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Sample records for assessing organ doses

  1. Assessment of organ equivalent doses and effective doses from diagnostic X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Hyun

    2003-02-01

    The MIRD-type adult male, female and age 10 phantoms were constructed to evaluate organ equivalent dose and effective dose of patient due to typical diagnostic X-ray examination. These phantoms were constructed with external and internal dimensions of Korean. The X-ray energy spectra were generated with SPEC78. MCNP4B ,the general-purposed Monte Carlo code, was used. Information of chest PA , chest LAT, and abdomen AP diagnostic X-ray procedures was collected on the protocol of domestic hospitals. The results showed that patients pick up approximate 0.02 to 0.18 mSv of effective dose from a single chest PA examination, and 0.01 to 0.19 mSv from a chest LAT examination depending on the ages. From an abdomen AP examination, patients pick up 0.17 to 1.40 mSv of effective dose. Exposure time, organ depth from the entrance surface and X-ray beam field coverage considerably affect the resulting doses. Deviation among medical institutions is somewhat high, and this indicated that medical institutions should interchange their information and the need of education for medical staff. The methodology and the established system can be applied, with some expansion, to dose assessment for other medical procedures accompanying radiation exposure of patients like nuclear medicine or therapeutic radiology

  2. Assessment of Organ Radiation Dose Associated with Uterine Artery Embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glomset, O.; Hellesnes, J.; Heimland, N.; Hafsahl, G.; Smith, H.J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the radiation dose to the skin, uterus, and ovaries during uterine artery embolization. Material and Methods: Guided uterine artery embolization for leiomyomata and two types of X-ray equipment with different dose levels were utilized during fluoroscopy in 20 women (ages ranging from 32 to 52 years, body weights from 55 to 68 kg). The first 13 women were treated using a non-pulsed system A, with 3.3 mm Al filtering and, for simplicity, a fixed peak voltage 80 kV. During treatment of the other 7 women, a pulsed system B with 5.4 mm Al filtering and an identical fixed voltage was used. The dose area product (DAP) was recorded. The vaginal dose of the first 13 patients and the peak skin dose of all patients were measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs). TLDs were placed in the posterior vaginal fornix and on the skin at the beam entrance site. The uterine and ovarian doses were estimated based on the measured skin doses, normalized depth dose, and organ depth values. The effective dose (D eff ) was estimated based on the observed DAP values. The measured vaginal doses and the corresponding estimated uterine doses were compared statistically, as were the DAP values from systems A and B. Results: For system A, the mean fluoroscopic time was 20.9 min (range 12.7-31.1), and for system B 35.9 min (range 16.4-55.4). The mean numbers of angiographic exposures for systems A and B were 82 (range 30-164) and 37 (range 20-72), respectively. The mean peak skin dose for system A was 601.5 mGy (range 279-1030) and for system B 453 mGy (range 257-875). The mean DAP for system A was 88.6 Gy cm 2 (range 41.4-161.0) and for system B 52.5 Gy cm 2 (range 20.1-107.9). Statistical analysis showed a significant difference between the DAP values, the DAP for system B being the lower one. The mean estimated effective doses from systems A and B were 32 mSv (range 15.1-58.4) and 22 mSv (range 9-46), respectively. The mean estimated maximum uterine and ovarian doses

  3. Assessment of dose received by organ in lumbosacral examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eltyeib, Nashwa Kheirallah

    2014-11-01

    The biological damage produced by radiation is closely related to the amount of energy absorbed in the case x- rays. Measurement of produced ionizing provides a useful assessment of the total energy absorbed. This study was performed in Khartoum Teaching Hospital in period of January to June 2014. This study was performed to assess the effective dose (ED) received in lumbosacral radiography examination and to analyze effective dose distributions among radiological department under study. The study was performed in Khartoum Teaching Hospital, covering two x-ray units and a sample of 50 patients. The following parameters were recorded: age weight, height, body mass index (BMI) derived from mass (kg) and (height. (m)) and exposure factors. The dose was measured for lumbosacral x- rays examination. For effective dose calculation, the entrance surface dose (ESD) values were estimated from the x-ray tube output parameters for lumbosacral spine A P and lateral examinations. The ED values were then calculated from the obtained ESD values using IAEA calculation methods. Effective doses were than calculated from energy imported using ED conversion factors by IAEA. The results of ED values calculated showed that patient exposures were within the normal range of exposure. The mean ED values calculated were (2.49 ±0.03) mGy and (5.5.60 ± 0.0.22) mGy for Lumbosacral spine A P and lateral examinations, respectively. Further studies are recommended with more number of patients and using more modalities for comparison.(Author)

  4. Equivalent dose, effective dose and risk assessment from cephalometric radiography to critical organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Seong Sook; Cho, Bon Hae; Kim, Hyun Ja

    1995-01-01

    In head and neck region, the critical organ and tissue doses were determined, and the risks were estimated from lateral, posteroanterial and basilar cephalometric radiography. For each cephalometric radiography, 31 TLDs were placed in selected sites (18 internal and 13 external sites) in a tissue-equivalent phantom and exposed, then read-out in the TLD reader. The following results were obtained; 1. From lateral cephalometric radiography, the highest effective dose recorded was that delivered to the salivary gland (3.6 μSv) and the next highest dose was that received by the bone marrow (3 μSv). 2. From posteroanterial cephalometric radiography, the highest effective dose recorded was that delivered to the salivary gland (2 μSv) and the next highest dose was that received by the bone marrow (1.8 μSv). 3. From basilar cephalometric radiography, the highest effective dose recorded was that delivered to the thyroid gland (31.4 μSv) and the next highest dose was that received by the salivary gland (13.3 μSv). 4. The probabilities of stochastic effect from lateral, posteroanterial and basilar cephalometric radiography were 0.72 X 10 -6 , 0.49 X 10 -6 and 3.51 X 10 -6 , respectively.

  5. Evaluation of various approaches for assessing dose indicators and patient organ doses resulting from radiotherapy cone-beam CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rampado, Osvaldo; Giglioli, Francesca Romana; Rossetti, Veronica; Ropolo, Roberto; Fiandra, Christian; Ragona, Riccardo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate various approaches for assessing patient organ doses resulting from radiotherapy cone-beam CT (CBCT), by the use of thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements in anthropomorphic phantoms, a Monte Carlo based dose calculation software, and different dose indicators as presently defined. Methods: Dose evaluations were performed on a CBCT Elekta XVI (Elekta, Crawley, UK) for different protocols and anatomical regions. The first part of the study focuses on using PCXMC software (PCXMC 2.0, STUK, Helsinki, Finland) for calculating organ doses, adapting the input parameters to simulate the exposure geometry, and beam dose distribution in an appropriate way. The calculated doses were compared to readouts of TLDs placed in an anthropomorphic Rando phantom. After this validation, the software was used for analyzing organ dose variability associated with patients’ differences in size and gender. At the same time, various dose indicators were evaluated: kerma area product (KAP), cumulative air-kerma at the isocenter (K_a_i_r), cone-beam dose index, and central cumulative dose. The latter was evaluated in a single phantom and in a stack of three adjacent computed tomography dose index phantoms. Based on the different dose indicators, a set of coefficients was calculated to estimate organ doses for a range of patient morphologies, using their equivalent diameters. Results: Maximum organ doses were about 1 mGy for head and neck and 25 mGy for chest and pelvis protocols. The differences between PCXMC and TLDs doses were generally below 10% for organs within the field of view and approximately 15% for organs at the boundaries of the radiation beam. When considering patient size and gender variability, differences in organ doses up to 40% were observed especially in the pelvic region; for the organs in the thorax, the maximum differences ranged between 20% and 30%. Phantom dose indexes provided better correlation with organ doses

  6. Ocular organ dose assessment of nuclear medicine workers handling diagnostic radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong In; Kim, Ja Mee; Kim, Jung Hoon

    2017-01-01

    The dose distribution in the ocular organs of nuclear medicine workers during the handling of diagnostic radionuclides was assessed via simulation in virtual space. The cornea and lenses received the highest dose, and the dose distribution tended to be proportional to the gamma-ray energy emitted from the radiation source being handled. Moreover, calculations on the dose-reduction effects of eye-wear protectors for the eyes of the workers showed that the effects were inversely proportional to the emitted gamma-ray energy, with the dose-reduction effect decreasing in the order of "2"0"1Tl, "1"2"3I, "9"9mTc, "6"7Ga, "1"1"1In and "1"8F. Among the considered sources, the dose-reduction effect was significant for sources that emit relatively less energy, namely "1"2"3I, "2"0"1Tl and "9"9mTc, while it was lower for the remaining sources, namely "1"8F, "1"1"1In and "6"7Ga. (authors)

  7. Assessment of organ doses by standard X-ray procedures in the GDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tautz, M.; Brandt, G.A.

    1986-01-01

    A modern method has been described to assess the radiation burden by X-ray procedures with consideration of the standards of our Society for Medical Radiology in the GDR. The underlying methodology is a Monte Carlo computer technique, which simulates stochastically the energy deposition of X-ray photons in a mathematically described heterogeneous anthropomorphic phantom by Rosenstein (US Department of Health, Education and Welfare). To apply the procedure specific values for the following parameters must be determined for each dose estimation: projection and view, X-ray field size and location entrance exposure at skin surface, beam quality, source-to-image receptor distance. The base data are obtained in terms of tissue-air ratio. Organ doses were calculated for chest, urography, skull, cervical spine, thoracic spine, lumbar spine, pelvis and lymphography. Concluding possibilities have been discussed for reduction of radiation burden. 9 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs. (author)

  8. Development of the voxel computational phantoms of pediatric patients and their application to organ dose assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Choonik

    A series of realistic voxel computational phantoms of pediatric patients were developed and then used for the radiation risk assessment for various exposure scenarios. The high-resolution computed tomographic images of live patients were utilized for the development of the five voxel phantoms of pediatric patients, 9-month male, 4-year female, 8-year female, 11-year male, and 14-year male. The phantoms were first developed as head and torso phantoms and then extended into whole body phantoms by utilizing computed tomographic images of a healthy adult volunteer. The whole body phantom series was modified to have the same anthropometrics with the most recent reference data reported by the international commission on radiological protection. The phantoms, named as the University of Florida series B, are the first complete set of the pediatric voxel phantoms having reference organ masses and total heights. As part of the dosimetry study, the investigation on skeletal tissue dosimetry methods was performed for better understanding of the radiation dose to the active bone marrow and bone endosteum. All of the currently available methodologies were inter-compared and benchmarked with the paired-image radiation transport model. The dosimetric characteristics of the phantoms were investigated by using Monte Carlo simulation of the broad parallel beams of external phantom in anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left lateral, right lateral, rotational, and isotropic angles. Organ dose conversion coefficients were calculated for extensive photon energies and compared with the conventional stylized pediatric phantoms of Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The multi-slice helical computed tomography exams were simulated using Monte Carlo simulation code for various exams protocols, head, chest, abdomen, pelvis, and chest-abdomen-pelvis studies. Results have found realistic estimates of the effective doses for frequently used protocols in pediatric radiology. The results were very

  9. Assessment of low-dose radiotoxicity in microorganisms and higher organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obeid, Muhammad Hassan

    2016-01-01

    This work was dedicated to quantify and distinguish the radio- and chemitoxic effects of environmentally relevant low doses of uranium on the metabolism of microorganisms and multicellular organisms by a modern and highly sensitive microcalorimetry. In such low-dose regime, lethality is low or absent. Therefore, quantitative assays based on survival curves cannot be employed, particularly for multicellular organisms. Even in the case of microbial growth, where individual cells may be killed by particle radiation, classical toxicity assessments based on colony counting are not only extremely time-consuming but also highly error-prone. Therefore, measuring the metabolic activity of the organism under such kinds of conditions would give an extremely valuable quantitative measure of viability that is based on life cell monitoring, rather than determining lethality at higher doses and extrapolating it to the low dose regime. The basic concept is simple as it relies on the metabolic heat produced by an organism during development, growth or replication as an inevitable byproduct of all biochemical processes. A metabolic effect in this concept is defined as a change in heat production over time in the presence of a stressor, such as a heavy metal. This approach appeared to be particular versatile for the low dose regime. Thus, the thesis attempted in this case to measure the enthalpy production of a bacterial population as a whole to derive novel toxicity concepts. In the following chapters, an introduction about the properties of ionizing radiation will be briefly presented, in addition to a review about the isothermal calorimetry and its application in studying the bacterial growth. Later in chapter 2, the effect of uranium on the metabolic activity of three different bacterial strains isolated form a uranium mining waste pile together with a reference strain that is genetically related to them will be investigated. Due to the lack of published dedicated calibration

  10. Assessment of low-dose radiotoxicity in microorganisms and higher organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obeid, Muhammad Hassan

    2016-01-11

    This work was dedicated to quantify and distinguish the radio- and chemitoxic effects of environmentally relevant low doses of uranium on the metabolism of microorganisms and multicellular organisms by a modern and highly sensitive microcalorimetry. In such low-dose regime, lethality is low or absent. Therefore, quantitative assays based on survival curves cannot be employed, particularly for multicellular organisms. Even in the case of microbial growth, where individual cells may be killed by particle radiation, classical toxicity assessments based on colony counting are not only extremely time-consuming but also highly error-prone. Therefore, measuring the metabolic activity of the organism under such kinds of conditions would give an extremely valuable quantitative measure of viability that is based on life cell monitoring, rather than determining lethality at higher doses and extrapolating it to the low dose regime. The basic concept is simple as it relies on the metabolic heat produced by an organism during development, growth or replication as an inevitable byproduct of all biochemical processes. A metabolic effect in this concept is defined as a change in heat production over time in the presence of a stressor, such as a heavy metal. This approach appeared to be particular versatile for the low dose regime. Thus, the thesis attempted in this case to measure the enthalpy production of a bacterial population as a whole to derive novel toxicity concepts. In the following chapters, an introduction about the properties of ionizing radiation will be briefly presented, in addition to a review about the isothermal calorimetry and its application in studying the bacterial growth. Later in chapter 2, the effect of uranium on the metabolic activity of three different bacterial strains isolated form a uranium mining waste pile together with a reference strain that is genetically related to them will be investigated. Due to the lack of published dedicated calibration

  11. Equivalent dose, effective dose and risk assessment from panoramic radiography to the critical organs of head and neck region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Bong Hae; Nah, Kyung Soo; Lee, Ae Ryeon

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the equivalent and effective dose, and estimate radiation risk to the critical organs of head and neck region from the use of adult and child mode in panoramic radiography. The results were as follows. 1. The salivary glands showed the highest equivalent and effective dose in adult and child mode. The equivalent and effective dose in adult mode were 837 μSv and 20.93 μSv, those in child mode were 462 μSv and 11.54 μSv, respectively. 2. Total effective doses to the critical head and neck organs were estimated 34.2l μSv in adult mode, 20.14 μSv in child mode. From these data, the probabilities of stochastic effect from adult and child mode were 2.50xl0 -6 and 1.47x10 -6 3. The other remainder showed the greatest risk of fatal cancer. The risk estimate were 4.5 and 2.7 fatal malignancies in adult and child mode from million examinations. The bone marrow and thyroid gland showed about 0.1 fatal cancer in adult. and child mode from these examinations.

  12. Incorporating organ movements in inverse planning: assessing dose uncertainties by Bayesian inference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unkelbach, J; Oelfke, U

    2005-01-01

    We present a method to calculate dose uncertainties due to inter-fraction organ movements in fractionated radiotherapy, i.e. in addition to the expectation value of the dose distribution a variance distribution is calculated. To calculate the expectation value of the dose distribution in the presence of organ movements, one estimates a probability distribution of possible patient geometries. The respective variance of the expected dose distribution arises for two reasons: first, the patient is irradiated with a finite number of fractions only and second, the probability distribution of patient geometries has to be estimated from a small number of images and is therefore not exactly known. To quantify the total dose variance, we propose a method that is based on the principle of Bayesian inference. The method is of particular interest when organ motion is incorporated in inverse IMRT planning by means of inverse planning performed on a probability distribution of patient geometries. In order to make this a robust approach, it turns out that the dose variance should be considered (and minimized) in the optimization process. As an application of the presented concept of Bayesian inference, we compare three approaches to inverse planning based on probability distributions that account for an increasing degree of uncertainty. The Bayes theorem further provides a concept to interpolate between patient specific data and population-based knowledge on organ motion which is relevant since the number of CT images of a patient is typically small

  13. SU-F-I-38: Patient Organ Specific Dose Assessment in Coronary CT Angiograph Using Voxellaized Volume Dose Index in Monte Carlo Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallal, Mohammadi Gh.; Riyahi, Alam N.; Graily, Gh. [Tehran University of Medical Scienced(TUMS), School of Medicine, Department of Nedical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Paydar, R. [Iran University of Medical Sciences(IUMS), Allied Medicine Faculty, Department of radiation Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Clinical use of multi detector computed tomography(MDCT) in diagnosis of diseases due to high speed in data acquisition and high spatial resolution is significantly increased. Regarding to the high radiation dose in CT and necessity of patient specific radiation risk assessment, the adoption of new method in the calculation of organ dose is completely required and necessary. In this study by introducing a conversion factor, patient organ dose in thorax region based on CT image data using MC system was calculated. Methods: The geometry of x-ray tube, inherent filter, bow tie filter and collimator were designed using EGSnrc/BEAMnrc MC-system component modules according to GE-Light-speed 64-slices CT-scanner geometry. CT-scan image of patient thorax as a specific phantom was voxellised with 6.25mm3 in voxel and 64×64×20 matrix size. Dose to thorax organ include esophagus, lung, heart, breast, ribs, muscle, spine, spinal cord with imaging technical condition of prospectively-gated-coronary CT-Angiography(PGT) as a step and shoot method, were calculated. Irradiation of patient specific phantom was performed using a dedicated MC-code as DOSXYZnrc with PGT-irradiation model. The ratio of organ dose value calculated in MC-method to the volume CT dose index(CTDIvol) reported by CT-scanner machine according to PGT radiation technique has been introduced as conversion factor. Results: In PGT method, CTDIvol was 10.6mGy and Organ Dose/CTDIvol conversion factor for esophagus, lung, heart, breast, ribs, muscle, spine and spinal cord were obtained as; 0.96, 1.46, 1.2, 3.28. 6.68. 1.35, 3.41 and 0.93 respectively. Conclusion: The results showed while, underestimation of patient dose was found in dose calculation based on CTDIvol, also dose to breast is higher than the other studies. Therefore, the method in this study can be used to provide the actual patient organ dose in CT imaging based on CTDIvol in order to calculation of real effective dose(ED) based on organ dose

  14. An Assessment of Cs-137, R-226 and Pa-239, 240 doses for aquatic and terrestrial reference organisms in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajewski, P.; Suplinska, M.; Rosiak, I.

    2004-01-01

    The doses assessment for aquatic and terrestrial reference organisms was performed, based on the methodology elaborated by U.S. Department of Energy. Four organism types and their corresponding dose limits were used, and the principal exposure pathways were considered for aquatic animal, riparian animal, terrestrial plant, and terrestrial animal organism types respectively. Terrestrial rodent (apodemus flavicollis), Baltic Sea fish (cod, sprat, herring, plaice) and crustaceans (Sanduria entomon and Mytilus edulis) were taken in to special consideration. In the first screening approach the annual doses from 137Cs and 239Pu (bomb-tests-fallout and Czarnobyl origin) and 226Ra (natural radionuclide) to biota were calculated at average, minimum and maximum concentrations of these radionuclides observed in soil, water, and sediment using the default bioaccumulation factors as well as lumped parameters values recommended by DOE Standard. The concentrations of 137Cs measured in the most contaminated region in Poland (Stare Olesno 380 Bqxkg-1 d.w.) and the concentrations of 226Ra for Southern regions of Poland with elevated levels of 226Ra in soil (100 B kg-1 d.w.) were taken in the dose assessment for terrestrial animals. The concentrations of 137Cs and 239Pu and 226Ra determined in see water and bottom sediments from two sub-areas (Gdansk Basin and Bornholm Basin) were used in the dose assessment for aquatic biota. In the second ''site specific'' approach the average empirically measured concentrations of radionuclides in animal tissues were used. At the first approach the total maximal annual doses for terrestrial plants were less then one percent of the recommended dose limits ( 3600 mGyxy-1 ) and items for seawater organisms did not exceed a 40% of this limit whereas the total maximal annual doses for terrestrial animal were close to the recommended dose limit (360 mGyxy-1). It prompted to start supplementary site-specific biota dose assessment through site

  15. Entrance surface dose distribution and organ dose assessment for cone-beam computed tomography using measurements and Monte Carlo simulations with voxel phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, M.; Di Maria, S.; Vieira, S.; Vaz, P.

    2017-11-01

    Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) enables high-resolution volumetric scanning of the bone and soft tissue anatomy under investigation at the treatment accelerator. This technique is extensively used in Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) for pre-treatment verification of patient position and target volume localization. When employed daily and several times per patient, CBCT imaging may lead to high cumulative imaging doses to the healthy tissues surrounding the exposed organs. This work aims at (1) evaluating the dose distribution during a CBCT scan and (2) calculating the organ doses involved in this image guiding procedure for clinically available scanning protocols. Both Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and measurements were performed. To model and simulate the kV imaging system mounted on a linear accelerator (Edge™, Varian Medical Systems) the state-of-the-art MC radiation transport program MCNPX 2.7.0 was used. In order to validate the simulation results, measurements of the Computed Tomography Dose Index (CTDI) were performed, using standard PMMA head and body phantoms, with 150 mm length and a standard pencil ionizing chamber (IC) 100 mm long. Measurements for head and pelvis scanning protocols, usually adopted in clinical environment were acquired, using two acquisition modes (full-fan and half fan). To calculate the organ doses, the implemented MC model of the CBCT scanner together with a male voxel phantom ("Golem") was used. The good agreement between the MCNPX simulations and the CTDIw measurements (differences up to 17%) presented in this work reveals that the CBCT MC model was successfully validated, taking into account the several uncertainties. The adequacy of the computational model to map dose distributions during a CBCT scan is discussed in order to identify ways to reduce the total CBCT imaging dose. The organ dose assessment highlights the need to evaluate the therapeutic and the CBCT imaging doses, in a more balanced approach, and the

  16. Organ dose and risk assessment in paediatric radiography using the PCXMC 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladia, A.; Messaris, G.; Delis, H.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2015-09-01

    Abdominal and chest radiographs are the most common examinations in paediatric radiology. X-ray examination of children attracts particular interest, mainly due to the increased risk for the expression of delayed radiogenic cancers as they have many years of expected life remaining. This study aims to calculate the organ dose and estimate the radiation Risk of Exposure Induced cancer Death (REID) to paediatric patients, using the PCXMC 2.0 Monte Carlo code.Patient data and exposure parameters were recorded during examinations of 240 patients, separated in four age groups undergoing chest or abdomen examinations.The organs received the highest dose in all patient groups were liver, lungs, stomach, thyroid, pancreas, breast, spleen in chest radiographs and liver, lungs, colon, stomach and ovaries, uterus (for girls) and prostate (for boys) in abdomen radiographs. The effective dosefor the chest was 0.49×10-2- 1.07×10-2 mSv, while for the abdomen 1.85×10-2- 3.02×10-2 mSv. The mean REID value was 1.254×10-5 for the abdomen and 0.645×10-5 for the chest.

  17. Organ dose and risk assessment in paediatric radiography using the PCXMC 2.0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ladia, A; Messaris, G; Delis, H; Panayiotakis, G

    2015-01-01

    Abdominal and chest radiographs are the most common examinations in paediatric radiology. X-ray examination of children attracts particular interest, mainly due to the increased risk for the expression of delayed radiogenic cancers as they have many years of expected life remaining. This study aims to calculate the organ dose and estimate the radiation Risk of Exposure Induced cancer Death (REID) to paediatric patients, using the PCXMC 2.0 Monte Carlo code.Patient data and exposure parameters were recorded during examinations of 240 patients, separated in four age groups undergoing chest or abdomen examinations.The organs received the highest dose in all patient groups were liver, lungs, stomach, thyroid, pancreas, breast, spleen in chest radiographs and liver, lungs, colon, stomach and ovaries, uterus (for girls) and prostate (for boys) in abdomen radiographs. The effective dosefor the chest was 0.49×10 -2 - 1.07×10 -2 mSv, while for the abdomen 1.85×10 -2 - 3.02×10 -2 mSv. The mean REID value was 1.254×10 -5 for the abdomen and 0.645×10 -5 for the chest. (paper)

  18. Using the 60Co source to assess the dose received by risky organs during a cancer brain treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faik Ouahab, Z.; Jehouani, A.; Ghassoun, J.; Senhou, N.; Mouhssine, D.; Groetz, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary of an investigation of exposures associated with brain cancer treatment for a child in order to determine the level of doses received by the different organs at risk during the treatment. Measurements have been performed at the vicinity of a cobalto therapy apparatus. Then, cumulative doses in each organ have been compared to admitted doses with respect to the organ

  19. Preclinical Study of 68Ga-DOTATOC: Biodistribution Assessment in Syrian Rats and Evaluation of Absorbed Dose in Human Organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, Mojdeh; Zolghadri, Samaneh; Yousefnia, Hassan; Ramazani, Ali; Jalilian, Amir Reza

    2016-01-01

    Gallium-68 DOTA-DPhe 1 -Tyr 3 -Octreotide ( 68 Ga-DOTATOC) has been applied by several European centers for the treatment of a variety of human malignancies. Nevertheless, definitive dosimetric data are yet unavailable. According to the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, researchers are investigating the safety and efficacy of this radiotracer to meet Food and Drug Administration requirements. The aim of this study was to introduce the optimized procedure for 68 Ga-DOTATOC preparation, using a novel germanium-68 ( 68 Ge)/ 68 Ga generator in Iran and evaluate the absorbed doses in numerous organs with high accuracy. The optimized conditions for preparing the radiolabeled complex were determined via several experiments by changing the ligand concentration, pH, temperature and incubation time. Radiochemical purity of the complex was assessed, using high-performance liquid chromatography and instant thin-layer chromatography. The absorbed dose of human organs was evaluated, based on biodistribution studies on Syrian rats via Radiation Absorbed Dose Assessment Resource Method. 68 Ga-DOTATOC was prepared with radiochemical purity of >98% and specific activity of 39.6 MBq/nmol. The complex demonstrated great stability at room temperature and in human serum at 37°C at least two hours after preparation. Significant uptake was observed in somatostatin receptor-positive tissues such as pancreatic and adrenal tissues (12.83 %ID/g and 0.91 %ID/g, respectively). Dose estimations in human organs showed that the pancreas, kidneys and adrenal glands received the maximum absorbed doses (0.105, 0.074 and 0.010 mGy/MBq, respectively). Also, the effective absorbed dose was estimated at 0.026 mSv/MBq for 68 Ga-DOTATOC. The obtained results showed that 68 Ga-DOTATOC can be considered as an effective agent for clinical PET imaging in Iran.

  20. CALDoseX-a software tool for the assessment of organ and tissue absorbed doses, effective dose and cancer risks in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, R; Khoury, H J; Vieira, J W

    2008-01-01

    CALDose X is a software tool that provides the possibility of calculating incident air kerma (INAK) and entrance surface air kerma (ESAK), two important quantities used in x-ray diagnosis, based on the output of the x-ray equipment. Additionally, the software uses conversion coefficients (CCs) to assess the absorbed dose to organs and tissues of the human body, the effective dose as well as the patient's cancer risk for radiographic examinations. The CCs, ratios between organ or tissue absorbed doses and measurable quantities, have been calculated with the FAX06 and the MAX06 phantoms for 34 projections of 10 commonly performed x-ray examinations, for 40 combinations of tube potential and filtration ranging from 50 to 120 kVcp and from 2.0 to 5.0 mm aluminum, respectively, for various field positions, for 29 selected organs and tissues and simultaneously for the measurable quantities, INAK, ESAK and kerma area product (KAP). Based on the x-ray irradiation parameters defined by the user, CALDose X shows images of the phantom together with the position of the x-ray beam. By using true to nature voxel phantoms, CALDose X improves earlier software tools, which were mostly based on mathematical MIRD5-type phantoms, by using a less representative human anatomy.

  1. Dosimetric characterization and organ dose assessment in digital breast tomosynthesis: Measurements and Monte Carlo simulations using voxel phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Mariana, E-mail: marianabaptista@ctn.ist.utl.pt; Di Maria, Salvatore; Barros, Sílvia; Vaz, Pedro [Centro de Ciências e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Estrada Nacional 10, km 139,7, Bobadela LRS 2695-066 (Portugal); Figueira, Catarina [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen’s University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Sarmento, Marta; Orvalho, Lurdes [Serviço de Imagiologia, Hospital da Luz, Avenida Lusíada, 100, Lisboa 1500-650 (Portugal)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Due to its capability to more accurately detect deep lesions inside the breast by removing the effect of overlying anatomy, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has the potential to replace the standard mammography technique in clinical screening exams. However, the European Guidelines for DBT dosimetry are still a work in progress and there are little data available on organ doses other than to the breast. It is, therefore, of great importance to assess the dosimetric performance of DBT with respect to the one obtained with standard digital mammography (DM) systems. The aim of this work is twofold: (i) to study the dosimetric properties of a combined DBT/DM system (MAMMOMAT Inspiration Siemens{sup ®}) for a tungsten/rhodium (W/Rh) anode/filter combination and (ii) to evaluate organs doses during a DBT examination. Methods: For the first task, measurements were performed in manual and automatic exposure control (AEC) modes, using two homogeneous breast phantoms: a PMMA slab phantom and a 4 cm thick breast-shaped rigid phantom, with 50% of glandular tissue in its composition. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended v.2.7.0. A MC model was implemented to mimic DM and DBT acquisitions for a wide range of x-ray spectra (24 –34 kV). This was used to calculate mean glandular dose (MGD) and to compute series of backscatter factors (BSFs) that could be inserted into the DBT dosimetric formalism proposed by Dance et al. Regarding the second aim of the study, the implemented MC model of the clinical equipment, together with a female voxel phantom (“Laura”), was used to calculate organ doses considering a typical DBT acquisition. Results were compared with a standard two-view mammography craniocaudal (CC) acquisition. Results: Considering the AEC mode, the acquisition of a single CC view results in a MGD ranging from 0.53 ± 0.07 mGy to 2.41 ± 0.31 mGy in DM mode and from 0.77 ± 0.11 mGy to 2.28 ± 0.32 mGy in DBT mode

  2. Assessing absorbed dose heterogeneities for organ S-value calculation in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mauxion, T.; Villoing, D.; Marcatili, S.; Garcia, M.P.; Poirot, M.; Bardies, M.; Suhard, J.; Barbet, J.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Introduction and aim: S-values calculated according to the MIRD scheme strongly depend on the size of source/target regions and particle ranges (1). Several mean organ S-values were recently calculated for mice in the context of targeted radionuclide therapy and molecular imaging (2). However, the heterogeneity of energy deposition at the sub-organ level is seldom taken into account and the relevance of mean organ S-values is not systematically evaluated. This study aims at assessing spatial variations associated to mean S-values for small animals to estimate energy deposition heterogeneity at the sub-organ or voxel level. Materials and methods: a 29 g-mouse-model generated at high spatial sampling (200*200*200 μm 3 ) from the Moby software was used to calculate S-values for several radionuclides of interest (3). Monte Carlo simulations were performed with GATE (v6.2), in which specific corrections were implemented and validated to improve the accuracy of voxel energy-scoring. Mean S-values and standard deviations were calculated from 3D-voxel-based energy deposition maps for several source/target organ pairs. As the standard deviation associated to the mean S-value in a given target organ includes both spatial and statistical fluctuations, we simulated an increasing number of primary particles (typically from 10 6 to 10 10 ) to estimate the impact of relative statistical/spatial fluctuations for several source/target pairs. A spatial dispersion factor (HS-value for Heterogeneity of S-value) was obtained when the standard deviation converged to a stable value. Results: several HS-values calculated for source organs were significant in case of self-irradiation for all considered radionuclides, but remained very low as compared to values obtained for short and large source/target distances. For example, for 131 I sources located in the thyroid, S(thyroid - thyroid)=1.80*10 -9 Gy.Bq -1 .s -1 and HS(thyroid - thyroid)=3.09*10 -10 Gy

  3. Enjebi Island dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Phillips, W.A.

    1987-07-01

    We have updeated the radiological dose assessment for Enjebi Island at Enewetak Atoll using data derived from analysis of food crops grown on Enjebi. This is a much more precise assessment of potential doses to people resettling Enjebi Island than the 1980 assessment in which there were no data available from food crops on Enjebi. Details of the methods and data used to evaluate each exposure pathway are presented. The terrestrial food chain is the most significant potential exposure pathway and 137 Cs is the radionuclide responsible for most of the estimated dose over the next 50 y. The doses are calculated assuming a resettlement date of 1990. The average wholebody maximum annual estimated dose equivalent derived using our diet model is 166 mremy;the effective dose equivalent is 169 mremy. The estimated 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral whole-body dose equivalents are 3.5 rem, 5.1 rem, and 6.2 rem, respectively. Bone-marrow dose equivalents are only slightly higher than the whole-body estimates in each case. The bone-surface cells (endosteal cells) receive the highest dose, but they are a less sensitive cell population and are less sensitive to fatal cancer induction than whole body and bone marrow. The effective dose equivalents for 30, 50, and 70 y are 3.6 rem, 5.3 rem, and 6.6 rem, respectively. 79 refs., 17 figs., 24 tabs

  4. Assessment of internal doses

    CERN Document Server

    Rahola, T; Falk, R; Isaksson, M; Skuterud, L

    2002-01-01

    There is a definite need for training in dose calculation. Our first course was successful and was followed by a second, both courses were fully booked. An example of new tools for software products for bioassay analysis and internal dose assessment is the Integrated Modules for Bioassay Analysis (IMBA) were demonstrated at the second course. This suite of quality assured code modules have been adopted in the UK as the standard for regulatory assessment purposes. The intercomparison measurements are an important part of the Quality Assurance work. In what is known as the sup O utside workers ' directive it is stated that the internal dose measurements shall be included in the European Unions supervision system for radiation protection. The emergency preparedness regarding internal contamination was much improved by the training with and calibration of handheld instruments from participants' laboratories. More improvement will be gained with the handbook giving practical instructions on what to do in case of e...

  5. Organ dose assessment of nuclear medicine practitioners using L-block shielding device for handing diagnostic radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Se Sik; Kim, Jung Hoon [Dep. of Radiological Science, College of Health Science, Catholic University of Pusan, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Yong In [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    In the case of nuclear medicine practitioners in medical institutions, a wide range of exposure dose to individual workers can be found, depending on the type of source, the amount of radioactivity, and the use of shielding devices in handling radioactive isotopes. In this regard, this study evaluated the organ dose on practitioners as well as the dose reduction effect of the L-block shielding device in handling the diagnostic radiation source through the simulation based on the Monte Carlo method. As a result, the distribution of organ dose was found to be higher as the position of the radiation source was closer to the handling position of a practitioner, and the effective dose distribution was different according to the ICRP tissue weight. Furthermore, the dose reduction effect according to the L-block thickness tended to decrease, which showed the exponential distribution, as the shielding thickness increased. The dose reduction effect according to each radiation source showed a low shielding effect in proportion to the emitted gamma ray energy level.

  6. Assessment of organ dose reduction and secondary cancer risk associated with the use of proton beam therapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy in treatment of neuroblastomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuji, Hiroshi; Harada, Hideyuki; Asakura, Hirofumi; Nishimura, Tetsuo; Schneider, Uwe; Ishida, Yuji; Konno, Masahiro; Yamashita, Haruo; Kase, Yuki; Murayama, Shigeyuki; Onoe, Tsuyoshi; Ogawa, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    To compare proton beam therapy (PBT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with conformal radiation therapy (CRT) in terms of their organ doses and ability to cause secondary cancer in normal organs. Five patients (median age, 4 years; range, 2–11 years) who underwent PBT for retroperitoneal neuroblastoma were selected for treatment planning simulation. Four patients had stage 4 tumors and one had stage 2A tumor, according to the International Neuroblastoma Staging System. Two patients received 36 Gy, two received 21.6 Gy, and one received 41.4 Gy of radiation. The volume structures of these patients were used for simulations of CRT and IMRT treatment. Dose–volume analyses of liver, stomach, colon, small intestine, pancreas, and bone were performed for the simulations. Secondary cancer risks in these organs were calculated using the organ equivalent dose (OED) model, which took into account the rates of cell killing, repopulation, and the neutron dose from the treatment machine. In all evaluated organs, the mean dose in PBT was 20–80% of that in CRT. IMRT also showed lower mean doses than CRT for two organs (20% and 65%), but higher mean doses for the other four organs (110–120%). The risk of secondary cancer in PBT was 24–83% of that in CRT for five organs, but 121% of that in CRT for pancreas. The risk of secondary cancer in IMRT was equal to or higher than CRT for four organs (range 100–124%). Low radiation doses in normal organs are more frequently observed in PBT than in IMRT. Assessments of secondary cancer risk showed that PBT reduces the risk of secondary cancer in most organs, whereas IMRT is associated with a higher risk than CRT

  7. Dose. Detriment. Limit assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breckow, J.

    2015-01-01

    One goal of radiation protection is the limitation of stochastic effects due to radiation exposure. The probability of occurrence of a radiation induced stochastic effect, however, is only one of several other parameters which determine the radiation detriment. Though the ICRP-concept of detriment is a quantitative definition, the kind of detriment weighting includes somewhat subjective elements. In this sense, the detriment-concept of ICRP represents already at the stage of effective dose a kind of assessment. Thus, by comparing radiation protection standards and concepts interconvertible or with those of environment or occupational protection one should be aware of the possibly different principles of detriment assessment.

  8. Model of organ dose combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valley, J.-F.; Lerch, P.

    1977-01-01

    The ICRP recommendations are based on the limitation of the dose to each organ. In the application and for a unique source the critical organ concept allows to limit the calculation and represents the irradiation status of an individuum. When several sources of radiation are involved the derivation of the dose contribution of each source to each organ is necessary. In order to represent the irradiation status a new parameter is to be defined. Propositions have been made by some authors, in particular by Jacobi introducing at this level biological parameters like the incidence rate of detriment and its severity. The new concept is certainly richer than a simple dose notion. However, in the actual situation of knowledge about radiation effects an intermediate parameter, using only physical concepts and the maximum permissible doses to the organs, seems more appropriate. The model, which is a generalization of the critical organ concept and shall be extended in the future to take the biological effects into account, will be presented [fr

  9. Information approach to the assessment of mechanisms and action consequences of ionizing radiation in low doses on a living organism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulanova, K.Ya.; Kundas, S.P.; Lobanok, L.M.; Konoplya, E.F.

    2006-01-01

    In order to reveal the regularities of interaction of the organism with low-intense ionizing radiation, cybernetic approaches are needed. Living organisms are a self-regulating system of behavioural type. The complexity of the organization is determined by the hierarchy of a controlling system. Relations between systems are not of physico-chemical nature; they are based on control, i. e. on information processes. In the information system, all the weak influences (including ionizing radiation) are perceived in the form of a signal. Signal information of a natural radiation background is vitally important for organisms as in cardioversion type, as bioradiation, it is used for management initiation, i. e. self-regulation, self-development and so on. In the case of a superfluous surge of information at man-caused impacts of ionizing radiation (up to 10 Gy) the information system loses its ability to solve information tasks quickly and begins to experience the state of tension. Brought to a very tensed state it is able to lose its balance, its stability, i. e. to die. The signal-information perception of radiation explains the effects of its low dose, the non-linear character of dependence of biologic response of irradiated dose, hormesis phenomenon, apoptosis, remote consequences of irradiation, bystander effect and other postradiation effects. (authors)

  10. Dose assessment and radioecological consequences to aquatic organisms in the areas of Russia exposed to radioactive contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryshev, I.I.; Sazykina, T.G.

    1996-01-01

    A comparative analysis of the radioecological state of aquatic ecosystems in the territory of Russia was performed. The following water bodies were considered: lakes and rivers in the Ural and Chernobyl contaminated areas, the Yenisei River, cooling ponds of nuclear power plants, and the Arctic Seas. It was demonstrated that in all cases under consideration, doses to aquatic organisms were markedly higher than those to humans. Especially high exposure levels to fish and molluscs much in excess of the natural background were observed in a number of water bodies in the Ural and Chernobyl contaminated areas

  11. Determination of organ doses and effective doses in radiooncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, J.; Martinez, A.E.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Purpose: With an increasing chance of success in radiooncology, it is necessary to estimate the risk from radiation scatter to areas outside the target volume. The cancer risk from a radiation treatment can be estimated from the organ doses, allowing a somewhat limited effective dose to be estimated and compared. Material and Methods: The doses of the radiation-sensitive organs outside the target volume can be estimated with the aid of the PC program PERIDOSE developed by van der Giessen. The effective doses are determined according to the concept of ICRP, whereby the target volume and the associated organs related to it are not taken into consideration. Results: Organ doses outside the target volume are generally < 1% of the dose in the target volume. In some cases, however, they can be as high as 3%. The effective doses during radiotherapy are between 60 and 900 mSv, depending upon the specific target volume, the applied treatment technique, and the given dose in the ICRU point. Conclusion: For the estimation of the radiation risk, organ doses in radiooncology can be calculated with the aid of the PC program PERIDOSE. While evaluating the radiation risk after ICRP, for the calculation of the effective dose, the advanced age of many patients has to be considered to prevent that, e.g., the high gonad doses do not overestimate the effective dose. (orig.)

  12. Organ doses from computerized tomography examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janeczek, J.

    1995-12-31

    Estimates of mean organs doses from five typical computerized tomography (CT) examinations were obtained. Measurements were done using Rando-Alderson anthropomorphic phantom and thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD). Radiation dose distributions within a phantom has been measured for each examination and results were used for organ dose calculation. Doses to organs specified by ICPR 60 Recommendations were measured for five CT scanners (CT/T8800, CT 9800, CT MAX - made by General Electric; CT 1200 SX - made by Picker; SOMATOM 2 - made by Siemens). Dose distributions from scattered radiation were measured and indicate that scattered radiation dose to thyroid and eye lens can be reduced by proper examination limits setting. The lowest mean organ doses were obtained from CT/T8800 scanner. More advanced scanners using high intensity continuous radiation were giving higher organ doses. (author). 23 refs, 6 figs, 13 tabs.

  13. Organ doses from computerized tomography examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janeczek, J.

    1995-01-01

    Estimates of mean organs doses from five typical computerized tomography (CT) examinations were obtained. Measurements were done using Rando-Alderson anthropomorphic phantom and thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD). Radiation dose distributions within a phantom has been measured for each examination and results were used for organ dose calculation. Doses to organs specified by ICPR 60 Recommendations were measured for five CT scanners (CT/T8800, CT 9800, CT MAX - made by General Electric; CT 1200 SX - made by Picker; SOMATOM 2 - made by Siemens). Dose distributions from scattered radiation were measured and indicate that scattered radiation dose to thyroid and eye lens can be reduced by proper examination limits setting. The lowest mean organ doses were obtained from CT/T8800 scanner. More advanced scanners using high intensity continuous radiation were giving higher organ doses. (author). 23 refs, 6 figs, 13 tabs

  14. Determination of Entrance Skin Doses and Organ Doses for Medical X Ray Examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tung, C.J.; Cheng, C.Y.; Chao, T.C.; Tsai, H.Y.

    1999-01-01

    A national survey of patient doses for diagnostic X ray radiographs is planned in Taiwan. Entrance skin doses and organ doses for all installed X ray machines will be investigated. A pilot study has been carried out for the national survey to develop a protocol for the dose assessment. Entrance skin doses and organ doses were measured by thermoluminescence dosemeters and calculated by Monte Carlo simulations for several X ray examinations. The conversion factor from free air entrance absorbed dose to entrance skin dose was derived. A formula for the computation of entrance skin doses from inputs of kV p , mA.s, source to skin distance, aluminium filtration, and generator rectifying was constructed. Organ doses were measured using a RANDO phantom and calculated using a mathematical phantom. All data will be passed to the Atomic Energy Council for developing a programme of national survey and regulatory controls for diagnostic X ray examinations. (author)

  15. [Evaluation of Organ Dose Estimation from Indices of CT Dose Using Dose Index Registry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriuchijima, Akiko; Fukushima, Yasuhiro; Ogura, Akio

    Direct measurement of each patient organ dose from computed tomography (CT) is not possible. Most methods to estimate patient organ dose is using Monte Carlo simulation with dedicated software. However, dedicated software is too expensive for small scale hospitals. Not every hospital can estimate organ dose with dedicated software. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the simple method of organ dose estimation using some common indices of CT dose. The Monte Carlo simulation software Radimetrics (Bayer) was used for calculating organ dose and analysis relationship between indices of CT dose and organ dose. Multidetector CT scanners were compared with those from two manufactures (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare; SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare). Using stored patient data from Radimetrics, the relationships between indices of CT dose and organ dose were indicated as each formula for estimating organ dose. The accuracy of estimation method of organ dose was compared with the results of Monte Carlo simulation using the Bland-Altman plots. In the results, SSDE was the feasible index for estimation organ dose in almost organs because it reflected each patient size. The differences of organ dose between estimation and simulation were within 23%. In conclusion, our estimation method of organ dose using indices of CT dose is convenient for clinical with accuracy.

  16. Thermoluminescent dosimetry and assessment of personal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boas, J.F.; Martin, L.J.; Young, J.G.

    1982-01-01

    Thermoluminescence is discussed in terms of the energy band structure of a crystalline solid and the trapping of charge carriers by point defects. Some general properties of thermoluminescent materials used for dosimetry are outlined, with thermoluminescence of CaSO 4 :Dy being described in detail. The energy response function and the modification of the energy response of a dosimeter by shielding are discussed. The final section covers the connection between exposure, as recorded by a TLD badge, and the absorbed dose to various organs from gamma radiation in a uranium mine; the conversion from absorbed dose to dose equivalent; and uncertainties in assessment of dose equivalent

  17. Doses received by organs in interventional cardiology; Les doses recues aux organes en cardiologie interventionnelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maccia, C. [Centre d' Assurance de qualite des Applications Technologiques dans le domaine de la Sante, (CAATS) - 43, Bd du Marechal Joffre, 92 - Bourg-La-Reine (France)

    2009-07-01

    After a discussion of several publications about patient dosimetry in interventional cardiology, the author recalls that the in vivo assessment of the dose received by some organs is uneasy because invasive. Therefore, the assessment requires the use of physical or mathematical dosimetric phantoms which simulate patient morphology as well as the incident photon attenuation phenomenon. He evokes some characteristics and applications of these phantoms. He outlines the different sources and origins of the dose received by the patient, and discusses results obtained by collecting data from 177 patients submitted to diagnosis or therapeutic procedures

  18. Calculation of dose conversion factors for doses in the fingernails to organ doses at external gamma irradiation in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khailov, A.M.; Ivannikov, A.I.; Skvortsov, V.G.; Stepanenko, V.F.; Orlenko, S.P.; Flood, A.B.; Williams, B.B.; Swartz, H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Absorbed doses to fingernails and organs were calculated for a set of homogenous external gamma-ray irradiation geometries in air. The doses were obtained by stochastic modeling of the ionizing particle transport (Monte Carlo method) for a mathematical human phantom with arms and hands placed loosely along the sides of the body. The resulting dose conversion factors for absorbed doses in fingernails can be used to assess the dose distribution and magnitude in practical dose reconstruction problems. For purposes of estimating dose in a large population exposed to radiation in order to triage people for treatment of acute radiation syndrome, the calculated data for a range of energies having a width of from 0.05 to 3.5 MeV were used to convert absorbed doses in fingernails to corresponding doses in organs and the whole body as well as the effective dose. Doses were assessed based on assumed rates of radioactive fallout at different time periods following a nuclear explosion. - Highlights: • Elemental composition and density of nails were determined. • MIRD-type mathematical human phantom with arms and hands was created. • Organ doses and doses to nails were calculated for external photon exposure in air. • Effective dose and nail doses values are close for rotational and soil surface exposures.

  19. Consultative exercise on dose assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, B A; Parker, T; Simmonds, J R; Sumner, D

    2001-06-01

    A summary is given of a meeting held at Sussex University, UK, in October 2000, which allowed the exchange of ideas on methods of assessment of dose to the public arising from potential authorised radioactive discharges from nuclear sites in the UK. Representatives of groups with an interest in dose assessments were invited, and hence the meeting was called the Consultative Exercise on Dose Assessments (CEDA). Although initiated and funded by the Food Standards Agency, its organisation, and the writing of the report, were overseen by an independent Chairman and Steering Group. The report contains recommendations for improvement in co-ordination between different agencies involved in assessments, on method development and on the presentation of data on assessments. These have been prepared by the Steering Group, and will be taken forward by the Food Standards Agency and other agencies in the UK. The recommendations are included in this memorandum.

  20. Radiation transport modeling and assessment to better predict radiation exposure, dose, and toxicological effects to human organs on long duration space flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denkins, Pamela; Badhwar, Gautam; Obot, Victor; Wilson, Bobby; Jejelewo, Olufisayo

    2001-08-01

    NASA is very interested in improving its ability to monitor and forecast the radiation levels that pose a health risk to space-walking astronauts as they construct the International Space Station and astronauts that will participate in long-term and deep-space missions. Human exploratory missions to the moon and Mars within the next quarter century, will expose crews to transient radiation from solar particle events which include high-energy galactic cosmic rays and high-energy protons. Because the radiation levels in space are high and solar activity is presently unpredictable, adequate shielding is needed to minimize the deleterious health effects of exposure to radiation. Today, numerous models have been developed and used to predict radiation exposure. Such a model is the Space Environment Information Systems (SPENVIS) modeling program, developed by the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronautics. SPENVIS, which has been assessed to be an excellent tool in characterizing the radiation environment for microelectronics and investigating orbital debris, is being evaluated for its usefulness with determining the dose and dose-equivalent for human exposure. Thus far, the calculations for dose-depth relations under varying shielding conditions have been in agreement with calculations done using HZETRN and PDOSE, which are well-known and widely used models for characterizing the environments for human exploratory missions. There is disagreement when assessing the impact of secondary radiation particles since SPENVIS does a crude estimation of the secondary radiation particles when calculating LET versus Flux. SPENVIS was used to model dose-depth relations for the blood-forming organs. Radiation sickness and cancer are life-threatening consequences resulting from radiation exposure. In space, exposure to radiation generally includes all of the critical organs. Biological and toxicological impacts have been included for discussion along with alternative risk mitigation

  1. Radiation transport modeling and assessment to better predict radiation exposure, dose, and toxicological effects to human organs on long duration space flights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denkins, P.; Badhwar, G.; Obot, V.; Wilson, B.; Jejelewo, O.

    2001-01-01

    NASA is very interested in improving its ability to monitor and forecast the radiation levels that pose a health risk to space-walking astronauts as they construct the International Space Station and astronauts that will participate in long-term and deep-space missions. Human exploratory missions to the moon and Mars within the next quarter century, will expose crews to transient radiation from solar particle events which include high-energy galactic cosmic rays and high-energy protons. Because the radiation levels in space are high and solar activity is presently unpredictable, adequate shielding is needed to minimize the deleterious health effects of exposure to radiation. Today, numerous models have been developed and used to predict radiation exposure. Such a model is the Space Environment Information Systems (SPENVIS) modeling program, developed by the Belgian Institute for Space Aeronautics. SPENVIS, which has been assessed to be an excellent tool in characterizing the radiation environment for microelectronics and investigating orbital debris, is being evaluated for its usefulness with determining the dose and dose-equivalent for human exposure. Thus far. the calculations for dose-depth relations under varying shielding conditions have been in agreement with calculations done using HZETRN and PDOSE, which are well-known and widely used models for characterizing the environments for human exploratory missions. There is disagreement when assessing the impact of secondary radiation particles since SPENVIS does a crude estimation of the secondary radiation particles when calculating LET versus Flux. SPENVIS was used to model dose-depth relations for the blood-forming organs. Radiation sickness and cancer are life-threatening consequences resulting from radiation exposure. In space. exposure to radiation generally includes all of the critical organs. Biological and toxicological impacts have been included for discussion along with alternative risk mitigation

  2. Age-dependent conversion coefficients for organ doses and effective doses for external neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishizaki, Chihiro; Endo, Akira; Takahashi, Fumiaki

    2006-06-01

    To utilize dose assessment of the public for external neutron irradiation, conversion coefficients of absorbed doses of organs and effective doses were calculated using the numerical simulation technique for six different ages (adult, 15, 10, 5 and 1 years and newborn), which represent the member of the public. Calculations were performed using six age-specific anthropomorphic phantoms and a Monte Carlo radiation transport code for two irradiation geometries, anterior-posterior and rotational geometries, for 20 incident energies from thermal to 20 MeV. Effective doses defined by the 1990 Recommendation of ICRP were calculated from the absorbed doses in 21 organs. The calculated results were tabulated in the form of absorbed doses and effective doses per unit neutron fluence. The calculated conversion coefficients are used for dose assessment of the public around nuclear facilities and accelerator facilities. (author)

  3. Human data and internal dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, H.; Tanaka, G.; Shiraishi, K.; Yamamoto, M.

    1992-01-01

    Recent data on physical and anatomical and physiological or metabolic data regarding Japanese Reference Man is briefly reviewed. This includes reference values for masses of all organs and tissues proposed for a Japanese Reference male adult. Part of the data is used to assess alpha doses to bone tissues from naturally occurring 226 Ra in bone of Japanese adult. (author)

  4. AGING FACILITY WORKER DOSE ASSESSMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R.L. Thacker

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this calculation is to estimate radiation doses received by personnel working in the Aging Facility performing operations to transfer aging casks to the aging pads for thermal and logistical management, stage empty aging casks, and retrieve aging casks from the aging pads for further processing in other site facilities. Doses received by workers due to aging cask surveillance and maintenance operations are also included. The specific scope of work contained in this calculation covers both collective doses and individual worker group doses on an annual basis, and includes the contributions due to external and internal radiation from normal operation. There are no Category 1 event sequences associated with the Aging Facility (BSC 2004 [DIRS 167268], Section 7.2.1). The results of this calculation will be used to support the design of the Aging Facility and to provide occupational dose estimates for the License Application. The calculations contained in this document were developed by Environmental and Nuclear Engineering of the Design and Engineering Organization and are intended solely for the use of the Design and Engineering Organization in its work regarding facility operation. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from the Environmental and Nuclear Engineering should be consulted before use of the calculations for purposes other than those stated herein or use by individuals other than authorized personnel in Environmental and Nuclear Engineering

  5. TH-AB-207A-11: Anatomical and Functional Assessment of Coronary Artery Disease Using Low-Dose Whole-Organ Dynamic Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, L; Ziemer, B; Lipinski, J; Malkasian, S; Sadeghi, B; Javan, H; Dertli, B; Groves, EM; Molloi, S [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of a low-dose, first-pass-analysis (FPA) dynamic computed tomography angiography and perfusion (CTAP) technique, for whole-organ anatomical and functional assessment of coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods: An angioplasty balloon was advanced into the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery of five swine (35–45 kg) to induce several levels of stenosis at maximal hyperemia (intracoronary adenosine, 240 µg/min). Reference fluorescence microspheres and intravenous contrast (370 mg/mL iodine, 25 mL, 7 mL/s) were injected centrally and dynamic imaging was performed using a 320-slice CT scanner at 100 kVp and 200 mA. Twenty volume scans were acquired per stenosis level to capture complete aortic and myocardial enhancement curves, but only two volume scans were used for whole-organ dynamic FPA CTAP measurement. All CTAP measurements in the LAD were compared to the reference microsphere perfusion measurements using linear regression, concordance correlation, and Bland-Altman analysis. Results: The result of dynamic FPA CTAP measurement in the LAD was in good agreement with the reference microsphere perfusion measurement (P-CTAP = 1.01 P-MICRO + 0.16, R{sup 2} = 0.95). The root mean square error (RMSE) and difference (RMSD) of measurement were 0.51 mL/min/g and 0.47 mL/min/g, respectively. Bland-Altman analysis demonstrated negligible systematic measurement bias. Additionally, the concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) was found to be ρ = 0.97, indicating excellent agreement between dynamic FPA CTAP measurement and the reference microsphere perfusion measurement. Lastly, the effective dose of the proposed technique using the “simulated” two-volume scan CTAP acquisition protocol was 2.6 mSv; much lower than the ∼10 mSv effective dose of current dynamic CTP techniques alone. Conclusion: The results indicate the potential for significant improvements in CAD assessment through low-dose, quantitative dynamic FPA CTAP. Such

  6. Determining organ dose: the holy grail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samei, Ehsan; Tian, Xiaoyu; Segars, W.P.

    2014-01-01

    Among the various metrics to quantify CT radiation dose, organ dose is generally regarded as one of the best to reflect patient radiation burden. Organ dose is dependent on two main factors, namely patient anatomy and irradiation field. An accurate estimation of organ dose requires detailed modeling of both factors. The modeling of patient anatomy needs to reflect the anatomical diversity and complexity across the population so that the attributes of a given clinical patient can be properly accounted for. The modeling of the irradiation field needs to accurately reflect the CT system condition, especially the tube current modulation (TCM) technique. We present an atlas-based method to model patient anatomy via a library of computational phantoms with representative ages, sizes and genders. A clinical patient is matched with a corresponding computational phantom to obtain a representation of patient anatomy. The irradiation field of the CT system is modeled using a validated Monte Carlo simulation program. The tube current modulation profiles are simulated using a manufacturer-generalizable ray-tracing algorithm. Combining the patient model, Monte Carlo results, and TCM profile, organ doses are obtained by multiplying organ dose values from a fixed mA scan (normalized to CTDI vol -normalized, denoted as h organ ) and an adjustment factor that reflects the specific irradiation of each organ. The accuracy of the proposed method was quantified by simulating clinical abdominopelvic examinations of 58 patients. The predicted organ doses showed good agreement with simulated organ dose across all organs and modulation schemes. For an average CTDI vol of a CT exam of 10 mGy, the absolute median error across all organs was 0.64 mGy (-0.21 and 0.97 for 25th and 75th percentiles, respectively). The percentage differences were within 15%. The study demonstrates that it is feasible to estimate organ doses in clinical CT examinations for protocols without and with tube current

  7. Dose assessment in radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donkor, S.

    2013-04-01

    The applications of ionizing radiation bring many benefits to humankind, ranging from power generation to uses in medicine, industry and agriculture. Facilities that use radiation source require special care in the design and operation of equipment to prevent radiation injury to workers or to the public. Despite considerable development of radiation safety, radiation accidents do happen. The purpose of this study is therefore to discuss how to assess doses to people who will be exposed to a range of internal and external radiation sources in the event of radiological accidents. This will go a long way to complement their medical assessment thereby helping to plan their treatment. Three radiological accidents were reviewed to learn about the causes of those accidents and the recommendations that were put in place to prevent recurrence of such accidents. Various types of dose assessment methods were discussed.(au)

  8. Internal dose assessment in radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toohey, R.E.

    2003-01-01

    Although numerous models have been developed for occupational and medical internal dosimetry, they may not be applicable to an accident situation. Published dose coefficients relate effective dose to intake, but if acute deterministic effects are possible, effective dose is not a useful parameter. Consequently, dose rates to the organs of interest need to be computed from first principles. Standard bioassay methods may be used to assess body contents, but, again, the standard models for bioassay interpretation may not be applicable because of the circumstances of the accident and the prompt initiation of decorporation therapy. Examples of modifications to the standard methodologies include adjustment of biological half-times under therapy, such as in the Goiania accident, and the same effect, complicated by continued input from contaminated wounds, in the Hanford 241 Am accident. (author)

  9. Dose assessments for SFR 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, Ulla; Avila, Rodolfo; Ekstroem, Per-Anders; Cruz, Idalmis de la

    2008-05-01

    Following a review by the Swedish regulatory authorities of the safety analysis of the SFR 1 disposal facility for low and intermediate level waste, SKB has prepared an updated safety analysis, SAR-08. This report presents estimations of annual doses to the most exposed groups from potential radionuclide releases from the SFR 1 repository for a number of calculation cases, selected using a systematic approach for identifying relevant scenarios for the safety analysis. The dose estimates can be used for demonstrating that the long term safety of the repository is in compliance with the regulatory requirements. In particular, the mean values of the annual doses can be used to estimate the expected risks to the most exposed individuals, which can then be compared with the regulatory risk criteria for human health. The conversion from doses to risks is performed in the main report. For one scenario however, where the effects of an earthquake taking place close to the repository are analysed, risk calculations are presented in this report. In addition, prediction of concentrations of radionuclides in environmental media, such as water and soil, are compared with concentration limits suggested by the Erica-project as a base for estimating potential effects on the environment. The assessment of the impact on non-human biota showed that the potential impact is negligible. Committed collective dose for an integration period of 10,000 years for releases occurring during the first thousand years after closure are also calculated. The collective dose commitment was estimated to be 8 manSv. The dose calculations were carried out for a period of 100,000 years, which was sufficient to observe peak doses in all scenarios considered. Releases to the landscape and to a well were considered. The peaks of the mean annual doses from releases to the landscape are associated with C-14 releases to a future lake around year 5,000 AD. In the case of releases to a well, the peak annual doses

  10. Dose assessments for SFR 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, Ulla (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)); Avila, Rodolfo; Ekstroem, Per-Anders; Cruz, Idalmis de la (Facilia AB, Bromma (Sweden))

    2008-06-15

    Following a review by the Swedish regulatory authorities of the safety analysis of the SFR 1 disposal facility for low and intermediate level waste, SKB has prepared an updated safety analysis, SAR-08. This report presents estimations of annual doses to the most exposed groups from potential radionuclide releases from the SFR 1 repository for a number of calculation cases, selected using a systematic approach for identifying relevant scenarios for the safety analysis. The dose estimates can be used for demonstrating that the long term safety of the repository is in compliance with the regulatory requirements. In particular, the mean values of the annual doses can be used to estimate the expected risks to the most exposed individuals, which can then be compared with the regulatory risk criteria for human health. The conversion from doses to risks is performed in the main report. For one scenario however, where the effects of an earthquake taking place close to the repository are analysed, risk calculations are presented in this report. In addition, prediction of concentrations of radionuclides in environmental media, such as water and soil, are compared with concentration limits suggested by the Erica-project as a base for estimating potential effects on the environment. The assessment of the impact on non-human biota showed that the potential impact is negligible. Committed collective dose for an integration period of 10,000 years for releases occurring during the first thousand years after closure are also calculated. The collective dose commitment was estimated to be 8 manSv. The dose calculations were carried out for a period of 100,000 years, which was sufficient to observe peak doses in all scenarios considered. Releases to the landscape and to a well were considered. The peaks of the mean annual doses from releases to the landscape are associated with C-14 releases to a future lake around year 5,000 AD. In the case of releases to a well, the peak annual doses

  11. Occupational dose assessment and national dose registry system in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jafari-Zadeh, M.; Nazeri, F.; Hosseini-Pooya, S. M.; Taheri, M.; Gheshlaghi, F.; Kardan, M. R.; Babakhani, A.; Rastkhah, N.; Yousefi-Nejad, F.; Darabi, M.; Oruji, T.; Gholamali-Zadeh, Z.; Karimi-Diba, J.; Kazemi-Movahed, A. A.; Dashti-Pour, M. R.; Enferadi, A.; Jahanbakhshian, M. H.; Sadegh-Khani, M. R.

