins, L.R.F.; Thom, A.F.; Boainain, E.; Goias Univ., Goiania

    1984-01-01

    The esophageal transit time of a sup(99m) Tc labelled test drink (swallow to arrival at the cardia) - TTE - and the time elapsed from swallow to opening of the cardia - TDAC - were assessed by scintigraphy in 40 healthy volunteers (Group I) and in 106 patients with Chagas disease. Sequential images of tracer esophageal transit were obtained by scintigraphy chamber. A time/activity curve in the region of the cardia was obtained by a multichannel analyzer, from which the 2 parameters were calculated. The assessment of TTE and TDAC by scintigraphic technique is proposed as a screening test for early recognition of esophageal motor disorders as well as for follow-up studies after treatment. (M.A.C.) [pt

  20. Radiation Dose and Hazard Assessment of Potential Contamination Events During Use of 223Ra Dichloride in Radionuclide Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabin, Michael G; Siegel, Jeffry A

    2015-09-01

    An analysis is presented of the possible dosimetric consequences of various potential contamination events involving 223Ra dichloride (Xofigo), the FDA-approved therapeutic agent used in the treatment of bone metastases in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer. Three exposure scenarios are considered: inhalation dose to an individual due to the hypothetical inhalation of 219Rn and its progeny assumed to be released into the air from a liquid spill on the floor, external dose from direct photon exposure of an individual assigned to clean up a spill, and skin dose to an individual should the liquid material come into contact with their skin. Doses from the first two scenarios were very small; 2.8 × 10(-3) mSv and 8.1 × 10(-4) mSv, respectively. Using extremely conservative assumptions, the skin dose was estimated to be 72 mSv; in a realistic scenario, this dose would likely be an order of magnitude or more lower. These doses are very small compared to regulatory limits, and good health physics practices likely to be employed in such incidents would lower them still further. The authors conclude that the medical use of Xofigo does not pose any significant radiation safety issue with respect to potential contamination events, even if multiple incidents might occur during the course of a year, since all worst-case potential contamination events considered in this study will not result in significant radiation exposures to workers.

  1. Current potential of radionuclide applications in therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navratil, L.

    1987-01-01

    A review is presented of the proceedings of the 4th Boettstein Collegium held in June, 1986 in Wuerenlingen (CH), debating new possibilities in applying radionuclides in the therapy of malignant diseases. The new possibilities are open with the development of new biological carriers with high detection capacities, especially monoclonal antibodies. Therapeutical applications are characterized of some radionuclides, mainly 131 I and 123 I, and beta and alpha radionuclides are listed promising for therapeutical uses. Therapeutical prospects are also outlined for immunotherapy. (L.O.). 1 ref

  2. Potential Application Of Radionuclide Scaling Factors To High Level Waste Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reboul, S. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2013-09-30

    Production sources, radiological properties, relative solubilities in waste, and laboratory analysis techniques for the forty-five radionuclides identified in Hanford's Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Feed Acceptance Data Quality Objectives (DQO) document are addressed in this report. Based on Savannah River Site (SRS) experience and waste characteristics, thirteen of the radionuclides are judged to be candidates for potential scaling in High Level Waste (HLW) based on the concentrations of other radionuclides as determined through laboratory measurements. The thirteen radionuclides conducive to potential scaling are: Ni-59, Zr-93, Nb-93m, Cd-113m, Sn-121m, Sn-126, Cs-135, Sm-151, Ra-226, Ra-228, Ac-227, Pa-231, and Th-229. The ability to scale radionuclides is useful from two primary perspectives: 1) it provides a means of checking the radionuclide concentrations that have been determined by laboratory analysis; and 2) it provides a means of estimating radionuclide concentrations in the absence of a laboratory analysis technique or when a complex laboratory analysis technique fails. Along with the rationale for identifying and applying the potential scaling factors, this report also provides examples of using the scaling factors to estimate concentrations of radionuclides in current SRS waste and into the future. Also included in the report are examples of independent laboratory analysis techniques that can be used to check results of key radionuclide analyses. Effective utilization of radionuclide scaling factors requires understanding of the applicable production sources and the chemistry of the waste. As such, the potential scaling approaches identified in this report should be assessed from the perspective of the Hanford waste before reaching a decision regarding WTP applicability.

  3. Radionuclide release rates from spent fuel for performance assessment modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, D.B.

    1994-01-01

    In a scenario of aqueous transport from a high-level radioactive waste repository, the concentration of radionuclides in water in contact with the waste constitutes the source term for transport models, and as such represents a fundamental component of all performance assessment models. Many laboratory experiments have been done to characterize release rates and understand processes influencing radionuclide release rates from irradiated nuclear fuel. Natural analogues of these waste forms have been studied to obtain information regarding the long-term stability of potential waste forms in complex natural systems. This information from diverse sources must be brought together to develop and defend methods used to define source terms for performance assessment models. In this manuscript examples of measures of radionuclide release rates from spent nuclear fuel or analogues of nuclear fuel are presented. Each example represents a very different approach to obtaining a numerical measure and each has its limitations. There is no way to obtain an unambiguous measure of this or any parameter used in performance assessment codes for evaluating the effects of processes operative over many millennia. The examples are intended to suggest by example that in the absence of the ability to evaluate accuracy and precision, consistency of a broadly based set of data can be used as circumstantial evidence to defend the choice of parameters used in performance assessments

  4. Radionuclide transport report for the safety assessment SR-Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-12-15

    This document compiles radionuclide transport calculations of a KBS-3 repository for the safety assessment SR-Site. The SR-Site assessment supports the licence application for a final repository at Forsmark, Sweden

  5. Potential influence of organic compounds on the transport of radionuclides from a geologic repository. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silviera, D.J.

    1981-03-01

    This study identifies organic compounds that may be present in a repository and outlines plausible interactions and mechanisms that may influence the forms and chemical behavior of these compounds. A review of the literature indicates that large quantities of organic radioactive wastes are generated by the nuclear industry and if placed in a repository could increase or decrease the leach rate and sorption characteristics of waste radionuclides. The association of radionuclides with organic matter can render the nuclides soluble or insoluble depending on the particular nuclide and such parameters as the pH, Eh, and temperature of the hydrogeologic system as well as the properties of the organic compounds themselves. 44 references.

  6. Potential influence of organic compounds on the transport of radionuclides from a geologic repository. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silviera, D.J.

    1981-03-01

    This study identifies organic compounds that may be present in a repository and outlines plausible interactions and mechanisms that may influence the forms and chemical behavior of these compounds. A review of the literature indicates that large quantities of organic radioactive wastes are generated by the nuclear industry and if placed in a repository could increase or decrease the leach rate and sorption characteristics of waste radionuclides. The association of radionuclides with organic matter can render the nuclides soluble or insoluble depending on the particular nuclide and such parameters as the pH, Eh, and temperature of the hydrogeologic system as well as the properties of the organic compounds themselves. 44 references

  7. Assessment of waste management of volatile radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altomare, P.M.; Barbier, M.; Lord, N.; Nainan, D.

    1979-05-01

    This document presents a review of the Technologies for Waste Management of the Volatile Radionuclides of iodine-129, krypton-85, tritium, and carbon-14. The report presents an estimate of the quantities of these volatile radionuclides as are produced in the nuclear power industry. The various technologies as may be used, or which are under investigation, to immobilize these nuclides and to contain them during storage and in disposal are discussed. Also, the alternative disposal options as may be applied to isolate these radioactive wastes from the human environment are presented. The report contains information which was available through approximately January 1978

  8. Mobilization of radionuclides from sediments. Potential sources to Arctic waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oughton, D.H.; Boerretzen, P.; Mathisen, B.; Salbu, B.; Tronstad, E.

    1995-01-01

    Contaminated soils and sediments can act as secondary sources of radionuclides to Arctic waters. In cases where the original source of contamination has ceased or been greatly reduced (e.g., weapons' testing, waste discharges from Mayak and Sellafield) remobilization of radionuclides from preciously contaminated sediments increases in importance. With respect to Arctic waters, potential secondary sources include sediments contaminated by weapons' testing, by discharges from nuclear installations to seawater, e.g., the Irish Sea, or by leakages from dumped waste containers. The major land-based source is run-off from soils and transport from sediments in the catchment areas of the Ob and Yenisey rivers, including those contaminated by Mayak discharges. Remobilization of radionuclides is often described as a secondary source of contamination. Whereas primary sources of man-made radionuclides tend to be point sources, secondary sources are usually more diffuse. Experiments were carried out on marine (Kara Sea, Irish Sea, Stepovogo and Abrosimov Fjords), estuarine (Ob-Yenisey) and dirty ice sediments. Total 137 Cs and 90 Sr concentrations were determined using standard radiochemical techniques. Tracer studies using 134 Cs and 85 Sr were used to investigate the kinetics of radionuclide adsorption and desorption. It is concluded that 90 Sr is much less strongly bound to marine sediments than 137 Cs, and can be chemically mobilized through ion exchange with elements is seawater. Radiocaesium is strongly and rapidly fixed to sediments. Discharges of 137 Cs to surface sediments (i.e., from dumped containers) would be expected to be retained in sediments to a greater extent than discharges to sea-waters. Physical mobilization of sediments, for example resuspension, may be of more importance for transport of 137 Cs than for 90 Sr. 7 refs., 4 figs

  9. CRRIS, Health Risk Assessment from Atmospheric Releases of Radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: CRRIS consists of eight fully integrated computer codes which calculate environmental transport of atmospheric releases of radionuclides and resulting doses and health risks to individuals or populations. Each code may be used alone for various assessment applications. Because of its modular structure, CRRIS allows assessments to be tailored to the user's needs. Radionuclides are handled by CRRIS either in terms of the released radionuclides or the exposure radionuclides which consist of both the released nuclides and decay products that build up during environmental transport. Atmospheric dispersion calculations are performed by the ANEMOS computer code for distances less than 100 km and the RETADD-II computer code regional-scale distances. Both codes estimate annual-average air concentrations and ground deposition rates by location. SUMIT will translate and scale multiple ANEMOS runs onto a master grid. TERRA reads radionuclide air concentrations and deposition rates to estimate concentrations of radionuclides in food and surface soil. Radiologic decay and ingrowth, soil leaching, and transport through the food chain are included in the calculations. MLSOIL computes an effective radionuclide ground-surface concentration to be used in computing external health effects. The five-layer model of radionuclide transport through soil in MLSOIL provides an alternative to the single-layer model used in TERRA. DFSOIL computes dose factors used in MLSOIL to compute doses from the five soil layers and from the ground surface. ANDROS reads environmental concentrations of radionuclides computed by the other CRRIS codes and produces tables of doses and risks to individuals or populations from atmospheric releases of radionuclides. 2 - Method of solution: SUMIT performs geometric interpolation. TERRA and MLSOIL are terrestrial transport compartment models. DFSOIL computes soil-layer-specific dose factors based on the point-kernel method

  10. Potential radionuclide emissions from stacks on the Hanford site, Part 2: Dose assessment methodology using portable low-resolution gamma spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, J.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    In September 1992, the Westinghouse Hanford Company began developing an in situ measurement method to assess gamma radiation emanating from high-efficiency particulate air filters using portable low-resolution gamma spectroscopy. The purpose of the new method was to assess radioactive exhaust stack air emissions from empirical data rather than from theoretical models and to determine the potential unabated dose to an offsite theoretical maximally exposed individual. In accordance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61, Subpart H, {open_quotes}National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants{close_quotes}, stacks that have the potential to emit {ge} 1 {mu}Sv y{sup {minus}1} (0.1 mrem y{sup {minus}1}) to the maximally exposed individual are considered {open_quotes}major{close_quotes} and must meet the continuous monitoring requirements. After the method was tested and verified, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10, approved its use in June 1993. Of the 125 stacks operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company, 22 were targeted for evaluation by this method, and 15 were assessed. (The method could not be applied at seven stacks because of excessive background radiation or because no gamma emitting particles appear in the emission stream.) The most significant result from this study was the redesignation of the T Plant main stack. The stack was assessed as being {open_quotes}minor{close_quotes}, and it now only requires periodic confirmatory measurements and meets federally imposed sampling requirements.

  11. Potential radionuclide emissions from stacks on the Hanford Site, Part 2: Dose assessment methodology using portable low-resolution gamma spectroscoy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, J.M.

    1994-07-01

    In September 1992, the Westinghouse Hanford Company began developing an in situ measurement method to assess gamma radiation emanating from high-efficiency particulate air filters using portable low-resolution gamma spectroscopy. The purpose of the new method was to assess radioactive exhaust stack air emissions from empirical data rather than from theoretical models and to determine the potential unabated dose to an offsite theoretical maximally exposed individual. In accordance with Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61, Subpart H, ''National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants'', stacks that have the potential to emit ≥ 0.1 mrem per year to the maximally exposed individual are considered ''major'' and must meet the continuous monitoring requirements. After the method was tested and verified, the US Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10, approved its use in June 1993. Of the 125 stacks operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company, 22 were targeted for evaluation by this method; and 15 were assessed. The most significant,result from this study was the redesignation. of the T Plant main stack. The stack was assessed as being ''minor'', and it now only requires periodic confirmatory measurements and meets federally imposed sampling requirements

  12. Radionuclide assessment of pulmonary microvascular permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groeneveld, A.B.J. [Medical Intensive Care Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Free University Hospital, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    1997-04-01

    The literature has been reviewed to evaluate the technique and clinical value of radionuclide measurements of microvascular permeability and oedema formation in the lungs. Methodology, modelling and interpretation vary widely among studies. Nevertheless, most studies agree on the fact that the measurement of permeability via pulmonary radioactivity measurements of intravenously injected radiolabelled proteins versus that in the blood pool, the so-called pulmonary protein transport rate (PTR), can assist the clinician in discriminating between permeability oedema of the lungs associated with the adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and oedema caused by an increased filtration pressure, for instance in the course of cardiac disease, i.e. pressure-induced pulmonary oedema. Some of the techniques used to measure PTR are also able to detect subclinical forms of lung microvascular injury not yet complicated by permeability oedema. This may occur after cardiopulmonary bypass and major vascular surgery, for instance. By paralleling the clinical severity and course of the ARDS, the PTR method may also serve as a tool to evaluate new therapies for the syndrome. Taken together, the currently available radionuclide methods, which are applicable at the bedside in the intensive care unit, may provide a gold standard for detecting minor and major forms of acute microvascular lung injury, and for evaluating the severity, course and response to treatment. (orig.). With 2 tabs.

  13. A review of transfer factors for assessing the dose from radionuclides in agricultural products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, Y.C.

    1982-01-01

    The dose to man from radionuclides released to the environment is generally assessed with mathematical models that require transfer factors as input parameters to predict the concentration of radionuclides in foodstuffs. This article summarizes recent attempts to review the worldwide literature and derive updated transfer factors to predict concentrations of radionuclides in terrestrial foods using equilibrium models. Updated transfer coefficients to predict the concentration of a radionuclide in cow's milk and other animal products from that in feed are presented as well as concentration factors to predict the concentration of a nuclide in a food or feed crop from that in soil. Comparing the updated transfer coefficients with those in existing tables leads to suggested changes in the transfer coefficients for milk and beef. Soil-to-plant concentration factors are extremely variable, which limits the usefulness of a single concentration factor to predict the uptake of a radionuclide into crops from soil. The potentially large uncertainty associated with predicting the uptake of radionuclides by plants from soil at a particular location may be reduced by considering the dominant crops and soil types in the area and how various soil properties affect the concentration factor. The updated transfer factors may be useful in assessing transport through terrestrial food chains when site-specific information is not available. In addition, they provide a basis for systematically updating existing tables of transfer factors for generic assessments

  14. Assessment of Management Oxides for the Sorption of Radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D.R. Learman; M.F. Hochella, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Recent research has shown that certain manganese oxides have the ability to sorb aqueous metal cations much more efficiently than any of the naturally occurring iron oxides when normalized to surface area. This ability is, at least in part, related to the internal sites available in many manganese oxide structures, including those within tunnels and between sheets. Additionally, a new naturally-occurring manganese oxide structurally related to vernadite ((delta)-MnO 2 ), collected along the Clark Fork River in western Montana, USA, has shown the ability to sorb arsenate, an anionic complex. The potential for manganese oxides to sorb anions has made it an attractive material as a radionuclide ''getter''. According to the US Department of Energy's Total Systems Performance Assessment, technetium and iodine are two major anionic radionuclides contributing to the list of potential contaminants released from Yucca Mountain repository, Nevada, USA. These two radionuclides are extremely problematic because they are very mobile in the environment. This project involves running flow-through sorption experiments using rhenium (a surrogate for technetium) and stable iodine as sorbates and several synthetic manganese oxides, including birnessite, vernadite, cryptomelane, and possibly the new vernadite-like phase mentioned earlier, as sorbants. For all synthesis reactions, manganese (VII) salts are reduced to manganese (III,IV) oxides. The different oxides are produced from specific reductants and/or the addition of heat, followed by multiple washing steps. To verify that the proper phases have been synthesized, all oxides are analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). The sorption experiments will be run in flow-through reactors bearing the aqueous complex of interest, where solutions, at various temperatures, pH's, and ionic strengths, will pass through a bed of one of the manganese oxides. The effluent solution will be analyzed

  15. Research on the assessment technology of the radionuclide inventory for the radioactive waste disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K. J.; Song, M. C.; Hwang, G. H.; Lee, C. M.; Yuk, D. S.; Lee, S. C. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-15

    The contents and the scope of this study are as follows : reassessment of selection criteria and final selection of target radionuclides, establishment of detailed radionuclide evaluation methods for each target radionuclide, development of requirement and fulfillment guidelines for the assessment methods of the assay-target radionuclide inventory.

  16. Review of radionuclide source terms used for performance-assessment analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnard, R.W.

    1993-06-01

    Two aspects of the radionuclide source terms used for total-system performance assessment (TSPA) analyses have been reviewed. First, a detailed radionuclide inventory (i.e., one in which the reactor type, decay, and burnup are specified) is compared with the standard source-term inventory used in prior analyses. The latter assumes a fixed ratio of pressurized-water reactor (PWR) to boiling-water reactor (BWR) spent fuel, at specific amounts of burnup and at 10-year decay. TSPA analyses have been used to compare the simplified source term with the detailed one. The TSPA-91 analyses did not show a significant difference between the source terms. Second, the radionuclides used in source terms for TSPA aqueous-transport analyses have been reviewed to select ones that are representative of the entire inventory. It is recommended that two actinide decay chains be included (the 4n+2 ''uranium'' and 4n+3 ''actinium'' decay series), since these include several radionuclides that have potentially important release and dose characteristics. In addition, several fission products are recommended for the same reason. The choice of radionuclides should be influenced by other parameter assumptions, such as the solubility and retardation of the radionuclides

  17. Noninvasive assessment of right ventricular wall motion by radionuclide cardioangiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Tsunehiko; Uehara, Toshiisa; Naito, Hiroaki; Hayashida, Kohei; Kozuka, Takahiro

    1981-01-01

    Radionuclide cardioangiography is a useful method to evaluate the left ventricular wall motion in various heart diseases. It has been also attempted to assess the right ventricular wall motion simultaneously by radionuclide method. In this study, using the combination of first-pass (RAO 30 0 ) and multi-gate (LAO 40 0 ) method, the site of right vetricle was classified in five. (1 inflow, 2 sinus, 3 outflow, 4 septal, 5 lateral) and the degree of wall motion was classified in four stages (dyskinesis, akinesis, hypokinesis, normal) according to the AHA committee report. These methods were applied clinically to forty-eight patients with various heart diseases. In the cases with right ventricular pressure or volume overload such as COLD, pulmonary infarction, the right ventricle was dilated and the wall motion was reduced in all portions. Especially, in the cases with right ventricular infarction, the right ventricular wall motion was reduced in the infarcted area. The findings of radionuclide method were in good agreement with those of contrast right ventriculography or echocardiography. In conclusion, radionuclide cardioangiography is a useful and noninvasive method to assess not only the left but also the right ventricular wall motion. (author)

  18. Radionuclide transport and dose assessment modelling in biosphere assessment 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjerpe, T.; Broed, R.

    2010-11-01

    Following the guidelines set forth by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (now Ministry of Employment and Economy), Posiva is preparing to submit a construction license application for the final disposal spent nuclear fuel at the Olkiluoto site, Finland, by the end of the year 2012. Disposal will take place in a geological repository implemented according to the KBS-3 method. The long-term safety section supporting the license application will be based on a safety case that, according to the internationally adopted definition, will be a compilation of the evidence, analyses and arguments that quantify and substantiate the safety and the level of expert confidence in the safety of the planned repository. This report documents in detail the conceptual and mathematical models and key data used in the landscape model set-up, radionuclide transport modelling, and radiological consequences analysis applied in the 2009 biosphere assessment. Resulting environmental activity concentrations in landscape model due to constant unit geosphere release rates, and the corresponding annual doses, are also calculated and presented in this report. This provides the basis for understanding the behaviour of the applied landscape model and subsequent dose calculations. (orig.)

  19. Assessment of Natural Gamma Emitting Radionuclides in Composite Food Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, M.; Orfi, S.D.; Khan, K.; Rashid, A.; Jabbar, A.; Akhter, P.; Malik, G.M.; Jan, F.; Shafiq, M.

    2001-01-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Laboratory has also been engaged in radiometric analysis of composite food as a part of environmental surveillance and monitoring of low-level radioactivity in various environmental media. The samples of cooked meal, served at PINSTECH cafeteria, were collected and assessed for gamma emitting radionuclides. A high purity germanium (HPGe) detector coupled with high-resolution multichannel analyser (MCA) and Gennie-2000 software was used for the detection, analysis and data acquisition. Radio potassium (40K) was the only radionuclide present in all the lunch samples. The range of activities was found to be from 18.06+-.51 to 74.93+-.97 Bq meal-1 with cumulative average value of 42.58+-0.14 Bq meal-1 for the sampling period from 1991-1998. Based on cooked meal taken by a man in the cafeteria (250 lunches y-1), the annual intake of 40K was found to be 1.06x104 Bq y-1 which is 0.11% of the annual limit on intake (ALI) of this radionuclide as specified by IAEA. (author)

  20. Potential and limitations of radionuclide-based exercise testing before and after operation in the patient with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borer, J.S.; Phillips, P.; Jacobstein, J.

    1982-01-01

    The authors assess the potential benefits and limitations of radionuclide cineangiography when used to select patients with ischemic heart disease for operation, to precisely plan the operation, and to assess the effects of such therapy. The results indicate that this technique provides potentially important benefits, but also several limitations. Additional studies are required to clarify the optimal role for this technique in the evaluation of the patient with coronary artery disease. (Auth.)

  1. Recent developments in assessment of long-term radionuclide behavior in the geosphere-biosphere subsystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G M; Smith, K L; Kowe, R; Pérez-Sánchez, D; Thorne, M; Thiry, Y; Read, D; Molinero, J

    2014-05-01

    Decisions on permitting, controlling and monitoring releases of radioactivity into the environment rely on a great variety of factors. Important among these is the prospective assessment of radionuclide behavior in the environment, including migration and accumulation among and within specific environmental media, and the resulting environmental and human health impacts. Models and techniques to undertake such assessments have been developed over several decades based on knowledge of the ecosystems involved, as well as monitoring of previous radionuclide releases to the environment, laboratory experiments and other related research. This paper presents developments in the assessment of radiation doses and related research for some of the key radionuclides identified as of potential significance in the context of releases to the biosphere from disposal facilities for solid radioactive waste. Since releases to the biosphere from disposal facilities involve transfers from the geosphere to the biosphere, an important aspect is the combined effects of surface hydrology, near-surface hydrogeology and chemical gradients on speciation and radionuclide mobility in the zone in which the geosphere and biosphere overlap (herein described as the geosphere-biosphere subsystem). In turn, these aspects of the environment can be modified as a result of environmental change over the thousands of years that have to be considered in radioactive waste disposal safety assessments. Building on the experience from improved understanding of the behavior of the key radionuclides, this paper proceeds to describe development of a generic methodology for representing the processes and environmental changes that are characteristic of the interface between the geosphere and the biosphere. The information that is provided and the methodology that is described are based on international collaborative work implemented through the BIOPROTA forum, www.bioprota.org. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All

  2. The uses of bioindicators in radionuclide contamination assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGee, E. J.; McGarry, A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is a brief review and discussion of some approaches to sampling using bioindicators that have been employed in the assessment of radionuclide contamination in Ireland. Studies by other researchers are also referred to and the fields of research in radioecology where the use of bioindicators could be further developed are discussed. The review includes a discussion of the important attributes of bioindicators and how they can best be used in the development of effective but economical sampling strategies that yield the maximum amount of information. (author)

  3. Luminescence imaging using radionuclides: a potential application in molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Chan; Il An, Gwang; Park, Se-Il; Oh, Jungmin; Kim, Hong Joo; Su Ha, Yeong; Wang, Eun Kyung; Min Kim, Kyeong; Kim, Jung Young; Lee, Jaetae; Welch, Michael J; Yoo, Jeongsoo

    2011-04-01

    Nuclear and optical imaging are complementary in many aspects and there would be many advantages when optical imaging probes are prepared using radionuclides rather than classic fluorophores, and when nuclear and optical dual images are obtained using single imaging probe. The luminescence intensities of various radionuclides having different decay modes have been assayed using luminescence imaging and in vitro luminometer. Radioiodinated Herceptin was injected into a tumor-bearing mouse, and luminescence and microPET images were obtained. The plant dipped in [(32)P]phosphate solution was scanned in luminescence mode. Radio-TLC plate was also imaged in the same imaging mode. Radionuclides emitting high energy β(+)/β(-) particles showed higher luminescence signals. NIH3T6.7 tumors were detected in both optical and nuclear imaging. The uptake of [(32)P]phosphate in plant was easily followed by luminescence imaging. Radio-TLC plate was visualized and radiochemical purity was quantified using luminescence imaging. Many radionuclides with high energetic β(+) or β(-) particles during decay were found to be imaged in luminescence mode due mainly to Cerenkov radiation. 'Cerenkov imaging' provides a new optical imaging platform and an invaluable bridge between optical and nuclear imaging. New optical imaging probes could be easily prepared using well-established radioiodination methods. Cerenkov imaging will have more applications in the research field of plant science and autoradiography. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Recent developments in assessment of long-term radionuclide behavior in the geosphere-biosphere subsystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.M.; Smith, K.L.; Kowe, R.; Pérez-Sánchez, D.; Thorne, M.; Thiry, Y.; Read, D.; Molinero, J.

    2014-01-01

    Decisions on permitting, controlling and monitoring releases of radioactivity into the environment rely on a great variety of factors. Important among these is the prospective assessment of radionuclide behavior in the environment, including migration and accumulation among and within specific environmental media, and the resulting environmental and human health impacts. Models and techniques to undertake such assessments have been developed over several decades based on knowledge of the ecosystems involved, as well as monitoring of previous radionuclide releases to the environment, laboratory experiments and other related research. This paper presents developments in the assessment of radiation doses and related research for some of the key radionuclides identified as of potential significance in the context of releases to the biosphere from disposal facilities for solid radioactive waste. Since releases to the biosphere from disposal facilities involve transfers from the geosphere to the biosphere, an important aspect is the combined effects of surface hydrology, near-surface hydrogeology and chemical gradients on speciation and radionuclide mobility in the zone in which the geosphere and biosphere overlap (herein described as the geosphere-biosphere subsystem). In turn, these aspects of the environment can be modified as a result of environmental change over the thousands of years that have to be considered in radioactive waste disposal safety assessments. Building on the experience from improved understanding of the behavior of the key radionuclides, this paper proceeds to describe development of a generic methodology for representing the processes and environmental changes that are characteristic of the interface between the geosphere and the biosphere. The information that is provided and the methodology that is described are based on international collaborative work implemented through the BIOPROTA forum, (www.bioprota.org). - Highlights: • Geological

  5. Assessment of Radionuclides in the Savannah River Site Environment Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlton, W.H.

    1999-01-26

    This document summarizes the impact of radionuclide releases from Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities from 1954 through 1996. The radionuclides reported here are those whose release resulted in the highest dose to people living near SRS.

  6. Assessments for High Dose Radionuclide Therapy Treatment Planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, Darrell R.

    2003-10-01

    Advances in the biotechnology of cell-specific targeting of cancer, and the increased number of clinical trials involving treatment of cancer patients with radiolabeled antibodies, peptides, and similar delivery vehicles have led to an increase in the number of high-dose radionuclide therapy procedures. Optimized radionuclide therapy for cancer treatment is based on the concept of absorbed dose to the dose-limiting normal organ or tissue. The limiting normal tissue is often the red marrow, but it may sometimes be lungs, liver, intestinal tract, or kidneys. Appropriate treatment planning requires assessment of radiation dose to several internal organs and tissues, and usually involves biodistribution studies in the patient using a tracer amount of radionuclide bound to the targeting agent and imaged at sequential time points using a planar gamma camera. Time-activity curves are developed from the imaging data for the major organs tissues of concern, for the whole body, and sometimes for selected tumors. Patient-specific factors often require that dose estimates be customized for each patient. The Food and Drug Administration regulates the experimental use of investigational new drugs and requires reasonable calculation of radiation absorbed dose to the whole body and to critical organs using methods prescribed by the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine. Review of high-dose studies in the U.S. and elsewhere shows that (1) some studies are conducted with minimal dosimetry, (2) the marrow dose is difficult to establish and is subject to large uncertainties, and (3) despite the general availability of MIRD software, internal dosimetry methods are often inconsistent from one clinical center to another

  7. Assessment of doses to the public from ingested radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Safety Report offers the scientific basis for these values and their application, providing the information necessary to assess the radiological implications, in terms of doses to population groups, of the measured concentrations of radionuclides in foodstuffs independent of the source of exposure

  8. ASSESSMENT OF RELEASE RATES FOR RADIONUCLIDES IN ACTIVATED CONCRETE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SULLIVAN,T.M.

    2003-08-23

    The Maine Yankee (MY) nuclear power plant is undergoing the process of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). Part of the process requires analyses that demonstrate that any radioactivity that remains after D&D will not cause exposure to radioactive contaminants to exceed acceptable limits. This requires knowledge of the distribution of radionuclides in the remaining material and their potential release mechanisms from the material to the contacting groundwater. In this study the concern involves radionuclide contamination in activated concrete in the ICI Sump below the containment building. Figures 1-3 are schematic representations of the ICI Sump. Figure 2 and 3 contain the relevant dimensions needed for the analysis. The key features of Figures 2 and 3 are the 3/8-inch carbon steel liner that isolates the activated concrete from the pit and the concrete wall, which is between 7 feet and 7 feet 2 inches thick. During operations, a small neutron flux from the reactor activated the carbon steel liner and the concrete outside the liner. Current MY plans call for filling the ICI sump with compacted sand.

  9. Ventricular dysfunction in children with obstructive sleep apnea: radionuclide assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tal, A.; Leiberman, A.; Margulis, G.; Sofer, S.

    1988-01-01

    Ventricular function was evaluated using radionuclide ventriculography in 27 children with oropharyngeal obstruction and clinical features of obstructive sleep apnea. Their mean age was 3.5 years (9 months to 7.5 years). Conventional clinical assessment did not detect cardiac involvement in 25 of 27 children; however, reduced right ventricular ejection fraction (less than 35%) was found in 10 (37%) patients (mean: 19.5 +/- 2.3% SE, range: 8-28%). In 18 patients wall motion abnormality was detected. In 11 children in whom radionuclide ventriculography was performed before and after adenotonsillectomy, right ventricular ejection fraction rose from 24.4 +/- 3.6% to 46.7 +/- 3.4% (P less than 0.005), and in all cases wall motion showed a definite improvement. In five children, left ventricular ejection fraction rose greater than 10% after removal of oropharyngeal obstruction. It is concluded that right ventricular function may be compromised in children with obstructive sleep apnea secondary to adenotonsillar hypertrophy, even before clinical signs of cardiac involvement are present.

  10. Ventricular dysfunction in children with obstructive sleep apnea: radionuclide assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tal, A.; Leiberman, A.; Margulis, G.; Sofer, S.

    1988-01-01

    Ventricular function was evaluated using radionuclide ventriculography in 27 children with oropharyngeal obstruction and clinical features of obstructive sleep apnea. Their mean age was 3.5 years (9 months to 7.5 years). Conventional clinical assessment did not detect cardiac involvement in 25 of 27 children; however, reduced right ventricular ejection fraction (less than 35%) was found in 10 (37%) patients (mean: 19.5 +/- 2.3% SE, range: 8-28%). In 18 patients wall motion abnormality was detected. In 11 children in whom radionuclide ventriculography was performed before and after adenotonsillectomy, right ventricular ejection fraction rose from 24.4 +/- 3.6% to 46.7 +/- 3.4% (P less than 0.005), and in all cases wall motion showed a definite improvement. In five children, left ventricular ejection fraction rose greater than 10% after removal of oropharyngeal obstruction. It is concluded that right ventricular function may be compromised in children with obstructive sleep apnea secondary to adenotonsillar hypertrophy, even before clinical signs of cardiac involvement are present

  11. U.S. Department of Energy approaches to the assessment of radionuclide migration for the geologic repository program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luik, A.E. van; Apted, M.J.

    1988-01-01

    Potential radionuclide migration in geologic repositories is being addressed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management through its Office of Geologic Repositories (OGR). A diversity of geohydrologic settings is being investigated: unsaturated tuff, saturated basalt, and bedded salt. A number of approaches to assessing potential migration are being considered. Mass transfer is prominent among near-field approaches. For far-field analysis of migration in the geosphere, detailed characterizations of potential repository sites will lead to site-specific models describing radionuclide migration for a variety of postulated release scenarios. Finite-element and finite-difference codes are being used and developed to solve the mathematical equations pertinent to far-field assessments. Computational approaches presently in use generally require distribution coefficients to estimate the retardation of specific radionuclides with respect to the transport rate of water. 26 refs

  12. Screening Risk Assessment for Possible Radionuclides in the Amchitka Marine Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NNSA/NV

    2002-10-31

    As part of its environmental stewardship program the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is reevaluating three sites where underground nuclear tests were conducted in the deep subsurface of Amchitka Island, Alaska. The tests (i.e., Long Shot, Milrow, and Cannikin) were conducted in 1965, 1969, and 1971, respectively. Extensive investigations were conducted on these tests and their effect on the environment. Evaluations at the time of testing indicated limited release of radionuclides and absence of risk related to the testing; however, these are being reevaluated under the current DOE environmental stewardship program. A screening risk assessment of potential radionuclide release into the marine environment is an important part of this reevaluation. The risk assessment is one of three interrelated activities: a groundwater model and this screening risk assessment, both of which guide the decisions in the third activity, the site closure plan. Thus, the overall objective of the work is to understand, and subsequently manage, any risk to humans and the environment through a closure and long-term stewardship plan. The objective of this screening risk assessment is to predict whether possible releases of radionuclides at the ocean floor would represent potential risks to Native Alaskans by consumption of marine subsistence species. In addition, risks were predicted for consumers of commercial catches of marine organisms. These risks were calculated beginning with estimates of possible radionuclide release at the seafloor (from a groundwater modeling study), into the seawater, through possible uptake by marine organisms, and finally possible consumption by humans. The risk assessment model has 11 elements, progressing from potential release at the seafloor through water and food chains to human intake. Data for each of these elements were systematically found and synthesized from many sources, and represent the best available knowledge. Whenever precise data were lacking

  13. Hanford Site radionuclide national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants unregistered stack (power exhaust) source assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W.E.

    1994-01-01

    On February 3, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Division of the US Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10. The Compliance Order requires the Richland Operations Office to evaluate all radionuclide emission points at the Hanford Site to determine which are subject to continuous emission measurement requirements in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61, Subpart H, and to continuously measure radionuclide emissions in accordance with 40 CFR 61.93. This evaluation provides an assessment of the 39 unregistered stacks, under Westinghouse Hanford Company's management, and their potential radionuclide emissions, i.e., emissions with no control devices in place. The evaluation also determined if the effective dose equivalent from any of these stack emissions exceeded 0.1 mrem/yr, which will require the stack to have continuous monitoring. The result of this assessment identified three stacks, 107-N, 296-P-26 and 296-P-28, as having potential emissions that would cause an effective dose equivalent greater than 0.1 mrem/yr. These stacks, as noted by 40 CFR 61.93, would require continuous monitoring

  14. Hanford Site radionuclide national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants unregistered stack (power exhaust) source assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, W.E.

    1994-08-04

    On February 3, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Division of the US Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10. The Compliance Order requires the Richland Operations Office to evaluate all radionuclide emission points at the Hanford Site to determine which are subject to continuous emission measurement requirements in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61, Subpart H, and to continuously measure radionuclide emissions in accordance with 40 CFR 61.93. This evaluation provides an assessment of the 39 unregistered stacks, under Westinghouse Hanford Company`s management, and their potential radionuclide emissions, i.e., emissions with no control devices in place. The evaluation also determined if the effective dose equivalent from any of these stack emissions exceeded 0.1 mrem/yr, which will require the stack to have continuous monitoring. The result of this assessment identified three stacks, 107-N, 296-P-26 and 296-P-28, as having potential emissions that would cause an effective dose equivalent greater than 0.1 mrem/yr. These stacks, as noted by 40 CFR 61.93, would require continuous monitoring.

  15. Speciation analysis of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salbu, B.

    2010-01-01

    Full text: Naturally occurring and artificially produced radionuclides in the environment can be present in different physico-chemical forms (i. e. radionuclide species) varying in size (nominal molecular mass), charge properties and valence, oxidation state, structure and morphology, density, complexing ability etc. Low molecular mass (LMM) species are believed to be mobile and potentially bioavailable, while high molecular mass (HMM) species such as colloids, polymers, pseudocolloids and particles are considered inert. Due to time dependent transformation processes such as mobilization of radionuclide species from solid phases or interactions of mobile and reactive radionuclide species with components in soils and sediments, however, the original distribution of radionuclides deposited in ecosystems will change over time and influence the ecosystem behaviour. To assess the environmental impact from radionuclide contamination, information on radionuclide species deposited, interactions within affected ecosystems and the time-dependent distribution of radionuclide species influencing mobility and biological uptake is essential. The development of speciation techniques to characterize radionuclide species in waters, soils and sediments should therefore be essential for improving the prediction power of impact and risk assessment models. The present paper reviews fractionation techniques which should be utilised for radionuclide speciation purposes. (author)

  16. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy as neoadjuvant therapy for resectable or potentially resectable pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partelli, Stefano; Bertani, Emilio; Bartolomei, Mirco; Perali, Carolina; Muffatti, Francesca; Grana, Chiara Maria; Schiavo Lena, Marco; Doglioni, Claudio; Crippa, Stefano; Fazio, Nicola; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Falconi, Massimo

    2018-04-01

    Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy is a valid therapeutic option for pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms. The aim of this study was to describe an initial experience with the use of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy as a neoadjuvant agent for resectable or potentially resectable pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms. The postoperative outcomes of 23 patients with resectable or potentially resectable pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms at high risk of recurrence who underwent neoadjuvant peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (peptide receptor radionuclide therapy group) were compared with 23 patients who underwent upfront surgical operation (upfront surgery group). Patients were matched for tumor size, grade, and stage. Median follow-up was 61 months. The size (median greatest width) of the primary pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms decreased after neoadjuvant peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (59 to 50 mm; P=.047). There were no differences in intraoperative and postoperative outcomes and there were no operative deaths, but the risk of developing a pancreatic fistula tended to be less in the peptide receptor radionuclide therapy group when compared to the upfront surgery group (0/23 vs 4/23; P radionuclide therapy group (n= 9/23 vs 17/23; P.2) differed between groups, but progression-free survival in the 31 patients who had an R0 resection seemed to be greater in the 15 patients in the peptide receptor radionuclide therapy group versus 16 patients the upfront group (median progression-free survival not reached vs 36 months; Pradionuclide therapy for resectable or potentially resectable pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms in patients with high-risk features of recurrence seems to be beneficial, but well-designed and much larger prospective trials are needed to confirm the safety and the oncologic value of this approach. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification and characterization of potential discharge areas for radionuclide transport by groundwater from a nuclear waste repository in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berglund, Sten; Bosson, Emma; Selroos, Jan-Olof; Sassner, Mona

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes solute transport modeling carried out as a part of an assessment of the long-term radiological safety of a planned deep rock repository for spent nuclear fuel in Forsmark, Sweden. Specifically, it presents transport modeling performed to locate and describe discharge areas for groundwater potentially carrying radionuclides from the repository to the surface where man and the environment could be affected by the contamination. The modeling results show that topography to large extent determines the discharge locations. Present and future lake and wetland objects are central for the radionuclide transport and dose calculations in the safety assessment. Results of detailed transport modeling focusing on the regolith and the upper part of the rock indicate that the identification of discharge areas and objects considered in the safety assessment is robust in the sense that it does not change when a more detailed model representation is used.

  18. Risk assessment of radionuclide discharges to sanitary sewers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galpin, F.L.; Merrell, G.; Rogers, V.C.

    1996-01-01

    This presentation describes the basic approach and conduct of a study of the possible risks and consequences of radionuclide discharges into a sewage treatment system. The study's objective was to determine if there were any possible significant exposures to either WSSC workers or the public form the discharge of radioactive material into the sewer system. The conduct of this study included a review of applicable regulations, and a case study of some past contamination events. The evaluation of potential occupational exposures involved measurements in the collection system were selected based on their location relative to potential dischargers. Measurement points at the treatment works were selected at points where biosolids might accumulate. Both passive, (TLD) and active, (scintillation detector) measurements were made. A limited number of samples were taken and analyzed. Potential doses to the public were estimated based on the possible pathways to man. Due both to limited resources and other project constraints several assumptions and bounding calculations were necessary to meet the objective. Although the study concluded that there were no present significant health concerns, followup evaluations were recommended. 7 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  19. Assessing ecological effects of radionuclides: data gaps and extrapolation issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnier-Laplace, Jacqueline; Gilek, Michael; Sundell-Bergman, Synnoeve; Larsson, Carl-Magnus

    2004-01-01

    By inspection of the FASSET database on radiation effects on non-human biota, one of the major difficulties in the implementation of ecological risk assessments for radioactive pollutants is found to be the lack of data for chronic low-level exposure. A critical review is provided of a number of extrapolation issues that arise in undertaking an ecological risk assessment: acute versus chronic exposure regime; radiation quality including relative biological effectiveness and radiation weighting factors; biological effects from an individual to a population level, including radiosensitivity and lifestyle variations throughout the life cycle; single radionuclide versus multi-contaminants. The specificities of the environmental situations of interest (mainly chronic low-level exposure regimes) emphasise the importance of reproductive parameters governing the demography of the population within a given ecosystem and, as a consequence, the structure and functioning of that ecosystem. As an operational conclusion to keep in mind for any site-specific risk assessment, the present state-of-the-art on extrapolation issues allows us to grade the magnitude of the uncertainties as follows: one species to another > acute to chronic = external to internal = mixture of stressors> individual to population> ecosystem structure to function

  20. Database construction for assessment of chronic radionuclide releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hively, L.M.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Bledsoe, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a comprehensive dose/risk assessment methodology, CRRIS (Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System), for assessment of atmospheric radionuclide releases (e.g., during decontamination and decommissioning). Radiological effects are calculated for direct atmospheric and ground exposure and for consumption of contaminated agricultural products. Previously, population and agricultural data for CRRIS were tabulated on 1/2-degree square grid cells. This coarse resolution resulted in anomalies such as population in water bodies, agricultural production in city centers, and nonconservation of population over the assessment grid. An even finer mesh (2-minute square grid) is inadequate in densely populated cities where 20,000 or more people live in a square block. These difficulties are overcome by a higher resolution technique using US Census Bureau population data at the most detailed [enumeration district (ED)] level available and by excluding population from unpopulated areas (e.g., water bodies). Agricultural data are available at only the county level and are apportioned to the ED grid according to farm population, conserving the original data. This paper discusses the database construction using Tennessee as an illustration. 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  1. Introduction to CRRIS: a computerized radiological risk investigation system for assessing atmospheric releases of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baes, C.F. III; Miller, C.W.; Kocher, D.C.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Murphy, B.D.

    1985-08-01

    The CRRIS is a Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System consisting of eight fully integrated computer codes which calculate environmental transport of atmospheric releases of radionuclides and resulting doses and health risks to individuals or populations. Each code may also be used alone for various assessment applications. Radionuclides are handled by the CRRIS either in terms of the released radionuclides or the exposure radionuclides which consist of both the released nuclides and decay products that grow in during environmental transport. The CRRIS is not designed to simulate short-term effects. 51 refs

  2. Effects of processing on radionuclide content of food -implications for radiological assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, N.; Wilkins, B.T.

    1996-01-01

    Published information on the effects of processing on the radionuclide content of food has been reviewed. Data are scarce: the majority of the available information concerns 137 Cs, 90 Sr and 131 I, with some dealing with 35 S, 210 Pb and 210 Po. For broad assessments of doses to critical groups from controlled releases, processes that can be carried out on a domestic or local scale are of greatest relevance. In this case, food can be prepared in various ways and cooking liquors can also be consumed, either directly or in the form of sauces. Consequently, when making estimates of intakes of activity, it would be reasonable to assume that, that for the majority of food items and most radionuclides, effectively no loss occurs as a result of processing, provided that the activity concentrations in the foodstuff relate to the edible portion. More information on the behaviour of potentially volatile radionuclides during cooking would however be useful. Recommendations are made about the presentation of data on food processing. (Author)

  3. Radionuclide adsorption distribution coefficients measured in Hanford sediments for the low level waste performance assessment project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, D.I.; Serne, R.J.; Owen, A.T.

    1996-08-01

    Preliminary modeling efforts for the Hanford Site's Low Level Waste-Performance Assessment (LLW PA) identified 129 I, 237 Np, 79 Se, 99 Tc, and 234 , 235 , 238 U as posing the greatest potential health hazard. It was also determined that the outcome of these simulations was very sensitive to the parameter describing the extent to which radionuclides sorb to the subsurface matrix, i.e., the distribution coefficient (K d ). The distribution coefficient is a ratio of the radionuclide concentration associated with the solid phase to that in the liquid phase. The objectives of this study were to (1) measure iodine, neptunium, technetium, and uranium K d values using laboratory conditions similar to those expected at the LLW PA disposal site, and (2) evaluate the effect of selected environmental parameters, such as pH, ionic strength, moisture concentration, and radio nuclide concentration, on K d values of selected radionuclides. It is the intent of these studies to develop technically defensible K d values for the PA. The approach taken throughout these studies was to measure the key radio nuclide K d values as a function of several environmental parameters likely to affect their values. Such an approach provides technical defensibility by identifying the mechanisms responsible for trends in K d values. Additionally, such studies provide valuable guidance regarding the range of K d values likely to be encountered in the proposed disposal site

  4. Tumour therapy with radionuclides: assessment of progress and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, Joergen; Forssell Aronsson, Eva; Hietala, Sven-Ola; Stigbrand, Torgny; Tennvall, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Radionuclide therapy is a promising modality for treatment of tumours of haematopoietic origin while the success for treatment of solid tumours so far has been limited. The authors consider radionuclide therapy mainly as a method to eradicate disseminated tumour cells and small metastases while bulky tumours and large metastases have to be treated surgically or by external radiation therapy. The promising therapeutic results for haematological tumours give hope that radionuclide therapy will have a breakthrough also for treatment of disseminated cells from solid tumours. New knowledge related to this is continuously emerging since new molecular target structures are being characterised and the knowledge on pharmacokinetics and cellular processing of different types of targeting agents increases. There is also improved understanding of the factors of importance for the choice of appropriate radionuclides with respect to their decay properties and the therapeutic applications. Furthermore, new methods to modify the uptake of radionuclides in tumour cells and normal tissues are emerging. However, we still need improvements regarding dosimetry and treatment planning as well as an increased knowledge about the tolerance doses for normal tissues and the radiobiological effects on tumour cells. This is especially important in targeted radionuclide therapy where the dose rates often are lower than 1 Gy/h

  5. Tumor therapy with radionuclides; assessment of progress and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, J.

    2003-01-01

    Radionuclide therapy is a promising modality for treatment of tumors of hematopoietic origin while the success for treatment of solid tumors so far has been limited. The authors consider radionuclide therapy mainly as a method to eradicate disseminated tumor cells and small metastases while bulky tumors and large metastases have to be treated surgically or by external radiation therapy. The promising therapeutic results for hematological tumors give hope that radionuclide therapy will have a breakthrough also for treatment of disseminated cells from solid tumors. New knowledge is continuously emerging related to this since new molecular target structures are being characterized and the knowledge on pharmacokinetics and cellular processing of different types of targeting agents increases. There is also improved understanding of the factors of importance for the choice of appropriate radionuclides with respect to their decay properties and the therapeutic applications. Furthermore, new methods to modify the uptake of radionuclides in tumor cells and normal tissues are emerging. However, we still need improvements regarding dosimetry and treatment planning as well as an increased knowledge about the tolerance doses for normal tissues and the radiobiological effects on tumor cells. This is especially important in targeted radionuclide therapy where the dose rates often are low

  6. Natural radionuclide concentrations of cements in Izmir and dose assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanbay, A.; Yener, G.

    1996-01-01

    The growing demand of electric power and the large domestic deposits of lignite coal have made coal-fired plants grow in number in Aegean Region of Turkey. Some of this coals like Yatagan lignites are known to have high uranium concentration (315-405 Bq/kg for coal, 746-1076 Bq/kg for collected fly ash). The stockpiles of fly ash of these power plants are readily available for industrial uses as in the case of cement production. Therefore to assess the doses arising from building materials especially from cement in the cities of Aegean Region a project has been started beginning from Izmir. The traces of radium, potassium and thorium in 45 cement samples which are collected from building constructions in Izmir have been analysed by gamma spectrometry. The mean concentrations of Ra-226, Th-232 and K-40 were determined. The indoor radionuclide doses were calculated using the mean concentrations found in the measurements of this work. The results were compared with those given for other countries. (author)

  7. Radionuclide assessment of skeletal growth and maturation (160 bone scans)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillet, J.; Blanquet, P.; Guillet, C.

    1982-01-01

    Increases in blood supply, and certain metabolic and physical processes, are of special significance in epiphyseal growth centers. Such events are evidenced by the uptake of sup(99m)Tc methylenes diphosphonate (MDP). Bone scans in children and young adults show increased radionuclide uptake in epiphyseal growth plates. Age-related changes in sup(99m)Tc MDP epiphyseal uptake can be used for determining a functional bone age. Radiation exposure is within the range of other routine diagnostic procedures. Scanning was done with a gamma scintillation camera, which supplys rapid, high resolution, studies. In the first five years of life, nearly all the main epiphyseal growth plates were visible symmetrically on routine scans. In six cases, growth plates were visible before the corresponding epiphyseal ossification foci became apparent on roentgenograms. Little bones (hands, wrists, feet, and ankles) were not assessed because of the poor resolution of the parallel collimator-camera system. A slow decrease in epiphyseal growth plate activity was demonstrated in subjects over sixteen years of age. In some instances, this decrease occurred only after epiphyseal closure became visible on roentgenograms. Data described here are not usually employed for clinical purposes, except when viability of a growth plate is doubtful. Functional analysis with sup(99m)Tc MDP is a useful complement to roentgenologic investigation of skeletal growth and maturation [fr

  8. Assessment of radionuclide contents in food in Hong Kong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, K.N.; Mao, S.Y.

    1999-01-01

    Baseline values of concentrations of the natural radionuclides ( 238 U, 226 Ra, 228 Ra/ 232 Th, 210 Pb) and artificial radionuclides ( 137 Cs, 60 Co) in food and drinks (tap water, milk, and water-based drinks) were determined by gamma spectroscopy. All food and drinks were found to contain detectable 40 K contents: 0.1 to 160 Bq Kg -1 for food and 0.006 to 61 Bq L -1 for drinks. Most of the other natural radionuclides in solid food were found to have contents below the minimum detectable activities (MDA). More samples in the leafy vegetable, tomato, carrot and potato categories contained detectable amounts of 228 Ra than the meat, cereal, and fish categories, with concentrations up to 1.2 Bq kg -1 for the former categories and 0.35 Bq kg -1 for the latter categories. The 238 U and 226 Ra radionuclides were detectable in most of the water-based drink samples, and the 228 Ra and 210 Pb radionuclides were detectable in fewer water-based drink samples. The 137 Cs contents in solid food were detectable in most of the solid food samples (reaching 0.59 Bq kg -1 ), but in drinks the 137 Cs contents were very low and normally lower than the MDA values. Nearly all the 60 Co contents in food and drinks were below the MDA values and their contents were below those of 137 Cs

  9. A Bayesian Algorithm for Assessing Uncertainty in Radionuclide Source Terms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Inferring source term parameters for a radionuclide release is difficult, due to the large uncertainties in forward dispersion modelling as a consequence of imperfect knowledge pertaining to wind vector fields and turbulent diffusion in the Earth's atmosphere. Additional sources of error include the radionuclide measurements obtained from sensors. These measurements may either be subject to random fluctuations or are simple indications that the true, unobserved quantity is below a detection limit. Consequent large reconstruction uncertainties can render a "best" estimate meaningless. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) Bayesian Algorithm is presented that attempts to account for uncertainties in atmospheric transport modelling and radionuclide sensor measurements to quantify uncertainties in radionuclide release source term parameters. Prior probability distributions are created for likely release locations at existing nuclear facilities and seismic events. Likelihood models are constructed using CTBTO adjoint modelling output and probability distributions of sensor response. Samples from the resulting multi-isotope source term parameters posterior probability distribution are generated that can be used to make probabilistic statements about the source term. Examples are given of marginal probability distributions obtained from simulated sensor data. The consequences of errors in numerical weather prediction wind fields are demonstrated with a reconstruction of the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident from International Monitoring System radionuclide particulate sensor data.

  10. Research on the assessment technology of the radionuclide inventory for the radioactive waste disposal(I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K. J.; Hong, D. S.; Hwang, G. H.; Shin, J. J.; Yuk, D. S. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-15

    Characteristics and states of management of low and intermediate level radioactive waste in site : state of management for each type of wastes, characteristics of low and intermediate level solid radioactive waste, stage of management of low and intermediate level solid radioactive waste. Survey of state of management and characteristics of low and intermediate level radioactive waste disposal facility in foreign countries : state of management of disposal facilities, classification criteria and target radionuclides for assessment in foreign disposal facilities. Survey of the assessment methods of the radionuclides inventory and establishing the direction of requirement : assessment methods of the radionuclides inventory, analysis of radionuclides assay system in KORI site, establishment the direction of requirement in the assessment methods.

  11. Assessment of permissible low-level releases of radionuclides into the marine environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryshev, I.I.; Sazykina, T.G.

    2002-01-01

    The subject of this paper is radio-ecological assessment of permissible low-level releases of radionuclides in sea waters ensuring the radiological protection of the human population, as well as marine biota. (author)

  12. Pacific Northwest Laboratory facilities radionuclide inventory assessment CY 1992-1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sula, M.J.; Jette, S.J.

    1994-09-01

    Assessments for evaluating compliance with airborne radionuclide emission monitoring requirements in the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs - U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 40 Part 61, Subparts H and I) were performed for 33 buildings at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Pacific Northwest Laboratory on the Hanford Site, and for five buildings owned and operated by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories in Richland, Washington. The assessments were performed using building radionuclide inventory data obtained in 1992 and 1993. Results of the assessments are summarized in Table S.1 for DOE-PNL buildings and in Table S.2 for Battelle-owned buildings. Based on the radionuclide inventory assessments, four DOE-PNL buildings (one with two emission points) require continuous sampling for radionuclides per 40 CFR 61. None of the Battelle-owned buildings require continuous emission sampling

  13. Methods for assessing the long term radiological consequences of radionuclide entry into groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maul, P.R.

    1983-01-01

    The methods have been developed to model the transport of radionuclides in groundwater, based on an analytical approach to the governing transport equations, are sufficiently general to enable assessments to be made of the long term radiological significance of groundwater contamination for a range of possible problems. Although the methods are not as flexible as those based on numerical solutions of the transport equations, they have several advantages, including reduced computing time. The methods described can be used to identify critical parameters and assess the significance of data uncertainties in ground-water transport calculations. Such an analysis, combined with experimental measurements where necessary, can provide a sound basis for assessing potential radiation hazards. (U.K.)

  14. Assessment and treatment of external and internal radionuclide contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    The most serious problems arise from accidents involving radionuclide contamination. This was demonstrated by experience from the Chernobyl and Goiania accidents, where large groups of people were externally and internally contaminated and which demanded significant management efforts from the health and other authorities. It is important that radionuclide contamination be minimized, not only by preventive measures, but also by good medical management when an exposure has occurred. This is an updated Technical Document based upon the IAEA Safety Series No. 88 ''Medical Handling of Accidentally Exposed Individuals'' and IAEA-TECDOC-366 ''What the General Practitioner (MD) Should Know about Medical Handling of Overexposed Individuals''. 26 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs

  15. Renal Function Assessment During Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbas, Belkis; Tuncel, Murat

    2016-09-01

    Theranostics labeled with Y-90 or Lu-177 are highly efficient therapeutic approaches for the systemic treatment of various cancers including neuroendocrine tumors and prostate cancer. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) has been used for many years for metastatic or inoperable neuroendocrine tumors. However, renal and hematopoietic toxicities are the major limitations for this therapeutic approach. Kidneys have been considered as the "critical organ" because of the predominant glomerular filtration, tubular reabsorption by the proximal tubules, and interstitial retention of the tracers. Severe nephrotoxity, which has been classified as grade 4-5 based on the "Common Terminology Criteria on Adverse Events," was reported in the range from 0%-14%. There are several risk factors for renal toxicity; patient-related risk factors include older age, preexisting renal disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, previous nephrotoxic chemotherapy, metastatic lesions close to renal parenchyma, and single kidney. There are also treatment-related issues, such as choice of radionuclide, cumulative radiation dose to kidneys, renal radiation dose per cycle, activity administered, number of cycles, and time interval between cycles. In the literature, nephrotoxicity caused by PRRT was documented using different criteria and renal function tests, from serum creatinine level to more accurate and sophisticated methods. Generally, serum creatinine level was used as a measure of kidney function. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimation based on serum creatinine was preferred by several authors. Most commonly used formulas for estimation of GFR are "Modifications of Diet in Renal Disease" (MDRD) equation and "Cockcroft-Gault" formulas. However, more precise methods than creatinine or creatinine clearance are recommended to assess renal function, such as GFR measurements using Tc-99m-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), Cr-51-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), or

  16. Predicting radionuclide leaching from root zone soil for assessment applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baes, C.F. III.; Sharp, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    A simple leaching model is given for estimation of leaching rates of thirteen radioisotopes. A literature search with radionuclide migration data is presented in tabular form. This data must be considered in any model for predicting radiation doses from agricultural products or drinking water obtained from contaminated soils

  17. Assessment of radionuclidic impurities in cyclotron produced Tc-99m

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lebeda, Ondřej; van Lier, E. J.; Štursa, Jan; Ráliš, Jan; Zyuzin, A.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 12 (2012), s. 1286-1291 ISSN 0969-8051 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : Technetium-99m * cyclotron * proton irradiation * radionuclidic impurities Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 2.517, year: 2012

  18. CRRIS: a methodology for assessing the impact of airborne radionuclide releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baes, C.F. III; Miller, C.W.

    1983-01-01

    The Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System (CRRIS) consists of six fully integrated computer codes which calculate environmental transport and resulting doses and risks to individuals or populations exposed to atmospheric radionuclide releases. The individual codes may be used alone for various assessment applications or may be run as a system. This presentation provides an overview and introduction to this system of computer codes and their use in conducting nuclear assessments. Radionuclides are handled by CRRIS either in terms of the released radionuclides or in terms of exposure radionuclides which consist of both the released nuclides and all (or a subset of) the decay daughters that grow in during environmental transport. The capability of CRRIS to handle radionuclide chains is accomplished through PRIMUS which serves as a preprocessor by accessing a library of radionuclide decay data and sets up matricies of decay constants which are used by the other CRRIS codes in all calculations involving transport and decay. PRIMUS may also be run independently by the user to define the decay chains, radionuclide decay constants, and branching ratios

  19. Accumulation and potential dissolution of Chernobyl-derived radionuclides in river bottom sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanada, Yukihisa; Matsunaga, Takeshi; Yanase, Nobuyuki; Nagao, Seiya; Amano, Hikaru; Takada, Hideshige; Tkachenko, Yuri

    2002-01-01

    Areas contaminated with radionuclides from the Chernobyl nuclear accident have been identified in Pripyat River near the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. The river bottom sediment cores contained 137 Cs (10 5 - 10 6 Bq/m 2 ) within 0-30 cm depth, whose concentration is comparable to that in the ground soil in the vicinity of the nuclear power plant (the Exclusion Zone). The sediment cores also accumulated 90 Sr (10 5 Bq/m 2 ), 239,240 Pu (10 4 Bq/m 2 ) and 241 Am (10 4 Bq/m 2 ) derived from the accident. Several nuclear fuel particles have been preserved at 20-25 cm depth that is the peak area of the concentrations of the radionuclides. Th ese inventories in the bottom sediments were compared with those of the released radionuclides during the accident. An analysis using a selective sequential extraction technique was applied for the radionuclides in the sediments. Results suggest that the possibility of release of 137 Cs and 239,240 Pu from the bottom sediment was low compared with 90 Sr. The potential dissolution and subsequent transport of 90 Sr from the river bottom sediment should be taken into account with respect to the long-term radiological influence on the aquatic environment

  20. Identification and analysis of main radionuclides that potentially contribute to the internal dose for workers at radiopharmacy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanches, Matias Puga

    2004-01-01

    The optimization principle in radiation protection means that there is a reasonable balance between resources used to monitor exposures and the benefits due to the monitoring program. Programs for the monitoring of workers handling radioactive materials are influenced by numerous factors. Estimation of internal doses due to inhalation or ingestion of radioactive materials is often based on measurements of the activity in the tissues of the body and in excreta, following a given intake. In order to enable dose estimations using the biokinetic models recommended by the ICRP and laboratory data, it is proposed to carry out comprehensive study to identify the main radionuclides that potentially contribute to the internal dose of workers at radiopharmacy facilities. The applied methodology for identification of these radionuclides takes into account criteria set out by the ICRP and IAEA. The practical purpose to set up this study was to establish a consistent approach to ensure that the dose assessments are as simple as possible and guarantee the necessary quality standards. The result of this study has indicated the requirement of routine measurements for seven radionuclides over all range of radioactive material compounds, handled at the radiopharmacy plant of IPEN, avoiding unjustifiable work concerning activity levels that are not relevant for the health of the occupationally exposed persons. The main intake pathways, the appropriate monitoring frequencies and derived reference level have also been identified. (author)

  1. Radiological assessment of long lived radionuclides transferred through aquatic pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Florou, H.; Kritidis, P.; Polikarpov, G.G.; Triulzi, C.; Nonnis-Marzano, F.

