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Sample records for assessing patient-centered care

  1. The Patient Centered Assessment Method (PCAM: integrating the social dimensions of health into primary care

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    Rebekah Pratt

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Social dimensions of health are known to contribute to what is often termed “patient complexity”, which is particularly common among patients with multimorbidity. Health-care professionals require tools to help them identify and manage these aspects of patient needs. Objectives: To examine: (i the Patient Centered Assessment Method (PCAM, a tool for assessing patient complexity in ways that are sensitive to the biopsychosocial dimensions of health, in primary care settings in Scotland; (ii the impact of the PCAM on referral patterns and its perceived value; and (iii the PCAM’s perceived applicability for use in a complex patient population. Design: Two studies are described: (i a mixed-methods prospective cohort study of the implementation of the PCAM in primary care clinics; and (ii a qualitative exploratory study that evaluated the value of the PCAM in a complex patient population. Results: Use of the PCAM did not impact patient satisfaction or perception of practitioners’ empathy, but it did increase both the number of onward referrals per referred patient (9–12% and the proportion of referrals to non-medical services addressing psychological, social, and lifestyle needs. Nurses valued the PCAM, particularly its ability to help them address psychological and social domains of patients’ lives, and found it to be highly relevant for use in populations with known high complexity. Conclusions: The PCAM represents a feasible approach for assessing patient needs with consideration to the social dimensions of health, and allows practitioners to refer patients to a broader range of services to address patient complexity.

  2. Development of an Inventory for Health-Care Office Staff to Self-Assess Their Patient-Centered Cultural Sensitivity

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    Carolyn M. Tucker

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patient-centered culturally sensitive health care (PC-CSHC is a best practice approach for improving health-care delivery to culturally diverse populations and reducing health disparities. Despite patients’ report that cultural sensitivity by health-care office staff is an important aspect of PC-CSHC, the majority of available research on PC-CSHC focuses exclusively on health-care providers. This may be due in part to the paucity of instruments available to assess the cultural sensitivity of health-care office staff. The objective of the present study is to determine the psychometric properties of the Tucker-Culturally Sensitive Health Care Office Staff Inventory-Self-Assessment Form (T-CSHCOSI-SAF. This instrument is designed to enable health-care office staff to self-assess their level of agreement that they display behaviors and attitudes that culturally diverse patients have identified as office staff cultural sensitivity indicators. Methods: A sample of 510 health-care office staff were recruited at 67 health-care sites across the United States. These health-care office staff anonymously completed the T-CSHCOSI-SAF and a demographic data questionnaire. Results and Level of Evidence: Confirmatory factor analyses of the T-CSHCOSI-SAF revealed that this inventory has 2 factors with high internal consistency reliability (Cronbach’s αs= .916 and .912. Conclusion and Implications: The T-CSHCOSI-SAF is a useful inventory for health-care office staff to assess their own level of patient-centered cultural sensitivity. Such self-assessment data can be used in the development and implementation of trainings to promote patient-centered cultural sensitivity of health-care office staff and to help draw the attention of these staff to displaying patient-centered cultural sensitivity.

  3. Caregiver Objective Burden and Assessments of Patient-Centered, Family-Focused Care for Frail Elderly Veterans

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    Rose, Julia Hannum; Bowman, Karen F.; O'Toole, Elizabeth E.; Abbott, Katherine; Love, Thomas E.; Thomas, Charles; Dawson, Neal V.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: There is a growing consensus that quality of care for frail elders should include family and be evaluated in terms of patient-centered, family-focused care (PCFFC). Family caregivers are in a unique and sometimes sole position to evaluate such care. In the context of caring for physically frail elders, this study examined the extent to…

  4. Integrative medicine and patient-centered care.

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    Maizes, Victoria; Rakel, David; Niemiec, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Integrative medicine has emerged as a potential solution to the American healthcare crisis. It provides care that is patient centered, healing oriented, emphasizes the therapeutic relationship, and uses therapeutic approaches originating from conventional and alternative medicine. Initially driven by consumer demand, the attention integrative medicine places on understanding whole persons and assisting with lifestyle change is now being recognized as a strategy to address the epidemic of chronic diseases bankrupting our economy. This paper defines integrative medicine and its principles, describes the history of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in American healthcare, and discusses the current state and desired future of integrative medical practice. The importance of patient-centered care, patient empowerment, behavior change, continuity of care, outcomes research, and the challenges to successful integration are discussed. The authors suggest a model for an integrative healthcare system grounded in team-based care. A primary health partner who knows the patient well, is able to addresses mind, body, and spiritual needs, and coordinates care with the help of a team of practitioners is at the centerpiece. Collectively, the team can meet all the health needs of the particular patient and forms the patient-centered medical home. The paper culminates with 10 recommendations directed to key actors to facilitate the systemic changes needed for a functional healthcare delivery system. Recommendations include creating financial incentives aligned with health promotion and prevention. Insurers are requested to consider the total costs of care, the potential cost effectiveness of lifestyle approaches and CAM modalities, and the value of longer office visits to develop a therapeutic relationship and stimulate behavioral change. Outcomes research to track the effectiveness of integrative models must be funded, as well as feedback and dissemination strategies

  5. A patient-centered care ethics analysis model for rehabilitation.

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    Hunt, Matthew R; Ells, Carolyn

    2013-09-01

    There exists a paucity of ethics resources tailored to rehabilitation. To help fill this ethics resource gap, the authors developed an ethics analysis model specifically for use in rehabilitation care. The Patient-Centered Care Ethics Analysis Model for Rehabilitation is a process model to guide careful moral reasoning for particularly complex or challenging matters in rehabilitation. The Patient-Centered Care Ethics Analysis Model for Rehabilitation was developed over several iterations, with feedback at different stages from rehabilitation professionals and bioethics experts. Development of the model was explicitly informed by the theoretical grounding of patient-centered care and the context of rehabilitation, including the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. Being patient centered, the model encourages (1) shared control of consultations, decisions about interventions, and management of the health problems with the patient and (2) understanding the patient as a whole person who has individual preferences situated within social contexts. Although the major process headings of the Patient-Centered Care Ethics Analysis Model for Rehabilitation resemble typical ethical decision-making and problem-solving models, the probes under those headings direct attention to considerations relevant to rehabilitation care. The Patient-Centered Care Ethics Analysis Model for Rehabilitation is a suitable tool for rehabilitation professionals to use (in real time, for retrospective review, and for training purposes) to help arrive at ethical outcomes.

  6. [Teaching patient-centered holistic care].

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    Wung, Hwang-Ling; Chen, Huei-Ling; Hwu, Yueh-Juen

    2007-06-01

    Nursing education aims to help students understand concepts and gain competencies in holistic care. The purpose of this paper was to present a nursing curriculum that adapted and introduced holistic care into an adult nursing curriculum taught at a university of science and technology. The course framework included both holistic and nursing domains. The holistic aspect addressed client physical psychological-spiritual needs and related factors, health related factors, and the status of Maslow's hierarchy of needs and related factors. The nursing aspect addressed the way in which nursing was applied to identify client problems and provide individualized, integrated and continuous care in hospital, family or community based settings employing primary, secondary, or tertiary prevention. Scenario with problem based learning and concept mapping were used in class to guide students to consider in depth the concepts that underpin holistic care.

  7. Healthcare professionals' views on patient-centered care in hospitals

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    M. Berghout (Mathilde); N.J.A. van Exel (Job); L. Leensvaart (Laszlo); J.M. Cramm (Jane)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Patient-centered care (PCC) is a main determinant of care quality. Research has shown that PCC is a multi-dimensional concept, and organizations that provide PCC well report better patient and organizational outcomes. However, little is known about the relative importance of

  8. Improving personal health records for patient-centered care

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    Feldman, Henry J; Ross, Stephen E; Safran, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess the patient-centeredness of personal health records (PHR) and offer recommendations for best practice guidelines. Design Semi-structured interviews were conducted in seven large early PHR adopter organizations in 2007. Organizations were purposively selected to represent a variety of US settings, including medium and large hospitals, ambulatory care facilities, insurers and health plans, government departments, and commercial sectors. Measurements Patient-centeredness was assessed against a framework of care that includes: (1) respect for patient values, preferences, and expressed needs; (2) information and education; (3) access to care; (4) emotional support to relieve fear and anxiety; (5) involvement of family and friends; (6) continuity and secure transition between healthcare providers; (7) physical comfort; (8) coordination of care. Within this framework we used evidence for patient preferences (where it exists) to compare existing PHR policies, and propose a best practice model. Results Most organizations enable many patient-centered functions such as data access for proxies and minors. No organization allows patient views of clinical progress notes, and turnaround times for PHR reporting of normal laboratory results can be up to 7 days. Conclusion Findings suggest patient-centeredness for personal health records can be improved, and recommendations are made for best practice guidelines. PMID:20190063

  9. Consumerism: forcing medical practices toward patient-centered care.

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    Ozmon, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    Consumerism has been apart of many industries over the years; now consumerism may change the way many medical practices deliver healthcare. With the advent of consumer-driven healthcare, employers are shifting the decision-making power to their employees. Benefits strategies like health savings accounts and high-deductible insurance plans now allow the patients to control how and where they spend their money on medical care. Practices that seek to attract the more affluent and informed consumers are beginning to institute patient-centered systems designs that invite patients to actively participate in their healthcare. This article will outline the changes in the healthcare delivery system facing medical practices, the importance of patient-centered care, and six strategies to implement to change toward more patient-centered care.

  10. Conformity of pediatric/adolescent HIV clinics to the patient-centered medical home care model.

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    Yehia, Baligh R; Agwu, Allison L; Schranz, Asher; Korthuis, P Todd; Gaur, Aditya H; Rutstein, Richard; Sharp, Victoria; Spector, Stephen A; Berry, Stephen A; Gebo, Kelly A

    2013-05-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) has been introduced as a model for providing high-quality, comprehensive, patient-centered care that is both accessible and coordinated, and may provide a framework for optimizing the care of youth living with HIV (YLH). We surveyed six pediatric/adolescent HIV clinics caring for 578 patients (median age 19 years, 51% male, and 82% black) in July 2011 to assess conformity to the PCMH. Clinics completed a 50-item survey covering the six domains of the PCMH: (1) comprehensive care, (2) patient-centered care, (3) coordinated care, (4) accessible services, (5) quality and safety, and (6) health information technology. To determine conformity to the PCMH, a novel point-based scoring system was devised. Points were tabulated across clinics by domain to obtain an aggregate assessment of PCMH conformity. All six clinics responded. Overall, clinics attained a mean 75.8% [95% CI, 63.3-88.3%] on PCMH measures-scoring highest on patient-centered care (94.7%), coordinated care (83.3%), and quality and safety measures (76.7%), and lowest on health information technology (70.0%), accessible services (69.1%), and comprehensive care (61.1%). Clinics moderately conformed to the PCMH model. Areas for improvement include access to care, comprehensive care, and health information technology. Future studies are warranted to determine whether greater clinic PCMH conformity improves clinical outcomes and cost savings for YLH.

  11. Patient centered primary care is associated with patient hypertension medication adherence.

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    Roumie, Christianne L; Greevy, Robert; Wallston, Kenneth A; Elasy, Tom A; Kaltenbach, Lisa; Kotter, Kristen; Dittus, Robert S; Speroff, Theodore

    2011-08-01

    There is increasing evidence that patient centered care, including communication skills, is an essential component to chronic illness care. Our aim was to evaluate patient centered primary care as a determinant of medication adherence. We mailed 1,341 veterans with hypertension the Short Form Primary Care Assessment Survey (PCAS) which measures elements of patient centered primary care. We prospectively collected each patient's antihypertensive medication adherence for 6 months. Patients were characterized as adherent if they had medication for >80%. 654 surveys were returned (50.7%); and 499 patients with complete data were analyzed. Antihypertensive adherence increased as scores in patient centered care increased [RR 3.18 (95% CI 1.44, 16.23) bootstrap 5000 resamples] for PCAS score of 4.5 (highest quartile) versus 1.5 (lowest quartile). Future research is needed to determine if improving patient centered care, particularly communication skills, could lead to improvements in health related behaviors such as medication adherence and health outcomes.

  12. Oncology nurse communication barriers to patient-centered care.

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    Wittenberg-Lyles, Elaine; Goldsmith, Joy; Ferrell, Betty

    2013-04-01

    Although quality communication has been identified as a necessary component to cancer care, communication skills training programs have yet to focus on the unique role of nurses. This study explored communication barriers as reported by seven nurse managers to better identify communication skills needed for oncology nurses to practice patient-centered care. Thematic analysis of transcripts was used to identify barriers to patient and family communication and desirable patient-centered nursing communication skills. Overall, the nurse managers reported that nurses experience patient and family communication difficulties as a result of inconsistent messages to patients and family from other healthcare staff. Physician assumptions about nursing left nurses feeling uncomfortable asking for clarification, creating a barrier to team communication processes. Patient-centered communication and care cannot be actualized for nurses unless team roles are clarified and nurses receive training in how to communicate with physicians, patients, and family. Therefore, the authors of this article created the COMFORT communication training protocol, and key concepts and resources for nurse communication training through COMFORT are detailed in this article.

  13. [Fusing empowerment concept into patient-centered collaborative care model].

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    Wu, Chia-Chen; Lin, Chiu-Chu

    2014-12-01

    Chronic diseases are incurable, long-term illnesses. To improve quality of life, patients with chronic diseases must adjust their own personal lifestyle to cope with their diseases and eventually learn to achieve a balance between disease control and daily life. Therefore, self-management necessarily plays a key role in chronic disease management. Different from physician-centered healthcare, the self-management practiced by chronic disease patients is more patient-centered with a greater emphasis on active patient participation. The main goal of this article is to elucidate the essence of the empowerment concept. An example of diabetes care, this article introduces a detailed five-step application as a basic model for incorporating the empowerment concept into the healthcare of patients with chronic disease. The author suggests that healthcare providers apply the empowerment model in clinical practice to assist patients to maintain an optimal balance between their health status and personal lives.

  14. Why Patient Centered Care Coordination Is Important in Developing Countries?

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    Luna, D.; Marcelo, A.; Househ, M.; Mandirola, H.; Curioso, W.; Pazos, P.; Villalba, C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Patient Centered Care Coordination (PCCC) focuses on the patient health care needs. PCCC involves the organization, the patients and their families, that must coordinate resources in order to accomplish the goals of PCCC. In developing countries, where disparities are frequent, PCCC could improve clinical outcomes, costs and patients satisfaction. Objective the IMIA working group Health Informatics for Development analyzes the benefits, identifies the barriers and proposes strategies to reach PCCC. Methods Discussions about PCCC emerged from a brief guide that posed questions about what is PCCC, why consider PCCC important, barriers to grow in this direction and ask about resources considered relevant in the topic. Results PCCC encompasses a broad definition, includes physical, mental, socio-environmental and self care. Even benefits are proved, in developing countries the lack of a comprehensive and integrated healthcare network is one of the main barriers to reach this objective. Working hard to reach strong health policies, focus on patients, and optimizing the use of resources could improve the performance in the devolvement of PCCC programs. International collaboration could bring benefits. We believe information IT, and education in this field will play an important role in PCCC. Conclusion PCCC in developing countries has the potential to improve quality of care. Education, IT, policies and cultural issues must be addressed in an international collaborative context in order to reach this goal. PMID:26123907

  15. Patient-centered care: the key to cultural competence.

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    Epner, D E; Baile, W F

    2012-04-01

    Much of the early literature on 'cultural competence' focuses on the 'categorical' or 'multicultural' approach, in which providers learn relevant attitudes, values, beliefs, and behaviors of certain cultural groups. In essence, this involves learning key 'dos and don'ts' for each group. Literature and educational materials of this kind focus on broad ethnic, racial, religious, or national groups, such as 'African American', 'Hispanic', or 'Asian'. The problem with this categorical or 'list of traits' approach to clinical cultural competence is that culture is multidimensional and dynamic. Culture comprises multiple variables, affecting all aspects of experience. Cultural processes frequently differ within the same ethnic or social group because of differences in age cohort, gender, political association, class, religion, ethnicity, and even personality. Culture is therefore a very elusive and nebulous concept, like art. The multicultural approach to cultural competence results in stereotypical thinking rather than clinical competence. A newer, cross cultural approach to culturally competent clinical practice focuses on foundational communication skills, awareness of cross-cutting cultural and social issues, and health beliefs that are present in all cultures. We can think of these as universal human beliefs, needs, and traits. This patient centered approach relies on identifying and negotiating different styles of communication, decision-making preferences, roles of family, sexual and gender issues, and issues of mistrust, prejudice, and racism, among other factors. In the current paper, we describe 'cultural' challenges that arise in the care of four patients from disparate cultures, each of whom has advanced colon cancer that is no longer responding to chemotherapy. We then illustrate how to apply principles of patient centered care to these challenges.

  16. Patient-Centered Care and Patient-Reported Measures: Let's Look Before We Leap.

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    Miller, Daniel; Steele Gray, Carolyn; Kuluski, Kerry; Cott, Cheryl

    2015-08-01

    This commentary focuses on patient-reported measures as tools to support patient-centered care for patients with multiple chronic conditions (MCCs). We argue that those using patient-reported measures in care management or evaluation of services for MCC patients should do so in recognition of the challenges involved in treating them. MCC patient care is challenging because (1) it is difficult to specify the causes of particular symptoms; (2) assessment of many important symptoms relies on subjective report; and (3) patients require care from a variety of providers. Due to the multiple domains of health affected in single individuals, and the large variation in needs, care that is holistic and individualized (i.e. patient-centered) is appropriate for MCC patients. However, due to the afore-mentioned challenges, it is important to carefully consider what this care entails and how practical contexts shape it. Patient-centered care for MCC patients implies continuous, dialogic patient-provider relationships, and the formulation of coherent and adaptive multi-disciplinary care protocols. We identify two broadly defined contextual influences on the nature and quality of these processes and their outputs: (1) busy practice settings and (2) fragmented information technology. We then identify several consequences that may result from inattention to these contextual influences upon introduction of patient-reported measure applications. To maximize the benefits, and minimize the harms of patient-reported measure use, we encourage policy makers and providers to attend carefully to these and other important contextual factors before, during and after the introduction of patient-reported measure initiatives.

  17. Optimizing Patient-centered Communication and Multidisciplinary Care Coordination in Emergency Diagnostic Imaging: A Research Agenda.

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    Sabbatini, Amber K; Merck, Lisa H; Froemming, Adam T; Vaughan, William; Brown, Michael D; Hess, Erik P; Applegate, Kimberly E; Comfere, Nneka I

    2015-12-01

    Patient-centered emergency diagnostic imaging relies on efficient communication and multispecialty care coordination to ensure optimal imaging utilization. The construct of the emergency diagnostic imaging care coordination cycle with three main phases (pretest, test, and posttest) provides a useful framework to evaluate care coordination in patient-centered emergency diagnostic imaging. This article summarizes findings reached during the patient-centered outcomes session of the 2015 Academic Emergency Medicine consensus conference "Diagnostic Imaging in the Emergency Department: A Research Agenda to Optimize Utilization." The primary objective was to develop a research agenda focused on 1) defining component parts of the emergency diagnostic imaging care coordination process, 2) identifying gaps in communication that affect emergency diagnostic imaging, and 3) defining optimal methods of communication and multidisciplinary care coordination that ensure patient-centered emergency diagnostic imaging. Prioritized research questions provided the framework to define a research agenda for multidisciplinary care coordination in emergency diagnostic imaging.

  18. What is Patient-Centered Care? A Typology of Models and Missions.

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    Tanenbaum, Sandra J

    2015-09-01

    Recently adopted health care practices and policies describe themselves as "patient-centered care." The meaning of the term, however, remains contested and obscure. This paper offers a typology of "patient-centered care" models that aims to contribute to greater clarity about, continuing discussion of, and further advances in patient-centered care. The paper imposes an original analytic framework on extensive material covering mostly US health care and health policy topics over several decades. It finds that four models of patient-centered care emphasize: patients versus their parts; patients versus providers; patients/providers/states versus "the system"; and patients and providers as persons. Each type is distinguishable along three dimensions: epistemological orientations, practical accommodations, and policy tools. Based on this analysis, the paper recommends that four questions be asked of any proposal that claims to provide patient-centered care: Is this care a means to an end or an end in itself? Are patients here subjects or objects? Are patients here individuals or aggregates? How do we know what patients want and need? The typology reveals that models are neither entirely compatible nor entirely incompatible and may be usefully combined in certain practices and policies. In other instances, internal contradictions may jeopardize the realization of coherent patient-centered care.

  19. Communication About Sexuality in Advanced Illness Aligns With a Palliative Care Approach to Patient-Centered Care.

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    Leung, Margaret W; Goldfarb, Shari; Dizon, Don S

    2016-02-01

    Treatment-related sexual complications are common in cancer patients although rarely discussed in the palliative care setting. Sexuality is an important survivorship issue and remains relevant even in the terminal setting. There are multiple barriers in dialoguing about intimacy and sexual functioning from the patient and provider perspectives. Palliative care providers, while not expected to be sexual health experts, can provide comprehensive patient-centered care by including sexual health as part of their evaluation. They can explore how sexual dysfunction can impair functioning and utilize an interdisciplinary approach to manage symptoms. Palliative care providers can help patients identify their goals of care and explore what anticipated sexual changes and treat-related side effects are tolerable and intolerable to the patient's quality of life. Principles on addressing sexuality in the palliative setting and practical ways of incorporating sexual history into the palliative care assessment are provided.

  20. Cancer patient-centered home care: a new model for health care in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tralongo P

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Paolo Tralongo1, Francesco Ferraù2, Nicolò Borsellino3, Francesco Verderame4, Michele Caruso5, Dario Giuffrida6, Alfredo Butera7, Vittorio Gebbia81Medical Oncology Unit, Azienda Sanitaria Provinciale, Siracusa; 2Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale San Vincenzo, Taormina; 3Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale Buccheri La Ferla, Palermo; 4Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale Giovanni Paolo II, Sciacca; 5Medical Oncology Unit, Istituto Humanitas, Catania; 6Medical Oncology Unit, Istituto Oncologico del Mediterraneo, Catania; 7Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedale San Giovanni di Dio, Agrigento; 8Medical Oncology Unit, Dipartimento Oncologico, La Maddalena, Università degli Studi, Palermo, ItalyAbstract: Patient-centered home care is a new model of assistance, which may be integrated with more traditional hospital-centered care especially in selected groups of informed and trained patients. Patient-centered care is based on patients' needs rather than on prognosis, and takes into account the emotional and psychosocial aspects of the disease. This model may be applied to elderly patients, who present comorbid diseases, but it also fits with the needs of younger fit patients. A specialized multidisciplinary team coordinated by experienced medical oncologists and including pharmacists, psychologists, nurses, and social assistance providers should carry out home care. Other professional figures may be required depending on patients' needs. Every effort should be made to achieve optimal coordination between the health professionals and the reference hospital and to employ shared evidence-based guidelines, which in turn guarantee safety and efficacy. Comprehensive care has to be easily accessible and requires a high level of education and knowledge of the disease for both the patients and their caregivers. Patient-centered home care represents an important tool to improve quality of life and help cancer patients while also being cost effective.Keywords: cancer, home care

  1. Patient-centered care or cultural competence: negotiating palliative care at home for Chinese Canadian immigrants.

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    Nielsen, Lisa Seto; Angus, Jan E; Howell, Doris; Husain, Amna; Gastaldo, Denise

    2015-06-01

    The literature about Chinese attitudes toward death and dying contains frequent references to strong taboos against open discussion about death; consequently, there is an assumption that dying at home is not the preferred option. This focused ethnographic study examined the palliative home care experiences of 4 Chinese immigrants with terminal cancer, their family caregivers, and home care nurses and key informant interviews with 11 health care providers. Three main themes emerged: (1) the many facets of taboo; (2) discursive tensions between patient-centered care and cultural competence; and (3) rethinking language barriers. Thus, training on cultural competence needs to move away from models that portray cultural beliefs as shared, fixed patterns, and take into account the complicated reality of everyday care provision at end of life in the home.

  2. Designing a patient-centered personal health record to promote preventive care

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    Krist Alex H

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evidence-based preventive services offer profound health benefits, yet Americans receive only half of indicated care. A variety of government and specialty society policy initiatives are promoting the adoption of information technologies to engage patients in their care, such as personal health records, but current systems may not utilize the technology's full potential. Methods Using a previously described model to make information technology more patient-centered, we developed an interactive preventive health record (IPHR designed to more deeply engage patients in preventive care and health promotion. We recruited 14 primary care practices to promote the IPHR to all adult patients and sought practice and patient input in designing the IPHR to ensure its usability, salience, and generalizability. The input involved patient usability tests, practice workflow observations, learning collaboratives, and patient feedback. Use of the IPHR was measured using practice appointment and IPHR databases. Results The IPHR that emerged from this process generates tailored patient recommendations based on guidelines from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and other organizations. It extracts clinical data from the practices' electronic medical record and obtains health risk assessment information from patients. Clinical content is translated and explained in lay language. Recommendations review the benefits and uncertainties of services and possible actions for patients and clinicians. Embedded in recommendations are self management tools, risk calculators, decision aids, and community resources - selected to match patient's clinical circumstances. Within six months, practices had encouraged 14.4% of patients to use the IPHR (ranging from 1.5% to 28.3% across the 14 practices. Practices successfully incorporated the IPHR into workflow, using it to prepare patients for visits, augment health behavior counseling, explain test results

  3. Improving the quality of discharge care for the homeless: a patient-centered approach.

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    Greysen, S Ryan; Allen, Rebecca; Rosenthal, Marjorie S; Lucas, Georgina I; Wang, Emily A

    2013-05-01

    Homeless patients are at risk for low-quality discharge care, yet there are limited patient-centered data to guide improvement. We explored relationships between assessment of housing status by hospital staff and quality of discharge care using quantitative and qualitative data from interviews and chart reviews with 98 homeless patients: 80% male, mean homelessness 2.8 years, mean age 44. Patient-reported performance of discharge care varied substantially across seven domains from 16-75% and chart review documented lower performance than patient report. Over half (56%) were not asked about their housing status and multivariable logistic regression showed assessment of housing status was independently associated with higher performance in five domains: discussions about cost of medications, physical activity levels, diet, transportation, and mental health follow-up. Qualitative data revealed patient concerns about stigmatization from disclosure of housing status. Our findings suggest that addressing housing status in acute care settings while avoiding stigmatization may improve discharge care for homeless patients.

  4. Diabetes Stories: Use of Patient Narratives of Diabetes to Teach Patient-Centered Care

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    Kumagai, Arno K.; Murphy, Elizabeth A.; Ross, Paula T.

    2009-01-01

    A critical component to instituting compassionate, patient-centered diabetes care is the training of health care providers. Our institution developed the Family Centered Experience (FCE), a comprehensive 2-year preclinical program based on longitudinal conversations with patients about living with chronic illness. The goal of the FCE is to explore…

  5. Partnership and empowerment program: a model for patient-centered, comprehensive, and cost-effective care.

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    Brown, Corinne; Bornstein, Elizabeth; Wilcox, Catina

    2012-02-01

    The Partnership and Empowerment Program model offers a comprehensive, patient-centered, and cost-effective template for coordinating care for underinsured and uninsured patients with cancer. Attention to effective coordination, including use of internal and external resources, may result in decreased costs of care and improved patient compliance and health outcomes.

  6. Innovation in patient-centered care: lessons from a qualitative study of innovative health care organizations in Washington State

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    Reed Peter

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Growing interest in the promise of patient-centered care has led to numerous health care innovations, including the patient-centered medical home, shared decision-making, and payment reforms. How best to vet and adopt innovations is an open question. Washington State has been a leader in health care reform and is a rich laboratory for patient-centered innovations. We sought to understand the process of patient-centered care innovation undertaken by innovative health care organizations – from strategic planning to goal selection to implementation to maintenance. Methods We conducted key-informant interviews with executives at five health plans, five provider organizations, and ten primary care clinics in Washington State. At least two readers of each interview transcript identified themes inductively; final themes were determined by consensus. Results Innovation in patient-centered care was a strategic objective chosen by nearly every organization in this study. However, other goals were paramount: cost containment, quality improvement, and organization survival. Organizations commonly perceived effective chronic disease management and integrated health information technology as key elements for successful patient-centered care innovation. Inertia, resource deficits, fee-for-service payment, and regulatory limits on scope of practice were cited as barriers to innovation, while organization leadership, human capital, and adaptive culture facilitated innovation. Conclusions Patient-centered care innovations reflected organizational perspectives: health plans emphasized cost-effectiveness while providers emphasized health care delivery processes. Health plans and providers shared many objectives, yet the two rarely collaborated to achieve them. The process of innovation is heavily dependent on organizational culture and leadership. Policymakers can improve the pace and quality of patient-centered innovation by setting targets

  7. Advancing patient-centered care through transformative educational leadership: a critical review of health care professional preparation for patient-centered care

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    Lévesque MC

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Martine C Lévesque,1,2 Richard Bruce Hovey,2,3 Christophe Bedos2,4 1Faculté de médecine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada; 2Division of Oral Health and Society, Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; 3Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 4Département de médecine sociale et préventive, Faculté de médicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada Abstract: Following a historical brief on the development of patient-centered care (PCC, we discuss PCC's value and role in counterbalancing the evidence-based movement in health care. We in turn make a case for a philosophical shift in thinking about the PCC concept, one based on a consideration for how knowledge is produced, used, and valued within care provision processes. A “shared epistemology” foundation is presented, defined, and promoted as essential to the authentic and ethical realization of “shared decision making” between patient and health care provider, and, more generally, of PCC. In accordance with these views, this article critically reviews the literature on health care professional education for the development of PCC. We uncover the disturbing ways in which education frequently undermines the development of patient centeredness, despite curricular emphasis on professionalism and ethical PCC. We also establish the need to raise awareness of how dominant approaches to evaluating student or practitioner performance often fail to reinforce or promote patient centeredness. Finally, we identify successful and inspiring cases of teaching and learning experiences that have achieved perspective transformation on PCC and on new ways of providing care. The pertinence of adopting the theoretical foundations of adult transformative learning is argued, and a call to action is proposed to the leadership of health professional educators across all disciplines. Keywords: patient-centered care, health professional

  8. Using a patient-centered approach for health and social care integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulymenopoulou, Mikaela; Papakonstantinou, Despoina; Malamateniou, Flora; Vassilacopoulos, George

    2012-01-01

    The drive in using health and social care resources more effectively has resulted in undertaking various efforts towards better coordination in order to improve patient-centered and personalized care for the individuals. This requires horizontal integration in terms of processes among health and social care organizations existing information systems (ISs) and personal health records (PHRs) in order to enable integrated patient information sharing among all the health and social care staff and individuals involved. Service-oriented and business process management (BPM) technologies are considered most appropriate for achieving such integration especially when is required to change existing processes and to integrate diverse information systems. On these grounds, a patient-centered approach is proposed for redesigning health and social care processes and for integrating diverse ISs and PHRs with the objective to meet holistic care goals.

  9. Patient-centered care in lung cancer: exploring the next milestones

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In this editorial, the authors comment on a recently published review paper by Molassiotis et al. on the developments made over the past 40 years in supportive care for patients with lung cancer. During this period, a paradigm shift promoting patient-centered care (PCC) has led to an important change in the approach of supportive cancer care, from a purely disease-centered approach, measuring survival-related outcomes, to recognizing the importance of quality of life outcomes as well. This ch...

  10. Professional Quality of Life of Veterans Affairs Staff and Providers in a Patient-Centered Care Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Sara M; LaVela, Sherri L

    2015-01-01

    Changes to the work environment prompted by the movement toward patient-centered care have the potential to improve occupational stress among health care workers by improving team-based work activities, collaboration, and employee-driven quality improvement. This study was conducted to examine professional quality of life among providers at patient-centered care pilot facilities. Surveys were conducted with 76 Veterans Affairs employees/providers at facilities piloting patient-centered care interventions, to assess demographics, workplace practices and views (team-based environment, employee voice, quality of communication, and turnover intention), and professional quality of life (compassion satisfaction, burnout, and secondary traumatic stress).Professional quality-of-life subscales were not related to employee position type, age, or gender. Employee voice measures were related to lower burnout and higher compassion satisfaction. In addition, employees who were considering leaving their position showed higher burnout and lower compassion satisfaction scores. None of the work practices showed relationships with secondary traumatic stress.

  11. Integrating patient-centered care and clinical ethics into nutrition practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Denise Baird

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to present the application of patient-centered care and clinical ethics into nutrition practice, illustrate the process in a case study, and promote change in the current healthcare clinical ethics model. Nutrition support clinicians have an opportunity to add another dimension to their practice with the incorporation of patient-centered care and clinical ethics. This represents a culture change for healthcare professionals, including nutrition support clinicians, patients and their family. All of these individuals are stakeholders in the process and have the ability to modify the current healthcare system to improve communication and facilitate a change by humanizing nutrition support practice. Nutrition support is a medical, life-sustaining treatment, and the use of this therapy requires knowledge by the nutrition support clinician of patient-centered care concepts, preventive clinical ethics, religion/spirituality and cultural diversity, palliative care team role, and advance care planning. Integrating these into the practice of nutrition support is an innovative approach and results in new knowledge that requires a change in the culture of care and engagement and empowerment of the patient and their family in the process. This is more than a healthcare issue; it involves a social/family conversation movement that will be enhanced by the nutrition support clinician's participation.

  12. Market-Based Health Care in Specialty Surgery: Finding Patient-Centered Shared Value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy R; Rambachan, Aksharananda; Cote, David; Cybulski, George; Laws, Edward R

    2015-10-01

    : The US health care system is struggling with rising costs, poor outcomes, waste, and inefficiency. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act represents a substantial effort to improve access and emphasizes value-based care. Value in health care has been defined as health outcomes for the patient per dollar spent. However, given the opacity of health outcomes and cost, the identification and quantification of patient-centered value is problematic. These problems are magnified by highly technical, specialized care (eg, neurosurgery). This is further complicated by potentially competing interests of the 5 major stakeholders in health care: patients, doctors, payers, hospitals, and manufacturers. These stakeholders are watching with great interest as health care in the United States moves toward a value-based system. Market principles can be harnessed to drive costs down, improve outcomes, and improve overall value to patients. However, there are many caveats to a market-based, value-driven system that must be identified and addressed. Many excellent neurosurgical efforts are already underway to nudge health care toward increased efficiency, decreased costs, and improved quality. Patient-centered shared value can provide a philosophical mooring for the development of health care policies that utilize market principles without losing sight of the ultimate goals of health care, to care for patients.

  13. Patient-centered care and its effect on outcomes in the treatment of asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qamar N

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Nashmia Qamar1,*, Andrea A Pappalardo2,*, Vineet M Arora3, Valerie G Press41Pediatric Residency Program, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Internal Medicine-Pediatric Residency Program, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA; 3Section of General Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA; 4Section of Hospital Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA *Drs Qamar and Pappalardo contributed equally to this paperAbstract: Patient-centered care may be pivotal in improving health outcomes for patients with asthma. In addition to increased attention in both research and clinical forums, recent legislation also highlights the importance of patient-centered outcomes research in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. However, whether patient-centered care has been shown to improve outcomes for this population is unclear. To answer this question, we performed a systematic review of the literature that aimed to define current patient-focused management issues, characterize important patient-defined outcomes in asthma control, and identify current and emerging treatments related to patient outcomes and perspectives. We used a parallel search strategy via Medline®, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL® (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, and PsycINFO®, complemented with a reference review of key articles that resulted in a total of 133 articles; 58 were interventions that evaluated the effect on patient-centered outcomes, and 75 were descriptive studies. The majority of intervention studies demonstrated improved patient outcomes (44; “positive” results; none showed true harm (0; “negative”; and the remainder were equivocal (14; “neutral”. Key themes emerged relating to patients’ desires for asthma knowledge, preferences for tailored management plans, and

  14. Patient-centered collaborative care: employer-led business coalition vision for action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Andrew; Mercure, Suzanne

    2006-01-01

    Employers influence healthcare delivery. Two spheres of influence include (i) what is done at each worksite and by each employer (plan design and communications as well as health plan contracting) and (ii) what is done collectively in both private and public sectors to address performance and to encourage the physicians to adopt practice changes. The need for change toward patient-centered care is the subject of this article.

  15. Application of a marketing concept to patient-centered care: co-producing health with heart failure patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Robert P; Walker, Charles A; Curry, Linda Cox; Agee, Elizabeth J

    2012-04-03

    Increasing numbers of patients are being treated for heart failure each year. One out of four of the heart failure patients who receives care in a hospital is readmitted to the hospital within 30 days of discharge. Effective discharge instruction is critical to prevent these patient readmissions. Co-production is a marketing concept whereby the customer is a partner in the delivery of a good or service. For example, a patient and nurse may partner to co-produce a patient-centered health regimen to improve patient outcomes. In this article we review the cost of treating heart failure patients and current strategies to decrease hospital readmissions for these patients along with the role of the nurse and the concept of co-producing health as related to heart failure patients. Next we describe our study assessing the degree to which discharge processes were co-produced on two hospital units having a preponderance of heart failure patients, and present our findings indicating minimal evidence of co-production. A discussion of our findings, along with clinical implications of these findings, recommendations for change, and suggestions for future research are offered. We conclude that standardized discharge plans lead to a mindset of 'one size fits all,' a mindset inconsistent with the recent call for patient-centered care. We offer co-production as a patient-centered strategy for customizing discharge teaching and improving health outcomes for heart failure patients.

  16. Transforming care teams to provide the best possible patient-centered, collaborative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevin, Cory; Moore, Gordon; Shepherd, John; Jacobs, Tracy; Hupke, Cindy

    2009-01-01

    Patient experience of care is now a crucial parameter in assessing the quality of healthcare delivered in the United States. Continuity, patient-driven access to care, and being "known" by a provider or practice, particularly for patients with chronic diseases, have been shown to enhance patient satisfaction with care and health outcomes. Healthcare systems are challenged to effectively meet the wants and needs of patients by tailoring interventions based on each person's unique set factors-his or her strengths, preferences, and personal and social context. Creating care teams, a coordinated multidisciplinary group of healthcare professionals, enables a practice to take advantage of the skill sets represented and redesign care delivery with the patient and community as the focal point. This article describes the attributes of highly functioning care teams, how to measure them, and guidance on creating them. A case example illustrates how these ideas work in practice.

  17. Language Discordance and Patient- Centered Care in Occupational Therapy: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Jenny; Leland, Natalie

    2015-04-01

    The accumulative burden of a growing non-English speaking minority population and health disparities in the United States demonstrate the urgency of examining occupational therapy practices and defining care that is timely, effective, safe, and patient-centered. In this context, we investigate an occupational therapy episode of care from the perspectives of patient, caregiver, and primary occupational therapy care provider. Treatment sessions were observed and one-on-one semistructured interviews were conducted with the participants. Several themes describing areas of concern in communication and care delivery emerged, including expectations for care, the therapy relationship, professional identity, and pragmatic constraints. The use of untrained interpreters compromised treatment effectiveness and safety. This case highlights potential areas of concern in therapy when working with a diverse patient population. Abundant opportunities exist for occupational therapy to situate itself as an equitable, responsive, valuable, and essential service.

  18. Identifying Elements of Patient-Centered Care in Underserved Populations: A Qualitative Study of Patient Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Sheela; Hasnain, Memoona; Vadakumchery, Tracy; Hamad, Judy; Shah, Raveena; Hoersch, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Patient-centered care is an important goal in the delivery of healthcare. However, many patients do not engage in preventive medical care. In this pilot study, we conducted twenty in depth, semi-structured qualitative interviews at the University of Illinois at Chicago Health Sciences campus in a four month time frame. Many patients were underserved and underinsured, and we wanted to understand their experiences in the healthcare system. Using content analysis, several themes emerged from the interview data. Participants discussed the need for empathy and rapport with their providers. They identified provider behaviors that fostered a positive clinical relationship, including step-by step explanations of procedures, attention to body language and clinic atmosphere, and appropriate time management. Participants identified cost as the most common barrier to engaging in preventive care and discussed children and social support as motivating factors. A long-term relationship with a provider was an important motivator for preventive care, suggesting that the therapeutic alliance was essential to many patients. Conversely, many participants discussed a sense of dehumanization in the healthcare system, reporting that their life circumstances were overlooked, or that they were judged based on insurance status or ethnicity. We discuss implications for provider training and healthcare delivery, including the importance of patient-centered medical homes. PMID:25993110

  19. Identifying elements of patient-centered care in underserved populations: a qualitative study of patient perspectives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheela Raja

    Full Text Available Patient-centered care is an important goal in the delivery of healthcare. However, many patients do not engage in preventive medical care. In this pilot study, we conducted twenty in depth, semi-structured qualitative interviews at the University of Illinois at Chicago Health Sciences campus in a four month time frame. Many patients were underserved and underinsured, and we wanted to understand their experiences in the healthcare system. Using content analysis, several themes emerged from the interview data. Participants discussed the need for empathy and rapport with their providers. They identified provider behaviors that fostered a positive clinical relationship, including step-by step explanations of procedures, attention to body language and clinic atmosphere, and appropriate time management. Participants identified cost as the most common barrier to engaging in preventive care and discussed children and social support as motivating factors. A long-term relationship with a provider was an important motivator for preventive care, suggesting that the therapeutic alliance was essential to many patients. Conversely, many participants discussed a sense of dehumanization in the healthcare system, reporting that their life circumstances were overlooked, or that they were judged based on insurance status or ethnicity. We discuss implications for provider training and healthcare delivery, including the importance of patient-centered medical homes.

  20. What is patient-centered care really? Voices of Hispanic prenatal patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Alicia A; Connaughton, Stacey L

    2013-01-01

    Variations in patient-centered care (PCC) models and approaches contribute to ambiguity in how PCC is understood and defined, especially with regard to meeting the needs of diverse patient populations. One of the biggest challenges of putting PCC into practice is knowing what elements are the most important to patients. This qualitative study privileges patients' voices and adds a cultural dimension to existing health communication research on PCC through an empirical investigation of 48 Hispanic prenatal care patients' understandings and expectations of PCC. Semistructured interviews with 48 patients revealed five key themes in order of frequency: (a) una relación amable (a friendly relationship), (b) la atencion médica efectiva (effective medical care), (c) Español hablado (the Spanish language spoken), (d) comprensión de la información (understanding of information), and (e) eliminación del racismo (elimination of racism). The themes reflected several different assumptions and expectations with regard to PCC as compared to those espoused in many of the existing models and frameworks, such as the extent to which friendly interpersonal behaviors (e.g., smiling, making eye contact, displaying patience, and engaging in formal greetings, introductions, and farewells) were critical to patient satisfaction with the health care experience. Not only did patients feel better understood, but accompanied by friendly behaviors, information was viewed as more believable and accurate, and thus more patient-centered. The findings suggest that implementing culturally sensitive PCC approaches to caring for Hispanic prenatal care patients can include training health care staff on the importance of displaying friendly communicative behaviors such as smiling.

  1. Usual Primary Care Provider Characteristics of a Patient-Centered Medical Home and Mental Health Service Use

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, AL; Cochran, SD; Leibowitz, A.; Wells, KB; Kominski, G; Mays, VM

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Society of General Internal Medicine BACKGROUND: The benefits of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) over and above that of a usual source of medical care have yet to be determined, particularly for adults with mental health disorders. OBJECTIVE: To examine qualities of a usual provider that align with PCMH goals of access, comprehensiveness, and patient-centered care, and to determine whether PCMH qualities in a usual provider are associated with the use of mental health services...

  2. Patient-centered care in lung cancer: exploring the next milestones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Samuels, Noah

    2015-10-01

    In this editorial, the authors comment on a recently published review paper by Molassiotis et al. on the developments made over the past 40 years in supportive care for patients with lung cancer. During this period, a paradigm shift promoting patient-centered care (PCC) has led to an important change in the approach of supportive cancer care, from a purely disease-centered approach, measuring survival-related outcomes, to recognizing the importance of quality of life outcomes as well. This change of understanding in supportive and palliative care for patients with lung cancer can be further advanced through the understanding that there is a need to address bio-psycho-spiritual concerns and health belief models, within the context of the family socio-cultural environment, for both patients and their caregivers. There is also a need to address the psycho-spiritual effects of cancer on those health care professionals treating patients with lung cancer, in order to reduce compassion fatigue and increase resilience. Future directions for supportive care for patients with lung cancer may include the development of a patient-tailored treatment approach, assisted by the integration of a multidisciplinary team of health care providers and evidence-based complementary medicine practices, within conventional supportive care practice.

  3. A patient-centered research agenda for the care of the acutely ill older patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Heidi L; Leykum, Luci K; Mattison, Melissa L P; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Meltzer, David O

    2015-05-01

    Hospitalists and others acute-care providers are limited by gaps in evidence addressing the needs of the acutely ill older adult population. The Society of Hospital Medicine sponsored the Acute Care of Older Patients Priority Setting Partnership to develop a research agenda focused on bridging this gap. Informed by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute framework for identification and prioritization of research areas, we adapted a methodology developed by the James Lind Alliance to engage diverse stakeholders in the research agenda setting process. The work of the Partnership proceeded through 4 steps: convening, consulting, collating, and prioritizing. First, the steering committee convened a partnership of 18 stakeholder organizations in May 2013. Next, stakeholder organizations surveyed members to identify important unanswered questions in the acute care of older persons, receiving 1299 responses from 580 individuals. Finally, an extensive and structured process of collation and prioritization resulted in a final list of 10 research questions in the following areas: advanced-care planning, care transitions, delirium, dementia, depression, medications, models of care, physical function, surgery, and training. With the changing demographics of the hospitalized population, a workforce with limited geriatrics training, and gaps in evidence to inform clinical decision making for acutely ill older patients, the identified research questions deserve the highest priority in directing future research efforts to improve care for the older hospitalized patient and enrich training.

  4. The Process of Interactional Sensitivity Coding in Health Care: Conceptually and Operationally Defining Patient-Centered Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabee, Christina M; Koenig, Christopher J; Wingard, Leah; Foster, Jamie; Chivers, Nick; Olsher, David; Vandergriff, Ilona

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a process for measuring sensitivity in provider-patient interactions to better understand patient-centered communication. The authors developed the Process of Interactional Sensitivity Coding in Healthcare (PISCH) by incorporating a multimethod investigation into conversations between physicians and their patients with type 2 diabetes. The PISCH was then applied and assessed for its reliability across the unitization of interactions, the activities that were reflected, and the characteristics of patient-centered interactional sensitivity that were observed within each unit. In most cases, the PISCH resulted in reliable analysis of the interactions, but a few key areas (shared decision making, enabling self-management, and responding to emotion) were not reliably assessed. Implications of the test of this coding scheme include the expansion of the theoretical notion of interactional sensitivity to the health care context, rigorous implementation of a multimethod measurement development that relied on qualitative and quantitative assessments, and important future questions about the role of communication concepts in future interpersonal research.

  5. Primary Care Research in the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute's Portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, Joe V; Slutsky, Jean R

    2016-04-01

    In their article in this issue, Mazur and colleagues analyze the characteristics of early recipients of funding from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI). Mazur and colleagues note correctly that PCORI has a unique purpose and mission and suggest that it should therefore have a distinct portfolio of researchers and departments when compared with other funders such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Responding on behalf of PCORI, the authors of this Commentary agree with the characterization of PCORI's mission as distinct from that of NIH and others. They agree too that data found on PCORI's Web site demonstrate that PCORI's portfolio of researchers and departments is more diverse and more heavily populated with clinician researchers, as would be expected. The authors take issue with Mazur and colleagues' suggestion that because half of clinical visits occur within primary care settings, half of PCORI's funded research should be based in primary care departments. PCORI's portfolio reflects what patients and others tell PCORI are the critical questions. Many of these do, in fact, occur with more complex conditions in specialty care. The authors question whether the research of primary care departments is too narrowly focused and whether it sufficiently considers study of these complex conditions. Research on more complex conditions including heart failure, coronary artery disease, and multiple comorbid conditions could be highly valuable when approached from the primary care perspective, where many of the comparative effectiveness questions first arise.

  6. Survey of 5 European countries suggests that more elements of patient-centered medical homes could improve primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, M.J.; Voerman, G.E.; Erler, A.; Eriksson, T.; Baker, R.; Lepeleire, J. De; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Burgers, J.S.

    2013-01-01

    The patient-centered medical home is a US model for comprehensive care. This model features a personal physician or registered nurse who is augmented by a proactive team and information technology. Such a model could prove useful for advanced European systems as they strive to improve primary care,

  7. Exploring the practice of patient centered care: The role of ethnography and reflexivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberati, Elisa Giulia; Gorli, Mara; Moja, Lorenzo; Galuppo, Laura; Ripamonti, Silvio; Scaratti, Giuseppe

    2015-05-01

    Patient centered care (PCC) is an essential dimension of healthcare systems' mission worldwide and is recognized as an important condition for ensuring the quality of care. Nonetheless, it is also acknowledged that various care providers perceive patient centeredness differently and that there remain several unanswered questions about the aspects of healthcare delivery that are linked to an actual achievement of PCC. In the paper, we categorize the current research on PCC into two streams ("dyadic" and "organizational") and we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of each. Despite their important contributions to healthcare services research, these approaches to PCC do not fully capture the network of practices and relationships constituting patients and providers' experiences within healthcare contexts. Therefore, we propose an alternative interpretation of PCC that integrates insights from "practice theories" and emphasizes the negotiated and local nature of patient centeredness, which is accomplished through the engagement of providers and patients in everyday care practices. To develop such interpretation, we propose a research approach combining ethnographic and reflexive methods. Ethnography can help achieve more nuanced descriptions of what PCC truly encapsulates in the care process by drawing attention to the social and material reality of healthcare contexts. Reflexivity can help disentangle and bring to surface the tacit knowledge spread in everyday care practices and transform it into actionable knowledge, a type of knowledge that may support services improvement toward PCC. We anticipate that such improvement is far from straightforward: an actual achievement of PCC may challenge the interests of different stakeholders and unsettle consolidated habits, hierarchies and power dynamics. This unsettlement, however, can also serve as a necessary condition for engaging in a participative process of internal development. We discuss the outcomes, limitations and

  8. Impact of Information Technology, Clinical Resource Constraints, and Patient-Centered Practice Characteristics on Quality of Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JongDeuk Baek

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Factors in the practice environment, such as health information technology (IT infrastructure, availability of other clinical resources, and financial incentives, may influence whether practices are able to successfully implement the patient-centered medical home (PCMH model and realize its benefits. This study investigates the impacts of those PCMH-related elements on primary care physicians’ perception of quality of care. Methods: A multiple logistic regression model was estimated using the 2004 to 2005 CTS Physician Survey, a national sample of salaried primary care physicians (n = 1733. Results: The patient-centered practice environment and availability of clinical resources increased physicians’ perceived quality of care. Although IT use for clinical information access did enhance physicians’ ability to provide high quality of care, a similar positive impact of IT use was not found for e-prescribing or the exchange of clinical patient information. Lack of resources was negatively associated with physician perception of quality of care. Conclusion: Since health IT is an important foundation of PCMH, patient-centered practices are more likely to have health IT in place to support care delivery. However, despite its potential to enhance delivery of primary care, simply making health IT available does not necessarily translate into physicians’ perceptions that it enhances the quality of care they provide. It is critical for health-care managers and policy makers to ensure that primary care physicians fully recognize and embrace the use of new technology to improve both the quality of care provided and the patient outcomes.

  9. A Comparison of Patient-Centered Care in Pharmacy Curricula in the United States and Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes-da-Cunha, Ines; Arguello, Blanca; Martinez, Fernando Martinez; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando

    2016-06-25

    Objective. To compare United States and European Higher Education Area (EHEA) undergraduate pharmacy curricula in terms of patient-centered care courses. Methods. Websites from all pharmacy colleges or schools in the United States and the 41 countries in the EHEA were retrieved from the FIP Official World List of Pharmacy Schools and investigated. A random sample of schools was selected and, based on analyses of course descriptions from syllabi, each course was classified into the following categories: social/behavioral/administrative pharmacy sciences, clinical sciences, experiential, or other/basic sciences. Results. Of 147 schools of pharmacy, 59 were included (23 in US and 36 in the EHEA). Differences existed in the percentages of credits/hours in all of the four subject area categories. Conclusion. Institutions in EHEA countries maintain a greater focus on basic sciences and a lower load of clinical sciences in pharmacy curricula compared to the United States. These differences may not be in accordance with international recommendations to educate future pharmacists focused on patient care.

  10. Patient-Centered Dialysis Care: Depression, Pain, and Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisbord, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    Remarkable advancements have been made in the provision of chronic dialysis therapy since its inception decades ago. A series of studies inform current dialysis dosing recommendations, while advancements in strategies to treat mineral and bone disease, acid-base and electrolyte disturbances, and anemia have facilitated the management of these well-recognized complications of ESRD. The collective result has been a model of chronic dialysis care focused principally on the achievement of metabolic and dialysis-related targets. In fact, guidelines such as the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative put forth by the National Kidney Foundation recommend metrics that characterize successful dialysis care, including the attainment of specific solute clearance targets; maintenance of hemoglobin, calcium, phosphorous, and parathyroid hormone levels within target ranges; and the preferred use of primary arteriovenous fistulae for vascular access. This focus on serologic and dialysis-specific outcomes has helped renal providers manage the biochemical effects related to the loss of kidney function and has reduced ESRD-related morbidity and mortality. Yet, absent from this model of care is an emphasis on the treatment of bothersome symptoms and the impact of such treatment on quality of life (QOL). Among the many symptoms that affect patients on chronic dialysis, depression and pain are particularly common, strongly associated with decrements in QOL, and potentially treatable. This review discusses key research findings and unanswered questions pertaining to the prevalence, significance, and treatment of depression and pain and the effect of such treatment on QOL in patients dependent on chronic dialysis, with the broad goal of incorporating symptom management strategies into a paradigm of patient-centered dialysis care.

  11. Evidence, research, and clinical practice: a patient-centered framework for progress in wound care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rijswijk, Lia; Gray, Mikel

    2012-01-01

    Traditional criteria used in selecting wound care interventions are being slowly replaced with an evidence-based practice approach. The value of such an approach for providing optimal care has been established, but the definition of evidence-based care and the process used to generate evidence continue to evolve. For example, the role of studies developed to demonstrate efficacy, randomized controlled trials, the value of effectiveness studies designed to evaluate outcomes in real world practice, and the use of disease-oriented (interim) study outcomes for wound care research, such as reduces wound fluid or improves granulation tissue formation, have been topics of international conversations and consensus documents. In addition, the use in some clinical studies and most systematic study reviews of ingredient or characteristic-based categories to group products that may not share a common operational definition of how they function has led to a high variability in outcomes, resulting in inconclusive or low-level evidence. These concerns and debates, along with their influence on practice, may cast doubt on the value of evidence-based practice guidelines for some clinicians, slowing their rate of implementation, and extending the discussion about definitions of evidence-based care and the relative merits of various research designs. At the same time, amid growing concerns about medical device safety, clinicians must answer 3 questions about an intervention and its related products or devices in order to provide safe and effective care: (1) Can it work? (2) Does it work? (3) Is it worth it? Reviewing current knowledge about wound care, wound treatment modalities, and the basic principles of research within the existing framework of questions to be answered suggests a clear path toward obtaining much-needed evidence. In wound care, using clearly defined processes to study patient-centered outcomes (eg, quality of life, complete healing) and only product groupings that

  12. The Contribution of Online Peer-to-Peer Communication Among Patients With Adrenal Disease to Patient-Centered Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kauw, D.; Repping-Wuts, H.; Noordzij, A.; Stikkelbroeck, N.; Hermus, A.R.; Faber, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Addison's disease and Cushing's syndrome are rare. The Dutch Adrenal Society offers an online forum for Dutch adrenal patients to meet and communicate. However, little is known about the added value such a forum has for the delivery of patient-centered care. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to ana

  13. Pharmaceutical care as narrative practice? Rethinking patient-centered care through a pharmacist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naß, Janine; Banerjee, Mita; Efferth, Thomas; Wohlmann, Anita

    2016-12-01

    Illness is a disruptive experience that requires high-quality care. The best evidence-based medical treatment risks losing some of its efficacy, however, when patients feel misunderstood when faced with the complexity of their experiences. They might stop treatment, refuse to disclose relevant information or seek unsound alternatives. A narrative-based approach to health care understands the patient's case history as a narrative that can be read or analyzed like a story. In other words, this approach honors individual illness experiences through the stories that patients tell. While programs that train 'narrative competence' have been successfully implemented in medical education, an application to pharmaceutical training is missing so far. We argue for the necessity to complement evidence-based pharmaceutical practice with narrative-based approaches to ensure high-quality care. Using the perspective of a pharmacist in a case scenario, we exemplify the centrality of "narrative pharmacy" for improving the quality and safety of pharmaceutical health care.

  14. Patient-centered care interventions for the management of alcohol use disorders: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio, Pablo; Gual, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Issues Patient-centered care (PCC) is increasingly accepted as an integral component of good health care, including addiction medicine. However, its implementation has been controversial in people with alcohol use disorders. Approach A systematic search strategy was devised to find completed randomized controlled trials enrolling adults (>18 years) with alcohol use disorders. Studies had to use a PCC approach such that they should have been individualized, respectful to the patients’ own goals, and empowering. Studies until September 2015 were searched using PubMed, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, PsychINFO, and Web of Knowledge. Key findings In total, 40 studies enrolling 16,020 patients met the inclusion criteria. Assessment revealed two main categories of study: psychosocial (n=35 based on motivational interviewing) and pharmacological (n=5 based on an as needed dosing regimen). Psychosocial interventions were further classified according to the presence or absence of an active comparator. When no active comparator was present, studies were classified according to the number of sessions (≥1). Results from single sessions of motivational interviewing showed no clear benefit on alcohol consumption outcomes, with few studies indicating benefit of PCC versus control. Although the results for studies of multiple sessions of counseling were also mixed, many did show a significant benefit of the PCC intervention. By contrast, studies consistently demonstrated a benefit of pharmacologically supported PCC interventions, with most of the differences reaching statistical significance. Implications PCC-based interventions may be beneficial for reducing alcohol consumption in people with alcohol use disorders. PMID:27695301

  15. The Treatment Effectiveness Assessment (TEA: an efficient, patient-centered instrument for evaluating progress in recovery from addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling W

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Walter Ling,1 David Farabee,1 Dagmar Liepa,2 Li-Tzy Wu31Integrated Substance Abuse Programs, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2Valley Care Medical Center, Panorama City, CA, USA; 3Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, School of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: The fields of addiction medicine and addiction research have long sought an efficient yet comprehensive instrument to assess patient progress in treatment and recovery. Traditional tools are expensive, time consuming, complex, and based on topics that clinicians or researchers think are important. Thus, they typically do not provide patient-centered information that is meaningful and relevant to the lives of patients with substance use disorders. To improve our ability to understand patients’ progress in treatment from their perspectives, the authors and colleagues developed a patient-oriented assessment instrument that has considerable advantages over existing instruments: brevity, simplicity, ease of administration, orientation to the patient, and cost (none. The resulting Treatment Effectiveness Assessment (TEA elicits patient responses that help the patient and the clinician quickly gauge patient progress in treatment and in recovery, according to the patients’ sense of what is important within four domains established by prior research. Patients provide both numerical responses and representative details on their substance use, health, lifestyle, and community. No software is required for data entry or scoring, and no formal training is required to administer the TEA. This article describes the development of the TEA and the initial phases of its application in clinical practice and in research.Keywords: substance use disorders, global treatment progress, brief instrument, patient-centered

  16. Patient-centered care interventions for the management of alcohol use disorders: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrio P

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Pablo Barrio, Antoni Gual Neurosciences Institute, Hospital Clinic, Institut d’Investigacions Biomèdiques Agustí Pi i Sunyer, Barcelona, Spain Issues: Patient-centered care (PCC is increasingly accepted as an integral component of good health care, including addiction medicine. However, its implementation has been controversial in people with alcohol use disorders. Approach: A systematic search strategy was devised to find completed randomized controlled trials enrolling adults (>18 years with alcohol use disorders. Studies had to use a PCC approach such that they should have been individualized, respectful to the patients’ own goals, and empowering. Studies until September 2015 were searched using PubMed, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, PsychINFO, and Web of Knowledge. Key findings: In total, 40 studies enrolling 16,020 patients met the inclusion criteria. Assessment revealed two main categories of study: psychosocial (n=35 based on motivational interviewing and pharmacological (n=5 based on an as needed dosing regimen. Psychosocial interventions were further classified according to the presence or absence of an active comparator. When no active comparator was present, studies were classified according to the number of sessions (≥1. Results from single sessions of motivational interviewing showed no clear benefit on alcohol consumption outcomes, with few studies indicating benefit of PCC versus control. Although the results for studies of multiple sessions of counseling were also mixed, many did show a significant benefit of the PCC intervention. By contrast, studies consistently demonstrated a benefit of pharmacologically supported PCC interventions, with most of the differences reaching statistical significance. Implications: PCC-based interventions may be beneficial for reducing alcohol consumption in people with alcohol use disorders. Keywords: psychosocial intervention, pharmacological intervention, motivational interviewing, as-needed

  17. An online module series to prepare pharmacists to facilitate student engagement in patient-centered care delivery: development and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kassam R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Rosemin Kassam,1 Mona Kwong,1 John B Collins21Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Educational Studies, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, CanadaIntroduction: Accreditation bodies across North America have adopted revised standards that place increased emphasis on experiential education and preceptors to promote and demonstrate patient-centered, pharmaceutical care practices to students. Since such practices are still evolving, challenges exist in recruiting skilled preceptors who are prepared to provide such opportunities. An online educational module series titled "A Guide to Pharmaceutical Care" (The Guide was developed and evaluated to facilitate this transition. The objectives of this paper are: (1 to describe the development of the modules; and (2 to present the evaluation results from its pilot testing.Methods: The Guide was developed as an online, self-directed training program. It begins by providing an overview of patient care (PC philosophy and practice, and then discusses the tools that facilitate PC. It also provides a range of tips to support students as they provide PC during their experiential learning. Pharmacists participating in the pilot study were recruited using purposive and snowball sampling techniques. A pre–post quantitative survey with additional open-ended questions was used to evaluate the modules.Results: The modules incorporated a variety of teaching strategies: self-reflection exercises, quizzes to review important concepts, quick tips, flash cards, and video clips to illustrate more in-depth learning. Thirty-two pharmacists completed the pre–post assessment and reported significant increases in their confidence because of this training. The most influenced outcome was "Application of techniques to facilitate learning opportunities that enable pharmacy students to practice pharmaceutical care competencies." They also indicated that the training clarified necessary changes in their

  18. 患者中心疗法疗效评估%Patient-centered Therapy Efficacy Assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢雅; 王欢; 苗银宁

    2014-01-01

    Patient-centered therapy (CCT) was created by the famous American Humanism psychologist Carl o Rogers. This therapy is based on the characteristics of the patient as the center, the entire treatment process of creating a suitable environ-ment for the atmosphere and the patient to alleviate the patient's anxiety. This article will be based on collecting and collating documents, to assess the efficacy of CCT.%患者中心疗法(CCT)由美国著名人本主义心理学家卡尔·罗杰斯倡导创立。这种疗法的特点是以患者为中心,在整个治疗过程中为患者创造适宜的气氛和环境,以减轻患者的焦虑。本文将在文献搜集和整理的基础上,对CCT的疗效进行评估。

  19. Veteran family reintegration, primary care needs, and the benefit of the patient-centered medical home model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinojosa, Ramon; Hinojosa, Melanie Sberna; Nelson, Karen; Nelson, David

    2010-01-01

    Men and women returning from the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq face a multitude of difficulties while integrating back into civilian life, but the importance of their veteran status is often overlooked in primary care settings. Family physicians have the potential to be the first line of defense to ensure the well-being of veterans and their families because many will turn to nonmilitary and non-Veterans Affairs providers for health care needs. An awareness of the unique challenges faced by this population is critical to providing care. A patient-centered medical home orientation can help the family physician provide veterans and their families the care they need. Specific recommendations for family physicians include screening their patient population; providing timely care; treating the whole family; and integrating care from multiple disciplines and specialties, providing veterans and families with "one-stop shopping" care. An awareness of the unique challenges faced by veterans and their families translates into better overall outcomes for this population.