    2011-01-01

    This report presents status of external and internal dose assessment of workers and introducing the structure of National Dose Registry System of Iran (NDRSI). As well as types of individual dosemeters in use, techniques for internal dose assessment are presented. Results obtained from the International Atomic Energy Agency intercomparison programme on measurement of personal dose equivalent H p (10) and consistency of the measured doses with the delivered doses are shown. Also, implementation of dosimetry standards, establishment of quality management system, authorisation and approval procedure of dosimetry service providers are discussed. (authors)

  12. Conversion from tooth enamel dose to organ doses for electron spin resonance dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro; Saito, Kimiaki; Hamada, Tatsuji

    2002-01-01

    Conversion from tooth enamel dose to organ doses was analyzed to establish a method of retrospective individual dose assessment against external photon exposure by electron spin resonance (ESR) dosimetry. Dose to tooth enamel was obtained by Monte Carlo calculations using a modified MIRD-type phantom with a teeth part. The calculated tooth enamel doses were verified by measurements with thermo-luminescence dosimeters inserted in a physical head phantom. Energy and angular dependences of tooth enamel dose were compared with those of other organ doses. Additional Monte Carlo calculations were performed to study the effect of human model on the tooth enamel dose with a voxel-type phantom, which was based on computed tomography images of the physical phantom. The data derived with the modified MIRD-type phantom were applied to convert from tooth enamel dose to organ doses against external photon exposure in a hypothesized field, where scattered radiation was taken into account. The results indicated that energy distribution of photons incident to a human body is required to evaluate precisely an individual dose based on ESR dosimetry for teeth. (author)

  13. Conversion coefficients for determining organ doses in paediatric spine radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidenbusch, Michael; Schneider, Karl [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Institute of Clinical Radiology - Paediatric Radiology, Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    Knowledge of organ and effective doses achieved during paediatric x-ray examinations is an important prerequisite for assessment of radiation burden to the patient. Conversion coefficients for reconstruction of organ and effective doses from entrance doses for segmental spine radiographs of 0-, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15- and 30-year-old patients are provided regarding the Guidelines of Good Radiographic Technique of the European Commission. Using the personal computer program PCXMC developed by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (Saeteilyturvakeskus STUK), conversion coefficients for conventional segmental spine radiographs were calculated performing Monte Carlo simulations in mathematical hermaphrodite phantom models describing patients of different ages. The clinical variation of beam collimation was taken into consideration by defining optimal and suboptimal radiation field settings. Conversion coefficients for the reconstruction of organ doses in about 40 organs and tissues from measured entrance doses during cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine radiographs of 0-, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15- and 30-year-old patients were calculated for the standard sagittal and lateral beam projections and the standard focus detector distance of 115 cm. The conversion coefficients presented may be used for organ dose assessments from entrance doses measured during spine radiographs of patients of all age groups and all field settings within the optimal and suboptimal standard field settings. (orig.)

  14. Evaluation of organ-specific peripheral doses after 2-dimensional, 3-dimensional and hybrid intensity modulated radiation therapy for breast cancer based on Monte Carlo and convolution/superposition algorithms: Implications for secondary cancer risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joosten, Andreas; Matzinger, Oscar; Jeanneret-Sozzi, Wendy; Bochud, François; Moeckli, Raphaël

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose: To make a comprehensive evaluation of organ-specific out-of-field doses using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for different breast cancer irradiation techniques and to compare results with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS). Materials and methods: Three breast radiotherapy techniques using 6MV tangential photon beams were compared: (a) 2DRT (open rectangular fields), (b) 3DCRT (conformal wedged fields), and (c) hybrid IMRT (open conformal + modulated fields). Over 35 organs were contoured in a whole-body CT scan and organ-specific dose distributions were determined with MC and the TPS. Results: Large differences in out-of-field doses were observed between MC and TPS calculations, even for organs close to the target volume such as the heart, the lungs and the contralateral breast (up to 70% difference). MC simulations showed that a large fraction of the out-of-field dose comes from the out-of-field head scatter fluence (>40%) which is not adequately modeled by the TPS. Based on MC simulations, the 3DCRT technique using external wedges yielded significantly higher doses (up to a factor 4–5 in the pelvis) than the 2DRT and the hybrid IMRT techniques which yielded similar out-of-field doses. Conclusions: In sharp contrast to popular belief, the IMRT technique investigated here does not increase the out-of-field dose compared to conventional techniques and may offer the most optimal plan. The 3DCRT technique with external wedges yields the largest out-of-field doses. For accurate out-of-field dose assessment, a commercial TPS should not be used, even for organs near the target volume (contralateral breast, lungs, heart)

  15. Irrigation in dose assessments models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, Ulla; Barkefors, Catarina [Studsvik RadWaste AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2004-05-01

    SKB has carried out several safety analyses for repositories for radioactive waste, one of which was SR 97, a multi-site study concerned with a future deep bedrock repository for high-level waste. In case of future releases due to unforeseen failure of the protective multiple barrier system, radionuclides may be transported with groundwater and may reach the biosphere. Assessments of doses have to be carried out with a long-term perspective. Specific models are therefore employed to estimate consequences to man. It has been determined that the main pathway for nuclides from groundwater or surface water to soil is via irrigation. Irrigation may cause contamination of crops directly by e.g. interception or rain-splash, and indirectly via root-uptake from contaminated soil. The exposed people are in many safety assessments assumed to be self-sufficient, i.e. their food is produced locally where the concentration of radionuclides may be the highest. Irrigation therefore plays an important role when estimating consequences. The present study is therefore concerned with a more extensive analysis of the role of irrigation for possible future doses to people living in the area surrounding a repository. Current irrigation practices in Sweden are summarised, showing that vegetables and potatoes are the most common crops for irrigation. In general, however, irrigation is not so common in Sweden. The irrigation model used in the latest assessments is described. A sensitivity analysis is performed showing that, as expected, interception of irrigation water and retention on vegetation surfaces are important parameters. The parameters used to describe this are discussed. A summary is also given how irrigation is proposed to be handled in the international BIOMASS (BIOsphere Modelling and ASSessment) project and in models like TAME and BIOTRAC. Similarities and differences are pointed out. Some numerical results are presented showing that surface contamination in general gives the

  16. Irrigation in dose assessments models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, Ulla; Barkefors, Catarina

    2004-05-01

    SKB has carried out several safety analyses for repositories for radioactive waste, one of which was SR 97, a multi-site study concerned with a future deep bedrock repository for high-level waste. In case of future releases due to unforeseen failure of the protective multiple barrier system, radionuclides may be transported with groundwater and may reach the biosphere. Assessments of doses have to be carried out with a long-term perspective. Specific models are therefore employed to estimate consequences to man. It has been determined that the main pathway for nuclides from groundwater or surface water to soil is via irrigation. Irrigation may cause contamination of crops directly by e.g. interception or rain-splash, and indirectly via root-uptake from contaminated soil. The exposed people are in many safety assessments assumed to be self-sufficient, i.e. their food is produced locally where the concentration of radionuclides may be the highest. Irrigation therefore plays an important role when estimating consequences. The present study is therefore concerned with a more extensive analysis of the role of irrigation for possible future doses to people living in the area surrounding a repository. Current irrigation practices in Sweden are summarised, showing that vegetables and potatoes are the most common crops for irrigation. In general, however, irrigation is not so common in Sweden. The irrigation model used in the latest assessments is described. A sensitivity analysis is performed showing that, as expected, interception of irrigation water and retention on vegetation surfaces are important parameters. The parameters used to describe this are discussed. A summary is also given how irrigation is proposed to be handled in the international BIOMASS (BIOsphere Modelling and ASSessment) project and in models like TAME and BIOTRAC. Similarities and differences are pointed out. Some numerical results are presented showing that surface contamination in general gives the

  17. Exposure dose assessment using bioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suga, Shinichi

    1994-01-01

    Bioassay involves following steps: sampling, pre-treatment, chemical separation and counting of radioactivity. As bioassay samples, urines are usually used, although faecal analysis may be required in some occasions for example to assess intake of non-transferable radioactive materials. Nasal smear is a useful indicator of an inhalation case. Exhalation air is used to estimate the intake of tritiated water. Sample pre-treatment includes evaporation for concentration, wet ashing, dry ashing and co-precipitation. After adding small amount of nitric acid, the sample can be concentrated by 1/10 of initial volume, which may be used to identify γ-emitters. As the pre-treatment of urine, wet ashing is used for example for analysis of Pu, and co-precipitation is used for example for analysis of Sr. Dry ashing by electric furnace is usually adopted for faecal samples. Methods of chemical separation depend on the radionuclide(s) to be analysed. The detection limit depends also on radionuclide, and for example typical detection limits are 0.4Bq / l (volume of urine sample) for 89 Sr or 90 Sr, and 0.01 Bq / l with urine and 0.01 Bq per sample with faeces for 238 Pu, 239 Pu or 241 Am. Simpler methods can be used for some radionuclides: For example, radioactivity concentration of tritium can be determined by liquid scintillation counting of urine or condensed water from exhaled air, and natural uranium in urine can be quantified by using fluorometric method. In some circumstances, gross-α or gross-β analyses are useful for quick estimation. To estimate intakes by inhalation or by ingestion from bioassay results and to assess the committed dose equivalent, commonly available bases are the relevant publications by the ICRP and domestic guides and manuals that conform to the radiation protection regulations. (author)

  18. Radiation doses to aquatic organisms from natural radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J E; Jones, S R; Saxen, R; Thoerring, H; Batlle, J Vives i

    2004-01-01

    A framework for protection of the environment is likely to require a methodology for assessing dose rates arising from naturally occurring radionuclides. This paper addresses this issue for European aquatic environments through a process of (a) data collation, mainly with respect to levels of radioactivity in water sediments and aquatic flora and fauna, (b) the use of suitable distribution coefficients, concentration factors and global data where data gaps are present and (c) the utilisation of a reference organism approach whereby a finite number of suitable geometries are selected to allow dose per unit concentration factors to be derived and subsequent absorbed dose calculations (weighted or unweighted) to be made. The majority of the calculated absorbed dose, for both marine and freshwater organisms, arises from internally incorporated alpha emitters, with 210 Po and 226 Ra being the major contributors. Calculated doses are somewhat higher for freshwater compared to marine organisms, and the range of doses is also much greater. This reflects both the much greater variability of radionuclide concentrations in freshwater as compared to seawater, and also variability or uncertainty in concentration factor values. This work has revealed a number of substantial gaps in published empirical data especially for European aquatic environments

  19. Iodine-129 Dose in LLW Disposal Facility Performance Assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhite, E.L.

    1999-01-01

    Iodine-129 has the lowest Performance Assessment derived inventory limit in SRS disposal facilities. Because iodine is concentrated in the body to one organ, the thyroid, it has been thought that dilution with stable iodine would reduce the dose effects of 129I.Examination of the dose model used to establish the Dose conversion factor for 129I shows that, at the levels considered in performance assessments of low-level waste disposal facilities, the calculated 129I dose already accounts for ingestion of stable iodine. At higher than normal iodine ingestion rates, the uptake of iodine by the thyroid itself decrease, which effectively cancels out the isotopic dilution effect

  20. The development, validation and application of a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner model for assessing organ doses to the pregnant patient and the fetus using Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, J.; Bednarz, B.; Caracappa, P. F.; Xu, X. G.

    2009-05-01

    The latest multiple-detector technologies have further increased the popularity of x-ray CT as a diagnostic imaging modality. There is a continuing need to assess the potential radiation risk associated with such rapidly evolving multi-detector CT (MDCT) modalities and scanning protocols. This need can be met by the use of CT source models that are integrated with patient computational phantoms for organ dose calculations. Based on this purpose, this work developed and validated an MDCT scanner using the Monte Carlo method, and meanwhile the pregnant patient phantoms were integrated into the MDCT scanner model for assessment of the dose to the fetus as well as doses to the organs or tissues of the pregnant patient phantom. A Monte Carlo code, MCNPX, was used to simulate the x-ray source including the energy spectrum, filter and scan trajectory. Detailed CT scanner components were specified using an iterative trial-and-error procedure for a GE LightSpeed CT scanner. The scanner model was validated by comparing simulated results against measured CTDI values and dose profiles reported in the literature. The source movement along the helical trajectory was simulated using the pitch of 0.9375 and 1.375, respectively. The validated scanner model was then integrated with phantoms of a pregnant patient in three different gestational periods to calculate organ doses. It was found that the dose to the fetus of the 3 month pregnant patient phantom was 0.13 mGy/100 mAs and 0.57 mGy/100 mAs from the chest and kidney scan, respectively. For the chest scan of the 6 month patient phantom and the 9 month patient phantom, the fetal doses were 0.21 mGy/100 mAs and 0.26 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. The paper also discusses how these fetal dose values can be used to evaluate imaging procedures and to assess risk using recommendations of the report from AAPM Task Group 36. This work demonstrates the ability of modeling and validating an MDCT scanner by the Monte Carlo method, as well as

  1. The development, validation and application of a multi-detector CT (MDCT) scanner model for assessing organ doses to the pregnant patient and the fetus using Monte Carlo simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, J; Bednarz, B; Caracappa, P F; Xu, X G

    2009-01-01

    The latest multiple-detector technologies have further increased the popularity of x-ray CT as a diagnostic imaging modality. There is a continuing need to assess the potential radiation risk associated with such rapidly evolving multi-detector CT (MDCT) modalities and scanning protocols. This need can be met by the use of CT source models that are integrated with patient computational phantoms for organ dose calculations. Based on this purpose, this work developed and validated an MDCT scanner using the Monte Carlo method, and meanwhile the pregnant patient phantoms were integrated into the MDCT scanner model for assessment of the dose to the fetus as well as doses to the organs or tissues of the pregnant patient phantom. A Monte Carlo code, MCNPX, was used to simulate the x-ray source including the energy spectrum, filter and scan trajectory. Detailed CT scanner components were specified using an iterative trial-and-error procedure for a GE LightSpeed CT scanner. The scanner model was validated by comparing simulated results against measured CTDI values and dose profiles reported in the literature. The source movement along the helical trajectory was simulated using the pitch of 0.9375 and 1.375, respectively. The validated scanner model was then integrated with phantoms of a pregnant patient in three different gestational periods to calculate organ doses. It was found that the dose to the fetus of the 3 month pregnant patient phantom was 0.13 mGy/100 mAs and 0.57 mGy/100 mAs from the chest and kidney scan, respectively. For the chest scan of the 6 month patient phantom and the 9 month patient phantom, the fetal doses were 0.21 mGy/100 mAs and 0.26 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. The paper also discusses how these fetal dose values can be used to evaluate imaging procedures and to assess risk using recommendations of the report from AAPM Task Group 36. This work demonstrates the ability of modeling and validating an MDCT scanner by the Monte Carlo method, as well as

  2. Dose assessment at Bikini Atoll

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robison, W.L.; Phillips, W.A.; Colsher, C.S.

    1977-01-01

    Bikini Atoll is one of two sites in the northern Marshall Islands that was used by the United States as testing grounds for the nuclear weapons program from 1946 to 1958. In 1969 a general cleanup began at Bikini Atoll. Subsistence crops, coconut and Pandanus fruit, were planted on Bikini and Eneu Islands, and housing was constructed on Bikini Island. A second phase of housing was planned for the interior of Bikini Island. Preliminary data indicated that external gamma doses in the interior of the island might be higher than in other parts of the island. Therefore, to select a second site for housing on the island with minimum external exposure, a survey of Bikini Atoll was conducted in June 1975. External gamma measurements were made on Bikini and Eneu Islands, and soil and vegetations samples collected to evaluate the potential doses via terrestrial food chains and inhalation. Estimates of potential dose via the marine food chain were based upon data collected on previous trips to the atoll. The terrestrial pathway contributes the greater percentage, external gamma exposure contributes the next highest, and inhalation and marine pathways contribute minor fractions of the total whole body and bone marrow doses. The radionuclides contributing the major fraction of the dose are 90 Sr and 137 Cs. All living patterns involving Bikini Island exceed federal guidelines for 30-yr population doses. The Eneu Island living pattern leads to doses that are slightly less than federal guidelines. All patterns evaluated for Bikini Atoll lead to higher doses than those on the southern islands at Enewetak Atoll

  3. Estimation and comparison of effective dose (E) in standard chest CT by organ dose measurements and dose-length-product methods and assessment of the influence of CT tube potential (energy dependency) on effective dose in a dual-source CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, Jijo; Banckwitz, Rosemarie; Krauss, Bernhard; Vogl, Thomas J.; Maentele, Werner; Bauer, Ralf W.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The dual-energy protocol delivers the lowest effective dose of the investigated protocols for standard chest CT examinations, thus enabling functional imaging (like dual-energy perfusion) and can produce weighted images without dose penalty. ► The high-pitch protocol goes along with a 16% increase in dose compared to the standard 120 kV protocol and thus should preferably be used in pediatric, acute care settings (e.g. pulmonary embolism, aortic dissection and the like) or restless patients. ► The difference in effective dose estimates between ICRP 60 and 103 is minimal. ► Tube potential definitely has an effect on estimates of effective dose. - Abstract: Purpose: To determine effective dose (E) during standard chest CT using an organ dose-based and a dose-length-product-based (DLP) approach for four different scan protocols including high-pitch and dual-energy in a dual-source CT scanner of the second generation. Materials and methods: Organ doses were measured with thermo luminescence dosimeters (TLD) in an anthropomorphic male adult phantom. Further, DLP-based dose estimates were performed by using the standard 0.014 mSv/mGycm conversion coefficient k. Examinations were performed on a dual-source CT system (Somatom Definition Flash, Siemens). Four scan protocols were investigated: (1) single-source 120 kV, (2) single-source 100 kV, (3) high-pitch 120 kV, and (4) dual-energy with 100/Sn140 kV with equivalent CTDIvol and no automated tube current modulation. E was then determined following recommendations of ICRP publication 103 and 60 and specific k values were derived. Results: DLP-based estimates differed by 4.5–16.56% and 5.2–15.8% relatively to ICRP 60 and 103, respectively. The derived k factors calculated from TLD measurements were 0.0148, 0.015, 0.0166, and 0.0148 for protocol 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. Effective dose estimations by ICRP 103 and 60 for single-energy and dual-energy protocols show a difference of less than 0.04 m

  4. Cellular vs. organ approaches to dose estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelstein, S.J.; Kassis, A.I.; Sastry, K.S.R.

    1986-01-01

    The cellular distribution of tissue-incorporated radionuclides has generally been neglected in the dosimetry of internal emitters. Traditional dosimetry assumes homogeneous distribution of radionuclides in organs of interest, while presuming that the ranges of particulate radiations are large relative to typical cell diameters. The macroscopic distribution of dose thus calculated has generally served as a sufficient approximation for the energy deposited within radiosensitive sites. However, with the increasing utilization of intracellular agents, such as thallium-201, it has become necessary to examine the microscopic distribution of energy at the cellular level. This is particularly important in the instance of radionuclides that decay by electron capture or by internal conversion with the release of Auger and Coster-Kronig electrons. In many instances, these electrons are released as a dense shower of low-energy particles with ranges of subcellular dimensions. The high electron density in the immediate vicinity of the decaying atom produces a focal deposition of energy that far exceeds the average dose taken over several cell diameters. These studies point out the increasing need to take into account the microscopic distribution of dose on the cellular level as radionuclides distributed in cells become more commonplace, especially if the decay involves electron capture or internal conversion. As radiotracers are developed for the measurement of intracellular functions these factors should be given greater consideration. 16 references, 5 figures, 5 tables

  5. Howard Hughes Medical Institute dose assessment survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, S.L.; McDougall, M.M.; Barkley, W.E.

    1996-01-01

    Biomedical science researchers often express frustration that health physics practices vary widely between individual institutions. A survey examining both internal and external dose assessment practices was devised and mailed to fifty institutions supporting biomedical science research. The results indicate that health physics dose assessment practices and policies are highly variable. Factors which may contribute to the degree of variation are discussed. 2 tabs

  6. Neutron organ dose and the influence of adipose tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpkins, Robert Wayne

    Neutron fluence to dose conversion coefficients have been assessed considering the influences of human adipose tissue. Monte Carlo code MCNP4C was used to simulate broad parallel beam monoenergetic neutrons ranging in energy from thermal to 10 MeV. Simulated Irradiations were conducted for standard irradiation geometries. The targets were on gender specific mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms modified to approximate human adipose tissue distributions. Dosimetric analysis compared adipose tissue influence against reference anthropomorphic phantom characteristics. Adipose Male and Post-Menopausal Female Phantoms were derived introducing interstitial adipose tissue to account for 22 and 27 kg additional body mass, respectively, each demonstrating a Body Mass Index (BMI) of 30. An Adipose Female Phantom was derived introducing specific subcutaneous adipose tissue accounting for 15 kg of additional body mass demonstrating a BMI of 26. Neutron dose was shielded in the superficial tissues; giving rise to secondary photons which dominated the effective dose for Incident energies less than 100 keV. Adipose tissue impact on the effective dose was a 25% reduction at the anterior-posterior incidence ranging to a 10% increase at the lateral incidences. Organ dose impacts were more distinctive; symmetrically situated organs demonstrated a 15% reduction at the anterior-posterior Incidence ranging to a 2% increase at the lateral incidences. Abdominal or asymmetrically situated organs demonstrated a 50% reduction at the anterior-posterior incidence ranging to a 25% increase at the lateral incidences.

  7. Estimation and comparison of effective dose (E) in standard chest CT by organ dose measurements and dose-length-product methods and assessment of the influence of CT tube potential (energy dependency) on effective dose in a dual-source CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Jijo; Banckwitz, Rosemarie; Krauss, Bernhard; Vogl, Thomas J; Maentele, Werner; Bauer, Ralf W

    2012-04-01

    To determine effective dose (E) during standard chest CT using an organ dose-based and a dose-length-product-based (DLP) approach for four different scan protocols including high-pitch and dual-energy in a dual-source CT scanner of the second generation. Organ doses were measured with thermo luminescence dosimeters (TLD) in an anthropomorphic male adult phantom. Further, DLP-based dose estimates were performed by using the standard 0.014mSv/mGycm conversion coefficient k. Examinations were performed on a dual-source CT system (Somatom Definition Flash, Siemens). Four scan protocols were investigated: (1) single-source 120kV, (2) single-source 100kV, (3) high-pitch 120kV, and (4) dual-energy with 100/Sn140kV with equivalent CTDIvol and no automated tube current modulation. E was then determined following recommendations of ICRP publication 103 and 60 and specific k values were derived. DLP-based estimates differed by 4.5-16.56% and 5.2-15.8% relatively to ICRP 60 and 103, respectively. The derived k factors calculated from TLD measurements were 0.0148, 0.015, 0.0166, and 0.0148 for protocol 1, 2, 3 and 4, respectively. Effective dose estimations by ICRP 103 and 60 for single-energy and dual-energy protocols show a difference of less than 0.04mSv. Estimates of E based on DLP work equally well for single-energy, high-pitch and dual-energy CT examinations. The tube potential definitely affects effective dose in a substantial way. Effective dose estimations by ICRP 103 and 60 for both single-energy and dual-energy examinations differ not more than 0.04mSv. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dose assessment models. Annex A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The models presented in this chapter have been separated into 2 general categories: environmental transport models which describe the movement of radioactive materials through all sectors of the environment after their release, and dosimetric models to calculate the absorbed dose following an intake of radioactive materials or exposure to external irradiation. Various sections of this chapter also deal with atmospheric transport models, terrestrial models, and aquatic models.

  9. Population dose assessment from radiodiagnosis in Portugal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serro, R.; Carreiro, J.V.; Galvao, J.P.; Reis, R.

    1992-01-01

    A survey of radiodiagnostic installations was carried out in Portugal covering 75 premises including public hospitals, local and regional public health centres. A total of 175 X ray tubes was surveyed using the new NEXT methodology covering data on premises, tube and operator, and projection. Average value of voltage, current-time product, HVL, ratio of beam area to film area and source to film distance for the eleven most frequent projections are reported as well as the skin entrance exposure and the doses to some organs. The weighted average dose values per projection and for the different organs allowed an estimate of the whole-body dose per caput. From the gonadal doses the genetic significant dose was also estimated

  10. Research and assessment of national population dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Ziqiang

    1984-01-01

    This article describes the necessity and probability of making researches on assessment of national population dose, and discusses some problems which might be noticeable in the research work. (author)

  11. Calculational Tool for Skin Contamination Dose Assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, R L

    2002-01-01

    Spreadsheet calculational tool was developed to automate the calculations preformed for dose assessment of skin contamination. This document reports on the design and testing of the spreadsheet calculational tool.

  12. Organ or tissue doses, effective dose and collective effective dose from X-ray diagnosis, in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Takashi; Nishizawa, Kanae; Noda, Yutaka; Kumamoto, Yoshikazu; Iwai, Kazuo.

    1996-01-01

    Effective doses and collective effective doses from X-ray diagnostic examinations were calculated on the basis of the frequency of examinations estimated by a nationwide survey and the organ or tissue doses experimentally determined. The average organ or tissue doses were determined with thermoluminescence dosimeters put at various sites of organs or tissues in an adult and a child phantom. Effective doses (effective dose equivalents) were calculated as the sum of the weighted equivalent doses in all the organs or tissues of the body. As the examples of results, the effective doses per radiographic examination were approximately 7 mGy for male, and 9 mGy for female angiocardiography, and about 3 mGy for barium meal. Annual collective effective dose from X-ray diagnostic examinations in 1986 were about 104 x 10 3 person Sv from radiography and 118 x 10 3 person Sv from fluoroscopy, with the total of 222 x 10 3 person Sv. (author)

  13. An updated dose assessment for Rongelap Island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Bogen, K.T.

    1994-07-01

    We have updated the radiological dose assessment for Rongelap Island at Rongelap Atoll using data generated from field trips to the atoll during 1986 through 1993. The data base used for this dose assessment is ten fold greater than that available for the 1982 assessment. Details of each data base are presented along with details about the methods used to calculate the dose from each exposure pathway. The doses are calculated for a resettlement date of January 1, 1995. The maximum annual effective dose is 0.26 mSv y{sup {minus}1} (26 mrem y{sup {minus}1}). The estimated 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral effective doses are 0.0059 Sv (0.59 rem), 0.0082 Sv (0.82 rem), and 0.0097 Sv (0.97 rem), respectively. More than 95% of these estimated doses are due to 137-Cesium ({sup 137}Cs). About 1.5% of the estimated dose is contributed by 90-Strontium ({sup 90}Sr), and about the same amount each by 239+240-Plutonium ({sup 239+240}PU), and 241-Americium ({sup 241}Am).

  14. Construction of average adult Japanese voxel phantoms for dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kaoru; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Satoh, Daiki; Endo, Akira

    2011-12-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) adopted the adult reference voxel phantoms based on the physiological and anatomical reference data of Caucasian on October, 2007. The organs and tissues of these phantoms were segmented on the basis of ICRP Publication 103. In future, the dose coefficients for internal dose and dose conversion coefficients for external dose calculated using the adult reference voxel phantoms will be widely used for the radiation protection fields. On the other hand, the body sizes and organ masses of adult Japanese are generally smaller than those of adult Caucasian. In addition, there are some cases that the anatomical characteristics such as body sizes, organ masses and postures of subjects influence the organ doses in dose assessment for medical treatments and radiation accident. Therefore, it was needed to use human phantoms with average anatomical characteristics of Japanese. The authors constructed the averaged adult Japanese male and female voxel phantoms by modifying the previously developed high-resolution adult male (JM) and female (JF) voxel phantoms. It has been modified in the following three aspects: (1) The heights and weights were agreed with the Japanese averages; (2) The masses of organs and tissues were adjusted to the Japanese averages within 10%; (3) The organs and tissues, which were newly added for evaluation of the effective dose in ICRP Publication 103, were modeled. In this study, the organ masses, distances between organs, specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) and dose conversion coefficients of these phantoms were compared with those evaluated using the ICRP adult reference voxel phantoms. This report provides valuable information on the anatomical and dosimetric characteristics of the averaged adult Japanese male and female voxel phantoms developed as reference phantoms of adult Japanese. (author)

  15. Radiation dose assessment in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabin, M.G.

    2002-01-01

    In any application involving the use of ionizing radiation in humans, risks and benefits must be properly evaluated and balanced. Radionuclides are used in nuclear medicine in a variety of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. Recently, interest has grown in therapeutic agents for a number of applications in nuclear medicine, particularly in the treatment of hematologic and non-hematologic malignancies. This has heightened interest in the need for radiation dose calculations and challenged the scientific community to develop more patient-specific and relevant dose models. Consideration of radiation dose in such studies is central to efforts to maximize dose to tumor while sparing normal tissues. In many applications, a significant absorbed dose may be received by some radiosensitive organs, particularly the active marrow. This talk will review the methods and models used in internal dosimetry in nuclear medicine, and discuss some current trends and challenges in this field

  16. Microdosimetric approach for lung dose assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofmann, W.; Steinhausler, F.; Pohl, E.; Bernroider, G.

    1980-01-01

    In the macroscopic region the term ''organ dose'' is related to an uniform energy deposition within a homogeneous biological target. Considering the lung, inhaled radioactive nuclides, however, show a significant non-uniform distribution pattern throughout the respiratory tract. For the calculation of deposition and clearance of inhaled alpha-emitting radionuclides within different regions of this organ, a detailed compartment model, based on the Weibel model A was developed. Since biological effects (e.g. lung cancer initiation) are primarily caused at the cellular level, the interaction of alpha particles with different types of cells of the lung tissue was studied. The basic approach is to superimpose alpha particle tracks on magnified images of randomly selected tissue slices, simulating alpha emitting sources. Particle tracks are generated by means of a specially developed computer program and used as input data for an on-line electronic image analyzer (Quantimet-720). Using adaptive pattern recognition methods the different cells in the lung tissue can be identified and their distribution within the whole organ determined. This microdosimetric method is applied to soluble radon decay products as well as to insoluble, highly localized, plutonium particles. For a defined microdistribution of alpha emitters, the resulting dose, integrated over all cellular dose values, is compared to the compartmental doses of the ICRP lung model. Furthermore this methodology is also applicable to other organs and tissues of the human body for dose calculations in practical health physics. (author)

  17. Volume dose of organs at risk in the irradiated volume

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hishikawa, Yoshio; Tanaka, Shinichi; Miura, Takashi

    1984-01-01

    Absorbed dose of organs at risk in the 50% irradiated volume needs to be carefully monitored because there is high risk of radiation injury. This paper reports on the histogram of threedimensional volume dose of organs at risk, which is obtained by computer calculation of CT scans. In order to obtain this histogram, CT is first performed in the irradiation field. The dose in each pixel is then examined by the computer as to each slice. After the pixels of all slices in the organ at risk of the irradiated field are classified according to the doses, the number of pixels in the same dose class is counted. The result is expressed in a histogram. The histogram can show the differences of influence to organs at risk given by various radiation treatment techniques. Total volume dose of organs at risk after radiotherapy can also be obtained by integration of each dose of different treatment techniques. (author)

  18. Predicted allowable doses to normal organs for biologically targeted radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donoghue, J.A.; Wheldon, T.E.; Western Regional Hospital Board, Glasgow

    1988-01-01

    The authors have used Dale's extension to the ''linear quadratic'' (LQ) model (Dale, 1985) to evaluate ''equivalent doses'' in cases involving exponentially decaying dose rates. This analysis indicates that the dose-rate effect will be a significant determinant of allowable doses to organs such as liver, kidney and lung. These organ tolerance doses constitute independent constraints on the therapeutic intensity of biologically targeted radiotherapy in exactly the same way as for conventional external beam radiotherapy. In the context of marrow rescue they will in all likelihood constitute the dose-limiting side-effects and thus be especially important. (author)

  19. Organ dose variability and trends in tomosynthesis and radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoye, Jocelyn; Zhang, Yakun; Agasthya, Greeshma; Sturgeon, Greg; Kapadia, Anuj; Segars, W Paul; Samei, Ehsan

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate relationships between patient attributes and organ dose for a population of computational phantoms for 20 tomosynthesis and radiography protocols. Organ dose was estimated from 54 adult computational phantoms (age: 18 to 78 years, weight 52 to 117 kg) using a validated Monte-Carlo simulation (PENELOPE) of a system capable of performing tomosynthesis and radiography. The geometry and field of view for each exam were modeled to match clinical protocols. For each protocol, the energy deposited in each organ was estimated by the simulations, converted to dose units, and then normalized by exposure in air. Dose to radiosensitive organs was studied as a function of average patient thickness in the region of interest and as a function of body mass index. For tomosynthesis, organ doses were also studied as a function of x-ray tube position. This work developed comprehensive information for organ dose dependencies across a range of tomosynthesis and radiography protocols. The results showed a protocol-dependent exponential decrease with an increasing patient size. There was a variability in organ dose across the patient population, which should be incorporated in the metrology of organ dose. The results can be used to prospectively and retrospectively estimate organ dose for tomosynthesis and radiography.

  20. Dose assessment for brachytherapy with Henschke applicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Pei-Chieh; Chao, Tsi-Chian; Tung, Chuan-Jong; Wu, Ching-Jung; Lee, Chung-Chi

    2011-01-01

    Dose perturbation caused by the Henschke applicator is a major concern for the brachytherapy planning system (BPS) in recent years. To investigate dose impact owing to neglect of the metal shielding effect, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, BPS calculation, and film measurement have been performed for dose assessment in a water phantom. Additionally, a cylindrical air cavity representing the rectum was added into the MC simulation to study its effect on dose distribution. Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) was used in this study to simulate the dose distribution using a mesh tally. This Monte Carlo simulation has been validated using the TG-43 data in a previous report. For the measurement, the Henschke applicator was placed in a specially-designed phantom, and Gafchromic films were inserted in the center plane for 2D dose assessment. Isodose distributions with and without the Henschke applicator by the MC simulation show significant deviation from those by the BPS. For MC simulation, the isodose curves shrank more significantly when the metal applicator was applied. For the impact of the added air cavity, the results indicate that it is hard to distinguish between with and without the cavity. Thus, the rectum cavity has little impact on the dose distribution around the Henschke applicator.

  1. Investigation of the Entrance Surface Dose and Dose to Different Organs in Lumbar Spine Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina S

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dose assessment using proper dosimeters is especially important in radiation protection optimization and imaging justification in diagnostic radiology. Objective: The aim of this study is to obtain the Entrance Skin Dose (ESD of patients undergoing lumbar spine imaging using two thermoluminescence dosimeters TLD-100 (LiF: Mg, Ti and GR-200 (LiF: Mg, Cu, P and also to obtain the absorbed dose to different organs in lumbar spine imaging with several views. Methods: To measure the ESD values of the patients undergoing lumbar spine imaging, the two TLD types were put on their skin surface. The ESD values for different views of lumbar spine imaging were also measured by putting the TLDs at the surface of the Rando phantom. Several TLD chips were inserted inside different organs of Rando phantom to measure the absorbed dose to different organs in lumbar spine imaging. Results: The results indicate that there is a close agreement between the results of the two dosimeters. Based on the results of this experiment, the ESD dose of the 16 patients included in this study varied between 2.71 mGy and 26.29 mGy with the average of 11.89 mGy for TLD-100, and between 2.55 mGy and 27.41 mGy with the average of 12.32 mGy for GR-200 measurements. The ESDs obtained by putting the two types of TLDs at the surface of Rando phantom are in close agreement. Conclusion: According to the results, the GR200 has greater sensitivity than the TLD-100.

  2. Investigation of the Entrance Surface Dose and Dose to Different Organs in Lumbar Spine Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sina, S; Zeinali, B; Karimipoorfard, M; Lotfalizadeh, F; Sadeghi, M; Zamani, E; Faghihi, R

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dose assessment using proper dosimeters is especially important in radiation protection optimization and imaging justification in diagnostic radiology. Objective: The aim of this study is to obtain the Entrance Skin Dose (ESD) of patients undergoing lumbar spine imaging using two thermoluminescence dosimeters TLD-100 (LiF: Mg, Ti) and GR-200 (LiF: Mg, Cu, P) and also to obtain the absorbed dose to different organs in lumbar spine imaging with several views. Methods: To measure the ESD values of the patients undergoing lumbar spine imaging, the two TLD types were put on their skin surface. The ESD values for different views of lumbar spine imaging were also measured by putting the TLDs at the surface of the Rando phantom. Several TLD chips were inserted inside different organs of Rando phantom to measure the absorbed dose to different organs in lumbar spine imaging. Results: The results indicate that there is a close agreement between the results of the two dosimeters. Based on the results of this experiment, the ESD dose of the 16 patients included in this study varied between 2.71 mGy and 26.29 mGy with the average of 11.89 mGy for TLD-100, and between 2.55 mGy and 27.41 mGy with the average of 12.32 mGy for GR-200 measurements. The ESDs obtained by putting the two types of TLDs at the surface of Rando phantom are in close agreement. Conclusion: According to the results, the GR200 has greater sensitivity than the TLD-100. PMID:25599058

  3. Organ dose and effective dose with the EOS scanner in spine deformity surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heide Pedersen, Peter; Petersen, Asger Greval; Eiskjær, Søren Peter

    2016-01-01

    Organ dose and effective dose with the EOS scanner in spine deformity surgery. A study on anthropomorphic phantoms describing patient radiation exposure in full spine examinations. Authors: Peter Heide Pedersen, Asger Greval Petersen, Søren Peter Eiskjær. Background: Ionizing radiation potentially...... quality images while at the same time reducing radiation dose. At our institution we use the EOS for pre- and postoperative full spine examinations. Purpose: The purpose of the study is to make first time organ dose and effective dose evaluations with micro-dose settings in full spine examinations. Our...... hypothesis is that organ dose and effective doses can be reduced 5-10 times compared to standard settings, without too high image-quality trade off, resulting in a theoretical reduction of radiation induced cancer. Methods: Patient dosimetry is performed on anthropomorphic child phantoms, representing a 5...

  4. Local dose assessment for a contaminated wound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piechowski, J.; Chaptinel, Y.

    2004-01-01

    Contaminated wounds present a great variability concerning the type of lesion. Assessment of the local dose is one amongst other factors for a decision as to the surgical operation. A simple model has been used to calculate the doses in a representative volume, that of a phalanx for instance. The dose rates are given for current radionuclides. The method of calculation is enough simple in order to allow the practitioners to use it in situations involving other radionuclides. Committed dose depends on the biological half-life which can be estimated from the local measurements. Some examples of calculation of committed dose are given considering half-lives characteristic of the compound. Transposition of the dose to the local risk is easy for the non-stochastic risk. Conversely, this is not the case for the risk of chronic inflammation or cancer. The latter question could only be solved by a feedback based on the analysis of real till now observed cases, nevertheless taking into account the fact that the available data are generally not so easy to make use for establishing an unquestionable dose - effect relation. A critical issue remains open as to the use of these doses for their comparison to the regulatory limits and for the subsequent decisions in case of exceeding the limits. The actual impact of an irradiation, especially by alpha particles, is not linked to the calculated dose in a simple and direct way. This question needs further consideration and perhaps a practical guide concerning this topic would be useful. The anatomical (surgical side effects), psychological and professional consequences should have a large weight relatively to the doses, obviously except for the cases, involving actually large contamination. (authors)

  5. Assessments for high dose radionuclide therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.R.

    2003-01-01

    Advances in the biotechnology of cell specific targeting of cancer and the increased number of clinical trials involving treatment of cancer patients with radiolabelled antibodies, peptides, and similar delivery vehicles have led to an increase in the number of high dose radionuclide therapy procedures. Optimised radionuclide therapy for cancer treatment is based on the concept of absorbed dose to the dose limiting normal organ or tissue. The limiting normal tissue is often the red marrow, but it may sometimes be the lungs, liver, intestinal tract, or kidneys. Appropriate treatment planning requires assessment of radiation dose to several internal organs and tissues, and usually involves biodistribution studies in the patient using a tracer amount of radionuclide bound to the targeting agent and imaged at sequential timepoints using a planar gamma camera. Time-activity curves are developed from the imaging data for the major organ tissues of concern, for the whole body and sometimes for selected tumours. Patient specific factors often require that dose estimates be customised for each patient. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration regulates the experimental use of investigational new drugs and requires 'reasonable calculation of radiation absorbed dose to the whole body and to critical organs' using the methods prescribed by the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine. Review of high dose studies shows that some are conducted with minimal dosimetry, that the marrow dose is difficult to establish and is subject to large uncertainties. Despite the general availability of software, internal dosimetry methods often seem to be inconsistent from one clinical centre to another. (author)

  6. The embryogenesis of dose assessment at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    Several significant events occurred between 1955 and 1960 that resulted in major changes in environmental monitoring at Hanford and in the initiation of comprehensive dose assessments. These included: (1) specification of dose limits for nonoccupational exposure (including internal emitters); (2) a national and international awakening to the need for managing the disposal of radioactive wastes; (3) identification of the most important radionuclides and their sources of exposure; (4) data that quantified the transfer coefficients of nuclides along environmental pathways; and (5) development of greatly improved radiation detection instrumentation. In response to a growing need, the Hanford Laboratories formed the Environmental Studies and Evaluation component. This group revamped the monitoring and sampling programs so that analytical results contributed directly to dose estimation. Special studies were conducted to ascertain local dietary and recreational habits that affected dose calculations and to calibrate the models. These studies involved extensive contact with the public and governmental agencies, which elicited a positive reaction

  7. Inhalation dose assessment for Maralinga and Emu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, P.N.; Lokan, K.H.; Williams, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    Dose assessments for the inhalation of artificial radionuclides are presented for all types of contaminated areas at Maralinga and Emu. These enable Committed Effective Dose Equivalent (CEDE), to be estimated by scaling at any area of interest where activity concentrations are known. In the case of Aborigines, these dose are estimated assuming respirable dust loadings of 1 mg/m 3 for adults and 1.5 mg/m 3 for children and infants. Details of the calculations are presented in the appendix. The model of the respiratory system used in this assessment is that described in Interantional Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 30 (ICRP, 1979a). With the exception of Kuli, which is contaminated with uranium, at all other sites it is only the inhalation of plutonium and americium that contributes significantly to the dose, and of these 239 Pu is the largest contributor. Therefore, considering the long half lives of the radionuclides concerned, it appears that the inhalation problems highlighted by this dose assessment will not diminish significantly within any reasonable period of time and hence management strategies must be developed to deal with such problems. 32 refs., 5 tabs., 1 fig

  8. Dose assessment for Greifswald and Cadarache

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raskob, W.

    1996-07-01

    Probabilistic dose assessments for accidental atmospheric releases of tritium and activation products as well as releases under normal operation conditions were performed for the sites of Greifswald, Germany, and Cadarache, France. Additionally, aquatic releases were considered for both sites. No country specific rules were applied and the input parameters were adapted as far as possible to those used within former ITER studies to have a better comparison to site independent dose assessments performed in the frame of ITER. The main goal was to complete the generic data base with site specific values. The agreement between the results from the ITER study on atmospheric releases and the two sites are rather good for tritium, whereas the ITER reference dose values for the activation product releases are often lower, than the maximum doses for Greifswald and Cadarache. However, the percentile values fit better to the deterministic approach of ITER. Within all scenarios, the consequences of aquatic releases are in nearly all cases smaller than those from comparable releases to the atmosphere (HTO and steel). This rule is only broken once in case of accidental releases of activated steel from Cadarache. However, the uncertainties associated with the aquatic assessments are rather high and a better data base is needed to obtain more realistic and thus more reliable dose values. (orig.) [de

  9. A model to accumulate fractionated dose in a deforming organ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Di; Jaffray, D.A.; Wong, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Measurements of internal organ motion have demonstrated that daily organ deformation exists throughout the course of radiation treatment. However, a method of constructing the resultant dose delivered to the organ volume remains a difficult challenge. In this study, a model to quantify internal organ motion and a method to construct a cumulative dose in a deforming organ are introduced. Methods and Materials: A biomechanical model of an elastic body is used to quantify patient organ motion in the process of radiation therapy. Intertreatment displacements of volume elements in an organ of interest is calculated by applying an finite element method with boundary conditions, obtained from multiple daily computed tomography (CT) measurements. Therefore, by incorporating also the measurements of daily setup error, daily dose delivered to a deforming organ can be accumulated by tracking the position of volume elements in the organ. Furthermore, distribution of patient-specific organ motion is also predicted during the early phase of treatment delivery using the daily measurements, and the cumulative dose distribution in the organ can then be estimated. This dose distribution will be updated whenever a new measurement becomes available, and used to reoptimize the ongoing treatment. Results: An integrated process to accumulate dosage in a daily deforming organ was implemented. In this process, intertreatment organ motion and setup error were systematically quantified, and incorporated in the calculation of the cumulative dose. An example of the rectal wall motion in a prostate treatment was applied to test the model. The displacements of volume elements in the rectal wall, as well as the resultant doses, were calculated. Conclusion: This study is intended to provide a systematic framework to incorporate daily patient-specific organ motion and setup error in the reconstruction of the cumulative dose distribution in an organ of interest. The realistic dose

  10. The MESORAD dose assessment model: Computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Athey, G.F.; Bander, T.J.; Scherpelz, R.I.

    1988-10-01

    MESORAD is a dose equivalent model for emergency response applications that is designed to be run on minicomputers. It has been developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for use as part of the Intermediate Dose Assessment System in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Operations Center in Washington, DC, and the Emergency Management System in the US Department of Energy Unified Dose Assessment Center in Richland, Washington. This volume describes the MESORAD computer code and contains a listing of the code. The technical basis for MESORAD is described in the first volume of this report (Scherpelz et al. 1986). A third volume of the documentation planned. That volume will contain utility programs and input and output files that can be used to check the implementation of MESORAD. 18 figs., 4 tabs

  11. Assessment of external dose indoors in Lithuania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilkyte, L.; Butkus, D.; Morkunas, G.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper was an assessment of external exposure indoors and its dependence on construction materials and indoor radon concentrations in Lithuanian living houses. Relationship of absorbed dose rate in air indoors and activity indexes of the most commonly used construction materials (wood, concrete and bricks) have been studied using results received in measurements done in >4700 rooms in 1995-2005. Possible connections of dose rate indoors with indoor radon concentrations are also discussed. Findings of this study helped to make an assessment of the mean value of effective dose of Lithuanian population due to external exposure indoors which is equal to 0.58 mSv y -1 . The received data might also be used in improvement of quality of personal dosimetric measurements done in premises constructed of different construction materials. (authors)

  12. Radiation exposure during paediatric CT in Sudan: CT dose, organ and effective doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suliman, I.I.; Khamis, H.M.; Ombada, T.H.; Alzimami, K.; Alkhorayef, M.; Sulieman, A.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the magnitude of radiation exposure during paediatric CT in Sudanese hospitals. Doses were determined from CT acquisition parameters using CT-Expo 2.1 dosimetry software. Doses were evaluated for three patient ages (0-1, 1-5 and 5-10 y) and two common procedures (head and abdomen). For children aged 0-1 y, volume CT air kerma index (C vol ), air Kerma-length product and effective dose (E) values were 19.1 mGy, 265 mGy.cm and 3.1 mSv, respectively, at head CT and those at abdominal CT were 8.8 mGy, 242 mGy.cm and 7.7 mSv, respectively. Those for children aged 1-5 y were 22.5 mGy, 305 mGy.cm and 1.1 mSv, respectively, at head CT and 12.6 mGy, 317 mGy.cm, and 5.1 mSv, respectively, at abdominal CT. Dose values and variations were comparable with those reported in the literature. Organ equivalent doses vary from 7.5 to 11.6 mSv for testes, from 9.0 to 10.0 mSv for ovaries and from 11.1 to 14.3 mSv for uterus in abdominal CT. The results are useful for dose optimisation and derivation of national diagnostic reference levels. (authors)

  13. Determination of environmental radioactivity for dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakoaka, A.; Fukushima, M.; Takagi, S.

    1980-01-01

    A method was devised to determine detection limits for radioactivity in environmental samples. The method is based on the 5 mrem/yr whole-body dose objective established by the Japan Atomic Enerty Commission and is valid for assessing the internal dose from radionuclides in the environment around a nuclear facility. Eleven samples and 15 radionuclides were considered. Internal dose was assumed to be one-half of the total dose (5 mrem/yr) and was assessed using the critical pathway method. Needed detection limits (NDLs) were established to confirm the dose of 5 mrem/yr when there was more than one radionuclide per sample. The NDLs for γ-emitters were 10 -5 pCi/l. for air; 10 -3 pCi/l. for seawater; 10 -1 pCi/l. for drinking water; 10 0 pCi/kg for vegetables and fish; 10 0 pCi/l. for milk; and 10 1 pCi/kg for molluscs, crustaceans, seaweeds, soil and submarine sediments. The NDLs for β-emitters were 1-1/100 of those for γ-emitters. (author)

  14. Real time source term and dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breznik, B.; Kovac, A.; Mlakar, P.

    2001-01-01

    The Dose Projection Programme is a tool for decision making in case of nuclear emergency. The essential input data for quick emergency evaluation in the case of hypothetical pressurised water reactor accident are following: source term, core damage assessment, fission product radioactivity, release source term and critical exposure pathways for an early phase of the release. A reduced number of radio-nuclides and simplified calculations can be used in dose calculation algorithm. Simple expert system personal computer programme has been developed for the Krsko Nuclear Power Plant for dose projection within the radius of few kilometers from the pressurised water reactor in early phase of an accident. The input data are instantaneous data of core activity, core damage indicators, release fractions, reduction factor of the release pathways, spray operation, release timing, and dispersion coefficient. Main dose projection steps are: accurate in-core radioactivity determination using reactor power input; core damage and in-containment source term assessment based on quick indications of instrumentation or on activity analysis data; user defines release pathway for typical PWR accident scenarius; dose calculation is performed only for exposure pathway critical for decision about evacuation or sheltering in early phase of an accident.(author)

  15. Dose assessment in the Marshall Islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robison, William L.

    1978-01-01

    Bikini Atoll and Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands were the sites of major U.S. weapons testing from 1948 through 1958. Both the Bikini and Knewetak people have expressed a desire to return to their native Atolls. In 1968 clean-up and resettlement of Bikini was begun. In 1972-73 the initial survey of Enewetak Atoll was conducted and clean-up began in 1977. Surveys have been conducted at both Atolls to establish the concentrations of radionuclides in the biota and to determine the external exposure rates. Subsequent to the surveys dose assessments have been made to determine the potential dose to returning (100) populations at both Atolls. This talk will include discussions of the relative importance of the critical exposure pathways (i.e., external exposure, inhalation, marine, terrestrial and drinking water), the predominant radionuclides contributing to the predicted doses for each pathway, the doses predicted for alternate living patterns, comparison to Federal Guidelines, the comparison between Atolls, some of the social problems created by adherence to Federal Guidelines and the follow-up research identified and initiated to help refine the dose assessments and better predict the long term use of the Atolls (86). (author)

  16. Organ doses in interventional radiology procedures: Evaluation of software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tort, I.; Ruiz-Cruces, R.; Perez-Martinez, M.; Carrera, F.; Ojeda, C.; Diez de los Rios, A.

    2001-01-01

    Interventional Radiology (IR) procedures require large fluoroscopy times and important number of radiological images, so the levels of radiation to patient are high, which leads us to calculate the organ doses. The objective of this work is to estimate and make a comparison of the results given by the different software that we have to do the calculation of organ doses in complex procedures of IR. To do this, 28 patients have been selected, distributed in the 3 procedures with highest doses. The determination of organ doses and effective doses has been made using the projections utilized and different software based on Monte Carlo Methods: Eff-dose, PCXMC and Diasoft. We have obtained very high dispersion in the average organ dose between the 3 programs. In many cases, it is higher than 25% and in some particular cases, it is greater than 100%. Dispersion obtained in effective doses is not so high, being under 20% in all cases. This shows that a better solution is needed to solve the problem of the organ doses calculation; a more accurate method is necessary that brings us to a trustworthy approach to reality, and, at the moment, that we do not dispose of it. (author)

  17. A Topographically and anatomically unified phantom model for organ dose determination in radiation hygiene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servomaa, A.; Rannikko, S.; Ermakov, I.; Masarskyi, L.; Saltukova, L.

    1989-08-01

    The effective dose equivalent is used as a risk-related factor for assessing radiation impact on patients. In order to assess the effective dose equivalent, data on organ doses in several organs are needed. For calculation of the collective effective dose equivalent, data on the sex and size distribution of the exposed population are also needed. A realistic phantom model based on the Alderson-Rando anatomical phantom has been developed for these purposes. The phantom model includes 22 organs and takes into account the deflections due to sex, height, weight and other anatomical features. Coordinates of the outer contours of inner organs are given in different slabs of the phantom. The images of cross sections of different slabs realistically depict the distribution of the organs in the phantom. Statistics about height and weight distribution as a function of the age of the Finnish population are also given. (orig.)

  18. Effective dose and organ doses estimation taking tube current modulation into account with a commercial software package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Rendon, X.; Bosmans, H.; Zanca, F.; Oyen, R.

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of including tube current modulation (TCM) versus using the average mAs in estimating organ and effective dose (E) using commercial software. Forty adult patients (24 females, 16 males) with normal BMI underwent chest/abdomen computed tomography (CT) performed with TCM at 120 kVp, reference mAs of 110 (chest) and 200 (abdomen). Doses to fully irradiated organs (breasts, lungs, stomach, liver and ovaries) and E were calculated using two versions of a dosimetry software: v.2.0, which uses the average mAs, and v.2.2, which accounts for TCM by implementing a gender-specific mAs profile. Student's t-test was used to assess statistically significant differences between organ doses calculated with the two versions. A statistically significant difference (p < 0.001) was found for E on chest and abdomen CT, with E being lower by 4.2 % when TCM is considered. Similarly, organ doses were also significantly lower (p < 0.001): 13.7 % for breasts, 7.3 % for lungs, 9.1 % for the liver and 8.5 % for the stomach. Only the dose to the ovaries was higher with TCM (11.5 %). When TCM is used, for the stylized phantom, the doses to lungs, breasts, stomach and liver decreased while the dose to the ovaries increased. (orig.)

  19. Effective dose and organ doses estimation taking tube current modulation into account with a commercial software package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Rendon, X. [KU Leuven, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Division of Medical Physics and Quality Assessment, Herestraat 49, box 7003, Leuven (Belgium); Bosmans, H.; Zanca, F. [KU Leuven, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Division of Medical Physics and Quality Assessment, Herestraat 49, box 7003, Leuven (Belgium); University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Oyen, R. [University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium)

    2015-07-15

    To evaluate the effect of including tube current modulation (TCM) versus using the average mAs in estimating organ and effective dose (E) using commercial software. Forty adult patients (24 females, 16 males) with normal BMI underwent chest/abdomen computed tomography (CT) performed with TCM at 120 kVp, reference mAs of 110 (chest) and 200 (abdomen). Doses to fully irradiated organs (breasts, lungs, stomach, liver and ovaries) and E were calculated using two versions of a dosimetry software: v.2.0, which uses the average mAs, and v.2.2, which accounts for TCM by implementing a gender-specific mAs profile. Student's t-test was used to assess statistically significant differences between organ doses calculated with the two versions. A statistically significant difference (p < 0.001) was found for E on chest and abdomen CT, with E being lower by 4.2 % when TCM is considered. Similarly, organ doses were also significantly lower (p < 0.001): 13.7 % for breasts, 7.3 % for lungs, 9.1 % for the liver and 8.5 % for the stomach. Only the dose to the ovaries was higher with TCM (11.5 %). When TCM is used, for the stylized phantom, the doses to lungs, breasts, stomach and liver decreased while the dose to the ovaries increased. (orig.)

  20. Bio-indicators for radiation dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, A.

    1990-12-01

    In nuclear facilities, such as Chalk River Laboratories, dose to the atomic radiation workers (ARWs) is assessed routinely by using physical dosimeters and bioassay procedures in accordance with regulatory recommendations. However, these procedures may be insufficient in some circumstances, e.g., in cases where the reading of the physical dosimeters is questioned, in cases of radiation accidents where the person(s) in question was not wearing a dosimeter, or in the event of a radiation emergency when an exposure above the dose limits is possible. The desirability of being able to assess radiation dose on the basis of radio-biological effects has prompted the Dosimetric Research Branch to investigate the suitability of biological devices and techniques that could be used for this purpose. Current biological dosimetry concepts suggest that there does not appear to be any bio-indicator that could reliably measure the very low doses that are routinely measured by the physical devices presently in use. Nonetheless, bio-indicators may be useful in providing valuable supplementary information in cases of unusual radiation exposures, such as when the estimated body doses are doubtful because of lack of proper physical measurements, or in cases where available results need to be confirmed for medical treatment plannings. This report evaluates the present state of biological dosimetry and, in particular, assesses the efficiency and limits of individual indicators. This has led to the recommendation of a few promising research areas that may result in the development of appropriate biological dosimeters for operational and emergency needs at Chalk River

  1. Evaluation of organ doses and specific k effective dose of 64-slice CT thorax examination using an adult anthropomorphic phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashim, S.; Karim, M.K.A.; Bakar, K.A.; Sabarudin, A.; Chin, A.W; Saripan, M.I.; Bradley, D.A.

    2016-01-01

    The magnitude of radiation dose in computed tomography (CT) depends on the scan acquisition parameters, investigated herein using an anthropomorphic phantom (RANDO®) and thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD). Specific interest was in the organ doses resulting from CT thorax examination, the specific k coefficient for effective dose estimation for particular protocols also being determined. For measurement of doses representing five main organs (thyroid, lung, liver, esophagus and skin), TLD-100 (LiF:Mg, Ti) were inserted into selected holes in a phantom slab. Five CT thorax protocols were investigated, one routine (R1) and four that were modified protocols (R2 to R5). Organ doses were ranked from greatest to least, found to lie in the order: thyroid>skin>lung>liver>breast. The greatest dose, for thyroid at 25 mGy, was that in use of R1 while the lowest, at 8.8 mGy, was in breast tissue using R3. Effective dose (E) was estimated using three standard methods: the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP)-103 recommendation (E103), the computational phantom CT-EXPO (E(CTEXPO)) method, and the dose-length product (DLP) based approach. E103 k factors were constant for all protocols, ~8% less than that of the universal k factor. Due to inconsistency in tube potential and pitch factor the k factors from CTEXPO were found to vary between 0.015 and 0.010 for protocols R3 and R5. With considerable variation between scan acquisition parameters and organ doses, optimization of practice is necessary in order to reduce patient organ dose. - Highlights: • Using TLD-100 dosimeters and a RANDO phantom 5 CT thorax protocol organ doses were assessed. • The specific k coefficient for effective dose estimation of protocols differed with approach. • Organ dose was observed to decrease in the order: thyroid>skin>lung>liver>breast. • E103 k factors were constant for all protocols, lower by ~8% compared to the universal k factor.

  2. Uncertainty on faecal analysis on dose assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juliao, Ligia M.Q.C.; Melo, Dunstana R.; Sousa, Wanderson de O.; Santos, Maristela S.; Fernandes, Paulo Cesar P. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Salvador Allende s/n. Via 9, Recreio, CEP 22780-160, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2007-07-01

    Monitoring programmes for internal dose assessment may need to have a combination of bioassay techniques, e.g. urine and faecal analysis, especially in workplaces where compounds of different solubilities are handled and also in cases of accidental intakes. Faecal analysis may be an important data for assessment of committed effective dose due to exposure to insoluble compounds, since the activity excreted by urine may not be detectable, unless a very sensitive measurement system is available. This paper discusses the variability of the daily faecal excretion based on data from just one daily collection; collection during three consecutive days: samples analysed individually and samples analysed as a pool. The results suggest that just 1 d collection is not appropriate for dose assessment, since the 24 h uranium excretion may vary by a factor of 40. On the basis of this analysis, the recommendation should be faecal collection during three consecutive days, and samples analysed as a pool, it is more economic and faster. (authors)

  3. Organ doses to examinees during photofluorography, fluoroscopy and computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kazuo; Antoku, Shigetoshi; Sawada, Shozo; Russell, W.J.; Wada, Takuro.

    1990-07-01

    Doses to the salivary glands, thyroid gland, breast, lung, stomach and colon during mass radiologic gastric screening, mass radiographic chest screening, upper gastrointestinal series, and computed tomography were determined by exposing a phantom female human to simulated radiological X-ray examinations in community hospitals. The doses were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters, and the results will be used to document organ doses received by participants in the ABCC/RERF Adult Health Study. (author)

  4. Dose. Detriment. Limit assessment; Dosis. Schadensmass. Grenzwertsetzung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breckow, J. [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen, Giessen (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik und Strahlenschutz (IMPS)

    2015-07-01

    One goal of radiation protection is the limitation of stochastic effects due to radiation exposure. The probability of occurrence of a radiation induced stochastic effect, however, is only one of several other parameters which determine the radiation detriment. Though the ICRP-concept of detriment is a quantitative definition, the kind of detriment weighting includes somewhat subjective elements. In this sense, the detriment-concept of ICRP represents already at the stage of effective dose a kind of assessment. Thus, by comparing radiation protection standards and concepts interconvertible or with those of environment or occupational protection one should be aware of the possibly different principles of detriment assessment.

  5. Organ dose estimates for the Japanese atomic-bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, G.D.

    1978-10-01

    Recent studies concerning radiation risks to man by the Committee on Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation of the National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council and the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation have emphasized the need for estimates of dose to organs of the Japanese atomic-bomb survivors. Shielding of internal organs by the body has been investigated for fission-weapon gamma rays and neutrons, and ratios of mean absorbed dose in a number of organs to survivors' T65D assignments of tissue kerma in air are provided for adults. Ratios of mean absorbed dose to tissue kerma in air are provided also for the thyroid and active bone marrow of juveniles. These organ dose estimates for juveniles are of interest in studies of radiation risks due to an elevated incidence of leukemia and thyroid cancer in survivors exposed as children compared to survivors exposed as adults

  6. Estimation of organ doses of patient undergoing hepatic chemoembolization procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaramillo, G.W.; Kramer, R.; Khoury, H.J.; Barros, V.S.M.; Andrade, G.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the organ doses of patients undergoing hepatic chemoembolization procedures performed in two hospitals in the city of Recife-Brazil. Forty eight patients undergoing fifty hepatic chemoembolization procedures were investigated. For the 20 cases with PA projection only, organ and tissue absorbed doses as well as radiation risks were calculated. For this purpose organs and tissues dose to KAP conversion coefficients were calculated using the mesh-based phantom series FASH and MASH coupled to the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code. Clinical, dosimetric and irradiations parameters were registered for all patients. The maximum organ doses found were 1.72 Gy, 0.65Gy, 0.56 Gy and 0.33 Gy for skin, kidneys, adrenals and liver, respectively. (authors)

  7. Beta particle dose rates to micro-organisms in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabir, M.; Spiers, F.W.; Iinuma, Takeshi.

    1977-01-01

    Studies were made to estimate the beta-particle dose rates to micro-organisms of various sizes in soil. The small insects and organisms living in soil are constantly exposed to beta-radiation arising from naturally occuring radionuclides in soil as in this case no overlying tissue shields them. The technique of measuring beta-particle dose rate consisted of using of a thin plastic scintillator to measure the pulse height distribution as the beta particle traverses the scintillator. The integrated response was determined by the number and size of the photomultiplier pulses. From the data of soil analyses it was estimated that typically about 29% of the beta particles emitted per gm. of soil were contributed by the U/Ra series, 21% by the Th series and about 50% by potassium. By combining the individual spectra of these three radionuclides in the proportion found in a typical soil, a resultant spectrum was computed representing the energy distribution of the beta particles. The dose rate received by micro-organisms of different shape and size in soil was derived from the equilibrium dose rates combined with a 'Geometrical Factor' of the organisms. For small organisms, the dose rates did not vary between the spherical and cylindrical types, but in the case of larger organisms, the dose rates were found to be greater for the spherical types of the same diameter. (auth.)

  8. Dose assessment under incidental and accidental conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebschmann, W.G.

    1988-01-01

    Dose assessment for the licesing process of a nuclear power plant covers the routine release of radioactive substances into the atmosphere as well as releases due to incidents. Source terms for these incidents are evaluated by the detailed incident analysis of the plant. The types of incidents to be covered are determined in the FRG by the ''Stoerfall-Leitlinien'' of the Ministry of the Interior. The calculation of dose equivalents in the environment of the plant differs from the calculation of doses due to routine releases, as incidents are single events occuring at undeterminate time, and the results must be conservative. Some details are being described. During the operation of the plant it is essential to measure not only the radioactivity release rates but also the necessary meteorological parameters for the instantaneous determination of the atmospheric dispersion in case of incidental or accidental releases of radioactivity. This instantaneous assessment assists in taking measurements of ground contamination and in deciding about countermeasures for the protection of plant personnell and population. (author) [pt

  9. Thermoluminescence dosemeter for personal dose equivalent assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, T.A. da; Rosa, L.A.R. da; Campos, L.L.

