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Sample records for assessing notorious contributing

  1. FRamework Assessing Notorious Contributing Influences for Error (FRANCIE): Perspective on Taxonomy Development to Support Error Reporting and Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lon N. Haney; David I. Gertman

    2003-04-01

    Beginning in the 1980s a primary focus of human reliability analysis was estimation of human error probabilities. However, detailed qualitative modeling with comprehensive representation of contextual variables often was lacking. This was likely due to the lack of comprehensive error and performance shaping factor taxonomies, and the limited data available on observed error rates and their relationship to specific contextual variables. In the mid 90s Boeing, America West Airlines, NASA Ames Research Center and INEEL partnered in a NASA sponsored Advanced Concepts grant to: assess the state of the art in human error analysis, identify future needs for human error analysis, and develop an approach addressing these needs. Identified needs included the need for a method to identify and prioritize task and contextual characteristics affecting human reliability. Other needs identified included developing comprehensive taxonomies to support detailed qualitative modeling and to structure meaningful data collection efforts across domains. A result was the development of the FRamework Assessing Notorious Contributing Influences for Error (FRANCIE) with a taxonomy for airline maintenance tasks. The assignment of performance shaping factors to generic errors by experts proved to be valuable to qualitative modeling. Performance shaping factors and error types from such detailed approaches can be used to structure error reporting schemes. In a recent NASA Advanced Human Support Technology grant FRANCIE was refined, and two new taxonomies for use on space missions were developed. The development, sharing, and use of error taxonomies, and the refinement of approaches for increased fidelity of qualitative modeling is offered as a means to help direct useful data collection strategies.

  2. Definitions of Complexity are Notoriously Difficult

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    Schuster, Peter

    Definitions of complexity are notoriously difficult if not impossible at all. A good working hypothesis might be: Everything is complex that is not simple. This is precisely the way in which we define nonlinear behavior. Things appear complex for different reasons: i) Complexity may result from lack of insight, ii) complexity may result from lack of methods, and (iii) complexity may be inherent to the system. The best known example for i) is celestial mechanics: The highly complex Pythagorean epicycles become obsolete by the introduction of Newton's law of universal gravitation. To give an example for ii), pattern formation and deterministic chaos became not really understandable before extensive computer simulations became possible. Cellular metabolism may serve as an example for iii) and is caused by the enormous complexity of biochemical reaction networks with up to one hundred individual reaction fluxes. Nevertheless, only few fluxes are dominant in the sense that using Pareto optimal values for them provides near optimal values for all the others...

  3. Notorious: Hitchcock’s good neighbor film Notorious: Hitchcock’s good neighbor film

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    Arlindo Castro

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The New York release of Alfred Hitchcock’s Notorious occurred in August 1946, one month after the Bikini atomic explosions, and one year after the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. “Is mankind dying of curiosity?” asked a double page Time magazine ad, in the same issue that published a review of the film. “Time’s Science department noted recently,” readers were told, “that people everywhere have one great Fear: will the curiosity of nuclear physicists someday set off a giant chain reaction which will flash-bum the world to a clinker?”l To overcome that fear of the nuclear apocalypse, according to the add, readers should learn more and more about “the big mysteries of our atomic age,” beginning by checking her or his score in the “Time’s Quiz on Science.” If they happened to go to Radio City Music Hall, Notorious would reassure them that the U.S. was doing well in preventing obstinate Nazis from making an atomic bomb, though at that moment of the nuclear espionage war, former Manhattan Project insider Klaus Fuchs had actually passed on to a Soviet contact in London classified information about the Manhattan Project and American atomic plans.2 Indeed, in that transitional period between World War II and the Cold War, the major political villains were still Nazis, not Communists, as exemplified by other 1946 films like Orson Welles’ The Stranger, Charles Vidor’s Gilda, and Edward Dmytryk’s Cornered. The New York release of Alfred Hitchcock’s Notorious occurred in August 1946, one month after the Bikini atomic explosions, and one year after the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. “Is mankind dying of curiosity?” asked a double page Time magazine ad, in the same issue that published a review of the film. “Time’s Science department noted recently,” readers were told, “that people everywhere have one great Fear: will the curiosity of nuclear physicists someday set off a giant chain reaction which will