  20. The patient care component: patient-centered horizontal integration in a vertical world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, A C

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the structure and operational properties of the Patient Care Component, a patient care data system developed by the Indian Health Service to support primary care in a multi-site, decentralized, health care organization. Sharing the same technology base as the Department of Veterans Affairs Distributed Hospital Computer Program, the system requires a minimal level of investment in technology compared to alternative approaches and is in operation at 140 sites. The Indian Health Service and historical aspects of the system are described briefly; the paper focuses on the design objectives for the system and lessons learned from development and several years of operational experience.

  1. Using online health communities to deliver patient-centered care to people with chronic conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, M. van der; Faber, M.J.; Aarts, J.W.M.; Kremer, J.A.M.; Munneke, M.; Bloem, B.R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Our health care system faces major threats as the number of people with multiple chronic conditions rises dramatically. OBJECTIVE: To study the use of Online Health Communities (OHCs) as a tool to facilitate high-quality and affordable health care for future generations. METHODS: OHCs ar

  2. An interprofessional service-learning course: uniting students across educational levels and promoting patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacey, Marie; Murphy, Judy I; Anderson, Delia Castro; McCloskey, William W

    2010-12-01

    Recognizing the importance of interprofessional education, we developed a pilot interprofessional education course at our institution that included a total of 10 nursing, BS health psychology, premedical, and pharmacy students. Course goals were for students to: 1) learn about, practice, and enhance their skills as members of an interprofessional team, and 2) create and deliver a community-based service-learning program to help prevent or slow the progression of cardiovascular disease in older adults. Teaching methods included lecture, role-play, case studies, peer editing, oral and poster presentation, and discussion. Interprofessional student teams created and delivered two different health promotion programs at an older adult care facility. Despite barriers such as scheduling conflicts and various educational experiences, this course enabled students to gain greater respect for the contributions of other professions and made them more patient centered. In addition, inter-professional student teams positively influenced the health attitudes and behaviors of the older adults whom they encountered.

  3. Health information needs, sources, and barriers of primary care patients to achieve patient-centered care: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Martina A; Moore, Joi L; Steege, Linsey M; Koopman, Richelle J; Belden, Jeffery L; Canfield, Shannon M; Meadows, Susan E; Elliott, Susan G; Kim, Min Soon

    2016-12-01

    To synthesize findings from previous studies assessing information needs of primary care patients on the Internet and other information sources in a primary care setting. A systematic review of studies was conducted with a comprehensive search in multiple databases including OVID MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Scopus. The most common information needs among patients were information about an illness or medical condition and treatment methods, while the most common information sources were the Internet and patients' physicians. Overall, patients tend to prefer the Internet for the ease of access to information, while they trust their physicians more for their clinical expertise and experience. Barriers to information access via the Internet include the following: socio-demographic variables such as age, ethnicity, income, education, and occupation; information search skills; and reliability of health information.

  4. Patient-centered care in affective, non-affective, and schizoaffective groups: patients' opinions and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempier, Raymond; Hepp, Shelanne L; Duncan, C Randy; Rohr, Betty; Hachey, Krystal; Mosier, Karen

    2010-10-01

    An outcome evaluation was conducted to obtain psychiatric inpatients' perspectives on acute care mental health treatment and services. The applicability of diagnostic categories based on affective, non-affective, and schizoaffective disorder were considered in the predictability of responses to treatment regimens and the related services provided in an inpatient psychiatric unit. A multidimensional approach was used to survey patients, which included the DAI-30, the BMQ, the SERVQUAL, and the CSQ-8. Overall, findings indicate that inpatient satisfaction could be improved with tailoring treatment to suit their respective symptoms. Furthermore, this exploratory study demonstrates some preliminary support for the inclusion of patients with a diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder as a separate group toward improving acute mental health care while hospitalized.

  5. Moving Toward Patient-Centered Care in Africa: A Discrete Choice Experiment of Preferences for Delivery Care among 3,003 Tanzanian Women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elysia Larson

    Full Text Available In order to develop patient-centered care we need to know what patients want and how changing socio-demographic factors shape their preferences.We fielded a structured questionnaire that included a discrete choice experiment to investigate women's preferences for place of delivery care in four rural districts of Pwani Region, Tanzania. The discrete choice experiment consisted of six attributes: kind treatment by the health worker, health worker medical knowledge, modern equipment and medicines, facility privacy, facility cleanliness, and cost of visit. Each woman received eight choice questions. The influence of potential supply- and demand- side factors on patient preferences was evaluated using mixed logit models.3,003 women participated in the discrete choice experiment (93% response rate completing 23,947 choice tasks. The greatest predictor of health facility preference was kind treatment by doctor (β = 1.13, p<0.001, followed by having a doctor with excellent medical knowledge (β = 0.89 p<0.001 and modern medical equipment and drugs (β = 0.66 p<0.001. Preferences for all attributes except kindness and cost were changed with changes to education, primiparity, media exposure and distance to nearest hospital.Care quality, both technical and interpersonal, was more important than clinic inputs such as equipment and cleanliness. These results suggest that while basic clinic infrastructure is necessary, it is not sufficient for provision of high quality, patient-centered care. There is an urgent need to build an adequate, competent, and kind health workforce to raise facility delivery and promote patient-centered care.

  6. Patient-Centered Cancer Care Programs in Italy: Benchmarking Global Patient Education Initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truccolo, Ivana; Cipolat Mis, Chiara; Cervo, Silvia; Dal Maso, Luigino; Bongiovanni, Marilena; Bearz, Alessandra; Sartor, Ivana; Baldo, Paolo; Ferrarin, Emanuela; Fratino, Lucia; Mascarin, Maurizio; Roncadin, Mario; Annunziata, Maria Antonietta; Muzzatti, Barbara; De Paoli, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    In Italy, educational programs for cancer patients are currently provided by the national government, scientific societies, and patient advocate organizations. Several gaps limit their effectiveness, including the lack of coordinated efforts, poor involvement of patient feedback in the planning of programs, as well as a lack of resources on innovative cancer-related topics. This process is parallel to a strong shift in the attitude of patients towards health in general and taking charge of their own health conditions in particular. The National Cancer Institute in the USA and the Organization of European Cancer Institutes encourage comprehensive cancer centers in providing educational programs conceived to overcome these gaps. The goal of this paper is to identify and describe the key elements necessary to develop a global patient education program and provide recommendations for strategies with practical examples for implementation in the daily activities of cancer institutes. A multidisciplinary committee was established for patient education, including patient representatives as equal partners, to define, implement, verify, and evaluate the fundamental steps for establishing a comprehensive education program. Six essential topics were identified for the program: appropriate communication of cancer epidemiology, clinical trial information, new therapeutic technologies, support in the use of medicines, psycho-oncological interventions, age-personalized approaches, and training programs for healthcare providers. Integration of these topics along with patient feedback is the key to a successful model for educational programs. An integrated educational program can transform a comprehensive cancer center to an institution that provides research and care for and with patients.

  7. Adaptive practices in heart failure care teams: implications for patient-centered care in the context of complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tait GR

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Glendon R Tait,1 Joanna Bates,2 Kori A LaDonna,3 Valerie N Schulz,4 Patricia H Strachan,5 Allan McDougall,3 Lorelei Lingard3 1Department of Psychiatry and Division of Medical Education, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, 2Centre for Health Education Scholarship, Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver, BC, 3Centre for Education Research and Innovation, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, 4Palliative Care, London Health Sciences Centre, University Hospital, London; 5School of Nursing, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada Background: Heart failure (HF, one of the three leading causes of death, is a chronic, progressive, incurable disease. There is growing support for integration of palliative care’s holistic approach to suffering, but insufficient understanding of how this would happen in the complex team context of HF care. This study examined how HF care teams, as defined by patients, work together to provide care to patients with advanced disease. Methods: Team members were identified by each participating patient, generating team sampling units (TSUs for each patient. Drawn from five study sites in three Canadian provinces, our dataset consists of 209 interviews from 50 TSUs. Drawing on a theoretical framing of HF teams as complex adaptive systems (CAS, interviews were analyzed using the constant comparative method associated with constructivist grounded theory. Results: This paper centers on the dominant theme of system practices, how HF care delivery is reported to work organizationally, socially, and practically, and describes two subthemes: “the way things work around here”, which were commonplace, routine ways of doing things, and “the way we make things work around here”, which were more conscious, effortful adaptations to usual practice in response to emergent needs. An adaptive practice, often a small alteration to routine, could have amplified effects beyond those intended by the innovating team

  8. The Power to drive change: Working together for excellence. Creating a continuously improving consumer engagement framework for excellence in patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization has acknowledged Patient Safety while receiving hospital care as a serious global public health issue, with patient empowerment and community engagement key to continuously improving safety and quality of care for the best possible clinical and patient outcomes. In Australia, the introduction of ten mandatory National Safety and Quality Health Service Standards in 2011 provided the catalyst for all Australian health facilities to review their systems. Standard 2: Partnering with Consumers required health facilities across Australia to assess commitment to, and capacity for consumer and community engagement and participation. At this time, the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital did not have a strategic perspective and understanding, or an organizational structure for engaging with consumers (patients, families, care givers and community members). The concept required a new model to replace the clinician-led model of healthcare historically featured in Australia, with a change in culture and core business. processes to partner with consumers at all levels of the system, from individual patient care through to participating in policy development, health service planning and delivery, and evaluation and measurement processes. The challenge for the hospital was to build a sustainable framework of engagement for a genuine patient-centered model of care informed by best practice, and provide leadership and commitment to developing as an area of excellence in patient engagement and experience. A successful and sustainable framework for consumer and community engagement has been embedded in the hospital, with resultant culture change, achieving accreditation across all core and developmental criteria for the partnering with consumer standards including several Met with Merit ratings.

  9. Creating a Patient-Centered Health Care Delivery System: A Systematic Review of Health Care Quality From the Patient Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Khaled; Nolan, Margaret B; Rajjo, Tamim; Shah, Nilay D; Prokop, Larry J; Varkey, Prathibha; Murad, Mohammad H

    2016-01-01

    Patient experience is one of key domains of value-based purchasing that can serve as a measure of quality and be used to improve the delivery of health services. The aims of this study are to explore patient perceptions of quality of health care and to understand how perceptions may differ by settings and condition. A systematic review of multiple databases was conducted for studies targeting patient perceptions of quality of care. Two reviewers screened and extracted data independently. Data synthesis was performed following a meta-narrative approach. A total of 36 studies were included that identified 10 quality dimensions perceived by patients: communication, access, shared decision making, provider knowledge and skills, physical environment, patient education, electronic medical record, pain control, discharge process, and preventive services. These dimensions can be used in planning and evaluating health care delivery. Future research should evaluate the effect of interventions targeting patient experience on patient outcomes.

  10. Community health worker integration into the health care team accomplishes the triple aim in a patient-centered medical home: a Bronx tale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findley, Sally; Matos, Sergio; Hicks, April; Chang, Ji; Reich, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Community health workers are ideally suited to the care coordination niche within the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) team, but there are few case studies detailing how to accomplish this integration. This qualitative study documents how community health workers (CHWs) were integrated into a PCMH in South Bronx, New York. Results show that integration was linked to clear definition of their care coordination role within the care team, meticulous recruitment, training and supervision by a senior CHW, shared leadership of the care management team, and documented value for money. By helping the team understand patients' backgrounds, constraints, and preferences, they helped everyone genuinely focus on the patient.

  11. Patient-Centered Homes and Integrated Behavioral Health Care: Reclaiming the Role of "Consultant" for Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltis-Jarrett, Victoria

    2016-06-01

    The notion of patient-centered care has long been linked with nursing practice since Florence Nightingale. The discipline of nursing is focused on the holistic care of individuals, families, and communities in times of sickness and/or health. However, in psychiatric-mental health nursing, the concepts of mental health and psychiatric illness still remain marginalized in our health care delivery systems, as well as in nursing education, knowledge development, and practice. Even with the concept of patient-centered homes, acute and primary care providers are reluctant to embrace care of those with psychiatric illness in their respective settings. Psychiatric illness was and continues to be in the shadows, hidden and often ignored by the larger community as well as by health care providers. This paper describes a Health Resources Services Administration (HRSA) Advanced Nursing Education (ANE) training grant's objective of reintegrating psychiatric-mental health practice into ALL health care delivery systems using the concept of patient-centered nursing care as a foundation for, and promotion of, the Psychiatric-Mental Health Nurse Practitioner (PMH-NP) as the "navigator" for not only the patients and their families, but also for their acute and primary care colleagues using an Interprofessional Education Model. The major barriers and lessons learned from this project as well as the need for psychiatric-mental health nurses to reclaim their role as a consultant/liaison in acute, primary, and long-term care settings will be discussed. The PMHNP as a consultant/liaison is being revitalized as an innovative advanced practice nursing health care model in North Carolina.

  12. Increased literacy of the best evidence base optimizes patient-clinician communication in convergent translational health care: Relevance for patient-centered modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Khakshooy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dentistry in particular and biomedicine in general have undergone a fundamental transformation over the recent decades, which have been formalized by the Affordable Care Act, 2010. In brief, modern contemporary health care has evolved from procedure-driven and intervention-centered care based on research evidence to the administration and delivery of care that is patient-centered, effectiveness-focused, and that utilizes the best evidence base generated by systematic research synthesis (i.e., evidence-based. The present conceptualization of health care integrates translational research and translational effectiveness, and allows convergence of the multiple specialization fields of biomedicine (e.g., dentistry, internal medicine, and psychiatry as well as the various medical traditions globally (i.e., Western, Ayurvedic, and Chinese medical traditions, etc.. The Hypothesis: Here, we propose the hypothesis that increased literacy of the best evidence base optimizes patient-clinician communication in the current convergent translational health care model including dental care. Evaluation of the Hypothesis: We discuss the salient points of this proposition, and outline the relevance of certain salient convergent patient-centered modalities of health care that intimately intertwine medicine and dentistry.

  13. Attributes of patient-centered primary care associated with the public perception of good healthcare quality in Brazil, Colombia, Mexico and El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubova, Svetlana V; Guanais, Frederico C; Pérez-Cuevas, Ricardo; Canning, David; Macinko, James; Reich, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated primary care attributes of patient-centered care associated with the public perception of good quality in Brazil, Colombia, Mexico and El Salvador. We conducted a secondary data analysis of a Latin American survey on public perceptions and experiences with healthcare systems. The primary care attributes examined were access, coordination, provider-patient communication, provision of health-related information and emotional support. A double-weighted multiple Poisson regression with robust variance model was performed. The study included between 1500 and 1503 adults in each country. The results identified four significant gaps in the provision of primary care: not all respondents had a regular place of care or a regular primary care doctor (Brazil 35.7%, Colombia 28.4%, Mexico 22% and El Salvador 45.4%). The communication with the primary care clinic was difficult (Brazil 44.2%, Colombia 41.3%, Mexico 45.1% and El Salvador 56.7%). There was a lack of coordination of care (Brazil 78.4%, Colombia 52.3%, Mexico 48% and El Salvador 55.9%). Also, there was a lack of information about healthy diet (Brazil 21.7%, Colombia 32.9%, Mexico 16.9% and El Salvador 20.8%). The public's perception of good quality was variable (Brazil 67%, Colombia 71.1%, Mexico 79.6% and El Salvador 79.5%). The primary care attributes associated with the perception of good quality were a primary care provider 'who knows relevant information about a patient's medical history', 'solves most of the health problems', 'spends enough time with the patient', 'coordinates healthcare' and a 'primary care clinic that is easy to communicate with'. In conclusion, the public has a positive perception of the quality of primary care, although it has unfulfilled expectations; further efforts are necessary to improve the provision of patient-centered primary care services in these four Latin American countries.

  14. Psychosocial risk factors, interventions and comorbidity in patients with non-specific low back pain in primary care: need for comprehensive and patient-centered care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline eRamond-Roquin

    2015-10-01

    psychosocial conditions, this suggests taking into account any potential comorbidity in patients with chronic LBP, as in other patients. All these results support the adoption of a more comprehensive and patient-centered approach when dealing with patients with LBP in primary care. As this condition is illustrative of many situations encountered in primary care, the strategies proposed here may benefit most patients consulting in this setting.

  15. China Patient-centered Evaluative Assessment of Cardiac Events Prospective Study of Acute Myocardial Infarction:Study Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Li; Rachel P Dreyer; Xi Li; Xue Du; Nicholas S Downing; Li Li; Hai-Bo Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the rapid growth in the incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in China, there is limited information about patients' experiences after AMI hospitalization, especially on long-term adverse events and patient-reported outcomes (PROs).Methods: The China Patient-centered Evaluative Assessment of Cardiac Events (PEACE)-Prospective AMI Study will enroll 4000 consecutive AMI patients from 53 diverse hospitals across China and follow them longitudinally for 12 months to document their treatment, recovery, and outcomes.Details of patients' medical history, treatment, and in-hospital outcomes are abstracted from medical charts.Comprehensive baseline interviews are being conducted to characterize patient demographics, risk factors, presentation, and healthcare utilization.As part of these interviews, validated instruments are administered to measure PROs, including quality of life, symptoms, mood, cognition, and sexual activity.Follow-up interviews, measuring PROs, medication adherence, risk factor control, and collecting hospitalization events are conducted at 1, 6, and 12 months after discharge.Supporting documents for potential outcomes are collected for adjudication by clinicians at the National Coordinating Center.Blood and urine samples are also obtained at baseline, 1-and 12-month follow-up.In addition, we are conducting a survey of participating hospitals to characterize their organizational characteristics.Conclusion: The China PEACE-Prospective AMI study will be uniquely positioned to generate new information regarding patient's experiences and outcomes after AMI in China and serve as a foundation for quality improvement activities.

  16. Validation of a provider self-report inventory for measuring patient-centered cultural sensitivity in health care using a sample of medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsu-Paun, Anca; Tucker, Carolyn M; Herman, Keith C; Hernandez, Caridad A

    2010-04-01

    The paper describes the construction and initial evaluation of the new Tucker-Culturally Sensitive Health Care Inventory (T-CSHCI) Provider Form, which was developed to address the shortcomings of existing similar measures. Two hundred seventeen (217) 3rd and 4th year medical students completed the T-CSHCI-Provider Form. Factor analysis was used to identify non-overlapping items. The final solution produced five factors: patient-centeredness, interpersonal skills, disrespect/disempowerment, competence, and cultural knowledge/responsiveness. The five T-CSHCI-Provider Form factors/subscales proved to be reliable and were associated with related constructs as hypothesized. This study provides initial evidence that the T-CSHCI-Provider Form measures independent dimensions of patient-centered culturally sensitive health care as perceived by medical students. Recommendations for ways in which the T-CSHCI Provider Form can be used to guide culturally sensitive health care training are provided.

  17. Patient-Centered Communication: Basic Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, M Jawad

    2017-01-01

    Communication skills needed for patient-centered care include eliciting the patient's agenda with open-ended questions, especially early on; not interrupting the patient; and engaging in focused active listening. Understanding the patient's perspective of the illness and expressing empathy are key features of patient-centered communication. Understanding the patient's perspective entails exploring the patient's feelings, ideas, concerns, and experience regarding the impact of the illness, as well as what the patient expects from the physician. Empathy can be expressed by naming the feeling; communicating understanding, respect, and support; and exploring the patient's illness experience and emotions. Before revealing a new diagnosis, the patient's prior knowledge and preferences for the depth of information desired should be assessed. After disclosing a diagnosis, physicians should explore the patient's emotional response. Shared decision making empowers patients by inviting them to consider the pros and cons of different treatment options, including no treatment. Instead of overwhelming the patient with medical information, small chunks of data should be provided using repeated cycles of the "ask-tell-ask" approach. Training programs on patient-centered communication for health care professionals can improve communication skills.

  18. Academic-Community Partnership to Develop a Patient-Centered Breast Cancer Risk Reduction Program for Latina Primary Care Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Sheila F; Giacinto, Rebeca E; Medeiros, Elizabeth A; Brongiel, Ilana; Cardona, Olga; Perez, Patricia; Talavera, Gregory A

    2016-06-01

    This collaborative study sought to address Latina breast cancer (BC) disparities by increasing health literacy (HL) in a community health center situated on the US-Mexico border region of San Diego County. An academic-community partnership conducted formative research to develop a culturally tailored promotora-based intervention with 109 individuals. The Spanish language program, entitled Nuestra Cocina: Mesa Buena, Vida Sana (Our Kitchen: Good Table, Healthy Life), included six sessions targeting HL, women's health, BC risk reduction, and patient-provider communication; sessions include cooking demonstrations of recipes with cancer-risk-reducing ingredients. A pilot study with 47 community health center Latina patients was conducted to examine the program's acceptability, feasibility, and ability to impact knowledge and skills. Pre- and post-analyses demonstrated that participants improved their self-reported cancer screening, BC knowledge, daily fruit and vegetable intake, and ability to read a nutrition label (p < 0.05). Results of the pilot study demonstrate the importance of utilizing patient-centered culturally appropriate noninvasive means to educate and empower Latina patients.

  19. Toward competency-based curricula in patient-centered spiritual care: recommended competencies for family medicine resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandarajah, Gowri; Craigie, Frederic; Hatch, Robert; Kliewer, Stephen; Marchand, Lucille; King, Dana; Hobbs, Richard; Daaleman, Timothy P

    2010-12-01

    Spiritual care is increasingly recognized as an important component of medical care. Although many primary care residency programs incorporate spiritual care into their curricula, there are currently no consensus guidelines regarding core competencies necessary for primary care training. In 2006, the Society of Teachers of Family Medicine's Interest Group on Spirituality undertook a three-year initiative to address this need. The project leader assembled a diverse panel of eight educators with dual expertise in (1) spirituality and health and (2) family medicine. The multidisciplinary panel members represented different geographic regions and diverse faith traditions and were nationally recognized senior faculty. They underwent three rounds of a modified Delphi technique to achieve initial consensus regarding spiritual care competencies (SCCs) tailored for family medicine residency training, followed by an iterative process of external validation, feedback, and consensus modifications of the SCCs. Panel members identified six knowledge, nine skills, and four attitude core SCCs for use in training and linked these to competencies of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. They identified three global competencies for use in promotion and graduation criteria. Defining core competencies in spiritual care clarifies training goals and provides the basis for robust curricula evaluation. Given the breadth of family medicine, these competencies may be adaptable to other primary care fields, to medical and surgical specialties, and to medical student education. Effective training in this area may enhance physicians' ability to attend to the physical, mental, and spiritual needs of patients and better maintain sustainable healing relationships.

  20. The Veterans Health Administration: quality, value, accountability, and information as transforming strategies for patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlin, Johnathan B; Kolodner, Robert M; Roswell, Robert H

    2005-01-01

    The Veterans Health Administration is the United States' largest integrated health system. Once disparaged as a bureaucracy providing mediocre care, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) reinvented itself during the past decade through a policy shift mandating structural and organizational change, rationalization of resource allocation, explicit measurement and accountability for quality and value, and development of an information infrastructure supporting the needs of patients, clinicians, and administrators. Today, the VA is recognized for leadership in clinical informatics and performance improvement, cares for more patients with proportionally fewer resources, and sets national benchmarks in patient satisfaction and for 18 indicators of quality in disease prevention and treatment.

  1. Quality, Safety and Patient Centered Care--A Dream Come True in the Mountains of Northern Pakistan. An Award winning project of "2015 Quality, Safety & Patient Centered Care Award" at, Chicago USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassani, Kashif; Essani, Rozina Roshan; Abbas, Syed Nadeem Husain

    2016-01-01

    Northern Pakistan remains very challenging terrain due to harsh weather all year round presenting an infrastructura, human resource and supply chain challenge of its own. Many times the facility had to move to different locations on emergency and ad hoc basis due to landslides, earthquakes affecting continuity of care. Providing quality healthcare to often resource constraint hard-to-reach areas has always been AKHS,P's unique forte. Breaking barriers for catchment population to access quality healthcare, AKHS,P embarked on an initiative of implementing, achieving and sustaining ISO 9001:2008 Quality Management System international standards certification. This article shares the unique experience of AKHS,P in achieving and sustaining ISO 9001:2008 International Quality Management System Certification. After untiring efforts and the hard work of ground staff; AKHS,P achieved ISO 9001:2008 International Quality Management System Certification as well as 1st Surveillance Audit which itself proved that AKHS,P sustained quality systems and ensured continuous quality improvement in the Mountains of Northern Pakistan.

  2. Full body photography in the massive weight loss population: an inquiry to optimize patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasicek, Philip; Kaswan, Sumesh; Messing, Susan; Gusenoff, Jeffrey A

    2013-11-01

    Medical photography of body contouring patients often requires complete nudity, placing patients in a vulnerable situation. We investigated patient perspectives on full body photography in an effort to better protect the patients and enhance comfort with the photography process. Sixty-five massive weight loss patients were identified who underwent body contouring surgery with full body photography. Photographs were taken at the time of initial consult, time of marking, and postoperatively. A retrospective chart review was performed to assess body mass indices and comorbidities, and a telephone survey inquired about several aspects of the photographic process. Fifty-six (86%) patients participated. Patients were more comfortable at the time of markings (P = 0.0004) and at the postoperative session (P = 0.0009). Patients' perception of positive body image increased after body contouring surgery (P photography improves quickly as they move through the surgical process. Maintaining professionalism is the most important factor in achieving patient trust and comfort. Limiting the number of observers in the room, providing explicit details of the photography process, and having at least 1 person of the same sex in the room can optimize patient safety and comfort.

  3. 以患者为中心的优质护理在门诊分诊护理中的应用%Application of Patient - centered High Quality Nursing Care in Outpatient Triage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈慧; 莫晓琼; 刘立捷

    2011-01-01

    目的 观察以患者为中心的优质护理在门诊分诊护理中的作用.方法 统计2008年12月- 2009年12月实行门诊分诊常规护理时284例患者的满意度,以及2010年1月-2011年1月实行以患者为中心的优质门诊分诊护理时256例患者的满意度,对比分析二者的差别.结果 以患者为中心的优质护理服务中有224例患者满意,32例患者不满意;常规分诊护理服务中有196例患者,88例患者不满意.统计分析结果显示实行以患者为中心的优质门诊分诊护理时患者的满意度较常规护理明显提高.结论 以患者为中心的优质门诊分诊护理能够更好地满足患者的需求,是门诊分诊护理的发展趋势.%Objective To observe the effect of the application of patient - centered high quality nursing care in outpatient triage. Methods We analyzed and compared the satisfaction of 284 outpatients who received conventional nursing care from December 2008 to December 2009 in Nanfang Hospital and the satisfaction of 256 outpatients who received patient -centered high quality nursing care from January 2010 to January 2011. Results Two hundred and twenty - four outpatients who received patient - centered high quality nursing care were satisfied with the service, while 32 outpatients were not satisfied with the service received. 196 outpatients who received conventional nursing care were satisfied with the service, while 88 outpatients were not satisfied with the service received. Statistical analysis showed that the satisfaction of outpatients who received patient- centered high quality nursing care was significantly higher than that of outpatients who received conventional nursing care. Conclusions Patient - centered high quality nursing care can better meet the needs of outpatients, and it is the trend of nursing care in outpatient triage.

  4. The impact of behavioral and mental health risk assessments on goal setting in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krist, Alex H; Glasgow, Russell E; Heurtin-Roberts, Suzanne; Sabo, Roy T; Roby, Dylan H; Gorin, Sherri N Sheinfeld; Balasubramanian, Bijal A; Estabrooks, Paul A; Ory, Marcia G; Glenn, Beth A; Phillips, Siobhan M; Kessler, Rodger; Johnson, Sallie Beth; Rohweder, Catherine L; Fernandez, Maria E

    2016-06-01

    Patient-centered health risk assessments (HRAs) that screen for unhealthy behaviors, prioritize concerns, and provide feedback may improve counseling, goal setting, and health. To evaluate the effectiveness of routinely administering a patient-centered HRA, My Own Health Report, for diet, exercise, smoking, alcohol, drug use, stress, depression, anxiety, and sleep, 18 primary care practices were randomized to ask patients to complete My Own Health Report (MOHR) before an office visit (intervention) or continue usual care (control). Intervention practice patients were more likely than control practice patients to be asked about each of eight risks (range of differences 5.3-15.8 %, p set goals for six risks (range of differences 3.8-16.6 %, p controls, intervention patients felt clinicians cared more for them and showed more interest in their concerns. Patient-centered health risk assessments improve screening and goal setting.Trial RegistrationClinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01825746.

  5. An International Standard Set of Patient-Centered Outcome Measures After Stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salinas, J. (Joel); Sprinkhuizen, S.M. (Sara M.); Ackerson, T. (Teri); Bernhardt, J. (Julie); Davie, C. (Charlie); George, M.G. (Mary G.); Gething, S. (Stephanie); Kelly, A.G. (Adam G.); Lindsay, P. (Patrice); Liu, L. (Liping); Martins, S.C.O. (Sheila C.O.); Morgan, L. (Louise); B. Norrving (Bo); Ribbers, G.M. (Gerard M.); Silver, F.L. (Frank L.); Smith, E.E. (Eric E.); Williams, L.S. (Linda S.); Schwamm, L.H. (Lee H.)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:__ Value-based health care aims to bring together patients and health systems to maximize the ratio of quality over cost. To enable assessment of healthcare value in stroke management, an international standard set of patient-centered stroke outcome measures

  6. BMT Roadmap: A User-Centered Design Health Information Technology Tool to Promote Patient-Centered Care in Pediatric Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runaas, Lyndsey; Hanauer, David; Maher, Molly; Bischoff, Evan; Fauer, Alex; Hoang, Tiffany; Munaco, Anna; Sankaran, Roshun; Gupta, Rahael; Seyedsalehi, Sajjad; Cohn, Amy; An, Larry; Tewari, Muneesh; Choi, Sung Won

    2017-05-01

    Health information technology (HIT) has great potential for increasing patient engagement. Pediatric hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a setting ripe for using HIT but in which little research exists. "BMT Roadmap" is a web-based application that integrates patient-specific information and includes several domains: laboratory results, medications, clinical trial details, photos of the healthcare team, trajectory of transplant process, and discharge checklist. BMT Roadmap was provided to 10 caregivers of patients undergoing first-time HCT. Research assistants performed weekly qualitative interviews throughout the patient's hospitalization and at discharge and day 100 to assess the impact of BMT Roadmap. Rigorous thematic analysis revealed 5 recurrent themes: emotional impact of the HCT process itself; critical importance of communication among patients, caregivers, and healthcare providers; ways in which BMT Roadmap was helpful during inpatient setting; suggestions for improving BMT Roadmap; and other strategies for organization and management of complex healthcare needs that could be incorporated into BMT Roadmap. Caregivers found the tool useful and easy to use, leading them to want even greater access to information. BMT Roadmap was feasible, with no disruption to inpatient care. Although this initial study is limited by the small sample size and single-institution experience, these initial findings are encouraging and support further investigation.

  7. Reflective practice: providing safe quality patient-centered pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Gwen; McNeill, Jeanette

    2017-02-02

    Effective pain management continues to baffle clinicians in spite of numerous evidence-based guidelines and standards, focused clinical interventions and standardized assessments. Reflective practice is a mindful approach to practice that grounds clinicians in the moment with the individual patient to ask questions and then to listen to the patient's message about their pain experience. Reflective practice helps meld theoretical knowledge with lessons from experience to rethink mechanistic responses to patient pain. The subjective nature of pain means no two patients have the same experience, and, evidence based best practices are to be applied within the patient's preferences and context. The paper uses a case study to illustrate how to apply reflective practice to integrate the interprofessional quality and safety competencies to provide patient-centered pain management. Applying reflective questions throughout the care experience by all members of the healthcare team provides a mindful approach that focuses care on the individual patient.

  8. Development and evaluation of a patient-centered cardiovascular health education program among insured primary care patients with hypertension in rural Nigeria: The QUICK-II study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odusola, A.O.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are increasingly common in Nigeria and sub Saharan Africa (SSA). Poverty is rampant and quality of primary care substandard. Moreover adherence capacity for prescribed anti-hypertensive treatment is limited and blood pressure (BP) control consequently poor.

  9. FAmily CEntered (FACE) advance care planning: Study design and methods for a patient-centered communication and decision-making intervention for patients with HIV/AIDS and their surrogate decision-makers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, Allison L; Wang, Jichuan; Scott, Rachel K; Briggs, Linda; Lyon, Maureen E

    2015-07-01

    Although the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) has become a chronic illness, disease-specific advance care planning has not yet been evaluated for the palliative care needs of adults with HIV/AIDS. This prospective, longitudinal, randomized, two-arm controlled clinical trial aims to test the efficacy of FAmily CEntered advance care planning among adults living with AIDS and/or HIV with co-morbidities on congruence in treatment preferences, healthcare utilization, and quality of life. The FAmily CEntered intervention arm is two face-to-face sessions with a trained, certified facilitator: Session 1) Disease-Specific Advance Care Planning Respecting Choices Interview; Session 2) Completion of advance directive. The Healthy Living Control arm is: Session 1) Developmental/Relationship History; Session 2) Nutrition. Follow-up data will be collected at 3, 6, 12, and 18 months post-intervention. A total of 288 patient/surrogate dyads will be enrolled from five hospital-based, out-patient clinics in Washington, District of Columbia. Participants will be HIV positive and ≥ 21 years of age; surrogates will be ≥ 18 years of age. Exclusion criteria are homicidality, suicidality, psychosis, and impaired cognitive functioning. We hypothesize that this intervention will enhance patient-centered communication with a surrogate decision-maker about end of life treatment preferences over time, enhance patient quality of life and decrease health care utilization. We further hypothesize that this intervention will decrease health disparities for Blacks in completion of advance directives. If proposed aims are achieved, the benefits of palliative care, particularly increased treatment preferences about end-of-life care and enhanced quality of life, will be extended to people living with AIDS.

  10. WellStar Paulding Hospital intensive care unit case study: achieving a research-based, patient-centered design using a collaborative process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Georgeann B; Hogue, Vicky

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the processes and tools used by WellStar Paulding Hospital to plan and design a new intensive care unit (ICU) as part of a 108-bed replacement hospital on a new site. Seeking to create a culture of safety centered around patient care, quality, and efficiency, the team used multiple external resources to increase their effectiveness as participants in the design process and to ensure that the new ICU achieves the functional performance goals identified at the beginning of planning and design. Specific focus on evidence-based design was assisted through participation in the Center for Health Design's Pebble Project process as well as the Joint Commission International Safe Health Design Learning Academy Pilot Program.

  11. Social media: opportunities for quality improvement and lessons for providers-a networked model for patient-centered care through digital engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornkessel, Alexandra; Furberg, Robert; Lefebvre, R Craig

    2014-07-01

    Social media brings a new dimension to health care for patients, providers, and their support networks. Increasing evidence demonstrates that patients who are more actively involved in their healthcare experience have better health outcomes and incur lower costs. In the field of cardiology, social media are proposed as innovative tools for the education and update of clinicians, physicians, nurses, and medical students. This article reviews the use of social media by healthcare providers and patients and proposes a model of "networked care" that integrates the use of digital social networks and platforms by both patients and providers and offers recommendations for providers to optimize their use and understanding of social media for quality improvement.

  12. Encounter Decision Aid vs. Clinical Decision Support or Usual Care to Support Patient-Centered Treatment Decisions in Osteoporosis: The Osteoporosis Choice Randomized Trial II.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie LeBlanc

    Full Text Available Osteoporosis Choice, an encounter decision aid, can engage patients and clinicians in shared decision making about osteoporosis treatment. Its effectiveness compared to the routine provision to clinicians of the patient's estimated risk of fracture using the FRAX calculator is unknown.Patient-level, randomized, three-arm trial enrolling women over 50 with osteopenia or osteoporosis eligible for treatment with bisphosphonates, where the use of Osteoporosis Choice was compared to FRAX only and to usual care to determine impact on patient knowledge, decisional conflict, involvement in the decision-making process, decision to start and adherence to bisphosphonates.We enrolled 79 women in the three arms. Because FRAX estimation alone and usual care produced similar results, we grouped them for analysis. Compared to these, use of Osteoporosis Choice increased patient knowledge (median score 6 vs. 4, p = .01, improved understanding of fracture risk and risk reduction with bisphosphonates (p = .01 and p<.0001, respectively, had no effect on decision conflict, and increased patient engagement in the decision making process (OPTION scores 57% vs. 43%, p = .001. Encounters with the decision aid were 0.8 minutes longer (range: 33 minutes shorter to 3.0 minutes longer. There were twice as many patients receiving and filling prescriptions in the decision aid arm (83% vs. 40%, p = .07; medication adherence at 6 months was no different across arms.Supporting both patients and clinicians during the clinical encounter with the Osteoporosis Choice decision aid efficiently improves treatment decision making when compared to usual care with or without clinical decision support with FRAX results.clinical trials.gov NCT00949611.

  13. Instruments to assess integrated care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsø, Anne Marie; Godtfredsen, Nina Skavlan; Høst, Dorte

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Although several measurement instruments have been developed to measure the level of integrated health care delivery, no standardised, validated instrument exists covering all aspects of integrated care. The purpose of this review is to identify the instruments concerning how to mea...... was prevalent. It is uncertain whether development of a single 'all-inclusive' model for assessing integrated care is desirable. We emphasise the continuing need for validated instruments embedded in theoretical contexts.......INTRODUCTION: Although several measurement instruments have been developed to measure the level of integrated health care delivery, no standardised, validated instrument exists covering all aspects of integrated care. The purpose of this review is to identify the instruments concerning how...... to measure the level of integration across health-care sectors and to assess and evaluate the organisational elements within the instruments identified. METHODS: An extensive, systematic literature review in PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, Web of Science for the years 1980-2011. Selected...

  14. Assessing the assessment in emergency care training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E W Dankbaar

    Full Text Available Each year over 1.5 million health care professionals attend emergency care courses. Despite high stakes for patients and extensive resources involved, little evidence exists on the quality of assessment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the validity and reliability of commonly used formats in assessing emergency care skills.Residents were assessed at the end of a 2-week emergency course; a subgroup was videotaped. Psychometric analyses were conducted to assess the validity and inter-rater reliability of the assessment instrument, which included a checklist, a 9-item competency scale and a global performance scale.A group of 144 residents and 12 raters participated in the study; 22 residents were videotaped and re-assessed by 8 raters. The checklists showed limited validity and poor inter-rater reliability for the dimensions "correct" and "timely" (ICC = .30 and.39 resp.. The competency scale had good construct validity, consisting of a clinical and a communication subscale. The internal consistency of the (subscales was high (α = .93/.91/.86. The inter-rater reliability was moderate for the clinical competency subscale (.49 and the global performance scale (.50, but poor for the communication subscale (.27. A generalizability study showed that for a reliable assessment 5-13 raters are needed when using checklists, and four when using the clinical competency scale or the global performance scale.This study shows poor validity and reliability for assessing emergency skills with checklists but good validity and moderate reliability with clinical competency or global performance scales. Involving more raters can improve the reliability substantially. Recommendations are made to improve this high stakes skill assessment.

  15. Instruments to assess integrated care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsø, Anne Marie; Godtfredsen, Nina Skavlan; Høst, Dorte;

    2014-01-01

    to measure the level of integration across health-care sectors and to assess and evaluate the organisational elements within the instruments identified. METHODS: An extensive, systematic literature review in PubMed, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Cochrane Library, Web of Science for the years 1980-2011. Selected...

  16. 78 FR 10610 - TRICARE; Demonstration Project for Participation in Maryland Multi-Payer Patient Centered Medical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ... Department of Defense (DoD) Enhanced Access to Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH): Participation in Maryland Multi-payer Patient Centered Medical Home Program (MMPCMHP). DATES: The demonstration program will... strengthen the provider-patient relationship by replacing episodic care with coordinated care and a...

  17. Communication: the royal pathway to patient-centered medicine.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bensing, J.M.; Verhaak, P.F.M.; Dulmen, A.M. van; Visser, A.P.

    2000-01-01

    The papers in this special issue on communication in health care can be summarized in one easy and powerful message: communication is the royal pathway to patient-centerd medicine. Approached from differen angles, the linkage between communication and patient-centered medicine is the common theme th

  18. Improving breast cancer survivors’ knowledge using a patient-centered intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulloa, Jesus G.; Hemmelgarn, Marian; Viveros, Lori; Odele, Patience; Feldman, Nancy R.; Ganz, Patricia A.; Maggard-Gibbons, Melinda

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-income, minority women with breast cancer experience a range of barriers to receiving survivorship information. Our objective was to test a novel, patient-centered intervention aimed at improving communication about survivorship care. Methods We developed a wallet card to provide oncologic and follow-up care survivorship information to breast cancer patients. We used a prospective, pre–post design to assess the intervention at a safety net hospital. The intervention was given by a patient navigator or community health worker. Results Patient knowledge (n = 130) of personal cancer history improved from baseline pretest to 1 week after the intervention for stage (66–93%; P < .05), treatment (79–92%; P < .05), and symptoms of recurrence (48–89%; P <.05), which was retained at 3 months. The intervention reduced the number of patients who were unsure when their mammogram was due (15–5% at 1 week and 6%at 3 months; P <.05). Nearly 90% reported they would be likely to share their survivorship card with their providers. Conclusion A patient-centered survivorship card improved short-term recall of key survivorship care knowledge and seems to be effective at reducing communication barriers for this population. Further studies are warranted to assess long-term retention and the impact on receipt of appropriate survivorship follow-up care. PMID:26032819

  19. Patients' preferences for patient-centered communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lau, Sofie Rosenlund; Christensen, Søren Troels; Andreasen T., Jesper

    2013-01-01

    To investigate patients' preferences for patient-centered communication (PCC) in the encounter with healthcare professionals in an outpatient department in rural Sierra Leone.......To investigate patients' preferences for patient-centered communication (PCC) in the encounter with healthcare professionals in an outpatient department in rural Sierra Leone....

  20. Value Assessment at the Point of Care: Incorporating Patient Values throughout Care Delivery and a Draft Taxonomy of Patient Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Melissa J; Mullins, C Daniel

    2017-02-01

    Incorporation of patient values is a key element of patient-centered care, but consistent incorporation of patient values at the point of care is lacking. Shared decision making encourages incorporation of patient values in decision making, but associated tools often lack guidance on value assessment. In addition, focusing on patient values relating only to specific decisions misses an opportunity for a more holistic approach to value assessment that could impact other aspects of clinical encounters, including health care planning, communication, and stakeholder involvement. In this commentary, we propose a taxonomy of values underlying patient decision making and provide examples of how these impact provision of health care. The taxonomy describes four categories of patient values: global, decisional, situational, and external. Global values are personal values impacting decision making at a universal level and can include value traits and life priorities. Decisional values are the values traditionally conceptualized in decision making, including considerations such as efficacy, toxicity, quality of life, convenience, and cost. Situational values are values tied to a specific moment in time that modify patients' existing global and decisional values. Finally, discussion of external values acknowledges that many patients consider values other than their own when making decisions. Recognizing the breadth of values impacting patient decision making has implications for both overall health care delivery and shared decision making because value assessments focusing only on decisional values may miss important patient considerations. This draft taxonomy highlights different values impacting decision making and facilitates a more complete value assessment at the point of care.

  1. It can't hurt to ask; a patient-centered quality of service assessment of health canada's medical cannabis policy and program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2001 Health Canada responded to a series of Ontario court decisions by creating the Marihuana Medical Access Division (MMAD and the Marihuana Medical Access Regulations (MMAR. Although Health Canada has conducted a small number of stakeholder consultations, the federal government has never polled federally authorized cannabis patients. This study is an attempt to learn more about patient needs, challenges and experiences with the MMAD. Methods Launched in the spring of 2007, Quality of Service Assessment of Health Canada's Medical Cannabis Policy and Program pairs a 50 question online survey addressing the personal experiences of patients in the federal cannabis program with 25 semi-guided interviews. Data gathering for this study took place from April 2007 to Jan. 2008, eventually garnering survey responses from 100 federally-authorized users, which at the time represented about 5% of the patients enrolled in Health Canada's program. This paper presents the results of the survey portion of the study. Results 8% of respondents report getting their cannabis from Health Canada, while 66% grow it for themselves. >50% report that they frequent compassion clubs or dispensaries, which remain illegal and unregulated in Canada. 81% of patients would chose certified organic methods of cultivation; >90% state that not all strains are equally effective at relieving symptoms, and 97% would prefer to obtain cannabis from a source where multiple strains are available. Of the 48 patients polled that had tried the Health Canada cannabis supply, >75% rank it as either "1" or "2" on a scale of 1-10 (with "1" being "very poor", and 10 being "excellent". Discussion 72% of respondents report they are either "somewhat" or "totally unsatisfied" with Canada's medical cannabis program. These survey results and relevant court decisions suggest that the MMAR are not meeting the needs of most of the nation's medical cannabis patient community. It is

  2. Patient-Centered Medical Home in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortiz G

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Gabriel Ortiz1, Len Fromer21Pediatric Pulmonary Services, El Paso, TX; 2Department of Family Medicine, David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a progressive and debilitating but preventable and treatable disease characterized by cough, phlegm, dyspnea, and fixed or incompletely reversible airway obstruction. Most patients with COPD rely on primary care practices for COPD management. Unfortunately, only about 55% of US outpatients with COPD receive all guideline-recommended care. Proactive and consistent primary care for COPD, as for many other chronic diseases, can reduce hospitalizations. Optimal chronic disease management requires focusing on maintenance rather than merely acute rescue. The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH, which implements the chronic care model, is a promising framework for primary care transformation. This review presents core PCMH concepts and proposes multidisciplinary team-based PCMH care strategies for COPD.Keywords: Patient-Centered Medical Home, chronic care model, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, patient education, physician assistants, nurse practitioners

  3. Personality assessment in today's health care environment: therapeutic alliance and patient satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Michael P; Erdberg, Philip; Crosier, Marlan; Steinfeld, Bradley

    2007-10-01

    This article addresses the role of personality assessment-specifically the Rorschach (Exner, 2002)-]in the context of the health care industry's increased focus on patient satisfaction. When providing psychotherapy, a challenge to providing patient-centered care turns on understanding and acting on the key aspects of the patient's personality that are crucial to forming an effective alliance. This article includes a description and examples of how personality assessment can enhance therapists' understanding of the ideational, affective, and self-control aspects of complicated patients' problem-solving styles. This enhanced understanding in turn can lead to improved therapeutic alliance between therapists and patients and to increased patient satisfaction with their care. How to provide feedback to the therapist also is addressed.

  4. Value and Application Effect of Patient-centered Quality Care in Outpatient Triage Care%以患者为中心的优质护理在门诊分诊护理中的应用效果与价值分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付晶晶

    2016-01-01

    目的:分析以患者为中心的优质护理在门诊分诊护理中的应用效果与价值。方法选取2012年6月~2016年6月我院门诊接诊的460例患者作为观察目标,按照抽签法分为对照组(n=230)和研究组(n=230),对照组应用常规护理,研究组应用以患者为中心的优质护理,比较2组护理满意度。结果对照组护理满意度82.6%,与研究组的护理满意度99.1%比较,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论在门诊分诊护理中应用以患者为中心的优质护理对提高患者满意度和护理服务质量具有重要意义。%Objective To analyze application effect and value of patient-centered quality care in outpatient triage nursing. Methods 460 patients in outpatient department of our hospital from June 2012 to June 2016 were taken as research target and divided into control group (n=230) and study group (n=230) according to the draw method, the control group was given the conventional nursing, the study group was given patient-centered high quality nursing care, nursing satisfaction between two groups were compared. Results The nursing satisfaction in the control group was 82.6%, 99.1% in study group, there was signiifcant difference between the two groups (P<0.05) .Conclusion Application of patient-centered high quality nursing in the clinic triage nursing to patients can improve patient satisfaction and service quality is of great signiifcance.

  5. Quality Assessment in the Primary care

    OpenAIRE

    Muharrem Ak

    2013-01-01

    -Quality Assessment in the Primary care Dear Editor; I have read the article titled as “Implementation of Rogi Kalyan Samiti (RKS) at Primary Health Centre Durvesh” with great interest. Shrivastava et all concluded that assessment mechanism for the achievement of objectives for the suggested RKS model was not successful (1). Hereby I would like to emphasize the importance of quality assessment (QA) especially in the era of newly established primary care implementations in our coun...

  6. Holistic wound assessment in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornforth, Amber

    2013-12-01

    Wound care is expensive and can cause immeasurable stress and inconvenience to patients and their significant others. It is therefore in the best interest of the patient, their significant others and the NHS as a whole that wounds are expertly assessed, managed and healed in the quickest timeframe possible. Nurses play a pivotal role in the process of accurate holistic wound assessment, evaluation and treatment. This article aims to help further develop and enhance both professional and clinical wound care assessment and evaluation skills. Pertinent wound care literature is critically reviewed and the crucial nature and important components of comprehensive wound assessment for facilitating the highest possible quality wound care to patients are presented alongside recommendations regarding how the enhanced knowledge and skills could be applied into everyday wound care practice.

  7. Depression in primary care: assessing suicide risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chung Wai Mark; How, Choon How; Ng, Yin Ping

    2017-01-01

    Major depression is a common condition seen in the primary care setting. This article describes the suicide risk assessment of a depressed patient, including practical aspects of history-taking, consideration of factors in deciding if a patient requires immediate transfer for inpatient care and measures to be taken if the patient is not hospitalised. It follows on our earlier article about the approach to management of depression in primary care. PMID:28210741

  8. Continuity in a VA patient-centered medical home reduces emergency department visits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krisda H Chaiyachati

    Full Text Available One major goal of the Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH is to improve continuity of care between patients and providers and reduce the utilization of non-primary care services like the emergency department (ED.To characterize continuity under the Veterans Health Administration's PCMH model--the Patient Aligned Care Team (PACT, at one large Veterans Affair's (VA's primary care clinic, determine the characteristics associated with high levels of continuity, and assess the association between continuity and ED visits.Retrospective, observational cohort study of patients at the West Haven VA (WHVA Primary Care Clinic from March 2011 to February 2012.The 13,495 patients with established care at the Clinic, having at least one visit, one year before March 2011.Our exposure variable was continuity of care--a patient seeing their assigned primary care provider (PCP at each clinic visit. The outcome of interest was having an ED visit.The patients encompassed 42,969 total clinic visits, and 3185 (24% of them had 15,458 ED visits. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, patients with continuity of care--at least one visit with their assigned PCP--had lower ED utilization compared to individuals without continuity (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.54; 95% CI: 0.41, 0.71, controlling for frequency of primary care visits, comorbidities, insurance, distance from the ED, and having a trainee PCP assigned. Likewise, the adjusted rate of ED visits was 544/1000 person-year (PY for patients with continuity vs. 784/1000 PY for patients without continuity (p = 0.001. Compared to patients with low continuity (50% continuity were less likely to utilize the ED.Strong continuity of care is associated with decreased ED utilization in a PCMH model and improving continuity may help reduce the utilization of non-primary care services.

  9. A patient-centered approach to nurse orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumgarner, S D; Biggerstaff, G H

    2000-01-01

    An orientation pathway was developed using a patient-centered approach. The pathway provides a guide or "road map" for the preceptor and new nurse to care for high-volume patient populations in medical and surgical units. Benefits include application of the nursing process, promotion of critical thinking skills, reduction of reality shock, and improvement in job satisfaction and retention. This article describes the rationale behind the approach and its application to nurse orientation. Steps in the process are described. Staff development educators can use the steps to develop orientation pathways for other practice settings.

  10. PCATool: primary care assessment tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Henrique Norman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A Revista Brasileira de Medicina de Família e Comunidade (RBMFC  encerra o ano de 2013 com uma edição em comemoração ao nascimento da Dra. Barbara Starfield em 18 de dezembro (18/12/1932 - 10/6/2011. A foto da capa, intitulada  “Desayuno en Buitrago de Lozoya” retrata a amizade entre Barbara Starfield, seu marido Neil “Tony” Holtzman e Juan Gérvas e Mercedes Pérez Fernández (autora da foto, na qual desfrutam e compartilham a vida à mesa. A mesa também faz referência a uma característica marcante de Starfield: a de nutriz (do latim nuctrix, que possui a capacidade de nutrir; que sustenta. Como  afirmou seu marido Tony: - “Ela fez isso por meio de sua pesquisa, sua paixão altruísta e sua orientação àqueles que se preocupam com as pessoas, a justiça e a verdade”1.O editorial especial para esta edição foi escrito pelo Dr. Juan Gérvas e reflete a importância de se avaliar a qualidade da atenção primária à saúde (APS a fim de que ela possa, continuamente,  se fortalecer. Em decorrência disso, todos os artigos desta edição versam sobre o Instrumento de Avaliação da Atenção Primária, em inglês Primary Care Assessment Tool (PCATool, sua validação, adaptação e aplicação para a APS2. Starfield e colaboradores desenvolveram, no The Johns Hopkins Populations Care Policy Center for the Underserved Populations, o PCATool, instrumento que permite mensurar a presença e a extensão dos atributos essenciais e derivados da APS3. Os quatro atributos essenciais da APS: a acesso de primeiro contato; b continuidade do cuidado; c abrangência  (comprehensiveness; e d coordenação dos cuidados são subcomponentes do acesso e, portanto, a qualidade dos serviços passa pela melhoria de estruturas e processos (efetividade que garantam o acesso tanto no nível individual – atendendo os indivíduos e suas necessidades em saúde – como no nível populacional, em que o acesso volta-se à dimensão ética da

  11. Quality Assessment in the Primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muharrem Ak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available -Quality Assessment in the Primary care Dear Editor; I have read the article titled as “Implementation of Rogi Kalyan Samiti (RKS at Primary Health Centre Durvesh” with great interest. Shrivastava et all concluded that assessment mechanism for the achievement of objectives for the suggested RKS model was not successful (1. Hereby I would like to emphasize the importance of quality assessment (QA especially in the era of newly established primary care implementations in our country. Promotion of quality has been fundamental part of primary care health services. Nevertheless variations in quality of care exist even in the developed countries. Accomplishment of quality in the primary care has some barriers like administration and directorial factors, absence of evidence-based medicine practice lack of continuous medical education. Quality of health care is no doubt multifaceted model that covers all components of health structures and processes of care. Quality in the primary care set up includes patient physician relationship, immunization, maternal, adolescent, adult and geriatric health care, referral, non-communicable disease management and prescribing (2. Most countries are recently beginning the implementation of quality assessments in all walks of healthcare. Organizations like European society for quality and safety in family practice (EQuiP endeavor to accomplish quality by collaboration. There are reported developments and experiments related to the methodology, processes and outcomes of quality assessments of health care. Quality assessments will not only contribute the accomplishment of the program / project but also detect the areas where obstacles also exist. In order to speed up the adoption of QA and to circumvent the occurrence of mistakes, health policy makers and family physicians from different parts of the world should share their experiences. Consensus on quality in preventive medicine implementations can help to yield

  12. Incorporating the principles of the patient- centered medical home into a student-run free clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riddle MC

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Megan C Riddle,1,* Jiahui Lin,3,* Jonathan B Steinman,2 Joshua D Salvi,2 Margaret M Reynolds,3 Anne S Kastor,3,† Christina Harris,4 Carla Boutin-Foster3 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, 2Weill Cornell/Rockefeller/Sloan-Kettering Tri-Institutional MD–PhD Program, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, 4Department of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine, VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, LA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work †Anne S Kastor passed away on July 5, 2013. Abstract: As the health care delivery landscape changes, medical schools must develop creative strategies for preparing future physicians to provide quality care in this new environment. Despite the growing prominence of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH as an effective model for health care delivery, few medical schools have integrated formal education on the PCMH into their curricula. Incorporating the PCMH model into medical school curricula is important to ensure that students have a comprehensive understanding of the different models of health care delivery and can operate effectively as physicians. The authors provide a detailed description of the process by which the Weill Cornell Community Clinic (WCCC, a student-run free clinic, has integrated PCMH principles into a service-learning initiative. The authors assessed patient demographics, diagnoses, and satisfaction along with student satisfaction. During the year after a PCMH model was adopted, 112 students and 19 licensed physicians volunteered their time. A review of the 174 patients seen from July 2011 to June 2012 found that the most common medical reasons for visits included management of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, gastrointestinal conditions, arthritis, anxiety, and depression. During the year after the adoption of the PCMH model, 87

  13. Clinton County Child Care Needs Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Elicker, James; Benner, Aprile; Hahn, Georgia; Hertzog, Jodie; Kensinger, Katherine

    1998-01-01

    The final report of a research study assessing current and future needs for child care in Clinton county. Counties with similar profiles may find the results relevant. The methods used also can serve as a model for other counties wishing to conduct their own assessments.

  14. Patient Centered Medical Home: Creating a Blueprint for Quality Healthcare through Illustrative Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheingold, Brenda Helen; Chapa, Deborah W.; Ekmekci, Ozgur; Emard, Esther

    2015-01-01

    The advent of healthcare reform in the U.S. presents an unprecedented challenge to academic institutions that are striving to prepare a workforce to interact with individuals needing care in a variety of new practice settings. Patient-centered care is a core objective of these evolving settings which enhance access to a variety professionals and…

  15. A viewpoint on the impact of device advisories on patient-centered outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne S.; van den Berg, Martha; Theuns, Dominic A M J

    2009-01-01

    Device advisories due to potential hardware failure comprise one of the downsides of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) therapy. The impact of advisories on patient-centered outcomes has largely been overlooked. We examined the impact of ICD advisories on patient-centered outcomes via....... The sample size across studies varied between 30 and 86 patients subject to an advisory; four of six studies used a case-control design and two of six a prospective study design. There was considerable variability between notification of the advisory and assessment of the patient-centered outcomes, ranging...

  16. Driving Care Quality: Aligning Trainee Assessment and Supervision Through Practical Application of Entrustable Professional Activities, Competencies, and Milestones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraccio, Carol; Englander, Robert; Holmboe, Eric S; Kogan, Jennifer R

    2016-02-01

    To address the long-standing challenge of meaningful trainee assessment, the authors reviewed and expanded on the Accountable Assessment for Quality Care and Supervision (AAQCS) equation. The equation proposes that care quality is the product of the interaction between trainee performance (measured by workplace assessment) and supervision (required level of intervention to ensure care quality) in the context of the environment where the care occurs: Trainee performance × Appropriate supervision = Safe, effective patient-centered care. Assessing trainee performance and matching that performance to "appropriate" supervision, however, is fraught with challenges. The authors suggest a unifying framework that integrates entrustable professional activities (EPAs), competencies, and milestones to inform trainee assessment and supervision, thereby enabling the practical application of the AAQCS equation in the workplace. Because the unit of measure for an EPA is the outcome of whether the trainee can safely and effectively perform the professional activity without supervision, the proposed unifying framework directly aligns with the dependent variable in the AAQCS equation: care quality.The value of applying a unifying framework that integrates EPAs, competencies, and milestones to the AAQCS equation in the clinical learning environment lies in its ability to provide supervisors with a shared mental model of performance expectations for trainees, reducing unwanted variability and improving assessment accuracy; guidance for aligning performance milestones of trainees with the needed level of supervisor intervention to ensure care quality; and substrate for specific feedback to improve the trainee's professional development as a way to ensure future care quality.

  17. Validation of the Spanish Translation of the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham Aragones, MD, MSCI

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC survey is a patient-centered instrument for evaluating the quality and patient-centeredness of chronic illness care received according to the Chronic Care Model paradigm. This study validates the Spanish translation of the PACIC in an urban, Spanish-speaking population.MethodsOne hundred Spanish-speaking patients with diabetes completed the translated PACIC and sociodemographic and cultural questionnaires. Test-retest reliability was assessed in a subset of 20 patients who completed the questionnaire 2 to 4 months later. Internal consistency was evaluated with Cronbach α. PACIC score and subscale associations with sociodemographic characteristics were examined.ResultsTest-retest reliability for the overall translated PACIC scale was 0.77. Scores were not associated with patient sociodemographic characteristics, including age, country of birth, years living in the United States, or education level (P >.05.ConclusionThe Spanish translation of the PACIC survey demonstrated high reliability, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability. Scores showed no association with sociodemographic or cultural characteristics. The Spanish version can reliably be used to assess care delivered according to the Chronic Care Model in a heterogeneous Spanish-speaking population.