    1995-01-01

    The possibility was investigated of utilising a Brazilian thermoluminescence individual dosemeter, usually calibrated in terms of photon dose equivalent, for the assessment of the personal dose equivalent, H p (d), at depths of 0.07 and 10 mm. The dosemeter uses four CaSO 4 :Dy thermoluminescent detectors, between different filters, as the sensitive materials. It was calibrated in gamma and X radiation fields in the energy range from 17 to 1250 keV. Linear combinations of the responses of three detectors, in this energy range, allow the evaluation of H p (0.07) and H p (10), for radiation incidence angles varying from 0 to 60 degrees, with an accuracy better than 35%. The method is not applicable to mixed photon-beta fields. (author)

  10. Combination TLD/TED dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkhurst, M.A.

    1992-11-01

    During the early 1980s, an appraisal of dosimetry programs at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities identified a significant weakness in dose assessment in fast neutron environments. Basing neutron dose equivalent on thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDS) was not entirely satisfactory for environments that had not been well characterized. In most operational situations, the dosimeters overrespond to neutrons, and this overresponse could be further exaggerated with changes in the neutron quality factor (Q). Because TLDs are energy dependent with an excellent response to thermal and low-energy neutrons but a weak response to fast neutrons, calibrating the dosimetry system to account for mixed and moderated neutron energy fields is a difficult and seldom satisfactory exercise. To increase the detection of fast neutrons and help improve the accuracy of dose equivalent determinations, a combination dosimeter was developed using TLDs to detect thermal and low-energy neutrons and a track-etch detector (TED) to detect fast neutrons. By combining the albedo energy response function of the TLDs with the track detector elements, the dosimeter can nearly match the fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion curve. The polymer CR-39 has neutron detection characteristics superior to other materials tested. The CR-39 track detector is beta and gamma insensitive and does not require backscatter (albedo) from the body to detect the exposure. As part of DOE's Personnel Neutron and Upgrade Program, we have been developing a R-39 track detector over the past decade to address detection and measurement of fast neutrons. Using CR-39 TEDs in combination with TLDs will now allow us to detect the wide spectrum of occupational neutron energies and assign dose equivalents much more confidently

  11. 222Rn alpha dose to organs other than lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harley, N.H.; Robbins, E.S.

    1991-01-01

    The alpha dose to cells in tissues or organs other theft the lung has been calculated using the solubility coefficients for 222 Rn measured in human tissue. The annual alpha dose equivalent f rom 222 Rn and decay products in most tissues is a maximum of 30% of the annual average natural background dose equivalent (1 mSv) for external and internally deposited nuclides. The dose to the small population of lymphocytes located in or under the bronchial epithelium is a special case and their annual dose equivalent is essentially the same as that to basal cells in bronchial epithelium (200 mSv) for continuous exposure to 200 Bq M -3 . The significance of this dose is uncertain because the only excess cancer observed in follow up studies of underground miners with high 222 Rn exposure is bronchogenic carcinoma

  12. Biosphere model for assessing doses from nuclear waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zach, R.; Amiro, B.D.; Davis, P.A.; Sheppard, S.C.; Szekeley, J.G.

    1994-01-01

    The biosphere model, BIOTRAC, for predicting long term nuclide concentrations and radiological doses from Canada's nuclear fuel waste disposal concept of a vault deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield is presented. This generic, boreal zone biosphere model is based on scenario analysis and systems variability analysis using Monte Carlo simulation techniques. Conservatism is used to bridge uncertainties, even though this creates a small amount of extra nuclide mass. Environmental change over the very long assessment period is mainly handled through distributed parameter values. The dose receptors are a critical group of humans and four generic non-human target organisms. BIOTRAC includes six integrated submodels and it interfaces smoothly with a geosphere model. This interface includes a bedrock well. The geosphere model defines the discharge zones of deep groundwater where nuclides released from the vault enter the biosphere occupied by the dose receptors. The size of one of these zones is reduced when water is withdrawn from the bedrock well. Sensitivity analysis indicates 129 I is by far the most important radionuclide. Results also show bedrock-well water leads to higher doses to man than lake water, but the former doses decrease with the size of the critical group. Under comparable circumstances, doses to the non-human biota are greater than those for man

  13. Dose Assessment Model for Chronic Atmospheric Releases of Tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Huifang; Yao Rentai

    2010-01-01

    An improved dose assessment model for chronic atmospheric releases of tritium was proposed. The proposed model explicitly considered two chemical forms of tritium.It was based on conservative assumption of transfer of tritiated water (HTO) from air to concentration of HTO and organic beam tritium (OBT) in vegetable and animal products.The concentration of tritium in plant products was calculated based on considering dividedly leafy plant and not leafy plant, meanwhile the concentration contribution of tritium in the different plants from the tritium in soil was taken into account.Calculating the concentration of HTO in animal products, average water fraction of animal products and the average weighted tritium concentration of ingested water based on the fraction of water supplied by each source were considered,including skin absorption, inhalation, drinking water and food.Calculating the annual doses, the ingestion doses were considered, at the same time the contribution of inhalation and skin absorption to the dose was considered. Concentrations in foodstuffs and dose of annual adult calculated with the specific activity model, NEWTRI model and the model proposed by the paper were compared. The results indicate that the model proposed by the paper can predict accurately tritium doses through the food chain from chronic atmospheric releases. (authors)

  14. Assessment of dose during an SGTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission requires utilities to determine the response of a pressurized water reactor to a steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) as part of the safety analysis for the plant. The SGTR analysis includes assumptions regarding the iodine concentration in the reactor coolant system (RCS) due to iodine spikes, primary flashing and bypass fractions, and iodine partitioning in the secondary coolant system (SCS). Experimental and analytical investigations have recently been completed wherein these assumptions were tested to determine whether and to what degree they were conservative (that is, whether they result in a calculated iodine source term/dose that is at least as large or larger than that expected during an actual event). The current study has the objective to assess the overall effects of the results of these investigations on the calculated iodine dose to the environment during an SGTR. To assist in this study, a computer program, DOSE, was written. This program uses a simple, non-mechanistic model to calculate the iodine source term to the environment during an SGTR as a function of water mass inventories and flow rates and iodine concentrations in the RCS and SCS. The principal conclusion of this study is that the iodine concentration in the RCS is the dominant parameter, due to the dominance of primary flashing on the iodine source term

  15. Committed equivalent organ doses and committed effective doses from intakes of radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Phipps, A W; Kendall, G M; Silk, T J; Stather, J W

    1991-01-01

    This report contains details of committed equivalent doses to individual organs for intakes by ingestion and inhalation of 1 mu m AMAD particles of 359 nuclides by infants aged 3 months, by children aged 1, 5, 10 and 15 years, and by adults. It complements NRPB-R245 which describes the changes which have taken place since the last NRPB compendium of dose per unit intake factors (dose coefficients) and gives summary tables. Information on the way committed doses increase with the integration period is given in NRPB-M289. The information given in these memoranda is also available as a microcomputer package - NRPB-SR245.

  16. Conversion coefficients for determining organ doses in paediatric pelvis and hip joint radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidenbusch, Michael C.; Schneider, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of organ and effective doses achieved during paediatric X-ray examinations is an important prerequisite for assessment of radiation burden to the patient. Conversion coefficients for reconstruction of organ and effective doses from entrance doses for pelvis and hip joint radiographs of 0-, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15- and 30-year-old patients are provided regarding the Guidelines of Good Radiographic Technique of the European Commission. Using the personal computer program PCXMC developed by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (Saeteilyturvakeskus STUK), conversion coefficients for conventional pelvis and hip joint radiographs were calculated by performing Monte Carlo simulations in mathematical hermaphrodite phantom models representing patients of different ages. The clinical variation of radiation field settings was taken into consideration by defining optimal and suboptimal standard field settings. Conversion coefficients for the reconstruction of organ doses in about 40 organs and tissues from measured entrance doses during pelvis and hip joint radiographs of 0-, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15- and 30-year-old patients were calculated for the standard sagittal beam projection and the standard focus detector distance of 115 cm. The conversion coefficients presented can be used for organ dose assessments from entrance doses measured during pelvis and hip joint radiographs of children and young adults with all field settings within the optimal and suboptimal standard field settings. (orig.)

  17. A PC program for estimating organ dose and effective dose values in computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalender, W.A.; Schmidt, B.; Schmidt, M.; Zankl, M.

    1999-01-01

    Dose values in CT are specified by the manufacturers for all CT systems and operating conditions in phantoms. It is not trivial, however, to derive dose values in patients from this information. Therefore, we have developed a PC-based program which calculates organ dose and effective dose values for arbitrary scan parameters and anatomical ranges. Values for primary radiation are derived from measurements or manufacturer specifications; values for scattered radiation are derived from Monte Carlo calculations tabulated for standard anthropomorphic phantoms. Based on these values, organ doses can be computed by the program for arbitrary scan protocols in conventional and in spiral CT. Effective dose values are also provided, both with ICRP 26 and ICRP 60 tissue-weighting coefficients. Results for several standard CT protocols are presented in tabular form in this paper. In addition, potential for dose reduction is demonstrated, for example, in spiral CT and in quantitative CT. Providing realistic patient dose estimates for arbitrary CT protocols is relevant both for the physician and the patient, and it is particularly useful for educational and training purposes. The program, called WinDose, is now in use at the Erlangen University hospitals (Germany) as an information tool for radiologists and patients. Further extensions are planned. (orig.)

  18. Dose assessment considering evolution of the biosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, Sara; Bergstroem, Ulla

    2002-01-01

    Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management AB (SKB) is presently updating the safety assessment for SFR (Final repository for radioactive operational waste) in Sweden. The bio-spheric part of the analysis is performed by Studsvik Eco and Safety AB. According to the regulations the safety of the repository has to be accounted for different possible courses of the development of the biosphere. A number of studies have been carried out during the past years to investigate and document the biosphere in the area surrounding the repository. Modelling of shore-level displacement by land uplift, coastal water exchange and sedimentation have provided data for prediction of the evolution of the area. The prediction is done without considering a future change in climatic conditions. The results from this study show that accumulation of radionuclides in sediments is an important process to simulate when performing dose assessments covering biosphere evolution. The dose calculated for the first years of the period with agricultural use of the contaminated sediments may be severely underestimated in a scenario with large accumulation in coastal and lake stages. (LN)

  19. Dose-stress synergism in cancer risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop-Jordanova, N.; Pop-Jordanov, J.

    2001-01-01

    Our hypothesis is that the relatively low risk of cancer or leukaemia from depleted uranium, as predicted by the World Health Organization and the International Atomic Energy Agency, is a result of neglecting the synergism between physico-chemical agents and psychological stress agents (here shortly denoted as dose-stress synergism). We use the modified risk assessment model that comprises a psycho-somatic extension, originally developed by us for assessing the risks of energy sources. Our preliminary meta-analysis of animal and human studies on cancers confirmed the existence of stress effects, including the amplifying synergism. Consequently, the psychological stress can increase the probability of even small toxic chemical or ionizing radiation exposure to produce malignancy. Such dose-stress synergism might influence the health risks among military personnel and the residents in the highly stressful environment in the Balkans. Further investigation is needed to estimate the order of magnitude of these combined effects in particular circumstances. (Original)

  20. VirtualDose: a software for reporting organ doses from CT for adult and pediatric patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Aiping; Gao, Yiming; Liu, Haikuan; Caracappa, Peter F.; Long, Daniel J.; Bolch, Wesley E.; Liu, Bob; Xu, X. George

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of VirtualDose—a software for reporting organ doses for adult and pediatric patients who undergo x-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations. The software is based on a comprehensive database of organ doses derived from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations involving a library of 25 anatomically realistic phantoms that represent patients of different ages, body sizes, body masses, and pregnant stages. Models of GE Lightspeed Pro 16 and Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 scanners were carefully validated for use in MC dose calculations. The software framework is designed with the ‘software as a service (SaaS)’ delivery concept under which multiple clients can access the web-based interface simultaneously from any computer without having to install software locally. The RESTful web service API also allows a third-party picture archiving and communication system software package to seamlessly integrate with VirtualDose’s functions. Software testing showed that VirtualDose was compatible with numerous operating systems including Windows, Linux, Apple OS X, and mobile and portable devices. The organ doses from VirtualDose were compared against those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT—two dosimetry tools that were based on the stylized pediatric and adult patient models that were known to be anatomically simple. The organ doses reported by VirtualDose differed from those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT by as much as 300% in some of the patient models. These results confirm the conclusion from past studies that differences in anatomical realism offered by stylized and voxel phantoms have caused significant discrepancies in CT dose estimations.

  1. VirtualDose: a software for reporting organ doses from CT for adult and pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Aiping; Gao, Yiming; Liu, Haikuan; Caracappa, Peter F; Xu, X George; Long, Daniel J; Bolch, Wesley E; Liu, Bob

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development and testing of VirtualDose—a software for reporting organ doses for adult and pediatric patients who undergo x-ray computed tomography (CT) examinations. The software is based on a comprehensive database of organ doses derived from Monte Carlo (MC) simulations involving a library of 25 anatomically realistic phantoms that represent patients of different ages, body sizes, body masses, and pregnant stages. Models of GE Lightspeed Pro 16 and Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 scanners were carefully validated for use in MC dose calculations. The software framework is designed with the ‘software as a service (SaaS)’ delivery concept under which multiple clients can access the web-based interface simultaneously from any computer without having to install software locally. The RESTful web service API also allows a third-party picture archiving and communication system software package to seamlessly integrate with VirtualDose’s functions. Software testing showed that VirtualDose was compatible with numerous operating systems including Windows, Linux, Apple OS X, and mobile and portable devices. The organ doses from VirtualDose were compared against those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT—two dosimetry tools that were based on the stylized pediatric and adult patient models that were known to be anatomically simple. The organ doses reported by VirtualDose differed from those reported by CT-Expo and ImPACT by as much as 300% in some of the patient models. These results confirm the conclusion from past studies that differences in anatomical realism offered by stylized and voxel phantoms have caused significant discrepancies in CT dose estimations. (paper)

  2. Wound trauma alters ionizing radiation dose assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiang Juliann G

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wounding following whole-body γ-irradiation (radiation combined injury, RCI increases mortality. Wounding-induced increases in radiation mortality are triggered by sustained activation of inducible nitric oxide synthase pathways, persistent alteration of cytokine homeostasis, and increased susceptibility to bacterial infection. Among these factors, cytokines along with other biomarkers have been adopted for biodosimetric evaluation and assessment of radiation dose and injury. Therefore, wounding could complicate biodosimetric assessments. Results In this report, such confounding effects were addressed. Mice were given 60Co γ-photon radiation followed by skin wounding. Wound trauma exacerbated radiation-induced mortality, body-weight loss, and wound healing. Analyses of DNA damage in bone-marrow cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, changes in hematology and cytokine profiles, and fundamental clinical signs were evaluated. Early biomarkers (1 d after RCI vs. irradiation alone included significant decreases in survivin expression in bone marrow cells, enhanced increases in γ-H2AX formation in Lin+ bone marrow cells, enhanced increases in IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and G-CSF concentrations in blood, and concomitant decreases in γ-H2AX formation in PBMCs and decreases in numbers of splenocytes, lymphocytes, and neutrophils. Intermediate biomarkers (7 – 10 d after RCI included continuously decreased γ-H2AX formation in PBMC and enhanced increases in IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and G-CSF concentrations in blood. The clinical signs evaluated after RCI were increased water consumption, decreased body weight, and decreased wound healing rate and survival rate. Late clinical signs (30 d after RCI included poor survival and wound healing. Conclusion Results suggest that confounding factors such as wounding alters ionizing radiation dose assessment and agents inhibiting these responses may prove therapeutic for radiation combined

  3. Preliminary dose assessment of the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    From the major accident at Unit 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear power station, a plume of airborne radioactive fission products was initially carried northwesterly toward Poland, thence toward Scandinavia and into Central Europe. Reports of the levels of radioactivity in a variety of media and of external radiation levels were collected in the Department of Energy's Emergency Operations Center and compiled into a data bank. Portions of these and other data which were obtained directly from published and official reports were utilized to make a preliminary assessment of the extent and magnitude of the external dose to individuals downwind from Chernobyl. Radioactive 131 I was the predominant fission product. The time of arrival of the plume and the maximum concentrations of 131 I in air, vegetation and milk and the maximum reported depositions and external radiation levels have been tabulated country by country. A large amount of the total activity in the release was apparently carried to a significant elevation. The data suggest that in areas where rainfall occurred, deposition levels were from ten to one-hundred times those observed in nearby ''dry'' locations. Sufficient spectral data were obtained to establish average release fractions and to establish a reference spectra of the other nuclides in the release. Preliminary calculations indicated that the collective dose equivalent to the population in Scandinavia and Central Europe during the first year after the Chernobyl accident would be about 8 x 10 6 person-rem. From the Soviet report, it appears that a first year population dose of about 2 x 10 7 person-rem (2 x 10 5 Sv) will be received by the population who were downwind of Chernobyl within the U.S.S.R. during the accident and its subsequent releases over the following week. 32 refs., 14 figs., 20 tabs

  4. Evaluation of the Entrance Surface Dose (ESD and Radiation Dose to the Radiosensitive Organs in Pediatric Pelvic Radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Karami

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Patients' dosimetry is crucial in order to enhance radiation protection optimization and to deliver low radiation dose to the patients in a radiological procedure. The aim of this study was to assess the entrance surface dose (ESD and radiation dose to the radiosensitive organs in pediatric pelvic radiography. Materials and Methods The studied population included 98 pediatric patients of both genders referred to anteroposterior (AP projection of pelvic radiography. The radiation dose was directly measured using high radiosensitive cylindrical lithium fluoride thermo-luminescent dosimeters (TLD-GR200. Two TLDs were placed at the center point of the radiation field to measure the ESD of pelvis. Moreover for each patient, 2 TLDs were placed upon each eyelid, 2 TLDs upon each breast, 2 TLDs upon the surface anatomical position of the thyroid gland and finally 2 TLDs at the surface anatomical position of the gonads to measure the received dose. Results The ESD ± standard deviation for AP pelvic radiography was obtained 591.7±76 µGy. Statistically significant difference was obtained between organs located outside and inside of the radiation field with respect to dose received (P

  5. Population dose assessment: characteristics of PC CREAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, Maria T.; Curti, Adriana R.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the main features of the PC CREAM, a program for performing radiological impact assessments due to radioactive discharges into the environment during the operation of radioactive and nuclear facilities. PC CREAM is a suite of six programs that can be used to estimate individual and collective radiation doses. The methodology of PC CREAM is based on updated environmental and dosimetric models, including ICRP 60 recommendations. The models include several exposure pathways and the input files are easy to access. The ergonomics of the program improves the user interaction and makes easier the input of local data. This program is useful for performing sensitivity analysis, siting studies and validation of model comparing the activity concentration output data with environmental monitoring data. The methodology of each module is described as well as the output data. (author)

  6. Assessment of internal doses in emergency situations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahola, T.; Muikku, M. [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority - STUK (Finland); Falk, R.; Johansson, J. [Swedish Radiation Protection Authority - SSI (Sweden); Liland, A.; Thorshaug, S. [NRPA (Norway)

    2006-04-15

    The need for assessing internal radiation doses in emergency situations was demonstrated after accidents in Brazil, Ukraine and other countries. Lately more and more concern has been expressed regarding malevolent use of radiation and radioactive materials. The scenarios for such use are more difficult to predict than for nuclear power plant or weapons accidents. Much of the results of the work done in the IRADES project can be adopted for use in various accidental situations involving radionuclides that are not addressed in this report. If an emergency situation occurs in only one or a few of the Nordic countries, experts from the other countries could be called upon to assist in monitoring. A big advantage is then our common platform. In the Nordic countries much work has been put down on quality assurance of measurements and on training of dose assessment calculations. Attention to this was addressed at the internal dosimetry course in October 2005. Nordic emergency preparedness exercises have so far not included training of direct measurements of people in the early phase of an emergency. The aim of the IRADES project was to improve the preparedness especially for thyroid measurements. The modest financial support did not enable the participants to make big efforts but certainly acted as a much appreciated reminder of the importance of being prepared also to handle situations with malevolent use of radioactive materials. It was left to each country to decide to which extent to improve the practical skills. There is still a need for detailed national implementation plans. Measurement strategies need to be developed in each country separately taking into account national regulations, local circumstances and resources. End users of the IRADES report are the radiation protection authorities. (au)

  7. Assessment of internal doses in emergency situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahola, T.; Muikku, M.; Falk, R.; Johansson, J.; Liland, A.; Thorshaug, S.

    2006-04-01

    The need for assessing internal radiation doses in emergency situations was demonstrated after accidents in Brazil, Ukraine and other countries. Lately more and more concern has been expressed regarding malevolent use of radiation and radioactive materials. The scenarios for such use are more difficult to predict than for nuclear power plant or weapons accidents. Much of the results of the work done in the IRADES project can be adopted for use in various accidental situations involving radionuclides that are not addressed in this report. If an emergency situation occurs in only one or a few of the Nordic countries, experts from the other countries could be called upon to assist in monitoring. A big advantage is then our common platform. In the Nordic countries much work has been put down on quality assurance of measurements and on training of dose assessment calculations. Attention to this was addressed at the internal dosimetry course in October 2005. Nordic emergency preparedness exercises have so far not included training of direct measurements of people in the early phase of an emergency. The aim of the IRADES project was to improve the preparedness especially for thyroid measurements. The modest financial support did not enable the participants to make big efforts but certainly acted as a much appreciated reminder of the importance of being prepared also to handle situations with malevolent use of radioactive materials. It was left to each country to decide to which extent to improve the practical skills. There is still a need for detailed national implementation plans. Measurement strategies need to be developed in each country separately taking into account national regulations, local circumstances and resources. End users of the IRADES report are the radiation protection authorities. (au)

  8. Determination of organ doses in radiographic imaging and diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathjen, M.

    1981-01-01

    Earlier publications on diagnostic radiation exposure commonly presented data on the gonadal dose. This emphasis on the genetic radiation risk is no longer valid in view of recent radiobiological findings; equal attention should be paid to the somatic radiation risk which is manifested by the induction of malignant neoplasms, e.g. in the lungs, red bone marrow, thyroid and female breast (ICRP 26). The permissible radiation doses for these organs and the gonals for routine diagnostic radiology are determined. A formula is established on the basis of terms from relevant publications (e.g. open-air dose, backscattering factor) and from the author's own measurements in an Alderson-Rando phantom (depth dose curves, dose decrements). The measurements were carried out using CaP 2 thermoluminescence dosemeters, and the organ doses for the various techniques of X-ray examination were calculated by computer. Calculations of this type will enable the radiologist to determine the patient exposure quickly and easily from the records kept according to Sect. 29 of the X-ray Ordinance. Experimental value from relevant publications are compared with the author's own results. (orig./HP) [de

  9. On the influence of the exposure model on organ doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drexler, G.; Eckerl, H.

    1988-01-01

    Based on the design characteristics of the MIRD-V phantom, two sex-specific adult phantoms, ADAM and EVA were introduced especially for the calculation of organ doses resulting from external irradiation. Although the body characteristics of all the phantoms are in good agreement with those of the reference man and woman, they have some disadvantages related to the location and shape of organs and the form of the whole body. To overcome these disadvantages related to the location and shape of organs and form of the whole body. To overcome these disadvantages related to the location and shape of organs and the form of the whole body. To overcome these disadvantages and to obtain more realistic phantoms, a technique based on computer tomographic data (voxel-phantom) was developed. This technique allows any physical phantom or real body to be converted into computer files. The improvements are of special importance with regard to the skeleton, because a better modeling of the bone surfaces and separation of hard bone and bone marrow can be achieved. For photon irradiation, the sensitivity of the model on organ doses or the effective dose equivalent is important for operational radiation protection

  10. Acute Radiation Risk and BRYNTRN Organ Dose Projection Graphical User Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Hu, Shaowen; Nounu, Hateni N.; Kim, Myung-Hee

    2011-01-01

    The integration of human space applications risk projection models of organ dose and acute radiation risk has been a key problem. NASA has developed an organ dose projection model using the BRYNTRN with SUM DOSE computer codes, and a probabilistic model of Acute Radiation Risk (ARR). The codes BRYNTRN and SUM DOSE are a Baryon transport code and an output data processing code, respectively. The risk projection models of organ doses and ARR take the output from BRYNTRN as an input to their calculations. With a graphical user interface (GUI) to handle input and output for BRYNTRN, the response models can be connected easily and correctly to BRYNTRN. A GUI for the ARR and BRYNTRN Organ Dose (ARRBOD) projection code provides seamless integration of input and output manipulations, which are required for operations of the ARRBOD modules. The ARRBOD GUI is intended for mission planners, radiation shield designers, space operations in the mission operations directorate (MOD), and space biophysics researchers. BRYNTRN code operation requires extensive input preparation. Only a graphical user interface (GUI) can handle input and output for BRYNTRN to the response models easily and correctly. The purpose of the GUI development for ARRBOD is to provide seamless integration of input and output manipulations for the operations of projection modules (BRYNTRN, SLMDOSE, and the ARR probabilistic response model) in assessing the acute risk and the organ doses of significant Solar Particle Events (SPEs). The assessment of astronauts radiation risk from SPE is in support of mission design and operational planning to manage radiation risks in future space missions. The ARRBOD GUI can identify the proper shielding solutions using the gender-specific organ dose assessments in order to avoid ARR symptoms, and to stay within the current NASA short-term dose limits. The quantified evaluation of ARR severities based on any given shielding configuration and a specified EVA or other mission

  11. Patient dose assessment in different diagnostic procedures in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sena, E de; Bejar, M J; Berenguer, R [Servicio de Radiofisica y Proteccion Radiologica, Salamanca (Spain); Ruano, R; Tamayo, P [Servicio de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital Universitario de Salamanca (Spain)

    2001-03-01

    Effective doses have been estimated for 314 patients under diagnostic procedures in a Nuclear Medicine Department using data reported in ICRP-80 and RIDIC (Radiation Internal Dose Information Center). Data on administered activity, radiopharmaceutical and administration route, age and sex of the patients have been collected. Doses in the most exposed critical organ for every protocol, doses in uterus, doses in fetus versus the stage of pregnancy (in case the female patient was pregnant) and doses for nursing infants have been also estimated. Ga-67 studies give the highest effective doses per protocol followed by cardiac SPECT procedures using Tl-201 chloride. Ga-67 studies also give the highest absorbed doses in uterus. Due to not administering different activities, depending on height and weight of adults, women receive doses about 20% higher than men. This would be a practice to modify in the future in order to optimise doses. (author)

  12. Patient dose assessment in different diagnostic procedures in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sena, E. de; Bejar, M.J.; Berenguer, R.; Ruano, R.; Tamayo, P.

    2001-01-01

    Effective doses have been estimated for 314 patients under diagnostic procedures in a Nuclear Medicine Department using data reported in ICRP-80 and RIDIC (Radiation Internal Dose Information Center). Data on administered activity, radiopharmaceutical and administration route, age and sex of the patients have been collected. Doses in the most exposed critical organ for every protocol, doses in uterus, doses in fetus versus the stage of pregnancy (in case the female patient was pregnant) and doses for nursing infants have been also estimated. Ga-67 studies give the highest effective doses per protocol followed by cardiac SPECT procedures using Tl-201 chloride. Ga-67 studies also give the highest absorbed doses in uterus. Due to not administering different activities, depending on height and weight of adults, women receive doses about 20% higher than men. This would be a practice to modify in the future in order to optimise doses. (author)

  13. Development of a method to estimate organ doses for pediatric CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadakis, Antonios E., E-mail: apapadak@pagni.gr; Perisinakis, Kostas; Damilakis, John [Department of Medical Physics, University Hospital of Heraklion, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, P.O. Box 1352, Iraklion, Crete 71110 (Greece)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: To develop a method for estimating doses to primarily exposed organs in pediatric CT by taking into account patient size and automatic tube current modulation (ATCM). Methods: A Monte Carlo CT dosimetry software package, which creates patient-specific voxelized phantoms, accurately simulates CT exposures, and generates dose images depicting the energy imparted on the exposed volume, was used. Routine head, thorax, and abdomen/pelvis CT examinations in 92 pediatric patients, ranging from 1-month to 14-yr-old (49 boys and 43 girls), were simulated on a 64-slice CT scanner. Two sets of simulations were performed in each patient using (i) a fixed tube current (FTC) value over the entire examination length and (ii) the ATCM profile extracted from the DICOM header of the reconstructed images. Normalized to CTDI{sub vol} organ dose was derived for all primary irradiated radiosensitive organs. Normalized dose data were correlated to patient’s water equivalent diameter using log-transformed linear regression analysis. Results: The maximum percent difference in normalized organ dose between FTC and ATCM acquisitions was 10% for eyes in head, 26% for thymus in thorax, and 76% for kidneys in abdomen/pelvis. In most of the organs, the correlation between dose and water equivalent diameter was significantly improved in ATCM compared to FTC acquisitions (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The proposed method employs size specific CTDI{sub vol}-normalized organ dose coefficients for ATCM-activated and FTC acquisitions in pediatric CT. These coefficients are substantially different between ATCM and FTC modes of operation and enable a more accurate assessment of patient-specific organ dose in the clinical setting.

  14. Organ doses and effective doses in some medical and industrial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshavkumar, Biju

    2000-01-01

    The ICRP recommends radiation protection standards for the safe use of radiation and also prescribes the radiation protection quantities and periodically reviews them. In this context, the quantities like organ doses and effective doses are defined by ICRP. In this work we calculate these quantities and hence the conversion functions for the industrial radiation sources and those for CT and diagnostic X-ray exposures. Workers who are occupationally exposed to radiation are regularly monitored to evaluate the radiation dose received by them. It is quite possible that in an accident situation, the worker involved in the accident might not have worn a personal monitor, popularly known as the monitoring badge. In addition, even some non radiation workers (who are obviously not monitored) may also have received exposure. Under these circumstances, the persons involved are interviewed, the accident site inspected, and on the basis of realistic assumptions, the likely doses received by the exposed persons are estimated

  15. A radiological dose assessment for the Port Hope conversion facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garisto, N.C.; Cooper, F.; Janes, A.; Stager, R.; Peters, R.

    2011-01-01

    The Port Hope Conversion Facility (PHCF) receives uranium trioxide for conversion to uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) or uranium dioxide (UO 2 ). The PHCF Site has a long history of industrial use. A Radiological Dose Assessment was undertaken as part of a Site Wide Risk Assessment. This assessment took into account all possible human receptors, both workers and members of the public. This paper focuses on a radiological assessment of dose to members of the public. The doses to members of the public from terrestrial pathways were added to the doses from aquatic pathways to obtain overall dose to receptors. The benchmark used in the assessment is 1 mSv/y. The estimated doses related to PHCF operations are much lower than the dose limit. (author)

  16. Dose assessments in nuclear power plant siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-03-01

    This document is mainly intended to provide information on dose estimations and assessments for the purpose of nuclear power plant (NPP) siting. It is not aimed at giving radiation protection guidance, criteria or procedures to be applied during the process of NPP siting nor even to provide recommendations on this subject matter. The document may however be of help for implementing some of the Nuclear Safety Standards (NUSS) documents on siting. The document was prepared before April 26, 1986, when a severe accident at the Unit 4 of Chernobyl NPP in the USSR had occurred. It should be emphasized that this document does not bridge the gap which exists in the NUSS programme as far as radiation protection guidance for the specific case of siting of NPP is concerned. The Agency will continue to work on this subject with the aim to prepare a safety series document on radiation protection requirements for NPP siting. This document could serve as a working document for this purpose. Refs, figs and tabs

  17. Accurate assessment of the distortions produced by the transit dose in HDR brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nani, E.K.; Kyere, A.W.K.; Tetteh, K.

    2001-01-01

    Current polynomial methods used in the modelling of the dose distributions in HDR brachytherapy have been reformulated to improve accuracy. An example is provided to show the effects of the transit dose on the output. The transit dose, which is neglected by current computer software for calculating doses, can result in significant dosimetric errors. These additional unrecognised doses imply over-dosing and distortions in the dose distributions within the irradiated volume. Assessment of dose to critical and radiosensitive organs is therefore inaccurate. These could increase late tissue complications as predicted by the Linear Quadratic Model. Our model works very well for straight catheters and is highly recommended for the evaluation of the transit dose around such catheters. (author)

  18. Assessment of a new p-Mosfet usable as a dose rate insensitive gamma dose sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vettese, F.; Donichak, C.; Bourgeault, P.

    1995-01-01

    Dosimetric response of unbiased MOS devices has been assessed at dose rates greater than 2000 cGy/h. Application have been made to a personal dosemeter / dose rate meter to measure the absorbed tissue dose received in the case of acute external irradiation. (D.L.)

  19. Program for rapid dose assessment in criticality accident, RADAPAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki

    2006-09-01

    In a criticality accident, a person near fissile material can receive extremely high dose which can cause acute health effect. For such a case, medical treatment should be carried out for the exposed person, according to severity of the exposure. Then, radiation dose should be rapidly assessed soon after an outbreak of an accident. Dose assessment based upon the quantity of induced 24 Na in human body through neutron exposure is expected as one of useful dosimetry techniques in a criticality accident. A dose assessment program, called RADAPAS (RApid Dose Assessment Program from Activated Sodium in Criticality Accidents), was therefore developed to assess rapidly radiation dose to exposed persons from activity of induced 24 Na. RADAPAS consists of two parts; one is a database part and the other is a part for execution of dose calculation. The database contains data compendiums of energy spectra and dose conversion coefficients from specific activity of 24 Na induced in human body, which had been derived in a previous analysis using Monte Carlo calculation code. Information for criticality configuration or characteristics of radiation in the accident field is to be interactively given with interface displays in the dose calculation. RADAPAS can rapidly derive radiation dose to the exposed person from the given information and measured 24 Na specific activity by using the conversion coefficient in database. This report describes data for dose conversions and dose calculation in RADAPAS and explains how to use the program. (author)

  20. Biological dose assessment of 15 victims in Haerbin radiation accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jian-xiang; Huang, Min-yan; Ruan, Jian-lei; Bai, Yu-shu; Xu, Su

    2008-01-01

    Full text: a) On July 5 and 8, 2005, Two patients with bone marrow suppression were successively hospitalized by the First Affiliated Hospital of Haerbin Medical University. Examination results showed that the patients seemed to get suspicious radiation disease. On July 13, 2005, a radioactive source was found in the patients' dwelling. The radiation source is Iridium-192 with 0.5 Ci(1.85 x 10 10 Bq) radioactivity. The radiation source is a metal bar which is a kind of radioactive industrial detection source for welding. The source is currently stored in the urban radioactive waste storehouse of Heilongjiang province. After finding the radioactive source on July 13, The Haerbin municipal government initiated an emergency response plan and developed medical rescue, radioactive source examination and case detection through organizing ministries involving health, environmental protection and public security. After receiving a report at 17:00 on July 14, 2005, Chinese Ministry of Health immediately sent experts to the spot for investigation, dose estimation and direction of patients' rescue. Health authority carried out physical examination twice on 113 residents within 30 meters to the source, among which 4 got radiation sickness, 5 showed abnormal hemotogram, and others showed no abnormal response. Of 4 patients with radiation sickness, one 81 year old patient has died of severe bone marrow form of sub acute radiation sickness coupled with lung infection and prostrate apparatus at 13:00 on Oct., 20. Two children have been treated in Beitaiping Road Hospital in Beijing, another patient has been treated in local hospital. b) Biological dosimetry using conventional chromosome aberration analysis in human peripheral blood lymphocytes has been shown as a reliable and useful tool in medical management of radiation accident victims. Peripheral blood lymphocytes of the victims were cultured using conventional culture medium with colchicine added at the beginning. Chromosome

  1. Internal dose assessment in nuclear medicine: fetal doses due to radiopharmaceutical administration to the mother

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo, Ana M.; Michelin, Severino C.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this publication is to present a guideline for the dose assessment through a comprehensive introduction of knowledge on ionizing radiation, radiation protection during pregnancy and fetal dosimetry for physician and other professionals involved in nuclear medicine practices. It contains tables with recommended dose estimates at all stages of pregnancy for many radiopharmaceuticals. Compounds for which some information was available regarding placental crossover are shown in shaded rows. It includes the most common diagnostic and therapy practices in nuclear medicine considering the four radioactive isotopes selected: 99m Tc, 131 I, 201 Tl and 67 Ga. There is a special case included, it is when conception occurs after the iodine has been administered. In almost every case, the diagnostic benefit to the mother outweighs the risk of any irradiation of the fetus. However, there is one situation in which severe fetal injury can be incurred from administering a radiopharmaceutical to the mother, and that is use of iodine-131 therapy for ablation of the thyroid in cases of hyperthyroidism or carcinoma. Radioactive iodine readily crosses the placenta and concentrates in the fetal thyroid, where, because of its small organ mass, high radiation doses are received. (author)

  2. Toward an organ based dose prescription method for the improved accuracy of murine dose in orthovoltage x-ray irradiators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belley, Matthew D.; Wang, Chu; Nguyen, Giao; Gunasingha, Rathnayaka; Chao, Nelson J.; Chen, Benny J.; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Yoshizumi, Terry T.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate dosimetry is essential when irradiating mice to ensure that functional and molecular endpoints are well understood for the radiation dose delivered. Conventional methods of prescribing dose in mice involve the use of a single dose rate measurement and assume a uniform average dose throughout all organs of the entire mouse. Here, the authors report the individual average organ dose values for the irradiation of a 12, 23, and 33 g mouse on a 320 kVp x-ray irradiator and calculate the resulting error from using conventional dose prescription methods. Methods: Organ doses were simulated in the Geant4 application for tomographic emission toolkit using the MOBY mouse whole-body phantom. Dosimetry was performed for three beams utilizing filters A (1.65 mm Al), B (2.0 mm Al), and C (0.1 mm Cu + 2.5 mm Al), respectively. In addition, simulated x-ray spectra were validated with physical half-value layer measurements. Results: Average doses in soft-tissue organs were found to vary by as much as 23%–32% depending on the filter. Compared to filters A and B, filter C provided the hardest beam and had the lowest variation in soft-tissue average organ doses across all mouse sizes, with a difference of 23% for the median mouse size of 23 g. Conclusions: This work suggests a new dose prescription method in small animal dosimetry: it presents a departure from the conventional approach of assigninga single dose value for irradiation of mice to a more comprehensive approach of characterizing individual organ doses to minimize the error and uncertainty. In human radiation therapy, clinical treatment planning establishes the target dose as well as the dose distribution, however, this has generally not been done in small animal research. These results suggest that organ dose errors will be minimized by calibrating the dose rates for all filters, and using different dose rates for different organs

  3. Dose assessment in pediatric computerized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilarinho, Luisa Maria Auredine Lima

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this work was the evaluation of radiation doses in paediatric computed tomography scans, considering the high doses usually involved and the absence of any previous evaluation in Brazil. Dose values were determined for skull and abdomen examinations, for different age ranges, by using the radiographic techniques routinely used in the clinical centers investigated. Measurements were done using pencil shape ionization chambers inserted in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantoms. These were compact phantoms of different diameters were specially designed and constructed for this work, which simulate different age ranges. Comparison of results with published values showed that doses were lower than the diagnostic reference levels established to adults exams by the European Commission. Nevertheless, doses in paediatric phantoms were higher than those obtained in adult phantoms. The paediatric dose values obtained in Hospitals A and B were lower than the reference level (DRL) adopted by SHIMPTON for different age ranges. In the range 0 - 0.5 year (neonatal), the values of DLP in Hospital B were 94 por cent superior to the DRL For the 10 years old children the values of CTDI w obtained were inferior in 89 por cent for skull and 83 por cent for abdomen examinations, compared to the values published by SHRIMPTON and WALL. Our measured CTDI w values were inferior to the values presented for SHRIMPTON and HUDA, for all the age ranges and types of examinations. It was observed that the normalized dose descriptors values in children in the neonatal range were always superior to the values of doses for the adult patient. In abdomen examinations, the difference was approximately 90% for the effective dose (E) and of 57%.for CTDI w . (author)

  4. Organ dose from inhaled radionuclides taking lull period into account

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, S.

    1982-01-01

    The dosimetry of inhaled radionuclides is generally carried out in accordance with the lung model recommended by the ICRP Task Group on Lung Dynamics. The relevant expressions are integrated over a given period, assuming continuous inhalation in an atmosphere of constant aerosol concentration. Though for the same amount of intake the dose commitment is found to be independent of variations in the rate of intake, the dose determined over specific intervals of time, is influenced by it or by lull intervals therein. Formulae are developed to arrive at doses to different organs when the subject's intake is constant and continuous for 8 hours, followed by a lull period of 16 hours each day. Results are given for a number of radionuclides and are compared with values characteristic of continuous inhalation. It is observed that when exposure is assumed to be continuous the dose for the same intake of activity is underestimated as compared to the dose when lull period is taken into account. For working periods of 6 days and 30 days the underestimate ranges from 5%-20% and 0.6% to 4.5% respectively. (author)

  5. Occupational dose assessment in interventional cardiology in Serbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaljevic, J.; Ciraj-Bjelac, O.; Stankovic, J.; Arandjic, D.; Bozovic, P.; Antic, V.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this work is to assess the occupational dose in interventional cardiology in a large hospital in Belgrade, Serbia. A double-dosimetry method was applied for the estimation of whole-body dose, using thermoluminescent dosemeters, calibrated in terms of the personal dose equivalent H p (10). Besides the double-dosimetry method, eye dose was also estimated by means of measuring ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), and doses per procedure were reported. Doses were assessed for 13 physicians, 6 nurses and 10 radiographers, for 2 consequent years. The maximum annual effective dose assessed was 4.3, 2.1 and 1.3 mSv for physicians, nurses and radiographers, respectively. The maximum doses recorded by the dosemeter worn at the collar level (over the apron) were 16.8, 11.9 and 4.5 mSv, respectively. This value was used for the eye lens dose assessment. Estimated doses are in accordance with or higher than annual dose limits for the occupational exposure. (authors)

  6. WAYS TO INCREASE ACCURACY AND RELIABILITY OF INDIVIDUAL DOSES ASSESSMENTS IN PERSONNEL WITHIN THERMOLUMINESCENCE TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Kaydanovskiy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the main sources of measurement errors of individual doses in personnel performed within the thermoluminescence technique and gives recommendations to minimize these errors. The reasons that reduce reliability of effective dose assessments derived from measured values of personal dose equivalent are imperfections of guidance documents. Changes to the Guidelines «Organization and implementation of individual dosimetric control. Staff of health institutions» are justified.

  7. Eye dose assessment and management: overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehani, M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Some publications have shown that Hp( 0.07 ) or even Hp( 10 ) can be used as good operational quantities for X-rays in view of difficulties with Hp( 3 ). With increasing awareness, there is tendency to use whatever dosimeter is available with correction factor to estimate eye lens dose. The best position for an eye lens dosimeter has been reported to be at the side of the head nearest to the radiation source, close to the eye. Recent studies have reported eye doses with cone beam CT (CBCT) both for patients and staff, and there are many papers reporting eye lens doses to staff in nuclear medicine. To minimise the dose to eyes, the user can take advantage of a feature of CBCT of projections acquired over an angular span of 1808 plus cone angle of the X-ray tube and with tube under scan arcs. (authors)

  8. Comparison of internal dose estimates obtained using organ-level, voxel S value, and Monte Carlo techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, Joshua, E-mail: grimes.joshua@mayo.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver V5Z 1L8 (Canada); Celler, Anna [Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver V5Z 1L8 (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: The authors’ objective was to compare internal dose estimates obtained using the Organ Level Dose Assessment with Exponential Modeling (OLINDA/EXM) software, the voxel S value technique, and Monte Carlo simulation. Monte Carlo dose estimates were used as the reference standard to assess the impact of patient-specific anatomy on the final dose estimate. Methods: Six patients injected with{sup 99m}Tc-hydrazinonicotinamide-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide were included in this study. A hybrid planar/SPECT imaging protocol was used to estimate {sup 99m}Tc time-integrated activity coefficients (TIACs) for kidneys, liver, spleen, and tumors. Additionally, TIACs were predicted for {sup 131}I, {sup 177}Lu, and {sup 90}Y assuming the same biological half-lives as the {sup 99m}Tc labeled tracer. The TIACs were used as input for OLINDA/EXM for organ-level dose calculation and voxel level dosimetry was performed using the voxel S value method and Monte Carlo simulation. Dose estimates for {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 131}I, {sup 177}Lu, and {sup 90}Y distributions were evaluated by comparing (i) organ-level S values corresponding to each method, (ii) total tumor and organ doses, (iii) differences in right and left kidney doses, and (iv) voxelized dose distributions calculated by Monte Carlo and the voxel S value technique. Results: The S values for all investigated radionuclides used by OLINDA/EXM and the corresponding patient-specific S values calculated by Monte Carlo agreed within 2.3% on average for self-irradiation, and differed by as much as 105% for cross-organ irradiation. Total organ doses calculated by OLINDA/EXM and the voxel S value technique agreed with Monte Carlo results within approximately ±7%. Differences between right and left kidney doses determined by Monte Carlo were as high as 73%. Comparison of the Monte Carlo and voxel S value dose distributions showed that each method produced similar dose volume histograms with a minimum dose covering 90% of the volume (D90

  9. Critical Dose of Internal Organs Internal Exposure - 13471

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoryan, G.; Amirjanyan, A. [Nuclear and Radiation Safety Centre (Armenia); Grigoryan, N. [Yerevan State Medical University 4Tigran Mets,375010 Yerevan (Armenia)

    2013-07-01

    The health threat posed by radionuclides has stimulated increased efforts to developed characterization on the biological behavior of radionuclides in humans in all ages. In an effort motivated largely by the Chernobyl nuclear accident, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is assembling a set of age specific biokinetic models for environmentally important radioelements. Radioactive substances in the air, mainly through the respiratory system and digestive tract, is inside the body. Radioactive substances are unevenly distributed in various organs and tissues. Therefore, the degree of damage will depend not only on the dose of radiation have but also on the critical organ, which is the most accumulation of radioactive substances, which leads to the defeat of the entire human body. The main objective of radiation protection, to avoid exceeding the maximum permissible doses of external and internal exposure of a person to prevent the physical and genetic damage people. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of radiation is called a dose of radiation a person in uniform getting her for 50 years does not cause changes in the health of the exposed individual and his progeny. The following classification of critical organs, depending on the category of exposure on their degree of sensitivity to radiation: First group: the whole body, gonads and red bone marrow; Second group: muscle, fat, liver, kidney, spleen, gastrointestinal tract, lungs and lens of the eye; The third group: bone, thyroid and skin; Fourth group: the hands, forearms, feet. MTD exposure whole body, gonads and bone marrow represent the maximum exposures (5 rem per year) experienced by people in their normal activities. The purpose of this article is intended dose received from various internal organs of the radionuclides that may enter the body by inhalation, and gastrointestinal tract. The biokinetic model describes the time dependent distribution and excretion of different

  10. Assessment of doses due to secondary neutrons received by patient treated by proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayah, R.; Martinetti, F.; Donadille, L.; Clairand, I.; Delacroix, S.; De Oliveira, A.; Herault, J.

    2010-01-01

    Proton therapy is a specific technique of radiotherapy which aims at destroying cancerous cells by irradiating them with a proton beam. Nuclear reactions in the device and in the patient himself induce secondary radiations involving mainly neutrons which contribute to an additional dose for the patient. The author reports a study aimed at the assessment of these doses due to secondary neutrons in the case of ophthalmological and intra-cranial treatments. He presents a Monte Carlo simulation of the room and of the apparatus, reports the experimental validation of the model (dose deposited by protons in a water phantom, ambient dose equivalent due to neutrons in the treatment room, absorbed dose due to secondary particles in an anthropomorphic phantom), and the assessment with a mathematical phantom of doses dues to secondary neutrons received by organs during an ophthalmological treatment. He finally evokes current works of calculation of doses due to secondary neutrons in the case of intra-cranial treatments

  11. Radionuclide transport and dose assessment modelling in biosphere assessment 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjerpe, T.; Broed, R.

    2010-11-01

    Following the guidelines set forth by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (now Ministry of Employment and Economy), Posiva is preparing to submit a construction license application for the final disposal spent nuclear fuel at the Olkiluoto site, Finland, by the end of the year 2012. Disposal will take place in a geological repository implemented according to the KBS-3 method. The long-term safety section supporting the license application will be based on a safety case that, according to the internationally adopted definition, will be a compilation of the evidence, analyses and arguments that quantify and substantiate the safety and the level of expert confidence in the safety of the planned repository. This report documents in detail the conceptual and mathematical models and key data used in the landscape model set-up, radionuclide transport modelling, and radiological consequences analysis applied in the 2009 biosphere assessment. Resulting environmental activity concentrations in landscape model due to constant unit geosphere release rates, and the corresponding annual doses, are also calculated and presented in this report. This provides the basis for understanding the behaviour of the applied landscape model and subsequent dose calculations. (orig.)

  12. Assessment of radiation dose awareness among pediatricians

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Karen E.; Parnell-Parmley, June E.; Charkot, Ellen; BenDavid, Guila; Krajewski, Connie; Haidar, Salwa; Moineddin, Rahim

    2006-01-01

    There is increasing awareness among pediatric radiologists of the potential risks associated with ionizing radiation in medical imaging. However, it is not known whether there has been a corresponding increase in awareness among pediatricians. To establish the level of awareness among pediatricians of the recent publicity on radiation risks in children, knowledge of the relative doses of radiological investigations, current practice regarding parent/patient discussions, and the sources of educational input. Multiple-choice survey. Of 220 respondents, 105 (48%) were aware of the 2001 American Journal of Roentgenology articles on pediatric CT and radiation, though only 6% were correct in their estimate of the quoted lifetime excess cancer risk associated with radiation doses equivalent to pediatric CT. A sustained or transient increase in parent questioning regarding radiation doses had been noticed by 31%. When estimating the effective doses of various pediatric radiological investigations in chest radiograph (CXR) equivalents, 87% of all responses (and 94% of CT estimates) were underestimates. Only 15% of respondents were familiar with the ALARA principle. Only 14% of pediatricians recalled any relevant formal teaching during their specialty training. The survey response rate was 40%. Awareness of radiation protection issues among pediatricians is generally low, with widespread underestimation of relative doses and risks. (orig.)

  13. Software for the estimation of organ equivalent and effective doses from diagnostic radiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osei, Ernest K; Barnett, Rob

    2009-01-01

    Diagnostic radiological imaging such as conventional radiography, fluoroscopy and computed tomography (CT) examinations will continue to provide tremendous benefits in modern healthcare. The benefit derived by the patient should far outweigh the risk associated with a properly conducted imaging examination. Nonetheless, it is very important to be able to quantify the risk associated with any radiological examination of patients, and effective dose has been considered a useful indicator of patient exposure. Quantification of the risks associated with radiological imaging is very important as such information will be helpful to physicians and their patients for comparing risks from various imaging examinations and for making informed decisions whenever there is a need for any radiological imaging. The determination of equivalent and effective doses in diagnostic radiology is of interest as a basis for estimates of risk from medical exposures. In this paper we describe a simple computer program OrgDose, which calculates the doses to 27 organs in the body and then calculates the organ equivalent and effective doses and the risk from various procedures in the radiology department including conventional radiography, fluoroscopy and computed tomography examinations. The program will be a useful tool for the medical and paramedical personnel who are involved with assessing organ and effective doses and risks from diagnostic radiology procedures.

  14. Calculation of organ doses in x-ray examinations of premature babies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smans, Kristien; Tapiovaara, Markku; Cannie, Mieke; Struelens, Lara; Vanhavere, Filip; Smet, Marleen; Bosmans, Hilde

    2008-01-01

    Lung disease represents one of the most life-threatening conditions in prematurely born children. In the evaluation of the neonatal chest, the primary and most important diagnostic study is the chest radiograph. Since prematurely born children are very sensitive to radiation, those radiographs may lead to a significant radiation detriment. Knowledge of the radiation dose is therefore necessary to justify the exposures. To calculate doses in the entire body and in specific organs, computational models of the human anatomy are needed. Using medical imaging techniques, voxel phantoms have been developed to achieve a representation as close as possible to the anatomical properties. In this study two voxel phantoms, representing prematurely born babies, were created from computed tomography- and magnetic resonance images: Phantom 1 (1910 g) and Phantom 2 (590 g). The two voxel phantoms were used in Monte Carlo calculations (MCNPX) to assess organ doses. The results were compared with the commercially available software package PCXMC in which the available mathematical phantoms can be downsized toward the prematurely born baby. The simple phantom-scaling method used in PCXMC seems to be sufficient to calculate doses for organs within the radiation field. However, one should be careful in specifying the irradiation geometry. Doses in organs that are wholly or partially outside the primary radiation field depend critically on the irradiation conditions and the phantom model

  15. Assessment of low absorbed dose with a MOSFET detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butson, M.J.; Cancer Services, Wollongong, NSW; Cheung, T.; Yu, P.K.N.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The ability of a MOSFET dosimetry system to measure low therapeutic doses has been evaluated for accuracy for high energy x-ray radiotherapy applications. The MOSFET system in high sensitivity mode produces a dose measurement reproducibility of within 10%, 4% and 2.5% for 2 cGy, 5 cGy and 10cGy dose assessment respectively. This is compared to 7%, 4% and 2% for an Attix parallel plate ionisation chamber and 20%, 7% and 3.5% for a Wellhofer IC4 small volume ionisation chamber. Results for our dose standard thimble ionisation chamber and low noise farmer dosemeter were 2%, 0.5% and 0.25% respectively for these measurements. The quoted accuracy of the MOSFET dosimetry system is partially due to the slight non linear dose response (reduced response) with age of the detector but mainly due to the intrinsic variations in measured voltage differential per applied dose. Results have shown that the MOSFET dosimetry system provides an adequate measure of dose at low dose levels and is comparable in accuracy to the Attix parallel plate ionisation chambers for relative dose assessment at levels of 2cGy to 10cGy. The use of the MOSFET dosimeter at low doses can extend the life expectancy of the device and may provide useful information for areas where low dose assessment is required. Copyright (2004) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  16. Dose assessment for decontamination in Goiania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, E.C.S.

    2000-01-01

    Shortly after the accident at Goiania, the need arose to set derived intervention levels for the various exposure pathways to guide and optimise clean up measures. For the members of the critical group an intervention level of 5 mSv for the total effective dose in the first year after the accident was chosen, which then was subdivided into values of 1 mSv due to the contribution of external irradiation indoors, 3 mSv from external irradiation while being outdoors, and 1 mSv due to incorporation of resuspended particles and ingestion of locally produced food. The clean up indoors could be directed such that a pre-described ambient dose rate was no longer exceeded. These exposure levels and effective doses to the critical groups predicted in 1988 are compared to actual measurements made in 1988 to 1993 in a local house near one primary contamination foci, and best estimate. It can be shown that the actual doses received by members of the public living in the affected areas were significantly lower. The various reasons for this overprediction will be discussed. (author)

  17. Going beyond the most exposed people in a dose assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjerpe, Thomas; Broed, Robert [Facilia AB, Gustavslundsvaegen 151C, SE-167 51 Bromma (Sweden); Ikonen, Ari T.K. [Environmental Research and Assessment, EnviroCase, Ltd., Hallituskatu 1 D 4, FI-28 100 Pori (Finland)

    2014-07-01

    The dose assessment in a long-term radiation safety assessment often focus on assessing dose of a representative person to be used for determining compliance with a radiation dose constraint. This representative person is often assumed to receive a dose that is representative of the most exposed people, i.e., the more highly exposed individuals in the population. This is not always sufficient, the Finnish regulations for disposal of nuclear waste has radiation dose constraint to the most exposed people as well as for larger groups of exposed people. This work presents the methodology to assessing dose of a representative person for a larger group of exposed people as applied by Posiva in the TURVA-2012 safety case for the spent nuclear fuel disposal at Olkiluoto. In addition, annual doses from the set of biosphere calculation cases analysed in TURVA-2012 are presented and discussed. Special focus is given on explaining the differences in exposure levels and exposure routes between the estimated annual doses to representative persons for most exposed people and a larger exposed group. The results show that the annual doses to a larger group of people ranges from one to three orders of magnitude below the annual doses to the most exposed people. Furthermore, the exposure route related to food ingestion is less significant for the larger group of people compared to the most exposed people and that the exposure route related to water ingestion shows the opposite behaviour. (authors)

  18. A review of occupational dose assessment uncertainties and approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R. W.

    2004-01-01

    The Radiological Protection Practitioner (RPP) will spend a considerable proportion of his time predicting or assessing retrospective radiation exposures to occupational personnel for different purposes. The assessments can be for a variety of purposes, such as to predict doses for occupational dose control, or project design purposes or to make retrospective estimates for the dose record, or account for dosemeters which have been lost or damaged. There are other less frequent occasions when dose assessment will be required such as to support legal cases and compensation claims and to provide the detailed dose information for epidemiological studies. It is important that the level of detail, justification and supporting evidence in the dose assessment is suitable for the requirements. So for instance, day to day operational dose assessments often rely mainly on the knowledge of the RPP in discussion with operators whilst at the other end of the spectrum a historical dose assessment for a legal case will require substantial research and supporting evidence for the estimate to withstand forensic challenge. The robustness of the assessment will depend on many factors including a knowledge of the work activities, the radiation dose uptake and field characteristics; all of which are affected by factors such as the time elapsed, the memory of operators and the dosemeters employed. This paper reviews the various options and uncertainties in dose assessments ranging from use of personal dosimetry results to the development of upper bound assessments. The level of assessment, the extent of research and the evidence adduced should then be appropriate to the end use of the estimate. (Author)

  19. IAEA/IDEAS intercomparison exercise on internal dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerfel, H.; Andrasi, A.; Cruz-Suarez, R.; Castellani, C. M.; Hurtgen, C.; Marsh, J.; Zeger, J.

    2007-01-01

    An Internet based intercomparison exercise on assessment of occupational exposure due to intakes of radionuclides has been performed to check the applicability of the 'General Guidelines for the Assessment of Internal Dose from Monitoring Data' developed by the IDEAS group. There were six intake cases presented on the Internet and 81 participants worldwide reported solutions to these cases. Results of the exercise indicate that the guidelines have a positive influence on the methodologies applied for dose assessments and, if correctly applied, improve the harmonisation of assessed doses. (authors)

  20. Eye lens exposure to medical staff performing electrophysiology procedures: dose assessment and correlation to patient dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciraj-Bjelac, Olivera; Bozovic, Predrag; Arandjic, Danijela; Antic, Vojislav; Selakovic, Jovana; Pavlovic, Sinisa

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the patient exposure and staff eye dose levels during implantation procedures for all types of pacemaker therapy devices performed under fluoroscopic guidance and to investigate potential correlation between patients and staff dose levels. The mean eye dose during pacemaker/defibrillator implementation was 12 μSv for the first operator, 8.7 μSv for the second operator/nurse and 0.50 μSv for radiographer. Corresponding values for cardiac re-synchronisation therapy procedures were 30, 26 and 2.0 μSv, respectively. Significant (p < 0.01) correlation between the eye dose and the kerma-area product was found for the first operator and radiographers, but not for other staff categories. The study revealed eye dose per procedure and eye dose normalised to patient dose indices for different staff categories and provided an input for radiation protection in electrophysiology procedures. (authors)

  1. Dose inhomogeneities at various levels of biological organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, V.P.

    1988-01-01

    Dose inhomogeneities in both tumor and normal tissue, inherent to the application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), can be the result not only of ununiform distribution of 10 B at various levels of biological organization, but also of the distribution of the thermal neutrons and of the energy depositions from more energetic neutrons and other radiations comprising the externally-applied beams. The severity of the problems resulting from such inhomogeneities, and approaches to evaluating them, are illustrated by three examples, at the macro, micro and intermediate levels

  2. Personal monitoring and assessment of doses received by radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindon, T.N.; Morris, N.D.

    1981-12-01

    The Personal Radiation Monitoring Service operated by the Australian Radiation Laboratory is outlined and the types of monitors used for assessment of doses received by radiation workers are described. The distribution of doses received by radiation workers in different occupational categories is determined. From these distributions, the average doses received have been assessed and the maximum likely additional increase in cancer deaths in Australia as a result of occupational exposure estimated. This increase is shown to be very small. There is, however, a considerable spread of doses received by individuals within occupational groups

  3. An Internal Dose Assessment Associated with Personal Food Intake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joeun; Jae, Moosung [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Wontae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection), Therefore, had recommended the concept of 'Critical Group'. Recently the ICRP has recommended the use of 'Representative Person' on the new basic recommendation 103. On the other hand the U.S. NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission) has adopted more conservative concept, 'Maximum Exposed Individuals (MEI)' of critical Group. The dose assessment in Korea is based on MEI. Although dose assessment based on MEI is easy to receive the permission of the regulatory authority, it is not efficient. Meanwhile, the internal dose by food consumption takes an important part. Therefore, in this study, the internal dose assessment was performed in accordance with ICRP's new recommendations. The internal dose assessment was performed in accordance with ICRP's new recommendations. It showed 13.2% decreased of the annual internal dose due to gaseous effluents by replacing MEI to the concept of representative person. Also, this calculation based on new ICRP's recommendation has to be extended to all areas of individual dose assessment. Then, more accurate and efficient values might be obtained for dose assessment.

  4. Development of 1-year-old computational phantom and calculation of organ doses during CT scans using Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, Yuxi; Qiu, Rui; Ge, Chaoyong; Xie, Wenzhang; Li, Junli; Gao, Linfeng; Zheng, Junzheng

    2014-01-01

    With the rapidly growing number of CT examinations, the consequential radiation risk has aroused more and more attention. The average dose in each organ during CT scans can only be obtained by using Monte Carlo simulation with computational phantoms. Since children tend to have higher radiation sensitivity than adults, the radiation dose of pediatric CT examinations requires special attention and needs to be assessed accurately. So far, studies on organ doses from CT exposures for pediatric patients are still limited. In this work, a 1-year-old computational phantom was constructed. The body contour was obtained from the CT images of a 1-year-old physical phantom and the internal organs were deformed from an existing Chinese reference adult phantom. To ensure the organ locations in the 1-year-old computational phantom were consistent with those of the physical phantom, the organ locations in 1-year-old computational phantom were manually adjusted one by one, and the organ masses were adjusted to the corresponding Chinese reference values. Moreover, a CT scanner model was developed using the Monte Carlo technique and the 1-year-old computational phantom was applied to estimate organ doses derived from simulated CT exposures. As a result, a database including doses to 36 organs and tissues from 47 single axial scans was built. It has been verified by calculation that doses of axial scans are close to those of helical scans; therefore, this database could be applied to helical scans as well. Organ doses were calculated using the database and compared with those obtained from the measurements made in the physical phantom for helical scans. The differences between simulation and measurement were less than 25% for all organs. The result shows that the 1-year-old phantom developed in this work can be used to calculate organ doses in CT exposures, and the dose database provides a method for the estimation of 1-year-old patient doses in a variety of CT examinations. (paper)

  5. Characteristics of environmental gamma-rays and dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Kimiaki; Moriuchi, Shigeru

    1986-01-01

    Environmental radioactivity has attracted much attention in terms of exposure to the population, although its exposure doses are minimal. This paper presents problems encountered in the assessment of exposure doses using model and monitoring systems, focusing on the characteristics, such as energy distribution, direction distribution, and site, of environmental gamma-rays. The assessment of outdoor and indoor exposure doses of natural gamma-rays is discussed in relation to the shielding effect of the human body. In the assessment of artificial gamma-rays, calculation of exposure doses using build-up factor, the shielding effect of the human body, and energy dependency of the measuring instrument are covered. A continuing elucidation about uncertainties in dose assessment is emphasized. (Namekawa, K.)

  6. A study of the effects of internal organ motion on dose escalation in conformal prostate treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Happersett, Laura; Mageras, Gig S.; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Burman, Chandra M.; Leibel, Steven A.; Chui Chen; Fuks, Zvi; Bull, Sarah; Ling, C. Clifton; Kutcher, Gerald J.