    1997-01-01

    In this study the main routes of the late Chernobyl debris from the pollution source to the Mediterranean are evaluated, in relation to the long lived radionuclides 137 Cs mainly, while some data on 90 Sr dispersion are also given. The decrease trend of the Chernobyl impact on a closed aquatic system is also evacuated in relation to the 137 Cs deposition during May 1986 over Greece and following measurements during 1987 and 1989

  2. Assessment of impact to effective dose due to radionuclide carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lujaniene, G.; Gudelis, A.

    2002-01-01

    Peculiarities of contamination of the Lithuanian territory after the Chernobyl accident were investigated. Evaluation based on measurements of activity concentration of 137 Cs, 239,240 Pu, 238 Pu, 241 Am and 90 Sr their activity ratio and physical chemical characteristics of their aerosol carriers indicated that the pollution was caused both by condensed and fuel components with different their contribution to the total atmospheric activity on different phases of the Chernobyl NPP accident. Studies of physical chemical forms of actinides showed that two type of fraction distribution were characteristic of aerosol samples Chernobyl origin. They could be interpreted as presence of fuel particles themselves in aerosol samples and possible transport of highly dispersed fuel component on the graphite particles and their burning products. Later the increase in activity concentration in the atmosphere in Lithuania was conditioned by two main sources of radionuclides. They are forest fires and resuspension products transferred from polluted regions. In order to understand better the influence of forest fires on the radionational situation the special fire experiment was performed in the highly contaminated Briansk region (Russia). Data on activity concentration, size distribution and physical chemical forms of aerosol carriers of radionuclides obtained from this experiment were used to estimate effective doses received from inhalation and ingestion of emitted radioactive particles. The calculations of effective doses received from inhalation of 137 Cs, 239,240 Pu, 238 Pu, 90 Sr and 241 Am during the Chernobyl accident in Vilnius showed that the activity concentrations of insoluble radionuclides contributed considerably into effective dozes received from inhalation. The results of calculation indicated that contribution of activities of water soluble and insoluble cesium and plutonium to the total effective dose differed more than by factor. The calculation of effective

  3. Scenarios for potential radionuclide release from marine reactors dumped in the Kara Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynn, N.; Mount, M.; Gussgard, K.

    1995-01-01

    The largest inventory of radioactive materials dumped in the Kara Sea by the former Soviet Union comes from the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) of seven marine reactors, the current (1994) inventory of which makes a total of approximately 4.7x10 15 Bq. In progressing its work for the International Arctic Seas Assessment Project, under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Source Term Working Group has analysed the Source Term and subsequently developed a number of model scenarios for the potential release patterns of radionuclides into the Kara Sea from the SNF and activated components dumped within the marine reactors.These models are based on the present and future conditions of the barrier materials and their configuration within the dumped objects. They account for progressive corrosion of the outer and inner steel barriers, breakdown of the organic fillers, and degradation and leaching from the SNFs. Annual release rates are predicted to four thousand years into the future. 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  4. The variability of the potential radiation exposure to man arising from radionuclides released to the ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proehl, G.; Mueller, H.; Paretzke, H.G.

    1993-04-01

    The variability of the potential radiation exposure of the population is estimated if radionuclides are released from waste repositories to the ground water which is used as drinking for humans and animals, for irrigation of food and feed crops, and for the production of fish in freshwater bodies. Annual effective dose equivalents are calculated assuming normalized activity concentrations in the water. The uncertainty of the exposure due to the uncertainty and the variability of the input parameters. For this purpose, the estimated frequency distributions of the input parameters were used as a model input and processed with Latin Hypercube Sampling and a Monte-Carlo technique. This estimation is based on an exposure scenario which reflects the present conditions. Most sensitive for the resulting potential radiation exposure are the processes root uptake, the contamination of fish, and the intake of drinking water and fish. For nearly all radionuclides, the intake of drinking water dominates the potential exposure. This is in particular true for the actinide and transuranium elements. The consideration of radioactive daughter nuclides for the dose estimation is in most cases of minor importance. The critical group for the exposure due to the use of contaminated ground water are for most radionuclides the children of 1 year. The distributions of the potential doses cover in general about a factor of 10. The uncertainty of the potential dose due to the uncertainty of the exposure scenario is also assessed. Therefore, scenarios were simulated covering typical cases for changes in the biosphere such as the change of consumption habits, the extensivation of agriculture, the simulation of a dry and a wet climate respectively. The influence of the scenario is in general relatively little, if the mean values of the exposures are compared. (orig.) [de

  5. Assessment of environmental impact models in natural occurring radionuclides solid wastes disposal from the mineral industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontedeiro, Elizabeth May Braga Dulley

    2006-07-01

    This work evaluates the behavior of wastes with naturally occurring radionuclides as generated by the mineral industry and their final disposal in landfills. An integrated methodology is used to predict the performance of an industrial landfill for disposal of wastes containing NORM/TENORM, and to define acceptable amounts that can be disposed at the landfill using long-term environmental assessment. The governing equations for radionuclide transport are solved analytically using the generalized integral transform technique. Results obtained for each compartment of the biogeosphere are validated with experimental results or compared to other classes of solutions. An impact analysis is performed in order to define the potential consequences of a landfill to the environment, considering not only the engineering characteristics of the waste deposit but also the exposure pathways and plausible scenarios in which the contaminants could migrate and reach the environment and the human population. The present work permits the development of a safety approach that can be used to derive quantitative waste acceptance criteria for the disposal of NORM/TENORM waste in landfills. (author)

  6. Performance assessment model development and analysis of radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Bruce A.; Li, Chunhong; Ho, Clifford K.

    2003-05-01

    This paper describes the development and use of a particle-tracking model to perform radionuclide-transport simulations in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The goal of the effort was to produce a computational model that can be coupled to the project's calibrated 3D site-scale flow model so that the results of that effort could be incorporated directly into the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) analyses. The transport model simulates multiple species (typically 20 or more) with complex time-varying and spatially varying releases from the potential repository. Water-table rise, climate-change scenarios, and decay chains are additional features of the model. A cell-based particle-tracking method was employed that includes a dual-permeability formulation, advection, longitudinal dispersion, matrix diffusion, and colloid-facilitated transport. This paper examines the transport behavior of several key radionuclides through the unsaturated zone using the calibrated 3D unsaturated flow fields. Computational results illustrate the relative importance of fracture flow, matrix diffusion, and lateral diversion on the distribution of travel times from the simulated repository to the water table for various climatic conditions. Results also indicate rapid transport through fractures for a portion of the released mass. Further refinement of the model will address several issues, including conservatism in the transport model, the assignment of parameters in the flow and transport models, and the underlying assumptions used to support the conceptual models of flow and transport in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain.

  7. Prediction of radionuclide accumulation in main ecosystem components of NPP cooling water reservoirs and assessment of acceptable radionuclide disposal into water reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, Yu.A.; Kazakov, S.V.

    1987-01-01

    The problems of prediction of radionuclide accumulation in ecosystem main components of NPP cooling water-reservoirs (CWR) and assessment of radionuclide acceptable disposal into water reservoir are considered. Two models are nessecary for the calculation technique: model of radionuclide migration and accumulation in CWR ecosystem components and calculation model of population dose commitment due to water consumption (at the public health approach to the normalization of the NPP radioactive effect on CWC) or calculation model of dose commitment on hydrocenosis components (at the ecological approach to the normalization). Analytical calculations and numerical calculation results in the model CWC, located in the USSR middle region, are presented

  8. Hanford Site radionuclide national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants registered stack source assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W.E.; Barnett, J.M.

    1994-01-01

    On February 3, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Division of the US Environmental Protection Agency,, Region 10. The Compliance Order requires the Richland Operations Office to evaluate all radionuclide emission points at the Hanford Site . The evaluation also determined if the effective dose equivalent from any of these stack emissions exceeded 0.1 mrem/yr, which will require the stack to have continuous monitoring. The result of this assessment identified a total of 16 stacks as having potential emissions that,would cause an effective dose equivalent greater than 0.1 mrem/yr

  9. Hanford Site radionuclide national emission standards for hazardous air pollutants registered stack source assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, W.E.; Barnett, J.M.

    1994-07-01

    On February 3, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Division of the US Environmental Protection Agency,, Region 10. The Compliance Order requires the Richland Operations Office to evaluate all radionuclide emission points at the Hanford Site . The evaluation also determined if the effective dose equivalent from any of these stack emissions exceeded 0.1 mrem/yr, which will require the stack to have continuous monitoring. The result of this assessment identified a total of 16 stacks as having potential emissions that,would cause an effective dose equivalent greater than 0.1 mrem/yr.

  10. Radionuclide assessment of renal function in the transplanted kidney

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Yukiko; Maki, Masako; Nara, Shigeko; Hiroe, Michiaki; Kusakabe, Kiyoko; Shigeta, Akiko; Toma, Hiroshi; Kohno, Hiroko

    1985-01-01

    The ability of radionuclide renal function to detect rejection and to presume the prognosis of the transplanted kidney was evaluated in 70 patients. Effective renal plasma flow (ERPF), excretory index (EI) and perfusion index (PI) were examined by I-123 OIH and Tc-99 m DTPA. Numbers of the study in various status were as follows; 51 studies in good function, 43 in acute rejection and 18 in chronic rejection. Significant reduction in ERPF and EI and increase of PI were observed in the acute rejection (p<0.01). In the chronic rejection, there was a progressive decrease of ERPF (p<0.01). The patients were divided into two groups: group A; 46 patients with good function more than 9 months after transplantation and group B; 20 patients of whom recurrence of hemodialysis or nephectomy was done. In living transplantation, ERPF of group B at the first week after transplantation was remarkably lower than group A (p<0.05). In cadaveric transplantation, ERPF of group B at the sixth week was lower than that of group B (p<0.05). This study indicates that serial measurements of renal function by radionuclide methods may provide the state of rejection and prognosis of the transplanted kidney. (author)

  11. Radiation environment impact assessment of field radionuclide migration test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Zede; Han Jingyin; Wang Zhiming; Han Bianlian; Jin Xiaojuan; Yan Yukui

    2000-01-01

    A field radionuclide migration test was carried out under natural and sprinkling conditions at CIRP's Field Test Site. Environment monitoring results indicated that the test did not cause any change of radiation environment quality in and around the test area. After test, contaminated soil in each test pits was retrieved and transported back in CIRP for other research work. All recovery rates of 60 Co, 134 Cs in each test pits is more than 99.99%. After recovery, residual 3 H in former natural test pits is kept in shallow soil and subjected to be evaporated into atmosphere; residual 3 H in other test pits after stopping sprinkling is kept in deep position of aerated zone and can not reach aqueous layer before fully decay. Since its short half life, 85 Sr had nearly fully decayed when the test was finished. Retrieving contaminated soil eliminates possibility of any incidents in future. It is concluded from the point of both total amount and concentrations, that residual radionuclides at the field test site can not cause any unacceptable effect on human and the environment

  12. Chemical conditions in present and future ecosystems in Forsmark - implications for selected radionuclides in the safety assessment SR-Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Troejbom, Mats; Grolander, Sara

    2010-12-01

    This report is a background report for the biosphere analysis of the SR-Site Safety Assessment. This work aims to describe the future development of the chemical conditions at Forsmark, based on the present chemical conditions at landscape level taking landscape development and climate cases into consideration. The results presented contribute to the overall understanding of the present and future chemistry in the Forsmark area, and specifically, to the understanding of the behaviour of some selected radionuclides in the surface system. The future development of the chemistry at the site is qualitatively discussed with focus on the interglacial within the next 10,000 years. The effects on the chemical environment of future climate cases as Global Warming and cold permafrost climates are also briefly discussed. The work is presented in two independent parts describing background radionuclide activities in the Forsmark area and the distribution and behaviour of a large number of stable elements in the landscape. In a concluding section, implications of the future chemical environment of a selection of radionuclides important in the Safety Assessment are discussed based on the knowledge of stable elements. The broad range of elements studied show that there are general and expected patterns for the distribution and behaviour in the landscape of different groups of elements. Mass balances reveal major sources and sinks, pool estimations show where elements are accumulated in the landscape and estimations of time-scales give indications of the potential future development. This general knowledge is transferred to radionuclides not measured in order to estimate their behaviour and distribution in the landscape. It could be concluded that the future development of the chemical environment in the Forsmark area might affect element specific parameters used in de radionuclide model in different directions depending on element. The alternative climate cases, Global Warming

  13. Chemical conditions in present and future ecosystems in Forsmark - implications for selected radionuclides in the safety assessment SR-Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troejbom, Mats (Mats Troejbom Konsult AB (Sweden)); Grolander, Sara (Facilia AB (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    This report is a background report for the biosphere analysis of the SR-Site Safety Assessment. This work aims to describe the future development of the chemical conditions at Forsmark, based on the present chemical conditions at landscape level taking landscape development and climate cases into consideration. The results presented contribute to the overall understanding of the present and future chemistry in the Forsmark area, and specifically, to the understanding of the behaviour of some selected radionuclides in the surface system. The future development of the chemistry at the site is qualitatively discussed with focus on the interglacial within the next 10,000 years. The effects on the chemical environment of future climate cases as Global Warming and cold permafrost climates are also briefly discussed. The work is presented in two independent parts describing background radionuclide activities in the Forsmark area and the distribution and behaviour of a large number of stable elements in the landscape. In a concluding section, implications of the future chemical environment of a selection of radionuclides important in the Safety Assessment are discussed based on the knowledge of stable elements. The broad range of elements studied show that there are general and expected patterns for the distribution and behaviour in the landscape of different groups of elements. Mass balances reveal major sources and sinks, pool estimations show where elements are accumulated in the landscape and estimations of time-scales give indications of the potential future development. This general knowledge is transferred to radionuclides not measured in order to estimate their behaviour and distribution in the landscape. It could be concluded that the future development of the chemical environment in the Forsmark area might affect element specific parameters used in de radionuclide model in different directions depending on element. The alternative climate cases, Global Warming

  14. Assessing the impact of releases of radionuclides into sewage systems in urban environment - simulation, modelling and experimental studies - LUCIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundelll-Bergman, S.; Avila, R.; Cruz, I. de la; Xu, S.; Puhakainen, M.; Heikkinene, T.; Rahola, T.; Hosseini, A.; Nielsen, Sven; Sigurgeirsson, M.

    2009-06-01

    This report summarises the findings of a project on assessing the impact of releases of radionuclides into sewage systems and was established to provide more knowledge and suitable tools for emergency preparedness purposes in urban areas. It was known that the design of sewage plants, and their wastewater treatments, is rather similar between the Nordic countries. One sewage plant in each of the five Nordic countries was selected for assessing the impact of radionuclide releases from hospitals into their sewerage systems. Measurements and model predictions of dose assessments to different potentially exposed members of the public were carried out. The results from the dose assessments indicate that in case of routine releases annual doses to the three hypothetical groups of individuals are most likely insignificant. Estimated doses for workers are below 10 μSv/y, for the two studied radionuclides 99mTc and 131I. If uncertainties in the predictions of activity concentrations in sludge are considered, then the probability of obtaining doses above 10 μSv/y may not be insignificant. The models and approaches developed can also be applied in case of accidental releases. A laboratory inter-comparison exercise was also organised to compare analytical results across the laboratories participating in the project, using both 131I, dominating man-made radionuclide in sewage systems due to the medical use. A process oriented model of the biological treatment is also proposed in the report that does not require as much input data as for the LUCIA model. This model is a combination of a simplified well known Activated Sludge Model No.1 (Henze, 1987) and the Kd concept used in the LUCIA model. The simplified model is able to estimate the concentrations and the retention time of the sludge in different parts of the treatment plant, which in turn, can be used as a tool for the dose assessment purpose.filled by the activity. (au)

  15. Assessing the impact of releases of radionuclides into sewage systems in urban environment - simulation, modelling and experimental studies - LUCIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundelll-Bergman, S. (Vattenfall Power Consultant, Stockholm (Sweden)); Avila, R.; Cruz, I. de la (Facilia AB, (Sweden)); Xu, S. (Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, (Sweden)); Puhakainen, M.; Heikkinene, T.; Rahola, T. (STUK (Finland)); Hosseini, A. (Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway)); Nielsen, Sven (Risoe National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, DTU (Denmark)); Sigurgeirsson, M. (Geislavarnir rikisins (Iceland))

    2009-06-15

    This report summarises the findings of a project on assessing the impact of releases of radionuclides into sewage systems and was established to provide more knowledge and suitable tools for emergency preparedness purposes in urban areas. It was known that the design of sewage plants, and their wastewater treatments, is rather similar between the Nordic countries. One sewage plant in each of the five Nordic countries was selected for assessing the impact of radionuclide releases from hospitals into their sewerage systems. Measurements and model predictions of dose assessments to different potentially exposed members of the public were carried out. The results from the dose assessments indicate that in case of routine releases annual doses to the three hypothetical groups of individuals are most likely insignificant. Estimated doses for workers are below 10 muSv/y, for the two studied radionuclides 99mTc and 131I. If uncertainties in the predictions of activity concentrations in sludge are considered, then the probability of obtaining doses above 10 muSv/y may not be insignificant. The models and approaches developed can also be applied in case of accidental releases. A laboratory inter-comparison exercise was also organised to compare analytical results across the laboratories participating in the project, using both 131I, dominating man-made radionuclide in sewage systems due to the medical use. A process oriented model of the biological treatment is also proposed in the report that does not require as much input data as for the LUCIA model. This model is a combination of a simplified well known Activated Sludge Model No.1 (Henze, 1987) and the Kd concept used in the LUCIA model. The simplified model is able to estimate the concentrations and the retention time of the sludge in different parts of the treatment plant, which in turn, can be used as a tool for the dose assessment purpose.filled by the activity. (au)

  16. Radionuclide assessment of renal function in patients with oncogynecological diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlakhov, N.; Penkova, D.; Kovachev, A.

    1989-01-01

    Results of 131 I-hippuran (0.74 MBq) nephrography and 99m Tc DMCA (55.6 MBq) scintigraphy of the kidneys in 204 women from 21 to 75 years of age are analyzed. All patients were examined before and after treatment (surgical, radiation, hormonal). It was found that combined radiotherapy of patients with cervix uteri cancer and surgical treatment of patients with corpus uteri cancer resulted in aggravation of the secretory and excretory renal disorders, as compared to the pre-treatment state. It was not until after the second year of treatment that normal renal function was reestablished. Radionuclide methods furnish the opportunity both for early detection of renal function disorders and for their dynamic control and treatment. 1 tab., 4 refs

  17. Radionuclide assessment of heterotopic ossification in spinal cord injury patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, V.

    1983-01-01

    Whole body /sup 99m/T-pyrophosphate bone scans were obtained and correlated with skeletal radiographs for detection of heterotopic ossification in 135 spinal injury patients. There were 40 patients with recent injury (less than 6 months) and 95 with injury of over 6 months duration. Heterotopic new bone was detected on the bone scan in 33.7% of 95 patients with spinal cord injuries of more than 6 months duration and 30% of 40 patients with injuries of less than 6 months. The radionuclide scan was found to be useful in detection of heterotopic ossification at its early stage and in its differentiation from other complications in spinal cord injury patients

  18. Chernobyl case study increases confidence level in radionuclide transport assessments in the geosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bugai, D.; Skalskyy, A. [Inst. of Geological Sciences (IGS), Kiev (Ukraine); Dewiere, L. [Inst. for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), Fontenay aux Roses (France); Kashparov, V.; Levchuk, S. [Ukrainian Inst. of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Chabany, Kiev Region (Ukraine); Barthes, V. [Atomic Energy Commission, DRT - DTN Section of Application of Tracers (SAT), Grenoble (France)

    2002-07-01

    Results are presented from the ongoing international study (i.e., Chernobyl pilot site project) on characterization and modeling of fallout nuclear fuel particles dissolution behavior and subsequent radionuclide transport from the near-surface waste disposal site in Chernobyl zone to the geo-environment. The reported experimental work includes: - characterization of radionuclide physico-chemical speciation inside the waste site (trench); - evaluation of infiltration recharge regime through the trench body; and determination of waste soil matrix sorption parameters. In order to describe radionuclide releases from the waste, the multi-component source term model accounting for several types of fuel particles (UO{sub 2}, UO{sub 2+X}, and U-Zr-O matrix) was developed. Application of the source-term model to the Pilot Site data has given satisfactory and encouraging results. The modeling approach has proved to be capable of rather accurately reproducing independent field characterization and monitoring data relevant to {sup 90}Sr speciation inside the trench and radionuclide releases from the trench to the aquifer. The developed parameter database and modeling approach are of general value for radiological assessments of Chernobyl contaminated areas, and for possible similar accidental situations in future. Thus, acquired knowledge and data serve to increase the confidence level in radionuclide transport assessments from nuclear fuel source term to soils and geo-sphere. (orig.)

  19. Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

    1991-06-01

    Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called ``produced water.`` Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

  20. Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

    1991-06-01

    Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called produced water.'' Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

  1. Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

    1991-06-01

    Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called ''produced water.'' Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium

  2. Multimedia radionuclide exposure assessment modeling. Annual report, October 1980-September 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, G.; Onishi, Y.; Simmons, C.S.; Horst, T.W.; Gupta, S.K.; Orgill, M.M.; Newbill, C.A.

    1982-12-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are jointly developing a methodology for assessing exposures of the air, water, and plants to radionuclides as part of an overall development effort of a radionuclide disposal site evaluation methodology. Work in FY-1981 continued the development of the Multimedia Contaminant Environmental Exposure Assessment (MCEA) methodology and initiated an assessment of radionuclide migration in Los Alamos and Pueblo Canyons, New Mexico, using the methodology. The AIRTRAN model was completed, briefly tested, and documented. In addition, a literature search for existing validation data for AIRTRAN was performed. The feasibility and advisability of including the UNSAT moisture flow model as a submodel of the terrestrial code BIOTRAN was assessed. A preliminary application of the proposed MCEA methodology, as it related to the Mortandad-South Mortandad Canyon site in New Mexico is discussed. This preliminary application represented a scaled-down version of the methodology in which only the terrestrial, overland, and surface water components were used. An update describing the progress in the assessment of radionuclide migration in Los Alamos and Pueblo Canyons is presented. 38 references, 47 figures, 11 tables

  3. Estimation of daily food usage factors for assessing radionuclide intakes in the US population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Y.Y.; Nelson, C.B.

    1986-01-01

    We have statistically analyzed data from the 1977-78 USDA Nationwide Food Consumption Survey to estimate the daily average food intakes by individuals in the general population and various subpopulations of the United States. These estimates are intended for use in assessing radionuclide intake by individuals through food consumption. We have also compared our results with those from other studies

  4. Assessment of right ventricular afterload in mitral valve diseases with radionuclide angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Mitsuharu; Nakagawa, Tomio; Kohno, Yoshihiro; Kuroda, Masahiro; Takeda, Yoshihiro; Hiraki, Yoshio; Nagaya, Isao; Senoh, Yoshimasa; Teramoto, Shigeru

    1991-01-01

    Right ventricular function at rest and during exercise was studied in 33 patients with mitral valve disease by equilibrium gated radionuclide angiography using 99m Tc in vivo labeled red blood cells. Radionuclide measurements of right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) were correlated with mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP). RVEF decreased significantly with exercise. There was no significant correlation between RVEF at rest and mPAP. However, mPAP showed significant negative correlation with RVEF during exercise and with the changes of RVEF from rest to exercise. It is concluded that RVEF during exercise in mitral valve disease is affected by right ventricular afterload, and the measurements of RVEF at rest and during exercise by equilibrium gated radionuclide angiography is useful to assess right ventricular afterload. (author)

  5. Assessment and the levels of radioactivity of natural radionuclides in drinking waters in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yulan

    1989-03-01

    In order to assess the levels of radioactivity of natural radionuclides in drinking waters and to estimate the internal doses of the population of China from ingestion, 1650 samples of waters were collected from normal radiation background areas of 28 provinces or autonomous regions of China. Radioactivity levels of U, Th, 226 Ra and 40 K in drinking waters were determined. The levels and the characteristics of distribution of 4 radionuclides are given. The results show that radioactivity levels in the southeast China are lower than in the north and northwest China. The average radioactivity levles of the 4 radionuclides in China close to the average levels given in UNSCEAR 1986 report. The result of estimation of internal doses from ingestion in the population of China is below the corresponding results given in UNSCEAR 1986 report, but near the result given by ICRP

  6. Integrated performance assessment model for waste policy package behavior and radionuclide release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kossik, R.; Miller, I.; Cunnane, M.

    1992-01-01

    Golder Associates Inc. (GAI) has developed a probabilistic total system performance assessment and strategy evaluation model (RIP) which can be applied in an iterative manner to evaluate repository site suitability and guide site characterization. This paper describes one component of the RIP software, the waste package behavior and radionuclide release model. The waste package component model considers waste package failure by various modes, matrix alteration/dissolution, and radionuclide mass transfer. Model parameters can be described as functions of local environmental conditions. The waste package component model is coupled to component models for far-field radionuclide transport and disruptive events. The model has recently been applied to the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain

  7. Integrated performance assessment model for waste package behavior and radionuclide release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kossik, R.; Miller, I.; Cunnane, M.

    1992-01-01

    Golder Associates Inc. (GAI) has developed a probabilistic total system performance assessment and strategy evaluation model (RIP) which can be applied in an iterative manner to evaluate repository site suitability and guide site characterization. This paper describes one component of the RIP software, the waste package behavior and radionuclide release model. The waste package component model considers waste package failure by various modes, matrix alteration/dissolution, and radionuclide mass transfer. Model parameters can be described as functions of local environmental conditions. The waste package component model is coupled to component models for far-field radionuclide transport and disruptive events. The model has recently been applied to the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain

  8. Assessment of radionuclides and heavy metals in marine sediments along the Upper Gulf of Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuntong, S.; Phaophang, C.; Sudprasert, W.

    2015-05-01

    Due to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in 2011 and the development of nuclear power plant in neighboring countries such as Vietnam in the near future, radionuclide assessment in marine sediment during 2010 - 2011 may be useful as background levels for radiation protection in Thailand. Marine sediments (10 samples) were collected approximately 1 km away from the coastline along Chonburi to Pattaya, Chonburi Province. The sediments were ground and sieved through 2-mm test sieve after air drying. Radionuclides were measured with a gamma spectrometer equipped with a well-calibrated HPGe detector. The samples were prepared in the same geometry as the reference material. The optimal counting time was 60,000 - 80,000 s for statistical evaluation and uncertainties. No contamination of 137Cs as an artificial radionuclide was found. Naturally-occurring radionuclides including 238U, 232Th and 40K were found. The mean specific activities of 238U, 232Th and 40K were 44 ± 10, 59 ± 17 and 463 ± 94 Bq/kg in the rainy season (2010); 41 ± 6, 50 ± 9 and 484 ± 83 Bq/kg in the winter (2010), and 39 ± 6, 41 ± 7 and 472 ± 81 Bq/kg in the summer (2011), respectively. The mean specific activities were higher than the values in the UNSCEAR report of 35, 30 and 400 Bq/kg for 238U, 232Th and 40K, respectively. From the measured specific activities, the absorbed dose rate, radium equivalent activity, external hazard index and annual external effective dose rate were calculated in order to assess the health risk. No radiation hazards related to the radioactivity in the sediment were expected. The accumulation of radionuclides varied with the particle size and the organic matter content in the sediment. The accumulation of heavy metals showed similar results to that of the radionuclides in the sediment.

  9. Assessment of hydrologic transport of radionuclides from the Rio Blanco underground nuclear test site, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, J.; Earman, S.; Andricevic, R.

    1996-10-01

    DOE is operating an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close non-Nevada Test Site locations used for nuclear testing. Evaluation of radionuclide transport by groundwater is part of preliminary risk analysis. These evaluations allow prioritization of test areas in terms of risk, provide a basis for discussions with regulators and the public about future work, and provide a framework for assessing site characterization data needs. The Rio Blanco site in Colorado was the location of the simultaneous detonation of three 30-kiloton nuclear devices. The devices were located 1780, 1899, and 2039 below ground surface in the Fort Union and Mesaverde formations. Although all the bedrock formations at the site are thought to contain water, those below the Green River Formation (below 1000 in depth) are also gas-bearing, and have very low permeabilities. The transport scenario evaluated was the migration of radionuclides from the blast-created cavity through the Fort Union Formation. Transport calculations were performed using the solute flux method, with input based on the limited data available for the site. Model results suggest that radionuclides from the test are contained entirely within the area currently administered by DOE. This modeling was performed to investigate how the uncertainty in various physical parameters affect radionuclide transport at the site, and to serve as a starting point for discussion regarding further investigation; it was not intended to be a definitive simulation of migration pathways or radionuclide concentration values. Given the sparse data, the modeling results may differ significantly from reality. Confidence in transport predictions can be increased by obtaining more site data, including the amount of radionuclides which would have been available for transport (i.e., not trapped in melt glass or vented during gas flow testing), and the hydraulic properties of the formation. 38 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  10. Sorption of prioritized elements on montmorillonite colloids and their potential to transport radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wold, Susanna

    2010-04-01

    Due to colloids potential to bind radionuclides (RN) and even mobilise sorbed RN, colloid transport of RN should be taken into account when modeling radionuclide transport in the scenario of a leaking canister in a deep bedrock repository of spent nuclear fuel. Colloids are always present in natural waters and the concentrations are controlled by the groundwater chemistry where specifically the ionic strength is of major importance. In many deep bedrock groundwaters, the ionic strength is fairly high (above the Critical Coagulation Concentration) and therefore colloids are not likely to be stable. In these types of groundwaters colloid concentrations up to 100 μg/l could be expected, and clay colloids organic degradation products and bacteria and viruses represent can be found. In a long time perspective cycles of glaciations can be expected in Sweden as in other Nordic countries. It can not be excluded that glacial melt water can intrude to repository depth with high flows. In this scenario the groundwater conditions may drastically change. In contact with dilute groundwater the bentonite barrier can start to propagate a bentonite gel and further release montmorillonite colloids into water bearing fractures. The concentration of colloids in vicinity of the bentonite barrier can then increase drastically. In contact with Grimsel groundwater types with [Na] and [Ca] of 0.001 and 0.0001 M respectively a montmorillonite concentration of a maximum of 20 mg/l is expected. Further, the groundwater chemistry of Grimsel seems to be representative for glacial meltwater when comparing with the water chemistry data on meltwaters from existing glaciers. A key to be able to model colloid transport of radionuclides is the sorption strength and the sorption reversibility. To facilitate this, a compilation of literature K d -values and an inventory of available sorption kinetic data has been composed for the prioritized elements Pu, Th, Am, Pb, Pa, Ra, Np, Cm, Ac, Tc, Cs, Nb, Ni

  11. Sediment characteristics of the 2800 meter Atlantic nuclear waste disposal site: Radionuclide retention potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neiheisel, James

    1979-09-01

    The sediments of the abandoned 2800 meter Atlantic nuclear waste dumpsite have been analyzed for texture mineral composition, physical properties, cation exchange capacity and factors effecting sediment deposition, as part of an extensive program by the Environmental Protection Agency to evaluate ocean disposal as an alternative nuclear waste disposal method. The sediments physical and chemical properties are evaluated in the light of the geologic setting for their potential role in retarding radionuclide leachate migration from the waste drums to the water column. The sediments are relatively uniform silty clays and clayey silts comprised of approximately one-third biogenous carbonate materials, one-third terrigenous materials and one-third clay minerals. The biogenous materials in the sand and upper silt-size fraction are predominantly foraminifera with minor amounts of diatoms while coccoliths dominate the finer silt and clay size fractions. The terrigenous materials in the course sediment fractions are predominantly quartz and feldspar with minor amounts of mica, glauconite, and heavy minerals. Clay minerals, of the clay-size fraction, in order of abundance, include illite, kaolinite, chlorite and montmorillonite. Relatively high cation exchange capacity in the sediment (15.2-25.4 meq/100g) is attributed to the clay minerals comprising approximately one-third of the sediment. Correspondingly high Kd values might also be expected as a result of sorption of radionuclides onto clay minerals with most favorable conditions related to pH, Eh, and other environmental factors. The biogenous fraction might also be expected to retain some strontium-90 by isomorphous substitution of this radionuclide for calcium. Diagnostic heavy minerals in the sand-size fraction reflect the source areas as predominantly the adjacent continental shelf, and provide important clues concerning the mechanisms effecting transport and deposition of the sediment. Longshore currents along the

  12. Parameters on the radionuclide transfer in crop plants for Korean food chain dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yong Ho; Lim, K. M.; Cho, Y. H.

    2001-12-01

    For more realistic assessment of Korean food chain radiation doses due to the operation of nuclear facilities, it is required to use domestically produced data for radionuclide transfer parameters in crop plants. In this report, results of last about 15 years' studies on radionuclide transfer parameters in major crop plants by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, were summarized and put together. Soil-to-plant transfer factors, parameters quantifying the root uptake of radionuclides, were measured through greenhouse experiments and field studies. In addition to traditional transfer factors, which are based on the activity in unit weight of soil, those based on the activity applied to unit area of soil surface were also investigated. Interception factors, translocation factors and weathering half lives, parameters in relation to direct plant contamination, were investigated through greenhouse experiments. The levels of initial plant contamination with HTO and I2 vapor were described with absorption factors. Especially for HTO vapor, 3H levels in crop plants at harvest were expressed with TFWT (tissue free water tritium) reduction factors and OBT (organically bound tritium) production factors. The above-mentioned parameters generally showed great variations with soils, crops and radionuclide species and application times. On the basis of summarized results, the points to be amended or improved in food chain dose assessment models were discussed both for normal operation and for accidental release

  13. Assessment of human health risk of reported soil levels of metals and radionuclides in Port Hope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    Risk assessment methods are applied to the question of health implications of contaminated soil in the Port Hope area. Soil-related as well as other pathways of exposure are considered. Exposures to the reported levels of uranium, antimony, chromium, copper, nickel, cadmium, cobalt, selenium, and zinc in Port Hope soils are not expected to result in adverse health consequences. Oral exposure to arsenic in soil at the reported levels is estimated to result in incremental cancer risk levels in the negligible range (10 -5 ). Estimated exposures also fall well below suggested toxic thresholds for arsenic. For the two small areas within the >50 μg/g isopleth, assessment of exposure is difficult without more definitive data on soil concentrations in these zones. Contamination of soils with lead is overall quite limited. In general, the reported soil levels of lead are not anticipated to pose a hazard. The site with the highest concentrations of lead is located on the west bank of the Ganaraska River, a popular fishing area. Depending on the level and extent of contamination, as well as degree of contact with the site, potential exposures could exceed tolerable intakes for children. Exposures to the radionuclides Ra(226), Pb(210), and U(238) in soil at the reported levels are estimated to fall well within recommended population limits

  14. Development of alpha-emitting radionuclide lead 212 for the potential treatment of ovarian carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotmensch, J.; Atcher, R.W.; Hines, J.; Grdina, D.; Schwartz, J.S.; Toohill, M.; Herbst, A.L.

    1989-01-01

    alpha-Emitting radionuclides may be an effective alternative treatment against ovarian carcinoma because they have short half-lives and are densely ionizing, with high linear energy transfer to a depth of several cell diameters without requiring cellular oxygenation. One radionuclide that has been generated and tested in our laboratory in vitro and in vivo is lead 212 ( 212 Pb). Intraperitoneal instillation of 212 Pb prolonged survival and totally eradicated tumor in 24% of mice inoculated with the extremely virulent Ehrlich ascites-producing tumor. In vitro 212 Pb was two to four times more effective in killing human ovarian cancer cells than x-rays. Irradiation with 212 Pb increased the radiosensitivity and chromosomal aberrations of cells. In dogs, intraperitoneal instillation of 2.6 mCi of ferrous hydroxide tagged with 212 Pb caused no significant toxicity. It appears that alpha-emitting radionucides such as 212 Pb have the potential to be a new and potent treatment of ovarian carcinoma and could be effective in cases that are resistant to conventional chemotherapy or x-ray therapy

  15. Dosimetry assessment of DNA damage by Auger-emitting radionuclides: Experimental and Monte Carlo studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Maria, S.; Belchior, A.; Pereira, E.; Quental, L.; Oliveira, M. C.; Mendes, F.; Lavrado, J.; Paulo, A.; Vaz, P.

    2017-11-01

    Recently there has been considerable effort to investigate the potential use and efficacy of Auger-electron emitters in targeted radiotherapy. Auger electrons travel a short distance within human tissues (at nano-scale level) and, therefore, if an Auger-emitting radionuclide is transported to the cell nucleus it will cause enhanced DNA damage. Among the Auger-emitting radionuclides, 125I is of particular interest, as it emits about 25 electrons per decay. 99mTc only emits 5 electrons per decay, but presents some attractive characteristics such as a short half-life, easy procurement and availability and ideal imaging properties for therapy monitoring. In order to study the dosimetric behavior of these two radionuclides (125I and 99mTc) at nano-scale sizes and given the DNA-intercalation properties of Acridine Orange (AO), we have designed 99mTc (I)-tricarbonyl complexes and 125I-heteroaromatic compounds that contain AO derivatives, in order to promote a closer proximity between the radionuclides and the DNA structure. With the aim to have an insight on the relevance of these radiolabelled compounds for DNA-targeted Auger therapy, different aspects were investigated: i) their ability to cause DNA strand breaks; ii) the influence of the two different radionuclides in DNA damage; iii) the effect of the distance between the AO intercalating unit and the radioactive atom (99mTc or 125I). To address these issues several studies were carried out encompassing the evaluation of plasmid DNA damage, molecular docking and nanodosimetric Monte Carlo modelling and calculations. Results show that the two classes of compounds are able to induce DNA double strand breaks (dsb), but the number of DNA damages (e.g. dsb yield) is strongly dependent on the linker used to attach the Auger emitting radionuclide (125I or 99mTc) to the AO moiety. In addition, nanodosimetric calculations confirm a strong gradient of the absorbed energy with the DNA-radionuclide distance for the two

  16. Radionuclide cystography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sty, J.R.; Wells, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on radionuclide cystography in infants and children for the detection of vesicoureteral reflux. Vesicoureteral reflux represents a common and potentially serious form of urinary tract pathology. Reflux accompanied by asymptomatic or inadequately treated urinary tract infections has been associated with significant sequelae, including renal scarring, hypertension, and end- stage renal disease. Although there are several advantages and disadvantages to both radionuclide and radiographic techniques for detection of reflux, radionuclide cystography has been found to be at least as sensitive as the voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) for the detection of clinically significant reflux. The major advantage of radionuclide cystography is a significantly lower radiation dose as compared to VCUG. Both indirect and direct techniques for radionuclide cystography have been developed. In addition to detection of vesicoureteral reflux, indirect radionuclide cystography allows evaluation of differential renal function. Supplemental parameters that may be evaluated with direct radionuclide cystography include: quantitation of reflux, determination of bladder volume at which reflux occurs, evaluation of the dynamics of bladder emptying, and determination of residual bladder volume following voiding

  17. REIDAC. A software package for retrospective dose assessment in internal contamination with radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Osamu; Kanai, Katsuta; Takada, Chie; Takasaki, Koji; Ito, Kimio; Momose, Takumaro; Hato, Shinji; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Oeda, Mikihiro; Kurosawa, Naohiro; Fukutsu, Kumiko; Yamada, Yuji; Akashi, Makoto

    2007-01-01

    For cases of internal contamination with radionuclides, it is necessary to perform an internal dose assessment to facilitate radiation protection. For this purpose, the ICRP has supplied the dose coefficients and the retention and excretion rates for various radionuclides. However, these dosimetric quantities are calculated under typical conditions and are not necessarily detailed enough for dose assessment situations in which specific information on the incident or/and individual biokinetic characteristics could or should be taken into account retrospectively. This paper describes a newly developed PC-based software package called Retrospective Internal Dose Assessment Code (REIDAC) that meets the needs of retrospective dose assessment. REIDAC is made up of a series of calculation programs and a package of software. The former calculates the dosimetric quantities for any radionuclide being assessed and the latter provides a user with the graphical user interface (GUI) for executing the programs, editing parameter values and displaying results. The accuracy of REIDAC was verified by comparisons with dosimetric quantities given in the ICRP publications. This paper presents the basic structure of REIDAC and its calculation methods. Sensitivity analysis of the aerosol size for 239 Pu compounds and provisional calculations for wound contamination with 241 Am were performed as examples of the practical application of REIDAC. (author)

  18. Assessment of Dose to the Nursing Infant from Radionuclides in Breast Milk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL

    2010-03-01

    A computer software package was developed to predict tissue doses to an infant due to intake of radionuclides in breast milk based on bioassay measurements and exposure data for the mother. The package is intended mainly to aid in decisions regarding the safety of breast feeding by a mother who has been acutely exposed to a radionuclide during lactation or pregnancy, but it may be applied to previous intakes during the mother s adult life. The package includes biokinetic and dosimetric information needed to address intake of Co-60, Sr-90, Cs-134, Cs-137, Ir-192, Pu-238, Pu-239, Am-241, or Cf-252 by the mother. It has been designed so that the library of biokinetic and dosimetric files can be expanded to address a more comprehensive set of radionuclides without modifying the basic computational module. The methods and models build on the approach used in Publication 95 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 2004), Doses to Infants from Ingestion of Radionuclides in Mothers Milk . The software package allows input of case-specific information or judgments such as chemical form or particle size of an inhaled aerosol. The package is expected to be more suitable than ICRP Publication 95 for dose assessment for real events or realistic planning scenarios in which measurements of the mother s excretion or body burden are available.

  19. Proceedings of the international symposium: Transfer of radionuclides in biosphere. Prediction and assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Hikaru

    2003-09-01

    The International Symposium : Transfer of Radionuclides in Biosphere - Prediction and Assessment was held at Mito on the 18th and 19th of December 2002. This International Symposium was organized by the Interchange Committee on Radionuclide Transfer in Soil Ecosphere. This project is the 3rd Phase Crossover Research, which is engaged in cooperation with five organizations: Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), Meteorological Research Institute (MRI), National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), RIKEN (Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) and Institute for Environmental Sciences (IES). The main objective of this symposium is to discuss and exchange recent findings and ideas in the area of the behavior and transfer of radionuclides in biosphere. One of the important topics in this symposium is to discuss a suitable transfer model and transfer parameters which may be adapted for Southeast Asian countries including Japan, as environmental conditions and foodstuffs in this region are significantly different from those in Europe and North America. It will be hoped that the predictions of the consequences of the release of radionuclides in the terrestrial environment will be improved through exchange of views and new results. The symposium consisted of 12 invited lectures and 44 poster presentations. The 117 participants attended the symposium, including 19 foreigners coming from 12 countries. (author)

  20. Hydrogeological modelling for assessment of radionuclide release scenarios for the repository system 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, L.; Hoek, J.; Swan, D.; Appleyard, P.; Baxter, S.; Roberts, D.; Simpson, T.

    2013-07-01

    Posiva Oy is responsible for implementing the programme for geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel produced by its owners Teollisuuden Voima Oyj (TVO) and Fortum Power and Heat Oy in Finland. Olkiluoto in Eurajoki has been selected as the primary site for the repository, subject to further detailed investigation which is currently focused on the construction of an underground rock characterisation and research facility (the ONKALO). An essential part of the assessment of long-term safety of a repository is the analysis of groundwater flow since it is the only means of transport of radionuclides to the biosphere (besides human intrusion). The analysis of long-term safety for a KBS-3 concept requires as input a description of details of the groundwater flow around and through components of the engineered barrier system as well as details of the groundwater pathway to the biosphere during the current temperate climate period, as well as indications of behaviour under future climate periods such as glacial conditions. This report describes the groundwater flow modelling study performed to provide some of the necessary inputs required by Safety Assessment (i.e. radionuclide transport analysis). Underlying this study is the understanding of the site developed during the site investigations as summarised in the site descriptive model (SDM), and in particular the description of Olkiluoto Hydrogeological DFN model (Hydro-DFN). The main focus of this study is the temperate climate period, i.e. the evolution over the next 10,000 years, but the hydrogeological situation under various glacial climate conditions is also evaluated. Primary outputs of the study are repository performance measures relating to: the distributions of groundwater flow around the deposition holes; deposition tunnels and through the EDZ; flow-related transport resistance along groundwater pathways from the repository to the surface; and their the exit locations. Other analyses consider the

  1. Assessment of Radionuclide Concentrations in Some Public Water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work assessed the concentration of radioactive elements found in some public water samples in use in Makurdi metropolis of Benue State, Nigeria. The study area is an agrarian community where agro-chemicals are normally used and there is a frequent health breakdown as a result of water sources in use.

  2. RANGELAND SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Spangler; George F. Vance; Gerald E. Schuman; Justin D. Derner

    2012-03-31

    Rangelands occupy approximately half of the world's land area and store greater than 10% of the terrestrial biomass carbon and up to 30% of the global soil organic carbon. Although soil carbon sequestration rates are generally low on rangelands in comparison to croplands, increases in terrestrial carbon in rangelands resulting from management can account for significant carbon sequestration given the magnitude of this land resource. Despite the significance rangelands can play in carbon sequestration, our understanding remains limited. Researchers conducted a literature review to identify sustainably management practices that conserve existing rangeland carbon pools, as well as increase or restore carbon sequestration potentials for this type of ecosystem. The research team also reviewed the impact of grazing management on rangeland carbon dynamics, which are not well understood due to heterogeneity in grassland types. The literature review on the impact of grazing showed a wide variation of results, ranging from positive to negative to no response. On further review, the intensity of grazing appears to be a major factor in controlling rangeland soil organic carbon dynamics. In 2003, researchers conducted field sampling to assess the effect of several drought years during the period 1993-2002. Results suggested that drought can significantly impact rangeland soil organic carbon (SOC) levels, and therefore, carbon sequestration. Resampling was conducted in 2006; results again suggested that climatic conditions may have overridden management effects on SOC due to the ecological lag of the severe drought of 2002. Analysis of grazing practices during this research effort suggested that there are beneficial effects of light grazing compared to heavy grazing and non-grazing with respect to increased SOC and nitrogen contents. In general, carbon storage in rangelands also increases with increased precipitation, although researchers identified threshold levels of

  3. Transport of radionuclides in urban environs: working draft assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DuCharme, A.R.; Akins, R.E.; Daniel, S.L.; Ericson, D.M. Jr.; Finley, B.H.; Kaestner, P.C.; Sheldon, D.D.; Taylor, J.M.; Tierney, M.S.; Finley, N.N.

    1978-05-01

    Purpose of this study is to assess the environmental impacts from transportation of radioactive materials in urban environs. The impacts from accident-free transport, vehicular accidents during transport, and from other abnormal situations are analyzed. The approach is outlined including description of the models developed and the data bases employed to account for the special features of the urban environment. The operations and contributions of the task group formed to assist in this study are also discussed. The results obtained for the New York City study area are presented and explained

  4. Transport of radionuclides in urban environs: working draft assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DuCharme, A.R.; Akins, R.E.; Daniel, S.L.; Ericson, D.M. Jr.; Finley, B.H.; Kaestner, P.C.; Sheldon, D.D.; Taylor, J.M.; Tierney, M.S.; Finley, N.N.

    1978-05-01

    Purpose of this study is to assess the environmental impacts from transportation of radioactive materials in urban environs. The impacts from accident-free transport, vehicular accidents during transport, and from other abnormal situations are analyzed. The approach is outlined including description of the models developed and the data bases employed to account for the special features of the urban environment. The operations and contributions of the task group formed to assist in this study are also discussed. The results obtained for the New York City study area are presented and explained.

  5. Assessment of the radionuclide fluxes from the Chernobyl shelter and cooling pond into pripyat river and groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheleznyak, M.; Onishi, Y.; Kivva, S.; Dzjuba, N.; Dvorzhak, A.

    2004-01-01

    The destroyed Chernobyl Unit 4 under the constructed 'shelter' and the Chernobyl Cooling Pond are potentially most hazardous object in the Chernobyl zone. The model based assessment of the consequences of the Shelter collapse on surface water contamination was provided in the frame of the Environmental Impact Assessment of New Safe Confinement (NSC), designed above the Shelter. For the conservative worst hydrological scenario the wind direction was taken to deposit the maximum amount of radionuclides directly on the Pripyat River surface and flood plain upstream the Chernobyl NPP. Assuming the atmospheric dispersion of 8 kg of reactor fuel due to the Shelter collapse, it was assessed that 2.4 TBq of 137 Cs and 1.1 TBq of 90 Sr will be released into the Pripyat River within 3 days. The 1-D model RIVTOX was used to simulate the propagation of released radionuclides through Dniper reservoir cascade. It was shown that the concentrations of 137 Cs and 90 Sr in Dnieper reservoirs for the simulated scenario will not be higher than during last high spring flood 1999. The impact of the NSC on the diminishing of the surface water and groundwater contamination was simulated. Most of the initial contamination of the Chernobyl Cooling Pond (CCP) by long lived radionuclides, such as 137 Cs, 90 Sr and transuranics, has accumulated in its bottom sediments. The water elevation in the CCP is at 6 m higher than in the neighbouring Pripyat river. The scenario of a collapse of CCP's dam, has been considered, which hypothetical cause can be earthquake, dam score during high flood, terrorist attack. The propagation of contaminated water and sediments from the CCP dam breach through the Pripyat River flood plain, downstream river and than through the Dnieper reservoirs was modelled by the chain of 2-D and 1-D models. (author)

  6. A comment on the assessment of internal dose to the total body from radionuclides incorporated into sea food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchiyama, Masafumi

    1981-01-01

    In the equations to assess the dose commitment from the consumption of sea food polluted with radionuclides, the absorption of the radionuclides from the gastrointestinal tract or the fraction of the radionuclides passing from the blood to the body organ of concern and the effective half-time in the organ are included as biological parameters. After summarizing briefly the effects on the parameters from amounts of the stable isotopes, the physico-chemical states in the sea food and the time of age and the duration in which the sea-life was in contact with the radionuclide, it is emphasized that the values of parameters in the equations are not constant but variable, especially in cases of some biologically important radionuclides. (author)

  7. Transportation of radionuclides in urban environs: draft environmental assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finley, N.C.; Aldrich, D.C.; Daniel, S.L.; Ericson, D.M.; Henning-Sachs, C.; Kaestner, P.C.; Ortiz, N.R.; Sheldon, D.D.; Taylor, J.M.

    1980-07-01

    This report assesses the environmental consequences of the transportation of radioactive materials in densely populated urban areas, including estimates of the radiological, nonradiological, and social impacts arising from this process. The chapters of the report and the appendices which follow detail the methodology and results for each of four causative event categories: incident free transport, vehicular accidents, human errors or deviations from accepted quality assurance practices, and sabotage or malevolent acts. The numerical results are expressed in terms of the expected radiological and economic impacts from each. Following these discussions, alternatives to the current transport practice are considered. Then, the detailed analysis is extended from a limited area of New York city to other urban areas. The appendices contain the data bases and specific models used to evaluate these impacts, as well as discussions of chemical toxicity and the social impacts of radioactive material transport in urban areas. The latter are evaluated for each causative event category in terms of psychological, sociological, political, legal, and organizational impacts. The report is followed by an extensive bibliography covering the many fields of study which were required in performing the analysis.

  8. Fractionation of radionuclide species in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salbu, Brit

    2009-01-01

    Naturally occurring and artificially produced radionuclides in the environment may be present in different physico-chemical forms (i.e., radionuclide species) varying in size (nominal molecular mass), charge properties and valence, oxidation state, structure and morphology, density, degree of complexation, etc. Low molecular mass (LMM) species are believed to be mobile and potentially bioavailable, while high molecular mass (HMM) species such as colloids, polymers, pseudocolloids and particles are considered inert. Due to time-dependent transformation processes such as mobilisation of radionuclide species from solid phases or interactions of mobile and reactive radionuclide species with components in soils and sediments, the original distribution of radionuclides deposited in ecosystems will change over time. To assess the environmental impact from radionuclide contamination, information on radionuclide species deposited, interactions within affected ecosystems and the time-dependent distribution of radionuclide species influencing mobility and biological uptake is essential. The development of speciation techniques to characterize radionuclide species in waters, soils and sediments should therefore be essential for improving the prediction power of impact and risk assessment models. The present paper reviews available fractionation techniques which can be utilised for radionuclide speciation purposes

  9. An Exact Solution for the Assessment of Nonequilibrium Sorption of Radionuclides in the Vadose Zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drake, R. L.; Chen, J-S.

    2002-02-26

    , and the Darcian fluid flux density. In addition, the system possesses a stepwise, variable source of radionuclides at the ground surface and a variable flux of pollutants from the vadose zone at the water table. Although this new system is a ''stripped down'' version of the HYDRUS Code, it is a valuable system in its own right for the assessment of nonequilibrium sorption of radionuclides in the vadose zone.

  10. Assessing radiation doses to the public from radionuclides in timber and wood products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-10-01

    In the event of a nuclear accident involving the release of radionuclides to the biosphere the radioactive contamination of forests can become a significant potential source of public radiation exposure. Two of these accidents - the Kyshtim accident, Urals, USSR (now Russian Federation) in 1957 and the Chernobyl accident, USSR (now Ukraine), in 1986 - resulted in significant contamination of thousands of square kilometres of forested areas with mixtures of radionuclides including long lived fission products such as 137 Cs and 90 Sr. Measurements and modelling of forest ecosystems after both accidents have shown that, following initial contamination, the activity concentration of long lived radionuclides in wood gradually increases over one to two decades and then slowly decreases in the subsequent period. The longevity of the contamination is due to the slow migration and persistent bioavailability of radionuclides in the forest soil profile, which results in long term transfer into wood through the root system of the trees. Another source of contamination is from global radioactive fallout after nuclear weapons tests, but the level of contamination is much lower than that from, for example, the Chernobyl accident. For instance, the level of 137 Cs in wood in Sweden is about 2-5 Bq kg -1 from global fallout. Global values are very similar to the Swedish levels. In contrast, the level of 137 Cs in Swedish wood due to Chernobyl is around 50 Bq kg -1 . Levels in wood from some contaminated areas located in countries of the Former Soviet Union (FSU) are about one to two orders of magnitude higher than this. The data on 137 Cs soil contamination within European territories, originating mainly from the Chernobyl accident, illustrate the scale of the problem. For comparison, residual 137 Cs soil deposition in Europe from global radioactive fallout was in the range 1-4 kBq m -2 . There is concern in several countries about the potential radiation exposure of people from

  11. High-tension electrical injury to the heart as assessed by radionuclide imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iino, Hitoshi; Chikamori, Taishiro; Hatano, Tsuguhisa [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)] [and others

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate cardiac complications associated with electrical injury, 7 patients with high-tension electrical injury (6,600 V alternating current) underwent {sup 201}Tl and {sup 123}I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) imaging in addition to conventional electrocardiographic and echocardiographic assessments. Electrocardiography showed transient atrial fibrillation, second degree atrioventricular block, ST-segment depression, and sinus bradycardia in each patient. Echocardiography showed mild hypokinesis of the anterior wall in only 2 patients, but {sup 201}Tl and {sup 123}I-MIBG myocardial scintigraphy showed an abnormal scan image in 6/7 and 5/6 patients, respectively. Decreased radionuclide accumulation was seen primarily in areas extending from the anterior wall to the septum. Decreased radionuclide accumulation was smaller in extent and milder in degree in {sup 123}I-MIBG than in {sup 201}Tl imaging. These results suggest that even in patients without definite evidence of severe cardiac complications in conventional examinations, radionuclide imaging detects significant damage due to high-tension electrical injury, in which sympathetic nerve dysfunction might be milder than myocardial cell damage. (author)

  12. Assessment of hydrologic transport of radionuclides from the Gasbuggy underground nuclear test site, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Earman, S.; Chapman, J.; Andricevic, R.

    1996-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is operating an environmental restoration program to characterize, remediate, and close non-Nevada Test Site locations that were used for nuclear testing. Evaluation of radionuclide transport by groundwater from these sites is an important part of the preliminary risk analysis. These evaluations are undertaken to allow prioritization of the test areas in terms of risk, provide a quantitative basis for discussions with regulators and the public about future work at the sites, and provide a framework for assessing data needs to be filled by site characterization. The Gasbuggy site in northwestern New Mexico was the location of an underground detonation of a 29-kiloton nuclear device in 1967. The test took place in the Lewis Shale, approximately 182 m below the Ojo Alamo Sandstone, which is the aquifer closest to the detonation horizon. The conservative assumption was made that tritium was injected from the blast-created cavity into the Ojo Alamo Sandstone by the force of the explosion, via fractures created by the shot. Model results suggest that if radionuclides produced by the shot entered the Ojo Alamo, they are most likely contained within the area currently administered by DOE. The transport calculations are most sensitive to changes in the mean groundwater velocity, followed by the variance in hydraulic conductivity, the correlation scale of hydraulic conductivity, the transverse hydrodynamic dispersion coefficient, and uncertainty in the source size. This modeling was performed to investigate how the uncertainty in various physical parameters affects calculations of radionuclide transport at the Gasbuggy site, and to serve as a starting point for discussion regarding further investigation at the site; it was not intended to be a definitive simulation of migration pathways or radionuclide concentration values

  13. Impact assessment of radionuclide dispersion due to stuck of sources used in well logging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amado, V. A.; Alvarez, D.E.; Lee Gonzáles, H.

    2015-01-01

    The well logging allows to characterize and to predict the hydrocarbon potential of an area. For this, tools that may contain one or more radioactive sources are used. Eventually, they may be stuck at a certain depth, without viable technical alternatives for recovery. In this case, it is necessary to implement actions that minimize the risk of release of radioactive material into the groundwater, because of the natural degradation of shielding or by the accidental destruction by the unexpected collision with another tool, in a possible future drilling. In this paper, a simplified assessment of the doses associated with the natural degradation and the breakdown of shielding radioactive sources is presented. For this purpose two main pathways of exposure; incorporation by ingestion of contaminated water from the aquifer and external irradiation because of the drilling mud that rise to the surface and distributed over it, are considered. Each of these pathways corresponds to a different scenario. In the first scenario, the evaluation was performed by applying the Dispersion of Radionuclides in Aquifers model that take in account pollutants dispersion in the aquifer unto extraction well water. This model solves the equation of solute transport in porous media in three dimensions, considering soil retention and radioactive decay. In the second scenario the contaminated mud rises from the well to the surface, due to actions taken to retrieve stuck sources or because of new drillings are assumed. The aim of this work is to present a simple and conservative method to estimate doses involved in the natural degradation of shielding or by accidental destruction of sources used in well logging. (authors) [es

  14. Potentiation of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy by the PARP inhibitor olaparib

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Nonnekens (Julie); M. van Kranenburg (Melissa); C.E.M.T. Beerens (Cecile); M. Suker (Mustafa); M. Doukas (Michael); C.H.J. van Eijck (Casper); M. de Jong (Marcel); D.C. van Gent (Dik)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractMetastases expressing tumor-specific receptors can be targeted and treated by binding of radiolabeled peptides (peptide receptor radionuclide therapy or PRRT). For example, patients with metastasized somatostatin receptor-positive neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) can be treated with

  15. Correlations between Natural Radionuclide Concentrations in Soil and Vine-Growth Potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modisane, T.G.D.