  18. Ambulatory Assessment of Depression in Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-29

    Statement The auth~r hereby certifies that the use of any copyrighted material in the thesis manuscript entitled: "AMBULATORY ASSESSMENT OF DEPRESSION IN...Department Medical and Clinical Psychology Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences 11 iii Abstract Depression is common among individuals in...primary care. Despite the prevalence of depression in primary care, patients are usually not adequately treated for depression . Often the treatment

  19. An overview and discussion of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute's decision aid portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayer, Christopher C; Crowley, Matthew J; Lawrence, William F; Gierisch, Jennifer M; Gaglio, Bridget; Williams, John W; Myers, Evan R; Kendrick, Amy; Slutsky, Jean; Sanders, Gillian D

    2016-07-01

    Decision aids (DAs) help patients make informed healthcare decisions in a manner consistent with their values and preferences. Despite their promise, DAs developed with public research dollars are not being implemented and adopted in real-world patient care settings at a rate consistent with which they are being developed. To appraise the sum of the parts of the portfolio and create a strategic imperative surrounding future funding, the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) tasked the Duke Evidence Synthesis Group with evaluating its DA portfolio. This paper describes PCORI's portfolio of DAs according to the Duke Evidence Synthesis Group's analysis in the context of PCORI's mission and the field of decision science. The results revealed a diversity within PCORI's portfolio of funded DA projects. Findings support the movement toward more rigorous DA development, assessment and maintenance. PCORI's funding priorities related to DAs are clarified and comparative questions of interest are posed.

  20. Respecting patients is associated with more patient-centered communication behaviors in clinical encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flickinger, Tabor E.; Saha, Somnath; Roter, Debra; Korthuis, P. Todd; Sharp, Victoria; Cohn, Jonathon; Moore, Richard D.; Ingersoll, Karen S.; Beach, Mary Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Objective Attitudes towards patients may influence how clinicians interact. We investigated whether clinician-reported respect for patients was associated with communication behaviors during HIV care encounters. Methods We analyzed audio-recordings of visits between 413 adult HIV-infected patients and 45 primary HIV care providers. The independent variable was clinician-reported respect for the patient and outcomes were clinician and patient communication behaviors assessed by the Roter Interaction Analysis System (RIAS). We performed negative binomial regressions for counts outcomes and linear regressions for global outcomes. Results Clinicians with higher respect When clinicians had higher respect for a patient, they engaged in more rapport-building, social chitchat, and positive talk. Patients of clinicians with higher respect for them engaged in more rapport-building, social chitchat, positive talk, and gave more psychosocial information. Encounters between patients and clinicians with higher respect for them had more positive clinician emotional tone [regression coefficient 2.97 (1.92-4.59)], more positive patient emotional tone [2.71 (1.75-4.21)], less clinician verbal dominance [0.81 (0.68-0.96)] and more patient-centeredness [1.28 (1.09-1.51)]. Conclusions Respect is associated with positive and patient-centered communication behaviors during medical encounters by clinicians and patients. Practice Implications Clinicians should be mindful of their respectful attitudes of respect and work to foster positive regard for patients to promote more patient-centered communication and higher quality of care. Educators should consider methods to enhance trainees’ respect in communication skills training. PMID:26320821

  1. Patients’ needs for care in public mental health: unity and diversity of self-assessed needs for care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja eBellier-Teichmann

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Needs assessment is recognized to be a key element of mental health care. Patients tend to present heterogeneous profiles of needs. However, there is no consensus in previous research about how patients’ needs are organized. This study investigates both general and specific dimensions of patients’ needs for care. Methods. Patients’ needs were assessed with ELADEB, an 18-domain self-report scale. The use of a self-assessment scale represents a unique way of obtaining patients’ perceptions. A patient-centered psychiatric practice facilitates empowerment as it is based on the patients’ personal motivations, needs and wants. 471 patients’ profiles were analyzed through exploratory factor analysis. Results. A four-factor bi-factor model, including one general factor and three specific factors of needs was most adequate. Specific factors were: (a ‘finances’ and ‘administrative tasks’; (b ‘transports’, ‘public places’, ‘self-care’, ‘housework’ and ‘food’; (c ‘family’, ‘children’, ‘intimate relationships’ and ‘friendship’.Conclusions. As revealed by the general factor, patients expressing urgent needs in some domains are also more susceptible to report urgent needs in several other domains. This general factor relates to high versus low utilizers of public mental healthcare. Patients also present specific needs in life domains, which are organized in three dimensions: management; functional disabilities; familial and interpersonal relationships. These dimensions relate to the different types of existing social support described in the literature.

  2. Factors associated with a patient-centered medical home among children with behavioral health conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Caprice; Woodworth, Lindsey; Fernandez-Baca, Daniel; Baron-Lee, Jacqueline; Thompson, Lindsay; Hinojosa, Melanie

    2013-11-01

    At some point in their lives, nearly one-half of all American children will have a behavioral health condition. Many will not receive the care they need from a fragmented health delivery system. The patient-centered medical home is a promising model to improve their care; however, little evidence exists. Our study aim was to examine the association between several behavioral health indicators and having a patient-centered medical home. 91,642 children's parents or guardians completed the 2007 National Survey of Children's Health. An indicator for patient-centered medical home was included in the dataset. Descriptive statistics, bivariate tests, and multivariate regression models were used in the analyses. Children in the sample were mostly Male (52 %), White (78 %), non-Hispanic (87 %), and did not have a special health care need (80 %). 6.2 % of the sample had at least one behavioral health condition. Conditions ranged from ADHD (6 %) to Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) (1 %). Frequency of having a patient-centered medical home also varied for children with a behavioral health condition (49 % of children with ADHD and 33 % of children with ASD). Frequency of having a patient-centered medical home decreased with multiple behavioral health conditions. Higher severity of depression, anxiety, and conduct disorder were associated with a decreased likelihood of a patient-centered medical home. Results from our study can be used to target patient-centered medical home interventions toward children with one or more behavioral health conditions and consider that children with depression, anxiety, and conduct disorder are more vulnerable to these disparities.

  3. The role of the pharmacist in patient-centered medical home practices: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewis NJW

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Nancy JW Lewis,1 Leslie A Shimp,2 Stuart Rockafellow,2 Jeffrey M Tingen,2 Hae Mi Choe,3 Marie A Marcelino21Private consultancy practice, Rochester Hills, MI, USA; 2Clinical, Social and Administrative Department, University of Michigan College of Pharmacy, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 3Department of Pharmacy Services, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI, USAAbstract: Patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs are the centerpiece of primary care transformation in the US. They are intended to improve care coordination and communication, enhance health care quality and patient experiences, and lower health care costs by linking patients to a physician-led interdisciplinary health care team. PCMHs are widely supported by health care associations, payers, and employers. Health care accreditation organizations have created performance measures that promote the adoption of PCMH core attributes. Public and private payers are increasingly providing incentives and bonuses related to performance measure status. Evidence-based prescription, medication adherence, medication use coordination, and systems to support medication safety are all necessary components of PCMHs. Pharmacists have unique knowledge and skills that can complement the care provided by other PCMH team members. Their experience in drug therapy assessments, medication therapy management, and population health has documented benefits, both in terms of patient health outcomes and health care costs. Through collaborative care, pharmacists can assist physicians and other prescribers in medication management and thus improve prescriber productivity and patient access to care. Pharmacists are engaged in PCMHs through both employment and contractual arrangements. While some pharmacists serve a unique PCMH, others work within practice networks that serve practices within a geographical area. Financial support for pharmacist-provided services includes university funding, external grant funding

  4. Assessing the Quality of Diabetic Patients Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belkis Vicente Sánchez

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the actions of family doctors and nurses in this area is an indispensable requisite in order to achieve a comprehensive health care. Objective: to assess the quality of health care provided to diabetic patients by the family doctor in Abreus health area. Methods: a descriptive and observational study based on the application of tools to assess the performance of family doctors in the treatment of diabetes mellitus in the five family doctors consultation in Abreus health area from January to July 2011 was conducted. The five doctors working in these consultations, as well as the 172 diabetic patients were included in the study. At the same time, 172 randomly selected medical records were also revised. Through observation, the existence of some necessary material resources and the quality of their performance as well as the quality of medical records were evaluated. Patient criteria served to assess the quality of the health care provided. Results: scientific and technical training on diabetes mellitus has been insufficient; the necessary equipment for the appropriate care and monitoring of patients with diabetes is available; in 2.9% of medical records reviewed, interrogation appears in its complete form including the complete physical examination in 12 of them and the complete medical indications in 26. Conclusions: the quality of comprehensive medical care to diabetic patients included in the study is compromised. Doctors interviewed recognized the need to be trained in the diagnosis and treatment of diabetes in order to improve their professional performance and enhance the quality of the health care provided to these patients.

  5. [Depression in palliative care: prevalence and assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julião, Miguel; Barbosa, António

    2011-12-01

    Depression is the most common mental health problem in palliative care, yet it's widely misunderstood, underdiagnosed, undertreated and considered a complex medical task. Psychological distress is a major cause of suffering among patients and families and it's highly correlated with reduced quality of life and amplification of pain. Terminally-ill individuals who suffer from depression are also at high risk of suicide and desire for a hastened death. Every patient receiving palliative care should receive a complete personal and familial psychiatric history, with risk factors, as well as the typical signs and symptoms in the terminal disease. There are two different approaches to assess depression in palliative care: Categorial vs Dimensional The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is the most used assessment method for depression in advanced disease and it's validated to the Portuguese population. HADS overcomes the biggest problem when evaluating depression in the terminally-ill: the influence of somatic symptoms due to the underlying disease on the results of the depression scales. In this article we revise other approaches for the assessment of depression in advanced disease: single question vs two-item question; structured clinical interview and diagnostic criteria. Clinicians who care for terminally-ill patients must develop competences on the psychological area, developing state-of-the-art clinical skills that provide quality of life and comfort to patients and their families.

  6. Qualitative Methods in Patient-Centered Outcomes Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandermause, Roxanne; Barg, Frances K; Esmail, Laura; Edmundson, Lauren; Girard, Samantha; Perfetti, A Ross

    2016-09-14

    The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), created to fund research guided by patients, caregivers, and the broader health care community, offers a new research venue. Many (41 of 50) first funded projects involved qualitative research methods. This study was completed to examine the current state of the science of qualitative methodologies used in PCORI-funded research. Principle investigators participated in phenomenological interviews to learn (a) how do researchers using qualitative methods experience seeking funding for, implementing and disseminating their work; and (b) how may qualitative methods advance the quality and relevance of evidence for patients? Results showed the experience of doing qualitative research in the current research climate as "Being a bona fide qualitative researcher: Staying true to research aims while negotiating challenges," with overlapping patterns: (a) researching the elemental, (b) expecting surprise, and (c) pushing boundaries. The nature of qualitative work today was explicitly described and is rendered in this article.

  7. Characteristics of Early Recipients of Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute Funding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Stephany; Bazemore, Andrew; Merenstein, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) is grounded in the goals of increasing access, improving quality, and reducing cost in the U.S. health care system. The ACA established the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) to help accomplish these goals through patient-focused research. PCORI has a different charge than its federally supported counterpart, the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-to fund research that ultimately helps patients make better-informed health care decisions. The authors examined characteristics of the recipients and settings of the first six rounds of PCORI funding and differentiated PCORI and NIH funding patterns to analyze the extent to which PCORI is accomplishing the goals set out by the ACA. The authors performed a retrospective review of publicly available datasets, supplemented by a short questionnaire to funded PCORI principal investigators (PIs). The authors analyzed PCORI's first six funding cycles (2011-2014) and data on NIH funding patterns (2000-2013) to determine whether PCORI and NIH funding patterns differed by investigator, department, and institution, and whether PCORI had funded research in primary care settings. The authors found that PCORI is funding a more diverse cadre of PIs and biomedical departments than is NIH, but not a greater diversity of institutions, and that less than one-third of PCORI studies involve or are relevant to primary care--the largest patient care platform in the United States. As PCORI looks to be refunded, it is important that research funding is further evaluated and publicly acknowledged to assess whether goals are being achieved.

  8. Lessons Learned from Implementing the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen P. Green

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH is a primary care model that provides coordinated and comprehensive care to patients to improve health outcomes. This paper addresses practical issues that arise when transitioning a traditional primary care practice into a PCMH recognized by the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA. Individual organizations' experiences with this transition were gathered at a PCMH workshop in Alexandria, Virginia in June 2010. An analysis of their experiences has been used along with a literature review to reveal common challenges that must be addressed in ways that are responsive to the practice and patients’ needs. These are: NCQA guidance, promoting provider buy-in, leveraging electronic medical records, changing office culture, and realigning workspace in the practice to accommodate services needed to carry out the intent of PCMH. The NCQA provides a set of standards for implementing the PCMH model, but these standards lack many specifics that will be relied on in location situations. While many researchers and providers have made critiques, we see this vagueness as allowing for greater flexibility in how a practice implements PCMH.

  9. Assessing the prognoses on Health care in the information society 2013--thirteen years after.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaup, Petra; Ammenwerth, Elske; Dujat, Carl; Grant, Andrew; Hasman, Arie; Hein, Andreas; Hochlehnert, Achim; Kulikowski, Casimir; Mantas, John; Maojo, Victor; Marschollek, Michael; Moura, Lincoln; Plischke, Maik; Röhrig, Rainer; Stausberg, Jürgen; Takabayashi, Katsuhiko; Uckert, Frank; Winter, Alfred; Wolf, Klaus-Hendrik; Haux, Reinhold

    2014-07-01

    Health care and information technology in health care is advancing at tremendous speed. We analysed whether the prognoses by Haux et al. - first presented in 2000 and published in 2002 - have been fulfilled in 2013 and which might be the reasons for match or mismatch. Twenty international experts in biomedical and health informatics met in May 2013 in a workshop to discuss match or mismatch of each of the 71 prognoses. After this meeting a web-based survey among workshop participants took place. Thirty-three prognoses were assessed matching; they reflect e.g. that there is good progress in storing patient data electronically in health care institutions. Twenty-three prognoses were assessed mismatching; they reflect e.g. that telemedicine and home monitoring as well as electronic exchange of patient data between institutions is not established as widespread as expected. Fifteen prognoses were assessed neither matching nor mismatching. ICT tools have considerably influenced health care in the last decade, but in many cases not as far as it was expected by Haux et al. in 2002. In most cases this is not a matter of the availability of technical solutions but of organizational and ethical issues. We need innovative and modern information system architectures which support multiple use of data for patient care as well as for research and reporting and which are able to integrate data from home monitoring into a patient centered health record. Since innovative technology is available the efficient and wide-spread use in health care has to be enabled by systematic information management.

  10. Clinical risk assessment in intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Asefzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical risk management focuses on improving the quality and safety of health care services by identifying the circumstances and opportunities that put patients at risk of harm and acting to prevent or control those risks. The goal of this study is to identify and assess the failure modes in the ICU of Qazvin′s Social Security Hospital (Razi Hospital through Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA. Methods: This was a qualitative-quantitative research by Focus Discussion Group (FDG performed in Qazvin Province, Iran during 2011. The study population included all individuals and owners who are familiar with the process in ICU. Sampling method was purposeful and the FDG group members were selected by the researcher. The research instrument was standard worksheet that has been used by several researchers. Data was analyzed by FMEA technique. Results: Forty eight clinical errors and failure modes identified, results showed that the highest risk probability number (RPN was in respiratory care "Ventilator′s alarm malfunction (no alarm" with the score 288, and the lowest was in gastrointestinal "not washing the NG-Tube" with the score 8. Conclusions: Many of the identified errors can be prevented by group members. Clinical risk assessment and management is the key to delivery of effective health care.

  11. Novel Diagnostic and Monitoring Tools in Stroke: an Individualized Patient-Centered Precision Medicine Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Villiers, Sulette; Swanepoel, Albe; Bester, Janette; Pretorius, Etheresia

    2016-05-02

    Central to the pathogenesis of ischaemic stroke are the normally protective processes of platelet adhesion and activation. Experimental evidence has shown that the ligand-receptor interactions in ischaemic stroke represent a thrombo-inflammatory cascade, which presents research opportunities into new treatment. However, as anti-platelet drugs have the potential to cause severe side effects in ischaemic stroke patients (as well as other vascular disease patients), it is important to carefully monitor the risk of bleeding and risk of thrombus in patients receiving treatment. Because thrombo-embolic ischaemic stroke is a major health issue, we suggest that the answer to adequate treatment is based on an individualized patient-centered approach, inline with the latest NIH precision medicine approach. A combination of viscoelastic methodologies may be used in a personalized patient-centered regime, including thromboelastography (TEG®) and the lesser used scanning electron microscopy approach (SEM). Thromboelastography provides a dynamic measure of clot formation, strength, and lysis, whereas SEM is a visual structural tool to study patient fibrin structure in great detail. Therefore, we consider the evidence for TEG® and SEM as unique means to confirm stroke diagnosis, screen at-risk patients, and monitor treatment efficacy. Here we argue that the current approach to stroke treatment needs to be restructured and new innovative thought patterns need to be applied, as even approved therapies require close patient monitoring to determine efficacy, match treatment regimens to each patient's individual needs, and assess the risk of dangerous adverse effects. TEG® and SEM have the potential to be a useful tool and could potentially alter the clinical approach to managing ischaemic stroke. As envisaged in the NIH precision medicine approach, this will involve a number of role players and innovative new research ideas, with benefits that will ultimately only be realized in a

  12. Usability of patient-centered health IT: mixed-methods usability study of ePill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt-Kraepelin, Manuel; Dehling, Tobias; Sunyaev, Ali

    2014-01-01

    To facilitate use of patient-centered health IT applications in everyday life, a high degree of usability is required. Based on the example of a patient-centered web application, we propose a usability study design enabling developers and researchers to assess usability of patient-centered health IT applications and derive implications for their improvement. Our study design integrates tasks that subjects have to process, an associated questionnaire based on Perceived Ease of Use, Perceived Usefulness, Attitude Toward Using, and Behavioral Intention to Use, a System Usability Scale questionnaire, and focus groups. Application of the usability study design demonstrates its feasibility and provides insights for assessment of usability in related projects in research and practice.

  13. Microbiological risk assessment for personal care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, S E; Parker, M D; Amézquita, A; Pitt, T L

    2016-12-01

    Regulatory decisions regarding microbiological safety of cosmetics and personal care products are primarily hazard-based, where the presence of a potential pathogen determines decision-making. This contrasts with the Food industry where it is a commonplace to use a risk-based approach for ensuring microbiological safety. A risk-based approach allows consideration of the degree of exposure to assess unacceptable health risks. As there can be a number of advantages in using a risk-based approach to safety, this study explores the Codex Alimentarius (Codex) four-step Microbiological Risk Assessment (MRA) framework frequently used in the Food industry and examines how it can be applied to the safety assessment of personal care products. The hazard identification and hazard characterization steps (one and two) of the Codex MRA framework consider the main microorganisms of concern. These are addressed by reviewing the current industry guidelines for objectionable organisms and analysing reports of contaminated products notified by government agencies over a recent 5-year period, together with examples of reported outbreaks. Data related to estimation of exposure (step three) are discussed, and examples of possible calculations and references are included. The fourth step, performed by the risk assessor (risk characterization), is specific to each assessment and brings together the information from the first three steps to assess the risk. Although there are very few documented uses of the MRA approach for personal care products, this study illustrates that it is a practicable and sound approach for producing products that are safe by design. It can be helpful in the context of designing products and processes going to market and with setting of microbiological specifications. Additionally, it can be applied reactively to facilitate decision-making when contaminated products are released on to the marketplace. Currently, the knowledge available may only allow a

  14. [Assessment of our home care and home palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midorikawa, Yasuhiko; Suzushino, Seiko; Tamotsu, Kiyokazu

    2014-12-01

    We conducted home care and home palliative care from the department of home care. We provided home care services to 190 patients(105 men, 85 women)in October 2013. Their average age was 78.7(range: 32-102)years old, and home care had been underway from 1 day to 8 years, 10 months. Among all participants, 168(88.4%)suffered from malignant diseases, 168 patients had died, and over half of deceased patients(88 out of 168)had died at home. We used opioids for control of cancer pain, carried out home parenteral nutrition(HPN), home enteral nutrition(HEN), percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy( PEG), and removed pleural effusion and ascites during home care. In order to facilitate the practice of palliative care by the palliative care team, which consists of various medical staff in the hospital, we are giving high priority to education and enlightenment in the hospital. To provide enlightenment, education, and cooperation between regional home care and home palliative care, we are also conducting educational lectures in the regional party of the Iwaki city medical associate, and providing combined educational-medical training for home care and home palliative care by various medical staff.

  15. Spreading a patient-centered medical home redesign: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Clarissa; Coleman, Katie; Ross, Tyler R; Johnson, Eric; Fishman, Paul A; Larson, Eric B; Liss, David; Trescott, Claire; Reid, Robert J

    2012-01-01

    Health care leaders and policymakers are turning to the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model to contain costs, improve the quality of care, and create a more positive primary care work environment. We describe how Group Health, an integrated delivery system, developed and implemented a PCMH intervention that included standardized structural and practice level changes. This intervention was spread to a diverse set of 26 primary care practices in 14 months using Lean Management principles. Group Health's experience provides valuable insights that can be used to improve the design and implementation of future PCMH models.

  16. Towards patient centered care in female stress urinary incontinence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Labrie, J.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis focussed on the treatment of stress urinary incontinence in women. It comprises the results of the PORTRET study (Physiotherapy OR Tvt Effectiveness Trial). Currently, pelvic floor muscle training is advised as initial treatment for all women with stress urinary incontinence. We question

  17. Use of RE-AIM to develop a multi-media facilitation tool for the patient-centered medical home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glasgow Russell E

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much has been written about how the medical home model can enhance patient-centeredness, care continuity, and follow-up, but few comprehensive aids or resources exist to help practices accomplish these aims. The complexity of primary care can overwhelm those concerned with quality improvement. Methods The RE-AIM planning and evaluation model was used to develop a multimedia, multiple-health behavior tool with psychosocial assessment and feedback features to facilitate and guide patient-centered communication, care, and follow-up related to prevention and self-management of the most common adult chronic illnesses seen in primary care. Results The Connection to Health Patient Self-Management System, a web-based patient assessment and support resource, was developed using the RE-AIM factors of reach (e.g., allowing input and output via choice of different modalities, effectiveness (e.g., using evidence-based intervention strategies, adoption (e.g., assistance in integrating the system into practice workflows and permitting customization of the website and feedback materials by practice teams, implementation (e.g., identifying and targeting actionable priority behavioral and psychosocial issues for patients and teams, and maintenance/sustainability (e.g., integration with current National Committee for Quality Assurance recommendations and clinical pathways of care. Connection to Health can work on a variety of input and output platforms, and assesses and provides feedback on multiple health behaviors and multiple chronic conditions frequently managed in adult primary care. As such, it should help to make patient-healthcare team encounters more informed and patient-centered. Formative research with clinicians indicated that the program addressed a number of practical concerns and they appreciated the flexibility and how the Connection to Health program could be customized to their office. Conclusions This primary care practice

  18. Patient-centered medical home cyberinfrastructure current and future landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Joseph; Barr, Michael S; Kothari, Pranav P; Nace, David K; Quinn, Matthew

    2011-05-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) is an approach that evolved from the understanding that a well-organized, proactive clinical team working in a tandem with well-informed patients is better able to address the preventive and disease management needs in a guideline-concordant manner. This approach represents a fundamental shift from episodic acute care models and has become an integral part of health reform supported on a federal level. The major aspects of PCMH, especially pertinent to its information infrastructure, have been discussed by an expert panel organized by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality at the Informatics for Consumer Health Summit. The goal of this article is to summarize the panel discussions along the four major domains presented at the summit: (1) PCMH as an Evolving Model of Healthcare Delivery; (2) Health Information Technology (HIT) Applications to Support the PCMH; (3) Current HIT Landscape of PCMH: Challenges and Opportunities; and (4) Future HIT Landscape of PCMH: Federal Initiatives on Health Informatics, Legislation, and Standardization.

  19. Patient-centered outcomes research in radiology: trends in funding and methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Christoph I; Jarvik, Jeffrey G

    2014-09-01

    The creation of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Trust Fund and the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) through the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 presents new opportunities for funding patient-centered comparative effectiveness research (CER) in radiology. We provide an overview of the evolution of federal funding and priorities for CER with a focus on radiology-related priority topics over the last two decades, and discuss the funding processes and methodological standards outlined by PCORI. We introduce key paradigm shifts in research methodology that will be required on the part of radiology health services researchers to obtain competitive federal grant funding in patient-centered outcomes research. These paradigm shifts include direct engagement of patients and other stakeholders at every stage of the research process, from initial conception to dissemination of results. We will also discuss the increasing use of mixed methods and novel trial designs. One of these trial designs, the pragmatic trial, has the potential to be readily applied to evaluating the effectiveness of diagnostic imaging procedures and imaging-based interventions among diverse patient populations in real-world settings.

  20. Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Portal Implementation Toolkit for Ambulatory Clinics: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahm, Eun-Shim; Diblasi, Catherine; Gonzales, Eva; Silver, Kristi; Zhu, Shijun; Sagherian, Knar; Kongs, Katherine

    2017-04-01

    Personal health records and patient portals have been shown to be effective in managing chronic illnesses. Despite recent nationwide implementation efforts, the personal health record and patient portal adoption rates among patients are low, and the lack of support for patients using the programs remains a critical gap in most implementation processes. In this study, we implemented the Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit in a large diabetes/endocrinology center and assessed its preliminary impact on personal health record and patient portal knowledge, self-efficacy, patient-provider communication, and adherence to treatment plans. Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit is composed of Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit-General, clinic-level resources for clinicians, staff, and patients, and Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit Plus, an optional 4-week online resource program for patients ("MyHealthPortal"). First, Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit-General was implemented, and all clinicians and staff were educated about the center's personal health record and patient portal. Then general patient education was initiated, while a randomized controlled trial was conducted to test the preliminary effects of "MyHealthPortal" using a small sample (n = 74) with three observations (baseline and 4 and 12 weeks). The intervention group showed significantly greater improvement than the control group in patient-provider communication at 4 weeks (t56 = 3.00, P = .004). For other variables, the intervention group tended to show greater improvement; however, the differences were not significant. In this preliminary study, Patient-Centered Personal Health Record and Patient Portal Implementation Toolkit showed potential for filling the gap in the current

  1. Evidence-based guidelines for teaching patient-centered interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R C; Marshall-Dorsey, A A; Osborn, G G; Shebroe, V; Lyles, J S; Stoffelmayr, B E; Van Egeren, L F; Mettler, J; Maduschke, K; Stanley, J M; Gardiner, J C

    2000-01-01

    In a rare study of effectiveness of an interviewing method, we previously reported a randomized controlled trial demonstrating that training in a step-by-step patient-centered interviewing method improved residents' knowledge, attitudes, and skills and had a consistently positive effect on trained residents' patients. For those who wish to use this evidence-based patient-centered method as a template for their own teaching, we describe here for the first time our training program--and propose that the training can be adapted for students, physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and other new learners as well. Training was skills-oriented and experiential, fostered positive attitudes towards patient-centered interviewing, and used a learner-centered approach which paid special attention to the teacher-resident relationship and to the resident's self-awareness. Skills training was guided by a newly identified patient-centered interviewing method that described the step-by-step use of specific behaviors.

  2. Development and evaluation of a patient centered cardiovascular health education program for insured patients in rural Nigeria (QUICK - II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osibogun Akin

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Sub Saharan Africa, the incidence of hypertension and other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors is growing rapidly. Poor adherence to prescribed prevention and treatment regimens by patients can compromise treatment outcomes. Patient-centered cardiovascular health education is likely to improve shortcomings in adherence. This paper describes a study that aims to develop a cardiovascular health education program for patients participating in a subsidized insurance plan in Nigeria and to evaluate the applicability and effectiveness in patients at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Methods/Design Design: The study has two parts. Part 1 will develop a cardiovascular health education program, using qualitative interviews with stakeholders. Part 2 will evaluate the effectiveness of the program in patients, using a prospective (pre-post observational design. Setting: A rural primary health center in Kwara State, Nigeria. Population: For part 1: 40 patients, 10 healthcare professionals, and 5 insurance managers. For part 2: 150 patients with uncontrolled hypertension or other cardiovascular risk factors after one year of treatment. Intervention: Part 2: patient-centered cardiovascular health education program. Measurements: Part 1: Semi-structured interviews to identify stakeholder perspectives. Part 2: Pre- and post-intervention assessments including patients' demographic and socioeconomic data, blood pressure, body mass index and self-reporting measures on medication adherence and perception of care. Feasibility of the intervention will be measured using process data. Outcomes: For program development (part 1: overview of healthcare professionals' perceptions on barriers and facilitators to care, protocol for patient education, and protocol implementation plan. For program evaluation (part 2: changes in patients' scores on adherence to medication and life style changes, blood pressure, and other physiological and self

  3. Obstetrics Patients' Assessment of Medical Students' Role in Their Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrane, Diane

    1988-01-01

    Obstetric patients rated the skills and assessed the roles of students caring for them during a clinical clerkship. They rated skills and attitudes high, generally, with lower ratings for their ability to answer questions and preparation to participate in care. Most felt students improved their care, primarily in supportive ways. (Author/MSE)

  4. The empowerment paradox as a central challenge to patient centered medical home implementation in the veteran's health administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solimeo, Samantha L; Ono, Sarah S; Lampman, Michelle A M; Paez, Monica B W; Stewart, Gregory L

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we present results of a mixed methods study conducted to identify barriers to team function among staff implementing patient aligned care teams - the Department of Veterans Affairs' patient centered medical home (PCMH) model. Using a convergent mixed methods design, we administered a standardized survey measure (Team and Individual Role Perception Survey) to assess work role challenge and engagement; and conducted discussion groups to gather context pertaining to role change. We found that the role of primary care providers is highly challenging and did not become less difficult over the initial year of implementation. Unexpectedly over the course of the first year nurse care managers reported a decrease in their perceptions of empowerment and clerical associates reported less skill variety. Qualitative data suggest that more skilled team members fail to delegate and share tasks within their teams. We characterize this interprofessional knowledge factor as an empowerment paradox where team members find it difficult to share tasks in ways that are counter to traditionally structured hierarchical roles. Health care systems seeking to implement PCMH should dedicate resources to facilitating within-team role knowledge and negotiation.

  5. Facial rehabilitation: a neuromuscular reeducation, patient-centered approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanswearingen, Jessie

    2008-05-01

    Individuals with facial paralysis and distorted facial expressions and movements secondary to a facial neuromotor disorder experience substantial physical, psychological, and social disability. Previously, facial rehabilitation has not been widely available or considered to be of much benefit. An emerging rehabilitation science of neuromuscular reeducation and evidence for the efficacy of facial neuromuscular reeducation, a process of facilitating the return of intended facial movement patterns and eliminating unwanted patterns of facial movement and expression, may provide patients with disorders of facial paralysis or facial movement control opportunity for the recovery of facial movement and function. We provide a brief overview of the scientific rationale for facial neuromuscular reeducation in the structure and function of the facial neuromotor system, the neuropsychology of facial expression, and relations among expressions, movement, and emotion. The primary purpose is to describe principles of neuromuscular reeducation, assessment and outcome measures, approach to treatment, the process, including surface-electromyographic biofeedback as an adjunct to reeducation, and the goal of enhancing the recovery of facial expression and function in a patient-centered approach to facial rehabilitation.

  6. Iowa Child Care Quality Rating System: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Iowa's Child Care Quality Rating System prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile is divided into the following categories: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators for Family Child Care Programs;…

  7. [The preliminary draft of the methodology report by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiemann, Guido

    2012-01-01

    There is a mismatch between results of clinical trials and the needs of patients. The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) in the US will commission research that supports patients and providers of care to make informed decisions. The preliminary draft of a methodology report presented by PCORI contains methodological standards which researchers will have to take into account when applying for funds from PCORI. An innovative instrument, the "Translation Tool" has been introduced to judge the best match between a specific research question and the corresponding methods. The "Translation Tool" structures the necessary trade-offs (e.g. between validity, patient-centered endpoints, timeliness, and resources) in a transparent manner. This article summarizes the development, structure and content of the methodology report. (As supplied by publisher).

  8. Assessment of oral self-care in patients with periodontitis: a pilot study in a dental school clinic in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masuda Hitomi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral hygiene education is central to every stage of periodontal treatment. Successful management of periodontal disease depends on the patient's capacity for oral self-care. In the present study, the oral self-care and perceptions of patients attending a dental school clinic in Japan were assessed using a short questionnaire referring to existing oral health models. Methods A cross-sectional study design was used. The study population consisted of sixty-five patients (age range 23-77 with chronic periodontitis. The pre-tested 19-item questionnaire comprised 3 domains; 1 oral hygiene, 2 dietary habits and 3 perception of oral condition. The questionnaire was used as a part of the comprehensive assessment. Results Analyses of the assessment data revealed no major problems with the respondents' perceived oral hygiene habits, although their actual plaque control levels were not entirely adequate. Most of the respondents acknowledged the importance of prevention of dental caries and periodontal diseases, but less than one third of them were regular users of the dental care system. Twenty-five percent of the respondents were considered to be reluctant to change their daily routines, and 29% had doubts about the impact of their own actions on oral health. Analyzing the relationships between patient responses and oral hygiene status, factors like 'frequency of tooth brushing', 'approximal cleaning', 'dental check-up' and 'compliance with self-care advice' showed statistically significant associations (P Conclusion The clinical utilization of the present questionnaire facilitates the inclusion of multiple aspects of patient information, before initiation of periodontal treatment. The significant associations that were found between some of the self-care behaviors and oral hygiene levels document the important role of patient-centered oral health assessment in periodontal care.

  9. Assessing the effect of increased managed care on hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowll, C A

    1998-01-01

    This study uses a new relative risk methodology developed by the author to assess and compare certain performance indicators to determine a hospital's relative degree of financial vulnerability, based on its location, to the effects of increased managed care market penetration. The study also compares nine financial measures to determine whether hospital in states with a high degree of managed-care market penetration experience lower levels of profitability, liquidity, debt service, and overall viability than hospitals in low managed care states. A Managed Care Relative Financial Risk Assessment methodology composed of nine measures of hospital financial and utilization performance is used to develop a high managed care state Composite Index and to determine the Relative Financial Risk and the Overall Risk Ratio for hospitals in a particular state. Additionally, financial performance of hospitals in the five highest managed care states is compared to hospitals in the five lowest states. While data from Colorado and Massachusetts indicates that hospital profitability diminishes as the level of managed care market penetration increases, the overall study results indicate that hospitals in high managed care states demonstrate a better cash position and higher profitability than hospitals in low managed care states. Hospitals in high managed care states are, however, more heavily indebted in relation to equity and have a weaker debt service coverage capacity. Moreover, the overall financial health and viability of hospitals in high managed care states is superior to that of hospitals in low managed care states.

  10. Assessment, authorization and access to medicaid managed mental health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masland, Mary C; Snowden, Lonnie R; Wallace, Neal T

    2007-11-01

    Examined were effects on access of managed care assessment and authorization processes in California's 57 county mental health plans. Primary data on managed care implementation were collected from surveys of county plan administrators; secondary data were from Medicaid claims and enrollment files. Using multivariate fixed effects regression, we found that following implementation of managed care, greater access occurred in county plans where assessments and treatment were performed by the same clinician, and where service authorizations were made more rapidly. Lower access occurred in county plans where treating clinicians authorized services themselves. Results confirm the significant effects of managed care processes on outcomes and highlight the importance of system capacity.

  11. 77 FR 47573 - Fees on Health Insurance Policies and Self-Insured Plans for the Patient-Centered Outcomes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Parts 40 and 46 RIN 1545-BK59 Fees on Health Insurance Policies and Self... Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act on issuers of certain health insurance policies and plan sponsors of certain self-insured health plans to fund the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Trust...

  12. Developing and implementing an oral care policy and assessment tool.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stout, Michelle

    2012-01-09

    Oral hygiene is an essential aspect of nursing care. Poor oral care results in patients experiencing pain and discomfort, puts individuals at risk of nutritional deficiency and infection, and has an adverse effect on quality of life. This article describes how an oral care policy and assessment tool were updated to ensure the implementation of evidence-based practice at one hospital in the Republic of Ireland.

  13. Development and Validation of the Tibetan Primary Care Assessment Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhua Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To develop a primary care assessment tool in Tibetan area and assess the primary care quality among different healthcare settings. Methods. Primary care assessment tool-Tibetan version (PCAT-T was developed to measure seven primary care domains. Data from a cross-sectional survey of 1386 patients was used to conduct validity and reliability analysis of PCAT-T. Analysis of variance was used to conduct comparison of primary care quality among different healthcare settings. Results. A 28-item PCAT-T was constructed which included seven multi-item scales and two single-item scales. All of multi-item scales achieved good internal consistency and item-total correlations. Scaling assumptions tests were well satisfied. The full range of possible scores was observed for all scales, except first contact and continuity. Compared with prefecture hospital (77.42 and county hospital (82.01, township health center achieved highest primary care quality total score (86.64. Conclusions. PCAT-T is a valid and reliable tool to measure patients' experience of primary care in the Tibet Autonomous Region. Township health center has the best primary care performance compared with other healthcare settings, and township health center should play a key role in providing primary care in Tibet.

  14. Oral health assessment and mouth care for children and young people receiving palliative care. Part two.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargeant, S; Chamley, C

    2013-04-01

    This is the second part of a two-part article on oral health assessment and mouth care for children and young people receiving palliative care. This article covers basic oral hygiene and management of oral health problems: oral candidiasis, coated tongue/dirty mouth, dry mouth, hypersalivation, ulceration, painful mouth, stomatitis and mucositis. The article also covers treating patients who are immunocompromised and the need to educate families and carers in the basic principles of oral care, including the importance of preventing cross-infection. Part one outlined oral assessment and discussed the adaptation of the Nottingham Oral Health Assessment Tool (Freer 2000).

  15. Achieving Value in Primary Care: The Primary Care Value Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollow, William; Cucchiara, Peter

    2016-03-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model provides a compelling vision for primary care transformation, but studies of its impact have used insufficiently patient-centered metrics with inconsistent results. We propose a framework for defining patient-centered value and a new model for value-based primary care transformation: the primary care value model (PCVM). We advocate for use of patient-centered value when measuring the impact of primary care transformation, recognition, and performance-based payment; for financial support and research and development to better define primary care value-creating activities and their implementation; and for use of the model to support primary care organizations in transformation.

  16. Toward Patient-Centered Telerehabilitation Design: Understanding Chronic Pain Patients’ Preferences for Web-Based Exercise Telerehabilitation Using a Discrete Choice Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groothuis-Oudshoorn, Catharina GM; Vollenbroek-Hutten, Miriam MR; IJzerman, Maarten J

    2017-01-01

    Background Patient-centered design that addresses patients’ preferences and needs is considered an important aim for improving health care systems. At present, within the field of pain rehabilitation, patients’ preferences regarding telerehabilitation remain scarcely explored and little is known about the optimal combination between human and electronic contact from the patients’ perspective. In addition, limited evidence is available about the best way to explore patients’ preferences. Therefore, the assessment of patients’ preferences regarding telemedicine is an important step toward the design of effective patient-centered care. Objective To identify which telerehabilitation treatment options patients with chronic pain are most likely to accept as alternatives to conventional rehabilitation and assess which treatment attributes are most important to them. Methods A discrete choice experiment with 15 choice tasks, combining 6 telerehabilitation treatment characteristics, was designed. Each choice task consisted of 2 hypothetical treatment scenarios and 1 opt-out scenario. Relative attribute importance was estimated using a bivariate probit regression analysis. One hundred and thirty surveys were received, of which 104 were usable questionnaires; thus, resulting in a total of 1547 observations. Results Physician communication mode, the use of feedback and monitoring technology (FMT), and exercise location were key drivers of patients’ treatment preferences (Phealth care premiums would make these telerehabilitation scenarios as attractive as conventional clinic-based rehabilitation. Conclusions “Intermediate” telerehabilitation treatments offering FMT, some face-to-face consulting, and a gym-based exercise location should be pursued as promising alternatives to conventional chronic pain rehabilitation. Further research is necessary to explore whether strategies other than health care premium reductions could also increase the value of home

  17. Interprofessional Teamwork Education: Moving Toward the Patient-Centered Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Kamran; Najarkolai, Atena Rahmati; Keshmiri, Fatemeh

    2016-10-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ISSUE Instructions: 1.3 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded after you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. In order to obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Interprofessional Teamwork Education: Moving Toward the Patient-Centered Approach," found on pages 449-460, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name, contact information, and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until September 30, 2019. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. OBJECTIVES Explain the recommended framework in teaching and implementing interprofessional competencies. Identify

  18. Palliative care in India: Situation assessment and future scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, S S; Subitha, L; Iswarya, S

    2015-01-01

    Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problems associated with life-threatening illness, through prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification, assessment and treatment of pain, and other problems - physical, psychosocial, and spiritual. It is estimated that in India the total number of people who need palliative care is likely to be 5.4 million people a year. Though palliative care services have been in existence for many years, India ranks at the bottom of the Quality of Death index in overall score. However there has been steady progress in the past few years through community-owned palliative care services. One of the key objectives of the National Programme for prevention and control of cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and stroke is to establish and develop capacity for palliative and rehabilitative care. Community models for the provision of home-based palliative care is possible by involving community caregivers and volunteers supervised by nurses trained in palliative care. Training of medical officers and health care professionals, and sensitization of the public through awareness campaigns are vital to improve the scope and coverage of palliative care. Process of translating palliative care plan into action requires strong leadership, competent management, political support and integration across all levels of care.

  19. Palliative care in India: Situation assessment and future scope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S S Kar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problems associated with life-threatening illness, through prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification, assessment and treatment of pain, and other problems – physical, psychosocial, and spiritual. It is estimated that in India the total number of people who need palliative care is likely to be 5.4 million people a year. Though palliative care services have been in existence for many years, India ranks at the bottom of the Quality of Death index in overall score. However there has been steady progress in the past few years through community-owned palliative care services. One of the key objectives of the National Programme for prevention and control of cancer, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and stroke is to establish and develop capacity for palliative and rehabilitative care. Community models for the provision of home-based palliative care is possible by involving community caregivers and volunteers supervised by nurses trained in palliative care. Training of medical officers and health care professionals, and sensitization of the public through awareness campaigns are vital to improve the scope and coverage of palliative care. Process of translating palliative care plan into action requires strong leadership, competent management, political support and integration across all levels of care.

  20. New Dimensions in Patient–Physician Interaction: Values, Autonomy, and Medical Information in the Patient-Centered Clinical Encounter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Aakash Kumar; Murinson, Beth Brianna

    2012-01-01

    Patient–physician interactions are increasingly influenced by the extraordinary diversification of populations and rapid expansion of medical knowledge that characterize our modern era. By contrast, the patient–physician interaction models currently used to teach medical trainees have little capacity to address these twin challenges. We developed a new model of patient–physician interaction to explicitly address these problems. Historically, models of patient–physician interaction viewed patient autonomy and the manifestation of clearly defined health care-related values as tightly linked, and it was assumed that patients’ medical knowledge was low. Unfortunately, this does not adequately represent patients such as 1) the highly educated non-medical specialist who possesses little familiarity with health-related values but is highly autonomous, and 2) the patient from a non-Western background who may have well-established health care-related values but a low sense of personal independence. In addition, it is evident to us that the assumption that all patients possess little medical knowledge can create alienation between patient and physician, e.g. the well-informed patient with a rare disease. We propose a paradigm that models autonomy, health care-related values formation, and medical knowledge as varying from patient to patient. Four examples of patient types are described within the context of the model based on clinical experience. We believe that adopting this model will have implications for optimizing patient–physician interactions and teaching about patient-centered care. Further research is needed to identify relevant patient types within this framework and to assess the impact on health care outcomes. PMID:23908841

  1. Metrics for assessing improvements in primary health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Kurt C; Etz, Rebecca S; Gullett, Heidi; Sweeney, Sarah A; Miller, William L; Jaén, Carlos Roberto; Crabtree, Benjamin F; Nutting, Paul A; Glasgow, Russell E

    2014-01-01

    Metrics focus attention on what is important. Balanced metrics of primary health care inform purpose and aspiration as well as performance. Purpose in primary health care is about improving the health of people and populations in their community contexts. It is informed by metrics that include long-term, meaning- and relationship-focused perspectives. Aspirational uses of metrics inspire evolving insights and iterative improvement, using a collaborative, developmental perspective. Performance metrics assess the complex interactions among primary care tenets of accessibility, a whole-person focus, integration and coordination of care, and ongoing relationships with individuals, families, and communities; primary health care principles of inclusion and equity, a focus on people's needs, multilevel integration of health, collaborative policy dialogue, and stakeholder participation; basic and goal-directed health care, prioritization, development, and multilevel health outcomes. Environments that support reflection, development, and collaborative action are necessary for metrics to advance health and minimize unintended consequences.

  2. Outcomes in Child Health: Exploring the Use of Social Media to Engage Parents in Patient-Centered Outcomes Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shave, Kassi; Fernandes, Ricardo M; Scott, Shannon D; Hartling, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Background With the rapid growth of technology and its improved accessibility globally, social media is gaining an increasingly important role in health care. Patients are frequently engaging with social media to access information, share content, and interact with others in online health communities. However, the use of social media as a stakeholder engagement strategy has been minimally explored, and effective methods for involving participants in research on the identification of patient-centered outcomes remain unknown. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the process of using social media to engage parents in identifying patient-centered outcomes, using acute respiratory infections in children as an example to gauge feasibility. Methods We conducted a process evaluation of a two-phase Web-based strategy to engage parents in research on patient-centered outcomes. In the first phase, we developed a website and study-specific Facebook and Twitter accounts to recruit parents to complete a Web-based survey identifying patient-centered outcomes. In the second phase, we used Facebook to host discussion with parents based on the survey results. The reach of social media as an engagement strategy and the characteristics of the population recruited were assessed. Results During the first phase, there were 5027 visits to the survey site, 110 participants completed the survey, 553 unique users visited the study website (675 visits), the Facebook page received 104 likes, and the Twitter account gained 52 followers over the 14-week study period. Most survey respondents identified Facebook (51.8%, 57/110) or a friend (45.5%, 50/110) as their source of referral. It was found that 70.0% (77/110) of respondents resided in Canada, in urban centers (92.7%, 102/110), and 88.2% (97/110) had a college or university degree or higher. The median year of birth was 1978 and 90.0% (99/110) were female. Most survey responses (88.2%, 97/110) were completed during the first month

  3. Compassionate Care: Can it be Defined and Measured? The Development of the Compassionate Care Assessment Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Burnell

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Compassion has not been universally defined or understood, nonetheless is recognized as a component of nursing excellence. If compassionate care is routine in health care delivery models, nursing behaviors and actions that exemplify compassion ought to be easily identifiable to patients. However, a standardized scale measuring compassionate care attributes has been notably absent.Objective: To address this gap and ascertain the importance of compassionate care to patients, a Compassionate Care Assessment Tool (CCAT© was formulated. This new tool, derived from a pilot study of two published surveys, combined the constructs of compassion and caring to generate 28 elements of compassionate care.Methodology: The CCAT© was administered to 250 hospitalized patients. Patients were asked to rate (a the importance of these items to compassionate care and (b the extent to which nurses made this type of care apparent to them.Results: Four categorical segments illustrated compassion from the patients’ perspective: the ability to establish meaningful connections, meet expectations, exhibit caring attributes, and function as a capable practitioner.Conclusions: The provision of compassionate care requires a holistic approach. Patients value nurses forming personal connections, serving as their advocates, and responding to their individual needs.

  4. Social media and rating sites as tools to understanding quality of care: a scoping review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoef, L.M.; Belt, T.H. van de; Engelen, L.J.; Schoonhoven, L.; Kool, R.B.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Insight into the quality of health care is important for any stakeholder including patients, professionals, and governments. In light of a patient-centered approach, it is essential to assess the quality of health care from a patient's perspective, which is commonly done with surveys or

  5. Patient-centeredness in PD care: Development and validation of a patient experience questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, M. van der; Faber, M.J.; Ummels, I.; Aarts, J.W.M.; Munneke, M.; Bloem, B.R.

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Patient-centeredness is increasingly recognized as a crucial element of quality of care. A suitable instrument to assess the level of patient-centeredness for Parkinson's disease (PD) care is lacking. Here we describe the development and validation of the Patient-Centered Questionnaire

  6. Self-assessment in cancer patients referred to palliative care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strömgren, Annette S; Goldschmidt, Dorthe; Groenvold, Mogens

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Research in palliative care is considered difficult due to the poor health of patients. However, patient-provided data are essential for a thorough description of patient symptomatology and for the evaluation of care. METHODS: The authors examined the feasibility of a questionnaire......-based study using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality-of-life instrument EORTC QLQ-C30, the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS), and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) in cancer patients who were receiving palliative care. This report describes...... the symptomatology of participating patients and examines differences in symptomatology between patients in three palliative care functions: inpatient, outpatient, and palliative home care. RESULTS: Of 267 eligible patients who were referred to a department of palliative medicine, initial self...

  7. Assessment and treatment of dizzy patients in primary health care.

    OpenAIRE

    Ekvall-Hansson, Eva

    2006-01-01

    Dizziness is a common reason for visits to primary health care, especially among elderly patients. From a physiotherapeutic perspective, this thesis aims to study the assessment and treatment of dizzy patients in primary health care. Interventions in papers I, III and IV comprised a vestibular rehabilitation programme. In paper I, patients with multisensory dizziness were randomized to intervention group or control group. At follow-up after six weeks and three months, the intervention ...

  8. Assessing health centre systems for guiding improvement in diabetes care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robinson Gary

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aboriginal people in Australia experience the highest prevalence of diabetes in the country, an excess of preventable complications and early death. There is increasing evidence demonstrating the importance of healthcare systems for improvement of chronic illness care. The aims of this study were to assess the status of systems for chronic illness care in Aboriginal community health centres, and to explore whether more developed systems were associated with better quality of diabetes care. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted in 12 Aboriginal community health centres in the Northern Territory of Australia. Assessment of Chronic Illness Care scale was adapted to measure system development in health centres, and administered by interview with health centre staff and managers. Based on a random sample of 295 clinical records from attending clients with diagnosed type 2 diabetes, processes of diabetes care were measured by rating of health service delivery against best-practice guidelines. Intermediate outcomes included the control of HbA1c, blood pressure, and total cholesterol. Results Health centre systems were in the low to mid-range of development and had distinct areas of strength and weakness. Four of the six system components were independently associated with quality of diabetes care: an increase of 1 unit of score for organisational influence, community linkages, and clinical information systems, respectively, was associated with 4.3%, 3.8%, and 4.5% improvement in adherence to process standards; likewise, organisational influence, delivery system design and clinical information systems were related to control of HbA1c, blood pressure, and total cholesterol. Conclusion The state of development of health centre systems is reflected in quality of care outcome measures for patients. The health centre systems assessment tool should be useful in assessing and guiding development of systems for improvement of

  9. Development framework for a patient-centered record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentes, John; Roux, Michèle; Montagner, Julien; Lecornu, Laurent

    2012-12-01

    Patient records have been developed to support the physician-oriented medical activity scheme. One recommended yet rarely studied alternative, expected to improve healthcare, is the patient-centered record. We propose a development framework for such record, which includes domain-specific database models at the conceptual level, analyzing the fundamental role of complementary information destined to ensure proper patient understanding of related clinical situations. A patient-centered awareness field study of user requirements and medical workflow was carried out in three medical services and two technical units to identify the most relevant elements of the framework, and compared to the definitions of a theoretical approach. Three core data models - centered on the patient, medical personnel, and complementary patient information, corresponding to the determined set of entities, information exchanges and actors roles, constitute the technical recommendations of the development framework. An open source proof of concept prototype was developed to show the model feasibility. The resulting patient-centered record development framework implies particular medical personnel contributions to supply complementary information.

  10. [Valvular heart disease: preoperative assessment and postoperative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nägele, Reto; Kaufmann, Beat A

    2013-10-30

    Patients with valvular heart disease or with a prosthetic heart valve replacement are seen with increasing frequency in clinical practice. The medical care and evaluation of patients with valvular heart disease before valve surgery, but also the post-operative treatment is complex and managed by general practitioners, cardiologists and cardiac surgeons. In this mini-review we will first discuss the preoperative assessment of the two most common valvulopathies, aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation. Then we will discuss the post-operative care, which includes the management of anticoagulation, serial follow up and as well as the diagnostic assessment of complications such as thromboembolism, hemolysis, endocarditis and valve dysfunction.

  11. Assessing patient care: summary of the breakout group on assessment of observable learner performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayesu, James Kimo; Kulstad, Christine; Wallenstein, Joshua; Gallahue, Fiona; Gordon, David; Leone, Katrina; Kessler, Chad

    2012-12-01

    There is an established expectation that physicians in training demonstrate competence in all aspects of clinical care prior to entering professional practice. Multiple methods have been used to assess competence in patient care, including direct observation, simulation-based assessments, objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs), global faculty evaluations, 360-degree evaluations, portfolios, self-reflection, clinical performance metrics, and procedure logs. A thorough assessment of competence in patient care requires a mixture of methods, taking into account each method's costs, benefits, and current level of evidence. At the 2012 Academic Emergency Medicine (AEM) consensus conference on educational research, one breakout group reviewed and discussed the evidence supporting various methods of assessing patient care and defined a research agenda for the continued development of specific assessment methods based on current best practices. In this article, the authors review each method's supporting reliability and validity evidence and make specific recommendations for future educational research.

  12. Quality assessment of child care services in primary health care settings of Central Karnataka (Davangere District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infectious disease and malnutrition are common in children. Primary health care came into being to decrease the morbidity. Quality assessment is neither clinical research nor technology assessment. It is primarily an administrative device used to monitor performance to determine whether it continues to remain within acceptable bounds. Aims and Objectives: To assess the quality of service in the delivery of child health care in a primary health care setting. To evaluate client satisfaction. To assess utilization of facilities by the community. Materials and Methods: Study Type: Cross-sectional community-based study. Quality assessment was done by taking 30-50%, of the service provider. Client satisfaction was determined with 1 Immunization and child examination-90 clients each. Utilization of services was assessed among 478 households. Statistical Analysis: Proportions, Likert′s scale to grade the services and Chi-square. Results: Immunization service: Identification of needed vaccine, preparation and care was average. Vaccination technique, documentation, EPI education, maintenance of cold chain and supplies were excellent. Client satisfaction was good. Growth monitoring: It was excellent except for mother′s education andoutreach educational session . Acute respiratory tract infection care: History, physical examination, ARI education were poor. Classification, treatment and referral were excellent. Client satisfaction was good. Diarrheal disease care: History taking was excellent. But examination, classification, treatment, ORT education were poor. Conclusion: Mothers education was not stressed by service providers. Service providers′ knowledge do not go with the quality of service rendered. Physical examination of the child was not good. Except for immunization other services were average.

  13. [Assessing and evaluating physical activity during counseling in health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagströmer, Maria; Wisén, Anita; Hassmén, Peter

    2015-01-01

    To make individualized counseling possible, valid and reliable measures of physical activity are necessary. In health care, quality must be continuously secured and developed. Follow-up of life-style habits such as physical activity does not differ from monitoring of other treatment in the health care setting.  After counseling and appropriate period of time, evaluation should be done to assess if there has been any change in the physical activity level. For assessment and evaluation of physical activity in routine clinical practice the National Board for Health and Social Welfare indicator questions regarding physical activity are recommended. For a more detailed assessment and evaluation of physical activity and sedentary behavior comprehensive validated instruments/diaries should be used. For precise and objective assessment and evaluation of both physical activity and sedentary behavior, movement sensors are recommended.

  14. Reliability of medical audit in quality assessment of medical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camacho Luiz Antonio Bastos

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical audit of hospital records has been a major component of quality of care assessment, although physician judgment is known to have low reliability. We estimated interrater agreement of quality assessment in a sample of patients with cardiac conditions admitted to an American teaching hospital. Physician-reviewers used structured review methods designed to improve quality assessment based on judgment. Chance-corrected agreement for the items considered more relevant to process and outcome of care ranged from low to moderate (0.2 to 0.6, depending on the review item and the principal diagnoses and procedures the patients underwent. Results from several studies seem to converge on this point. Comparisons among different settings should be made with caution, given the sensitivity of agreement measurements to prevalence rates. Reliability of review methods in their current stage could be improved by combining the assessment of two or more reviewers, and by emphasizing outcome-oriented events.

  15. Reliable and Valid Assessment of Point-of-care Ultrasonography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Todsen, Tobias; Tolsgaard, Martin Grønnebæk; Olsen, Beth Härstedt

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the reliability and validity of the Objective Structured Assessment of Ultrasound Skills (OSAUS) scale for point-of-care ultrasonography (POC US) performance. BACKGROUND: POC US is increasingly used by clinicians and is an essential part of the management of acute surgical c...

  16. Methodology of constructive technology assessment in health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, Kirsten F.L.; Karsenberg, Kim; Hummel, Marjan J.M.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Jolien M.; Harten, van Wim H.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: Technologies in health care are evolving quickly, with new findings in the area of biotechnological and genetic research being published regularly. A health technology assessment (HTA) is often used to answer the question of whether the new technology should be implemented into clinical

  17. Teaching while learning while practicing: reframing faculty development for the patient-centered medical home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Michael A; Sikon, Andrea L; Lypson, Monica L; Gomez, Arthur; Kennedy-Malone, Laurie; Bussey-Jones, Jada; Bowen, Judith L

    2013-09-01

    Soaring costs of health care, patients living longer with chronic illnesses, and continued attrition of interest in primary care contribute to the urgency of developing an improved model of health care delivery. Out of this need, the concept of the team-based, patient-centered medical home (PCMH) has developed. Amidst implementation in academic settings, clinical teachers face complex challenges not previously encountered: teaching while simultaneously learning about the PCMH model, redesigning clinical delivery systems while simultaneously delivering care within them, and working more closely in expanded interprofessional teams.To address these challenges, the authors reviewed three existing faculty development models and recommended four important adaptations for preparing clinical teachers for their roles as system change agents and facilitators of learning in these new settings. First, many faculty find themselves in the awkward position of teaching concepts they have yet to master themselves. Professional development programs must recognize that, at least initially, health professions learners and faculty will be learning system redesign content and skills together while practicing in the evolving workplace. Second, all care delivery team members influence learning in the workplace. Thus, the definition of faculty must expand to include nurses, pharmacists, social workers, medical assistants, patients, and others. These team members will need to accept their roles as educators. Third, learning to deliver health care in teams will require support of both interprofessional collaboration and intraprofessional identity development. Fourth, learning to manage change and uncertainty should be part of the core content of any faculty development program within the PCMH.

  18. Measurement Properties and Implementation of a Checklist to Assess Leadership Skills during Interdisciplinary Rounds in the Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsbeth C. M. Ten Have

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of interdisciplinary teams in the intensive care unit (ICU has focused attention on leadership behavior. A daily recurrent situation in ICUs in which both leadership behavior and interdisciplinary teamwork are integrated concerns the interdisciplinary rounds (IDRs. Although IDRs are recommended to provide optimal interdisciplinary and patient-centered care, there are no checklists available for leading physicians. We tested the measurement properties and implementation of a checklist to assess the quality of leadership skills in interdisciplinary rounds. The measurement properties of the checklist, which included 10 essential quality indicators, were tested for interrater reliability and internal consistency and by factor analysis. The interrater reliability among 3 raters was good (κ, 0.85 and the internal consistency was acceptable (α, 0.74. Factor analysis showed all factor loadings on 1 domain (>0.65. The checklist was further implemented during videotaped IDRs which were led by senior physicians and in which 99 patients were discussed. Implementation of the checklist showed a wide range of “no” and “yes” scores among the senior physicians. These results may underline the need for such a checklist to ensure tasks are synchronized within the team.

  19. Measurement properties and implementation of a checklist to assess leadership skills during interdisciplinary rounds in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Have, Elsbeth C M; Nap, Raoul E; Tulleken, Jaap E

    2015-01-01

    The implementation of interdisciplinary teams in the intensive care unit (ICU) has focused attention on leadership behavior. A daily recurrent situation in ICUs in which both leadership behavior and interdisciplinary teamwork are integrated concerns the interdisciplinary rounds (IDRs). Although IDRs are recommended to provide optimal interdisciplinary and patient-centered care, there are no checklists available for leading physicians. We tested the measurement properties and implementation of a checklist to assess the quality of leadership skills in interdisciplinary rounds. The measurement properties of the checklist, which included 10 essential quality indicators, were tested for interrater reliability and internal consistency and by factor analysis. The interrater reliability among 3 raters was good (κ, 0.85) and the internal consistency was acceptable (α, 0.74). Factor analysis showed all factor loadings on 1 domain (>0.65). The checklist was further implemented during videotaped IDRs which were led by senior physicians and in which 99 patients were discussed. Implementation of the checklist showed a wide range of "no" and "yes" scores among the senior physicians. These results may underline the need for such a checklist to ensure tasks are synchronized within the team.

  20. [DEVELOPMENTAL CARE IN THE NEONATAL INTENSIVE CARE UNIT ACCORDING TO NEWBORN INDIVIDUALIZED DEVELOPMENTAL CARE AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM (NIDCAP)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberstein, Dalia; Litmanovitz, Ita

    2016-01-01

    During hospitalization in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), the brain of the preterm infant undergoes a particularly vulnerable and sensitive period of development. Brain development might be negatively influenced by direct injury as well as by complications of prematurity. Over the past few years, stress has come to be increasingly recognized as a potential risk factor. The NICU environment contains numerous stress factors due to maternal deprivation and over-stimulation, such as light, sound and pain, which conflict with the brain's developmental requirements. Developmental care is a caregiving approach that addresses the early developmental needs of the preterm infant as an integral component of quality neonatal care. NIDCAP (Newborn Individualized Developmental Care and Assessment Program) is a comprehensive program that aims to reduce environmental stress, to support the infant's neuro-behavioral maturation and organization, and to promote early parent-infant relationships. The implementation of developmental care based on NIDCAP principles is a gradual, in-depth systems change process, which affects all aspects of care in the NICU. This review describes the theoretical basis of the NIDCAP approach, summarizes the scientific evidence and addresses some of the implications of the transition from a traditional to a developmental care NICU.