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: To assess the effect of internal organ motion on the dose distributions and biological indices for the target and non-target organs for three different conformal prostate treatment techniques. Materials and methods: We examined three types of treatment plans in 20 patients: (1) a six field plan, with a prescribed dose of 75.6 Gy; (2) the same six field plan to 72 Gy followed by a boost to 81 Gy; and (3) a five field plan with intensity modulated beams delivering 81 Gy. Treatment plans were designed using an initial CT data set (planning) and applied to three subsequent CT scans (treatment). The treatment CT contours were used to represent patient specific organ displacement; in addition, the dose distribution was convolved with a Gaussian distribution to model random setup error. Dose-volume histograms were calculated using an organ deformation model in which the movement between scans of individual points interior to the organs was tracked and the dose accumulated. The tumor control probability (TCP) for the prostate and proximal half of seminal vesicles (clinical target volume, CTV), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for the rectum and the percent volume of bladder wall receiving at least 75 Gy were calculated. Results: The patient averaged increase in the planned TCP between plan types 2 and 1 and types 3 and 1 was 9.8% (range 4.9-12.5%) for both, whereas the corresponding increases in treatment TCP were 9.0% (1.3-16%) and 8.1% (-1.3-13.8%). In all patients, plans 2 and 3 (81 Gy) exhibited equal or higher treatment TCP than plan 1 (75.6 Gy). The maximum treatment NTCP for rectum never exceeded the planning constraint and percent volume of bladder wall receiving at least 75 Gy was similar in the planning and treatment scans for all three plans. Conclusion: For plans that deliver a uniform prescribed dose to the planning target volume (PTV) (plan 1), current margins are adequate. In plans that further escalate the dose to part

  7. Monitoring requirements for assessment of internal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckerman, K.F.

    1985-01-01

    Data obtained by routine personnel monitoring is usually not a sufficient basis for estimation of dose. Collected data must be interpreted carefully and supplemented with appropriate information before reasonably accurate estimates of dose (i.e., accurate enough to indicate whether or nor personnel are exposed in excess of recommended limits) can be developed. When the exposure is of sufficient magnitude that a rather precise estimate of dose is needed, the health physicist will bring to bear on the problem other, more refined, methods of dosimetry. These might include a reconstruction of the incident and, for internal emitters, an extensive series of in vivo measurements or analyses of excreta. Thus, cases of special significance must often be evaluated using techniques and resources beyond those routinely employed. This is not a criticism of most routine monitoring programs. These programs are usually carefully designed in a manner commensurate with the degree of exposure routinely encountered and the requirement of a practical program of radiation protection. 10 refs

  8. Ecological Dose Modeling of Aquatic and Riparian Receptors to Strontium-90 with an Emphasis on Radiosensitive Organs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, Ted M.; Traub, Richard J.; Antonio, Ernest J.

    2011-07-20

    The 100-NR-2 site is the location of elevated releases of strontium-90 to the Columbia River via contaminated groundwater. The resulting dose to aquatic and riparian receptors was evaluated in 2005 (DOE 2009) and compared to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) dose guidance values. We have conducted additional dose assessments for a broader spectrum of aquatic and riparian organisms using RESRAD Biota and specific exposure scenarios. Because strontium-90 accumulates in bone, we have also modeled the dose to the anterior kidney, a blood-forming and immune system organ that lies close to the spinal column of fish. The resulting dose is primarily attributable to the yttrium-90 progeny of strontium-90 and very little of the dose is associated with the beta emission from strontium-90. All dose modeling results were calculated with an assumption of secular equilibrium between strontium-90 and yttrum-90.

  9. Radiation dose assessment in space missions. The MATROSHKA experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitz, Guenther

    2010-01-01

    The exact determination of radiation dose in space is a demanding and challenging task. Since January 2004, the International Space Station is equipped with a human phantom which is a key part of the MATROSHKA Experiment. The phantom is furnished with thousands of radiation sensors for the measurement of depth dose distribution, which has enabled the organ dose calculation and has demonstrated that personal dosemeter at the body surface overestimates the effective dose during extra-vehicular activity by more than a factor two. The MATROSHKA results serve to benchmark models and have therefore a large impact on the extrapolation of models to outer space. (author)

  10. Dose from organically bound tritium after an acute tritiated water intake in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, A; Richardson, R B; Galeriu, D [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.

    1995-10-01

    We have analyzed the urinary excretion data from eight male workers following an acute intake of tritiated water (HTO) and assessed the dose contribution from organically bound tritium (OBT) in the body. The individuals affected increased their fluid intakes during the first month or more post-exposure, to accelerate the turnover of tritium in the body water for dose mitigation purposes. The volumes of cumulative 24 h urine samples were similar to Reference Man in the latter part of the study (100-300 d post-exposure). The workers` urine samples were analyzed for total tritium up to 300 d post-exposure. The results suggest that a measurement of the tritium activity per unit mass of organic matter in urine can provide an assessment of the specific activity of tritium in the organic fraction of the soft tissue, providing an equilibrium condition exists. A mathematical model is proposed to estimate the dose increase from the retained OBT by examining the kinetics of total tritium excretion in urine. The model accounts for the variable rates of fluid intake. The influence of measurement errors and the limited duration of the study (0-300 d post-exposure) on the OBT dose contribution was assessed through statistical analysis, while the role of direct OBT excretion in urine was estimated by using metabolic models. Based on the time series of tritium concentration in urine, the average dose increase to the workers from the metabolised OBT was calculated as 6.2 {+-} 1.3% of the HTO dose. 78 refs., 36 tabs., 11 figs.

  11. Dose from organically bound tritium after an acute tritiated water intake in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, A.; Richardson, R.B.; Galeriu, D.

    1995-10-01

    We have analyzed the urinary excretion data from eight male workers following an acute intake of tritiated water (HTO) and assessed the dose contribution from organically bound tritium (OBT) in the body. The individuals affected increased their fluid intakes during the first month or more post-exposure, to accelerate the turnover of tritium in the body water for dose mitigation purposes. The volumes of cumulative 24 h urine samples were similar to Reference Man in the latter part of the study (100-300 d post-exposure). The workers' urine samples were analyzed for total tritium up to 300 d post-exposure. The results suggest that a measurement of the tritium activity per unit mass of organic matter in urine can provide an assessment of the specific activity of tritium in the organic fraction of the soft tissue, providing an equilibrium condition exists. A mathematical model is proposed to estimate the dose increase from the retained OBT by examining the kinetics of total tritium excretion in urine. The model accounts for the variable rates of fluid intake. The influence of measurement errors and the limited duration of the study (0-300 d post-exposure) on the OBT dose contribution was assessed through statistical analysis, while the role of direct OBT excretion in urine was estimated by using metabolic models. Based on the time series of tritium concentration in urine, the average dose increase to the workers from the metabolised OBT was calculated as 6.2 ± 1.3% of the HTO dose. 78 refs., 36 tabs., 11 figs

  12. Overview of Graphical User Interface for ARRBOD (Acute Radiation Risk and BRYNTRN Organ Dose Projection)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Hu, Shaowen; Nounu, Hatem N.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2010-01-01

    Solar particle events (SPEs) pose the risk of acute radiation sickness (ARS) to astronauts, because organ doses from large SPEs may reach critical levels during extra vehicular activities (EVAs) or lightly shielded spacecraft. NASA has developed an organ dose projection model of Baryon transport code (BRYNTRN) with an output data processing module of SUMDOSE, and a probabilistic model of acute radiation risk (ARR). BRYNTRN code operation requires extensive input preparation, and the risk projection models of organ doses and ARR take the output from BRYNTRN as an input to their calculations. With a graphical user interface (GUI) to handle input and output for BRYNTRN, these response models can be connected easily and correctly to BRYNTRN in a user friendly way. The GUI for the Acute Radiation Risk and BRYNTRN Organ Dose (ARRBOD) projection code provides seamless integration of input and output manipulations required for operations of the ARRBOD modules: BRYNTRN, SUMDOSE, and the ARR probabilistic response model. The ARRBOD GUI is intended for mission planners, radiation shield designers, space operations in the mission operations directorate (MOD), and space biophysics researchers. Assessment of astronauts organ doses and ARS from the exposure to historically large SPEs is in support of mission design and operation planning to avoid ARS and stay within the current NASA short-term dose limits. The ARRBOD GUI will serve as a proof-of-concept for future integration of other risk projection models for human space applications. We present an overview of the ARRBOD GUI product, which is a new self-contained product, for the major components of the overall system, subsystem interconnections, and external interfaces.

  13. Establishment of exposure dose assessment laboratory in National Radiation Emergency Medical Center (NREMC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jae Ryong; Ha, Wi Ho; Yoon, Seok Won; Han, Eun Ae; Lee, Seung Sook [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    As unclear industry grown, 432 of the nuclear power plants are operating and 52 of NPPs are under construction currently. Increasing use of radiation or radioisotopes in the field of industry, medical purpose and research such as non-destructive examination, computed tomography and x-ray, etc. constantly. With use of nuclear or radiation has incidence possibility for example the Fukushima NPP incident, the Goiania accident and the Chernobyl Nuclear accident. Also the risk of terror by radioactive material such as Radiological Dispersal Device(RDD) etc. In Korea, since the 'Law on protection of nuclear facilities and countermeasure for radioactive preparedness was enacted in 2003, the Korean institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences(KIRAMS) was established for the radiation emergency medical response in radiological disaster due to nuclear accident, radioactive terror and so on. Especially National Radiation Emergency Medical Center(NREMC) has the duty that is protect citizens from nuclear, radiological accidents or radiological terrors through the emergency medical preparedness. The NREMC was established by the 39-article law on physical protection of nuclear material and facilities and measures for radiological emergencies. Dose assessment or contamination survey should be performed which provide the radiological information for medical response. For this reason, the NREMC establish and re-organized dose assessment system based on the existing dose assessment system of the NREMC recently. The exposure dose could be measured by physical and biological method. With these two methods, we can have conservative dose assessment result. Therefore the NREMC established the exposure dose assessment laboratory which was re-organized laboratory space and introduced specialized equipment for dose assessment. This paper will report the establishment and operation of exposure dose assessment laboratory for radiological emergency response and discuss how to enhance

  14. Size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) provides a simple method to calculate organ dose for pediatric CT examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Bria M.; Brady, Samuel L., E-mail: samuel.brady@stjude.org; Kaufman, Robert A. [Department of Radiological Sciences, St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee 38105 (United States); Mirro, Amy E. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Washington University, St Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the correlation of size-specific dose estimate (SSDE) with absorbed organ dose, and to develop a simple methodology for estimating patient organ dose in a pediatric population (5–55 kg). Methods: Four physical anthropomorphic phantoms representing a range of pediatric body habitus were scanned with metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters placed at 23 organ locations to determine absolute organ dose. Phantom absolute organ dose was divided by phantom SSDE to determine correlation between organ dose and SSDE. Organ dose correlation factors (CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ}) were then multiplied by patient-specific SSDE to estimate patient organ dose. The CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ} were used to retrospectively estimate individual organ doses from 352 chest and 241 abdominopelvic pediatric CT examinations, where mean patient weight was 22 kg ± 15 (range 5–55 kg), and mean patient age was 6 yrs ± 5 (range 4 months to 23 yrs). Patient organ dose estimates were compared to published pediatric Monte Carlo study results. Results: Phantom effective diameters were matched with patient population effective diameters to within 4 cm; thus, showing appropriate scalability of the phantoms across the entire pediatric population in this study. IndividualCF{sub SSDE}{sup organ} were determined for a total of 23 organs in the chest and abdominopelvic region across nine weight subcategories. For organs fully covered by the scan volume, correlation in the chest (average 1.1; range 0.7–1.4) and abdominopelvic region (average 0.9; range 0.7–1.3) was near unity. For organ/tissue that extended beyond the scan volume (i.e., skin, bone marrow, and bone surface), correlation was determined to be poor (average 0.3; range: 0.1–0.4) for both the chest and abdominopelvic regions, respectively. A means to estimate patient organ dose was demonstrated. Calculated patient organ dose, using patient SSDE and CF{sub SSDE}{sup organ}, was compared to

  15. Dose distribution over the radiation field and organs of the body during radiotherapy procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, S.; Begum, M.; Ambia, A.S.M.; Akhter, S.; Banu, H.

    2001-01-01

    Beam profile of the 60 Co teletherapy unit for 10 cm x 10 cm along central axis was measured to study the symmetry of the gamma beam and found that the average dose was 98.44±1.40 mGy. Output dose versus field size was also measured and values were found reasonable. Dose prescription to delivery was measured by placing TLD onto the treatment field for lung and cervix cancer patient which was found to be 39.16±2.98 Gy and 50.48±3.68 Gy respectively which are within 2 % and 0.17 % of the prescribed dose as 40.00 and 50.40 Gy respectively, reveals good agreement with the treatment planning. Six typical types of patients (both male and female) with cancers in lung, larynx, breast, cervix, oesophagus and brain treated with 60 Co teletherapy were particularly considered for dose assessment at different critical organs of interest. It was observed that the doses to the lens of eye with a maximum value of 460.35+78.87 mGy for a larynx cancer patient to a minimum value of 30.80+4.00 mGy of a cervix cancer patient. Doses to the gonad vary with a maximum value of 3810.80+389.76 mGy for a cervix cancer patient to a minimum value of 8.20+1.00 mGy for a brain cancer patient. (author)

  16. The Contribution of Tissue Level Organization to Genomic Stability Following Low Dose/Low Dose Rate Gamma and Proton Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheryl G. Burrell, Ph.D.

    2012-05-14

    The formation of functional tissue units is necessary in maintaining homeostasis within living systems, with individual cells contributing to these functional units through their three-dimensional organization with integrin and adhesion proteins to form a complex extra-cellular matrix (ECM). This is of particular importance in those tissues susceptible to radiation-induced tumor formation, such as epithelial glands. The assembly of epithelial cells of the thyroid is critical to their normal receipt of, and response to, incoming signals. Traditional tissue culture and live animals present significant challenges to radiation exposure and continuous sampling, however, the production of bioreactor-engineered tissues aims to bridge this gap by improve capabilities in continuous sampling from the same functional tissue, thereby increasing the ability to extrapolate changes induced by radiation to animals and humans in vivo. Our study proposes that the level of tissue organization will affect the induction and persistence of low dose radiation-induced genomic instability. Rat thyroid cells, grown in vitro as 3D tissue analogs in bioreactors and as 2D flask grown cultures were exposed to acute low dose (1, 5, 10 and 200 cGy) gamma rays. To assess immediate (6 hours) and delayed (up to 30 days) responses post-irradiation, various biological endpoints were studied including cytogenetic analyses, apoptosis analysis and cell viability/cytotoxicity analyses. Data assessing caspase 3/7 activity levels show that, this activity varies with time post radiation and that, overall, 3D cultures display more genomic instability (as shown by the lower levels of apoptosis over time) when compared to the 2D cultures. Variation in cell viability levels were only observed at the intermediate and late time points post radiation. Extensive analysis of chromosomal aberrations will give further insight on the whether the level of tissue organization influences genomic instability patterns after

  17. The feasibility of a regional CTDIvol to estimate organ dose from tube current modulated CT exams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatonabadi, Maryam; Kim, Hyun J.; Lu, Peiyun; McMillan, Kyle L.; Cagnon, Chris H.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.; DeMarco, John J.

    2013-01-01

    patient size was investigated. Results: For all five organs, the correlations with patient size increased when organ doses were normalized by regional and organ-specific CTDI vol values. For example, when estimating dose to the liver, CTDI vol,global yielded a R 2 value of 0.26, which improved to 0.77 and 0.86, when using the regional and organ-specific CTDI vol for abdomen and liver, respectively. For breast dose, the global CTDI vol yielded a R 2 value of 0.08, which improved to 0.58 and 0.83, when using the regional and organ-specific CTDI vol for chest and breasts, respectively. The R 2 values also increased once the thoracic models were separated for the analysis into females and males, indicating differences between genders in this region not explained by a simple measure of effective diameter. Conclusions: This work demonstrated the utility of regional and organ-specific CTDI vol as normalization factors when using TCM. It was demonstrated that CTDI vol,global is not an effective normalization factor in TCM exams where attenuation (and therefore tube current) varies considerably throughout the scan, such as abdomen/pelvis and even thorax. These exams can be more accurately assessed for dose using regional CTDI vol descriptors that account for local variations in scanner output present when TCM is employed.

  18. Development of Monte Carlo simulations to provide scanner-specific organ dose coefficients for contemporary CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Jan T. M.; Shrimpton, Paul C.

    2016-07-01

    The ImPACT (imaging performance assessment of CT scanners) CT patient dosimetry calculator is still used world-wide to estimate organ and effective doses (E) for computed tomography (CT) examinations, although the tool is based on Monte Carlo calculations reflecting practice in the early 1990’s. Subsequent developments in CT scanners, definitions of E, anthropomorphic phantoms, computers and radiation transport codes, have all fuelled an urgent need for updated organ dose conversion factors for contemporary CT. A new system for such simulations has been developed and satisfactorily tested. Benchmark comparisons of normalised organ doses presently derived for three old scanners (General Electric 9800, Philips Tomoscan LX and Siemens Somatom DRH) are within 5% of published values. Moreover, calculated normalised values of CT Dose Index for these scanners are in reasonable agreement (within measurement and computational uncertainties of  ±6% and  ±1%, respectively) with reported standard measurements. Organ dose coefficients calculated for a contemporary CT scanner (Siemens Somatom Sensation 16) demonstrate potential deviations by up to around 30% from the surrogate values presently assumed (through a scanner matching process) when using the ImPACT CT Dosimetry tool for newer scanners. Also, illustrative estimates of E for some typical examinations and a range of anthropomorphic phantoms demonstrate the significant differences (by some 10’s of percent) that can arise when changing from the previously adopted stylised mathematical phantom to the voxel phantoms presently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and when following the 2007 ICRP recommendations (updated from 1990) concerning tissue weighting factors. Further simulations with the validated dosimetry system will provide updated series of dose coefficients for a wide range of contemporary scanners.

  19. Evaluation of the impact of organ-specific dose reduction on image quality in pediatric chest computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boos, Johannes; Kroepil, Patric; Klee, Dirk; Heusch, Philipp; Schimmoeller, Lars; Schaper, Joerg; Antoch, Gerald; Lanzman, Rotem S.

    2014-01-01

    Organ-specific dose reduction significantly reduces the radiation exposure of radiosensitive organs. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of a novel organ-specific dose reduction algorithm on image quality of pediatric chest CT. We included 28 children (mean age 10.9 ± 4.8 years, range 3-18 years) who had contrast-enhanced chest CT on a 128-row scanner. CT was performed at 100 kV using automated tube current modulation and a novel organ-specific dose-reduction algorithm (XCare trademark; Siemens, Forchheim, Germany). Seven children had a previous chest CT performed on a 64-row scanner at 100 kV without organ-specific dose reduction. Subjective image quality was assessed using a five-point scale (1-not diagnostic; 5-excellent). Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) were assessed in the descending aorta. Overall mean subjective image quality was 4.1 ± 0.6. In the subgroup of the seven children examined both with and without organ-specific dose reduction, subjective image quality was comparable (score 4.4 ± 0.5 with organ-specific dose reduction vs. 4.4 ± 0.7 without it; P > 0.05). There was no significant difference in mean signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio with organ-specific dose reduction (38.3 ± 10.1 and 28.5 ± 8.7, respectively) and without the reduction (35.5 ± 8.5 and 26.5 ± 7.8, respectively) (P > 0.05). Volume computed tomography dose index (CTDI vol ) and size-specific dose estimates did not differ significantly between acquisitions with the organ-specific dose reduction (1.7 ± 0.8 mGy) and without the reduction (1.7 ± 0.8 mGy) (P > 0.05). Organ-specific dose reduction does not have an impact on image quality of pediatric chest CT and can therefore be used in clinical practice to reduce radiation dose of radiosensitive organs such as breast and thyroid gland. (orig.)

  20. A real-time internal dose assessment exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingham, D.; Bull, R. K.

    2013-01-01

    A real-time internal dose assessment exercise has been conducted in which participants were required to make decisions about sampling requirements, seek relevant information about the 'incident' and make various interim dose assessments. At the end of the exercise, each participant was requested to make a formal assessment, providing statements of the methods, models and assumptions used in that assessment. In this paper we describe how the hypothetical assessment case was set up and the exercise was conducted, the responses of the participants and the assessments of dose that they made. Finally we discuss the lessons learnt from the exercise and suggest how the exercise may be adapted to a wider range of participants. (authors)

  1. Nonparametric estimation of benchmark doses in environmental risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piegorsch, Walter W.; Xiong, Hui; Bhattacharya, Rabi N.; Lin, Lizhen

    2013-01-01

    Summary An important statistical objective in environmental risk analysis is estimation of minimum exposure levels, called benchmark doses (BMDs), that induce a pre-specified benchmark response in a dose-response experiment. In such settings, representations of the risk are traditionally based on a parametric dose-response model. It is a well-known concern, however, that if the chosen parametric form is misspecified, inaccurate and possibly unsafe low-dose inferences can result. We apply a nonparametric approach for calculating benchmark doses, based on an isotonic regression method for dose-response estimation with quantal-response data (Bhattacharya and Kong, 2007). We determine the large-sample properties of the estimator, develop bootstrap-based confidence limits on the BMDs, and explore the confidence limits’ small-sample properties via a short simulation study. An example from cancer risk assessment illustrates the calculations. PMID:23914133

  2. Distribution of dose within the body from a photon emitter present in an organ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, W.S.; Ford, M.R.; Warner, G.G.

    1977-01-01

    A dosimetric system was developed which provides estimates of mean radiation dose to organs from photon sources distributed uniformly in one or more organs. Although the sources of photons are assumed to be distributed uniformly, it is not true that dose from these photons is uniformly distributed. In particular, when a source of photons is located in a particular organ, nearby tissues will be irradiated at doses which decrease markedly with distance from the source. The mean dose may give a poor approximation to the actual dose if the tissues over which dose is averaged are extensive, for example, the remainder of the body. A set of enveloping organs was devised for liver, lungs, etc., which give mean dose at distances from zero to one centimeter from the source organ, from one to two centimeters, etc. These can be used to yield estimates of the extent of inhomogeneity of the dose distribution from a source of photons located in the source organ

  3. The system of radiation dose assessment and dose conversion coefficients in the ICRP and FGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, So Ra; Min, Byung Il; Park, Kihyun; Yang, Byung Mo; Suh, Kyung Suk [Nuclear Environmental Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the Federal Guidance Report (FGR) published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have been widely applied worldwide in the fields of radiation protection and dose assessment. The dose conversion coefficients of the ICRP and FGR are widely used for assessing exposure doses. However, before the coefficients are used, the user must thoroughly understand the derivation process of the coefficients to ensure that they are used appropriately in the evaluation. The ICRP provides recommendations to regulatory and advisory agencies, mainly in the form of guidance on the fundamental principles on which appropriate radiological protection can be based. The FGR provides federal and state agencies with technical information to assist their implementation of radiation protection programs for the U.S. population. The system of radiation dose assessment and dose conversion coefficients in the ICRP and FGR is reviewed in this study. A thorough understanding of their background is essential for the proper use of dose conversion coefficients. The FGR dose assessment system was strongly influenced by the ICRP and the U.S. National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), and is hence consistent with those recommendations. Moreover, the ICRP and FGR both used the scientific data reported by Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) and United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) as their primary source of information. The difference between the ICRP and FGR lies in the fact that the ICRP utilized information regarding a population of diverse races, whereas the FGR utilized data on the American population, as its goal was to provide guidelines for radiological protection in the US. The contents of this study are expected to be utilized as basic research material in the areas of radiation protection and dose assessment.

  4. The system of radiation dose assessment and dose conversion coefficients in the ICRP and FGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, So Ra; Min, Byung Il; Park, Kihyun; Yang, Byung Mo; Suh, Kyung Suk

    2016-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations and the Federal Guidance Report (FGR) published by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have been widely applied worldwide in the fields of radiation protection and dose assessment. The dose conversion coefficients of the ICRP and FGR are widely used for assessing exposure doses. However, before the coefficients are used, the user must thoroughly understand the derivation process of the coefficients to ensure that they are used appropriately in the evaluation. The ICRP provides recommendations to regulatory and advisory agencies, mainly in the form of guidance on the fundamental principles on which appropriate radiological protection can be based. The FGR provides federal and state agencies with technical information to assist their implementation of radiation protection programs for the U.S. population. The system of radiation dose assessment and dose conversion coefficients in the ICRP and FGR is reviewed in this study. A thorough understanding of their background is essential for the proper use of dose conversion coefficients. The FGR dose assessment system was strongly influenced by the ICRP and the U.S. National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), and is hence consistent with those recommendations. Moreover, the ICRP and FGR both used the scientific data reported by Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) and United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) as their primary source of information. The difference between the ICRP and FGR lies in the fact that the ICRP utilized information regarding a population of diverse races, whereas the FGR utilized data on the American population, as its goal was to provide guidelines for radiological protection in the US. The contents of this study are expected to be utilized as basic research material in the areas of radiation protection and dose assessment

  5. Feasibility study for the assessment of the exposed dose with TENORM added in consumer products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Do Hyeon; Lee, Hyun Cheol; Shin, Wook-Geun; Min, Chul Hee; Ha, Wi-Ho; Yoo, Jae Ryong; Yoon, Seok-Won; Lee, Jiyon; Choi, Won-Chul

    2015-01-01

    Consumer products including naturally occurring radioactive material have been distributed widely in human life. The potential hazard of the excessively added technically enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material (TENORM) in consumer products should be assessed. The aim of this study is to evaluate the organ equivalent dose and the annual effective dose with the usage of the TENORM added in paints. The activities of gammas emitted from natural radionuclides in the five types of paints were measured with the high-purity germanium detector, and the annual effective dose was assessed with the computational human phantom and the Monte Carlo method. The results show that uranium and thorium series were mainly measured over the five paints. Based on the exposure scenario of the paints in the room, the highest effective dose was evaluated as <1 mSv y -1 of the public dose limit. (authors)

  6. Interactive Rapid Dose Assessment Model (IRDAM): user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poeton, R.W.; Moeller, M.P.; Laughlin, G.J.; Desrosiers, A.E.

    1983-05-01

    As part of the continuing emphasis on emergency preparedness the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored the development of a rapid dose assessment system by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This system, the Interactive Rapid Dose Assessment Model (IRDAM) is a micro-computer based program for rapidly assessing the radiological impact of accidents at nuclear power plants. This User's Guide provides instruction in the setup and operation of the equipment necessary to run IRDAM. Instructions are also given on how to load the magnetic disks and access the interactive part of the program. Two other companion volumes to this one provide additional information on IRDAM. Reactor Accident Assessment Methods (NUREG/CR-3012, Volume 2) describes the technical bases for IRDAM including methods, models and assumptions used in calculations. Scenarios for Comparing Dose Assessment Models (NUREG/CR-3012, Volume 3) provides the results of calculations made by IRDAM and other models for specific accident scenarios

  7. Dose assessment activities in the Republic of the Marshall Islands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, S.L.; Graham, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    Dose assessments, both retrospective and prospective, comprise one important function of a radiological study commissioned by the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) government in late 1989. Estimating past or future exposure requires the synthesis of information from historical data, results from a recently completed field monitoring program, laboratory measurements, and some experimental studies. Most of the activities in the RMI to date have emphasized a pragmatic rather than theoretical approach. In particular, most of the recent effort has been expended on conducting an independent radiological monitoring program to determine the degree of deposition and the geographical extent of weapons test fallout over the nation. Contamination levels on 70% of the land mass of the Marshall Islands were unknown prior to 1994. The environmental radioactivity data play an integral role in both retrospective and prospective assessments. One recent use of dose assessment has been to interpret environmental measurements of radioactivity into annual doses that might be expected at every atoll. A second use for dose assessment has been to determine compliance with dose action level for the rehabitation of Rongelap Island. Careful examination of exposure pathways relevant to the island lifestyle has been necessary to accommodate these purposes. Finally, an examination is underway of gummed film, fixed-instrument, and aerial survey data accumulated during the 1950's by the Health and Safety Laboratory of the U.S. AEC. This article gives an overview of these many different activities and a summary of recent dose assessments

  8. Development of Computational Procedure for Assessment of Patient Dose in Multi-Detector Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Dong Wook

    2007-02-01

    Technological development to improve the quality and speed with which images are obtained have fostered the growth of frequency and collective effective dose of CT examination. Especially, High-dose x-ray technique of CT has increased in the concern of patient dose. However CTDI and DLP in CT dosimetry leaves something to be desired to evaluate patient dose. And even though the evaluation of effective dose in CT practice is required for comparison with other radiography, it's not sufficient to show any estimation because it's not for medical purpose. Therefore the calculation of effective dose in CT procedure is needed for that purpose. However modelling uncertainties will be due to insufficient information from manufacturing tolerances. Therefore the purpose of this work is development of computational procedure for assessment of patient dose through the experiment for getting essential information in MDCT. In order to obtain exact absorbed dose, normalization factors must be created to relate simulated dose values with CTDI air measurement. The normalization factors applied to the calculation of CTDI 100 using axial scanning and organ effective dose using helical scanning. The calculation of helical scanning was compared with the experiment of Groves et al.(2004). The result has a about factor 2 of the experiment. It seems because AEC is not simulated. In several studies, when AEC applied to a CT examination, approximately 20-30% dose reduction was appeared. Therefore the study of AEC simulation should be added and modified

  9. Epidemiological methods for assessing dose-response and dose-effect relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjellström, Tord; Grandjean, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Selected Molecular Mechanisms of Metal Toxicity and Carcinogenicity General Considerations of Dose-Effect and Dose-Response Relationships Interactions in Metal Toxicology Epidemiological Methods for Assessing Dose-Response and Dose-Effect Relationships Essential Metals: Assessing Risks from Deficiency......Description Handbook of the Toxicology of Metals is the standard reference work for physicians, toxicologists and engineers in the field of environmental and occupational health. This new edition is a comprehensive review of the effects on biological systems from metallic elements...... access to a broad range of basic toxicological data and also gives a general introduction to the toxicology of metallic compounds. Audience Toxicologists, physicians, and engineers in the fields of environmental and occupational health as well as libraries in these disciplines. Will also be a useful...

  10. Automated size-specific CT dose monitoring program: Assessing variability in CT dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christianson, Olav; Li Xiang; Frush, Donald; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The potential health risks associated with low levels of ionizing radiation have created a movement in the radiology community to optimize computed tomography (CT) imaging protocols to use the lowest radiation dose possible without compromising the diagnostic usefulness of the images. Despite efforts to use appropriate and consistent radiation doses, studies suggest that a great deal of variability in radiation dose exists both within and between institutions for CT imaging. In this context, the authors have developed an automated size-specific radiation dose monitoring program for CT and used this program to assess variability in size-adjusted effective dose from CT imaging. Methods: The authors radiation dose monitoring program operates on an independent health insurance portability and accountability act compliant dosimetry server. Digital imaging and communication in medicine routing software is used to isolate dose report screen captures and scout images for all incoming CT studies. Effective dose conversion factors (k-factors) are determined based on the protocol and optical character recognition is used to extract the CT dose index and dose-length product. The patient's thickness is obtained by applying an adaptive thresholding algorithm to the scout images and is used to calculate the size-adjusted effective dose (ED adj ). The radiation dose monitoring program was used to collect data on 6351 CT studies from three scanner models (GE Lightspeed Pro 16, GE Lightspeed VCT, and GE Definition CT750 HD) and two institutions over a one-month period and to analyze the variability in ED adj between scanner models and across institutions. Results: No significant difference was found between computer measurements of patient thickness and observer measurements (p= 0.17), and the average difference between the two methods was less than 4%. Applying the size correction resulted in ED adj that differed by up to 44% from effective dose estimates that were not

  11. Automated size-specific CT dose monitoring program: Assessing variability in CT dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christianson, Olav; Li Xiang; Frush, Donald; Samei, Ehsan [Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Clinical Imaging Physics Group, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: The potential health risks associated with low levels of ionizing radiation have created a movement in the radiology community to optimize computed tomography (CT) imaging protocols to use the lowest radiation dose possible without compromising the diagnostic usefulness of the images. Despite efforts to use appropriate and consistent radiation doses, studies suggest that a great deal of variability in radiation dose exists both within and between institutions for CT imaging. In this context, the authors have developed an automated size-specific radiation dose monitoring program for CT and used this program to assess variability in size-adjusted effective dose from CT imaging. Methods: The authors radiation dose monitoring program operates on an independent health insurance portability and accountability act compliant dosimetry server. Digital imaging and communication in medicine routing software is used to isolate dose report screen captures and scout images for all incoming CT studies. Effective dose conversion factors (k-factors) are determined based on the protocol and optical character recognition is used to extract the CT dose index and dose-length product. The patient's thickness is obtained by applying an adaptive thresholding algorithm to the scout images and is used to calculate the size-adjusted effective dose (ED{sub adj}). The radiation dose monitoring program was used to collect data on 6351 CT studies from three scanner models (GE Lightspeed Pro 16, GE Lightspeed VCT, and GE Definition CT750 HD) and two institutions over a one-month period and to analyze the variability in ED{sub adj} between scanner models and across institutions. Results: No significant difference was found between computer measurements of patient thickness and observer measurements (p= 0.17), and the average difference between the two methods was less than 4%. Applying the size correction resulted in ED{sub adj} that differed by up to 44% from effective dose

  12. Re-assessment of dose from the Vinten extremity dosemeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Hagan, J.B.; Pearson, A.J.; Dutt, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    A procedure is described for re-assessing the dose from the Vinten extremity dosemeter using phototransferred thermoluminescence. The technique produces a linear response up to 50 Sv. The re-assessment efficiency is approximately 10% for the first re-assessment and 3-5% for the second re-assessment. The detection threshold values (at the 95% confidence level) are 3 mSv and 9 mSv respectively. (author)

  13. Assessment of concomitant testicular dose with radiochromic film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricker, Katherine; Thompson, Christine; Meyer, Juergen

    2013-01-01

    To assess the suitability of EBT2 and XRQA2 Gafchromic film for measuring low doses in the periphery of treatment fields, and to measure the accumulative concomitant dose to the contralateral testis resulting from CT imaging, pre-treatment imaging (CBCT) and seminoma radiotherapy with and without gonadal shielding. Superficial peripheral dose measurements made using EBT2 Gafchromic film on the surface of water equivalent material were compared to measurements made with an ionisation chamber in a water phantom to evaluate the suitability and accuracy of the film dosimeter for such measurements. Similarly, XRQA2 was used to measure surface doses within a kilovoltage beam and compared with ionisation chamber measurements. Gafchromic film was used to measure CT, CBCT and seminoma treatment related testicular doses on an anthropomorphic phantom. Doses were assessed for two clinical plans, both with and without gonadal shielding. Testicular doses resulting from the treatment of up to 0.83 ± 0.17 Gy were measured per treatment. Additional doses of up to 0.49 ± 0.01 and 2.35 ± 0.05 cGy were measured per CBCT and CT image, respectively. Reductions in the testicular dose in the order of 10, 36 and 78 % were observed when gonadal shielding was fitted for treatment, CT and CBCT imaging, respectively. Gafchromic film was found to be suitable for measuring dose in the periphery of treatment fields. The dose to the testis should be limited to minimise the risk of radiation related side effects. This can be achieved by using appropriate gonadal shielding, irrespective of the treatment fields employed.

  14. Convolution-based estimation of organ dose in tube current modulated CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Segars, W. Paul; Dixon, Robert L.; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-05-01

    Estimating organ dose for clinical patients requires accurate modeling of the patient anatomy and the dose field of the CT exam. The modeling of patient anatomy can be achieved using a library of representative computational phantoms (Samei et al 2014 Pediatr. Radiol. 44 460-7). The modeling of the dose field can be challenging for CT exams performed with a tube current modulation (TCM) technique. The purpose of this work was to effectively model the dose field for TCM exams using a convolution-based method. A framework was further proposed for prospective and retrospective organ dose estimation in clinical practice. The study included 60 adult patients (age range: 18-70 years, weight range: 60-180 kg). Patient-specific computational phantoms were generated based on patient CT image datasets. A previously validated Monte Carlo simulation program was used to model a clinical CT scanner (SOMATOM Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare, Forchheim, Germany). A practical strategy was developed to achieve real-time organ dose estimation for a given clinical patient. CTDIvol-normalized organ dose coefficients ({{h}\\text{Organ}} ) under constant tube current were estimated and modeled as a function of patient size. Each clinical patient in the library was optimally matched to another computational phantom to obtain a representation of organ location/distribution. The patient organ distribution was convolved with a dose distribution profile to generate {{≤ft(\\text{CTD}{{\\text{I}}\\text{vol}}\\right)}\\text{organ, \\text{convolution}}} values that quantified the regional dose field for each organ. The organ dose was estimated by multiplying {{≤ft(\\text{CTD}{{\\text{I}}\\text{vol}}\\right)}\\text{organ, \\text{convolution}}} with the organ dose coefficients ({{h}\\text{Organ}} ). To validate the accuracy of this dose estimation technique, the organ dose of the original clinical patient was estimated using Monte Carlo program with TCM profiles explicitly modeled. The

  15. ANDROS: A code for Assessment of Nuclide Doses and Risks with Option Selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begovich, C.L.; Sjoreen, A.L.; Ohr, S.Y.; Chester, R.O.

    1986-11-01

    ANDROS (Assessment of Nuclide Doses and Risks with Option Selection) is a computer code written to compute doses and health effects from atmospheric releases of radionuclides. ANDROS has been designed as an integral part of the CRRIS (Computerized Radiological Risk Investigation System). ANDROS reads air concentrations and environmental concentrations of radionuclides to produce tables of specified doses and health effects to selected organs via selected pathways (e.g., ingestion or air immersion). The calculation may be done for an individual at a specific location or for the population of the whole assessment grid. The user may request tables of specific effects for every assessment grid location. Along with the radionuclide concentrations, the code requires radionuclide decay data, dose and risk factors, and location-specific data, all of which are available within the CRRIS. This document is a user manual for ANDROS and presents the methodology used in this code

  16. Organ doses as a function of body weight for environmental gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Kimiaki; Petoussi, N.; Zankl, M.; Veit, R.; Jacob, P.; Drexler, G.

    1991-01-01

    The organ doses for γ rays from typical environmental sources were determined with Monte Carlo calculations using anthropomorphic phantoms having different body sizes. It has been suggested that body weight is the predominant factor influencing organ doses for environmental γ rays, regardless of sex and age. A weight function expressing organ doses for environmental γ rays was introduced. This function fitted well with the organ doses calculated using the different phantoms. The function coefficients were determined mathematically with the least squares method. On the assumption that this function was applicable to organ doses for human bodies with diverse characteristics, the variances in organ doses due to race, sex, age and difference in body weight of adults were investigated. The variations of organ doses due to race and sex were not significant. Differences in body weight were found to alter organ doses by a maximum of 10% for γ rays over 100 keV, and 20% for low-energy γ rays. The doses for organs located deep inside a body, such as ovaries, differed between a newborn baby and an adult by a maximum factor of 2 to 3. For γ rays over 100 keV, the variation was within a factor of 2 for all organs. The organ doses for adolescents more than 12 years agreed within 15% with those of the average adult. (author)

  17. Monitoring of high-radiation areas for the assessment of operational and body doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, T.J.; Tung, C.J.; Yeh, W.W.; Liao, R.Y.

    2004-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommended a system of dose limits for the protection of ionizing radiation. This system was established based on the effective dose, E, and the equivalent dose to an organ or tissue, H T , to assess stochastic and deterministic effects. In radiation protection monitoring for external radiation, operational doses such as the deep dose equivalent index, H I,d , shallow dose equivalent index, H I,s , ambient dose equivalent [1,4-6], H*, directional dose equivalent, H', individual dose equivalent-penetrating, H p , and individual dose equivalent-superficial, H s , are implemented. These quantities are defined in an International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) sphere and in an anthropomorphic phantom under simplified irradiation conditions. They are useful when equivalent doses are below the corresponding limits. In the case of equivalent doses far below the limits, the exposure or air kerma is commonly applied. For workers exposed to high levels of radiation, accurate assessments of effective doses and equivalent doses may be needed in order to acquire legal and health information. In the general principles of monitoring for radiation protection of workers, ICRP recommended that: 'A graduated response is advocated for the monitoring of the workplace and for individual monitoring - graduated in the sense that a greater degree of monitoring is deemed to be necessary as doses increase of as unpredictability increases. Gradually more complex or realistic procedures should be adopted as doses become higher. Thus, at low dose equivalents (corresponding say to those within Working Condition B) dosimetric quantities might be used directly to assess exposure, since accuracy is not crucial. At intermediate dose equivalents (corresponding say to Working Condition A and slight overexposures) somewhat greater accuracy is warranted, and the conversion coefficients from dosimetric to radiation

  18. Dose and dose rate effects of whole-body gamma-irradiation: I. Lymphocytes and lymphoid organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecaut, M. J.; Nelson, G. A.; Gridley, D. S.

    2001-01-01

    The major goal of part I of this study was to compare varying doses and dose rates of whole-body gamma-radiation on lymphoid cells and organs. C57BL/6 mice (n = 75) were exposed to 0, 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0 Gy gamma-rays (60Co) at 1 cGy/min (low-dose rate, LDR) and 80 cGy/min (high-dose rate, HDR) and euthanized 4 days later. A significant dose-dependent loss of spleen mass was observed with both LDR and HDR irradiation; for the thymus this was true only with HDR. Decreasing leukocyte and lymphocyte numbers occurred with increasing dose in blood and spleen at both dose rates. The numbers (not percentages) of CD3+ T lymphocytes decreased in the blood in a dose-dependent manner at both HDR and LDR. Splenic T cell counts decreased with dose only in HDR groups; percentages increased with dose at both dose rates. Dose-dependent decreases occurred in CD4+ T helper and CD8+ T cytotoxic cell counts at HDR and LDR. In the blood the percentages of CD4+ cells increased with increasing dose at both dose rates, whereas in the spleen the counts decreased only in the HDR groups. The percentages of the CD8+ population remained stable in both blood and spleen. CD19+ B cell counts and percentages in both compartments declined markedly with increasing HDR and LDR radiation. NK1.1+ natural killer cell numbers and proportions remained relatively stable. Overall, these data indicate that the observed changes were highly dependent on the dose, but not dose rate, and that cells in the spleen are more affected by dose rate than those in blood. The results also suggest that the response of lymphocytes in different body compartments may be variable.

  19. Mesorad dose assessment model. Volume 1. Technical basis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherpelz, R.I.; Bander, T.J.; Athey, G.F.; Ramsdell, J.V.

    1986-03-01

    MESORAD is a dose assessment model for emergency response applications. Using release data for as many as 50 radionuclides, the model calculates: (1) external doses resulting from exposure to radiation emitted by radionuclides contained in elevated or deposited material; (2) internal dose commitment resulting from inhalation; and (3) total whole-body doses. External doses from airborne material are calculated using semi-infinite and finite cloud approximations. At each stage in model execution, the appropriate approximation is selected after considering the cloud dimensions. Atmospheric processes are represented in MESORAD by a combination of Lagrangian puff and Gaussian plume dispersion models, a source depletion (deposition velocity) dry deposition model, and a wet deposition model using washout coefficients based on precipitation rates

  20. Organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices in adult CT: Comparison of four types of reference phantoms across different examination protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yakun; Li Xiang; Paul Segars, W.; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation exposure from computed tomography (CT) to the public has increased the concern among radiation protection professionals. Being able to accurately assess the radiation dose patients receive during CT procedures is a crucial step in the management of CT dose. Currently, various computational anthropomorphic phantoms are used to assess radiation dose by different research groups. It is desirable to better understand how the dose results are affected by different choices of phantoms. In this study, the authors assessed the uncertainties in CT dose and risk estimation associated with different types of computational phantoms for a selected group of representative CT protocols. Methods: Routinely used CT examinations were categorized into ten body and three neurological examination categories. Organ doses, effective doses, risk indices, and conversion coefficients to effective dose and risk index (k and q factors, respectively) were estimated for these examinations for a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). Four methods were used, each employing a different type of reference phantoms. The first and second methods employed a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated in our laboratory. In the first method, the reference male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms were used, which were initially created from the Visible Human data and later adjusted to match organ masses defined in ICRP publication 89. In the second method, the reference male and female phantoms described in ICRP publication 110 were used, which were initially developed from tomographic data of two patients and later modified to match ICRP 89 organ masses. The third method employed a commercial dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT group, London, England) with its own hermaphrodite stylized phantom. In the fourth method, another widely used dosimetry spreadsheet (CT-Expo, Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover, Germany) was employed together with its associated

  1. Organ doses, effective doses, and risk indices in adult CT: Comparison of four types of reference phantoms across different examination protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yakun; Li Xiang; Paul Segars, W.; Samei, Ehsan [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 and Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) and Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States); Department of Radiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States) and Departments of Physics, Biomedical Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27705 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: Radiation exposure from computed tomography (CT) to the public has increased the concern among radiation protection professionals. Being able to accurately assess the radiation dose patients receive during CT procedures is a crucial step in the management of CT dose. Currently, various computational anthropomorphic phantoms are used to assess radiation dose by different research groups. It is desirable to better understand how the dose results are affected by different choices of phantoms. In this study, the authors assessed the uncertainties in CT dose and risk estimation associated with different types of computational phantoms for a selected group of representative CT protocols. Methods: Routinely used CT examinations were categorized into ten body and three neurological examination categories. Organ doses, effective doses, risk indices, and conversion coefficients to effective dose and risk index (k and q factors, respectively) were estimated for these examinations for a clinical CT system (LightSpeed VCT, GE Healthcare). Four methods were used, each employing a different type of reference phantoms. The first and second methods employed a Monte Carlo program previously developed and validated in our laboratory. In the first method, the reference male and female extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms were used, which were initially created from the Visible Human data and later adjusted to match organ masses defined in ICRP publication 89. In the second method, the reference male and female phantoms described in ICRP publication 110 were used, which were initially developed from tomographic data of two patients and later modified to match ICRP 89 organ masses. The third method employed a commercial dosimetry spreadsheet (ImPACT group, London, England) with its own hermaphrodite stylized phantom. In the fourth method, another widely used dosimetry spreadsheet (CT-Expo, Medizinische Hochschule, Hannover, Germany) was employed together with its associated

  2. Assessment of exposure dose to workers in virtual decommissioning environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, KwanSeong; Moon, JeiKwon; Choi, ByungSeon; Hyun, Dongjun; Lee, Jonghwan; Kim, Ikjune; Kim, GeunHo; Seo, JaeSeok

    2014-01-01

    This paper is intended to suggest the method analyze and assess the exposure dose to workers in virtual decommissioning environments. To simulate a lot of decommissioning scenarios, decommissioning environments were designed in virtual reality. To simulate and assess the exposure dose to workers, human model also was designed in virtual environments. These virtual decommissioning environments made it possible to real-time simulate and assess the exposure dose to workers. This work was to be able to simulate scenarios of decommissioning so that exposure dose to workers could be measured and assessed. To establish the plan of exposure dose to workers during decommissioning of nuclear facilities before decommissioning activities are accomplished, the method of simulation assessment was developed in virtual radiological environments. But this work was developed as a tool of simulation for single subject mode. Afterwards, the simulation environment for multi-subjects mode will be upgraded by simultaneous modules with networking environments. Then the much more practical method will be developed by changing number of workers and duration of time under any circumstances of decommissioning

  3. Assessment of exposure dose to workers in virtual decommissioning environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, KwanSeong; Moon, JeiKwon; Choi, ByungSeon; Hyun, Dongjun; Lee, Jonghwan; Kim, Ikjune; Kim, GeunHo; Seo, JaeSeok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    This paper is intended to suggest the method analyze and assess the exposure dose to workers in virtual decommissioning environments. To simulate a lot of decommissioning scenarios, decommissioning environments were designed in virtual reality. To simulate and assess the exposure dose to workers, human model also was designed in virtual environments. These virtual decommissioning environments made it possible to real-time simulate and assess the exposure dose to workers. This work was to be able to simulate scenarios of decommissioning so that exposure dose to workers could be measured and assessed. To establish the plan of exposure dose to workers during decommissioning of nuclear facilities before decommissioning activities are accomplished, the method of simulation assessment was developed in virtual radiological environments. But this work was developed as a tool of simulation for single subject mode. Afterwards, the simulation environment for multi-subjects mode will be upgraded by simultaneous modules with networking environments. Then the much more practical method will be developed by changing number of workers and duration of time under any circumstances of decommissioning.

  4. The assessment of personal dose due to external radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boas, J.F.; Young, J.G.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamental basis of thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) is discussed and a number of considerations in the measurement of thermoluminescence described, with particular reference to CaSO 4 :Dy. The steps taken to convert a thermoluminescence measurement to an exposure and then an absorbed dose are outlined. The calculation of effective dose equivalents due to external exposure to γ-radiation in a number of situations commonly encountered in a uranium mine is discussed. Factors which may affect the accuracy of external dose assessments are described

  5. External dose assessment in the Ukraine following the Chernobyl accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Remi Jordan Lesartre

    While the physiological effects of radiation exposure have been well characterized in general, it remains unclear what the relationship is between large-scale radiological events and psychosocial behavior outcomes in individuals or populations. To investigate this, the National Science Foundation funded a research project in 2008 at the University of Colorado in collaboration with Colorado State University to expand the knowledge of complex interactions between radiation exposure, perception of risk, and psychosocial behavior outcomes by modeling outcomes for a representative sample of the population of the Ukraine which had been exposed to radiocontaminant materials released by the reactor accident at Chernobyl on 26 April 1986. In service of this project, a methodology (based substantially on previously published models specific to the Chernobyl disaster and the Ukrainian population) was developed for daily cumulative effective external dose and dose rate assessment for individuals in the Ukraine for as a result of the Chernobyl disaster. A software platform was designed and produced to estimate effective external dose and dose rate for individuals based on their age, occupation, and location of residence on each day between 26 April 1986 and 31 December 2009. A methodology was developed to transform published 137Cs soil deposition contour maps from the Comprehensive Atlas of Caesium Deposition on Europe after the Chernobyl Accident into a geospatial database to access these data as a radiological source term. Cumulative effective external dose and dose rate were computed for each individual in a 703-member cohort of Ukrainians randomly selected to be representative of the population of the country as a whole. Error was estimated for the resulting individual dose and dose rate values with Monte Carlo simulations. Distributions of input parameters for the dose assessment methodology were compared to computed dose and dose rate estimates to determine which

  6. Cumulative effective and individual organ dose levels in paediatric patients undergoing multiple catheterizations for congenital heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, T.P.; Brennan, P.C.; Ryan, E.

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the cumulative radiation dose levels received by a group of children who underwent multiple cardiac catheterisation procedures during the investigation and management of congenital heart disease (CHD). The purpose is to calculate cumulative doses, identify higher dose individuals, outline the inconsistencies with risk assessment and encourage the establishment of dose databases in order to facilitate the longitudinal research necessary to better understand health risks. A retrospective review of patient records for 117 paediatric patients who have undergone two or more cardiac catheterizations for the investigation of CHD was undertaken. This cohort consisted of patients who were catheterised over a period from September 2002 to August 2014. The age distribution was from newborn to 17 y. Archived kerma-area product (P KA ) and fluoroscopy time (T) readings were retrieved and analysed. Cumulative effective and individual organ doses were determined. The cumulative P KA levels ranged from 1.8 to 651.2 Gycm 2 , whilst cumulative effective dose levels varied from 2 to 259 mSv. The cumulative fluoroscopy time was shown to vary from 8.1 to 193.5 min. Median cumulative organ doses ranged from 3 to 94 mGy. Cumulative effective dose levels are highly variable but may exceed 250 mSv. Individual organ and effective dose measurements remain useful for comparison purposes between institutions although current methodologies used for determining lifetime risks are inadequate. (authors)

  7. Rectal dose assessment in patients submitted to high-dose-rate brachytherapy for uterine cervix cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Jetro Pereira de; Batista, Delano Valdivino Santos; Bardella, Lucia Helena; Carvalho, Arnaldo Rangel

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The present study was aimed at developing a thermoluminescent dosimetric system capable of assessing the doses delivered to the rectum of patients submitted to high-dose-rate brachytherapy for uterine cervix cancer. Materials and methods: LiF:Mg,Ti,Na powder was the thermoluminescent material utilized for evaluating the rectal dose. The powder was divided into small portions (34 mg) which were accommodated in a capillary tube. This tube was placed into a rectal probe that was introduced into the patient's rectum. Results: The doses delivered to the rectum of six patients submitted to high-dose-rate brachytherapy for uterine cervix cancer evaluated by means of thermoluminescent dosimeters presented a good agreement with the planned values based on two orthogonal (anteroposterior and lateral) radiographic images of the patients. Conclusion: The thermoluminescent dosimetric system developed in the present study is simple and easy to be utilized as compared to other rectal dosimetry methods. The system has shown to be effective in the evaluation of rectal doses in patients submitted to high-dose-rate brachytherapy for uterine cervix cancer. (author)

  8. Dose to the Developing Dentition During Therapeutic Irradiation: Organ at Risk Determination and Clinical Implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Reid F.; Schneider, Ralf A.; Albertini, Francesca; Lomax, Antony J.; Ares, Carmen; Goitein, Gudrun; Hug, Eugen B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Irradiation of pediatric facial structures can cause severe impairment of permanent teeth later in life. We therefore focused on primary and permanent teeth as organs at risk, investigating the ability to identify individual teeth in children and infants and to correlate dose distributions with subsequent dental toxicity. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 14 pediatric patients who received a maximum dose >20 Gy(relative biological effectiveness, RBE) to 1 or more primary or permanent teeth between 2003 and 2009. The patients (aged 1-16 years) received spot-scanning proton therapy with 46 to 66 Gy(RBE) in 23 to 33 daily fractions for a variety of tumors, including rhabdomyosarcoma (n=10), sarcoma (n=2), teratoma (n=1), and carcinoma (n=1). Individual teeth were contoured on axial slices from planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Dose-volume histogram data were retrospectively obtained from total calculated delivered treatments. Dental follow-up information was obtained from external care providers. Results: All primary teeth and permanent incisors, canines, premolars, and first and second molars were identifiable on CT scans in all patients as early as 1 year of age. Dose-volume histogram analysis showed wide dose variability, with a median 37 Gy(RBE) per tooth dose range across all individuals, and a median 50 Gy(RBE) intraindividual dose range across all teeth. Dental follow-up revealed absence of significant toxicity in 7 of 10 patients but severe localized toxicity in teeth receiving >20 Gy(RBE) among 3 patients who were all treated at <4 years of age. Conclusions: CT-based assessment of dose distribution to individual teeth is feasible, although delayed calcification may complicate tooth identification in the youngest patients. Patterns of dental dose exposure vary markedly within and among patients, corresponding to rapid dose falloff with protons. Severe localized dental toxicity was observed in a few patients receiving the

  9. Peak Dose Assessment for Proposed DOE-PPPO Authorized Limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maldonado, Delis

    2012-01-01

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prime contractor, was contracted by the DOE Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (DOE-PPPO) to conduct a peak dose assessment in support of the Authorized Limits Request for Solid Waste Disposal at Landfill C-746-U at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (DOE-PPPO 2011a). The peak doses were calculated based on the DOE-PPPO Proposed Single Radionuclides Soil Guidelines and the DOE-PPPO Proposed Authorized Limits (AL) Volumetric Concentrations available in DOE-PPPO 2011a. This work is provided as an appendix to the Dose Modeling Evaluations and Technical Support Document for the Authorized Limits Request for the C-746-U Landfill at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky (ORISE 2012). The receptors evaluated in ORISE 2012 were selected by the DOE-PPPO for the additional peak dose evaluations. These receptors included a Landfill Worker, Trespasser, Resident Farmer (onsite), Resident Gardener, Recreational User, Outdoor Worker and an Offsite Resident Farmer. The RESRAD (Version 6.5) and RESRAD-OFFSITE (Version 2.5) computer codes were used for the peak dose assessments. Deterministic peak dose assessments were performed for all the receptors and a probabilistic dose assessment was performed only for the Offsite Resident Farmer at the request of the DOE-PPPO. In a deterministic analysis, a single input value results in a single output value. In other words, a deterministic analysis uses single parameter values for every variable in the code. By contrast, a probabilistic approach assigns parameter ranges to certain variables, and the code randomly selects the values for each variable from the parameter range each time it calculates the dose (NRC 2006). The receptor scenarios, computer codes and parameter input files were previously used in ORISE 2012. A few modifications were made to the parameter input files as appropriate for this effort. Some of these changes

  10. Development of a real-time radiological dose assessment system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Moon Hee; Lee, Young Bok; Kim, Eun Han; Suh, Kyung Suk; Hwang, Won Tae; Choi, Young Gil

    1997-07-01

    A radiological dose assessment system named FADAS has been developed. This system is necessary to estimated the radiological consequences against a nuclear accident. Mass-consistent wind field module was adopted for the generation of wind field over the whole domain using the several measured wind data. Random-walk dispersion module is used for the calculation of the distribution of radionuclides in the atmosphere. And volume-equivalent numerical integration method has been developed for the assessment of external gamma exposure given from a randomly distributed radioactive materials and a dose data library has been made for rapid calculation. Field tracer experiments have been carried out for the purpose of analyzing the site-specific meteorological characteristics and increasing the accuracy of wind field generation and atmospheric dispersion module of FADAS. At first, field tracer experiment was carried out over flat terrain covered with rice fields using the gas samplers which were designed and manufactured by the staffs of KAERI. The sampled gas was analyzed using gas chromatograph. SODAR and airsonde were used to measure the upper wind. Korean emergency preparedness system CARE was integrated at Kori 4 nuclear power plants in 1995. One of the main functions of CARE is to estimate the radiological dose. The developed real-time dose assessment system FADAS was adopted in CARE as a tool for the radiological dose assessment. (author). 79 refs., 52 tabs., 94 figs.

  11. Depth dose of critical organs of phantom based on surface dose exposed with Dual X-ray absorptiometry: pencil beam using TLD dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Akbar Sharafi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA is one of the most widely used techniques fornon-invasive assessment of bone status. Radiation dosimetry is well established technique for pencilbeam and fan beam DXA system, for the assessment of the surface absorbed dose. No publishedassessment of the absorbed dose for the various depths of the critical organs such as the thyroid anduterus was found. Therefore, in this study, we measured the surface dose and depth dose of criticalorgans to determine the correlation between the depth dose and the surface dose.Materials and Methods: A Lunar DPX-MD (pencil beam system was used in this study. Ananthropomorphic phantom was designed. AP spine and femur scan modes were used to measure thesurface and depth doses of the thyroid left and right lobes and uterus in various deeps and scan centers.TLDs-400 were placed at the surface, near the source and also inserted at different depths in thyroidand uterus of the anthropomorphic phantom. Absorbed doses were measured on the phantom for APspine and femur scans. The correlation between the absorbed dose and the depth was found using thelinear regression analysis.Results: There was no significant correlation between the depth dose and the scan center doseexcept in the femur scan. AP spine effective dose were calculated as 0.064, 0.059, 0.061 and 0.242μSv for thyroid left, right lobes, uterus and ovary, respectively.Conclusion: It is concluded that there is significant correlation between the surface and the doseof various depths of the scanned sections.

  12. Skin dose assessment in routine personnel beta/gamma dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, P.

    1980-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (Publication 26) has recommended a tissue depth of 5 to 10 mg.cm -2 for skin dose assessments. This requirement is generally not fulfilled by routine monitoring procedures because of practical difficulties in using very thin dosemeters with low sensitivity and therefore a high minimum detectable dose. Especially for low-energy beta-ray exposures underestimations of the skin dose by a factor of more than ten may occur. Low-transparent graphite-mixed sintered LiF and Li 2 B 4 0 7 : Mn dosemeters were produced which show a skin-equivalent response to beta and gamma exposures over a wide range of energies. These have found wide-spread application for extremity dosimetry but have not yet been generally introduced in routine personnel beta/gamma monitoring. The following adaptations of existing routine monitoring systems for improved skin dose assessments have been investigated: 1) Placement of a supplementary, thin, skin-dose equivalent dosemeter in the TLD badge to give additional information on low-energy exposures. 2) Introduction of a second photomultiplier in the read-out chamber which enables a simultaneous determination of emitted TL from both sides of the dosemeter separately. This method makes use of the selfshielding of the dosemeter to give information on the low-energy dose contribution. 3) By diffusion of Li 2 B 4 0 7 into solid LiF-dosemeters it was possible to produce a surface layer with a new distinct glow-peak at about 340 deg C which is not present in the undiffused part of the LiF chip, and which can be utilized for the assessment of the skin-dose. Data on energy response and accuracy of dose measurement for beta/gamma exposures are given for the three methods and advantages and disadvantages are discussed (H.K.)

  13. Organ doses can be estimated from the computed tomography (CT) dose index for cone-beam CT on radiotherapy equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Colin J; Abuhaimed, Abdullah; Sankaralingam, Marimuthu; Metwaly, Mohamed; Gentle, David J

    2016-06-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) systems are fitted to radiotherapy linear accelerators and used for patient positioning prior to treatment by image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). Radiotherapists' and radiographers' knowledge of doses to organs from CBCT imaging is limited. The weighted CT dose index for a reference beam of width 20 mm (CTDIw,ref) is displayed on Varian CBCT imaging equipment known as an On-Board Imager (OBI) linked to the Truebeam linear accelerator. This has the potential to provide an indication of organ doses. This knowledge would be helpful for guidance of radiotherapy clinicians preparing treatments. Monte Carlo simulations of imaging protocols for head, thorax and pelvic scans have been performed using EGSnrc/BEAMnrc, EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc, and ICRP reference computational male and female phantoms to derive the mean absorbed doses to organs and tissues, which have been compared with values for the CTDIw,ref displayed on the CBCT scanner console. Substantial variations in dose were observed between male and female phantoms. Nevertheless, the CTDIw,ref gave doses within  ±21% for the stomach and liver in thorax scans and 2  ×  CTDIw,ref can be used as a measure of doses to breast, lung and oesophagus. The CTDIw,ref could provide indications of doses to the brain for head scans, and the colon for pelvic scans. It is proposed that knowledge of the link between CTDIw for CBCT should be promoted and included in the training of radiotherapy staff.

  14. Model for assessing alpha doses for a Reference Japanese Man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Hisao

    1993-01-01

    In view of the development of the nuclear fuel cycle in this country, it is urgently important to establish dose assessment models and related human and environmental parameters for long-lived radionuclides. In the current program, intake and body content of actinides (Pu, Th, U) and related alpha-emitting nuclides (Ra and daughters) have been studied as well as physiological aspects of Reference Japanese Man as the basic model of man for dosimetry. The ultimate object is to examine applicability of the existing models particularly recommended by the ICRP for workers to members of the public. The result of an interlaboratory intercomparison of 239 Pu + 240 Pu determination including our result was published. Alpha-spectrometric determinations of 226 Ra in bone yielded repesentative bone concentration level in Tokyo and Ra-Ca O.R. (bone-diet) which appear consistent with the literature value for Sapporo and Kyoto by Ohno using a Rn emanation method. Specific effective energies for alpha radiation from 226 Ra and daughters were calculated using the ICRP dosimetric model for bone incorporating masses of source and target organs of Reference Japanese Man. Reference Japanese data including the adult, adolescent, child and infant of both sexes was extensively and intensively studied by Tanaka as part of the activities of the ICRP Task Group on Reference Man Revision. Normal data for the physical measurements, mass and dimension of internal organs and body surfaces and some of the body composition were analysed viewing the nutritional data in the Japanese population. Some of the above works are to be continued. (author)

  15. Public Dose Assessment Modeling from Skyshine by Proton Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mwambinga, S. A. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, S. J. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this paper, the skyshine dose by proton accelerator (230 MeV) has been evaluated. The amount of dose by skyshine is related to some influence factors which are emission angle (Height wall), the thickness of ceiling and distance from source to receptor (Human body). Empirical formula is made by using MCNPX code results. It can easily calculate and assess dose from skyshine by proton accelerator. The skyshine doses are calculated with MCNPX code and DCFs in ICRP 116. Thereafter, we made empirical formula which can calculate dose easily and be compared with the results of MCNPX. The maximum exposure point by skyshine is about 5 ∼ 10 m from source. Therefore, the licensee who wants to operate the proton accelerator must keep the appropriate distance from accelerator and set the fence to restrict the approach by the public. And, exposure doses by accelerator depend on operating time and proton beam intensities. Eq. (6) suggested in this study is just considered for mono energy proton accelerator. Therefore, it is necessary to expand the dose calculation to diverse proton energies. Radiations like neutron and photon generated by high energy proton accelerators over 10 MeV, are important exposure sources to be monitored to radiation workers and the public members near the facility. At that case, one of the exposure pathways to the public who are located in near the facility is skyshine. Neutrons and photons can be scattered by the atmosphere near the facility and exposed to public as scattered dose. All of the facilities using high energy radiation and NDI (Non-Destructive Inspection) which is tested at open field, skyshine dose must be taken into consideration. Skyshine dose is not related to the wall thickness of radiation shielding directly.