    2008-01-01

    Stellenbosch district is known as one of the best wine-producing regions in South Africa and lies 45 km east of Cape Town. It has a large number of estates, of which one of them was earmarked for vineyard development and is of much importance to this study. Soil plays an important role in the development of the vine and ultimately the grapes harvested from the vine. It is therefore important to characterise vineyard soils (quantitatively and qualitatively) and to study the impact of soil properties on the vine. These properties include among others and of importance to this study, the soil ph, concentrations of trace elements, clay content and natural radioactivity concentrations (1). In this study correlations between radiometric data and traditional chemical data in vineyard soils used to infer growth potential were studied. Discussed below are experimental techniques used in the determination of activity concentration of natural radionuclide ( 40 K, 232 Th and 238 U) in soil, data analysis, results and conclusions

  16. Use of radionuclide techniques for assessment of splenic function and detection of splenic remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, S.; Sinha, S.; Sarkar, B.R.; Basu, S.; Ghosh, S.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: The spleen is often involved in hematological malignancies; it is also the site of RBC destruction in thalassemia and ITP. In latter cases, splenectomy is often performed and postoperatively, detection of functioning splenic remnants affect the prognosis adversely. In this study, we assessed the usefulness of radionuclide techniques in : a) assessment of splenic function in primarily non-splenic diseases (benign or malignant), and b) detection of splenic remnant after splenectomy. 12 patients of splenomegaly and 5 patients after splenectomy underwent splenic imaging; imaging was performed using both 99m Tc-sulphur colloid (with first pass) and 99m Tc labelled heat denatured RBCs as tracers. Thus splenic perfusion, morphology and RBC trapping functions were all assessed. The colloid images usually matched the RBC images except in 2 cases where photogenic areas (presumably infarcts) were visualized on RBC scans that were missed on colloid scans. Three of the post splenectomy cases revealed functioning splenic remnants, which was also better visualized on RBC scans. It is concluded that radionuclide imaging could be used regularly for assessing function of spleen, or detecting splenic remnants

  17. Cancer risk assessment after exposure from natural radionuclides in soil using Monte Carlo techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupunski, Ljubica; Spasić-Jokić, Vesna; Trobok, Mirjana; Gordanić, Vojin

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assess fatal cancer risk after external and internal (inhalation and ingestion) exposure from natural radionuclides in soil like (238)U, (232)Th, (40)K, and (226)Ra on the territory of Bela Crkva, Serbia. Although receiving doses are low from sources like natural radionuclides in soil, because of stochastic effects of ionizing radiation, risk for developing cancer exists and can be quantified. Concentrations of radionuclides from 80 soil samples are measured using HPGe detector. Fatal cancer risk is assessed from calculated ambient dose rate in the target organs of body due to external and internal exposure. Monte Carlo simulations are used to obtain conversion factors which are required to calculate absorbed dose rate in target organs. Assessed cancer risk for (238)U in the case of both inhalation and ingestion exposure is from 1.11 × 10(-6) to 24 × 10(-6) for minimal and maximal activity in soil samples, from 1.02 × 10(-6) to 23.3 × 10(-6) for exposure to (226)Ra, from 1.89 × 10(-6) to 50.3 × 10(-6) for exposure to (232)Th, and from 0.265 × 10(-6) to 9.83 × 10(-6) for exposure to (40)K. Overall risk from (40)K as external and internal source is from 0.8 × 10(-6) to 31.9 × 10(-6). Calculated cancer risks from both inhalation and ingestion exposure could be related to all tissues that are on the way of distribution of particles within the body but especially to deposition sites in the body. Assessed risks for fatal cancer development from inhaled and ingested natural radionuclides originating in soil are not increased.

  18. As assessment of the flux of radionuclide contamination through the Ob and Yenisei rivers and estuaries to the Kara Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pauluszkiewicz, T.; Hibler, L.F.; Richmond, M.C.; Bradley, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Recent data indicate that there are potentially large sources of radionuclide contamination on the Ob River system. To quantify the existing radionuclide contamination from a possible catastrophic event data and models have been used to quantify scenarios. Using a compilation of Russian data on the radionuclide contamination, hydrologic data and studies on the sediment transport process a conceptual model has been developed of the Ob system, and a numerical model has been applied to estimate the radionuclide flux to the Kara Sea. The initial results of the river modeling in the Mayak region show how important watershed flow from the marshes are to the hydrologic budget of the area. The preliminary analysis of the sediment flux indicates the need to consider the depositional (storage) regions such as the Asanow Marsh. 31 refs., 5 figs

  19. Assessment of the effect of kinetics on colloid facilitated radionuclide transport in porous media.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerd, van de H.; Leijnse, A.

    1997-01-01

    Binding of radionuclides to natural colloids can significantly alter their transport behaviour in porous media. Dependent on the interaction between radionuclides, colloids and the solid matrix, radionuclide transport may be enhanced or retarded as a result of the presence of colloids. Often,

  20. Update of a thermodynamic database for radionuclides to assist solubility limits calculation for performance assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duro, L.; Grive, M.; Cera, E.; Domenech, C.; Bruno, J. (Enviros Spain S.L., Barcelona (ES))

    2006-12-15

    This report presents and documents the thermodynamic database used in the assessment of the radionuclide solubility limits within the SR-Can Exercise. It is a supporting report to the solubility assessment. Thermodynamic data are reviewed for 20 radioelements from Groups A and B, lanthanides and actinides. The development of this database is partially based on the one prepared by PSI and NAGRA. Several changes, updates and checks for internal consistency and completeness to the reference NAGRA-PSI 01/01 database have been conducted when needed. These modifications are mainly related to the information from the various experimental programmes and scientific literature available until the end of 2003. Some of the discussions also refer to a previous database selection conducted by Enviros Spain on behalf of ANDRA, where the reader can find additional information. When possible, in order to optimize the robustness of the database, the description of the solubility of the different radionuclides calculated by using the reported thermodynamic database is tested in front of experimental data available in the open scientific literature. When necessary, different procedures to estimate gaps in the database have been followed, especially accounting for temperature corrections. All the methodologies followed are discussed in the main text

  1. Handbook for the assessment of soil erosion and sedimentation using environmental radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zapata, F.

    2002-01-01

    Soil erosion and sedimentation are major environmental and agricultural threats worldwide. There is an urgent need for obtaining reliable information on the rates of these processes to establish the magnitude of the problems and to underpin the selection of soil erosion/sedimentation control technologies, including assessment of their economic and environmental on-site and off-site impacts. The quest for alternative techniques for assessing soil erosion to complement existing classical methods directed attention to the use of environmental radionuclides. Including the latest research developments made in the refinement and standardization of the 137 Cs technique by 25 research groups worldwide and featuring the contributions of a selected team of leading experts in the field, this handbook provides a comprehensive coverage of the methodologies for using radionuclides, primarily 137Cs and 210Pb to establish rates and spatial patterns of soil redistribution and determine the geochronology of sediment deposits. This Handbook is an up-to-date resource for soil and environmental scientists, hydrologists, geomorphologists, geologists, agronomists, ecologists, and upper-level undergraduate and graduate students in these disciplines. (author)

  2. TURVA-2012: Assessment of radionuclide release scenarios for the repository system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Paul; Poteri, Antti; Nordman, Henrik; Cormenzana, Jose Luis; Snellman, Margit; Marcos, Nuria; Hjerpe, Thomas; Koskinen, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    TURVA-2012 is Posiva's safety case in support of the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) and application for a construction licence for a repository for disposal of spent nuclear fuel at the Olkiluoto site in south-western Finland. This paper gives a summary of the analyses of the radionuclide release scenarios formulated in a companion paper, TURVA-2012: Formulation of Radionuclide Release Scenarios (Marcos, 2014). The scenarios and the analyses take into account major uncertainties in the initial state of the barriers and possible paths for the evolution of the repository system identified in a further paper: TURVA-2012: Performance Assessment (Hellae, 2014). For each scenario, calculation cases are analysed to evaluate compliance of the proposed repository with regulatory requirements on radiological protection, as well as to illustrate the impact of specific uncertainties or combinations of uncertainties on the calculated results. Each case illustrates different possibilities for how the repository might evolve and perform over time, taking into account uncertainties in the models and parameter values used to represent radionuclide release, retention and transport and, for biosphere assessment calculation cases, radiation exposure. The calculation cases each address a single, failed canister, where three possible modes of failure are considered: - The presence of an initial defect in the copper overpack of the canister that penetrates the overpack completely (subsequent corrosion of the insert may then lead to an enlargement of the defect). - Corrosion of the copper overpack, which occurs most rapidly in scenarios in which buffer density is reduced, e.g. by erosion. - Shear movements on fractures intersecting the deposition holes. However, the likelihood and consequences of more than one canister failure occurring during the assessment time fame are also considered, generally based on the findings from the single canister calculations. Quantitative

  3. Dynamic modelling of radionuclide uptake by Fukushima coastal biota - Dynamic modelling of radionuclide uptake by marine biota: application to Fukushima assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vives i Batlle, Jordi [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    Radiological assessments to non-human marine biota are usually carried out by assuming that the activity concentration in an organism is proportional to the activity concentration in an adjacent volume of water, via a concentration factor (CF). It is also assumed that radionuclides in the water are in isotopic equilibrium with the sediments via a sediment distribution coefficient (K{sub d}). These assumptions are not valid in accidental situations where the biota and the sediments react with a time delay to large variations of activity concentration in seawater. A simple dynamic model was developed to factorise the dynamics of radionuclide uptake and turnover in biota and sediments, as determined by a balance between the residence time of radionuclides in seawater/sediments and the biological half-life of elimination in the biota. The model calculates activity concentration of {sup 131}I, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr in seabed sediment, fish, crustaceans, molluscs and macro-algae from surrounding activity concentrations in seawater, with which to derive internal and external dose rates. A central element of this new model is the inclusion of sediment processes in dynamic transfer modelling. The model is adapted to include depletion of radionuclides adsorbed onto suspended particulates (particle scavenging), molecular diffusion, pore water mixing and bioturbation (modelled effectively as a diffusive process) represented by a simple set of differential equations that is coupled with the biological uptake/turnover processes. In this way, the model is capable of reproducing activity concentration in sediment to give a more realistic calculation of the external dose to biota compared with the simpler approach based on CF and K{sub d} values used in previous assessments. The model is applied to the assessment of the radiological impact of the Fukushima accident on marine biota in the early phase of the accident. It is shown that previous assessment of the

  4. Cardiac tumours: non invasive detection and assessment by gated cardiac blood pool radionuclide imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, D.; Wainwright, R.; Brennand-Roper, D.; Deverall, P.; Sowton, E.; Maisey, M.

    1980-01-01

    Four patients with cardiac tumours were investigated by gated cardiac blood pool radionuclide imaging and echocardiography. Contrast angiocardiography was performed in three of the cases. Two left atrial tumours were detected by all three techniques. In one of these cases echocardiography alone showed additional mitral valve stenosis, but isotope imaging indicated tumour size more accurately. A large septal mass was detected by all three methods. In this patient echocardiography showed evidence of left ventricular outflow obstruction, confirmed at cardiac catheterisation, but gated isotope imaging provided a more detailed assessment of the abnormal cardiac anatomy. In the fourth case gated isotope imaging detected a large right ventricular tumour which had not been identified by echocardiography. Gated cardiac blood pool isotope imaging is a complementary technique to echocardiography for the non-invasive detection and assessment of cardiac tumours. (author)

  5. Equilibrium radionuclide technique to assess the effect of propranolol on left ventricular function in thyrotoxicosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Critchley, M.; Gulliford, P. (Royal Liverpool Hospital (UK))

    1980-11-01

    Radionuclide imaging of the left ventricular blood pool using sup(99m)Tc pertechnetate provides a convenient non-invasive method of monitoring left ventricular function. Left ventricular function is characterised by the left ventricular volume curve which represents all phases of the cardiac cycle and is obtained by a multiple gated equilibrium method (MUGA). Volume curves were obtained over a minimum 1 1/2h period in 15 normal subjects and in 20 thyrotoxic patients. Changes in left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), maximum ejection fraction rate and total electromechanical time interval were recorded from volume curve data. To assess the effect of pharmacological intervention, serial measurements of LVEF were made before and after 40 mg oral propranolol. In thyrotoxic patients, LVEF decreased by 17% of the initial value and in normal subjects by less than 10% following propranolol. This method can be extended to assess the effects of physiological or pharmacological intervention on left ventricular function in other disease states.

  6. Assessing the reliability of dose coefficients for inhaled and ingested radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puncher, Matthew; Harrison, John D

    2012-01-01

    Consideration of uncertainties on doses can provide numerical estimates of the reliability of the protection quantities (dose coefficients) used in radiation protection to assess exposures to radionuclides that enter the body by ingestion or inhalation (‘internal emitters’). Uncertainty analysis methods have been widely applied to quantify uncertainties on doses, including effective dose. However, it is not always clear how the distributions of effective dose per unit intake that result from such analyses should be interpreted with respect to the intended use of effective dose in radiation protection and the use of dose coefficients as reference values. The ICRP system of radiological protection is reviewed briefly and it is argued that the reliability of an effective dose coefficient as a protection device can best be determined by comparing the nominal detriment adjusted cancer risk associated with the dose coefficient, with a best estimate of risk for the exposure pathway and exposed population group, considering uncertainties in biokinetic, dosimetric and risk parameters. Because it is the uncertainty on the population mean of this quantity that is required, the effect of parameter variability should be distinguished from the effect of parameter uncertainty when performing uncertainty analyses. A methodology for performing the uncertainty analysis is discussed and studies that quantify uncertainty on doses and risk from intakes of radionuclides are reviewed. (paper)

  7. UFOING: A program for assessing the off-site consequences from ingestion of accidentally released radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhauer, C.

    1988-12-01

    The program UFOING estimates foodchain-related consequences following accidental releases of radionuclides to the atmosphere. It was developed as a stand-alone supplement to the accident consequence assessment program system UFOMOD to allow faster and more detailed investigations of the consequences arising from the foodchain pathways than possible with the version of UFOING which is implemented in UFOMOD. For assumed releases at different times of the year, age dependent individual doses, collective doses, individual risks for fatal stochastic somatic health effects as a function of time, the total numbers of the effects, and the areas affected by foodbans together with the estimated duration of the bans are calculated. In addition, percentage contributions of radionuclides and foodstuffs to the doses and risks can be evaluated. In the first part of this report, an overview over the program is given. The other parts contain a user's guide, a program guide, and descriptions of the data employed and of the version of UFOING which is implemented in UFOMOD. (orig.) [de

  8. Danish approaches to the assessment of radionuclide migration in the geosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, B.S.

    1988-01-01

    With no immediate need for a large scale engagement in high-level waste disposal, but with responsibilities for available low- and medium rad-wastes, the Danish effort in the field is rather modest and directed towards more fundamental studies of a broader applicability. Experimental work has concentrated on studies of chemical processes which influence the migration like complexformation, multi-element ion-exchange and the formation of solid solutions in coprecipitation reactions or surface substitution. As part of the CEC work concerned with the effect of humic acids on the migration of radionuclides in nature a literature survey over published observations was prepared. Experimental work as well as theoretical studies of the migrations of water and radionuclides through artificial barriers like cement and related studies of the leaching behaviour of conditioned low activity waste forms is being performed. Geochemical modelling risk assessment work has resulted in the construction of the WHATIF program package. At present this work is continuing with the development of enlarged and improved computerprograms. 3 figs.; 1 table

  9. Radionuclide field lysimeter experiment (RadFLEx): geochemical and hydrological data for SRS performance assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Powell, B. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Barber, K. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Devol, T. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Dixon, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Erdmann, B. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Maloubier, M. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Martinez, N. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Montgomery, D. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Peruski, K. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States); Roberts, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Witmer, M. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    2017-12-12

    The SRNL Radiological Field Lysimeter Experiment (RadFLEx) is a one-of-a-kind test bed facility designed to study radionuclide geochemical processes in the Savannah River Site (SRS) vadose zone at a larger spatial scale (from grams to tens of kilograms of sediment) and temporal scale (from months to decade) than is readily afforded through laboratory studies. RadFLEx is a decade-long project that was initiated on July 5, 2012 and is funded by six different sources. The objective of this status report is as follows: 1) to report findings to date that have an impact on SRS performance assessment (PA) calculations, and 2) to provide performance metrics of the RadFLEx program. The PA results are focused on measurements of transport parameters, such as distribution coefficients (Kd values), solubility, and unsaturated flow values. As this is an interim report, additional information from subsequent research may influence our interpretation of current results. Research related to basic understanding of radionuclide geochemistry in these vadose zone soils and other source terms are not described here but are referenced for the interested reader.

  10. Monitoring and assessment of individual doses of occupationally exposed workers due to intake of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, O. A.

    2014-04-01

    Monitoring and estimation of individual intakes of radionuclides can be complex. Doses of intakes cannot be measured directly, however must be assessed from the monitoring data of the individual. The individual monitoring data includes whole body counting, excretion analysis (urine or faecal). In the estimation of these data requires that the assessor makes assumptions about the exposure scenario, including the pattern and mode of radionuclide intake. Also physicochemical characteristics of the material involved and the period of time between exposure and measurement. This project report seeks to provide some underlying guidance on monitoring programmes and data interpretation using case study. In this present study the committed effective dose (CED) 1.20mSv exceeded the recording level (i.e. 1mSv) however it was below the investigation level (i.e. 2mSv). The present study recommends that as an essential part in internal dosimetry, specialists be capable of recognizing conditions warranting follow-up bioassay and dose evaluation. Personnel should be familiar with the relevant internal dosimetry literature and the recommendations of national and international scientific organizations with regard to internal dose. (au)

  11. Long-Term Assessment of Critical Radionuclides and Associated Environmental Media at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannik, G. T.; Baker, R. A.; Lee, P. L.; Eddy, T. P.; Blount, G. C.; Whitney, G. R.

    2012-11-06

    During the operational history of the Savannah River Site (SRS), many different radionuclides have been released from site facilities. However, only a relatively small number of the released radionuclides have been significant contributors to doses and risks to the public. At SRS dose and risk assessments indicate tritium oxide in air and surface water, and Cs-137 in fish and deer have been, and continue to be, the critical radionuclides and pathways. In this assessment, indepth statistical analyses of the long-term trends of tritium oxide in atmospheric and surface water releases and Cs-137 concentrations in fish and deer are provided. Correlations also are provided with 1) operational changes and improvements, 2) geopolitical events (Cold War cessation), and 3) recent environmental remediation projects and decommissioning of excess facilities. For example, environmental remediation of the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins and the Solid Waste Disposal Facility have resulted in a measurable impact on the tritium oxide flux to the onsite Fourmile Branch stream. Airborne releases of tritium oxide have been greatly affected by operational improvements and the end of the Cold War in 1991. However, the effects of SRS environmental remediation activities and ongoing tritium operations on tritium concentrations in the environment are measurable and documented in this assessment. Controlled hunts of deer and feral hogs are conducted at SRS for approximately six weeks each year. Before any harvested animal is released to a hunter, SRS personnel perform a field analysis for Cs-137 concentrations to ensure the hunter's dose does not exceed the SRS administrative game limit of 0.22 millisievert (22 mrem). However, most of the Cs-137 found in SRS onsite deer is not from site operations but is from nuclear weapons testing fallout from the 1950's and early 1960's. This legacy source term is trended in the SRS deer, and an assessment of the ''effective'' half-life of Cs-137 in deer

  12. Assessment of occupational exposure due to intakes of radionuclides. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Occupational exposure due to radioactive materials can occur as a result of various human activities. These include work associated with the different stages of the nuclear fuel cycle, the use of radioactive sources in medicine, scientific research, agriculture and industry, and occupations which involve the handling of materials containing enhanced concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides. In order to control this exposure, it is necessary to be able to assess the magnitude of the doses involved. Three interrelated Safety Guides, prepared jointly by the IAEA and the International Labour Office (ILO), provide guidance on the application of the requirements of the Basic Safety Standards with respect to occupational exposure. Reference [3] gives general advice on the exposure conditions for which monitoring programmes should be set up to assess radiation doses arising from external radiation and from intakes of radionuclides by workers. More specific guidance on the assessment of doses from external sources of radiation can be found in Ref. [4] and the present Safety Guide deals with intakes of radioactive materials. Recommendations related to occupational radiation protection have also been developed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) [5]. These and other current recommendations of the ICRP [6] have been taken into account in preparing this Safety Guide. The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide guidance for regulatory authorities on conducting assessments of intakes of radioactive material arising from occupational exposure. This Guide will also be useful to those concerned with the planning, management and operation of occupational monitoring programmes, and to those involved in the design of equipment for use in internal dosimetry and workplace monitoring

  13. Assessment of occupational exposure due to intakes of radionuclides. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Occupational exposure due to radioactive materials can occur as a result of various human activities. These include work associated with the different stages of the nuclear fuel cycle, the use of radioactive sources in medicine, scientific research, agriculture and industry, and occupations which involve the handling of materials containing enhanced concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides. In order to control this exposure, it is necessary to be able to assess the magnitude of the doses involved. Three interrelated Safety Guides, prepared jointly by the IAEA and the International Labour Office (ILO), provide guidance on the application of the requirements of the Basic Safety Standards with respect to occupational exposure. Reference [3] gives general advice on the exposure conditions for which monitoring programmes should be set up to assess radiation doses arising from external radiation and from intakes of radionuclides by workers. More specific guidance on the assessment of doses from external sources of radiation can be found in Ref. [4] and the present Safety Guide deals with intakes of radioactive materials. Recommendations related to occupational radiation protection have also been developed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) [5]. These and other current recommendations of the ICRP [6] have been taken into account in preparing this Safety Guide. The purpose of this Safety Guide is to provide guidance for regulatory authorities on conducting assessments of intakes of radioactive material arising from occupational exposure. This Guide will also be useful to those concerned with the planning, management and operation of occupational monitoring programmes, and to those involved in the design of equipment for use in internal dosimetry and workplace monitoring

  14. Analysis of the low-level waste radionuclide inventory for the Radioactive Waste Management Complex performance assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plansky, L.E.; Hoiland, S.A.

    1992-02-01

    This report summarizes the results of a study to improve the estimates of the radionuclides in the low-level radioactive waste (LLW) inventory which is buried in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). The work is done to support the RWMC draft performance assessment (PA). Improved radionuclide inventory estimates are provided for the INEL LLW generators. Engineering, environmental assessment or other research areas may find use for the information in this report. It may also serve as a LLW inventory baseline for data quality assurance. The individual INEL LLW generators, their history and their activities are also described in detail.

  15. Analysis of the low-level waste radionuclide inventory for the Radioactive Waste Management Complex performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plansky, L.E.; Hoiland, S.A.

    1992-02-01

    This report summarizes the results of a study to improve the estimates of the radionuclides in the low-level radioactive waste (LLW) inventory which is buried in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). The work is done to support the RWMC draft performance assessment (PA). Improved radionuclide inventory estimates are provided for the INEL LLW generators. Engineering, environmental assessment or other research areas may find use for the information in this report. It may also serve as a LLW inventory baseline for data quality assurance. The individual INEL LLW generators, their history and their activities are also described in detail

  16. Use of thermodynamic sorption models to derive radionuclide Kd values for performance assessment: Selected results and recommendations of the NEA sorption project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochs, M.; Davis, J.A.; Olin, M.; Payne, T.E.; Tweed, C.J.; Askarieh, M.M.; Altmann, S.

    2006-01-01

    For the safe final disposal and/or long-term storage of radioactive wastes, deep or near-surface underground repositories are being considered world-wide. A central safety feature is the prevention, or sufficient retardation, of radionuclide (RN) migration to the biosphere. To this end, radionuclide sorption is one of the most important processes. Decreasing the uncertainty in radionuclide sorption may contribute significantly to reducing the overall uncertainty of a performance assessment (PA). For PA, sorption is typically characterised by distribution coefficients (Kd values). The conditional nature of Kd requires different estimates of this parameter for each set of geochemical conditions of potential relevance in a RN's migration pathway. As it is not feasible to measure sorption for every set of conditions, the derivation of Kd for PA must rely on data derived from representative model systems. As a result, uncertainty in Kd is largely caused by the need to derive values for conditions not explicitly addressed in experiments. The recently concluded NEA Sorption Project [1] showed that thermodynamic sorption models (TSMs) are uniquely suited to derive K d as a function of conditions, because they allow a direct coupling of sorption with variable solution chemistry and mineralogy in a thermodynamic framework. The results of the project enable assessment of the suitability of various TSM approaches for PA-relevant applications as well as of the potential and limitations of TSMs to model RN sorption in complex systems. ?? by Oldenbourg Wissenschaftsverlag.

  17. Organic material in clay-based buffer materials and its potential impact on radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilks, P.; Goulard, M.; Stroes-Gascoyne, S.; Haveman, S.A.; Bachinski, D.B.; Hamon, C.J.; Comba, R.

    1997-03-01

    AECL has submitted an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to evaluate the concept of nuclear fuel disposal at depth in crystalline rock of the Canadian Shield. In this disposal concept used fuel would be emplaced in corrosion-resistant containers which would be surrounded by clay-based buffer and backfill materials. Once groundwater is able to penetrate the buffer and corrosion-resistant container, radionuclides could be transported from the waste form to the surrounding geosphere, and eventually to the biosphere. The release of radionuclides from the waste form and their subsequent transport would be determined by the geochemistry of the disposal vault and surrounding geosphere. Organic substances affect the geochemistry of radionuclides through complexation reactions that increase solubility and alter mobility, by affecting the redox of certain radionuclides and by providing food for microbes. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the buffer and backfill materials proposed for use in a disposal vault contain organics that could be leached by groundwater in large enough quantities to complex with radionuclides and affect their mobility within the disposal vault and surrounding geosphere. Buffer material, made from a mixture of 50 wt.% Avonlea sodium bentonite and 50 wt.% silica sand, was extracted with deionized water to determine the release of dissolved organic carbon, humic acid and fulvic acid. The effect of radiation and heat from the used fuel was simulated by treating samples of buffer before leaching to various amounts of heat (60 deg C and 90 deg C) for periods of 2, 4 and 6 weeks, and to ionizing radiation with doses of 25 kGy and 50 kGy. Humic substances were isolated from the leachates to determine the concentrations of humic and fulvic acids and to determine their functional group content by acid-base titrations. The results showed that groundwater would leach significant amounts of organics that would complex with radionuclides such as

  18. The variability of the potential radiation exposure to man arising from radionuclides released to the ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proehl, G.; Mueller, H.

    1994-12-01

    The variability of the potential radiation exposure of the population is estimated if radionuclides (Np-237, Tc-99, I-129, Cs-135, Ra-226, U-238) are released to the ground water which is used by man as drinking water for humans and animals, for irrigation of food and feed crops, and for the production of fish in freshwater bodies. Annual effective dose equivalents are calculated assuming a normalized activity concentration in the water of 1 Bq/l for each radionuclide considered. An important aim is the estimation of the uncertainty of the exposure due to the uncertainty and the variability of the input parameters. The estimated frequency distributions of the input parameters were used as a model input and processed with Latin Hypercube Sampling and a Monte-Carlo technique. This estimation is based on an exposure scenario which reflects the present conditions. The critical group for the exposure due to the use of contaminated ground water are for most radionuclides the children of 1 year, although the activity intake of children is much lower than for adults. However the ingestion dose factors for infants are higher; in many cases the differences are higher than a factor of 5. (orig./HP)

  19. Stable tracer investigations in humans for assessing the biokinetics of ruthenium and zirconium radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veronese, I.; Cantone, M.C.; Giussani, A.; Maggioni, T.; Birattari, C.; Bondardi, M.; Groppi, F.; Garlaschelli, I.; Werner, E.; Roth, P.; Hoellriegl, V.; Louvat, P.; Felgenhauer, N.; Zilker, Th.

    2003-01-01

    The interest in the biokinetics of ruthenium and zirconium in humans is justified by the potential radiological risk represented by their radionuclides. Only a few data related to the biokinetics of ruthenium and zirconium in humans are available and, accordingly, the biokinetic models currently recommended by the ICRP for these elements are mainly based on data from animal experiments. The use of stable isotopes as tracers, coupled with a proper analytical technique (nuclear activation analysis with protons) for their determination in biological samples, represents an ethically acceptable methodology for biokinetic investigations, being free from any radiation risk for the volunteer subjects. In this work, the results obtained in eight biokinetic investigations for ruthenium, conducted on a total of three healthy volunteers, and six for zirconium, performed on a total of three subjects, are presented and compared to the predictions of the ICRP models. (author)

  20. The value of radionuclide angiography for risk assessment of patients following acute myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, K.G.

    1985-01-01

    Radionuclide angiography (RNA) is an accurate noninvasive method for the evaluation of left ventricular function at rest and exercise. Both the change in ejection fraction from rest to exercise and the exercise ejection fraction correlate with the severity of coronary artery disease and are more sensitive than ST-segment changes for detecting abnormalities due to exercise-induced myocardial ischemia. The amount of left ventricular dysfunction produced acutely by myocardial ischemia appears to vary linearly with the severity of ischemia produced. Thus rest and exercise RNA provide information noninvasively regarding both the severity of left ventricular dysfunction and the amount of potentially ischemic myocardium, two of the three major pathophysiologic mechanisms related to prognosis. It is reasonable to hypothesize that rest and exercise RNA may provide useful prognostic information concerning subsequent mortality and morbidity in survivors of acute myocardial infarction

  1. Ecological risk assessment of radionuclides in the Columbia River System ''a historical assessment''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friant, S.L.; Brandt, C.A.; Probasco, K.M.

    1993-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in southcentral Washington State has been the location of nuclear production activities since 1943. Radioactive effluents were discharged to the Columbia River, which runs through the northern portion of the Site and borders it on the east (the Hanford Reach). The assessment was conducted using historical Hanford Site monitoring data for the aquatic environment of the Columbia River over the time period from 1963 to 1964. The time period was chosen because it was then that peak production of nuclear material was occurring and the maximum number of reactors were operational. Exposure characterization consisted of measured radioactivity in water, sediments, and biota. Two approaches were used in assessing ecological risk to Columbia River organisms. In the first approach, environmental exposure data were used to calculate internal dose to a variety of aquatic organisms, including the most sensitive receptors (fish). In the second approach, measured tissue concentrations were used for selected aquatic organisms to calculate organism internal dose directly. Organism dose was used to assess potential toxic effects and assess regulatory compliance. Risk characterization was developed by comparing dose levels in fish and other organisms found in the Columbia River to known concentrations through a hazard quotient for acute dose and developmental effects

  2. Response of left ventricular volume to exercise in man assessed by radionuclide equilibrium angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slutsky, R.; Karliner, J.; Ricci, D.; Schuler, G.; Pfisterer, M.; Peterson, K.; Ashburn, W.

    1979-01-01

    To assess the effects of exercise on left ventricular volumes we studied 10 normal men, 15 patients with coronary disease who developed angina pectoris during exercise, and 10 patients with known coronary disease who did not develop angina during exercise. Each subject performed supine bicycle exercise under a mobile, single-crystal scintillation camera until angina or fatigue occurred. Technetium-99m bound to human serum albumin was the imaging agent. Data were collected at rest and during the last 2 minutes of each 3-minute stage of exercise and for 10 minutes after exercise. Volumes were calculated by a new radionuclide technique that correlated well with cineangiography and is expressed in nondimensional units. In normal subjects, the end-diastolic volume (EDV) at rest was not different from that a peak exercise. The end-systolic volume (ESV) decreased at peak exercise. ESV decreased progressively in all but two of 30 exercise periods. Angina patients had a larger EDV at rest and during chest pain than normals. Angina patients increased their ESV during chest pain resulting in a decreased ejection fraction (EF). All angina patients had a higher ESV during chest pain than during the exercise stage before chest pain. As a group, patients who did not develop angina had a lower EDV at rest and peak exercise than those who did develop angina. We conclude: that the EF increases during exercise due to a decrease in ESV; that the EF in patients with angina decreases because of an increase in ESV; and that the EF in coronary disease patients without angina shows no change because there is no significant change in the ESV. Radionuclide equilibrium angiography may prove useful for assessing EF and volume changes in patients with coronary artery disease

  3. Migration of radionuclides in the soil-crop-food product system and assessment of agricultural countermeasures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogdevitch, I.; Ageyets, V.

    1996-01-01

    Studies on dynamics of redistribution of radionuclides through of profile of the different soils on uncultivated agricultural lands of Belarus during the 1986-1995 period show that vertical migration occurs with low rate. In arable soils the radionuclides are distributed in comparatively uniform way through the whole depth of the 25-30 cm cultivated layer. Investigations on migration of radionuclides with wind erosion on the drained series of wet sandy and peat soils and water erosion on sloping lands show that one should take into consideration the secondary contamination of soils while forecasting a possible accumulation of radionuclides in farm products

  4. Compilation and comparison of radionuclide sorption databases used in recent performance assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinley, I.G.; Scholtis, A.

    1992-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to review the radionuclide sorption databases which have been used in performance assessments published within the last decade. It was hoped that such a review would allow areas of consistency to be identified, possibly indicating nuclide/rock/water systems which are now well characterised. Inconsistencies, on the other hand, might indicate areas in which further work is required. This study followed on from a prior review of the various databases which had been used in Swiss performance assessments. The latter was, however, considerably simplified by the fact that the authors had been heavily involved in sorption database definition for these assessments. The first phase of the current study was based entirely on available literature and it was quickly evident that the analyses would be much more complex (and time consuming) than initially envisaged. While some assessments clearly list all sorption data used, others depend on secondary literature (which may or may not be clearly referenced) or present sorption data which has been transmogrified into another form (e.g. into a retardation factor -c.f. following section). This study focused on database used (or intended) for performance assessment which have been published within the last 10 years or so. 45 refs., 12 tabs., 1 fig

  5. ASSESSMENT OF RADIONUCLIDES DATABASES IN CAP88 MAINFRAME VERSION 1.0 AND WINDOWS-BASED VERSION 3.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfan, E.; Lee, P.; Jannik, T.; Donnelly, E.

    2008-09-16

    In this study the radionuclide databases for two versions of the Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988 (CAP88) computer model were assessed in detail. CAP88 estimates radiation dose and the risk of health effects to human populations from radionuclide emissions to air. This program is used by several Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to comply with National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) regulations. CAP88 Mainframe, referred to as Version 1.0 on the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) website (http://www.epa.gov/radiation/assessment/CAP88/), was the very first CAP88 version released in 1988. Some DOE facilities including the Savannah River Site still employ this version (1.0) while others use the more user-friendly personal computer Windows-based Version 3.0 released in December 2007. Version 1.0 uses the program RADRISK based on International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 30 as its radionuclide database. Version 3.0 uses half-life, dose and risk factor values based on Federal Guidance Report 13. Differences in these values could cause different results for the same input exposure data (same scenario), depending on which version of CAP88 is used. Consequently, the differences between the two versions are being assessed in detail at Savannah River National Laboratory. The version 1.0 and 3.0 database files contain 496 and 838 radionuclides, respectively, and though one would expect the newer version to include all the 496 radionuclides, thirty-five radionuclides are listed in version 1.0 that are not included in version 3.0. The majority of these has either extremely short or long half-lives or is no longer in production; however, some of the short-lived radionuclides might produce progeny of great interest at DOE sites. In addition, one hundred and twenty-two radionuclides were found to have different half-lives in the two versions, with 21 over 3 percent different and 12 over 10 percent different.

  6. Assessment of radionuclide databases in CAP88 mainframe version 1.0 and Windows-based version 3.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBone, Elizabeth D; Farfán, Eduardo B; Lee, Patricia L; Jannik, G Timothy; Donnelly, Elizabeth H; Foley, Trevor Q

    2009-09-01

    In this study the radionuclide databases for two versions of the Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988 (CAP88) computer model were assessed in detail. CAP88 estimates radiation dose and the risk of health effects to human populations from radionuclide emissions to air. This program is used by several U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to comply with National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants regulations. CAP88 Mainframe, referred to as version 1.0 on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Web site (http://www.epa.gov/radiation/assessment/CAP88/), was the very first CAP88 version released in 1988. Some DOE facilities including the Savannah River Site still employ this version (1.0) while others use the more user-friendly personal computer Windows-based version 3.0 released in December 2007. Version 1.0 uses the program RADRISK based on International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 30 as its radionuclide database. Version 3.0 uses half-life, dose, and risk factor values based on Federal Guidance Report 13. Differences in these values could cause different results for the same input exposure data (same scenario), depending on which version of CAP88 is used. Consequently, the differences between the two versions are being assessed in detail at Savannah River National Laboratory. The version 1.0 and 3.0 database files contain 496 and 838 radionuclides, respectively, and though one would expect the newer version to include all the 496 radionuclides, 35 radionuclides are listed in version 1.0 that are not included in version 3.0. The majority of these has either extremely short or long half-lives or is no longer in production; however, some of the short-lived radionuclides might produce progeny of great interest at DOE sites. In addition, 122 radionuclides were found to have different half-lives in the two versions, with 21 over 3 percent different and 12 over 10 percent different.

  7. The potential for gamma-emitting radionuclides to contribute to an understanding of erosion processes in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. L. Foster

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Several research projects undertaken by the authors and others over the last 14 years have used fallout and geogenic radionuclides for understanding erosion processes and sediment yield dynamics in South Africa over the last 100–200 years as European settlers colonised the interior plains and plateaux of the country and imported new livestock and farming techniques to the region. These projects have used two fallout radionuclides (210Pb and 137Cs to date sediments accumulating in reservoirs, farm dams, wetlands, alluvial fans and floodouts and have used other fallout nuclides (7Be and long-lived geogenic radionuclides (e.g. 40K, 235U as part of a composite fingerprint exploring contemporary sediment sources and changes to sources through time. While successful in many parts of the world, applying these techniques in Southern Africa has posed a number of challenges often not encountered elsewhere. Here we explore some of the benefits and challenges in using gamma-emitting radionuclides, especially 137Cs, in these landscapes. Benefits include the potential for discriminating gully sidewall from topsoil sources, which has helped to identify contemporary gully systems as sediment conduits, rather than sources, and for providing a time-synchronous marker horizon in a range of sedimentary environments that has helped to develop robust chronologies. Challenges include the spatial variability in soil cover on steep rocky hillslopes, which is likely to challenge assumptions about the uniformity of initial fallout nuclide distribution, the paucity of stable (non-eroding sites in order to estimate atmospheric fallout inventories, and the limited success of 210Pb dating in some rapidly accumulating high altitude catchments where sediments often comprise significant amounts of sand and gravel. Despite these challenges we present evidence suggesting that the use of gamma-emitting radionuclides can make a significant contribution to our understanding of

  8. Vegetation-derived insights on the mobilization and potential transport of radionuclides from the Nopal I natural analog site, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leslie, B.W.; Pickett, D.A.; Pearcy, E.C.

    1999-07-01

    The Nopal I uranium (U) deposit, Pena Blanca, Mexico is a source term and contaminant transport natural analog to the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In an attempt to characterize the mobilization and potential transport of radionuclides in the unsaturated zone at the Nopal I deposit, vegetation growing on ore piles was analyzed for {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 232}Th decay-series isotopes. Specimens of Phacelia robusta growing on high-grade piles of U ore were collected and analyzed by alpha autoradiography, and by alpha and gamma spectrometry. Activities for U, thorium (Th), and radium (Ra) isotopes (Bq/kg dried plant) were 300, 1,000, and 7,000 for {sup 238}U, {sup 230}Th, and {sup 226}Ra, respectively. The {sup 226}Ra activities in these specimens are among the highest ever measured for plants; furthermore, the plant-to-soil {sup 226}Ra concentration ratio is higher than expected. These results demonstrate the large mobility and bio-availability of Ra in the Nopal I environment, and support previous indications of recent loss of {sup 226}Ra from the ore body. Comparison between the activities of {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th decay-chain Th isotopes in the plants and in the ore substrate indicate that relative mobilization into pore solutions of {sup 228}Th > {sup 230}Th > {sup 232}Th, in a ratio of about 50--25:4:1, respectively. The similarity of the plant's {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratio ({approximately}1.2) to that of a caliche deposit that formed adjacent to the Nopal ore body around 54 ka suggests the {sup 234}U/{sup 238}U activity ratio of U released from the ore is approximately 1.2. The U and {sup 226}Ra isotope activities of the plants and ore substrate, and solubility considerations, are used to assess a source term model of the potential Yucca Mountain repository. These results suggest the use of a natural analog source term model in performance assessments may be non-conservative.

  9. Investigation of the potential of fuzzy sets and related approaches for treating uncertainties in radionuclide transfer predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, W.; Grindrod, P.

    1989-01-01

    This document encompasses two main items. The first consists of a review of four aspects of fuzzy sets, namely, the general framework, the role of expert judgment, mathematical and computational aspects, and present applications. The second consists of the application of fuzzy-set theory to simplified problems in radionuclide migration, with comparisons between fuzzy and probabilistic approaches, treated both analytically and computationally. A new approach to fuzzy differential equations is presented, and applied to simple ordinary and partial differential equations. It is argued that such fuzzy techniques represent a viable alternative to probabilistic risk assessment, for handling systems subject to uncertainties

  10. Monitored Natural Attenuation of Inorganic Contaminants in Ground Water Volume 3 Assessment for Radionuclides IncludingTritium, Radon, Strontium, Technetium, Uranium, Iodine, Radium, Thorium, Cesium, and Plutonium-Americium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The current document represents the third volume of a set of three volumes that address the technical basis and requirements for assessing the potential applicability of MNA as part of a ground-water remedy for plumes with nonradionuclide and/or radionuclide inorganic contamina...

  11. Safety assessments for potential exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, D.I.

    2012-04-01

    Safety Assessment of potential exposures have been carried out in major practices, namely: industrial radiography, gamma irradiators and electron accelerators used in industry and research, and radiotherapy. This paper focuses on reviewing safety assessment methodologies and using developed software to analyse radiological accidents, also review, and discuss these past accidents.The primary objective of the assessment is to assess the adequacy of planned or existing measures for protection and safety and to identify any additional measures that should be put in place. As such, both routine use of the source and the probability and magnitude of potential exposures arising from accidents or incidents should be considered. Where the assessment indicates that there is a realistic possibility of an accident affecting workers or members of the public or having consequences for the environment, the registrant or licensee should prepare a suitable emergency plan. A safety assessment for normal operation addresses all the conditions under which the radiation source operates as expected, including all phases of the lifetime of the source. Due account needs to be taken of the different factors and conditions that will apply during non-operational phases, such as installation, commissioning and maintenance. (author)

  12. Quantitative assessment of accumulation of radionuclides in fish organism in dependence on water temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katkov, A.E.

    1980-01-01

    Eperimentally studied are the changes of levels of several indices of radionuclide metabolism in fishes in dependence on water temperature at its absorption directly from water and at introduction into the digestive tract. Presented are the coefficients of radionuclide storage by the fish tissues in the dependence on temperature (scales and fins, gills, head, intestines, skin, muscles, axial skeleton) and the coefficients of radionuclide retention in the whole fish. It is shown that the connection between the coefficient of radionuclide storage in the fish organism and water temperature is described by the logarithmic dependence. At the systematic entering of radionuclides into the digestive tract the retention coefficient of them in the organism expressed in the form of the ratio of residual quantity in the fish to the quantity in day dose is constant

  13. Assessment of sistemic ventricle function in corrected transposition of great arteries with Gated SPECT: comparison with radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexanderson, E.; Espinola, N.; Duenas, D.; Fermon, S.; Acevedo, C.; Martinez, C.

    2002-01-01

    Corrected trasposition of great arteries is a uncommon congenital heart disease where the right ventricle works as the sistemic one. QGS Gated SPECT program was designed to recognize the contours of left ventricle being a good method to evaluate left ventricle ejection fraction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the right ventricle ejection fraction (RVEF) by gated SPECT using Tc-99mSestaMIBI in comparison with radionuclide ventriculography (RVG) in patients with corrected trasposition of great arteries. Methods: We performed gated SPECT and radionuclide ventriculography within 15 days of each other in 7 adults consecutive patients with the diagnosis of corrected trasposition of great arteries (5 men, 2 women; mean age 47 y). Gated tomographic data, including ventricular volumes and ejection fraction, were processed using QGS automatic algorithm, whereas equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography used standard techniques. Results: We found a good correlation between right ventricle ejection fraction obtained with Gated SPECT compared with equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography. The mean of the RVEF with Gated SPECT was 41.2% compared with 44.2% of RVEF with equilibrium radionuclide ventriculography. Both methods recognized abnormal RVEF in 5 patients ( 50%) with Gated SPECT and abnormal with RVG meanwhile another patient had normal RVEF with RVG and abnormal with Gated SPECT. Conclusion: Quantitative gated tomography, using Tc 99mSestaMIBI, has a good correlation with radionuclide ventriculography for the assessment of right ventricle ejection fraction in patients with corrected trasposition of great arteries. These results support the clinical use of this technique among these patients

  14. Microbially-mediated Iron Dissolution and the Potential for Radionuclide Redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lack, J. G.; Maldonado, D.; Rivere, T.; Forsythe, J.; Boukhalfa, H.; Ruggiero, C.; Neu, M.; Traina, S.; Hersman, L.

    2003-12-01

    Investigation into microbial iron dissolution and the effects on radionuclides associated with Fe-containing minerals is of significant importance in determining the distribution and fate of actinides (e.g. uranium, plutonium, neptunium) in contaminated environments. Nearly all microorganisms have a metabolic requirement for iron at ~10-7 M for growth and survival. Iron, while abundant, only has a solubility product in the range of 10-39 to 10-44 M Fe that limits its available concentration in the environment to ~10-17 M. Thus, microorganisms are faced with a discrepancy of ~10 orders of magnitude to overcome in acquiring Fe needed for growth. Experiments were performed with two ubiquitous aerobic Pseudomonads (Pseudomonas mendocina and P. putida) to determine their ability to grow on iron-deficient media utilizing insoluble Fe-oxides as well as soluble Fe as their iron sources. Bacterial growth was observed indicating that the bacteria are actively sequestering Fe from the minerals via dissolution mechanism(s). Moreover, different pathways of dissolution used in obtaining iron from different Fe-oxides (ferrihydrite, goethite, and hematite) were quantified by determining siderophore production - an average of ~4-6 x 10-13 mmol x cell-1 when the cells were grown on either of the three minerals studied, while as expected much more siderophore was generated on a per cell basis in the no Fe control, ~15-16 x 10-13 mmol x cell-1, and much less in the readily accessible soluble Fe control (FeEDTA), ~1.5 x 10-13 mmol x cell-1; and reductant production - an average of about ~1-4 x 10-18 mol x cell-1 both cell associated and in the supernatant for hematite, goethite, and FeEDTA, while the cells grown on ferrihydrite produced a much greater amount of reductant per cell, ~14-26 x 10-18 mol x cell-1 and the no Fe control ~6-9 x 10-18 mol x cell-1. These studies of different dissolution mechanisms are not only significant from a geomicrobial view on iron distribution and

  15. Radionuclides in the Arctic seas from the former Soviet Union: Potential health and ecological risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Layton, D.W.; Edson, R.; Varela, M.; Napier, B.

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of the assessment reported here is to evaluate the health and environmental threat to coastal Alaska posed by radioactive-waste dumping in the Arctic and Northwest Pacific Oceans by the FSU. In particular, the FSU discarded 16 nuclear reactors from submarines and an icebreaker in the Kara Sea near the island of Novaya Zemlya, of which 6 contained spent nuclear fuel (SNF); disposed of liquid and solid wastes in the Sea of Japan; lost a 90 Sr-powered radioisotope thermoelectric generator at sea in the Sea of Okhotsk; and disposed of liquid wastes at several sites in the Pacific Ocean, east of the Kamchatka Peninsula. In addition to these known sources in the oceans, the RAIG evaluated FSU waste-disposal practices at inland weapons-development sites that have contaminated major rivers flowing into the Arctic Ocean. The RAIG evaluated these sources for the potential for release to the environment, transport, and impact to Alaskan ecosystems and peoples through a variety of scenarios, including a worst-case total instantaneous and simultaneous release of the sources under investigation. The risk-assessment process described in this report is applicable to and can be used by other circumpolar countries, with the addition of information about specific ecosystems and human life-styles. They can use the ANWAP risk-assessment framework and approach used by ONR to establish potential doses for Alaska, but add their own specific data sets about human and ecological factors. The ANWAP risk assessment addresses the following Russian wastes, media, and receptors: dumped nuclear submarines and icebreaker in Kara Sea--marine pathways; solid reactor parts in Sea of Japan and Pacific Ocean--marine pathways; thermoelectric generator in Sea of Okhotsk--marine pathways; current known aqueous wastes in Mayak reservoirs and Asanov Marshes--riverine to marine pathways; and Alaska as receptor. For these waste and source terms addressed, other pathways, such as atmospheric

  16. Assessment of variation due to laboratory and field conditions in the measurement of radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkinson, J.A.; Horrill, A.D. (Institute of Terrestrial Ecology, Grange-over-Sands (UK). Merlewood Research Station)

    1984-06-15

    One of the main problems associated with environmental studies is due to the large amount of variation encountered in field materials. Data obtained during studies into the distribution and movement of radionuclides in terrestrial environments in West Cumbria was found to be suitable for assessments of both spatial and analytical variation. Plutonium measurements on vegetation samples taken from samples of grazed and ungrazed saltmarsh and pasture fields having different management regimes were used in the assessment. Bulk samples of Halimione portulacoides and Pteridium aquilinum were analysed 14 and 11 times respectively and gave coefficients of variation of 9.18% and 7.91%. These were considered to be realistic estimates of analytical variability. Coefficients of variation for results of single plutonium determinations on replicate samples obtained from the pasture sites ranged from 23.4% to 33.1%. The data indicated that for the mean value obtained for a site to fall within 10% of the true mean at 95% probability, the numbers of samples to be taken at these sites ranged from 22 to 44. The grazed and ungrazed saltmarsh sites gave coefficients of variation of 95.70% and 47.2% respectively. These sites, however, would be stratified into vegetation classes, within class coefficients of variation being much lower at 16-24%.

  17. An assessment of variation due to laboratory and field conditions in the measurement of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson, J.A.; Horrill, A.D.

    1984-01-01

    One of the main problems associated with environmental studies is due to the large amount of variation encountered in field materials. Data obtained during studies into the distribution and movement of radionuclides in terrestrial environments in West Cumbria was found to be suitable for assessments of both spatial and analytical variation. Plutonium measurements on vegetation samples taken from samples of grazed and ungrazed saltmarsh and pasture fields having different management regimes were used in the assessment. Bulk samples of Halimione portulacoides and Pteridium aquilinum were analysed 14 and 11 times respectively and gave coefficients of variation of 9.18% and 7.91%. These were considered to be realistic estimates of analytical variability. Coefficients of variation for results of single plutonium determinations on replicate samples obtained from the pasture sites ranged from 23.4% to 33.1%. The data indicated that for the mean value obtained for a site to fall within 10% of the true mean at 95% probability, the numbers of samples to be taken at these sites ranged from 22 to 44. The grazed and ungrazed saltmarsh sites gave coefficients of variation of 95.70% and 47.2% respectively. These sites, however, would be stratified into vegetation classes, within class coefficients of variation being much lower at 16-24%. (orig.)

  18. The release of organic material from clay based buffer materials and its potential implications for radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilks, P.; Stroes-Gascoyne, S.; Goulard, M.; Haveman, S.A.; Bachinski, D.B.

    1998-01-01

    In the Canadian nuclear fuel waste disposal concept used fuel would be placed in corrosion resistant containers which would be surrounded by clay-based buffer and backfill materials in an engineered vault excavated at 500 to 1000 m depth in crystalline rock formations in the Canadian shield. Organic substances could affect radionuclide mobility due to the effects of redox and complexation reactions that increase solubility and alter mobility. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the buffer and backfill materials, proposed for use in a disposal vault, contain organics that could be leached by groundwater in large enough quantities to affect radionuclide mobility within the disposal vault and surrounding geosphere complex. Buffer material, made from a mixture of 50 wt.% Avonlea sodium bentonite and 50 wt.% silica sand, was extracted with deionized water to determine the release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), humic acid and fulvic acid. The effect of radiation and heat from the used fuel was simulated by treating samples of buffer before leaching to various amounts of heat (60 and 90 C) for periods of 2, 4 and 6 weeks, and to ionizing radiation with doses of 25 kGy and 50 kGy. The results showed that groundwater would leach significant amounts of organics from buffer that complex with radionuclides such as the actinides, potentially affecting their solubility and transport within the disposal vault and possibly the surrounding geosphere. In addition, the leached organics would likely stimulate microbial growth by several orders of magnitude. Heating and radiation affect the amount and nature of leachable organics. (orig.)

  19. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. Prouty

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport

  20. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Prouty

    2006-07-14

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment (TSPA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers advective transport and diffusive transport

  1. Potential effects of bacteria on radionuclide transport from a Swedish high level nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, K.

    1990-01-01

    Microorganisms can influence radionuclide migration if their concentration are high in comparison with other organic particles. Data on the numbers of microorganisms in undisturbed ground-water have been collected. The average number of cells in the samples from 17 levels in 5 boreholes was 3.0 x 10 5 cells ml -1 . A biofilm experiment indicated an active microbial rock surface population. Radiographic uptake experiments suggest inactive bulk water populations. The bulk water microbial cells in deep ground water might then be inactive cells detached from active biofilms. Enrichment cultures for anaerobic bacteria demonstrated the presence of anaerobic bacteria capable of growth on C-1 compounds with hydrogen and carbon dioxide, presumably methanogenic bacteria. Further, growth in enrichment cultures with sulphate as electron-acceptor and lactate as carbon source proved dissimilatory sulphate reducing bacteria to be present. (author)

  2. Cyclotron produced {sup 67}Ga, a potential radionuclide for diagnostic and therapeutic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin, E-mail: mu-khandaker@um.edu.my; Kassim, Hasan Abu [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Haba, Hiromitsu [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2015-04-29

    Production cross-sections of the {sup nat}Zn(d,x){sup 67}Ga reactions have been measured from a 24-MeV deuteron energy down to the threshold by using a stacked-foil activation technique combined with HPGe γ-ray spectrometry. An overall good agreement is found with some of the earlier measurements, whereas a partial agreement is obtained with the theoretical data extracted from the TENDL-2013 library. Physical thick target yield for the {sup 67}Ga radionuclide was deduced using the measured cross-sections, and found in agreement with the directly measured yield available in the literature. This study reveals that a low deuteron energy (<11 MeV) cyclotron and an enriched {sup 66}Zn target could be used to obtain {sup 67}Ga in no carrier added form.

  3. Quantitative radionuclide angiocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, P.M.; Rerych, S.K.; Moran, J.F.; Newman, G.E.; Douglas, J.M.; Sabiston, D.C. Jr.; Jones, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    This study introduces a new method for calculating actual left ventricular volumes and cardiac output from data recorded during a single transit of a radionuclide bolus through the heart, and describes in detail current radionuclide angiocardiography methodology. A group of 64 healthy adults with a wide age range were studied to define the normal range of hemodynamic parameters determined by the technique. Radionuclide angiocardiograms were performed in patients undergoing cardiac catherization to validate the measurements. In 33 patients studied by both techniques on the same day, a close correlation was documented for measurement of ejection fraction and end-diastolic volume. To validate the method of volumetric cardiac output calcuation, 33 simultaneous radionuclide and indocyanine green dye determinations of cardiac output were performed in 18 normal young adults. These independent comparisons of radionuclide measurements with two separate methods document that initial transit radionuclide angiocardiography accurately assesses left ventricular function

  4. Right and left ventricular ejection fraction at rest and during exercise assessed with radionuclide angiocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlstroem, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    Right (RVEF) and left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) assessed with radionuclide angiocardiography were compared to simultaneously obtained catheterization results at rest and during exercise in patients with pulmonary hypertension and ischemic heart disease. Blood pool imaging was performed with red blood cells (RBC) labelled with 99 Tcsup(m) in vivo as this method gave more stable 99 Tcsup(m) levels in blood compared to 99 Tcsup(m)-labelled human serum albumin and because it was more convenient than labelling RBC in vitro. RVEF measured with first pass (FP) technique and equilibrium (EQ) technique correlated well at rest, r = 0.86, and during exercise, r = 0.91. The FP technique had the best reproducibility and reference values at rest were 49+-5 per cent increasing with exercise. When 99 Tcsup(m) and 133 Xe were compared to assess RVEF with FP technique, the correlation was good, r = 0.88. LVEF assessed with EQ technique and a fixed end-diastolic region of interest was very reproducible at rest and during exercise; reference values at rest were 56+-8 per cent increasing with exercise. In 10 patients with pulmonary hypertension significant negative correlations were found between RVEF assessed with FP technique and pressures in pulmonary artery and right atrium. Abnormal RVEF was found in all patients with right ventricular disfunction. In 22 patients with recent myocardial infarction measurements of LVEF detected left ventricular disfunction better than did measurement of pulmonary artery diastolic pressure. During effort angina in another 10 patients all had abnormal LVEF and abnormal hemodynamics. By combining ejection fraction and stroke volume, ventricular volumes were calculated at rest and during exercise. (author)

  5. Realistic assessment of the radiological impact due to radionuclide releases to the terrestrial environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proehl, G.

    2007-01-01

    Radioecological models are inherently associated with uncertainties, since ecological parameters are subject to a more or less pronounced variability; furthermore, the knowledge of the exposure conditions is - even in the best case - incomplete. To keep models simple and widely applicable and to avoid at the same time underestimations, parameters are selected with a conservative bias. However, conservative results are not appropriate for decision making and optimisation. To discuss the prevention of overly conservative models, in this paper, some selected processes are analysed that are involved in the transfer of radionuclides in the environment as e.g. interception of radionuclides deposited during precipitation by vegetation, systemic transport of radionuclides, migration of radionuclides in soil and speciation in soil. These processes are characterized, and it is discussed which factors should be integrated in modelling to achieve more realistic results. (author)

  6. Human Anti-Oxidation Protein A1M—A Potential Kidney Protection Agent in Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Ahlstedt

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT has been in clinical use for 15 years to treat metastatic neuroendocrine tumors. PRRT is limited by reabsorption and retention of the administered radiolabeled somatostatin analogues in the proximal tubule. Consequently, it is essential to develop and employ methods to protect the kidneys during PRRT. Today, infusion of positively charged amino acids is the standard method of kidney protection. Other methods, such as administration of amifostine, are still under evaluation and show promising results. α1-microglobulin (A1M is a reductase and radical scavenging protein ubiquitously present in plasma and extravascular tissue. Human A1M has antioxidation properties and has been shown to prevent radiation-induced in vitro cell damage and protect non-irradiated surrounding cells. It has recently been shown in mice that exogenously infused A1M and the somatostatin analogue octreotide are co-localized in proximal tubules of the kidney after intravenous infusion. In this review we describe the current situation of kidney protection during PRRT, discuss the necessity and implications of more precise dosimetry and present A1M as a new, potential candidate for renal protection during PRRT and related targeted radionuclide therapies.

  7. Ocean disposal option for bulk wastes containing naturally occurring radionuclides: an assessment case history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stull, E.A.; Merry-Libby, P.

    1985-01-01

    There are 180,000 m 3 of slightly contaminated radioactive wastes (36 pCi/g radium-226) currently stored at the US Department of Energy's Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS), near Lewiston, New York. These wastes resulted from the cleanup of soils that were contaminated above the guidelines for unrestricted use of property. An alternative to long-term management of these wastes on land is dispersal in the ocean. A scenario for ocean disposal is presented for excavation, transport, and emplacement of these wastes in an ocean disposal site. The potential fate of the wastes and impacts on the ocean environment are analyzed, and uncertainties in the development of two worst-case scenarios for dispersion and pathway analyses are discussed. Based on analysis of a worst-case pathway back to man, the incremental dose from ingesting fish containing naturally occurring radionuclides from ocean disposal of the NFSS wastes is insignificant. Ocean disposal of this type of waste appears to be a technically promising alternative to the long-term maintenance costs and eventual loss of containment associated with management in a near-surface land burial facility

  8. Quantification of radionuclide transfer in terrestrial and freshwater environments for radiological assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-05-01

    For more than thirty years, the IAEA has published a set of documents aimed at the limitation of the radiation exposure of the population from various nuclear activities. In particular, in 1994 the IAEA published Technical Reports Series No. 364, Handbook of Parameter Values for the Prediction of Radionuclide Transfer in Temperate Environments. Over the years, it has proved to be a valuable reference for radioecologists, modellers and authorities in Member States, and has been quoted in numerous impact assessments. Technical Reports Series No. 364 was based on a review of available data up to the end of 1992. However, a number of high quality critical reviews have been produced in recent years for some of the transfer parameter values which merit consideration. Thus, it was assumed that there is sufficient new information available to warrant reconsideration of a significant proportion of the values given in Technical Reports Series No. 364 and to initiate an updating of Technical Reports Series No. 364 in the framework of the IAEA EMRAS (Environmental Modelling for RAdiation Safety) project. It is expected that the revision of Technical Reports Series No. 364 will initiate further updating of related IAEA publications, and international and national radiological models. The present IAEA-TECDOC is intended to be a support to the update of Technical Reports Series No. 364, overcoming the limitations of the former, and comprises both revised transfer parameter values, as well as missing data, key transfer processes, concepts and models that were found to be important for radiation safety

  9. Assessment of microbial processes on radionuclide mobility in shallow land burial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colombo, P.; Tate, R.L. III; Weiss, A.J.