  1. Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment and Transitional Care in Acutely Hospitalized Patients The Transitional Care Bridge Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buurman, Bianca M.; Parlevliet, Juliette L.; Allore, Heather G.; Blok, Willem; van Deelen, Bob A. J.; van Charante, Eric P. Moll; de Haan, Rob J.; de Rooij, Sophia E.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Older adults acutely hospitalized are at risk of disability. Trials on comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) and transitional care present inconsistent results. OBJECTIVE To test whether an intervention of systematic CGA, followed by the transitional care bridge program, improved activ

  2. Assessing the role of GPs in Nordic health care systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaye, Randolph K

    2016-05-03

    Purpose This paper examines the changing role of general practitioners (GPs) in Nordic countries of Sweden, Norway and Denmark. It aims to explore the "gate keeping" role of GPs in the face of current changes in the health care delivery systems in these countries. Design/methodology/approach Data were collected from existing literature, interviews with GPs, hospital specialists and representatives of Danish regions and Norwegian Medical Association. Findings The paper contends that in all these changes, the position of the GPs in the medical division of labor has been strengthened, and patients now have increased and broadened access to choice. Research limitations/implications Health care cost and high cancer mortality rates have forced Nordic countries of Sweden, Norway and Denmark to rethink their health care systems. Several attempts have been made to reduce health care cost through market reform and by strenghtening the position of GPs. The evidence suggests that in Norway and Denmark, right incentives are in place to achieve this goal. Sweden is not far behind. The paper has limitations of a small sample size and an exclusive focus on GPs. Practical implications Anecdotal evidence suggests that physicians are becoming extremely unhappy. Understanding the changing status of primary care physicians will yield valuable information for assessing the effectiveness of Nordic health care delivery systems. Social implications This study has wider implications of how GPs see their role as potential gatekeepers in the Nordic health care systems. The role of GPs is changing as a result of recent health care reforms. Originality/value This paper contends that in Norway and Denmark, right incentives are in place to strengthen the position of GPs.

  3. [Pain assessment in the premature newborn in Intensive Care Unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Luciano Marques; Pereira, Monick Piton; dos Santos, Leandro Feliciano Nery; de Santana, Rosana Castelo Branco

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to analyze the process of pain identification in premature by the professional staff of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of a public hospital in the interior of Bahia, Brazil. This is a quantitative descriptive exploratory study that was made through a form applied to twenty-four health professional of a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. The data were analyzed in the Statistical Package for Social Sciences. The results showed 100% of professionals believed that newborns feel pain, 83.3% knew the pain as the fifth vital sign to be evaluated; 54,8% did not know the pain assessment scales; 70.8% did not use scales and highlighted behavioral and physiological signs of the newborn as signs suggestive of pain. Thus, it is important that professionals understand the pain as a complex phenomenon that demands early intervention, ensuring the excellence of care.

  4. [Patient-centered evaluation of the illness sequelae of musculoskeletal diseases: overview of important outcome instruments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangha, O; Stucki, G

    1997-12-01

    Quality of life and patient-centered health status has received increasing attention during the last decade. Simultaneously, there have been multiple instruments to assess quality of life in a standardized way. There are several possible approaches to assess health status in a more standardized way: (1) the judgement of a health professional, (2) performing standardized activities by the patient, and (3) self report of patients with standardized questionnaires. This paper presents a selection of health status instruments that have been used successfully to assess health-related quality of life in patients with musculoskeletal diseases. The description is restricted to instruments that have sound psychometric properties and that have been published in the scientific literature.

  5. Rapid assessment methods in eye care: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivas Marmamula

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliable information is required for the planning and management of eye care services. While classical research methods provide reliable estimates, they are prohibitively expensive and resource intensive. Rapid assessment (RA methods are indispensable tools in situations where data are needed quickly and where time- or cost-related factors prohibit the use of classical epidemiological surveys. These methods have been developed and field tested, and can be applied across almost the entire gamut of health care. The 1990s witnessed the emergence of RA methods in eye care for cataract, onchocerciasis, and trachoma and, more recently, the main causes of avoidable blindness and visual impairment. The important features of RA methods include the use of local resources, simplified sampling methodology, and a simple examination protocol/data collection method that can be performed by locally available personnel. The analysis is quick and easy to interpret. The entire process is inexpensive, so the survey may be repeated once every 5-10 years to assess the changing trends in disease burden. RA survey methods are typically linked with an intervention. This article provides an overview of the RA methods commonly used in eye care, and emphasizes the selection of appropriate methods based on the local need and context.

  6. Creation of complexity assessment tool for patients receiving home care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Leopoldina de Castro Villas Bôas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To create and validate a complexity assessment tool for patients receiving home care from a public health service. METHOD A diagnostic accuracy study, with estimates for the tool's validity and reliability. Measurements of sensitivity and specificity were considered when producing validity estimates. The resulting tool was used for testing. Assessment by a specialized team of home care professionals was used as the gold standard. In the tool's reliability study, the authors used the Kappa statistic. The tool's sensitivity and specificity were analyzed using various cut-off points. RESULTS On the best cut-off point-21-with the gold standard, a sensitivity of 75.5% was obtained, with the limits of confidence interval (95% at 68.3% and 82.8% and specificity of 53.2%, with the limits of confidence interval (95% at 43.8% and 62.7%. CONCLUSION The tool presented evidence of validity and reliability, possibly helping in service organization at patient admission, care type change, or support during the creation of care plans.

  7. Influence of Human Factor Issues on Patient-Centered mHealth Apps' Impact; Where Do We Stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildenbos, G A; Peute, L W; Jaspers, M W M

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the preliminary results of a literature review on studies published in 2014-2015 concerning patient-centered mHealth applications' (apps) impact. Abstracts were included when they described a mHealth app targeted at patients and reported on the effects of this app on patient care. From a total of 559 potentially relevant articles, 17 papers were finally included. Nine studies reported a positive impact of the patient-centered mHealth app on patient care; 4 of these studies were randomized controlled trials. Measured impacts in the 17 studies focused on improving patients' physical activity, self-efficacy and medication adherence. Human factors issues potentially mediating these effects were discussed in all studies. Transitions in the interaction between healthcare providers and their patients were most often discussed as influencing the impact of the mHealth app. More research is needed, focussing on human issues mediating the effect of patient-centered mHealth apps to precipitate knowledge on the effectiveness of mHealth. This research should preferably be guided by socio-technical models.

  8. Patient-centered hand hygiene: the next step in infection prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landers, Timothy; Abusalem, Said; Coty, Mary-Beth; Bingham, James

    2012-05-01

    Hand hygiene has been recognized as the most important means of preventing the transmission of infection, and great emphasis has been placed on ways to improve hand hygiene compliance by health care workers (HCWs). Despite increasing evidence that patients' flora and the hospital environment are the primary source of many infections, little effort has been directed toward involving patients in their own hand hygiene. Most previous work involving patients has included patients as monitors or auditors of hand hygiene practices by their HCWs. This article reviews the evidence on the benefits of including patients more directly in hand hygiene initiatives, and uses the framework of patient-centered safety initiatives to provide recommendations for the timing and implementation of patient hand hygiene protocols. It also addresses key areas for further research, practice guideline development, and implications for training of HCWs.

  9. Patient-centered transfer process for patients admitted through the ED boosts satisfaction, improves safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    To improve safety and patient flow, administrators at Hallmark Health System, based in Melrose, MA, implemented a new patient-centered transfer process for patients admitted through the ED at the health system's two hospitals. Under the new approach, inpatient nurses come down to the ED to take reports on new patients in a process that includes the ED care team as well as family members. The inpatient nurses then accompany the patients up to their designated floors. Since the new patient-transfer process was implemented in June 2012, patient satisfaction has increased by at least one point on patient satisfaction surveys. Administrators anticipate that medical errors or omissions related to the handoff process will show a drop of at least 50%, when data is tabulated.

  10. National Lipid Association Recommendations for Patient-Centered Management of Dyslipidemia: Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Terry A; Maki, Kevin C; Orringer, Carl E; Jones, Peter H; Kris-Etherton, Penny; Sikand, Geeta; La Forge, Ralph; Daniels, Stephen R; Wilson, Don P; Morris, Pamela B; Wild, Robert A; Grundy, Scott M; Daviglus, Martha; Ferdinand, Keith C; Vijayaraghavan, Krishnaswami; Deedwania, Prakash C; Aberg, Judith A; Liao, Katherine P; McKenney, James M; Ross, Joyce L; Braun, Lynne T; Ito, Matthew K; Bays, Harold E; Brown, W Virgil; Underberg, James A

    2015-01-01

    An Expert Panel convened by the National Lipid Association previously developed a consensus set of recommendations for the patient-centered management of dyslipidemia in clinical medicine (part 1). These were guided by the principle that reducing elevated levels of atherogenic cholesterol (non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol) reduces the risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. This document represents a continuation of the National Lipid Association recommendations developed by a diverse panel of experts who examined the evidence base and provided recommendations regarding the following topics: (1) lifestyle therapies; (2) groups with special considerations, including children and adolescents, women, older patients, certain ethnic and racial groups, patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus, patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and patients with residual risk despite statin and lifestyle therapies; and (3) strategies to improve patient outcomes by increasing adherence and using team-based collaborative care.

  11. Feasibility of Implementing a Patient-Centered Postoperative Wound Monitoring Program Using Smartphone Images: A Pilot Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    hospital readmission. Conclusions Health systems are increasingly dedicating efforts to transitional care improvement programs. This feasibility trial will confirm whether patients and their caregivers can learn to use a postdischarge wound monitoring smartphone app and will assess patient and provider satisfaction. This protocol will provide preliminary evidence for a shift in the delivery of postdischarge care in a patient-centered and cost-effective manner. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02735525; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02735525 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6oIvN4Mab) PMID:28228369

  12. Assessing Quality of Care of Elderly Patients Using the ACOVE Quality Indicator Set: A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Askari, M.; Wierenga, P.C.; Eslami, S.; Medlock, S.; de Rooij, S.E.; Abu-Hanna, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Care of the elderly is recognized as an increasingly important segment of health care. The Assessing Care Of Vulnerable Elderly (ACOVE) quality indicators (QIs) were developed to assess and improve the care of elderly patients. Objectives: The purpose of this review is to summarize studi

  13. A patient-centered methodology that improves the accuracy of prognostic predictions in cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Kashani-Sabet

    Full Text Available Individualized approaches to prognosis are crucial to effective management of cancer patients. We developed a methodology to assign individualized 5-year disease-specific death probabilities to 1,222 patients with melanoma and to 1,225 patients with breast cancer. For each cancer, three risk subgroups were identified by stratifying patients according to initial stage, and prediction probabilities were generated based on the factors most closely related to 5-year disease-specific death. Separate subgroup probabilities were merged to form a single composite index, and its predictive efficacy was assessed by several measures, including the area (AUC under its receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve. The patient-centered methodology achieved an AUC of 0.867 in the prediction of 5-year disease-specific death, compared with 0.787 using the AJCC staging classification alone. When applied to breast cancer patients, it achieved an AUC of 0.907, compared with 0.802 using the AJCC staging classification alone. A prognostic algorithm produced from a randomly selected training subsample of 800 melanoma patients preserved 92.5% of its prognostic efficacy (as measured by AUC when the same algorithm was applied to a validation subsample containing the remaining patients. Finally, the tailored prognostic approach enhanced the identification of high-risk candidates for adjuvant therapy in melanoma. These results describe a novel patient-centered prognostic methodology with improved predictive efficacy when compared with AJCC stage alone in two distinct malignancies drawn from two separate populations.

  14. Exploring valid and reliable assessment methods for care management education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennissen, Lokke; Stammen, Lorette; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Jolien; Wieringa, Sietse; Busari, Jamiu

    2016-07-04

    Purpose It is assumed that the use of valid and reliable assessment methods can facilitate the development of medical residents' management and leadership competencies. To justify this assertion, the perceptions of an expert panel of health care leaders were explored on assessment methods used for evaluating care management (CM) development in Dutch residency programs. This paper aims to investigate how assessors and trainees value these methods and examine for any inherent benefits or shortcomings when they are applied in practice. Design/methodology/approach A Delphi survey was conducted among members of the platform for medical leadership in The Netherlands. This panel of experts was made up of clinical educators, practitioners and residents interested in CM education. Findings Of the respondents, 40 (55.6 per cent) and 31 (43 per cent) participated in the first and second rounds of the Delphi survey, respectively. The respondents agreed that assessment methods currently being used to measure residents' CM competencies were weak, though feasible for use in many residency programs. Multi-source feedback (MSF, 92.1 per cent), portfolio/e-portfolio (86.8 per cent) and knowledge testing (76.3 per cent) were identified as the most commonly known assessment methods with familiarity rates exceeding 75 per cent. Practical implications The findings suggested that an "assessment framework" comprising MSF, portfolios, individual process improvement projects or self-reflections and observations in clinical practice should be used to measure CM competencies in residents. Originality/value This study reaffirms the need for objective methods to assess CM skills in post-graduate medical education, as there was not a single assessment method that stood out as the best instrument.

  15. From Cure to Care: Assessing the Ethical and Professional Learning Needs of Medical Learners in a Care-Based Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Pippa; O'Reilly, Jane; Dojeiji, Sue; Blair, Richard; Harley, Anne

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the ethical and professional learning needs of medical trainees on clinical placements at a care-based facility, as they shifted from acute care to care-based philosophy. Using qualitative data analysis and grounded theory techniques, 12 medical learners and five clinical supervisors were interviewed. Five…

  16. Care planning needs of palliative home care clients: Development of the interRAI palliative care assessment clinical assessment protocols (CAPs)

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, Shannon; Hirdes, John P; Stolee, Paul; Garcia, John; Smith, Trevor Frise; Steel, Knight; Morris, John N.

    2014-01-01

    Background The interRAI Palliative Care (interRAI PC) assessment instrument provides a standardized, comprehensive means to identify person-specific need and supports clinicians to address important factors such as aspects of function, health, and social support. The interRAI Clinical Assessment Protocols (CAPs) inform clinicians of priority issues requiring further investigation where specific intervention may be warranted and equip clinicians with evidence to better inform development of a ...

  17. Integrating community health workers into a patient-centered medical home to support disease self-management among Vietnamese Americans: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennerstrom, Ashley; Bui, Tap; Harden-Barrios, Jewel; Price-Haywood, Eboni G

    2015-01-01

    There is evidence that patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) and community health workers (CHWs) improve chronic disease management. There are few models for integrating CHWs into PCMHs in order to enhance disease self-management support among diverse populations. In this article, we describe how a community-based nonprofit agency, a PCMH, and academic partners collaborated to develop and implement the Patient Resource and Education Program (PREP). We employed CHWs as PCMH care team members to provide health education and support to Vietnamese American patients with uncontrolled diabetes and/or hypertension. We began by conducting focus groups to assess patient knowledge, desire for support, and availability of community resources. Based on findings, we developed PREP with CHW guidance on cultural tailoring of educational materials and methods. CHWs received training in core competencies related to self-management support principles and conducted the 4-month intervention for PCMH patients. Throughout the program, we conducted process evaluation through structured team meetings and patient satisfaction surveys. We describe successes and challenges associated with PREP delivery including patient recruitment, structuring/documenting visits, and establishing effective care team integration, work flow, and communication. Strategies for mitigating these issues are presented, and we make recommendations for other PCMHs seeking to integrate CHWs into care teams.

  18. Health Services OutPatient Experience questionnaire: factorial validity and reliability of a patient-centered outcome measure for outpatient settings in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coluccia A

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Anna Coluccia, Fabio Ferretti, Andrea PozzaDepartment of Medical Sciences, Surgery and Neurosciences, Santa Maria alle Scotte University Hospital, University of Siena, Siena, ItalyPurpose: The patient-centered approach to health care does not seem to be sufficiently developed in the Italian context, and is still characterized by the biomedical model. In addition, there is a lack of validated outcome measures to assess outpatient experience as an aspect common to a variety of settings. The current study aimed to evaluate the factorial validity, reliability, and invariance across sex of the Health Services OutPatient Experience (HSOPE questionnaire, a short ten-item measure of patient-centeredness for Italian adult outpatients. The rationale for unidimensionality of the measure was that it could cover global patient experience as a process common to patients with a variety of diseases and irrespective of the phase of treatment course.Patients and methods: The HSOPE was compiled by 1,532 adult outpatients (51% females, mean age 59.22 years, standard deviation 16.26 receiving care in ten facilities at the Santa Maria alle Scotte University Hospital of Siena, Italy. The sample represented all the age cohorts. Twelve percent were young adults, 57% were adults, and 32% were older adults. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were conducted to evaluate factor structure. Reliability was evaluated as internal consistency using Cronbach’s α. Factor invariance was assessed through multigroup analyses.Results: Both exploratory and confirmatory analyses suggested a clearly defined unidimensional structure of the measure, with all the ten items having salient loadings on a single factor. Internal consistency was excellent (α=0.95. Indices of model fit supported a single-factor structure for both male and female outpatient groups. Young adult outpatients had significantly lower scores on perceived patient-centeredness relative to older adults. No

  19. Assessment of nursing care using indicators generated by software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Souza Lima

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to analyze the efficacy of the Nursing Process in an Intensive Care Unit using indicators generated by software. METHOD: cross-sectional study using data collected for four months. RNs and students daily registered patients, took history (at admission, performed physical assessments, and established nursing diagnoses, nursing plans/prescriptions, and assessed care delivered to 17 patients using software. Indicators concerning the incidence and prevalence of nursing diagnoses, rate of effectiveness, risk diagnoses, and rate of effective prevention of complications were computed. RESULTS: the Risk for imbalanced body temperature was the most frequent diagnosis (23.53%, while the least frequent was Risk for constipation (0%. The Risk for Impaired skin integrity was prevalent in 100% of the patients, while Risk for acute confusion was the least prevalent (11.76%. Risk for constipation and Risk for impaired skin integrity obtained a rate of risk diagnostic effectiveness of 100%. The rate of effective prevention of acute confusion and falls was 100%. CONCLUSION: the efficacy of the Nursing Process using indicators was analyzed because these indicators reveal how nurses have identified patients' risks and conditions, and planned care in a systematized manner.

  20. Assessing methods for measurement of clinical outcomes and quality of care in primary care practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Green Michael E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose To evaluate the appropriateness of potential data sources for the population of performance indicators for primary care (PC practices. Methods This project was a cross sectional study of 7 multidisciplinary primary care teams in Ontario, Canada. Practices were recruited and 5-7 physicians per practice agreed to participate in the study. Patients of participating physicians (20-30 were recruited sequentially as they presented to attend a visit. Data collection included patient, provider and practice surveys, chart abstraction and linkage to administrative data sets. Matched pairs analysis was used to examine the differences in the observed results for each indicator obtained using multiple data sources. Results Seven teams, 41 physicians, 94 associated staff and 998 patients were recruited. The survey response rate was 81% for patients, 93% for physicians and 83% for associated staff. Chart audits were successfully completed on all but 1 patient and linkage to administrative data was successful for all subjects. There were significant differences noted between the data collection methods for many measures. No single method of data collection was best for all outcomes. For most measures of technical quality of care chart audit was the most accurate method of data collection. Patient surveys were more accurate for immunizations, chronic disease advice/information dispensed, some general health promotion items and possibly for medication use. Administrative data appears useful for indicators including chronic disease diagnosis and osteoporosis/ breast screening. Conclusions Multiple data collection methods are required for a comprehensive assessment of performance in primary care practices. The choice of which methods are best for any one particular study or quality improvement initiative requires careful consideration of the biases that each method might introduce into the results. In this study, both patients and providers were

  1. [Risk factors for the spine: nursing assessment and care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringuente, M E; de Castro, I S; de Jesus, J C; Luciano, L dos S

    1997-01-01

    The present work aimed at studying risk factor that affect people with back pain, identifying them and implementing an intervention proposal of a health education program based on self-care teaching, existential humanist philosophical projects and stress equalization approach line, skeletal-muscle reintegration activities, basic techniques on stress equalization and massage. It has been developed for a population of 42 (forty-two) clients. Two instruments which integrate nursing consultation protocol have been used in data collection. The results showed the existence of associated risk factors which are changeable according to health education programs. The assessment process has contributed for therapeutic measures focus, using non-conventional care methods for this approach providing an improvement to these clients life quality.

  2. Cognitive assessment on elderly people under ambulatory care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Zortea

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the cognitive state of elderly people under ambulatory care and investigating the connection between such cognitive state and sociodemographic variables, health conditions, number of and adhesion to medicine. Methods: transversal, exploratory, and descriptive study, with a quantitative approach, realized with 107 elderly people under ambulatory care in a university hospital in southern Brazil, in november, 2013. The following variables were used: gender, age, civil status, income, schooling, occupation, preexisting noncommunicable diseases, number and type of prescribed medications, adhesion, mini-mental state examination score, and cognitive status. Data was analyzed through inferential and descriptive statistics. Results: the prevalence of cognitive deficit was of 42.1% and had a statistically significant connection to schooling, income, civil status, hypertension, and cardiopathy. Conclusion: nurses can intervene to avoid the increase of cognitive deficit through an assessment of the elderly person, directed to facilitative strategies to soften this deficit.

  3. mHealth tools for the pediatric patient-centered medical home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaper, Michael R; Conkol, Kimberly

    2014-02-01

    The concept of the pediatric patient-centered medical home (PCMH) as a theory has been evolving since it was initially conceived more than 40 years ago. When the American Academy of Pediatrics' (AAP) Council on Pediatric Practice first wrote about this model, "medical home" was defined solely as the central location of a pediatric patient's medical records. Approximately two decades later, the AAP published its inaugural policy statement on this topic. Through this policy statement, the medical home was defined as a place where care for pediatric patients would be accessible, continuous, comprehensive, family-centered, coordinated, compassionate, and culturally effective. Although the lack of access to providers, especially in rural communities, may inhibit the adoption of the PCMH or chronic care models, technology has evolved to the point where many of the gaps in care can be bridged. mHealth, defined by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) as the use of mobile and wireless devices to improve health outcomes, health care services, and health research, can be one specific example of how technology can address these issues. One early study has shown that patients who use mHealth tools are more likely to adhere to self-monitoring requirements and, in turn, have significantly improved outcomes. A rapidly evolving and scalable mHealth technology that has the ability to address these issues are self-management mobile applications, or apps. It has been estimated that there are currently more than 40,000 health care-related apps available. Furthermore, use of these apps is growing, as more than 50% of smartphone users surveyed responded that they have used their device to gather health information, and almost 20% of this population has at least one health care app on their device.

  4. Use of CAHPS® patient experience survey data as part of a patient-centered medical home quality improvement initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quigley DD

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Denise D Quigley,1 Peter J Mendel,1 Zachary S Predmore,2 Alex Y Chen,3 Ron D Hays41RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, CA, 2RAND Corporation, Boston, MA, 3AltaMed Health Services Corporation, 4Division of General Internal Medicine and Health Services Research, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA, USAObjective: To describe how practice leaders used Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS® Clinician and Group (CG-CAHPS data in transitioning toward a patient-centered medical home (PCMH.Study design: Interviews conducted at 14 primary care practices within a large urban Federally Qualified Health Center in California.Participants: Thirty-eight interviews were conducted with lead physicians (n=13, site clinic administrators (n=13, nurse supervisors (n=10, and executive leadership (n=2.Results: Seven themes were identified on how practice leaders used CG-CAHPS data for PCMH transformation. CAHPS® was used: 1 for quality improvement (QI and focusing changes for PCMH transformation; 2 to maintain focus on patient experience; 3 alongside other data; 4 for monitoring site-level trends and changes; 5 to identify, analyze, and monitor areas for improvement; 6 for provider-level performance monitoring and individual coaching within a transparent environment of accountability; and 7 for PCMH transformation, but changes to instrument length, reading level, and the wording of specific items were suggested.Conclusion: Practice leaders used CG-CAHPS data to implement QI, develop a shared vision, and coach providers and staff on performance. They described how CAHPS® helped to improve the patient experience in the PCMH model, including access to routine and urgent care, wait times, provider spending enough time and listening carefully, and courteousness of staff. Regular reporting, reviewing, and discussing of patient-experience data alongside other clinical quality and productivity measures at multilevels of the organization was critical in maximizing the

  5. Nurses and Psychologists Advancing the Patient-Centered Medical Home Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corso, Kent A; Gage, Donna

    2016-01-01

    As America experiences the largest health care revolution of the past 50 years, clinicians and administrators are refocusing their attention on the goals of the Quadruple Aim. Motivation and capabilities among stakeholders vary as practical tools and an adequate workforce remain elusive. At the same time, the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model is spreading rapidly but demonstrating variable results. Positive PCMH outcomes seem to reflect high-quality teamwork. A primary care physician shortage is looming, and increasing numbers of health professionals are being pushed into the PCMH, mandated to provide "integrated" care. Even now, the majority of our Graduate Medical Education programs do not train clinicians in team-based workflow models and interaction skills. Consequently, PCMH teams will only optimize and realize the model's true potential if they learn to coordinate, communicate, and collaborate effectively. This means all PCMH staff members achieve solid teamwork skills and work at the top of their license. The authors discuss resources for improving coordination, communication, and collaboration among members of PCMH teams, and strategies for including other professionals.

  6. Ethics and Regulatory Challenges and Opportunities in Patient-Centered Comparative Effectiveness Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugarman, Jeremy

    2016-04-01

    The Affordable Care Act includes provisions for the conduct of large-scale, patient-centered comparative effectiveness research. Such efforts aim toward the laudable moral goal of having evidence to improve health care decision making. Nevertheless, these pragmatic clinical research efforts that typically pose minimal incremental risk and are enmeshed in routine care settings perhaps surprisingly encounter an array of ethics and regulatory challenges and opportunities for academic health centers. An emphasis on patient-centeredness forces an examination of the appropriateness of traditional methods used to protect the rights, interests, and welfare of participants. At the same time, meaningful collaboration with patients throughout the research process also necessitates ensuring that novel approaches to research (including recruitment and consent) entail necessary protections regarding such issues as privacy. As the scientific and logistical aspects of this research are being developed, substantial attention is being focused on the accompanying ethics and regulatory issues that have emerged, which should help to facilitate ethically appropriate research in a variety of contexts.

  7. Psychosocial screening and assessment in oncology and palliative care settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi eGrassi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric and psychosocial disorders among cancer patients have been reported as a major consequence of the disease and treatment. The problems in applying a pure psychiatric approach have determined the need for structuring more defined methods, including screening for distress and emotional symptoms and a more specific psychosocial assessment, to warrant proper care to cancer patients with psychosocial problems. This review examines some of the most significant issues related to these two steps, screening and assessment of psychosocial morbidity in cancer and palliative care. With regard to this , the many different variables, such as the factors affecting individual vulnerability (e.g. life events, chronic stress and allostatic load, well-being, and health attitudes and the psychosocial correlates of medical disease (e.g. psychiatric disturbances, psychological symptoms, illness behavior, and quality of life which are possibly implicated not only in classical psychiatric disorders but more broadly in psychosocial suffering. Multidimensional tools (e.g. and specific psychosocially oriented interview (e.g. the Diagnostic Criteria for Psychosomatic Research - DCPR represent a way to screen for and assess emotional distress, anxiety and depression, maladaptive coping, dysfunctional attachment, as well as other significant psychosocial dimensions secondary to cancer, such as demoralization and health anxiety. Cross-cultural issues, such as language, ethnicity, race, and religion, are also discussed as possible factors influencing the patients and families perception of illness, coping mechanisms, psychological response to a cancer diagnosis.

  8. Assessment in health psychology: Introduction to the special issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Zeeshan

    2016-09-01

    For the past 27 years, has been committed to publishing empirical research relevant to clinical assessment of basic and applied cognition, personality, interpersonal behavior, psychopathology, forensics, and biological psychology. There is growing interest in the use of patient-centered outcomes in medical/surgical care and for measuring health care performance. Patient-centered outcome measures complement traditional clinical outcomes of morbidity and mortality, capturing the patient's perspective regarding their health and its treatment. In this issue, we highlight 11 articles that address different aspects of such work. The articles in this special issue represent both the depth and breadth of the opportunities that exist for psychological assessment in the health setting. While there are countless patient-centered measures currently in use to measure health and health outcomes, the evidence base for their use can be quite variable (Butt, 2016). The hope is that future issues of will highlight more work in this area. (PsycINFO Database Record

  9. Association between Physician Trainee Self-Assessments in Discussing Religion and Spirituality and Their Patients' Reports

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background: Effective physician communication at the end-of-life is a cornerstone to providing patient-centered palliative care. Educational programs in physician communication often rely on self-assessments of physician knowledge and attitudes and seldom provide patients' reports. Thus, it is unclear whether physician self-assessments are associated with patient perspectives.

  10. Assessment of satisfaction with care among family members of survivors in a neuroscience intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, David Y; Yagoda, Daniel; Perrey, Hilary M; Tehan, Tara M; Guanci, Mary; Ananian, Lillian; Currier, Paul F; Cobb, J Perren; Rosand, Jonathan

    2014-04-01

    Many prior nursing studies regarding family members specifically of neuroscience intensive care unit (neuro-ICU) patients have focused on identifying their primary needs. A concept related to identifying these needs and assessing whether they have been met is determining whether families explicitly report satisfaction with the care that both they and their loved ones have received. The objective of this study was to explore family satisfaction with care in an academic neuro-ICU and compare results with concurrent data from the same hospital's medical ICU (MICU). Over 38 days, we administered the Family Satisfaction-ICU instrument to neuro-ICU and MICU patients' families at the time of ICU discharge. Those whose loved ones passed away during ICU admission were excluded. When asked about the respect and compassion that they received from staff, 76.3% (95% CI [66.5, 86.1]) of neuro-ICU families were completely satisfied, as opposed to 92.7% in the MICU (95% CI [84.4, 101.0], p = .04). Respondents were less likely to be completely satisfied with the courtesy of staff if they reported participation in zero formal family meeting. Less than 60% of neuro-ICU families were completely satisfied by (1) frequency of physician communication, (2) inclusion and (3) support during decision making, and (4) control over the care of their loved ones. Parents of patients were more likely than other relatives to feel very included and supported in the decision-making process. Future studies may focus on evaluating strategies for neuro-ICU nurses and physicians to provide better decision-making support and to implement more frequent family meetings even for those patients who may not seem medically or socially complicated to the team. Determining satisfaction with care for those families whose loved ones passed away during their neuro-ICU admission is another potential avenue for future investigation.

  11. ASSESSING SATISFACTION WITH THE NURSING CARE OF OLDER PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pediaditaki O.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Assessing patients’ views indicates to patients that we are concerned about continuous assessment and improvingservices in general. It also indicates that we are a conscientious professional within a genuine humanistic line of work. Thepaper discusses the many theoretical and methodological problems that have arisen from attempts to measure andquantify patient satisfaction. Numerical data are thought to be ‘sterile’ without any insight into personal meanings. On theother hand purely qualitative methods have not been widely used. This discussion paper ends with the formulation of twosimple questions which can help us to explore and negotiate patients’ needs and satisfaction. Two non-offensivestraightforward questions are proposed as examples which could be used on a regular basis by nurses caring for olderpatients.

  12. National Lipid Association recommendations for patient-centered management of dyslipidemia: part 1 - executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Terry A; Ito, Matthew K; Maki, Kevin C; Orringer, Carl E; Bays, Harold E; Jones, Peter H; McKenney, James M; Grundy, Scott M; Gill, Edward A; Wild, Robert A; Wilson, Don P; Brown, W Virgil

    2014-01-01

    Various organizations and agencies have issued recommendations for the management of dyslipidemia. Although many commonalities exist among them, material differences are present as well. The leadership of the National Lipid Association (NLA) convened an Expert Panel to develop a consensus set of recommendations for patient-centered management of dyslipidemia in clinical medicine. The current Executive Summary highlights the major conclusions in Part 1 of the recommendations report of the NLA Expert Panel and includes: (1) background and conceptual framework for formulation of the NLA Expert Panel recommendations; (2) screening and classification of lipoprotein lipid levels in adults; (3) targets for intervention in dyslipidemia management; (4) atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk assessment and treatment goals based on risk category; (5) atherogenic cholesterol-non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol-as the primary targets of therapy; and (6) lifestyle and drug therapies intended to reduce morbidity and mortality associated with dyslipidemia.

  13. Shock as a determinant of poor patient-centered outcomes in implantable cardioverter defibrillator patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne S.; Van Den Broek, Krista C; Van Den Berg, Martha

    2010-01-01

    -PATCH, CIDS, AVID, AMIOVIRT, SCD-HeFT, MADIT-II, and DEFINITE), evidence for an association between ICD shocks and quality of life is mixed, with some indication that the influence of shocks may depend largely on the interval between shocks and assessment of quality of life. In order to improve the clinical......The medical benefits of the implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) are well established, but ICD shocks are known to influence patient-centered outcomes. In this viewpoint, we examine the strength of the evidence as found in primary and secondary prevention trials that used quality of life...... of life may not be as straightforward as previously assumed. Given that programming of the ICD is changing, leading to fewer shocks and improved quality of life, it may be timely to also examine the influence of other determinants (e.g., heart failure progression and the patient's psychological profile...

  14. Oral health assessment and mouth care for children and young people receiving palliative care. Part one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargeant, Stephanie; Chamley, Carol

    2013-03-01

    This is the first part of two articles exploring oral health problems and treatments for children receiving palliative care, successful management of which can improve considerably the quality of life for this group of children and young people. Part one includes an adapted oral health assessment tool for use in children and young people with complex and palliative healthcare needs that has the potential to help nurses identify and monitor oral health problems and prevent or minimise oral problems from developing. Part two--to be published next month--focuses on basic oral hygiene and the management of specific oral health problems.

  15. The Self Care Assessment Schedule (SCAS)--I. The purpose and construction of a new assessment of self care behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, D; Benjamin, S

    1987-01-01

    The Self Care Assessment Schedule (SCAS) is a new questionnaire which measures the frequency of ten behaviours during a period of fourteen days. Data are presented for five patient samples and a group of non consulting controls and the distributions of scores between groups show expected differences. In some groups scores are significantly greater for male subjects and those with the most chronic disorders but scores are not related to age. It is tentatively suggested that the SCAS may be used to determine the severity of aspects of disability based on percentile scores.

  16. Found in translation: exporting patient-centered communication and small group teaching skills to China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, Benjamin; Kallenberg, Gene; Lang, Forrest; Mahoney, Patrick; Patterson, JoEllen; Dugan, Beverly; Sun, Shaobang

    2009-06-26

    The Chinese Medical Doctor's Association asked us to develop a train-the-trainers program in doctor-patient communication and in teaching skills for a select group of Chinese health care professionals, who would then serve as trainers for practicing physicians throughout China. The request came in the context of increasing doctor-patient friction related, in part, to the dissolution of the socialist health care safety net in China. In this article we recount the implementation of our 5-day training program in Beijing. We explore cross-cultural issues that arose in presenting the program's two principal training domains: small group teaching and patient-centered doctor-patient communication. We also explore the linguistic challenges we encountered as non-Chinese speaking teachers. Finally, we reflect on the lessons learned from this project that may be of value to others called upon to export Western doctor-patient communications training to other cultures. In this age of increasing globalization, cross-cultural sharing of medical education represents a growing trend.

  17. Assessment of quality of care in acute postoperative pain management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milutinović Dragana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Managing of acute postoperative pain should be of great interest for all hospital institutions, as one of the key components of patients satisfaction, which indicates quality, as well as the outcome of treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of nursing care in managing acute postoperative pain and to establish factors which influence patients assessment of the same. Method. The investigation was conducted on the sample of 135 patients hospitalized in surgical clinics of the Clinical Centre of Vojvodina in Novi Sad in the form of cross-sectional study, by interviewing patients during the second postoperative day and collecting sociodemographic variables, type of surgical procedure and applied analgesic therapy which were taken from their medical documentation. The modified questionnaire of the Strategic and Clinical Quality Indicators in Postoperative Pain Management (SCQIPP was used as the instrument of the investigation. The data were processed with suitable mathematical statistics methods such as multivariate analyses of variance (MANOVA, discriminative and other parametric procedures and methods. Roy's test, Pearson's coefficient contingency (χ, multiple correlation coefficient (R were conducted amongst other invariant procedures. Results. The mean score for the individual items of SCQIPP questionnaire was between 2.0 and 4.7 (scale range 1-5 and the percentage of patients answers 'strongly agree' ranged from 4.4 to 77%. The smallest number of positive answers were given by the patients for the item 'In order to assess pain intensity, some of the staff asked me at least once in the morning, in the afternoon and in the evening to show the number from 0-10'. Most of the patients (57% evaluated severe pain during the previous 24 hours, as moderate pain, which represents significantly greater number of patients which complain of severe pain and mild pain (p < 0.001. The analysis of patients evaluation (MANOVA p

  18. 75 FR 59720 - Methodology Committee of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ... OFFICE Methodology Committee of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) AGENCY... appointing not more than 15 members to a Methodology Committee of the Patient- Centered Outcomes Research Institute. In addition, the Directors of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and the...

  19. Empowerment, motivation, and medical adherence (EMMA: the feasibility of a program for patient-centered consultations to support medication adherence and blood glucose control in adults with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varming AR

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Annemarie Reinhardt Varming,1 Ulla Møller Hansen,1 Gudbjörg Andrésdóttir,2 Gitte Reventlov Husted,1 Ingrid Willaing1 1Patient Education Research, 2Complications Research, Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte, Denmark Purpose: To explore the feasibility of a research-based program for patient-centered consultations to improve medical adherence and blood glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes.  Patients and methods: The patient-centered empowerment, motivation, and medical adherence (EMMA consultation program consisted of three individual consultations and one phone call with a single health care professional (HCP. Nineteen patients with type 2 diabetes completed the feasibility study. Feasibility was assessed by a questionnaire-based interview with patients 2 months after the final consultation and interviews with HCPs. Patient participation was measured by 10-second event coding based on digital recordings and observations of the consultations.  Results: HCPs reported that EMMA supported patient-centered consultations by facilitating dialogue, reflection, and patient activity. Patients reported that they experienced valuable learning during the consultations, felt understood, and listened to and felt a trusting relationship with HCPs. Consultations became more person-specific, which helped patients and HCPs to discover inadequate diabetes self-management through shared decision-making. Compared with routine consultations, HCPs talked less and patients talked more. Seven of ten dialogue tools were used by all patients. It was difficult to complete the EMMA consultations within the scheduled time.  Conclusion: The EMMA program was feasible, usable, and acceptable to patients and HCPs. The use of tools elicited patients’ perspectives and facilitated patient participation and shared decision-making. Keywords: type 2 diabetes, adherence, participation, dialogue, health education, self-management

  20. Tennessee Star-Quality Child Care Program: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Tennessee's Star-Quality Child Care Program prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4)…

  1. Physical Therapy Observation and Assessment in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Eilish; Campbell, Suzann K.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the elements of the Observation and Assessment section of the Infant Care Path for Physical Therapy in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU). The types of physical therapy assessments presented in this path are evidence-based and the suggested timing of these assessments is primarily based on practice knowledge from expert…

  2. Assessing barriers to care and readiness for cognitive behavioral therapy in early acute care PTSD interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusz, Sarah Geiss; Wagner, Amy W; Russo, Joan; Love, Jeff; Zatzick, Douglas F

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) interventions are efficacious in reducing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) but are challenging to implement in acute care and other non-specialty mental health settings. This investigation identified barriers impacting CBT delivery through a content analysis of interventionist chart notes from an acute care PTSD prevention trial. Only 8.5% of all intervention patients were able to complete CBT. Lack of engagement, clinical and logistical barriers had the greatest impact on CBT entry. Treatment preferences and stigma only prevented entry when more primary barriers resolved. Patients with prior diagnosis of alcohol abuse or dependence were able to enter CBT after six months of sobriety. Based on the first trial, we developed a CBT readiness assessment tool. We implemented and evaluated the tool in a second early intervention trial. Lack of engagement emerged again as the primary impediment to CBT entry. Patients who were willing to enter CBT treatment but demonstrated high rates of past trauma or diagnosis of PTSD were also the least likely to engage in any PTSD treatment one month post-discharge. Findings support the need for additional investigations into engagement and alternative delivery strategies, including those which dismantle traditional office-based, multi-session CBT into stepped, deliverable components.

  3. Assessment of women's perspectives and experiences of childbirth and postnatal care using Q-methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabila, N P; Ahmed, H M; Yasin, M Y

    2015-10-02

    To complement standard measures of maternity care outcomes, an assessment of women's satisfaction with care is needed. The aim of this study was to elicit the perspectives and experiences of Iraqi women about childbirth and postnatal care services. The study participants were a sample of 37 women of different educational and socioeconomic status who had given birth during the previous 6 months. Q-methodology was used for data collection and analysis. Three distinct viewpoints and experiences of childbirth and postnatal care services were identified: a general perception of poor childbirth and postnatal care with lack of appropriate interpersonal care and support; a high satisfaction and positive experience with childbirth and postnatal care services among the confident and well-supported women; and poor satisfaction with the childbirth and postnatal care services in terms of meeting traditional cultural practices. Needs assessment around providers' skills and attitudes and the wider sociocultural environment of childbirth and postnatal care is necessary in Iraq.

  4. Multi-criteria clinical decision support: A primer on the use of multiple criteria decision making methods to promote evidence-based, patient-centered healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, James G

    2010-01-01

    Current models of healthcare quality recommend that patient management decisions be evidence-based and patient-centered. Evidence-based decisions require a thorough understanding of current information regarding the natural history of disease and the anticipated outcomes of different management options. Patient-centered decisions incorporate patient preferences, values, and unique personal circumstances into the decision making process and actively involve both patients along with health care providers as much as possible. Fundamentally, therefore, evidence-based, patient-centered decisions are multi-dimensional and typically involve multiple decision makers.Advances in the decision sciences have led to the development of a number of multiple criteria decision making methods. These multi-criteria methods are designed to help people make better choices when faced with complex decisions involving several dimensions. They are especially helpful when there is a need to combine "hard data" with subjective preferences, to make trade-offs between desired outcomes, and to involve multiple decision makers. Evidence-based, patient-centered clinical decision making has all of these characteristics. This close match suggests that clinical decision support systems based on multi-criteria decision making techniques have the potential to enable patients and providers to carry out the tasks required to implement evidence-based, patient-centered care effectively and efficiently in clinical settings.The goal of this paper is to give readers a general introduction to the range of multi-criteria methods available and show how they could be used to support clinical decision-making. Methods discussed include the balance sheet, the even swap method, ordinal ranking methods, direct weighting methods, multi-attribute decision analysis, and the analytic hierarchy process (AHP).

  5. The impact of patient centered communication in managing Gardner′s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayathri Subramanian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective patient communication and comprehension are fundamental toward empowering the patient to make optimal health decisions. Barriers in patient health literacy extend beyond cultural and language differences and can significantly impede this process. This case report illustrates a major communication gap that resulted in contradictory perceptions between a treating oncologist and a patient. The patient′s dentist was able to resolve this miscommunication and facilitate the patient′s acceptance of the recommended intravenous chemotherapy for management of malignant desmoid tumors occurring secondary to Gardner′s syndrome (GS. This report also documents classic craniofacial manifestations of GS including multiple unerupted supernumerary teeth, compound odontomas associated with a dentigerous cyst, as well as multiple osteomas in both arches and in the ethmoid and irregularly shaped radioopacities in both arches. In summary, effective patient-centered communication is a prerequisite for the optimal delivery of healthcare. Both interdisciplinary care and one-on-one patient-provider relationship center on coherent bidirectional communication.

  6. MODELING CHRONIC DISEASE PATIENT FLOWS DIVERTED FROM EMERGENCY DEPARTMENTS TO PATIENT-CENTERED MEDICAL HOMES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Rafael; Behr, Joshua; Kumar, Sameer; Britton, Bruce

    Chronic Disease is defined as a long lasting health condition, which can develop and/or worsen over an extended time, but which can also be controlled. The monetary and budgetary toll due to its persistent nature has become unsustainable and requires pressing actions to limit their incidence and burden. This paper demonstrates the utility of the System Dynamics approach to simulate the behavior of key factors involved in the implementation of chronic disease management. We model the patient flow diversion from emergency departments (ED) to patient-centered medical homes (PCMH), with emphasis on the visit rates, as well as the effect of insurance coverage, in an effort to assure continuity of quality care for Asthma patients at lower costs. The model is used as an evaluative method to identify conditions of a maintained health status through adequate policy planning, in terms of resources and capacity. This approach gives decision makers the ability to track the level of implementation of the intervention and generate knowledge about dynamics between population demands and the intervention effectiveness. The functionality of the model is demonstrated through the consideration of hypothetical scenarios executed using sensitivity analysis.

  7. Development and User Research of a Smart Bedside Station System toward Patient-Centered Healthcare System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Sooyoung; Lee, Kee-Hyuck; Baek, Hyunyoung; Ryu, Borim; Chung, Eunja; Kim, Kidong; Yi, Jay Chaeyong; Park, Soo Beom; Hwang, Hee

    2015-09-01

    User experience design that reflects real-world application and aims to support suitable service solutions has arisen as one of the current issues in the medical informatics research domain. The Smart Bedside Station (SBS) is a screen that is installed on the bedside for the personal use and provides a variety of convenient services for the patients. Recently, bedside terminal systems have been increasingly adopted in hospitals due to the rapid growth of advanced technology in healthcare at the point of care. We designed user experience (UX) research to derive users' unmet needs and major functions that are frequently used in the field. To develop the SBS service, a service design methodology, the Double Diamond Design Process Model, was undertaken. The problems or directions of the complex clinical workflow of the hospital, the requirements of stakeholders, and environmental factors were identified through the study. The SBS system services provided to patients were linked to the hospital's main services or to related electronic medical record (EMR) data. Seven key services were derived from the results of the study. The primary services were as follows: Bedside Check In and Out, Bedside Room Service, Bedside Scheduler, Ready for Rounds, My Medical Chart, Featured Healthcare Content, and Bedside Community. This research developed a patient-centered SBS system with improved UX using service design methodology applied to complex and technical medical services, providing insights to improve the current healthcare system.

  8. Improving communication skill training in patient centered medical practice for enhancing rational use of laboratory tests: The core of bioinformation for leveraging stakeholder engagement in regulatory science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Josemar de Almeida; Costa, Bruna Carvalho; de Faria, Rosa Malena Delbone; Soares, Taciana Figueiredo; Moura, Eliane Perlatto; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Requests for laboratory tests are among the most relevant additional tools used by physicians as part of patient's health problemsolving. However, the overestimation of complementary investigation may be linked to less reflective medical practice as a consequence of a poor physician-patient communication, and may impair patient-centered care. This scenario is likely to result from reduced consultation time, and a clinical model focused on the disease. We propose a new medical intervention program that specifically targets improving the patient-centered communication of laboratory tests results, the core of bioinformation in health care. Expectations are that medical students training in communication skills significantly improve physicians-patient relationship, reduce inappropriate use of laboratorial tests, and raise stakeholder engagement.

  9. Comprehensive assessment of depression and behavioral problems in long-term care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, R.T.C.M.; Zuidema, S.U.; Leontjevas, R.; Gerritsen, D.L.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The IPA Taskforce on Mental Health Issues in Long-Term Care Homes seeks to improve mental health care in long-term care (LTC) homes. The aim of this paper is to provide recommendations on comprehensive assessment of depression and behavioral problems in order to further stimulate countri

  10. Comprehensive assessment of depression and behavioral problems in long-term care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, Raymond T C M; Zuidema, Sytse U; Leontjevas, Roeslan; Gerritsen, Debby L

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The IPA Taskforce on Mental Health Issues in Long-Term Care Homes seeks to improve mental health care in long-term care (LTC) homes. The aim of this paper is to provide recommendations on comprehensive assessment of depression and behavioral problems in order to further stimulate countri

  11. Caring for adolescents and families in crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Cindy

    2003-03-01

    Nurses are likely to see adolescents and their families in a variety of practice settings. Recognizing the youth and family at risk is significant in helping them resolve a stressful situation by mobilizing resources and strengthening coping and problem-solving skills. This article has focused on several areas, including suicide and depression, sex-related issues, substance abuse, and poor academic performance. Helping the youth and family in crisis challenges the nurse to use astute assessment skills that support a patient-centered crisis intervention model. During a time when cost-effective mental health care is a necessity, this model offers nurses an opportunity to provide quality health care.

  12. Rapid assessment of infrastructure of primary health care facilities – a relevant instrument for health care systems management

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background Health care infrastructure constitutes a major component of the structural quality of a health system. Infrastructural deficiencies of health services are reported in literature and research. A number of instruments exist for the assessment of infrastructure. However, no easy-to-use instruments to assess health facility infrastructure in developing countries are available. Present tools are not applicable for a rapid assessment by health facility staff. Therefore, health informatio...

  13. [Computers in the consultation: can we stay patient-centered?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanier, Cédric; Sommer, Johanna; Perron, Noelle Junod

    2015-05-13

    Eletronic health records (EHR) are now part of most medical practices in many countries including Switzerland. Their use facilitates access and exchange of information among health professionals, improves the quality of medical care and decreases the number of medical errors. Even patients express their satisfaction with the use of EHR. However, it has been observed that use of EHR can modify patient-physician communication. The present article describes the different elements linked to EHR which can enhance or inhibit patient-physician communication. It also suggests strategies for improving it.

  14. Assessment of health care by children and adolescents depends on when they respond to the questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Irene; Ammentorp, Jette; Kofoed, Poul-Erik

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the assessments and priorities by children and adolescents of health care in a paediatric outpatient clinic, to examine the influence of the time factor on the assessments and priorities by children and adolescents of health care, and to determine their prefer...

  15. Assessment of a pharmacist-driven point-of-care spirometry clinic within a primary care physicians office

    OpenAIRE

    Cawley MJ; Pacitti R; Warning W

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess value-added service of a pharmacist-driven point-of-care spirometry clinic to quantify respiratory disease abnormalities within a primary care physicians officeMethods: This retrospective, cohort study was an analysis of physician referred patients who attended our spirometry clinic during 2008-2010 due to pulmonary symptoms or disease. After spirometry testing, data was collected retrospectively to include patient demographics, spirometry results, and pulmonary pharmaceu...

  16. The assessment and management of skin tears in care homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen-Haynes, Jackie; Callaghan, Rosie; Bethell, Elaine; Greenwood, Michelle

    This article discusses a project conducted in Worcestershire nursing homes to review current practices in the management of skin tears and the subsequent development and implementation of guidelines resulting in a standardised client care package. An initial audit in five care homes was followed by an in-depth audit in 52 homes over a 12-week period. This led to the development of resources and the 'STAR box' to assist with implementation of timely and appropriate care delivery.

  17. Patient-centered outcomes of high-velocity, low-amplitude spinal manipulation for low back pain: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertz, C M; Pohlman, K A; Vining, R D; Brantingham, J W; Long, C R

    2012-10-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a well-recognized public health problem with no clear gold standard medical approach to treatment. Thus, those with LBP frequently turn to treatments such as spinal manipulation (SM). Many clinical trials have been conducted to evaluate the efficacy or effectiveness of SM for LBP. The primary objective of this paper was to describe the current literature on patient-centered outcomes following a specific type of commonly used SM, high-velocity low-amplitude (HVLA), in patients with LBP. A systematic search strategy was used to capture all LBP clinical trials of HVLA using our predefined patient-centered outcomes: visual analogue scale, numerical pain rating scale, Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, and the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index. Of the 1294 articles identified by our search, 38 met our eligibility criteria. Like previous SM for LBP systematic reviews, this review shows a small but consistent treatment effect at least as large as that seen in other conservative methods of care. The heterogeneity and inconsistency in reporting within the studies reviewed makes it difficult to draw definitive conclusions. Future SM studies for LBP would benefit if some of these issues were addressed by the scientific community before further research in this area is conducted.

  18. Patient and Other Stakeholder Engagement in Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute Funded Studies of Patients with Kidney Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cukor, Daniel; Cohen, Lewis M; Cope, Elizabeth L; Ghahramani, Nasrollah; Hedayati, S Susan; Hynes, Denise M; Shah, Vallabh O; Tentori, Francesca; Unruh, Mark; Bobelu, Jeanette; Cohen, Scott; Dember, Laura M; Faber, Thomas; Fischer, Michael J; Gallardo, Rani; Germain, Michael J; Ghahate, Donica; Grote, Nancy; Hartwell, Lori; Heagerty, Patrick; Kimmel, Paul L; Kutner, Nancy; Lawson, Susan; Marr, Lisa; Nelson, Robert G; Porter, Anna C; Sandy, Phillip; Struminger, Bruce B; Subramanian, Lalita; Weisbord, Steve; Young, Bessie; Mehrotra, Rajnish

    2016-09-07

    Including target populations in the design and implementation of research trials has been one response to the growing health disparities endemic to our health care system, as well as an aid to study generalizability. One type of community-based participatory research is "Patient Centered-Research", in which patient perspectives on the germane research questions and methodologies are incorporated into the study. The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) has mandated that meaningful patient and stakeholder engagement be incorporated into all applications. As of March 2015, PCORI funded seven clinically-focused studies of patients with kidney disease. The goal of this paper is to synthesize the experiences of these studies to gain an understanding of how meaningful patient and stakeholder engagement can occur in clinical research of kidney diseases, and what the key barriers are to its implementation. Our collective experience suggests that successful implementation of a patient- and stakeholder-engaged research paradigm involves: (1) defining the roles and process for the incorporation of input; (2) identifying the particular patients and other stakeholders; (3) engaging patients and other stakeholders so they appreciate the value of their own participation and have personal investment in the research process; and (4) overcoming barriers and challenges that arise and threaten the productivity of the collaboration. It is our hope that the experiences of these studies will further interest and capacity for incorporating patient and stakeholder perspectives in research of kidney diseases.

  19. Human factors in computing systems: focus on patient-centered health communication at the ACM SIGCHI conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Lauren; Patel, Rupa; Chen, Yunan; Shachak, Aviv

    2013-12-01

    Health Information Technologies, such as electronic health records (EHR) and secure messaging, have already transformed interactions among patients and clinicians. In addition, technologies supporting asynchronous communication outside of clinical encounters, such as email, SMS, and patient portals, are being increasingly used for follow-up, education, and data reporting. Meanwhile, patients are increasingly adopting personal tools to track various aspects of health status and therapeutic progress, wishing to review these data with clinicians during consultations. These issues have drawn increasing interest from the human-computer interaction (HCI) community, with special focus on critical challenges in patient-centered interactions and design opportunities that can address these challenges. We saw this community presenting and interacting at the ACM SIGCHI 2013, Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, (also known as CHI), held April 27-May 2nd, 2013 at the Palais de Congrès de Paris in France. CHI 2013 featured many formal avenues to pursue patient-centered health communication: a well-attended workshop, tracks of original research, and a lively panel discussion. In this report, we highlight these events and the main themes we identified. We hope that it will help bring the health care communication and the HCI communities closer together.

  20. Quality of life and disease understanding: impact of attending a patient-centered cancer symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padrnos, Leslie; Dueck, Amylou C; Scherber, Robyn; Glassley, Pamela; Stigge, Rachel; Northfelt, Donald; Mikhael, Joseph; Aguirre, Annette; Bennett, Robert M; Mesa, Ruben A

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the impact of a patient-centered symposium as an educational intervention on a broad population of cancer patients. We developed a comprehensive patient symposium. Through voluntary questionnaires, we studied the impact of this cancer symposium on quality of life, cancer-specific knowledge, and symptom management among cancer patients. Symposium attendees were provided surveys prior to and 3 months following the educational intervention. Surveys included (1) EORTC-QLQ-C30; (2) disease understanding tool developed for this conference; (3) validated disease-specific questionnaires. Changes over time were assessed using McNemar's tests and paired t-tests for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. A total of 158 attendees completed the pre-convention survey. Most respondents reported at least "quite a bit" of understanding regarding treatment options, screening modalities, symptomatology, and cancer-related side effects. Attendees endorsed the least understanding of disease-related stress, risk factors, fatigue management, and legal issues related to disease/treatment. At 3 months, there was improvement in understanding (12 of 14 areas of self-reported knowledge especially regarding nutrition, and stress/fatigue management). However, no significant change was seen in QLQ-C30 functioning, fatigue, pain, or insomnia. A patient symposium, as an educational intervention improves a solid knowledge base amongst attendees regarding their disease, increases knowledge in symptom management, but may be insufficient to impact QoL as a single intervention.

  1. A Tool for Assessing a Community’s Capacity for Substance Abuse Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyerla, Rob; Stroup, Donna F.; Azofeifa, Alejandro; High, Patrick M.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence-based programs for prevention and intervention in substance abuse are increasing. Community needs assessments and health rankings provide descriptions of local behavioral health needs but do not provide public health practitioners and policy makers with guidelines on the number of programs, health care practitioners, or interventions needed in the local substance abuse care system. This article presents a new framework for measuring and assessing the substance abuse care system in a community. The assessment can inform resource allocation across the continuum of care to more equitably and efficiently distribute interventions and care. We conducted 2 literature reviews and synthesized our findings to create a community assessment methodology and needs calculator, CAST (calculating for an adequate system tool). We reviewed 212 articles to produce an inventory of community and social correlates of behavioral health, components of a substance abuse care system, and numerical values for guidelines for estimating community needs. CAST produces community-specific assessments of the capacity of the components of a community substance abuse care system. CAST generates recommendations by the application of social and community determinants of health as risk coefficients to each estimate of component need. CAST can assist public health practitioners in evaluation and improvement of the capacity of community-based, substance abuse care systems. By using recommendations for component needs across the continuum of care, community leaders can use CAST to prioritize resource allocation more effectively and efficiently. PMID:27657505

  2. Danish cancer patients’ perspective on health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandager, Mette; Sperling, Cecilie; Jensen, Henry;

    2015-01-01

    of the health care they have received, in regard to access to diagnostics, coordination and continuity of care, information and communication and involvement of patients and relatives. Questions and the opportunity to comment in free text were distributed to 6,720 newly diagnosed cancer patients in the summer...... for improvements with regard to better access to diagnostics, healthcare professionals’ responsiveness to patients, improved coordination and involvement of patient and relatives. There is a need to focus more on individual needs and patient-centered care.......Patient’s experiences and patient surveys are increasingly being used for the evaluation of the quality of health care. Patient information is valuable input when we aim to improve healthcare services. The aim of this study was to assess Danish cancer patients’ experiences and assessment...

  3. Deficiencies in culturally competent asthma care for ethnic minority children: a qualitative assessment among care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seeleman Conny

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthma outcomes are generally worse for ethnic minority children. Cultural competence training is an instrument for improving healthcare for ethnic minority patients. To develop effective training, we explored the mechanisms in paediatric asthma care for ethnic minority patients that lead to deficiencies in the care process. Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews on care for ethnic minority children with asthma (aged 4-10 years with paediatricians (n = 13 and nurses (n = 3 in three hospitals. Interviews were analysed qualitatively with a framework method, using a cultural competence model. Results Respondents mentioned patient non-adherence as the central problem in asthma care. They related non-adherence in children from ethnic minority backgrounds to social context factors, difficulties in understanding the chronic nature of asthma, and parents’ language barriers. Reactions reported by respondents to patients’ non-adherence included retrieving additional information, providing biomedical information, occasionally providing referrals for social context issues, and using informal interpreters. Conclusions This study provides keys to improve the quality of specialist paediatric asthma care to ethnic minority children, mainly related to non-adherence. Care providers do not consciously recognise all the mechanisms that lead to deficiencies in culturally competent asthma care they provide to ethnic minority children (e.g. communicating mainly from a biomedical perspective and using mostly informal interpreters. Therefore, the learning objectives of cultural competence training should reflect issues that care providers are aware of as well as issues they are unaware of.

  4. Twin Cities care system assessment: process, findings, and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othieno, Joan

    2007-08-01

    The Twin Cities Care system lacks services that are most needed in the later stages of HIV disease. Services in highest demand included housing, transportation, and translation; available translations services are generally limited to Somali, Oromo, and Amharic, the languages most widely spoken by the three largest African immigrant and refugee groups in the Twin Cities. The care system is not well-integrated, and most of the work of moving clients within the system is done by case managers and care advocates. The main technical competencies identified by providers as lacking are understanding mental health from the perspective of African-born people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWH) and addressing sexual issues, especially with women. African providers with foreign certifications not recognized in the United States are not able to use their professional skills. African clients are not well-informed about HIV, and African women are more likely than men to seek and stay in care.

  5. The Development and Validation of a Rapid Assessment Tool of Primary Care in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Mei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. With Chinese health care reform increasingly emphasizing the importance of primary care, the need for a tool to evaluate primary care performance and service delivery is clear. This study presents a methodology for a rapid assessment of primary care organizations and service delivery in China. Methods. The study translated and adapted the Primary Care Assessment Tool-Adult Edition (PCAT-AE into a Chinese version to measure core dimensions of primary care, namely, first contact, continuity, comprehensiveness, and coordination. A cross-sectional survey was conducted to assess the validity and reliability of the Chinese Rapid Primary Care Assessment Tool (CR-PCAT. Eight community health centers in Guangdong province have been selected to participate in the survey. Results. A total of 1465 effective samples were included for data analysis. Eight items were eliminated following principal component analysis and reliability testing. The principal component analysis extracted five multiple-item scales (first contact utilization, first contact accessibility, ongoing care, comprehensiveness, and coordination. The tests of scaling assumptions were basically met. Conclusion. The standard psychometric evaluation indicates that the scales have achieved relatively good reliability and validity. The CR-PCAT provides a rapid and reliable measure of four core dimensions of primary care, which could be applied in various scenarios.