  16. Radiological dose assessment from the operation of Daeduk nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Won Tae; Kim, Eun Han; Suh, Kyung Suk; Choi, Young Gil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    2000-02-01

    The objective of this project is to assure the public acceptance for nuclear facilities, and the environmental safety from the operation of Daeduk nuclear facilities, such as HANARO research reactor, nuclear fuel processing facilities and others. For identifying the integrity of their facilities, the maximum individual doses at the site boundary and on the areas with high population density were assessed. Also, the collective doses within radius 80 km from the site were assessed. The radiation impacts for residents around the site from the operation of Daeduk nuclear facilities in 1999 were neglectable. 8 refs., 10 figs., 27 tabs. (Author)

  17. Tool development for organ dose optimization taking into account the image quality in Computed Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adrien-Decoene, Camille

    2015-01-01

    Due to the significant rise of computed tomography (CT) exams in the past few years and the increase of the collective dose due to medical exams, dose estimation in CT imaging has become a major public health issue. However dose optimization cannot be considered without taking into account the image quality which has to be good enough for radiologists. In clinical practice, optimization is obtained through empirical index and image quality using measurements performed on specific phantoms like the CATPHAN. Based on this kind of information, it is thus difficult to correctly optimize protocols regarding organ doses and radiologist criteria. Therefore our goal is to develop a tool allowing the optimization of the patient dose while preserving the image quality needed for diagnosis. The work is divided into two main parts: (i) the development of a Monte Carlo dose simulator based on the PENELOPE code, and (ii) the assessment of an objective image quality criterion. For that purpose, the GE Lightspeed VCT 64 CT tube was modelled with information provided by the manufacturer technical note and by adapting the method proposed by Turner et al (Med. Phys. 36: 2154-2164). The axial and helical movements of the X-ray tube were then implemented into the MC tool. To improve the efficiency of the simulation, two variance reduction techniques were used: a circular and a translational splitting. The splitting algorithms allow a uniform particle distribution along the gantry path to simulate the continuous gantry motion in a discrete way. Validations were performed in homogeneous conditions using a home-made phantom and the well-known CTDI phantoms. Then, dose values were measured in CIRS ATOM anthropomorphic phantom using both optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters for point doses and XR-QA Gafchromic films for relative dose maps. Comparisons between measured and simulated values enabled us to validate the MC tool used for dosimetric purposes. Finally, organ doses for

  18. Summary of the dose assessment tool for diagnostic X-ray CT, WAZA-ARIv2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koba, Yosuke

    2016-01-01

    WAZA-ARIv2 is the web-based open system for the dose assessment for diagnostic X-ray CT. Amid growing interest about the dose assessment for medical exposure, WAZA-ARIv2 is opened to the public from January 2015 and attracts rising attention. Using WAZA-ARIv2 system, users can calculate exposure dose to consider patient's age and body shape, and can register the calculation results on WAZA-ARIv2 server for checking as histogram statistics. This paper reviews the background of development of WAZA-ARI system, the comparison of characteristics between WAZA-ARIv2 and other tools, and the calculation method of organ dose in WAZA-ARIv2. (author)

  19. Characteristics of the graded wildlife dose assessment code K-BIOTA and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keum, Dong Kwon; Jun, In; Lim, Kwang Muk; Kim, Byeong Ho; Choi, Yong Ho

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the technical background for the Korean wildlife radiation dose assessment code, K-BIOTA, and the summary of its application. The K-BIOTA applies the graded approaches of 3 levels including the screening assessment (Level 1 and 2), and the detailed assessment based on the site specific data (Level 3). The screening level assessment is a preliminary step to determine whether the detailed assessment is needed, and calculates the dose rate for the grouped organisms, rather than an individual biota. In the Level 1 assessment, the risk quotient (RQ) is calculated by comparing the actual media concentration with the environmental media concentration limit (EMCL) derived from a bench-mark screening reference dose rate. If RQ for the Level 1 assessment is less than 1, it can be determined that the ecosystem would maintain its integrity, and the assessment is terminated. If the RQ is greater than 1, the Level 2 assessment, which calculates RQ using the average value of the concentration ratio (CR) and equilibrium distribution coefficient (Kd) for the grouped organisms, is carried out for the more realistic assessment. Thus, the Level 2 assessment is less conservative than the Level 1 assessment. If RQ for the Level 2 assessment is less than 1, it can be determined that the ecosystem would maintain its integrity, and the assessment is terminated. If the RQ is greater than 1, the Level 3 assessment is performed for the detailed assessment. In the Level 3 assessment, the radiation dose for the representative organism of a site is calculated by using the site specific data of occupancy factor, CR and Kd. In addition, the K-BIOTA allows the uncertainty analysis of the dose rate on CR, Kd and environmental medium concentration among input parameters optionally in the Level 3 assessment. The four probability density functions of normal, lognormal, uniform and exponential distribution can be applied. The applicability of the code was tested through the

  20. Characteristics of the graded wildlife dose assessment code K-BIOTA and its application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keum, Dong Kwon; Jun, In; Lim, Kwang Muk; Kim, Byeong Ho; Choi, Yong Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    This paper describes the technical background for the Korean wildlife radiation dose assessment code, K-BIOTA, and the summary of its application. The K-BIOTA applies the graded approaches of 3 levels including the screening assessment (Level 1 and 2), and the detailed assessment based on the site specific data (Level 3). The screening level assessment is a preliminary step to determine whether the detailed assessment is needed, and calculates the dose rate for the grouped organisms, rather than an individual biota. In the Level 1 assessment, the risk quotient (RQ) is calculated by comparing the actual media concentration with the environmental media concentration limit (EMCL) derived from a bench-mark screening reference dose rate. If RQ for the Level 1 assessment is less than 1, it can be determined that the ecosystem would maintain its integrity, and the assessment is terminated. If the RQ is greater than 1, the Level 2 assessment, which calculates RQ using the average value of the concentration ratio (CR) and equilibrium distribution coefficient (Kd) for the grouped organisms, is carried out for the more realistic assessment. Thus, the Level 2 assessment is less conservative than the Level 1 assessment. If RQ for the Level 2 assessment is less than 1, it can be determined that the ecosystem would maintain its integrity, and the assessment is terminated. If the RQ is greater than 1, the Level 3 assessment is performed for the detailed assessment. In the Level 3 assessment, the radiation dose for the representative organism of a site is calculated by using the site specific data of occupancy factor, CR and Kd. In addition, the K-BIOTA allows the uncertainty analysis of the dose rate on CR, Kd and environmental medium concentration among input parameters optionally in the Level 3 assessment. The four probability density functions of normal, lognormal, uniform and exponential distribution can be applied. The applicability of the code was tested through the

  1. Effect of organ size and position on out-of-field dose distributions during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scarboro, Sarah B; White, Allen; Yaldo, Derek; Kry, Stephen F; Howell, Rebecca M; Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan A

    2010-01-01

    Mantle field irradiation has historically been the standard radiation treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma. It involves treating large regions of the chest and neck with high doses of radiation (up to 30 Gy). Previous epidemiological studies on the incidence of second malignancies following radiation therapy for Hodgkin lymphoma have revealed an increased incidence of second tumors in various organs, including lung, breast, thyroid and digestive tract. Multiple other studies, including the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results, indicated an increased incidence in digestive tract including stomach cancers following mantle field radiotherapy. Assessment of stomach dose is challenging because the stomach is outside the treatment field but very near the treatment border where there are steep dose gradients. In addition, the stomach can vary greatly in size and position. We sought to evaluate the dosimetric impact of the size and variable position of the stomach relative to the field border for a typical Hodgkin lymphoma mantle field irradiation. The mean stomach dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimetry for nine variations in stomach size and position. The mean doses to the nine stomach variations ranged from 0.43 to 0.83 Gy when 30 Gy was delivered to the treatment isocenter. Statistical analyses indicated that there were no significant differences in the mean stomach dose when the stomach was symmetrically expanded up to 3 cm or shifted laterally (medial, anterior or posterior shifts) by up to 3 cm. There was, however, a significant (P > 0.01) difference in the mean dose when the stomach was shifted superiorly or inferiorly by ≥2.5 cm.

  2. The assessment of the carcinogenic effects of low dose radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.; Lafuma, J.; Masse, R.; Latarjet, R.

    1991-01-01

    It is concluded that the exclusion of patients for the purposes of risk estimation, the choice of a particular relative risk projection model and of a dose reduction factor equal to 2 are all decisions which result in an overestimation of the actual risk. These choices can be understood when the aim is radiation protection and when it is safer to overestimate the risk; however, they are open to criticism if the aim is a realistic assessment of the risk. For low doses, below 50 mSv/year, and when all causes of uncertainty are added, the actual risk might be markedly lower than the risk estimated with the ICRP (1991) carcinogenic risk coefficient and the DRF estimated by ICRP. Future studies should aim at providing direct and more precise assessments of risk coefficients in the low dose region. (Author)

  3. Organ and effective doses in newborn patients during helical multislice computed tomography examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staton, Robert J; Lee, Choonik; Lee, Choonsik; Williams, Matt D; Hintenlang, David E; Arreola, Manuel M; Williams, Jonathon L; Bolch, Wesley E

    2006-01-01

    In this study, two computational phantoms of the newborn patient were used to assess individual organ doses and effective doses delivered during head, chest, abdomen, pelvis, and torso examinations using the Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 helical multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) scanner. The stylized phantom used to model the patient anatomy was the revised ORNL newborn phantom by Han et al (2006 Health Phys.90 337). The tomographic phantom used in the study was that developed by Nipper et al (2002 Phys. Med. Biol. 47 3143) as recently revised by Staton et al (2006 Med. Phys. 33 3283). The stylized model was implemented within the MCNP5 radiation transport code, while the tomographic phantom was incorporated within the EGSnrc code. In both codes, the x-ray source was modelled as a fan beam originating from the focal spot at a fan angle of 52 0 and a focal-spot-to-axis distance of 57 cm. The helical path of the source was explicitly modelled based on variations in collimator setting (12 mm or 24 mm), detector pitch and scan length. Tube potentials of 80, 100 and 120 kVp were considered in this study. Beam profile data were acquired using radiological film measurements on a 16 cm PMMA phantom, which yielded effective beam widths of 14.7 mm and 26.8 mm for collimator settings of 12 mm and 24 mm, respectively. Values of absolute organ absorbed dose were determined via the use of normalization factors defined as the ratio of the CTDI 100 measured in-phantom and that determined by Monte Carlo simulation of the PMMA phantom and ion chamber. Across various technique factors, effective dose differences between the stylized and tomographic phantoms ranged from +2% to +9% for head exams, -4% to -2% for chest exams, +8% to +24% for abdominal exams, -16% to -12% for pelvic exams and -7% to 0% for chest-abdomen-pelvis (CAP) exams. In many cases, however, relatively close agreement in effective dose was accomplished at the expense of compensating errors in individual organ

  4. Organ and effective doses in newborn patients during helical multislice computed tomography examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staton, Robert J.; Lee, Choonik; Lee, Choonsik; Williams, Matt D.; Hintenlang, David E.; Arreola, Manuel M.; Williams, Jonathon L.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2006-10-01

    In this study, two computational phantoms of the newborn patient were used to assess individual organ doses and effective doses delivered during head, chest, abdomen, pelvis, and torso examinations using the Siemens SOMATOM Sensation 16 helical multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) scanner. The stylized phantom used to model the patient anatomy was the revised ORNL newborn phantom by Han et al (2006 Health Phys.90 337). The tomographic phantom used in the study was that developed by Nipper et al (2002 Phys. Med. Biol. 47 3143) as recently revised by Staton et al (2006 Med. Phys. 33 3283). The stylized model was implemented within the MCNP5 radiation transport code, while the tomographic phantom was incorporated within the EGSnrc code. In both codes, the x-ray source was modelled as a fan beam originating from the focal spot at a fan angle of 52° and a focal-spot-to-axis distance of 57 cm. The helical path of the source was explicitly modelled based on variations in collimator setting (12 mm or 24 mm), detector pitch and scan length. Tube potentials of 80, 100 and 120 kVp were considered in this study. Beam profile data were acquired using radiological film measurements on a 16 cm PMMA phantom, which yielded effective beam widths of 14.7 mm and 26.8 mm for collimator settings of 12 mm and 24 mm, respectively. Values of absolute organ absorbed dose were determined via the use of normalization factors defined as the ratio of the CTDI100 measured in-phantom and that determined by Monte Carlo simulation of the PMMA phantom and ion chamber. Across various technique factors, effective dose differences between the stylized and tomographic phantoms ranged from +2% to +9% for head exams, -4% to -2% for chest exams, +8% to +24% for abdominal exams, -16% to -12% for pelvic exams and -7% to 0% for chest-abdomen-pelvis (CAP) exams. In many cases, however, relatively close agreement in effective dose was accomplished at the expense of compensating errors in individual organ

  5. SU-F-I-32: Organ Doses from Pediatric Head CT Scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H; Liu, Q; Qiu, J; Zhuo, W [Institute of Radiation Medicine Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Majer, M; Knezevic, Z; Miljanic, S [Radiation Chemistry and Dosimetry Laboratory, Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Hrsak, H [Clinical Hospital Centre Zagreb, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the organ doses of pediatric patients who undergoing head CT scan using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and compare it with measurements in anthropomorphic child phantom.. Methods: A ten years old children voxel phantom was developed from CT images, the voxel size of the phantom was 2mm*2mm*2mm. Organ doses from head CT scan were simulated using MCNPX software, 180 detectors were placed in the voxel phantom to tally the doses of the represented tissues or organs. When performing the simulation, 120 kVp and 88 mA were selected as the scan parameters. The scan range covered from the top of the head to the end of the chain, this protocol was used at CT simulator for radiotherapy. To validate the simulated results, organ doses were measured with radiophotoluminescence (RPL) detectors, placed in the 28 organs of the 10 years old CIRS ATOM phantom. Results: The organ doses results matched well between MC simulation and phantom measurements. The eyes dose was showed to be as expected the highest organ dose: 28.11 mGy by simulation and 27.34 mGy by measurement respectively. Doses for organs not included in the scan volume were much lower than those included in the scan volume, thymus doses were observed more than 10 mGy due the CT protocol for radiotherapy covered more body part than routine head CT scan. Conclusion: As the eyes are superficial organs, they may receive the highest radiation dose during the CT scan. Considering the relatively high radio sensitivity, using shielding material or organ based tube current modulation technique should be encouraged to reduce the eye radiation risks. Scan range was one of the most important factors that affects the organ doses during the CT scan. Use as short as reasonably possible scan range should be helpful to reduce the patient radiation dose. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China(11475047)

  6. Integrated Worker Radiation Dose Assessment for the K Basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NELSON, J.V.

    1999-01-01

    This report documents an assessment of the radiation dose workers at the K Basins are expected to receive in the process of removing spent nuclear fuel from the storage basins. The K Basins (K East and K West) are located in the Hanford 100K Area

  7. Excipient Usage Technical Risk Assessment for Generic Solid Dose Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Babu Pazhayattil

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an assessment methodology for solid dose generic small molecule drug products. It addresses the ‘usage of the excipient’ portion of the trinomial by utilizing the systematic approach of Risk Identification, Risk Analysis and Risk Evaluation as per ICH Q9 Quality Risk Management outlined for developing risk control strategies. The assessment and maintenance of excipient risk profile is essential to minimize any potential risk associated to excipients impacting patients.

  8. Technical Note: SCUDA: A software platform for cumulative dose assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seyoun; McNutt, Todd; Quon, Harry; Wong, John; Lee, Junghoon, E-mail: rshekhar@childrensnational.org, E-mail: junghoon@jhu.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Plishker, William [IGI Technologies, Inc., College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Shekhar, Raj, E-mail: rshekhar@childrensnational.org, E-mail: junghoon@jhu.edu [IGI Technologies, Inc., College Park, Maryland 20742 and Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Children’s National Health System, Washington, DC 20010 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Purpose: Accurate tracking of anatomical changes and computation of actually delivered dose to the patient are critical for successful adaptive radiation therapy (ART). Additionally, efficient data management and fast processing are practically important for the adoption in clinic as ART involves a large amount of image and treatment data. The purpose of this study was to develop an accurate and efficient Software platform for CUmulative Dose Assessment (SCUDA) that can be seamlessly integrated into the clinical workflow. Methods: SCUDA consists of deformable image registration (DIR), segmentation, dose computation modules, and a graphical user interface. It is connected to our image PACS and radiotherapy informatics databases from which it automatically queries/retrieves patient images, radiotherapy plan, beam data, and daily treatment information, thus providing an efficient and unified workflow. For accurate registration of the planning CT and daily CBCTs, the authors iteratively correct CBCT intensities by matching local intensity histograms during the DIR process. Contours of the target tumor and critical structures are then propagated from the planning CT to daily CBCTs using the computed deformations. The actual delivered daily dose is computed using the registered CT and patient setup information by a superposition/convolution algorithm, and accumulated using the computed deformation fields. Both DIR and dose computation modules are accelerated by a graphics processing unit. Results: The cumulative dose computation process has been validated on 30 head and neck (HN) cancer cases, showing 3.5 ± 5.0 Gy (mean±STD) absolute mean dose differences between the planned and the actually delivered doses in the parotid glands. On average, DIR, dose computation, and segmentation take 20 s/fraction and 17 min for a 35-fraction treatment including additional computation for dose accumulation. Conclusions: The authors developed a unified software platform that provides

  9. Radiological assessment. A textbook on environmental dose analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, J.E.; Meyer, H.R.

    1983-09-01

    Radiological assessment is the quantitative process of estimating the consequences to humans resulting from the release of radionuclides to the biosphere. It is a multidisciplinary subject requiring the expertise of a number of individuals in order to predict source terms, describe environmental transport, calculate internal and external dose, and extrapolate dose to health effects. Up to this time there has been available no comprehensive book describing, on a uniform and comprehensive level, the techniques and models used in radiological assessment. Radiological Assessment is based on material presented at the 1980 Health Physics Society Summer School held in Seattle, Washington. The material has been expanded and edited to make it comprehensive in scope and useful as a text. Topics covered include (1) source terms for nuclear facilities and Medical and Industrial sites; (2) transport of radionuclides in the atmosphere; (3) transport of radionuclides in surface waters; (4) transport of radionuclides in groundwater; (5) terrestrial and aquatic food chain pathways; (6) reference man; a system for internal dose calculations; (7) internal dosimetry; (8) external dosimetry; (9) models for special-case radionuclides; (10) calculation of health effects in irradiated populations; (11) evaluation of uncertainties in environmental radiological assessment models; (12) regulatory standards for environmental releases of radionuclides; (13) development of computer codes for radiological assessment; and (14) assessment of accidental releases of radionuclides

  10. Radiological assessment. A textbook on environmental dose analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Till, J.E.; Meyer, H.R. (eds.)

    1983-09-01

    Radiological assessment is the quantitative process of estimating the consequences to humans resulting from the release of radionuclides to the biosphere. It is a multidisciplinary subject requiring the expertise of a number of individuals in order to predict source terms, describe environmental transport, calculate internal and external dose, and extrapolate dose to health effects. Up to this time there has been available no comprehensive book describing, on a uniform and comprehensive level, the techniques and models used in radiological assessment. Radiological Assessment is based on material presented at the 1980 Health Physics Society Summer School held in Seattle, Washington. The material has been expanded and edited to make it comprehensive in scope and useful as a text. Topics covered include (1) source terms for nuclear facilities and Medical and Industrial sites; (2) transport of radionuclides in the atmosphere; (3) transport of radionuclides in surface waters; (4) transport of radionuclides in groundwater; (5) terrestrial and aquatic food chain pathways; (6) reference man; a system for internal dose calculations; (7) internal dosimetry; (8) external dosimetry; (9) models for special-case radionuclides; (10) calculation of health effects in irradiated populations; (11) evaluation of uncertainties in environmental radiological assessment models; (12) regulatory standards for environmental releases of radionuclides; (13) development of computer codes for radiological assessment; and (14) assessment of accidental releases of radionuclides.

  11. A model for radiological dose assessment in an urban environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Won Tae; Kim, Eun Han; Jeong, Hyo Joon; Suh, Kyung Suk; Han, Moon Hee

    2007-01-01

    A model for radiological dose assessment in an urban environment, METRO-K has been developed. Characteristics of the model are as follows ; 1) mathematical structures are simple (i.e. simplified input parameters) and easy to understand due to get the results by analytical methods using experimental and empirical data, 2) complex urban environment can easily be made up using only 5 types of basic surfaces, 3) various remediation measures can be applied to different surfaces by evaluating the exposure doses contributing from each contamination surface. Exposure doses contributing from each contamination surface at a particular location of a receptor were evaluated using the data library of kerma values as a function of gamma energy and contamination surface. A kerma data library was prepared for 7 representative types of Korean urban building by extending those data given for 4 representative types of European urban buildings. Initial input data are daily radionuclide concentration in air and precipitation, and fraction of chemical type. Final outputs are absorbed dose rate in air contributing from the basic surfaces as a function of time following a radionuclide deposition, and exposure dose rate contributing from various surfaces constituting the urban environment at a particular location of a receptor. As the result of a contaminative scenario for an apartment built-up area, exposure dose rates show a distinct difference for surrounding environment as well as locations of a receptor

  12. Thoron in the air: assessment of the occupational dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Marcia Pires de

    1999-01-01

    The occupational dose due to inhalation of thoron was assessed through the committed effective dose and the committed equivalent dose received by workers exposed to the radionuclide at the nuclear materials storage site and the thorium purification plant of the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP). The radiation doses were performed by compartmental analysis following the compartmental model of the lung and biokinetic model of the lead, through the thoron equilibrium equivalent concentrations. These values were obtained by gamma ray spectrometry, total alpha count and alpha particle spectrometry of air samples glass fiber filters. The results of the thoron equilibrium equivalent concentration varied from 0.3 to 0,67 Bq/m 3 at the nuclear materials storage site and from 0.9 to 249.8 Bq/m 3 at the thorium purification plant. The committed effective dose due to thoron inhalation varied from 0.03 mSv/a to 0.67 mSv/a at the nuclear materials storage site and from 0.12 mSv/a to 6.0 mSv/a at the thorium purification plant. The risk assessment of lung cancer and fatal cancers for the workers exposed to thoron at the nuclear materials storage site and the thorium purification plant showed an increment for both risk cancer. (author)

  13. Approach to non-human species radiation dose assessment in the republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keum, D. K.; Jun, I.; Lim, K. M.; Choi, Y. H.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the approach to non-human species radiation dose assessment in Korea. As the tentative reference organisms, one plant and seven animals were selected based on the new International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendation issued in 2007, and the size of the selected organisms was determined from the corresponding Korean endemic species. A set of 25 radionuclides was considered as a potential source term of causing radiological damage to organisms. External and internal dose conversion coefficients for the selected organisms and radionuclides were calculated by the uniform isotropic model or Monte Carlo simulation. Concentration ratios of some endemic species are being measured in laboratory experiments, in parallel with the review of existing data. (authors)

  14. Environmental dose rate assessment of ITER using the Monte Carlo method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimian Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to radiation is one of the main sources of risk to staff employed in reactor facilities. The staff of a tokamak is exposed to a wide range of neutrons and photons around the tokamak hall. The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER is a nuclear fusion engineering project and the most advanced experimental tokamak in the world. From the radiobiological point of view, ITER dose rates assessment is particularly important. The aim of this study is the assessment of the amount of radiation in ITER during its normal operation in a radial direction from the plasma chamber to the tokamak hall. To achieve this goal, the ITER system and its components were simulated by the Monte Carlo method using the MCNPX 2.6.0 code. Furthermore, the equivalent dose rates of some radiosensitive organs of the human body were calculated by using the medical internal radiation dose phantom. Our study is based on the deuterium-tritium plasma burning by 14.1 MeV neutron production and also photon radiation due to neutron activation. As our results show, the total equivalent dose rate on the outside of the bioshield wall of the tokamak hall is about 1 mSv per year, which is less than the annual occupational dose rate limit during the normal operation of ITER. Also, equivalent dose rates of radiosensitive organs have shown that the maximum dose rate belongs to the kidney. The data may help calculate how long the staff can stay in such an environment, before the equivalent dose rates reach the whole-body dose limits.

  15. Organ dose evaluation for CT scans based on in-phantom measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Haikuan; Zhuo Weihai; Chen Bo; Yi Yanling; Li Dehong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the organ doses and their distributions in different projections of CT scans. Methods: The CT values were measured and the linear absorption coefficients were derived for the main organs of the anthropomorphic phantom to compare with the normal values of human beings. The radiophotoluminescent glass dosimeters were set into various tissues or organs of the phantom for mimic measurements of the organ doses undergoing the head, chest, abdomen and pelvis CT scans, respectively. Results: The tissue equivalence of the phantom used in this study was good. The brain had the largest organ dose undergoing the head CT scan. The organ doses in thyroid, breast, lung and oesophagus were relatively large in performing the chest CT scan, while the liver, stomach, colon and lung had relatively hrge organ doses in abdomen CT practice. The doses in bone surface and colon exceeded by 50 mGy in a single pelvis CT scan. Conclusions: The organ doses and their distributions largely vary with different projections of CT scans. The organ doses of colon, bone marrow,gonads and bladder are fairly large in performing pelvis CT scan, which should be paid attention in the practice. (authors)

  16. Assessment of patients' skin dose during interventional cardiology procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsapaki, V.; Vardalaki, E.; Kottou, S.; Molfetas, M.; Neofotistou, V.

    2002-01-01

    During the last 30 years the use of Interventional Cardiology (IC) procedures has increased significantly, mainly due to the benefits and advantages of the method that offers more accurate diagnosis and treatment along with less complications and hospitalization. However, IC procedures are based on the use of x-ray radiation, mostly localized at certain areas of patient's body and for extended periods of time. Consequently, patient may receive high radiation dose and deterministic effects, such as erythema, epilation or even dermal necrosis may be observed. Therefore, the need for reducing radiation dose is highly important. In order to achieve this, good knowledge of the dose levels delivered to the patient during IC procedures is essential since radiation effects are known to increase with dose. It is of great interest to know the point where the maximum skin dose (MSD) is noted since individual sensitivity may vary. MSDs greater than 1 Gy should be recorded. Patient dosimetry during IC procedures is a complex task since these type of procedures depend on various factors, such as complexity and severity of case, different specifications of x-ray equipment and patient's physical characteristics. Moreover, cardiologist's experience plays an important role. For these reasons, Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) as well as the World Health Organization (WHO), have published documents on radiation safety and ways to reduce skin injuries during IC procedures. Various methods have been proposed for measuring MSD such as the use of slow radiotherapy films, thermoluminescent detectors (TLD), scintillation detectors, Dose-Area Product (DAP) meter, as well as a combination of DAP and air kerma. A literature review on MSDs measured during IC procedures showed that doses ranged from 300 to 43000 mGy

  17. TSD-DOSE: A radiological dose assessment model for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfingston, M.; Arnish, J.; LePoire, D.; Chen, S.-Y.

    1998-01-01

    Past practices at US Department of Energy (DOE) field facilities resulted in the presence of trace amounts of radioactive materials in some hazardous chemical wastes shipped from these facilities. In May 1991, the DOE Office of Waste Operations issued a nationwide moratorium on shipping all hazardous waste until procedures could be established to ensure that only nonradioactive hazardous waste would be shipped from DOE facilities to commercial treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. To aid in assessing the potential impacts of shipments of mixed radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes, a radiological assessment computer model (or code) was developed on the basis of detailed assessments of potential radiological exposures and doses for eight commercial hazardous waste TSD facilities. The model, called TSD-DOSE, is designed to incorporate waste-specific and site-specific data to estimate potential radiological doses to on-site workers and the off-site public from waste-handling operations at a TSD facility. The code is intended to provide both DOE and commercial TSD facilities with a rapid and cost-effective method for assessing potential human radiation exposures from the processing of chemical wastes contaminated with trace amounts of radionuclides

  18. Dose Calculation Evolution for Internal Organ Irradiation in Humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez V, Reina A.

    2007-01-01

    The International Commission of Radiation Units (ICRU) has established through the years, a discrimination system regarding the security levels on the prescription and administration of doses in radiation treatments (Radiotherapy, Brach therapy, Nuclear Medicine). The first level is concerned with the prescription and posterior assurance of dose administration to a point of interest (POI), commonly located at the geometrical center of the region to be treated. In this, the effects of radiation around that POI, is not a priority. The second level refers to the dose specifications in a particular plane inside the patient, mostly the middle plane of the lesion. The dose is calculated to all the structures in that plane regardless if they are tumor or healthy tissue. In this case, the dose is not represented by a point value, but by level curves called 'isodoses' as in a topographic map, so you can assure the level of doses to this particular plane, but it also leave with no information about how this values go thru adjacent planes. This is why the third level is referred to the volumetrical description of doses so these isodoses construct now a volume (named 'cloud') that give us better assurance about tissue irradiation around the volume of the lesion and its margin (sub clinical spread or microscopic illness). This work shows how this evolution has resulted, not only in healthy tissue protection improvement but in a rise of tumor control, quality of life, better treatment tolerance and minimum permanent secuelae

  19. Estimating the Absorbed Dose to Critical Organs During Dual X-ray Absorptiometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari-Dizaji, M.; Sharafi, A. A.; Larijani, B.; Mokhlesian, N.; Hasanzadeh, H. [Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-04-15

    Objective : The purpose of this study is to estimate a patient's organ dose (effective dose) during performance of dual X-ray absorptiometry by using the correlations derived from the surface dose and the depth doses in an anthropomorphic phantom. Materials and Methods : An anthropomorphic phantom was designed and TLDs (Thermoluminescent Dosimeters) were placed at the surface and these were also inserted at different depths of the thyroid and uterus of the anthropomorphic phantom. The absorbed doses were measured on the phantom for the spine and femur scan modes. The correlation coefficients and regression functions between the absorbed surface dose and the depth dose were determined. The derived correlation was then applied for 40 women patients to estimate the depth doses to the thyroid and uterus. Result : There was a correlation between the surface dose and depth dose of the thyroid and uterus in both scan modes. For the women's dosimetry, the average surface doses of the thyroid and uterus were 1.88 {mu}Gy and 1.81 Gy, respectively. Also, the scan center dose in the women was 5.70 Gy. There was correlation between the thyroid and uterus surface doses, and the scan center dose. Conclusion : We concluded that the effective dose to the patient's critical organs during dual X-ray absorptiometry can be estimated by the correlation derived from phantom dosimetry.

  20. Estimating the Absorbed Dose to Critical Organs During Dual X-ray Absorptiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokhtari-Dizaji, M.; Sharafi, A. A.; Larijani, B.; Mokhlesian, N.; Hasanzadeh, H.

    2008-01-01

    Objective : The purpose of this study is to estimate a patient's organ dose (effective dose) during performance of dual X-ray absorptiometry by using the correlations derived from the surface dose and the depth doses in an anthropomorphic phantom. Materials and Methods : An anthropomorphic phantom was designed and TLDs (Thermoluminescent Dosimeters) were placed at the surface and these were also inserted at different depths of the thyroid and uterus of the anthropomorphic phantom. The absorbed doses were measured on the phantom for the spine and femur scan modes. The correlation coefficients and regression functions between the absorbed surface dose and the depth dose were determined. The derived correlation was then applied for 40 women patients to estimate the depth doses to the thyroid and uterus. Result : There was a correlation between the surface dose and depth dose of the thyroid and uterus in both scan modes. For the women's dosimetry, the average surface doses of the thyroid and uterus were 1.88 μGy and 1.81 Gy, respectively. Also, the scan center dose in the women was 5.70 Gy. There was correlation between the thyroid and uterus surface doses, and the scan center dose. Conclusion : We concluded that the effective dose to the patient's critical organs during dual X-ray absorptiometry can be estimated by the correlation derived from phantom dosimetry

  1. The relative importance of ingestion for multiple pathway dose assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wicker, W.; Grogan, H.; Bergstroem, U.; Hoffman, O.

    1991-01-01

    The general purpose of this report is to examine the relative importance of ingestion pathways, and particularly food chain transport in overall dose assessment. The importance of ingestion pathways is examined for various release scenarios and radionuclides because the findings are expected to differ with circumstances. The degree to which contaminated food products contribute to the total dose will affect the importance of accuracy and uncertainty of food chain model predictions, which is the main thrust of the Biospheric Model Validation Study (BIOMOVS). This analysis requires that all modes of radiation exposure be examined, including inhalation, external exposure, and the various ingestion pathways. (2 figs., 2 tabs.)

  2. Radiation dose reduction in paediatric coronary computed tomography: assessment of effective dose and image quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habib Geryes, Bouchra; Calmon, Raphael; Boddaert, Nathalie; Khraiche, Diala; Bonnet, Damien; Raimondi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    To assess the impact of different protocols on radiation dose and image quality for paediatric coronary computed tomography (cCT). From January-2012 to June-2014, 140 children who underwent cCT on a 64-slice scanner were included. Two consecutive changes in imaging protocols were performed: 1) the use of adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR); 2) the optimization of acquisition parameters. Effective dose (ED) was calculated by conversion of the dose-length product. Image quality was assessed as excellent, good or with significant artefacts. Patients were divided in three age groups: 0-4, 5-7 and 8-18 years. The use of ASIR combined to the adjustment of scan settings allowed a reduction in the median ED of 58 %, 82 % and 85 % in 0-4, 5-7 and 8-18 years group, respectively (7.3 ± 1.4 vs 3.1 ± 0.7 mSv, 5.5 ± 1.6 vs 1 ± 1.9 mSv and 5.3 ± 5.0 vs 0.8 ± 2.0 mSv, all p < 0,05). Prospective protocol was used in 51 % of children. The reduction in radiation dose was not associated with reduction in diagnostic image quality as assessed by the frequency of coronary segments with excellent or good image quality (88 %). cCT can be obtained at very low radiation doses in children using ASIR, and prospective acquisition with optimized imaging parameters. (orig.)

  3. Measurements of dose distribution in thyroids, gonads, crystalline and other organs, for radio-diagnostics with computorized tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    An evaluation of radiation doses in organs, from radiologic examinations by computorized tomography was done, comparing with theoretic data obtained by Monte Carlo method. The measurements were done with help of a 'Rando Alderson Phantom' exposed to irradiation coming from a 0450 AS and E Pfizer Tomographic. The cases under study were the head and abdomen examinations. The dose assessment was done by using mini TLD's of LiF. The calculated dose equivalents were obtained by using the Monte Carlo method applied to a mathematical antropomorphic phantom, simulating the same experimental arrangements. The results were compared with the experimental one. (E.G.) [pt

  4. TSD-DOSE : a radiological dose assessment model for treatment, storage, and disposal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfingston, M.

    1998-01-01

    In May 1991, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Waste Operations, issued a nationwide moratorium on shipping slightly radioactive mixed waste from DOE facilities to commercial treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. Studies were subsequently conducted to evaluate the radiological impacts associated with DOE's prior shipments through DOE's authorized release process under DOE Order 5400.5. To support this endeavor, a radiological assessment computer code--TSD-DOSE (Version 1.1)--was developed and issued by DOE in 1997. The code was developed on the basis of detailed radiological assessments performed for eight commercial hazardous waste TSD facilities. It was designed to utilize waste-specific and site-specific data to estimate potential radiological doses to on-site workers and the off-site public from waste handling operations at a TSD facility. The code has since been released for use by DOE field offices and was recently used by DOE to evaluate the release of septic waste containing residual radioactive material to a TSD facility licensed under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Revisions to the code were initiated in 1997 to incorporate comments received from users and to increase TSD-DOSE's capability, accuracy, and flexibility. These updates included incorporation of the method used to estimate external radiation doses from DOE's RESRAD model and expansion of the source term to include 85 radionuclides. In addition, a detailed verification and benchmarking analysis was performed

  5. Assessment of body doses from photon exposures using human voxel models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zankl, M.; Fill, U.; Petoussi-Henss, N.; Regulla, D.

    2000-01-01

    For the scope of risk assessment in protection against ionising radiation (occupational, environmental and medical) it is necessary to determine the radiation dose to specific body organs and tissues. For this purpose, a series of models of the human body were designed in the past, together with computer codes simulating the radiation transport and energy deposition in the body. Most of the computational body models in use are so-called mathematical models; the most famous is the MIRD-5 phantom developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In the 1980s, a new generation of human body models was introduced at GSF, constructed from whole body CT data. Due to being constructed from image data of real persons, these 'voxel models' offer an improved realism of external and internal shape of the body and its organs, compared to MIRD-type models. Comparison of dose calculations involving voxel models with respective dose calculations for MIRD-type models revealed that the deviation of the individual anatomy from that described in the MIRD-type models indeed introduces significant deviations of the calculated organ doses. Specific absorbed fractions of energy released in a source organ due to incorporated activity which are absorbed in target organs may differ by more than an order of magnitude between different body models; for external photon irradiation, the discrepancies are more moderate. (author)

  6. Location of radiosensitive organs, measurement of absorbed dose to radiosensitive organs and use of bismuth shields in paediatric anthropomorphic phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inkoom, S.

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate: firstly, (i) location of radiosensitive organs in the interior of four (4) paediatric anthropomorphic phantoms, and, secondly, (ii) effectiveness of single and double bismuth thyroid shields, distance between shield and phantom surface, during paediatric multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) using fixed tube current (FTC) and automatic exposure control (AEC) on dose reduction and image quality. Four (4) paediatric anthropomorphic phantoms representing the equivalent of a newborn, 1-, 5-, and 10-y-old child underwent head, thorax and abdomen computed tomography (CT) scans. CT and magnetic resonance imaging scans of all children aged 0-16 y-old performed during a 5-y-period at the University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete, Greece were reviewed, and five hundred and three (503) were found to be eligible for normal anatomy. Anterior-posterior and lateral dimensions of twelve (12) of the above children closely matched that of the phantoms' thoracic and abdominal region in each four (4) phantoms. The mid-sagittal plane (MSP) and mid-coronal plane (MCP) were drawn on selected matching axial images of patients and phantoms. Multiple points outlining large radiosensitive organs and centres of small organs in patient images were identified at each slice level and their orthogonal distances from the MSP and MCP were measured. The outlines and centres of all radiosensitive organs were reproduced using the coordinates of each organ on the corresponding phantom's transverse images. The four (4) phantoms were also subjected to routine head and neck, neck and thorax CT scans on a 16-slice CT system. Each phantom was first scanned with both FTC and AEC for with and without bismuth shields. Each scan was repeated ten (10) times to increase thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) signal and reduce measurement statistical error. For neck CT, the effect of using single and double thickness of bismuth shields and 1-3 cm cotton spacers

  7. Post-closure radiation dose assessment for Yucca Mountain repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia Mingyan; Zhang Xiabin; Yang Chuncai

    2006-01-01

    A brief introduction of post-closure long-term radiation safety assessment results was represented for the yucca mountain high-level waste geographic disposal repository. In 1 million years after repository closure, for the higher temperature repository operating mode, the peak annual dose would be 150 millirem (120 millirem under the lower-temperature operating mode) to a reasonably maximally exposed individual approximately 18 kilometers (11 miles) from the repository. The analysis of a drilling intrusion event occurring at 30,000 years indicated a peak of the mean annual dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual approximately 18 kilometers (11 miles) downstream of the repository would be 0.002 millirem. The analysis of an igneous activity scenario, including a volcanic eruption event and igneous intrusion event indicated a peak of the mean annual dose to the reasonably maximally exposed individual approximately 18 kilometers downstream of the repository would be 0.1 millirem. (authors)

  8. Assessment of cosmic radiation doses received by air crew

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAulay, I.R.

    1998-01-01

    Cosmic radiation in the atmosphere is such a complex mixture of radiation type that it is difficult to get a single instrument which is suitable for such measurements. Passive devices such as film badges and track etch detectors have also been used, but again present difficulties of interpretation and requirements of multiple devices to accommodate the different types of radiation encountered. In summary, air crew are the occupational group most highly exposed to radiation. The radiation doses experienced by them are sufficiently high as to require assessment on a regular basis and possible control by appropriate rostering. There appears little possibility of the dose limit for workers being exceeded, except possibly in the case of pregnant female crew. This category of air crew should be the subject of special controls aimed at ensuring that the dose limits for the foetus should not be exceeded

  9. Improvement of the following accident dose assessment system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Enn Han; Han, Moon Hee; Suh, Kyung Suk; Hwang, Won Tae; Choi, Young Gil [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-15

    The FADAS has been updates for calculating the real-time wind fields continuously at the nuclear sites in Korea. The system has been constructed to compute the wind fields using its own process for the dummy meteorological data, and dose not effect on the overall wind field module. If the radioactive materials are released into the atmosphere in real situation, the calculations of wind fields and exposure dose in the previous FADAS are performed in the case of the recognition of the above situation in the source term evaluation module. The current version of FADAS includes the program for evaluating the effect of the predicted accident and the assumed scenario together. The dose assessment module is separated into the real-time and the supposed accident respectively.

  10. Development of radiation dose assessment system for radiation accident (RADARAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Shigemori, Yuji; Seki, Akiyuki

    2009-07-01

    The possibility of radiation accident is very rare, but cannot be regarded as zero. Medical treatments are quite essential for a heavily exposed person in an occurrence of a radiation accident. Radiation dose distribution in a human body is useful information to carry out effectively the medical treatments. A radiation transport calculation utilizing the Monte Carlo method has an advantageous in the analysis of radiation dose inside of the body, which cannot be measured. An input file, which describes models for the accident condition and quantities of interest, should be prepared to execute the radiation transport calculation. Since the accident situation, however, cannot be prospected, many complicated procedures are needed to make effectively the input file soon after the occurrence of the accident. In addition, the calculated doses are to be given in output files, which usually include much information concerning the radiation transport calculation. Thus, Radiation Dose Assessment system for Radiation Accident (RADARAC) was developed to derive effectively radiation dose by using the MCNPX or MCNP code. RADARAC mainly consists of two parts. One part is RADARAC - INPUT, which involves three programs. A user can interactively set up necessary resources to make input files for the codes, with graphical user interfaces in a personnel computer. The input file includes information concerning the geometric structure of the radiation source and the exposed person, emission of radiations during the accident, physical quantities of interest and so on. The other part is RADARAC - DOSE, which has one program. The results of radiation doses can be effectively indicated with numerical tables, graphs and color figures visibly depicting dose distribution by using this program. These results are obtained from the outputs of the radiation transport calculations. It is confirmed that the system can effectively make input files with a few thousand lines and indicate more than 20

  11. Dose assessment in patients undergoing lung examinations by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzaga, Natalia B.; Silva, Teogenes A. da; Magalhaes, Marcos J.

    2011-01-01

    In the last fifteen years, the use of computed tomography (CT) has increased alongside other radiology technologies technologies. Its contribution has already achieved 34% in terms of doses undergone by patients. Radiation protection of patients submitted to CT examinations is based on the knowledge of internationally defined dosimetric quantities as the CT air kerma-length product (P K,L ) and weighted CT air kerma index (C w ). In Brazil, those dosimetric quantities are not routinely used and the optimization criteria are based only upon the MSAD - the average dose in multislices. In this work, the dosimetric quantities P K,L and C w were assessed by the CT Expo program for seven protocols used daily for lung examinations in adults with the use of Siemens and Philips scanners in Belo Horizonte. Results showed that P K,L values varied from 163 to 558 mGy.cm and the C w from 9.6 to 17.5 mGy. All results were found to be lower than the reference values internationally recommended by ICRP 87 and the European Community 16262 (30 mGy and 650 mGy.cm). The large dose ranges suggest that optimization of patient dose reduction is still possible without losses in the image quality and new reference dose levels could be recommended after a large survey to be carried out in the region. (author)

  12. Methods of assessing total doses integrated across pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grzechnik, M.; Camplin, W.; Clyne, F.; Allott, R.; Webbe-Wood, D.

    2006-01-01

    Calculated doses for comparison with limits resulting from discharges into the environment should be summed across all relevant pathways and food groups to ensure adequate protection. Current methodology for assessments used in the radioactivity in Food and the Environment (R.I.F.E.) reports separate doses from pathways related to liquid discharges of radioactivity to the environment from those due to gaseous releases. Surveys of local inhabitant food consumption and occupancy rates are conducted in the vicinity of nuclear sites. Information has been recorded in an integrated way, such that the data for each individual is recorded for all pathways of interest. These can include consumption of foods, such as fish, crustaceans, molluscs, fruit and vegetables, milk and meats. Occupancy times over beach sediments and time spent in close proximity to the site is also recorded for inclusion of external and inhalation radiation dose pathways. The integrated habits survey data may be combined with monitored environmental radionuclide concentrations to calculate total dose. The criteria for successful adoption of a method for this calculation were: Reproducibility can others easily use the approach and reassess doses? Rigour and realism how good is the match with reality?Transparency a measure of the ease with which others can understand how the calculations are performed and what they mean. Homogeneity is the group receiving the dose relatively homogeneous with respect to age, diet and those aspects that affect the dose received? Five methods of total dose calculation were compared and ranked according to their suitability. Each method was labelled (A to E) and given a short, relevant name for identification. The methods are described below; A) Individual doses to individuals are calculated and critical group selection is dependent on dose received. B) Individual Plus As in A, but consumption and occupancy rates for high dose is used to derive rates for application in

  13. Evaluation of absorbed dose in organs far from the target volume for different therapies of head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pletsch, Cristiana

    2013-01-01

    Many advances in radiotherapy are the result of innovations in technology and engineering as well as the information technology revolution applied to the treatment planning of patients. The intensity modulated radiation therapy (lMRT) is a sophisticated treatment technique that allows the concentration of the dose prescribed by radiotherapist in tumor volume, while sparing healthy tissues that surround it. However, the disadvantage of the technique is a potential induction of secondary cancers in distant organs related to the target volume due to leakage and scattered radiation, which generate these higher doses to the distant organs when compared to those measured in conventional treatments. These higher doses are is due to the greater use of monitor units and a larger amount of treatment fields. In this study the absorbed dose values in distant organs from the head and neck region were assessed, comparing conventional treatments and treatments using the IMRT techniques. The evaluation was made considering the assessment of dose in radiological significant organs distant from the treatment area. All measurements were performed using the RANDO Alderson anthropomorphic phantom that has internal components equivalent to muscle, bones and lungs and is sliced for placing thermoluminescent detectors in appropriate holes existing in the slices. This phantom, tilled with TLD-100 dosimeters, was submitted to a head and neck treatment with a cobalt-60 irradiator and a Trilogy linear accelerator. Three treatments were carried out with the accelerator, namely a conventional one and two treatments of IMRT with different complexities, all treatments using the 6MV beam. The results show that IMRT techniques generate large doses in distant organs when compared to those generated due to the conventional 6 MV beam treatment. However, these doses are not very different from those measured in the case of 60 Co treatment. (author)

  14. Determination of organ doses during radiological examinations and calculation of somatically significant dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, H.

    1980-01-01

    Examples are used to demonstrate that a shift in the point of emphasis is necessary with regard to radiation hazard in medicinal X-ray diagnosis. The parameters employed in this study to calculate somatic dose (SD) and somatically significant dose (SSD) may well be in need of modification; nevertheless the numerical estimation of SSD arrived at here appears to reflect the right order of magnitude for the estimation of somatic risk. The consideration of the threshold dose for somatic injury remains a problem. (orig./MG) [de

  15. Dose assessment activities in the Republic of the Marshall Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, S L; Graham, J C

    1996-10-01

    Dose assessments, both retrospective and prospective, comprise one important function of a radiological study commissioned by the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) government in late 1989. Estimating past or future exposure requires the synthesis of information from historical data, results from a recently completed field monitoring program, laboratory measurements, and some experimental studies. Most of the activities in the RMI to date have emphasized a pragmatic rather than theoretical approach. In particular, most of the recent effort has been expended on conducting an independent radiological monitoring program to determine the degree of deposition and the geographical extent of weapons test fallout over the nation. Contamination levels on 70% of the land mass of the Marshall Islands were unknown prior to 1994. The environmental radioactivity data play an integral role in both retrospective and prospective assessments. One recent use of dose assessment has been to interpret environmental measurements of radioactivity into annual doses that might be expected at every atoll. A second use for dose assessment has been to determine compliance with a dose action level for the rehabilitation of Rongelap Island. Careful examination of exposure pathways relevant to the island lifestyle has been necessary to accommodate these purposes. Examples of specific issues studied include defining traditional island diets as well as current day variations, sources of drinking water, uses of tropical plants including those consumed for food and for medicinal purposes, the nature and microvariability of plutonium particles in the soil and unusual pathways of exposure, e.g., that which might be associated with cooking and washing outdoors and inadvertent soil ingestion. A study on the prevalence of thyroid disease is also being conducted and the geographic pattern of disease may be useful as a bioindicator of the geographic pattern of exposure to radioiodine. Finally, an

  16. Organ-specific external dose coefficients and protective apron transmission factors for historical dose reconstruction for medical personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Steven L

    2011-07-01

    While radiation absorbed dose (Gy) to the skin or other organs is sometimes estimated for patients from diagnostic radiologic examinations or therapeutic procedures, rarely is occupationally-received radiation absorbed dose to individual organs/tissues estimated for medical personnel; e.g., radiologic technologists or radiologists. Generally, for medical personnel, equivalent or effective radiation doses are estimated for compliance purposes. In the very few cases when organ doses to medical personnel are reconstructed, the data is usually for the purpose of epidemiologic studies; e.g., a study of historical doses and risks to a cohort of about 110,000 radiologic technologists presently underway at the U.S. National Cancer Institute. While ICRP and ICRU have published organ-specific external dose conversion coefficients (DCCs) (i.e., absorbed dose to organs and tissues per unit air kerma and dose equivalent per unit air kerma), those factors have been published primarily for mono-energetic photons at selected energies. This presents two related problems for historical dose reconstruction, both of which are addressed here. It is necessary to derive conversion factor values for (1) continuous distributions of energy typical of diagnostic medical x-rays (bremsstrahlung radiation), and (2) energies of particular radioisotopes used in medical procedures, neither of which are presented in published tables. For derivation of DCCs for bremsstrahlung radiation, combinations of x-ray tube potentials and filtrations were derived for different time periods based on a review of relevant literature. Three peak tube potentials (70 kV, 80 kV, and 90 kV) with four different amounts of beam filtration were determined to be applicable for historic dose reconstruction. The probabilities of these machine settings were assigned to each of the four time periods (earlier than 1949, 1949-1954, 1955-1968, and after 1968). Continuous functions were fit to each set of discrete values of the

  17. Organ doses for reference pediatric and adolescent patients undergoing computed tomography estimated by Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choonsik; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Long, Daniel J.; Bolch, Wesley E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To establish an organ dose database for pediatric and adolescent reference individuals undergoing computed tomography (CT) examinations by using Monte Carlo simulation. The data will permit rapid estimates of organ and effective doses for patients of different age, gender, examination type, and CT scanner model. Methods: The Monte Carlo simulation model of a Siemens Sensation 16 CT scanner previously published was employed as a base CT scanner model. A set of absorbed doses for 33 organs/tissues normalized to the product of 100 mAs and CTDI vol (mGy/100 mAs mGy) was established by coupling the CT scanner model with age-dependent reference pediatric hybrid phantoms. A series of single axial scans from the top of head to the feet of the phantoms was performed at a slice thickness of 10 mm, and at tube potentials of 80, 100, and 120 kVp. Using the established CTDI vol - and 100 mAs-normalized dose matrix, organ doses for different pediatric phantoms undergoing head, chest, abdomen-pelvis, and chest-abdomen-pelvis (CAP) scans with the Siemens Sensation 16 scanner were estimated and analyzed. The results were then compared with the values obtained from three independent published methods: CT-Expo software, organ dose for abdominal CT scan derived empirically from patient abdominal circumference, and effective dose per dose-length product (DLP). Results: Organ and effective doses were calculated and normalized to 100 mAs and CTDI vol for different CT examinations. At the same technical setting, dose to the organs, which were entirely included in the CT beam coverage, were higher by from 40 to 80% for newborn phantoms compared to those of 15-year phantoms. An increase of tube potential from 80 to 120 kVp resulted in 2.5-2.9-fold greater brain dose for head scans. The results from this study were compared with three different published studies and/or techniques. First, organ doses were compared to those given by CT-Expo which revealed dose differences up to

  18. The feasibility assessment of radiation dose of movement 3D NIPAM gel by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Chih-Ming; Leung, Joseph Hang; Ng, Yu-Bun; Cheng, Chih-Wu; Sun, Jung-Chang; Lin, Ping-Chin; Hsieh, Bor-Tsung

    2015-01-01

    NIPAM dosimeter is widely accepted and recommended for its 3D distribution and accuracy in dose absorption. Up to the moment, most research works on dose measurement are based on a fixed irradiation target without the consideration of the effect from physiological motion. We present a study to construct a respiratory motion simulating patient anatomical and dosimetry model for the study of dosimetic effect of organ motion. The dose on fixed and motion targets was measured by MRI after a dose adminstration of 1, 2, 5, 8, and 10 Gy from linear accelerator. Comparison of two situations is made. The average sensitivity of fixed NIPAM was 0.1356 s −1 /Gy with linearity R 2 =0.998. The average sensitivity of movement NIPAM was 0.1366 s −1 /Gy with linearity R 2 =0.998 both having only 0.001 of the sensitivity difference. The difference between the two based on dose rate dependency, position and depth was not significant. There was thus no apparent impact on NIPAM dosimeter from physiological motion. The high sensitivity, linearity and stability of NIPAM dosimeter proved to be an ideal apparatus in the dose measurement in these circumstances. - Highlights: • Feasibility assessment of a dynamic 3D NIPAM gel dosimeter. • MRI to evaluate NIPAM dosimeter and compared its static and dynamic irradiation. • NIPAM dosimeter could be used to simulate organ movements in the future.

  19. Equine scintigraphy: assessment of the dose received by the personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clairand, I.; Bottollier, J.F.; Trompier, F.

    2003-01-01

    Following a request from the Permanent Secretary of the French Commission for Artificial Radioelements (CIREA) engaged to investigate a request for a licence related to a new scintigraphy unit dedicated to equidae, a dosimetric assessment concerning the personnel attending the examination was carried out. This scintigraphy unit depends on the Goustranville Centre for Imaging and Research on the Locomotive Diseases of Equidae (CIRALE) in the Calvados region. The dosimetric assessment was carried out for the different operators during the successive stages of the scintigraphic examination. Assuming 150 examinations per year, the annual equivalent dose to the fingers skin is 150 mSv maximum for the technologist and 2 mSv for the veterinary surgeon; the annual effective dose ranges from 0.15 to 0.45 mSv, depending on the operators. (authors)

  20. Biological dosimetry: chromosomal aberration analysis for dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In view of the growing importance of chromosomal aberration analysis as a biological dosimeter, the present report provides a concise summary of the scientific background of the subject and a comprehensive source of information at the technical level. After a review of the basic principles of radiation dosimetry and radiation biology basic information on the biology of lymphocytes, the structure of chromosomes and the classification of chromosomal aberrations are presented. This is followed by a presentation of techniques for collecting blood, storing, transporting, culturing, making chromosomal preparations and scaring of aberrations. The physical and statistical parameters involved in dose assessment are discussed and examples of actual dose assessments taken from the scientific literature are given

  1. Skin dose assessment in routine personnel beta/gamma dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, P.

    1980-01-01

    Three alternative methods are outlined by which substantial improvements of the capabilities of existing routine monitoring systems for skin dose assessment can be obtained. The introduction of a supplementary skin dosemeter may be an attractive method for systems with badges that have a capability for an additional dosemeter already built-in. The two-side reading method has limited possibilities because of reduced accuracy for mixed radiation and technical difficulties in using it for TLD systems with planchet heating. The use of a boron diffused LiF layer for skin dose assessment seems to be most attractive method since the only modification needed here is replacement of a dosemeter. However the study of this method is so far only in a preliminary stage and further investigations are needed. (U.K.)

  2. JADA: a graphical user interface for comprehensive internal dose assessment in nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Joshua; Uribe, Carlos; Celler, Anna

    2013-07-01

    The main objective of this work was to design a comprehensive dosimetry package that would keep all aspects of internal dose calculation within the framework of a single software environment and that would be applicable for a variety of dose calculation approaches. Our MATLAB-based graphical user interface (GUI) can be used for processing data obtained using pure planar, pure SPECT, or hybrid planar/SPECT imaging. Time-activity data for source regions are obtained using a set of tools that allow the user to reconstruct SPECT images, load images, coregister a series of planar images, and to perform two-dimensional and three-dimensional image segmentation. Curve fits are applied to the acquired time-activity data to construct time-activity curves, which are then integrated to obtain time-integrated activity coefficients. Subsequently, dose estimates are made using one of three methods. The organ level dose calculation subGUI calculates mean organ doses that are equivalent to dose assessment performed by OLINDA/EXM. Voxelized dose calculation options, which include the voxel S value approach and Monte Carlo simulation using the EGSnrc user code DOSXYZnrc, are available within the process 3D image data subGUI. The developed internal dosimetry software package provides an assortment of tools for every step in the dose calculation process, eliminating the need for manual data transfer between programs. This saves times and minimizes user errors, while offering a versatility that can be used to efficiently perform patient-specific internal dose calculations in a variety of clinical situations.

  3. Measuring the absorbed dose in critical organs during low rate dose brachytherapy with 137 Cs using thermoluminescent dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, A.; Gonzalez, P.R.; Furetta, C.; Azorin, J.; Andres, U.; Mendez, G.

    2003-01-01

    Intracavitary Brachytherapy is one of the most used methods for the treatment of the cervical-uterine cancer. This treatment consists in the insertion of low rate dose 137 Cs sources into the patient. The most used system for the treatment dose planning is that of Manchester. This planning is based on sources, which are considered fixed during the treatment. However, the experience has shown that, during the treatment, the sources could be displaced from its initial position, changing the dose from that previously prescribed. For this reason, it is necessary to make measurements of the absorbed dose to the surrounding organs (mainly bladder and rectum). This paper presents the results of measuring the absorbed dose using home-made LiF: Mg, Cu, P + Ptfe thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). Measurements were carried out in-vivo during 20 minutes at the beginning and at the end of the treatments. Results showed that the absorbed dose to the critical organs vary significantly due to the movement of the patient during the treatment. (Author)

  4. Assessment of dose measurement uncertainty using RisoScan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helt-Hansen, Jakob; Miller, Arne

    2006-01-01

    The dose measurement uncertainty of the dosimeter system RisoScan, office scanner and Riso B3 dosimeters has been assessed by comparison with spectrophotometer measurements of the same dosimeters. The reproducibility and the combined uncertainty were found to be approximately 2% and 4%, respectively, at one standard deviation. The subroutine in RisoScan for electron energy measurement is shown to give results that are equivalent to the measurements with a scanning spectrophotometer

  5. Assessment of dose measurement uncertainty using RisøScan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helt-Hansen, J.; Miller, A.

    2006-01-01

    The dose measurement uncertainty of the dosimeter system RisoScan, office scanner and Riso B3 dosimeters has been assessed by comparison with spectrophotometer measurements of the same dosimeters. The reproducibility and the combined uncertainty were found to be approximately 2% and 4%, respectiv......%, respectively, at one standard deviation. The subroutine in RisoScan for electron energy measurement is shown to give results that are equivalent to the measurements with a scanning spectrophotometer. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  6. Radiological environmental dose assessment methods and compliance dose results for 2015 operations at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jannik, G. T.; Dixon, K. L.

    2016-01-01

    This report presents the environmental dose assessment methods and the estimated potential doses to the offsite public from 2015 Savannah River Site (SRS) atmospheric and liquid radioactive releases. Also documented are potential doses from special-case exposure scenarios - such as the consumption of deer meat, fish, and goat milk.

  7. Radiological environmental dose assessment methods and compliance dose results for 2015 operations at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannik, G. T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Dixon, K. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-01

    This report presents the environmental dose assessment methods and the estimated potential doses to the offsite public from 2015 Savannah River Site (SRS) atmospheric and liquid radioactive releases. Also documented are potential doses from special-case exposure scenarios - such as the consumption of deer meat, fish, and goat milk.

  8. Cone beam computed tomography radiation dose and image quality assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofthag-Hansen, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Diagnostic radiology has undergone profound changes in the last 30 years. New technologies are available to the dental field, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) as one of the most important. CBCT is a catch-all term for a technology comprising a variety of machines differing in many respects: patient positioning, volume size (FOV), radiation quality, image capturing and reconstruction, image resolution and radiation dose. When new technology is introduced one must make sure that diagnostic accuracy is better or at least as good as the one it can be expected to replace. The CBCT brand tested was two versions of Accuitomo (Morita, Japan): 3D Accuitomo with an image intensifier as detector, FOV 3 cm x 4 cm and 3D Accuitomo FPD with a flat panel detector, FOVs 4 cm x 4 cm and 6 cm x 6 cm. The 3D Accuitomo was compared with intra-oral radiography for endodontic diagnosis in 35 patients with 46 teeth analyzed, of which 41 were endodontically treated. Three observers assessed the images by consensus. The result showed that CBCT imaging was superior with a higher number of teeth diagnosed with periapical lesions (42 vs 32 teeth). When evaluating 3D Accuitomo examinations in the posterior mandible in 30 patients, visibility of marginal bone crest and mandibular canal, important anatomic structures for implant planning, was high with good observer agreement among seven observers. Radiographic techniques have to be evaluated concerning radiation dose, which requires well-defined and easy-to-use methods. Two methods: CT dose index (CTDI), prevailing method for CT units, and dose-area product (DAP) were evaluated for calculating effective dose (E) for both units. An asymmetric dose distribution was revealed when a clinical situation was simulated. Hence, the CTDI method was not applicable for these units with small FOVs. Based on DAP values from 90 patient examinations effective dose was estimated for three diagnostic tasks: implant planning in posterior mandible and

  9. An airborne dispersion/dose assessment computer program. Phase 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, C.K.; Kennedy, E.R.; Hughs, R.

    1991-05-01

    The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) staff have a need for an airborne dispersion-dose assessment computer programme for a microcomputer. The programme must be capable of analyzing the dispersion of both radioactive and non-radioactive materials. A further requirement of the programme is that it be implemented on the AECB complex of microcomputers and that it have an advanced graphical user interface. A survey of computer programs was conducted to determine which, if any, could meet the AECB's requirements in whole or in part. Ten programmes were selected for detailed review including programs for nuclear and non-radiological emergencies. None of the available programmes for radiation dose assessment meets all the requirements for reasons of user interaction, method of source term estimation or site specificity. It is concluded that the best option for meeting the AECB requirements is to adopt the CAMEO programme (specifically the ALOHA portion) which has a superior graphical user interface and add the necessary models for radiation dose assessment

  10. Assessment and recording of radiation doses to workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The assessment and recording of the radiation exposure of workers in activities involving radiation risks are required for demonstrating compliance with institutional dose limitations and for a number of other complementary purposes. A significant proportion of the labor force involved in radiation work is currently represented by those specialised workers who operate as itinerant contractors for different nuclear installations and in different countries. In order to ensure that the exposure of these workers is adequately and consistently controlled and kept within acceptable limits, there is a need for the criteria and methods for dose assessment and recording to be harmonised throughout the different countries. An attempt in that direction has been made in this report, which has been prepared by a group of experts convened by the Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. Its primary purpose is to describe recommended technical procedures for an unified approach to the assessment and recording of worker doses. The report is published under the responsibility of the Secretary-General of the OECD, and does not commit Member governments

  11. Initial growth of physic nut as a function of sources and doses of organic fertilizers

    OpenAIRE

    Schulz,Deisinara Giane; Fey,Rubens; Ruppenthal,Viviane; Malavasi,Marlene de Matos; Malavasi,Ubirajara Contro

    2012-01-01

    Organic fertilization provides low cost, supplemental nutrition for plant production. This study aimed to determine the best source and dose of organic fertilizer on the growth of physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.), a potential biodiesel producer. Physic nut seedlings were transplanted to 18 dm³ black plastic pots filled with soil mixed with four sources of organic fertilizer (chicken, fish, cattle manure or urban waste compost) at four dose levels (50, 100, 200 or 400 L m-3). Fertilized and con...