    1982-07-01

    The impact of microbial metabolism of the organic substituents of low level radioactive wastes on radionuclide mobility in disposal sites, the nature of the microbial transformations involved in this metabolism and the effect of the prevailing environmental parameters on the quantities and types of metabolic intermediates accumulated were examined. Since both aerobic and anaerobic periods can occur during trench ecosystem development, oxidation capacities of the microbial community in the presence and absence of oxygen were analyzed. Results of gas studies performed at three commercial low level radioactive waste disposal sites were reviewed. Several deficiencies in available data were determined. Further research needs are suggested. This assessment has demonstrated that the biochemical capabilities expressed within the low level radioactive waste disposal site are common to a wide variety of soil bacteria. Hence, assuming trenches would not be placed in sites with such extreme abiotic conditions that all microbial activity is precluded, the microbial populations needed for colonization and decomposition of the organic waste substances are readily provided from the waste itself and from the soil of existing and any proposed disposal sites. Indeed, considering the ubiquity of occurrence of the microorganisms responsible for waste decomposition and the chemical nature of the organic waste material, long-term prevention of biodecomposition is difficult, if not impossible

  10. Content of PAHs, activities of γ-radionuclides and ecotoxicological assessment in biochars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gondek Krzysztof

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to determine the effect of thermal conversion temperature and plant material addition to sewage sludge on the PAHs content and the activity of selected γ-radionuclides in biochars, and to conduct an ecotoxicological assessment. The pyrolysis of the mixtures of sewage sludge and plant materials at 300°C and such temperature caused an increase in the contents of 2- and 3-ring hydrocarbons. During the pyrolysis of organic materials at 600°C, the amount of the following compounds was reduced in biochars: benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[a]pyrene, indeno[1,2,3c,d]pyrene, dibenzo[a,h]anthracene, and benzo[g,h,i]perylene. Among γ-radioisotopes of the elements, natural radiogenic isotopes were dominant. 137Cs was the only artificial radioactive isotope. The pyrolysis of the mixtures of municipal sewage sludge and plant materials revealed that isotope 40K had the highest radioactive activity. In the case of other analysed nuclides, activities of 212Pb, 214Pb, 214Bi, and 137Cs were determined after the sample pyrolysis. The extracts from the mixtures of sewage sludge and plant materials were non-toxic to Vibrio fischeri.

  11. Initial Radionuclide Inventories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Miller

    2004-09-19

    The purpose of this analysis is to provide an initial radionuclide inventory (in grams per waste package) and associated uncertainty distributions for use in the Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) in support of the license application for the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This document is intended for use in postclosure analysis only. Bounding waste stream information and data were collected that capture probable limits. For commercially generated waste, this analysis considers alternative waste stream projections to bound the characteristics of wastes likely to be encountered using arrival scenarios that potentially impact the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste stream. For TSPA-LA, this radionuclide inventory analysis considers U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) high-level radioactive waste (DHLW) glass and two types of spent nuclear fuel (SNF): CSNF and DOE-owned (DSNF). These wastes are placed in two groups of waste packages: the CSNF waste package and the codisposal waste package (CDSP), which are designated to contain DHLW glass and DSNF, or DHLW glass only. The radionuclide inventory for naval SNF is provided separately in the classified ''Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program Technical Support Document'' for the License Application. As noted previously, the radionuclide inventory data presented here is intended only for TSPA-LA postclosure calculations. It is not applicable to preclosure safety calculations. Safe storage, transportation, and ultimate disposal of these wastes require safety analyses to support the design and licensing of repository equipment and facilities. These analyses will require radionuclide inventories to represent the radioactive source term that must be accommodated during handling, storage and disposition of these wastes. This analysis uses the best available information to identify the radionuclide inventory that is expected at the last year of last emplacement

  12. ACCI38 XL 2: a useful tool for dose assessment in case of accidental atmospheric releases of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassin, A.; Merle-Szeremeta, A.

    2002-01-01

    In the scope of its assignments in the field of nuclear risks, the French Institute for Radiation protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) develops tools to assess the impact of nuclear facilities on their environment and surrounding populations. The code ACCI38 XL 2 is a tool dedicated to the assessment of integrated concentrations in the environment and of dosimetric consequences on man, in case of accidental atmospheric releases of radionuclides (up to 170 radionuclides). This code is widely used by IRSN for studies on accidents, mainly for the analysis of regulatory documents from nuclear operators. The aim of this communication is to present the main features of the model used in the code ACCI38 XL 2, and to give details about the code. After a general presentation of the model, a detailed description of atmospheric dispersion, transfer in the environment and radiological impact is given. Then, some information on parameters and limitations of the model and the code are presented

  13. Intercomparison and biokinetic model validation of radionuclide intake assessment. Report of a co-ordinated research project. 1996-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-03-01

    This TECDOC presents the results of a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Intercomparison and Biokinetic Model Validation of Radionuclide Intake Assessment, including the conclusions of a Research Co-ordination Meeting held from 6 to 8 July 1998. The present CRP on Intercomparison and Biokinetic Model Validation of Radionuclide Intake Assessment is part of the activities of the IAEA's Occupational Protection programme. The objective of this programme is to promote an internationally harmonized approach for optimizing occupational radiation protection through: the development of guides, within the IAEA's activities for establishing standards for radiation protection, for restricting radiation exposures in the workplace and for applying current occupational radiation protection techniques; and the promotion of application of these guidelines

  14. Natural colloids in groundwater from granite and their potential impact on radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilks, P.; Bachinski, D.B.

    1997-03-01

    AECL has submitted an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to evaluate the concept of nuclear fuel disposal at depth in crystalline rock of the Canadian Shield. As part of geochemical studies carried out in support of the EIS, the role of natural groundwater colloids (0.001 to 0.45 μm) and suspended particles (>0.45 μm) in radionuclide transport in granite rock has been investigated. This report summarizes the results of investigations carried out in groundwaters from the Whiteshell Research Area (WRA) of southern Manitoba and the Atikokan Research Area (ARA) of northwestern Ontario to determine the concentrations, size distributions, and compositions of natural particles in groundwaters from the Canadian Shield. Particles from groundwater were isolated by ultrafiltration under a nitrogen atmosphere and particle concentrations and size distributions were determined by filtration, and by laser-based particle counting and size analysis. Groundwaters from Canadian Shield granites contain particles in a broad range of sizes, with no one particular size being dominant. Particle compositions include aluminosilicates, Fe oxides, carbonate and organics. Suspended particles are most likely generated by the mobilization of fracture-lining minerals by groundwater flow, while colloids are formed by a combination of precipitation and mobilization of colloidal material from fracture surfaces. The average concentration of 0.01 to 0.45 μm colloids in WRA groundwaters was 1.05 ± 0.14 mg/L. Average colloid concentrations were slightly higher in the more highly fractured ARA, although the highest observed colloid concentration in the ARA was below the 7 mg/L maximum observed in a sample from the WRA. The existence of colloids in the 0.001 to 0.01 μm size range was demonstrated using the results of chemical analysis of particle concentrates and data obtained with the laser-based Ultrafine Particle Size Analyzer (UPA). The WRA groundwaters contain on average about 2.7 mg/L of 0

  15. Potential for post-closure radionuclide redistribution due to biotic intrusion: aboveground biomass, litter production rates, and the distribution of root mass with depth at material disposal area G, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, Sean B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Christensen, Candace [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jennings, Terry L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jaros, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wykoff, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Crowell, Kelly J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shuman, Rob [URS

    2008-01-01

    Low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated at the Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL) is disposed of at LANL's Technical Area (T A) 54, Material Disposal Area (MDA) G. The ability of MDA G to safely contain radioactive waste during current and post-closure operations is evaluated as part of the facility's ongoing performance assessment (PA) and composite analysis (CA). Due to the potential for uptake and incorporation of radio nuclides into aboveground plant material, the PA and CA project that plant roots penetrating into buried waste may lead to releases of radionuclides into the accessible environment. The potential amount ofcontamination deposited on the ground surface due to plant intrusion into buried waste is a function of the quantity of litter generated by plants, as well as radionuclide concentrations within the litter. Radionuclide concentrations in plant litter is dependent on the distribution of root mass with depth and the efficiency with which radionuclides are extracted from contaminated soils by the plant's roots. In order to reduce uncertainties associated with the PA and CA for MDA G, surveys are being conducted to assess aboveground biomass, plant litter production rates, and root mass with depth for the four prominent vegetation types (grasses, forbs, shrubs and trees). The collection of aboveground biomass for grasses and forbs began in 2007. Additional sampling was conducted in October 2008 to measure root mass with depth and to collect additional aboveground biomass data for the types of grasses, forbs, shrubs, and trees that may become established at MDA G after the facility undergoes final closure, Biomass data will be used to estimate the future potential mass of contaminated plant litter fall, which could act as a latent conduit for radionuclide transport from the closed disposal area. Data collected are expected to reduce uncertainties associated with the PA and CA for MDA G and ultimately aid in the assessment and

  16. Assessment of poststress left ventricular ejection fraction by gated SPECT: comparison with equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acampa, Wanda; Liuzzi, Raffaele; De Luca, Serena; Capasso, Enza; Luongo, Luca; Cuocolo, Alberto [University Federico II, Department of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences, Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages, National Council of Research, Naples (Italy); Caprio, Maria Grazia [University Federico II, Department of Biomorphological and Functional Sciences, Institute of Biostructures and Bioimages, National Council of Research, Naples (Italy); SDN Foundation, Institute of Diagnostic and Nuclear Development, Naples (Italy); Nicolai, Emanuele [SDN Foundation, Institute of Diagnostic and Nuclear Development, Naples (Italy); Petretta, Mario [University Federico II, Department of Clinical Medicine, Cardiovascular and Immunological Sciences, Naples (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    We compared left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction obtained by gated SPECT with that obtained by equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography in a large cohort of patients. Within 1 week, 514 subjects with suspected or known coronary artery disease underwent same-day stress-rest {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi gated SPECT and radionuclide angiocardiography. For both studies, data were acquired 30 min after completion of exercise and after 3 h rest. In the overall study population, a good correlation between ejection fraction measured by gated SPECT and by radionuclide angiocardiography was observed at rest (r=0.82, p<0.0001) and after stress (r=0.83, p<0.0001). In Bland-Altman analysis, the mean differences in ejection fraction (radionuclide angiocardiography minus gated SPECT) were -0.6% at rest and 1.7% after stress. In subjects with normal perfusion (n=362), a good correlation between ejection fraction measured by gated SPECT and by radionuclide angiocardiography was observed at rest (r=0.72, p<0.0001) and after stress (r=0.70, p<0.0001) and the mean differences in ejection fraction were -0.9% at rest and 1.4% after stress. Also in patients with abnormal perfusion (n=152), a good correlation between the two techniques was observed both at rest (r=0.89, p<0.0001) and after stress (r=0.90, p<0.0001) and the mean differences in ejection fraction were 0.1% at rest and 2.5% after stress. In a large study population, a good agreement was observed in the evaluation of LV ejection fraction between gated SPECT and radionuclide angiocardiography. However, in patients with perfusion abnormalities, a slight underestimation in poststress LV ejection fraction was observed using gated SPECT as compared to equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography. (orig.)

  17. Guidelines for Using Fallout Radionuclides to Assess Erosion and Effectiveness of Soil Conservation Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-06-01

    Soil degradation currently affects 1.9 billion hectares of agricultural land worldwide, and the area of degraded land is increasing rapidly at a rate of 5 to 7 million hectares each year. Most of this degradation is caused by inappropriate and poor land management practices in agriculture and livestock production. Among all degradation processes, including soil acidification, salinization and nutrient mining, soil erosion is by far the most common type of land degradation, accounting for 84% of affected areas, with more than three quarters of the affected surface land area located in developing countries. Current concerns about the impacts of soil erosion on crop productivity and the environment, as well as the deployment of effective soil conservation measures, have generated an urgent need to obtain reliable quantitative data on the extent and actual rates of soil erosion to underpin sustainable soil conservation strategies. The quest for new approaches for assessing soil erosion to complement conventional methods has led to the development of methodologies based on the use of fallout radionuclides (FRNs) as soil erosion tracers. With increasing attention being paid to land degradation worldwide, this publication explains and demonstrates FRN based methods to trace soil movement and to assess soil erosion at different spatial and temporal scales, and to evaluate the effectiveness of soil conservation strategies to ensure sustainable land management in agricultural systems. This publication summarizes the experiences and knowledge gained since the end of the 1990s in the use of FRNs by the IAEA and by scientists from both developed and developing countries involved in IAEA research networks. This publication provides guidance in the application of FRNs to stakeholders involved in sustainable agricultural development

  18. Production of {sup 177}Lu, a potential radionuclide for diagnostic and therapeutic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Kassim, Hasan Abu [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Haba, Hiromitsu [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2015-04-24

    {sup 177g}Lu (T{sub 1/2}=6.647d; E{sub β{sup −max}}=498.3KeV, I{sub β{sup −total}}=100%; E{sub γ} = 112.9498 keV, I{sub γ} = 6.17%; E{sub γ} = 208.3662 keV, I {sub γ} = 10.36%) is widely used in many clinical procedures due to its excellent decay characteristics. Production cross-sections of the {sup nat}Yb(d,x){sup 177g}Lu reactions have been measured from a 24-MeV deuteron energy down to the threshold by using a stacked-foil activation technique combined with high resolution γ-ray spectrometry. An overall good agreement is found with some of the earlier measurements, whereas a partial agreement is obtained with the theoretical data extracted from the TENDL-2013 library. Physical thick target yield for the {sup 177g}Lu radionuclide was deduced using the measured cross-sections. The deduced yield curves indicate that a low energy (<11 MeV) cyclotron and a highly enriched {sup 176}Yb target could be used to obtain {sup 177g}Lu with negligible impurity from {sup 177m}Lu.

  19. Potentiation of Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy by the PARP Inhibitor Olaparib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonnekens, Julie; van Kranenburg, Melissa; Beerens, Cecile E M T; Suker, Mustafa; Doukas, Michael; van Eijck, Casper H J; de Jong, Marion; van Gent, Dik C

    2016-01-01

    Metastases expressing tumor-specific receptors can be targeted and treated by binding of radiolabeled peptides (peptide receptor radionuclide therapy or PRRT). For example, patients with metastasized somatostatin receptor-positive neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) can be treated with radiolabeled somatostatin analogues, resulting in strongly increased progression-free survival and quality of life. There is nevertheless still room for improvement, as very few patients can be cured at this stage of disease. We aimed to specifically sensitize replicating tumor cells without further damage to healthy tissues. Thereto we investigated the DNA damaging effects of PRRT with the purpose to enhance these effects through modulation of the DNA damage response. Although PRRT induces DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), a larger fraction of the induced lesions are single strand breaks (expected to be similar to those induced by external beam radiotherapy) that require poly-[ADP-ribose]-polymerase 1 (PARP-1) activity for repair. If these breaks cannot be repaired, they will cause replication fork arrest and DSB formation during replication. Therefore, we used the PARP-1 inhibitor Olaparib to increase the number of cytotoxic DSBs. Here we show that this new combination strategy synergistically sensitized somatostatin receptor expressing cells to PRRT. We observed increased cell death and reduced cellular proliferation compared to the PRRT alone. The enhanced cell death was caused by increased numbers of DSBs that are repaired with remarkably slow kinetics, leading to genome instability. Furthermore, we validated the increased DSB induction after PARP inhibitor addition in the clinically relevant model of living human NET slices. We expect that this combined regimen can thus augment current PRRT outcomes.

  20. Special Analysis: Radionuclides Screening Analysis for E Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COOK, JAMES

    2004-07-22

    It was recently discovered that waste being disposed of onsite contained radionuclides that had not been analyzed by the Performance Assessment (PA). These radionuclides had been eliminated from the PA in an earlier screening evaluation because they were not expected to be contained in SRS-generated waste or that received from offsite generators. This Special Analysis (SA) is being prepared to establish the screening criteria and level of evaluation for all radionuclides potentially significant to a Low Level Waste PA or Composite Analysis (CA). The screening methodology recommended by the National Council on Radiological Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has been used to identify those radionuclides that require detailed analysis to derive disposal limits. Of the approximately 2800 radionuclides, a total of 826 were considered by the NCRP to be potentially significant. Approximately 686 radionuclides were eliminated from this analysis due to their short half-life or other properties. Approximately 40 of the 140 remaining radionuclides have been analyzed in the existing PA and waste acceptance criteria established. This SA develops the screening criteria and establishes trigger values to be used to determine the level of analysis required for those radionuclides not analyzed in PA. The results of the SA identified 20 radionuclides that will require more detailed groundwater and intruder analysis. This analysis will be documented in a SA for trench disposal.

  1. Methodological guide for risk assessment and management of industrial sites contaminated with radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudiz, A.; Brenot, J.; Cessac, B.; Charbonneau, P.; Maigne, J.P.; Santucci, P.

    2000-01-01

    At the request of the French ministries of health and environment, IPSN was asked to elaborate a methodological guide for risk assessment and management of industrial sites contaminated with radionuclides. This guide is devoted to local administration, technical organisms and more generally to all the relevant stakeholders involved with the choice of a rehabilitation strategy, according to the future use of the site. The methodology to be presented is designed to fit with the different types of 'risk governance', according to circumstances: - when an industrial site is relatively small, with rather restricted zones of contamination, and no specific social concern, management may rely essentially upon radiological expertise, using generic reference levels, - when the site is larger, with spread out contamination, risk assessment and management of the site may become more controversial, namely because uncertainties remain about the effective magnitude of the contamination and no low cost solution appears to exist in view of rehabilitation. In this case, an open procedure is required, which combines technical expertise and involvement of stakeholders, in view of improving the risk assessment process as well as trying to get a better understanding of the benefits and drawbacks of different rehabilitation strategies. The methodology consists of six main steps : - Initiating the process, Pre-diagnosis, Initial diagnosis, Simplified risk assessment, Detailed risk assessment, Decision aiding in view of letting the stakeholders defining the solution appropriate to the local context. The paper will present how the risk assessment and management process can be aportionated to the importance of the problem to be solved. As far as possible, simplified risk assessment should provide information allowing the definition of the appropriate strategy. In this case, stakeholders involvement is mainly devoted to determine: - whether the site can be affected to a given use without

  2. Assessment of gamma-emitting radionuclides in sediment cores from the Gulf of Aqaba, Red Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ababneh, Zaid Q; Al-Omari, Husam; Rasheed, Mohamad; Al-Najjar, Tariq; Ababneh, Anas M

    2010-10-01

    The Gulf of Aqaba is the only seaport in Jordan which currently has intense activities such as industrial development, phosphate ore exportation, oil importation, shipping, commercial and sport fishing. Most of these activities, especially the phosphate ore exportation, could cause serious radiological effects to the marine environment. Thus, it is essential to investigate the level of the radioactivity concentrations to establish a baseline database, which is not available yet in the Gulf of Aqaba. Radioactivity concentrations of gamma-emitting radionuclides in core and beach sediments of the Gulf of Aqaba were investigated. Core sediments were collected from five representative locations for three different water column depths (5, 15 and 35 m). The results showed that the activity concentrations of 238U, 235U and 226Ra for both seafloor and beach sediments from the phosphate loading berth (PLB) location to be higher than those from other investigated locations and more than twice as high as the worldwide average; the 238U activity concentration was found to vary from 57 to 677 Bq kg(-1). The results also showed that there is little variation of radioactivity concentrations within the core length of 15 cm. The calculated mean values of the radium equivalent activity Ra(eq), the external hazard index, H(ex), the absorbed dose rate and the annual effective dose for the beach sediment in PLB location were 626 Bq kg(-1), 1.69, 263 nGy h(-1) and 614 µSv y(-1), respectively. These values are much higher than the recommended limits that impose potential health risks to the workers in this location. As for other studied locations, the corresponding values were far below the maximum recommended limit and lies within the worldwide range.

  3. Development of a computational code for the internal doses assessment of the main radionuclides of occupational exposure at IPEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claro, Thiago Ribeiro

    2011-01-01

    The dose resulting from internal contamination can be estimated with the use of biokinetic models combined with experimental results obtained from bioanalysis and assessment of the time of incorporation. The biokinetics models are represented by a set of compartments expressing the transportation, retention and elimination of radionuclides from the body. The ICRP publications, number 66, 78 and 100, present compartmental models for the respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract and for systemic distribution for an array of radionuclides of interest for the radiological protection. The objective of this work is to develop a computational code for the internal doses assessment of the main radionuclides of occupational exposure at IPEN. Consequently serving as a agile and efficient tool for the designing, visualization and resolution of compartmental models of any nature. The architecture of the system was conceived containing two independent software: CBT - responsible for the setup and manipulation of models and SSID - responsible for the mathematical solution of the models. Four different techniques are offered for the resolution of system of equations, including semi-analytical and numerical methods, allowing for comparison of precision and performance of both. The software was developed in C≠ programming, using a Microsoft Access database and XML standards for file exchange with other applications. Compartmental models for uranium, thorium and iodine radionuclides were generated for the validation of the CBT software. The models were subsequently solved via SSID software and the results compared with the values published in the issue 78 of ICRP. In all cases the system replicated the values published by ICRP. (author)

  4. Modelling of Radionuclide Transport by Groundwater Motion in Fractured Bedrock for Performance Assessment Purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woerman, Anders; Shulan Xu

    2003-10-01

    Field data of physical properties in heterogeneous crystalline bedrock, like fracture zones, fracture connectivity, matrix porosity and fracture aperture, is associated with uncertainty that can have a significant impact on the analysis of solute transport in fractured rock. The purpose of this study is to develop a performance assessment (PA) model for analyses of radionuclide transport in the geosphere, in which the model takes into account both the effect of heterogeneities of hydrological and geochemical rock properties. By using a travel time description of radionuclide transport in rock fractures, we decompose the transport problem into a one-dimensional mass transfer problem along a distribution of transport pathways and a multi-dimensional flow problem in the fractured bedrock. The hydraulic/flow problem is solved based on a statistical discrete-fracture model (DFM) that represents the network of fractures around the repository and in the surrounding geosphere. A Monte Carlo technique reflects the fact that the representation of the fracture network is uncertain. If the flow residence time PDF exhibits multiple peaks or in another way shows a more erratic hydraulic response on the network scale, the three-dimensional travel time approach is superior to a one-dimensional transport modeling. Examples taken from SITE 94, a study performed by the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, showed that such cases can be found in safety assessments based on site data. The solute transport is formulated based on partial, differential equations and perturbations (random spatial variability in bedrock properties) are introduced in the coefficients to reflect an uncertainty of the exact appearance of the bedrock associated with the discrete data collection. The combined approach for water flow and solute transport, thereby, recognises an uncertainty in our knowledge in both 1) bedrock properties along individual pathways and 2) the distribution of pathways. Solutions to the

  5. On the assessment of radionuclide resorption from the gastro-intestinal tract of the blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhilber-Schwab, B.; Teufel, D.

    1980-01-01

    A comparison of the resorption rates measured for the radionuclides Ce, Co, Pu, Ru, Sr and Zn as well as the vitamin B12 with the recommendations for calculation given by the SSK showed that the values used by the SSK partly are too low by orders of magnitude. The dose factors therefore no longer correspond to the international level of science. (DG) [de

  6. Review of radionuclides released from the nuclear fuel cycle and methods of assessing dose to man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, P.M.

    1979-01-01

    There are two broad subject areas associated with releases of radionuclides from nuclear fuel cycle installations to the environment in which there are biological implications. One concerns interpretation of doses to man in terms of their radiological significance; the other concerns estimation of environmental transfer of radionuclides and of associated radiation doses to man. The radiation protection philosophy on which past practice regarding effluent releases of radionuclides to the environment was based is illustrated by drawing upon estimates of the associated radiation doses to man given in the 1977 report of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. The present emphasis in radiation protection philosophy is illustrated by summarizing a review of environmental models relevant to estimation of radiation doses to population groups with reference to effluent releases of 3 H, 14 C, 85 Kr and 129 I; the author carried out the review as a contribution to a current study by an expert group set up by the Nuclear Energy Agency of OECD. Radionuclides of significance in the future may differ from those currently released to the environment because of possible developments in nuclear fuel cycles and options which may be exercised for disposal of high-level radioactive wastes, already in storage or postulated to be produced in the future. (author)

  7. Radionuclide venography as an adjunct to V-P imaging in the assessment of thromboembolic disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellman, H.N.; Siddiqui, A.R.; Park, H.M.; Moran, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    Ascending radionuclide venography, in principle, differs from radiographic contrast venography in that the radionuclide technique demonstrates flow patterns rather than anatomy. Normally the injection of the radiotracer into foot veins using the technique described results in the radioactivity passing into the deep venous system at its first opportunity, especially if care is taken to properly occlude the superficial venous system just below the knee. Radionuclide venography is more of a screening test and its relationship to contrast venography is the same as ventilation-perfusion imaging to contrast pulmonary arteriography. That is to say, just as when the V-P study does not satisfactorily answer the question regarding the presence of pulmonary embolism, contrast pulmonary arteriography is done, and contrast venography can be performed if the radionuclide venogram is not conclusive. In the patient with strong suspicion of deep venous thrombosis, the integrated VP-RNV is the best screening test. Considerable evolution in the technique of venography has occurred. Excellent studies are obtained using gamma cameras integrated with moving tables. The technique described depends upon the manipulation of venous flow in the lower extremity to demonstrate the deep venous system as well as possible

  8. Assessment of radionuclides (uranium and thorium) atmospheric pollution around Manjung district, Perak using moss as bio-indicator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arshad, Nursyairah, E-mail: nursyairah1990@gmail.com; Hamzah, Zaini; Wood, Ab. Khalik [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450, Shah Alam Selangor (Malaysia); Saat, Ahmad [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450, Shah Alam Selangor (Malaysia); Institute of Science, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450, Shah Alam Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    Bio-monitoring method using mosses have been widely done around the world and the effectiveness has been approved. Mosses can be used to assess the levels of atmospheric pollution as mosses pick up nutrients from the atmosphere and deposition retaining many trace elements. In this study, the deposition of two radionuclides; uranium (U) and thorium (Th) around Manjung districts have been evaluated using Leucobryum aduncum as bio-monitoring medium. The samples were collected from 24 sampling sites covering up to 40 km radius to the North, North-East and South-East directions from Teluk Rubiah. The concentrations of U and Th in moss samples were analysed using Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) Spectrometer. The concentrations of Th are in the range of 0.07-2.09 mg/kg. Meanwhile, the concentrations of U in the moss are in the range of 0.03-0.18 mg/kg. The Enrichment Factor (EF) was calculated to determine the origin of the radionuclides distributions. Other than that, the distribution maps were developed to observe the distribution of the radionuclides around the study area.

  9. Uncertainty analysis in an accidental situation. Radionuclide transfer in environment and assessment of human exposure by food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sy, Mouhamadou Moustapha

    2016-01-01

    Major nuclear accidents of Chernobyl (April, 1986) and Fukushima (March, 2011) have led to a huge environmental contamination with important amounts of radionuclides released in the atmosphere. Risk assessment, in case of nuclear emergency, is confronted to uncertainties on the transfer of radioactive substances in terrestrial ecosystems and to human population through the food chain, which could affect the reliability of decisions. The extent of the repercussions of Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents highlighted the difficulty of managing the consequences of such disasters and specifically to accommodate the different sources of uncertainty within decision-making processes. The objective of this research project is to develop a methodology to take into account uncertainties within environmental and food risk assessment models in order to improve decision support tools used for accidental situations. In this regard, different hierarchical Bayesian models aiming at capturing, within a unique modelling framework, uncertainty and variability about radioecological parameters of great important for accidental situation (dry and wet interception fractions and weathering loss parameter) were developed. Models parameters were estimated by Bayesian inference applied on databases obtained by an extended literature review. The impact on the risk assessment models of uncertainty and variability about these radioecological parameters was then assessed by stochastic simulations and sensitivity analyses applied on two case-studies: a hypothetical accident simulating a standardized deposition of radionuclides and the accident of Fukushima nuclear power plant. The works developed in this project contribute to enhance knowledge on key processes governing environmental transfer of radionuclides and to improve the parameterization of the radioecological risk assessment models with respect to the research lines outlined by the scientific community in radioecology. (author)

  10. The 226Ra/Ba ratio as a tool for assessment of radionuclides migration from phosphogypsum stockpiles to Santos estuary - Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Nivaldo Carlos da; Silva, Paula Sergio Cardoso da; Mazzilli, Barbara Paci; Fernandes, Elicabete A. De Nadai

    2006-01-01

    The presence of natural radionuclides (mainly 226 Ra) restricts the use of phosphogypsum in building materials and in soil amendments. Therefore, the phosphogypsum currently produced is stockpiled close to the production site. Many problems are associated with subaerial deposition thereby raising the common question: is there any migration of naturally occurring radionuclides that are able to reach the water sources affecting residents in the areas near the stacks? To answer this question the 226 Ra/Ba ratio was used as a tool for the assessment of radionuclides migration according to the theoretical approach proposed

  11. Accurate assessment of long-term nephrotoxicity after peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with {sup 177}Lu-octreotate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabet, Amir; Ezziddin, Khaled; Reichman, Karl; Haslerud, Torjan; Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat; Biersack, Hans-Juergen; Ezziddin, Samer [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Pape, Ulrich-Frank [Charite, University Medicine Berlin, Campus Virchow Clinic, Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Berlin (Germany); Nagarajah, James [University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    Renal radiation during peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) may result in glomerular damage, a potential reduction of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and ultimately lead to renal failure. While reported PRRT nephrotoxicity is limited to data derived from serum creatinine - allowing only approximate estimates of GFR - the aim of this study is to accurately determine PRRT-induced long-term changes of renal function and associated risk factors according to state-of-the-art GFR measurement. Nephrotoxicity was analysed using {sup 99m}Tc-diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) clearance data of 74 consecutive patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (GEP NET) undergoing PRRT with {sup 177}Lu-octreotate. The mean follow-up period was 21 months (range 12-50) with a median of five GFR measurements per patient. The change of GFR was analysed by linear curve fit. Potential risk factors including diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension, previous chemotherapy, renal impairment at baseline and cumulative administered activity were analysed regarding potential impact on renal function loss. In addition, Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) v3.0 were used to compare nephrotoxicity determined by {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA clearance versus serum creatinine. The alteration in GFR differed widely among the patients (mean -2.1 ± 13.1 ml/min/m{sup 2} per year, relative yearly reduction -1.8 ± 18.9 %). Fifteen patients (21 %) experienced a mild (2-10 ml/min/m{sup 2} per year) and 16 patients (22 %) a significant (>10 ml/min/m{sup 2} per year) decline of GFR following PRRT. However, 11 patients (15 %) showed an increase of >10 ml/min/m{sup 2} per year. Relevant nephrotoxicity according to CTCAE (grade ≥3) was observed in one patient (1.3 %) with arterial hypertension and history of chemotherapy. Nephrotoxicity according to serum creatinine was discordant to that defined by GFR in 15 % of the assessments and led to underestimation in 12 % of

  12. LOW CONTENT OF RADIONUCLIDES IN NATURAL ENVIRONMENT AND PRODUCTION AS A RATIONALE FOR DEVELOPMENT OF RECREATIONAL POTENTIAL OF NORTHERN BUKOVINA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia OMEL’CHENKO

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Investigation on food products contamination by Cesium-137 and Strontium-90, detection of content of natural radionuclides (Radium-226, Thorium-232, Potassium-40 in raw materials and finished products of building industry, monitoring of some radionuclides content in soils of mountainous area of Northern Bukovina was carried out. All the results were analyzed and discussed in view of the life safety position. Data on radionuclides content in surrounding natural environment as well as in building and food industry production confirm Northern Bukovina territory’s attractiveness and safety for recreation areas development.

  13. RADBASE: A PC-based radionuclide data base for environmental site assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dundon, S.T.; Heger, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    A personal computer-based code, RADBASE, is being developed as a tool for reviewing environmental risk data. RADBASE has been designed to display the properties of radionuclides encountered in environmental restoration programs. The code contains five major features that display (a) physical properties, (b) pathways and toxicity data, (c) means of production and common uses, (d) federal radiation protection standards and action levels, and (e) bibliographic information. The benefits of the radionuclide data base contained in this code include time efficiency and update capability. This code separates itself from similar codes on the basis of its interactive data files, windows environment, and content. The user must only be equipped with basic information on a site and possess a minimum amount of user knowledge to operate and access additional data applicable to the constituents at the site

  14. Release of airborne radionuclides from Olympic Dam operations and exposure assessment for members of the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, F.F.; Chandler, W.P.

    1992-01-01

    Olympic Dam Operations, a copper, uranium, silver and gold producing project, is situated in a semi-arid area 550 km north of Adelaide. Airborne dispersal is the major transport pathway of operation-related radionuclides to members of the public, and as such has become the focus of a major environmental monitoring program. Major emissions consist of radon and its associated daughters and radionuclides in dust that originate from mine, metallurgical plant, ore and mullock stockpiles and the tailings retention system. Dispersion modelling and measured ground level concentrations have been utilised to calculate the effective dose equivalent for three critical groups. All critical groups exposures are less than 0.2 mSv by the most conservative calculation and are well below the legislative limit of 1 mSv applicable to members of the public. 12 refs., 5 gabs., 12 figs

  15. An assessment of natural radionuclides in water of Langat River estuary, Selangor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamzah, Zaini, E-mail: tengkuliana88@gmail.com; Rosli, Tengku Nurliana Tuan Mohd, E-mail: tengkuliana88@gmail.com; Saat, Ahmad, E-mail: tengkuliana88@gmail.com; Wood, Ab. Khalik, E-mail: tengkuliana88@gmail.com [Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA, 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-02-12

    An estuary is an area that has a free connection with the open sea and it is a dynamic semi-enclosed coastal bodies. Ex-mining, aquaculture and industrial areas in Selangor are the sources of pollutants discharged into the estuary water. Radionuclides are considered as pollutants to the estuary water. Gamma radiations emitted by natural radionuclides through their decaying process may give impact to human. The radiological effect of natural radionuclides which are {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 40}K, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th, were explored by determining the respective activity concentrations in filtered water along the Langat estuary, Selangor. Meanwhile, in- situ water quality parameters such as temperature, dissolve oxygen (DO), salinity, total suspended solid (TSS), pH and turbidity were measured by using YSI portable multi probes meter. The activity concentration of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K were determined by using gamma-ray spectrometry with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. The activity concentrations of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K in samples are in the range of 0.17 - 0.67 Bq/L, 0.16 - 0.97 Bq/L and 1.22 - 5.57 Bq/L respectively. On the other hand, the concentrations of uranium-238 and thorium-232 were determined by using Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (EDXRF). The thorium concentrations are between 0.17 ppm to 0.28 ppm and uranium concentrations were 0.25 ppm to 0.31 ppm. The results show activity concentrations of radionuclides are slightly high near the river estuary. The Radium Equivalent, Absorbed Dose Rate, External Hazard Index, and Annual Effective Dose of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K are also studied.

  16. Radionuclide carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, F.A.; Kretschmar, H.C.; Tofe, A.J.

    1977-01-01

    The invention provides physiologically acceptable particulate radionuclide carriers comprising a reducing agent bound to an anionic starch derivative, useful in the preparation of organ-specific diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals

  17. Radionuclides in nephrology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lausanne, A.B.D.

    1987-01-01

    In 47 expert contributions, this volume provides a summary of the latest research on radionuclides in nephro-urology together with current and new clinical applications especially in renovascular hypertension, kidney transplantation, and metabolic and urological diseases. In addition, attention is given to aspects of basic renal physiology and function and possible applications of nuclear magnetic resonance and spectroscopy in nephro-urology. New testing procedures which promise to improve diagnosis, and new radiopharmaceuticals are described. The reports are divided into eight sections, the first of which features studies on the renin-angiotensin system, cisplatin, atrial natriuretic factor and determining plasma oxalate. Four papers describe a number of new radiopharmaceuticals which have the potential to replace hippuran. In the third section, radionuclide methods for the measurement of renal function parameters are discussed. The book then focuses on the potential role of captopril in the improved diagnosis of renovascular hypertension. Applications of nuclear magnetic resonance and spectroscopy are demonstrated in the diagnosis of acute pyelonephritis, kidney assessment after lithotripsy, kidney evaluation prior to transplantation, and in monitoring renal ischemia during hypotension

  18. Bioaccumulation of radionuclides and metals by microorganisms: Potential role in the separation of inorganic contaminants and for the in situ treatment of the subsurface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolton, H. Jr.; Wildung, R.E.

    1993-01-01

    Radionuclide, metal and organic contaminants are present in relatively inaccessible subsurface environments at many U.S Department of Energy (DOE) sites. Subsurface contamination is of concern to DOE because the migration of these contaminants into relatively deep subsurface zones indicates that they exist in a mobile chemical form and thus could potentially enter domestic groundwater supplies. Currently, economic approaches to stabilize or remediate these deep contaminated zones are limited, because these systems are not well characterized and there is a lack of understanding of how geochemical, microbial, and hydrological processes interact to influence contaminant behavior. Microorganisms offer a potential means for radionuclide and metal immobilization or mobilization for subsequent surface treatment. Bioaccumulation is a specific microbial sequestering mechanism wherein mobile radionuclides and metals become associated with the microbial biomass by both intra- and extracellular sequestering ligands. Since most of the microorganism in the subsurface are associated with the stationary strata, bioaccumulation of mobile radionuclides and metals would initially result in a decrease in the transport of inorganic contaminants. How long the inorganic contaminants would remain immobilized, the selectivity of the bioaccumulation process for specific inorganic contaminants, the mechanism involved, and how the geochemistry and growth conditions of the subsurface environment influence bioaccumulation are not currently known. This presentation focuses on the microbial process of immobilizing radionuclides and metals and using this process to reduce inorganic contaminant migration at DOE sites. Background research with near-surface microorganisms will be presented to demonstrate this process and show its potential to reduce inorganic contaminant migration. Future research needs and approaches in this relatively new research area will also be discussed

  19. Radionuclide cisternography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, H.H.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to show that radionuclide cisternography makes an essential contribution to the investigation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics, especially for the investigation of hydrocephalus. The technical details of radionuclide cisternography are discussed, followed by a description of the normal and abnormal radionuclide cisternograms. The dynamics of CFS by means of radionuclide cisternography were examined in 188 patients in whom some kind of hydrocephalus was suspected. This study included findings of anomalies associated with hydrocephalus in a number of cases, such as nasal liquorrhea, hygromas, leptomeningeal or porencephalic cysts. The investigation substantiates the value of radionuclide cisternography in the diagnosis of disturbances of CSF flow. The retrograde flow of radiopharmaceutical into the ventricular system (ventricular reflux) is an abnormal phenomenon indicating the presence of communicating hydrocephalus. (Auth.)

  20. Safety case for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel at Olkiluoto. Assessment of radionuclide release scenarios for the repository system 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-12-15

    Assessment of Radionuclide Release Scenarios sits within Posiva Oy's Safety Case 'TURVA-2012' report portfolio and has the objective of presenting an assessment of the repository system scenarios leading to radionuclide releases that have been identified in Formulation of Radionuclide Release Scenarios. A base scenario, variant scenarios and disturbance scenarios are considered. For each scenario, a range of calculation cases, also identified in Formulation of Radionuclide Release Scenarios, has been analysed, complemented by Monte Carlo simulations, a probabilistic sensitivity analysis and other supporting calculations. The calculation cases and analyses take into account major uncertainties in the initial state of the barriers and possible paths for the evolution of the repository system identified in Performance Assessment. Quality control and assurance measures have been adopted to ensure transparency and traceability of the calculations performed and hence to promote confidence in the analysis of the calculation cases. The calculation cases each consider a single, failed canister, where three possible modes of failure are addressed: (1) the presence of an initial penetrating defect in the copper overpack of the canister, (2) corrosion of the copper overpack, which occurs most rapidly in scenarios in which buffer density is reduced, e.g. by erosion, (3) shear movement on a fracture intersecting a deposition hole. The likelihood and consequences of multiple canister failure occurring during the assessment time frame are also considered. In particular, the analyses consider: The likelihood and consequences of there being multiple canisters with initial penetrating defects; The consequences if canister failure due to corrosion following buffer erosion were to occur; and The low annual probability of there being an earthquake large enough to give rise to canister failure due to rock shear movements and the potential consequences of such an earthquake

  1. Safety case for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel at Olkiluoto. Assessment of radionuclide release scenarios for the repository system 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-12-01

    Assessment of Radionuclide Release Scenarios sits within Posiva Oy's Safety Case 'TURVA-2012' report portfolio and has the objective of presenting an assessment of the repository system scenarios leading to radionuclide releases that have been identified in Formulation of Radionuclide Release Scenarios. A base scenario, variant scenarios and disturbance scenarios are considered. For each scenario, a range of calculation cases, also identified in Formulation of Radionuclide Release Scenarios, has been analysed, complemented by Monte Carlo simulations, a probabilistic sensitivity analysis and other supporting calculations. The calculation cases and analyses take into account major uncertainties in the initial state of the barriers and possible paths for the evolution of the repository system identified in Performance Assessment. Quality control and assurance measures have been adopted to ensure transparency and traceability of the calculations performed and hence to promote confidence in the analysis of the calculation cases. The calculation cases each consider a single, failed canister, where three possible modes of failure are addressed: (1) the presence of an initial penetrating defect in the copper overpack of the canister, (2) corrosion of the copper overpack, which occurs most rapidly in scenarios in which buffer density is reduced, e.g. by erosion, (3) shear movement on a fracture intersecting a deposition hole. The likelihood and consequences of multiple canister failure occurring during the assessment time frame are also considered. In particular, the analyses consider: The likelihood and consequences of there being multiple canisters with initial penetrating defects; The consequences if canister failure due to corrosion following buffer erosion were to occur; and The low annual probability of there being an earthquake large enough to give rise to canister failure due to rock shear movements and the potential consequences of such an earthquake, taking into

  2. Biological transfer of radionuclides in marine environments - Identifying and filling knowledge gaps for environmental impact assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J.E.; Borretzen, P.; Hosseini, A.; Iosjpe, M.

    2004-01-01

    A review on concentration factors (CF) for the marine environment was conducted in order to consider the relevance of existing data from the perspective of environmental protection and to identify areas of data paucity. Data have been organised in a format compatible with a reference organism approach, for selected radionuclides, and efforts have been taken to identify the factors that may be of importance in the context of dosimetric and dose-effects analyses. These reference organism categories had been previously selected by identifying organism groups that were likely to experience the highest levels of radiation exposure, owing to high uptake levels or residence in a particular habitat, for defined scenarios. Significant data gaps in the CF database have been identified, notably for marine mammals and birds. Most empirical information pertains to a limit suite of radionuclides, particularly 137 Cs, 210 Po and 99 Tc. A methodology has been developed to help bridge this information deficit. This has been based on simple dynamic, biokinetic models that mainly use parameters derived from laboratory-based study and field observation. In some cases, allometric relationships have been employed to allow further model parameterization. Initial testing of the model by comparing model output with empirical data sets suggest that the models provide sensible equilibrium CFs. Furthermore, analyses of modelling results suggest that for some radionuclides, in particularly those with long effective half-lives, the time to equilibrium can be far greater than the life-time of an organism. This clearly emphasises the limitations of applying a universal equilibrium approach. The methodology, therefore, has an added advantage that non-equilibrium scenarios can be considered in a more rigorous manner. Further refinements to the modelling approach might be attained by exploring the importance of various model parameters, through sensitivity analyses, and by identifying those

  3. Application of bio-indication approach for an assessment of natural radionuclides impact on biota in post-mining areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraskin, Stanislav; Dikareva, Nina; Dikarev, Vladimir; Oudalova, Alla; Michalik, Boguslaw; Wysocka, Malgorzata; Chalupnik, Stanislaw

    2006-01-01

    While many research projects were focused on areas with radioecological problems like Chernobyl, the Techa river region, and Semipalatinsk, the similar impact in post-mining areas with enhanced levels of natural radioactivity both in Komi and Yakutia, Russia and in the Upper Silesia, Poland is far less known. These areas are of special concern as being polluted by mixture of natural radionuclides, heavy metals and saline waste water, resulting in relatively high contamination levels. This leads to many ecosystem components undergoing a simultaneous potential stress from chemical and radioactive toxicants. Heavy metals and heavy natural radionuclides are both distributed very irregularly in ecosystem compartments. Such elements may accumulate in certain food chains and eventually reach concentrations capable to yield toxic or genotoxic effects. Contemporary levels of persistent pollutants in post-mining areas may enhance a risk both for human health and to biological components of natural ecosystems, therefore, a clear understanding of all these hazards are needed. With this in mind, many efforts have been undertaken to develop effective methods for assessing the quality of the environment. Generally, two approaches are used. The more classical one is to take samples of air, water and soil and analyze them in laboratory using routine chemical-physical techniques. An evaluation of genuine exposure characteristics is complicated, however, because the whole list of mutagens involved is to be recognized in advance, since most quantification techniques are able of recognizing just an assigned specific compound or its metabolites. Consequently, even exhaustive information on exposures in contaminated sites gives only a part of the knowledge necessary to evaluate and assess the harmful potential of pollutants for organisms and communities. The other approach is to score biological effects in standard indicator species. Plant systems seem especially well suited (Serres

  4. Application of bio-indication approach for an assessment of natural radionuclides impact on biota in post-mining areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geraskin, Stanislav; Dikareva, Nina; Dikarev, Vladimir; Oudalova, Alla [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology. RIARAE, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Michalik, Boguslaw; Wysocka, Malgorzata; Chalupnik, Stanislaw [Central Mining Institute, Katowice (Poland)

    2006-07-01

    While many research projects were focused on areas with radioecological problems like Chernobyl, the Techa river region, and Semipalatinsk, the similar impact in post-mining areas with enhanced levels of natural radioactivity both in Komi and Yakutia, Russia and in the Upper Silesia, Poland is far less known. These areas are of special concern as being polluted by mixture of natural radionuclides, heavy metals and saline waste water, resulting in relatively high contamination levels. This leads to many ecosystem components undergoing a simultaneous potential stress from chemical and radioactive toxicants. Heavy metals and heavy natural radionuclides are both distributed very irregularly in ecosystem compartments. Such elements may accumulate in certain food chains and eventually reach concentrations capable to yield toxic or genotoxic effects. Contemporary levels of persistent pollutants in post-mining areas may enhance a risk both for human health and to biological components of natural ecosystems, therefore, a clear understanding of all these hazards are needed. With this in mind, many efforts have been undertaken to develop effective methods for assessing the quality of the environment. Generally, two approaches are used. The more classical one is to take samples of air, water and soil and analyze them in laboratory using routine chemical-physical techniques. An evaluation of genuine exposure characteristics is complicated, however, because the whole list of mutagens involved is to be recognized in advance, since most quantification techniques are able of recognizing just an assigned specific compound or its metabolites. Consequently, even exhaustive information on exposures in contaminated sites gives only a part of the knowledge necessary to evaluate and assess the harmful potential of pollutants for organisms and communities. The other approach is to score biological effects in standard indicator species. Plant systems seem especially well suited (Serres

  5. Assessment of the Chernobyl NPP radionuclide distribution at the territory of Kiev industrial-urban agglomeration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Results were presented of the complex of geological-ecological studies conducted in 1991-1992 with the aim of establishment of radionuclide distribution character in the upper part of geologic medium of the Kiev industrial-urban agglomeration (IUA). Soil, vegetative biomass, surface and underground water, atmospheric precipitations, atmospheric moisture were sampled for study. Distributions of 134,137 Cs, 144 Ce, 106 Ru, 238,239,240 Pu, 90 Sr, 3 H were investigated. Environmental contamination levels were compared with the preaccidental values. Anomaly fields of contamination density with radioisotopes of the Kiev IUA were revealed. 3 figs.; 3 tabs

  6. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-08-25

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport

  7. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.D. Schreiber

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to develop and analyze the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, consistent with Level I and Level II model validation, as identified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport: Engineered Barrier System: Radionuclide Transport Abstraction Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173617]). The EBS radionuclide transport abstraction (or EBS RT Abstraction) is the conceptual model used in the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) to determine the rate of radionuclide releases from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ). The EBS RT Abstraction conceptual model consists of two main components: a flow model and a transport model. Both models are developed mathematically from first principles in order to show explicitly what assumptions, simplifications, and approximations are incorporated into the models used in the TSPA-LA. The flow model defines the pathways for water flow in the EBS and specifies how the flow rate is computed in each pathway. Input to this model includes the seepage flux into a drift. The seepage flux is potentially split by the drip shield, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the drip shield and some passing through breaches in the drip shield that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. The flux through drip shield breaches is potentially split by the waste package, with some (or all) of the flux being diverted by the waste package and some passing through waste package breaches that might result from corrosion or seismic damage. Neither the drip shield nor the waste package survives an igneous intrusion, so the flux splitting submodel is not used in the igneous scenario class. The flow model is validated in an independent model validation technical review. The drip shield and waste package flux splitting algorithms are developed and validated using experimental data. The transport model considers

  8. A dynamic compartment model for assessing the transfer of radionuclide deposited onto flooded rice-fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keum, Dong-Kwon; Lee, Han-Soo; Choi, Heui-Ju; Kang, Hee-Seok; Lim, Kwang-Muk; Choi, Young-Ho; Lee, Chang-Woo

    2004-01-01

    A dynamic compartment model has been studied to estimate the transfer of radionuclides deposited onto flooded rice-fields after an accidental release. In the model, a surface water compartment and a direct shoot-base absorption from the surface water to the rice-plant, which are major features discriminating the present model from the existing model, has been introduced to account for the flooded condition of rice-fields. The model has been applied to the deposition experiments of 137 Cs on rice-fields that were performed at three different times to simulate the deposition before transplanting (May 2) and during the growth of the rice (June 1 and August 12), respectively. In the case of the deposition of May 2, the root-uptake is the most predominant process for transferring 137 Cs to the rice-body and grain. When the radionuclide is applied just after transplanting (June 1), the activity of the body is controlled by the shoot-base absorption and the activity of the grain by the root-uptake. The deposition just before ear-emergence (August 12) shows that the shoot-base absorption contributes entirely to the increase of both the activities of the body and grain. The model prediction agrees within one or two factors with the experimental results obtained for a respective deposition experiment

  9. Soil depth profiles and radiological assessment of natural radionuclides in forest ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manigandan, P.K. [Al Musanna College of Technology, Muscat (Oman); Chandar Shekar, B. [Bharathiar Univ., Coimbatore (India). Kongunadu Arts and Science College

    2017-08-01

    We measured the distribution of three naturally occurring radionuclides, {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, and {sup 40}K, in soil samples collected from a rainforest in the Western Ghats of India. For each surface sample, we calculated average activity concentration, outdoor terrestrial γ dose rate, annual effective dose equivalent (AEDE), and radiation hazard index. The activity concentrations of surface samples were randomly distributed over space, but differed slightly with different soil depths. The concentration of {sup 232}Th and the average terrestrial γ dose rates were slightly higher than the world averages, so slightly high γ radiation appears to be a general characteristic of the Western Ghats. However, all radiological hazard indices were within the limits proposed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. The results reported here indicate that, except for {sup 232}Th, the naturally occurring radionuclides in the forest soils of the Western Ghats were within the ranges specified by United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation for undisturbed virgin soils.

  10. Therapeutic radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun Ju; Hong, Young Don; Lee, So Young

    2006-01-01

    Since the development of sophisticated molecular carriers such as octereotides for peptide receptor targeting and monoclonal antibodies against various associated with specific tumor types, radionuclide therapy (RNT) employing open sources of therapeutic agents is promising modality for treatment of tumors. Furthermore, the emerging of new therapeutic regimes and new approaches for tumor treatment using radionuclide are anticipated in near future. In targeted radiotherapy using peptides and other receptor based carrier molecules, the use of radionuclide with high specific activity in formulating the radiopharmaceutical is essential in order to deliver sufficient number of radionuclides to the target site without saturating the target. In order to develop effective radiopharmaceuticals for therapeutic applications, it is crucial to carefully consider the choice of appropriate radionuclides as well as the carrier moiety with suitable pharmacokinetic properties that could result in good in vivo localization and desired excretion. Up to date, only a limited number of radionuclides have been applied in radiopharmaceutical development due to the constraints in compliance with their physical half-life, decay characteristics, cost and availability in therapeutic applications. In this review article, we intend to provide with the improved understanding of the factors of importance of appropriate radionuclide for therapy with respect to their physical properties and therapeutic applications

  11. History of medical radionuclide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ice, R D

    1995-11-01

    Radionuclide production for medical use originally was incidental to isotope discoveries by physicists and chemists. Once the available radionuclides were identified they were evaluated for potential medical use. Hevesy first used 32P in 1935 to study phosphorous metabolism in rats. Since that time, the development of cyclotrons, linear accelerators, and nuclear reactors have produced hundreds of radionuclides for potential medical use. The history of medical radionuclide production represents an evolutionary, interdisciplinary development of applied nuclear technology. Today the technology is represented by a mature industry and provides medical benefits to millions of patients annually.

  12. Sources of anthropogenic radionuclides in the environment: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Qinhong; Weng Jianqing; Wang Jinsheng

    2010-01-01

    Studies of radionuclides in the environment have entered a new era with the renaissance of nuclear energy and associated fuel reprocessing, geological disposal of high-level nuclear wastes, and concerns about national security with respect to nuclear non-proliferation. This work presents an overview on sources of anthropogenic radionuclides in the environment, as well as a brief discussion of salient geochemical behavior of important radionuclides. We first discuss the following major anthropogenic sources and current developments that have lead, or could potentially contribute, to the radionuclide contamination of the environment: (1) nuclear weapons program; (2) nuclear weapons testing; (3) nuclear power plants; (4) uranium mining and milling; (5) commercial fuel reprocessing; (6) geological repository of high-level nuclear wastes that include radionuclides might be released in the future, and (7) nuclear accidents. Then, we briefly summarize the inventory of radionuclides 99 Tc and 129 I, as well as geochemical behavior for radionuclides 99 Tc, 129 I, and 237 Np, because of their complex geochemical behavior, long half-lives, and presumably high mobility in the environment; biogeochemical cycling and environment risk assessment must take into account speciation of these redox-sensitive radionuclides.

  13. The importance of variations in the deposition velocity assumed for the assessment of airborne radionuclide releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.W.; Hoffman, F.O.; Shaeffer, D.L.

    1978-01-01

    In environmental radiological assessments, the depletion of airborne plumes by dry deposition processes and the subsequent contamination of ground and vegetation have been estimated through the use of a parameter termed the 'deposition velocity'. The sensitivity of environmental assessment models to changes in values of deposition velocity is here examined so that the effect of potential variations of deposition velocity on calculations of radiation dose can be determined. The results show that until more data are available great care must be exercised when applying theoretical ideas and scientific judgement in the selection of a value of the deposition velocity to be used in calculating the dose to man as a result of deposition. (U.K.)

  14. User's guide to the radionuclide inventory and hazard code INVENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nancarrow, D.J.; Thorne, M.C.

    1986-05-01

    This report constitutes the user's guide to the radionuclide inventory and hazard index code INVENT and provides an explanation of the mathematical basis of the code, the database used and operation of the code. INVENT was designed to facilitate the post-closure radiological assessment of land-based repositories for low and intermediate-level wastes. For those radionuclides identified to be of potential significance, it allows the calculation of time-dependent radionuclide activities, hazard indices for both inhalation and ingestion of activity, and photon spectra. (author)

  15. Ecological risk assessment for radionuclides and metals: A radiological and chemical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahini, X.; Mahini, R.; Fan, A.

    1995-01-01

    In response to the regulatory concern over the adverse effects of depleted uranium (DU) on ecological receptors at two sites contaminated with DU and metals, an ecological risk assessment (ERA) was performed, in conjunction with a radiological/chemical human health risk assessment (HRA). To date, most research on the harmful effects of radiation has focused only on humans. With regard to radiation protection of the environment, national and international radiation protection advisory committees have concluded that levels protecting human health should be sufficient to protect the environment as well. To select chemicals of potential ecological concern, a qualitative ERA was first performed by comparing chemical stressor concentrations in abiotic media with various benchmarked criteria. The results indicate that, as with the case of human health, DU was the ecological risk-driving chemical at these sites. Both radiological and chemical effects posed by DU were then estimated for the bald eagle, an endangered species that represents the assessment end point of the quantitative ERA. Abiotic media and food webs evaluated were: soils, surface water, plants, terrestrial (both mammalian and avian) species, and aquatic species. The results of the quantitative ERA indicate that the decision to cleanup DU contamination at these sites can solely be based on human health effects as limiting criteria. The risk assessments were well received by the regulatory agencies overseeing the project

  16. The radiological impact of radionuclides dispersed on a regional and global scale: Methods for assessment and their application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The basic features of models, developed to assess the radiological impact of radionuclides that become dispersed on a regional or global scale, have been reviewed. Particular attention has been given to identifying the important processes that need to be modelled in order to make a reliable estimate of the radiological impact, rather than attempting to judge which models are the most appropriate. Judgements on the latter will be sensitive to the particular application; in some cases a very simple approach may be sufficient, whereas in others a more rigorous analysis may be necessary. Two aspects are important in assessing the radiological impact: these are the exposure of critical groups, and the collective dose in the exposed population

  17. Quantitative assessment of limb blood flow using Tc-99m labeled red blood cells. Radionuclide venous occlusion plethysmography (RAVOP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kazuo; Shougase, Takashi; Kawamura, Naoyuki; Tsukamoto, Eriko; Nakada, Kunihiro; Sakuma, Makoto; Furudate, Masayori

    1987-10-01

    A quantitative assessment of limb blood flow using a non-diffusible radioindicator, Tc-99m labeled red blood cells, was reported. This was an application of venous occlusion plethysmography using radionuclide which was originally proposed by M. Fukuoka et al. The peripheral blood flow (mean +- s.e.) of 30 legs in a normal control group was 1.87 +- 0.08 ml/100 ml/min. In heart diseases (46 legs), it was 1.49 +- 0.13 ml/100 ml/min. The limb blood flow between a control group and heart diseases was statistically significant (p < 0.01) in the t-test. The peripheral blood flow at rest between diseased legs and normal legs in occlusive arterial disorders was also statistically significant (p < 0.01) in a paired t-test. RAVOP was done after the completion of objective studies such as radionuclide angiography or ventriculography. Technique and calculation of a blood flow were very easy and simple. RAVOP study which was originally proposed by Fukuoka et al. was reappraised to be hopeful for quantitative measurement of limb blood flow as a non-invasive technique using Tc-99m labeled red blood cells.

  18. The repeatability of left ventricular volume assessment by a new ambulatory radionuclide monitoring system during head-up tilt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Bonpei; Hosaka, Haruhiko; Kitamura, Katsuhiro

    2001-01-01

    The precise measurement of changes in left ventricular volume is important to elucidate the mechanisms of neurally mediated syncope. This study was conducted to determine whether or not a brand-new ambulatory radionuclide monitoring system (C-VEST system) can be clinically used to easily and precisely measure left ventricular volume and function in tilt testing. To assess the repeatability of the C-VEST system, 12 healthy volunteers (mean age 24±4 years old) underwent 20 minute head-up tilt testing and we measured the temporal changes in left ventricular volume and ejection fraction twice a day (first and second studies). To investigate the changes in the C-VEST measurements and the detector position in the first and second studies, tilt testing was performed with an 80-degree passive tilt, which is the same as the standard procedure used in diagnosing neurally mediated syncope. The coefficient of repeatability for both the C-VEST and detector position was well within the clinical range (coefficient of repeatability in left ventricular volume ranged from 1.7 to 2.8; coefficient of repeatability in the detector position ranged from 2.3 to 3.1). Precise evaluation of the left ventricular volume can be achieved by an ambulatory radionuclide monitoring system in tilt testing. (author)

  19. Colloid-Facilitated Radionuclide Transport: Current State of Knowledge from a Nuclear Waste Repository Risk Assessment Perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimus, Paul William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zavarin, Mavrik [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-01-25

    This report provides an overview of the current state of knowledge of colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport from a nuclear waste repository risk assessment perspective. It draws on work that has been conducted over the past 3 decades, although there is considerable emphasis given to work that has been performed over the past 3-5 years as part of the DOE Used Fuel Disposition Campaign. The timing of this report coincides with the completion of a 3-year DOE membership in the Colloids Formation and Migration (CFM) partnership, an international collaboration of scientists studying colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides at both the laboratory and field-scales in a fractured crystalline granodiorite at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland. This Underground Research Laboratory has hosted the most extensive and carefully-controlled set of colloid-facilitated solute transport experiments that have ever been conducted in an in-situ setting, and a summary of the results to date from these efforts, as they relate to transport over long time and distance scales, is provided in Chapter 3 of this report.

  20. Colloid-Facilitated Radionuclide Transport: Current State of Knowledge from a Nuclear Waste Repository Risk Assessment Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimus, Paul William; Zavarin, Mavrik; Wang, Yifeng

    2017-01-01

    This report provides an overview of the current state of knowledge of colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport from a nuclear waste repository risk assessment perspective. It draws on work that has been conducted over the past 3 decades, although there is considerable emphasis given to work that has been performed over the past 3-5 years as part of the DOE Used Fuel Disposition Campaign. The timing of this report coincides with the completion of a 3-year DOE membership in the Colloids Formation and Migration (CFM) partnership, an international collaboration of scientists studying colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides at both the laboratory and field-scales in a fractured crystalline granodiorite at the Grimsel Test Site in Switzerland. This Underground Research Laboratory has hosted the most extensive and carefully-controlled set of colloid-facilitated solute transport experiments that have ever been conducted in an in-situ setting, and a summary of the results to date from these efforts, as they relate to transport over long time and distance scales, is provided in Chapter 3 of this report.