  4. Assessing Contributions to Group Assignments

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    Johnston, Lucy; Miles, Lynden

    2004-01-01

    We report the use of a combination of self- and peer-assessment in an undergraduate social psychology laboratory course. Students worked in small groups on a self-directed empirical project that they each wrote up independently as a laboratory report. Marks for the written assignment were moderated by a contribution index measure based on the…

  5. Constraints on coastal dune invasion for a notorious plant invader.

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    Griffith, Alden B; Ahmed, Tania; Hildner, Abigail L G; Kuckreja, Shivani; Long, Shuangxou

    2015-11-10

    Although most biological invasions are not successful, relatively few studies have examined otherwise notorious invaders in systems where they are not highly problematic. The annual grass Bromus tectorum is a dominant invader in western North America, but is usually confined to human-dominated and disturbed systems (e.g. roadsides and parking lots) in the East where it remains virtually unstudied. This study aims to address fundamental ecological questions regarding B. tectorum in a Cape Cod dune ecosystem. (i) What is the range of variation in population dynamics and the potential for population growth? (ii) Which factors influence its local abundance and distribution? We observed substantial variation in population dynamics over 3 years, with the number of adult B. tectorum individuals increasing substantially between the first 2 years (λ = 9.24) and then decreasing (λ = 0.43). Population growth in terms of total seeds was similarly variable, but to a lesser extent (λ = 2.32 followed by λ = 0.32). Experimental soil disturbance led to a more than 10-fold increase in mean seedling emergence, and high sensitivity to differences in emergence carried this effect through the life cycle. In contrast, barriers to seed dispersal had no effect on population dynamics, suggesting limited dispersal in this system. Across the landscape, the presence of B. tectorum was associated with areas of higher plant diversity as opposed to those with a strong dominant (e.g. the foredune, dominated by Ammophila breviligulata, or low heathlands, characterized by Hudsonia tomentosa and Arctostaphylos uva-ursi). Overall, we find that B. tectorum is capable of both substantial population growth and decline in a dune ecosystem, but is likely limited without disturbance and dispersal agents. Thus, management actions that restrict dune access (e.g. for nesting habitat) likely have the co-benefit of limiting the invasive potential of B. tectorum.

  6. The Inconsistency Between The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County and The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Wen-hua

    2015-01-01

    This paper compares Mark Twain’s The Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County and The Man That Corrupted Had⁃leyburg, in terms of their stylistic and semantic inconsistency, specifically, their narrative technique and moral vision.

  7. Assessing Urban Landscape Variables’ Contributions to Microclimates

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    Tammy E. Parece

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The well-known urban heat island (UHI effect recognizes prevailing patterns of warmer urban temperatures relative to surrounding rural landscapes. Although UHIs are often visualized as single features, internal variations within urban landscapes create distinctive microclimates. Evaluating intraurban microclimate variability presents an opportunity to assess spatial dimensions of urban environments and identify locations that heat or cool faster than other locales. Our study employs mobile weather units and fixed weather stations to collect air temperatures across Roanoke, Virginia, USA, on selected dates over a two-year interval. Using this temperature data, together with six landscape variables, we interpolated (using Kriging and Random Forest air temperatures across the city for each collection period. Our results estimated temperatures with small mean square errors (ranging from 0.03 to 0.14; landscape metrics explained between 60 and 91% of temperature variations (higher when the previous day’s average temperatures were included as a variable. For all days, similar spatial patterns appeared for cooler and warmer areas in mornings, with distinctive patterns as landscapes warmed during the day and over successive days. Our results revealed that the most potent landscape variables vary according to season and time of day. Our analysis contributes new dimensions and new levels of spatial and temporal detail to urban microclimate research.