  12. Assessment of dose in cervical vertebrae radiographic examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owrnasir, Wafa Fadol Orsud

    2014-12-01

    Reference dose levels provide a framework to reduce doses variability and aid in the optimization of radiation protection.This study was performed in Khartoum Teaching Hospital in period of January to June 2014. This study performed to assess the entrance surface dose ( ESD) received in Cervical Vertebrae radiographic examination and to analyze effective dose distributions among radiological departments under study. The study was performed in Khartoum Teaching Hospital, covering two x-ray units and a sample of 64 patients. The following parameter were recorded; age, weight, height, body mass index (BMI) derived from weight (kg) and height (m) and exposure factors. The dose was measured for Cervical Vertebrae x-ray examinations, the entrance surface dose (ESD) values were estimated from the x-ray tube output parameters for Cervical Vertebrae AP and lateral examinations. The ESD values were then calculated using IAEA calculation methods. The results of ESD values calculated showed than patient exposure were within the normal range of exposure. The mean ED values calculated were ( 3.85 ±0.04) and (4.02 ±0.05) mGy for Cervical Vertebrae AP and lateral examinations, respectively in department Na1 and (3.99± 0.15) and (4.23± 0.34) mGy, for Cervical Vertebrae Ap and lateral examinations respectively in department Na2, the IAEA standard value of ESD for cervical equal (7), (20) mGy AP and LAT, Further studies are recommended with more number of patients and using more than two modalities for comparison. (Author)

  13. Experimental validation of Monte Carlo calculations for organ dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yalcintas, M.G.; Eckerman, K.F.; Warner, G.G.

    1980-01-01

    The problem of validating estimates of absorbed dose due to photon energy deposition is examined. The computational approaches used for the estimation of the photon energy deposition is examined. The limited data for validation of these approaches is discussed and suggestions made as to how better validation information might be obtained

  14. Comparison of organ doses in human phantoms: variations due to body size and posture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Xu; Xiang-Hong, Jia; Xue-Jun, Yu; Zhan-Chun, Pan; Qian, Liu; Chun-Xin, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Organ dose calculations performed using human phantoms can provide estimates of astronauts' health risks due to cosmic radiation. However, the characteristics of such phantoms strongly affect the estimation precision. To investigate organ dose variations with body size and posture in human phantoms, a non-uniform rational B-spline boundary surfaces model was constructed based on cryo-section images. This model was used to establish four phantoms with different body size and posture parameters, whose organs parameters were changed simultaneously and which were voxelised with 4x4x4 mm"3 resolution. Then, using Monte Carlo transport code, the organ doses caused by ≤500 MeV isotropic incident protons were calculated. The dose variations due to body size differences within a certain range were negligible, and the doses received in crouching and standing-up postures were similar. Therefore, a standard Chinese phantom could be established, and posture changes cannot effectively protect astronauts during solar particle events. (authors)

  15. Prospective estimation of organ dose in CT under tube current modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Xiaoyu; Li, Xiang; Segars, W. Paul; Frush, Donald P.; Samei, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) has been widely used worldwide as a tool for medical diagnosis and imaging. However, despite its significant clinical benefits, CT radiation dose at the population level has become a subject of public attention and concern. In this light, optimizing radiation dose has become a core responsibility for the CT community. As a fundamental step to manage and optimize dose, it may be beneficial to have accurate and prospective knowledge about the radiation dose for an individual patient. In this study, the authors developed a framework to prospectively estimate organ dose for chest and abdominopelvic CT exams under tube current modulation (TCM). Methods: The organ dose is mainly dependent on two key factors: patient anatomy and irradiation field. A prediction process was developed to accurately model both factors. To model the anatomical diversity and complexity in the patient population, the authors used a previously developed library of computational phantoms with broad distributions of sizes, ages, and genders. A selected clinical patient, represented by a computational phantom in the study, was optimally matched with another computational phantom in the library to obtain a representation of the patient’s anatomy. To model the irradiation field, a previously validated Monte Carlo program was used to model CT scanner systems. The tube current profiles were modeled using a ray-tracing program as previously reported that theoretically emulated the variability of modulation profiles from major CT machine manufacturers Li et al., [Phys. Med. Biol. 59, 4525–4548 (2014)]. The prediction of organ dose was achieved using the following process: (1) CTDI vol -normalized-organ dose coefficients (h organ ) for fixed tube current were first estimated as the prediction basis for the computational phantoms; (2) each computation phantom, regarded as a clinical patient, was optimally matched with one computational phantom in the library; (3) to

  16. Radiation dose in critical organs due to non-coplanar irradiation of the pituitary gland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, R.W.M.; Rittmann, K.L.; Meinass, H.J.; Rennicke, P.

    1996-01-01

    In order to estimate the somatic and genetic risk associated with a non-coplanar linac-based radiation technique of the pituitary gland, systematic secondary-dose measurements in a phantom and sample measurements of the dose near critical organs of patients were performed. For measurements of the dose outside the primary radiation field an acrylic-PVC phantom was used which was irradiated with a single field (4x4 cm 2 ). Eight patients with pituitary tumors were treated isocentrically with a combination of sagittal and transverse rotational arcs. To measure the dose in critical organs, LiF thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) in chip form were placed onto 1 eyelid, the skin over the thyroid, and the patient's clothes covering the region of breasts and ovaries of female patients and the testicles of male patients. Measurements were performed for all patients during 1 sagittal irradiation and for the majority of patients during 1 transverse irradiation. The phantom measurements demonstrated that the secondary dose measured on the patients surface can be considered as a good approximation for the dose in adjacent organs. The median dose in critical organs for sagittal irradiation was in the range of 25.8 mGy (eyes) to 1.9 mGy (testicles), and for transverse irradiation in the range of 23.3 mGy (eyes) to 1.3 mGy (testicles). The ratio of median organ doses for sagittal and transverse irradiation was 2.1 for the thyroid gland, 1.1 for the eyes, and 1.5 for the other organs. The dose in critical organs due to non-coplanar irradiation of the pituitary gland is only a small fraction of the dose delivered to the reference point of the planning target volume. The risk of a radiation-induced tumor and a genetic consequence associated with these small doses is generally less than 1% and 0.1%, respectively. (orig./MG) [de

  17. Proposal of a dosemeter for skin beta radiation dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, L.A.R. da; Caldas, L.V.E.

    1987-08-01

    Beta radiation is, undoubtedly, less penetrating than X or gamma radiation. Thus, beta radiation sources external to the human body do not cause a significant irradiation of its deeper tissues. However, in some cases, they may contribute in a very important way to the irradiation of the lens of the eyes and, mainly, of the skin. Specially, the hands and finger tips may receive a high dose. In this work some relevant aspects of the individual monitoring in beta radiation fields are discussed and the importance of monitoring this kind of radiation in some activities where the skin absorbed dose may be a limiting factor is evidenced. The main characteristics of the thermoluminescent (TL) response of ultra-thin CaSO 4 : Dy detectors (UT-CaSO 4 : Dy) in the detection of this kind of radiation are also studied. The irradiation are performed with 90 Sr 90 Y, 204 TI and 147 Pm sources. The reproducibility, linearity, dependence on the absorbed dose rate, optical fading, energy and angular dependences of the detector TL responce are investigated. Transmission factors for different thicknesses of tissue equivalent material are obtained for the TL detectors using the three available beta sources. Based on the results obtained, a dosemeter for skin beta radiation absorbed dose assessment with an energy dependence better than 12% is proposed. (Author) [pt

  18. Tomographic anthropomorphic models. Pt. 2. Organ doses from computed tomographic examinations in paediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zankl, M.; Panzer, W.; Drexler, G.

    1993-11-01

    This report provides a catalogue of organ dose conversion factors resulting from computed tomographic (CT) examinations of children. Two radiation qualities and two exposure geometries were simulated as well as the use of asymmetrical beams. The use of further beam shaping devices was not considered. The organ dose conversion factors are applicable to babies at the age of ca. 2 months and to children between 5 and 7 years but can be used for other ages as well with the appropriate adjustments. For the calculations, the patients were represented by the GSF tomographic anthropomorphic models BABY and CHILD. The radiation transport in the body was simulated using a Monte Carlo method. The doses are presented as conversion factors of mean organ doses per air kerma free in air on the axis of rotation. Mean organ dose conversion factors are given per organ and per scanned body section of 1 cm height. The mean dose to an organ resulting from a particular CT examination can be estimated by summing up the contributions to the organ dose from all relevant sections. To facilitate the selection of the appropriate sections, a table is given which relates the tomographic models' coordinates to certain anatomical landmarks in the human body. (orig.)

  19. Evaluation of planning dose accuracy in case of radiation treatment on inhomogeneous organ structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chan Yong; Lee, Jae Hee; Kwak, Yong Kook; Ha, Min Yong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    We are to find out the difference of calculated dose of treatment planning system (TPS) and measured dose in case of inhomogeneous organ structure. Inhomogeneous phantom is made with solid water phantom and cork plate. CT image of inhomogeneous phantom is acquired. Treatment plan is made with TPS (Pinnacle3 9.2. Royal Philips Electronics, Netherlands) and calculated dose of point of interest is acquired. Treatment plan was delivered in the inhomogeneous phantom by ARTISTE (Siemens AG, Germany) measured dose of each point of interest is obtained with Gafchromic EBT2 film (International Specialty Products, US) in the gap between solid water phantom or cork plate. To simulate lung cancer radiation treatment, artificial tumor target of paraffin is inserted in the cork volume of inhomogeneous phantom. Calculated dose and measured dose are acquired as above. In case of inhomogeneous phantom experiment, dose difference of calculated dose and measured dose is about -8.5% at solid water phantom-cork gap and about -7% lower in measured dose at cork-solid water phantom gap. In case of inhomogeneous phantom inserted paraffin target experiment, dose difference is about 5% lower in measured dose at cork-paraffin gap. There is no significant difference at same material gap in both experiments. Radiation dose at the gap between two organs with different electron density is significantly lower than calculated dose with TPS. Therefore, we must be aware of dose calculation error in TPS and great care is suggested in case of radiation treatment planning on inhomogeneous organ structure.

  20. Evaluation of planning dose accuracy in case of radiation treatment on inhomogeneous organ structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chan Yong; Lee, Jae Hee; Kwak, Yong Kook; Ha, Min Yong

    2013-01-01

    We are to find out the difference of calculated dose of treatment planning system (TPS) and measured dose in case of inhomogeneous organ structure. Inhomogeneous phantom is made with solid water phantom and cork plate. CT image of inhomogeneous phantom is acquired. Treatment plan is made with TPS (Pinnacle3 9.2. Royal Philips Electronics, Netherlands) and calculated dose of point of interest is acquired. Treatment plan was delivered in the inhomogeneous phantom by ARTISTE (Siemens AG, Germany) measured dose of each point of interest is obtained with Gafchromic EBT2 film (International Specialty Products, US) in the gap between solid water phantom or cork plate. To simulate lung cancer radiation treatment, artificial tumor target of paraffin is inserted in the cork volume of inhomogeneous phantom. Calculated dose and measured dose are acquired as above. In case of inhomogeneous phantom experiment, dose difference of calculated dose and measured dose is about -8.5% at solid water phantom-cork gap and about -7% lower in measured dose at cork-solid water phantom gap. In case of inhomogeneous phantom inserted paraffin target experiment, dose difference is about 5% lower in measured dose at cork-paraffin gap. There is no significant difference at same material gap in both experiments. Radiation dose at the gap between two organs with different electron density is significantly lower than calculated dose with TPS. Therefore, we must be aware of dose calculation error in TPS and great care is suggested in case of radiation treatment planning on inhomogeneous organ structure

  1. A comparison of newborn stylized and tomographic models for dose assessment in paediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staton, R J; Pazik, F D; Nipper, J C; Williams, J L; Bolch, W E

    2003-01-01

    Establishment of organ doses from diagnostic and interventional examinations is a key component to quantifying the radiation risks from medical exposures and for formulating corresponding dose-reduction strategies. Radiation transport models of human anatomy provide a convenient method for simulating radiological examinations. At present, two classes of models exist: stylized mathematical models and tomographic voxel models. In the present study, organ dose comparisons are made for projection radiographs of both a stylized and a tomographic model of the newborn patient. Sixteen separate radiographs were simulated for each model at x-ray technique factors typical of newborn examinations: chest, abdomen, thorax and head views in the AP, PA, left LAT and right LAT projection orientation. For AP and PA radiographs of the torso (chest, abdomen and thorax views), the effective dose assessed for the tomographic model exceeds that for the stylized model with per cent differences ranging from 19% (AP abdominal view) to 43% AP chest view. In contrast, the effective dose for the stylized model exceeds that for the tomographic model for all eight lateral views including those of the head, with per cent differences ranging from 9% (LLAT chest view) to 51% (RLAT thorax view). While organ positioning differences do exist between the models, a major factor contributing to differences in effective dose is the models' exterior trunk shape. In the tomographic model, a more elliptical shape is seen thus providing for less tissue shielding for internal organs in the AP and PA directions, with corresponding increased tissue shielding in the lateral directions. This observation is opposite of that seen in comparisons of stylized and tomographic models of the adult

  2. Dose assessment in environmental radiological protection: State of the art and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Karolina; Goméz-Ros, José M; Vives I Batlle, Jordi; Lindbo Hansen, Elisabeth; Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine; Kapustka, Lawrence A; Wood, Michael D; Bradshaw, Clare; Real, Almudena; McGuire, Corynne; Hinton, Thomas G

    2017-09-01

    Exposure to radiation is a potential hazard to humans and the environment. The Fukushima accident reminded the world of the importance of a reliable risk management system that incorporates the dose received from radiation exposures. The dose to humans from exposure to radiation can be quantified using a well-defined system; its environmental equivalent, however, is still in a developmental state. Additionally, the results of several papers published over the last decade have been criticized because of poor dosimetry. Therefore, a workshop on environmental dosimetry was organized by the STAR (Strategy for Allied Radioecology) Network of Excellence to review the state of the art in environmental dosimetry and prioritize areas of methodological and guidance development. Herein, we report the key findings from that international workshop, summarise parameters that affect the dose animals and plants receive when exposed to radiation, and identify further research needs. Current dosimetry practices for determining environmental protection are based on simple screening dose assessments using knowledge of fundamental radiation physics, source-target geometry relationships, the influence of organism shape and size, and knowledge of how radionuclide distributions in the body and in the soil profile alter dose. In screening model calculations that estimate whole-body dose to biota the shapes of organisms are simply represented as ellipsoids, while recently developed complex voxel phantom models allow organ-specific dose estimates. We identified several research and guidance development priorities for dosimetry. For external exposures, the uncertainty in dose estimates due to spatially heterogeneous distributions of radionuclide contamination is currently being evaluated. Guidance is needed on the level of dosimetry that is required when screening benchmarks are exceeded and how to report exposure in dose-effect studies, including quantification of uncertainties. Further

  3. Present dose limits and their relation to radiosensitivity of different organs and tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1987-01-01

    Dose equivalent limits in relation to dose thresholds are considered for injury of various tissues and organs to evaluate the protection agains non-stochastic irradiation effects by the existing system of dose limitation for radiotherapeutic personnel. Data on tissue radiosensitivity in relation to non-stochastic effects, obtained from radiotherapeutic experience, are presented. Dose threshold values, derived for patients, with a correction in the direction of increase, may be applied to conditions of occupational exposure except for bone marrow, gonads and eye lens, where threshold doses are lower

  4. Evaluation of dose delivered to critical organs during pituitary radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awoda, Marwa Elrashied Mohammed

    2017-12-01

    The selection of an appropriate energy in radiation therapy for tumor and the delivery adequate dose to the tumors to be treated, is very important during the radiation treatment planning. Also the dose received to critical organs surrounding the tumor has be considered. In addition, validation of treatment plan quality is important, so the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of teletherapy cobalt and 6MV linac energies on dose distribution for the pituitary gland tumors and dose delivered to critical organs surrounding the tumor. 10 patients with pituitary adenocarcinomas were selected. For treatment plans with three field technique, verdes and two lateral fields, were used. For the therapeutic area, five organs left and right eye lens left and right optic never and chasms and brain stem, were considered as Organ at risk (OARS). Several physical indices for for planning target volume (PTV) and the organs at risk 9 (OARS) as means dose (MD). 95%, dose (D950), 5% dose (D5) and normal tissue dose (NTID), were calculated, and the homogeneity index and conformity index were also two other evaluation parameters have been taken into account. The comparative evaluation was based on dose volume histogram ( DVH) analysis for both energies plans. After performing the treatment planning with two different energies the dose received to critical organs and dose distribution in PTV were studied. Results showed that the difference between the integral dose received to OARs with Co-60 and 6-MV linac respectively, 2.16±1.48, 1.85±1.55 for Lt eye lens. 3.01±2.52, 1.89±2.09 for Rt eye lens, 18.5±10.97, 19.43±10.65 for Lt optic nerve and chasms, 15.86±11.30, 17.44±15.73 for Rt optic nerve and chasms and 24.03±13.68, 23.77±16.64 for Brain stem case showed higher integral dose for linac than Co-60 than due to using the 6-MV energy as an open field with no beam modifiers such MLCs or shielding blocks. Eventually, it found that using of 6-MV linac provides better

  5. Assessment of CT dose to the fetus and pregnant female patient using patient-specific computational models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Tianwu; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Platon, Alexandra

    2018-01-01

    of pregnant patients and the embedded foetus, we developed a methodology for construction of patient-specific voxel-based computational phantoms based on existing standardised hybrid computational pregnant female phantoms. We estimated the maternal absorbed dose and foetal organ dose for 30 pregnant patients...... for assessment of the radiation risks to pregnant patients and the foetus from various CT scanning protocols, thus guiding the decision-making process. KEY POINTS: • In CT examinations, the absorbed dose is non-uniformly distributed within foetal organs. • This work reports, for the first time, estimates...

  6. Screening level dose assessment of aquatic biota downstream of the Marcoule nuclear complex in southern France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Pierre, S; Chambers, D B; Lowe, L M; Bontoux, J G

    1999-09-01

    Aquatic biota in the Rhone River downstream of the Marcoule nuclear complex in France are exposed to natural sources of radiation and to radioactivity released from the Marcoule complex. A simple conservative screening level model was used to estimate the range of concentrations in aquatic media (water, sediments, and aquatic organisms) of both artificial and natural radionuclides and the consequent absorbed (whole body) dose rates for aquatic organisms. Five categories of aquatic organisms were studied, namely, submerged aquatic plants (phanerogam), non-bottom-feeding fish, bottom-feeding fish, mollusca, and fish-eating birds. The analysis was based on the radionuclide concentrations reported in four consecutive annual radioecological monitoring reports published by French agencies with nuclear regulatory responsibilities. The results of this assessment were used to determine, qualitatively, the magnitude of any potential health impacts on each of the five categories of aquatic organisms studied. The range of dose rate estimates ranged over three orders of magnitude, with maximum dose rates estimated to be in the order of 1 to 10 microGy h(-1). These maximum dose rates are a factor 40 or more below the international guideline intended to ensure the protection of aquatic populations (about 400 microGy h(-1)), and a factor ten or more below the level which may trigger the need for a more detailed evaluation of potential ecological consequences to the exposed populations (about 100 microGy h(-1)). As a result, chronic levels of radioactivity, artificial and natural, measured in aquatic media downstream of Marcoule are unlikely to result in adverse health impacts on the categories and species of aquatic organisms studied. Thus, based on the screening level analysis discussed in this paper, a more detailed evaluation of the dose rates does not appear to be warranted.

  7. Average dose to an organ per microcurie-day accumulated by a radionuclide in a source organ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, W.S.; Ford, M.R.

    1975-01-01

    Methods are discussed that are used in calculations of the average radiation dose to an organ per microcurie/day accumulated by a radionuclide in a source organ. The dosimetric data on photons are obtained by Monte Carlo type computer calculations on a non-homogeneous phantom having the general form of the human body. (U.S.)

  8. A phantom for assessing the personal dose equivalent, HP(10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santoro, C.; Filho, J.A

    2013-01-01

    Characteristics of a phantom designed to evaluate the personal dose equivalent, H P (10), and appropriate for photographic dosimetry are presented. It is called HP(10) phantom due to cavities constructed to insert dosimetric films at a depth of 10 mm. The H P (10) phantom is irradiated with ionizing radiation energy, E, from 45 to 1250 keV, with doses ranging from 0.2 to 50 mSv. It is positioned in the direction α = 0 °, and the radiation field focusing perpendicular to its front surface. So, are established calibration curves of dosimeters in the position conventionally true and quantities H P (10). It made a comparison between the responses obtained with the H P (10) phantom and responses obtained when using the calibration procedure recommended by ISO dosimeters. The ISO recommends getting the air kerma, Ka, for photons at test point of the radiation field by an ionization chamber. And through conversion coefficients, h pK (10; E, α), becomes the air kerma for H P (10). The ISO 4037-3 recommendation has been studied by researchers to ensure that the low energy spectral differences occur in radiation fields which are generated by various X-ray equipment, and induce changes in the percentages of conversion coefficients on the order of 10% to 90% . On the basis of the recommendations ISO, this article develops phantom able to assess the dose to the influence of scattering and absorption of radiation, its implications with respect to dosimetry, providing improvement in the assessment of doses. (author)

  9. Smartphone apps for calculating insulin dose: a systematic assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huckvale, Kit; Adomaviciute, Samanta; Prieto, José Tomás; Leow, Melvin Khee-Shing; Car, Josip

    2015-05-06

    Medical apps are widely available, increasingly used by patients and clinicians, and are being actively promoted for use in routine care. However, there is little systematic evidence exploring possible risks associated with apps intended for patient use. Because self-medication errors are a recognized source of avoidable harm, apps that affect medication use, such as dose calculators, deserve particular scrutiny. We explored the accuracy and clinical suitability of apps for calculating medication doses, focusing on insulin calculators for patients with diabetes as a representative use for a prevalent long-term condition. We performed a systematic assessment of all English-language rapid/short-acting insulin dose calculators available for iOS and Android. Searches identified 46 calculators that performed simple mathematical operations using planned carbohydrate intake and measured blood glucose. While 59% (n = 27/46) of apps included a clinical disclaimer, only 30% (n = 14/46) documented the calculation formula. 91% (n = 42/46) lacked numeric input validation, 59% (n = 27/46) allowed calculation when one or more values were missing, 48% (n = 22/46) used ambiguous terminology, 9% (n = 4/46) did not use adequate numeric precision and 4% (n = 2/46) did not store parameters faithfully. 67% (n = 31/46) of apps carried a risk of inappropriate output dose recommendation that either violated basic clinical assumptions (48%, n = 22/46) or did not match a stated formula (14%, n = 3/21) or correctly update in response to changing user inputs (37%, n = 17/46). Only one app, for iOS, was issue-free according to our criteria. No significant differences were observed in issue prevalence by payment model or platform. The majority of insulin dose calculator apps provide no protection against, and may actively contribute to, incorrect or inappropriate dose recommendations that put current users at risk of both catastrophic overdose and more

  10. ARAC: A flexible real-time dose consequence assessment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, J.S.; Sullivan, T.J.

    1993-01-01

    Since its beginning, the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC), an emergency radiological dose assessment service of the US Government, has been called on to do consequence assessments for releases into the atmosphere of radionuclides and a variety of other substances. Some of the more noteworthy emergency responses have been for the Three Mile Island and Chernobyl nuclear power reactor accidents, and more recently, for a cloud of gases from a rail-car spill into the Sacramento river of the herbicide metam sodium, smoke from hundreds of burning oil wells in Kuwait, and ash clouds from the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo. The spatial scales of these responses range from local, to regional, to global, and the response periods from hours, to weeks, to months. Because of the variety of requirements of each unique assessment, ARAC has developed and maintains a flexible system of people, computer software and hardware

  11. Assessment of individual doses and intervention planning at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, M.; Forkel-Wirth, D.; Gaborit, J.C.; Menzel, H.; Roesler, S.

    2006-01-01

    Founded in 1954, CERN is the European Organization for Nuclear Research, one of the world's largest international particle physics centres. It sits astride the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is currently being installed in a 27-kilometer ring tunnel, buried deep below the countryside on the outskirts of Geneva, Switzerland and the Pays de Gex, France. When its operation begins in 2007, the LHC will be the world's most power particle accelerator. The start-up and the operation of the LHC will mark a new era for CERN's operational radiation protection. The total surface of CERN's radiation areas will enlarge significantly and a large number of work places have to be regularly monitored by CERN's radiation protection group. The maintenance personnel will comprise CERN staff, outside contractors and a large number of physicists from all over the world. CERN meets this challenge by applying optimisation processes already in the design of accelerator and detector components and by an appropriate intervention and dose planning during operation. Detailed Monte Carlo calculations were performed during the design phase of the LHC and were used to identify the potential radiation hazards during future maintenance in areas with elevated beam losses (accelerator ejection and injection, beam dumps, target areas or beam cleaning insertions) and thus elevated dose rates. In an iterative way, the design of the accelerator components and the layout of these regions were optimised. The impact of the proposed modifications on the dose to personnel was evaluated by Monte Carlo simulations. Calculated individual and collective doses were then compared to design constraints. (author)

  12. Assessment of Individual Doses and Intervention Planning at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brugger, M.; Forkel-Wirth, D.; Gaborit, J.C.; Menzel, H.; Roesler, S.; Vincke, H.

    2006-01-01

    Founded in 1954, CERN is the European Organization for Nuclear Research, one of the world's largest international particle physics centres. It sits astride the Franco-Swiss border near Geneva. The Large Hadron Collider (Lhc) is currently being installed in a 27-kilometer ring tunnel, buried deep below the countryside on the outskirts of Geneva, Switzerland and the Pays de Gex, France. When its operation begins in 2007, the Lhc will be the world's most powerful particle accelerator. The start-up and the operation of the Lhc will mark a new era for CERN's operational radiation protection. The total surface of CERN's radiation areas will enlarge significantly and a large number of work places have to be regularly monitored by CERN's radiation protection group. The maintenance personnel will comprise CERN staff, outside contractors and a large number of physicists from all over the world. CERN meets this challenge by applying optimisation processes already in the design of accelerator and detector components and by an appropriate intervention and dose planning during operation. Detailed Monte Carlo calculations were performed during the design phase of the Lhc and were used to identify the potential radiation hazards during future maintenance in areas with elevated beam losses (accelerator ejection and injection, beam dumps, target areas or beam cleaning insertions) and thus elevated dose rates. In an iterative way, the design of the accelerator components and the layout of these regions were optimised. The impact of the proposed modifications on the dose to personnel was evaluated by Monte Carlo simulations. Calculated individual and collective doses were then compared to design constraints. (authors)

  13. Critical dose and toxicity index of organs at risk in radiotherapy: Analyzing the calculated effects of modified dose fractionation in non–small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedicini, Piernicola, E-mail: ppiern@libero.it [Service of Medical Physics, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B, Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Benassi, Marcello [Service of Medical Physics, Scientific Institute of Tumours of Romagna I.R.S.T., Meldola (Italy); Caivano, Rocchina [Service of Medical Physics, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B, Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Fiorentino, Alba [U.O. of Radiotherapy, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Nappi, Antonio [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Salvatore, Marco [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. SDN Foundation, Naples (Italy); Storto, Giovanni [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy)

    2014-04-01

    To increase the efficacy of radiotherapy for non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), many schemes of dose fractionation were assessed by a new “toxicity index” (I), which allows one to choose the fractionation schedules that produce less toxic treatments. Thirty-two patients affected by non resectable NSCLC were treated by standard 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) with a strategy of limited treated volume. Computed tomography datasets were employed to re plan by simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The dose distributions from plans were used to test various schemes of dose fractionation, in 3DCRT as well as in IMRT, by transforming the dose-volume histogram (DVH) into a biological equivalent DVH (BDVH) and by varying the overall treatment time. The BDVHs were obtained through the toxicity index, which was defined for each of the organs at risk (OAR) by a linear quadratic model keeping an equivalent radiobiological effect on the target volume. The less toxic fractionation consisted in a severe/moderate hyper fractionation for the volume including the primary tumor and lymph nodes, followed by a hypofractionation for the reduced volume of the primary tumor. The 3DCRT and IMRT resulted, respectively, in 4.7% and 4.3% of dose sparing for the spinal cord, without significant changes for the combined-lungs toxicity (p < 0.001). Schedules with reduced overall treatment time (accelerated fractionations) led to a 12.5% dose sparing for the spinal cord (7.5% in IMRT), 8.3% dose sparing for V{sub 20} in the combined lungs (5.5% in IMRT), and also significant dose sparing for all the other OARs (p < 0.001). The toxicity index allows to choose fractionation schedules with reduced toxicity for all the OARs and equivalent radiobiological effect for the tumor in 3DCRT, as well as in IMRT, treatments of NSCLC.

  14. Development of Landscape Dose Factors for dose assessments in SR-Can

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, Rodolfo; Ekstroem, Per-Anders [Facilia AB, Bromma (Sweden); Kautsky, Ulrik [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-08-15

    In previous safety assessments Ecosystem Dose Factors (EDFs), were derived from estimates of doses to the most exposed group resulting from constant unit radionuclide release rates over 10,000 years to various ecosystem types, e.g. mires, agricultural lands, lakes and marine ecosystems. A number of limitations of the EDF approach have been identified. The objectives of this report is to further develop the EDF approach, in order to resolve the identified limitations, and to use the improved approach for deriving Dose Conversion Factors for use in the SR-Can risk assessments. The Dose Conversion Factors derived in this report are named Landscape Dose Factors (LDFs). It involves modelling the fate of the radionuclides in the whole landscape, which develops from a sea to a inland situation during 20,000 years. Both candidate sites studies in SR-Can, Forsmark and Laxemar, are included in the study. As a basis for the modelling, the period starting at the beginning of the last interglacial (8,000 BC) is used, over which releases from a hypothetical repository were assumed to take place. For the present temperate period, the overall development of the biosphere at each site is outlined in a 1,000 year perspective and beyond, essentially based on the ongoing shoreline displacement and the understanding on the impact this has on the biosphere. The past development, i.e. from deglaciation to the present time, is inferred from geological records and associated reconstructions of the shore-line. For each time step of 1,000 years, the landscape at the site is described as a number of interconnected biosphere objects constituting an integrated landscape model of each site. The water fluxes through the objects were estimated from the average run-off at the site, the areas of the objects and their associated catchment areas. Radionuclides in both dissolved and particulate forms were considered in the transport calculations. The transformation between ecosystems was modelled as

  15. Non-human biota dose assessment. Sensitivity analysis and knowledge quality assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.; Robinson, C.; Jackson, D.; La Cruz, I. de; Zinger, I.; Avila, R.

    2010-10-01

    This report provides a summary of a programme of work, commissioned within the BIOPROTA collaborative forum, to assess the quantitative and qualitative elements of uncertainty associated with biota dose assessment of potential impacts of long-term releases from geological disposal facilities (GDF). Quantitative and qualitative aspects of uncertainty were determined through sensitivity and knowledge quality assessments, respectively. Both assessments focused on default assessment parameters within the ERICA assessment approach. The sensitivity analysis was conducted within the EIKOS sensitivity analysis software tool and was run in both generic and test case modes. The knowledge quality assessment involved development of a questionnaire around the ERICA assessment approach, which was distributed to a range of experts in the fields of non-human biota dose assessment and radioactive waste disposal assessments. Combined, these assessments enabled critical model features and parameters that are both sensitive (i.e. have a large influence on model output) and of low knowledge quality to be identified for each of the three test cases. The output of this project is intended to provide information on those parameters that may need to be considered in more detail for prospective site-specific biota dose assessments for GDFs. Such information should help users to enhance the quality of their assessments and build greater confidence in the results. (orig.)

  16. Guidance on internal dose assessments from monitoring data (Project IDEAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerfel, H.; Andrasi, A.; Bailey, M.; Berkovski, V.; Castellani, M.; Hurtgen, C.; Jourdain, R.; Le Guen, B.

    2003-01-01

    Several international intercomparison exercises on intake and internal dose assessments from monitoring data led to the conclusion that the results calculated by different participants varied significantly mainly to the broad variety of methods and assumptions applied in the assessment procedure. Based on these experiences the need of harmonisation of the procedures has been formulated as an EU research project under the 5th Framework Programme, with the aim of developing general guidelines for standardising assessments of intakes and internal doses. In the IDEAS project, eight institutions from seven European countries are participating, also using inputs from internal dosimetry professionals from across Europe to ensure broad consensus in the outcome of the project. To ensure that the guidelines are applicable to a wide range of practical situations, the first step will be to compile a database on well documented cases of internal contamination. In parallel, an improved version of existing software will be developed and distributed to the partners for further use. Many cases from the database will be evaluated independently by more partners using the same software and the results will be discussed and the draft guidelines prepared. The guidelines will then be revised and refined on the basis of the experiences and discussions of two workshops, and an inter-comparison exercise organised in the frame of the project which will be open to all internal dosimetry professionals. (author)

  17. Effective and organ doses from common CT examinations in one general hospital in Tehran, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoramian, Daryoush; Hashemi, Bijan

    2017-09-01

    Purpose: It is well known that the main portion of artificial sources of ionizing radiation to human results from X-ray imaging techniques. However, reports carried out in various countries have indicated that most of their cumulative doses from artificial sources are due to CT examinations. Hence assessing doses resulted from CT examinations is highly recommended by national and international radiation protection agencies. The aim of this research has been to estimate the effective and organ doses in an average human according to 103 and 60 ICRP tissue weighting factor for six common protocols of Multi-Detector CT (MDCT) machine in a comprehensive training general hospital in Tehran/Iran. Methods: To calculate the patients' effective dose, the CT-Expo2.2 software was used. Organs/tissues and effective doses were determined for about 20 patients (totally 122 patients) for every one of six typical CT protocols of the head, neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, pelvis and spine exams. In addition, the CT dosimetry index (CTDI) was measured in the standard 16 and 32 cm phantoms by using a calibrated pencil ionization chamber for the six protocols and by taking the average value of CT scan parameters used in the hospital compared with the CTDI values displayed on the console device of the machine. Results: The values of the effective dose based on the ICRP 103 tissue weighting factor were: 0.6, 2.0, 3.2, 4.2, 2.8, and 3.9 mSv and based on the ICRP 60 tissue weighting factor were: 0.9, 1.4, 3, 7.9, 4.8 and 5.1 mSv for the head, neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, pelvis, spine CT exams respectively. Relative differences between those values were -22, 21, 23, -6, -31 and 16 percent for the head, neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis, pelvis, spine CT exams, respectively. The average value of CTDIv calculated for each protocol was: 27.32 ± 0.9, 18.08 ± 2.0, 7.36 ± 2.6, 8.84 ± 1.7, 9.13 ± 1.5, 10.42 ± 0.8 mGy for the head, neck, chest, abdomen-pelvis and spine CT exams, respectively

  18. Approximate distribution of dose among foetal organs for radioiodine uptake via placenta transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, R. K.; Saunders, M.; Palmer, A. M.; Preece, A. W.

    2001-11-01

    Absorbed radiation doses to internal foetal organs were calculated according to the medical internal radiation dose (MIRD) technique in this study. Anthropomorphic phantoms of the pregnant female as in MIRDOSE3 enabled estimation of absorbed dose to the whole foetus at two stages of gestation. Some foetal organ self-doses could have been estimated by invoking simple spherical models for thyroid, liver, etc, but we investigated the use of the MIRDOSE3 new-born phantom as a surrogate for the stage 3 foetus, scaled to be compatible with total foetal body mean absorbed dose/cumulated activity. We illustrate the method for obtaining approximate dose distribution in the foetus near term following intake of 1 MBq of 123I, 124I, 125I or 131I as sodium iodide by the mother using in vivo biodistribution data examples from a good model of placenta transfer. Doses to the foetal thyroid of up to 1.85 Gy MBq-1 were predicted from the 131I uptake data. Activity in the foetal thyroid was the largest contributor to absorbed dose in the foetal body, brain, heart and thymus. Average total doses to the whole foetus ranged from 0.16 to 1.2 mGy MBq-1 for stages 1 and 3 of pregnancy using the MIRDOSE3 program, and were considerably higher than those predicted from the maternal contributions alone. Doses to the foetal thymus and stomach were similar, around 2-3 mGy MBq-1. Some foetal organ doses from the radioiodides were ten times higher than to the corresponding organs of the mother, and up to 100 times higher to the thyroid. The fraction of activity uptakes in foetal organs were distributed similarly to the maternal ones.

  19. Approximate distribution of dose among foetal organs for radioiodine uptake via placenta transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millard, R.K. [Medical Physics Research Centre, Bristol Oncology Centre, Bristol (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: rkmillard_69@yahoo.co.uk; Saunders, M.; Palmer, A.M.; Preece, A.W. [Medical Physics Research Centre, Bristol Oncology Centre, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2001-11-01

    Absorbed radiation doses to internal foetal organs were calculated according to the medical internal radiation dose (MIRD) technique in this study. Anthropomorphic phantoms of the pregnant female as in MIRDOSE3 enabled estimation of absorbed dose to the whole foetus at two stages of gestation. Some foetal organ self-doses could have been estimated by invoking simple spherical models for thyroid, liver, etc, but we investigated the use of the MIRDOSE3 new-born phantom as a surrogate for the stage 3 foetus, scaled to be compatible with total foetal body mean absorbed dose/cumulated activity. We illustrate the method for obtaining approximate dose distribution in the foetus near term following intake of 1 MBq of {sup 123}I, {sup 124}I, {sup 125}I or {sup 131}I as sodium iodide by the mother using in vivo biodistribution data examples from a good model of placenta transfer. Doses to the foetal thyroid of up to 1.85 Gy MBq{sup -1} were predicted from the {sup 131}I uptake data. Activity in the foetal thyroid was the largest contributor to absorbed dose in the foetal body, brain, heart and thymus. Average total doses to the whole foetus ranged from 0.16 to 1.2 mGy MBq{sup -1} for stages 1 and 3 of pregnancy using the MIRDOSE3 program, and were considerably higher than those predicted from the maternal contributions alone. Doses to the foetal thymus and stomach were similar, around 2-3 mGy MBq{sup -1}. Some foetal organ doses from the radioiodides were ten times higher than to the corresponding organs of the mother, and up to 100 times higher to the thyroid. The fraction of activity uptakes in foetal organs were distributed similarly to the maternal ones. (author)

  20. Dose assessment for public at the hypothetical submergence of a fresh MOX fuel package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsumune, Daisuke; Saegusa, Toshiari; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Maruyama, Koki

    2000-01-01

    For the structure and equipment of transport ships for fresh MOX fuels, there is a special safety standard called the INF Code of IMO (International Maritime Organization). For transport of radioactive materials, there is a safety standard stipulated in Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material issued by IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency). Under those code and standard, fresh MOX fuel is transported safety on the sea. To gain the public acceptance for this transport, a dose assessment has been made by assuming that a fresh MOX fuel package might be sunk into the sea by unknown reasons. In the both cases for a package sunk at the coastal region and for that sunk at the ocean, the evaluated result of the dose equivalent by radiation exposure to the public are far below the dose equivalent limit of the ICRP recommendation (1 mSv/year). (author)

  1. Application of Whole Body Counter to Neutron Dose Assessment in Criticality Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurihara, O.; Tsujimura, N.; Takasaki, K.; Momose, T.; Maruo, Y. [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Tokai (Japan)

    2001-09-15

    Neutron dose assessment in criticality accidents using Whole Body Counter (WBC) was proved to be an effective method as rapid neutron dose estimation at the JCO criticality accident in Tokai-mura. The 1.36MeV gamma-ray of {sup 24}Na in a body can be detected easily by a germanium detector. The Minimum Detectable Activity (MDA) of {sup 24}Na is approximately 50Bq for 10minute measurement by the germanium-type whole body counter at JNC Tokai Works. Neutron energy spectra at the typical shielding conditions in criticality accidents were calculated and the conversion factor, whole body activity-to-organ mass weighted neutron absorbed dose, corresponding to each condition were determined. The conversion factor for uncollied fission spectrum is 7.7 [(Bq{sup 24}Na/g{sup 23}Na)/mGy].

  2. Mixed species radioiodine air sampling readout and dose assessment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distenfeld, C.H.; Klemish, J.R. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a simple, reliable, inexpensive and portable means and method for determining the thyroid dose rate of mixed airborne species of solid and gaseous radioiodine without requiring highly skilled personnel, such as health physicists or electronics technicians. To this end, this invention provides a means and method for sampling a gas from a source of a mixed species of solid and gaseous radioiodine for collection of the mixed species and readout and assessment of the emissions therefrom by cylindrically, concentrically and annularly molding the respective species around a cylindrical passage for receiving a conventional probe-type Geiger-Mueller radiation detector

  3. Development of a method to calculate organ doses for the upper gastrointestinal fluoroscopic examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suleiman, O.H.

    1989-01-01

    A method was developed to quantitatively measure the upper gastrointestinal fluoroscopic examination in order to calculate organ doses. The dynamic examination was approximated with a set of discrete x-ray fields. Once the examination was segmented into discrete x-ray fields appropriate organ dose tables were generated using an existing computer program for organ dose calculations. This, along with knowledge of the radiation exposures associated with each of the fields, enabled the calculation of organ doses for the entire dynamic examination. The protocol involves videotaping the examination while fluoroscopic technique factors, tube current and tube potential, are simultaneously recorded on the audio tracks of the videotape. Subsequent analysis allows the dynamic examination to be segmented into a series of discrete x-ray fields uniquely defined by field size, projection, and anatomical region. The anatomical regions associated with the upper gastrointestinal examination were observed to be the upper, middle, and lower esophagus, the gastroesophageal junction, the stomach, and the duodenum

  4. WAZA-ARI. A dose assessment system for patients in CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kaoru; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Endo, Akira; Ono, Koji; Ban, Nobuhiko; Hasegawa, Takayuki; Katsunuma, Yasushi; Yoshitake, Takayasu; Kai, Michiaki

    2015-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) are now developing WAZA-ARI for improvement of management of exposure doses due to CT examination under the joint research with the Oita University of Nursing and Health Sciences. The trial version of WAZA-ARI has been released on 21 December 2012. In trial version, users can perform dose assessment by using organ dose database based on the average adult Japanese male (JM-103) and female (JF-103) voxel phantoms and a 4 years old female voxel phantom (UFF4). The homepage of WAZA-ARI has been accessed over 1000 times per month and 28421 times by the end of September 2014. We are developing WAZA-ARI version 2 as the extension version of dose calculation functions of WAZA-ARI. WAZA-ARI version 2 will be released by the end of March 2015. In WAZA-ARI version 2. Users can upload dose calculation results to WAZA-ARI version 2 server, and utilize improvement of the dose management of patients and the optimization of CT scan conditions. (author)

  5. Dose-dependent adverse effects of salinomycin on male reproductive organs and fertility in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olajumoke Omolara Ojo

    Full Text Available Salinomycin is used as an antibiotic in animal husbandry. Its implication in cancer therapy has recently been proposed. Present study evaluated the toxic effects of Salinomycin on male reproductive system of mice. Doses of 1, 3 or 5 mg/kg of Salinomycin were administered daily for 28 days. Half of the mice were sacrificed after 24 h of the last treatment and other half were sacrificed 28 days after withdrawal of treatment. Effects of SAL on body and reproductive organ weights were studied. Histoarchitecture of testis and epididymis was evaluated along with ultrastructural changes in Leydig cells. Serum and testicular testosterone and luteinizing hormones were estimated. Superoxide dismutase, reduced glutathione, lipid peroxidation, catalase and lactate dehydrogenase activities were measured. Spermatozoa count, morphology, motility and fertility were evaluated. Expression patterns of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR and cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage proteins (CYP11A1 were assessed by Western blotting. Salinomycin treatment was lethal to few mice and retarded body growth in others with decreased weight of testes and seminal vesicles in a dose dependent manner. Seminiferous tubules in testes were disrupted and the epithelium of epididymis showed frequent occurrence of vacuolization and necrosis. Leydig cells showed hypertrophied cytoplasm with shrunken nuclei, condensed mitochondria, proliferated endoplasmic reticulum and increased number of lipid droplets. Salinomycin decreased motility and spermatozoa count with increased number of abnormal spermatozoa leading to infertility. The testosterone and luteinizing hormone levels were decreased in testis but increased in serum at higher doses. Depletion of superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione with increased lipid peroxidation in both testis and epididymis indicated generation of oxidative stress. Suppressed expression of StAR and CYP11A1 proteins indicates inhibition of

  6. The assessment of collective dose for travellers travelling by water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Qingyu; Jiang Ping; Jin Hua

    1992-06-01

    The major contribution to the various radiation exposure received by mankind comes from natural radiation. Some environmental change caused by human beings and some activities of mankind may decrease or increase the radiation exposure level from natural radiation. People travelling by air will receive more exposure dose and by water will receive less. China has about 18000 km coast line and the inland water transportation is very flourishing. According to statistic data from Ministry of Transportation in 1988, the turnover in that year was about 2 x 10 10 man.km. The total number of fisherman for inshore fishing was nearly two million reported by Ministry of Farming, Animal Husbandry and Fishery. We measured 212 points in six typical shipping lines of inshore lines and inland rivers, and the distance was 5625 km. The average natural radiation exposure dose rate received by travellers in each shipping line was calculated. From that the assessment of collective dose equivalent for passengers by water and fishermen was derived. The value is 32.7 man.Sv for passengers and 265.3 man.Sv for fishermen

  7. The assessment of collective dose for travellers travelling by water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Qingyu; Jian Ping; Jin Hua

    1994-01-01

    The major contribution to various radiation exposure received by mankind comes from natural radiation. Some environmental change caused by human beings and some activities of mankind may decrease or increase the radiation exposure level from natural radiation. China has about 18000 km coast line and the inland water transportation is very flourishing. According to statistic data from Ministry of Transportation in 1988, the turnover in that year was about 2 x 10 10 man·km. The total number of fisherman for inshore fishing was nearly two millions reported by Ministry of Farming, Animal Husbandry and Fishery. We measured exposure dose rates over 212 points in six typical shipping lines of inshore lines and inland rivers, and the distance was 5625 km. The average natural radiation exposure dose rate received by travellers in each shipping line was calculated. From that the assessment of collective dose equivalent for passengers by water and fishermen was derived. The value is 32.7 man·Sv for passengers and 265.3 man·Sv for fishermen

  8. Dose contribution from metabolized organically bound tritium after chronic tritiated water intakes in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, A.; Lamothe, E.; Galeriu, D.

    2001-01-01

    Our earlier study of acute tritiated water intakes in humans has demonstrated that the dose contribution from metabolized organically bound tritium is less than 10% of the body water dose. To further demonstrate that the dose contribution from the organically bound tritium per unit intake of tritiated water is the same, regardless of whether the intake is acute (all at once) or chronic (spread over time), urine samples from six male radiation workers with chronic tritiated water intakes were collected and analyzed for tritium. These workers have a well-documented dose history and a well-controlled tritium bioassay database, providing assurance that their tritium intakes were in the form of tritiated water. Each month for a full calendar year, urine samples were collected from each exposed worker. The monthly concentration of tritium-in-urine for each exposed worker was no lower than 104 Bq L -1 but no higher than 105 Bq L -1 . These urine samples were analyzed for tritiated water and organically bound tritium to determine the ratio of these tritiated species in urine. The average ratio of tritiated water to organically bound tritium in urine for each exposed worker was 330-129 (range, 297-589). In calculating the dose to these workers, we assumed that, under steady-state conditions, the ratio of the specific activity of tritium ( 3 H activity per gH) in the organic matter and water fractions of urine is representative of the ratio of the specific activity of tritium in the organic matter and water fractions of soft tissue. A mathematical model was developed and used to estimate the dose increase from the metabolized organically bound tritium based on the ratio of tritiated water to organically bound tritium in urine. The resulting average dose from the organically bound tritium was 6.9-3.1% (range, 4.7-9.9%) of the body water dose for the six male workers, and agrees well with the value obtained from our acute tritiated water intakes study in humans. The observed

  9. Radiation exposure and risk assessment for critical female body organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atwell, W.; Weyland, M.D.; Hardy, A.C.

    1991-07-01

    Space radiation exposure limits for astronauts are based on recommendations of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. These limits now include the age at exposure and sex of the astronaut. A recently-developed computerized anatomical female (CAF) model is discussed in detail. Computer-generated, cross-sectional data are presented to illustrate the completeness of the CAF model. By applying ray-tracing techniques, shield distribution functions have been computed to calculate absorbed dose and dose equivalent values for a variety of critical body organs (e.g., breasts, lungs, thyroid gland, etc.) and mission scenarios. Specific risk assessments, i.e., cancer induction and mortality, are reviewed. 13 refs

  10. Fetal organ dosimetry for the Techa River and Ozyorsk Offspring Cohorts. Pt. 2. Radionuclide S values for fetal self-dose and maternal cross-dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynard, Matthew R.; Bolch, Wesley E.; Shagina, Natalia B.; Tolstykh, Evgenia I.; Degteva, Marina O.; Fell, Tim P.

    2015-01-01

    One of the many objectives of the European Union's SOLO (Epidemiological Studies of Exposed Southern Urals Populations) project is to quantify the radiation dose-response following chronic in utero exposures to ionizing radiation. The project is presently conducting a pooled analysis of two cohorts of individuals born to exposed mothers - the Techa River Offspring Cohort (TROC) and the Ozyorsk Offspring Cohort (OOC). The TROC includes the offspring of mothers with external exposures to contaminated riverbanks and internal ingestions of 89 Sr, 90 Sr/ 90 Y, and 137 Cs/ 137m Ba, while the OOC includes the offspring of mothers with external exposures seen within the Mayak plutonium production facilities and internal inhalation of 239 Pu and possibly 131 I. In the present study, a newly created Urals-based series of fetal and maternal models is employed to assess S values for all seven radionuclides. Among all fetal ages, S values ranged in magnitude from 10 -14 to 10 -10 Gy per Bq-s for fetal source organs and from 10 -18 to 10 -14 Gy per Bq-s from maternal source organs, depending upon particle type, particle energy, and fetal age. For a given radionuclide and fetal age, S values for fetal source organs were approximately two orders of magnitude higher than for maternal source organs. Little variation in S values was observed among fetal source organs, while variations of over 100 % with respect to the mean were observed for maternal source organs near the fetus. S value variations from maternal cross-fire were highly dependent on fetal position and separation distance from the maternal source organ. These radionuclide S values have been coupled with biokinetic models for use in cohort dose assessment within the SOLO project. (orig.)

  11. Optimization of radiation therapy, III: a method of assessing complication probabilities from dose-volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyman, J.T.; Wolbarst, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    To predict the likelihood of success of a therapeutic strategy, one must be able to assess the effects of the treatment upon both diseased and healthy tissues. This paper proposes a method for determining the probability that a healthy organ that receives a non-uniform distribution of X-irradiation, heat, chemotherapy, or other agent will escape complications. Starting with any given dose distribution, a dose-cumulative-volume histogram for the organ is generated. This is then reduced by an interpolation scheme (involving the volume-weighting of complication probabilities) to a slightly different histogram that corresponds to the same overall likelihood of complications, but which contains one less step. The procedure is repeated, one step at a time, until there remains a final, single-step histogram, for which the complication probability can be determined. The formalism makes use of a complication response function C(D, V) which, for the given treatment schedule, represents the probability of complications arising when the fraction V of the organ receives dose D and the rest of the organ gets none. Although the data required to generate this function are sparse at present, it should be possible to obtain the necessary information from in vivo and clinical studies. Volume effects are taken explicitly into account in two ways: the precise shape of the patient's histogram is employed in the calculation, and the complication response function is a function of the volume

  12. Relationship between dose and risk, and assessment of carcinogenic risks associated with low doses of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tubiana, M.; Aurengo, A.

    2005-01-01

    This report raises doubts on the validity of using LNT (linear no-threshold) relationship for evaluating the carcinogenic risk of low doses (< 100 mSv) and even more for very low doses (< 10 mSv). The LNT concept can be a useful pragmatic tool for assessing rules in radioprotection for doses above 10 mSv; however since it is not based on biological concepts of our current knowledge, it should not be used without precaution for assessing by extrapolation the risks associated with low and even more so, with very low doses (< 10 mSv), especially for benefit-risk assessments imposed on radiologists by the European directive 97-43. The biological mechanisms are different for doses lower than a few dozen mSv and for higher doses. The eventual risks in the dose range of radiological examinations (0.1 to 5 mSv, up to 20 mSv for some examinations) must be estimated taking into account radiobiological and experimental data. An empirical relationship which has been just validated for doses higher than 200 mSv may lead to an overestimation of risks (associated with doses one hundred fold lower), and this overestimation could discourage patients from undergoing useful examinations and introduce a bias in radioprotection measures against very low doses (< 10 mSv). Decision makers confronted with problems of radioactive waste or risk of contamination, should re-examine the methodology used for the evaluation of risks associated with very low doses and with doses delivered at a very low dose rate. This report confirms the inappropriateness of the collective dose concept to evaluate population irradiation risks

  13. Background and anthropogenic radionuclide derived dose rates to freshwater ecosystem - Nuclear power plant cooling pond - Reference organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedveckaite, T.; Filistovic, V.; Marciulioniene, D.; Prokoptchuk, N.; Plukiene, R.; Gudelis, A.; Remeikis, V.; Yankovich, T.; Beresford, N.-A.

    2011-01-01

    The radiological assessment of non-human biota to demonstrate protection is now accepted by a number of international and national bodies. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a scientific basis to assess and evaluate exposure of biota to ionizing radiation. Radionuclides from the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (Lithuania) were discharged into Lake Druksiai cooling pond. Additional radionuclide migration and recharge to this lake from a hypothetical near-surface, low-level radioactive waste disposal, to be situated 1.5 km from the lake, had been simulated using RESRAD-OFFSITE code. This paper uses ERICA Integrated Approach with associated tools and databases to compare the radiological dose to freshwater reference organisms. Based on these data, it can be concluded that background dose rates to non-human biota in Lake Druksiai far exceed those attributable to anthropogenic radionuclides. With respect the fishery and corresponding annual committed effective human dose as a result of this fish consumption Lake Druksiai continues to be a high-productivity water body with intensive angling and possible commercial fishing. - Highlights: → Dose rates to the reference organisms are lower than expected from the background radioactivity. → Pelagic fish part of adult human annual committed effective dose would be as small as a few μSv y -1 . → With respect the fishery Lake Druksiai continues to be a high-productivity water body.

  14. Handbook of selected organ doses for projections common in pediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenstein, M.; Beck, T.J.; Warner, G.G.

    1979-05-01

    This handbook contains data from which absorbed dose (mrad) to selected organs can be estimated for common projections in pediatric radiology. The organ doses are for three reference patients: a newborn (0 to 6 months), a 1-year old child, and a 5-year old child. One intent of the handbook is to permit the user to evaluate the effect on organ dose to these reference pediatric patients as a function of certain changes in technical parameters used in or among facilities. A second intent is to permit a comparison to be made of organ doses as a function of age. This comparison can be extended to a reference adult by referring to the previous Handbook of Selected Organ Doses fo Projections Common in Diagnostic Radiology, FDA 76-8031. Assignment of organ doses to individual pediatric patients using the Handbook data is not recommended unless the physical characteristics of the patient closely correlate with one of the three reference pediatric patients given in Appendix A

  15. Cytogenetic analysis for radiation dose assessment. A manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Chromosome aberration analysis is recognized as a valuable dose assessment method which fills a gap in dosimetric technology, particularly when there are difficulties in interpreting the data, in cases where there is reason to believe that persons not wearing dosimeters have been exposed to radiation, in cases of claims for compensation for radiation injuries that are not supported by unequivocal dosimetric evidence, or in cases of exposure over an individual's working lifetime. The IAEA has maintained a long standing involvement in biological dosimetry commencing in 1978. This has been via a sequence of Co-ordinated Research Programmes (CRPs), the running of Regional Training Courses, the sponsorship of individual training fellowships and the provision of necessary equipment to laboratories in developing Member States. The CRP on the 'Use of Chromosome Aberration Analysis in Radiation Protection' was initiated by IAEA in 1982. It ended with the publication of the IAEA Technical Report Series No. 260, titled 'Biological Dosimetry: Chromosomal Aberration Analysis for Dose Assessment' in 1986. The overall objective of the CRP (1998-2000) on 'Radiation Dosimetry through Biological Indicators' is to review and standardize the available methods and amend the above mentioned previous IAEA publication with current techniques on cytogenetic bioindicators which may be of practical use in biological dosimetry worldwide. An additional objective is to identify promising cytogenetic techniques to provide Member States with up to date and generally agreed advice regarding the best focus for research and suggestions for the most suitable techniques for near future practice in biodosimetry. This activity is in accordance with the International Basic Safety Standards (BSS) published in 1996. To pursue this task the IAEA has conducted a Research Co-ordination Meeting (Budapest, Hungary, June 1998) with the participation of senior scientists of 24 biodosimetry laboratories to discuss

  16. Estimation of organ and effective dose due to Compton backscatter security scans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoppe, Michael E.; Schmidt, Taly Gilat

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate organ and effective radiation doses due to backscatter security scanners using Monte Carlo simulations and a voxelized phantom set. Methods: Voxelized phantoms of male and female adults and children were used with the GEANT4 toolkit to simulate a backscatter security scan. The backscatter system was modeled based on specifications available in the literature. The simulations modeled a 50 kVp spectrum with 1.0 mm-aluminum-equivalent filtration and a previously measured exposure of approximately 4.6 μR at 30 cm from the source. Photons and secondary interactions were tracked from the source until they reached zero kinetic energy or exited from the simulation’s boundaries. The energy deposited in the phantoms’ respective organs was tallied and used to calculate total organ dose and total effective dose for frontal, rear, and full scans with subjects located 30 and 75 cm from the source. Results: For a full screen, all phantoms’ total effective doses were below the established 0.25 μSv standard, with an estimated maximum total effective dose of 0.07 μSv for full screen of a male child. The estimated maximum organ dose due to a full screen was 1.03 μGy, deposited in the adipose tissue of the male child phantom when located 30 cm from the source. All organ dose estimates had a coefficient of variation of less than 3% for a frontal scan and less than 11% for a rear scan. Conclusions: Backscatter security scanners deposit dose in organs beyond the skin. The effective dose is below recommended standards set by the Health Physics Society (HPS) and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) assuming the system provides a maximum exposure of approximately 4.6 μR at 30 cm.

  17. The feasibility of a scanner-independent technique to estimate organ dose from MDCT scans: Using CTDIvol to account for differences between scanners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, Adam C.; Zankl, Maria; DeMarco, John J.; Cagnon, Chris H.; Zhang Di; Angel, Erin; Cody, Dianna D.; Stevens, Donna M.; McCollough, Cynthia H.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Monte Carlo radiation transport techniques have made it possible to accurately estimate the radiation dose to radiosensitive organs in patient models from scans performed with modern multidetector row computed tomography (MDCT) scanners. However, there is considerable variation in organ doses across scanners, even when similar acquisition conditions are used. The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a technique to estimate organ doses that would be scanner independent. This was accomplished by assessing the ability of CTDI vol measurements to account for differences in MDCT scanners that lead to organ dose differences. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations of 64-slice MDCT scanners from each of the four major manufacturers were performed. An adult female patient model from the GSF family of voxelized phantoms was used in which all ICRP Publication 103 radiosensitive organs were identified. A 120 kVp, full-body helical scan with a pitch of 1 was simulated for each scanner using similar scan protocols across scanners. From each simulated scan, the radiation dose to each organ was obtained on a per mA s basis (mGy/mA s). In addition, CTDI vol values were obtained from each scanner for the selected scan parameters. Then, to demonstrate the feasibility of generating organ dose estimates from scanner-independent coefficients, the simulated organ dose values resulting from each scanner were normalized by the CTDI vol value for those acquisition conditions. Results: CTDI vol values across scanners showed considerable variation as the coefficient of variation (CoV) across scanners was 34.1%. The simulated patient scans also demonstrated considerable differences in organ dose values, which varied by up to a factor of approximately 2 between some of the scanners. The CoV across scanners for the simulated organ doses ranged from 26.7% (for the adrenals) to 37.7% (for the thyroid), with a mean CoV of 31.5% across all organs. However, when organ doses

  18. ARAC: a computer-based emergency dose-assessment service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) has developed and evolved a computer-based, real-time, radiological-dose-assessment service for the United States Departments of Energy and Defense. This service is built on the integrated components of real-time computer-acquired meteorological data, extensive computer databases, numerical atmospheric-dispersion models, graphical displays, and operational-assessment-staff expertise. The focus of ARAC is the off-site problem where regional meteorology and topography are dominant influences on transport and dispersion. Through application to numerous radiological accidents/releases on scales from small accidental ventings to the Chernobyl reactor disaster, ARAC has developed methods to provide emergency dose assessments from the local to the hemispheric scale. As the power of computers has evolved inversely with respect to cost and size, ARAC has expanded its service and reduced the response time from hours to minutes for an accident within the United States. Concurrently the quality of the assessments has improved as more advanced models have been developed and incorporated into the ARAC system. Over the past six years, the number of directly connected facilities has increased from 6 to 73. All major U.S. Federal agencies now have access to ARAC via the Department of Energy. This assures a level of consistency as well as experience. ARAC maintains its real-time skills by participation in approximately 150 exercises per year; ARAC also continuously validates its modeling systems by application to all available tracer experiments and data sets

  19. Assessing the effect of electron density in photon dose calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seco, J.; Evans, P. M.

    2006-01-01

    Photon dose calculation algorithms (such as the pencil beam and collapsed cone, CC) model the attenuation of a primary photon beam in media other than water, by using pathlength scaling based on the relative mass density of the media to water. In this study, we assess if differences in the electron density between the water and media, with different atomic composition, can influence the accuracy of conventional photon dose calculations algorithms. A comparison is performed between an electron-density scaling method and the standard mass-density scaling method for (i) tissues present in the human body (such as bone, muscle, etc.), and for (ii) water-equivalent plastics, used in radiotherapy dosimetry and quality assurance. We demonstrate that the important material property that should be taken into account by photon dose algorithms is the electron density, and not the mass density. The mass-density scaling method is shown to overestimate, relative to electron-density predictions, the primary photon fluence for tissues in the human body and water-equivalent plastics, where 6%-7% and 10% differences were observed respectively for bone and air. However, in the case of patients, differences are expected to be smaller due to the large complexity of a treatment plan and of the patient anatomy and atomic composition and of the smaller thickness of bone/air that incident photon beams of a treatment plan may have to traverse. Differences have also been observed for conventional dose algorithms, such as CC, where an overestimate of the lung dose occurs, when irradiating lung tumors. The incorrect lung dose can be attributed to the incorrect modeling of the photon beam attenuation through the rib cage (thickness of 2-3 cm in bone upstream of the lung tumor) and through the lung and the oversimplified modeling of electron transport in convolution algorithms. In the present study, the overestimation of the primary photon fluence, using the mass-density scaling method, was shown

  20. Out-of-field organ doses and associated radiogenic risks from para-aortic radiotherapy for testicular seminoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazonakis, Michalis, E-mail: mazonak@med.uoc.gr; Berris, Theocharis; Damilakis, John [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, P. O. Box 2208, 71003 Iraklion, Crete (Greece); Varveris, Charalambos; Lyraraki, Efrossyni [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, University Hospital of Iraklion, 71110 Iraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The aims of this study were to (a) calculate the radiation dose to out-of-field organs from radiotherapy for stage I testicular seminoma and (b) estimate the associated radiogenic risks. Methods: Monte Carlo methodology was employed to model radiation therapy with typical anteroposterior and posteroanterior para-aortic fields on an anthropomorphic phantom simulating an average adult. The radiation dose received by all main and remaining organs that defined by the ICRP publication 103 and excluded from the treatment volume was calculated. The effect of field dimensions on each organ dose was determined. Additional therapy simulations were generated by introducing shielding blocks to protect the kidneys from primary radiation. The gonadal dose was employed to assess the risk of heritable effects for irradiated male patients of reproductive potential. The lifetime attributable risks (LAR) of radiotherapy-induced cancer were estimated using gender- and organ-specific risk coefficients for patient ages of 20, 30, 40, and 50 years old. The risk values were compared with the respective nominal risks. Results: Para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy resulted in out-of-field organ doses of 5.0–538.6 mGy. Blocked field treatment led to a dose change up to 28%. The mean organ dose variation by increasing or decreasing the applied field dimensions was 18.7% ± 3.9% and 20.8% ± 4.5%, respectively. The out-of-field photon doses increased the lifetime intrinsic risk of developing thyroid, lung, bladder, prostate, and esophageal cancer by (0.1–1.4)%, (0.4–1.1)%, (2.5–5.4)%, (0.2–0.4)%, and (6.4–9.2)%, respectively, depending upon the patient age at exposure and the field size employed. A low risk for heritable effects of less than 0.029% was found compared with the natural incidence of these defects. Conclusions: Testicular cancer survivors are subjected to an increased risk for the induction of bladder and esophageal cancer following para-aortic radiotherapy. The

  1. Monitoring and assessment of individual doses of occupationally exposed workers due to external radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitaw, S. T.