  6. Sharing clinical information across care settings: the birth of an integrated assessment system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrard Jean-Claude

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Population ageing, the emergence of chronic illness, and the shift away from institutional care challenge conventional approaches to assessment systems which traditionally are problem and setting specific. Methods From 2002, the interRAI research collaborative undertook development of a suite of assessment tools to support assessment and care planning of persons with chronic illness, frailty, disability, or mental health problems across care settings. The suite constitutes an early example of a "third generation" assessment system. Results The rationale and development strategy for the suite is described, together with a description of potential applications. To date, ten instruments comprise the suite, each comprising "core" items shared among the majority of instruments and "optional" items that are specific to particular care settings or situations. Conclusion This comprehensive suite offers the opportunity for integrated multi-domain assessment, enabling electronic clinical records, data transfer, ease of interpretation and streamlined training.

  7. There is no "i" in teamwork in the patient-centered medical home: defining teamwork competencies for academic practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leasure, Emily L; Jones, Ronald R; Meade, Lauren B; Sanger, Marla I; Thomas, Kris G; Tilden, Virginia P; Bowen, Judith L; Warm, Eric J

    2013-05-01

    Evidence suggests that teamwork is essential for safe, reliable practice. Creating health care teams able to function effectively in patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs), practices that organize care around the patient and demonstrate achievement of defined quality care standards, remains challenging. Preparing trainees for practice in interprofessional teams is particularly challenging in academic health centers where health professions curricula are largely siloed. Here, the authors review a well-delineated set of teamwork competencies that are important for high-functioning teams and suggest how these competencies might be useful for interprofessional team training and achievement of PCMH standards. The five competencies are (1) team leadership, the ability to coordinate team members' activities, ensure appropriate task distribution, evaluate effectiveness, and inspire high-level performance, (2) mutual performance monitoring, the ability to develop a shared understanding among team members regarding intentions, roles, and responsibilities so as to accurately monitor one another's performance for collective success, (3) backup behavior, the ability to anticipate the needs of other team members and shift responsibilities during times of variable workload, (4) adaptability, the capability of team members to adjust their strategy for completing tasks on the basis of feedback from the work environment, and (5) team orientation, the tendency to prioritize team goals over individual goals, encourage alternative perspectives, and show respect and regard for each team member. Relating each competency to a vignette from an academic primary care clinic, the authors describe potential strategies for improving teamwork learning and applying the teamwork competences to academic PCMH practices.

  8. Health Social Media and Patient-Centered Care: Buzz or Evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Luque, L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective To summarize the 2014 state of the art in the areas related to consumer health informatics and social media. Methods We conducted a systematic review of articles published in 2014 in PubMed with a predefined set of queries. We identified 439 articles relevant for the review. The two section editors independently screened those papers taking into account their relevance to the topics covered by the section. In a second step, they jointly selected the 20 most representative papers as candidate best papers. Candidate best papers were then submitted for full review and scoring by external reviewers. Based on the scoring, section editors together with the IMIA Yearbook editorial board selected the four best papers published in 2014 in consumer health informatics. Results Helping patients acquire a healthier lifestyle is a crucial part of patient empowerment. In this line of work, new studies are exploring the efficacy of online health interventions for patient behavioral change. The special case of smoking cessation for consumers with low socio-economic status is particularly noticeable. Another study has explored how an online intervention can reduce the anxiety of women who experience an abnormal mammography. The team of PatientsLikeMe has studied how online support groups could play a role in the quality of life of organ transplant recipients. The patient perspective of online forums’ users is also analyzed in the domain of anticoagulation therapy. Conclusions Online health interventions, many of them using social media, have confirmed their potential to impact consumer behavioral change. However, there are still many methodological issues that need to be addressed in order to prove cost-effectiveness. PMID:26293862

  9. The service encounter in radiology: acing the "moments of truth" to achieve patient-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B; Pysarenko, Kristine

    2015-02-01

    Radiologists are increasingly recognizing their role as direct service providers to patients and seeking to offer an exceptional patient experience as part of high-quality service delivery. Patients' perceptions of service delivery are derived from the chain of numerous individual real-time encounters that occur throughout their visit. These so-called "moments of truth" define the overall experience and form the lasting impression of the given practice in their mind. Providing excellent service can be difficult to achieve in practice given its intangible nature as well as the heterogeneity and unpredictability of the large number of patients, frontline staff, and environmental circumstances that define the patient experience. Thus, broad commitment and team effort among all members of a radiology practice are required. This article explores important areas to be considered by a radiology practice to ensure positive and meaningful patient experiences. Specific ways in which every member within the practice, including schedulers, receptionists, technologists, nurses, and radiologists, can contribute to achieving high-quality patient service are discussed. Examples of patient-oriented language that may be useful in particular scenarios in radiology practice are given. The role of the practice's physical facility, including all aspects of its aesthetics and amenities, as well as of Internet services, in shaping the patient experience is also described. Throughout this work, a proactive approach to promoting a service-oriented organizational culture is provided. By improving the patient experience, these strategies may serve to enhance patients' perceptions of radiology and radiologists.

  10. Patient-Centered Care Transition for Patients Admitted through the ED: Improving Patient and Employee Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Algauer BSN, RN

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available With increasing wait times in emergency departments (ED across America, there is a need to streamline the inpatient admission process in order to decrease wait times and more important, to increase patient and employee satisfaction. One inpatient unit at New York-Presbyterian Weill Cornell Medical Center initiated a program to help expedite the inpatient admission process from the ED. The goal of the ED Bridge program is to ease the patient's transition from the ED to an inpatient unit by visiting the patient in the ED and introducing and setting expectations for the inpatient environment (i.e. telemetry alarms, roommates, hourly comfort rounds. Along with improving the patient experience, this program intends to improve the collaboration between ED nurses and inpatient nurses. With the continued support of our nurse management, hospital administrators and most important, our staff, this concept is aimed to increase patient satisfaction scores and subsequently employee satisfaction.

  11. Patient-Centered Cancer Care Programs in Italy: Benchmarking Global Patient Education Initiatives

    OpenAIRE

    Truccolo, Ivana; Cipolat Mis, Chiara; Cervo, Silvia; Dal Maso, Luigino; Bongiovanni, Marilena; Bearz, Alessandra; Sartor, Ivana; Baldo, Paolo; Ferrarin, Emanuela; Fratino, Lucia; Mascarin, Maurizio; Roncadin, Mario; Annunziata, Maria Antonietta; Muzzatti, Barbara; Paoli, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    In Italy, educational programs for cancer patients are currently provided by the national government, scientific societies, and patient advocate organizations. Several gaps limit their effectiveness, including the lack of coordinated efforts, poor involvement of patient feedback in the planning of programs, as well as a lack of resources on innovative cancer-related topics. This process is parallel to a strong shift in the attitude of patients towards health in general and taking charge of th...

  12. Six Sigma and Lean concepts, a case study: patient centered care model for a mammography center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viau, Mark; Southern, Becky

    2007-01-01

    Boca Raton Community Hospital in South Florida decided to increase return while enhancing patient experience and increasing staff morale. They implemented a program to pursue "enterprise excellence" through Six Sigma methodologies. In order to ensure the root causes to delays and rework were addressed, a multigenerational project plan with 3 major components was developed. Step 1: Stabilize; Step 2: Optimize; Step 3: Innovate. By including staff and process owners in the process, they are empowered to think differently about what they do and how they do it. A team that works collaboratively to identify problems and develop solutions can only be a positive to any organization.

  13. Center to Advance Palliative Care palliative care clinical care and customer satisfaction metrics consensus recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, David E; Morrison, R Sean; Meier, Diane E

    2010-02-01

    Data collection and analysis are vital for strategic planning, quality improvement, and demonstration of palliative care program impact to hospital administrators, private funders and policymakers. Since 2000, the Center to Advance Palliative Care (CAPC) has provided technical assistance to hospitals, health systems and hospices working to start, sustain, and grow nonhospice palliative care programs. CAPC convened a consensus panel in 2008 to develop recommendations for specific clinical and customer metrics that programs should track. The panel agreed on four key domains of clinical metrics and two domains of customer metrics. Clinical metrics include: daily assessment of physical/psychological/spiritual symptoms by a symptom assessment tool; establishment of patient-centered goals of care; support to patient/family caregivers; and management of transitions across care sites. For customer metrics, consensus was reached on two domains that should be tracked to assess satisfaction: patient/family satisfaction, and referring clinician satisfaction. In an effort to ensure access to reliably high-quality palliative care data throughout the nation, hospital palliative care programs are encouraged to collect and report outcomes for each of the metric domains described here.

  14. Pinellas Plant: Child Care/Partnership School safety assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-11-01

    The Albuquerque Operations Office through the Pinellas Plant Area Office is involved in a joint venture to establish a Partnership School and a Day Care Facility at the Plant. The venture is unique in that it is based on a partnership with the local county school system. The county school system will provide the teachers, supplies and classroom furnishings for the operation of the school for pre-kindergarten, kindergarten, first and second grade during regular school hours. The Government will provide the facility and its normal operating and maintenance costs. A Day Care Facility will also be available for children from infancy through the second grade for outside school hours. The day care will be operated as a non-profit corporation. Fees paid by parents with children in the day care center will cove the cost of staff, food, supplies and liability insurance. Again, the government will provide the facility and its normal operating and maintenance costs. Between 75 and 90 children are expected in the first year of operation. The Partnership School will consist of one class each for pre-kindergarten, kindergarten and first grade. Second grade will be added in 1990. The total estimated number of children for both the Child Care and Partnership School should not exceed 200 children. Expected benefits include reduced absenteeism, tardiness and turnover and thus increased productivity. The program will be an asset in recruiting and retaining the best workforce. Other benefits include improved education for the children.

  15. Belgian primary care EPR: assessment of nationwide routine data extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Clercq, Etienne; van Casteren, Viviane; Bossuyt, Nathalie; Goderis, Geert; Moreels, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Starting in 2009, the first ever Belgian nationwide data collection network using routine data extracted from primary care EPR (upload method) has been built from scratch. The network also uses a manual web-based data collection method. This paper compares these two methods by analysing missing and most recent values for certain parameters. We collected data from 4954 practices, pertaining to 29,180 patients. Mean values for the most recent parameters were similar regardless of which data collection method was used. Many missing recent values (>46%) were found for all of the parameters when using the upload method. It seems that, in Belgium, uploading routine data from primary care EPR on a large scale is suitable and allows the collection of chronological retrospective data. However, the method still requires major, carefully controlled improvements.

  16. A tool for assessing continuity of care across care levels: an extended psychometric validation of the CCAENA questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Beatriz Aller

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The CCAENA questionnaire was developed to assess care continuity across levels from the patients’ perspective. The aim is to provide additional evidence on the psychometric properties of the scales of this questionnaire. Methods: Cross-sectional study by means of a survey of a random sample of 1500 patients attended in primary and secondary care in three healthcare areas of the Catalan healthcare system. Data were collected in 2010 using the CCAENA questionnaire. To assess psychometric properties, an exploratory factor analysis was performed (construct validity and the item-rest correlations and Cronbach’s alpha were calculated (internal consistency. Spearman correlation coefficients were calculated (multidimensionality and the ability to discriminate between groups was tested. Results: The factor analysis resulted in 21 items grouped into three factors: patient-primary care provider relationship, patient-secondary care provider relationship and continuity across care levels. Cronbach’s alpha indicated good internal consistency (0.97, 0.93, 0.80 and the correlation coefficients indicated that dimensions can be interpreted as separated scales. Scales discriminated patients according to healthcare area, age and educational level. Conclusion: The CCAENA questionnaire has proved to be a valid and reliable tool for measuring patients’ perceptions of continuity. Providers and researchers could apply the questionnaire to identify areas for healthcare improvement.

  17. Assessing the acceptability of community pharmacy based pharmaceutical care services in Karachi

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Amir, B.Pharmacy, MSc. MBA, Assistant Professor/Clinical Pharmacist

    2011-01-01

    Provision of pharmaceutical care services in community pharmacies is a new trend in pharmacy practice worldwide. Published literature from developed countries is available showing benefits of pharmaceutical care services provided in community pharmacies. However, relatively little published literature is available from developing countries in which unique market environments are encountered. This study was conducted to assess the acceptability of community pharmacy based pharmaceutical care s...

  18. Assessing quality of care of elderly patients using the ACOVE quality indicator set: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Askari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Care of the elderly is recognized as an increasingly important segment of health care. The Assessing Care Of Vulnerable Elderly (ACOVE quality indicators (QIs were developed to assess and improve the care of elderly patients. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this review is to summarize studies that assess the quality of care using QIs from or based on ACOVE, in order to evaluate the state of quality of care for the reported conditions. METHODS: We systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL for English-language studies indexed by February 2010. Articles were included if they used any ACOVE QIs, or adaptations thereof, for assessing the quality of care. Included studies were analyzed and relevant information was extracted. We summarized the results of these studies, and when possible generated an overall conclusion about the quality of care as measured by ACOVE for each condition, in various settings, and for each QI. RESULTS: Seventeen studies were included with 278 QIs (original, adapted or newly developed. The quality scores showed large variation between and within conditions. Only a few conditions showed a stable pass rate range over multiple studies. Overall, pass rates for dementia (interquartile range (IQR: 11%-35%, depression (IQR: 27%-41%, osteoporosis (IQR: 34%-43% and osteoarthritis (IQR: 29-41% were notably low. Medication management and use (range: 81%-90%, hearing loss (77%-79% and continuity of care (76%-80% scored higher than other conditions. Out of the 278 QIs, 141 (50% had mean pass rates below 50% and 121 QIs (44% had pass rates above 50%. Twenty-three percent of the QIs scored above 75%, and 16% scored below 25%. CONCLUSIONS: Quality of care per condition varies markedly across studies. Although there has been much effort in improving the care for elderly patients in the last years, the reported quality of care according to the ACOVE indicators is still relatively low.

  19. Vermont STep Ahead Recognition System: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Vermont's STep Ahead Recognition System (STARS) prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for All Child Care Programs;…

  20. The validity and reliability of an instrument to assess nursing competencies in spiritual care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Rene; Tiesinga, Lucas J.; Middel, Berrie; Post, Doeke; Jochemsen, Henk

    2009-01-01

    Aim. This study contributes to the development of a valid and reliable instrument, the spiritual care competence scale, as an instrument to assess nurses' competencies in providing spiritual care. Background. Measuring these competencies and their development is important and the construction of a r

  1. The validity and reliability of an instrument to assess nursing competencies in spiritual care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, R.R.; Tiesinga, L.J.; Middel, L.J.; Post, D.; Jochemsen, H.

    2009-01-01

    Aim. This study contributes to the development of a valid and reliable instrument, the spiritual care competence scale, as an instrument to assess nurses’ competencies in providing spiritual care. Background. Measuring these competencies and their development is important and the construction of a r

  2. Leadership in Care of the Elderly: Assessing Needs and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stryker-Gordon, Ruth

    1982-01-01

    This article discusses the following questions: What opportunities and challenges for nursing leadership present themselves in institutions that provide care for our expanding aged population? Should nursing administrators take up these challenges? If so, what skills, resources, and attitudes will they need? (Author/CT)

  3. Proposals for enhanced health risk assessment and stratification in an integrated care scenario

    OpenAIRE

    Dueñas-Espín, Ivan; Vela, Emili; Pauws, Steffen; Bescos, Cristina; Cano, Isaac; Cleries, Montserrat; Contel, Joan Carles; de Manuel Keenoy, Esteban; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Gomez-Cabrero, David; Kaye, Rachelle; Lahr, Maarten M H; Lluch-Ariet, Magí; Moharra, Montserrat; Monterde, David

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Population-based health risk assessment and stratification are considered highly relevant for large-scale implementation of integrated care by facilitating services design and case identification. The principal objective of the study was to analyse five health-risk assessment strategies and health indicators used in the five regions participating in the Advancing Care Coordination and Telehealth Deployment (ACT) programme (http://www.act-programme.eu). The second purpose was to el...

  4. Patient-centered Communication survey of nursing homes and rehabilitation centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinder-Meredith, Amy; Bye, Lynn; Bulthuis, Kari; Schueller, Angie

    2007-01-01

    A surge of research has recently been published on the importance ofpatient-centered communication (P-CC). However, patients with communication disorders are rarely considered in these discussions. Health care workers in long-term care facilities (L-TCFs) and rehabilitation centers were surveyed in order to: (1) assess the level of P-CC used with people with communication disorders versus those without communication disorders; (2) identify the tools and strategies currently used by health care providers in long-term care facilities and rehabilitation centers to enhance P-CC with people with communication disorders; (3) assess the perceived level of efectiveness of these tools and strategies; and (4) identify the tools desired by health care providers in these settings. The results regarding P-CC levels were fairly consistent across settings. Health care providers reported that they achieve slightly higher P-CC with patients without communication disorders than with those with communication disorders. Respondents in both settings used similar tools and strategies, but the reported level of effectiveness varied greatly between the two settings, with rehabilitation centers indicating better success than L-TCFs. Interestingly, rehabilitation center respondents were more interested in obtaining additional tools than were L-TCF respondents, but the types of tools desired were similar.

  5. National lipid association recommendations for patient-centered management of dyslipidemia: part 1--full report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Terry A; Ito, Matthew K; Maki, Kevin C; Orringer, Carl E; Bays, Harold E; Jones, Peter H; McKenney, James M; Grundy, Scott M; Gill, Edward A; Wild, Robert A; Wilson, Don P; Brown, W Virgil

    2015-01-01

    The leadership of the National Lipid Association convened an Expert Panel to develop a consensus set of recommendations for patient-centered management of dyslipidemia in clinical medicine. An Executive Summary of those recommendations was previously published. This document provides support for the recommendations outlined in the Executive Summary. The major conclusions include (1) an elevated level of cholesterol carried by circulating apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins (non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C], termed atherogenic cholesterol) is a root cause of atherosclerosis, the key underlying process contributing to most clinical atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) events; (2) reducing elevated levels of atherogenic cholesterol will lower ASCVD risk in proportion to the extent that atherogenic cholesterol is reduced. This benefit is presumed to result from atherogenic cholesterol lowering through multiple modalities, including lifestyle and drug therapies; (3) the intensity of risk-reduction therapy should generally be adjusted to the patient's absolute risk for an ASCVD event; (4) atherosclerosis is a process that often begins early in life and progresses for decades before resulting a clinical ASCVD event. Therefore, both intermediate-term and long-term or lifetime risk should be considered when assessing the potential benefits and hazards of risk-reduction therapies; (5) for patients in whom lipid-lowering drug therapy is indicated, statin treatment is the primary modality for reducing ASCVD risk; (6) nonlipid ASCVD risk factors should also be managed appropriately, particularly high blood pressure, cigarette smoking, and diabetes mellitus; and (7) the measurement and monitoring of atherogenic cholesterol levels remain an important part of a comprehensive ASCVD prevention strategy.

  6. Social construction of the managerialism of needs assessment by health and social care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevannes, Mel

    2002-05-01

    Managerialism in community care has not only radically changed organisational structures delivering care, but the assessment of health and social care needs, the justifications for the assessments, and the experience of those who require publicly funded services. The present paper describes the social construction of the managerialism of needs assessment by health and social care professionals, and illustrates this through the identification of older people as a particular kind of client. The argument draws on 'third way', modernity and postmodernity thinking to show needs assessment as a socially constructed area of welfare. The empirical work in this study is based on the views of 38 health and social care professionals obtained by semi-structured in-depth interviews and a postal questionnaire. The views of these professionals show that the social construction of needs assessment takes place in managing the matching of eligibility criteria against types of services. The key to this process is the application of the concept of management that places health and social care professionals in roles where they are acting for state, voluntary or private agencies, and not in all contexts working together with older people. The study shows that professionals identify older people into two groups or 'classes', i.e. those having health needs as distinct from those with social care. The techniques used amount to an exercise of power by professionals over older people. Change is necessary to break down the dominance by professionals in the needs assessment process. A broader concept of the 'third way' vision by Giddens (1998) is also required to achieve greater relevance to how health and social care is organised, and how relations between professionals and older people are integrated into the idea and practice of participatory care. Therefore, the emancipatory side of modernity remains a largely unfinished project.

  7. Medical health care professionals' assessments of oral health needs in children with disabilities: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallberg, Ulrika; Klingberg, Gunilla

    2005-10-01

    Good collaboration between medical and dental care is essential to provide not only good oral health care, but also more holistic care for children with disabilities. The aim was to explore and describe medical health care professionals' assessments and considerations of orofacial problems and treatment needs in children with disabilities and in their families. In-depth interviews focusing on orofacial function were carried out with 17 medical health care employees. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed in open and focused (selective) coding processes according to grounded theory. A core category was identified and named focusing on basic needs, showing that oral health care assessment was not on the agenda of medical health care professionals, but was instead viewed as a responsibility of parents or dentists. This study shows that oral health issues are not fully integrated in the medical care of children with disabilities. The omission of oral health issues from the medical agenda implies a risk of oral health problems in children with disabilities. To put the oral cavity and oral health on the medical agenda, dentists need to influence the undergraduate training of medical professionals and to initiate co-operation with the medical care system.

  8. Clinical and perceived quality of care for maternal, neonatal and antenatal care in Kenya and Namibia: the service provision assessment

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background The majority of women in sub-Saharan Africa now deliver in a facility, however, little is known about the quality of services for maternal and newborn basic and emergency care, nor how this is associated with patient’s perception of their experiences. Methods Using data from the Service Provision Assessment (SPA) survey from Kenya 2010 and Namibia 2009, we explore whether facilities have the necessary signal functions for providing emergency and basic maternal (EmOC) and newborn ca...

  9. Psychometric evaluation of the Swedish version of the Person-Centered Care Assessment Tool (P-CAT)

    OpenAIRE

    Sjögren, Karin; Lindkvist, Marie; Sandman, Per-Olof; Zingmark, Karin; Edvardsson, David

    2012-01-01

    Background: Person-centered care is a multidimensional concept describing good care, especially within aged care and care for people with dementia. Research studies evaluating person-centered care interventions seldom use direct measurement of levels of person-centeredness. Existing scales that measure person-centeredness need further testing. This study evaluated the psychometric properties of the Swedish version of the Person-Centered Care Assessment Tool (P-CAT). Methods: A cross-sectional...

  10. Long-term mortality after critical care: what is the starting point?

    OpenAIRE

    Ranzani, Otavio T; Zampieri, Fernando G; Park, Marcelo; Salluh, Jorge IF

    2013-01-01

    Mortality is still the most assessed outcome in the critically ill patient and is routinely used as the primary end-point in intervention trials, cohort studies, and benchmarking analysis. Despite this, interest in patient-centered prognosis after ICU discharge is increasing, and several studies report quality of life and long-term outcomes after critical illness. In a recent issue of Critical Care, Cuthbertson and colleagues reported interesting results from a cohort of 439 patients with sep...

  11. Assessment of parents' perception of quality of pediatric oncology inpatient care at Kenyatta National Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunice Mmbone Keiza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Adequate knowledge of parents' perception of quality of pediatric cancer care helps to identify the areas of care improvement which would contribute to disease outcome in regard to the quality of life and satisfaction with the care provided. The aim of the study was to assess the parents' perception of the quality of Pediatric Oncology Inpatient Care at Kenyatta National Hospital. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive quantitative and qualitative study was undertaken using a pretested semi-structured questionnaire and a focused group discussion guide. Assessment of parents' perception of quality of care was done in relation to the institution's structures and care delivery processes. These included the ward environment, resources for cancer treatment, care processes, service providers, and parents' knowledge empowerment. Participants were systematically selected. Parents' perception was defined as satisfaction or dissatisfaction with the care provided. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0 (Armonk, NY: IBM Corp. and presented as frequencies and percentages. Chi-square was used to test the significant association between variables. Level of significance was set at a P ≤ 0.05. Results: A total of 107 respondents were interviewed and 57.9% were satisfied with the overall quality of care they received. The determinants of overall satisfaction in this study were found to be related to resources for cancer treatment (odds ratio [OR] =3.10; 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.39–6.90; P = 0.005, care delivery processes (OR = 2.87; 95% CI = 1.28–6.43; P = 0.009, and the ward environment (OR = 2.59; 95% CI = 1.17–5.74; P = 0.018. Conclusions: The parents were moderately satisfied with the oncology care services their children received. The gaps identified in service delivery included those related to the availability of the required resources for efficient care delivery and also educational as well as psychosocial needs of the

  12. Enhancing mHealth Technology in the Patient-Centered Medical Home Environment to Activate Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Multisite Feasibility Study Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lu; Williams, Joel E; Dye, Cheryl J; Chen, Liwei; Crawford, Paul; Shry, Eric A; Griffin, Sarah F; Jones, Karyn O; Sherrill, Windsor W; Truong, Khoa; Little, Jeanette R; Edwards, Karen W; Hing, Marie; Moss, Jennie B

    2017-01-01

    Background The potential of mHealth technologies in the care of patients with diabetes and other chronic conditions has captured the attention of clinicians and researchers. Efforts to date have incorporated a variety of tools and techniques, including Web-based portals, short message service (SMS) text messaging, remote collection of biometric data, electronic coaching, electronic-based health education, secure email communication between visits, and electronic collection of lifestyle and quality-of-life surveys. Each of these tools, used alone or in combination, have demonstrated varying degrees of effectiveness. Some of the more promising results have been demonstrated using regular collection of biometric devices, SMS text messaging, secure email communication with clinical teams, and regular reporting of quality-of-life variables. In this study, we seek to incorporate several of the most promising mHealth capabilities in a patient-centered medical home (PCMH) workflow. Objective We aim to address underlying technology needs and gaps related to the use of mHealth technology and the activation of patients living with type 2 diabetes. Stated differently, we enable supporting technologies while seeking to influence patient activation and self-care activities. Methods This is a multisite phased study, conducted within the US Military Health System, that includes a user-centered design phase and a PCMH-based feasibility trial. In phase 1, we will assess both patient and provider preferences regarding the enhancement of the enabling technology capabilities for type 2 diabetes chronic care management. Phase 2 research will be a single-blinded 12-month feasibility study that incorporates randomization principles. Phase 2 research will seek to improve patient activation and self-care activities through the use of the Mobile Health Care Environment with tailored behavioral messaging. The primary outcome measure is the Patient Activation Measure scores. Secondary outcome

  13. Care Transitions: Using Narratives to Assess Continuity of Care Provided to Older Patients after Hospital Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Carolyn; Hogan, David B.

    2016-01-01

    Background A common scenario that may pose challenges to primary care providers is when an older patient has been discharged from hospital. The aim of this pilot project is to examine the experiences of patients’ admission to hospital through to discharge back home, using analysis of patient narratives to inform the strengths and weaknesses of the process. Methods For this qualitative study, we interviewed eight subjects from the Sheldon M. Chumir Central Teaching Clinic (CTC). Interviews were analyzed for recurring themes and phenomena. Two physicians and two resident learners employed at the CTC were recruited as a focus group to review the narrative transcripts. Results Narratives generally demonstrated moderate satisfaction among interviewees with respect to their hospitalization and follow-up care in the community. However, the residual effects of their hospitalization surprised five patients, and five were uncertain about their post-discharge management plan. Conclusion Both secondary and primary care providers can improve on communicating the likely course of recovery and follow-up plans to patients at the time of hospital discharge. Our findings add to the growing body of research advocating for the implementation of quality improvement measures to standardize the discharge process. PMID:27729948

  14. Assessing the quality of interdisciplinary rounds in the intensive care unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Have, Elsbeth C. M.; Hagedoorn, Mariet; Holman, Nicole D.; Nap, Raoul E.; Sanderman, Robbert; Tulleken, Jaap E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Interdisciplinary rounds (IDRs) in the intensive care unit (ICU) are increasingly recommended to support quality improvement, but uncertainty exists about assessing the quality of IDRs. We developed, tested, and applied an instrument to assess the quality of IDRs in ICUs. Materials and Meth

  15. An assessment of burn care professionals' attitudes to major burn.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, A D

    2008-06-01

    The resuscitation of severe burn remains a controversial area within the burn care profession. There is ongoing debate as to what percentage burn is associated with a sufficient quality of life to support initial resuscitation efforts. We conducted a survey of delegates at the 39th Annual Meeting of the British Burns Association (2005), regarding attitudes towards resuscitation following major burns. Respondents were asked the maximum percentage total body surface area (TBSA) burn beyond which they would not wish to be resuscitated. They were also asked what maximum TBSA they perceived to be commensurate with an acceptable quality of life (QOL). One hundred and forty three of 300 delegates responded to the questionnaire. Thirty three percent of respondents would not wish to be resuscitated with 50-75% TBSA burns or greater. A further 35% would not wish to have life-sustaining intervention with 75-95% TBSA burns or greater. The remaining 32% indicated that they would not want resuscitation with TBSA burns>95%. Regardless of TBSA affected, 16% would not wish resuscitation if they had full thickness facial burns, a further 10% did not want resuscitation if both their hands and faces were affected. Our survey demonstrates the diversity of personal preference amongst burn care professionals. This would suggest that a unifying philosophy regarding the resuscitation of extensive burns will remain elusive.

  16. Assessing and Enhancing Health Care Providers’ Response to Domestic Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuija Leppäkoski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to examine possible changes from 2008 to 2012 in the skills of health care staff in identifying and intervening in domestic violence (DV. A longitudinal descriptive study design with volunteer samples (baseline; n=68, follow-up; n=100 was used to acquire information regarding the present state and needs of the staff in practices related to DV. The results of the baseline survey were used as a basis for planning two interventions: staff training and drafting practical guidelines. Information was collected by questionnaires from nurses, physicians, and social workers and supplemented by responses from the interviews. The data were analysed using both quantitative and qualitative methods. A chi-square test was used to test the statistical significance of the data sets. In addition, participants’ quotes are used to describe specific phenomena or issues. The comparison showed that overall a small positive change had taken place between the study periods. However, the participants were aware of their own shortcomings in identifying and intervening in DV. Changes happen slowly, and administrative support is needed to sustain such changes. Therefore, this paper offers recommendations to improve health care providers’ response to DV. Moreover, there is a great need for evaluating the training programme used.

  17. Assessing emergency medical care in low income countries: A pilot study from Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhtar Tasleem

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergency Medical Care is an important component of health care system. Unfortunately it is however, ignored in many low income countries. We assessed the availability and quality of facility-based emergency medical care in the government health care system at district level in a low income country – Pakistan. Methods We did a quantitative pilot study of a convenience sample of 22 rural and 20 urban health facilities in 2 districts – Faisalabad and Peshawar – in Pakistan. The study consisted of three separate cross-sectional assessments of selected community leaders, health care providers, and health care facilities. Three data collection instruments were created with input from existing models for facility assessment such as those used by the Joint Commission of Accreditation of Hospitals and the National Center for Health Statistics in USA and the Medical Research Council in Pakistan. Results The majority of respondents 43/44(98%, in community survey were not satisfied with the emergency care provided. Most participants 36/44(82% mentioned that they will not call an ambulance in health related emergency because it does not function properly in the government system. The expenses on emergency care for the last experience were reported to be less than 5,000 Pakistani Rupees (equivalent to US$ 83 for 19/29(66% respondents. Most health care providers 43/44(98% were of the opinion that their facilities were inadequately equipped to treat emergencies. The majority of facilities 31/42(74% had no budget allocated for emergency care. A review of medications and equipment available showed that many critical supplies needed in an emergency were not found in these facilities. Conclusion Assessment of emergency care should be part of health systems analysis in Pakistan. Multiple deficiencies in emergency care at the district level in Pakistan were noted in our study. Priority should be given to make emergency care responsive to

  18. Is the acute care of frail elderly patients in a comprehensive geriatric assessment unit superior to conventional acute medical care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekerstad, Niklas; Karlson, Björn W; Dahlin Ivanoff, Synneve; Landahl, Sten; Andersson, David; Heintz, Emelie; Husberg, Magnus; Alwin, Jenny

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate whether the acute care of frail elderly patients in a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) unit is superior to the care in a conventional acute medical care unit. Design This is a clinical, prospective, randomized, controlled, one-center intervention study. Setting This study was conducted in a large county hospital in western Sweden. Participants The study included 408 frail elderly patients, aged ≥75 years, in need of acute in-hospital treatment. The patients were allocated to the intervention group (n=206) or control group (n=202). Mean age of the patients was 85.7 years, and 56% were female. Intervention This organizational form of care is characterized by a structured, systematic interdisciplinary CGA-based care at an acute elderly care unit. Measurements The primary outcome was the change in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) 3 months after discharge from hospital, measured by the Health Utilities Index-3 (HUI-3). Secondary outcomes were all-cause mortality, rehospitalizations, and hospital care costs. Results After adjustment by regression analysis, patients in the intervention group were less likely to present with decline in HRQoL after 3 months for the following dimensions: vision (odds ratio [OR] =0.33, 95% confidence interval [CI] =0.14–0.79), ambulation (OR =0.19, 95% CI =0.1–0.37), dexterity (OR =0.38, 95% CI =0.19–0.75), emotion (OR =0.43, 95% CI =0.22–0.84), cognition (OR = 0.076, 95% CI =0.033–0.18) and pain (OR =0.28, 95% CI =0.15–0.50). Treatment in a CGA unit was independently associated with lower 3-month mortality adjusted by Cox regression analysis (hazard ratio [HR] =0.55, 95% CI =0.32–0.96), and the two groups did not differ significantly in terms of hospital care costs (P>0.05). Conclusion Patients in an acute CGA unit were less likely to present with decline in HRQoL after 3 months, and the care in a CGA unit was also independently associated with lower mortality

  19. CHoosing Options for Insomnia in Cancer Effectively (CHOICE): Design of a patient centered comparative effectiveness trial of acupuncture and cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Sheila N; Gehrman, Philip; Barg, Frances K; Xie, Sharon X; Mao, Jun J

    2016-03-01

    Insomnia is a prevalent and persistent side effect of cancer, which if left unaddressed, can be unremitting and negatively influence physical and mental well-being. Acupuncture and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) are commonly used non-pharmacological treatments that are efficacious for treating insomnia in cancer patients; however, little is known about the comparative effectiveness of these options. The goal of personalized medicine is to determine which treatments are most effective for which individuals, and patient preference for treatment is a particularly important contributor to adherence and outcomes. Here we describe the design of a clinical trial that begins to determine how best to personalize the treatment of insomnia for cancer survivors. This project is a randomized controlled comparative effectiveness trial with a nested qualitative study comparing acupuncture and CBT for insomnia and co-morbid symptoms in a heterogeneous sample of 160 cancer survivors. The primary aim is to determine which treatment is associated with the largest reduction in insomnia severity. The secondary aim is to examine the demographic, clinical, and psychological characteristics that predict and/or moderate treatment effect. Patients will receive ten treatments of acupuncture or 7 sessions of CBT over eight weeks and complete validated patient-reported outcome measures of sleep and co-morbid symptoms at baseline, mid-treatment, post-treatment, and at three-months to assess durability of effect. The results of the proposed study have the potential to improve healthcare outcomes by helping cancer survivors and their caregivers make informed and evidence-based decisions, leading to patient-centered and personalized care for cancer survivors with insomnia.

  20. Assessment of the Ability of the Health Care Provider to Detect Manifestations Indicative of TBI Management of care for TBI Through the Utilization of High Fidelity Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Ability of the medical health care provider to detect manifestations indicative of TBI and management of care for TBI through the utilization of High ...utilizing high fidelity simulation to identify the efficacy of the medics ability to assess and manage manifestations of TBI  Development of Evaluation...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-11-1-0837 TITLE: Assessment of the Ability of the medical health care provider to detect manifestations indicative of TBI and

  1. Clinical undergraduate training and assessment in primary health care: Experiences gained from Crete, Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fioretos Michael

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary Health Care (PHC is increasingly being introduced into undergraduate medical education. In Greece, the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Crete was the first to introduce a 4-week long training in primary health care. This paper presents the experiences gained from the initial implementation of the teaching of practice-based primary care in rural Crete and reports on the assessment scale that was developed. Methods 284 students' case write-ups from the 6 primary care units (PCUs where they were allocated for the period 1990 to 1994 were analysed. The demographic data of the students and patients and the number of home visits were studied. Content analysis of the students' write-ups was carried out, using an assessment scale consisting of 10 dichotomous variables, in order to quantify eight (8 primary qualitative criteria. Results Internal reliability was estimated by the index KR20 = 0.67. Face and content validity was found to conform to the standards set for the course, while logistic linear regression analysis showed that the quality criteria could be used as an assessment scale. The number of home visits carried out varied between the various different PCUs (p Conclusion The primary health care course achieved the objectives of introducing students to comprehensive, community oriented care, although there was variation between the PCUs. The assessment scale that was developed to analyse the case-write ups of the students provided data that can be used to evaluate the course.

  2. Moving Parkinson care to the home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, E Ray; Vlaanderen, Floris P; Engelen, Lucien Jlpg; Kieburtz, Karl; Zhu, William; Biglan, Kevin M; Faber, Marjan J; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2016-09-01

    In many ways, the care of individuals with Parkinson disease does not meet their needs. Despite the documented benefits of receiving care from clinicians with Parkinson disease expertise, many patients (if not most) do not. Moreover, current care models frequently require older individuals with impaired mobility, cognition, and driving ability to be driven by overburdened caregivers to large, complex urban medical centers. Moving care to the patient's home would make Parkinson disease care more patient-centered. Demographic factors, including aging populations, and social factors, such as the splintering of the extended family, will increase the need for home-based care. Technological advances, especially the ability to assess and deliver care remotely, will enable the transition of care back to the home. However, despite its promise, this next generation of home-based care will have to overcome barriers, including outdated insurance models and a technological divide. Once these barriers are addressed, home-based care will increase access to high quality care for the growing number of individuals with Parkinson disease. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  3. Assessment of elderly people on entry to residential homes and continuing care arrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoad-Reddick, G

    1992-08-01

    Increasing numbers of elderly people are entering private residential homes in the UK. Results of surveys show poor oral health in this group. A survey was therefore conducted of 50 residential homes (housing 1337 residents) to determine assessment on entry and continuing care provision. In 38 per cent of homes no written notes were made of the initial assessment. Topics of dental interests were infrequently assessed on entry (only 16 per cent of carers examined the oral cavity, 52 per cent assessed the subject's ability to care for their dentures). Medical topics (mobility, incontinence, eyesight, etc) were all assessed in more than 80 per cent of subjects. Suggestions are made for utilization of an easy assessment questionnaire and improved denture naming arrangements. The importance of regular check-ups, education and publicity for this group is stressed.

  4. Patient-centered applications: use of information technology to promote disease management and wellness. A white paper by the AMIA knowledge in motion working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiris, George; Afrin, Lawrence B; Speedie, Stuart; Courtney, Karen L; Sondhi, Manu; Vimarlund, Vivian; Lovis, Christian; Goossen, William; Lynch, Cecil

    2008-01-01

    Advances in information technology (IT) enable a fundamental redesign of health care processes based on the use and integration of electronic communication at all levels. New communication technologies can support a transition from institution centric to patient-centric applications. This white paper defines key principles and challenges for designers, policy makers, and evaluators of patient-centered technologies for disease management and prevention. It reviews current and emerging trends; highlights challenges related to design, evaluation, reimbursement and usability; and reaches conclusions for next steps that will advance the domain.

  5. Rationale and design of a patient-centered medical home intervention for patients with end-stage renal disease on hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Anna C; Fitzgibbon, Marian L; Fischer, Michael J; Gallardo, Rani; Berbaum, Michael L; Lash, James P; Castillo, Sheila; Schiffer, Linda; Sharp, Lisa K; Tulley, John; Arruda, Jose A; Hynes, Denise M

    2015-05-01

    In the U.S., more than 400,000 individuals with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) require hemodialysis (HD) for renal replacement therapy. ESRD patients experience a high burden of morbidity, mortality, resource utilization, and poor quality of life (QOL). Under current care models, ESRD patients receive fragmented care from multiple providers at multiple locations. The Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) is a team approach, providing coordinated care across the healthcare continuum. While this model has shown some early benefits for complex chronic diseases such as diabetes, it has not been applied to HD patients. This study is a non-randomized quasi-experimental intervention trial implementing a Patient-Centered Medical Home for Kidney Disease (PCMH-KD). The PCMH-KD extends the existing dialysis care team (comprised of a nephrologist, dialysis nurse, dialysis technician, social worker, and dietitian) by adding a general internist, pharmacist, nurse coordinator, and a community health worker, all of whom will see the patients together, and separately, as needed. The primary goal is to implement a comprehensive, multidisciplinary care team to improve care coordination, quality of life, and healthcare use for HD patients. Approximately 240 patients will be recruited from two sites; a non-profit university-affiliated dialysis center and an independent for-profit dialysis center. Outcomes include (i) patient-reported outcomes, including QOL and satisfaction; (ii) clinical outcomes, including blood pressure and diet; (iii) healthcare use, including emergency room visits and hospitalizations; and (iv) staff perceptions. Given the significant burden that patients with ESRD on HD experience, enhanced care coordination provides an opportunity to reduce this burden and improve QOL.

  6. Is the acute care of frail elderly patients in a comprehensive geriatric assessment unit superior to conventional acute medical care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekerstad N

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Niklas Ekerstad,1,2 Björn W Karlson,3 Synneve Dahlin Ivanoff,4 Sten Landahl,5 David Andersson,6 Emelie Heintz,7 Magnus Husberg,2 Jenny Alwin2 1Department of Cardiology, NU (NÄL-Uddevalla Hospital Group, Trollhattan, 2Division of Health Care Analysis, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Linköping University, Linköping, 3Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Institute of Medicine, 4Centre for Ageing and Health, AGECAP, Department of Health and Rehabilitation, 5Department of Geriatrics, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, 6Division of Economics, Department of Management and Engineering, Linköping University, Linköping, 7Health Outcomes and Economic Evaluation Research Group, Medical Management Centre, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate whether the acute care of frail elderly patients in a comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA unit is superior to the care in a conventional acute medical care unit. Design: This is a clinical, prospective, randomized, controlled, one-center intervention study. Setting: This study was conducted in a large county hospital in western Sweden. Participants: The study included 408 frail elderly patients, aged ≥75 years, in need of acute in-hospital treatment. The patients were allocated to the intervention group (n=206 or control group (n=202. Mean age of the patients was 85.7 years, and 56% were female. Intervention: This organizational form of care is characterized by a structured, systematic interdisciplinary CGA-based care at an acute elderly care unit. Measurements: The primary outcome was the change in health-related quality of life (HRQoL 3 months after discharge from hospital, measured by the Health Utilities Index-3 (HUI-3. Secondary outcomes were all-cause mortality, rehospitalizations, and hospital care costs. Results: After adjustment by

  7. How much time is available for antenatal care consultations? Assessment of the quality of care in rural Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cousens Simon

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many women in Sub-Saharan African countries do not receive key recommended interventions during routine antenatal care (ANC including information on pregnancy, related complications, and importance of skilled delivery attendance. We undertook a process evaluation of a successful cluster randomized trial testing the effectiveness of birth plans in increasing utilization of skilled delivery and postnatal care in Ngorongoro district, rural Tanzania, to document the time spent by health care providers on providing the recommended components of ANC. Methods The study was conducted in 16 health units (eight units in each arm of the trial. We observed, timed, and audio-recorded ANC consultations to assess the total time providers spent with each woman and the time spent for the delivery of each component of care. T-test statistics were used to compare the total time and time spent for the various components of ANC in the two arms of the trial. We also identified the topics discussed during the counselling and health education sessions, and examined the quality of the provider-woman interaction. Results The mean total duration for initial ANC consultations was 40.1 minutes (range 33-47 in the intervention arm versus 19.9 (range 12-32 in the control arm p Conclusion Although the implementation of birth plans in the intervention health units improved provider-women dialogue on skilled delivery attendance, most recommended topics critical to improving maternal and newborn survival were rarely covered.

  8. Developing a pressure ulcer risk assessment scale for patients in long-term care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepisto, Mervi; Eriksson, Elina; Hietanen, Helvi; Lepisto, Jyri; Lauri, Sirkka

    2006-02-01

    Previous pressure ulcer risk assessment scales appear to have relied on opinions about risk factors and are based on care setting rather than research evidence. Utilizing 21 existing risk assessment scales and relevant risk factor literature, an instrument was developed by Finnish researchers that takes into account individual patient risk factors, devices and methods applied in nursing care, and organizational characteristics. The instrument underwent two pilot tests to assess the relevance and clarity of the instrument: the first involved 43 nurses and six patients; the second involved 50 nurses with expertise in wound care. Changes to questionnaire items deemed necessary as a result of descriptive analysis and agreement percentages were completed. After pilot testing, the final instrument addressed the following issues: 1) patient risks: activity, mobility in bed, mental status, nutrition, urinary incontinence, fecal incontinence, sensory perception, and skin condition; 2) devices and methods used in patient care: technical devices, bed type, mattress, overlay, seat cushions, and care methods; and 3) staff number and structure, maximum number of beds, and beds in use (the last group of questions were included to ensure participants understood the items; results were not analyzed). The phases of the study provided an expeditious means of data collection and a suitable opportunity to assess how the instrument would function in practice. Instrument reliability and validity were improved as a result of the pilot testing and can be enhanced further with continued use and assessment.

  9. Assessment of Chronic Illness Care with the German version of the ACIC in different primary care settings in Switzerland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoller Marco

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Switzerland the extent to which patients with chronic illnesses receive care congruent with the Chronic Care Model (CCM is unknown. Methods According to guidelines we translated the Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (ACIC into German (G-ACIC. We tested the instrument in different primary care settings and compared subscales with the original testing. Results Difficulties encountered during the translation process consisted in the difference of health care settings in Switzerland and USA. However initial testing showed the G-ACIC to be a suitable instrument. The average ACIC subscale scores in Swiss managed care (MC-, group (GP- and single handed practices (SP were higher for MC practices than for group- and single handed practices: Organization of the healthcare delivery system: MC mean (m = 6.80 (SD 1.55, GP m = 5.42 (SD 0.99, SP m = 4.60 (SD 2.07; community linkages: MC m = 4.19 (SD 1.47, GP m = 4.83 (SD 1.81, SP m = 3.10 (SD 2.12; self-management support: MC m = 4.96 (SD 1.13, GP m = 4.73 (SD 1.40, SP m = 4.43 (SD 1.34; decision support: MC m = 4.75 (SD 1.06; GP m = 4.20 (SD 0.87, SP m = 3.25 (SD 1.59; delivery system design: MC m = 5.98 (SD 1.61, GP m = 5.05 (SD 2.05, SP m = 3.86 (SD 1.51 and clinical information systems: MC m = 4.34 (SD = 2.49, GP m = 2.06 (SD 1.35, SP m = 3.20 (SD 1.57. Conclusions The G-ACIC is applicable and useful for comparing different health care settings in German speaking countries. Managed care organizations seem to implement the different components of the CCM in a greater extend than group and single handed practices. However, much room exists for further improvement.

  10. How to Systematically Assess Serious Games Applied to Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graafland, Maurits; Dankbaar, Mary; Mert, Agali; Lagro, Joep; De Wit-Zuurendonk, Laura; Schuit, Stephanie; Schaafstal, Alma

    2014-01-01

    The usefulness and effectiveness of specific serious games in the medical domain is often unclear. This is caused by a lack of supporting evidence on validity of individual games, as well as a lack of publicly available information. Moreover, insufficient understanding of design principles among the individuals and institutions that develop or apply a medical serious game compromises their use. This article provides the first consensus-based framework for the assessment of specific medical serious games. The framework provides 62 items in 5 main themes, aimed at assessing a serious game’s rationale, functionality, validity, and data safety. This will allow caregivers and educators to make balanced choices when applying a serious game for healthcare purposes. Furthermore, the framework provides game manufacturers with standards for the development of new, valid serious games. PMID:25654163

  11. How to systematically assess serious games applied to health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graafland, Maurits; Dankbaar, Mary; Mert, Agali; Lagro, Joep; De Wit-Zuurendonk, Laura; Schuit, Stephanie; Schaafstal, Alma; Schijven, Marlies

    2014-11-11

    The usefulness and effectiveness of specific serious games in the medical domain is often unclear. This is caused by a lack of supporting evidence on validity of individual games, as well as a lack of publicly available information. Moreover, insufficient understanding of design principles among the individuals and institutions that develop or apply a medical serious game compromises their use. This article provides the first consensus-based framework for the assessment of specific medical serious games. The framework provides 62 items in 5 main themes, aimed at assessing a serious game's rationale, functionality, validity, and data safety. This will allow caregivers and educators to make balanced choices when applying a serious game for healthcare purposes. Furthermore, the framework provides game manufacturers with standards for the development of new, valid serious games.

  12. Notes for the Primary Care Teachers: PORTFOLIO ASSESSMENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Cl

    2007-01-01

    The portfolio consists of a variety of documentation of a learner's proof of learning. It has been promoted as one way to verify a learner's personal and professional development, especially for the more mature trainees and doctors at work. It has not been widely accepted as a summative tool because the amount of time imposed on the learners may be considerable. Ways to improve the reliability of assessments on unstandardised portfolios are needed for its wider application.

  13. Notes for the Primary Care Teachers: PORTFOLIO ASSESSMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Teng, CL

    2007-01-01

    The portfolio consists of a variety of documentation of a learner’s proof of learning. It has been promoted as one way to verify a learner’s personal and professional development, especially for the more mature trainees and doctors at work. It has not been widely accepted as a summative tool because the amount of time imposed on the learners may be considerable. Ways to improve the reliability of assessments on unstandardised portfolios are needed for its wider application.

  14. [Assessment of the spiritual needs of patients in palliative care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajnová Fukasová, E; Bužgová, R; Feltl, D

    2015-01-01

    The appraisal and the right diagnostics of all needs and problems of patients, including the spiritual needs, are unavoidable for increase of the quality of the all-embracing nursing care. In the case of satisfying of the needs of the patients, it is important to have view the person as a unity of thebody and the soul. Identification and satisfying of the spiritual needs are not uncomplicated; moreover, spirituality does not have a target--ed and clear definition. In the palliative care, the solution and saturation of spiritual needs have a great priority, and it can be the key aspect of psychological activity. Also, medical experts are becoming aware of the meaning of spirituality as the part of psychological contentment more and more. Smaller importance is attached to measurement of spiritual needs, and in many medical institutions ends at the case history with the questions: "Are you a believer?", "Do you have any spiritual needs?". Spirituality and religion are very personal matters of every human. Many patients turn to religion to find answers to difficult questions while others find support through the spiritual beliefs outside the scope of organized religion. Mistaking of meanings of the spirituality and religionism can lead to many misunderstandings. The basic condition for the right diagnostics and satisfaction of spiritual needs are the definition of the used terms and using of standardized measurement devices in the clinical praxis. The target of summarizing study was to define the term of spirituality, to describe a lot of measurement devices these are suitable for the evaluation of human spiritual needs. For methodology for acquiring of the results of research works that are concerned with the questions of spiritual needs in case of the incurable patients, the following databases were used (2005-2013): EBSCO, Bibliographia Medica Čechoslovaca, Google Scholar, Solen - www.solen.cz, Profese on-line as the source of the data. The choice of studies were

  15. A primary care-based health needs assessment in inner city Dublin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Kelly, C M

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2001, a primary care-based health needs assessment (HNA) in South Inner City of Dublin identified high levels of morbidity and widespread and frequent use of primary care and specialist hospital services as particular concerns. AIMS: This study aims to determine the primary care health needs of a local community, from the perspective of service users and service providers. METHODS: A similar methodology to our 2001 HNA was adopted, involving semi-structured interviews with a convenience sample of patients attending two general practices and key informants regarding local health issues and health service utilisation. RESULTS: High levels of morbidity and chronic illness were found. A correlation between the local environment and ill-health was identified, as well as high utilisation of primary care services in the area. CONCLUSION: The establishment of a Primary Care Team would begin to address the health needs of the community.

  16. Quality along the continuum: a health facility assessment of intrapartum and postnatal care in Ghana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin C Nesbitt

    Full Text Available To evaluate quality of routine and emergency intrapartum and postnatal care using a health facility assessment, and to estimate "effective coverage" of skilled attendance in Brong Ahafo, Ghana.We conducted an assessment of all 86 health facilities in seven districts in Brong Ahafo. Using performance of key signal functions and the availability of relevant drugs, equipment and trained health professionals, we created composite quality categories in four dimensions: routine delivery care, emergency obstetric care (EmOC, emergency newborn care (EmNC and non-medical quality. Linking the health facility assessment to surveillance data we estimated "effective coverage" of skilled attendance as the proportion of births in facilities of high quality.Delivery care was offered in 64/86 facilities; only 3-13% fulfilled our requirements for the highest quality category in any dimension. Quality was lowest in the emergency care dimensions, with 63% and 58% of facilities categorized as "low" or "substandard" for EmOC and EmNC, respectively. This implies performing less than four EmOC or three EmNC signal functions, and/or employing less than two skilled health professionals, and/or that no health professionals were present during our visit. Routine delivery care was "low" or "substandard" in 39% of facilities, meaning 25/64 facilities performed less than six routine signal functions and/or had less than two skilled health professionals and/or less than one midwife. While 68% of births were in health facilities, only 18% were in facilities with "high" or "highest" quality in all dimensions.Our comprehensive facility assessment showed that quality of routine and emergency intrapartum and postnatal care was generally low in the study region. While coverage with facility delivery was 68%, we estimated "effective coverage" of skilled attendance at 18%, thus revealing a large "quality gap." Effective coverage could be a meaningful indicator of progress towards

  17. Framework for assessing quality of care for inflammatory bowel disease in Sweden

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Martin Rejler; J(o)rgen Tholstrup; Mattias Elg; Anna Sp(a)ngéus; Boel Andersson G(a)re

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To create and apply a framework for quality assessment and improvement in care for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients.METHODS A framework for quality assessment and improvement was created for IBD based on two generally acknowledged quality models.The model of Donabedian (Df) offers a logistical and productive perspective and the Clinical Value Compass (CVC) model adds a management and service perspective.The framework creates a pedagogical tool to understand the balance between the dimensions of clinical care (CVC) and the components of clinical outcome (Df).The merged models create a framework of the care process dimensions as a whole,reflecting important parts of the IBD care delivery system in a local setting.Clinical and organizational quality measures were adopted from clinical experience and the literature and were integrated into the framework.Data were collected at the yearly check-up for 481 IBD patients during 2008.The application of the quality assessment framework was tested and evaluated in a local clinical IBD care setting in J(o)nk(o)ping County,Sweden.RESULTS:The main outcome was the presentation of how locally-selected clinical quality measures,integrated into two complementary models to develop a framework,could be instrumental in assessing the quality of care delivered to patients with IBD.The selected quality measures of the framework noted less anemia in the population than previously reported,provided information about hospitalization rates and the few surgical procedures reported,and noted good access to the clinic.CONCLUSION:The applied local quality framework was feasible and useful for assessing the quality of care delivered to IBD patients in a local setting.

  18. The perception of midwives regarding psychosocial risk assessment during antenatal care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna M. Mathibe-Neke

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The physiological and psychological changes caused by pregnancy may increase a woman’s vulnerability to depression, which may in turn have adverse effects on both maternal and foetal wellbeing. Inadequate psychosocial risk assessment of women by midwives may lead to lack of psychosocial support during pregnancy and childbirth. Pregnant women who lack psychosocial support may experience stress, anxiety and depression that could possibly affect foetal wellbeing. Objective:The objective of this study was toexplore and describe the perception of psychosocial risk assessment and psychosocial care by midwives providing antenatal care to pregnant women. Method: An interpretive and descriptive qualitative approach was adopted. Three focus group interviews were conducted with midwives working in three Maternal Obstetric Units in Gauteng Province, using a semi-structured interview guide. The constant comparison data analysis approach was used. Results:Findings revealed that midwives are aware of and have encountered a high prevalence of psychosocial problems in pregnant women. Furthermore, they acknowledged the importance of psychosocial care for pregnant women although they stated that they were not equipped adequately to offer psychosocial assessment and psychosocial care. Conclusion:The findings provided a basis for incorporation of psychosocial care into routine antenatal care.

  19. Assessing the quality of care for the elderly in services from public primary health care in Porto Alegre, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Botteselle de Oliveira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aging population creates a greater demand creates a greater demand for health services and becomes a challenge for the health care system. Primary Health Care (PHC plays a fundamental role in promoting healthy aging and controlling multi-morbidity. Objective: To assess the quality of care provided to elderly patients in public PHC in Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil. Methods: A cross-sectional population-based study carried out in 2007, with interviews conducted with 212 elderly patients from four types of municipal public services: Primary Health Centers, Family Health Strategy teams, the “Conceição” Hospital Community Health Service (CH/CHS, and the “Murialdo” School Health Center. Results: There were significant differences between the centers investigated regarding the following attributes: Access-utilization, Longitudinality, Care coordination and information systems, and Family and community orientation. The CH/CHS showed prevalence of 55.8% (p<0.001 for the overall PHC high score - higher figures in comparison with the other services. The overall score of preventive practices showed a significant association with the services to the overall PHC score, with an average of 3.9 (CI 95%=3.60-4.32 among the elderly who presented low scores and 5.9 (CI 95%=5.3-6.5 among those presenting high scores. Discussion: The results show low scores in all types of services. The services with a high overall PHC score present higher preventive practice prevalence. Conclusions: PHC-oriented services are more effective and offer greater quality of preventive care recommended for the elderly.

  20. A Comparison of the impact of family-centered and patient-centered education methods on attitude toward and adherence to diet and fluid restriction in hemodialysis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asgari P

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: One of the major issues in hemodialysis patients is adherence to diet and fluid restriction. In order to reduce the adverse consequences of the disease and improve quality of life, educating these patients is of great importance. Therefore, the present study was conducted in order to compare the impact of two methods of education (patient-centered and family–centered on attitude toward and adherence to diet and fluid restriction in hemodialysis patients. Materials and Method: This clinical trial was performed on patients referred to the hemodialysis ward of hospitals affiliated with Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iran, during May to October 2012. Through purposive sampling method, 60 patients were selected and randomly assigned to two groups patient-centered (n = 30 and family-centered (n = 30. Patients’ attitude toward and adherence to diet regime and fluid restriction were assessed using a researcher-made self-report questionnaire in 3 stages (before the intervention, and 2 and 4 weeks after the intervention. The reliability and validity of the questionnaire were approved. Data analysis was performed using SPSS software version 16 and independent t-test, chi-square, Fisher’s exact test, and repeated measures ANOVA. Results: Before the intervention, the findings showed no significant difference between the 2 groups in terms of adherence to diet and fluid restriction. In the second week after the intervention, mean adherence to diet in the family-centered group was significantly higher than the patient-centered group (P = 0.010. Moreover, at the end of the second (P = 0.001 and fourth weeks (P = 0.002, the attitude toward adherence to diet and fluid restriction was more positive in the family-centered group, in comparison to the patient-centered group. Conclusion: Family-centered education is more effective on patient adherence to the treatment regimen. Thus, it is recommended that family

  1. Patient-Centered Research Priorities for Pulmonary Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) Infection. An NTM Research Consortium Workshop Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkle, Emily; Aksamit, Timothy; Barker, Alan; Daley, Charles L; Griffith, David; Leitman, Philip; Leitman, Amy; Malanga, Elisha; Marras, Theodore K; Olivier, Kenneth N; Prevots, D Rebecca; Prieto, Delia; Quittner, Alexandra L; Skach, William; Walsh, John W; Winthrop, Kevin L

    2016-09-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) cause an increasingly important chronic and debilitating lung disease in older adults. Diagnosis is often delayed, although awareness among clinicians and patients is increasing. When necessary, treatment often lasts 18-24 months and consists of three or four antibiotics that can have serious side effects. Relapses are common and commonly require resumption of prolonged therapy. Given the need for improved diagnostic techniques and clinical trials to identify new therapies or to improve existing therapies, a group of North American clinicians and researchers formed the NTM Research Consortium (NTMRC) in 2014. The NTMRC recognized the importance of including the patient voice in determining research priorities for NTM. In November 2015, patients, caregivers, patient advocates, clinical experts, and researchers gathered for a 1-day meeting in Portland, Oregon funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute. The meeting goal was to define patient-centered research priorities for NTM lung infections. Patients expressed frustration with the number of people who have endured years of missed diagnoses or inadequate treatment of NTM. Participants identified as top research priorities the prevention of NTM infection; approval of more effective treatments with fewer side effects and easier administration; understanding the best chest physiotherapy methods; validating and using tools to measure quality of life; and developing a disease-specific activity and severity assessment tool. Workshop participants agreed that two complementary objectives are critical to ensure the best achievable outcomes for patients: (1) additional clinician education to improve screening and diagnosis of NTM infections; and (2) development of a geographically distributed network of experts in NTM disease to offer consultation or direct therapy after a diagnosis is made.

  2. The Development of a Critical Care Resident Research Curriculum: A Needs Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeeta Jain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Conducting research is expected from many clinicians’ professional profile, yet many do not have advanced research degrees. Research training during residency is variable amongst institutions and research education needs of trainees are not well understood. Objective. To understand needs of critical care trainees regarding research education. Methods. Canadian critical care trainees, new critical care faculty, program directors, and research coordinators were surveyed regarding research training, research expectations, and support within their programs. Results. Critical care trainees and junior faculty members highlighted many gaps in research knowledge and skills. In contrast, critical care program directors felt that trainees were prepared to undertake research careers. Major differences in opinion amongst program directors and other respondent groups exist regarding preparation for designing a study, navigating research ethics board applications, and managing a research budget. Conclusion. We demonstrated that Canadian critical care trainees and junior faculty reported gaps in knowledge in all areas of research. There was disagreement amongst trainees, junior faculty, research coordinators, and program directors regarding learning needs. Results from this needs assessment will be used to help redesign the education program of the Canadian Critical Care Trials Group to complement local research training offered for critical care trainees.

  3. Abnormal Grief: Should We Consider a More Patient-Centered Approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moayedoddin, Babak; Markowitz, John C

    2015-01-01

    Grief, the psychological reaction to the loss of a significant other, varies complexly in its cause, experience, evolution, and prognosis. Although most bereaved individuals experience a normal grieving process, some develop complicated grief (CG) or major depressive disorder (MDD). The DSM-5, which controversially altered the nosology, recognizes grief-related major depression (GRMD) as a diagnostic subtype if a patient meets MDD criteria two weeks post bereavement. The (DSM-5) tries to distinguish between grief and MDD, but remains a symptom-based, centered approach to grief that is not patient centered. This article reviews grief in its normal and abnormal dimensions. Using an illustrative clinical case in which interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) was employed, we discuss the need for a more patient-centered approach to treating abnormal grief, considering the patient's personal history, perceptions, experiences of bereavement, and interpersonal environment. Clinical studies need to better identify subgroups of individuals susceptible to abnormal grief and to evaluate their response to early interventions.