  8. Contribution to DEMO reactor RH maintenance assessment

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    Bonnemason, Julie [CEA, LIST, Service de Robotique Interactive 18 route du Panorama, BP6, FONTENAY AUX ROSES, F-92265 (France)], E-mail: julie.bonnemason@cea.fr; Friconneau, Jean-Pierre [CEA, LIST, Service de Robotique Interactive 18 route du Panorama, BP6, FONTENAY AUX ROSES, F-92265 (France); Maisonnier, David [EFDA, Boltzmannstrasse 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Perrot, Yann [CEA, LIST, Service de Robotique Interactive 18 route du Panorama, BP6, FONTENAY AUX ROSES, F-92265 (France)

    2009-06-15

    The scope of this paper is a preliminary assessment of the maintenance scheme in support of the European study for the next generation of fusion reactor: DEMO. Despite other fusion machine requiring remote handling maintenance operations, DEMO is supposed to work under steady state operational conditions. Therefore, requirement on the maintenance scheme is stronger. To target a good availability of the machine along machine operation plan, it is necessary to draw an adequate maintenance scheme. Indeed, due to the high fluxes generated by the plasma in the vacuum vessel, the first wall lifetime is limited, so the frequent replacement is necessary. On current fusion experimental machine, as first wall load conditions are less severe, DEMO condition implies high level of requirement on maintenance time. During DEMO lifetime, several full first wall replacements are expected. To provide access to the vacuum vessel machine for first wall removal, preparatory work is required to set the machine to adequate maintenance conditions and to open the machine properly, the same situation at the end of the maintenance period. Shutdown duration for first wall replacement should be as short as possible to reach the availability target of the machine. From this statement, the maintenance duration should not exceed 20% of the total lifetime of the reactor operation. First wall segmentation (i.e. total number of component to replace) has a high impact onto the replacement time. Considering the number of feasible designs for the first wall segmentation, we concentrate remote handling concept assessments one type of segmentation, the one minimizing the numbers of modules to replace . Assumption on Divertor segmentation for these DEMO studies have similarities with Divertor ITER design; therefore ITER design output is relevant . We assume divertor removal performed in shadow time, while removing the other first wall modules.

  9. Peer-Assessing Peers' Contribution to EFL Group Presentations

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    Saito, Hidetoshi; Fujita, Tomoko

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is three-fold: (1) to examine the similarities and differences between instructor and peer assessments of EFL group presentations; (2) to understand the utility of peer assessment for discriminating each group member's contribution to group presentations in college EFL classrooms; and (3) to investigate the relationship…

  10. How social impact assessment can contribute to conflict management

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    Prenzel, Paula V.; Vanclay, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The potential for conflict is omnipresent in all projects, and even in all human interactions, and conflict itself leads to many second-order social impacts. This article examines the contribution of the methodological approach used in social impact assessment (SIA) to conflict management. We view c

  11. Peer Assessments of GPW: Infusing Fairness into Students' Assessments of Peer Contributions

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    Onyia, Okey Peter; Allen, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    This paper contains results of an empirical study that tested the efficacy and acceptability of two templates designed to fully involve students in proper and fair peer-assessments of their group project work (GPW) by providing concrete evidence of independent progressive documentation of their peers' contributions to the work-process and…