    2015-05-01

    Exposure to external radiation occurs in many occupations. Any exposure to ionizing radiation has the tendency to change the biochemical make-up of the human body which may result in biological health effects of ionizing radiation. This study reviews the monitoring and assessment of external radiation doses in industrial radiography using thermoluminescence and direct reading dosimeters. Poor handling procedures such as inadequate engineering control of equipment, safety culture, management, and inadequate assessment and monitoring of doses are the causes of most of the reported cases of exposure to external radiation in industrial radiography. Occupational exposure data in industrial radiography from UNSCEAR report 2008 was discussed and recommendations were made to regulatory authorities, operating organizations and radiographers. (au)

  2. Local organ dose conversion coefficients for angiographic examinations of coronary arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlattl, H; Zankl, M; Hausleiter, J; Hoeschen, C

    2007-01-01

    New organ dose conversion coefficients for coronary angiographic interventions are presented, as well as dose distributions and resulting maximal local dose conversion coefficients in the relevant organs. For the Monte Carlo based simulations, voxel models of the human anatomy were employed which represent the average Caucasian adult man and woman as defined by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. In the 21 investigated projections, the mean organ dose conversion coefficients vary from a few 0.01 to 2 mGy(Gy cm 2 ) -1 , depending on the projections. However, especially in portions of the lungs and the active bone marrow, the conversion coefficients can locally amount up to 10 mGy(Gy cm 2 ) -1 , which is half the average conversion coefficient of the skin at the field entrance. In addition to the dose conversion coefficients, the dependence of the patient dose on the projection has been estimated. It could be shown that the patient doses are highest for left anterior oblique views with strong caudal or cranial orientation. Nevertheless, for a large range of image-intensifier positions no significant dose differences could be found

  3. Modelling the Influence of Shielding on Physical and Biological Organ Doses

    CERN Document Server

    Ballarini, Francesca; Ferrari, Alfredo; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Pelliccioni, Maurizio; Scannicchio, Domenico

    2002-01-01

    Distributions of "physical" and "biological" dose in different organs were calculated by coupling the FLUKA MC transport code with a geometrical human phantom inserted into a shielding box of variable shape, thickness and material. While the expression "physical dose" refers to the amount of deposited energy per unit mass (in Gy), "biological dose" was modelled with "Complex Lesions" (CL), clustered DNA strand breaks calculated in a previous work based on "event-by-event" track-structure simulations. The yields of complex lesions per cell and per unit dose were calculated for different radiation types and energies, and integrated into a version of FLUKA modified for this purpose, allowing us to estimate the effects of mixed fields. As an initial test simulation, the phantom was inserted into an aluminium parallelepiped and was isotropically irradiated with 500 MeV protons. Dose distributions were calculated for different values of the shielding thickness. The results were found to be organ-dependent. In most ...

  4. Risk and dose assessment methods in gamma knife QA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banks, W.W.; Jones, E.D.; Rathbun, P.

    1992-10-01

    Traditional methods used in assessing risk in nuclear power plants may be inappropriate to use in assessing medical radiation risks. The typical philosophy used in assessing nuclear reactor risks is machine dominated with only secondary attention paid to the human component, and only after critical machine failure events have been identified. In assessing the risk of a misadministrative radiation dose to patients, the primary source of failures seems to stem overwhelmingly, from the actions of people and only secondarily from machine mode failures. In essence, certain medical misadministrations are dominated by human events not machine failures. Radiological medical devices such as the Leksell Gamma Knife are very simple in design, have few moving parts, and are relatively free from the risks of wear when compared with a nuclear power plant. Since there are major technical differences between a gamma knife and a nuclear power plant, one must select a particular risk assessment method which is sensitive to these system differences and tailored to the unique medical aspects of the phenomena under study. These differences also generate major shifts in the philosophy and assumptions which drive the risk assessment (Machine-centered vs Person-centered) method. We were prompted by these basic differences to develop a person-centered approach to risk assessment which would reflect these basic philosophical and technological differences, have the necessary resolution in its metrics, and be highly reliable (repeatable). The risk approach chosen by the Livermore investigative team has been called the ''Relative Risk Profile Method'' and has been described in detail by Banks and Paramore, (1983)

  5. Dose measurement, its distribution and individual external dose assessments of inhabitants in the high background radiation areas in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishima, Hiroshige; Koga, Taeko; Tatsumi, Kusuo; Nakai, Sayaka; Sugahara, Tsutomu; Yuan Yongling; Wei Luxin

    2000-01-01

    As a part of the China-Japan cooperative research on natural radiation epidemiology, we have carried out a dose-assessment study to evaluate the external exposure to natural radiation in the high background radiation areas (HBRA) of Yangjiang in Guangdong province and in the control areas (CA) of Enping prefecture since 1991. Because of the difficulties in measuring the individual doses of all inhabitants directly by personal dosimeters, an indirect method was applied in which the exposed individual doses were estimated from the environmental radiation doses measured by survey meters and the occupancy factors of each hamlet. We analyzed the dose in the hamlets and the variation in the occupancy factors to obtain the parameters of dose estimation on the inhabitants in selected hamlets; Madi and several hamlets of different dose levels in HBRA and Hampizai hamlet in CA. With these parameters, we estimated individual dose rates and compared them with those obtained from direct measurement using dosimeters carried by selected individuals. The results obtained are as follows. The environmental radiation doses are influenced by the natural radioactive nuclide concentrations in building materials, the age of the building and the arrangement of the houses in a hamlet. There existed a fairly large and heterogeneous distribution of indoor and outdoor environmental radiations. The indoor radiation doses were due to exposure from the natural radioactive nuclides in the building materials and were about two times as large as the outdoor radiation doses. The difference between indoor and outdoor doses was not observed in CA. The occupancy factor was influenced by the age of individuals and by the season of the year. The occupancy factor was higher for infants and aged individuals than for other age groups. This lead to higher dose rates of exposure to those age groups. A good correlation was observed between the dose assessed indirectly and that measured directly and the

  6. Dose measurement, its distribution and individual external dose assessments of inhabitants in the high background radiation areas in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morishima, Hiroshige; Koga, Taeko [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan). Atomic Energy Research Inst.; Tatsumi, Kusuo; Nakai, Sayaka; Sugahara, Tsutomu; Yuan Yongling; Wei Luxin

    2000-10-01

    As a part of the China-Japan cooperative research on natural radiation epidemiology, we have carried out a dose-assessment study to evaluate the external exposure to natural radiation in the high background radiation areas (HBRA) of Yangjiang in Guangdong province and in the control areas (CA) of Enping prefecture since 1991. Because of the difficulties in measuring the individual doses of all inhabitants directly by personal dosimeters, an indirect method was applied in which the exposed individual doses were estimated from the environmental radiation doses measured by survey meters and the occupancy factors of each hamlet. We analyzed the dose in the hamlets and the variation in the occupancy factors to obtain the parameters of dose estimation on the inhabitants in selected hamlets; Madi and several hamlets of different dose levels in HBRA and Hampizai hamlet in CA. With these parameters, we estimated individual dose rates and compared them with those obtained from direct measurement using dosimeters carried by selected individuals. The results obtained are as follows. The environmental radiation doses are influenced by the natural radioactive nuclide concentrations in building materials, the age of the building and the arrangement of the houses in a hamlet. There existed a fairly large and heterogeneous distribution of indoor and outdoor environmental radiations. The indoor radiation doses were due to exposure from the natural radioactive nuclides in the building materials and were about two times as large as the outdoor radiation doses. The difference between indoor and outdoor doses was not observed in CA. The occupancy factor was influenced by the age of individuals and by the season of the year. The occupancy factor was higher for infants and aged individuals than for other age groups. This lead to higher dose rates of exposure to those age groups. A good correlation was observed between the dose assessed indirectly and that measured directly and the

  7. Development of Japanese voxel models and their application to organ dose calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kaoru; Endo, Akira; Saito, Kimiaki

    2007-01-01

    Three Japanese voxel (volume pixel) phantoms in supine and upright postures, which are consisted of about 1 mm 3 size voxels, have been developed on the basis of computed tomography (CT) images of healthy Japanese adult male and female volunteers. Their body structures are reproduced more realistically in comparison with most existing voxel phantoms. Organ doses due to internal or external exposures were calculated using the developed phantoms. In estimation of radiation dose from radionuclides incorporated into body, specific absorbed fractions (SAFs) for low energy photon were significantly influenced by the changes in postures. In estimation of organ doses due to external exposures, the doses of some organs of the developed phantom were calculated and were compared with those of a previous Japanese voxel phantom (voxel size: 0.98x0.98x10 mm 3 ) and the reference values of ICRP Publication 74. (author)

  8. Monte Carlo Method in the calculate of conversion coefficients for dose in children's organs and tissues subjected to dentistric radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loureiro, E.C.M.; Khoury, H.; Lima, F.R.A.

    1998-01-01

    The increasing utilization of oral X-rays, specially in youngsters and children, prompts the assessment of equivalent doses in their organs and tissues. With this purpose, Monte Carlo code was adopted to simulate an X-ray source irradiating phantoms of the MIRD-5 type with different ages (10, 15 and 40 years old) to calculate the conversion coefficients which transform the exposure at skin to equivalent doses at several organs and tissues of interest. In order to check the computer program, simulations were performed for adult patients using the original code (ADAM,FOR developed by GSF Germany) and the adapted program (MCDRO,PAS). Good agreement between results obtained by both programs was observed. Applications to incisive, canine and molar teeth were simulated. The conversion factors were calculated for the following organs and tissues: thyroid, active bone marrow (head and whole body), bone (facial skeleton, cranium and whole body), skin (head and whole body) and crystalline. Based on the obtained results, it follows that the younger the patient and the langer the field area, the higher the doses in assessed organs and tissues

  9. The measurement of organic radiation dose of multi-slice CT scanning by using the Chinese anthropomorphic chest phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Gang; Zeng Yongming; Luo Tianyou; Zhao Feng; Zhang Zhiwei; Yu Renqiang; Peng Shengkun

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Using the Chinese anthropomorphic chest phantom to measure the absorbed dose of various tissues and organs under different noise index, and to assess the radiation dose of MSCT chest scanning with the effective dose (ED). Methods: The equivalence of the Chinese anthropomorphic chest phantom (CDP-1 C) and the adult chest on CT sectional anatomy and X-ray attenuation was demonstrated. The absorbed doses of various tissues and organs under different noise index were measured by laying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) inside the phantom, and the corresponding dose-length products (DLP) were recorded. Both of them were later converted into ED and comparison was conducted to analyze the dose levels of chest CT scanning with automatic tube current modulation (ATCM) under different noise index. Student t-test was applied using SPSS 12.0 statistical software. Results: The Phantom was similar to the human body on CT sectional anatomy. The average CT value of phantom are - 788.04 HU in lung, 45.64 HU in heart, 65.84 HU in liver, 254.32 HU in spine and the deviations are 0.10%, 3.04%, 4.49% and 4.36% respectively compared to humans. The difference of average CT value of liver was statistically significant (t=-8.705, P 0.05). As the noise index increased from 8.5 to 22.5, the DLP decreased from 393.57 mGy · cm to 78.75 mGy · cm and the organs dose declined. For example, the average absorbed dose decreased from 22.38 mGy to 3.66 mGy in lung. Compared to ED calculating by absorbed dose, the ED calculating by DLP was lower. The ED values of the two methods were 6.69 mSv and 8.77 mSv when the noise index was set at 8.5. Conclusions: Application of the Chinese anthropomorphic chest phantom to carry out CT dose assessment is more accurate. The noise index should be set more than 8.5 during the chest CT scanning based on ATCM technique. (authors)

  10. Volume arc therapy of gynaecological tumours: target volume coverage improvement without dose increase for critical organs; Arctherapie volumique des tumeurs gynecologiques: amelioration de la couverture du volume cible sans augmentation de la dose aux organes critiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducteil, A.; Kerr, C.; Idri, K.; Fenoglietto, P.; Vieillot, S.; Ailleres, N.; Dubois, J.B.; Azria, D. [CRLC Val-d' Aurelle, Montpellier (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report the assessment of the application of conventional intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy (IMRT) and volume arc-therapy (RapidArc) for the treatment of cervical cancers, with respect to conventional radiotherapy. Dosimetric plans associated with each of these techniques have been compared. Dose-volume histograms of these three plans have also been compared for the previsional target volume (PTV), organs at risk, and sane tissue. IMCT techniques are equivalent in terms of sparing of organs at risk, and improve target volume coverage with respect to conventional radiotherapy. Arc-therapy reduces significantly treatment duration. Short communication

  11. Clinical signs and organ pathology in rats exposed to graded doses ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    haemorrhages, vasculitis and thrombosis in many organs, and Kuppfer and intestinal goblet cells hyperplasia. The severity of the lesions was dose and time dependent. The lesions observed suggest interference with tissue energy metabolism and widespread vascular damage and multi-organ degeneration and necrosis.

  12. Doses in sensitive organs during prostate treatment with a 60Co unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega-Carrillo, H.R.; Navarro Becerra, J.A.; Pérez Arrieta, M.L.; Pérez-Landeros, L.H.

    2014-01-01

    Using thermoluminiscent dosimeters the absorbed dose in the bladder, rectum and thyroid have been evaluated when 200 cGy was applied to the prostate. The treatment was applied with a 60 Co unit. A water phantom was built and thermoluminiscent dosimeters were located in the position where the prostate, bladder, rectum and thyroid are located. The therapeutic beam was applied in 4 irradiations at 0, 90, 180 and 270° with the prostate at the isocenter. The TLDs readouts were used to evaluate the absorbed dose in each organ. The absorbed doses were used to estimate the effective doses and the probability of developing secondary malignacies in thyroid, rectum and bladder. - Highlights: • The absorbed doses in the bladder, rectum and thyroid were measured. • Measurements were done during prostate treatment with a 60 Co unit. • TLD100s in a water phantom were used. • The effective doses were also estimated

  13. X-rays individual dose assessment using TLD dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salas, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology used in Embalse NPP for measuring individual X-ray dose in dentists and radiologists, who work in areas near the plant. Personnel is provided with TLD personal dosimeters for thoracic use, as well as TLD ring dosimeters. This individual X-ray dosimetry is fundamental in order to know the effective energy coming from the radiation field, since the dosimetry factors depend on it. On the other hand, the response of the TLD crystals also depends of the effective energy; this accentuates the problem when assessing the individual dose. The X-ray dosimeter must simultaneously determine the value of the effective energy and the corresponding dose value. The basic principle for determining effective energy is by using at least two different TLD materials covered by filters of different thickness. The TLD materials used have totally energy responses. Therefore, different readouts from each of the crystals are obtained. The ratio between both readouts provides a factor that depends of the effective energy but that is 'independent' from the exposure values irradiated to the dosimeter. The Personal TLD dosimeter currently in use is Bicron-Harshaw. It comprises a carrier model 8807. This carrier contains a card model 2211 which groups two TLD 200 crystals and two TLD 100 crystals. It has internal filters at each side of the TLD 200 crystals. The periodical calibration of these dosimeters consists in the irradiation of some dosimeters with different X-ray energy beams in the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA). This dosimeter was used, by the National Regulatory Authority (ARN) in several comparisons, always getting satisfactory results. (author)

  14. Revue of some dosimetry and dose assessment European projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolognese-Milsztajn, T.; Frank, D.; Lacoste, V.; Pihet, P.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Within the 5. Framework Programme of the European Commission several project dealing with dosimetry and dose assessment for internal and external exposure have been supported. A revue of the results of some of them is presented in this paper. The EURADOS network which involved 50 dosimetry institutes in EUROPE has coordinated the project DOSIMETRY NETWORK: the main results achieved within this action are the following: - The release on the World Wide Web of the EURADOS Database of Dosimetry Research Facilities; - The realisation of the report 'Harmonization of Individual Monitoring (IM) in Europe'; - The continuation of the intercomparisons programme of environmental radiation monitoring systems; - The realisation of the report Cosmic radiation exposure of aircraft crew. The EVIDOS project aimed at evaluating state of the art dosimetry techniques in representative workplaces of the nuclear industry with complex mixed neutron-photon radiation fields. This paper summarises the main findings from a practical point of view. Conclusions and recommendations will be given concerning characterisation of radiation fields, methods to derive radiation protection quantities and dosimeters results. The IDEA project aimed to improve the assessment of incorporated radionuclides through developments of advanced in-vivo and bioassay monitoring techniques and making use of such enhancements for improvements in routine monitoring. The primary goal was to categorize those new developments regarding their potential and eligibility for the routine monitoring community. The costs of monitoring for internal exposures in the workplace are usually significantly greater than the equivalent costs for external exposures. There is therefore a need to ensure that resources are employed with maximum effectiveness. The EC-funded OMINEX (Optimisation of Monitoring for Internal Exposure) project has developed methods for optimising the design and implementation of

  15. A convolution method for predicting mean treatment dose including organ motion at imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, J.T.; Zavgorodni, S.F.; Royal Adelaide Hospital, SA

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The random treatment delivery errors (organ motion and set-up error) can be incorporated into the treatment planning software using a convolution method. Mean treatment dose is computed as the convolution of a static dose distribution with a variation kernel. Typically this variation kernel is Gaussian with variance equal to the sum of the organ motion and set-up error variances. We propose a novel variation kernel for the convolution technique that additionally considers the position of the mobile organ in the planning CT image. The systematic error of organ position in the planning CT image can be considered random for each patient over a population. Thus the variance of the variation kernel will equal the sum of treatment delivery variance and organ motion variance at planning for the population of treatments. The kernel is extended to deal with multiple pre-treatment CT scans to improve tumour localisation for planning. Mean treatment doses calculated with the convolution technique are compared to benchmark Monte Carlo (MC) computations. Calculations of mean treatment dose using the convolution technique agreed with MC results for all cases to better than ± 1 Gy in the planning treatment volume for a prescribed 60 Gy treatment. Convolution provides a quick method of incorporating random organ motion (captured in the planning CT image and during treatment delivery) and random set-up errors directly into the dose distribution. Copyright (2000) Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine

  16. SU-E-T-371: Validation of Organ Doses Delivered During Craniospinal Irradiation with Helical Tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Andujar, A; Chen, J; Garcia, A; Haas-Kogan, D [University of San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: New techniques have been developed to deliver more conformal treatments to the craniospinal axis. One concern, however, is the widespread low dose delivered and implications for possible late effects. The purpose of this work is for the first time to validate the organ doses calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS), including out-of-field doses for a pediatric craniospinal treatment (CSI). Methods: A CSI plan prescribed to 23.4 Gy and a posterior fossa boost plan to 30.6 Gy (total dose 54.0 Gy) was developed for a pediatric anthropomorphic phantom representing a 13 yearold- child. For the CSI plan, the planning target volumes (PTV) consisted of the brain and spinal cord with 2 mm and 5 mm expansions, respectively. Organs at risk (OAR) were contoured and included in the plan optimization. The plans were delivered on a helical tomotherapy unit. Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were used to measure the dose at 54 positions within the PTV and OARs. Results: For the CSI treatment, the mean percent difference between TPS dose calculations and measurements was 5% for the PTV and 10% for the OARs. For the boost, the average was 3% for the PTV. The percent difference for the OARs, which lie outside the field and received a small fraction of the prescription dose, varied from 15% to 200%. However in terms of absolute dose, the average difference between measurement and TPS per treatment Gy was 2 cGy/Gy and 3 mGy/Gy for the CSI and boost plans, respectively. Conclusion: There was good agreement between doses calculated by the TPS and measurements for the CSI treatment. Higher percent differences were observed for out-of-field doses in the boost plan, but absolute dose differences were very small compared to the prescription dose. These findings can help in the estimation of late effects after radiotherapy for pediatric patients.

  17. A method to acquire CT organ dose map using OSL dosimeters and ATOM anthropomorphic phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Da; Li, Xinhua; Liu, Bob [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics and Webster Center for Advanced Research and Education in Radiation, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Gao, Yiming; Xu, X. George [Nuclear Engineering Program, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To present the design and procedure of an experimental method for acquiring densely sampled organ dose map for CT applications, based on optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters “nanoDots” and standard ATOM anthropomorphic phantoms; and to provide the results of applying the method—a dose data set with good statistics for the comparison with Monte Carlo simulation result in the future.Methods: A standard ATOM phantom has densely located holes (in 3 × 3 cm or 1.5 × 1.5 cm grids), which are too small (5 mm in diameter) to host many types of dosimeters, including the nanoDots. The authors modified the conventional way in which nanoDots are used, by removing the OSL disks from the holders before inserting them inside a standard ATOM phantom for dose measurements. The authors solved three technical difficulties introduced by this modification: (1) energy dependent dose calibration for raw OSL readings; (2) influence of the brief background exposure of OSL disks to dimmed room light; (3) correct pairing between the dose readings and measurement locations. The authors acquired 100 dose measurements at various positions in the phantom, which was scanned using a clinical chest protocol with both angular and z-axis tube current modulations.Results: Dose calibration was performed according to the beam qualities inside the phantom as determined from an established Monte Carlo model of the scanner. The influence of the brief exposure to dimmed room light was evaluated and deemed negligible. Pairing between the OSL readings and measurement locations was ensured by the experimental design. The organ doses measured for a routine adult chest scan protocol ranged from 9.4 to 18.8 mGy, depending on the composition, location, and surrounding anatomy of the organs. The dose distribution across different slices of the phantom strongly depended on the z-axis mA modulation. In the same slice, doses to the soft tissues other than the spinal cord demonstrated

  18. A method to acquire CT organ dose map using OSL dosimeters and ATOM anthropomorphic phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Da; Li, Xinhua; Liu, Bob; Gao, Yiming; Xu, X. George

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To present the design and procedure of an experimental method for acquiring densely sampled organ dose map for CT applications, based on optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dosimeters “nanoDots” and standard ATOM anthropomorphic phantoms; and to provide the results of applying the method—a dose data set with good statistics for the comparison with Monte Carlo simulation result in the future.Methods: A standard ATOM phantom has densely located holes (in 3 × 3 cm or 1.5 × 1.5 cm grids), which are too small (5 mm in diameter) to host many types of dosimeters, including the nanoDots. The authors modified the conventional way in which nanoDots are used, by removing the OSL disks from the holders before inserting them inside a standard ATOM phantom for dose measurements. The authors solved three technical difficulties introduced by this modification: (1) energy dependent dose calibration for raw OSL readings; (2) influence of the brief background exposure of OSL disks to dimmed room light; (3) correct pairing between the dose readings and measurement locations. The authors acquired 100 dose measurements at various positions in the phantom, which was scanned using a clinical chest protocol with both angular and z-axis tube current modulations.Results: Dose calibration was performed according to the beam qualities inside the phantom as determined from an established Monte Carlo model of the scanner. The influence of the brief exposure to dimmed room light was evaluated and deemed negligible. Pairing between the OSL readings and measurement locations was ensured by the experimental design. The organ doses measured for a routine adult chest scan protocol ranged from 9.4 to 18.8 mGy, depending on the composition, location, and surrounding anatomy of the organs. The dose distribution across different slices of the phantom strongly depended on the z-axis mA modulation. In the same slice, doses to the soft tissues other than the spinal cord demonstrated

  19. Dose volume assessment of high dose rate 192IR endobronchial implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, B. Saw; Korb, Leroy J.; Pawlicki, Todd; Wu, Andrew

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To study the dose distributions of high dose rate (HDR) endobronchial implants using the dose nonuniformity ratio (DNR) and three volumetric irradiation indices. Methods and Materials: Multiple implants were configured by allowing a single HDR 192 Ir source to step through a length of 6 cm along an endobronchial catheter. Dwell times were computed to deliver a dose of 5 Gy to points 1 cm away from the catheter axis. Five sets of source configurations, each with different dwell position spacings from 0.5 to 3.0 cm, were evaluated. Three-dimensional (3D) dose distributions were then generated for each source configuration. Differential and cumulative dose-volume curves were generated to quantify the degree of target volume coverage, dose nonuniformity within the target volume, and irradiation of tissues outside the target volume. Evaluation of the implants were made using the DNR and three volumetric irradiation indices. Results: The observed isodose distributions were not able to satisfy all the dose constraints. The ability to optimally satisfy the dose constraints depended on the choice of dwell position spacing and the specification of the dose constraint points. The DNR and irradiation indices suggest that small dwell position spacing does not result in a more homogeneous dose distribution for the implant. This study supports the existence of a relationship between the dwell position spacing and the distance from the catheter axis to the reference dose or dose constraint points. Better dose homogeneity for an implant can be obtained if the spacing of the dwell positions are about twice the distance from the catheter axis to the reference dose or dose constraint points

  20. Interactive Rapid Dose Assessment Model (IRDAM): reactor-accident assessment methods. Vol.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poeton, R.W.; Moeller, M.P.; Laughlin, G.J.; Desrosiers, A.E.

    1983-05-01

    As part of the continuing emphasis on emergency preparedness, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsored the development of a rapid dose assessment system by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This system, the Interactive Rapid Dose Assessment Model (IRDAM) is a micro-computer based program for rapidly assessing the radiological impact of accidents at nuclear power plants. This document describes the technical bases for IRDAM including methods, models and assumptions used in calculations. IRDAM calculates whole body (5-cm depth) and infant thyroid doses at six fixed downwind distances between 500 and 20,000 meters. Radionuclides considered primarily consist of noble gases and radioiodines. In order to provide a rapid assessment capability consistent with the capacity of the Osborne-1 computer, certain simplifying approximations and assumptions are made. These are described, along with default values (assumptions used in the absence of specific input) in the text of this document. Two companion volumes to this one provide additional information on IRDAM. The user's Guide (NUREG/CR-3012, Volume 1) describes the setup and operation of equipment necessary to run IRDAM. Scenarios for Comparing Dose Assessment Models (NUREG/CR-3012, Volume 3) provides the results of calculations made by IRDAM and other models for specific accident scenarios

  1. Dosimetry of {sup 223}Ra-chloride: dose to normal organs and tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lassmann, Michael [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Nosske, Dietmar [Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS), Department of Radiation and Health, Oberschleissheim (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    {sup 223}Ra-Chloride (also called Alpharadin {sup registered}) targets bone metastases with short range alpha particles. In recent years several clinical trials have been carried out showing, in particular, the safety and efficacy of palliation of painful bone metastases in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer using {sup 223}Ra-chloride. The purpose of this work was to provide a comprehensive dosimetric calculation of organ doses after intravenous administration of {sup 223}Ra-chloride according to the present International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) model for radium. Absorbed doses were calculated for 25 organs or tissues. Bone endosteum and red bone marrow show the highest dose coefficients followed by liver, colon and intestines. After a treatment schedule of six intravenous injections with 0.05 MBq/kg of {sup 223}Ra-chloride each, corresponding to 21 MBq for a 70 kg patient, the absorbed alpha dose to the bone endosteal cells is about 16 Gy and the corresponding absorbed dose to the red bone marrow is approximately 1.5 Gy. The comprehensive list of dose coefficients presented in this work will assist in comparing and evaluating organ doses from various therapy modalities used in nuclear medicine and will provide a base for further development of patient-specific dosimetry. (orig.)

  2. Human intruder dose assessment for deep geological disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G. M.; Molinero, J.; Delos, A.; Valls, A.; Conesa, A.; Smith, K.; Hjerpe, T.

    2013-07-01

    For near-surface disposal, approaches to assessment of inadvertent human intrusion have been developed through international cooperation within the IAEA's ISAM programme. Other assessments have considered intrusion into deep geological disposal facilities, but comparable international cooperation to develop an approach for deep disposal has not taken place. Accordingly, the BIOPROTA collaboration project presented here (1) examined the technical aspects of why and how deep geological intrusion might occur; (2) considered how and to what degree radiation exposure would arise to the people involved in such intrusion; (3) identified the processes which constrain the uncertainties; and hence (4) developed and documented an approach for evaluation of human intruder doses which addresses the criteria adopted by the IAEA and takes account of other international guidance and human intrusion assessment experience. Models for radiation exposure of the drilling workers and geologists were developed and described together with compilation of relevant input data, taking into account relevant combinations of drilling technique, geological formation and repository material. Consideration has been given also to others who might be exposed to contaminated material left at the site after drilling work has ceased. The models have been designed to be simple and stylised, in accordance with international recommendations. The set of combinations comprises 58 different scenarios which cover a very wide range of human intrusion possibilities via deep drilling. (orig.)

  3. Estimate of the absorbed dose in the mouse organs and tissues after tritium administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Masahiro

    2000-01-01

    Chronic and accidental release of tritium from future fusion facilities may cause some extent of hazardous effect to the public health. Various experiments using small animals such as mice have been performed to mimic the dose accumulation due to tritium intake by the human body. An difficulty in such animal experiments using small animals is that it is rather difficult to administer tritium orally and estimate the dose to small organs or tissues. In the course of our study, a simple method to administer THO and T-labeled amino acids orally to the mouse was dictated and dose accumulation in various organs and tissues was determined. The tritium retention in the bone marrow was also determined using the micro-centrifuge method. Throughout our experiment, colony-bred DDY mice were used. The 8-10 week old male mice were orally and intraperitoneally administered THO water or T-amino acids mixture solution. For the purpose of oral administration, a 10 μl aliquot of T-containing saline solution was placed on the tongue of the mice using an automatic micropipette. At various times after tritium administration, the animals were sacrificed and the amount of tritium in various tissues and organs including bone marrow was examined. Dose accumulation pattern after THO intake and T-amino acids was compared between intraperitoneal injection and oral administration. The accumulated dose after oral administration of THO exhibited a tendency to be 10-20% higher than after intraperitoneal injection. The bone marrow dose after oral intake of THO was found to be lower than the doses to urine, blood, liver and testis. In contrast, the blood dose gave a conservative estimate for the dose to the other tissues and organs. (author)

  4. Reevaluation of time spent indoors used for exposure dose assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Katsumi; Fujimoto, Kenzo

    2016-01-01

    A time spent indoors of sixteen hours per day (indoor occupancy factor: 0.67) has been used to assess the radiation dose of residents who spend daily life in the area contaminated due to the nuclear accident in Japan. However, much longer time is considered to be spent indoors for recent modern life. United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) has been used an indoor occupancy factor of 0.8 since 1977 and a few reports suggested much higher indoor occupancy factors. Therefore it is important to reevaluate the indoor occupancy factor using current available survey data in Japan, such as 'NHK 2010 National Time Use Survey' and 'Survey on Time Use and Leisure Activities' of Statistics Bureau with certain assumption of time spent indoors in each daily activity. The total time spent indoors in a day is calculated to be 20.2 hours and its indoor occupancy factor is 0.84. Much lower indoor occupancy factors were derived from the survey data by Statistics Bureau for 10 to 14 and 15 to 19 years old groups and farmers who spend most of their time outdoors although present estimated indoor occupancy factor of 0.84 is still lower than those found in some of the relevant reports. A rounded indoor occupancy factor of 0.80 might be the appropriate conservative reference value to be used for the dose estimation of people who live in radioactively contaminated areas and for other relevant purposes of exposure assessment, taken into consideration the present results and values reported in United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) and UNSCEAR. (author)

  5. Effect of Localizer Radiography Projection on Organ Dose at Chest CT with Automatic Tube Current Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltybaeva, Natalia; Krauss, Andreas; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2017-03-01

    Purpose To calculate the effect of localizer radiography projections to the total radiation dose, including both the dose from localizer radiography and that from subsequent chest computed tomography (CT) with tube current modulation (TCM). Materials and Methods An anthropomorphic phantom was scanned with 192-section CT without and with differently sized breast attachments. Chest CT with TCM was performed after one localizer radiographic examination with anteroposterior (AP) or posteroanterior (PA) projections. Dose distributions were obtained by means of Monte Carlo simulations based on acquired CT data. For Monte Carlo simulations of localizer radiography, the tube position was fixed at 0° and 180°; for chest CT, a spiral trajectory with TCM was used. The effect of tube start angles on dose distribution was investigated with Monte Carlo simulations by using TCM curves with fixed start angles (0°, 90°, and 180°). Total doses for lungs, heart, and breast were calculated as the sum of the dose from localizer radiography and CT. Image noise was defined as the standard deviation of attenuation measured in 14 circular regions of interest. The Wilcoxon signed rank test, paired t test, and Friedman analysis of variance were conducted to evaluate differences in noise, TCM curves, and organ doses, respectively. Results Organ doses from localizer radiography were lower when using a PA instead of an AP projection (P = .005). The use of a PA projection resulted in higher TCM values for chest CT (P chest CT. © RSNA, 2016 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  6. Assessment of population external irradiation doses with consideration of Rospotrebnadzor bodies equipment for monitoring of photon radiation dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Stamat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides review of equipment and methodology for measurement of photon radiation dose; analysis of possible reasons for considerable deviation between the Russian Federation population annual effective external irradiation doses and the relevant average global value. Data on Rospotrebnadzor bodies dosimetry equipment used for measurement of gamma radiation dose are collected and systematized. Over 60 kinds of dosimeters are used for monitoring of population external irradiation doses. Most of dosimeters used in the country have gas-discharge detectors (Geiger-Mueller counters, minor biochemical annunciators, etc. which have higher total values of own background level and of space radiation response than the modern dosimeters with scintillation detectors. This feature of dosimeters is apparently one of most plausible reasons of a bit overstating assessment of population external irradiation doses. The options for specification of population external irradiation doses assessment are: correction of gamma radiation dose measurement results with consideration of dosimeters own background level and space radiation response, introduction of more up-to-date dosimeters with scintillation detectors, etc. The most promising direction of research in verification of population external irradiation doses assessment is account of dosimetry equipment.

  7. A model to incorporate organ deformation in the evaluation of dose/volume relationship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, D.; Jaffray, D.; Wong, J.; Brabbins, D.; Martinez, A. A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Measurements of internal organ motion have demonstrated that daily organ deformation exists during the course of radiation treatment. However, a model to evaluate the resultant dose delivered to a daily deformed organ remains a difficult challenge. Current methods which model such organ deformation as rigid body motion in the dose calculation for treatment planning evaluation are incorrect and misleading. In this study, a new model for treatment planning evaluation is introduced which incorporates patient specific information of daily organ deformation and setup variation. The model was also used to retrospectively analyze the actual treatment data measured using daily CT scans for 5 patients with prostate treatment. Methods and Materials: The model assumes that for each patient, the organ of interest can be measured during the first few treatment days. First, the volume of each organ is delineated from each of the daily measurements and cumulated in a 3D bit-map. A tissue occupancy distribution is then constructed with the 50% isodensity representing the mean, or effective, organ volume. During the course of treatment, each voxel in the effective organ volume is assumed to move inside a local 3D neighborhood with a specific distribution function. The neighborhood and the distribution function are deduced from the positions and shapes of the organ in the first few measurements using the biomechanics model of viscoelastic body. For each voxel, the local distribution function is then convolved with the spatial dose distribution. The latter includes also the variation in dose due to daily setup error. As a result, the cumulative dose to the voxel incorporates the effects of daily setup variation and organ deformation. A ''variation adjusted'' dose volume histogram, aDVH, for the effective organ volume can then be constructed for the purpose of treatment evaluation and optimization. Up to 20 daily CT scans and daily portal images for 5 patients with prostate

  8. Internal Dose Conversion Coefficients of Domestic Reference Animal and Plants for Dose Assessment of Non-human Species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keum, Dong Kwon; Jun, In; Lim, Kwang Muk; Choi, Yong Ho

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, radiation protection has been focused on a radiation exposure of human beings. In the international radiation protection community, one of the recent key issues is to establish the methodology for assessing the radiological impact of an ionizing radiation on non-human species for an environmental protection. To assess the radiological impact to non-human species dose conversion coefficients are essential. This paper describes the methodology to calculate the internal dose conversion coefficient for non-human species and presents calculated internal dose conversion coefficients of 25 radionuclides for 8 domestic reference animal and plants

  9. Assessing doses to terrestrial wildlife at a radioactive waste disposal site: Inter-comparison of modelling approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansen, M.P., E-mail: mathew.johansen@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW, 2232 (Australia); Barnett, C.L., E-mail: clb@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Beresford, N.A., E-mail: nab@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Brown, J.E., E-mail: justin.brown@nrpa.no [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Oesteraas (Norway); Cerne, M., E-mail: marko.cerne@ijs.si [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Howard, B.J., E-mail: bjho@ceh.ac.uk [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Kamboj, S., E-mail: skamboj@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States); Keum, D.-K., E-mail: dkkeum@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Smodis, B. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Twining, J.R., E-mail: jrt@ansto.gov.au [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Locked Bag 2001, Kirrawee DC, NSW, 2232 (Australia); Vandenhove, H., E-mail: hvandenh@sckcen.be [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Mol (Belgium); Vives i Batlle, J., E-mail: jvbatll@sckcen.be [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, Mol (Belgium); Wood, M.D., E-mail: m.d.wood@salford.ac.uk [University of Salford, Manchester (United Kingdom); Yu, C., E-mail: cyu@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Radiological doses to terrestrial wildlife were examined in this model inter-comparison study that emphasised factors causing variability in dose estimation. The study participants used varying modelling approaches and information sources to estimate dose rates and tissue concentrations for a range of biota types exposed to soil contamination at a shallow radionuclide waste burial site in Australia. Results indicated that the dominant factor causing variation in dose rate estimates (up to three orders of magnitude on mean total dose rates) was the soil-to-organism transfer of radionuclides that included variation in transfer parameter values as well as transfer calculation methods. Additional variation was associated with other modelling factors including: how participants conceptualised and modelled the exposure configurations (two orders of magnitude); which progeny to include with the parent radionuclide (typically less than one order of magnitude); and dose calculation parameters, including radiation weighting factors and dose conversion coefficients (typically less than one order of magnitude). Probabilistic approaches to model parameterisation were used to encompass and describe variable model parameters and outcomes. The study confirms the need for continued evaluation of the underlying mechanisms governing soil-to-organism transfer of radionuclides to improve estimation of dose rates to terrestrial wildlife. The exposure pathways and configurations available in most current codes are limited when considering instances where organisms access subsurface contamination through rooting, burrowing, or using different localised waste areas as part of their habitual routines. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Assessment of modelled dose rates to terrestrial biota from radionuclides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The substantial variation among current approaches is quantifiable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The dominant variable was soil-to-organism

  10. Analysis of the Dose Distribution of Moving Organ using a Moving Phantom System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yon Lae; Park, Byung Moon; Bae, Yong Ki; Kang, Min Young; Bang, Dong Wan; Lee, Gui Won

    2006-01-01

    Few researches have been performed on the dose distribution of the moving organ for radiotherapy so far. In order to simulate the organ motion caused by respiratory function, multipurpose phantom and moving device was used and dosimetric measurements for dose distribution of the moving organs were conducted in this study. The purpose of our study was to evaluate how dose distributions are changed due to respiratory motion. A multipurpose phantom and a moving device were developed for the measurement of the dose distribution of the moving organ due to respiratory function. Acryl chosen design of the phantom was considered the most obvious choice for phantom material. For construction of the phantom, we used acryl and cork with density of 1.14 g/cm 3 , 0.32 g/cm 3 respectively. Acryl and cork slab in the phantom were used to simulate the normal organ and lung respectively. The moving phantom system was composed of moving device, moving control system, and acryl and cork phantom. Gafchromic film and EDR2 film were used to measure dose distributions. The moving device system may be driven by two directional step motors and able to perform 2 dimensional movements (x, z axis), but only 1 dimensional movement(z axis) was used for this study. Larger penumbra was shown in the cork phantom than in the acryl phantom. The dose profile and isodose curve of Gafchromic EBT film were not uniform since the film has small optical density responding to the dose. As the organ motion was increased, the blurrings in penumbra, flatness, and symmetry were increased. Most of measurements of dose distributions, Gafchromic EBT film has poor flatness and symmetry than EDR2 film, but both penumbra distributions were more or less comparable. The Gafchromic EBT film is more useful as it does not need development and more radiation dose could be exposed than EDR2 film without losing film characteristics. But as response of the optical density of Gafchromic EBT film to dose is low, beam profiles

  11. Evaluation on organ dose and image quality of lumber spine radiography using glass dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Kyeom; Kim, Jeong Koo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide resources for medical exposure reduction through evaluation of organ dose and image resolution for lumbar spine around according to the size of the collimator in DR system. The size of the collimator were varied from 8″×17″ to 14″×17″ by 1″ in AP and lateral projection for the lumbar spine radiography with RANDO phantom. The organ dose measured for liver, stomach, pancreas, kidney and gonad by the glass dosimeter. The image resolution was analyzed using the Image J program. The organ dose of around lumbar spine were reduced as the size of the collimator is decreased in AP projection. There were no significant changes decreasing rate whenever the size of the collimator were reduced 1″ in the gonad. The organ dose showed higher on liver and kidney near the surface in lateral projection. There were decreasing rate of less than 5% in liver and kidney, but decreasing rate was 24.34% in the gonad whenever the size of the collimator were reduced 1″. Organ dose difference for internal and external of collimator measured 549.8 μGy in the liver and 264.6 μGy in the stomach. There were no significant changes organ dose difference that measured 1,135.1 μG in the gonad. Image Quality made no difference because SNR and PSNR were over than 30 dB when the collimator size is less than 9″×17″ on AP projection and 10″×17″ on lateral projection. Therefore, we are considered that the recommendations criterion for control of collimator were suggested in order to reduce unnecessary X-ray exposure and to obtain good image quality because lumbar spine radiography contains a lot of peripheral organs rather than other area radiography

  12. A geographical basis for long-range dose assessment calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, H.; Hage, G.

    1989-01-01

    Releases of radioactive material into the atmosphere have effects that are distributed over the earth's surface. As a result, geographical information can play an important role in understanding the impact of an emergency. The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is an emergency response organization that utilizes complex computer models to provide real-time assessments of the consequences of such releases. These models are one component of a sophisticated system that also includes data-gathering systems, data analysis techniques, and highly trained operational personnel. The products of this service are isopleths of the material concentration plotted over a base map of geographic features. The components mentioned in this paper are being added to the operation ARAC system. This will provide a means of producing fast, high-quality assessments of the consequences of major releases of radioactive material with effects extending to continental and global regions

  13. Diffuse and fugitive emission dose assessment on the Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W.E.; Schmidt, J.W.; Gleckler, B.P.; Rhoads, K.

    1995-01-01

    On February 3, 1993, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL), received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Division of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10. The Compliance Order requires RL to (1) evaluate all radionuclide emission points at the Hanford Site to determine which are subject to continuous emission measurement requirements in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61, Subpart H, and (2) continuously measure radionuclide emissions in accordance with 40 CFR 61.93. The Information Request requires RL to provide a written Compliance Plan to meet the requirements of the Compliance Order. The RL Compliance Plan included as one of its milestones the requirement to develop a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement (FFCA). An FFCA was negotiated between RL and the EPA, Region 10, and was entered into on February 7, 1994. One of the milestones was to provide EPA, Region 10, with a copy of the Federal Clean Air Act Title V operating air permit application and Air Emission Inventory (AEI) concurrent with its submission to the Washington State Department of Ecology. The AEI will include an assessment of the diffuse and fugitive emissions from the Hanford Site. This assessment does not identify any diffuse or fugitive emission source that would cause an effective dose equivalent greater than 0.1 mrem/yr

  14. Radiation therapy for stage IIA and IIB testicular seminoma: peripheral dose calculations and risk assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazonakis, Michalis; Berris, Theocharris; Lyraraki, Efrossyni; Damilakis, John

    2015-03-01

    This study was conducted to calculate the peripheral dose to critical structures and assess the radiation risks from modern radiotherapy for stage IIA/IIB testicular seminoma. A Monte Carlo code was used for treatment simulation on a computational phantom representing an average adult. The initial treatment phase involved anteroposterior and posteroanaterior modified dog-leg fields exposing para-aortic and ipsilateral iliac lymph nodes followed by a cone-down phase for nodal mass irradiation. Peripheral doses were calculated using different modified dog-leg field dimensions and an extended conventional dog-leg portal. The risk models of the BEIR-VII report and ICRP-103 were combined with dosimetric calculations to estimate the probability of developing stochastic effects. Radiotherapy for stage IIA seminoma with a target dose of 30 Gy resulted in a range of 23.0-603.7 mGy to non-targeted peripheral tissues and organs. The corresponding range for treatment of stage IIB disease to a cumulative dose of 36 Gy was 24.2-633.9 mGy. A dose variation of less than 13% was found by altering the field dimensions. Radiotherapy with the conventional instead of the modern modified dog-leg field increased the peripheral dose up to 8.2 times. The calculated heart doses of 589.0-632.9 mGy may increase the risk for developing cardiovascular diseases whereas the testicular dose of more than 231.9 mGy may lead to a temporary infertility. The probability of birth abnormalities in the offspring of cancer survivors was below 0.13% which is much lower than the spontaneous mutation rate. Abdominoplevic irradiation may increase the lifetime intrinsic risk for the induction of secondary malignancies by 0.6-3.9% depending upon the site of interest, patient’s age and tumor dose. Radiotherapy for stage IIA/IIB seminoma with restricted fields and low doses is associated with an increased morbidity. These data may allow the definition of a risk-adapted follow-up scheme for long

  15. An approach to calculating absorbed doses to organs of high radiation sensitivity in diagnostic radioisotope examinations in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staniszewska, M.A.; Jankowski, J.

    1984-01-01

    A method is presented of dose calculations for internal exposures of organ-sources and organ-targets. Variations of absorbed doses depending on sex and age of the patients investigated with the use of radionuclides are discussed. Definitions of the effective and collective dose equivalents are also given. 8 refs., 1 tab. (author)

  16. Technology Assessment and Roadmap for the Emergency Radiation Dose Assessment Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turteltaub, K W; Hartman-Siantar, C; Easterly, C; Blakely, W

    2005-10-03

    A Joint Interagency Working Group (JIWG) under the auspices of the Department of Homeland Security Office of Research and Development conducted a technology assessment of emergency radiological dose assessment capabilities as part of the overall need for rapid emergency medical response in the event of a radiological terrorist event in the United States. The goal of the evaluation is to identify gaps and recommend general research and development needs to better prepare the Country for mitigating the effects of such an event. Given the capabilities and roles for responding to a radiological event extend across many agencies, a consensus of gaps and suggested development plans was a major goal of this evaluation and road-mapping effort. The working group consisted of experts representing the Departments of Homeland Security, Health and Human Services (Centers for Disease Control and the National Institutes of Health), Food and Drug Administration, Department of Defense and the Department of Energy's National Laboratories (see appendix A for participants). The specific goals of this Technology Assessment and Roadmap were to: (1) Describe the general context for deployment of emergency radiation dose assessment tools following terrorist use of a radiological or nuclear device; (2) Assess current and emerging dose assessment technologies; and (3) Put forward a consensus high-level technology roadmap for interagency research and development in this area. This report provides a summary of the consensus of needs, gaps and recommendations for a research program in the area of radiation dosimetry for early response, followed by a summary of the technologies available and on the near-term horizon. We then present a roadmap for a research program to bring present and emerging near-term technologies to bear on the gaps in radiation dose assessment and triage. Finally we present detailed supporting discussion on the nature of the threats we considered, the status of

  17. Technology Assessment and Roadmap for the Emergency Radiation Dose Assessment Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turteltaub, K W; Hartman-Siantar, C; Easterly, C; Blakely, W

    2005-01-01

    A Joint Interagency Working Group (JIWG) under the auspices of the Department of Homeland Security Office of Research and Development conducted a technology assessment of emergency radiological dose assessment capabilities as part of the overall need for rapid emergency medical response in the event of a radiological terrorist event in the United States. The goal of the evaluation is to identify gaps and recommend general research and development needs to better prepare the Country for mitigating the effects of such an event. Given the capabilities and roles for responding to a radiological event extend across many agencies, a consensus of gaps and suggested development plans was a major goal of this evaluation and road-mapping effort. The working group consisted of experts representing the Departments of Homeland Security, Health and Human Services (Centers for Disease Control and the National Institutes of Health), Food and Drug Administration, Department of Defense and the Department of Energy's National Laboratories (see appendix A for participants). The specific goals of this Technology Assessment and Roadmap were to: (1) Describe the general context for deployment of emergency radiation dose assessment tools following terrorist use of a radiological or nuclear device; (2) Assess current and emerging dose assessment technologies; and (3) Put forward a consensus high-level technology roadmap for interagency research and development in this area. This report provides a summary of the consensus of needs, gaps and recommendations for a research program in the area of radiation dosimetry for early response, followed by a summary of the technologies available and on the near-term horizon. We then present a roadmap for a research program to bring present and emerging near-term technologies to bear on the gaps in radiation dose assessment and triage. Finally we present detailed supporting discussion on the nature of the threats we considered, the status of technology

  18. Computerized assessment of the measurement of individual doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiibus, A.

    1981-06-01

    The department for the measurements of individual doses makes regular dose controls by means of film badges for approximately 14000 individuals. The operation is facilitated by a Honeywell Bull Mini 6 Mod 43 computer. The computer language is COBOL applied to registering of in-data such as delivery of badges, film development, calibration, invoices, recording of individual doses and customers. The print-out consists of customers, badge codes, dosimeter lists, development specifications, dose statements, addresses, bills, dose statistics and the register of individuals. As a consequence of charges the activity is financially self-supporting. (G.B.)

  19. Estimation dose in organs of hyperthyroidism patients treated with I-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farias de Lima, F.; Khoury, H.C.; Bertelli Neto, L.; Hazin, C.

    1997-01-01

    Full text: The absorbed dose in organs of hyperthyroidism patients, which received 370 MBq and 555 MBq of I-131 were estimated, using the MIRDOSE computational program and data of the ICRP-53 publication. The calculus were done considering an equal uptake to 45% and an effective half life of 5 days, these values are closed to the average values found in 17 studied patients. The thyroidal masses were previously determined by the physicians and varied between 40 g and 80 g The results showed that the dose in the thyroid, for an activity of 370 MBq, varied between 99 Gy and 49,5 Gy for the masses of 40 g and 80 g respectively. In the case of the administration of 555 MBq the patients had thyroidal masses between 60 g and 80 g and the doses varied between 99 Gy and 74,2 Gy, respectively. These values showed that the absorbed doses in thyroid are within limits expected for the hyperthyroidism therapy, which are of 506 Gy to 100 Gy. The 100 Gy dose would be exceeded, if the patients with thyroidal mass of 40 g had received a therapeutic dose of 555 MBq. The estimated media doses in others organs were relatively low, with inferior values of 0,1 Gy in kidneys, bone marrow and ovaries and of 0,19 Gy in stomach

  20. Electron arc therapy: Influence of heterogeneities on dose to blood-forming organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leavitt, D.D.; Gibbs, F.A.; Moeller, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Electron arc therapy has been used successfully to treat extended chest wall surfaces after mastectomy. Treatment is frequently given simultaneously with chemotherapy. Although the primary electron arc treatment volume consists only of the chest wall and mediastinum, dose is accumulated at the isocenter of rotation due to the photon contamination of the arcing electron beam. Additionally, higher energy electron fields which are occasionally used over segments of the arc may contribute to the dose at isocenter if the electron range has been extended due to passage through a low-density heterogeneity such as lung. In some patient setups, the isocenter may intersect blood-forming organs, such as the vertebral bodies. Thermoluminescent dosimetry has been used to measure the dose at isocenter for the following setups: polystyrene phantom, polystyrene phantom covered by 1-cm-thick lead cast, polystyrene phantom with cork insert to simulate lung, and phantom plus cork insert plus lead cast. For the 9-MeV treatment mode, dose at isocenter per 90 0 of arc (as a percentage of maximum tumor dose) is as follows: phantom, 6.5%; phantom plus lead, 5%; phantom plus cork, 8%; and phantom plus cork plus lead, 6%. These values must be scaled by the size of the arc to estimate dose at isocenter in actual treatments. Computer calculation showed good agreement with these measured values, indicating that the computerized treatment plans can be used as a predictor of electron arc dose to blood-forming organs

  1. Issues of assessment of doses from natural sources in working conditions: implications for the unified state system of individual dose monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Kormanovskaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the work are: 1 an analysis of information on radiation doses from natural sources of ionizing radiation of employees of enterprises in some industries of the Russian Federation and 2 an assessment of the state of registration of doses from natural sources in working conditions in the Unified System of Individual Dose Control. Materials and methods. The analysis was performed on the results of the operation of the Federal database of radiation doses of the population due to natural and artificial radiation background in 2013–2015 on the basis of the forms of the Federal statistical observation No. 4-DOZ in terms of collecting information on the radiation doses of workers in some non-nuclear industries due to natural sources of ionizing radiation. Results. Analysis of enterprises in 17 industries in 23 regions of Russia connected with the specificity of production processes showed cases of natural exposure of workers at the dose level exceeding 5 mSv/year. We have identified those branches of industry, for which the doses were close to 5 mSv/year.Examples of reducing the radiation doses by reducing the time spent by workers in workplaces with high levels of radiation are given. The problems of insufficient representativeness of the sample data are due to the lack of interaction of the management of industrial enterprises with the bodies of the Rospotrebnadzor. The obtained data allow speaking about the problem of assessing the quality of radiation control in the organizations where additional exposure of workers from natural radiation sources is expected. It is necessary to create a system of regulatory and procedural documents to solve the problem at the national level.

  2. Intravascular ultrasound based dose assessment in endovascular brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalano, Gianpiero; Tamburini, Vittorio; Colombo, Antonio; Nishida, Takahiro; Parisi, Giovanni; Mazzetta, Chiara; Orecchia, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    Background: the role of endovascular brachytherapy in restenosis prevention is well documented. Dose is usually prescribed at a fixed distance from the source axis by angiographic quantification of vessel diameter. Recently, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) was introduced in dose prescription, allowing a better evaluation of the vessel anatomy. This study retrospectively explores the difference between prescription following angiographic vessel sizing and delivered dose calculated with IVUS. Methods and results: Seventeen lesions were studied with IVUS, identifying on irradiated segment, three sections on which measuring minimal and maximal distance from the centre of IVUS catheter to the adventitia; using dedicated software, corresponding doses were calculated. The dose ranged widely, with maximal and minimal values of 71.6 and 4.9 Gy; furthermore, heterogeneity in dose among different sections was observed. In the central section, the maximal dose was 206% of the one prescribed with the QCA model at 2 mm from the source axis, while the minimal dose was 96%. In proximal and distal sections, respective values were 182, 45, 243, and 122%. Conclusions: Our analysis confirmed the dose inhomogeneity delivered with an angiographic fixed-dose prescription strategy. A dose variation was found along the irradiated segment due to the differences in vessel thickness. IVUS emerged as an important tool in endovascular brachytherapy, especially for irregular-shaped vessels

  3. Models for dose assessments. Modules for various biosphere types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, U.; Nordlinder, S.; Aggeryd, I. [Studsvik Eco and Safety AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1999-12-01

    The main objective of this study was to provide a basis for illustrations of yearly dose rates to the most exposed individual from hypothetical leakages of radionuclides from a deep bedrock repository for spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive waste. The results of this study will be used in the safety assessment SR 97 and in a study on the design and long-term safety for a repository planned to contain long-lived low and intermediate level waste. The repositories will be designed to isolate the radionuclides for several hundred thousands of years. In the SR 97 study, however, hypothetical scenarios for leakage are postulated. Radionuclides are hence assumed to be transported in the geosphere by groundwater, and probably discharge into the biosphere. This may occur in several types of ecosystems. A number of categories of such ecosystems were identified, and turnover of radionuclides was modelled separately for each ecosystem. Previous studies had focused on generic models for wells, lakes and coastal areas. These models were, in this study, developed further to use site-specific data. In addition, flows of groundwater, containing radionuclides, to agricultural land and peat bogs were considered. All these categories are referred to as modules in this report. The forest ecosystems were not included, due to a general lack of knowledge of biospheric processes in connection with discharge of groundwater in forested areas. Examples of each type of module were run with the assumption of a continuous annual release into the biosphere of 1 Bq for each radionuclide during 10 000 years. The results are presented as ecosystem specific dose conversion factors (EDFs) for each nuclide at the year 10 000, assuming stationary ecosystems and prevailing living conditions and habits. All calculations were performed with uncertainty analyses included. Simplifications and assumptions in the modelling of biospheric processes are discussed. The use of modules may be seen as a step

  4. Models for dose assessments. Modules for various biosphere types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, U.; Nordlinder, S.; Aggeryd, I.

    1999-12-01

    The main objective of this study was to provide a basis for illustrations of yearly dose rates to the most exposed individual from hypothetical leakages of radionuclides from a deep bedrock repository for spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive waste. The results of this study will be used in the safety assessment SR 97 and in a study on the design and long-term safety for a repository planned to contain long-lived low and intermediate level waste. The repositories will be designed to isolate the radionuclides for several hundred thousands of years. In the SR 97 study, however, hypothetical scenarios for leakage are postulated. Radionuclides are hence assumed to be transported in the geosphere by groundwater, and probably discharge into the biosphere. This may occur in several types of ecosystems. A number of categories of such ecosystems were identified, and turnover of radionuclides was modelled separately for each ecosystem. Previous studies had focused on generic models for wells, lakes and coastal areas. These models were, in this study, developed further to use site-specific data. In addition, flows of groundwater, containing radionuclides, to agricultural land and peat bogs were considered. All these categories are referred to as modules in this report. The forest ecosystems were not included, due to a general lack of knowledge of biospheric processes in connection with discharge of groundwater in forested areas. Examples of each type of module were run with the assumption of a continuous annual release into the biosphere of 1 Bq for each radionuclide during 10 000 years. The results are presented as ecosystem specific dose conversion factors (EDFs) for each nuclide at the year 10 000, assuming stationary ecosystems and prevailing living conditions and habits. All calculations were performed with uncertainty analyses included. Simplifications and assumptions in the modelling of biospheric processes are discussed. The use of modules may be seen as a step

  5. Monitoring and assessment of individual doses of occupationally exposed workers due to intake of radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, O. A.

    2014-04-01

    Monitoring and estimation of individual intakes of radionuclides can be complex. Doses of intakes cannot be measured directly, however must be assessed from the monitoring data of the individual. The individual monitoring data includes whole body counting, excretion analysis (urine or faecal). In the estimation of these data requires that the assessor makes assumptions about the exposure scenario, including the pattern and mode of radionuclide intake. Also physicochemical characteristics of the material involved and the period of time between exposure and measurement. This project report seeks to provide some underlying guidance on monitoring programmes and data interpretation using case study. In this present study the committed effective dose (CED) 1.20mSv exceeded the recording level (i.e. 1mSv) however it was below the investigation level (i.e. 2mSv). The present study recommends that as an essential part in internal dosimetry, specialists be capable of recognizing conditions warranting follow-up bioassay and dose evaluation. Personnel should be familiar with the relevant internal dosimetry literature and the recommendations of national and international scientific organizations with regard to internal dose. (au)

  6. Dose measurement, its distribution and individual external dose assessments of inhabitants on high background radiation area in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koga, Taeko; Morishima, Hiroshige [Kinki Univ., Atomic Energy Research Institute, Osaka (Japan); Tatsumi, Kusuo [Kinki Univ., Life Science Research Institute, Osaka (Japan); Nakai, Sayaka; Sugahara, Tsutomu [Health Research Foundation, Kyoto (Japan); Yuan Yongling [Labor Hygiene Institute of Hunan Prov. (China); Wei Luxin [Laboratory of Industorial Hygiene, Ministry of Health (China)

    2001-01-01

    As a part of the China-Japan cooperative research on the natural radiation epidemiology, we have carried out a dose-assessment study to evaluate the external to natural radiation in the high background radiation area (HBRA) of Yangjiang in Guangdong province and in the control area (CA) of Enping prefecture since 1991. Because of the difficulties in measuring the individual doses of all inhabitants directly by the personal dosimeters, an indirect method was applied to estimate the exposed dose rates from the environmental radiation dose rates measured by survey meters and the occupancy factors of each hamlet. An individual radiation dose roughly correlates with the environmental radiation dose and the life style of the inhabitant. We have analyzed the environmental radiation doses in the hamlets and the variation of the occupancy factors to obtain the parameters of dose estimation on the inhabitants in selected hamlets; Madi and the several hamlets of the different level doses in HBRA and Hampizai hamlet in CA. With these parameters, we made estimations of individual dose rates and compared them with those obtained from the direct measurement using dosimeters carried by selected individuals. The results obtained are as follows: (1) The environmental radiation dose rates are influenced by the natural radioactive nuclide concentrations in building materials, the age of the building and the arrangement of the houses in a hamlet. There existed a fairly large and heterogeneous distribution of indoor and outdoor environmental radiation. The indoor radiation dose rates were due to the exposure from the natural radioactive nuclides in the building materials and they were about twice higher than the outdoor radiation dose rates. This difference was not observed in CA. (2) The occupancy factor was affected by the age of individuals and the seasons of a year. Indoor occupancy factors were higher for infants and aged individuals than for other age groups. This lead to higher

  7. Dose measurement, its distribution and individual external dose assessments of inhabitants on high background radiation area in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Taeko; Morishima, Hiroshige; Tatsumi, Kusuo; Nakai, Sayaka; Sugahara, Tsutomu; Yuan Yongling; Wei Luxin

    2001-01-01

    As a part of the China-Japan cooperative research on the natural radiation epidemiology, we have carried out a dose-assessment study to evaluate the external to natural radiation in the high background radiation area (HBRA) of Yangjiang in Guangdong province and in the control area (CA) of Enping prefecture since 1991. Because of the difficulties in measuring the individual doses of all inhabitants directly by the personal dosimeters, an indirect method was applied to estimate the exposed dose rates from the environmental radiation dose rates measured by survey meters and the occupancy factors of each hamlet. An individual radiation dose roughly correlates with the environmental radiation dose and the life style of the inhabitant. We have analyzed the environmental radiation doses in the hamlets and the variation of the occupancy factors to obtain the parameters of dose estimation on the inhabitants in selected hamlets; Madi and the several hamlets of the different level doses in HBRA and Hampizai hamlet in CA. With these parameters, we made estimations of individual dose rates and compared them with those obtained from the direct measurement using dosimeters carried by selected individuals. The results obtained are as follows: 1) The environmental radiation dose rates are influenced by the natural radioactive nuclide concentrations in building materials, the age of the building and the arrangement of the houses in a hamlet. There existed a fairly large and heterogeneous distribution of indoor and outdoor environmental radiation. The indoor radiation dose rates were due to the exposure from the natural radioactive nuclides in the building materials and they were about twice higher than the outdoor radiation dose rates. This difference was not observed in CA. 2) The occupancy factor was affected by the age of individuals and the seasons of a year. Indoor occupancy factors were higher for infants and aged individuals than for other age groups. This lead to higher

  8. Assessing Doses to Interventional Radiologists Using a Personal Dosimeter Worn Over a Protective Apron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stranden, E.; Widmark, A.; Sekse, T.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Interventional radiologists receive significant radiation doses, and it is important to have simple methods for routine monitoring of their exposure. Purpose: To evaluate the usefulness of a dosimeter worn outside the protective apron for assessments of dose to interventional radiologists. Material and Methods: Assessments of effective dose versus dose to dosimeters worn outside the protective apron were achieved by phantom measurements. Doses outside and under the apron were assessed by phantom measurements and measurements on eight radiologists wearing two routine dosimeters for a 2-month period during ordinary working conditions. Finger doses for the same radiologists were recorded using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD; DXT-RAD Extremity dosimeters). Results: Typical values for the ratio between effective dose and dosimeter dose were found to be about 0.02 when the radiologist used a thyroid shield and about 0.03 without. The ratio between the dose to the dosimeter under and outside a protective apron was found to be less than 0.04. There was very good correlation between finger dose and dosimeter dose. Conclusion: A personal dosimeter worn outside a protective apron is a good screening device for dose to the eyes and fingers as well as for effective dose, even though the effective dose is grossly overestimated. Relatively high dose to the fingers and eyes remains undetected by a dosimeter worn under the apron

  9. Assessing Doses to Interventional Radiologists Using a Personal Dosimeter Worn Over a Protective Apron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stranden, E.; Widmark, A.; Sekse, T. (Buskerud Univ. College, Drammen (Norway))

    2008-05-15

    Background: Interventional radiologists receive significant radiation doses, and it is important to have simple methods for routine monitoring of their exposure. Purpose: To evaluate the usefulness of a dosimeter worn outside the protective apron for assessments of dose to interventional radiologists. Material and Methods: Assessments of effective dose versus dose to dosimeters worn outside the protective apron were achieved by phantom measurements. Doses outside and under the apron were assessed by phantom measurements and measurements on eight radiologists wearing two routine dosimeters for a 2-month period during ordinary working conditions. Finger doses for the same radiologists were recorded using thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD; DXT-RAD Extremity dosimeters). Results: Typical values for the ratio between effective dose and dosimeter dose were found to be about 0.02 when the radiologist used a thyroid shield and about 0.03 without. The ratio between the dose to the dosimeter under and outside a protective apron was found to be less than 0.04. There was very good correlation between finger dose and dosimeter dose. Conclusion: A personal dosimeter worn outside a protective apron is a good screening device for dose to the eyes and fingers as well as for effective dose, even though the effective dose is grossly overestimated. Relatively high dose to the fingers and eyes remains undetected by a dosimeter worn under the apron

  10. Assessment of CT dose to the fetus and pregnant female patient using patient-specific computational models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Tianwu; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Platon, Alexandra; Becker, Christoph D. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Information Sciences, Geneva (Switzerland); Zaidi, Habib [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging and Information Sciences, Geneva (Switzerland); Geneva University, Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva (Switzerland); University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); University of Southern Denmark, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Odense (Denmark); Geneva University Hospital, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2018-03-15

    This work provides detailed estimates of the foetal dose from diagnostic CT imaging of pregnant patients to enable the assessment of the diagnostic benefits considering the associated radiation risks. To produce realistic biological and physical representations of pregnant patients and the embedded foetus, we developed a methodology for construction of patient-specific voxel-based computational phantoms based on existing standardised hybrid computational pregnant female phantoms. We estimated the maternal absorbed dose and foetal organ dose for 30 pregnant patients referred to the emergency unit of Geneva University Hospital for abdominal CT scans. The effective dose to the mother varied from 1.1 mSv to 2.0 mSv with an average of 1.6 mSv, while commercial dose-tracking software reported an average effective dose of 1.9 mSv (range 1.7-2.3 mSv). The foetal dose normalised to CTDI{sub vol} varies between 0.85 and 1.63 with an average of 1.17. The methodology for construction of personalised computational models can be exploited to estimate the patient-specific radiation dose from CT imaging procedures. Likewise, the dosimetric data can be used for assessment of the radiation risks to pregnant patients and the foetus from various CT scanning protocols, thus guiding the decision-making process. (orig.)