  4. Anticipated Ethics and Regulatory Challenges in PCORnet: The National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Joseph; Califf, Robert; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    PCORnet, the National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network, seeks to establish a robust national health data network for patient-centered comparative effectiveness research. This article reports the results of a PCORnet survey designed to identify the ethics and regulatory challenges anticipated in network implementation. A 12-item online survey was developed by leadership of the PCORnet Ethics and Regulatory Task Force; responses were collected from the 29 PCORnet networks. The most pressing ethics issues identified related to informed consent, patient engagement, privacy and confidentiality, and data sharing. High priority regulatory issues included IRB coordination, privacy and confidentiality, informed consent, and data sharing. Over 150 IRBs and five different approaches to managing multisite IRB review were identified within PCORnet. Further empirical and scholarly work, as well as practical and policy guidance, is essential if important initiatives that rely on comparative effectiveness research are to move forward.

  5. Transitioning to routine breast cancer risk assessment and management in primary care: what can we learn from cardiovascular disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Kelly-Anne; Steel, Emma J; Collins, Ian; Emery, Jon; Pirotta, Marie; Mann, G Bruce; Butow, Phyllis; Hopper, John L; Trainer, Alison; Moreton, Jane; Antoniou, Antonis C; Cuzick, Jack; Keogh, Louise

    2016-01-01

    To capitalise on advances in breast cancer prevention, all women would need to have their breast cancer risk formally assessed. With ~85% of Australians attending primary care clinics at least once a year, primary care is an opportune location for formal breast cancer risk assessment and management. This study assessed the current practice and needs of primary care clinicians regarding assessment and management of breast cancer risk. Two facilitated focus group discussions were held with 17 primary care clinicians (12 GPs and 5 practice nurses (PNs)) as part of a larger needs assessment. Primary care clinicians viewed assessment and management of cardiovascular risk as an intrinsic, expected part of their role, often triggered by practice software prompts and facilitated by use of an online tool. Conversely, assessment of breast cancer risk was not routine and was generally patient- (not clinician-) initiated, and risk management (apart from routine screening) was considered outside the primary care domain. Clinicians suggested that routine assessment and management of breast cancer risk might be achieved if it were widely endorsed as within the remit of primary care and supported by an online risk-assessment and decision aid tool that was integrated into primary care software. This study identified several key issues that would need to be addressed to facilitate the transition to routine assessment and management of breast cancer risk in primary care, based largely on the model used for cardiovascular disease.

  6. Developing a Business Plan for Critical Care Pharmacy Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erstad, Brian L; Mann, Henry J; Weber, Robert J

    2016-11-01

    Critical care medicine has grown from a small group of physicians participating in patient care rounds in surgical and medical intensive care units (ICUs) to a highly technical, interdisciplinary team. Pharmacy's growth in the area of critical care is as exponential. Today's ICU requires a comprehensive pharmaceutical service that includes both operational and clinical services to meet patient medication needs. This article provides the elements for a business plan to justify critical care pharmacy services by describing the pertinent background and benefit of ICU pharmacy services, detailing a current assessment of ICU pharmacy services, listing the essential ICU pharmacy services, describing service metrics, and delineating an appropriate timeline for implementing an ICU pharmacy service. The structure and approach of this business plan can be applied to a variety of pharmacy services. By following the format and information listed in this article, the pharmacy director can move closer to developing patient-centered pharmacy services for ICU patients.

  7. Cognitive and affective assessment in day care versus institutionalized elderly patients: a 1-year longitudinal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maseda A

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ana Maseda, Aránzazu Balo, Laura Lorenzo–López, Leire Lodeiro–Fernández, José Luis Rodríguez–Villamil, José Carlos Millán–CalentiGerontology Research Group, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of A Coruña, A Coruña, SpainPurpose: Cognitive decline and depression are two common mental health problems that may create a need for long-term care among the elderly. In the last decade, the percentage of older adults who receive health care in nursing homes, day care centers, or home support services has increased in Europe. The objectives of this descriptive and nonrandomized longitudinal study were to evaluate and to compare the cognitive and affective evolution of day care versus institutionalized older patients through a 1-year period, and to assess the presence of cognitive and affective impairment as a function of the care setting.Patients and methods: Ninety-four patients were assessed at baseline, and 63 (67.0% were reassessed 1 year later. Neuropsychological assessment included measures of cognitive performance (general cognitive status, visuospatial, and language abilities and affective status (depressive symptoms.Results: Our findings indicated that the majority of the participants (day care and institutionalized patients had mild–moderate cognitive impairment at baseline, which significantly increased in both groups after 1-year follow-up. However, the rate of change in global cognitive function did not significantly differ between groups over time. Regarding language abilities, naming function maintained among day care patients in comparison with institutionalized patients, who showed worse performance at follow-up. As regards to affective status, results revealed that institutionalized patients had a significant reduction in depressive symptoms at follow-up, when compared to day care patients. Results also highlight the high frequency of cognitive impairment and depressive symptoms regardless of the care setting

  8. Evaluating medical residents as managers of care: a critical appraisal of assessment methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busari JO

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Jamiu O Busari,1,2 Lorette A Stammen,2 Lokke M Gennissen,2 Rob M Moonen1 1Department of Pediatrics, Atrium Medical Center, Henri Dunantstraat 5, 6401 CX Heerlen, the Netherlands; 2Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Maastricht, the Netherlands Introduction: The increasing demands for effective and efficient health care delivery systems worldwide have resulted in an expansion of the desired competencies that physicians need to possess upon graduation. Presently, medical residents require additional professional competencies that can prepare them to practice adequately in a continuously changing health care environment. Recent studies show that despite the importance of competency-based training, the development and evaluation of management competencies in residents during residency training is inadequate. The aim of this literature review was to find out which assessment methods are currently being used to evaluate trainees' management competencies and which, if any, of these methods make use of valid and reliable instruments. Methods: In September 2012, a thorough search of the literature was performed using the PubMed, Cochrane, Embase®, MEDLINE®, and ERIC databases. Additional searches included scanning the references of relevant articles and sifting through the “related topics” displayed by the databases. Results: A total of 25 out of 178 articles were selected for final review. Four broad categories emerged after analysis that best reflected their content: 1 measurement tools used to evaluate the effect of implemented curricular interventions; 2 measurement tools based on recommendations from consensus surveys or conventions; 3 measurement tools for assessing general competencies, which included care-management; and 4 measurement tools focusing exclusively on care-management competencies. Conclusion: Little information was found about (validated assessment tools being used to measure care-management competence

  9. Using stakeholder engagement to develop a patient-centered pediatric asthma intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelef, Deborah Q; Rand, Cynthia; Streisand, Randi; Horn, Ivor B; Yadav, Kabir; Stewart, Lisa; Fousheé, Naja; Waters, Damian; Teach, Stephen J

    2016-12-01

    Stakeholder engagement has the potential to develop research interventions that are responsive to patient and provider preferences. This approach contrasts with traditional models of clinical research in which researchers determine the study's design. This article describes the effect of stakeholder engagement on the design of a randomized trial of an intervention designed to improve child asthma outcomes by reducing parental stress. The study team developed and implemented a stakeholder engagement process that provided iterative feedback regarding the study design, patient-centered outcomes, and intervention. Stakeholder engagement incorporated the perspectives of parents of children with asthma; local providers of community-based medical, legal, and social services; and national experts in asthma research methodology and implementation. Through a year-long process of multidimensional stakeholder engagement, the research team successfully refined and implemented a patient-centered study protocol. Key stakeholder contributions included selection of patient-centered outcome measures, refinement of intervention content and format, and language framing the study in a culturally appropriate manner. Stakeholder engagement was a useful framework for developing an intervention that was acceptable and relevant to our target population. This approach might have unique benefits in underserved populations, leading to sustainable improvement in health outcomes and reduced disparities.

  10. Effect of Organizational Culture on Patient Access, Care Continuity, and Experience of Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Dorothy; Chung, Sukyung; Martinez, Meghan; Tai-Seale, Ming

    2016-01-01

    This study examined relationships between organizational culture and patient-centered outcomes in primary care. Generalized least squares regression was used to analyze patient access, care continuity, and reported experiences of care among 357 physicians in 41 primary care departments. Compared with a "Group-oriented" culture, a "Rational" culture type was associated with longer appointment wait times, and both "Hierarchical" and "Developmental" culture types were associated with less care continuity, but better patient experiences with care. Understanding the unique effects of organizational culture can enhance the delivery of more patient-centered care.

  11. Opportunities for Prevention: Assessing Where Low-Income Patients Seek Care for Preventable Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaiman, Tamar A; Valdmanis, Vivian G; Bernet, Patrick; Moises, James

    2015-10-01

    The Affordable Care Act has many aspects that are aimed at improving health care for all Americans, including mandated insurance coverage for individuals, as well as required community health needs assessments (CHNAs), and reporting of investments in community benefit by nonprofit hospitals in order to maintain tax exemptions. Although millions of Americans have gained access to health insurance, many--often the most vulnerable--remain uninsured, and will continue to depend on hospital community benefits for care. Understanding where patients go for care can assist hospitals and communities to develop their CHNA and implementation plans in order to focus resources where the need for prevention is greatest. This study evaluated patient care-seeking behavior among patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) in Florida in 2008--analyzed in 2013--to assess whether low-income patients accessed specific safety net hospitals for treatment or received care from hospitals that were geographically closer to their residence. This study found evidence that low-income patients went to hospitals that treated more low-income patients, regardless of where they lived. The findings demonstrate that hospitals-especially public safety net hospitals with a tradition of treating low-income patients suffering from CAD-should focus prevention activities where low-income patients reside.

  12. Cold plasma treatment in wound care: efficacy and risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffels, Eva

    2007-10-01

    Cold atmospheric plasma is an ideal medium for non-destructive modification of vulnerable surfaces. One of the most promising medical applications of cold plasma treatment is wound healing. Potential advantages in wound healing have been demonstrated in vitro: the plasma does not necrotize the cells and does not affect the extracellular matrix [1], has clear bactericidal or bacteriostatic effects [2], and stimulates fibroblast cells towards faster attachment and proliferation [3]. However, safety issues, such as the potential cytotoxicity of the plasma must be clarified prior to clinical implementation. This work comprises the recent facts on sub-lethal plasma effects on mammalian cells, as well as studies on apoptosis induction and quantitative assessment of DNA damage. Fibroblast, smooth muscle and endothelial cells were treated using the standard cold plasma needle [1,2]; intra- and extracellular oxidant levels as well as the influence of the plasma on intracellular antioxidant balance were monitored using appropriate fluorescent markers [1]. We have studied long-term cellular damage was monitored using flow cytometry to determine the DNA profiles in treated cells. Dose-response curves were obtained: increased proliferation as well as apoptosis were visualized under different treatment conditions. The results from the in vitro studies are satisfying. [1] I.E. Kieft, ``Plasma needle: exploring biomedical applications of non-thermal plasmas'', PhD Thesis, Eindhoven University of Technology (2005). [2] R.E.J. Sladek, ``Plasma needle: non-thermal atmospheric plasmas in dentistry'' PhD Thesis, Eindhoven University of Technology (2006). [3] I.E. Kieft, D. Darios, A.J.M. Roks, E. Stoffels, IEEE Trans. Plasma Sci. 34(4), 2006, pp. 1331-1336.

  13. The National Single Assessment Tool (SAT) a pilot study in older persons care-survey results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott-Scales, L; Beaton, D; McMahon, F; Vereker, N; McCormack, B; Coen, R F; O'Keefe, S T

    2013-01-01

    Following a consultation and review process, the interRAI suite of assessment tools was chosen as the most suitable instrument for assessment of the care needs of older people in Ireland. We used previously validated questionnaires to examine the usability, practicality and acceptability of these tools to professionals, carers and clients in rural and urban acute, long-term care and community settings. Of the 45 professionals, 42-44 (93-98%) agreed or strongly agreed with 14 of 15 positive statements regarding the acceptability, clinical value and ease of use of the interRAl tools; 39 (87%) felt the terminology was consistent and familiar, although 35 (78%) felt some areas would require further explanation. Responses from carers (n = 15) and clients (n = 68) were similarly overwhelmingly positive regarding the experience of being assessed using these tools. These results support the clinical utility and practicality of using this approach to assess older people in Irish clinical practice.

  14. Validation of the Primary Care Assessment Tool: PCATool-Brazil for adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erno Harzheim

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to translate and adapt the PCATool version for adult users to the Brazilian context and assess its validity and reliability. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 2404 adult users living in areas covered from public services Primary Care in Porto Alegre, and users of a self- management plan. We performed translation, reverse translation and adaptation of the instrument as well as its assessment in respect of content validity, factorial validity and reliability. Results: In the factor analysis were considered 12 factors that explained 50.83% of the total variation. In this way were recognized the attributes of Primary Care: access - accessibility and utilization; longitudinality; coordination - coordination of care and systems of information; comprehensiveness - services available and services provided; family orientation; and community orientation. In terms of internal consistency the values of Cronbach’s alpha ranged from 0.15 to 0.90. The stability over time was not observed for coordination of care (p<0.05, coordination information of system (p<0.05 and comprehensiveness of services provided (p<0.05. The scaling success rate was close to 100% for all attributes, except to coordination of information system. Conclusions: the results indicated that the PCATool-Brazil has adequate validity and reliability, and it can act as a national instrument for the assessment of Primary Care from the perspective of adult users.

  15. The OCHIN community information network: bringing together community health centers, information technology, and data to support a patient-centered medical village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoe, Jennifer E; Sears, Abigail

    2013-01-01

    Creating integrated, comprehensive care practices requires access to data and informatics expertise. Information technology (IT) resources are not readily available to individual practices. One model of shared IT resources and learning is a "patient-centered medical village." We describe the OCHIN Community Health Information Network as an example of this model; community practices have come together collectively to form an organization that leverages shared IT expertise, resources, and data, providing members with the means to fully capitalize on new technologies that support improved care. This collaborative facilitates the identification of "problem sheds" through surveillance of network-wide data, enables shared learning regarding best practices, and provides a "community laboratory" for practice-based research. As an example of a community of solution, OCHIN uses health IT and data-sharing innovations to enhance partnerships between public health leaders, clinicians in community health centers, informatics experts, and policy makers. OCHIN community partners benefit from the shared IT resource (eg, a linked electronic health record, centralized data warehouse, informatics, and improvement expertise). This patient-centered medical village provides (1) the collective mechanism to build community-tailored IT solutions, (2) "neighbors" to share data and improvement strategies, and (3) infrastructure to support innovations based on electronic health records across communities, using experimental approaches.

  16. A study of automated self-assessment in a primary care student health centre setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poote, Aimee E; French, David P; Dale, Jeremy; Powell, John

    2014-04-01

    We evaluated the advice given by a prototype self-assessment triage system in a university student health centre. Students attending the health centre with a new problem used the automated self-assessment system prior to a face-to-face consultation with the general practitioner (GP). The system's rating of urgency was available to the GP, and following the consultation, the GP recorded their own rating of the urgency of the patient's presentation. Full data were available for 154 of the 207 consultations. Perfect agreement, where both the GP and the self-assessment system selected the same category of advice, occurred in 39% of consultations. The association between the GP assessment and the self-assessment rankings of urgency was low but significant (rho = 0.19, P = 0.016). The self-assessment system tended to be risk averse compared to the GP assessments, with advice for more urgent level of care seeking being recommended in 86 consultations (56%) and less urgent advice in only 8 (5%). This difference in assessment of urgency was significant (P self-assessed and GP-assessed urgency was not associated with symptom site or socio-demographic characteristics of the user. Although the self-assessment system was more risk averse than the GPs, which resulted in a high proportion of patients being triaged as needing emergency or immediate care, the self-assessment system successfully identified a proportion of patients who were felt by the GP to have a self-limiting condition that did not need a consultation. In its prototype form, the self-assessment system was not a replacement for clinician assessment and further refinement is necessary.

  17. Development of a Tool to Assess Resident Physicians' Perceived Competence for Patient-Centered Obesity Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Amy M.; Brezausek, Carl M.; Hendricks, Peter S.; Agne, April A.; Hankins, Shirley L.; Cherrington, Andrea L.

    2015-01-01

    Physicians report a number of barriers to obesity counseling, among them low perceived competence in the ability to counsel. While there is increasing recognition of the need for resident training on counseling, implementation requires residency programs to have the necessary curricula and tools to evaluate training effectiveness. This study's…

  18. Self-care assessment as an indicator for clinical supervision in nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Marlene Monteiro Teixeira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : to evaluate the needs of clinical supervision for nurses to assess the degree of dependence on self- care and planning of nursing interventions. Methods : analytical study, cross-cutting nature, collecting data from a sample of 110 patients. Results : it was shown the differences in the identification of the degree of dependence between registers and experts, as well as the selection of operations for each self-care and failures to the original assessment of the filling level (no evaluation self-care/no identification of the degree of dependence. Conclusion : there were gaps in the nursing process; they have proposed strategies such as clinical supervision sessions, training, case studies, protocols and guidance documents, to be included in a clinical supervision in nursing model.

  19. Self-care assessment as an indicator for clinical supervision in nursing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Marlene Monteiro Teixeira

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the needs of clinical supervision for nurses to assess the degree of dependence on self-care and planning of nursing interventions. Methods: analytical study, cross-cutting nature, collecting data from a sample of 110 patients. Results: it was shown the differences in the identification of the degree of dependence between registers and experts, as well as the selection of operations for each self-care and failures to the original assessment of the filling level (no evaluation self-care/no identification of the degree of dependence. Conclusion: there were gaps in the nursing process; they have proposed strategies such as clinical supervision sessions, training, case studies, protocols and guidance documents, to be included in a clinical supervision in nursing model.

  20. Precision nutrition - review of methods for point-of-care assessment of nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Balaji; Lee, Seoho; Erickson, David; Mehta, Saurabh

    2017-04-01

    Precision nutrition encompasses prevention and treatment strategies for optimizing health that consider individual variability in diet, lifestyle, environment and genes by accurately determining an individual's nutritional status. This is particularly important as malnutrition now affects a third of the global population, with most of those affected or their care providers having limited means of determining their nutritional status. Similarly, program implementers often have no way of determining the impact or success of their interventions, thus hindering their scale-up. Exciting new developments in the area of point-of-care diagnostics promise to provide improved access to nutritional status assessment, as a first step towards enabling precision nutrition and tailored interventions at both the individual and community levels. In this review, we focus on the current advances in developing portable diagnostics for assessment of nutritional status at point-of-care, along with the numerous design challenges in this process and potential solutions.

  1. Assessment of a primary and tertiary care integrated management model for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiro Meritxell

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diagnosis and treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in Spain continues to present challenges, and problems are exacerbated when there is a lack of coordinated follow-up between levels of care. This paper sets out the protocol for assessing the impact of an integrated management model for the care of patients with COPD. The new model will be evaluated in terms of 1 improvement in the rational utilization of health-care services and 2 benefits reflected in improved health status and quality of life for patients. Methods/Design A quasi-experimental study of the effectiveness of a COPD management model called COPD PROCESS. The patients in the study cohorts will be residents of neighborhoods served by two referral hospitals in Barcelona, Spain. One area comprises the intervention group (n = 32,248 patients and the other the control group (n = 32,114 patients. The study will include pre- and post-intervention assessment 18 months after the program goes into effect. Analyses will be on two datasets: clinical and administrative data available for all patients, and clinical assessment information for a cohort of 440 patients sampled randomly from the intervention and control areas. The main endpoints will be the hospitalization rates in the two health-care areas and quality-of-life measures in the two cohorts. Discussion The COPD PROCESS model foresees the integrated multidisciplinary management of interventions at different levels of the health-care system through coordinated routine clinical practice. It will put into practice diagnostic and treatment procedures that are based on current evidence, multidisciplinary consensus, and efficient use of available resources. Care pathways in this model are defined in terms of patient characteristics, level of disease severity and the presence or absence of exacerbation. The protocol covers the full range of care from primary prevention to treatment of

  2. Developing a new assessment procedure of social information processing in adolescents within secure residential care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rest, Maaike M.; van Bokhoven, Irene; van Nieuwenhuijzen, Maroesjka; Embregts, Petri J. C. M.; Vriens, Aart; Matthys, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a new assessment procedure of social information processing (SIP) for adolescents, to explore its validity and to examine whether it differentiated between IQ groups. Ninety-four adolescents within secure residential care were administered the SIP inst

  3. Virginia Star Quality Initiative: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Virginia's Star Quality Initiative prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators…

  4. Delaware Stars for Early Success. QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Delaware's Stars for Early Success prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators…

  5. North Carolina Star Rated License System: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of North Carolina's Star Rated License System prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4)…

  6. Kentucky STARS for KIDS NOW: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Kentucky's STARS for KIDS NOW prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators for…

  7. Pennsylvania Keystone STARS: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Pennsylvania's Keystone STARS prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators for…

  8. Caring for children with intellectual disabilities part 2: Detailed analyses of factors involved in respite workers' reported assessment and care decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genik, Lara M; McMurtry, C Meghan; Breau, Lynn M

    2017-02-20

    Respite workers (RW) commonly care for children with intellectual disabilities (ID), and pain is common for these children. Little is known about factors which inform RW pain assessment and management-related decisions.

  9. Development of a Self-Assessment Tool to Facilitate Decision-Making in Choosing a Long Term Care Administration Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johs-Artisensi, Jennifer L.; Olson, Douglas M.; Nahm, Abraham Y.

    2016-01-01

    Long term care administrators need a broad base of knowledge, skills, and interests to provide leadership and be successful in managing a fiscally responsible, quality long term care organization. Researchers developed a tool to help students assess whether a long term care administration major is a compatible fit. With input from professionals in…

  10. Inpatient care of the elderly in Brazil and India: assessing social inequalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channon, Andrew Amos; Andrade, Monica Viegas; Noronha, Kenya; Leone, Tiziana; Dilip, T R

    2012-12-01

    The rapidly growing older adult populations in Brazil and India present major challenges for health systems in these countries, especially with regard to the equitable provision of inpatient care. The objective of this study was to contrast inequalities in both the receipt of inpatient care and the length of time that care was received among adults aged over 60 in two large countries with different modes of health service delivery. Using the Brazilian National Household Survey from 2003 and the Indian National Sample Survey Organisation survey from 2004 inequalities by wealth (measured by income in Brazil and consumption in India) were assessed using concentration curves and indices. Inequalities were also examined through the use of zero-truncated negative binomial models, studying differences in receipt of care and length of stay by region, health insurance, education and reported health status. Results indicated that there was no evidence of inequality in Brazil for both receipt and length of stay by income per capita. However, in India there was a pro-rich bias in the receipt of care, although once care was received there was no difference by consumption per capita for the length of stay. In both countries the higher educated and those with health insurance were more likely to receive care, while the higher educated had longer stays in hospital in Brazil. The health system reforms that have been undertaken in Brazil could be credited as a driver for reducing healthcare inequalities amongst the elderly, while the significant differences by wealth in India shows that reform is still needed to ensure the poor have access to inpatient care. Health reforms that move towards a more public funding model of service delivery in India may reduce inequality in elderly inpatient care in the country.

  11. Foster care assessment: An exploratory study of the placement assessment process in Flanders and the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanderfaeillie, J.; Damen, H.R.; Pijnenburg, H.M.P.H.M.; Bergh, P.M. van den; Holen, F. van

    2016-01-01

    Family foster care placement decision-making has a weak scientific underpinning. The identification of clusters of foster children (groups of foster children with similar characteristics) can help improve decision quality. In this study, we investigated if foster children could indeed be clustered,

  12. Primary care assessment of capillaroscopy abnormalities in patients with Raynaud's phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overbury, Rebecca; Murtaugh, Maureen A; Fischer, Aryeh; Frech, Tracy M

    2015-12-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon is a clinical symptom that can commonly present to a primary care provider or generalist. Proper identification of an underlying connective tissue disease in a patient with Raynaud's could allow for the prevention of possible critical digital ischemia. Capillaroscopy is a tool which can identify abnormalities associated with connective tissue disease. Patients presenting with a complaint of Raynaud's phenomenon were assessed with capillaroscopy. In twenty consecutive Raynaud patients, 8 digits were assessed by a ×200 magnification dermatoscope and an image was obtained. Each image was assessed for the following abnormalities: drop-out (Raynaud's disease. However, formal training is needed to ensure accuracy and reproducibility. Furthermore, training and scoring systems should address time constraints of busy primary care practitioners.

  13. Age-friendly primary health care: an assessment of current service provision for older adults in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Jean; Mak, Benise; Yeung, Fannie

    2013-01-01

    There has been no study evaluating whether primary care services are sufficiently oriented towards the older population in Hong Kong, particularly those with increasing frailty. Since primary care is a key first interface in promotion and maintenance of health in older people, an assessment of the age-friendliness of service provisions is of critical importance in optimizing the health of aging populations. The age-friendliness of primary care services for older people was assessed using focus groups of elderly people and also of service providers who care for them. Discussion content was based on the WHO guidelines for age-friendly primary care in the following areas: Information, education and training, community-based health care management systems, and the physical environment. Desirable improvements were identified in all domains. The findings underscore the need for wider dissemination of health care needs of older people in the primary care setting.

  14. Development and Validation of an Assessment Tool for Competency in Critical Care Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrawalla, Paru; Eisen, Lewis Ari; Shiloh, Ariel; Shah, Brijen J.; Savenkov, Oleksandr; Wise, Wendy; Evans, Laura; Mayo, Paul; Szyld, Demian

    2015-01-01

    Background Point-of-care ultrasound is an emerging technology in critical care medicine. Despite requirements for critical care medicine fellowship programs to demonstrate knowledge and competency in point-of-care ultrasound, tools to guide competency-based training are lacking. Objective We describe the development and validity arguments of a competency assessment tool for critical care ultrasound. Methods A modified Delphi method was used to develop behaviorally anchored checklists for 2 ultrasound applications: “Perform deep venous thrombosis study (DVT)” and “Qualify left ventricular function using parasternal long axis and parasternal short axis views (Echo).” One live rater and 1 video rater evaluated performance of 28 fellows. A second video rater evaluated a subset of 10 fellows. Validity evidence for content, response process, and internal consistency was assessed. Results An expert panel finalized checklists after 2 rounds of a modified Delphi method. The DVT checklist consisted of 13 items, including 1.00 global rating step (GRS). The Echo checklist consisted of 14 items, and included 1.00 GRS for each of 2 views. Interrater reliability evaluated with a Cohen kappa between the live and video rater was 1.00 for the DVT GRS, 0.44 for the PSLA GRS, and 0.58 for the PSSA GRS. Cronbach α was 0.85 for DVT and 0.92 for Echo. Conclusions The findings offer preliminary evidence for the validity of competency assessment tools for 2 applications of critical care ultrasound and data on live versus video raters. PMID:26692968

  15. Measuring non-technical skills in medical emergency care: a review of assessment measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Cooper

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Simon Cooper1, Ruth Endacott2, Robyn Cant11School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Gippsland Campus, Churchill, Victoria, Australia; 2School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth UKAim: To review the literature on non-technical skills and assessment methods relevant to emergency care.Background: Non-technical skills (NTS include leadership, teamwork, decision making and situation awareness, all of which have an impact on healthcare outcomes. Significant concerns have been raised about the rates of adverse medical events, many of which are attributed to NTS failures.Methods: Ovid, Medline, ProQUEST, PsycINFO and specialty websites were searched for NTS measures using applicable access strategies, inclusion and exclusion criteria. Publications identified were assessed for relevance.Results: A range of non-technical skill measures relevant to emergency care was identified: leadership (n = 5, teamwork (n = 7, personality/behavior (n = 3 and situation awareness tools (n = 1. Of these, 9 have been used with emergency care populations/clinicians. All had varying degrees of reliability and validity. In the last decade there has been some development of teamwork measures specific to emergency care with a predominantly global and collective rating of broad skills.Conclusion: A variety of non-technical skill measures are available; only a few have been used in the emergency care arena. There is a need for an increase in the focused assessment of teamwork skills for a greater understanding of team performance to enhance patient safety in medical emergency care.Keywords: non-technical skills, teamwork, medical emergency, standards

  16. Personal Care Product Use in Pregnancy and the Postpartum Period: Implications for Exposure Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Carly; Fisher, Mandy; Neisa, Angelica; MacKinnon, Leona; Kuchta, Sandra; MacPherson, Susan; Probert, Adam; Arbuckle, Tye E

    2016-01-06

    Concern regarding the potential for developmental health risks associated with certain chemicals (e.g., phthalates, antibacterials) used in personal care products is well documented; however, current exposure data for pregnant women are limited. The objective of this study was to describe the pattern of personal care product use in pregnancy and the post-partum period. Usage patterns of personal care products were collected at six different time points during pregnancy and once in the postpartum period for a cohort of 80 pregnant women in Ottawa, Canada. The pattern of use was then described and groups of personal care product groups commonly used together were identified using hierarchical cluster analysis. The results showed that product use varied by income and country of birth. General hygiene products were the most commonly used products and were consistently used over time while cosmetic product use declined with advancing pregnancy and post-delivery. Hand soaps and baby products were reported as used more frequently after birth. This study is the first to track personal care product use across pregnancy and into the postpartum period, and suggests that pregnant populations may be a unique group of personal care product users. This information will be useful for exposure assessments.

  17. Assessment of access to primary health care among children and adolescents hospitalized due to avoidable conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Scoleze Ferrer

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (HACSC are considered an indicator of the effectiveness of primary health care (PHC. High rates of HACSC represent problems in the access or the quality of health care. In Brazil, HACSC rates are high and there are few studies on the factors associated with it. Objective: To evaluate the access to PHC offered to children and adolescents hospitalized due to ACSC and analyze the conditioning factors. Method: Cross-sectional study with a quantitative and qualitative approach. Five hundred and one (501 users (guardians/caregivers and 42 professionals of PHC units were interviewed over one year. Quantitative data were obtained using Primary Care Assessment Tool validated in Brazil (PCATool-Brazil, while qualitative data were collected by semi-structured interview. The independent variables were: age, maternal education, family income, type of diagnosis, and model of care offered, and the dependent variables were access and its components (accessibility and use of services. Results: Sixty-five percent (65.2% of hospitalizations were ACSC. From the perspective of both users and professionals, access and its components presented low scores. Age, type of diagnosis, and model of care affected the results. Conclusion: The proportion of HACSC was high in this population. Access to services is inappropriate due to: barriers to access, appreciation of the emergency services, and attitude towards health needs. Professional attitudes and opinions reinforce inadequate ideas of users reflecting on the pattern of service use.

  18. Quality assessment of diagnosis and antibiotic treatment of infectious diseases in primary care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saust, Laura Trolle; Monrad, Rikke Nygaard; Hansen, Malene Plejdrup;

    2016-01-01

    for diagnosis and antibiotic use in patients with infectious diseases in primary care. We extracted information about (1) type of infection; (2) target for quality assessment; (3) methodology used for developing the QIs; and (4) whether the QIs were developed for a national or international application. The QIs......OBJECTIVE: To identify existing quality indicators (QIs) for diagnosis and antibiotic treatment of patients with infectious diseases in primary care. DESIGN: A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed and EMBASE. We included studies with a description of the development of QIs...

  19. Assessment of Financial Burden as a Standard of Care in Pediatric Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Wendy; Bona, Kira

    2015-12-01

    Family financial hardship has emerged as a burden of pediatric cancer treatment with negative implications for family well-being. As part of an extensive project to create evidence-based standards for the psychosocial care of children with cancer, we performed a literature review of pediatric cancer-associated financial hardship utilizing six databases, and identified 24 publications for incorporation into this review. Financial hardship during childhood cancer was found to affect a significant proportion of the population and to negatively impact family well-being. Existing literature supports a strong recommendation for assessment of financial hardship as a component of comprehensive psychosocial care in pediatric oncology.

  20. Assessing Medication Adherence as a Standard of Care in Pediatric Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Ahna L H; McGrady, Meghan E

    2015-12-01

    Poor adherence to pediatric cancer treatment protocols may prevent children and adolescents from realizing the potential benefits of therapy. This paper presents the evidence for a standard of care for supporting medication adherence. Databases were reviewed for articles examining adherence and including children and/or adolescents with cancer. Fourteen articles (i.e., qualitative, quantitative, review, and randomized clinical trials) were evaluated for rigor. There is moderate-quality evidence to support a strong recommendation for adherence to be assessed routinely and monitored throughout the treatment. Integrating the proposed clinical procedures into standard clinical care may improve outcomes for children and adolescents with cancer.

  1. Structural violence and simplified paternalistic ideas of patient empowerment decreases health care access, quality & outcome for ethnic minority patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sodemann, Morten

    Increasing complexity of health care organization, rapid hyperspecialization of medical care, lack of ’patient literacy’ and pressure on patients to take over responsibility, challenges political dreams of equal access to patient centered high quality secure care....

  2. Model documentation of assessment and nursing diagnosis in the practice of nursing care management for nursing students

    OpenAIRE

    A. Aziz Alimul Hidayat; M. Kes

    2015-01-01

    Model documentation of assessment and nursing diagnosis in the practice of nursing care management is an integration model in nursing care records, especially records nursing assessment and diagnosis in one format. This model can reduce the duration of the recording in nursing care, and make it easier for students to understand the nursing diagnosis, so that nursing interventions more effective. The purpose of this paper was to describes the form integration documentation of nursing assessmen...

  3. Patient-centered financial incentives for health: Can employers get change for their dollars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullgren, Jeffrey T; Williams, Geoffrey C; An, Lawrence C

    2013-12-01

    While employer-sponsored financial incentives for healthy behaviors have demonstrated the potential to promote short-term employee behavior change, the effectiveness of such incentives in promoting long-term health behavior change has often been disappointing. This paucity of sustained change could be explained by the many factors that shape employees' health behaviors, only some of which may be influenced by incentives. We discuss how employer-sponsored incentives for healthy behaviors could become more patient-centered, and thus perhaps more effective, by integrating insights from self-determination theory and health behavior theories, targeting employees' capacity for change, and using tailoring.

  4. Getting on with your computer is associated with job satisfaction in primary care: entrants to primary care should be assessed for their competency with electronic patient record systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lusignan, Simon; Pearce, Christopher; Munro, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Job satisfaction in primary care is associated with getting on with your computer. Many primary care professionals spend longer interacting with their computer than anything else in their day. However, the computer often makes demands rather than be an aid or supporter that has learned its user's preferences. The use of electronic patient record (EPR) systems is underrepresented in the assessment of entrants to primary care, and in definitions of the core competencies of a family physician/general practitioner. We call for this to be put right: for the use of the EPR to support direct patient care and clinical governance to be given greater prominence in training and assessment. In parallel, policy makers should ensure that the EPR system use is orientated to ensuring patients receive evidence-based care, and EPR system suppliers should explore how their systems might better support their clinician users, in particular learning their preferences.

  5. Development and evaluation of a patient centered cardiovascular health education program for insured patients in rural Nigeria (QUICK-II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.O. Odusola; M. Hendriks; C. Schultsz; K. Stronks; J. Lange; A. Osibogun; T. Akande; S. Alli; P. Adenusi; K. Agbede; J. Haafkens

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Sub Saharan Africa, the incidence of hypertension and other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors is growing rapidly. Poor adherence to prescribed prevention and treatment regimens by patients can compromise treatment outcomes. Patient-centered cardiovascular health education is like

  6. Advancing user experience research to facilitate and enable patient-centered research: current state and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Philip R O

    2013-01-01

    Human-computer interaction and related areas of user experience (UX) research, such as human factors, workflow evaluation, and data visualization, are thus essential to presenting data in ways that can further the analysis of complex data sets such as those used in patient-centered research. However, a review of available data on the state of UX research as it relates to patient-centered research demonstrates a significant underinvestment and consequently a large gap in knowledge generation. In response, this report explores trends in funding and research productivity focused on UX and patient-centered research and then presents a set of recommendations to advance innovation at this important intersection point. Ultimately, the aim is to catalyze a community-wide dialogue concerning future directions for research and innovation in UX as it applies to patient-centered research.

  7. Music therapy for the Assessment of Parental Competencies for Children in need of Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine; Wigram, Tony

    2007-01-01

    using the autonomy profile of the Improvisation Assessment Profiles. Results demonstrate the strengths, weaknesses, and potential in the parent, and quantifiable observed musical events in the gradients of autonomy provide evidence of positive and/or negative interactional behaviour. The therapist has......The assessment for parenting competencies for parents of children potentially in need of care involves an evaluation of their relationship with their child, and the interaction that underpins that relationship. The "Assessment of Parenting Competences" (APC) music therapy assessment provides...... a structured series of interactional exercises that allow the therapist to explore the nature of the relationship both as a tool in every day clinical work and as a research method. The method of the assessment involves free improvisation, turn-taking exercises, and following leading exercises and is evaluated...

  8. Complex health care interventions: Characteristics relevant for ethical analysis in health technology assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysdahl, Kristin Bakke; Hofmann, Bjørn

    2016-01-01

    Complexity entails methodological challenges in assessing health care interventions. In order to address these challenges, a series of characteristics of complexity have been identified in the Health Technology Assessment (HTA) literature. These characteristics are primarily identified and developed to facilitate effectiveness, safety, and cost-effectiveness analysis. However, ethics is also a constitutive part of HTA, and it is not given that the conceptions of complexity that appears relevant for effectiveness, safety, and cost-effectiveness analysis are also relevant and directly applicable for ethical analysis in HTA. The objective of this article is therefore to identify and elaborate a set of key characteristics of complex health care interventions relevant for addressing ethical aspects in HTA. We start by investigating the relevance of the characteristics of complex interventions, as defined in the HTA literature. Most aspects of complexity found to be important when assessing effectiveness, safety, and efficiency turn out also to be relevant when assessing ethical issues of a given health technology. However, the importance and relevance of the complexity characteristics may differ when addressing ethical issues rather than effectiveness. Moreover, the moral challenges of a health care intervention may themselves contribute to the complexity. After identifying and analysing existing conceptions of complexity, we synthesise a set of five key characteristics of complexity for addressing ethical aspects in HTA: 1) multiple and changing perspectives, 2) indeterminate phenomena, 3) uncertain causality, 4) unpredictable outcome, and 5) ethical complexity. This may serve as an analytic tool in addressing ethical issues in HTA of complex interventions.

  9. Content Validity for a Child Care Self-assessment Tool: Creating Healthy Eating Environments Scale (CHEERS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafave, Lynne; Tyminski, Sheila; Riege, Theresa; Hoy, Diane; Dexter, Bria

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop and content validate both a formative and summative self-assessment scale designed to measure the nutrition and physical activity environment in community-based child care programs. The study followed a mixed-method modified Ebel procedure. An expert group with qualifications in nutrition, physical activity, and child care were recruited for content validation. The survey was subjected to expert review through digital communication followed by a face-to-face validation meeting. To establish consensus for content validity beyond the standard error of proportion (P healthy eating program planning, healthy eating environment, physical activity environment, and healthy body image environment. Content validation is an integral step in scale development that is often overlooked or poorly carried out. Initial content validity of this scale has been established and will be of value to researchers and practitioners interested in conducting healthy eating interventions in child care.

  10. Stakeholders' Perceptions About a Newly Established Dental School with a Problem-Based, Student-Led, Patient-Centered Curriculum: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Kamran; Tredwin, Christopher; Kay, Elizabeth; Slade, Anita

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of stakeholders regarding a newly established dental school with a problem-based, student-led, patient-centered curriculum in a community setting. Qualitative methods using 16 semistructured interviews and two focus groups were used to engage a range of stakeholders from students to faculty members to practitioners. Purposive sampling was employed with participants contacted through professional channels. Interview and focus group transcripts were transcribed verbatim. The data were analyzed thematically using an inductive approach. Themes related to preparedness of dental graduates were identified during data analyses. Early clinical exposure with patients in the first year of the course, holistic care using a patient-centered approach, and the acquisition of communication skills, professionalism, team-working skills, reflective practice, and evidence-informed clinical practice were perceived to be key strengths of the curriculum. The participants also expressed the need to strengthen teaching of life sciences and provide additional clinical experience in simulated general dental practice clinics. This study provides insight into the perceptions of a wide range of stakeholders and provides a deeper understanding of the merits and challenges of an innovative undergraduate dental curriculum.

  11. Development of a questionnaire to assess interprofessional collaboration between two different care levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Nuño Solinís

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This paper reports the development and validation of a questionnaire to assess collaboration between clinical professionals from two different care levels (primary and specialised care, according to the clinicians' own perceptions. This questionnaire has been elaborated to be used as part of the monitoring and evaluation process of the integrated care pilots in the public Basque Health Service.Methods. The process was carried out in four phases: development of the first version of the questionnaire, validation of the content, pre-testing, and evaluation of its construct validity and homogeneity in a sample of doctors and nurses. This last phase involved confirmatory factor analysis, as well as the calculation of Cronbach's α and various correlation coefficients.Results. The process demonstrated that the theoretical content of the questionnaire was appropriate, and also that its items were clear, relevant and intelligible. The fit indices for the confirmatory factor analysis were: c2 of 45.51 (p = 0.089, RMSEA of 0.043, RMR of 0.046, GFI of 0.92 and CFI of 0.99.Discussion. The statistics indicate a good fit between the data and a conceptual two-factor structure, in which both personal relationships between professionals and characteristics of the organisational environment are understood to underlie interprofessional collaboration.Conclusion. The end-product is a new instrument with good validity to assess the degree of interprofessional collaboration between clinicians working at two different levels of care.

  12. Development of a questionnaire to assess interprofessional collaboration between two different care levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Nuño Solinís

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This paper reports the development and validation of a questionnaire to assess collaboration between clinical professionals from two different care levels (primary and specialised care, according to the clinicians' own perceptions. This questionnaire has been elaborated to be used as part of the monitoring and evaluation process of the integrated care pilots in the public Basque Health Service. Methods. The process was carried out in four phases: development of the first version of the questionnaire, validation of the content, pre-testing, and evaluation of its construct validity and homogeneity in a sample of doctors and nurses. This last phase involved confirmatory factor analysis, as well as the calculation of Cronbach's α and various correlation coefficients. Results. The process demonstrated that the theoretical content of the questionnaire was appropriate, and also that its items were clear, relevant and intelligible. The fit indices for the confirmatory factor analysis were: c2 of 45.51 (p = 0.089, RMSEA of 0.043, RMR of 0.046, GFI of 0.92 and CFI of 0.99. Discussion. The statistics indicate a good fit between the data and a conceptual two-factor structure, in which both personal relationships between professionals and characteristics of the organisational environment are understood to underlie interprofessional collaboration. Conclusion. The end-product is a new instrument with good validity to assess the degree of interprofessional collaboration between clinicians working at two different levels of care.

  13. Instrument for assessing the quality of mobile emergency pre-hospital care: content validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Assis Neves Dantas

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES To validate an instrument to assess quality of mobile emergency pre-hospital care. METHOD A methodological study where 20 professionals gave their opinions on the items of the proposed instrument. The analysis was performed using Kappa test (K and Content Validity Index (CVI, considering K> 0.80 and CVI ≥ 0.80. RESULTS Three items were excluded from the instrument: Professional Compensation; Job Satisfaction and Services Performed. Items that obtained adequate K and CVI indexes and remained in the instrument were: ambulance conservation status; physical structure; comfort in the ambulance; availability of material resources; user/staff safety; continuous learning; safety demonstrated by the team; access; welcoming; humanization; response time; costumer privacy; guidelines on care; relationship between professionals and costumers; opportunity for costumers to make complaints and multiprofessional conjunction/actuation. CONCLUSION The instrument to assess quality of care has been validated and may contribute to the evaluation of pre-hospital care in mobile emergency services.

  14. Assessment and implementation of spirituality and religiosity in cancer care: effects on patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Penny

    2012-08-01

    Spirituality and religiosity have been defined by several governing bodies to mean everything from purpose in life, beliefs, faith, and hope, to transcendence with a higher being. The absence of uniformity regarding the components of spirituality and religiosity has created a barrier for professional caregivers in identifying, assessing, and providing spiritual needs. The diagnosis of cancer often leads patients to contemplate their own mortality and frequently presents unique challenges to their belief system. Spirituality is a unique component of holistic care. When appropriately addressed, it may strongly influence positive patient outcomes during the cancer journey. Consequently, nurses should actively participate in and incorporate the provision of spiritual care into the treatment plan for each patient with cancer or at least be able to assess those needs and make sure they are being addressed.

  15. The development and evaluation of a holistic needs assessment within children's palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Georgina; Berger, Zoe; Maynard, Linda

    2016-05-01

    Caring for a child with a life-limiting condition brings a number of challenges and many families require additional support. The need for services to move away from a 'one size fits all' approach to a personalised care planning approach is well recognised, as is the value of establishing a robust way of assessing family members' differing needs. A number of assessment tools that consider individuals' holistic needs already exist. These are predominantly for the adult cancer population and exclude consideration of the child in its system. There was therefore a need to develop a tool that would appropriately meet the needs of children and parents who access services provided by a children's hospice. The tool was evaluated qualitatively. Feedback was positive; the experience of professionals was one of concordance with their ethical stance, improved communication, improved documentation and the wish to embed the tool into daily practice.

  16. Assessing the context of health care utilization in Ecuador: A spatial and multilevel analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Chunhuei

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are few studies that have analyzed the context of health care utilization, particularly in Latin America. This study examines the context of utilization of health services in Ecuador; focusing on the relationship between provision of services and use of both preventive and curative services. Methods This study is cross-sectional and analyzes data from the 2004 National Demographic and Maternal & Child Health dataset. Provider variables come from the Ecuadorian System of Social Indicators (SIISE. Global Moran's I statistic is used to assess spatial autocorrelation of the provider variables. Multilevel modeling is used for the simultaneous analysis of provision of services at the province-level with use of services at the individual level. Results Spatial analysis indicates no significant differences in the density of health care providers among Ecuadorian provinces. After adjusting for various predisposing, enabling, need factors and interaction terms, density of public practice health personnel was positively associated with use of preventive care, particularly among rural households. On the other hand, density of private practice physicians was positively associated with use of curative care, particularly among urban households. Conclusions There are significant public/private, urban/rural gaps in provision of services in Ecuador; which in turn affect people's use of services. It is necessary to strengthen the public health care delivery system (which includes addressing distribution of health workers and national health information systems. These efforts could improve access to health care, and inform the civil society and policymakers on the advances of health care reform.

  17. Meeting the need for safe abortion care in Ethiopia: results of a national assessment in 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdella, Ahmed; Fetters, Tamara; Benson, Janie; Pearson, Erin; Gebrehiwot, Yirgu; Andersen, Kathryn; Gebreselassie, Hailemichael; Tesfaye, Solomon

    2013-01-01

    Complications of an unsafe abortion are a major contributor to maternal deaths and morbidity in Africa. When abortions are performed in safe environments, such complications are almost all preventable. This paper reports results from a nationally representative health facility study conducted in Ethiopia in 2008. The safe abortion care (SAC) model, a monitoring approach to assess the amount, distribution, use and quality of abortion services, provided a framework. Data collection included key informant interviews with 335 health care providers, prospective data on 8911 women seeking treatment for abortion complications or induced abortion and review of facility logbooks. Although the existing hospitals perform most basic abortion care functions, the number of facilities providing basic and comprehensive abortion care for the population size fell far short of the recommended levels. Almost one-half (48%) of women treated for obstetric complications in the facilities had abortion complications. The use of appropriate abortion technologies in the first trimester and the provision of post-abortion contraception overall were reasonably strong, especially in private sector facilities. Following abortion law reform in 2005 and subsequent service expansion and improvements, Ethiopia remains committed to reducing complications from an unsafe abortion. This study provides the first national snapshot to measure changes in a dynamic abortion care environment.

  18. Validation of a New Instrument for Self-Assessment of Nurses’ Core Competencies in Palliative Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari Slåtten

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Competence can be seen as a prerequisite for high quality nursing in clinical settings. Few research studies have focused on nurses’ core competencies in clinical palliative care and few measurement tools have been developed to explore these core competencies. The purpose of this study was to test and validate the nurses’ core competence in palliative care (NCPC instrument. A total of 122 clinical nurse specialists who had completed a postbachelor program in palliative care at two university colleges in Norway answered the questionnaire. The initial analysis, with structural equation modelling, was run in Mplus 7. A modified confirmatory factor analysis revealed the following five domains: knowledge in symptom management, systematic use of the Edmonton symptom assessment system, teamwork skills, interpersonal skills, and life closure skills. The actual instrument needs to be tested in a practice setting with a larger sample to confirm its usefulness. The instrument has the potential to be used to refine clinical competence in palliative care and be used for the training and evaluation of palliative care nurses.

  19. Validation of a new instrument for self-assessment of nurses' core competencies in palliative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slåtten, Kari; Hatlevik, Ove; Fagerström, Lisbeth

    2014-01-01

    Competence can be seen as a prerequisite for high quality nursing in clinical settings. Few research studies have focused on nurses' core competencies in clinical palliative care and few measurement tools have been developed to explore these core competencies. The purpose of this study was to test and validate the nurses' core competence in palliative care (NCPC) instrument. A total of 122 clinical nurse specialists who had completed a postbachelor program in palliative care at two university colleges in Norway answered the questionnaire. The initial analysis, with structural equation modelling, was run in Mplus 7. A modified confirmatory factor analysis revealed the following five domains: knowledge in symptom management, systematic use of the Edmonton symptom assessment system, teamwork skills, interpersonal skills, and life closure skills. The actual instrument needs to be tested in a practice setting with a larger sample to confirm its usefulness. The instrument has the potential to be used to refine clinical competence in palliative care and be used for the training and evaluation of palliative care nurses.

  20. Validation of the Dementia Care Assessment Packet-Instrumental Activities of Daily Living

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seok Bum; Park, Jeong Ran; Yoo, Jeong-Hwa; Park, Joon Hyuk; Lee, Jung Jae; Yoon, Jong Chul; Jhoo, Jin Hyeong; Lee, Dong Young; Woo, Jong Inn; Han, Ji Won; Huh, Yoonseok; Kim, Tae Hui; Kim, Ki Woong

    2013-01-01

    Objective We aimed to evaluate the psychometric properties of the IADL measure included in the Dementia Care Assessment Packet (DCAP-IADL) in dementia patients. Methods The study involved 112 dementia patients and 546 controls. The DCAP-IADL was scored in two ways: observed score (OS) and predicted score (PS). The reliability of the DCAP-IADL was evaluated by testing its internal consistency, inter-rater reliability and test-retest reliability. Discriminant validity was evaluated by comparing...

  1. Assessment of Patient Safety Culture in Primary Health Care Settings in Kuwait

    OpenAIRE

    Maha Mohamed Ghobashi; Hanan Abdel Ghani El-ragehy; Hanan Mosleh Ibrahim; Fatma Abdullah Al-Doseri

    2014-01-01

    Background Patient safety is critical component of health care quality. We aimed to assess the awareness of primary healthcare staff members about patient safety culture and explore the areas of deficiency and opportunities for improvement concerning this issue.Methods: This descriptive cross sectional study surveyed 369 staff members in four primary healthcare centers in Kuwait using self-administered “Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture” adopted questionnaire. The total number of resp...

  2. Pulmonary Edema Assessed by Ultrasound: Impact in Cardiology and Intensive Care Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Pablo A; Cianciulli, Tomás F

    2016-05-01

    Pulmonary edema is a frequent condition found in adult patients hospitalized in cardiology wards and intensive care units. Ultrasonography is a diagnostic modality with a high sensitivity for the detection of extravascular lung water, visualized as B lines, and usually caused by cardiogenic or noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. This paper highlights a simple method for the assessment of patients with pulmonary edema, which allows for a differential diagnosis of its possible mechanism and contributes to therapeutic intervention guiding and monitoring.

  3. An approach to sexuality from primary care nursing, what to assess?

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Figueroa-Martín; Gonzalo Duarte-Clíments; María Begoña Sánchez-Gómez; Pedro Ruyman Brito-Brito

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzes the content validity and criterion of different parts of the interview relationed with the sexuality pattern and studies the clinimetric and psychometric characteristics of the selected instruments in the review of literature -scoping review-.. By the inclusions criteria, 28 items have been selected; of which seven questionnaires assess sexuality in women and men. The contribution of this study to nursing care is to provide suitable tools for valuation of sexuality, raisin...

  4. Assessment of Sedation and Analgesia in Mechanically Ventilated Patients in Intensive Care Unit

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Post traumatic stress resulting from an intensive care unit(ICU) stay may be prevented by adequate level of sedation and analgesia. Aims of the study were reviewing the current practices of sedation and analgesia in our ICU setup and to assess level of sedation and analgesia to know the requirement of sedative and analgesics in mechani-cally ventilated ICU patients. This prospective observational study was conducted on 50 consecutive mechanically ventilated patients in ICU over a period of 6 ...

  5. Patient-Centered Robot-Aided Passive Neurorehabilitation Exercise Based on Safety-Motion Decision-Making Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Suolin; Yu, Zhuqing

    2017-01-01

    Safety is one of the crucial issues for robot-aided neurorehabilitation exercise. When it comes to the passive rehabilitation training for stroke patients, the existing control strategies are usually just based on position control to carry out the training, and the patient is out of the controller. However, to some extent, the patient should be taken as a “cooperator” of the training activity, and the movement speed and range of the training movement should be dynamically regulated according to the internal or external state of the subject, just as what the therapist does in clinical therapy. This research presents a novel motion control strategy for patient-centered robot-aided passive neurorehabilitation exercise from the point of the safety. The safety-motion decision-making mechanism is developed to online observe and assess the physical state of training impaired-limb and motion performances and regulate the training parameters (motion speed and training rage), ensuring the safety of the supplied rehabilitation exercise. Meanwhile, position-based impedance control is employed to realize the trajectory tracking motion with interactive compliance. Functional experiments and clinical experiments are investigated with a healthy adult and four recruited stroke patients, respectively. The two types of experimental results demonstrate that the suggested control strategy not only serves with safety-motion training but also presents rehabilitation efficacy. PMID:28194413

  6. Patient-Centered Robot-Aided Passive Neurorehabilitation Exercise Based on Safety-Motion Decision-Making Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizheng Pan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Safety is one of the crucial issues for robot-aided neurorehabilitation exercise. When it comes to the passive rehabilitation training for stroke patients, the existing control strategies are usually just based on position control to carry out the training, and the patient is out of the controller. However, to some extent, the patient should be taken as a “cooperator” of the training activity, and the movement speed and range of the training movement should be dynamically regulated according to the internal or external state of the subject, just as what the therapist does in clinical therapy. This research presents a novel motion control strategy for patient-centered robot-aided passive neurorehabilitation exercise from the point of the safety. The safety-motion decision-making mechanism is developed to online observe and assess the physical state of training impaired-limb and motion performances and regulate the training parameters (motion speed and training rage, ensuring the safety of the supplied rehabilitation exercise. Meanwhile, position-based impedance control is employed to realize the trajectory tracking motion with interactive compliance. Functional experiments and clinical experiments are investigated with a healthy adult and four recruited stroke patients, respectively. The two types of experimental results demonstrate that the suggested control strategy not only serves with safety-motion training but also presents rehabilitation efficacy.

  7. An approach to sexuality from primary care nursing, what to assess?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Figueroa-Martín

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the content validity and criterion of different parts of the interview relationed with the sexuality pattern and studies the clinimetric and psychometric characteristics of the selected instruments in the review of literature -scoping review-.. By the inclusions criteria, 28 items have been selected; of which seven questionnaires assess sexuality in women and men. The contribution of this study to nursing care is to provide suitable tools for valuation of sexuality, raising awareness on the need to conclude in important areas of exploration and develop effective tools for the assessment of this pattern in children, adolescents and elderly.

  8. Assessment of disease profiles and drug prescribing patterns of health care facilities in Edo State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehijie F.O. Enato

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have systematically characterized drug-prescribing patterns, particularly at the primary care level in Nigeria, a country disproportionately burdened with disease. The aim of this study was to assess the disease profiles and drug-prescribing pattern in two health care facilities in Edo State, Nigeria. The medical records of 495 patients who attended a primary or secondary health care facility in Owan-East Local Government Area of Edo State, Nigeria, between June and November 2009 were reviewed. Disease profiles and drug prescribing patterns were assessed. Data were analyzed based on the World Health Organization Anatomic Therapeutic Chemical classification system, and core drug prescribing indicators. Five hundred and twelve clinical conditions were identified. Infectious disease was most prevalent (38.3%, followed by disorder of the alimentary tract (16.4%. Malaria was responsible for 55.6% of the infectious diseases seen, and 21.3% (109/512 of the total clinical conditions managed at the two health facilities during the study period. Consequently, anti-infective medications were the most frequently prescribed medicines (21.5%, followed by vitamins (18.2%. Use of artesunate monotherapy at both facilities (15.7%, and chloroquine at the primary health facility (24.9% were common. Paracetamol (41.8% and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (24.9% were the most frequently used analgesic/antipyretic. At the primary health care facility, dipyrone was used in 21.6% of cases. The core drug prescribing use indicators showed inappropriate prescribing, indicating poly-pharmacy, overuse of antibiotics and injectio. Inappropriate drug use patterns were identified at both health care facilities, especially with regard to the use of ineffective antimalarial drugs and the use of dipyrone.

  9. Using a multi-method, user centred, prospective hazard analysis to assess care quality and patient safety in a care pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Escoto Kamisha

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Care pathways can be complex, often involving multiple care providers and as such are recognised as containing multiple opportunities for error. Prospective hazard analysis methods may be useful for evaluating care provided across primary and secondary care pathway boundaries. These methods take into account the views of users (staff and patients when determining where potential hazards may lie. The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of prospective hazard analysis methods when assessing quality and safety in care pathways that lie across primary and secondary care boundaries. Methods Development of a process map of the care pathway for patients entering into a Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD supported discharge programme. Triangulation of information from: care process mapping, semi-structured interviews with COPD patients, semi-structured interviews with COPD staff, two round modified Delphi study and review of prioritised quality and safety challenges by health care staff. Results Interview themes emerged under the headings of quality of care and patient safety. Quality and safety concerns were mostly raised in relation to communication, for example, communication with other hospital teams. The three highest ranked safety concerns from the modified Delphi review were: difficulties in accessing hospital records, information transfer to primary care and failure to communicate medication changes to primary care. Conclusion This study has demonstrated the feasibility of using mixed methods to review the quality and safety of care in a care pathway. By using multiple research methods it was possible to get a clear picture of service quality variations and also to demonstrate which points in the care pathway had real potential for patient safety incidents or system failures to occur. By using these methods to analyse one condition specific care pathway it was possible to uncover a number of hospital

  10. Patient-Centered Communication: Exploring the Dentist's Role in the Era of e-Patients and Health 2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Brittany; Yang, Helen; Getman, Rebekah; Barrow, Jane; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2016-06-01

    In today's digital era, people are increasingly relying on the Internet-including social media-to access health information and inform their health decisions. This article describes an exploratory initiative to better understand and define the role of dentists in patient education in the context of e-patients and Health 2.0. This initiative consisted of four phases. In Phase I, an interdisciplinary expert advisory committee was assembled for a roundtable discussion about patients' health information-seeking behaviors online. In Phase II, a pilot case study was conducted, with methods and analysis informed by Phase I recommendations. Phase III consisted of a debriefing conference to outline future areas of research on modernizing health communication strategies. In Phase IV, the findings and working theories were presented to 75 dental students, who then took a survey regarding their perspectives with the objective of guiding potential curriculum design for predoctoral courses. The results of the survey showed that the validity of online content was often secondary to the strength of the network sharing it and that advocacy online could be more effective if it allowed for emotional connections with peers rather than preserving accuracy of the information. Students expressed high interest in learning how to harness modern health communications in their clinical care since the role of the dentist is evolving from giving information to giving personalized guidance against the backdrop of an often contradictory modern information environment. The authors recommend that the dental profession develop patient-centered health communication training for predoctoral students and professional development and continuing education for practicing professionals.

  11. Assessing socioeconomic health care utilization inequity in Israel: impact of alternative approaches to morbidity adjustment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balicer Ran D

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background The ability to accurately detect differential resource use between persons of different socioeconomic status relies on the accuracy of health-needs adjustment measures. This study tests different approaches to morbidity adjustment in explanation of health care utilization inequity. Methods A representative sample was selected of 10 percent (~270,000 adult enrolees of Clalit Health Services, Israel's largest health care organization. The Johns-Hopkins University Adjusted Clinical Groups® were used to assess each person's overall morbidity burden based on one year's (2009 diagnostic information. The odds of above average health care resource use (primary care visits, specialty visits, diagnostic tests, or hospitalizations were tested using multivariate logistic regression models, separately adjusting for levels of health-need using data on age and gender, comorbidity (using the Charlson Comorbidity Index, or morbidity burden (using the Adjusted Clinical Groups. Model fit was assessed using tests of the Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristics Curve and the Akaike Information Criteria. Results Low socioeconomic status was associated with higher morbidity burden (1.5-fold difference. Adjusting for health needs using age and gender or the Charlson index, persons of low socioeconomic status had greater odds of above average resource use for all types of services examined (primary care and specialist visits, diagnostic tests, or hospitalizations. In contrast, after adjustment for overall morbidity burden (using Adjusted Clinical Groups, low socioeconomic status was no longer associated with greater odds of specialty care or diagnostic tests (OR: 0.95, CI: 0.94-0.99; and OR: 0.91, CI: 0.86-0.96, for specialty visits and diagnostic respectively. Tests of model fit showed that adjustment using the comprehensive morbidity burden measure provided a better fit than age and gender or the Charlson Index. Conclusions Identification of

  12. Balanced Scorecards As a Tool for Developing Patient-Centered Pharmacy Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enwere, Emmanuel N.; Keating, Ellen A.; Weber, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Having accurate data is essential for the pharmacy director to manage the department and develop patient-centered pharmacy services. A balanced scorecard (BSC) of essential department data, which is a broad view of a department’s function beyond its financial performance, is an important part of any department’s strategic plan. This column describes how the pharmacy director builds and promotes a department’s BSC. Specifically, this article reviews how the BSC supports the department’s mission and vision, describes the metrics of the BSC and how they are collected, and recommends how the pharmacy director can effectively use the scorecard results in promoting the pharmacy. If designed properly and updated consistently, a BSC can present a broad view of the pharmacy’s performance, serve as a guide for strategic decision making, and improve on the quality of its services. PMID:24958976

  13. Balanced scorecards as a tool for developing patient-centered pharmacy services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enwere, Emmanuel N; Keating, Ellen A; Weber, Robert J

    2014-06-01

    Having accurate data is essential for the pharmacy director to manage the department and develop patient-centered pharmacy services. A balanced scorecard (BSC) of essential department data, which is a broad view of a department's function beyond its financial performance, is an important part of any department's strategic plan. This column describes how the pharmacy director builds and promotes a department's BSC. Specifically, this article reviews how the BSC supports the department's mission and vision, describes the metrics of the BSC and how they are collected, and recommends how the pharmacy director can effectively use the scorecard results in promoting the pharmacy. If designed properly and updated consistently, a BSC can present a broad view of the pharmacy's performance, serve as a guide for strategic decision making, and improve on the quality of its services.