  1. Long-Term Assessment of Critical Radionuclides and Associated Environmental Media at the Savannah River Site - 13038

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannik, G.T.; Baker, R.A.; Lee, P.L. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Eddy, T.P.; Blount, G.C. [Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Whitney, G.R. [US Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    During the operational history of the Savannah River Site (SRS), many different radionuclides have been released from site facilities. However, only a relatively small number of the released radionuclides have been significant contributors to doses and risks to the public. At SRS dose and risk assessments indicate tritium oxide in air and surface water, and Cs-137 in fish and deer have been, and continue to be, the critical radionuclides and pathways. In this assessment, statistical analyses of the long-term trends of tritium oxide in atmospheric and surface water releases and Cs-137 concentrations in fish and deer are provided. Correlations also are provided with 1) operational changes and improvements, 2) geopolitical events (Cold War cessation), and 3) recent environmental remediation projects and decommissioning of excess facilities. For example, environmental remediation of the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins and the Solid Waste Disposal Facility have resulted in a measurable impact on the tritium oxide flux to the onsite Fourmile Branch stream. Airborne releases of tritium oxide have been greatly affected by operational improvements and the end of the Cold War in 1991. However, the effects of SRS environmental remediation activities and ongoing tritium operations on tritium concentrations in the environment are measurable and documented in this assessment. Controlled hunts of deer and feral hogs are conducted at SRS for approximately six weeks each year. Before any harvested animal is released to a hunter, SRS personnel perform a field analysis for Cs-137 concentrations to ensure the Hunter's dose does not exceed the SRS administrative game limit of 0.22 milli-sievert (22 mrem). However, most of the Cs-137 found in SRS onsite deer is not from site operations but is from nuclear weapons testing fallout from the 1950's and early 1960's. This legacy source term is trended in the SRS deer, and an assessment of the 'effective' half-life of Cs

  2. Assessment of function of the cardiovascular system in arterial hypertension using radionuclide methods of investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oganesyan, N.M.; Babayan, A.S.; Mikaehlyan, R.S.; Mnatsakyan, Eh.L.

    1986-01-01

    Proceeding from a study of the nature of changes in hemodynamics during development of hypertensive disease (HD) at its different stages it was shown that hemodynamic changes in 42.1% of the patients with Stage 1-2A HD were of hypertensive type, in the patients with Stage 2B-3 HD normal and hypokinetic types of the blood circulation prevailed. After bicycle ergometry exercise the reactivity of the cardiovascular system was revealed more completely. The most complete information on function of the cardiovascular system and myocardial contractility can be obtained with the help of radioangiocardiography and radionuclide ventriculography. However in the absence of a gamma-chamber radiocardiography can provide necessary information on function of the cardiovascular system in case it is used in one and the same patient over time using bicycle ergometry testing

  3. Assessment of gamma radionuclides in sediments from the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans of Guatemala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orozco Chilel, R.M.

    1997-01-01

    The study consisted in the assesment of radioactivity levels in marine sediments of Guatemala due to gamma radionuclides. The samples were taken from 5 selected places, the activity of each sediment was measured by gamma spectrometry using an GE High-Purity detector. The methodology used consisted in to measure the efficiency of the Ge detector, then the calibration for Pb-210 was made. The radioactivity ranges from 1.69 Bq/Kg to 8.68 Bq/Kg for Cs-137, 356.99 Bq/Kg to 431.18 Bq/Kg for K-40, 48.71 Bq/Kg to 59.94 Bq/Kg for Ra-226 and 151.283 Bq/Kg to 224.47 Bq/Kg for Pb-210

  4. 90Nb: potential radionuclide for application in immuno-PET. Development of appropriate production strategy and first in vivo evaluation of 90Nb-labeled monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radchenko, Valery

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is a modern and highly effective tool for the detection and treatment of oncological disease. Molecular imaging based on radiotracers includes single photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET), which provide non-invasive tumor visualization on nano- and picomolar level, respectively. Currently, many novel tracers for more precise discovery of small tumors and metastases have been introduced and are under investigation. Many of them are protein-based biomolecules which nature herself produces as antigens for the eradication of tumor cells. Antibodies and antibody fragments play an important role in tumor diagnostics and treatment. PET imaging with antibodies and antibody fragments is called immuno-PET. The main issue that needs to be addressed is that appropriate radiotracers with half-lives related to the half-lives of biomolecules are needed. The development of novel radiotracers is a multistep, complicated task. This task includes the evaluation of production, separation and labeling strategy for chosen radionuclide. Finally, the biomolecule-radionuclide complex should be stable in time. An equally important factor is the economic suitability of the production strategy, which will lead to a key decision for future application of the developed radionuclide. In recent work, 90 Nb has been proposed as a potential candidate for application in immuno-PET. Its half-life of 14.6 hours is suitable for application with antibody fragments and some intact antibodies. 90 Nb has a relatively high positron branching of 53% and an optimal energy of β + emission of 0.35 MeV that can provide high quality of imaging with low dose of used radionuclide. First proof-of-principle studies have shown that 90 Nb: (i) can be produced in sufficient amount and purity by proton bombardment of natural zirconium target (ii) can be isolated from target material with appropriate radiochemical purity (iii) may be used for labeling of monoclonal

  5. Modeling Radionuclide Transport in Clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Liange [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Li, Lianchong [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Rutqvist, Jonny [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Liu, Hui -Hai [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Clay/shale has been considered as potential host rock for geological disposal of high-level nuclear waste throughout the world, because of its low permeability, low diffusion coefficient, high retention capacity for radionuclides, and capability to self-seal fractures induced by tunnel excavation. For example, Callovo-Oxfordian argillites at the Bure site, France (Fouche et al., 2004), Toarcian argillites at the Tournemire site, France (Patriarche et al., 2004), Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri site, Switzerland (Meier et al., 2000), and Boom clay at the Mol site, Belgium (Barnichon and Volckaert, 2003) have all been under intensive scientific investigation (at both field and laboratory scales) for understanding a variety of rock properties and their relationships to flow and transport processes associated with geological disposal of nuclear waste. Clay/shale formations may be generally classified as indurated or plastic clays (Tsang and Hudson, 2010). The latter (including Boom clay) is a softer material without high cohesion; its deformation is dominantly plastic. During the lifespan of a clay repository, the repository performance is affected by complex thermal, hydrogeological, mechanical, chemical (THMC) processes, such as heat release due to radionuclide decay, multiphase flow, formation of damage zones, radionuclide transport, waste dissolution, and chemical reactions. All these processes are related to each other. An in-depth understanding of these coupled processes is critical for the performance assessment (PA) of the repository. These coupled processes may affect radionuclide transport by changing transport paths (e.g., formation and evolution of excavation damaged zone (EDZ)) and altering flow, mineral, and mechanical properties that are related to radionuclide transport. While radionuclide transport in clay formation has been studied using laboratory tests (e,g, Appelo et al. 2010, Garcia-Gutierrez et al., 2008, Maes et al., 2008), short-term field

  6. Radionuclide-Chelating Agent Complexes in Low-Level Radioactive Decontamination Waste; Stability, Adsorption and Transport Potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. Jeffrey; Cantrell, Cantrell J.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.; Owen, Antionette T.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Orr, Robert D.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2002-02-01

    Speciation calculations were done to determine whether organic complexants facilitate transport of radionuclides leached from waste buried in soils. EDTA readily mobilizes divalent transition metals and moderately impacts trivalent actinides. Picolinate readily mobilizes only Ni2+ and Co2+. These speciation predictions ignore the influence of soil adsorption and biodegradation that break apart the complexes. In adsorption studies, picolinate concentrations have to be >10-4 M to lower the adsorption of Ni and Co. For Sm(III), Th(IV), Np(V), U(VI), and Pu, the picolinate concentration must be >10-3 M before adsorption decreases. EDTA forms strong complexes with divalent transition metals and can stop adsorption of Ni and Co when EDTA solution concentrations are 10-5 M. EDTA complexes with Np(V), U(VI), and Pu are much weaker; EDTA concentrations would have to be >10-3 M to adversely effects non-transition metal/radionuclide adsorption. Most picolinate and ETDA-metal complexes appear to readily dissociate during interactions with soils. The enhanced migration of radionuclide-organic complexes may be limited to a few unique conditions. We recommend that mixtures of metal/radionuclides and EDTA should not be solidified or co-disposed with high pH materials such as cement. For weaker binding organic complexants, such as picolinate, citrate and oxalate, co-disposal of decontamination wastes and concrete should be acceptable.

  7. The utilisation of short-lived radionuclides in the assessment of formulation and in vivo disposition of drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digenis, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    The utilisation of short-lived radionuclides in the assessment of drug formulations, and the in vivo distribution of drugs is discussed. Disintegration of tablets and capsules as a function of the formulation, and gastric emptying are important. The applicability of perturbed angular correlation to the study of the dissolution of water soluble substances from solid dosages in man is shown. Examples are given to illustrate how external scintigraphy can be applied to study the tissue distribution of 18 F-haloperidol, 82 Br-bromperidol, in rat and monkey. 11 C, L-andD-phenylalanine in rats, 11 C, D-leucine in mice with human colon tumours; 13 N-nitrosoureas and 13 N-nitroso-carbamates. (U.K.)

  8. Radionuclides in Animal Feed (Poultry) 'Assessment of Radiation Dose'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Algadi, S.; Salih, I. [Radiation Safety Institute (Sudan)

    2014-07-01

    In this work a comprehensive study has been carried out for the determination of presents evaluation of effective dose due to consumption of chicken fed by fodders collected from four major Sudanese companies (Hader, Koudjs, Wifi and Preconex SPN.V). The concentrations of radionuclides in the thirty two (32) feed samples have been determined by gamma spectrometry using NaI(Tl) detector. Radionuclides observed were: Pb-212 (daughter of Th-238), Pb-214, Bi-214 (daughters of U-238), Cs-137 and K-40 concentration. In additives the activity concentration of these radionuclides has found in the following ranges: 0.81 - 22.06 Bq/kg, 0.59 - 32.07 Bq/kg, 0.64 - 15.77 Bq/kg, 0.01 - 2.02 Bq/kg and 33.58 - 204.61 Bq/kg respectively. In feed concentrates activity concentration ranges has: 0.73 - 13.79 Bq/kg, 0.33 - 20.04 Bq/kg, 0.01 - 1.67 Bq/kg, 0.01 - 0.28 Bq/kg, 26.86 - 99.21 Bq/kg respectively. In fodders the activity concentration ranges has: 1.25 - 1.52 Bq/kg, 0.12 - 1.24 Bq/kg, 0.51 - 1.25 Bq/kg, 0.01 - 0.61 Bq/kg, 11.94 - 127.88 Bq/kg respectively. The 'animal product' activity concentration ranges has: 0.31 - 1.65 Bq/kg, 0.22 - 1.11 Bq/kg, 0.26 - 1.07 Bq/kg, 0.03 - 0.51 Bq/kg, 14.07 - 79.93 Bq/kg respectively. High concentrations (233.3 Bq/Kg) has typically found in toxo(additive); the lowest concentration (27.9 Bq/Kg ) has found in concentrate for layers and animal product. The total average effective dose due to the different feed-stuff has estimated and found to be 5.89x10{sup -6}±3.11x10{sup -6}mSv/y and 13.9 x 10{sup -7} ± 7.24 x 10{sup -7}mSv/y for age categories 7-12 y and >17 y respectively. If compared with the limits - Radioactivity Levels Permitted in foodstuffs Part 1 the Saudi Standards, Metrology and quality (300 Bq/Kg) and ICRP,FAO organization (5 mSv/y) - these values are very low. Document available in abstract form only. (authors)

  9. Improved left ventricular function after growth hormone replacement in patients with hypopituitarism: assessment with radionuclide angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuocolo, A.; Nicolai, E.; Colao, A.; Longobardi, S.; Cardei, S.; Fazio, S.; Merola, B.; Lombardi, G.; Sacca, L.; Salvatore, M.

    1996-01-01

    Prolonged growth hormone deficiency (GHD) leads to marked cardiac dysfunction; however, whether reversal of this abnormality may be achieved after specific replacement therapy has not yet been completely clarified. Fourteen patients with childhood-onset GHD (nine men and five women, mean age 27±4 years) and 12 normal control subjects underwent equilibrium radionuclide angiography under control conditions at rest. Patients with GHD were also studied 6 months after recombinant human (rh) GH treatment (0.05 IU/kg per day). Normal control subjects and patients with GHD did not differ with respect to age, gender and heart rate. In contrast, left ventricular ejection fraction (53%±9% vs 66%±6%, P 2 , P 2 , P 2 , P 2 , P <0.01) was observed in GHD patients. In conclusion, prolonged lack of GH leads to impaired left ventricular function at rest. Reversal of this abnormality may be observed after 6 months of specific replacement therapy in patients with childhood-onset GHD. (orig.). With 4 figs., 1 tab

  10. Assessment of natural radionuclides and its radiological hazards from tiles made in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joel, E. S.; Maxwell, O.; Adewoyin, O. O.; Ehi-Eromosele, C. O.; Embong, Z.; Saeed, M. A.

    2018-03-01

    Activity concentration of 10 different brands of tiles made in Nigeria were analyzed using High purity Germanium gamma detector and its hazard indices such as absorbed dose rate, radium equivalent activity, external Hazard Index (Hex), internal Hazard Index (Hin), Annual Effective Dose (mSv/y), Gamma activity Index (Iγ) and Alpha Index (Iα) were determined. The result showed that the average activity concentrations of radionuclides (226Ra, 232Th and 40K) content are within the recommended limit. The average radium equivalent is within the recommended limit of 370 Bq/kg. The result obtained further showed that the mean values for the absorbed dose rate (D), external and internal hazard index, the annual effective dose (AEDR) equivalent, gamma activity index and Alpha Index were: 169.22 nGyh-1, 0.95 and 1.14, 1.59 mSv/y, 1.00 Sv yr-1 and 0.34 respectively. The result established that radiological hazards such as absorbed dose rate, internal hazard, annual effective dose rate, gamma activity index and Alpha Index for some samples are found to be slightly close or above international recommended values. The result for the present study was compared with tiles sample from others countries, it was observed that the concentration of tiles made in Nigeria and other countries are closer, however recommends proper radiation monitoring for some tiles made in Nigeria before usage due to the long term health effect.

  11. Clinical assessment of first pass radionuclide ventriculography after dipyridamole infusion in patients with coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanaya, Tohru; Tono-oka, Ichiro; Satoh, Satoshi; Yamaguchi, Yoshiko; Hoshi, Hikaru; Ikeda, Kozue; Tsuiki, Kai; Yasui, Shoji; Komatani, Akio

    1986-01-01

    First pass radionuclide ventriculography (RNV) was performed after dipyridamole (D) infusion in 33 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) and 15 normal volunteers. RNV findings after D infusion were compared with those of conventional exercise RNV and body surface ECG mapping (MAP). For patients with multiple vessel disease, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was significantly lower after D infusion than at rest. Wall motion abnormality (WMA) sites induced by D infusion were well coincident with those induced by exercise. Pressure rate product at exercise was significantly higher than that after D infusion, suggesting the different mechanism of the occurrence of WMA after D infusion and at exercise. The incidence of ischemic reaction tended to be higher after D infusion than at exercise in 25 patients with CAD. There was negative correlation between ST depression on MAP after D infusion and LVEF on RNV after D infusion. This RNV after D infusion can be used as a supplement tool to conventional exercise RNV in the evaluation of the degree of coronary artery lesions and preserved left ventricular function. (Namekawa, K.)

  12. Problems in clinical assessment of left ventricular peak filling rate with radionuclide ventriculography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Yoshio; Kim, Bong-Ha; Tsuneoka, Yutaka

    1987-02-01

    With an increased clinical application of early peak diastolic filling rate (PFR) using radionuclide ventriculography, problems of its clinical significance have emerged. The study was designed to answer the following questions: 1) accuracy of PFR measurement, 2) normalization of PFR, and 3) whether PFR may reflect left ventricular relaxation rate (LVRR). In measuring PFR, an elevated framing rate was required, and the optimal rate was 20 msec/F. Second sound heart gating technique proved to be complementary to conventional ECG R wave gating technique in the evaluation of left ventricular diastolic volume curves and mean filling rate associated with changes in the range of R-R interval. PFR which was normalized with end-diastolic volume (EDV) did not necessarily reflect measured PFR because of individual differences of EDV. An experiment on the relationship of mitral valve pressure to blood flow in dogs revealed that PFR was influenced by not only LVRR but also left atrial pressure. These results may raise a question of the rationale for using the measurement of PFR, as well as its technical problems, in the objective evaluation of LVRR. (Namekawa, K.).

  13. Knowledge gaps in relation to radionuclide levels and transfer to wild plants and animals, in the context of environmental impact assessments, and a strategy to fill them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J.E.; Saxen, R.; Mattila, J.

    2009-01-01

    International activities with regards the development of methods for assessing impacts on the environment from ionising radiation have been substantial in recent years. In developing these methods, there are requirements (i) to determine the transfer of radionuclides within ecosystems and (ii) to determine background dose-rates arising from the presence of naturally occurring radionuclides, in a satisfactory manner. It has quickly become evident that fulfilling these 2 requirements is not entirely straightforward reflecting a lack of data in many cases. This report specifies exactly where these data-gaps lie through analyses of data generated from the most recent studies conducted internationally on this topic. It is evident that information is limited for numerous radionuclides from U-238 and Th-232 decay series and notably, in view of its importance as a contributor to dose-rates in plants and animals, Po-210. The simple way to rectify these data deficiencies is to organise target field campaigns focusing on particular species and radionuclides where information is lacking. To this end, field sampling has been conducted in a semi-natural mountain ecosystem in Norway and freshwater aquatic systems in Finland. It is envisaged that the data derived from the studies briefly described in this report will provide fundamental information for our understanding of the behaviour and fate of natural decay series radionuclides in terrestrial and aquatic systems and provide the basis for more robust way. (au)

  14. Knowledge gaps in relation to radionuclide levels and transfer to wild plants and animals, in the context of environmental impact assessments, and a strategy to fill them

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, J.E. (ed.); Gjelsvik, R. (Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway)); Saxen, R.; Mattila, J. (STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (Finland))

    2009-01-15

    International activities with regards the development of methods for assessing impacts on the environment from ionising radiation have been substantial in recent years. In developing these methods, there are requirements (i) to determine the transfer of radionuclides within ecosystems and (ii) to determine background dose-rates arising from the presence of naturally occurring radionuclides, in a satisfactory manner. It has quickly become evident that fulfilling these 2 requirements is not entirely straightforward reflecting a lack of data in many cases. This report specifies exactly where these data-gaps lie through analyses of data generated from the most recent studies conducted internationally on this topic. It is evident that information is limited for numerous radionuclides from U-238 and Th-232 decay series and notably, in view of its importance as a contributor to dose-rates in plants and animals, Po-210. The simple way to rectify these data deficiencies is to organise target field campaigns focusing on particular species and radionuclides where information is lacking. To this end, field sampling has been conducted in a semi-natural mountain ecosystem in Norway and freshwater aquatic systems in Finland. It is envisaged that the data derived from the studies briefly described in this report will provide fundamental information for our understanding of the behaviour and fate of natural decay series radionuclides in terrestrial and aquatic systems and provide the basis for more robust way. (au)

  15. Left ventricular dimensions during isometric exercise in aortic valve incompetence assessed by M-mode echocardiography and gated equilibrium radionuclide angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groundstroem, K.; Huikuri, H.; Korhonen, U.; Ikaeheimo, M.; Torniainen, P.; Heikkilae, J.; Linnaluoto, M.; Takkunen, J.; Oulu Univ.; Oulu Univ.

    1989-01-01

    We compared M-mode echocardiographic and gated equilibrium radionuclide angiography assessment of the left ventricular (LV) dimensions at rest and during isometric exercise in 18 patients with chronic aortic valve incompetence. The two methods showed a satisfactory correlation when comparing LV size at rest and during exercise (LV end-diastolic dimension in echocardiography vs LV end-diastolic volume in radionuclide angiography, r=0.80, P<0.01 at rest and r=0.81, P<0.01 during exercise; LV end-systolic dimension in echocardiography vs LV end-systolic volume in radionuclide angiography, r=0.81, P<0.01 at rest and r=0.75; P<0.01 during exercise), but fractional shortening in echocardiography and ejection fraction in radionuclide angiography did not correlate (r=0.27, not significant (NS) at rest and r=0.34, NS during exercise). Thus echocardiography and radionuclide angiography describe LV dimensions at rest and during handgrip exercise in a similar fashion, documenting the concordance of these noninvasive methods to describe LV size in aortic incompetence at rest and during exercise. (orig.)

  16. Effects on radionuclide concentrations by cement/ground-water interactions in support of performance assessment of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krupka, K.M.; Serne, R.J.

    1998-05-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is developing a technical position document that provides guidance regarding the performance assessment of low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. This guidance considers the effects that the chemistry of the vault disposal system may have on radionuclide release. The geochemistry of pore waters buffered by cementitious materials in the disposal system will be different from the local ground water. Therefore, the cement-buffered environment needs to be considered within the source term calculations if credit is taken for solubility limits and/or sorption of dissolved radionuclides within disposal units. A literature review was conducted on methods to model pore-water compositions resulting from reactions with cement, experimental studies of cement/water systems, natural analogue studies of cement and concrete, and radionuclide solubilities experimentally determined in cement pore waters. Based on this review, geochemical modeling was used to calculate maximum concentrations for americium, neptunium, nickel, plutonium, radium, strontium, thorium, and uranium for pore-water compositions buffered by cement and local ground-water. Another literature review was completed on radionuclide sorption behavior onto fresh cement/concrete where the pore water pH will be greater than or equal 10. Based on this review, a database was developed of preferred minimum distribution coefficient values for these radionuclides in cement/concrete environments

  17. Fallout radionuclide-based techniques for assessing the impact of soil conservation measures on erosion control and soil quality: an overview of the main lessons learnt under an FAO/IAEA Coordinated Research Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dercon, G; Mabit, L; Hancock, G; Nguyen, M L; Dornhofer, P; Bacchi, O O S; Benmansour, M; Bernard, C; Froehlich, W; Golosov, V N; Haciyakupoglu, S; Hai, P S; Klik, A; Li, Y; Lobb, D A; Onda, Y; Popa, N; Rafiq, M; Ritchie, J C; Schuller, P; Shakhashiro, A; Wallbrink, P; Walling, D E; Zapata, F; Zhang, X

    2012-05-01

    This paper summarizes key findings and identifies the main lessons learnt from a 5-year (2002-2008) coordinated research project (CRP) on "Assessing the effectiveness of soil conservation measures for sustainable watershed management and crop production using fallout radionuclides" (D1.50.08), organized and funded by the International Atomic Energy Agency through the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. The project brought together nineteen participants, from Australia, Austria, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Japan, Morocco, Pakistan, Poland, Romania, Russian Federation, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States of America and Vietnam, involved in the use of nuclear techniques and, more particularly, fallout radionuclides (FRN) to assess the relative impacts of different soil conservation measures on soil erosion and land productivity. The overall objective of the CRP was to develop improved land use and management strategies for sustainable watershed management through effective soil erosion control practices, by the use of ¹³⁷Cs (half-life of 30.2 years), ²¹⁰Pb(ex) (half-life of 22.3 years) and ⁷Be (half-life of 53.4 days) for measuring soil erosion over several spatial and temporal scales. The environmental conditions under which the different research teams applied the tools based on the use of fallout radionuclides varied considerably--a variety of climates, soils, topographies and land uses. Nevertheless, the achievements of the CRP, as reflected in this overview paper, demonstrate that fallout radionuclide-based techniques are powerful tools to assess soil erosion/deposition at several spatial and temporal scales in a wide range of environments, and offer potential to monitor soil quality. The success of the CRP has stimulated an interest in many IAEA Member States in the use of these methodologies to identify factors and practices that can enhance sustainable agriculture and minimize land degradation. Copyright

  18. Fallout radionuclide-based techniques for assessing the impact of soil conservation measures on erosion control and soil quality: an overview of the main lessons learnt under an FAO/IAEA Coordinated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dercon, G.; Mabit, L.; Nguyen, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes key findings and identifies the main lessons learnt from a 5-year (2002-2008) coordinated research project (CRP) on Assessing the effectiveness of soil conservation measures for sustainable watershed management and crop production using fallout radionuclides (D1.50.08), organized and funded by the International Atomic Energy Agency through the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. The project brought together nineteen participants, from Australia, Austria, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Japan, Morocco, Pakistan, Poland, Romania, Russian Federation, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States of America and Vietnam, involved in the use of nuclear techniques and, more particularly, fallout radionuclides (FRN) to assess the relative impacts of the different soil conservation measure on soil erosion and land productivity. The overall objective of the CRP was to develop improved land use and management strategies for sustainable watershed management through effective soil erosion control practices, by the use of 137 Cs (half-life of 30.2 years), 210 Pb ex (half-life of 22.3 years) and 7 Be (half-life of 53.4 days) for measuring soil erosion over several spatial and temporal scales. The environmental conditions under which the different research teams applied the tools based on the use of fallout radionuclides varied considerably - a variety of climates, soils, topographies and land uses. Nevertheless, the achievements of the CRP, as reflected in this overview paper, demonstrate that fallout radionuclide-based techniques are powerful tools to assess soil erosion/deposition at several spatial and temporal scales in a wide range of environments, and offer potential to monitor soil quality. The success of the CRP has stimulated an interest in many IAEA Member States in the use of these methodologies to identify factors and practices that can enhance sustainable agriculture and minimize land degradation. (author)

  19. Seminar on Comparative assessment of the environmental impact of radionuclides released during three major nuclear accidents: Kyshtym, Windscale, Chernobyl. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    These proceedings of seminar on comparative assessment of the environmental impact of radionuclides released during three major nuclear accidents (Kyshtym, Windscale, Chernobyl) are divided into 5 parts bearing on: part 1: accident source terms; part 2: atmospheric dispersion, resuspension, chemical and physical forms of contamination; part 3: environmental contamination and transfer; part 4: radiological implications for man and his environment; part 5: countermeasures

  20. Increased left ventricular ejection fraction after a meal: potential source of error in performance of radionuclide angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J.M.; White, C.J.; Sobol, S.M.; Lull, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of a standardized meal on left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) was determined by equilibrium radionuclide angiography in 16 patients with stable congestive heart failure but without pulmonary or valvular heart disease. LVEF was determined in the fasting state and 15, 30, and 45 minutes after a meal. Patients with moderately depressed fasting LVEF (30 to 50%), Group I, had a mean increase of 6.9 +/- 2.9% (p less than 0.005) in the LVEF at 45 minutes after the meal. Patients with severely depressed fasting LVEF (less than 30%), Group II, had no change after the meal. It is concluded that significant increases in LVEF may occur after meals in patients with moderate but not severe left ventricular dysfunction. Equilibrium radionuclide angiography studies that are not standardized for patients' mealtimes may introduce an important unmeasured variable that will affect the validity of data in serial studies of left ventricular function

  1. Barium titanate microparticles as potential carrier platform for lanthanide radionuclides for their use in the treatment of arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sudipta; Vimalnath, K V; Sharma, Jyothi; Shetty, Priyalata; Sarma, H D; Chakravarty, Rubel; Prakash, Deep; Sinha, P K; Dash, Ashutosh

    2018-02-12

    Since the inception of radiation synovectomy, a host of radioactive colloids and microparticles incorporating suitable therapeutic radionuclides have been proposed for the treatment of arthritis. The present article reports the synthesis and evaluation of barium titanate microparticles as an innovative and effective carrier platform for lanthanide radionuclides in the preparation of therapeutic agents for treatment of arthritis. The material was synthesized by mechanochemical route and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface area and particle size distribution analyses. Loading of lanthanide radionuclides ( 166 Ho, 153 Sm, 177 Lu and 169 Er) on the microparticles was achieved in high yield (> 95%) resulting in the formulation of loaded particulates with excellent radiochemical purities (> 99%). Radiolanthanide-loaded microparticles exhibited excellent in vitro stability in human serum. In vitro DTPA challenge study indicated fairly strong chemical association of lanthanides with barium titanate microparticles. Long-term biodistribution studies carried out after administration of 177 Lu-loaded microparticles into one of the knee joints of normal Wistar rats revealed near-complete retention of the formulation (> 96% of the administered radioactivity) within the joint cavity even 14 d post-administration. The excellent localization of the loaded microparticles was further confirmed by sequential whole-body radio-luminescence imaging studies carried out using 166 Ho-loaded microparticles. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Prognostic significance of radionuclide-assessed diastolic function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikamori, T.; Dickie, S.; Poloniecki, J.D.; Myers, M.J.; Lavender, J.P.; McKenna, W.J. (Hammersmith Hospital, London (England))

    1990-02-15

    To evaluate the prognostic significance of diastolic function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC), technetium-99m gated equilibrium radionuclide angiography, acquired in list mode, was performed in 161 patients. Five diastolic indexes were calculated. During 3.0 +/- 1.9 years, 13 patients had disease-related deaths. With univariate analysis, these patients were younger (29 +/- 20 vs 42 +/- 16 years; p less than 0.05), had a higher incidence of syncope (p less than 0.025), dyspnea (p less than 0.001), reduced peak filling rate (2.9 +/- 0.9 vs 3.4 +/- 1.0 end-diastolic volume/s; p = 0.09) with increased relative filling volume during the rapid filling period (80 +/- 7 vs 75 +/- 12%; p = 0.06) and decreased atrial contribution (17 +/- 7 vs 22 +/- 11%; p = 0.07). Stepwise discriminant analysis revealed that young age at diagnosis, syncope at diagnosis, reduced peak ejection rate, positive family history, reduced peak filling rate, increased relative filling volume by peak filling rate and concentric left ventricular hypertrophy were the most statistically significant (p = 0.0001) predictors of disease-related death (sensitivity 92%, specificity 76%, accuracy 77%, positive predictive value 25%). Discriminant analysis excluding the diastolic indexes, however, showed similar predictability (sensitivity 92%, specificity 76%, accuracy 78%, positive predictive value 26%). To obtain more homogeneous groups for analysis, patients were classified as survivors or electrically unstable, including sudden death, out-of-hospital ventricular fibrillation and nonsustained ventricular tachycardia during 48-hour ambulatory electrocardiography, and heart failure death or cardiac transplant.

  3. Prognostic significance of radionuclide-assessed diastolic function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikamori, T.; Dickie, S.; Poloniecki, J.D.; Myers, M.J.; Lavender, J.P.; McKenna, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic significance of diastolic function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC), technetium-99m gated equilibrium radionuclide angiography, acquired in list mode, was performed in 161 patients. Five diastolic indexes were calculated. During 3.0 +/- 1.9 years, 13 patients had disease-related deaths. With univariate analysis, these patients were younger (29 +/- 20 vs 42 +/- 16 years; p less than 0.05), had a higher incidence of syncope (p less than 0.025), dyspnea (p less than 0.001), reduced peak filling rate (2.9 +/- 0.9 vs 3.4 +/- 1.0 end-diastolic volume/s; p = 0.09) with increased relative filling volume during the rapid filling period (80 +/- 7 vs 75 +/- 12%; p = 0.06) and decreased atrial contribution (17 +/- 7 vs 22 +/- 11%; p = 0.07). Stepwise discriminant analysis revealed that young age at diagnosis, syncope at diagnosis, reduced peak ejection rate, positive family history, reduced peak filling rate, increased relative filling volume by peak filling rate and concentric left ventricular hypertrophy were the most statistically significant (p = 0.0001) predictors of disease-related death (sensitivity 92%, specificity 76%, accuracy 77%, positive predictive value 25%). Discriminant analysis excluding the diastolic indexes, however, showed similar predictability (sensitivity 92%, specificity 76%, accuracy 78%, positive predictive value 26%). To obtain more homogeneous groups for analysis, patients were classified as survivors or electrically unstable, including sudden death, out-of-hospital ventricular fibrillation and nonsustained ventricular tachycardia during 48-hour ambulatory electrocardiography, and heart failure death or cardiac transplant

  4. MOIRA models and methodologies for assessing the effectiveness of countermeasures in complex aquatic systems contaminated by radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte, L.; Haakanson, L.; Gallego Diaz, E.

    1999-01-01

    The present report is composed of a set of articles written by the partners of the MOIRA project (a model-based computerized system for management support to identify optimal remedial strategies for restoring radionuclide contaminated aquatic ecosystems and drainage areas). The report describes models for predicting the behaviour of radionuclides in complex aquatic systems and the effects of countermeasures for their restoration [it

  5. Technical Advances in Image Guidance of Radionuclide Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beijst, Casper; Kunnen, Britt; Lam, Marnix G E H; de Jong, Hugo W A M

    2017-12-01

    Internal radiation therapy with radionuclides (i.e., radionuclide therapy) owes its success to the many advantages over other, more conventional, treatment options. One distinct advantage of radionuclide therapies is the potential to use (part of) the emitted radiation for imaging of the radionuclide distribution. The combination of diagnostic and therapeutic properties in a set of matched radiopharmaceuticals (sometimes combined in a single radiopharmaceutical) is often referred to as theranostics and allows accurate diagnostic imaging before therapy. The use of imaging benefits treatment planning, dosimetry, and assessment of treatment response. This paper focuses on a selection of advances in imaging technology relevant for image guidance of radionuclide therapy. This involves developments in nuclear imaging modalities, as well as other anatomic and functional imaging modalities. The quality and quantitative accuracy of images used for guidance of radionuclide therapy is continuously being improved, which in turn may improve the therapeutic outcome and efficiency of radionuclide therapies. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  6. Radionuclide studies in impotence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilson, A.J.; Lewis, C.A. (St. Peter' s Hospitals, London (England))

    1991-04-01

    Impotence may be of physiological origin with causes including vascular or neurological pathology. Alternatively, it may be of psychogenic origin. Clinicians can distinguish between psychological and organic impotence by observing nocturnal penile tumescence. Non-radionuclide investigations for organic impotence include penile plethysmography or pulse Doppler analysis for arterial supply, cavernosometry for venous drainage, and biothesiometry or evoked potentials for neurological pathology. Radionuclide studies are primarily based on the use of technetium 99m-pertechnetate, 99mTc-red blood cells, or xenon 133 to study the blood flow, with or without pharmacological intervention, commonly papaverine. 26 references.

  7. Project SAFE. Update of the SFR-1 safety assessment. Phase 1. Appendix A5: Radionuclide transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, L.

    1998-01-01

    A critical revision of the previous safety assessments made by SKB on the Final Repository for Radioactive Operational Waste, SFR is presented. The review of the Deepened Safety Assessment is also discussed. Based on this critical revision improvements are suggested. Hydrology, formation of complexes, and long-term behaviour of the barriers are some of the aspects where the safety assessment could be improved

  8. Radionuclides in foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report contains data on the levels of radionuclides in the UK foodchain. Most data derive from monitoring programmes that exist around nuclear sites, and in some cases date back to the 1960s. Some comparative data from site operator and government-run programmes are included. Data from monitoring undertaken after the Chernobyl accident are summarised. General monitoring of the foodchain for both artificial and natural radionuclides, and the results of relevant government-sponsored research are also described. The report includes basic information on radioactivity in the environment, radiation protection standards and describes what measures are taken to routinely monitor the foodchain and assess public risk. (Author)

  9. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ersahin, Devrim; Doddamane, Indukala; Cheng, David

    2011-01-01

    Targeted radiotherapy is an evolving and promising modality of cancer treatment. The killing of cancer cells is achieved with the use of biological vectors and appropriate radionuclides. Among the many advantages of this approach are its selectiveness in delivering the radiation to the target, relatively less severe and infrequent side effects, and the possibility of assessing the uptake by the tumor prior to the therapy. Several different radiopharmaceuticals are currently being used by various administration routes and targeting mechanisms. This article aims to briefly review the current status of targeted radiotherapy as well as to outline the advantages and disadvantages of radionuclides used for this purpose

  10. Radionuclides in house dust

    CERN Document Server

    Fry, F A; Green, N; Hammond, D J

    1985-01-01

    Discharges of radionuclides from the British Nuclear Fuel plc (BNFL) reprocessing plant at Sellafield in Cumbria have led to elevated concentrations radionuclides in the local environment. The major routes of exposure of the public are kept under review by the appropriate Government departments and monitoring is carried out both by the departments and by BNFL itself. Recently, there has been increasing public concern about general environmental contamination resulting from the discharges and, in particular, about possible exposure of members of the public by routes not previously investigated in detail. One such postulated route of exposure that has attracted the interest of the public, the press and Parliament arises from the presence of radionuclides within houses. In view of this obvious and widespread concern, the Board has undertaken a sampling programme in a few communities in Cumbria to assess the radiological significance of this source of exposure. From the results of our study, we conclude that, alt...

  11. Radionuclide carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, F.A.; Kretschmar, H.C.

    1976-01-01

    A new carrier for radionuclide technetium 99m has been prepared for scintiscanning purposes. The new preparate consists of physiologically acceptable water-insoluble Tcsup(99m)-carrier containing from 0.2 to 0.8 weight percent of stannic ion as reductor, bound to an anionic starch derivative with about 1-20% of phosphate substituents. (EG)

  12. Untapped potential of health impact assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Winkler, Mirko S; Krieger, Gary R; Divall, Mark J; Cissé, Guéladio; Wielga, Mark; Singer, Burton H; Tanner, Marcel; Utzinger, Jürg

    2013-01-01

    The World Health Organization has promoted health impact assessment (HIA) for over 20 years. At the 2012 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20), HIA was discussed as a critical method for linking health to “green economy” and “institutional framework” strategies for sustainable development. In countries having a high human development index (HDI), HIA has been added to the overall assessment suite that typically includes potential environmental and social impacts, but i...

  13. Radionuclide techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alazraki, N.

    1988-01-01

    During approximately 25 years of experience with bone scanning, broad expansions in the clinical impact of radionuclide imaging on disorders of bones, joints, and soft tissues have occurred. This increased impact had its groundwork laid by advances in radiopharmaceuticals and instruments that are used for bone imaging. The progression from /sup 85/Sr- to /sup 99m/Tc-labeled phosphate and phosphonate compounds, coupled with the advance from crude rectilinear scanning techniques to whole body scintillation imaging with large crystal cameras and sophisticated electronics, has encourage use of radionuclide techniques in the evaluation of muscoloskeletal diseases. Many clinical studies have documented the high degree of sensitivity of the bone scan compared with that of the radiograph in detecting osseous and articular abnormalities

  14. Radionuclide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatal, J F; Hoefnagel, C A

    1999-09-11

    Nuclear medicine therapy uses unsealed radioactive sources for the selective delivery of radiation to tumours or target organs. For benign disorders such as thyrotoxicosis and arthritis radionuclide therapy provides an alternative to surgery or medical treatment. In cancer treatment, it often combines the advantage of target selectivity (like brachytherapy or external beam radiotherapy) with that of being systemic, as with chemotherapy, and it may be used as part of a therapeutic strategy with curative intent or for disease control and palliation. Toxicity is generally limited to the haematopoietic tissue and few side-effects are observed. When cure is feasible, the long-term consequences of radionuclide therapy (eg, fertility disorders and leukaemia or other secondary cancers) do compare favourably with the risks associated with and accepted for chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

  15. Aquifer characterization and groundwater potential assessment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... integrated electrical resistivity and borehole lithologic logs with a view to characterizing the aquifer and assessing the groundwater potential. One hundred and four Vertical Electrical Soundings (VES) were quantitatively interpreted using the partial curve matching technique and computer assisted 1-D forward modeling.

  16. Comparisons of activity measurements with radionuclide calibrators, a tool for quality assessment and improvement in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oropesa, P. A.; Hernandez, T.; Serra, R.; Varela, C.

    2007-01-01

    A national program of ongoing comparisons for assaying gamma-emitting radiopharmaceuticals for amount of radioactivity using radionuclide calibrators was begun in 2000. Nuclides of the most wide-spread use in Cuban nuclear medicine, 131 I, 201 Tl and 99 mTc, as well as two measurement geometries, glass vials and plastic syringes, were employed. In this paper, the participants' performance is assessed by mean of a statistical analysis of the reported data. Performance tables have been obtained and a w2 statistic is calculated from observed and expected frequencies, with the aim of testing the hypothesis about the independence of some characteristics of the comparison results, at a significance level a 1/4 0:05. The proportion of satisfactory results in the years 2002-2004 were found to be at the same level, but higher than in 2000. It reveals an improvement of the measurement quality since 2002. The causes of improvement were investigated using the statistical treatment of several data available as supplementary information

  17. Comparisons of activity measurements with radionuclide calibrators a tool for quality assessment and improvement in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oropesa Verdecia, Pilar; Hernandez Rivero Aerulio Tulio; Serra Aguila, Rolando A.; Varela Corona, Consuelo

    2006-01-01

    In the present paper, an attempt has been made to ascertain the quality of activity measurements in the field of nuclear medicine in Cuba, on the basis of the results of a national program of ongoing comparisons for assaying gamma emitting radiopharmaceuticals for amount of radioactivity using radionuclide calibrators. Nuclides of the most wide spread use in Cuban nuclear medicine, 1 31 I, 201 Tl and 99m Tc, as well as two measurement geometries, glass vials and plastic syringes, were employed. The participants' performance is assessed regarding to the value of † 10 % required in the Pharmacopoeia as an accuracy limit of the measurement. Performance tables have been obtained and a c2 statistic is calculated from observed and expected frequencies, with the aim of testing the hypothesis about the independence of some characteristics of the comparison results, at a significance level a equal to 0.05. Particularly, the proportion of satisfactory results in the years 2002 2004 were found to be at the same level, but higher than in 2000. It reveals an improvement of the measurement quality since 2002. The causes of improvement were investigated using the statistical treatment of several data available as supplementary information. Cuban results are also compared with published results for similar comparisons organized in other countries

  18. Pharmacokinetic digital phantoms for accuracy assessment of image-based dosimetry in 177Lu-DOTATATE peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brolin, Gustav; Gustafsson, Johan; Ljungberg, Michael; Sjögreen Gleisner, Katarina

    2015-08-01

    Patient-specific image-based dosimetry is considered to be a useful tool to limit toxicity associated with peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). To facilitate the establishment and reliability of absorbed-dose response relationships, it is essential to assess the accuracy of dosimetry in clinically realistic scenarios. To this end, we developed pharmacokinetic digital phantoms corresponding to patients treated with 177Lu-DOTATATE. Three individual voxel phantoms from the XCAT population were generated and assigned a dynamic activity distribution based on a compartment model for 177Lu-DOTATATE, designed specifically for this purpose. The compartment model was fitted to time-activity data from 10 patients, primarily acquired using quantitative scintillation camera imaging. S values for all phantom source-target combinations were calculated based on Monte-Carlo simulations. Combining the S values and time-activity curves, reference values of the absorbed dose to the phantom kidneys, liver, spleen, tumours and whole-body were calculated. The phantoms were used in a virtual dosimetry study, using Monte-Carlo simulated gamma-camera images and conventional methods for absorbed-dose calculations. The characteristics of the SPECT and WB planar images were found to well represent those of real patient images, capturing the difficulties present in image-based dosimetry. The phantoms are expected to be useful for further studies and optimisation of clinical dosimetry in 177Lu PRRT.

  19. Assessment of microbial processes on radionuclide mobility in shallow land burial. [West Valley, NY; Beatty, Nevada; Maxey Flats, Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colombo, P.; Tate, R.L. III; Weiss, A.J.

    1982-07-01

    The impact of microbial metabolism of the organic substituents of low level radioactive wastes on radionuclide mobility in disposal sites, the nature of the microbial transformations involved in this metabolism and the effect of the prevailing environmental parameters on the quantities and types of metabolic intermediates accumulated were examined. Since both aerobic and anaerobic periods can occur during trench ecosystem development, oxidation capacities of the microbial community in the presence and absence of oxygen were analyzed. Results of gas studies performed at three commercial low level radioactive waste disposal sites were reviewed. Several deficiencies in available data were determined. Further research needs are suggested. This assessment has demonstrated that the biochemical capabilities expressed within the low level radioactive waste disposal site are common to a wide variety of soil bacteria. Hence, assuming trenches would not be placed in sites with such extreme abiotic conditions that all microbial activity is precluded, the microbial populations needed for colonization and decomposition of the organic waste substances are readily provided from the waste itself and from the soil of existing and any proposed disposal sites. Indeed, considering the ubiquity of occurrence of the microorganisms responsible for waste decomposition and the chemical nature of the organic waste material, long-term prevention of biodecomposition is difficult, if not impossible.

  20. Data and uncertainty assessment for radionuclide Kd partitioning coefficients in granitic rock for use in SR-Can calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, James; Neretnieks, Ivars; Malmstroem, Maria

    2006-10-01

    SKB is currently preparing licence applications related to the proposed deep repository for spent nuclear fuel as well as the encapsulation plant required for canister fabrication. The present report is one of several specific data reports that form the data input to an interim safety report (SR-Can) for the encapsulation plant licence application. This report concerns the derivation and recommendation of generic K d data (i.e. linear partitioning coefficients) for safety assessment modelling of far-field radionuclide transport in fractured granitic rock. The data are derived for typical Swedish groundwater conditions and rock types distinctive of those found on the Simpevarp peninsula and Forsmark. Data have been derived for 8 main elements (Cs, Sr, Ra, Ni, Th, U, Np, Am) and various oxidation states. The data have also been supplied with tentative correction factors to account for artefacts that have not been previously considered in detail in previous compilations. For the main reviewed solutes the data are given in terms of a best estimate K d value assumed to be the median of the aggregate set of selected data. A range corresponding to the 25-75% inter-quartile range is also specified and probable ranges of uncertainty are estimated in the form of an upper and lower limit to the expected variability. Data for an additional 19 elements that have not been reviewed are taken from a previous compilation by Carbol and Engkvist

  1. Probability distributions of dose conversion factors for radionuclides used in a long-term safety assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laheij GMH; Uijt de Haag PAM

    1993-01-01

    The research presented in this report forms part of the PROSA (PRObabilistic Safety Assessment) project. PROSA aims to determine the radiological effects on humans and the characteristics relevant to safety of disposal concepts for radioactive waste in rocksalt formations. This report describes

  2. Probability distributions of dose conversion factors for radionuclides used in a long-term safety assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laheij GMH; Uijt de Haag PAM

    1993-01-01

    The research presented in this report forms part of the PROSA (PRObabilistic Safety Assessment) project. PROSA aims to determine the radiological effects on humans and the characteristics relevant to safety of disposal concepts for radioactive waste in rocksalt formations. This report describes the

  3. Radionuclide assessment of the effects of chest physical therapy on ventilation in cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeCesare, J.A.; Babchyck, B.M.; Colten, H.R.; Treves, S.

    1982-01-01

    This study assesses the use of /sup 81m/Kr scintigraphy as a measurement tool in evaluating the effectiveness of bronchial drainage with percussion and vibration on peripheral ventilation in patients with cystic fibrosis. Ten patients with cystic fibrosis participated. Each patient underwent a /sup 81m/Kr ventilation study and traditional pulmonary function tests. Forty-five minutes later, these studies were repeated before and after a chest physical therapy treatment. Each patient acted as his own control. All /sup 81m/Kr scintiscans were recorded and analyzed visually and numerically using a digital computer to assess distribution of ventilation. Visual analysis of the scintiscans indicated individual variation in treatment response: in some patients ventilation improved with therapy; in others, no change was noted; still others had changes independent of treatment. Numerical data derived from the scintiscans and pulmonary function tests showed no important differences among the three studies of each patient. Airway abnormalities characteristic of cystic fibrosis, progression of the disease, sputum production, or a combination of these factors may account for the individual variation in response to treatment. /sup 81m/Kr scintigraphy is a reliable measure of regional ventilation and should be useful for assessing the efficacy of chest physical therapy because of the consistent, high quality visual data retrieved

  4. Methods for determining radionuclide retardation factors: status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relyea, J.F.; Serne, R.J.; Rai, D.

    1980-04-01

    This report identifies a number of mechanisms that retard radionuclide migration, and describes the static and dynamic methods that are used to study such retardation phenomena. Both static and dynamic methods are needed for reliable safety assessments of underground nuclear-waste repositories. This report also evaluates the extent to which the two methods may be used to diagnose radionuclide migration through various types of geologic media, among them unconsolidated, crushed, intact, and fractured rocks. Adsorption is one mechanism that can control radionuclide concentrations in solution and therefore impede radionuclide migration. Other mechanisms that control a solution's radionuclide concentration and radionuclide migration are precipitation of hydroxides and oxides, oxidation-reduction reactions, and the formation of minerals that might include the radionuclide as a structural element. The retardation mechanisms mentioned above are controlled by such factors as surface area, cation exchange capacity, solution pH, chemical composition of the rock and of the solution, oxidation-reduction potential, and radionuclide concentration. Rocks and ground waters used in determining retardation factors should represent the expected equilibrium conditions in the geologic system under investigation. Static test methods can be used to rapidly screen the effects of the factors mentioned above. Dynamic (or column) testing, is needed to assess the effects of hydrodynamics and the interaction of hydrodynamics with the other important parameters. This paper proposes both a standard method for conducting batch Kd determinations, and a standard format for organizing and reporting data. Dynamic testing methods are not presently developed to the point that a standard methodology can be proposed. Normal procedures are outlined for column experimentation and the data that are needed to analyze a column experiment are identified

  5. RIVER-RAD: A computer code for simulating the transport of radionuclides in rivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hetrick, D.M.; McDowell-Boyer, L.M.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Thorne, D.J.; Patterson, M.R.

    1992-11-01

    A screening-level model, RIVER-RAD, has been developed to assess the potential fate of radionuclides released to rivers. The model is simplified in nature and is intended to provide guidance in determining the potential importance of the surface water pathway, relevant transport mechanisms, and key radionuclides in estimating radiological dose to man. The purpose of this report is to provide a description of the model and a user's manual for the FORTRAN computer code.

  6. Assessment of risk factors in radionuclides pollution of coastal zone and river basins by numerical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsitskishvili, M.; Tsitskishvili, L.; Kordzakhia, G.; Diasamidze, R.; Shaptoshvili, A.; Valiaev, A.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: All types of industrial activities require the norms of protection, assessment of corresponding risks to preserve the pollution and degradation of corresponding areas. To make available the sustainable development of the country the risk assessment of possible accidents on the big enterprises is foreseen that provides preparedness of the country and possibility of the prevention measures and mitigation of the accidents. While big anthropogenic accidents in mountainous countries - the main paths for transportation of the pollution are the rivers and sea basins. Due to overpopulation of these areas assessment of the pollution risks are very important. For this aim the special deterministic models on the basis of passive admixture's turbulence diffusion equation is used. For numerical calculations Mc Kormack's predictor-corrector two steps scheme is used. The scheme is disintegrated, second order in space and time. Such scheme is established because the turbulent velocities very differ in horizontal and vertical directions and model allows implementing singular independent steps in different directions. Grid step for the model is 26.88 km in horizontal direction and 20 m m in vertical until 200 m. Time step is equal to 4 hours and computational time period - 4 months. Number of grid points is equal to 4983 for all calculation areas. Computations are carried out separately for big rivers basins as well as for Black and Caspian Seas water areas. The model calculations are made for cases with various locations of pollutant sources including accidental throws. For different realistic scenarios are calculated the concentrations of admixtures. The directions of their propagation are also determined. The risks are calculated in comparison with the Maximum Permissible Concentrations (MPC) of the pollutants according to achieved results. That gives possibility to define the most vulnerable areas in coastal zones. Realized methodology is verified by means of various

  7. Effect of Selected Modeling Assumptions on Subsurface Radionuclide Transport Projections for the Potential Environmental Management Disposal Facility at Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Painter, Scott L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division

    2016-06-28

    The Department of Energy’s Office of Environmental Management recently revised a Remedial Investigation/ Feasibility Study (RI/FS) that included an analysis of subsurface radionuclide transport at a potential new Environmental Management Disposal Facility (EMDF) in East Bear Creek Valley near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The effect of three simplifying assumptions used in the RI/FS analyses are investigated using the same subsurface pathway conceptualization but with more flexible modeling tools. Neglect of vadose zone dispersion was found to be conservative or non-conservative, depending on the retarded travel time and the half-life. For a given equilibrium distribution coefficient, a relatively narrow range of half-life was identified for which neglect of vadose zone transport is non-conservative and radionuclide discharge into surface water is non-negligible. However, there are two additional conservative simplifications in the reference case that compensate for the non-conservative effect of neglecting vadose zone dispersion: the use of a steady infiltration rate and vadose zone velocity, and the way equilibrium sorption is used to represent transport in the fractured material of the saturated aquifer. With more realistic representations of all three processes, the RI/FS reference case was found to either provide a reasonably good approximation to the peak concentration or was significantly conservative (pessimistic) for all parameter combinations considered.

  8. Oral intake of radionuclides in the population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, L.

    1982-11-01

    Dose factors of some radionuclides have been reviewed with respect to a chronic oral intake by members of the public. The radionuclides taken into account are Pu-239, Np-237, Ra-226, Th-230, Pa-231, Tc-99 and I-129, all of which might be of potential hazard at a long term storage disposal. The parameter which has the major influence on the dose factor, for most of the radionuclides studied, is the uptake from the gut. In order to assess the dose factor it is therefore essential to make a good estimate of the gastrointestinal uptake of the radionuclides under the actual conditions. The annual limit of intake (ALI) given in ICRP 30, is intended to be applicable on a population of workers, and for a single intake. Since the gut uptake figures in the ICRP-publication are based mainly on uptake values recieved in experiment animals, given single relatively large oral doses of the isotope studied. From a review of current literature, gut absorbation factors and dose factors, to be used for members of the public at a chronic oral intake, are suggested. Compared with those for workers in ICRP 30, the dose factors increases for plutonium and protactinium, and decreases for neptunium. (Author)

  9. Oral intake of radionuclides in the population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, L.

    1982-10-01

    Dose factors of some radionuclides have been reviewed with respect to a chronic oral intake by means of the public. The radionuclides taken into account are Pu-239, Np-237, Ra-226, Th-230, Pa-231, Tc-99 and I-129, all of which might be of potential hazard at a long term storage disposal. The parameter that have the major influence on the dose factor, for most of the radionuclides studied, is the uptake from the gut. In order to assess the dose factor it is therefore essential to make a good estimate of the gastrointestinal uptake of the radionuclides under the actual conditions. The 'annual limit of intake' (ALI) given in ICRP 30, is intended to be applicable on a population of workers, and for a single intake. Since the gut uptake in the ICRP-publication are based mainly on uptake values recieved in experimental animals, given single relatively large oral doses of the isotope studied. From a review of current literature, gut absorbtion factors and dose factors, to be used for members of the public at a chronic oral intake, are suggested. Compared with those for workers in ICRP 30, the dose factors increase for plutonium and protactinium, and decrease for neptunium. An attempt to predict possible future changes of the ALI for members of the general public is also made. (Author)

  10. Generic models and parameters for assessing the environmental transfer of radionuclides from routine releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This report is addressed to national regulatory bodies and technical and administrative personnel responsible for performing environmental impact analyses, in particular for generic assessments of doses to most exposed individuals from routine releases of radioactive effluents to atmospheric and aquatic environments. The concern of society in general for the quality of the environment and the realization that all human activities have some environmental effect, in which actions and reactions are coupled in a complex but predictable manner, have led to the development of a procedure for environmental impact analysis. This procedure is a predictive one, which tries to forecast probable environmental effects before some action, such as the construction and operation of a nuclear power station, is decided upon. The method of prediction is by the application of models that attempt to describe the environmental processes in mathematical terms in order to produce a quantitative result which can be used in the decision-making process

  11. Laser induced breakdown detection for the assessment of colloid mediated radionuclide migration

    CERN Document Server

    Walther, C; Hauser, W; Kim, J I; Scherbaum, F J

    2002-01-01

    Colloids play an important role in the transport of pollutants in the environment. Harmful substances can undergo transport over large distances if bound to colloids in aqueous surrounding. One important example is the migration of Pu(IV) at unexpectedly high rates over several miles at a Nevada nuclear detonation test site. For long term safety assessments of radioactive waste repositories, it is hence crucial to know about the amount, size distribution and chemical composition of colloids in the ground water. Standard methods (e.g. light scattering) can be applied for high concentrations and large sizes of particles. Colloids smaller than 50 nm, however, are detected with very low efficiency. Laser induced breakdown detection (LIBD) can fill this gap. A new instrumentation is presented, which as compared to previous instruments, opens up a much wider operational dynamic range, now covering three orders of magnitude in size (5-1000 nm) and seven orders of magnitude in particle concentration (1 ppt - several ...

  12. Review and analysis of parameters for assessing transport of environmentally released radionuclides through agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baes, C.F. III; Sharp, R.D.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Shor, R.W.

    1984-09-01

    Most of the default parameters incorporated into the TERRA computer code are documented including a literature review and systematic analysis of element-specific transfer parameters B/sub v/, B/sub r/, F/sub m/, F/sub f/, and K/sub d/. This review and analysis suggests default values which are consistent with the modeling approaches taken in TERRA and may be acceptable for most assessment applications of the computer code. However, particular applications of the code and additional analysis of elemental transport may require alternative default values. Use of the values reported herein in other computer codes simulating terrestrial transport is not advised without careful interpretation of the limitations and scope these analyses. An approach to determination of vegetation-specific interception fractions is also discussed. The limitations of this approach are many, and its use indicates the need for analysis of deposition, interception, and weathering processes. Judgement must be exercised in interpretation of plant surface concentrations generated. Finally, the location-specific agricultural, climatological, and population parameters in the default SITE data base documented. These parameters are intended as alternatives to average values currently used. Indeed, areas in the United States where intensive crop, milk, or beef production occurs will be reflected in the parameter values as will areas where little agricultural activity occurs. However, the original information sources contained some small error and the interpolation and conversion methods used will add more. Parameters used in TERRA not discussed herein are discussed in the companion report to this one - ORNL-5785. In the companion report the models employed in and the coding of TERRA are discussed. These reports together provide documentation of the TERRA code and its use in assessments. 96 references, 78 figures, 21 tables

  13. Review and analysis of parameters for assessing transport of environmentally released radionuclides through agriculture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baes, C.F. III; Sharp, R.D.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Shor, R.W.

    1984-09-01

    Most of the default parameters incorporated into the TERRA computer code are documented including a literature review and systematic analysis of element-specific transfer parameters B/sub v/, B/sub r/, F/sub m/, F/sub f/, and K/sub d/. This review and analysis suggests default values which are consistent with the modeling approaches taken in TERRA and may be acceptable for most assessment applications of the computer code. However, particular applications of the code and additional analysis of elemental transport may require alternative default values. Use of the values reported herein in other computer codes simulating terrestrial transport is not advised without careful interpretation of the limitations and scope these analyses. An approach to determination of vegetation-specific interception fractions is also discussed. The limitations of this approach are many, and its use indicates the need for analysis of deposition, interception, and weathering processes. Judgement must be exercised in interpretation of plant surface concentrations generated. Finally, the location-specific agricultural, climatological, and population parameters in the default SITE data base documented. These parameters are intended as alternatives to average values currently used. Indeed, areas in the United States where intensive crop, milk, or beef production occurs will be reflected in the parameter values as will areas where little agricultural activity occurs. However, the original information sources contained some small error and the interpolation and conversion methods used will add more. Parameters used in TERRA not discussed herein are discussed in the companion report to this one - ORNL-5785. In the companion report the models employed in and the coding of TERRA are discussed. These reports together provide documentation of the TERRA code and its use in assessments. 96 references, 78 figures, 21 tables.

  14. Beta-emitting radionuclides for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parus, J L; Mikolajczak, R

    2012-01-01

    The paper focuses on the β-emitting radionuclides which might be useful for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy, PRRT. For the effective design of the radiopharmaceutical, the choice of radionuclide will depend on the purpose for which the radioligand is being used and on the physicochemical properties of the radionuclide. The important factor is also the availability and the cost of production. The physical characteristics of several radionuclides which are currently used or can be considered as potential candidates for PRRT is provided, followed by short description of production methods and chemical aspects of their use in preparation of peptide-based radiopharmaceuticals. Somatostatin analogues labeled with radionuclides have been a successful example of PRRT. For treatment of patients with inoperable or metastasized neuroendocrine tumors, somatostatin analogues labeled with the radioisotopes (111)In, (90)Y and (177)Lu have been used so far. Labeling with (111)In, mainly an Auger electron emitter, resulted in no reduction of tumor size while somatostatin analogues labeled with (90)Y and (177)Lu gave overall positive response and improved the patients' quality of life. These promising results together with the increasing availability of other β-emitting radionuclides are a good basis for further studies.