  11. Dose contribution from metabolized organically bound tritium after acute tritiated water intakes in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivedi, A.; Galeriu, D.; Richardson, R.B.

    1997-01-01

    Urine samples from eight male radiation workers who had an unplanned acute tritiated water intake were measured for tritium-in-urine up to 300 d post-exposure. During the first month or so post-exposure, these individuals increased their fluid intakes to accelerate the turnover rate of tritium in the body for dose mitigation. Their daily fluid intakes reverted to normal levels in the latter period of the study. A non-linear regressional analysis of the tritium-in-urine data showed that the average biological half-life of tritium in body water, with standard deviation, was 63 ± 1.0 d (range, 5.0-8.1 d) and 8.4 ± 2.0 d (range, 6.2-12.8 d) during the respective periods of increased fluid intake and the later period of normal fluid intake. A longer term component of tritium excretion was also observed with average biological half-life of 74 ± 18 d (range, 58-104 d), indicating the incorporation of tritium, and its retention, in the organic fractions of the body. A mathematical model was developed and used to estimate the dose increase from the metabolized organically bound tritium on the basis of the kinetics of tritium-in-urine. The model accounts for a change in the rates of urinary excretion caused by variable fluid intakes. The average dose to the body, for the eight male workers, due to the metabolized organically bound tritium was estimated to be 6.2 ± 1.3% (range, 3.5% to 8.9%) of the committed effective dose due to tritium in the body water. This value for the dose increase from organically bound tritium is in the range of the current recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection, i.e., organically bound tritium incorporated into the body contributes about 10% of the dose to the body water following tritiated water intakes. (author)

  12. Effects of body and organ size on absorbed dose: there is no standard patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poston, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    The problem of estimating the absorbed dose to organs and tissues of the human body due to the presence of a radiopharmaceutical in one or more organs is discussed. Complications are introduced by the fact that the body is not homogeneous and in many cases the organ shapes are not regular. Publications of the MIRD Committee have provided a direct means of estimating the absorbed dose (or absorbed fraction) for a number of radioisotopes. These estimates are based on Monte Carlo calculations for monoenergetic photons distributed uniformly in organs of an adult phantom. The medical physicist finds that his patient does not resemble the adult phantom. In addition, the absorbed fractions for the adult are not reasonable values for the child. This paper examines how these absorbed fraction estimates apply to a nonstandard patient

  13. [Radiation exposure of children in pediatric radiology. Part 5: organ doses in chest radiography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidenbusch, M C; Schneider, K

    2009-05-01

    Reconstruction of organ doses of selected organs and tissues from radiographic settings and exposure data collected during chest X-ray examinations of children of various age groups performed in Dr. von Hauner's Kinderspital (children's hospital of the University of Munich, DvHK) between 1976 and 2007. The dosimetric data of all X-ray examinations performed since 1976 at DvHK were stored electronically in a database. After 30 years of data collection, the database now includes 305 107 radiological examinations (radiographs and fluoroscopies), especially 119 150 chest radiographs of all age groups. Reconstruction of organ doses in 40 organs and tissues in X-ray examinations of the chest was performed based on the conversion factor concept. The radiation exposure of organs in projection radiography is determined by the exact site of the organs relative to the edges of the X-ray field and the beam direction of X-rays. Optimal collimation in chest radiography can reduce the exposure of organs located at the periphery of the X-ray field, e. g. thyroid gland, stomach and partially the liver, by a factor of 2 to 3, while organs located in the center of the X-ray-field, e. g. thymus, breasts, lungs, esophagus and red bone marrow, are not affected by exact collimation. The high frequency of the roentgen examination of the chest in early age groups increases the collective radiation burden to radiosensitive organs. Therefore, radiation protection of the patient during chest radiographies remains of great importance.

  14. Radiation dose assessment of musa acuminata - triploid (AAA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maravillas, Mart Andrew S.; Locaylocay, Jocelyn R.; Mendoza, Concepcion S.

    2008-01-01

    Bananas are radioactive due to the presence of the radioisotope- 40 K. This imposes a possible health risk to the general public. This study intended to assess the annual equivalent dosages and the annual effective dosage committed by the body. This seeks to benefit the general public, students and researchers, and entrepreneurs. Using atomic absorption spectrophotometry, lakatan banana (Musa acuminata-triploid (AAA), the most purchased variety cultivated in Barangay Adlawon, Cebu City, Philippines, was found to contain 0.53 g of total potassium for every 100 g of its fresh fruit wherein 6.2 x 10 -5 g of which is potassium-40. Based on its 40 K content banana was calculated to have a radioactivity of 16 Bq/100 g. it was found out that the body is exposed to radiation dosages ranging from 2.8 x 10 -3 rem annually by eating 100 g of lakatan bananas everyday. Conversely, it is equivalent to the annual effective dosage of 0.0043 rem; the amount at which the body of an individual is uniformly exposed. However, no or extremely minute health risk was determined by just eating bananas. In fact, to exceed the radiation dose limits set by the International Commission on Radiation Protection, an individual may eat 116 kg of lakatan bananas everyday for a year. Fertilizers may be the major source of the radioisotope - 40 K and assimilated by the plants. (author)

  15. Effect of small-dose levosimendan on mortality rates and organ functions in Chinese elderly patients with sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang X

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Xin Wang,1,* Shikui Li2,* 1Intensive Care Unit, 2Cardiothoracic Surgery, Daqing Oilfield General Hospital, Daqing, Heilongjiang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Aim: As a primary cause of death not only in Western countries but also in the People’s Republic of China, sepsis is diagnosed as abnormal organ functions as a result of a disordered response to a severe infection. This study was designed to assess the effect of small-dose levosimendan without a loading dose on mortality rates and organ functions in Chinese elderly patients with sepsis.Methods: Following a prospective, randomized, and double-blinded design, 240 Chinese elderly patients with sepsis shock were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU. All patients were randomly and evenly assigned into a levosimendan group (number of patients =120 and a control group (number of patients =120. The control group underwent standard care, and the levosimendan group was administered levosimendan in addition to standard care.Results: All participants, comprising 134 males (55.8% and 106 females (44.2%, were 70 (67–73 years old. Baseline characteristics, preexisting illnesses, initial infections, organ failures, and additional agents and therapies showed no significant difference between the two groups (P>0.05 for all. There were no significant differences in mortality rates at 28 days, at ICU discharge, and at hospital discharge between the two groups (P>0.05 for all. The number of days of ICU and hospital stay in the levosimendan group was significantly less than for those in the control group (P<0.05 for all. Mean daily total sequential organ failure assessment score and all organ scores except the cardiovascular scores showed no significant difference between the two groups (P>0.05 for all. Cardiovascular scores in the levosimendan group were significantly higher than those in the control group (P<0.05 for all.Conclusion: Small-dose

  16. MO-E-17A-04: Size-Specific Dose Estimate (SSDE) Provides a Simple Method to Calculate Organ Dose for Pediatric CT Examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, B; Brady, S; Kaufman, R; Mirro, A

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Investigate the correlation of SSDE with organ dose in a pediatric population. Methods: Four anthropomorphic phantoms, representing a range of pediatric body habitus, were scanned with MOSFET dosimeters placed at 23 organ locations to determine absolute organ dosimetry. Phantom organ dosimetry was divided by phantom SSDE to determine correlation between organ dose and SSDE. Correlation factors were then multiplied by patient SSDE to estimate patient organ dose. Patient demographics consisted of 352 chest and 241 abdominopelvic CT examinations, 22 ± 15 kg (range 5−55 kg) mean weight, and 6 ± 5 years (range 4 mon to 23 years) mean age. Patient organ dose estimates were compared to published pediatric Monte Carlo study results. Results: Phantom effective diameters were matched with patient population effective diameters to within 4 cm. 23 organ correlation factors were determined in the chest and abdominopelvic region across nine pediatric weight subcategories. For organs fully covered by the scan volume, correlation in the chest (average 1.1; range 0.7−1.4) and abdominopelvic (average 0.9; range 0.7−1.3) was near unity. For organs that extended beyond the scan volume (i.e., skin, bone marrow, and bone surface), correlation was determined to be poor (average 0.3; range: 0.1−0.4) for both the chest and abdominopelvic regions, respectively. Pediatric organ dosimetry was compared to published values and was found to agree in the chest to better than an average of 5% (27.6/26.2) and in the abdominopelvic region to better than 2% (73.4/75.0). Conclusion: Average correlation of SSDE and organ dosimetry was found to be better than ± 10% for fully covered organs within the scan volume. This study provides a list of organ dose correlation factors for the chest and abdominopelvic regions, and describes a simple methodology to estimate individual pediatric patient organ dose based on patient SSDE

  17. MO-E-17A-04: Size-Specific Dose Estimate (SSDE) Provides a Simple Method to Calculate Organ Dose for Pediatric CT Examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, B; Brady, S; Kaufman, R [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States); Mirro, A [Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Investigate the correlation of SSDE with organ dose in a pediatric population. Methods: Four anthropomorphic phantoms, representing a range of pediatric body habitus, were scanned with MOSFET dosimeters placed at 23 organ locations to determine absolute organ dosimetry. Phantom organ dosimetry was divided by phantom SSDE to determine correlation between organ dose and SSDE. Correlation factors were then multiplied by patient SSDE to estimate patient organ dose. Patient demographics consisted of 352 chest and 241 abdominopelvic CT examinations, 22 ± 15 kg (range 5−55 kg) mean weight, and 6 ± 5 years (range 4 mon to 23 years) mean age. Patient organ dose estimates were compared to published pediatric Monte Carlo study results. Results: Phantom effective diameters were matched with patient population effective diameters to within 4 cm. 23 organ correlation factors were determined in the chest and abdominopelvic region across nine pediatric weight subcategories. For organs fully covered by the scan volume, correlation in the chest (average 1.1; range 0.7−1.4) and abdominopelvic (average 0.9; range 0.7−1.3) was near unity. For organs that extended beyond the scan volume (i.e., skin, bone marrow, and bone surface), correlation was determined to be poor (average 0.3; range: 0.1−0.4) for both the chest and abdominopelvic regions, respectively. Pediatric organ dosimetry was compared to published values and was found to agree in the chest to better than an average of 5% (27.6/26.2) and in the abdominopelvic region to better than 2% (73.4/75.0). Conclusion: Average correlation of SSDE and organ dosimetry was found to be better than ± 10% for fully covered organs within the scan volume. This study provides a list of organ dose correlation factors for the chest and abdominopelvic regions, and describes a simple methodology to estimate individual pediatric patient organ dose based on patient SSDE.

  18. Investigation of organ dose difference of age phantoms for medical X-ray examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Hyun; Kim, Woo Ran; Lee, Jai Ki; Lee, Choon Sik

    2003-01-01

    Methodology for calculating the organ equivalent doses and the effective doses of pediatric and adult patients undergoing medical X-ray examinations were established. The MIRD-type mathematical phantoms of 4 age groups were constructed with addition of the esophagus to the same phantoms. Two typical examination procedures, chest PA and abdomen AP, were simulated for the pediatric patients as well as the adult as illustrative examples. The results confirmed that patients pick up approximate 0.03 mSv of effective dose from a single chest PA examination, and 0.4 to 1.7 mSv from an abdomen AP examination depending on the ages. For dose calculations where irradiation is made with a limited field, the details of the position, size and shape of the organs and the organ depth from the entrance surface considerably affect the resulting doses. Therefore, it is important to optimize radiation protection by control of X-ray properties and beam examination field. The calculation result, provided in this study, can be used to implement optimization for medical radiation protection

  19. Dose distribution in organs: patient-specific phantoms versus reference phantoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, I.V.B., E-mail: isabelle.lacerda@ufpe.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife (Brazil); Vieira, J.W. [Instituto Federal de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife (Brazil); Oliveira, M.L.; Lima, F.R.A. [Centro Regional de Ciências Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PB), Recife (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Discrepancies between ICRP phantoms and real patients lead to disparities on patient-dose estimations. This paper aims to compare distribution of dose in organs of male/female specific-phantoms and ICRP reference phantoms. The absorbed dose estimation was performed using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code and a parallel source algorithm. In this work were used a patient-specific phantom for a man (1.73m/70.3kg) and another for a woman (1.63m/60.3kg) and the male and female ICRP reference phantoms. The comparison of the absorbed dose from each phantom gender was performed using the relative error. The results were expressed in terms of conversion coefficients to brain, lungs, liver and kidneys. The greatest absolute relative error between the organs of the patient-specific phantom and the reference phantom was 22.92% in the liver and 62.84% in the kidneys, respectively for man and woman. There are errors that cannot be disregarded. This paper shows the need for a specific study for each patient or for the population of each country, since there are different body types, which affects the distribution of the organ doses. (author)

  20. Dose distribution in organs: patient-specific phantoms versus reference phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacerda, I.V.B.; Vieira, J.W.; Oliveira, M.L.; Lima, F.R.A.

    2017-01-01

    Discrepancies between ICRP phantoms and real patients lead to disparities on patient-dose estimations. This paper aims to compare distribution of dose in organs of male/female specific-phantoms and ICRP reference phantoms. The absorbed dose estimation was performed using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code and a parallel source algorithm. In this work were used a patient-specific phantom for a man (1.73m/70.3kg) and another for a woman (1.63m/60.3kg) and the male and female ICRP reference phantoms. The comparison of the absorbed dose from each phantom gender was performed using the relative error. The results were expressed in terms of conversion coefficients to brain, lungs, liver and kidneys. The greatest absolute relative error between the organs of the patient-specific phantom and the reference phantom was 22.92% in the liver and 62.84% in the kidneys, respectively for man and woman. There are errors that cannot be disregarded. This paper shows the need for a specific study for each patient or for the population of each country, since there are different body types, which affects the distribution of the organ doses. (author)

  1. Dose assessment in pediatric computerized tomography; Avaliacao de doses em tomografia computadorizada pediatrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vilarinho, Luisa Maria Auredine Lima

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this work was the evaluation of radiation doses in paediatric computed tomography scans, considering the high doses usually involved and the absence of any previous evaluation in Brazil. Dose values were determined for skull and abdomen examinations, for different age ranges, by using the radiographic techniques routinely used in the clinical centers investigated. Measurements were done using pencil shape ionization chambers inserted in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantoms. These were compact phantoms of different diameters were specially designed and constructed for this work, which simulate different age ranges. Comparison of results with published values showed that doses were lower than the diagnostic reference levels established to adults exams by the European Commission. Nevertheless, doses in paediatric phantoms were higher than those obtained in adult phantoms. The paediatric dose values obtained in Hospitals A and B were lower than the reference level (DRL) adopted by SHIMPTON for different age ranges. In the range 0 - 0.5 year (neonatal), the values of DLP in Hospital B were 94 por cent superior to the DRL For the 10 years old children the values of CTDI{sub w} obtained were inferior in 89 por cent for skull and 83 por cent for abdomen examinations, compared to the values published by SHRIMPTON and WALL. Our measured CTDI{sub w} values were inferior to the values presented for SHRIMPTON and HUDA, for all the age ranges and types of examinations. It was observed that the normalized dose descriptors values in children in the neonatal range were always superior to the values of doses for the adult patient. In abdomen examinations, the difference was approximately 90% for the effective dose (E) and of 57%.for CTDI{sub w} . (author)

  2. Absorbed dose due to radioiodine therapy by organs of patients with hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, F.F.; Khoury, H.J.; Bertelli Neto, L.; Bertelli Neto, L.

    1999-01-01

    The dose absorbed by organs of patients with hyperthyroidism treated with 131 I was estimated by using the MIRDOSE computer program and data from ICRP-53. The calculation were performed using effective half-life and uptake average values, which were determined for 17 patients treated with 370 MBq and 555MBq of 131 I. The results shown that the dose in the thyroid, for a 370 MBq administrated activity, was of 99 Gy and 49.5 Gy for 60 g and 80 g thyroid respectively. The average dose estimated in other organs were relatively low, presenting values lower than 0.1 Gy in the kidneys, bone marrow and ovaries and 0.19 Gy in the stomach

  3. The choice of food consumption rates for radiation dose assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmonds, J.R.; Webb, G.A.M.

    1981-01-01

    The practical problem in estimating radiation doses due to radioactive contamination of food is the choice of the appropriate food intakes. To ensure compliance or to compare with dose equivalent limits, higher than average intake rates appropriate to critical groups should be used. However for realistic estimates of health detriment in the whole exposed population, average intake rates are more appropriate. (U.K.)

  4. Organ doses to atomic bomb survivors from radiological examinations at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kazuo; Antoku, Shigetoshi; Sawada, Shozo; Russell, W.J.

    1990-04-01

    When estimating the risks of oncogenesis and cancer mortality as a result of atomic bomb radiation exposure, medical X-ray doses received by the A-bomb survivors must also be estimated and considered. Using a phantom human, we estimated the X-ray doses received by A-bomb survivors during routine biennial medical examinations conducted at RERF as part of the long-term Adult Health Study (AHS), since these examinations may represent about 45 % of the survivors' total medical irradiations. Doses to the salivary glands, thyroid gland, lung, breast, stomach and colon were measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. The results reported here will aid in estimating organ doses received by individual AHS participants. (author)

  5. Organ and Effective Dose Coefficients for Cranial and Caudal Irradiation Geometries: Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veinot, K. G.; Eckerman, K. F.; Hertel, N. E.; Hiller, M. M.

    2017-09-01

    With the introduction of new recommendations by ICRP Publication 103, the methodology for determining the protection quantity, effective dose, has been modified. The modifications include changes to the defined organs and tissues, the associated tissue weighting factors, radiation weighting factors, and the introduction of reference sex-specific computational phantoms (ICRP Publication 110). Computations of equivalent doses in organs and tissues are now performed in both the male and female phantoms and the sex-averaged values used to determine the effective dose. Dose coefficients based on the ICRP 103 recommendations were reported in ICRP Publication 116, the revision of ICRP Publication 74 and ICRU Publication 57. The coefficients were determined for the following irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), right and left lateral (RLAT and LLAT), rotational (ROT), and isotropic (ISO). In this work, the methodology of ICRP Publication 116 was used to compute dose coefficients for neutron irradiation of the body with parallel beams directed upward from below the feet (caudal) and directed downward from above the head (cranial). These geometries may be encountered in the workplace from personnel standing on contaminated surfaces or volumes and from overhead sources. Calculations of organ and tissue absorbed doses for caudal and cranial exposures to neutrons ranging in energy from 10-9 MeV to 10 GeV have been performed using the MCNP6 radiation transport code and the adult reference voxel phantoms of ICRP Publication 110. At lower energies the effective dose per particle fluence for cranial and caudal exposures is less than AP orientations while above about 30 MeV the cranial and caudal values are greater.

  6. Organ and effective dose coefficients for cranial and caudal irradiation geometries: photons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veinot, K.G.; Eckerman, K.F.; Hertel, N.E.

    2016-01-01

    With the introduction of new recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in Publication 103, the methodology for determining the protection quantity, effective dose, has been modified. The modifications include changes to the defined organs and tissues, the associated tissue weighting factors, radiation weighting factors and the introduction of reference sex-specific computational phantoms. Computations of equivalent doses in organs and tissues are now performed in both the male and female phantoms and the sex-averaged values used to determine the effective dose. Dose coefficients based on the ICRP 103 recommendations were reported in ICRP Publication 116, the revision of ICRP Publication 74 and ICRU Publication 57. The coefficients were determined for the following irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), right and left lateral (RLAT and LLAT), rotational (ROT) and isotropic (ISO). In this work, the methodology of ICRP Publication 116 was used to compute dose coefficients for photon irradiation of the body with parallel beams directed upward from below the feet (caudal) and directed downward from above the head (cranial). These geometries may be encountered in the workplace from personnel standing on contaminated surfaces or volumes and from overhead sources. Calculations of organ and tissue kerma and absorbed doses for caudal and cranial exposures to photons ranging in energy from 10 keV to 10 GeV have been performed using the MCNP6.1 radiation transport code and the adult reference phantoms of ICRP Publication 110. As with calculations reported in ICRP 116, the effects of charged-particle transport are evident when compared with values obtained by using the kerma approximation. At lower energies the effective dose per particle fluence for cranial and caudal exposures is less than AP orientations while above ∼30 MeV the cranial and caudal values are greater. (authors)

  7. Dose in sensitive organs during the prostate treatment with a 60Co unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega C, H. R.; Navarro B, J. A.; Perez A, M. L.; Perez L, L. H.

    2012-10-01

    The absorbed dose by the bladder, the rectum and the gland thyroid was measured during a treatment applied for prostate cancer by means of a Cobalt 60 unit. The dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters of the type TLD 100, with the values of the absorbed the values of the effective dose were calculated and was determined the probability of the development of a secondary cancer. Because these measurements cannot be made -in vivo- a phantom or mannequin was built with water that represents the hip and part of the torso of the human body and to represent the neck was used polyethylene. The study was carried out in the Instituto Zacatecano del Tumor that has a -cobalt bomb- which is used to treat oncology patients, during the phantom irradiation a dose of 200 c Gy was applied of this dose the bladder received 96.7%, the rectum 100.8% and the gland thyroid 0.3%. The dose received by the rectum and the bladder is due to the therapeutic beam while the dose received by the thyroid is due to the dispersed radiation by the phantom. The probability that in these organs a new neoplasm is developed is of 0.033% for the bladder, 0.157% for the rectum and 7.8 x 10 -5 % for the thyroid case. (Author)

  8. Monte Carlo based estimation of organ and effective doses to patients undergoing hysterosalpingography and retrograde urethrography fluoroscopy procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngaile, J. E.; Msaki, P. K.; Kazema, R. R.

    2018-04-01

    Contrast investigations of hysterosalpingography (HSG) and retrograde urethrography (RUG) fluoroscopy procedures remain the dominant diagnostic tools for the investigation of infertility in females and urethral strictures in males, respectively, owing to the scarcity and high cost of services of alternative diagnostic technologies. In light of the radiological risks associated with contrast based investigations of the genitourinary tract systems, there is a need to assess the magnitude of radiation burden imparted to patients undergoing HSG and RUG fluoroscopy procedures in Tanzania. The air kerma area product (KAP), fluoroscopy time, number of images, organ dose and effective dose to patients undergoing HSG and RUG procedures were obtained from four hospitals. The KAP was measured using a flat transmission ionization chamber, while the organ and effective doses were estimated using the knowledge of the patient characteristics, patient related exposure parameters, geometry of examination, KAP and Monte Carlo calculations (PCXMC). The median values of KAP for the HSG and RUG were 2.2 Gy cm2 and 3.3 Gy cm2, respectively. The median organ doses in the present study for the ovaries, urinary bladder and uterus for the HSG procedures, were 1.0 mGy, 4.0 mGy and 1.6 mGy, respectively, while for urinary bladder and testes of the RUG were 3.4 mGy and 5.9 mGy, respectively. The median values of effective doses for the HSG and RUG procedures were 0.65 mSv and 0.59 mSv, respectively. The median values of effective dose per hospital for the HSG and RUG procedures had a range of 1.6-2.8 mSv and 1.9-5.6 mSv, respectively, while the overall differences between individual effective doses across the four hospitals varied by factors of up to 22.0 and 46.7, respectively for the HSG and RUG procedures. The proposed diagnostic reference levels (DRLs) for the HSG and RUG were for KAP 2.8 Gy cm2 and 3.9 Gy cm2, for fluoroscopy time 0.8 min and 0.9 min, and for number of images 5 and 4

  9. The Northern Marshall Islands radiological survey: Data and dose assessments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robison, W.L.; Noshkin, V.E.; Conrado, C.L.

    1997-01-01

    Fallout from atmospheric nuclear tests, especially from those conducted at the Pacific Proving Grounds between 1946 and 1958, contaminated areas of the Northern Marshall Islands. A radiological survey at some Northern Marshall Islands was conducted from September through November 1978 to evaluate the extent of residual radioactive contamination. The atolls included in the Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey (NMIRS) were Likiep, Ailuk, Utirik, Wotho, Ujelang, Taka, Rongelap, Rongerik, Bikar, Ailinginae, and Mejit and Jemo Islands. The original test sites, Bikini and Enewetak Atolls, were also visited on the survey. An aerial survey was conducted to determine the external gamma exposure rate. Terrestrial (soil, food crops, animals, and native vegetation), cistern and well water samples, and marine (sediment, seawater, fish and clams) samples were collected to evaluate radionuclide concentrations in the atoll environment. Samples were processed and analyzed for 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 239+240 Pu and 241 Am. The dose from the ingestion pathway was calculated using the radionuclide concentration data and a diet model for local food, marine, and water consumption. The ingestion pathway contributes 70% to 90% of the estimated dose. Approximately 95% of the dose is from 137 Cs accounts for about 10% to 30% of the dose. 239+240 Pu and 241 Am are the major contributors to dose via the inhalation pathway; however, inhalation accounts for only about 1% of the total estimated dose, based on surface soil levels and resuspension studies. All doses are computed for concentrations decay corrected to 1996. The maximum annual effective dose from manmade radionuclides at these atolls ranges from .02 mSv y -1 . The background dose in the Marshall Islands is estimated to be 2.4 mSv y -1 to 4.5 mSv y -1 . The 50-y integral dose ranges from 0.5 to 65 mSv. 35 refs., 2 figs., 9 tabs

  10. SU-E-T-616: Plan Quality Assessment of Both Treatment Planning System Dose and Measurement-Based 3D Reconstructed Dose in the Patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olch, A

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Systematic radiotherapy plan quality assessment promotes quality improvement. Software tools can perform this analysis by applying site-specific structure dose metrics. The next step is to similarly evaluate the quality of the dose delivery. This study defines metrics for acceptable doses to targets and normal organs for a particular treatment site and scores each plan accordingly. The input can be the TPS or the measurement-based 3D patient dose. From this analysis, one can determine whether the delivered dose distribution to the patient receives a score which is comparable to the TPS plan score, otherwise replanning may be indicated. Methods: Eleven neuroblastoma patient plans were exported from Eclipse to the Quality Reports program. A scoring algorithm defined a score for each normal and target structure based on dose-volume parameters. Each plan was scored by this algorithm and the percentage of total possible points was obtained. Each plan also underwent IMRT QA measurements with a Mapcheck2 or ArcCheck. These measurements were input into the 3DVH program to compute the patient 3D dose distribution which was analyzed using the same scoring algorithm as the TPS plan. Results: The mean quality score for the TPS plans was 75.37% (std dev=14.15%) compared to 71.95% (std dev=13.45%) for the 3DVH dose distribution. For 3/11 plans, the 3DVH-based quality score was higher than the TPS score, by between 0.5 to 8.4 percentage points. Eight/11 plans scores decreased based on IMRT QA measurements by 1.2 to 18.6 points. Conclusion: Software was used to determine the degree to which the plan quality score differed between the TPS and measurement-based dose. Although the delivery score was generally in good agreement with the planned dose score, there were some that improved while there was one plan whose delivered dose quality was significantly less than planned. This methodology helps evaluate both planned and delivered dose quality. Sun Nuclear Corporation has

  11. SU-E-T-616: Plan Quality Assessment of Both Treatment Planning System Dose and Measurement-Based 3D Reconstructed Dose in the Patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olch, A [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Systematic radiotherapy plan quality assessment promotes quality improvement. Software tools can perform this analysis by applying site-specific structure dose metrics. The next step is to similarly evaluate the quality of the dose delivery. This study defines metrics for acceptable doses to targets and normal organs for a particular treatment site and scores each plan accordingly. The input can be the TPS or the measurement-based 3D patient dose. From this analysis, one can determine whether the delivered dose distribution to the patient receives a score which is comparable to the TPS plan score, otherwise replanning may be indicated. Methods: Eleven neuroblastoma patient plans were exported from Eclipse to the Quality Reports program. A scoring algorithm defined a score for each normal and target structure based on dose-volume parameters. Each plan was scored by this algorithm and the percentage of total possible points was obtained. Each plan also underwent IMRT QA measurements with a Mapcheck2 or ArcCheck. These measurements were input into the 3DVH program to compute the patient 3D dose distribution which was analyzed using the same scoring algorithm as the TPS plan. Results: The mean quality score for the TPS plans was 75.37% (std dev=14.15%) compared to 71.95% (std dev=13.45%) for the 3DVH dose distribution. For 3/11 plans, the 3DVH-based quality score was higher than the TPS score, by between 0.5 to 8.4 percentage points. Eight/11 plans scores decreased based on IMRT QA measurements by 1.2 to 18.6 points. Conclusion: Software was used to determine the degree to which the plan quality score differed between the TPS and measurement-based dose. Although the delivery score was generally in good agreement with the planned dose score, there were some that improved while there was one plan whose delivered dose quality was significantly less than planned. This methodology helps evaluate both planned and delivered dose quality. Sun Nuclear Corporation has

  12. Dose assessment of the patient and the helper in emergency head computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Rong-Chou; Yu, Cheng-Ching; Hsu, Fang-Yuh; Chen, Tou-Rong; Hsu, Shih-Ming; Tyan, Yeu-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Computed Tomography (CT) becomes more and more important and is frequently used in modern diagnostic techniques. CT offers an effective diagnosis on lesion and pathology; however, it also delivers a radiation dose to patients. Besides, in some special emergency cases, the patient may require someone to help him in the examination room to perform the head CT, due to the patient lost intellectual and operational capacity. This study evaluated the delivered radiation dose and the risk of radiation-induced cancer for the patient and for the helper after carrying out the emergent head CT examination. A Rando phantom with thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) chips inside relevant organs was used to simulate the patient during head CT examination. An effective dose of 2.06 ± 0.16 mSv and 1.46 ± 0.07 mSv without and with wearing the lead apron were found respectively, considering ICRP 60 recommendation. ICRP 103 recommendations the readings would have been 1.29 ± 0.15 mSv and 0.71 ± 0.04 mSv. The effective dose determined from the dose-length product (DLP) method (2.19 mSv) was similar to the value (2.06 ± 0.16 mSv) estimated by TLD method considering the ICRP 60 recommendation (without lead apron). Assuming a 5% total risk for fatal cancer per Sv in the general population, risk of radiation-induced cancer for patients were 1.03 × 10 −2 % (without lead apron) and 7.80 × 10 −3 % (with lead apron) for ICRP 60, and were 6.45 × 10 −3 % (without lead apron) and 3.55 × 10 −3 % (with lead apron) for ICRP 103. The dose received by the helper was assessed by wearing a personal badge. The helper during emergent head CT examination may receive a personal dose equivalent (H p (10)) of 19.36 ± 5.89 μSv and 138.81 ± 101.28 μSv with and without lead apron, respectively, at distance of 0.3–1 m from the center of CT scanner. Based on the observed dose reduction of a factor of 7.17 we recommend that helpers wear lead apron in the CT examination room.

  13. Radiation Dose-Response Relationships and Risk Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-01-01

    The notion of a dose-response relationship was probably invented shortly after the discovery of poisons, the invention of alcoholic beverages, and the bringing of fire into a confined space in the forgotten depths of ancient prehistory. The amount of poison or medicine ingested can easily be observed to affect the behavior, health, or sickness outcome. Threshold effects, such as death, could be easily understood for intoxicants, medicine, and poisons. As Paracelsus (1493-1541), the 'father' of modern toxicology said, 'It is the dose that makes the poison.' Perhaps less obvious is the fact that implicit in such dose-response relationships is also the notion of dose rate. Usually, the dose is administered fairly acutely, in a single injection, pill, or swallow; a few puffs on a pipe; or a meal of eating or drinking. The same amount of intoxicants, medicine, or poisons administered over a week or month might have little or no observable effect. Thus, before the discovery of ionizing radiation in the late 19th century, toxicology ('the science of poisons') and pharmacology had deeply ingrained notions of dose-response relationships. This chapter demonstrates that the notion of a dose-response relationship for ionizing radiation is hopelessly simplistic from a scientific standpoint. While useful from a policy or regulatory standpoint, dose-response relationships cannot possibly convey enough information to describe the problem from a quantitative view of radiation biology, nor can they address societal values. Three sections of this chapter address the concepts, observations, and theories that contribute to the scientific input to the practice of managing risks from exposure to ionizing radiation. The presentation begins with irradiation regimes, followed by responses to high and low doses of ionizing radiation, and a discussion of how all of this can inform radiation risk management. The knowledge that is really needed for prediction of individual risk is presented

  14. Scintillator device using a combined organic-inorganic scintillator as dose ratemeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, W.; Lauterbach, U.

    1974-01-01

    The dose ratemeter independent of energy in the energy region 17 keV to 3 MeV consists of an organic and an inorganic scintillator. The organic scintillation material of an anthracene monocrystal is surrounded by ZnS surface coating. The coating thickness of the inorganic scintillator ZnS is measured in such a manner for gamma and X-radiation below 100 keV that the light produced due to the incident radiation compensates for the decrease of light produced in the organic scintillator. The whole energy and dose rate region of interest for radiation protection can thus be measured with a detector volume of 135 cm 3 . (DG) [de

  15. Radiation dose assessment of ACP hot cell in accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kook, D. H.; Jeong, W. M.; Koo, J. H.; Jeo, I. J.; Lee, E. P.; Ryu, K. S.

    2003-01-01

    The Advanced spent fuel Condition in Process(ACP) is under development for the effective management of spent fuel which had been generated in nuclear plants. The ACP needs a hot cell where most operations will be performed. To give priority to the environments safety, radiation doses evaluations for the radioactive nuclides in accident cases were preliminarily performed with the meteorological data around facility site. Fire accident prevails over several accidnets. Internal Dose and External Dose evaluation according to short dispersion data for that case show a safe margin for regulation limits and SAR limit of IMEF where this facility will be constructed

  16. Environmental dose-assessment methods for normal operations at DOE nuclear sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strenge, D.L.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Corley, J.P.

    1982-09-01

    Methods for assessing public exposure to radiation from normal operations at DOE facilities are reviewed in this report. The report includes a discussion of environmental doses to be calculated, a review of currently available environmental pathway models and a set of recommended models for use when environmental pathway modeling is necessary. Currently available models reviewed include those used by DOE contractors, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and other organizations involved in environmental assessments. General modeling areas considered for routine releases are atmospheric transport, airborne pathways, waterborne pathways, direct exposure to penetrating radiation, and internal dosimetry. The pathway models discussed in this report are applicable to long-term (annual) uniform releases to the environment: they do not apply to acute releases resulting from accidents or emergency situations

  17. Assessment of doses to non-human biota: Review of developments and demonstration assessment for Olkiluoto repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, K.; Robinson, C.

    2006-12-01

    This report provides a summary of work commissioned by Posiva Oy and undertaken by Enviros Consulting Ltd to support the development of a strategy for the assessment of environmental impacts from ionising radiation associated with the Olkiluoto waste repository, Finland, as part of the development of the Posiva Safety Case Portfolio. This project included a review of the development of international policies and standards related to protection of biota from the effects of ionizing radiation and of biota assessment methodologies, paying particular attention to those that have been applied to waste repository performance assessments. On the basis of this review, recommendations were developed on the most appropriate methodology to apply in order to assess the impact of radioactive releases from the planned spent fuel repository in Olkiluoto. A test-case was developed, in collaboration with staff from Posiva and Facilia AB, and an assessment was performed. The results and experience of which were analysed and summarised to develop recommendations for a future strategy. The test case highlighted some significant data gaps related to the assessment of impacts to both generic biota types and to interest species. In particular, concentration ratios for generic carnivorous mammals and migratory species such as moose that may consume food from multiple ecosystems and dose conversion factors for large burrowing (i.e. hibernating) mammals. However, in general terms, the dose rates predicted for all organism types were several orders of magnitude below those at which population effects would be expected to be observed and those at which effects on the individual may be anticipated. There would therefore be scope for simplifying the approach applied, although there would be value in performing a sensitivity analysis to ensure that the simplification is applied appropriately. There would also be value in ensuring consistency of the developing approach for non-human biota with

  18. Assessment of doses to non-human biota: Review of developments and demonstration assessment for Olkiluoto repository

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K. [Carol Robinson Enviros Consulting Ltd, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2006-12-15

    This report provides a summary of work commissioned by Posiva Oy and undertaken by Enviros Consulting Ltd to support the development of a strategy for the assessment of environmental impacts from ionising radiation associated with the Olkiluoto waste repository, Finland, as part of the development of the Posiva Safety Case Portfolio. This project included a review of the development of international policies and standards related to protection of biota from the effects of ionizing radiation and of biota assessment methodologies, paying particular attention to those that have been applied to waste repository performance assessments. On the basis of this review, recommendations were developed on the most appropriate methodology to apply in order to assess the impact of radioactive releases from the planned spent fuel repository in Olkiluoto. A test-case was developed, in collaboration with staff from Posiva and Facilia AB, and an assessment was performed. The results and experience of which were analysed and summarised to develop recommendations for a future strategy. The test case highlighted some significant data gaps related to the assessment of impacts to both generic biota types and to interest species. In particular, concentration ratios for generic carnivorous mammals and migratory species such as moose that may consume food from multiple ecosystems and dose conversion factors for large burrowing (i.e. hibernating) mammals. However, in general terms, the dose rates predicted for all organism types were several orders of magnitude below those at which population effects would be expected to be observed and those at which effects on the individual may be anticipated. There would therefore be scope for simplifying the approach applied, although there would be value in performing a sensitivity analysis to ensure that the simplification is applied appropriately. There would also be value in ensuring consistency of the developing approach for non-human biota with

  19. Study, assessment of radioactive dose on China's population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziqiang, P.

    1984-05-10

    The national population dose is defined as the radioactive dose from both natural and artificial sources which is received by the entire Chinese population. The necessity and prospects for developing ways to assess China's national population dose and some noteworthy problems in this area are described.

  20. Specific gamma-ray dose constants for nuclides important to dosimetry and radiological assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unger, L.M.; Trubey, D.K.

    1982-05-01

    Tables of specific gamma-ray dose constants (the unshielded gamma-ray dose equivalent rate at 1 m from a point source) have been computed for approximately 500 nuclides important to dosimetry and radiological assessment. The half life, the mean attenuation coefficient, and thickness for a lead shield providing 95% dose equivalent attenuation are also listed

  1. Application of computational models to estimate organ radiation dose in rainbow trout from uptake of molybdenum-99 with comparison to iodine-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, N.E.; Johnson, T.E.; Pinder, J.E.

    2016-01-01

    This study compares three anatomical phantoms for rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) for the purpose of estimating organ radiation dose and dose rates from molybdenum-99 ( 99 Mo) uptake in the liver and GI tract. Model comparison and refinement is important to the process of determining accurate doses and dose rates to the whole body and the various organs. Accurate and consistent dosimetry is crucial to the determination of appropriate dose-effect relationships for use in environmental risk assessment. The computational phantoms considered are (1) a geometrically defined model employing anatomically relevant organ size and location, (2) voxel reconstruction of internal anatomy obtained from CT imaging, and (3) a new model utilizing NURBS surfaces to refine the model in (2). Dose Conversion Factors (DCFs) for whole body as well as selected organs of O. mykiss were computed using Monte Carlo modeling and combined with empirical models for predicting activity concentration to estimate dose rates and ultimately determine cumulative radiation dose (μGy) to selected organs after several half-lives of 99 Mo. The computational models provided similar results, especially for organs that were both the source and target of radiation (less than 30% difference between all models). Values in the empirical model as well as the 14 day cumulative organ doses determined from 99 Mo uptake are compared to similar models developed previously for 131 I. Finally, consideration is given to treating the GI tract as a solid organ compared to partitioning it into gut contents and GI wall, which resulted in an order of magnitude difference in estimated dose for most organs. - Highlights: • Existing computational models for the internal dosimetry of trout are applied to 99 Mo uptake. • Consideration is given to the effect of alternate source distribution in the gut. • A hybrid computational phantom is developed. • At 14 days post-release, 99 Mo and 131 I provide similar

  2. Application of the mathematical modelling and human phantoms for calculation of the organ doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluson, J.; Cechak, T.

    2005-01-01

    Increasing power of the computers hardware and new versions of the software for the radiation transport simulation and modelling of the complex experimental setups and geometrical arrangement enable to dramatically improve calculation of organ or target volume doses ( dose distributions) in the wide field of medical physics and radiation protection applications. Increase of computers memory and new software features makes it possible to use not only analytical (mathematical) phantoms but also allow constructing the voxel models of human or phantoms with voxels fine enough (e.g. 1·1·1 mm) to represent all required details. CT data can be used for the description of such voxel model geometry .Advanced scoring methods are available in the new software versions. Contribution gives the overview of such new possibilities in the modelling and doses calculations, discusses the simulation/approximation of the dosimetric quantities ( especially dose ) and calculated data interpretation. Some examples of application and demonstrations will be shown, compared and discussed. Present computational tools enables to calculate organ or target volumes doses with new quality of large voxel models/phantoms (including CT based patient specific model ), approximating the human body with high precision. Due to these features has more and more importance and use in the fields of medical and radiological physics, radiation protection, etc. (authors)

  3. Dose assessment of an accidental exposure at IPNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, M.M.C.

    1996-01-01

    Seven different methods were used to estimate the dose rate to a female worker who was accidentally exposed in the neutron PHOENIX beamline at the IPNS. Theoretical and measured entrance dose rates ranged from 550 mrem/min to 2,850 mrem/min. Theoretical estimates were based on a Monte Carlo simulation of a spectrum provided by IPNS (Crawford Spectrum). Dose measurements were made with TLDs on phantoms and with ionization chambers in a water phantom. Estimates of the whole body total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) rate ranged from 5.2 mrem/min to 840 mrem/min. Assumed and measured quality factors ranged from 2.6 to 11.8. Cytogenic analyses of blood samples detected no positive exposure. The recommended TEDE rate was 158 mrem/min. The TEDE was 750 mrem

  4. Dose assessment of an accidental exposure at the IPNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos Torres, M.M.

    1995-02-01

    Seven different methods were used to estimate the dose rate to a female worker who was accidentally exposed in the neutron PHOENIX beamline at the IPNS. Theoretical and measured entrance dose ranged from 550 mrem/min to 2850 mrem/min. Theoretical estimates were based on a Monte Carlo simulation of a spectrum provided by IPNS (Crawford Spectrum). Dose measurements were made with TLDs on phantoms and with ionization chambers in a water phantom. Estimates of the whole body total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) rate ranged from 5.2 mrem/min to 840 mrem/min. Assumed and measured quality factors ranged from 2.6 to 11.8. Cytogenetic analyses of blood samples detected no positive exposure. The recommended TEDE rate was 158 mrem/min. The TEDE was 750 mrem

  5. The Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey: data and dose assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robison, W L; Noshkin, V E; Conrado, C L; Eagle, R J; Brunk, J L; Jokela, T A; Mount, M E; Phillips, W A; Stoker, A C; Stuart, M L; Wong, K M

    1997-07-01

    Fallout from atmospheric nuclear tests, especially from those conducted at the Pacific Proving Grounds between 1946 and 1958, contaminated areas of the Northern Marshall Islands. A radiological survey at some Northern Marshall Islands was conducted from September through November 1978 to evaluate the extent of residual radioactive contamination. The atolls included in the Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey (NMIRS) were Likiep, Ailuk, Utirik, Wotho, Ujelang, Taka, Rongelap, Rongerik, Bikar, Ailinginae, and Mejit and Jemo Islands. The original test sites, Bikini and Enewetak Atolls, were also visited on the survey. An aerial survey was conducted to determine the external gamma exposure rate. Terrestrial (soil, food crops, animals, and native vegetation), cistern and well water samples, and marine (sediment, seawater, fish and clams) samples were collected to evaluate radionuclide concentrations in the atoll environment. Samples were processed and analyzed for 137Cs, 90Sr, 239+240Pu and 241Am. The dose from the ingestion pathway was calculated using the radionuclide concentration data and a diet model for local food, marine, and water consumption. The ingestion pathway contributes 70% to 90% of the estimated dose. Approximately 95% of the dose is from 137Cs. 90Sr is the second most significant radionuclide via ingestion. External gamma exposure from 137Cs accounts for about 10% to 30% of the dose. 239+240Pu and 241Am are the major contributors to dose via the inhalation pathway; however, inhalation accounts for only about 1% of the total estimated dose, based on surface soil levels and resuspension studies. All doses are computed for concentrations decay corrected to 1996. The maximum annual effective dose from manmade radionuclides at these atolls ranges from .02 mSv y(-1) to 2.1 mSv y(-1). The background dose in the Marshall Islands is estimated to be 2.4 mSv y(-1). The combined dose from both background and bomb related radionuclides ranges from slightly

  6. Blood compounds irradiation process: assessment of absorbed dose using Fricke and Thermoluminescent dosimetric systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Gabriela de Amorim; Squair, Peterson Lima; Pinto, Fausto Carvalho; Belo, Luiz Claudio Meira; Grossi, Pablo Andrade [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN-CNEN/MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: gas@cdtn.br, e-mail: pls@cdtn.br, e-mail: fcp@cdtn.br, e-mail: lcmb@cdtn.br, e-mail: pabloag@cdtn.br

    2009-07-01

    The assessment of gamma absorbed doses in irradiation facilities allows the quality assurance and control of the irradiation process. The liability of dose measurements is assign to the metrological procedures adopted including the uncertainty evaluation. Fricke and TLD 800 dosimetric systems were used to measure absorbed dose in the blood compounds using the methodology presented in this paper. The measured absorbed doses were used for evaluating the effectiveness of the irradiation procedure and the gamma dose absorption inside the irradiation room of a gamma irradiation facility. The radiation eliminates the functional and proliferative capacities of donor T-lymphocytes, preventing Transfusion associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD), a possible complication of blood transfusions. The results show the applicability of such dosimetric systems in quality assurance programs, assessment of absorbed doses in blood compounds and dose uniformity assign to the blood compounds irradiation process by dose measurements in a range between 25 Gy and 100 Gy. (author)

  7. Blood compounds irradiation process: assessment of absorbed dose using Fricke and Thermoluminescent dosimetric systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Gabriela de Amorim; Squair, Peterson Lima; Pinto, Fausto Carvalho; Belo, Luiz Claudio Meira; Grossi, Pablo Andrade

    2009-01-01

    The assessment of gamma absorbed doses in irradiation facilities allows the quality assurance and control of the irradiation process. The liability of dose measurements is assign to the metrological procedures adopted including the uncertainty evaluation. Fricke and TLD 800 dosimetric systems were used to measure absorbed dose in the blood compounds using the methodology presented in this paper. The measured absorbed doses were used for evaluating the effectiveness of the irradiation procedure and the gamma dose absorption inside the irradiation room of a gamma irradiation facility. The radiation eliminates the functional and proliferative capacities of donor T-lymphocytes, preventing Transfusion associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD), a possible complication of blood transfusions. The results show the applicability of such dosimetric systems in quality assurance programs, assessment of absorbed doses in blood compounds and dose uniformity assign to the blood compounds irradiation process by dose measurements in a range between 25 Gy and 100 Gy. (author)

  8. Assessment of genetically significant doses to the Sofia population from natural gamma background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasilev, G.; Khristova, M.

    1977-01-01

    Genetically significant dose to the population of Sofia city was assessed within a program covering larger urban communities in the country. Measurements were made of gamma background exposure rates in the gonadal region. Gonad doses were estimated using a screening factor of 0.73. Based on statistical data for total number of inhabitants and number of people of reproductive age, and on the mean annual gonad doses derived, calculations were made of genetically significant dose to the Sofia population. Base-line data were thus provided for an assessment of extra radiation dose resulting from occupational radiation exposure. (author)

  9. LDR brachytherapy: can low dose rate hypersensitivity from the "inverse" dose rate effect cause excessive cell killing to peripherial connective tissues and organs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, B E; Lucas, A C

    2009-02-01

    Examined here are the possible effects of the "inverse" dose rate effect (IDRE) on low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy. The hyper-radiosensitivity and induced radioresistance (HRS/IRR) effect benefits cell killing in radiotherapy, and IDRE and HRS/IRR seem to be generated from the same radioprotective mechanisms. We have computed the IDRE excess cell killing experienced in LDR brachytherapy using permanent seed implants. We conclude, firstly, that IDRE is a dose rate-dependent manifestation of HRS/IRR. Secondly, the presence of HRS/IRR or IDRE in a cell species or tissue must be determined by direct dose-response measurements. Thirdly, a reasonable estimate is that 50-80% of human adjoining connective and organ tissues experience IDRE from permanent implanted LDR brachytherapy. If IDRE occurs for tissues at point A for cervical cancer, the excess cell killing will be about a factor of 3.5-4.0 if the initial dose rate is 50-70 cGy h(-1). It is greater for adjacent tissues at lower dose rates and higher for lower initial dose rates at point A. Finally, higher post-treatment complications are observed in LDR brachytherapy, often for unknown reasons. Some of these are probably a result of IDRE excess cell killing. Measurements of IDRE need be performed for connective and adjacent organ tissues, i.e. bladder, rectum, urinary tract and small bowels. The measured dose rate-dependent dose responses should extended to tissues and organs remain above IDRE thresholds).

  10. Toxicity risk of non-target organs at risk receiving low-dose radiation: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shueng, Pei-Wei; Lin, Shih-Chiang; Chang, Hou-Tai; Chong, Ngot-Swan; Chen, Yu-Jen; Wang, Li-Ying; Hsieh, Yen-Ping; Hsieh, Chen-Hsi

    2009-01-01

    The spine is the most common site for bone metastases. Radiation therapy is a common treatment for palliation of pain and for prevention or treatment of spinal cord compression. Helical tomotherapy (HT), a new image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), delivers highly conformal dose distributions and provides an impressive ability to spare adjacent organs at risk, thus increasing the local control of spinal column metastases and decreasing the potential risk of critical organs under treatment. However, there are a lot of non-target organs at risk (OARs) occupied by low dose with underestimate in this modern rotational IMRT treatment. Herein, we report a case of a pathologic compression fracture of the T9 vertebra in a 55-year-old patient with cholangiocarcinoma. The patient underwent HT at a dose of 30 Gy/10 fractions delivered to T8-T10 for symptom relief. Two weeks after the radiotherapy had been completed, the first course of chemotherapy comprising gemcitabine, fluorouracil, and leucovorin was administered. After two weeks of chemotherapy, however, the patient developed progressive dyspnea. A computed tomography scan of the chest revealed an interstitial pattern with traction bronchiectasis, diffuse ground-glass opacities, and cystic change with fibrosis. Acute radiation pneumonitis was diagnosed. Oncologists should be alert to the potential risk of radiation toxicities caused by low dose off-targets and abscopal effects even with highly conformal radiotherapy

  11. Assessment of patient radiation doses during routine diagnostic radiography examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, Asim Karam Aldden Adam

    2015-11-01

    Medical applications of radiation represent the largest source of exposure to general population. Accounting for 3.0 mSv against an estimated 2.4 mSv from a natural back ground in United States. The association of ionizing radiation an cancer risk is assumed to be continuos and graded over the entire range of exposure, The objective of this study is to evaluate the patient radiation doses in radiology departments in Khartoum state. A total of 840 patients ? during two in the following hospitals Khartoum Teaching Hospital (260 patients), Fedail specialized hospital ( 261 patients). National Ribat University hospital ( 189 patients) and Engaz hospital (130 patients). Patient doses were measured for 9 procedures. The Entrance surface Air Kerma (ESAK) was quantified using x-ray unit output by Unifiers xi dose rate meter( Un fore inc. Billdal. Sweden) and patient exposure parameters. The mean patient age. Weight and Body Mass index (BMI) were 42.6 year 58/4 kg and 212 kg/m respectively. The mean patient doses, kv and MAS and E.q was 0.35 mGy per procedures 59.9 volt 19.8 Ampere per second 0.32 Sv . Patient doses were comparable with previous studies. Patient radiation doses showed considerable difference between hospitals due to x- ray systems exposure settings and patient weight. Patient are exposed to unnecessary radiation.(Author)

  12. Assessment of prospective foodchain doses from radioactive discharges from BNFL Sellafield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ould-Dada, Z.; Tucker, S.; Webbe-Wood, D.; Mondon, K.; Hunt, J.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the method used by the UK Food Standards Agency (FSA) to assess the potential impact of proposed radioactive discharges from the Sellafield nuclear site on food and determine their acceptability. It explains aspects of a cautious method that has been adopted to reflect the UK government policy and uncertainties related to people's habits with regard to food production and consumption. Two types of ingestion doses are considered in this method: 'possible' and 'probable' doses. The method is specifically applied to Sellafield discharge limits and calculated possible and probable ingestion doses are presented and discussed. Estimated critical group ingestion doses are below the dose limit and constraint set for members of the public. The method may be subject to future amendments to take account of changes in government policy and the outcome of a recent Consultative Exercise on Dose Assessments carried out by FSA. Uncertainties inherent in dose assessments are discussed and quantified wherever possible

  13. Calculating the radiological parameters used in non-human biota dose assessment tools using ERICA Tool and site-specific data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotiropoulou, Maria [INRASTES, NCSR ' ' Demokritos' ' , Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory, Athens (Greece); Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Atomic and Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Thessaloniki (Greece); Florou, Heleny [INRASTES, NCSR ' ' Demokritos' ' , Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory, Athens (Greece); Kitis, Georgios [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Atomic and Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2017-11-15

    The substantial complexity in ecosystem-radionuclide interactions is difficult to be represented in terms of radiological doses. Thus, radiological dose assessment tools use typical exposure situations for generalized organisms and ecosystems. In the present study, site-specific data and radioactivity measurements of terrestrial organisms (grass and herbivore mammals) and abiotic components (soil) are provided. The retrieved data are used in combination with the ERICA Assessment Tool for calculation of radiological parameters. The process of radionuclide transfer within ecosystem components is represented using concentration ratios (CRs), while for the calculation of dose rates the dose conversion coefficient (DCC) methodology is applied. Comparative assessments are performed between the generic and assessment-specific radiological parameters and between the resulting dose rates. Significant differences were observed between CRs calculated in this study and those reported in the literature for cesium and thorium, which can easily be explained. On the other hand, CRs calculated for radium are in very good agreement with those reported in the literature. The DCCs exhibited some small differences between the reference and the assessment-specific organism due to mass differences. The differences were observed for internal and external dose rates, but they were less pronounced for total dose rates which are typically used in the assessment of radiological impact. The results of the current work can serve as a basis for further studies of the radiological parameters in environments that have not been studied yet. (orig.)

  14. Radiation dose to radiosensitive organs in PET/CT myocardial perfusion examination using versatile optical fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salasiah, M.; Nordin, A. J.; Fathinul Fikri, A. S.; Hishar, H.; Tamchek, N.; Taiman, K.; Ahmad Bazli, A. K.; Abdul-Rashid, H. A.; Mahdiraji, G. A.; Mizanur, R.; Noor, Noramaliza M.

    2013-05-01

    Cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) provides a precise method in order to diagnose obstructive coronary artery disease (CAD), compared to single photon emission tomography (SPECT). PET is suitable for obese and patients who underwent pharmacologic stress procedures. It has the ability to evaluate multivessel coronary artery disease by recording changes in left ventricular function from rest to peak stress and quantifying myocardial perfusion (in mL/min/g of tissue). However, the radiation dose to the radiosensitive organs has become crucial issues in the Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography(PET/CT) scanning procedure. The objective of this study was to estimate radiation dose to radiosensitive organs of patients who underwent PET/CT myocardial perfusion examination at Centre for Diagnostic Nuclear Imaging, Universiti Putra Malaysia in one month period using versatile optical fibres (Ge-B-doped Flat Fibre) and LiF (TLD-100 chips). All stress and rest paired myocardial perfusion PET/CT scans will be performed with the use of Rubidium-82 (82Rb). The optic fibres were loaded into plastic capsules and attached to patient's eyes, thyroid and breasts prior to the infusion of 82Rb, to accommodate the ten cases for the rest and stress PET scans. The results were compared with established thermoluminescence material, TLD-100 chips. The result shows that radiation dose given by TLD-100 and Germanium-Boron-doped Flat Fiber (Ge-B-doped Flat Fiber) for these five organs were comparable to each other where the p>0.05. For CT scans,thyroid received the highest dose compared to other organs. Meanwhile, for PET scans, breasts received the highest dose.

  15. Thyroid dose of I-131 absorbed by the internal organs of a pregnant woman

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcos P, A.; Manzanares A, E.; Vega C, H.R.; Leon, C.L. de

    2007-01-01

    The use of nuclear techniques, for diagnosis or treatment, generates stress in the patient and its relatives. During the pregnancy some sufferings related with the thyroid gland can be presented. If the patient is pregnant, OEP or NOEP, the stress comes from the fear to that the product can it turns affected. The dose is calculated that the Iodine 131, captured by the thyroid of a woman with three months of pregnancy, it deposits in the brain, stomach, heart, kidneys, liver, lungs, ovaries, pancreas, thymus, spleen and in the uterus. The thymus is the organ that receives the biggest dose. (Author)

  16. Analysis of volatile organic compounds and sensory characteristics of pork loin samples irradiated to high doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Zhengchi; Sun Dakuan; Qin Zongying; Jin Jiang; Zhu Liandi; Yao Side; Sheng Kanglong

    2005-01-01

    Fresh pork loin samples, protein enzyme inactivated at (72 ± 3) degree C and vacuum packaged, were irradiated to up to 45 kGy at -20 degree C by 60 Co γ-rays. The irradiated samples were examined by various kinds of method to study high dose irradiation effects of sensory changes (meat color and off-odor), transverse shearing strength, weight loss in steam cooking, volatile organic compounds, and lipid oxidation. The results showed that the high dose irradiation produced no serious effects to the pork loin samples, and volunteer responses showed fine acceptability to the irradiated meat. (authors)

  17. Bibliographic study of doses received by operators with non-protected organs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, B.; Rehel, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    Based on a literature survey, the authors present and discuss the various levels of doses received by different organs during interventional radiology. These doses depend on the procedures (close or remote), on the part of the body, on the protocols, and on the apparatus. They raise the issue of the use of a single dosimeter (born under protection as it is already required in France) or two dosimeters (a second one on a non protected area as it is the case in some other countries)

  18. Environmental assessment in health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Isabel; Carnero, María Carmen

    2017-12-22

    The aim of this research is to design a multi-criteria model for environmental assessment of health care organizations. This is a model which guarantees the objectivity of the results obtained, is easy to apply, and incorporates a series of criteria, and their corresponding descriptors, relevant to the internal environmental auditing processes of the hospital. Furthermore, judgments were given by three experts from the areas of health, the environment, and multi-criteria decision techniques. From the values assigned, geometric means were calculated, giving weightings for the criteria of the model. This innovative model is intended for application within a continuous improvement process. A practical case from a Spanish hospital is included at the end. Information contained in the sustainability report provided the data needed to apply the model. The example contains all the criteria previously defined in the model. The results obtained show that the best-satisfied criteria are those related to energy consumption, generation of hazardous waste, legal matters, environmental sensitivity of staff, patients and others, and the environmental management of suppliers. On the other hand, those areas returning poor results are control of atmospheric emissions, increase in consumption of renewable energies, and the logistics of waste produced. It is recommended that steps be taken to correct these deficiencies, thus leading to an acceptable increase in the sustainability of the hospital.

  19. Doses to organs and tissues from concomitant imaging in radiotherapy: a suggested framework for clinical justification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R M

    2008-12-01

    The increasing use of imaging for localization and verification in radiotherapy has raised issues concerning the justifiable doses to critical organs and tissues from concomitant exposures, particularly when extensive image-guided radiotherapy is indicated. Doses at positions remote from the target volume include components from high-energy leakage and scatter, as well as from concomitant imaging. In this paper, simulated prostate, breast and larynx treatments are used to compare doses from both high-energy and concomitant exposures as a function of distance from the target volume. It is suggested that the fraction, R, of the total dose at any point within the patient that is attributable to concomitant exposures may be a useful aid in their justification. R is small within the target volume and at large distances from it. However, there is a critical region immediately adjacent to the planning target volume where the dose from concomitant imaging combines with leakage and scatter to give values of R that approach 0.5 in the examples given here. This is noteworthy because the regions just outside the target volume will receive total doses in the order of 1 Gy, where commensurately high risk factors may not be substantially reduced because of cell kill. Other studies have identified these regions as sites of second cancers. The justification of an imaging regimen might therefore usefully take into account the maximum value of R encountered from the combination of imaging and radiotherapy for particular treatment sites.

  20. Effect on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. of different doses of organic fertilizer bocashi under agroecological conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Boudet Antomarchi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The research work was carried out in areas of the Agricultural Production Cooperative "Carlos Bastida Argüello" in Cauto Cristo municipality of Cuban province of Granma in the period between November 2013 and February 2014, on a fluvisol soil at a plantation distance of 0.90 x 0.30 m, in order to evaluate the effect of different doses of organic manure bocashi on the productive response of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. variety "Vyta". The treatments consisted of the application of three doses of manure "bocashi" and a control without application. A randomized complete block design with three repetitions was used and the evaluated variables were: the yield and its components (number of bunches per plant, number of fruits per plant, mass of fruits per plant, polar and equatorial diameter of the fruit and mesocarp thickness. The data obtained were submitted to a variance analysis of double classification with the use of SPSS version 22. In case of significant differences between treatments a Tukey test was performed for comparison of means. The results showed that treatment with application of organic manure had a positive influence on the yield and majority of yield components values. The yields values were higher in the three doses of organic manure than in the control treatment and yield increased with the increase of dosage of organic manure.

  1. Participation of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority in the 'Third European Intercomparison Exercise on Internal Dose Assessment'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo, Ana Maria; Gomez Parada, Ines Maria

    2001-01-01

    This paper resume the participation of the Argentine Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) in the 'Third European Intercomparison Exercise on Internal Dose Assessment'. It takes place during 5 months in 1998 and the final meeting was held in Weimar, Germany, on May 1999. This exercise involved the previous distribution of seven cases, simulated and real, describing possible incorporations of radioactive materials. There was a description of the event, data of retention or excretion measurements and air concentration data. The fifty participants belong to twenty three countries had do solve the cases and informed the results to the organizers, mainly the incorporation and effective