  14. Putting patients first: a novel patient-centered model for medical enterprise success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Naveen

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces a new way of viewing patient-customers. It encourages a greater emphasis on patients' needs and the importance of considering dimensions of the patient experience to better serve them. It also draws from examples in the general business world as they can be applied to medical enterprises. The author introduces a model that directs all business activities toward the end consumer with an underlying guidance by patient needs. A business is advised to understand its customer, design a patient-directed vision, and focus on creating a unique customer experience. The article delineates key action items for physicians and administrators that will allow them to better meet their patient-customers' needs and develop loyalty. By practicing a patient-centered approach and following these guidelines, one may ensure greater success of the medical enterprise.

  15. Opportunities for quality improvement in bereavement care at a children's hospital: assessment of interdisciplinary staff perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contro, Nancy; Sourkes, Barbara M

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the current state of bereavement care at a university-based children's hospital from the perspective of the interdisciplinary staff. In all, 60 staff members from multiple disciplines participated in in-depth interviews. In at least two-thirds of the interviews, issues related to the bereavement experience of both staff and families emerged and were consistently identified. Themes included: disparities in bereavement care based on relationship factors; logistics of time and space; geographical distances; the different cultures and languages of families; continuity in family follow-up; needs of siblings and other family members; staff communication, cooperation, and care coordination; staff suffering; and education, mentoring, and support for staff. This evidence-based needs assessment furnishes an empirical basis for the design and implementation of bereavement services for both families and staff. It can serve as a template for evaluation at other children's hospitals and thus contribute to the sound and creative development of the field of pediatric palliative care.

  16. Psychometric performance of an assessment scale for strain in nursing care: The M-NCAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleinman Leah

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple instruments exist to measure dementia behaviors, but the nursing staff perspective on those behaviors and their level of burden has not been well measured. The goal of this study was to examine the psychometric performance of the Modified Nursing Care Assessment Scale (M-NCAS, a 28-item nurse rating of burden associated with care for institutionalized individuals with dementia. Nurses rate items in terms of extent to which the behavior or characteristic is present ("attitude" domain, and extent to which it is a burden ("strain" domain. Methods Data from 282 patients enrolled in a 12-week, double-blind, randomized clinical trial comparing risperidone treatment to placebo was used to evaluate M-NCAS item performance, internal consistency reliability, and construct validity. Empirical subscales were identified via exploratory factor analysis (EFA. Results Four poorly-performing items were deleted from further analyses. EFA identified 3 "attitude" subscales and 5 "strain" subscales. Cronbach's alphas were 0.65 and above. Correlation with the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory and the BEHAVE-AD, clinical ratings of dementia behaviors, were low to moderate. Conclusion The M-NCAS provides a valid and reliable means of obtaining care burden ratings from formal caregivers in long-term care, and provides a method for evaluating dementia interventions from the perspective of nursing staff.

  17. [Informal caregivers of elderly people in South Tyrol. A qualitative assessment of home care situation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausserhofer, Dietmar; Mantovan, Franco; Innerhofer, Esther; Götsch, Ingrid; Ploner, Elfriede; Them, Christa

    2009-11-01

    Within the framework of a pilot project in the sanitary district of Bruneck (sanitary establishment of South Tyrol), the concept of care management is being investigated both practically and scientifically for informal caregivers of elderly people in need of care since 2009 the results of the qualitative assessment of the homecare situation. The assessment before the intervention will form the basis for further design and implementation of individual stress-reducing and supportive offers for the informal caregivers. Using a semi structured interview guideline twelve problem-centered interviews with informal caregivers were conducted and analysed according to Mayring's content analysis technique (2007). Informal caregivers are exposed to burdens in social, physical and mental areas. Own resources, family ties and support reduce stress and burdens caused by the homecare situation. The need of individual and continuous support of families and implications for further measures of care management can be deduced from the results. There is a need of support in the areas coping strategies, empowerment and direct stress reduction with regard to the homecare situation through education, training, counselling and the interconnection of social and health services.

  18. Assessment of cost of illness for diabetic patients in South Indian tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leelavathi D Acharya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The impact of diabetes on health-care expenditures has been increasingly recognized. To formulate an effective health planning and resource allocation, it is important to determine economic burden. Objective: The objective of this study is to assess the cost of illness (COI for diabetic inpatients with or without complications. Methodology: The study was conducted in the medicine wards of tertiary care hospital after ethical approval by the Institutional Ethical Committee. A total of 116 each diabetic with or without complications were selected and relevant data were collected using COI questionnaire and data were analyzed using SPSS version 20. Mann–Whitney U test is used to assess the statistical significant difference in the cost of treatment of diabetes alone and with complications'. P ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Total COI includes the cost of treatment, investigation, consultation fee, intervention cost, transportation, days lost due to work, and hospitalization. The median of total COI for diabetic care without any complication was Rs. 22,456.97/- per patient per annum and with complication was Rs. 30,634.45/-. Patients on dialysis had to spend 7.3 times higher, and patients with cardiac intervention had to spend 7.4 times higher than diabetic patients without any complication. Conclusion: Treatment costs were many times higher in patients with complications and with cardiac and renal interventions. Complications in diabetic patients will increase the economic burden to family and also to the society.

  19. E-health readiness assessment: promoting "hope" in the health-care institutions of Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoja, Shariq; Scott, Richard; Gilani, Salman

    2008-01-01

    e-Health readiness refers to the preparedness of health-care institutions to implement programmes that involve use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in provision and management of health services. Level of readiness depends on a number of factors that lead to success or failure of e-health programmes, and thus increase or decrease hope of achieving the desired results. This report presents results from in-depth interviews conducted during a larger study and presents views of managers and health-care providers from various institutions in Pakistan about the usefulness of e-health readiness assessment tools. Participants emphasized the need for implementing e-health programmes in the country, while appreciating the need for readiness assessment tools, and the way these tools could avoid failures related to implementation of e-health programmes. Participants also linked e-health readiness with the process of change management, essential for sustainable implementation of e-health programmes in the health-care institutions of developing countries.

  20. Complex health care interventions: Characteristics relevant for ethical analysis in health technology assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lysdahl, Kristin Bakke

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Complexity entails methodological challenges in assessing health care interventions. In order to address these challenges, a series of characteristics of complexity have been identified in the Health Technology Assessment (HTA literature. These characteristics are primarily identified and developed to facilitate effectiveness, safety, and cost-effectiveness analysis. However, ethics is also a constitutive part of HTA, and it is not given that the conceptions of complexity that appears relevant for effectiveness, safety, and cost-effectiveness analysis are also relevant and directly applicable for ethical analysis in HTA. The objective of this article is therefore to identify and elaborate a set of key characteristics of complex health care interventions relevant for addressing ethical aspects in HTA. We start by investigating the relevance of the characteristics of complex interventions, as defined in the HTA literature. Most aspects of complexity found to be important when assessing effectiveness, safety, and efficiency turn out also to be relevant when assessing ethical issues of a given health technology. However, the importance and relevance of the complexity characteristics may differ when addressing ethical issues rather than effectiveness. Moreover, the moral challenges of a health care intervention may themselves contribute to the complexity. After identifying and analysing existing conceptions of complexity, we synthesise a set of five key characteristics of complexity for addressing ethical aspects in HTA: 1 multiple and changing perspectives, 2 indeterminate phenomena, 3 uncertain causality, 4 unpredictable outcome, and 5 ethical complexity. This may serve as an analytic tool in addressing ethical issues in HTA of complex interventions.

  1. Service quality assessment of workers compensation health care delivery programs in New York using SERVQUAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arunasalam, Mark; Paulson, Albert; Wallace, William

    2003-01-01

    Preferred provider organizations (PPOs) provide healthcare services to an expanding proportion of the U.S. population. This paper presents a programmatic assessment of service quality in the workers' compensation environment using two different models: the PPO program model and the fee-for-service (FFS) payor model. The methodology used here will augment currently available research in workers' compensation, which has been lacking in measuring service quality determinants and assessing programmatic success/failure of managed care type programs. Results indicated that the SERVQUAL tool provided a reliable and valid clinical quality assessment tool that ascertained that PPO marketers should focus on promoting physician outreach (to show empathy) and accessibility (to show reliability) for injured workers.

  2. A Standard Set of Value-Based Patient-Centered Outcomes for Breast Cancer: The International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM) Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Wee Loon; Schouwenburg, Maartje G; van Bommel, Annelotte C M; Stowell, Caleb; Allison, Kim H; Benn, Karen E; Browne, John P; Cooter, Rodney D; Delaney, Geoff P; Duhoux, Francois P; Ganz, Patricia A; Hancock, Patricia; Jagsi, Reshma; Knaul, Felicia M; Knip, Anne M; Koppert, Linetta B; Kuerer, Henry M; McLaughin, Sarah; Mureau, Marc A M; Partridge, Ann H; Reid, Dereesa Purtell; Sheeran, Lisa; Smith, Thomas J; Stoutjesdijk, Mark J; Vrancken Peeters, Marie Jeanne T F D; Wengström, Yvonne; Yip, Cheng-Har; Saunders, Christobel

    2016-12-29

    A major challenge in value-based health care is the lack of standardized health outcomes measurements, hindering optimal monitoring and comparison of the quality of health care across different settings globally. The International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM) assembled a multidisciplinary international working group, comprised of 26 health care providers and patient advocates, to develop a standard set of value-based patient-centered outcomes for breast cancer (BC). The working group convened via 8 teleconferences and completed a follow-up survey after each meeting. A modified 2-round Delphi method was used to achieve consensus on the outcomes and case-mix variables to be included. Patient focus group meetings (8 early or metastatic BC patients) and online anonymized surveys of 1225 multinational BC patients and survivors were also conducted to obtain patients' input. The standard set encompasses survival and cancer control, and disutility of care (eg, acute treatment complications) outcomes, to be collected through administrative data and/or clinical records. A combination of multiple patient-reported outcomes measurement (PROM) tools is recommended to capture long-term degree of health outcomes. Selected case-mix factors were recommended to be collected at baseline. The ICHOM will endeavor to achieve wide buy-in of this set and facilitate its implementation in routine clinical practice in various settings and institutions worldwide.

  3. Weight Care Project: Health professionals' attitudes and ability to assess body weight status - Study protocol

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moorhead, Anne

    2011-03-31

    Abstract Background Health professionals working in primary care and public health have opportunities to address body weight status issues with their patients through face-to-face contact. The objectives of this all-Ireland project are: 1. to assess the attitudes, current practices\\/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups on body weight status; 2. to assess the health professional groups\\' ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The health professional groups are: (a) community related public health nurses; (b) school public health nurses; (c) GPs and practice nurses (primary care); and (d) occupational health nurses (workplace) from both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Methods\\/Design This all-Ireland multi-disciplinary project follows a mixed methods approach using both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, and consists of four components: 1. Literature review - to explore the role of health professionals in managing obesity through spontaneous intervention in a variety of health promotion settings. 2. Telephone interviews and focus groups - to gain an in-depth insight into the views of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 3. Survey (primarily online but also paper-based) - to determine the attitudes, current practices\\/behaviours and knowledge of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 4. Online evaluation study - an online interactive programme will be developed to assess health professionals\\' ability to identify the body weight status of adults and children. Discussion This project will assess and report the attitudes, current practices\\/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups within Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland on body weight status, and their ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The results of this project will generate recommendations for clinical practice in managing obesity, which may

  4. Proposals for enhanced health risk assessment and stratification in an integrated care scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueñas-Espín, Ivan; Vela, Emili; Pauws, Steffen; Bescos, Cristina; Cano, Isaac; Cleries, Montserrat; Contel, Joan Carles; de Manuel Keenoy, Esteban; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Gomez-Cabrero, David; Kaye, Rachelle; Lahr, Maarten M H; Lluch-Ariet, Magí; Moharra, Montserrat; Monterde, David; Mora, Joana; Nalin, Marco; Pavlickova, Andrea; Piera, Jordi; Ponce, Sara; Santaeugenia, Sebastià; Schonenberg, Helen; Störk, Stefan; Tegner, Jesper; Velickovski, Filip; Westerteicher, Christoph; Roca, Josep

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Population-based health risk assessment and stratification are considered highly relevant for large-scale implementation of integrated care by facilitating services design and case identification. The principal objective of the study was to analyse five health-risk assessment strategies and health indicators used in the five regions participating in the Advancing Care Coordination and Telehealth Deployment (ACT) programme (http://www.act-programme.eu). The second purpose was to elaborate on strategies toward enhanced health risk predictive modelling in the clinical scenario. Settings The five ACT regions: Scotland (UK), Basque Country (ES), Catalonia (ES), Lombardy (I) and Groningen (NL). Participants Responsible teams for regional data management in the five ACT regions. Primary and secondary outcome measures We characterised and compared risk assessment strategies among ACT regions by analysing operational health risk predictive modelling tools for population-based stratification, as well as available health indicators at regional level. The analysis of the risk assessment tool deployed in Catalonia in 2015 (GMAs, Adjusted Morbidity Groups) was used as a basis to propose how population-based analytics could contribute to clinical risk prediction. Results There was consensus on the need for a population health approach to generate health risk predictive modelling. However, this strategy was fully in place only in two ACT regions: Basque Country and Catalonia. We found marked differences among regions in health risk predictive modelling tools and health indicators, and identified key factors constraining their comparability. The research proposes means to overcome current limitations and the use of population-based health risk prediction for enhanced clinical risk assessment. Conclusions The results indicate the need for further efforts to improve both comparability and flexibility of current population-based health risk predictive modelling approaches

  5. Weight Care Project: Health professionals' attitudes and ability to assess body weight status - Study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy Kathy

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health professionals working in primary care and public health have opportunities to address body weight status issues with their patients through face-to-face contact. The objectives of this all-Ireland project are: 1. to assess the attitudes, current practices/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups on body weight status; 2. to assess the health professional groups' ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The health professional groups are: (a community related public health nurses; (b school public health nurses; (c GPs and practice nurses (primary care; and (d occupational health nurses (workplace from both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Methods/Design This all-Ireland multi-disciplinary project follows a mixed methods approach using both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, and consists of four components: 1. Literature review - to explore the role of health professionals in managing obesity through spontaneous intervention in a variety of health promotion settings. 2. Telephone interviews and focus groups - to gain an in-depth insight into the views of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 3. Survey (primarily online but also paper-based - to determine the attitudes, current practices/behaviours and knowledge of health professionals in assessing body weight status. 4. Online evaluation study - an online interactive programme will be developed to assess health professionals' ability to identify the body weight status of adults and children. Discussion This project will assess and report the attitudes, current practices/behaviours and knowledge of key health professional groups within Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland on body weight status, and their ability to identify body weight status in both adults and children. The results of this project will generate recommendations for clinical practice in managing obesity, which may

  6. Assessment of Pharmacists' Perception of Patient Care Competence and Need for Training in Rural and Urban Areas in North Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David M.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Few studies have examined pharmacists' level of patient care competence and need for continuous professional development in rural areas. Purpose: To assess North Dakota pharmacists' practice setting, perceived level of patient care competencies, and the need for professional development in urban and rural areas. Methods: A survey was…

  7. Primary care units in Emilia-Romagna, Italy: an assessment of organizational culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pracilio, Valerie P; Keith, Scott W; McAna, John; Rossi, Giuseppina; Brianti, Ettore; Fabi, Massimo; Maio, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the organizational culture and associated characteristics of the newly established primary care units (PCUs)-collaborative teams of general practitioners (GPs) who provide patients with integrated health care services-in the Emilia-Romagna Region (RER), Italy. A survey instrument covering 6 cultural dimensions was administered to all 301 GPs in 21 PCUs in the Local Health Authority (LHA) of Parma, RER; the response rate was 79.1%. Management style, organizational trust, and collegiality proved to be more important aspects of PCU organizational culture than information sharing, quality, and cohesiveness. Cultural dimension scores were positively associated with certain characteristics of the PCUs including larger PCU size and greater proportion of older GPs. The presence of female GPs in the PCUs had a negative impact on collegiality, organizational trust, and quality. Feedback collected through this assessment will be useful to the RER and LHAs for evaluating and guiding improvements in the PCUs.

  8. Needs assessment for training in interprofessional skills in Swiss primary care: a Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junod Perron, Noelle; Cerutti, Bernard; Picchiottino, Patricia; Empeyta, Sebastien; Cinter, Francoise; van Gessel, Elisabeth

    2014-05-01

    Despite the importance of appropriate interprofessional collaboration in health care, it is still insufficiently taught in health professions education. The aim of the study was to conduct a needs assessment among health professionals on the themes and skills to be taught during interprofessional education programs in the context of Swiss primary care. A three round Delphi electronic survey was carried out in order to identify priority themes and skills to be included in such a program. Participants comprised 12 categories of health professionals. Seventy-two participated in the first, 41 in the second and 43 in the third round. Patient communication, case management of chronic conditions, therapeutic patient education, health promotion and prevention, ethics and medication were the most important themes identified. The most important skill was regarded as "to define and then share tasks and responsibilities between professionals". Sub-analysis revealed that both priority themes and skills chosen differed between health professional categories.

  9. An instrument for broadened risk assessment in antenatal health care including non-medical issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber Amanda Vos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Growing evidence on the risk contributing role of non-medical factors on pregnancy outcomes urged for a new approach in early antenatal risk selection. The evidence invites to more integration, in particular between the clinical working area and the public health domain. We developed a non-invasive, standardized instrument for comprehensive antenatal risk assessment. The current study presents the application-oriented development of a risk screening instrument for early antenatal detection of risk factors and tailored prevention in an integrated care setting.Methods: A review of published instruments complemented with evidence from cohort studies. Selection and standardization of risk factors associated with small for gestational age, preterm birth, congenital anomalies and perinatal mortality. Risk factors were weighted to obtain a cumulative risk score. Responses were then connected to corresponding care pathways. A cumulative risk threshold was defined, which can be adapted to the population and the availability of preventive facilities. A score above the threshold implies multidisciplinary consultation between caregivers.Results: The resulting digital score card consisted of 70 items, subdivided into four non-medical and two medical domains. Weighing of risk factors was based on existing evidence. Pilot-evidence from a cohort of 218 pregnancies in a multi-practice urban setting showed a cut-off of 16 points would imply 20% of all pregnant women to be assessed in a multidisciplinary setting. A total of 28 care pathways were defined.Conclusion: The resulting score card is a universal risk screening instrument which incorporates recent evidence on non-medical risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes and enables systematic risk management in an integrated antenatal health care setting.

  10. An instrument for broadened risk assessment in antenatal health care including non-medical issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber Amanda Vos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Growing evidence on the risk contributing role of non-medical factors on pregnancy outcomes urged for a new approach in early antenatal risk selection. The evidence invites to more integration, in particular between the clinical working area and the public health domain. We developed a non-invasive, standardized instrument for comprehensive antenatal risk assessment. The current study presents the application-oriented development of a risk screening instrument for early antenatal detection of risk factors and tailored prevention in an integrated care setting. Methods: A review of published instruments complemented with evidence from cohort studies. Selection and standardization of risk factors associated with small for gestational age, preterm birth, congenital anomalies and perinatal mortality. Risk factors were weighted to obtain a cumulative risk score. Responses were then connected to corresponding care pathways. A cumulative risk threshold was defined, which can be adapted to the population and the availability of preventive facilities. A score above the threshold implies multidisciplinary consultation between caregivers. Results: The resulting digital score card consisted of 70 items, subdivided into four non-medical and two medical domains. Weighing of risk factors was based on existing evidence. Pilot-evidence from a cohort of 218 pregnancies in a multi-practice urban setting showed a cut-off of 16 points would imply 20% of all pregnant women to be assessed in a multidisciplinary setting. A total of 28 care pathways were defined. Conclusion: The resulting score card is a universal risk screening instrument which incorporates recent evidence on non-medical risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes and enables systematic risk management in an integrated antenatal health care setting.

  11. Assessing receipt of medical care and disparity among persons with HIV/AIDS in San Francisco, 2006-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ling C; Chen, Mi; Kali, Jessica; Pipkin, Sharon; Scheer, Susan; Schwarcz, Sandy

    2011-03-01

    We used data from HIV/AIDS surveillance case registry to assess the timing of entry into medical care, level of care received after HIV diagnosis, and to identify characteristics associated with delayed and insufficient care among persons diagnosed with HIV/AIDS between 2006 and 2007 in San Francisco. Laboratory reports of HIV viral load and CD4 test results were used as a marker for receipt of medical care. The time from HIV diagnosis to entry into care was estimated using Kaplan-Meier product limit method and independent predictors of delayed entry into care were determined using the proportional hazards model. Insufficient care was defined as less than an average of two viral load/CD4 tests per person-year of follow-up. Predictors of insufficient care were evaluated using a logistic regression model. An estimated 85% of persons diagnosed with HIV/AIDS entered care within three months after HIV diagnosis; the proportion increased to 95% within 12 months after diagnosis. Persons who were born outside of the USA and those tested at the public counseling and testing sites were more likely to delay care. Nineteen percent of persons were determined to have received insufficient care. Younger persons and those diagnosed at a hospital were more likely to receive insufficient care. A high proportion of persons diagnosed with HIV/AIDS in San Francisco established timely and adequate care after HIV diagnosis. However, delays for some individuals in entry into care and markers of insufficient care suggest that there remains a need to improve access to and sustainability of HIV-specific medical care.

  12. Nurses' Knowledge and Responsibility toward Nutritional Assessment for Patients in Intensive Care Units

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    Mahmoud Al Kalaldeh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nutritional assessment is a prerequisite for nutritional delivery. Patients in intensive care suffer from under-nutrition and nutritional failure due to poor assessment. Nursing ability to early detect nutritional failure is the key for minimizing imparities in practice and attaining nutritional goals. Aim of this article is to examine the ability of Jordanian ICU nurses to assess the nutritional status of critically ill patients, considering biophysical and biochemical measures.Methods: This cross sectional study recruited nurses from different health sectors in Jordan. ICU nurses from the governmental sector (two hospitals and private sectors (two hospitals were surveyed using a self-administered questionnaire. Nurses' knowledge and responsibility towards nutritional assessment were examined.Results: A total of 220 nurses from both sectors have completed the questionnaire. Nurses were consistent in regard to knowledge, responsibility, and documentation of nutritional assessment. Nurses in the governmental hospitals inappropriately perceived the application of aspiration reduction measures. However, they scored higher in applying physical examination and anthropometric assessment.  Although both nurses claimed higher use of biochemical measurements, biophysical measurements were less frequently used. Older nurses with longer clinical experience exhibited better adherence to biophysical measurement than younger nurses.Conclusion: Nursing nutritional assessment is still suboptimal to attain nutritional goals. Assessment of body weight, history of nutrition intake, severity of illness, and function of gastrointestinal tract should be considered over measuring albumin and pre-albumin levels.  A well-defined evidence-based protocol as well as a multidisciplinary nutritional team for nutritional assessment is the best to minimize episodes of under-nutrition.

  13. A rapid assessment of the availability and use of obstetric care in Nigerian healthcare facilities.

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    Daniel O Erim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As part of efforts to reduce maternal deaths in Nigeria, pregnant women are being encouraged to give birth in healthcare facilities. However, little is known about whether or not available healthcare facilities can cope with an increasing demand for obstetric care. We thus carried out this survey as a rapid and tactical assessment of facility quality. We visited 121 healthcare facilities, and used the opportunity to interview over 700 women seeking care at these facilities. FINDINGS: Most of the primary healthcare facilities we visited were unable to provide all basic Emergency Obstetric Care (bEmOC services. In general, they lack clinical staff needed to dispense maternal and neonatal care services, ambulances and uninterrupted electricity supply whenever there were obstetric emergencies. Secondary healthcare facilities fared better, but, like their primary counterparts, lack neonatal care infrastructure. Among patients, most lived within 30 minutes of the visited facilities and still reported some difficulty getting there. Of those who had had two or more childbirths, the conditional probability of a delivery occurring in a healthcare facility was 0.91 if the previous delivery occurred in a healthcare facility, and 0.24 if it occurred at home. The crude risk of an adverse neonatal outcome did not significantly vary by delivery site or birth attendant, and the occurrence of such an outcome during an in-facility delivery may influence the mother to have her next delivery outside. Such an outcome during a home delivery may not prompt a subsequent in-facility delivery. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, reducing maternal deaths in Nigeria will require attention to both increasing the number of facilities with high-quality EmOC capability and also assuring Nigerian women have access to these facilities regardless of where they live.

  14. The Value of Clinical Needs Assessments for Point-of-Care Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigl, Bernhard H; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Kost, Gerald; Beyette, Fred R; Sabourin, Stephanie; Rompalo, Anne; de Los Santos, Tala; McMullan, Jason T; Haller, John

    2012-06-01

    Most entrepreneurial ventures fail long before the core technology can be brought to the marketplace because of disconnects in performance and usability measures such as accuracy, cost, complexity, assay stability, and time requirements between technology developers' specifications and needs of the end-users. By going through a clinical needs assessment (CNA) process, developers will gain vital information and a clear focus that will help minimize the risks associated with the development of new technologies available for use within the health care system. This article summarizes best practices of the principal investigators of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering point-of-care (POC) centers within the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering POC Technologies Research Network. Clinical needs assessments are particularly important for product development areas that do not sufficiently benefit from traditional market research, such as grant-funded research and development, new product lines using cutting-edge technologies developed in start-up companies, and products developed through product development partnerships for low-resource settings. The objectives of this article were to (1) highlight the importance of CNAs for development of POC devices, (2) discuss methods applied by POC Technologies Research Network for assessing clinical needs, and (3) provide a road map for future CNAs.

  15. Child Disaster Mental Health Services: a Review of the System of Care, Assessment Approaches, and Evidence Base for Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfefferbaum, Betty; North, Carol S

    2016-01-01

    Several decades of research have informed our knowledge of children's reactions to disasters and the factors that influence their reactions. This article describes the system of care for child disaster mental health services using population risk to determine needed services and a stepped care approach built on assessment and monitoring to advance children to appropriate services. To assess the evidence base for disaster interventions, recent reviews of numerous child disaster mental health interventions are summarized.

  16. Patient and referring health care provider satisfaction with a physiotherapy spinal triage assessment service

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    Bath B

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Brenna Bath1, Bonnie Janzen21School of Physical Therapy, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, 2Community Health and Epidemiology, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, CanadaPurpose: To evaluate participant and referring care provider satisfaction associated with a spinal triage assessment service delivered by physiotherapists in collaboration with orthopedic surgeons.Methods: People with low back-related complaints were recruited from those referred to a spinal triage assessment program delivered by physiotherapists. Measures of patient and provider satisfaction were completed at approximately 4 weeks after the assessment. The satisfaction surveys were analyzed quantitatively with descriptive statistics and qualitatively with an inductive thematic approach of open and axial coding.Results: A total of 108/115 participants completed the posttest satisfaction survey. Sixty-six percent of participants were “very satisfied” with the service and 55% were “very satisfied” with the recommendations that were made. Only 18% of referring care providers completed the satisfaction survey and 90.5% of those were “very satisfied” with the recommendations. Sixty-one participants and 14 care providers provided comments which revealed a diverse range of themes which were coded into positive (ie, understanding the problem, communication, customer service, efficiency, and management direction, negative (ie, lack of detail, time to follow-up, cost and neutral related to the triage service, and an “other” category unrelated to the service (ie, chronic symptoms, comorbidities, and limited access to health care.Conclusion: The quantitative results of the participant survey demonstrated very high levels of satisfaction with the service and slightly less satisfaction with the recommendations that were made. Satisfaction of referring care providers with the recommendations and report was also high, but given

  17. Integrating Biopsychosocial Intervention Research in a Changing Health Care Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ell, Kathleen; Oh, Hyunsung; Wu, Shinyi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Safety net care systems are experiencing unprecedented change from the "Affordable Care Act," Patient-Centered Medical Home (PCMH) uptake, health information technology application, and growing of mental health care integration within primary care. This article provides a review of previous and current efforts in which social…

  18. Health Technology Assessment (HTA in a changing social and health care context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alìcia Granados

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Health Technology Assessment (HTA has been defined in different ways, nevertheless it can be described briefly as a multidisciplinary process of analysis dealing with evidence and context to inform decision making in health care.

    For decades HTA and related fields, aimed to produce and encourage the use of scientific evidence to inform decision making, at all levels of the health care system, from policy making and management to clinical decision making [1,2]. Scientific evidence involved in the HTA process may refer to efficacy, effectiveness, safety, needs, appropriateness, efficiency, equity, acceptability and some other issues related to the effect of the introduction, use and diffusion of medical technologies on health and health care. The evaluation, with formal rules, of the quality of available scientific information is an important step of the HTA process as are the skills required for literature searching.The source of scientific information should not be limited to clinical literature, but also exploit other areas of knowledge such as epidemiology, social sciences,economics,health services research among others [1].

    The best method to be used in the HTA analysis process obviously depends on the uncertainties to be assessed. It could range from the synthesis and/or integration of scientific information to production of primary data.

    The latter is the option of choice when there is insufficient existing evidence or its quality is poor. The assessments often require a multidisciplinary and multi-method approach, the former, of course, must be chosen after translating the uncertainty into sound research questions.

  19. Health Technology Assessment (HTA in a changing social and health care context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Granados

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Health Technology Assessment (HTA has been defined in different ways, nevertheless it can be described briefly as a multidisciplinary process of analysis dealing with evidence and context to inform decision making in health care. For decades HTA and related fields, aimed to produce and encourage the use of scientific evidence to inform decision making, at all levels of the health care system, from policy making and management to clinical decision making [1,2].

    Scientific evidence involved in the HTA process may refer to efficacy, effectiveness, safety, needs, appropriateness, efficiency, equity, acceptability and some other issues related to the effect of the introduction, use and diffusion of medical technologies on health and health care. The evaluation, with formal rules, of the quality of a

    vailable scientific information is an important step of the HTA process as are the skills required for literature searching. The source of scientific information should not be limited to clinical literature, but also exploit other areas of knowledge such as epidemiology, social sciences,economics,health services research among others [1].The best method to be used in the HTA analysis process obviously depends on the uncertainties to be assessed. It could range from the synthesis and/or integration of scientific information to production of primary data.The latter is the option of choice when there is insufficient existing evidence or its quality is poor.

    The assessments often require a multidisciplinary and multi-method approach, the former, of course,must be chosen after translating the uncertainty into sound research questions.

     

  20. Perceived Preparedness of Health Care Students for Providing Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Zolezzi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Early assessment and management of risk factors is known to have significant impact in preventing cardiovascular disease (CVD and its associated burden. Cardiovascular disease risk assessment and management (CVDRAM is best approached by teamwork across health care professionals. This study aimed at assessing health care students’ (HCSs knowledge about the parameters needed for estimating CVD risk, their self-assessed preparedness/confidence and perceived barriers for the provision of CVDRAM services through a survey administered to third and fourth year pharmacy, medical, and nursing students in Qatar. Although all student cohorst achieved similar knowledge scores, less than half (n = 38, 47% were able to identify all of the six main risk factors necessary to estimate absolute CVD risk, and a third (32% were unable to identify total cholesterol as an independent risk factor necessary to estimate CVD risk. Training on the use of CVD risk assessment tools differed among the three student cohorts. All student cohorts also perceived similar levels of preparedness in CVDRAM. However, pharmacy students reported the highest preparedness/confidence with the use of the latest CVDRAM guidelines. The majority of statements listed under the barriers scale were perceived by the students as being moderate (median score = 3. Poor public acceptance or unawareness of importance of estimating CVD risk was the only barrier perceived as major by nursing students. Future integration of interprofessional educational (IPE activities in the CVDRAM curricula of HCSs may be a suitable strategy to minimize barriers and foster collaborative practice for the provision of CVDRAM services in Qatar.

  1. Development of scales to assess patients' perception of physicians' cultural competence in health care interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Rukhsana; Bates, Benjamin R

    2012-07-01

    This study describes the development of scales to measure patients' perception of physicians' cultural competence in health care interactions and thus contributes to promoting awareness of physician-patient intercultural interaction processes. Surveys were administrated to a total of 682 participants. Exploratory factor analyses were employed to assess emergent scales and subscales to develop reliable instruments. The first two phases were devoted to formative research and pilot study. The third phase was devoted to scale development, which resulted in a five-factor solution to measure patient perception of physicians' cultural competence for patient satisfaction.

  2. Referring Quality Assessment of Primary Health Care for Endocrinology in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro Grendene, Gabriela; Szczecinski Rodrigues, Átila; Katz, Natan; Harzheim, Erno

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents results of an assessment of the quality research of endocrinology referrals in the public health system in the state of Rio Grande do Sul. From the analysis of 4,458 requests for endocrinology referrals, it was found that 15% of referrals had insufficient information for evaluation and 71% showed no clinical justification for authorization of referencing. The partial results of the study indicated that the lack of information makes it impossible to clinically regulate these requests. The use of referencing protocols associated with telemedicine tools can assist doctors in primary health care in the clinical management and make access to specialized services more equitable and timely.

  3. Assessment of Knowledge of Day-Care Center Workers in Basic Aspects of Child Care: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    nineteenth century were patterned upon widespread and successful at- tempts to provide care for children of working mothers in France and England from...due in part to the need to care for and protect children of working mothers and in part to a welfare response which created jobs for unemployed

  4. [Assessment of the association between nursing care services, hypertension, and Alzheimer's disease in elderly patients with late-stage diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Seiji; Kondo, Yasuko; Kitagawa, Chihiro; Katsuta, Sayaka

    2013-12-01

    In an aging society with fewer children, diabetes self-control is difficult for elderly patients. Under these circumstances, it is expected that living in care homes for the elderly and institutions where nursing care services could be provided will help improve the prognosis of diabetic patients. Therefore, we assessed whether HbA(1c). levels (National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program : NGSP) in 121 elderly patients with late-stage diabetes receiving home medical care in our clinic from March 2008 to March 2013 improved with nursing care services.

  5. The Patient-Centered Medical Home Neighbor: A Critical Concept for a Redesigned Healthcare Delivery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    Pharmacist Behavioral Health Case Manager Social Worker Community resources DM companies Others… 2011 MHS Conference Care Coordination “Effective care...delayed visits •Email vs. snail mail •PHR and practice portal 24/7/365 • Clinicians knowledgeable about specialty care Between Encounters •Contact

  6. History of the international societies in health technology assessment: International Society for Technology Assessment in Health Care and Health Technology Assessment International.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta, David; Jonsson, Egon; Childs, Paul

    2009-07-01

    The International Society for Technology Assessment in Health Care (ISTAHC) was formed in 1985. It grew out of the increasing awareness of the international dimensions of health technology assessment (HTA) and the need for new communication methods at the international level. The main function of ISTAHC was to present an annual conference, which gradually grew in size, and also to generally improve in quality from to year. ISTAHC overextended itself financially early in the first decade of the 2000s and had to cease its existence. A new society, Health Technology Assessment international (HTAi), based on many of the same ideas and people, grew up beginning in the year 2003. The two societies have played a large role in making the field of HTA visible to people around the world and providing a forum for discussion on the methods and role of HTA.

  7. The Seamless Transfer-of-Care Protocol: a randomized controlled trial assessing the efficacy of an electronic transfer-of-care communication tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okoniewska Barbara M

    2012-11-01

    evaluation will assess the cost per life saved, cost per readmission avoided and cost per QALY gained with the TOC communication tool compared to traditional dictation summaries. Discussion This paper outlines the study protocol for a randomized controlled trial evaluating an electronic transfer-of-care communication tool, with sufficient statistical power to assess the impact of the tool on the significant outcomes of post-discharge death or readmission. The study findings will inform health systems around the world on the potential benefits of such tools, and the value for money associated with their widespread implementation. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01402609.

  8. E-assessment of prior learning: a pilot study of interactive assessment of staff with no formal education who are working in Swedish elderly care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The current paper presents a pilot study of interactive assessment using information and communication technology (ICT) to evaluate the knowledge, skills and abilities of staff with no formal education who are working in Swedish elderly care. Methods Theoretical and practical assessment methods were developed and used with simulated patients and computer-based tests to identify strengths and areas for personal development among staff with no formal education. Results Of the 157 staff with no formal education, 87 began the practical and/or theoretical assessments, and 63 completed both assessments. Several of the staff passed the practical assessments, except the morning hygiene assessment, where several failed. Other areas for staff development, i.e. where several failed (>50%), were the theoretical assessment of the learning objectives: Health, Oral care, Ergonomics, hygiene, esthetic, environmental, Rehabilitation, Assistive technology, Basic healthcare and Laws and organization. None of the staff passed all assessments. Number of years working in elderly care and staff age were not statistically significantly related to the total score of grades on the various learning objectives. Conclusion The interactive assessments were useful in assessing staff members’ practical and theoretical knowledge, skills, and abilities and in identifying areas in need of development. It is important that personnel who lack formal qualifications be clearly identified and given a chance to develop their competence through training, both theoretical and practical. The interactive e-assessment approach analyzed in the present pilot study could serve as a starting point. PMID:24742168

  9. Antenatal Care Strengthening in Jimma, Ethiopia: A Mixed-Method Needs Assessment

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    Sarah Fredsted Villadsen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We assessed how health system priorities matched user expectations and what the needs for antenatal care (ANC strengthening were for improved maternal health in Jimma, Ethiopia. Methods. A questionnaire survey among all recent mothers in the study area was conducted to study the content of ANC and to identify the predictors of low ANC satisfaction. Further, a qualitative approach was applied to understand perceptions, practices, and policies of ANC. Results. There were no national guidelines for ANC in Ethiopia. Within the health system, the teaching of health professional students was given high priority, and that contributed to a lack of continuity and privacy. To the women, poor user-provider interaction was a serious concern hindering the trust in the health care providers. Further, the care provision was compromised by the inadequate laboratory facilities, unstructured health education, and lack of training of health professionals. Conclusions. Health system trials are needed to study the feasibility of ANC strengthening in the study area. Nationally and internationally, the leadership needs to be strengthened with supportive supervision geared towards building trust and mutual respect to protect maternal and infant health.

  10. Assessing risk: professional perspectives on work involving mental health and child care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, Rosaline S; Stanley, Nicky; Penhale, Bridget; Holden, Sue

    2002-11-01

    The assessment of risk is central to work with families where parental mental health needs and child care concerns coexist. This article reports on the findings of three interprofessional focus groups which examined professionals' experiences of working with such families. Specialisation and differing thresholds and codes were identified as factors which contributed to difficulties for practitioners and families and scepticism was expressed concerning the feasibility of a key worker system for this group. The issue of psychiatric diagnosis evoked ambivalent responses and was both valued as offering direction for planning interventions and seen as a means of labelling and excluding individuals from services. The focus group participants were aware that assessing risk placed families under considerable pressure, but practitioners themselves also appeared to experience an emphasis on risk as restrictive.

  11. Initial Health Assessments and HIV Screening under the Affordable Care Act.

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    Arleen A Leibowitz

    Full Text Available The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC estimates that 156,300 (95% CI 144,100-165,900 Americans living with HIV in 2012 were unaware of their infection. To increase knowledge of HIV status, CDC guidelines seek to make HIV screening a routine part of medical care. This paper examines how routinely California primary care providers test for HIV and how providers' knowledge of California's streamlined testing requirements, use of sexual histories, and having an electronic medical record prompt for HIV testing, relate to test offers.We surveyed all ten California health plans offered under health reform's Insurance Exchange (response rate = 50% and 322 primary care providers to those plans (response rate = 19% to assess use of HIV screening and risk assessments.Only 31.7% of 60 responding providers reported offering HIV tests to all or most new enrollees and only 8.8% offered an HIV test of blood samples all or most of the time despite the California law requiring that providers offer HIV testing of blood samples in primary care settings. Twenty-eight of the 60 providers (46.6% were unaware that California had reduced barriers to HIV screening by eliminating the requirement for written informed consent and pre-test counseling. HIV screening of new enrollees all or most of the time was reported by 53.1% of the well-informed providers, but only 7.1% of the less informed providers, a difference of 46 percentage points (95% CI: 21.0%-66.5%. Providers who routinely obtained sexual histories were 29 percentage points (95% CI: 0.2%-54.9% more likely to screen for HIV all or most of the time than those who did not ask sexual histories.Changing HIV screening requirements is important, but not sufficient to make HIV testing a routine part of medical care. Provider education to increase knowledge about the changed HIV testing requirements could positively impact testing rates.

  12. Using big data for quality assessment in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughman, James R; Chen, Ronald C

    2016-05-01

    There is increasing attention in the US healthcare system on the delivery of high-quality care, an issue central to oncology. In the report 'Crossing the Quality Chasm', the Institute of Medicine identified six aims for improving healthcare quality: safe, effective, patient-centered, timely, efficient and equitable. This article describes how current big data resources can be used to assess these six dimensions, and provides examples of published studies in oncology. Strengths and limitations of current big data resources for the evaluation of quality of care are also discussed. Finally, this article outlines a vision where big data can be used not only to retrospectively assess the quality of oncologic care, but help physicians deliver high-quality care in real time.

  13. Morbidity and mortality predictivity of nutritional assessment tools in the postoperative care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özbilgin, Şule; Hanc, Volkan; Ömür, Dilek; Özbilgin, Mücahit; Tosun, Mine; Yurtlu, Serhan; Küçükgüçlü, Semih; Arkan, Atalay

    2016-10-01

    The aim was to evaluate the nutritional situation of patients admitted to the Postoperative Acute Care Unit using classic methods of objective anthropometry, systemic evaluation methods, and Nutrition Risk in Critically Ill (NUTRIC) score, and to compare them as a predictor of morbidity and mortality.At admission to the postoperative care unit, patients undergoing various surgeries were assessed for the following items: Subjective Global Assessment (SGA), Nutritional Risk Index (NRI), Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS)-2002, Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), and NUTRIC score, anthropometric measurements, serum total protein, serum albumin, and lymphocyte count. Patients were monitored for postoperative complications until death or discharge. Correlation of complications with these parameters was also analyzed.A total of 152 patients were included in the study. In this study a positive correlation was determined between mortality and NRS-2002, SGA, CCI, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation , Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment, and NUTRIC score, whereas a negative correlation was determined between mortality and NRI. There was a correlation between NUTRIC score and pneumonia, development of atrial fibrillation, delirium, renal failure, inotrope use, and duration of mechanical ventilation. In our study group of postoperative patients, MNA had no predictive properties for any complication, whereas SGA had no predictive properties for any complications other than duration of hospital stay and mortality.The NUTRIC score is an important indicator of mortality and morbidity in postoperative surgical patients. NRI correlated with many postoperative complications, and though SGA and NRS were correlated with mortality, they were not correlated with the majority of complications. MNA was determined not to have any correlation with any complication, mortality, and duration of hospital stay in our patient group.

  14. Measurement properties of questionnaires measuring continuity of care: a systematic review.

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    Annemarie A Uijen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Continuity of care is widely acknowledged as a core value in family medicine. In this systematic review, we aimed to identify the instruments measuring continuity of care and to assess the quality of their measurement properties. METHODS: We did a systematic review using the PubMed, Embase and PsycINFO databases, with an extensive search strategy including 'continuity of care', 'coordination of care', 'integration of care', 'patient centered care', 'case management' and its linguistic variations. We searched from 1995 to October 2011 and included articles describing the development and/or evaluation of the measurement properties of instruments measuring one or more dimensions of continuity of care (1 care from the same provider who knows and follows the patient (personal continuity, (2 communication and cooperation between care providers in one care setting (team continuity, and (3 communication and cooperation between care providers in different care settings (cross-boundary continuity. We assessed the methodological quality of the measurement properties of each instrument using the COSMIN checklist. RESULTS: We included 24 articles describing the development and/or evaluation of 21 instruments. Ten instruments measured all three dimensions of continuity of care. Instruments were developed for different groups of patients or providers. For most instruments, three or four of the six measurement properties were assessed (mostly internal consistency, content validity, structural validity and construct validity. Six instruments scored positive on the quality of at least three of six measurement properties. CONCLUSIONS: Most included instruments have problems with either the number or quality of its assessed measurement properties or the ability to measure all three dimensions of continuity of care. Based on the results of this review, we recommend the use of one of the four most promising instruments, depending on the target population

  15. Needs assessment for home-based care and the strengthening of social support networks: the role of community care workers in rural South Africa

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    Mosa Moshabela

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Community care workers (CCWs in rural South Africa provide medical, personal, household, educational, and social care services to their clients. However, little understanding exists on how provision of services is approached within a household, taking into account available social support networks. Objective: The aim of this study was to generate an understanding of the processes that underpin the provision of care by CCWs in rural households and their engagement with clients, primary caregivers (PCGs, and other members of the social support network. Design: We analysed in-depth interviews conducted in a triad of participants involved in a home-based care (HBC encounter – 32 clients, 32 PCGs, and 17 CCWs. For each triad, a purposefully selected CCW was linked with a purposefully selected client and the corresponding PCG using maximum variation sampling. Three coders used an inductive content analysis method to describe participants’ references to the nuances of processes followed by CCWs in servicing HBC clients. Written informed consent was obtained from all participants. Findings: The results suggest that, by intuition and prior knowledge, CCWs treated each household uniquely, depending on the clients’ care needs, cooperation, availability of a social network, and the reliability and resilience of the social support system for the client. Four distinct processes took place in rural households: needs assessment for care, rationing of care, appraisal of care, and reinforcement of a social support system. However, there was no particular order or sequence established for these processes, and caregivers followed no prescribed or shared standards. Conclusions: CCWs bring a basket of services to a household, but engage in a constant, dynamic, and cyclical process of weighing needs against services provided. The service package is uniquely crafted and tailored for each household, depending on the absorptive capacity of the social

  16. Using a computer simulation program to assess the decision-making process in child health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauri, S

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to describe the development and testing of a computer simulation program designed to assess the decision-making process in the public health nurses' work in child health care. The work was based primarily on theories of problem-solving and decision making; on knowledge of child development, health care, and education; and on the soft systems methodology. An authoring program and two simulations were designed and produced at the University of Turku by a team of two nurse researchers, a computer specialist, and three public health nurses. The simulations presented two typical situations encountered by the public health nurses' work in child health care. A total of 61 public health nurses from 11 health centers in the southwestern part of Finland completed the simulations. The public health nurses responded positively to the simulations and the program worked very well. The results revealed some inconsistencies in the decision-making process of the public health nurses with respect to the needs of the child and the family. The public health nurses' decisions were more closely related to the developmental stage of the child than to the unique needs of each family. The simulation is acting to test the public health nurses' ability to make decisions "here and now" but not about caring it forward. These shortcomings can be corrected by asking them to explain their decisions and thoughts after each stage and by tape recording their answers. The findings gave many answers to the question of how the computer simulation program can be developed.

  17. Assessment of Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence among Children Attending Care at a Tertiary Hospital in Southeastern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cletus Akahara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Adherence is the strongest predictor of successful treatment outcome among children infected with HIV. Our aim was to assess the antiretroviral drugs adherence status of HIV-infected children attending care at a tertiary hospital in Southeastern Nigeria. Method. The study involved a cross-sectional survey of 210 HIV-infected children attending care at a tertiary hospital in Southeastern Nigeria using self-report method of assessment. Optimal ART adherence is defined as patient taking not missing more than 1 dose of combined antiretroviral therapy medication in the preceding 2 weeks prior to the study. Result. A majority of the subjects 191 (91% had good adherence. There was a significant relationship between adherence and patient educational level (p=0.004, duration of treatment (p=0.001, drug administrator (p=0.005, and orphan status (p=0.001. The motivating factor for adherence was “not falling sick as before” while stigma was the most discouraging factor. Conclusion. The adherence level in this study was good. Stigma was an important reason given by patient/caregivers for nonadherence. There is need for concerted effort in addressing this barrier to improve adherence and prevent the emergence of drug resistance and treatment failure.

  18. Commitment, confidence, and concerns: Assessing health care professionals' child maltreatment reporting attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Rebecca H; Olson-Dorff, Denyse; Reiland, Hannah M; Budzak-Garza, Ann

    2017-02-24

    Given that childhood maltreatment is a significant international public health problem contributing to all major morbidity and mortality determinants, there is need to explore current practices and readiness of health care professionals (HCPs) to assess maltreatment, identify maltreatment risk factors, and complete mandated reporting. HCPs (N=114) completed a child maltreatment mandated reporting measure to assess level of comfort with mandated reporting, commitment to the reporting role, and confidence in the child protection system to take action as needed. Additional questions explored comfort discussing maltreatment and risk factors for maltreatment in a medical setting and knowledge of community resources. Results indicated that HCPs were committed to their mandated reporting role and did not perceive substantial potential negative consequences of reporting. However, there were concerns regarding lack of confidence in the system's ability to respond sufficiently to reports. Despite commitment to the reporting role, results showed that large proportions of HCPs do not routinely screen for maltreatment, feel uncomfortable discussing maltreatment history, and lack knowledge about community resources. Additional training efforts must be prioritized in health care systems to improve short- and long-term health outcomes.

  19. Using touch-screen technology to assess smoking in a low-income primary care clinic: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Philip H; Homish, Gregory G; Barrick, Christopher; Grier, Nancy L

    2011-01-01

    This pilot study examined the use of a touch-screen tablet personal computer to assess smoking and alcohol use among low-income primary care patients (N = 100) and tested cross-method consistency with a paper assessment. Data were collected in 2009. A touch-screen survey assessed smoking, alcohol use, partner smoking, and acceptability. A separate paper survey assessed smoking, partner smoking, and acceptability. The touch-screen assessment was highly acceptable and reliable. Implications and limitations are noted. Future research should explore the use of touch-screen technology for clinical endeavors requiring a quick assessment of substance use. There was no outside funding for this study.

  20. Assessing quality of life in the treatment of patients with age-related macular degeneration: clinical research findings and recommendations for clinical practice

    OpenAIRE

    Yuzawa M; Fujita K; Tanaka E; Wang ECY

    2013-01-01

    Mitsuko Yuzawa,1 Kyoko Fujita,1 Erika Tanaka,2 Edward C Y Wang21Department of Ophthalmology, Nihon University School of Medicine, Surugadai, Kanda, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, Japan; 2Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Bayer Yakuhin Ltd, Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, JapanBackground: The importance of incorporating quality-of-life (QoL) assessments into medical practice is growing as health care practice shifts from a “disease-based” to a “patient-centered&rdquo...

  1. Spiritual Assessment within Clinical Interventions Focused on Quality of Life Assessment in Palliative Care: A Secondary Analysis of a Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Catania

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the most crucial palliative care challenges is in determining how patients’ needs are defined and assessed. Although physical and psychological needs are commonly documented in patient’s charts, spiritual needs are less frequently reported. The aim of this review was to determine which explicit, longitudinal documentation of spiritual concerns would sufficiently affect clinical care to alleviate spiritual distress or promote spiritual wellbeing. A secondary analysis of a systematic review originally aimed at appraising the effectiveness of complex interventions focused on quality of life in palliative care was conducted. Five databases were searched for articles reporting interventions focused on QoL including at least two or more QoL dimensions. A narrative synthesis was performed to synthesize findings. In total, 10 studies were included. Only three studies included spiritual wellbeing assessment. Spirituality tools used to assess spiritual wellbeing were different between studies: Hospital QoL Index 14; Spiritual Needs Inventory; Missoula-Vitas QoL Index; and the Needs Assessment Tool: Progressive Disease-Cancer. Only one study reported a healthcare professional’s session training in the use of the QoL tool. Two out of three studies showed in participants an improvement in spiritual wellbeing, but changes in spiritual wellbeing scores were not significant. Overall patients receiving interventions focused on QoL assessment experienced both improvements in their QoL and in their spiritual needs. Although spiritual changes were not significant, the results provide evidence that a spiritual need exists and that spiritual care should be appropriately planned and delivered. Spiritual needs assessment precedes spiritual caring. It is essential that interventions focused on QoL assessment in palliative care include training on how to conduct a spiritual assessment and appropriate interventions to be offered to patients to address their

  2. Evaluation of patient-centered electronic health record to overcome digital divide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, E; Mayani, A; Modi, S; Kim, Y; Soh, C

    2005-01-01

    Advances and wide acceptance of information and communication technology (ICT) have made development and implementation of web-based electronic personal health records (PHRs) more feasible than ever before, and previous studies have demonstrated some of its potential and promises. However, this type of ICT-dependent approach inherits its own vulnerabilities of exposing the society to "digital divide", commonly described as the gap that exists among individuals and communities with regards to the 'haves' and 'have-nots' of information and modern communications technologies. To address these concerns and improve healthcare outcomes, we have developed and customized a web-based patient-centered electronic PHR, named the Personal Health Information Management System (PHIMS), and evaluated the system at the Everett Housing Authority, which provides housings for low-income families and elderly or disabled populations. A preliminary study demonstrates that 92% of the participating residents are satisfied with the PHIMS system in general. Some of the residents found PHIMS records very useful for their clinic visits.

  3. Applying patient centered approach in management of pulmonary tuberculosis: A case report from Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atif, M; Sulaiman, Sas; Shafi, Aa; Muttalif, Ar; Ali, I; Saleem, F

    2011-06-01

    A 24 year university student with history of productive cough was registered as sputum smear confirmed case of pulmonary tuberculosis. During treatment, patient suffered from itchiness associated with anti tuberculosis drugs and was treated with chlorpheniramine (4mg) tablet. Patient missed twenty eight doses of anti tuberculosis drugs in continuation phase claiming that he was very busy in his studies and assignments. Upon questioning he further explained that he was quite healthy after five months and unable to concentrate on his studies after taking prescribed medicines. His treatment was stopped based on clinical improvement, although he did not complete six months therapy. Two major reasons; false perception of being completely cured and side effects associated with anti TB drugs might be responsible for non adherence. Non sedative anti histamines like fexofenadine, citrizine or loratidine should be preferred over first generation anti histamines (chlorpheniramine) in patients with such lifestyle. Patient had not completed full course of chemotherapy, which is preliminary requirement for a case to be classified as "cure" and "treatment completed". Moreover, patient had not defaulted for two consecutive months. Therefore, according to WHO treatment outcome categories, this patient can neither be classified as "cure" or "treatment completed" nor as "defaulter". Further elaboration of WHO treatment outcome categories is required for adequate classification of patients with similar characteristics. Likelihood of non adherence can be significantly reduced by applying the WHO recommended "Patient Centered Approach" strategy. Close friend, class mate or family member can be selected as treatment supporter to ensure adherence to treatment.

  4. Effective follow-up consultations: the importance of patient-centered communication and shared decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Paul L P; Stiggelbout, Anne M

    2013-12-01

    Paediatricians spend a considerable proportion of their time performing follow-up visits for children with chronic conditions, but they rarely receive specific training on how best to perform such consultations. The traditional method of running a follow-up consultation is based on the doctor's agenda, and is problem-oriented. Patients and parents, however, prefer a patient-centered, and solution-focused approach. Although many physicians now recognize the importance of addressing the patient's perspective in a follow-up consultation, a number of barriers hamper its implementation in practice, including time constraints, lack of appropriate training, and a strong tradition of the biomedical, doctor-centered approach. Addressing the patient's perspective successfully can be achieved through shared decision making, clinicians and patients making decisions together based on the best clinical evidence. Research shows that shared decision making not only increases patient, parent, and physician satisfaction with the consultation, but also may improve health outcomes. Shared decision making involves building a physician-patient-parent partnership, agreeing on the problem at hand, laying out the available options with their benefits and risks, eliciting the patient's views and preferences on these options, and agreeing on a course of action. Shared decision making requires specific communication skills, which can be learned, and should be mastered through deliberate practice.

  5. Focus group reflections on the current and future state of cognitive assessment tools in geriatric health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitehead JC

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Jocelyne C Whitehead,1 Sara A Gambino,1 Jeffrey D Richter,2 Jennifer D Ryan1,3,41Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest, 2Independent Human Factors Consultant, Toronto, ON, Canada; 3Department of Psychology, 4Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CanadaObjective: This study provides insight into the thoughts and opinions of geriatric health-care professionals toward cognitive assessments and the use of emerging technologies, such as eye-tracking, to supplement current tools.Methods: Two focus group sessions were conducted with nurses and physicians who routinely administer neurocognitive assessments to geriatric populations. Video recordings of the focus group sessions were transcribed and a thematic analysis was performed.Results: Participants reported the need for assessment and diagnostic tools that are accessible and efficient, and that are capable of accommodating the rapid growth in the aging population. The prevalence of more complex ailments experienced by older adults has had repercussions in the quality of care that the clients receive, and has contributed to lengthy wait times and resource shortages. Health-care professionals stated that they are hampered by the disjointed structure of the health-care system and that they would benefit from a more efficient allocation of responsibilities made possible through tools that did not require extensive training or certification. Eyetracking-based cognitive assessments were thought to strongly complement this system, yet it was thought that difficulty would be faced in gaining the support and increased uptake by health-care professionals due to the nonintuitive relationship between eyetracking and cognition.Conclusion: The findings suggest that health-care professionals are receptive to the use of eyetracking technology to assess for cognitive health as it would conserve resources by allowing frontline staff to administer assessments with minimal training

  6. A five-year assessment of the affordable care act: market forces still trump the common good in U.S. Health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyman, John P

    2015-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) was enacted in 2010 as the signature domestic achievement of the Obama presidency. It was intended to contain costs and achieve near-universal access to affordable health care of improved quality. Now, five years later, it is time to assess its track record. This article compares the goals and claims of the ACA with its actual experience in the areas of access, costs, affordability, and quality of care. Based on the evidence, one has to conclude that containment of health care costs is nowhere in sight, that more than 37 million Americans will still be uninsured when the ACA is fully implemented in 2019, that many more millions will be underinsured, and that profiteering will still dominate the culture of U.S. health care. More fundamental reform will be needed. The country still needs to confront the challenge that our for-profit health insurance industry, together with enormous bureaucratic waste and widespread investor ownership throughout our market-based system, are themselves barriers to health care reform. Here we consider the lessons we can take away from the ACA's first five years and lay out the economic, social/political, and moral arguments for replacing it with single-payer national health insurance.

  7. Applications of life cycle assessment and cost analysis in health care waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Sebastiao Roberto, E-mail: soares@ens.ufsc.br [Department of Sanitary Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, UFSC, Campus Universitario, Centro Tecnologico, Trindade, PO Box 476, Florianopolis, SC 88040-970 (Brazil); Finotti, Alexandra Rodrigues, E-mail: finotti@ens.ufsc.br [Department of Sanitary Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, UFSC, Campus Universitario, Centro Tecnologico, Trindade, PO Box 476, Florianopolis, SC 88040-970 (Brazil); Prudencio da Silva, Vamilson, E-mail: vamilson@epagri.sc.gov.br [Department of Sanitary Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, UFSC, Campus Universitario, Centro Tecnologico, Trindade, PO Box 476, Florianopolis, SC 88040-970 (Brazil); EPAGRI, Rod. Admar Gonzaga 1347, Itacorubi, Florianopolis, Santa Catarina 88034-901 (Brazil); Alvarenga, Rodrigo A.F., E-mail: alvarenga.raf@gmail.com [Department of Sanitary Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, UFSC, Campus Universitario, Centro Tecnologico, Trindade, PO Box 476, Florianopolis, SC 88040-970 (Brazil); Ghent University, Department of Sustainable Organic Chemistry and Technology, Coupure Links 653/9000 Gent (Belgium)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three Health Care Waste (HCW) scenarios were assessed through environmental and cost analysis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCW treatment using microwave oven had the lowest environmental impacts and costs in comparison with autoclave and lime. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lime had the worst environmental and economic results for HCW treatment, in comparison with autoclave and microwave. - Abstract: The establishment of rules to manage Health Care Waste (HCW) is a challenge for the public sector. Regulatory agencies must ensure the safety of waste management alternatives for two very different profiles of generators: (1) hospitals, which concentrate the production of HCW and (2) small establishments, such as clinics, pharmacies and other sources, that generate dispersed quantities of HCW and are scattered throughout the city. To assist in developing sector regulations for the small generators, we evaluated three management scenarios using decision-making tools. They consisted of a disinfection technique (microwave, autoclave and lime) followed by landfilling, where transportation was also included. The microwave, autoclave and lime techniques were tested at the laboratory to establish the operating parameters to ensure their efficiency in disinfection. Using a life cycle assessment (LCA) and cost analysis, the decision-making tools aimed to determine the technique with the best environmental performance. This consisted of evaluating the eco-efficiency of each scenario. Based on the life cycle assessment, microwaving had the lowest environmental impact (12.64 Pt) followed by autoclaving (48.46 Pt). The cost analyses indicated values of US$ 0.12 kg{sup -1} for the waste treated with microwaves, US$ 1.10 kg{sup -1} for the waste treated by the autoclave and US$ 1.53 kg{sup -1} for the waste treated with lime. The microwave disinfection presented the best eco-efficiency performance among those studied and provided a feasible

  8. Assessing an Adolescent's Capacity for Autonomous Decision-Making in Clinical Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Pierre-André; Blum, Robert Wm; Benaroyo, Lazare; Zermatten, Jean; Baltag, Valentina

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide policy guidance on how to assess the capacity of minor adolescents for autonomous decision-making without a third party authorization, in the field of clinical care. In June 2014, a two-day meeting gathered 20 professionals from all continents, working in the field of adolescent medicine, neurosciences, developmental and clinical psychology, sociology, ethics, and law. Formal presentations and discussions were based on a literature search and the participants' experience. The assessment of adolescent decision-making capacity includes the following: (1) a review of the legal context consistent with the principles of the Convention on the Rights of the Child; (2) an empathetic relationship between the adolescent and the health care professional/team; (3) the respect of the adolescent's developmental stage and capacities; (4) the inclusion, if relevant, of relatives, peers, teachers, or social and mental health providers with the adolescent's consent; (5) the control of coercion and other social forces that influence decision-making; and (6) a deliberative stepwise appraisal of the adolescent's decision-making process. This stepwise approach, already used among adults with psychiatric disorders, includes understanding the different facets of the given situation, reasoning on the involved issues, appreciating the outcomes linked with the decision(s), and expressing a choice. Contextual and psychosocial factors play pivotal roles in the assessment of adolescents' decision-making capacity. The evaluation must be guided by a well-established procedure, and health professionals should be trained accordingly. These proposals are the first to have been developed by a multicultural, multidisciplinary expert panel.