  15. Radionuclide cisternography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staab, E.V.

    1984-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) scanning, or cisternography, is a diagnostic technique that entails injection of an appropriate radiopharmaceutical into the subarachnoid space and sequential imaging of the spinal and cranial distribution. Radionuclide imaging techniques were originally named according to the spaces of greatest interest and the methods of administration (i.e., myeloscintigraphy, cisternography, and ventriculography). An all-inclusive term, CSF imaging, is now used. The initial studies were made in animals to investigate the physiology of the CSF. DiChiro et al. pioneered the subsequent clinical use in humans to investigate a variety of disorders, including hydrocephalus, leaks, shunt patency, and miscellaneous intracranial cysts

  16. Transfer of radionuclides to animal products following ingestion or inhalation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coughtrey, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    Contamination of animal products forms an important pathway in the transfer of radionuclides from source to man. Simulation of radionuclide transfer via animal products requires an understanding of the processes and mechanisms involved in absorption, distribution, turnover and excretion of radionuclides and related elements in animals as well as knowledge of animal grazing habits and husbandry. This paper provides a summary of the metabolism of important radionuclides in typical domestic animals and of the mathematical approaches that have been used to simulate transfer from diet to animal product. The equilibrium transfer factor approach has been used widely but suffers a number of disadvantages when releases or intakes are variable with time or when intakes are short relative to the lifetime of the animal of interest. Dynamic models, especially those of the compartmental type, have been developed and used widely. Both approaches have benefited from experiences obtained after the Chernobyl accident but a number of uncertainties still exist. Whereas there is now extensive knowledge on the behaviour of radiocaesium in both domestic and wild animals, knowledge of the behaviour of other potentially important radionuclides remains limited. Further experimental and metabolic studies will be required to reduce uncertainties associated with the transfer of radionuclides other than radiocaesium and thereby produce a sound basis for radiological assessments. (author)

  17. Review Paper of Radionuclide Monitoring in Food Sample

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noor Fadzilah Yusof; Abdul Kadir Ishak; Wo, Y.M.; Nurrul Assyikeen Mohd Jaffary

    2011-01-01

    The uncontrolled release of radionuclides into the atmospheric and aquatic environments may occur as the result of a nuclear or radiological accident. Monitoring of the accidental release at its source and especially direct monitoring of the environmental contamination with radionuclides is necessary for assessment and application of public protective actions and longer term countermeasures as well as emergency workers' protection. In areas historically contaminated with long lived radionuclides monitoring it is essential to protect the public and substantiation of any radiological incidents. Also, dietary pathways can be contaminated with radioactive materials resulting from natural occurrence or man-made applications especially during routine operation, accidents and migration of radionuclides from radioactive waste disposal repositories into the biosphere. Therefore, efforts should be made to determine the presence of radionuclides in a potentially high radiation area especially in operational nuclear facilities. This paper will review the strategies for food monitoring that has been adapted in most countries to obtain baseline data for future reference. Also, this study is discussing the type of food selection commonly collected as sample for radionuclide analysis in different countries over the years. Sampling procedure and analysis also included in this review for better understanding of the analysis. Stake holders' involvement is considered as an important asset in the establishment of monitoring strategies. As a conclusion, future plans for food monitoring programme in Malaysia are recommended as a preparation to embark on the Nuclear Power Plant programme. (author)

  18. Radionuclides in the food chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harley, J.H.; Schmidt, G.D.

    1988-01-01

    Radionuclides in the Food Chain reviews past experience in meeting the challenge of radionuclide contamination of foodstuffs and water sources and, in the wake of the reactor accidents at Chernobyl and Three Mile Island, presents current concepts and programs relating to measurement, surveillance, effects, risk management, evaluation guidelines, and control and regulatory activities. This volume, based on a symposium sponsored by the International Life Sciences Institute in association with the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis, which brought together both radiation experts and food industry policymakers, examines such vital topics as structural problems in large-scale crisis-managment systems; dose assessment from man-made sources; international recommendations on radiation protection; airborne contamination, as well as aquatic and soilborne radionuclides; food-chain contamination from testing nuclear devices; long-term health effects of radionuclides in food and water supplies; and use of mathematical models in risk assessment and management. (orig.)

  19. MOIRA models and methodologies for assessing the effectiveness of countermeasures in complex aquatic systems contaminated by radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monte, L. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente; Brittain, J.E. [Oslo Univ., Oslo (Norway); Zoological Museum, Oslo (Norway); Haakanson, L. [Uppsala Univ., Uppsala (Sweden). Inst. of Earth Science; Gallego Diaz, E. [Madrid Univ. Politecnica, Madrid (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Nuclear

    1999-07-01

    The present report is composed of a set of articles written by the partners of the MOIRA project (a model-based computerized system for management support to identify optimal remedial strategies for restoring radionuclide contaminated aquatic ecosystems and drainage areas). The report describes models for predicting the behaviour of radionuclides in complex aquatic systems and the effects of countermeasures for their restoration. [Italian] Il rapporto contiene articoli preparati nell'ambito del progetto MOIRA (a model-based computerized system for management support to identify optimal remedial strategies for restoring radionuclide contaminated aquatic ecosystems and drainage areas), che descrive alcuni modelli per la previsione del comportamento di radionuclidi in sistemi acquatici complessi e per la valutazione dell'effetto delle contromisure per il loro recupero.

  20. Assessment of injection bolus in first-pass radionuclide angiography. Evaluation of injection site and needle size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonami, Syuichi; Inagaki, Syoichi; Yasui, Masakazu; Sugishita, Kouki; Yoshita, Hisashi; Nakamura, Mamoru; Kuranishi, Makoto

    1996-01-01

    First-pass radionuclide angiography (FPRNA) using a multi-crystal gamma camera can correctly provide many quantitative and qualitative indices of left ventricular function as well as anatomic information. A compact injection bolus of radiotracer is, however, essential to the first-pass study since the temporal separation of cardiac chambers is required for the first-pass acquisition. To examine which factors affect the quality of an injection bolus, 327 patients who had FPRNA in the anterior projection were randomized for injection site of radiotracer (right or left external jugular veins, and right antecubital vein) and needle size (19- or 21-gauge). The injected bolus was assessed from the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the bolus time-activity curve in the superior vena cava. As to injection site using a 19-gauge needle, an attemption through right external jugular vein (EJV) revealed the shortest FWHM of an injection bolus, followed by left EJV and right antecubital vein (AV). In right EJV 91% of injected bolus FWHM was less than 1.5 sec, which was significantly higher (p<0.001) than those of the other sites (left EJV: 70%. right AV: 65%). Approximately 7% of injection from left EJV and right AV, showed a split bolus of radiotracer. However, no split bolus was observed from right EJV. There was no significant difference in FWHM of an injection bolus between 19- and 21-gauge needle from EJV. Our present study demonstrated that the quality of an injection bolus from left EJV and AV was affected by RVEF in a case of low right ventricular function. In conclusion, right EJV is the first choice of injection site to obtain a compact bolus of radiotracer for the first-pass cardiac study. A 21-gauge needle can also be inserted from the external jugular vein to perform a good bolus injection. (author)

  1. Assessment of injection bolus in first-pass radionuclide angiography. Evaluation of injection site and needle size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonami, Syuichi; Inagaki, Syoichi; Yasui, Masakazu; Sugishita, Kouki; Yoshita, Hisashi; Nakamura, Mamoru; Kuranishi, Makoto [Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical Univ. (Japan). Hospital

    1996-09-01

    First-pass radionuclide angiography (FPRNA) using a multi-crystal gamma camera can correctly provide many quantitative and qualitative indices of left ventricular function as well as anatomic information. A compact injection bolus of radiotracer is, however, essential to the first-pass study since the temporal separation of cardiac chambers is required for the first-pass acquisition. To examine which factors affect the quality of an injection bolus, 327 patients who had FPRNA in the anterior projection were randomized for injection site of radiotracer (right or left external jugular veins, and right antecubital vein) and needle size (19- or 21-gauge). The injected bolus was assessed from the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the bolus time-activity curve in the superior vena cava. As to injection site using a 19-gauge needle, an attemption through right external jugular vein (EJV) revealed the shortest FWHM of an injection bolus, followed by left EJV and right antecubital vein (AV). In right EJV 91% of injected bolus FWHM was less than 1.5 sec, which was significantly higher (p<0.001) than those of the other sites (left EJV: 70%. right AV: 65%). Approximately 7% of injection from left EJV and right AV, showed a split bolus of radiotracer. However, no split bolus was observed from right EJV. There was no significant difference in FWHM of an injection bolus between 19- and 21-gauge needle from EJV. Our present study demonstrated that the quality of an injection bolus from left EJV and AV was affected by RVEF in a case of low right ventricular function. In conclusion, right EJV is the first choice of injection site to obtain a compact bolus of radiotracer for the first-pass cardiac study. A 21-gauge needle can also be inserted from the external jugular vein to perform a good bolus injection. (author)

  2. Assessment of natural radionuclide content in deposits from drinking water purification station and excess lifetime cancer risk due to gamma radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Issa, S.A.M.; Uosif, M.A.M.; Tammam, M.; Elsaman, R.

    2012-01-01

    The concentrations of natural radionuclide in deposits samples taken from Thirty-six drinking water purification stations have been measured and determined using gamma-ray spectrometry system using (sodium iodide NaI (Tl) detector). Knowledge of radioactivity present in deposits of drinking water purification station enables one to assess any possible radiological hazard to humankind by the use of such materials. The natural radionuclide ( 226 Ra, 232 Th and 40 K) contents have been analyzed for the deposits samples with an aim of evaluating the radiation hazard nature. The Absorbed dose rate, The annual effective dose equivalent, Radium equivalent activities, Hazard indices (H ex and H in ), Gamma index, Excess lifetime cancer risk and Annual gonadal dose equivalent were calculated for investigated area. Results of the study could serve as an important baseline radiometric data for future epidemiological studies and monitoring initiatives in the study area.

  3. Geomorphological applications of environmental radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quine, T.A.; Walling, D.

    1998-01-01

    Geomorphologists have shown increasing interest in environmental radionuclides since pioneering studies by Ritchie and McHenry in the USA and Campbell, Longmore and Loughran in Australia. Environmental radionuclides have attracted this interest because they provide geomorphologists with the means to trace sediment movement within the landscape. They, therefore, facilitate investigation of subjects at the core of geomorphology, namely the rates and patterns of landscape change. Most attention has been focussed on the artificial radionuclide caesium-137 ( 137 Cs) but more recently potential applications of the natural radionuclides lead-210 ( 210 Pb) and beryllium-7( 7 Be) have been investigated (Walling et al., 1995; Wallbrink and Murray, 1996a, 1996b). The origin, characteristics and applications of these radionuclides are summarised. These radionuclides are of value as sediment tracers because of three important characteristics: a strong affinity for sediment; a global distribution and the possibility of measurement at low concentration. Geomorphological applications of environmental radionuclides provide unique access to detailed qualitative data concerning landscape change over a range of timescales

  4. Fallout radionuclide-based techniques for assessing the impact of soil conservation measures on erosion control and soil quality: an overview of the main lessons learnt under an FAO/IAEA Coordinated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dercon, G.; Mabit, L.; Hancock, G.; Nguyen, M.L.; Dornhofer, P.; Bacchi, O.O.S.; Benmansour, M.; Bernard, C.; Froehlich, W.; Golosov, V.N.; Haciyakupoglu, S.; Hai, P.S.; Klik, A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarizes key findings and identifies the main lessons learnt from a 5-year (2002–2008) coordinated research project (CRP) on “Assessing the effectiveness of soil conservation measures for sustainable watershed management and crop production using fallout radionuclides” (D1.50.08), organized and funded by the International Atomic Energy Agency through the Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture. The project brought together nineteen participants, from Australia, Austria, Brazil, Canada, Chile, China, Japan, Morocco, Pakistan, Poland, Romania, Russian Federation, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States of America and Vietnam, involved in the use of nuclear techniques and, more particularly, fallout radionuclides (FRN) to assess the relative impacts of different soil conservation measures on soil erosion and land productivity. The overall objective of the CRP was to develop improved land use and management strategies for sustainable watershed management through effective soil erosion control practices, by the use of 137 Cs (half-life of 30.2 years), 210 Pb ex (half-life of 22.3 years) and 7 Be (half-life of 53.4 days) for measuring soil erosion over several spatial and temporal scales. The environmental conditions under which the different research teams applied the tools based on the use of fallout radionuclides varied considerably – a variety of climates, soils, topographies and land uses. Nevertheless, the achievements of the CRP, as reflected in this overview paper, demonstrate that fallout radionuclide-based techniques are powerful tools to assess soil erosion/deposition at several spatial and temporal scales in a wide range of environments, and offer potential to monitor soil quality. The success of the CRP has stimulated an interest in many IAEA Member States in the use of these methodologies to identify factors and practices that can enhance sustainable agriculture and minimize land degradation. - Highlights:

  5. A Generic Procedure for the Assessment of the Effect of Concrete Admixtures on the Sorption of Radionuclides on Cement: Concept and Selected Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaus, M.A.; Laube, A.; Van Loon, L.R.

    2004-01-01

    A screening procedure is proposed for the assessment of the effect of concrete admixtures on the sorption of radionuclides by cement. The procedure is both broad and generic, and can thus be used as input for the assessment of concrete admixtures which might be used in the future. The experimental feasibility and significance of the screening procedure are tested using selected concrete admixtures: i.e. sulfonated naphthalene-formaldehyde condensates, lignosulfonates, and a plasticiser used at PSI for waste conditioning. The effect of these on the sorption properties of Ni(II), Eu(III) and Th(IV) in cement is investigated using crushed Hardened Cement Paste (HCP), as well as cement pastes prepared in the presence of these admixtures. Strongly adverse effects on the sorption of the radionuclides tested are observed only in single cases, and under extreme conditions: i.e. at high ratios of concrete admixtures to HCP, and at low ratios of HCP to cement pore water. Under realistic conditions, both radionuclide sorption and the sorption of isosaccharinic acid (a strong complexant produced in cement-conditioned wastes containing cellulose) remain unaffected by the presence of concrete admixtures, which can be explained by the sorption of them onto the HCP. The pore-water concentrations of the concrete admixtures tested are thereby reduced to levels at which the formation of radionuclide complexes is no longer of importance. Further, the Langmuir sorption model, proposed for the sorption of concrete admixtures on HCP, suggests that the HCP surface does not become saturated, at least for those concrete admixtures tested. (author)

  6. A Generic Procedure for the Assessment of the Effect of Concrete Admixtures on the Sorption of Radionuclides on Cement: Concept and Selected Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaus, M.A.; Laube, A.; Van Loon, L.R

    2004-03-01

    A screening procedure is proposed for the assessment of the effect of concrete admixtures on the sorption of radionuclides by cement. The procedure is both broad and generic, and can thus be used as input for the assessment of concrete admixtures which might be used in the future. The experimental feasibility and significance of the screening procedure are tested using selected concrete admixtures: i.e. sulfonated naphthalene-formaldehyde condensates, lignosulfonates, and a plasticiser used at PSI for waste conditioning. The effect of these on the sorption properties of Ni(II), Eu(III) and Th(IV) in cement is investigated using crushed Hardened Cement Paste (HCP), as well as cement pastes prepared in the presence of these admixtures. Strongly adverse effects on the sorption of the radionuclides tested are observed only in single cases, and under extreme conditions: i.e. at high ratios of concrete admixtures to HCP, and at low ratios of HCP to cement pore water. Under realistic conditions, both radionuclide sorption and the sorption of isosaccharinic acid (a strong complexant produced in cement-conditioned wastes containing cellulose) remain unaffected by the presence of concrete admixtures, which can be explained by the sorption of them onto the HCP. The pore-water concentrations of the concrete admixtures tested are thereby reduced to levels at which the formation of radionuclide complexes is no longer of importance. Further, the Langmuir sorption model, proposed for the sorption of concrete admixtures on HCP, suggests that the HCP surface does not become saturated, at least for those concrete admixtures tested. (author)

  7. External Cooling of the BWR Mark I and II Drywell Head as a Potential Accident Mitigation Measure – Scoping Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    This report documents a scoping assessment of a potential accident mitigation action applicable to the US fleet of boiling water reactors with Mark I and II containments. The mitigation action is to externally flood the primary containment vessel drywell head using portable pumps or other means. A scoping assessment of the potential benefits of this mitigation action was conducted focusing on the ability to (1) passively remove heat from containment, (2) prevent or delay leakage through the drywell head seal (due to high temperatures and/or pressure), and (3) scrub radionuclide releases if the drywell head seal leaks.

  8. Quantitative Determination of Radionuclides by Double-Headed Gamma Camera:A Phantom Study with Potential Clinical Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golan, H.; Melloul, M.; Presler, O.; Alfassi, Z.B.

    2002-01-01

    The position and activity of an organ can be found using single photon emission computed Tomography (SPECT).However,SPECT imaging is longer and more complicated due to the large number of counting steps and the reconstruction process.Since many gamma cameras nowadays are double-headed,it is important to see if such systems can allow this measurement without the need for SPECT. In measurement of a radioactive source by a non-collimated radiation detector,the distance between the source and the detector is affecting the count rate due to two factors (1)Increasing the distance,decreases the solid angle in which the detector sees the source,therefore decreases the count rate.(2)The absorption of the gamma rays in the medium between the source and the detector depends on the medium length.The larger the absorption length,less photons are reaching the detectors. In the case of gamma camera with collimators only parallel rays to the collimator holes should reach the detector,and hence it is expected that there will be no effect due to change in the solid angle and the only effect of varying the distance between the detectors would be due to absorption in the medium. This study was taken in order to check if this is true for the 140 keV gamma ray of 99m Tc, the main radionuclide used in nuclear medicine,and if this can be used for finding the location and activity of a radioactive source

  9. Assessing the proarrhythmic potential of drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Morten Bækgaard; Matz, Jørgen; Volders, Paul G A

    2006-01-01

    Torsades de pointes (TdP) is a potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmia that can occur as an unwanted adverse effect of various pharmacological therapies. Before a drug is approved for marketing, its effects on cardiac repolarisation are examined clinically and experimentally. This paper expresses...... the opinion that effects on repolarisation duration cannot directly be translated to risk of proarrhythmia. Current safety assessments of drugs only involve repolarisation assays, however the proarrhythmic profile can only be determined in the predisposed model. The availability of these proarrhythmic animal...... surrogate parameters possessing predictive power of TdP arrhythmia are reviewed. As these parameters are not developed to finalisation, any meaningful study of the proarrhythmic potential of a new drug will include evaluation in an integrated model of TdP arrhythmia....

  10. Radiological Assessment of the Artificial and Natural Radionuclide Concentrations of Wheat and Barley Samples in Karbala, Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Pourimani

    2018-04-01

     Conclusion: As the findings of the present study indicated, the specific activities of natural radionuclides in the soil were close to that of the world average. The observation of artificial radiocaesium, which is released by nuclear accidents or weapon test, in all soil samples was indicative of the pollution of the studied regions by radioactive dust.

  11. Untapped potential of health impact assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Mirko S; Krieger, Gary R; Divall, Mark J; Cissé, Guéladio; Wielga, Mark; Singer, Burton H; Tanner, Marcel; Utzinger, Jürg

    2013-04-01

    The World Health Organization has promoted health impact assessment (HIA) for over 20 years. At the 2012 United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20), HIA was discussed as a critical method for linking health to "green economy" and "institutional framework" strategies for sustainable development. In countries having a high human development index (HDI), HIA has been added to the overall assessment suite that typically includes potential environmental and social impacts, but it is rarely required as part of the environmental and social impact assessment for large development projects. When they are performed, project-driven HIAs are governed by a combination of project proponent and multilateral lender performance standards rather than host country requirements. Not surprisingly, in low-HDI countries HIA is missing from the programme and policy arena in the absence of an external project driver. Major drivers of global change (e.g. population growth and urbanization, growing pressure on natural resources and climate change) inordinately affect low- and medium-HDI countries; however, in such countries HIA is conspicuously absent. If the cloak of HIA invisibility is to be removed, it must be shown that HIA is useful and beneficial and, hence, an essential component of the 21st century's sustainable development agenda. We analyse where and how HIA can become fully integrated into the impact assessment suite and argue that the impact of HIA must not remain obscure.

  12. EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner, R.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) radionuclide transport abstraction model, as directed by a written development plan (CRWMS M and O 1999a). This abstraction is the conceptual model that will be used to determine the rate of release of radionuclides from the EBS to the unsaturated zone (UZ) in the total system performance assessment-license application (TSPA-LA). In particular, this model will be used to quantify the time-dependent radionuclide releases from a failed waste package (WP) and their subsequent transport through the EBS to the emplacement drift wall/UZ interface. The development of this conceptual model will allow Performance Assessment Operations (PAO) and its Engineered Barrier Performance Department to provide a more detailed and complete EBS flow and transport abstraction. The results from this conceptual model will allow PA0 to address portions of the key technical issues (KTIs) presented in three NRC Issue Resolution Status Reports (IRSRs): (1) the Evolution of the Near-Field Environment (ENFE), Revision 2 (NRC 1999a), (2) the Container Life and Source Term (CLST), Revision 2 (NRC 1999b), and (3) the Thermal Effects on Flow (TEF), Revision 1 (NRC 1998). The conceptual model for flow and transport in the EBS will be referred to as the ''EBS RT Abstraction'' in this analysis/modeling report (AMR). The scope of this abstraction and report is limited to flow and transport processes. More specifically, this AMR does not discuss elements of the TSPA-SR and TSPA-LA that relate to the EBS but are discussed in other AMRs. These elements include corrosion processes, radionuclide solubility limits, waste form dissolution rates and concentrations of colloidal particles that are generally represented as boundary conditions or input parameters for the EBS RT Abstraction. In effect, this AMR provides the algorithms for transporting radionuclides using the flow geometry and radionuclide concentrations determined by other

  13. Radionuclide and colloid transport in the Culebra Dolomite and associated complementary cumulative distribution functions in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RAMSEY, JAMES L.; BLAINE,R.; GARNER,J.W.; HELTON,JON CRAIG; JOHNSON,J.D.; SMITH,L.N.; WALLACE,M.

    2000-05-22

    The following topics related to radionuclide and colloid transport in the Culebra Dolomite in the 1996 performance assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are presented: (1) mathematical description of models, (2) uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results arising from subjective (i.e., epistemic) uncertainty for individual releases, and (3) construction of complementary cumulative distribution functions (CCDFs) arising from stochastic (i.e., aleatory) uncertainty. The presented results indicate that radionuclide and colloid transport in the Culebra Dolomite does not constitute a serious threat to the effectiveness of the WIPP as a disposal facility for transuranic waste. Even when the effects of uncertain analysis inputs are taken into account, no radionuclide transport to the boundary with the accessible environment was observed; thus the associated CCDFs for comparison with the boundary line specified in the US Environmental Protection Agency's standard for the geologic disposal of radioactive waste (40 CFR 191, 40 CFR 194) are degenerate in the sense of having a probability of zero of exceeding a release of zero.

  14. Radionuclide Retention in Concrete Wasteforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bovaird, Chase C.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Wood, Marcus I.

    2011-09-30

    Assessing long-term performance of Category 3 waste cement grouts for radionuclide encasement requires knowledge of the radionuclide-cement interactions and mechanisms of retention (i.e., sorption or precipitation); the mechanism of contaminant release; the significance of contaminant release pathways; how wasteform performance is affected by the full range of environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the process of wasteform aging under conditions that are representative of processes occurring in response to changing environmental conditions within the disposal facility; the effect of wasteform aging on chemical, physical, and radiological properties; and the associated impact on contaminant release. This knowledge will enable accurate prediction of radionuclide fate when the wasteforms come in contact with groundwater. The information present in the report provides data that (1) measures the effect of concrete wasteform properties likely to influence radionuclide migration; and (2) quantifies the rate of carbonation of concrete materials in a simulated vadose zone repository.

  15. Models for transport and fate of carbon, nutrients and radionuclides in the aquatic ecosystem at Oeregrundsgrepen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erichsen, Anders Christian; Moehlenberg, Flemming; Closter, Rikke Margrethe; Sandberg, Johannes

    2010-06-01

    The aim of the work was to provide supplementary input to the risk assessment of a planned final nuclear waste repository at Forsmark. The main deliverable was a computed water exchange between basins in the Forsmark marine area for the period 6500 BC to 9000 AD - based on the hydrodynamic modelling - to be used as input to the landscape dose model. In addition and what is described in this report, a second deliverable was development and application of high-resolution models for the marine ecosystem and radionuclide processes. The purpose of this deliverable was to illustrate the spatial and temporal variation in important processes and parameters, while constituting a complement to previous modelling approaches and providing supporting information to discussions of the marine ecosystem, parameters and variation (see Chapter 4 and 6).To this end, a hydrodynamic model of high temporal and spatial resolution was constructed and calibrated for the Forsmark area. An ecosystem model was then developed and coupled to the hydrodynamic model. In turn, a detailed radionuclide model was coupled to the ecosystem model to provide detailed predictions of radionuclide transport and accumulation in the coastal ecosystem. The ecosystem and radionuclide models were developed in the equation solver MIKE ECOLab that links seamless to the MIKE3 FM hydrodynamic model. The 'standard' ECOLab ecosystem model was extended with six biological state variables, perennial macroalgae, benthic herbivors, detritus feeders, planktivorus fish and, benthic predators representing the relict isopod Saduria and cod. In contrast to the ecosystem model, the radionuclide model was developed from scratch but building on the structure of the ecosystem model and using the output (process rates linking state variables) from the ecosystem model as input to the radionuclide model. Both the ecosystem model and the radionuclide model were run for several years (5-8 years) to bring state variables into quasi

  16. Quantitative assessment of radionuclide retention in the near-surface system at Forsmark. Development of a reactive transport model using Forsmark 1.2 data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandia, Fidel; Sena, Clara; Arcos, David; Molinero, Jorge; Duro, Lara; Bruno, Jordi

    2007-12-01

    The main objective of this work is to assess the migration behaviour of selected long-lived radionuclides through the near-surface system of Forsmark, with special focus on the evaluation of the capacity of the Quaternary deposits and sediments for radionuclide retention. The work reported here is based on data and information from Forsmark Site Descriptive Model version 1.2. From the geological point of view, the near-surface systems in the Forsmark area consist of Quaternary deposits and sediments that overlay the granitic bedrock. Glacial till is the more abundant outcropping Quaternary deposit and the remainder is made of clayey deposits. These types of near-surface sediments show distinctive hydraulic and geochemical features. The main reactive mineral in the till deposits, for the time horizons considered in this work, is calcium carbonate together with minor amounts of clay minerals (e.g. illite). The till deposits forms aquifers with relatively high hydraulic conductivities. In contrast, glacial and post-glacial clays are basically composed of illite with low to very low amounts of calcium carbonate, and containing organic matter-rich layers (gyttja), which can promote reducing conditions in the porewaters. All these clays exhibits relatively low hydraulic conductivity values. Five radionuclides have been selected for conceptualization and qualitative evaluation of retention process: U as an actinide, Se as a redox-sensitive radionuclide, Cs as a monovalent cation, Sr as a divalent cation, and I as an anion radionuclide. Overall, radionuclide retention capacity in the surface systems at Forsmark can be provided by sorption on charged surfaces of clays and oxyhydroxides, co-precipitation with sulphates, sulphides, oxyhydroxides and carbonates, and sorption on organic matter. Two-dimensional coupled hydrogeological and reactive solute transport models have been developed to simulate the geochemical behaviour of U, Cs and Sr. These three radionuclides have

  17. Assessing soil biodiversity potentials in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Ece; Louwagie, Geertrui; Gardi, Ciro; Gregor, Mirko; Schröder, Christoph; Löhnertz, Manuel

    2017-07-01

    Soil is important as a critical component for the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems. The largest part of the terrestrial biodiversity relies, directly or indirectly, on soil. Furthermore, soil itself is habitat to a great diversity of organisms. The suitability of soil to host such a diversity is strongly related to its physico-chemical features and environmental properties. However, due to the complexity of both soil and biodiversity, it is difficult to identify a clear and unambiguous relationship between environmental parameters and soil biota. Nevertheless, the increasing diffusion of a more integrated view of ecosystems, and in particular the development of the concept of ecosystem services, highlights the need for a better comprehension of the role played by soils in offering these services, including the habitat provision. An assessment of the capability of soils to host biodiversity would contribute to evaluate the quality of soils in order to help policy makers with the development of appropriate and sustainable management actions. However, so far, the heterogeneity of soils has been a barrier to the production of a large-scale framework that directly links soil features to organisms living within it. The current knowledge on the effects of soil physico-chemical properties on biota and the available data at continental scale open the way towards such an evaluation. In this study, the soil habitat potential for biodiversity was assessed and mapped for the first time throughout Europe by combining several soil features (pH, soil texture and soil organic matter) with environmental parameters (potential evapotranspiration, average temperature, soil biomass productivity and land use type). Considering the increasingly recognized importance of soils and their biodiversity in providing ecosystem services, the proposed approach appears to be a promising tool that may contribute to open a forum on the need to include soils in future environmental policy making

  18. NARAC: an emergency response resource for predicting the atmospheric dispersion and assessing the consequences of airborne radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, Michael M.

    2007-01-01

    The National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) serves as a national resource for the United States, providing tools and services to quickly predict the environmental contamination and health effects caused by airborne radionuclides, and to provide scientifically based guidance to emergency managers for the protection of human life. NARAC's scientists have developed a diverse tool kit of numerical modeling capabilities to respond to different types of release events, distance scales (local, regional, continental, and global), and response times

  19. Assessment of rainwater harvesting potential using GIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari, Durgasrilakshmi; Ramamohan Reddy, K.; Vikas, Kola; Srinivas, N.; Vikas, G.

    2018-03-01

    Rainwater harvesting (RWH) is one of the best practices to overcome the scarcity of water. Rainwater harvesting involves collection and storage of rainwater locally through different technologies, for future use. It is also useful for livestock, groundwater recharge and for irrigation practices. Potential of rainwater harvesting refers to the capacity of an individual catchment that harnesses the water falling on the catchment during a particular year considering all rainy days. The present study deals with the identification of the study area boundary and marking it as a Polygon in Google Earth Pro Later, Rooftops of various house entities and roads were digitized using the Polygon command in Google Earth Pro. GIS technique is employed for locating boundaries of the study area and for calculating the areas of various types of rooftops and roads. With the application of GIS, it is possible to assess the total potential of water that can be harvested. The present study will enable us to identify the suitable type of water harvesting structure along with the number of structures required. It is extremely an ideal and effective solution to overcome the water crisis through water conservation in the study area.

  20. Radionuclides in thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahadev, V.

    1980-01-01

    The three main areas of application of radionuclides in thyroid disease will be reviewed. Firstly thyroid radionuclide imaging in thyroid swellings, in relationship to lumps in the neck and ectopic thyroid tissue such as retrosternal goitre, and lingual goitre will be described. Future developments in the field including tomographic scanning, using the coded aperture method, and fluorescent scans and ultrasound are reviewed. The second area of application is the assessment and evaluation of thyroid function and the therapy of Grave's Disease and Plummer's Disease using radioiodine. The importance of careful collection of the line of treatment, results of treatment locally and the follow-up of patients after radioiodine therapy will be described. The third area of application is in the diagnosis and therapy of thyroid cancer. Investigation of thyroid swelling, and the diagnosis of functioning metastases are reported. The therapeutic iodine scan as the sole evidence of functioning metastatic involvement is recorded. Histological thyroid cancer appears to be increasingly encountered in clinical practice and the plan of management in relation to choice of cases for therapeutic scanning is discussed with case reports. Lastly the role of whole body scanning in relationship to biochemical markers is compared. In the changing field of nuclear medicine radionuclide applications in thyroid disease have remained pre-eminent and this is an attempt to reassess its role in the light of newer developments and local experience in the Institute of Radiotherapy, Oncology and Nuclear Medicine. (author)

  1. Anthropogenic radionuclides in the environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Q; Weng, J; Wang, J

    2007-11-15

    Studies of radionuclides in the environment have entered a new era with the renaissance of nuclear energy and associated fuel reprocessing, geological disposal of high-level nuclear wastes, and concerns about national security with respect to nuclear non-proliferation. This work presents an overview of anthropogenic radionuclide contamination in the environment, as well as the salient geochemical behavior of important radionuclides. We first discuss the following major anthropogenic sources and current development that contribute to the radionuclide contamination of the environment: (1) nuclear weapons program; (2) nuclear weapons testing; (3) nuclear power plants; (4) commercial fuel reprocessing; (5) geological repository of high-level nuclear wastes, and (6) nuclear accidents. Then, we summarize the geochemical behavior for radionuclides {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, and {sup 237}Np, because of their complex geochemical behavior, long half-lives, and presumably high mobility in the environment. Biogeochemical cycling and environment risk assessment must take into account speciation of these redox-sensitive radionuclides.

  2. Colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport: a regulatory perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dam, W. L.; Pickett, D. A.; Codell, R. B.; Nicholson, T. J.

    2001-12-01

    What hydrogeologic-geochemical-microbial conditions and processes affect migration of radionuclides sorbed onto microparticles or native colloid-sized radionuclide particles? The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is responsible for protecting public health, safety, and the environment at numerous nuclear facilities including a potential high-level nuclear waste disposal site. To fulfill these obligations, NRC needs to understand the mechanisms controlling radionuclide release and transport and their importance to performance. The current focus of NRC staff reviews and technical interactions dealing with colloid-facilitated transport relates to the potential nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. NRC staff performed bounding calculations to quantify radionuclide releases available for ground-water transport to potential receptors from a Yucca Mountain repository. Preliminary analyses suggest insignificant doses of plutonium and americium colloids could be derived from spent nuclear fuel. Using surface complexation models, NRC staff found that colloids can potentially lower actinide retardation factors by up to several orders of magnitude. Performance assessment calculations, in which colloidal transport of plutonium and americium was simulated by assuming no sorption or matrix diffusion, indicated no effect of colloids on human dose within the 10,000 year compliance period due largely to long waste-package lifetimes. NRC staff have identified information gaps and developed technical agreements with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to ensure sufficient information will be presented in any potential future Yucca Mountain license application. DOE has agreed to identify which radionuclides could be transported via colloids, incorporate uncertainties in colloid formation, release and transport parameters, and conceptual models, and address the applicability of field data using synthetic microspheres as colloid analogs. NRC is currently

  3. Impact assessment of shallow land burial for low-level waste: modelling of the water flow and transport of radionuclides in the near-field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walravens, J.; Volckaert, G.

    1996-09-18

    The Belgian concept for disposal of low-level waste consists of storage of waste drums into a concrete vault backfilled with a cementitious grout. The vault is placed above the water table and will be covered with a multilayer cap of clay, gravel, and sandy materials. The SCK/CEN is charged with the long-term performance assessment of the disposal site. The main processes and parameters determining the radioactivity release from the site are identified. The principal processes are the infiltration through the top cover and the sorption of waste on the backfill. The release of radionuclides from the site was modelled with the PORFLOW numerical code.

  4. Scientific Analysis Cover Sheet for Radionuclide Screening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Ragan

    2002-08-09

    The waste forms under consideration for disposal in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain contain scores of radionuclides (Attachments V and VI). It would be impractical and highly inefficient to model all of these radionuclides in a total system performance assessment (TSPA). Thus, the purpose of this radionuclide screening analysis is to remove from further consideration (screen out) radionuclides that are unlikely to significantly contribute to radiation dose to the public from the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The remaining nuclides (those screened in) are recommended for consideration in TSPA modeling for license application. This analysis also covers radionuclides that are not screened in based on dose, but need to be included in TSPA modeling for other reasons. For example, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations require consideration of the combined activity of Ra-226 and Ra-228 in groundwater (40 CFR 197.30, 10 CFR 63.331). Also, Cm-245, Pu-241, and U-235 decay indirectly to potentially important radionuclides, and are not identified by the screening analysis as important. The radionuclide screening analysis separately considers two different postclosure time periods: the 10,000-y regulatory period for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain and the period after 10,000 y up to 1 million y after emplacement. The incremental effect of extending the screening for the regulatory period to 20,000 y is also addressed. Four release scenarios are considered: (1) the nominal scenario, which entails long-term degradation of disposal containers and waste forms, (2) a human-intrusion scenario, (3) an intrusive igneous event, and (4) an eruptive igneous event. Because the first three scenarios require groundwater transport, they are called groundwater scenarios below. The screening analysis considers the following waste forms: spent boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel, spent

  5. Assessment of environmental impact models in natural occurring radionuclides solid wastes disposal from the mineral industry; Avaliacao de modelos de impacto ambiental para deposicao de residuos solidos com radionuclideos naturais em instalacoes minero-industriais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontedeiro, Elizabeth May Braga Dulley

    2006-07-15

    This work evaluates the behavior of wastes with naturally occurring radionuclides as generated by the mineral industry and their final disposal in landfills. An integrated methodology is used to predict the performance of an industrial landfill for disposal of wastes containing NORM/TENORM, and to define acceptable amounts that can be disposed at the landfill using long-term environmental assessment. The governing equations for radionuclide transport are solved analytically using the generalized integral transform technique. Results obtained for each compartment of the biogeosphere are validated with experimental results or compared to other classes of solutions. An impact analysis is performed in order to define the potential consequences of a landfill to the environment, considering not only the engineering characteristics of the waste deposit but also the exposure pathways and plausible scenarios in which the contaminants could migrate and reach the environment and the human population. The present work permits the development of a safety approach that can be used to derive quantitative waste acceptance criteria for the disposal of NORM/TENORM waste in landfills. (author)

  6. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy of Human Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Gudkov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Targeted radionuclide therapy is one of the most intensively developing directions of nuclear medicine. Unlike conventional external beam therapy, the targeted radionuclide therapy causes less collateral damage to normal tissues and allows targeted drug delivery to a clinically diagnosed neoplastic malformations, as well as metastasized cells and cellular clusters, thus providing systemic therapy of cancer. The methods of targeted radionuclide therapy are based on the use of molecular carriers of radionuclides with high affinity to antigens on the surface of tumor cells. The potential of targeted radionuclide therapy has markedly grown nowadays due to the expanded knowledge base in cancer biology, bioengineering, and radiochemistry. In this review, progress in the radionuclide therapy of hematological malignancies and approaches for treatment of solid tumors is addressed.

  7. Radiopharmaceuticals and other compounds labelled with short-lived radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Welch, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals and Other Compounds Labelled with Short-Lived Radionuclides covers through both review and contributed articles the potential applications and developments in labeling with short-lived radionuclides whose use is restricted to institutions with accelerators. The book discusses the current and potential use of generator-produced radionuclides as well as other short-lived radionuclides, and the problems of quality control of such labeled compounds. The book is useful to nuclear medicine physicians.

  8. Radionuclide transport processes in terrestrial ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whicker, F.W.

    1983-01-01

    Some major principles and the status of knowledge concerning the transport of radionuclides through terrestrial ecosystems are reviewed. Fundamental processes which control the flow of radionuclides between ecosystem components such as air, soil, plants, and animals are described, with emphasis on deposition, resuspension, plant uptake, ingestion, and assimilation. Properties of radionuclides, organisms, and ecosystems are examined in relation to their influence on the accumulation of radioactive materials by plants and animals. The effects of the physicochemical nature of the radionuclide; morphology, physiology, and behavior of the organism; and soil, nutrient, and trophic characteristics of the ecosystem are highlighted. Observations in natural ecosystems on radionuclides such as 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 131 I, 3 H, and 239 Pu are used to illustrate current concepts. An assessment of the degree to which the processes controlling radionuclide behavior are understood and of our ability to simulate and predict such behavior with computerized models is offered. Finally, brief comments are made on research needs

  9. Quantitative assessment of radionuclide retention in the near-surface system at Forsmark. Development of a reactive transport model using Forsmark 1.2 data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandia, Fidel; Sena, Clara; Arcos, David; Molinero, Jorge; Duro, Lara; Bruno, Jordi (Amphos XXI Consulting S.L., Barcelona (Spain))

    2007-12-15

    The main objective of this work is to assess the migration behaviour of selected long-lived radionuclides through the near-surface system of Forsmark, with special focus on the evaluation of the capacity of the Quaternary deposits and sediments for radionuclide retention. The work reported here is based on data and information from Forsmark Site Descriptive Model version 1.2. From the geological point of view, the near-surface systems in the Forsmark area consist of Quaternary deposits and sediments that overlay the granitic bedrock. Glacial till is the more abundant outcropping Quaternary deposit and the remainder is made of clayey deposits. These types of near-surface sediments show distinctive hydraulic and geochemical features. The main reactive mineral in the till deposits, for the time horizons considered in this work, is calcium carbonate together with minor amounts of clay minerals (e.g. illite). The till deposits forms aquifers with relatively high hydraulic conductivities. In contrast, glacial and post-glacial clays are basically composed of illite with low to very low amounts of calcium carbonate, and containing organic matter-rich layers (gyttja), which can promote reducing conditions in the porewaters. All these clays exhibits relatively low hydraulic conductivity values. Five radionuclides have been selected for conceptualization and qualitative evaluation of retention process: U as an actinide, Se as a redox-sensitive radionuclide, Cs as a monovalent cation, Sr as a divalent cation, and I as an anion radionuclide. Overall, radionuclide retention capacity in the surface systems at Forsmark can be provided by sorption on charged surfaces of clays and oxyhydroxides, co-precipitation with sulphates, sulphides, oxyhydroxides and carbonates, and sorption on organic matter. Two-dimensional coupled hydrogeological and reactive solute transport models have been developed to simulate the geochemical behaviour of U, Cs and Sr. These three radionuclides have

  10. Assessment of potential adjuvanticity of Cry proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Saurabh S; Barnett, Brian; Doerrer, Nancy G; Glenn, Kevin; Herman, Rod A; Herouet-Guicheney, Corinne; Hunst, Penny; Kough, John; Ladics, Gregory S; McClain, Scott; Papineni, Sabitha; Poulsen, Lars K; Rascle, Jean-Baptiste; Tao, Ai-Lin; van Ree, Ronald; Ward, Jason; Bowman, Christal C

    2016-08-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops have achieved success in the marketplace and their benefits extend beyond the overall increase in harvest yields to include lowered use of insecticides and decreased carbon dioxide emissions. The most widely grown GM crops contain gene/s for targeted insect protection, herbicide tolerance, or both. Plant expression of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crystal (Cry) insecticidal proteins have been the primary way to impart insect resistance in GM crops. Although deemed safe by regulatory agencies globally, previous studies have been the basis for discussions around the potential immuno-adjuvant effects of Cry proteins. These studies had limitations in study design. The studies used animal models with extremely high doses of Cry proteins, which when given using the ig route were co-administered with an adjuvant. Although the presumption exists that Cry proteins may have immunostimulatory activity and therefore an adjuvanticity risk, the evidence shows that Cry proteins are expressed at very low levels in GM crops and are unlikely to function as adjuvants. This conclusion is based on critical review of the published literature on the effects of immunomodulation by Cry proteins, the history of safe use of Cry proteins in foods, safety of the Bt donor organisms, and pre-market weight-of-evidence-based safety assessments for GM crops. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessing soil erosion rates for a large catchment in the Central Highlands of Vietnam using fallout radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phan Son Hai; Nguyen Thanh Binh; Nguyen Minh Dao; Nguyen Thi Huong Lan; Nguyen Thi Mui; Le Xuan Thang; Phan Quang Trung; Trinh Cong Tu; Tran Tien Dung

    2014-01-01

    Fallout radionuclides Be-7 and Cs-137 were applied to assess soil erosion rates for a 270.5 km 2 catchment with a variety of slope (from 0 o to more than 45 o , crops or vegetation (natural forest, artificial forest, perennial crops, annual crops) and a variety of tillage and soil conservation measures. Soil erosion rates were estimated at 90 areas within the catchment. Each sampling area has at least one feature of the slope, rainfall, crops, farming practice different from others. Soil erosion rates in this region depend significantly on the slope, crops and farming techniques. Averaging over crops, soil erosion rates by slopes 0 - 5 o , 5 - 15 o , 15 - 25 o and 25 - 35 o are 5.0, 12.8, 18.9 and 21.3 t.ha -1 .y -1 , respectively. Forest land has the least soil erosion rates, ranging between 0.5 t.ha -1 .y -1 and 14 t.ha -1 .y -1 depending on the slope. Annual crops land has the highest soil erosion rates, ranging between 6 t.ha -1 .y -1 and 42 t.ha -1 .y -1 when slope varies from < 5 o to 32 o . Perennial crop land has soil erosion rates in the range of 5 t.ha -1 .y -1 and 39 t.ha -1 .y -1 . In areas with the same slope, the soil erosion rate is the highest for cashew plantations, lower for mulberry field and the lowest for tea or coffee plantations. Soil erosion has resulted in losing a significant quantity of plant nutrients such as OM, N, P 2 O 5 and K 2 O every year. Generally, lost nutrient quantities due to soil erosion are proportional to erosion rates. Some areas of annual crop land lost a large amount of nutrients every year, up to 1435 kg OM, 79 kg N, 54 kg P 2 O 5 and 36 kg K 2 O. Similarly, perennial crop lands in this region could lost up to 1736 kg OM, 91 kg N, 66 kg P 2 O 5 and 40 kg K 2 O every year. Owing to soil erosion, the catchment has lost about 211200 tons of surface soil per year during last 50 years, corresponding to the rate of 7.8 t.ha -1 .y -1 . This amount of eroded soil was deposited in drainage of the catchment and in reservoirs

  12. The LLNL Nevada Test Side underground radionuclide source-term inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wild, J.F.; Goishi, W.; Meadows, J.W. [and others

    1995-03-01

    The potential for the contamination of ground water beneath the Nevada Test Site (NTS) by nuclear testing has long been recognized. The United States has conducted underground nuclear weapons testing at NTS since 1957, and a considerable amount of radioactive material has been deposited in the subsurface by this work. As a part of the U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office`s Underground Test Area Operable Unit (UGTA OP), the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has compiled an inventory of radionuclides produced by underground LLNL weapons tests from 1957 through 1992. It is well known that some groundwater at NTS has been contaminated by radionuclides from weapons testing. Nearly one-third of the nuclear tests were conducted near or beneath the pre-test static water level (SWL). An important responsibility of the UGTA OP is to assess the migration potential of contaminants beneath the NTS and surrounding lands. Except for tritium ({sup 3}H), which is capable of migration with water as molecular HTO, the ability of radionuclides to migrate significant distances from their source is presently thought to be very low. However, before this potential for migration can be fully assessed, the quantity of existing contaminants must be carefully estimated. The inventory of the radionuclide source term provides an upper limit on the availability of radionuclides for migration. However, an accurate assessment of risk to the public depends on more than an inventory of radionuclides remaining from underground testing. An estimate of the hydrologic source term consisting of radionuclides dissolved in or transported by ground water must compliment the radionuclide source term.

  13. Geochemical effects on the behavior of LLW radionuclides in soil/groundwater environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krupka, K.M.; Sterne, R.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Assessing the migration potential of radionuclides leached from low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and decommissioning sites necessitates information on the effects of sorption and precipitation on the concentrations of dissolved radionuclides. Such an assessment requires that the geochemical processes of aqueous speciation, complexation, oxidation/reduction, and ion exchange be taken into account. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is providing technical support to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for defining the solubility and sorption behavior of radionuclides in soil/ground-water environments associated with engineered cementitious LLW disposal systems and decommissioning sites. Geochemical modeling is being used to predict solubility limits for radionuclides under geochemical conditions associated with these environments. The solubility limits are being used as maximum concentration limits in performance assessment calculations describing the release of contaminants from waste sources. Available data were compiled regarding the sorption potential of radionuclides onto {open_quotes}fresh{close_quotes} cement/concrete where the expected pH of the cement pore waters will equal to or exceed 10. Based on information gleaned from the literature, a list of preferred minimum distribution coefficients (Kd`s) was developed for these radionuclides. The K{sub d} values are specific to the chemical environments associated with the evolution of the compositions of cement/concrete pore waters.

  14. Experimental studies of the early effects of inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides for nuclear accident risk assessment: Phase 2 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, B.R.; Hahn, F.F.; Newton, G.J.; Snipes, M.B.; Damon, E.G.; Mauderly, J.L.; Boecker, B.B.; Gray, D.H.

    1987-11-01

    This report summarizes a series of experiments concerning the effect of linear energy transfer and temporal radiation dose pattern to the lung from inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides. The results were used to test the validity of a hazard-function mathematical model for predicting death from radiation pneumonitis. Both morbidity and mortality within 18 months after exposure were examined in rats exposed to beta-emitting radionuclides, giving brief or protracted irradiation of the lung or having weak or strong beta emissions. Protraction of the radiation dose to the lung from a half-time in the lung of less than three days to a half-time with a long-term component of about 150 days has a sparing effect. The median lethal dose for the protracted irradiation is about 1.7 times the median lethal dose for the brief irradiation. Low energy beta emissions from /sup 147/Pm have a similar effectiveness in producing lethal injury as high energy beta emissions from /sup 90/Sr. Changes in three parameters of morbidity were measured: body weight, hematology and pulmonary function; only changes in pulmonary function correlated well with pulmonary radiation injury. The doses of radiation required to produce impaired function, however, were not significantly different from those that produced death. The hazard-function model for predicting death from radiation pneumonitis, which was developed from previously obtained data for inhalation exposures of dogs to beta-emitting radionuclides, adequately predicted the median lethal doses for rats receiving one of several different beta dose rate patterns to the lung, thus strengthening the validity of the mathematical model. 23 refs., 41 figs., 12 tabs.

  15. Quality of life assessment in radionuclide therapy: a feasibility study of the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire in palliative 131I-lipiodol therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brans, B.; Lambert, B.; De Beule, E.; De Winter, F.; Dierckx, R.A.; Van Belle, S.; Van Vlierberghe, H.; De Hemptinne, B.

    2002-01-01

    The good tolerance of radionuclide therapy has frequently been proposed as a major advantage. This study explored the feasibility of using the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire in palliative iodine-131 lipiodol therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma. Questionnaires were completed during interviews in which all symptoms, co-morbidity and medication were assessed at baseline within 1 week before 131 I-lipiodol therapy, and subsequently after 1 and 3 months, in 20 patients treated with locoregional, intra-arterial 131 I-lipiodol therapy with or without cisplatin. Principal observations were that (1) a number of important scales, i.e. overall quality of life, physical functioning and pain, worsened between 0 and 3 months after 131 I-lipiodol therapy, irrespective of tumour response, and (2) the occurrence of clinical side-effects was associated with a negative impact on quality of life and physical functioning 1 and 3 months after 131 I-lipiodol. The QLQ-C30 can be regarded as a feasible method for quality of life assessment in 131 I-lipiodol therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma and possibly in other radionuclide therapies. These observations should be related to the impact of other treatment modalities on quality of life. (orig.)

  16. Criteria for Radionuclide Activity Concentrations for Food and Drinking Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-04-01

    Requirements for the protection of people from the harmful consequences of exposure to ionizing radiation, for the safety of radiation sources and for the protection of the environment are established in IAEA Safety Standards Series No. GSR Part 3, Radiation Protection and Safety of Radiation Sources: International Basic Safety Standards. GSR Part 3 requires that the regulatory body or other relevant authority establish specific reference levels for exposure due to radionuclides in commodities, including food and drinking water. The reference level is based on an annual effective dose to the representative person that generally does not exceed a value of about 1 mSv. International standards have been developed by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations/World Health Organization (FAO/WHO) Codex Alimentarius Commission for levels of radionuclides contained in food traded internationally that contains, or could potentially contain, radioactive substances as a consequence of a nuclear or radiological emergency. International standards have also been developed by the WHO for radionuclides contained in drinking water, other than in a nuclear or radiological emergency. These international standards provide guidance and criteria in terms of levels of individual radiation dose, levels of activity concentration of specific radionuclides, or both. The criteria derived in terms of levels of activity concentration in the various international standards differ owing to a number of factors and assumptions underlying the common objective of protecting public health in different circumstances. This publication considers the various international standards to be applied at the national level for the assessment of levels of radionuclides in food and in drinking water in different circumstances for the purposes of control, other than in a nuclear or radiological emergency. It collates and provides an overview of the different criteria used in assessing and

  17. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Facility Radionuclide Emission Points and Sampling Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barfuss, Brad C.; Barnett, J. Matthew; Ballinger, Marcel Y.

    2009-04-08

    Battelle—Pacific Northwest Division operates numerous research and development laboratories in Richland, Washington, including those associated with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on the Department of Energy’s Hanford Site that have the potential for radionuclide air emissions. The National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP 40 CFR 61, Subparts H and I) requires an assessment of all effluent release points that have the potential for radionuclide emissions. Potential emissions are assessed annually. Sampling, monitoring, and other regulatory compliance requirements are designated based upon the potential-to-emit dose criteria found in the regulations. The purpose of this document is to describe the facility radionuclide air emission sampling program and provide current and historical facility emission point system performance, operation, and design information. A description of the buildings, exhaust points, control technologies, and sample extraction details is provided for each registered or deregistered facility emission point. Additionally, applicable stack sampler configuration drawings, figures, and photographs are provided.

  18. Is Environmental Impact Assessment fulfilling its potential?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sanne Vammen

    2014-01-01

    fuel with CO2-neutral energy sources. A variety of these projects are subject to environmental impact assessment (EIA), which raises the following questions: What role does an impact assessment play? When is the project environmentally friendly? How are climate change-related impacts assessed...

  19. Development of modern approach to absorbed dose assessment in radionuclide therapy, based on Monte Carlo method simulation of patient scintigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysak, Y. V.; Klimanov, V. A.; Narkevich, B. Ya

    2017-01-01

    One of the most difficult problems of modern radionuclide therapy (RNT) is control of the absorbed dose in pathological volume. This research presents new approach based on estimation of radiopharmaceutical (RP) accumulated activity value in tumor volume, based on planar scintigraphic images of the patient and calculated radiation transport using Monte Carlo method, including absorption and scattering in biological tissues of the patient, and elements of gamma camera itself. In our research, to obtain the data, we performed modeling scintigraphy of the vial with administered to the patient activity of RP in gamma camera, the vial was placed at the certain distance from the collimator, and the similar study was performed in identical geometry, with the same values of activity of radiopharmaceuticals in the pathological target in the body of the patient. For correct calculation results, adapted Fisher-Snyder human phantom was simulated in MCNP program. In the context of our technique, calculations were performed for different sizes of pathological targets and various tumors deeps inside patient’s body, using radiopharmaceuticals based on a mixed β-γ-radiating (131I, 177Lu), and clear β- emitting (89Sr, 90Y) therapeutic radionuclides. Presented method can be used for adequate implementing in clinical practice estimation of absorbed doses in the regions of interest on the basis of planar scintigraphy of the patient with sufficient accuracy.

  20. Assessment of radionuclide concentration and exhalation studies in soil of lesser Himalayas of Jammu and Kashmir, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay; Vij, Raman; Sharma, Sumit; Sarin, Amit; Narang, Saurabh

    2018-02-01

    Because to extensive utilization of soil as a building/construction stuff, the activities of 238U, 40K, 232Th, and exhalation studies in solid samples have been measured using thallium activated sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) gamma detector and scintillation-based smart RnDuo monitor. The measured activity concentration of radionuclides lies in the range of 2.76-38.96, 12.47-65.70, and 199-450 Bq/kg for uranium (C U), thorium (C Th), and potassium (C K), respectively. The annual effective dose rate due to radionuclides is within the secure limit suggested by ICRP. The radium equivalent activity of all the samples is under 100 Bq/kg. The maximum outward and inside risk indices of all these samples are below the values of 0.37 and 0.43. No direct correlation has been seen between 238U and its mass exhalation rate as well as 232Th and its surface exhalation rate in soil samples.

  1. Assessment of single vessel coronary artery disease: results of exercise electrocardiography, thallium-201 myocardial perfusion imaging and radionuclide angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Port, S.C.; Oshima, M.; Ray, G.; McNamee, P.; Schmidt, D.H.

    1985-01-01

    The sensitivity of the commonly used stress tests for the diagnosis of coronary artery disease was analyzed in 46 patients with significant occlusion (greater than or equal to 70% luminal diameter obstruction) of only one major coronary artery and no prior myocardial infarction. In all patients, thallium-201 perfusion imaging (both planar and seven-pinhole tomographic) and 12 lead electrocardiography were performed during the same graded treadmill exercise test and radionuclide angiography was performed during upright bicycle exercise. Exercise rate-pressure (double) product was 22,307 +/- 6,750 on the treadmill compared with 22,995 +/- 5,622 on the bicycle (p = NS). Exercise electrocardiograms were unequivocally abnormal in 24 patients (52%). Qualitative planar thallium images were abnormal in 42 patients (91%). Quantitative analysis of the tomographic thallium images were abnormal in 41 patients (89%). An exercise ejection fraction of less than 0.56 or a new wall motion abnormality was seen in 30 patients (65%). Results were similar for the right (n = 11) and left anterior descending (n = 28) coronary arteries while all tests but the planar thallium imaging showed a lower sensitivity for isolated circumflex artery disease (n = 7). The specificity of the tests was 72, 83, 89 and 72% for electrocardiography, planar thallium imaging, tomographic thallium imaging and radionuclide angiography, respectively. The results suggest that exercise thallium-201 perfusion imaging is the most sensitive noninvasive stress test for the diagnosis of single vessel coronary artery disease

  2. Radionuclide concentrations in agricultural products near the Hanford Site, 1982 through 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antonio, E.J.

    1994-06-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed monitoring data for agricultural products collected from 1982 through 1992 near the Hanford Site to determine radionuclide concentration trends. While samples were collected and analyzed, and results reported annual in Hanford Site environmental reports, an 11-year data set was reviewed for this report to increase the ability to assess trends and potential Hanford effects. Products reviewed included milk, chicken, eggs, beef, vegetables, fruit, wine, wheat, and alfalfa. To determine which radionuclides were detected sufficiently often to permit analysis for trends and effects, each radionuclide concentration and its associated uncertainty were ratioed. Radionuclides were considered routinely detectable if more than 50% of the ratios were between zero and one. Data for these radionuclides were then analyzed statistically, using analyses of variance. The statistical analyses indicated the following: for the most part, there were no measurable effects for Hanford operations; radionuclide concentrations in all products reviewed remained relatively low when compared to concentrations that would result in a 1-mrem effective dose equivalent to an individual; radionuclide concentrations are decreasing in general; however, 90 Sr concentrations in all media and 129 I in milk increased from 1982 to 1986, then decreased gradually for the remainder of the review period. The 129 I concentrations may be correlated with processing of irradiated reactor fuel at the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant

  3. Measurement of radionuclides in contaminated environmental matrices: participation in quality assessment programme of U.S. Department of energy's environmental monitoring laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SIDDIQUE, N.; Rahman, A.; Waheed, S.; Wasim, M.; Daud, M.; Ahmad, S.

    2006-03-01

    A Quality Assessment Programme (QAP) was initiated by the US, Department of Energy (DOE) in 1998 to establish credibility of radionuclide measurements in contaminated environmental samples, i.e. soil, vegetation and air filters. In this context best-known and pertinent laboratories around the world were identified and invited to participate in this programme. To evaluate the performance of these prestigious laboratories, the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) Laboratory at NCD, PINSTECH, which is an IAEA declared Regional Resource Unit (IAEA-RRU), along with 76 other laboratories were asked to take part in a regular proficiency exercise. In this report, the performance of the NAA Laboratory throughout the QAP programme (1998-2004) is presented is detail, describing the procedures employed, the problems encountered and the improvement and expertise gained from participating in this assessment programme. (author)

  4. Review of the modelling of radionuclide transport from U-series disequilibria and of its use in assessing the safe disposal of nuclear waste in crystalline rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latham, A.G.; Schwarcz, H.P.

    1989-01-01

    U-series disequilibria from crystalline rocks and U deposits have been used to estimate the timing of hydrogeological events for U and Ra mobility and to model the transport rates of U and Ra, both with some success. Unfortunately, activity ratio data alone are not unique to a given process or model, and it is shown how inappropriate choice of the model can have quite diverse consequences for interpretation of the data. Information from other sources is needed to help minimise these non-uniqueness problems but, as yet, the state of methodology is inadequate to assess completely the validity of the models. In particular, the rate of deposition of U in fractures seems highly dependent upon the availability of trivalent Fe and other low-temperature minerals whose rate of formation are largely unknown. This review reinforces the need to assess closely the suggestion that chemisorption is an effective retardant of fracture-borne repository source radionuclides. (author)

  5. Radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, S.E.; Horrill, A.D.; Howard, B.J.; Lowe, V.P.W.; Parkinson, J.A.

    1983-07-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: concentration and spatial distribution of radionuclides in grazed and ungrazed saltmarshes; incorporation of radionuclides by sheep grazing on an estuarine saltmarsh; inland transfer of radionuclides by birds feeding in the estuaries and saltmarshes at Ravenglass; radionuclides in contrasting types of coastal pastures and taken up by individual plant species found in west Cumbria; procedures developed and used for the measurement of alpha and gamma emitters in environmental materials. (U.K.)

  6. The Grimsel radionuclide migration experiment - a contribution to raising confidence in the validity of solute transport models used in performance assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frick, U.

    1995-01-01

    The safety assessment of radioactive waste repositories is to provide confidence that the predictive models utilized are applicable for the specific repository systems. Nagra has carried out radionuclide migration experiments at the Grimsel underground test site (Switzerland) for testing of currently used methodologies, data bases, conceptual approaches and codes for modeling radionuclide transport through fractured host rocks. Specific objectives included: identification of the relevant transport processes, to test the extrapolation of laboratory sorption data to field conditions, and to demonstrate the applicability of currently used methodology for conceptualizing or building realistic transport models. Field tests and transport modeling work are complemented by an extensive laboratory program. The field experimental activities focused predominantly on establishing appropriate conditions for identifying relevant transport mechanisms on the scale of a few meters, aiming at full recovery of injected tracers, simple geometry and long-term stability of induced dipole flow fields. A relatively simple homogeneous, dual-porosity advection/diffusion model was built with input from a state of the art petrographic characterisation of the water conducting feature. It was possible to calibrate the model from conservative tracer breakthrough curves. (J.S.). 21 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs

  7. Migration of radionuclides in geologic media: Fundamental research needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, D.T.; Zachara, J.M.; Wildung, R.E.; Wobber, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    An assessment of the fundamental research needs in understanding and predicting the migration of radionuclides in the subsurface is provided. Emphasis is on the following three technical areas: (1) aqueous speciation of radionuclides, (2) the interaction of radionuclides with substrates, and (3) intermediate-scale interaction studies. This research relates to important issues associated with environmental restoration and remediation of DOE sites contaminated with mixed radionuclide-organic wastes. 64 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  8. A comparison of models to assess the atmospheric dispersion of resuspended radionuclides on the Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, J.R.; Eckart, R.E.

    1994-11-01

    A study of computer codes was made to determine the suitability of their use for modeling radionuclide dispersion from attachment to fugitive dust at the GMX safety shot area of the Nevada Test site. Two codes, the Industrial Source Complex 2 Long Term Model (ISCLT2) and the Fugitive Dust Model (FDM), were subsequently chosen to model the GMX site. Dose calculations were performed using the output values generated by the computer codes. The concentration values produced by the two codes were within a factor of two of each other and were not significantly different. The FDM, however, was felt to be a more useful code for use in calculating doses caused by attachment to fugitive dust

  9. Ecological policy, assessment and prediction of the fate of Chernobyl radionuclides in sediments of the Black Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kontar, A.E.

    2002-01-01

    The mathematical model has been designed to investigate the fate and distribution of the Chernobyl radionuclides in sediments of the Black Sea. One of the regions of intensive radioactive precipitation during the Chernobyl disaster was the nothwestern Black Sea region. There are some canyon systems in this region, where bottom sediments of the shelf zone are removed to the continental slope region and finally to the abyssal part of the sea. The lack of reliable information on the removal intensity of the shelf sediments, which contain different kinds of radioactive precipitation, does not allow changes in the radioactive situation to be predicted reliably enough in the given region. On the other hand, the surface sedimentary layers dated by characteristic Chernobyl precipitation made it possible to obtain information on sediment movement rates and directions, as well as other quantitative and qualitative parameters for the mechanisms of canyon processes. This region was selected for our study

  10. Radionuclide content in laundry detergents commercially available on the Serbian market and assessment of radiological environmental hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukanac Ivana S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Laundry detergents are chemicals widely used in everyday life, and in numerous industry branches. In order to perceive the radiological aspect of environmental pollution by wastewater, the analysis of laundry detergents available on the Serbian market was undertaken. Laundry detergent samples were measured by means of gamma spectrometry and the results are presented in this paper. Analysis of the obtained activity concentrations showed that laundry detergents in Serbia mostly fulfill the international recommendation and requirements regarding the phosphate content. Besides that, the content of the detected radionuclides in laundry detergent samples indicates the minor radiological risk to the environment via wastewaters. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 171018

  11. An assessment of the reported leakage of anthropogenic radionuclides from the underground nuclear test sites at Amchitka Island, Alaska, USA to the surface environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasher, Douglas; Hanson, Wayne; Read, Stan; Faller, Scott; Farmer, Dennis; Efurd, Wes; Kelley, John; Patrick, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Three underground nuclear tests representing approximately 15-16% of the total effective energy released during the United States underground nuclear testing program from 1951 to 1992 were conducted at Amchitka Island, Alaska. In 1996, Greenpeace reported that leakage of radionuclides, 241Am and 239+240Pu, from these underground tests to the terrestrial and freshwater environments had been detected. In response to this report, a federal, state, tribal and non-governmental team conducted a terrestrial and freshwater radiological sampling program in 1997. Additional radiological sampling was conducted in 1998. An assessment of the reported leakage to the freshwater environment was evaluated by assessing 3H values in surface waters and 240Pu/239Pu ratios in various sample media. Tritium values ranged from 0.41 Bq/l +/- 0.11 two sigma to 0.74 Bq/1 +/- 0.126 two sigma at the surface water sites sampled, including the reported leakage sites. Only at the Long Shot test site, where leakage of radioactive gases to the near-surface occurred in 1965. were higher 3H levels of 5.8 Bq/1 +/- 0.19 two sigma still observed in 1997, in mud pit #3. The mean 240Pu/239Pu for all of the Amchitka samples was 0.1991 +/- 0.0149 one standard deviation, with values ranging from 0.1824 +/- 1.43% one sigma to 0.2431 +/- 6.56% one sigma. The measured 3H levels and 240Pu/239Pu ratios in freshwater moss and sediments at Amchitka provide no evidence of leakage occurring at the sites reported by Buske and Miller (1998 Nuclear-Weapons-Free America and Alaska Community Action on Toxics, Anchorage, Ak, p.38) and Miller and Buske (1996 Nuclear Flashback: The Return to Anchitka, p.35). It was noted that the marine sample; 240Pu/239Pu ratios are statistically different than the global fallout ratios presented by Krey et al. (1976) and Kelley, Bond, and Beasley (1999). The additional non-fallout component 240Pu/239Pu ratio, assuming a single unique source, necessary to modify the global fallout 240Pu/239

  12. Radionuclide antisense therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou Xiaohong

    2002-01-01

    Radionuclide antisense therapy achieves the joint goals of antisense therapy and internal radiation therapy. There have been a small number of investigations on the radionuclide antisense therapy in tissue culture and in animal studies. Considerable research is required before this novel technique can become a working practice. The authors reviewed some question and development on the radionuclide antisense therapy, such as selection of the target gene sequence, labelling the antisense oligonucleotide, improvement of the uptake and target of radionuclide antisense oligonucleotides and evaluation of the toxicity of the radionuclide antisense therapy

  13. Dose Assessment of Los Alamos National Laboratory-Derived Residual Radionuclides in Soils within C Tracts (C-2, C-3, and C-4) for Land Transfer Decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillis, Jessica M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Whicker, Jeffrey J.

    2016-01-26

    Three separate Sampling and Analysis Plans (SAPs) were prepared for tracts C-2, C-3, and C-4. The objective of sampling was to confirm, within the stated statistical confidence limits, that the mean levels of potential radioactive residual contamination in soils in the C Tracts are documented, in appropriate units, and are below the 15 mrem/y (150 μSv/y) Screening Action Levels (SALs). Results show that radionuclide concentration upper-bound 95% confidence levels were close to background levels, with the exception of Pu-239 and Cs-137 being slightly elevated above background, and all measurements were below the ALs and meet the real property release criteria for future construction or recreational use. A follow-up ALARA analysis showed that the costs of cleanup of the soil in areas of elevated concentration and confirmatory sampling would far exceed any benefit from dose reduction.

  14. An assessment of the relative importance of long-lived radionuclides released in accidents from the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisfeld, K.; Matthies, M.; Paretzke, H.G.; Wirth, E.

    1982-01-01

    Accidental releases of long-lived radionuclides from facilities of the nuclear fuel cycle could result in a chronic exposure of the population, in particular by ingestion of contaminated food and drinking water. The relative importance of the dose ingested by particular members of the general public of these various long-lived nuclides as a function of time after release has been calculated by the deterministic, time-dependent programme ''ECOSYS''. The ranking of the fission products was found to be: 129 I > 90 Sr approximately 137 Cs > 134 Cs approximately 99 Tc > 106 Ru > 144 Ce and reflects the potential hazards of long-term exposure following ingestion of contaminated food. Of the transuranics, neptunium-237 seems to be of particular importance in comparison to americium-243 and plutonium-239. (author)

  15. Bio-SNG potential assessment: Denmark 2020

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrenfeldt, J.; Thomsen, T. (Risoe DTU, Roskilde (Denmark)); Joergensen, Betina (Dansk Gasteknisk Center A/S, Hoersholm (Denmark))

    2010-11-15

    In this project the potential for SNG based on biomass gasification has been sought elucidated. As part of the project a model for simulation of biomass in Denmark has been developed. The conclusion is that SNG can substitute a significant amount of natural gas, but the energy efficiency should be improved. (Author)

  16. Bio-SNG potential assessment: Denmark 2020

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Jørgensen, Betina; Thomsen, Tobias

    In this project the potential for SNG based on biomass gasification has been sought elucidated. As part of the project a model for simulation of biomass in Denmark has been developed. The conclusion is that SNG can substitute a significant amount of natural gas, but the energy efficiency should...

  17. Assessing academic potential for university admission: The ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Biographical Questionnaire (BQ) has been used in the Faculty of Humanities at the University of the Witwatersrand since the mid-80s, to identify potential to succeed at university among applicants who have not met the requirements for automatic admission. As the key instrument in a special admissions process, the

  18. Contribution of the subjective factor to assessment of damage to health caused by the major risk factors at territories contaminated with radionuclides a nd clean territories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knizhnikov, V.A.; Shandala, N.K.; Pukhovskij, N.N.; Petukhova, Eh.V.

    1996-01-01

    The study was aimed at elucidation of the subjective opinion of the population about risk factors and the role of this opinion as a pathogenic factor. Questionnaires were distributed among 2 groups (n=61 and n=65) living at territories contaminated after the accident (town of Novozybkov) and at clean control territories (town of Dyatkov) the groups were matches for age, sex, and educational level. The respondents were to rank twelve possible sources leading to untimely death in the order of their decreasing hazard for human and to express their attitude to 14 diseases. The results helped define the mean index of leaf, which should be taken into consideration when assessing the hazards of living at territories contaminated with radionuclides. It is noteworthy that fear of diseases is a more sensitive characteristic than fear of this or that unfavorable factor. The index of fear is 1.4 times higher in a contaminated region than in the control one [ru

  19. Mobility and Bioavailability of Radionuclides in Soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iurian, A.; Olufemi Phaneuf, M.; Mabit, L.

    2016-01-01

    It is crucial to understand the behavior of radionuclides in the environment, their potential mobility and bioavailability related to long-term persistence, radiological hazards, and impact on human health. Such key information is used to develop strategies that support policy decisions. The environmental behavior of radionuclides depends on ecosystem characteristics. A given soil’s capacity to immobilize radionuclides has been proved to be the main factor responsible for their resulting activity concentrations in plants. The mobility and bioavailability of radionuclides in soils is complex, depending on clay-sized soil fraction, clay mineralogy, organic matter, cation exchange capacity, pH and quantities of competing cations. Moreover, plant species have different behaviors regarding radionuclide absorption depending on soil and plan characteristics

  20. Assessing therapeutic potential of molecules: molecular property ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 129; Issue 5. Assessing ... (MPDSTB) tool has nine modules which are classified into data library (1–3), data processing (4–5) and data analysis (6–9). Module ... Module 4 contains toolsfor chemical file format conversions and 2D to 3D coordinate conversions. Module ...

  1. Uptake by plants of radionuclides from FUSRAP waste materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, M.J.

    1983-04-01

    Radionuclides from FUSRAP wastes potentially may be taken up by plants during remedial action activities and permanent near-surface burial of contaminated materials. In order to better understand the propensity of radionuclides to accumulate in plant tissue, soil and plant factors influencing the uptake and accumulation of radionuclides by plants are reviewed. In addition, data describing the uptake of the principal radionuclides present in FUSRAP wastes (uranium-238, thorium-230, radium-226, lead-210, and polonium-210) are summarized. All five radionuclides can accumulate in plant root tissue to some extent, and there is potential for the translocation and accumulation of these radionuclides in plant shoot tissue. Of these five radionuclides, radium-226 appears to have the greatest potential for translocation and accumulation in plant shoot tissue. 28 references, 1 figure, 3 tables

  2. Uptake by plants of radionuclides from FUSRAP waste materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, M.J.

    1983-04-01

    Radionuclides from FUSRAP wastes potentially may be taken up by plants during remedial action activities and permanent near-surface burial of contaminated materials. In order to better understand the propensity of radionuclides to accumulate in plant tissue, soil and plant factors influencing the uptake and accumulation of radionuclides by plants are reviewed. In addition, data describing the uptake of the principal radionuclides present in FUSRAP wastes (uranium-238, thorium-230, radium-226, lead-210, and polonium-210) are summarized. All five radionuclides can accumulate in plant root tissue to some extent, and there is potential for the translocation and accumulation of these radionuclides in plant shoot tissue. Of these five radionuclides, radium-226 appears to have the greatest potential for translocation and accumulation in plant shoot tissue. 28 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  3. Assessment of long-term effects of radionuclides discharged from a phosphate ore processing plant to the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degetti, S.; Mazzoti, D.; Dall'Ara, S.; DeJoanna, C.

    1997-01-01

    The Northern Adriatic Sea was interested by continuous direct discharge of phosphogypsum from a local phosphate fertilizer industry up to 1985 following a productive activity of about twenty years.As it is known, due to the remarkable amounts of natural radioactivity connected with the productive cycle of fertilizers from phosphate ores, the release to the environment of huge amounts of potentially hazardous wastes might be in principle of major radioecological concern.In this respect Ra-226 and its decay products are expected to be the main responsible of radioactivity background enhancement.Taking into account that discharge at sea (depth 30-35 m) was interrupted over ten years ago, following the closing of the plant, the main scope of this investigation was to assess the long-term effect of the disposal of phosphogypsum in the marine environment and in particular the possible enrichment of the radioactive fraction after solubilization of the gypsum carrier. In order to assess the actual radioecological influence of discharged slurries on the marine environment a preliminary sampling was carried out.Radioactivity data obtained from sediment cores clearly indicate anomalies in respect to typical 'background' values obtained from homologous samples collected in an unaffected area in proximity of the disposal site.As an example, Ra-226 activities in sediment were found to be one hundred fold higher than natural background.Radioactivity data from sediments cores collected in sites interested by bottom sea currents coming from discharge area will be also reported and discussed.(authors)

  4. Options to meet the future global demand of radionuclides for radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Tapas; Pillai, M.R.A.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear medicine continues to represent one of the important modalities for cancer management. While diagnostic nuclear medicine for cancer management is fairly well established, therapeutic strategies using radionuclides are yet to be utilized to their full potential. Even if 1% of the patients undergoing diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures can benefit from subsequent nuclear therapeutic intervention, the radionuclide requirement for nuclear therapeutics would be expected to be in the multi-million Curie levels. Meeting the demand for such high levels of therapeutic radionuclides at an affordable price is an important task for the success of radionuclide therapy. Although different types of particle emitters (beta, alpha, Auger electron etc.) have been evaluated for treating a wide variety of diseases, the use of β − emitting radionuclides is most feasible owing to their ease of production and availability. Several β − emitting radionuclides have been successfully used to treat different kind of diseases. However, many of these radionuclides are not suitable to meet the projected demand owing to the non-availability with sufficiently high specific activity and adequate quantity because of high production costs, relatively short half-lives etc. This article describes the advantages and disadvantages for broader uses of some of the well known therapeutic radionuclides. In addition, radioisotopes which are expected to have the potential to meet the growing demand of therapeutic radionuclides are also discussed.

  5. Options to meet the future global demand of radionuclides for radionuclide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Tapas; Pillai, M R A

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear medicine continues to represent one of the important modalities for cancer management. While diagnostic nuclear medicine for cancer management is fairly well established, therapeutic strategies using radionuclides are yet to be utilized to their full potential. Even if 1% of the patients undergoing diagnostic nuclear medicine procedures can benefit from subsequent nuclear therapeutic intervention, the radionuclide requirement for nuclear therapeutics would be expected to be in the multi-million Curie levels. Meeting the demand for such high levels of therapeutic radionuclides at an affordable price is an important task for the success of radionuclide therapy. Although different types of particle emitters (beta, alpha, Auger electron etc.) have been evaluated for treating a wide variety of diseases, the use of β⁻ emitting radionuclides is most feasible owing to their ease of production and availability. Several β⁻ emitting radionuclides have been successfully used to treat different kind of diseases. However, many of these radionuclides are not suitable to meet the projected demand owing to the non-availability with sufficiently high specific activity and adequate quantity because of high production costs, relatively short half-lives etc. This article describes the advantages and disadvantages for broader uses of some of the well known therapeutic radionuclides. In addition, radioisotopes which are expected to have the potential to meet the growing demand of therapeutic radionuclides are also discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pilot study using technetium-99m pertechnetate sequential radionuclide-sialography for assessing salivary gland function of nasopharyngeal cancer patients on radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ng, K.S.; Sundram, F.; Somanesan, S.; Tan, H.S.K.; Gao, F.; Chung, B.; Machin, D.

    2003-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is mainly treated by radiation therapy. A common complication of radiotherapy is xerostomia. Direct measurements of the amount of saliva produced using suction cups and volumetric assessments are cumbersome and time consuming. Sequential radionuclide sialography is a reproducible and convenient method of measuring salivary function. Patients with newly diagnosed NPC underwent a pilot study using technetium-99m pertechnetate sequential radionuclide sialography to assess their salivary function before and at 3 months post radiation therapy. From the sialography, time-activity-curves were obtained for analysis of salivary function. The shape of the time-activity-curve with citric acid stimulation was classified into 4 types according to the degree of radiation-induced dysfunction. All 14 patients had worse time-activity curves for both parotids and submandibular glands after radiation therapy. The P values for the change in time-activity-curves for all the salivary glands were less than 0.005. All patients with abnormal type of curves before radiation therapy presented type IV(non-functioning) curve after radiation therapy. A ratio (Rc) of pre- and post-stimulation counts allowed for quantification of the degree of stimulatory response. We found a significant decrease in Rc before and after radiation therapy for all the salivary glands (P < 0.001). The salivary gland to background ratio, which is a reflection of the degree of salivary gland functional uptake, also had a significant reduction after radiation. It is feasible to use technetium 99m pertechnetate in the measurement of salivary gland function in nasopharyngeal cancer patients treated with radiation therapy

  7. Assessing the Potential to Intensify Pastureland Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishige, A. E.; Foley, J. A.; Sheehan, J.; Mueller, N. D.; Gerber, J. S.; Laser, M. S.; Lynd, L. R.

    2010-12-01

    Optimizing pastureland use has the potential to be a key part of sustainably meeting the growing global demands for food, feed, fiber, and fuel. This study identified where and to what degree we can utilize pastureland more intensively. We quantified and mapped the pasture utilization intensity, which is the ratio of current to potential pastureland productivity, at the global, continent, country, and 5’ x 5’ grid cell levels. We used the United Nations’ Food and Agricultural Organization’s 2005 Gridded Livestock of the World maps of cattle, sheep, and goat density as the measure of current pastureland productivity. For the potential pastureland productivity scenarios, we considered all possible combinations of three climate-based, globally distributed net primary productivity (NPP) models and optimistic, medium, and pessimistic conversions from NPP to livestock density. Using the utilization intensities calculated in each scenario, we assigned a logical yes, no, or maybe pastureland intensification is possible to each location on the globe. The locations for which most of the scenarios resulted in a yes are ripe for pasture intensification. Our logical maps of potential pastureland intensification highlight a number of locations where pastureland could be used more intensively, indicating that intensified pastureland use could contribute to meeting the increasing demand for livestock products and for land on which to grow plants for bioenergy. This globally distributed pasture productivity gap analysis highlights areas for further research into global land use optimization. There is a need to more closely investigate the specific conditions that constrain land use decisions at the local, national, and international levels in order to inform robust, sustainable, long-term land use planning and execution of those plans.

  8. Hydropower in Turkey: potential and market assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-10-15

    The Turkish hydropower market provides huge opportunities for investors and suppliers. Successful market entry is not easy, however, as the market is still not fully liberalized, the need for local intelligence is large and the competition is increasing. There are also potential political, reputational and environmental risks, typical for an emerging economy. The World Bank global 'Ease of doing business' ranking (2010), ranks Turkey as number 73 of 183 countries. (Author)

  9. Modeling Radionuclide Decay Chain Migration Using HYDROGEOCHEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, T. C.; Tsai, C. H.; Lai, K. H.; Chen, J. S.

    2014-12-01

    Nuclear technology has been employed for energy production for several decades. Although people receive many benefits from nuclear energy, there are inevitably environmental pollutions as well as human health threats posed by the radioactive materials releases from nuclear waste disposed in geological repositories or accidental releases of radionuclides from nuclear facilities. Theoretical studies have been undertaken to understand the transport of radionuclides in subsurface environments because that the radionuclide transport in groundwater is one of the main pathway in exposure scenarios for the intake of radionuclides. The radionuclide transport in groundwater can be predicted using analytical solution as well as numerical models. In this study, we simulate the transport of the radionuclide decay chain using HYDROGEOCHEM. The simulated results are verified against the analytical solution available in the literature. Excellent agreements between the numerical simulation and the analytical are observed for a wide spectrum of concentration. HYDROGECHEM is a useful tool assessing the ecological and environmental impact of the accidental radionuclide releases such as the Fukushima nuclear disaster where multiple radionuclides leaked through the reactor, subsequently contaminating the local groundwater and ocean seawater in the vicinity of the nuclear plant.

  10. Radionuclide behavior at underground environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Phil Soo; Park, Chung Kyun; Keum, Dong Kwon; Cho, Young Hwan; Kang, Moon Ja; Baik, Min Hoon; Hahn, Kyung Won; Chun, Kwan Sik; Park, Hyun Soo

    2000-03-01

    This study of radionuclide behavior at underground environment has been carried out as a part of the study of high-level waste disposal technology development. Therefore, the main objectives of this project are constructing a data-base and producing data for the safety assessment of a high-level radioactive waste, and verification of the objectivity of the assessment through characterization of the geochemical processes and experimental validation of the radionuclide migration. The various results from the this project can be applicable to the preliminary safety and performance assessments of the established disposal concept for a future high-level radioactive waste repository. Providing required data and technical basis for assessment methodologies could be a direct application of the results. In a long-term view, the results can also be utilized as a technical background for the establishment of government policy for high-level radioactive waste disposal.

  11. Sequence and timing of ventricular wall motion in patients with bundle branch block. Assessment by radionuclide cineangiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbush, S W; Ruggie, N; Turner, D A; Von Behren, P L; Denes, P; Fordham, E W; Groch, M W; Messer, J V

    1982-11-01

    We determined the sequence and timing of inward ventricular wall motion by least-square phase analysis of radionuclide cineangiograms in 10 patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB), five patients with right bundle branch block (RBBB) and 11 patients with normal conduction. All LBBB and RBBB patients had normal coronary arteries and no segmental wall motion abnormalities. The left ventricle (LV) was divided into eight segments and the right ventricle (RV) into three; sequence and timing were scored by three observers. In normal subjects, wall motion begins in either or both ventricles and ends in the LV or both ventricles. In patients with LBBB it begins in the RV and ends in the LV; in patients with RBBB is begins in the LV and ends in the RV or both ventricles. The intraventricular wall motion is also altered in the ventricle ipsilateral to a bundle branch block. In LBBB, the mean time of onset of LV wall motion is delayed 1.9 frames (38 msec), whereas RV wall motion is normal. In RBBB, the onset of RV wall motion is delayed 1.3 frames (26 msec), whereas LV wall motion is not delayed.

  12. The potential of two Salix genotypes for radionuclide/heavy metal accumulation. A case study of Rovinari ash pit (Gorj District, Romania)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernea, Cornelia; Neţoiu, Constantin; Corneanu, Gabriel; Crăciun, Constantin; Corneanu, Mihaela; Cojocaru, Luminiţa; Rovena Lăcătuşu, Anca; Popescu, Ion

    2014-05-01

    Thermo Electric Power Plants (TEPP) produce a high amount of ash, that contains heavy metals and radionuclides. Ash is usually stored in ash-pits, in mixture with water and contains U235, Th 234 and their decay products, that are released from the coal matrix, during combustion, as well as heavy metals. Warm weather dried the ash and it can be spread by the wind in surrounded area. This paper presents the results of an experiment with two Salix genotypes, cultivated on an old closed ash-pit, nearby the Rovinari TEPP, in the middle Jiu valley (Gorj District, Romania), in order to evaluate its tolerance to heavy metals and radionuclides. Ash analysis revealed the presence of natural radionuclides, beloging from ash and coal dust, as well as of Cs 137, of Chernobil provenance. Radionuclides content over the normal limits for Romania were registered for Th 234, Pb210, U235 and Ra226. The heavy metals level in ash was over the normal limits, but under the alerts limits. In order to establish the woody plants tolerance to heavy metals and radionuclides, it is important to study the seedlings behavior. In this respect Salix alba and Salix viminalis whips and cuttings culture have been establish on Rovinari ash-pit. The observations made on survival and growth rate pointed out the superiority of Salix viminalis behaviour. After a period of three years Salix viminalis registered a 96% survival rate, while in Salix alba annual decreases, reaching to 14%. These results are supported by the radionuclides content in leaves and by the electron microscopy studies. In Salix alba the leaves parenchimatic cells present a low sinthesis activity. The exogenous particles are accumulated in parenchima cells vacuola, the chloroplasts are usually agranal, with few starch grains and mitocondria presents slightly dillated crista. The ultrastructural features of the mature leaf cells, evidenced the natural adaptation of Salix viminalins for development in an environment with a big amount of

  13. Nuclear cardiology. I - Radionuclide angiographic assessment of left ventricular contraction: uses, limitations and future directions. II - The role of myocardial perfusion imaging using thallium-201 in diagnosis of coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodenheimer, M.M.; Banka, V.S.; Helfant, R.H.; Pennsylvania, University, Philadelphia, PA)

    1980-01-01

    The current status of radionuclide angiography is reviewed. First pass and gated equilibrium methods for determining left ventricular contraction are compared. Some clinical applications of radionuclide angiography are then examined, including the detection of discrete versus diffuse asynergy and the assessment of myocardial infarction. The second part of this work reviews the uses and limitations of thallium-201 perfusion imaging in the diagnosis of the acute and chronic manifestations of coronary heart disease. Theoretical and technical considerations of thallium-201 imaging are reviewed along with the clinical implications of the technique

  14. Three-dimensional simulation of radionuclides dispersion in the stratified estuaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koziy, L.; Margvelashvili, N.; Maderich, V.; Zheleznyak, M.

    1999-01-01

    THREE-dimensional model of TOXicants transport (THREETOX) was developed for assessment of potential and real emergency situations in the coastal area of seas and the inland water bodies. It includes the high resolution numerical hydrodynamic submodel, dynamic-thermodynamic ice submodel, submodels of suspended sediment and radionuclide transport. The results of two case studies are described. The first one concerns to two-year simulation of the Chernobyl origin radionuclide transport through Dnieper-Bug estuary into the Black sea. In the second case study the simulations were performed for the assessment of potential emergency situation caused by the radionuclide release from reactors and containers with the liquid radioactive wastes scuttled in the Novaya Zemlya fjords (Tsivolki, Stepovogo and Abrosimov). The presented results demonstrate the capability of THREETOX model to describe the wide spatial and temporal range of transport processes in the coastal area of seas. (author)

  15. Elaboration of methods for assessment of radio-ecological safety state of objects, situated on the territories contaminated with Chernobyl radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saltanov, Eugene; Saltanova, Irina

    2008-01-01

    The main purpose of assessment of radio-ecological state of object is to elaborate recommendations to reduce both radiation dose and negative action of other contaminators on human organism. The basis of objects' ecological safety assessment is considering complex influence of multiple negative factors, such as radioactive contamination, firstly, and air, water, soil and noise pollution, secondly. The objects of assessments are social, industrial, rural enterprises and their production: school buildings and territories, all kinds of recreational institutions, civil buildings, etc. The described method is embodied in a computer program, which enables calculation of integral indicator of contamination and gives information about object's safety state. The results of the work may be proposed to the corresponding supervisor institutions as a prototype of practical guidance to control ecological state of the objects and territories. Particularly, the proposed methods are necessary to determine the order of measures, normally undertaken to deactivate objects, and to provide unified approach to radio-ecological safety assessment of objects, situated in the territories contaminated with Chernobyl radionuclides. (author)

  16. Radionuclides (40K, 232Th and 238U) and Heavy Metals (Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, As and Pb) Distribution Assessment at Renggam Landfill, Simpang Renggam, Johor, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, E.; FahrulRazi, MJ; Azhar, ATS; Hazreek, ZAM; Shakila, A.; Norshuhaila, MS; Omeje, M.

    2017-08-01

    The assessment of radioactivity levels and the distribution of heavy metals in soil samples at CEP Farm landfill, Renggam in Johor State was to determine the activity concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides and heavy metal concentrations of this landfill. The background radiation was monitored to estimate the exposure level. The activity concentrations of radionuclides in soil samples were determined using HPGe gamma ray spectroscopy whereas the heavy metal concentration was measured using X-RF analysis. The mean exposure rate at the landfill site was 36.2±2.4 μR hr-1 and the annual effective dose rate at the landfill site was 3.19 ± 0.22 mSv yr-1. However, residential area has lower mean exposure dose rate of about 16.33±0.72 μR hr-1 and has an annual effective dose rate of 1.43±0.06 mSv yr-1 compared to landfill sites. The mean activity concentration of 40K, 238U and 232Th at landfill site were 239.95±15.89 Bq kg-1, 20.90±2.49 Bq kg-1 and 40.61±4.59 Bq kg-1, respectively. For heavy metal compositions, Cr, Ni and Cu have mean concentration of 232±10 ppm, 23±2 ppm, and 46±19 ppm, respectively. Whereas, Zn has concentration of 64±9 ppm and concentration of 12±1 ppm and 71±2 ppm was estimated for As and Pb respectively. The higher activity concentration of 40K down the slope through leaching process whereas the higher activity level of 238U content at the landfill site may be attributed to the soil disruption to local equilibrium.

  17. Risk assessment due to ingestion of natural radionuclides and heavy metals in the milk samples: a case study from a proposed uranium mining area, Jharkhand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Soma; Singh, Gurdeep; Jha, V N; Tripathi, R M

    2011-04-01

    Ingestion of radionuclides and heavy metals through drinking water and food intake represents one of the important pathways for long-term health considerations. Milk and milk products are main constituents of the daily diet. Radionuclides and heavy metals can be apprehended in the ecosystem of the East Singhbhum region which is known for its viable grades of uranium, copper and other minerals. For the risk assessment studies, samples of milk were collected from twelve villages around Bagjata mining area and analysed for U(nat), 226Ra, 230Th, 210Po, Fe, Mn, Zn, Pb, Cu and Ni. Analysis of the results of the study reveals that the geometric mean of U(nat), 226Ra, 230Th and 210Po was 0.021, 0.24, 0.23 and 1.08 Bq l(-1), respectively. The ingestion dose was calculated to be 12.34 μSvY(-1) which is reflecting the natural background dose via the route of ingestion, and much below the 1 mSv limit set in the new ICRP recommendations. The excess lifetime cancer risk was estimated to be 1.72×10(-4) which is within the acceptable excess individual lifetime cancer risk value of 1×10(-4). The geometric mean of Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu and Ni was 4.91, 0.29, 4.77, 0.56 and 0.48 mgl(-1), respectively; whereas the daily intake was computed to be 0.44, 0.03, 0.43, 0.05 and 0.04 mg/day, respectively. Pb was not detected in any of the samples. The hazard quotient revealed that the intake of the heavy metals through the ingestion of milk does not pose any apparent threat to the local people as none of the HQ of the heavy metals exceeds the limit of 1.

  18. Terrestrial pathways of radionuclide particulates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boone, F.W.; Ng, Y.C.

    1981-01-01

    Formulations are developed for computing potential human intake of 13 radionuclides via the terrestrial food chains. The formulations are an extension of the NRC methodology. Specific regional crop and livestock transfer and fractional distribution data from the southern part of the U.S.A. are provided and used in the computation of comparative values with those computed by means of USNRC Regulatory Guide 1.109 formulations. In the development of the model, emphasis was also placed on identifying the various time-delay compartments of the food chains and accounting for all of the activity initially deposited. For all radionuclides considered, except 137 Cs, the new formulations predict lower potential intakes from the total of all food chains combined than do the comparable Regulatory Guide formulations by as much as a factor of 40. For 137 Cs the new formulations predict 10% higher potential intakes. (author)

  19. Transuranic radionuclides in the environment surrounding radioactive waste diposal sites, a bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoker, A.C.; Noshkin, V.E.; Wong, K.M.; Brunk, J.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Jones, H.E.; Kehl, S.; Stuart, M.L.; Wasley, L.M.; Bradsher, R.V.

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of this project was to compile a bibliography of references containing environmental transuranic radionuclide data. Our intent was to identify those parameters affecting transuranic radionuclide transport that may be generic and those that may be dependent on chemical form and/or environmental conditions (i.e. site specific). An understanding of the unique characteristics and similarities between source terms and environmental conditions relative to transuranic radionuclide transport and cycling will provide the ability to assess and predict the long term impact on man and the environment. An additional goal of our literature review, was to extract the ranges of environmental transuranic radionuclide data from the identified references for inclusion in a data base. Related to source term, these ranges of data can be used to calculate the dose to man from the radionuclides, and to perform uncertainty analyses on these dose assessments. In an attempt to gather relevant information about the transuranic radionuclides in a variety of environments, we conducted an extensive literature search. In our literature search we identified over 5700 potential written sources of information for review. In addition, we have identified many references which were not found through the literature searches, but which were known to contain useful data. A total of approximately 2600 documents were determined to contain information which would be useful for an in depth study of radionuclides in different environments. The journal articles, books, reports and other documents were reviewed to obtain the source term of the radionuclides studied. Most references containing laboratory study data were not included in our databases. Although these may contain valuable data, we were trying to compile references with information on the behavior of the transuranics in the specific environment being studied

  20. Total System Performance Assessment, 1993: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrews, R.W.; Dale, T.F.; McNeish, J.A.

    1994-03-01

    Total System Performance Assessments are an important component in the evaluation of the suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada as a potential site for a mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive wastes in the United States. The Total System Performance Assessments are conducted iteratively during site characterization to identify issues which should be addressed by the characterization and design activities as well as providing input to regulatory/licensing and programmatic decisions. During fiscal years 1991 and 1992, the first iteration of Total System Performance Assessment (hereafter referred to as TSPA 1991) was completed by Sandia National Laboratories and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Beginning in fiscal year 1993, the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor was assigned the responsibility to plan, coordinate, and contribute to the second iteration of Total System Performance Assessment (hereafter referred to as TSPA 1993). This document presents the objectives, approach, assumptions, input, results, conclusions, and recommendations associated with the Management and Operating Contractor contribution to TSPA 1993. The new information incorporated in TSPA 1993 includes (1) revised estimates of radionuclide solubilities (and their thermal and geochemical dependency), (2) thermal and geochemical dependency of spent fuel waste alteration and glass dissolution rates, (3) new distribution coefficient (k d ) estimates, (4) revised estimates of gas-phase velocities and travel times, and (5) revised hydrologic modeling of the saturated zone which provides updated estimates of the advective flux through the saturated zone

  1. Total System Performance Assessment, 1993: An evaluation of the potential Yucca Mountain repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, R.W.; Dale, T.F.; McNeish, J.A.

    1994-03-01

    Total System Performance Assessments are an important component in the evaluation of the suitability of Yucca Mountain, Nevada as a potential site for a mined geologic repository for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive wastes in the United States. The Total System Performance Assessments are conducted iteratively during site characterization to identify issues which should be addressed by the characterization and design activities as well as providing input to regulatory/licensing and programmatic decisions. During fiscal years 1991 and 1992, the first iteration of Total System Performance Assessment (hereafter referred to as TSPA 1991) was completed by Sandia National Laboratories and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Beginning in fiscal year 1993, the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System Management and Operating Contractor was assigned the responsibility to plan, coordinate, and contribute to the second iteration of Total System Performance Assessment (hereafter referred to as TSPA 1993). This document presents the objectives, approach, assumptions, input, results, conclusions, and recommendations associated with the Management and Operating Contractor contribution to TSPA 1993. The new information incorporated in TSPA 1993 includes (1) revised estimates of radionuclide solubilities (and their thermal and geochemical dependency), (2) thermal and geochemical dependency of spent fuel waste alteration and glass dissolution rates, (3) new distribution coefficient (k{sub d}) estimates, (4) revised estimates of gas-phase velocities and travel times, and (5) revised hydrologic modeling of the saturated zone which provides updated estimates of the advective flux through the saturated zone.

  2. Left ventricular performance at rest and during peak exercise in never-treated hypertensive female - an assessment with radionuclide ventriculography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topuzovic, N.; Karner, I.; Rusic, A.; Krstonosic, B.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate left ventricular performance and exercise tolerance in never-treated female hypertensive patients. Materials and Methods: Seventeen female patients with newly established, uncomplicated essential hypertension (aged 25 to 57 years) were evaluated with rest-stress radionuclide gated ventriculography, and were compared to 23 age-matched normotensive female volunteers. Results: Mean blood pressure was significantly higher in patients at rest and during exercise than in controls (121±13 vs. 89±7 mm Hg, and 143±11 vs. 122±9 mm Hg, respectively, p 2 , respectively, p<0.01), while ESV was similar in both groups. Ejection fraction (EF) at rest and stress did not differ significantly (54±10 vs. 55±8%, and 70±10 vs. 66±8%, respectively), but % rise in EF during exercise was significantly higher in patients. At rest and during exercise, there were no significant difference in peak ejection rate (PER) and time to PER (TPER) between patients and controls. Patients had similar peak filling rate (PFR) at rest (2.88±0.79 vs. 2.76±0.76 EDV/s) and during exercise (5.85±1.86 vs. 6.21±1.97 EDV/s), in addition to nonsignificant difference in time to PFR (at rest 143±62 vs. 146±42 ms at rest, and 97±20 vs. 91±19 ms during exercise). Conclusion: Female patients with newly diagnosed, never-treated hypertension have preserved maximal exercise performance, systolic function and diastolic function, but they have significant enlargement of EDV and elevated cardiac output during exercise

  3. Assessment and management of risks associated with exposures to Auger- and beta-emitting radionuclides. Recommendations and proposals for lines of research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The assessment and management of risks associated with exposures to ionising radiation are defined by the general radiological protection system, proposed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This system is regarded by a large majority of users as a robust system with well-established relevance for the management and prevention of exposures. Despite this, there are a number of dissenting voices, claiming that this system is not suitable for estimating the risks resulting from internal exposures, particularly when incorporated radionuclides decay, emitting electrons. Criticisms of the system particularly pertain to Auger- and beta-emitting radionuclides, the intake of which can occur during environmental and industrial exposures or, simply, during a medical use of ionising radiation for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. These debates result from a lack of data in the fields of dosimetry and toxicology of these radionuclides. Auger and beta emitters can be distributed preferentially in certain tissue structures and even in certain cellular organelles, according to the vector with which they are associated. Given the limited range of electrons in matter, this heterogeneous distribution can generate highly localised energy depositions, not taken into account in conventional dosimetry methods, which make the assumption of uniform energy depositions. These specific physical and biochemical features of some of these radionuclides seem to influence their cellular toxicity directly. It is thus established that intranuclear distribution of iodine-125 is more effective for the induction of mutations or even cell death than a cytosolic distribution. This point is explained by the very short range of Auger electrons in matter (around a few dozen nm), which, in the case of an intranuclear distribution, would deliver all of their energy in the vicinity of the DNA, which, if affected, would be detrimental to the survival of the cell. The observation

  4. Turbulence assessment at potential turbine sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, A. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1996-12-31

    As opposed to a fixed anemometer, the Tala kite is free to move in the air. The motion of the kite is not random, it moves with or against the speed gradient towards the center of passing turbulence events of higher or lower speeds thus allowing the kite to measure event maximum or minimum speed rather than the speed at some unknown distance from the event center like a fixed anemometer. This behavior is confirmed both by a theoretical aerodynamics analysis of the kite motion and by data from a field study where kite and hot film anemometer (HFA) events, defined by the rain flow count method, were compared with flap events on a rotating turbine blade. The HFAs simulated too few events lasting too long while the kites reproduced both the number of events and event periods remarkably close. It is concluded that the kite is the optimal tool for measuring turbulence at potential turbine sites. Kite turbulence can form the bases for economic return estimates and an example is given where less windy sites could be more economical than other more turbulent higher speed sites. 13 refs., 8 figs.

  5. Assessment of potential adjuvanticity of Cry proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joshi, Saurabh S; Barnett, Brian; Doerrer, Nancy G

    2016-01-01

    Genetically modified (GM) crops have achieved success in the marketplace and their benefits extend beyond the overall increase in harvest yields to include lowered use of insecticides and decreased carbon dioxide emissions. The most widely grown GM crops contain gene/s for targeted insect protect......, the history of safe use of Cry proteins in foods, safety of the Bt donor organisms, and pre-market weight-of-evidence-based safety assessments for GM crops.......Genetically modified (GM) crops have achieved success in the marketplace and their benefits extend beyond the overall increase in harvest yields to include lowered use of insecticides and decreased carbon dioxide emissions. The most widely grown GM crops contain gene/s for targeted insect...... protection, herbicide tolerance, or both. Plant expression of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crystal (Cry) insecticidal proteins have been the primary way to impart insect resistance in GM crops. Although deemed safe by regulatory agencies globally, previous studies have been the basis for discussions around...

  6. ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, Klaas Jan; Homan, Greg; Brown, Rich; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

    2009-04-15

    The term ?household carbon footprint? refers to the total annual carbon emissions associated with household consumption of energy, goods, and services. In this project, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory developed a carbon footprint modeling framework that characterizes the key underlying technologies and processes that contribute to household carbon footprints in California and the United States. The approach breaks down the carbon footprint by 35 different household fuel end uses and 32 different supply chain fuel end uses. This level of end use detail allows energy and policy analysts to better understand the underlying technologies and processes contributing to the carbon footprint of California households. The modeling framework was applied to estimate the annual home energy and supply chain carbon footprints of a prototypical California household. A preliminary assessment of parameter uncertainty associated with key model input data was also conducted. To illustrate the policy-relevance of this modeling framework, a case study was conducted that analyzed the achievable carbon footprint reductions associated with the adoption of energy efficient household and supply chain technologies.

  7. Radionuclides: Accumulation and Transport in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, D K; Chatterjee, S; Datta, S; Voronina, A V; Walther, C

    Application of radioactive elements or radionuclides for anthropogenic use is a widespread phenomenon nowadays. Radionuclides undergo radioactive decays releasing ionizing radiation like gamma ray(s) and/or alpha or beta particles that can displace electrons in the living matter (like in DNA) and disturb its function. Radionuclides are highly hazardous pollutants of considerable impact on the environment, food chain and human health. Cleaning up of the contaminated environment through plants is a promising technology where the rhizosphere may play an important role. Plants belonging to the families of Brassicaceae, Papilionaceae, Caryophyllaceae, Poaceae, and Asteraceae are most important in this respect and offer the largest potential for heavy metal phytoremediation. Plants like Lactuca sativa L., Silybum marianum Gaertn., Centaurea cyanus L., Carthamus tinctorius L., Helianthus annuus and H. tuberosus are also important plants for heavy metal phytoremediation. However, transfer factors (TF) of radionuclide from soil/water to plant ([Radionuclide]plant/[Radionuclide]soil) vary widely in different plants. Rhizosphere, rhizobacteria and varied metal transporters like NRAMP, ZIP families CDF, ATPases (HMAs) family like P1B-ATPases, are involved in the radio-phytoremediation processes. This review will discuss recent advancements and potential application of plants for radionuclide removal from the environment.

  8. Microbial mediation of radionuclide transport -significance for the nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champ, D.R.

    1984-08-01

    The role that microbially catalyzed processes may play in determining, or altering, radionuclide migration is an unresolved question in the Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. This report documents the results of a review of the available information on the existence and biochemical capabilities of micro-organisms and the potential for their involvement in processes affecting the migration of radionuclides of interest. The potential was judged sufficient to warrant conducting experiments to assess their role. The outline of an experimental program to address the role of micro-organisms is presented

  9. Radionuclide particle transport, sedimentation and resuspension in the Forsmark and Laxemar coastal regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kling, Hanna; Doeoes, Kristofer (Dept. of Meteorology, Stockholm Univ., Stockholm (Sweden))

    2007-12-15

    In the safety assessment of a potential repository for spent nuclear fuel, it is important to assess the consequences of a hypothetical leak of radionuclides through the seabed and into a waterborne transport phase. Radionuclides adsorbed to sediment particles may be transported great distances through the processes of sedimentation and resuspension. This study investigates the transport patterns of sediment particles of two different sizes, released in the Forsmark and Laxemar area. The results show that the closed waters around Forsmark to a higher degree makes the particles stay in the area close to the release points

  10. Infant doses from the transfer of radionuclides in mothers' milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, J.D.; Smith, T.J.; Phipps, A.W.

    2003-01-01

    Assessments of potential internal exposures of the child following radionuclide intakes by the mother require consideration of transfers during lactation as well as during pregnancy. Current ICRP work on internal dosimetry includes the estimation of radiation doses to newborn infants from radionuclides ingested in mothers' milk. Infant doses will be calculated for maternal intakes by ingestion or inhalation of the radionuclides, radioisotopes of 31 elements, for which fetal dose coefficients have been published. In this paper, modelling approaches are examined, concentrating on models developed for iodine, caesium, polonium, alkaline earth elements and the actinides. Comparisons of model predictions show maximum overall transfer to milk following maternal ingestion during lactation of about 30% of ingested activity for 131 I, 20% for 45 Ca and 137 Cs, 10% for 90 Sr, 1% for 210 Po and low values of less than 0.01% for 239 Pu and 241 Am. The corresponding infant doses from milk consumption are estimated in preliminary calculations to be about two to three times the adult dose for 45 Ca and 131 I, 70-80% of the adult dose for 90 Sr, about 40% for 137 Cs, 20% for 210 Po, and 239 Pu and 241 Am. Infant doses from radionuclides in breast milk are compared with doses to the offspring resulting from in utero exposures during pregnancy. (author)

  11. Modeling of radionuclide migration through porous material with meshless method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrankar, L.; Turk, G.; Runovc, F.

    2005-01-01

    To assess the long term safety of a radioactive waste disposal system, mathematical models are used to describe groundwater flow, chemistry and potential radionuclide migration through geological formations. A number of processes need to be considered when predicting the movement of radionuclides through the geosphere. The most important input data are obtained from field measurements, which are not completely available for all regions of interest. For example, the hydraulic conductivity as an input parameter varies from place to place. In such cases geostatistical science offers a variety of spatial estimation procedures. Methods for solving the solute transport equation can also be classified as Eulerian, Lagrangian and mixed. The numerical solution of partial differential equations (PDE) is usually obtained by finite difference methods (FDM), finite element methods (FEM), or finite volume methods (FVM). Kansa introduced the concept of solving partial differential equations using radial basis functions (RBF) for hyperbolic, parabolic and elliptic PDEs. Our goal was to present a relatively new approach to the modelling of radionuclide migration through the geosphere using radial basis function methods in Eulerian and Lagrangian coordinates. Radionuclide concentrations will also be calculated in heterogeneous and partly heterogeneous 2D porous media. We compared the meshless method with the traditional finite difference scheme. (author)

  12. Beyond offshoring: assess your company's global potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Diana

    2004-12-01

    In the past few years, companies have become aware that they can slash costs by offshoring: moving jobs to lower-wage locations. But this practice is just the tip of the iceberg in terms of how globalization can transform industries, according to research by the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI). The institute's yearlong study suggests that by streamlining their production processes and supply chains globally, rather than just nationally or regionally, companies can lower their costs-as we've seen in the consumer-electronics and PC industries. Companies can save as much as 70% of their total costs through globalization--50% from offshoring, 5% from training and business-task redesign, and 15% from process improvements. But they don't have to stop there. The cost reductions make it possible to lower prices and expand into new markets, attracting whole new classes of customers. To date, however, few businesses have recognized the full scope of performance improvements that globalization makes possible, much less developed sound strategies for capturing those opportunities. In this article, Diana Farrell, director of MGI, offers a step-by-step approach to doing both things. Among her suggestions: Assess where your industry falls along the globalization spectrum, because not all sectors of the economy face the same challenges and opportunities at the same time. Also, pay attention to production, regulatory, and organizational barriers to globalization. If any of these can be changed, size up the cost-saving (and revenue-generating) opportunities that will emerge for your company as a result of those changes. Farrell also defines the five stages of globalization-market entry, product specialization, value chain disaggregation, value chain reengineering, and the creation of new markets-and notes the different levers for cutting costs and creating value that companies can use in each phase.

  13. Assessing asbestos exposure potential in nonindustrial settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, S N; White, L E; Scott, W D

    1987-01-01

    The presence of asbestos containing materials (ACM) in office and commercial buildings is a significant environmental problem. Asbestosis, mesothelioma and lung cancer have been linked with industrial exposure to airborne asbestos. The extensive use of asbestos products in buildings has raised concerns about the widespread exposure of the general public to asbestos in nonoccupational settings. The presence of asbestos in a building does not necessarily mean that significant exposure of the occupants of the building has occurred, but it is important that the asbestos be monitored regularly to ensure that fibers do not become airborne. If ACM are contained within a matrix and not disturbed, exposure is unlikely. However, if the asbestos becomes friable (crumbling) or if building maintenance, repair, renovation or other activities disturb ACM, airborne asbestos fibers may be a source of exposure to the occupants of the building. Currently, asbestos exposure assessment is conducted by a phase contrast light microscope (PCM) technique. Due to its inherent limitation in resolution and the generic counting rules used, analysis by the PCM method underestimates the airborne asbestos fiber concentration as compared to analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It is important that the air monitoring results analyzed by PCM be interpreted carefully in conjunction with a survey by a professional to judge the physical condition of the ACM in buildings. Exposure levels to airborne asbestos fibers vary from day to day and depend on the physical condition of the material involved and the type of operating and maintenance program in place.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Development of Biomarkers for Assessing In Situ RDX Biodegradation Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    could be used to identify RDX degraders in mixed culture samples. This information can ultimately be used to assess the potential for bioremediation and... bioremediation potential at RDX contaminated sites. 6 ER1606 –Development of Biomarkers for Assessing In Situ RDX...Microbial populations related to PAH biodegradation in an aged biostimulated creosote -contaminated soil. Biodegradation 20,593-601. Ludwig, W

  15. Soil - plant experimental radionuclide transfer factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobrin, R.I.; Dulama, C.N.; Toma, Al.

    2006-01-01

    Some experimental research was performed in our institute to assess site specific soil-plant transfer factors. A full characterization of an experimental site was done both from pedo-chemical and radiological point of view. Afterwards, a certain number of culture plants were grown on this site and the evolution of their radionuclide burden was then recorded. Using some soil amendments one performed a parallel experiment and the radionuclide root uptake was evaluated and recorded. Hence, transfer parameters were calculated and some conclusions were drawn concerning the influence of site specific conditions on the root uptake of radionuclides. (authors)

  16. Elucidating key factors affecting radionuclide aging in soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roig, M. [Universitat Politecnica Catalunya, Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Barcelona (Spain); Rigola, A.; Vidal, M.; Rauret, G. [Barcelona Univ., Dept. de Quimica Analitica (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    Mechanistic studies allow at present to describe the processes governing the short-term interaction of radiostrontium and radiocaesium in soils. The initial sorption step can be described through the estimation of the soil-soil solution distribution coefficient from soil parameters, as cationic exchange capacity, radiocaesium interception potential and concentration of competing ions in the soil solution. After the initial soil-radionuclide interaction, a fraction of radionuclide is no longer available for exchange with the solution, and it remains fixed in the solid fraction. At present, the initial fixed fraction of a radionuclide in a given soil cannot be predicted from soil properties. Besides, little is known about soil and environmental factors (e.g., temperature; hydric regime) provoking the increase in the fixed fraction with time, the so-called aging process. This process is considered to control the reduction of food contamination with time at contaminated scenarios. Therefore, it is crucial to be able to predict the radionuclide aging in the medium and long term for a better risk assessment, especially when a decision has to be made between relying on natural attenuation versus implementing intervention actions. Here we study radiostrontium and radiocaesium aging in a set of soils, covering a wide range of soil types of contrasting properties (e.g., loamy calcareous; podzol; chernozem, organic). Three factors are separately and simultaneously tested: time elapsed since contamination, temperature and hydric regime. Changes in the radionuclide fixed fraction are estimated with a leaching test based on the use of a mild extractant solution. In addition to this, secondary effects on the radiocaesium interception potential in various soils are also considered. (author)

  17. A preliminary assessment of potential doses to man from radioactive waste dumped in the Arctic sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, S.P.; Iosjpe, M.; Strand, P.

    1995-11-01

    This report describes a preliminary radiological assessment of collective doses to the world population from radioactive material dumped in the Kara and Barents Seas in the period 1961-1991. Information on the dumped waste and the rates of release of radionuclides have been available from Russian sources and from the International Atomic Energy Agency. A box model has been used to simulate the dispersion of radionuclides in the marine environment and to calculate the contamination of seafood and the subsequent radiation doses to man. Two release scenarios have been adopted. The worst-case release scenario, which ignores the presence of barriers between spent nuclear fuel and seawater, is estimated to give rise to about 10 mansievert calculated to 1000 years from the time of release. A more realistic release scenario is estimated to cause about 3 mansieverts. In both cases exposure from the radionuclide 137 Cs is found to dominate the doses. 19 refs., 56 figs., 8 tabs

  18. Natural radionuclides in meadow and pasture land in the Nordic countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, K.; Gutierrez Villanueva, J.-L.; Sundell-Bergman, S. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) (Sweden)] [and others

    2012-06-15

    The amount of natural radionuclides in the environment differs between the Nordic countries as shown by previous investigations and also by this study. Agricultural areas of high natural background are predominantly found in Sweden, Southern Finland and Norway while low background areas are typical for Iceland and Denmark. Thus, this study offers possibilities for studying behaviour of natural radionuclides under different conditions such as the influence of different soil types as well as the husbandry. Furthermore the areas also enable studying environmental behaviour of radium and other natural radionuclides under seemingly steady state conditions. However, migration and accumulation of natural radionuclides in cultivated soil is complex involving various processes. Thus, a long term goal of this study was to identify the implications of some of these processes by determining the soil to plant transfer for pasture land under the different conditions that prevail in the Nordic countries. The potential health hazards due to chronic ingestion of low concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides are fairly unknown but the results of this study may provide valuable background information for assessing these radiation risks. The aim of this project has been to gain knowledge on the status of natural radionuclides in meadow and pasture land and in grassland plants in different Nordic countries and on the transfer of these radionuclides from soil/water to man via the milk/food chain (soil- meadow/pasture grass -cow-milk). Limited data are available on the mobility and the transfer of naturally occurring radionuclides in the ecosystems of the agricultural land. In addition, information concerning the concentrations in meat and dairy products is of interest for assessing exposures of humans to natural radionuclides. Soil characteristics are known to have significant impact on the mobility and uptake of natural radionuclides. Therefore, the uptake in relation to

  19. Natural radionuclides in meadow and pasture land in the Nordic countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, K.; Gutierrez Villanueva, J.-L.; Sundell-Bergman, S.

    2012-06-01

    The amount of natural radionuclides in the environment differs between the Nordic countries as shown by previous investigations and also by this study. Agricultural areas of high natural background are predominantly found in Sweden, Southern Finland and Norway while low background areas are typical for Iceland and Denmark. Thus, this study offers possibilities for studying behaviour of natural radionuclides under different conditions such as the influence of different soil types as well as the husbandry. Furthermore the areas also enable studying environmental behaviour of radium and other natural radionuclides under seemingly steady state conditions. However, migration and accumulation of natural radionuclides in cultivated soil is complex involving various processes. Thus, a long term goal of this study was to identify the implications of some of these processes by determining the soil to plant transfer for pasture land under the different conditions that prevail in the Nordic countries. The potential health hazards due to chronic ingestion of low concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides are fairly unknown but the results of this study may provide valuable background information for assessing these radiation risks. The aim of this project has been to gain knowledge on the status of natural radionuclides in meadow and pasture land and in grassland plants in different Nordic countries and on the transfer of these radionuclides from soil/water to man via the milk/food chain (soil- meadow/pasture grass -cow-milk). Limited data are available on the mobility and the transfer of naturally occurring radionuclides in the ecosystems of the agricultural land. In addition, information concerning the concentrations in meat and dairy products is of interest for assessing exposures of humans to natural radionuclides. Soil characteristics are known to have significant impact on the mobility and uptake of natural radionuclides. Therefore, the uptake in relation to

  20. Marine biogeochemistry of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, S.W.

    1997-01-01

    Radionuclides entering the ocean from runoff, fallout, or deliberate release rapidly become involved in marine biogeochemical cycles. Sources, sinks and transport of radionuclides and analogue elements are discussed with emphasis placed on how these elements interact with marine organisms. Water, food and sediments are the source terms from which marine biota acquire radionuclides. Uptake from water occurs by surface adsorption, absorption across body surfaces, or a combination of both. Radionuclides ingested with food are either assimilated into tissue or excreted. The relative importance of the food and water pathway in uptake varies with the radionuclide and the conditions under which exposure occurs. Evidence suggests that, compared to the water and food pathways, bioavailability of sediment-bound radionuclides is low. Bioaccumulation processes are controlled by many environmental and intrinsic factors including exposure time, physical-chemical form of the radionuclide, salinity, temperature, competitive effects with other elements, organism size, physiology, life cycle and feeding habits. Once accumulated, radionuclides are transported actively by vertical and horizontal movements of organisms and passively by release of biogenic products, e.g., soluble excreta, feces, molts and eggs. Through feeding activities, particles containing radionuclides are ''packaged'' into larger aggregates which are redistributed upon release. Most radionuclides are not irreversibly bound to such particles but are remineralized as they sink and/or decompose. In the pelagic zones, sinking aggregates can further scavenge particle-reactive elements thus removing them from the surface layers and transporting them to depth. Evidence from both radiotracer experiments and in situ sediment trap studies is presented which illustrates the importance of biological scavenging in controlling the distribution of radionuclides in the water column. (author)

  1. Natural analogues and radionuclide transport model validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lever, D.A.