  9. Assessment of Sedation and Analgesia in Mechanically Ventilated Patients in Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udita Naithani

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Post traumatic stress resulting from an intensive care unit(ICU stay may be prevented by adequate level of sedation and analgesia. Aims of the study were reviewing the current practices of sedation and analgesia in our ICU setup and to assess level of sedation and analgesia to know the requirement of sedative and analgesics in mechani-cally ventilated ICU patients. This prospective observational study was conducted on 50 consecutive mechanically ventilated patients in ICU over a period of 6 months. Patient′s sedation level was assessed by Ramsay Sedation Scale (RSS = 1 : Agitated; 2,3 : Comfortable; 4,5,6 : Sedated and pain intensity by Behavioural Pain Scale (BPS = 3 :No pain, to 16 : Maximum pain. BPS, mean arterial pressure(MAP and heart rate(HR were assessed before and after painful stimulus (tracheal suction. Although no patient had received sedative and analgesics, mean Ramsay score was 3.52±1.92 with 30% patients categorized as ′agitated′, 12% as ′comfortable′ and 58% as ′sedated′ because of depressed consciousness level. Mean BPS at rest was 4.30±1.28 revealing background pain that further increased to 6.18±1.88 after painful stimulus. There was significant rise in HR (10.30%, MAP (7.56% and BPS (40.86% after painful stimulus, P< 0.0001. The correlation between BPS and Ramsay Score was negative and significant (P< 0.01. We conclude that there should be regular definition of the appropriate level of sedation and analgesia as well as monitoring of the desired level, using sedation and pain scales as a part of the total care for mechanically ventilated patients.

  10. Assessing the Validity of the Qualistar Early Learning Quality Rating and Improvement System as a Tool for Improving Child-Care Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellman, Gail L.; Perlman, Michal; Le, Vi-Nhuan; Setodji, Claude Messan

    2008-01-01

    As a result of the generally low quality of child care in the United States and the increased emphasis on accountability in education policy, quality rating systems (QRSs) are proliferating in the child-care arena. QRSs assess child-care providers on multiple dimensions of quality and integrate these assessments into an easily understood summary…

  11. Primary care perspectives on prostate cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarus, Ted A; Holmes-Rovner, Margaret; Northouse, Laurel L; Fagerlin, Angela; Garlinghouse, Carol; Demers, Raymond Y; Rovner, David R; Darwish-Yassine, May; Wei, John T

    2011-06-01

    Although the effectiveness of prostate cancer screening is controversial, screening rates have risen dramatically among primary care providers in the United States. The authors' findings suggest more collaboration among primary care and specialty organizations, especially with respect to decision aid endorsement, is needed to achieve more discriminatory and patient-centered prostate cancer screening.

  12. Development and reliability of an observation method to assess food intake of young children in child care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Sarah C; Benjamin, Sara E; Ward, Dianne S

    2007-04-01

    To our knowledge, a direct observation protocol for assessing dietary intake among young children in child care has not been published. This article reviews the development and testing of a diet observation system for child care facilities that occurred during a larger intervention trial. Development of this system was divided into five phases, done in conjunction with a larger intervention study; (a) protocol development, (b) training of field staff, (c) certification of field staff in a laboratory setting, (d) implementation in a child-care setting, and (e) certification of field staff in a child-care setting. During the certification phases, methods were used to assess the accuracy and reliability of all observers at estimating types and amounts of food and beverages commonly served in child care. Tests of agreement show strong agreement among five observers, as well as strong accuracy between the observers and 20 measured portions of foods and beverages with a mean intraclass correlation coefficient value of 0.99. This structured observation system shows promise as a valid and reliable approach for assessing dietary intake of children in child care and makes a valuable contribution to the growing body of literature on the dietary assessment of young children.

  13. Assessing the Extent of Adherence to the Recommended Antenatal Care Content in Malaysia: Room for Improvement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Ling Yeoh

    Full Text Available Recent papers on monitoring of health services affirmed that while antenatal care (ANC is an effective measure, quality is still a problem. Quality in maternal services "…involves providing a minimum level of care to all pregnant women…" Yet adherence to a minimum level of recommended ANC content appears to be unmet. Comprehensive review of ANC content rendered in environments with rapid changes in demographic, socio-economic, lifestyle and morbidity was sparse. Malaysia is such a country that has undergone these transitions with tremendous progress in health. However, recent progress in pregnancy outcomes is stagnating. This study aims to analyse adherence to recommended ANC; specifically, to examine the extent of adherence to recommended ANC content and to determine the factors influencing ANC content score.A retrospective cohort study of 522 randomly selected women who used ANC was conducted. Data were extracted from individual records. The study examined adherence to essential ANC guidelines using weighted scoring for physical examination, health screening, case management, and health education. GLM Univariate analysis procedure was used to determine the factors associated with ANC content score. Binary logistic regression was used to assess ANC content level and pregnancy outcomes, controlled for ANC utilisation.Around half of the women had <80% of recommended ANC content documented. Health education had the lowest mean score, at around 35%. The low-risk pregnancies had a higher ANC content score than the high-risk pregnancies (78% vs. 75%; P = 0.002. The smallest clinics had a higher ANC content score than the bigger clinics (78% vs. 74-76%; P<0.001. ANC content score among the women with "adequate" ANC utilisation, as defined by the modified Adequacy of Prenatal Care Utilisation Index, was lower than the women with "adequate-plus" ANC utilisation (75% vs. 78%, P<0.001. Assessment of symphysis-fundal height, foetal presentation and

  14. Withdrawal from Dialysis and Palliative Care for Severely Ill Dialysis Patients in terms of Patient-Centered Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We treated a dementia patient with end stage chronic kidney disease (CKD). The patient also had severe chronic heart disease and suffered from untreatable respiratory distress during the clinical course of his illness. We therefore initiated peritoneal dialysis therapy (PD) as renal replacement therapy, although we had difficulties continuing stable PD for many reasons, including a burden on caregivers and complications associated with PD therapy itself. Under these circumstances we considere...

  15. Assessing coverage, equity and quality gaps in maternal and neonatal care in sub-saharan Africa: an integrated approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calistus Wilunda

    Full Text Available Gaps in coverage, equity and quality of health services hinder the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5 in most countries of sub-Saharan Africa as well as in other high-burden countries, yet few studies attempt to assess all these dimensions as part of the situation analysis. We present the base-line data of a project aimed at simultaneously addressing coverage, equity and quality issues in maternal and neonatal health care in five districts belonging to three African countries.Data were collected in cross-sectional studies with three types of tools. Coverage was assessed in three hospitals and 19 health centres (HCs utilising emergency obstetric and newborn care needs assessment tools developed by the Averting Maternal Death and Disability program. Emergency obstetrics care (EmOC indicators were calculated. Equity was assessed in three hospitals and 13 HCs by means of proxy wealth indices and women delivering in health facilities were compared with those in the general population to identify inequities. Quality was assessed in three hospitals using the World Health Organization's maternal and neonatal quality of hospital care assessment tool which evaluates the whole range of aspects of obstetric and neonatal care and produces an average score for each main area of care.All the three hospitals qualified as comprehensive EmOC facilities but none of the HCs qualified for basic EmOC. None of the districts met the minimum requisites for EmOC indicators. In two out of three hospitals, there were major quality gaps which were generally greater in neonatal care, management of emergency and complicated cases and monitoring. Higher access to care was coupled by low quality and good quality by very low access. Stark inequities in utilisation of institutional delivery care were present in all districts and across all health facilities, especially at hospital level.Our findings confirm the existence of serious issues regarding coverage

  16. Assessing pain as a fifth vital sign in long-term care facilities: Recommendations from the field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molony, Sheila L; Kobayashi, Mia; Holleran, Elizabeth A; Mezey, Mathy

    2005-03-01

    In long-term care facilities, pain management is complex because dementia, delirium, and other reasons for residents' altered communication ability are a significant barrier to pain assessment. The purpose of this study was to explore the status of implementation of pain as a fifth vital sign in a sample of long-term care facilities. A three-round Delphi survey was used to obtain consensus from personnel in 60 long-term care facilities in NY State. Findings are presented in terms of recommendations related to pain criteria, assessment methods, frequency of pain assessment, responsibility for pain assessment, monitoring strategies, education, documentation, and pain management education. The results of this study highlight many important considerations in the treatment of pain as a fifth vital sign in long-term care facilities. Evidence-based practice will be facilitated by further research related to underexplored aspects of pain assessment and management, and further attention to care delivery systems that support continued knowledge acquisition and the implementation of best practices.

  17. Role-playing simulation as an educational tool for health care personnel: developing an embedded assessment framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libin, Alexander; Lauderdale, Manon; Millo, Yuri; Shamloo, Christine; Spencer, Rachel; Green, Brad; Donnellan, Joyce; Wellesley, Christine; Groah, Suzanne

    2010-04-01

    Simulation- and video game-based role-playing techniques have been proven effective in changing behavior and enhancing positive decision making in a variety of professional settings, including education, the military, and health care. Although the need for developing assessment frameworks for learning outcomes has been clearly defined, there is a significant gap between the variety of existing multimedia-based instruction and technology-mediated learning systems and the number of reliable assessment algorithms. This study, based on a mixed methodology research design, aims to develop an embedded assessment algorithm, a Knowledge Assessment Module (NOTE), to capture both user interaction with the educational tool and knowledge gained from the training. The study is regarded as the first step in developing an assessment framework for a multimedia educational tool for health care professionals, Anatomy of Care (AOC), that utilizes Virtual Experience Immersive Learning Simulation (VEILS) technology. Ninety health care personnel of various backgrounds took part in online AOC training, choosing from five possible scenarios presenting difficult situations of everyday care. The results suggest that although the simulation-based training tool demonstrated partial effectiveness in improving learners' decision-making capacity, a differential learner-oriented approach might be more effective and capable of synchronizing educational efforts with identifiable relevant individual factors such as sociobehavioral profile and professional background.

  18. Assessment of a primary care-based telemonitoring intervention for home care patients with heart failure and chronic lung disease. The TELBIL study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vergara Itziar

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Telemonitoring technology offers one of the most promising alternatives for the provision of health care services at the patient's home. The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of a primary care-based telemonitoring intervention on the frequency of hospital admissions. Methods/design A primary care-based randomised controlled trial will be carried out to assess the impact of a telemonitoring intervention aimed at home care patients with heart failure (HF and/or chronic lung disease (CLD. The results will be compared with those obtained with standard health care practice. The duration of the study will be of one year. Sixty patients will be recruited for the study. In-home patients, diagnosed with HF and/or CLD, aged 14 or above and with two or more hospital admissions in the previous year will be eligible. For the intervention group, telemonitoring will consist of daily patient self-measurements of respiratory-rate, heart-rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, weight and body temperature. Additionally, the patients will complete a qualitative symptom questionnaire daily using the telemonitoring system. Routine telephone contacts will be conducted every fortnight and additional telephone contacts will be carried out if the data received at the primary care centre are out of the established limits. The control group will receive usual care. The primary outcome measure is the number of hospital admissions due to any cause that occurred in a period of 12 months post-randomisation. The secondary outcome measures are: duration of hospital stay, hospital admissions due to HF or CLD, mortality rate, use of health care resources, quality of life, cost-effectiveness, compliance and patient and health care professional satisfaction with the new technology. Discussion The results of this study will shed some light on the effects of telemonitoring for the follow-up and management of chronic patients from a primary care

  19. Acute medical assessment units: an efficient alternative to in-hospital acute medical care.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Watts, M

    2011-02-01

    Acute Medical Assessment Units (AMAUs) are being proposed as an alternative to congested Emergency Departments (EDs for the assessment of patients with a range of acute medical problems. We retrospectively reviewed the discharge destination of patients referred to a newly established AMAU during a six-month period. During the same period we contrasted activity in the ED for a similar group of patients. 1,562 patients were assessed in the AMAU. 196 (12.5%) were admitted to an in-patient bed and 1,148 (73.5%) were entered into specific diagnosis-driven out-patient pathways. 1,465 patients attended the ED and 635 (43.3%) were admitted. Out-patient alternatives to expensive in-patient care need to be provided at the \\'coal face" of acute referral. The AMAU provides this, and as a consequence admission rates are relatively low. This is achieved by directly communicating with GPs, accessing senior clinical decision makers, and providing immediate access to diagnostically driven outpatient pathways.

  20. Assessment of a Hospital Palliative Care Unit (HPCU) for Cancer Patients; A Conceptual Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhollahi, Mohammad Reza; Saghafinia, Masoud; Zandehdel, Kazem; Motlagh, Ali Ghanbari; Kazemian, Ali; Mohagheghi, Mohammad Ali; Tahmasebi, Mamak

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The first hospital palliative care unit (HPCU) in Iran (FARS-HPCU) has been established in 2008 in the Cancer Institute, which is the largest referral cancer center in the country. We attempted to assess the performance of the HPCU based on a comprehensive conceptual framework. The main aim of this study was to develop a conceptual framework for assessment of the HPCU performances through designing a value chain in line with the goals and the main processes (core and support). Materials and Methods: We collected data from a variety of sources, including international guidelines, international best practices, and expert opinions in the country and compared them with national policies and priorities. We also took into consideration the trend of the HPCU development in the Cancer Institute of Iran. Through benchmarking the gap area with the performance standards, some recommendations for better outcome are proposed. Results: The framework for performance assessment consisted of 154 process indicators (PIs), based on which the main stakeholders of the HPCU (including staff, patients, and families) offered their scoring. The outcome revealed the state of the processes as well as the gaps Conclusion: Despite a significant improvement in many processes and indicators, more development in the comprehensive and integrative aspects of FARS-HPCU performance is required. Consideration of all supportive and palliative requirements of the patients through interdisciplinary and collaborative approaches is recommended. PMID:26600701

  1. Development and validation of a modified version of the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale in a Flemish palliative care population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claessens, Patricia; Menten, Johan; Schotsmans, Paul; Broeckaert, Bert

    2011-11-01

    Palliative cancer patients are faced with multiple symptoms that threaten their quality of life. To manage these symptoms, a reliable and valid way of registration is crucial. In this study, the Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS) has been translated, modified, and tested on content, face, criterion, construct validity, and internal consistency for patients admitted to Flemish palliative care units. These aspects are tested in a descriptive, comparative, longitudinal study based on 3 convenience samples. The first consisted of 8 palliative care experts. The second sample checked the face validity and consisted of 4 patients, 5 family members, and 5 nurses. The last sample involved 23 patients admitted to 3 Flemish palliative care units. Heedful of the "new-wave" vision on validity, the translated and altered ESAS seemed a suitable instrument for the symptom assessment of patients with cancer admitted to a palliative care unit.

  2. Assessment of food, nutrition, and physical activity practices in Oklahoma child-care centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisson, Susan B; Campbell, Janis E; May, Kellie B; Brittain, Danielle R; Monroe, Lisa A; Guss, Shannon H; Ladner, Jennifer L

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine the obesogenic practices in all-day child-care centers caring for preschool-aged children. This study used a cross-sectional, self-reported survey mailed to centers across Oklahoma (n=314). Frequency of responses and χ(2) were calculated comparing region and star rating. Items where the majority of centers frequently report best practices include: daily fruits served (76%), daily nonfried vegetables served (71%), rarely/never served sugary drinks (92%), rarely/never used food to encourage good behaviors (88%), staff join children at table most of the time (81%), staff rarely eat different foods in view of children (69%), visible self-serve or request availability of water (93%), regular informal communication about healthy eating (86%), opportunities for outdoor play (95%), not withholding activity for punishment (91%), accessible play equipment (59% to 80% for different types of equipment), and minimization of extended sitting time (78%). Practices where centers can improve include increasing variety of vegetables (18%), reducing frequency of high-fat meats served (74% serve more than once per week), increasing high-fiber and whole-grain foods (35% offer daily), serving style of "seconds" (28% help kids determine whether they are still hungry), nonfood holiday celebrations (44% use nonfood treats), having toys and books that encourage healthy eating (27%) and physical activity (25%) in all rooms in the center, a standard nutrition (21%) and physical education (50%) curriculum, and following a written physical activity policy (43%). Practitioners can use these data to develop benchmarks and interventions, as this was the first study to assess statewide obesogenic practices in child care.

  3. Home hemodialysis: a comprehensive review of patient-centered and economic considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Rachael C; Howard, Kirsten; Morton, Rachael L

    2017-01-01

    Internationally, the number of patients requiring treatment for end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) continues to increase, placing substantial burden on health systems and patients. Home hemodialysis (HD) has fluctuated in its popularity, and the rates of home HD vary considerably between and within countries although there is evidence suggesting a number of clinical, survival, economic, and quality of life (QoL) advantages associated with this treatment. International guidelines encourage shared decision making between patients and clinicians for the type of dialysis, with an emphasis on a treatment that aligned to the patients’ lifestyle. This is a comprehensive literature review of patient-centered and economic impacts of home HD with the studies published between January 2000 and July 2016. Data from the primary studies representing both efficiency and equity of home HD were presented as a narrative synthesis under the following topics: advantages to patients, barriers to patients, economic factors influencing patients, cost-effectiveness of home HD, and inequities in home HD delivery. There were a number of advantages for patients on home HD including improved survival and QoL and flexibility and potential for employment, compared to hospital HD. Similarly, there were several barriers to patients preferring or maintaining home HD, and the strategies to overcome these barriers were frequently reported. Good evidence reported that indigenous, low-income, and other socially disadvantaged individuals had reduced access to home HD compared to other forms of dialysis and that this situation compounds already-poor health outcomes on renal replacement therapy. Government policies that minimize barriers to home HD include reimbursement for dialysis-related out-of-pocket costs and employment-retention interventions for home HD patients and their family members. This review argues that home HD is a cost-effective treatment, and increasing the proportion of patients on this

  4. Engaging patients and stakeholders in research proposal review: the patient-centered outcomes research institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleurence, Rachael L; Forsythe, Laura P; Lauer, Michael; Rotter, Jason; Ioannidis, John P A; Beal, Anne; Frank, Lori; Selby, Joseph V

    2014-07-15

    The inaugural round of merit review for the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) in November 2012 included patients and other stakeholders, as well as scientists. This article examines relationships among scores of the 3 reviewer types, changes in scoring after in-person discussion, and the effect of inclusion of patient and stakeholder reviewers on the review process. In the first phase, 363 scientists scored 480 applications. In the second phase, 59 scientists, 21 patients, and 31 stakeholders provided a "prediscussion" score and a final "postdiscussion" score after an in-person meeting for applications. Bland-Altman plots were used to characterize levels of agreement among and within reviewer types before and after discussion. Before discussion, there was little agreement among average scores given by the 4 lead scientific reviewers and patient and stakeholder reviewers. After discussion, the 4 primary reviewers showed mild convergence in their scores, and the 21-member panel came to a much stronger agreement. Of the 25 awards with the best (and lowest) scores after phase 2, only 13 had ranked in the top 25 after the phase 1 review by scientists. Five percent of the 480 proposals submitted were funded. The authors conclude that patient and stakeholder reviewers brought different perspectives to the review process but that in-person discussion led to closer agreement among reviewer types. It is not yet known whether these conclusions are generalizable to future rounds of peer review. Future work would benefit from additional data collection for evaluation purposes and from long-term evaluation of the effect on the funded research.

  5. Quality assessment of diagnosis and antibiotic treatment of infectious diseases in primary care: a systematic review of quality indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Saust, Laura Trolle; Monrad, Rikke Nygaard; Hansen, Malene Plejdrup; Arpi, Magnus; Bjerrum, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify existing quality indicators (QIs) for diagnosis and antibiotic treatment of patients with infectious diseases in primary care. Design A systematic literature search was performed in PubMed and EMBASE. We included studies with a description of the development of QIs for diagnosis and antibiotic use in patients with infectious diseases in primary care. We extracted information about (1) type of infection; (2) target for quality assessment; (3) methodology used for developi...

  6. A Randomized Clinical Trial of the Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality vs. Enhanced Care as Usual for Suicidal Soldiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0164 TITLE: “A Randomized Clinical Trial of the Collaborative Assessment and Management of Suicidality vs. Enhanced...Care as Usual for Suicidal Soldiers” PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: David A. Jobes, Ph.D., ABPP CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Catholic University Washington, DC...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W23RYX0279N601 Management of Suicidality vs. Enhanced Care as Usual for Suicidal Soldiers Soldiers 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11

  7. Assessment of Patient Safety Culture in Primary Health Care Settings in Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha Mohamed Ghobashi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Patient safety is critical component of health care quality. We aimed to assess the awareness of primary healthcare staff members about patient safety culture and explore the areas of deficiency and opportunities for improvement concerning this issue.Methods: This descriptive cross sectional study surveyed 369 staff members in four primary healthcare centers in Kuwait using self-administered “Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture” adopted questionnaire. The total number of respondents was 276 participants (response rate = 74.79%.Results: Five safety dimensions with lowest positivity (less than 50% were identified and these are; the non – punitive response to errors, frequency of event reporting, staffing, communication openness, center handoffs and transitions with the following percentages of positivity 24%, 32%, 41%, 45% and 47% respectively. The dimensions of highest positivity were teamwork within the center’s units (82% and organizational learning (75%.Conclusion: Patient safety culture in primary healthcare settings in Kuwait is not as strong as improvements for the provision of safe health care. Well-designed patient safety initiatives are needed to be integrated with organizational policies, particularly the pressing need to address the bioethical component of medical errors and their disclosure, communication openness and emotional issues related to them and investing the bright areas of skillful organizational learning and strong team working attitudes.    

  8. The Assessment of Science and Technology Activity in Primary Health Care: an Approach to the Subject

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenia Tamara Sánchez García

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Primary Health Care is the strategy to organize the management of health system that ensures universal access to minimum health services through equitable distribution of resources, community participation and implication of policies from other sectors. Therefore, the development of assessment in Science and Technology System at this level becomes of vital importance. The policy and management of science and technology are crucial in the strategic development of each country. In this sense, considering the convergence of the activity of science and technology with social development becomes a necessity particularly important for developing countries. The purpose of this literature review is to summarize the development of this modality in Cuba and the world, in such a way that it will serve to help people who need information on the subject.

  9. Nurses' and physicians' perceptions of Confusion Assessment Method for the intensive care unit for delirium detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxenbøll-Collet, Marie; Egerod, Ingrid; Christensen, Vibeke;

    2017-01-01

    of this study was to identify nurses' and physicians' perceived professional barriers to using the CAM-ICU in Danish ICUs. METHODS: This study uses a qualitative explorative multicentre design using focus groups and a semi-structured interview guide. Five focus groups with nurses (n = 20) and four...... with physicians (n = 14) were conducted. Strategic sampling was used to include participants with varying CAM-ICU experience at units, with variable implementation of the tool. RESULTS: Using a hermeneutical approach, three main themes and nine sub-themes emerged. The main themes were (1) Professional role issues......: CAM-ICU screening affected nursing care, clinical judgment and professional integrity; (2) Instrument reliability: nurses and physicians expressed concerns about CAM-ICU assessment in non-sedated patients, patients with multi-organ failure or patients influenced by residual sedatives/opioids; and (3...

  10. Demands and Job Resources in the Child Care Workforce: Swiss Lead Teacher and Assistant Teacher Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloechliger, Olivia R.; Bauer, Georg F.

    2016-01-01

    Center-based child care has been struggling with poor health and high turnover rates of child care staff and their adverse impact on care quality for decades. Yet little is known about personal and structural antecedents of job resources and job demands that are valid predictors of health and turnover in the child care workforce. Research…

  11. Clinical mentorship of nurse initiated antiretroviral therapy in Khayelitsha, South Africa: a quality of care assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Green

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: To combat the AIDS epidemic and increase HIV treatment access, the South African government implemented a nurse-based, doctor-supported model of care that decentralizes administration of antiretroviral treatment (ART for HIV positive patients through nurse initiated and managed ART. Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF implemented a mentorship programme to ensure successful task-shifting, subsequently assessing the quality of clinical care provided by nurses. METHODS: A before-after cross-sectional study was conducted on nurses completing the mentorship programme in Khayelitsha, South Africa, from February 2011-September 2012. Routine clinical data from 229 patient folders and 21 self-assessment questionnaires was collected to determine the number of patients initiated on ART by nurses; quality of ART management before-after mentorship; patient characteristics for doctor and nurse ART initiations; and nurse self-assessments after mentorship. RESULTS: Twenty one nurses were authorized by one nurse mentor with one part-time medical officer's support, resulting in nurses initiating 77% of ART eligible patients. Improvements in ART management were found for drawing required bloods (91% vs 99%, p = 0.03, assessing adherence (50% vs 78%, p<0.001 and WHO staging (63% vs 91%, p<0.001. Nurse ART initiation indicators were successfully completed at 95-100% for 11 of 16 indicators: clinical presentation; patient weight; baseline blood work (CD4, creatinine, haemoglobin; STI screening; WHO stage, correlating medical history; medications prescribed appropriately; ART start date; and documented return date. Doctors initiated more patients with TB/HIV co-infection and WHO Stage 3 and 4 disease than nurses. Nurse confidence improved for managing HIV-infected children and pregnant women, blood result interpretation and long-term side effects. CONCLUSIONS: Implementation of a clinical mentorship programme in Khayelitsha led to nurse initiation of a

  12. Assessing systems quality in a changing health care environment: the 2009-10 national survey of children with special health care needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Bonnie B; Jones, Jessica R; Newacheck, Paul W; Bethell, Christina D; Blumberg, Stephen J; Kogan, Michael D

    2015-02-01

    To provide a national, population-based assessment of the quality of the health care system for children and youth with special health care needs using a framework of six health care system quality indicators. 49,242 interviews with parents of children with special health care needs from the 2009-10 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (NS-CSHCN) were examined to determine the extent to which CSHCN had access to six quality indicators of a well-functioning system of services. Criteria for determining access to each indicator were established and applied to the survey data to estimate the proportion of CSHCN meeting each quality indicator by socio-demographic status and functional limitations. 17.6% of CSHCN received care consistent with all six quality indicators. Results for each component of the system quality framework ranged from a high of 70.3% of parents reporting that they shared decision-making with healthcare providers to a low of 40% of parents reporting receipt of services needed for transition to adult health care. Attainment rates were lower for CSHCN of minority racial and ethnic groups, those residing in households where English was not the primary language, those in lower income households, and those most impacted by their health condition. Only a small proportion of CSHCN receive all identified attributes of a high-quality system of services. Moreover, significant disparities exist whereby those most impacted by their conditions and those in traditionally disadvantaged groups are served least well by the current system. A small proportion of CSHCN appear to remain essentially outside of the system, having met few if any of the elements studied.

  13. Availability of antidotes and key emergency drugs in tertiary care hospitals of Punjab and assessment of the knowledge of health care professionals in the management of poisoning cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Naheed; Khiljee, Sonia; Bakhsh, Allah; Ashraf, Muhammad; Maqsood, Iram

    2016-03-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the availability of antidotes/key emergency drugs in tertiary care hospitals of the Punjab province, and to assess the knowledge of health care professionals in the stocking and administration of antidotes in the proper management of poisoning cases. Seventeen (n=17) tertiary care hospitals of Punjab Pakistan were selected. Two performas (A and B) were designed for 26 antidotes/key emergency drugs and given to the hospital pharmacists and physicians respectively. It was observed that Activated Charcoal, being the universal antidote was found only in 6 hospitals (41%). Digoxin Immune Fab, Edentate Calcium disodium and Glucagon were not available in emergency department of any hospital and even not included in the formulary of any hospital. About 80% pharmacists were aware of the method of preparation of Activated Charcoal and 85% physicians were familiar with its route of administration. Data showed that tertiary care hospitals of Punjab do not stock antidotes according to national drug policy. Moreover the study strongly suggests the development of health care centers and professional by organizing antidote awareness programs, continuous education and record keeping of poisonous cases and availability of emergency drugs around the clock.

  14. Development of the dementia assessment sheet for community-based integrated care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awata, Shuichi; Sugiyama, Mika; Ito, Kae; Ura, Chiaki; Miyamae, Fumiko; Sakuma, Naoko; Niikawa, Hirotoshi; Okamura, Tsuyoshi; Inagaki, Hiroki; Ijuin, Mutsuo

    2016-03-01

    A series of our studies on the development of the Dementia Assessment Sheet for Community-based Integrated Care System 21-items (DASC-21) were reviewed. Study 1: to examine the distribution of scores and internal reliability of DASC-21, trained nurses and researchers visited the homes of 1341 participants aged 65 years and older and living in the community. The nurses interviewed the participants and, when possible, their family members, to complete the DASC-21. Then, the Mini-Mental State Examination was carried out to select the participants of study 2. Study 2: to examine the concurrent and discriminant validity, experienced psychiatrists and psychologists, who were blind to the findings of study 1, visited the homes of 131 subjects who were selected from the participants of study 1 and completed the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR), the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Frontal Assessment Battery (FAB). Cronbach's coefficient alpha of the DASC-21 was 0.808-0.950. Scores of the DASC-21 significantly correlated with CDR total and box scores, Mini-Mental State Examination and Frontal Assessment Battery. In an analysis of variance, CDR had the main effect on the score of the DASC-21. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that the DASC-21 had sufficient discriminatory ability between dementia (CDR1+) and non-dementia (CDR0 or CDR0.5; area under the curve = 0.804-0.895). When using a cut-off point of 30/31, sensitivity was 83.3-94.1% and specificity was 77.3-86.4%. The DASC-21 has sufficient reliability and validity as a tool to evaluate impairments in daily functioning and in cognitive functions, to detect dementia, and to assess the severity of dementia in the community.

  15. Assessing the Continuum of Care Pathway for Maternal Health in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kavita; Story, William T.; Moran, Allisyn C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective We assess how countries in regions of the world where maternal mortality is highest - South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa - are performing with regards to providing women with vital elements of the continuum of care. Methods Using recent Demographic and Health Survey data from nine countries including 18,036 women, descriptive and multilevel regression analyses were conducted on four key elements of the continuum of care - at least one antenatal care visit, four or more antenatal care visits, delivery with a skilled birth attendant and postnatal checks for the mother within the first 24 hours since birth. Family planning counseling within a year of birth was also included in the descriptive analyses. Results Results indicated that a major drop-out (more than 50%) occurs early on in the continuum of care between the first antenatal care visit and four or more antenatal care visits. Few women (less than 5%) who do not receive any antenatal care go on to have a skilled delivery or receive postnatal care. Women who receive some or all the elements of the continuum of care have greater autonomy and are richer and more educated than women who receive none of the elements. Conclusion Understanding where drop-out occurs and who drops out can enable countries to better target interventions. Four or more ANC visits plays a pivotal role within the continuum of care and warrants more programmatic attention. Strategies to ensure that vital services are available to all women are essential in efforts to improve maternal health. PMID:26511130

  16. Assessment of knowledge attitude and practice towards hepatitis B among health care workers in a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhana Siraj

    2016-01-01

    Results: This cross sectional prospective study was conducted in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology Govt. Medical College Srinagar from January to June 2015. 150 health care professionals were taken for the study. Knowledge regarding disease and transmission was fairly good. Regarding vaccination status 42.02% of medical and 29.60% of paramedical staff was fully vaccinated, the most common reason for non compliance being ignorance of importance of vaccination. Awareness of patients' vaccination status was also low. Conclusions: Due to low vaccine-compliance, Health care workers (HCW continue to be at the risk of occupational HBV infection. Regular Health education highlighting occupational risk of HBV, accessibility of vaccine, and mandatory vaccination of HCW is recommended to prevent Hepatitis B infection. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2016; 5(1.000: 58-61

  17. Defense Health Care: More-Specific Guidance Needed for Assessing Nonenrolled TRICARE Beneficiaries’ Access to Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    25These four categories (primary care, orthopedics, obstetrics and gynecology, and...doctor or nurse possible and 10 is the best personal doctor or nurse possible, what number would you use to rate your personal doctor or nurse ?” For...was it to get a personal doctor or nurse you are happy with?” For access to specialist doctor: “In the last 12 months, how much of a problem, if any

  18. Telephone calls to patients after discharge from the hospital: an important part of transitions of care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet D. Record

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Teaching interns patient-centered communication skills, including making structured telephone calls to patients following discharge, may improve transitions of care. Objective: To explore associations between a patient-centered care (PCC curriculum and patients’ perspectives of the quality of transitional care. Methods: We implemented a novel PCC curriculum on one of four inpatient general medicine resident teaching teams in which interns make post-discharge telephone calls to patients, contact outpatient providers, perform medication adherence reviews, and engage in patient-centered discharge planning. Between July and November of 2011, we conducted telephone surveys of patients from all four teaching teams within 30 days of discharge. In addition to asking if patients received a call from their hospital physician (intern, we administered the 3-Item Care Transitions Measure (CTM-3, which assesses patients’ perceptions of preparedness for the transition from hospital to home (possible score range 0–100. Results: The CTM-3 scores (mean±SD of PCC team patients and standard team patients were not significantly different (82.4±17.3 vs. 79.6±17.6, p=0.53. However, regardless of team assignment, patients who reported receiving a post-discharge telephone call had significantly higher CTM-3 scores than those who did not (84.7±16.0 vs. 78.2±17.4, p=0.03. Interns exposed to the PCC curriculum called their patients after discharge more often than interns never exposed (OR=2.78, 95% CI [1.25, 6.18], p=0.013. Conclusions: The post-discharge telephone call, one element of PCC, was associated with higher CTM-3 scores – which, in turn, have been shown to lessen patients’ risk of emergency department visits within 30 days of discharge.

  19. Developing a patient-centered outcome measure for complementary and alternative medicine therapies I: defining content and format

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritenbaugh Cheryl

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients receiving complementary and alternative medicine (CAM therapies often report shifts in well-being that go beyond resolution of the original presenting symptoms. We undertook a research program to develop and evaluate a patient-centered outcome measure to assess the multidimensional impacts of CAM therapies, utilizing a novel mixed methods approach that relied upon techniques from the fields of anthropology and psychometrics. This tool would have broad applicability, both for CAM practitioners to measure shifts in patients' states following treatments, and conventional clinical trial researchers needing validated outcome measures. The US Food and Drug Administration has highlighted the importance of valid and reliable measurement of patient-reported outcomes in the evaluation of conventional medical products. Here we describe Phase I of our research program, the iterative process of content identification, item development and refinement, and response format selection. Cognitive interviews and psychometric evaluation are reported separately. Methods From a database of patient interviews (n = 177 from six diverse CAM studies, 150 interviews were identified for secondary analysis in which individuals spontaneously discussed unexpected changes associated with CAM. Using ATLAS.ti, we identified common themes and language to inform questionnaire item content and wording. Respondents' language was often richly textured, but item development required a stripping down of language to extract essential meaning and minimize potential comprehension barriers across populations. Through an evocative card sort interview process, we identified those items most widely applicable and covering standard psychometric domains. We developed, pilot-tested, and refined the format, yielding a questionnaire for cognitive interviews and psychometric evaluation. Results The resulting questionnaire contained 18 items, in visual analog scale format

  20. Experiences of Community-Living Older Adults Receiving Integrated Care Based on the Chronic Care Model : A Qualitative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoorenberg, Sophie L. W.; Wynia, Klaske; Fokkens, Andrea S.; Slotman, Karin; Kremer, Hubertus P. H.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Integrated care models aim to solve the problem of fragmented and poorly coordinated care in current healthcare systems. These models aim to be patient-centered by providing continuous and coordinated care and by considering the needs and preferences of patients. The objective of this stu

  1. Calibration belt for quality-of-care assessment based on dichotomous outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Finazzi

    Full Text Available Prognostic models applied in medicine must be validated on independent samples, before their use can be recommended. The assessment of calibration, i.e., the model's ability to provide reliable predictions, is crucial in external validation studies. Besides having several shortcomings, statistical techniques such as the computation of the standardized mortality ratio (SMR and its confidence intervals, the Hosmer-Lemeshow statistics, and the Cox calibration test, are all non-informative with respect to calibration across risk classes. Accordingly, calibration plots reporting expected versus observed outcomes across risk subsets have been used for many years. Erroneously, the points in the plot (frequently representing deciles of risk have been connected with lines, generating false calibration curves. Here we propose a methodology to create a confidence band for the calibration curve based on a function that relates expected to observed probabilities across classes of risk. The calibration belt allows the ranges of risk to be spotted where there is a significant deviation from the ideal calibration, and the direction of the deviation to be indicated. This method thus offers a more analytical view in the assessment of quality of care, compared to other approaches.

  2. [What non invasive haemodynamic assessment in paediatric intensive care unit in 2009?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brissaud, O; Guichoux, J; Villega, F; Orliaguet, G

    2010-03-01

    The haemodynamic assessment of the patients is a daily activity in paediatric intensive care unit. It completes and is guided by the clinical examination. The will to develop the least invasive possible coverage of the patients is a constant concern. The haemodynamic monitoring, all the more if it is invasive, ceaselessly has to put in balance the profit and the risk of beginning this technique at a fragile patient. In the last three decades, numerous non-invasive haemodynamic tools were developed. The ideal one must be reliable, reproducible, with a time of fast, easily useful answer, with a total harmlessness, cheap and allowing a monitoring continues. Among all the existing tools (oesophageal Doppler ultrasound method, transthoracic echocardiography, NICO, thoracic impedancemetry, plethysmography, sublingual capnography), no one allies all these qualities. We can consider that the transthoracic echocardiography gets closer to most of these objectives. We shall blame it for its cost and for the fact that it is an intermittent monitoring but both in the diagnosis and in the survey, it has no equal among the non-invasive tools of haemodynamic assessment from part the quality and the quantity of the obtained information. The learning of the basic functions (contractility evaluation, cardiac output, cardiac and the vascular filling) useful for the start of a treatment is relatively well-to-do. We shall miss the absence of training in this tool in France in its paediatric and neonatal specificity within the university or interuniversity framework.

  3. An Overview of the Peer Assessment Rating (par) Index for Primary Dental Care Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James Ij

    2016-11-01

    The Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) index is a valid and reliable measure of orthodontic treatment outcome and is the most widely accepted such index. Assessing outcomes with the PAR index requires the examination of pre-treatment and post-treatment orthodontic study models. Beginning with the pre-treatment models, a score is given to each feature that deviates from an ideal occlusion (all anatomical contact points adjacent, good interdigitation between posterior teeth and non-excessive overjet/overbite), the scores are then added together to give a total that represents the severity of the malocclusion. The process is then repeated with the post-treatment models. The difference between the pre-treatment and the post-treatment scores reflects the improvement that has taken place during treatment. A score of zero represents an ideal occlusion and in general the higher the score, the more extensive the malocclusion. It is currently a condition of the NHS orthodontic contract for providers to monitor a proportion of their cases using the PAR index. This paper aims to provide primary dental care practitioners with an overview of the PAR index and should provide a useful guide for those wishing to seek calibration in the use of the index.

  4. Assessment and Availability of Trauma Care Services in a District Hospital of South India; A Field Observational Study

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    Pallavi Sarji Uthkarsh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the availability of trauma care services in a district referral hospital of Southern India. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study being performed during 2013 in a tertiary healthcare centre in Southern Indian. A detailed assessment of trauma care services was done in a 400 bed speciality hospital which is an apex referral hospital in the public health system using a check list based on WHO guidelines for evaluation of essential trauma care services, along with in-depth interviews of hospital stake holders and key informants. Results: The hospital had physical infrastructure in terms of emergency room, inpatient wards, operation theatres, intensive care unit and blood bank facilities. The recently constructed designated building for trauma care services was not operational and existing facilities were used beyond capacity. A designated trauma team was lacking and speciality services for managing polytrauma were deficient and thus, existing personnel were performing multiple tasks. Neurosurgeons and rehabilitative nursing staff were unavailable, and a radiographer was not available on a 24/7 basis. Existing nursing personnel had not received any formal training in trauma care and standard operating protocols were not available for trauma care. Resources for acute resuscitation were partially adequate. The hospital lacked adequate resources to manage head, abdomen, chest and spine injuries, and most of the polytrauma cases were referred to nearby city hospitals. Conclusion: District hospital, the only referral hospital in public health system for trauma victims of that region, had inadequate resources to manage trauma victims, which was probably responsible for delay in trauma care, improper referrals, high cost of care and poor outcomes.

  5. Home hemodialysis: a comprehensive review of patient-centered and economic considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker RC

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Rachael C Walker,1,2 Kirsten Howard,1 Rachael L Morton3 1School of Public Health, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; 2Hawke’s Bay District Health Board, Hastings, New Zealand; 3NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia Abstract: Internationally, the number of patients requiring treatment for end-stage kidney disease (ESKD continues to increase, placing substantial burden on health systems and patients. Home hemodialysis (HD has fluctuated in its popularity, and the rates of home HD vary considerably between and within countries although there is evidence suggesting a number of clinical, survival, economic, and quality of life (QoL advantages associated with this treatment. International guidelines encourage shared decision making between patients and clinicians for the type of dialysis, with an emphasis on a treatment that aligned to the patients’ lifestyle. This is a comprehensive literature review of patient-centered and economic impacts of home HD with the studies published between January 2000 and July 2016. Data from the primary studies representing both efficiency and equity of home HD were presented as a narrative synthesis under the following topics: advantages to patients, barriers to patients, economic factors influencing patients, cost-effectiveness of home HD, and inequities in home HD delivery. There were a number of advantages for patients on home HD including improved survival and QoL and flexibility and potential for employment, compared to hospital HD. Similarly, there were several barriers to patients preferring or maintaining home HD, and the strategies to overcome these barriers were frequently reported. Good evidence reported that indigenous, low-income, and other socially disadvantaged individuals had reduced access to home HD compared to other forms of dialysis and that this situation compounds already-poor health outcomes on renal

  6. Care coordination between specialty care and primary care: a focus group study of provider perspectives on strong practices and improvement opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim B

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bo Kim,1,2 Michelle A Lucatorto,3 Kara Hawthorne,4 Janis Hersh,5 Raquel Myers,6 A Rani Elwy,1,7 Glenn D Graham81Center for Healthcare Organization and Implementation Research, Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial VA Hospital, Bedford, 2Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 3Office of Nursing Services, Department of Veterans Affairs, 4Chief Business Office, Purchased Care, Washington, DC, 5New England Veterans Engineering Resource Center, Boston, MA, 6SJ Quinney College of Law, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, 7Department of Health Policy and Management, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 8Specialty Care Services (10P4E, Department of Veterans Affairs, Washington, DC, USAAbstract: Care coordination between the specialty care provider (SCP and the primary care provider (PCP is a critical component of safe, efficient, and patient-centered care. Veterans Health Administration conducted a series of focus groups of providers, from specialty care and primary care clinics at VA Medical Centers nationally, to assess 1 what SCPs and PCPs perceive to be current practices that enable or hinder effective care coordination with one another and 2 how these perceptions differ between the two groups of providers. A qualitative thematic analysis of the gathered data validates previous studies that identify communication as being an important enabler of coordination, and uncovers relationship building between specialty care and primary care (particularly through both formal and informal relationship-building opportunities such as collaborative seminars and shared lunch space, respectively to be the most notable facilitator of effective communication between the two sides. Results from this study suggest concrete next steps that medical facilities can take to improve care coordination, using as their basis the mutual understanding and respect developed between SCPs and PCPs through relationship-building efforts

  7. Personal care product preservatives: risk assessment and mixture toxicities with an industrial wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbajo, Jose B; Perdigón-Melón, Jose A; Petre, Alice L; Rosal, Roberto; Letón, Pedro; García-Calvo, Eloy

    2015-04-01

    The aquatic toxicity of eight preservatives frequently used in personal care products (PCPs) (iodopropynyl butylcarbamate, bronopol, diazolidinyl urea, benzalkonium chloride, zinc pyrithione, propylparaben, triclosan and a mixture of methylchloroisothiazolinone and methylisothiazolinone) was assessed by means of two different approaches: a battery of bioassays composed of single species tests of bacteria (Vibrio fischeri and Pseudomonas putida) and protozoa (Tetrahymena thermophila), and a whole biological community resazurin-based assay using activated sludge. The tested preservatives showed considerable toxicity in the studied bioassays, but with a marked difference in potency. In fact, all biocides except propylparaben and diazolidinyl urea had EC50 values lower than 1 mg L(-1) in at least one assay. Risk quotients for zinc pyrithione, benzalkonium chloride, iodopropynyl butylcarbamate and triclosan as well as the mixture of the studied preservatives exceeded 1, indicating a potential risk for the process performance and efficiency of municipal sewage treatment plants (STPs). These four single biocides explained more than 95% of the preservative mixture risk in all bioassays. Each individual preservative was also tested in combination with an industrial wastewater (IWW) from a cosmetics manufacturing facility. The toxicity assessment was performed on binary mixtures (preservative + IWW) and carried out using the median-effect principle, which is a special case of the concept of Concentration Addition (CA). Almost 70% of all experiments resulted in EC50 values within a factor of 2 of the values predicted by the median-effect principle (CI values between 0.5 and 2). The rest of the mixtures whose toxicity was mispredicted by CA were assessed with the alternative concept of Independent Action (IA), which showed higher predictive power for the biological community assay. Therefore, the concept used to accurately predict the toxicity of mixtures of a preservative

  8. Psychopathology of the General Population Referred by Primary Care Physicians for Urgent Assessment in Psychiatric Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith McLenan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the type, severity and progression of psychiatric pathologies in a sample of 372 outpatients (age range 18–65 years referred by their primary general practitioners (GPs to an Urgent Referral Team (URT based in a psychiatric hospital in Aberdeen, Scotland. This team offers immediate appointments (1- to 7-day delays for rapid assessments and early interventions to the outpatients referred by their primary family doctors.Method: One-sample t-test and z statistic were used for data analysis. From the total population, a convenience sample of 40 people was selected and assessed to evaluate whether follow-up appointments after the first visit could reduce the severity of suicidal ideation, depression and anxiety in the outpatients seen by the URT. A two-sample t-test and a Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used to assess the variations in the scores during the follow-up visits.Results: We found a statistically significant prevalence of depressive disorders, comorbid with anxiety at first presentation in people who were females, white, never married, living with a partner, not studying and not in paid employment. The common presentation of borderline personality disorder and dysthymia in this population underscores its vulnerability to major socioeconomic challenges.Conclusion: The data confirmed the impact that primary care cooperation with psychiatric hospitals can have on the psychiatric system, and as a reflection, on the population’s mental health and well-being. In fact, active cooperation and early diagnosis and intervention will help detect cases at risk in the general population and reduce admissions into hospitals.

  9. Improving patient-centeredness of fertility care using a multifaceted approach: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huppelschoten Aleida G

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Beside traditional outcomes of safety and (cost-effectiveness, the Institute of Medicine states patient-centeredness as an independent outcome indicator to evaluate the quality of healthcare. Providing patient-centered care is important because patients want to be heard for their ideas and concerns. Healthcare areas associated with high emotions and intensive treatment periods could especially benefit from patient-centered care. How care can become optimally improved in patient-centeredness is unknown. Therefore, we will conduct a study in the context of Dutch fertility care to determine the effects of a multifaceted approach on patient-centeredness, patients’ quality of life (QoL and levels of distress. Our aims are to investigate the effectiveness of a multifaceted approach and to identify determinants of a change in the level of patient-centeredness, patients’ QoL and distress levels. This paper presents the study protocol. Methods/Design In a cluster-randomized trial in 32 Dutch fertility clinics the effects of a multifaceted approach will be determined on the level of patient-centeredness (Patient-centredness Questionnaire – Infertility, patients’ QoL (FertiQoL and levels of distress (SCREENIVF. The multifaceted approach includes audit and feedback, educational outreach visits and patient-mediated interventions. Potential determinants of a change in patient-centeredness, patients’ QoL and levels of distress will be collected by an addendum to the patients’ questionnaire and a professionals’ questionnaire. The latter includes the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument about the clinic’s culture as a possible determinant of an increase in patient-centered care. Discussion The study is expected to yield important new evidence about the effects of a multifaceted approach on levels of patient-centeredness, patients’ QoL and distress in fertility care. Furthermore, determinants associated with a change

  10. Development and assessment of indicators for quality of care in severe preeclampsia/eclampsia and postpartum hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talungchit, Pattarawalai; Liabsuetrakul, Tippawan; Lindmark, Gunilla

    2013-01-01

    Severe preeclampsia/eclampsia and postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) are serious obstetric problems worldwide. Quality improvement of care measured by evidence-based indicators is recommended as a recent important strategy; however, the indicators for quality of care of these two conditions have not been established. This study aimed to develop such indicators and assess their validity, reliability, and feasibility at different contextual levels. Of 32 initially valid indicators for care of severe preeclampsia/eclampsia, after two rounds of Delphi technique, 21 and 30 indicators were agreed to be suitable to monitor care at district and referral hospitals. Of 13 initial indicators for PPH, 8 and 13 indicators were selected, respectively. The interrater reliability of indicators varied from 0.28 to 0.63. At least three-fourths of all indicators rated by local doctors and nurses were assessed as feasible in terms of relevance, measurability, and improvability. The process identified reliable and feasible performance indicators to monitor quality of care in severe preeclampsia/eclampsia and PPH for either basic or comprehensive emergency obstetric care (EmOC). The informative applicability of these indicators in clinical practice needs further evaluation.

  11. Ocular irritation reversibility assessment for personal care products using a porcine corneal culture assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Douglas A; Avalos, Javier; Kaufman, Lewis E; Simion, F Anthony; Cerven, Daniel R

    2011-04-01

    Personal care product manufacturers have used a broad spectrum of alternative ocular irritation assays during the past two decades because these tests do not require the use of live animals, they provide reliable predictive data, and they are relatively inexpensive to conduct. To complement these assays, the ex vivo Porcine Corneal Opacity Reversibility Assay (PorCORA) was recently developed using a corneal culture model to predict reversibility of ocular irritants. Three commercially available consumer products (a shampoo, a hair color glaze, and a hair colorant system containing 12% hydrogen peroxide) were each tested in two PorCORA study replicates in order to assess potential ocular damage reversibility for surfactant-, propylene carbonate-, and peroxide-based formulations, respectively. Under the exaggerated, in vitro study conditions, the surfactant-based shampoo may cause irreversible porcine corneal damage (histological changes in the epithelial squamous cell and/or basal cell layers), whereas the hair color glaze and 12% hydrogen peroxide product caused fully reversible ocular irritation (microscopic changes only in the superficial squamous cell layer). The hair color glaze and peroxide product results correlate with established in vivo data for similar compounds, but the shampoo results contradicted previous BCOP results (expected to be only a mild irritant). Therefore, although the PorCORA protocol shows promise in predicting the extent and reversibility of potential ocular damage caused by accidental consumer eye exposure to personal care products, the contradictory results for the surfactant-based shampoo indicate that more extensive validation testing of the PorCORA is necessary to definitively establish the protocol's reliability as a Draize test replacement.

  12. Assessment of Drug Related Problems in Patients with Cardiovascular Diseases in a Tertiary Care Teaching Hospital

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    Javedh Shareef

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds: Drug related problems can be defined as any event (or circumstance involving the drug treatment, which interferes or potentially interferes with the patient in achieving an optimum outcome of medical care. The aim of the study was to identify drug therapy problems and to assess the pharmacist interventions in patients with cardiovascular diseases.Methods: The inpatient case records including drug history and other relevant details of the admitted patients under the cardiology department were collected and reviewed by the clinical pharmacist for drug related problems. In case if any drug related problem was identified, was discussed with the concerned physician and suitable interventions was provided and documented.Results: A total of 112 patient case sheets were reviewed during the study period, out of which 53 drug related problems were identified from 44 patients. The most common drug related problem was found to be drug Interactions (49.05% followed by Adverse Drug Reaction (18.86%, and failure to receive drugs (9.43%. The most frequent suggestions provided by the intervening pharmacist were cessation of drug (24.52%, followed by Change in frequency of administration (22.64%, change in drug dose (20.75%. The majority of level of significance of drug related problems was seen to have moderate significance in grade. The acceptance rate of recommendations and change in drug therapy was found to be high (96.21%.Conclusion: The current study highlights the importance of a pharmacist in a multidisciplinary team of routinely reviewing the drug therapy for identification and resolution of drug related problems which helps in achieving better therapeutic outcomes and improved patient care.

  13. Assessment of work stress and alcohol use in mental health care workers

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    Athanasiadis T.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The documentation and assessment of general work stressors and alcohol use on mental health care workers as well as the relationship between them. Material and method: The sample consisted of 300 mental health care workers who worked in Private and Public Psychiatric Clinics and Psychiatric Hospitals of the country (Hellas. The collection of empirical material was done by using a questionnaire that included a scale of 34 questions for detecting occupational stress factors, the self-esteem scale of the Spielberger and questions about alcohol use. The statistical analysis of data was done with the statistical program SPSS version 15.0 using Student t - test, the ANOVA analysis of variance test and x2 test. Results: Higher frequency occupational stress factors appeared in Nurses rather than Doctors as well as in employees in Private Psychiatric Clinics rather than employees in the Public sector. The fact that Nurses have higher frequency in stressors rather than Doctors is reflected in measurements of anxiety, as a state as well as a personality trait. Also the employees of Private Psychiatric Clinics exhibit greater indicator of anxiety as a personality trait than the employees of the Public sector. Regarding alcohol use (concept of efficiency and normal consumption quantity it was found to be positively associated with the age of the employees. Also the concept of the effectiveness of alcohol in tackling work stress is associated with some occupational stress factors (dangerous conditions of work, rolling working hours. Conclusions: Factors such as specialty and the type of workplace (Public, Private sector affect the stress experienced by the mental health professional. The view of alcohol as a means of relieving working stress is associated with certain stressors of work and the worker's age.

  14. Causality assessment of adverse drug reaction in Pulmonology Department of a Tertiary Care Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Amer; Adil, Mir S.; Nematullah, K.; Ihtisham, S.; Aamer, K.; Aamir, Syed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Adverse drug reaction (ADR) is considered to be the sixth leading cause of death. The incidence rate estimates approximately 2% of hospital admissions are due to ADRs. Objective: To monitor ADRs in Pulmonology department of a tertiary care hospital patient with pulmonary diseases in an inpatient department of pulmonology. Materials and Methods: A prospective, single centered, observational and open labeled study was carried out in Princess Esra Hospital. The patient population was broadly divided into four categories based on diagnosis - chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, Infections, Asthma and Others. Suspected ADRs were reported, analyzed, and causality assessment was carried out using Naranjo's algorithm scale. Results: A total of 302 patients were observed, of which 98 patients experienced ADRs, which accounted for 32.23% of the incidence and totally 160 ADEs were observed. Adult Patients were found to have higher incidence (32.09%) while the incidence rate was slightly greater in geriatric patients (32.39%). The highest incidence of ADEs were found in others group (78.57%). Majority of ADRs were suspected to be due to theophylline (19.39%). Gastrointestinal system (38.75%) was the most common organ system affected due to ADRs. Drug was withdrawn in 12 patients, and specific treatment was administered to 32 patients in view of clinical status. Specific treatment for the management of suspected reaction was administered in 32.65% of ADR reports. Conclusion: A relatively high incidence of adverse drug events (32.2%) have been recorded which shows that not only Geriatric patients, but also adults are more susceptible to adverse drug effects. A number of drugs in combination were used, and ADEs often get multiplied. Careful therapeutic monitoring and dose individualization is necessary. PMID:26229344

  15. Assessing undergraduate nursing students' knowledge, attitudes, and cultural competence in caring for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Kristy L; Folse, Victoria N

    2015-01-01

    Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients experience barriers to health care that include fear of discrimination, as well as insensitivity and lack of knowledge about LGBT-specific health needs among providers. This study examined the effectiveness of an educational intervention designed to improve knowledge and attitudes of baccalaureate nursing students regarding LGBT patient care. Education focused on key terminology, health disparities, medical needs of transgender patients, and culturally sensitive communication skills for competent LGBT patient care. Knowledge level and attitudes were evaluated before and after the intervention using a survey based on a modified Attitudes Toward Lesbians and Gay Men Scale and two assessment tools developed for this study. A statistically significant increase in positive attitudes and knowledge level was found immediately after the intervention. Findings from this study support the inclusion of education related to LGBT patient health care in undergraduate nursing curricula to promote cultural competence and sensitivity.

  16. User satisfaction is influenced by the interval between a health care service and the assessment of the service

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hanne Irene; Ammentorp, Jette; Kofoed, Poul-Erik

    2010-01-01

    In order to improve the quality of patient care, questionnaires are often used to identify user's experiences and evaluations, but only a few studies have examined whether measuring user satisfaction at different time points influences the assessment of health care. Several studies have shown...... equivalency between paper and electronic patient reported outcomes; however, none of these studies have considered the fact that electronic questionnaires are usually completed at the hospital, while paper questionnaires are typically completed at home weeks after the visit. In order to ensure...... that the comparison of results collected by the two different methods are not biased, the aim of this study was to determine if the interval between an outpatient visit and the assessment of the quality of care influences user satisfaction and to compare response rates between questionnaires completed at different...

  17. Measuring unmet needs to assess the quality of home health care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, A.J.E. de; Bakker, D.H. de

    1994-01-01

    Until now home care research has been primarily focused on functional limitations. The instrument presented in this article also takes into account needs for psychosocial care, extra information, nursing care, and extra arrangements such as adaptations of the house. Elderly people with a chronic dis

  18. Non-invasive measurement of hemoglobin: assessment of two different point-of-care technologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etienne Gayat

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Measurement of blood hemoglobin (Hb concentration is a routine procedure. Using a non-invasive point-of-care device reduces pain and discomfort for the patient and allows time saving in patient care. The aims of the present study were to assess the concordance of Hb levels obtained non-invasively with the Pronto-7 monitor (version 2.1.9, Masimo Corporation, Irvine, USA or with the NBM-200MP monitor (Orsense, Nes Ziona, Israel and the values obtained from the usual colorimetric method using blood samples and to determine the source of discordance. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted two consecutive prospective open trials enrolling patients presenting in the emergency department of a university hospital. The first was designed to assess Pronto-7™ and the second NBM-200MP™. In each study, the main outcome measure was the agreement between both methods. Independent factors associated with the bias were determined using multiple linear regression. Three hundred patients were prospectively enrolled in each study. For Pronto-7™, the absolute mean difference was 0.56 g.L(-1 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.41 to 0.69 with an upper agreement limit at 2.94 g.L(-1 (95% CI [2.70;3.19], a lower agreement limit at -1.84 g.L(-1 (95% CI [-2.08;-1.58] and an intra-class correlation coefficient at 0.80 (95% CI [0.74;0.84]. The corresponding values for the NBM-200MP™ were 0.21 [0.02;0.39], 3.42 [3.10;3.74], -3.01 [-3.32;-2.69] and 0.69 [0.62;0.75]. Multivariate analysis showed that age and laboratory values of hemoglobin were independently associated with the bias when using Pronto-7™, while perfusion index and laboratory value of hemoglobin were independently associated with the bias when using NBM-200MP™. CONCLUSION: Despite a relatively limited bias in both cases, the large limits of agreement found in both cases render the clinical usefulness of such devices debatable. For both devices, the bias is independently and inversely associated

  19. New Mexico Look for the STARS--AIM HIGH: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of New Mexico's Look for the STARS--AIM HIGH prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4)…

  20. Diagnostic accuracy of history taking and physical examination for assessing anterior cruciate ligament lesions of the knee in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wagemakers, H.P.; Luijsterburg, P.A.; Boks, S.S.; Heintjes, E.M.; Berger, M.Y.; Verhaar, J.A.; Koes, B.W.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Wagemakers HP, Luijsterburg PA, Boks SS, Heintjes EM, Berger MY, Verhaar JA, Koes BK, Bierma-Zeinstra SM. Diagnostic accuracy of history taking and physical examination for assessing anterior cruciate ligament lesions of the knee in primary care. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2010;91:1452-9. Objective: To a

  1. Validation and Evaluation of Two Observational Pain Assessment Tools in a Trauma and Neurosurgical Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Topolovec-Vranic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Studies have demonstrated that patients in the intensive care unit experience high levels of pain. While many of these patients are nonverbal at some point during their stay, there are few valid tools available to assess pain in this group.

  2. The Development of an ICF-Oriented, Adaptive Physician Assessment Instrument of Mobility, Self-care, and Domestic Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farin, Erik; Fleitz, Annette

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was development and psychometric testing of an adaptive, International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF)-oriented questionnaire to be processed by the rehabilitation physician that aids in assessing mobility, self-care, and domestic life (Moses-Physician). The intent is to develop a physician…

  3. Risk assessment of parents' concerns at 18 months in preventive child health care predicted child abuse and neglect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.I.E. Staal; J.M.A. Hermanns; A.J.P. Schrijvers; H.F. van Stel

    2013-01-01

    Objective: As child maltreatment has a major impact, prevention and early detection of parenting problems are of great importance. We have developed a structured interview which uses parents’ concerns for a joint needs assessment by parents and a child health care nurse, followed by a professional j