    1987-08-01

    In this paper, some possible roles for natural analogues are discussed from the point of view of those involved with the development of mathematical models for radionuclide transport and with the use of these models in repository safety assessments. The characteristic features of a safety assessment are outlined in order to address the questions of where natural analogues can be used to improve our understanding of the processes involved and where they can assist in validating the models that are used. Natural analogues have the potential to provide useful information about some critical processes, especially long-term chemical processes and migration rates. There is likely to be considerable uncertainty and ambiguity associated with the interpretation of natural analogues, and thus it is their general features which should be emphasized, and models with appropriate levels of sophistication should be used. Experience gained in modelling the Koongarra uranium deposit in northern Australia is drawn upon. (author)

  2. Radionuclide evaluation of renal transplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Hong; Zhao Deshan

    2000-01-01

    Radionuclide renal imaging and plasma clearance methods can quickly quantitate renal blood flow and function in renal transplants. They can diagnose acute tubular necrosis and rejection, renal scar, surgical complications such as urine leaks, obstruction and renal artery stenosis after renal transplants. At the same time they can assess the therapy effect of renal transplant complications and can also predict renal transplant survival from early post-operative function studies

  3. Model of the long-term transfer of radionuclides in forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, Rodolfo [Facilia AB, Bromma (Sweden)

    2006-05-15

    This report describes a model of the long-term behaviour in temperate and boreal forests of radionuclides entering the ecosystem with subsurface water. The model can be applied for most radionuclides that are of relevance in safety assessment of repositories for high-level radioactive waste. The model can be used for estimating radionuclide concentrations in soil, trees, understorey plants, mushrooms and forest mammals. A recommended (nominal) value and an interval of variation are provided for each model parameter and a classification of parameters by the degree of confidence in the values is given. Model testing against existing empirical data showing satisfactory results is also presented. Forests can play an important role in the spatial and temporal distribution of radionuclides in the environment. Despite of this, forest ecosystems have not been addressed in previous safety assessments. This can be explained by the fact that a suitable model of the long-term transfer of a wide range of radionuclides in forests has not been readily available. The objective of this work was to develop a forest model applicable for a wide range of radionuclides of relevance for high level radioactive waste management (Am-241, Cl-36, Cs-135, I-129, Ni-59, Np-237, Pu-239, Ra-226, Sr-90, Tc-99, Th-232, U-238) that can potentially enter the ecosystem with contaminated groundwater. The model assumes that biomass growth, precipitation and evapo-transpiration drive the radionuclide cycling in the system by influencing the uptake of radionuclides by vegetation and their export from the system via runoff. The mathematical model of radionuclide transfer consists of a system of ordinary differential describing the mass balance in different forest compartments, taking into account the fluxes in and out from the compartment and the radionuclides decay. The fluxes between compartments are calculated by multiplying a transfer coefficient (TC) by the radionuclide inventory in the compartment

  4. Model of the long-term transfer of radionuclides in forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avila, Rodolfo

    2006-05-01

    This report describes a model of the long-term behaviour in temperate and boreal forests of radionuclides entering the ecosystem with subsurface water. The model can be applied for most radionuclides that are of relevance in safety assessment of repositories for high-level radioactive waste. The model can be used for estimating radionuclide concentrations in soil, trees, understorey plants, mushrooms and forest mammals. A recommended (nominal) value and an interval of variation are provided for each model parameter and a classification of parameters by the degree of confidence in the values is given. Model testing against existing empirical data showing satisfactory results is also presented. Forests can play an important role in the spatial and temporal distribution of radionuclides in the environment. Despite of this, forest ecosystems have not been addressed in previous safety assessments. This can be explained by the fact that a suitable model of the long-term transfer of a wide range of radionuclides in forests has not been readily available. The objective of this work was to develop a forest model applicable for a wide range of radionuclides of relevance for high level radioactive waste management (Am-241, Cl-36, Cs-135, I-129, Ni-59, Np-237, Pu-239, Ra-226, Sr-90, Tc-99, Th-232, U-238) that can potentially enter the ecosystem with contaminated groundwater. The model assumes that biomass growth, precipitation and evapo-transpiration drive the radionuclide cycling in the system by influencing the uptake of radionuclides by vegetation and their export from the system via runoff. The mathematical model of radionuclide transfer consists of a system of ordinary differential describing the mass balance in different forest compartments, taking into account the fluxes in and out from the compartment and the radionuclides decay. The fluxes between compartments are calculated by multiplying a transfer coefficient (TC) by the radionuclide inventory in the compartment

  5. Radionuclides in terrestrial ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocock, K.L.

    1981-01-01

    This report summarizes information on the distribution and movement of radionuclides in semi-natural terrestrial ecosystems in north-west England with particular emphasis on inputs to, and outputs from ecosystems; on plant and soil aspects; and on radionuclides in fallout and in discharges by the nuclear industry. (author)

  6. Modelling the transfer of radionuclides to fruit. Report of the Fruits Working Group of BIOMASS Theme 3. Part of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project on Biosphere Modelling and Assessment (BIOMASS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-07-01

    This report contains a description of the activities carried out by the Fruits Working Group and presents the main results such as conceptual advances, quantitative data and models on the transfer of radionuclides to fruit in the context of the overall objective of BIOMASS Theme 3. The aim of the study was to improve understanding of the processes affecting the migration of radionuclides in the fruit system and to identify the uncertainties associated with modelling the transfer of radionuclides to fruit. The overall objective was to improve the accuracy of risk assessment that should translate to improved health safety for the population and associated cost savings. The significance of fruit, intended as that particular component of the human diet generally consumed as a dessert item, derives from its high economic value, the agricultural area devoted to its cultivation, and its consumption rates. These are important factors for some countries and groups of population. Fruits may become contaminated with radioactive material from nuclear facilities during routine operation, as a consequence of nuclear accidents, or due to migration through the biosphere of radionuclides from radioactive waste disposal facilities. Relevant radionuclides when considering transfer to fruit from atmospheric deposition were identified as 3 H, 14 C, 35 S, 36 Cl, 90 Sr, 129 I, 134 Cs and 137 Cs. The transfer of radionuclides to fruit is complex and involves many interactions between biotic and abiotic components. Edible fruit is borne by different plant species, such as herbaceous plants, shrubs and trees, that can grow under different climatic conditions and may be found in agricultural or natural ecosystems. A review of experimental, field and modelling information on the transfer of radionuclides to fruit was carried out at the inception of the activities of the Group, taking into account results from a Questionnaire circulated to radioecologists. Results on current experimental

  7. CRITICAL RADIONUCLIDE AND PATHWAY ANALYSIS FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannik, T.

    2011-08-30

    This report is an update to the analysis, Assessment of SRS Radiological Liquid and Airborne Contaminants and Pathways, that was performed in 1997. An electronic version of this large original report is included in the attached CD to this report. During the operational history (1954 to the present) of the Savannah River Site (SRS), many different radionuclides have been released to the environment from the various production facilities. However, as will be shown by this updated radiological critical contaminant/critical pathway analysis, only a small number of the released radionuclides have been significant contributors to potential doses and risks to offsite people. The analysis covers radiological releases to the atmosphere and to surface waters, the principal media that carry contaminants offsite. These releases potentially result in exposure to offsite people. The groundwater monitoring performed at the site shows that an estimated 5 to 10% of SRS has been contaminated by radionuclides, no evidence exists from the extensive monitoring performed that groundwater contaminated with these constituents has migrated off the site (SRS 2011). Therefore, with the notable exception of radiological source terms originating from shallow surface water migration into site streams, onsite groundwater was not considered as a potential exposure pathway to offsite people. In addition, in response to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Order 435.1, several Performance Assessments (WSRC 2008; LWO 2009; SRR 2010; SRR 2011) and a Comprehensive SRS Composite Analysis (SRNO 2010) have recently been completed at SRS. The critical radionuclides and pathways identified in these extensive reports are discussed and, where applicable, included in this analysis.

  8. Simulation of radionuclide transfer in agricultural food chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthies, M.; Eisfeld, K.; Mueller, H.; Paretzke, H.G.; Proehl, G.; Wirth, E.

    1982-12-01

    Radioactive releases from nuclear facilities could pose longterm potential hazards to man if radionuclides enter food chains leading to man. The aim of the study was to develop radioecological and dosimetric models for the assessments of the activity intake by man via ingestion and the resulting radiation exposure for members of the population, in particular after accidental releases from fuel reprocessing plants and related installations. A dynamic compartment model for the transfer of radionuclides through agricultural food chains has been developed. Special emphasis is given to the time dependence and the biological and site specific variability of the various transfer and accumulation processes. Agricultural practices representative for Western Europe have been taken into consideration for food production (grain, potatoes, vegetables, beef and pork, milk). For the most relevant long-lived radionuclides a short-term initial deposition of 1 Ci/km 2 on agricultural areas at different months has been assumed and the time dependent transport through various food chains has been assessed. As a main result great differences have been calculated for the various months of releases because of plant foliar uptake and translocation into edible parts of the plants during the vegetation cycle. The potential activity intake over 50 years for the various nuclides and the resulting radiation exposure is dominated by the first two years after the release if no food restrictions are assumed. (orig./MG) [de

  9. Natural and Synthetic Barriers to Immobilize Radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Um, W.

    2011-01-01

    The experiments of weathering of glass waste form and the reacted sediments with simulated glass leachates show that radionuclide sequestration can be significantly enhanced by promoting the formation of secondary precipitates. In addition, synthetic phosphate-bearing nanoporous material exhibits high stability at temperature and has a very high K d value for U(VI) removal. Both natural and synthetic barrier materials can be used as additional efficient adsorbents for retarding transport of radionuclides for various contaminated waste streams and waste forms present at U. S. Department of Energy clean-up sites and the proposed geologic radioactive waste disposal facility. In the radioactive waste repository facility, natural or synthetic materials are planned to be used as a barrier material to immobilize and retard radionuclide release. The getter material can be used to selectively scavenge the radionuclide of interest from a liquid waste stream and subsequently incorporate the loaded getters in a cementitious or various monolithic waste forms. Also, the getter material is to reduce the release of radionuclides from monolithic waste forms. Also, the getter material is to reduce the release of radionuclides from monolithic waste forms. Also, the getter material is to reduce the release of radionuclides form monolithic waste forms by being emplaced as a backfill barrier material around the wastes or waste form to minimize the potential around the wastes or waste form to minimize the potential hazard of leached radioactive wastes. The barrier material should be highly efficient to sequester radionuclides and possess physical and chemical stability for long-term exposure to severe weathering conditions. Because potential leaching of radionuclides depends on various environmental and weathering conditions of the near-field repository, the barrier materials must be durable and not disintegrate under a range of moisture, temperature, pressure, radiation, Eh, ph. and

  10. Evaluation of models used for the assessment of radionuclide releases to the environment. Progress report, April 1976--December 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.W.

    1978-06-01

    The purpose of this project is to evaluate environmental transport and dose calculational models employed in the assessment of the radiological impact of routine and accidental radioactive discharges. This includes the identification of these models, the evaluation of their conceptualization, simplifying assumptions, and data bases, the estimation of their uncertainties and, if possible, the recommendation of the models and parameters which are best suited to particular assessment situations. Where needs are identified, recommendations will also be made for further environmental and biomedical research

  11. Evaluation of models used for the assessment of radionuclide releases to the environment. Progress report, April 1976--December 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, C.W. (comp.)

    1978-06-01

    The purpose of this project is to evaluate environmental transport and dose calculational models employed in the assessment of the radiological impact of routine and accidental radioactive discharges. This includes the identification of these models, the evaluation of their conceptualization, simplifying assumptions, and data bases, the estimation of their uncertainties and, if possible, the recommendation of the models and parameters which are best suited to particular assessment situations. Where needs are identified, recommendations will also be made for further environmental and biomedical research.

  12. Mutagenic potential assessment associated with human exposure to natural radioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcon, Alexandre Endres; Navoni, Julio Alejandro; de Oliveira Galvão, Marcos Felipe; Garcia, Anuska Conde Fagundes Soares; do Amaral, Viviane Souza; Petta, Reinaldo Antônio; Campos, Thomas Ferreira da Costa; Panosso, Renata; Quinelato, Antônio Luiz; de Medeiros, Sílvia Regina Batistuzzo

    2017-01-01

    Lucrécia city, known to harbor a high cancer rate, is located in a semiarid region characterized by the presence of mineral reservoirs, facing a high exposure to metal and natural radioactivity. The present study aimed to assess the environmental scenario at a semiarid region located in Northeastern Brazil. Metal concentration, alpha and beta radiation, and cyanobacteria content in tap water along with indoor radon and gamma emitters (U, K and Th) concentrations were measured. In addition, mutagenic and nuclear instability effects were assessed using buccal micronucleus cytome assay. The study included five samplings corresponding to a period between 2007 and 2009. Drinking water from Lucrécia city presented levels of Mn, Ni and Cr along with cyanobacteria in concentrations one to four times higher than regulatory guidelines considered. Furthermore, high levels of all the tested radionuclides were found. A high percentage of the houses included in this study presented indoor radon concentrations over 100 Bq m -3 . The mean annual effective dose from Lucrécia houses was six times higher than observed in a control region. The levels of exposure in most of the Lucrécia houses were classified as middle to high. A significant mutagenic effect, represented as an increase of micronuclei (MN) frequency and nuclear abnormalities as nuclear buds (NB), binucleated cells (BN), and pyknotic cells (PYC) were found. The results obtained highlight the role of high background radioactivity on the observed mutagenic effect and could help to explain the exacerbated cancer rate reported in this locality. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. AL Qaeda, Trends in Terrorism and Future Potentialities: An Assessment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoffman, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    This paper assesses current trends in terrorism and future potentialities. It examines first the presumed state of al Qaeda today with particular reference to its likely agenda in a post-Iraq war world...

  14. Flash-flood potential assessment and mapping by integrating the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    flood potential assessment and mapping by integrating the weights-of-evidence and frequency ratio statistical methods in GIS environment – case study: Bâsca Chiojdului River catchment (Romania). Romulus Costache Liliana Zaharia. Volume ...

  15. Transfer of radionuclides into human milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, M.; Wirth, E.

    1998-01-01

    Up until now the potential radiation exposure to breast-fed babies due to contaminated human milk has not been taken into account, when deriving international limit values and reference levels for radionuclides in foodstuffs, in air at monitored work places or for exposures in the medical field. It was the aim of the research project 'Transfer of radionuclides into human milk' to quantify the transfer of incorporated radionuclides into mother's milk, and develop simple models to estimate the radiation exposure of babies through the ingestion of human milk. The study focused on considerations of the radiation exposure due to the ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs by the mother, the inhalation of radionuclides at monitored work places, and the administration of radiopharmaceuticals to breast-feeding mothers. The blocking of infant thyroid glands by stable iodine in the case of accidental releases of radioiodine was considered as well. (orig.) [de

  16. Assessment of risk of potential exposures on facilities industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leocadio, Joao Carlos

    2007-03-01

    This work develops a model to evaluate potential exposures on open facilities of industrial radiography in Brazil. This model will decisively contribute to optimize operational, radiological protection and safety procedures, to prevent radiation accidents and to reduce human errors in industrial radiography. The probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) methodology was very useful to assess potential exposures. The open facilities of industrial radiography were identified as the scenario to be analyzed in what concerns the evaluation of potential exposures, due to their high accidents indices. The results of the assessment of potential exposures confirm that the industrial radiography in Brazil is a high-risk practice as classified by the IAEA. The risk of potential exposure was estimated to be 40,5 x 10 -2 per year in Brazil, having as main consequences injuries to the workers' hands and arms. In the world scene, the consequences are worst, leading to fatalities of people, thus emphasizing the high risk of industrial radiography. (author)

  17. Comparative advantages and limitations of the fallout radionuclides (137)Cs, (210)Pb(ex) and (7)Be for assessing soil erosion and sedimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabit, L; Benmansour, M; Walling, D E

    2008-12-01

    The fallout radionuclides (FRNs) (137)Cs, (210)Pb(ex) and (7)Be are increasingly being used as a means of obtaining quantitative information on soil erosion and sediment redistribution rates within agricultural landscapes, over a range of different timescales, and they are frequently seen to represent a valuable complement to conventional measurement techniques. The recent development of the (7)Be method has greatly extended the timescale over which FRNs can be used, by permitting assessment of short-term soil erosion linked to individual events and changing soil management practices. This paper aims to review the advantages and limitations of each of the three FRNs and to identify key knowledge gaps linked to their use. In addition, guidelines for selecting the most appropriate FRN and associated approach, in order to deal with a range of spatial and temporal scales and to investigate specific sets of agro-environmental problems, are provided. Key requirements for future work, related to the application of FRNs in soil erosion investigations, are also identified. These include the upscaling of the approach to the catchment scale and a shift from use of the approach as a research tool to a decision support tool.

  18. Assessment of impact of a severe accident at nuclear power plant of Angra dos Reis with release of radionuclides to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, Andre Silva de

    2015-01-01

    This study had as purpose the assess the impact of a severe accident, and also analyze the dispersion of 131 I in the atmosphere, so that, through concentrating and inhaling dose of the plume, were possible to verify if the results are in accordance with the indicated data by the Plan of Emergency of the CNAAA regarding the Impact Zone and Control. This exercise was performed with the aid of an atmospheric model and a dispersion where to atmospheric modeling we used the data coupling WRF / CALMET and of dispersion, CALPUFF. The suggested accident consists of a Station Blackout at Nuclear Power of Angra (Unit 1), where through the total core involvement, will release 100% of the 131 I to the atmosphere. The value of the total activity in the nucleus to this radionuclide is 7.44 x 1017 Bq, that is relative on the sixth day of burning. This activity will be released through the chimney at a rate in Bq/s in the scenario of 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours of release. Applying the model in the proposed scenario, it is verified that the plume has concentrations of the order of 1020 Bq/m³ and dose of about 108 Sv whose value is beyond of the presented by Eletronuclear in your current emergency plan. (author)

  19. Data and uncertainty assessment for radionuclide K{sub d} partitioning coefficients in granitic rock for use in SR-Can calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, James; Neretnieks, Ivars; Malmstroem, Maria [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology

    2006-10-15

    SKB is currently preparing licence applications related to the proposed deep repository for spent nuclear fuel as well as the encapsulation plant required for canister fabrication. The present report is one of several specific data reports that form the data input to an interim safety report (SR-Can) for the encapsulation plant licence application. This report concerns the derivation and recommendation of generic K{sub d} data (i.e. linear partitioning coefficients) for safety assessment modelling of far-field radionuclide transport in fractured granitic rock. The data are derived for typical Swedish groundwater conditions and rock types distinctive of those found on the Simpevarp peninsula and Forsmark. Data have been derived for 8 main elements (Cs, Sr, Ra, Ni, Th, U, Np, Am) and various oxidation states. The data have also been supplied with tentative correction factors to account for artefacts that have not been previously considered in detail in previous compilations. For the main reviewed solutes the data are given in terms of a best estimate K{sub d} value assumed to be the median of the aggregate set of selected data. A range corresponding to the 25-75% inter-quartile range is also specified and probable ranges of uncertainty are estimated in the form of an upper and lower limit to the expected variability. Data for an additional 19 elements that have not been reviewed are taken from a previous compilation by Carbol and Engkvist.

  20. Criteria for the selection of radionuclides for tumor radioimmunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mausner, L.F.; Mease, R.C.

    1991-01-01

    The potential of utilizing monoclonal antibodies as carriers of radionuclides for the selective destruction of tumors (radioimmunotherapy, RIT) has stimulated much research activity. From dosimetric and other considerations, the choice of radiolabel is an important factor that needs to be optimized for maximum effectiveness of RIT. This paper reviews and assesses a number of present and future radionuclides that are particularly suitable for RIT based on the various physical, chemical, and biological considerations. Intermediate to high-energy beta emitters' (with and without gamma photons in their emission) are emphasized since they possess a number of advantages over alpha and Auger emitters. Factors relating to the production and availability of candidate radiometals as well as their stable chemical attachment to monoclonal antibodies are discussed. 34 refs., 4 tabs.

  1. Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Radionuclides Through The Vadose Zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markus Flury; James B. Harsh; John F. McCarthy' Peter C. Lichtner; John M. Zachara

    2007-01-01

    The main purpose of this project was to advance the basic scientific understanding of colloid and colloid-facilitated Cs transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone. We focused our research on the hydrological and geochemical conditions beneath the leaking waste tanks at the USDOE Hanford reservation. Specific objectives were (1) to determine the lability and thermodynamic stability of colloidal materials, which form after reacting Hanford sediments with simulated Hanford Tank Waste, (2) to characterize the interactions between colloidal particles and contaminants, i.e., Cs and Eu, (3) to determine the potential of Hanford sediments for in situ mobilization of colloids, (4) to evaluate colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport through sediments under unsaturated flow, (5) to implement colloid-facilitated contaminant transport mechanisms into a transport model, and (6) to improve conceptual characterization of colloid-contaminant-soil interactions and colloid-facilitated transport for clean-up procedures and long-term risk assessment

  2. Radionuclide Air Emissions Report for 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, Linnea [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Berkeley Lab operates facilities where radionuclides are produced, handled, store d, and potentially emitted . These facilities are subject to the EPA radioactive air emission regulations in 40 CFR 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989a). Radionuclides may be emitted from stacks or vents on buildings where radionuclide production or use is authorized or they may be emitted as diffuse sources. In 2012, all Berkeley Lab sources were minor sources of radionuclides (sources resulting in a potential dose of less than 0.1 mrem/yr [0.001 mSv/yr]) . These minor sources include d about 140 stack sources and no diffuse sources . T here were no unplanned airborne radionuclide emissions from Berkeley Lab operations . Emissions from minor sources were measured by sampling or monitoring or were calculated based on quantities used, received for use, or produced during the year. Using measured and calculated emissions, and building- specific and common parameters, Laboratory personnel applied the EPA -approved computer code s, CAP88-PC and COMPLY , to calculate doses to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) at any offsite point where there is a residence, school, business, or office. Because radionuclides are used at three noncontiguous locations (the main site, Berkeley West Bio center, and Joint BioEnergy Institute), three different MEIs were identified.

  3. Process for encapsulating radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brownell, L.E.; Isaacson, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    Radionuclides are immobilized in virtually an insoluble form by reacting at a temperature of at least 90 0 C as an aqueous alkaline mixture having a solution pH of at least 10, containing a source of silicon, the radionuclide waste, and a metal cation. The molar ratio of silicon to the metal cation is on the order of unity to produce a gel from which complex metalosilicates crystallize to entrap the radionuclides within the resultant condensed crystal lattice. The product is a silicious stone-like material which is virtually insoluble and nonleachable in alkaline or neutral environment. One embodiment provides for the formation of the complex metalo-silicates, such as synthetic pollucite, by gel formation with subsequent calcination to the solid product; another embodiment utilizes a hydrothermal process, either above ground or deep within basalt caverns, at greater than atmospheric pressures and a temperature between 90 and 500 0 C to form complex metalo-silicates, such as strontium aluminosilicate. Another embodiment provides for the formation of complex metalo-silicates, such as synthetic pollucite, by slurrying an alkaline mixture of bentonite or kaolinite with a source of silicon and the radionuclide waste in salt form. In each of the embodiments a mobile system is achieved whereby the metalo-silicate constituents reorient into a condensed crystal lattice forming a cage structure with the condensed metalo-silicate lattice which completely surrounds the radionuclide and traps the radionuclide therein; thus rendering the radionuclide virtually insoluble

  4. Methodology for and uses of a radiological source term assessment for potential impacts to stormwater and groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teare, A.; Hansen, K.; DeWilde, J.; Yu, L.; Killey, D.

    2001-01-01

    A Radiological Source Term Assessment (RSTA) was conducted by Ontario Power Generation Inc. (OPG) at the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (PNGS). Tritium had been identified in the groundwater at several locations under the station, and OPG initiated the RSTA as part of its ongoing efforts to improve operations and to identify potential sources of radionuclide impact to groundwater and stormwater at the station. The RSTA provides a systematic approach to collecting information and assessing environmental risk for radioactive contaminants based on a ranking system developed for the purpose. This paper provides an overview of the RSTA focusing on the investigative approach and how it was applied. This approach can find application at other generating stations. (author)

  5. Uranium-series radionuclides in native fruits and vegetables of northern Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, B.; Martin, P.; Iles, M.

    2005-01-01

    Wild fruits and vegetables play an important part in a traditional Aboriginal diet in northern Australia. Radionuclide uptake by these foods is important for radiological impact assessment of uranium mining operations in the region, particularly after minesite rehabilitation. Data are presented for concentrations in several fruits and root vegetables, and associated soils. In terms of radiological dose, 210 Po, 226 Ra and, to a lesser extent, 210 Pb were found to be of greater importance than the uranium and thorium isotopes. Other important factors that have emerged include food preparation and consumption habits of Aboriginal people which could potentially affect radionuclide intake estimates. (author)

  6. The potential benefit of pre-operative assessment of amputation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The potential benefit of pre-operative assessment of amputation wound healing potential in peripheral vascular disease. M. Mars, R. P. Mills, J. V. Robbs. Abstract. Choosing the most distal amputation level that will heal is difficult in patients with peripheral vascular disease. From 1984 to 1988,965 patients underwent 1 563 ...

  7. Dynamic Assessment, Potential Giftedness and Mathematics Achievement in Elementary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Nicoleta Laura; Pauc, Ramona Loredana

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic assessment is currently discussed in educational literature as one of the most promising practices in stimulating learning among various groups of students, including gifted and potentially gifted students. The present study investigates effects of dynamic assessment on mathematics achievement among elementary school students, with…

  8. Environmentally important radionuclides in non-proliferative fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, S.V.; Till, J.E.

    1978-01-01

    Increased emphasis in energy research is being given to the development of nonproliferative nuclear fuel cycles and to the assessment of potential release of radionuclides to the environment from these new cycles. Four radionuclides, 14 C, 3 H, 99 Tc, and 232 U, due to lack of adequate knowledge or anticipated increased production in nonproliferative fuel cycles, may require renewed consideration. Our projections indicate that releases of 14 C by the global nuclear industry could exceed the natural production rate of 3.8 x 10 4 Ci/y by the year 2000 and could eventually stabilize at 2.3 times that rate. Tritium may become increasingly important, because recent data from fast reactors (of the nonproliferative type) have confirmed production rates up to 13 times greater than previous estimates. Present radwaste systems do not remove tritium. Recent experiments on the uptake of 99 Tc reveal that soil-to-plant concentration factors for technetium appear to be two to three orders of magnitude greater than the value of 0.25 which has been adopted routinely in radiological assessments. Research is needed to determine reliable 99 Tc soil-to-plant concentration factors because this radionuclide could be released at reprocessing and enrichment facilities. New calculations for certain reactors indicate that 232 U may be formed in concentrations up to 4000 ppm. If accurate, such data will require careful analysis of possible releases of 232 U because of external and food chain exposures. The environmental health aspects of these four radionuclides are discussed, as well as the potential for their release to the environment from nonproliferative fuel cycles. (author)

  9. AUTOPARK and DOSISPARK. Two modules of the software system for assessment and mitigation of radionuclide deposition and its effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregor, J.; Bleher, M.; Stapel, R.; Jakob, P.; Eklund, J.; Luczak-Ulrik, D.

    1994-09-01

    The PARK software system as a part of the IMIS system performs the processing of the measured ambient radioactivity data so as to allow full-scale analyses to be made of the topical radiological situation across Germany, or prospective analyses. The PARK data are intended to serve as the database for large-area ambient radioactivity assessment in the event of a radiological emergency, and as a basis for decisions to be taken for remedial action and recommended protective provisions. The software system relies essentially on the dynamic food chain model called ECOSYS-87, and comprises the sub-systems AUTOPARK, DIAPARK, and DOSISPARK. The core system is the largely automated sub-system AUTOPARK which at highest performance level of the entire IMIS system, as provided for in section 2 of the Preventive Radiation Protection Act, (StrVG), processes the measured data of the federal monitoring stations, and the results of the atmospheric dispersion computations contributed by the German Weather Service. In the event of a radiological emergency, AUTOPARK delivers the data for fast assessment of the given and prospective contamination of essential agricultural produce and of the radiation dose to the population, as well as data for assessment of the effects achieved by remedial action. DOSISPARK is the module applied in routine operation of the IMIS system for assessment of radiation doses to the population. The report explains the procedure for routine dose calculations and the permanent data base (as e.g. dose coefficients) maintained for this purpose, which also is available for emergency data processing with the AUTOPARK module. DIAPARK is a dialog-controlled software system. It allows analysis of specific problems in the wake of an emergency, as for example changes in the composition of animal feed, on the basis of data delivered by AUTOPARK, indicating the nuclide deposition and accumulation in soil and vegetation. (orig./HP) [de

  10. {sup 90}Nb: potential radionuclide for application in immuno-PET. Development of appropriate production strategy and first in vivo evaluation of {sup 90}Nb-labeled monoclonal antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radchenko, Valery

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear medicine is a modern and highly effective tool for the detection and treatment of oncological disease. Molecular imaging based on radiotracers includes single photon emission tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET), which provide non-invasive tumor visualization on nano- and picomolar level, respectively. Currently, many novel tracers for more precise discovery of small tumors and metastases have been introduced and are under investigation. Many of them are protein-based biomolecules which nature herself produces as antigens for the eradication of tumor cells. Antibodies and antibody fragments play an important role in tumor diagnostics and treatment. PET imaging with antibodies and antibody fragments is called immuno-PET. The main issue that needs to be addressed is that appropriate radiotracers with half-lives related to the half-lives of biomolecules are needed. The development of novel radiotracers is a multistep, complicated task. This task includes the evaluation of production, separation and labeling strategy for chosen radionuclide. Finally, the biomolecule-radionuclide complex should be stable in time. An equally important factor is the economic suitability of the production strategy, which will lead to a key decision for future application of the developed radionuclide. In recent work, {sup 90}Nb has been proposed as a potential candidate for application in immuno-PET. Its half-life of 14.6 hours is suitable for application with antibody fragments and some intact antibodies. {sup 90}Nb has a relatively high positron branching of 53% and an optimal energy of β{sup +} emission of 0.35 MeV that can provide high quality of imaging with low dose of used radionuclide. First proof-of-principle studies have shown that {sup 90}Nb: (i) can be produced in sufficient amount and purity by proton bombardment of natural zirconium target (ii) can be isolated from target material with appropriate radiochemical purity (iii) may be used for

  11. Hydrology/Radionuclide Migration Program and related research activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M.A.

    1992-02-01

    This report presents the results of technical studies conducted under the Hydrology/Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the period of October 1, 1985 through September 30, 1986. The HRMP was initiated in 1973 as the Radionuclide Migration Program to study and better understand the hydrologic systems of the NTS and potential movement and rates of movement of radionuclides and other contaminants injected into these systems by underground nuclear testing

  12. Radionuclide transport by Pocos de Caldas Plateau rivers, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barcellos, C. de C.

    1990-01-01

    Mass balance of Ra-226 and U-238 was used to assess the pollutant discharge from uranium mining and milling and to identify the main physical and chemical processes involved in radionuclide transport. The load value remains unchanged along the rivers although a decrease of radionuclide concentration was observed. Seasonal load variations are influenced by mobilization of sediments during wet periods. Soluble load is the principal form of radionuclide transport at Pocos de Caldas Plateau. (author)

  13. Radionuclide Basics: Iodine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Radiation Protection Contact Us Share Radionuclide Basics: Iodine Iodine (chemical symbol I) is a chemical element. ... in the environment Iodine sources Iodine and health Iodine in the Environment All 37 isotopes of iodine ...

  14. The behaviour of long-lived redox sensitive radionuclides in soil-plant system during the process of climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semioshkina, N.; Staudt, C.; Kaiser, C. [Helmhotz Zetrum Muenchen (Germany); Proehl, G. [International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)); Noseck, U.; Fahrenholz, C. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit - GRS (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    One important aspect of climate changes for the long-term safety assessment of radioactive waste repositories is its impact on exposure pathways for humans in the future, which are dependent on the environmental characteristics mentioned. It is conceivable that effects or processes occurring during climate changes lead to an increased accumulation and/or release of radionuclides in the biosphere resulting in higher doses compared to that calculated for discrete climate states. In order to shed light on this question key processes are identified which might lead to such an increased accumulation and/or release of radionuclides. The transition from one climate to another can cause changes in the physicochemical composition of radionuclides: some of them may become more available for plant uptake and due to this, their activity concentration in the plants increases. Other radionuclides maybe stronger bound to soil and their activity concentration in plants decreases. Such changes might also cause remobilization of radionuclides from localised areas with contaminated sediments, their re-suspension and transfer to the surrounding areas. A suitable illustration of the processes related to the changes of the redox potential is the examination of a dry lake or fen bed for agricultural purposes as pasture or ameliorated pasture. In these cases the accumulation of radionuclides in the lake or fen sediment is followed by their release and increasing mobility after agricultural processing of the dry bed of lake or fen. Ploughing of the soil leads to increased supply of oxygen to previous anoxic soil layers causing an increase in redox potential. The presented model describes a scenario, where the land is initially very humid and very low Eh-values cause high sorption and accumulation of radionuclides in soil particles. Then this land is dried out, the redox potential increases and redox sensitive radionuclides change their speciation and their behaviour. Such processes might

  15. Teacher assessment of students' motivation and learning potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gligorović Milica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Perceiving students' ability to acquire and apply academic knowledge and skills is a prerequisite for individualizing instruction and predicting academic achievement. The main aim of this research was to determine the relation between teacher assessment of students' motivation and learning potentials, and student's academic achievement in Serbian language and mathematics. The sample consisted of 111 students attending the third and fourth grade of elementary school, of both genders, aged between 8 and 10.8. Intellectual abilities were assessed by Standard Progressive Matrices, while motivation for learning and learning difficulties were assessed by Teacher Assessment of Motivation and Learning Potentials rating scale. No significant correlation was determined between the scale results and the students' age and grade, while gender differences were significant in favor of the girls in motivation (p=0.014 and reading and writing (p=0.039. Students' intelligence was a significant factor in teacher assessment of motivation for learning (p=0.023 and learning difficulties (p=0.004. Distribution of mean values of grades in Serbian language and mathematics significantly correlated with the results of Teacher Assessment of Motivation and Learning Potentials (p≤0,000. Systematization of data on students' abilities and limitations, based on teacher assessment, can significantly contribute to the application of ecological model of abilities and skills assessment.

  16. Radionuclide Migration Program: strategy document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The Radionuclide Migration Program (RNM) is composed of projects to obtain data that will define the hydrologic system on NTS and determine the radionuclides available for migration in that system. Specific objectives are: (1) determine the kinds and amounts of radionuclides available for migration in groundwater (Hydrologic Source Term); (2) determine regional and local hydrology; and (3) predict the direction and migration rates of radionuclides in groundwater and the radionuclide concentration at any given distance for the source

  17. Review of radionuclide treatment for neuroendocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Hwan Jeong

    2006-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) consist of a heterogeneous group of tumors that are uptake neuroamine and/or specific receptors, such as somatostatin receptors, which can play important roles of the localization and treatment of these tumors. When considering therapy with radionuclides, the best radioligand should be carefully investigated. 131 I-MIBG and beta-particle emitter labeled somatostatin analogs are well established radionuclide therapy modalities for NETs. 111 In, 90 Y and 177 Lu radiolabelled somatostatin analogues have been used for treatment of NETs. Further, radionuclide therapy modalities, for example, radioimmunotherapy, radiolabeled peptides such as minigastrin are currently under development and in different phases of clinical investigation. For all radionuclides used for therapy, long-tem and survival statistics are not yet available and only partial tumour responses have been obtained using 131 I-MIBG and 111 In-octreotide. Experimental results using 90 Y-DOTA-lanreotide as well as 90 Y-DOTA-D -Phe1-Tyr 3 -octreotide and/or 177 Lu-DOTA-Tyr 3 -octreotate have indicated the possible clinical potential of radionuclides receptor-targeted radiotherapy. It may be hoped that the efficacy of radionuclide therapy will be improved by co-administration of chemotherapeutic drugs whose antitumoral properties may be synergistic with that of irradiation

  18. Radionuclide therapy practice and facilities in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefnagel, C.A.; Clarke, S.E.M.; Fischer, M.; Chatal, J.F.; Lewington, V.J.; Nilsson, S.; Troncone, L.; Vieira, M.R.

    1999-01-01

    Using a questionnaire the EANM Task Group Radionuclide Therapy in 1993 collected data on the current practice of radionuclide therapy in European countries. Subsequently, at the request of the EANM Executive Committee, the EANM Radionuclide Therapy Committee has made an inventory of the distribution of facilities for radionuclide therapy and undertaken an assessment of the total number of patients treated throughout Europe and of the types of treatment provides, with the aim of supporting the development of policy to adjust the available capacity to the needs by the year 2000. For this purpose, a second, more detailed questionnaire was sent out the members and national advisors of the Committee (see below), who gathered the data for each country that was a member of the EANM at the time. It is concluded that a wide bariation in therapy practice exists across Europe, particularly in the utilisation of radionuclide therapy, the requirement and availability of proper isolation facilities and the background training of those undertaking therapy. More uniform guidelines and legislation are required, although changes in legislation may have a significant impact in some countries. Although there is wide variation in the therapies used in each country, one the whole it appears that there is an underutilisation of nuclear medicine as a therapeutic modality. A rapidly increasing role may be expected, in particular for oncological indications requiring high-dose radionuclide treatment. Therefore there is an urgent need for a greater number of isolation beds in dedicated centers throughout Europe

  19. Radionuclide therapy practice and facilities in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefnagel, C.A.; Clarke, S.E.M.; Fischer, M.; Chatal, J.F.; Lewington, V.J.; Nilsson, S.; Troncone, L.; Vieira, M.R.

    1999-03-01

    Using a questionnaire the EANM Task Group Radionuclide Therapy in 1993 collected data on the current practice of radionuclide therapy in European countries. Subsequently, at the request of the EANM Executive Committee, the EANM Radionuclide Therapy Committee has made an inventory of the distribution of facilities for radionuclide therapy and undertaken an assessment of the total number of patients treated throughout Europe and of the types of treatment provides, with the aim of supporting the development of policy to adjust the available capacity to the needs by the year 2000. For this purpose, a second, more detailed questionnaire was sent out the members and national advisors of the Committee (see below), who gathered the data for each country that was a member of the EANM at the time. It is concluded that a wide bariation in therapy practice exists across Europe, particularly in the utilisation of radionuclide therapy, the requirement and avilability of proper isolation facilities and the background training of those undertaking therapy. More uniform guidelines and legislation are required, although changes in legislation may have a significant impact in some countries. Although there is wide variation in the therapies used in each country, one the whole it appears that there is an underutilisation of nuclear medicine as a therapeutic modality. A rapidly increasing role may be expected, in particular for oncological indications requiring high-dose radionuclide treatment. Therefore there is an urgent need for a greater number of isolation beds in dedicated centers throughout Europe. With 8 tabs.

  20. HUMTRN: documentation and verification for an ICRP-based age- and sex-specific human simulation model for radionuclide dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallegos, A.F.; Wenzel, W.J.

    1984-06-01

    The dynamic human simulation model HUMTRN is designed specifically as a major module of BIOTRAN to integrate climatic, hydrologic, atmospheric, food crop, and herbivore simulation with human dietary and physiological characteristics, and metabolism and radionuclides to predict radiation doses to selected organs of both sexes in different age groups. The model is based on age- and weight-specific equations developed for predicting human radionuclide transport from metabolic and physical characteristics. These characteristics are modeled from studies documented by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP 23). HUMTRN allows cumulative doses from uranium or plutonium radionuclides to be predicted by modeling age-specific anatomical, physiological, and metabolic properties of individuals between 1 and 70 years of age and can track radiation exposure and radionuclide metabolism for any age group for specified daily or yearly time periods. The simulated daily dose integration of eight or more simultaneous air, water, and food intakes gives a new, comprehensive, dynamic picture of radionuclide intake, uptake, and hazard analysis for complex scenarios. A detailed example using site-specific data based on the Pantex studies is included for verification. 14 references, 24 figures, 10 tables

  1. Workshop on development of radionuclide getters for the Yucca Mountain waste repository: proceedings.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Robert Charles; Lukens, Wayne W. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory)

    2006-03-01

    The proposed Yucca Mountain repository, located in southern Nevada, is to be the first facility for permanent disposal of spent reactor fuel and high-level radioactive waste in the United States. Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) analysis has indicated that among the major radionuclides contributing to dose are technetium, iodine, and neptunium, all of which are highly mobile in the environment. Containment of these radionuclides within the repository is a priority for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). These proceedings review current research and technology efforts for sequestration of the radionuclides with a focus on technetium, iodine, and neptunium. This workshop also covered issues concerning the Yucca Mountain environment and getter characteristics required for potential placement into the repository.

  2. Lessons Learned from WIPP Site Characteriztion, Performance Assessment, and Regulatory Review Related to Radionuclide Migration through Water-Conducting Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauheim, R.L.: Larson. K.W.

    1998-11-11

    Many lessons have been learned over the past 24 years as the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) project has progressed from initial site characterization to final licensing that may be of relevance to other nuclear-waste-disposal projects. These lessons pertain to the manner in which field and laboratory investigations are planned, how experiments are interpreted, how conceptual and numerical models are developed and simplified~ and how defensibility and credibility are achieved and maintained. These lessons include 1) Site characterization and performance assessment (PA) should evolve together through an iterative process, with neither activity completely dominating the other. 2) Defensibility and credibility require a much greater depth of understanding than can be represented in PA models. 3) Experimentalists should be directly involved in model and parameter abstraction and simplification for PA. 4) External expert review should be incorporated at all stages of a project~ not just after an experiment or modeling activity is completed. 5) Key individuals should be retained for the life of a project or a process must be established to transfer their working knowledge to new individuals. 6) An effective QA program needs to be stable and consistent for the duration of a project and rests on best scientific practices. All of these lessons relate to the key point that consideration must be given from the earliest planning stages to maximizing the defensibility and credibility of all work.

  3. A possible approach for the assessment of radiation effects on populations of wild organisms in radionuclide-contaminated environments?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodhead, D.S.

    2003-01-01

    It is frequently asserted that measures to protect the biotic environment from increased radiation exposures arising from human activities should be focussed on the population rather than the individual. It is, however, difficult (if not impossible) to identify any population-specific attributes that can be affected by radiation exposure directly rather than through the mediation of direct, known and identifiable effects in individual organisms. Indeed, it is often conceded that this difficulty forces attention to be refocussed onto the effects in individuals. Regulatory controls on radioactive waste management and disposal could then be implemented to ensure that any radiation effects in individual native plants and animals remain at, or below, some acceptable level (yet to be defined). Nevertheless, the question remains as to whether such controls would also provide for the protection of the population. An answer to this question depends on the availability of a model that allows the integration of the known effects of radiation exposure on the mortality, morbidity, fertility and fecundity of individuals into an assessment of the possible impact at the population level. The utility of one such approach, the Leslie Matrix Model, is explore in respect of a fish population (the plaice, Pleuronectes platessa). This initial implementation of the population model is simplistic (and, certainly, environmentally unrealistic), but it is concluded that the output from the model does provide some insights into how the population might respond to radiation-induced changes in individual attributes, and that further development in the direction of increased realism is fully warranted

  4. A new calculational method to assess the therapeutic potential of Auger electron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humm, J.L.; Charlton, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses a new computer code to estimate the efficacy of Auger electron sources in cancer therapy. Auger electron emission accompanies the decay of many radionuclides already commonly used in nuclear medicine, for example; 99m Tc and 201 Tl. The range of these electrons is in general sub-cellular, therefore, the toxicity of the source depends on the site of decay relative to the genetic material of the cell. Electron track structure methods have been used which enable the study of energy deposition from Auger sources down to the Angstrom level. A figure for the minimum energy required per single strand break is obtained by fitting our energy deposition calculations for 125 I decays in a model of the DNA to experimental data on break lengths from 125 I labeled plasmid fragments. This method is used to investigate the efficiency of double strand break production by other Auger sources which have potential value for therapy. The high RBE of Auger sources depends critically on the distance between the source and target material. The application of Auger emitters for therapy may necessitate a carrier molecule that can append the source to the DNA. Many DNA localizing agents are known in the field of chemotherapy, some of which could be carrier molecules for Auger sources; the halogenated thymidine precursors are under scrutiny in this field. The activation of Auger cascades in situ by high energy, collimated X ray and neutron beams is also assessed

  5. Radionuclide behavior at underground environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hahn, Phil Soo; Park, Chung Kyun; Keum, Dong Kwon; Cho, Young Hwan; Kang, Moon Ja; Baik, Min Hoon; Hahn, Kyung Won; Park, Hyun Soo

    2003-04-01

    This study of radionuclide behavior at underground environment has been carried out as a part of the study of high-level waste disposal technology development. Therefore, the main objectives of this project are constructing a data-base and producing data for the safety assessment of a high-level radioactive waste, and verification of the objectivity of the assessment through characterization of the geochemical processes and experimental validation of the radionuclide migration. This project is composed of 6 subjects such as data production required for safety assessments, sorption properties and mechanisms, nuclide migration in the fractured rock, colloid formation and migration, nuclide speciation in deep geological environments, and total evaluation of geochemical behaviors considering multi-factors. The various results from the this project can be applicable to the preliminary safety and performance assessments of the established disposal concept for a future high-level radioactive waste repository. Providing required data and technical basis for assessment methodologies could be a direct application of the results. In a long-term view, the results can also be utilized as a technical background for the establishment of government policy for high-level radioactive waste disposal

  6. Dose Assessment of Los Alamos National Laboratory-Derived Residual Radionuclides in Soils within Tract A-18-2 for Land Conveyance and Transfer Decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedig, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Whicker, Jeffrey Jay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-07

    In 2017, soil sampling for radiological materials was conducted within Tract A-18-2 specifically for land conveyance decisions. Measurements of radionuclides in soil samples were evaluated against a recreational use scenario, and all measurements were below screening action levels for each radionuclide. The total estimated dose was less than 1 mrem/y (< 10 μSv/y) for a hypothetical recreational user (compared to a dose limit of 25 mrem/y (250 μSv/y)). Dose estimates were based on the 95% upper confidence limits for radionuclide concentrations within the Tract. Additionally, dose estimates less than 3 mrem/y are considered to be As Low As Reasonably Achievable, so no follow-up analysis was conducted. Release of this property is consistent with the requirements of DOE Order 458.1 and Policy 412.

  7. Dose Assessment of Los Alamos National Laboratory-Derived Residual Radionuclides in Soils within Tract A-18-2 for Land Conveyance and Transfer Decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruedig, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Whicker, Jeffrey Jay [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2018-01-26

    In 2017, soil sampling for radiological materials was conducted within Tract A-18-2 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for land conveyance decisions. Measurements of radionuclides in soil samples were evaluated against a recreational use scenario, and all measurements were below screening action levels for each radionuclide. The total estimated dose was less than 1 mrem/yr (<10 μSv/yr) for a hypothetical recreational user (compared with a dose limit of 25 mrem/yr [250 μSv/yr]). Dose estimates were based on the 95% upper confidence levels for radionuclide concentrations within the Tract. Dose estimates less than 3 mrem/yr are considered to be as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), therefore no follow-up analysis was conducted. Release of this property is consistent with the requirements of DOE Order 458.1 (DOE 2013) and Policy 412 (LANL 2014).

  8. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems. ARRRG and FOOD: computer programs for calculating radiation dose to man from radionuclides in the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napier, B.A.; Roswell, R.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Strenge, D.L.

    1980-06-01

    The computer programs ARRRG and FOOD were written to facilitate the calculation of internal radiation doses to man from the radionuclides in the environment and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. Using ARRRG, radiation doses to man may be calculated for radionuclides released to bodies of water from which people might obtain fish, other aquatic foods, or drinking water, and in which they might fish, swim or boat. With the FOOD program, radiation doses to man may be calculated from deposition on farm or garden soil and crops during either an atmospheric or water release of radionuclides. Deposition may be either directly from the air or from irrigation water. Fifteen crop or animal product pathways may be chosen. ARRAG and FOOD doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. Doses calculated are a one-year dose and a committed dose from one year of exposure. The exposure is usually considered as chronic; however, equations are included to calculate dose and dose commitment from acute (one-time) exposure. The equations for calculating internal dose and dose commitment are derived from those given by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for body burdens and Maximum Permissible Concentration (MPC) of each radionuclide. The radiation doses from external exposure to contaminated farm fields or shorelines are calculated assuming an infinite flat plane source of radionuclides. A factor of two is included for surface roughness. A modifying factor to compensate for finite extent is included in the shoreline calculations

  9. Radio-sensitivity and 40K, 3H, 14C levels in dark-striped field mice, apodemus agrarius coreae, as a potential biological monitor for enviro-radiation and radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Sun; Song, Seung Yeon; Kim, Eun Joo; Choi, Hoon; Shin, Suk Chul; Kim, Chong Soon; Nishimura, Y.

    2006-01-01

    To understand how environmental effects of radiation and radionuclides from radiation facilities relate to human beings, the development of an unmanned monitoring system is required. For the reasons of that, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) suggests a method to evaluate the effects of radiation emitted from radiation facilities on marine water, freshwater, and habitats for land animals and plants on its Technical Report Series 190, 288, and 332. Recently, International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication No. 91 (2003) was consecutively published to protect non-human animals and plants from environmental radiation and radioactive materials. This study examined the potential usefulness of dark-striped field mice as a biological indicator of enviro-radiation and radionuclides around nuclear power plants and radioactive waste storage facilities. For the purpose, dark-striped mice were collected in regions of Korea where there are no radiation facilities. Their external morphological characters and isoenzyme patterns were observed. As a result, the most dark-striped mice scattered in Korea are Apodemus agrarius coreae

  10. The basic principles for the assessment of occupational exposure due to intakes of radionuclides (The most important indirect methods used in the Protection and Safety Dept. for internal occupational exposure monitoring)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharita, M. H.; Sakhita, K.

    2009-05-01

    This study shows the basic principles for the assessment of occupational exposure due to intakes of radionuclides in order to calculate the committed effective dose of each radionuclide separately. We also discussed when the routine monitoring of workers becomes useful and when the workplace monitoring is better than workers monitoring. In addition, this study contains the details of four indirect methods as they are validated in the protection and safety department, and their names are: Determination the concentration of total uranium by using fluorimetry technique, Determination the activity of two uranium isotopes 238 and 234, The activity of Polonium 210, and the activity of Radium 226 by using alpha spectrometry for urine samples collected from workers occupationally exposed to this isotope. (author)

  11. An assessement of global energy resource economic potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercure, Jean-François; Salas, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of global economic energy potentials for all major natural energy resources. This work is based on both an extensive literature review and calculations using natural resource assessment data. Economic potentials are presented in the form of cost-supply curves, in terms of energy flows for renewable energy sources, or fixed amounts for fossil and nuclear resources, with strong emphasis on uncertainty, using a consistent methodology that allow direct comparisons to be made. In order to interpolate through available resource assessment data and associated uncertainty, a theoretical framework and a computational methodology are given based on statistical properties of different types of resources, justified empirically by the data, and used throughout. This work aims to provide a global database for natural energy resources ready to integrate into models of energy systems, enabling to introduce at the same time uncertainty over natural resource assessments. The supplementary material provides theoretical details and tables of data and parameters that enable this extensive database to be adapted to a variety of energy systems modelling frameworks. -- Highlights: ► Global energy potentials for all major energy resources are reported. ► Theory and methodology for calculating economic energy potentials is given. ► An uncertainty analysis for all energy economic potentials is carried out.

  12. IAEA-NBS international workshop. Practical analytical approaches to the assessment of human dietary intake of nutrients, toxic constituents and radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-10-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to seek a better understanding of the problems related to dietary research and monitoring studies. There was a general agreement that more natural matrix standard reference materials (SRM), especially for radionuclides, should be developed. These should focus on organic nutritients, radionuclides, pesticides, and industrial chemicals, in addition to the ongoing efforts to certify inorganic constituents. It was suggested that when SRMs are prepared, there should be a large enough quantity made for the maximum length of time possible, and the available analytical information updated. Refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  13. Assessment of the physiological potential of super sweet corn seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarenga,Renata Oliveira; Marcos-Filho,Julio; Timóteo,Tathiana Silva

    2013-01-01

    The assessment of physiological potential is essential in seed quality control programs. This study compared the sensitivity of different procedures for evaluating super sweet corn seed vigor, focusing on the primary root protrusion test. Six seed lots, each of the SWB 551 and SWB 585 hybrids, were used. Seed physiological potential was evaluated by germination and vigor tests (speed of germination, traditional and saturated salt accelerated aging, cold test, seedling length, seedling emergen...

  14. Geographical Assessment of Microalgae Biofuels Potential Incorporating Resource Availability

    OpenAIRE

    Quinn, Jason C.; Catton, Kimberly; Johnson, Sara; Bradley, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    Previous assessments of the economic feasibility and large-scale productivity of microalgae biofuels have not considered the impacts of land and carbon dioxide (CO2) availability on the scalability of microalgae-based biofuels production. To accurately assess the near-term productivity potential of large-scale microalgae biofuel in the US, a geographically realized growth model was used to simulate microalgae lipid yields based on meteorological data. The resulting lipid productivity potentia...

  15. Development of a computational code for the internal doses assessment of the main radionuclides of occupational exposure at IPEN; Desenvolvimento de um codigo computacional de apoio ao calculo de dose interna para radionuclideos de interesse do IPEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claro, Thiago Ribeiro

    2011-07-01

    The dose resulting from internal contamination can be estimated with the use of biokinetic models combined with experimental results obtained from bioanalysis and assessment of the time of incorporation. The biokinetics models are represented by a set of compartments expressing the transportation, retention and elimination of radionuclides from the body. The ICRP publications, number 66, 78 and 100, present compartmental models for the respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract and for systemic distribution for an array of radionuclides of interest for the radiological protection. The objective of this work is to develop a computational code for the internal doses assessment of the main radionuclides of occupational exposure at IPEN. Consequently serving as a agile and efficient tool for the designing, visualization and resolution of compartmental models of any nature. The architecture of the system was conceived containing two independent software: CBT - responsible for the setup and manipulation of models and SSID - responsible for the mathematical solution of the models. Four different techniques are offered for the resolution of system of equations, including semi-analytical and numerical methods, allowing for comparison of precision and performance of both. The software was developed in C{ne} programming, using a Microsoft Access database and XML standards for file exchange with other applications. Compartmental models for uranium, thorium and iodine radionuclides were generated for the validation of the CBT software. The models were subsequently solved via SSID software and the results compared with the values published in the issue 78 of ICRP. In all cases the system replicated the values published by ICRP. (author)

  16. Selected radionuclides important to low-level radioactive waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide information to state representatives and developers of low level radioactive waste (LLW) management facilities about the radiological, chemical, and physical characteristics of selected radionuclides and their behavior in the environment. Extensive surveys of available literature provided information for this report. Certain radionuclides may contribute significantly to the dose estimated during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. Among these are the radionuclides listed in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 61.55, Tables 1 and 2 (including alpha emitting transuranics with half-lives greater than 5 years). This report discusses these radionuclides and other radionuclides that may be significant during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. This report not only includes essential information on each radionuclide, but also incorporates waste and disposal information on the radionuclide, and behavior of the radionuclide in the environment and in the human body. Radionuclides addressed in this document include technetium-99, carbon-14, iodine-129, tritium, cesium-137, strontium-90, nickel-59, plutonium-241, nickel-63, niobium-94, cobalt-60, curium -42, americium-241, uranium-238, and neptunium-237.

  17. Selected radionuclides important to low-level radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide information to state representatives and developers of low level radioactive waste (LLW) management facilities about the radiological, chemical, and physical characteristics of selected radionuclides and their behavior in the environment. Extensive surveys of available literature provided information for this report. Certain radionuclides may contribute significantly to the dose estimated during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. Among these are the radionuclides listed in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 61.55, Tables 1 and 2 (including alpha emitting transuranics with half-lives greater than 5 years). This report discusses these radionuclides and other radionuclides that may be significant during a radiological performance assessment analysis of an LLW disposal facility. This report not only includes essential information on each radionuclide, but also incorporates waste and disposal information on the radionuclide, and behavior of the radionuclide in the environment and in the human body. Radionuclides addressed in this document include technetium-99, carbon-14, iodine-129, tritium, cesium-137, strontium-90, nickel-59, plutonium-241, nickel-63, niobium-94, cobalt-60, curium -42, americium-241, uranium-238, and neptunium-237

  18. Transuranic radionuclides dispersed into the aquatic environment, a bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noshkin, V.E.; Stoker, A.C.; Wong, Kai M. [and others

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of this project was to compile a bibliography of references containing environmental transuranic radionuclide data. Our intent was to identify those parameters affecting transuranic radionuclide transport that may be generic and those that may be dependent on chemical form and/or environmental conditions (i.e., site specific) in terrestrial, aquatic and atmospheric environments An understanding of the unique characteristics and similarities between source terms and environmental conditions relative to transuranic radionuclide transport and cycling will provide the ability to assess and predict the long term impact on man and the environment. An additional goal of our literature review, was to extract the ranges of environmental transuranic radionuclide data from the identified references for inclusion in a data base. Related to source term, these ranges of data can be used to calculate the dose to man from the radionuclides, and to perform uncertainty analyses on these dose assessments. On the basis of our reviews, we have arbitrarily outlined five general source terms. These are fallout, fuel cycle waste, accidents, disposal sites and resuspension. Resuspension of the transuranic radionuclides is a unique source term, in that the radionuclides can originate from any of the other source terms. If these transuranic radionuclides become resuspended into the air, they then become important as a source of inhaled radionuclides.

  19. Accumulation of radionuclides in selected marine biota from Manjung coastal area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Anisa; Hamzah, Zaini; Saat, Ahmad; Wood, Ab. Khalik; Alias, Masitah

    2015-04-01

    Distribution of radionuclides from anthropogenic activities has been intensively studied due to the accumulation of radionuclides in marine ecosystem. Manjung area is affected by rapid population growth and socio-economic development such as heavy industrial activities including coal fired power plant, iron foundries, port development and factories, agricultural runoff, waste and toxic discharge from factories.It has radiological risk and toxic effect when effluent from the industries in the area containing radioactive materials either being transported to the atmosphere and deposited back over the land or by run off to the river and flow into coastal area and being absorbed by marine biota. Radionuclides presence in the marine ecosystem can be adversely affect human health when it enters the food chain. This study is focusing on the radionuclides [thorium (Th), uranium (U), radium-226 (226Ra), radium-228 (228Ra) and potassium-40 (40K)] content in marine biota and sea water from Manjung coastal area. Five species of marine biota including Johnius dussumieri (Ikan Gelama), Pseudorhombus malayanus (Ikan Sebelah), Arius maculatus (Ikan Duri), Portunus pelagicus (Ketam Renjong) and Charybdis natator (Ketam Salib) were collected during rainy and dry seasons. Measurements were carried out using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICPMS). The results show that the concentration of radionuclides varies depends on ecological environment of respective marine biota species. The concentrations and activity concentrations are used for the assessment of potential internal hazard index (Hin), transfer factor (TF), ingestion dose rate (D) and health risk index (HRI) to monitor radiological risk for human consumption.

  20. Ecosystem modelling of carbon, nutrients and radionuclides in lake Eckarfjaerden, Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumblad, L.; Andersson, E.; Wijnbladh, E.; Kautsky, U. [Stockholm Univ., Dept. of Systems Ecology (Sweden)

    2004-07-01

    During the next few years, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB) perform site investigations at two sites in Sweden for a future underground repository of spent nuclear fuel. For the safety assessment of the repository, methods based on systems and landscape ecology was developed to understand the radionuclide flow at the site using site-specific data. In this part of the project a mechanistic mass-balance model for carbon and nutrients between the components of the Lake Eckarfjaerden was developed. The lake has been thoroughly monitored for water chemistry, biota, geo-morphometry and water flows etc. to enable site-specific process-oriented dose modelling. The modelling of carbon and nutrients was based on ecosystem processes such as primary production, respiration and consumption. C-14 was modelled in proportion to the circulation of non-radioactive carbon in the ecosystem, whereas the modelling of other radionuclides included two radionuclide specific mechanisms in addition to the ecological processes. The radionuclide uptake by plants was modelled with an uptake function based on conventional uptake factors related to the primary production rate of the plants. The transfer of radionuclides from plants to animals in the ecosystem was modelled in proportion to the consumption rate of the grazer/predator, the concentration in the plant/prey and a specific radionuclide excretion rate related to the rate of carbon and nutrients excreted. The results were compared with traditional dose assessment models. We believe that this method has a large potential to be used either directly in assessment modelling or to produce site-specific transfer factors for more conventional models, which is especially valuable when future changes of the environment needs to be taken into account. (author)

  1. Quantitative Assessment of the Potential Significance of Colloids to the KBS-3 Disposal Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klos, R.A.; White, M.J.; Wickham, S.M.; Bennett, D.G.; Hicks, T.W.

    2002-06-01

    Colloids are minute particles in the size range 1 nm to 1 μm that can remain suspended in water, and may influence radionuclide transport in radioactive waste disposal systems. Galson Sciences Ltd (GSL) has undertaken a quantitative assessment of the impact that colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport may have on the performance of the Swedish KBS-3 concept for disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent fuel. This assessment has involved the evaluation and application of SKI's colloid transport model, COLLAGE II, modelling of km-scale Pu transport at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), USA, and identification of circumstances under which colloid-facilitated transport could be important for a KBS-3-type environment. Colloids bearing traces of plutonium from the BENHAM underground nuclear test have been detected in samples obtained from Nevada Test Site (NTS) groundwater wells 1.3 km from the detonation point. Plutonium is generally fairly immobile in groundwater systems, and it has been suggested that colloids may have caused the plutonium from the BENHAM test to be transported 1.3 km in only 30 years. This hypothesis has been tested by modelling plutonium transport in a fracture with similar characteristics to those present in the vicinity of the BENHAM test. SKI's colloid transport code, COLLAGE II, considers radionuclide transport in a one-dimensional planar fracture and represents radionuclide-colloid sorption and desorption assuming first-order, linear kinetics. Recently published data from both the ongoing NTS site investigation and from the associated Yucca Mountain Project have been used to define a COLLAGE II dataset. The kinetics of radionuclide-colloid sorption and desorption have been found to be crucial in explaining the transport of plutonium associated with colloids, as inferred at the NTS. Specifically, it has been found that for plutonium to have been transported by colloids over the full 1.3 km transport path, it is likely that the plutonium

  2. Assessment of reproductive capacity of seeds sampled from natural populations of plants from a territory contaminated with radionuclides and heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vakhusheva, O.; Evseeva, T. [Institute of biology Komi SC Ural Branch of RAS (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    Plants are an essential component of any ecosystem and are permanently exposed to soil contamination. Therefore, they are widely used for characterization of ecological situation of the territory. Located at the base of the food chain, plants are exposed to toxic agents before the organisms at higher trophic levels. Kirovo-Chepetsk chemical plant (Kirov, Russia) is one of the biggest chemical enterprises in Europe. Vascular plant communities from surrounding area are exposed to industrial wastes, including uranium production wastes from 1938. The aim of this work was to estimate reproductive capacity of Urtica dioica L., Cirsium setosum (Willd.) Bess and Filipendula ulmaria (L.) Maxim - natural populations inhabiting the chemical plant industrial zone. The plant species studied are common for the meadow communities of south taiga zone, and are characterized by high seed yield and living in wide range of ecological conditions. Plant seeds were collected from two experimental sites with different soil contamination levels, located in the vicinity of the Kirovo-Chepetsk chemical plant, as well as from the reference site, in 2011 and 2012. Soil specific activities of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr and concentrations of Ni, Pb, Cd, Zn, Hg and Cu were measured and ecological criteria of the radioactive (C{sub r}) and chemical (C{sub c}) contamination of the soil cover were calculated. Seeds germination, germinative energy and seedling survival rate were used for assessing reproductive capacity. Urtica dioicawas found to be the most sensitive among plant species studied. Germination of seeds from contaminated sites was significantly lower compared with the reference values. Exponential relationship was found between the levels of soil radioactive contamination and seeds germination (R{sup 2}=0.8, p<0.001). Germination of Cirsium setosum seeds, sampled from contaminated sites, exceeded the values obtained for the reference plant population and was linearly dependent (R{sup 2

  3. Selection and manipulation of immunoglobulins for radionuclide delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steplewski, Z.; Curtis, P. [The Wistar Institute, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hainfeld, J.; Mausner, L.; Mease, R.; Srivastava, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1992-12-31

    This report describes a collection of monoclonal antibodies that are candidates for use in radioimmunotherapy towards neoplasms of the gastrointestinal tract, breast, or of astrocytomas. In addition a large series of candidate radionuclides to conjugate to antibodies for therapeutic uses are discussed with respect to potential therapeutic utility and to means of radionuclide production.