  12. AN ASSESSMENT OF CITIZEN CONTRIBUTED GROUND REFERENCE DATA FOR LAND COVER MAP ACCURACY ASSESSMENT

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    G. M. Foody

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It is now widely accepted that an accuracy assessment should be part of a thematic mapping programme. Authoritative good or best practices for accuracy assessment have been defined but are often impractical to implement. Key reasons for this situation are linked to the ground reference data used in the accuracy assessment. Typically, it is a challenge to acquire a large sample of high quality reference cases in accordance to desired sampling designs specified as conforming to good practice and the data collected are normally to some degree imperfect limiting their value to an accuracy assessment which implicitly assumes the use of a gold standard reference. Citizen sensors have great potential to aid aspects of accuracy assessment. In particular, they may be able to act as a source of ground reference data that may, for example, reduce sample size problems but concerns with data quality remain. The relative strengths and limitations of citizen contributed data for accuracy assessment are reviewed in the context of the authoritative good practices defined for studies of land cover by remote sensing. The article will highlight some of the ways that citizen contributed data have been used in accuracy assessment as well as some of the problems that require further attention, and indicate some of the potential ways forward in the future.

  13. How social impact assessment can contribute to conflict management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prenzel, Paula V., E-mail: p.v.prenzel@student.rug.nl; Vanclay, Frank, E-mail: frank.vanclay@rug.nl

    2014-02-15

    The potential for conflict is omnipresent in all projects, and even in all human interactions, and conflict itself leads to many second-order social impacts. This article examines the contribution of the methodological approach used in social impact assessment (SIA) to conflict management. We view conflict as a process that has its own dynamic, and is to be expected in all situations. By using game theory (prisoner's dilemma), we describe and conceptualize this process and highlight the importance of communication in managing conflict. We demonstrate the potential use of SIA in preventing, managing and resolving conflict. Emphasis is placed on the participatory character of SIA and the role of public media. In contrast to existing literature, our focus is not restricted to the typical fields of study of SIA (e.g. environmental conflicts), but understands conflict itself as a field of application. In this sense, conflict-sensitive SIA can be understood both as an extension to the SIA tool kit and a broadening of the scope of SIA application. -- Highlights: • Conflict is omnipresent and creates both positive and negative social impacts. • Conflict itself represents a possible field of application for SIA. • Conflict escalation is a process that can be modeled in a game-theoretic framework. • There needs to be concerted effort to prevent escalation to avoid harmful outcomes. • Conflict-sensitive SIA can support conflict management and sustainable resolution.

  14. Classroom Contribution: What Do Students Perceive as Fair Assessment?

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    Pepper, Molly B.; Pathak, Seemantini

    2008-01-01

    Assigning a grade to students' class contribution may be 1 of the most controversial and difficult challenges that instructors face. The authors examine the perceived fairness of class contribution grading methods from the perspective of the performance appraisal literature. In 2 scenario studies based on actual grading techniques, the authors…

  15. Exploring assessment factors contributing to students' study strategies: literature review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Kadri, H.M.; Al-Moamary, M.S.; Roberts, C.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2012-01-01

    "Assessment steers students' learning" is a statement that has been used repeatedly without solid evidence in the literature. This manuscript aims to evaluate the published literatures on the effect of teaching learning environment in particular, the implemented assessment on students' learning appr

  16. Advancing the Contribution of Occupational Epidemiology to Risk Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlaanderen, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    The identification and quantification of risk factors that are characterized by low exposure levels, moderately increased risks, and unspecific exposure-disease relations is a major challenge facing risk assessment today. Occupational epidemiological studies can play a role in addressing this challe

  17. The Contributions of Reliability and Pretests to Effective Assessment

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    Donald Bacon

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows how the reliability of measures and the use of pretests (or covariates both have the..potential to increase the statistical power in research designs. Tables are presented that show how specific..changes in these factors can dramatically reduce the sample size necessary to determine whether an..intervention is effective, thus potentially improving the effectiveness of assessment in terms of reducing the..time and cost of collecting scientific support for new practices.

  18. assessing contributions of jgofs; previewing Studies in Ocean Ecology, Biogeochemistry

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    Steinberg, Deborah K.; Ducklow, Hugh W.; Buesseler, Ken O.; Bowles, Margaret C.

    Despite impediments to travel imposed by global political and health concerns, 332 scientists and students from 32 countries gathered in Washington, D.C. in early May to celebrate the conclusion of the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS), and to assess both its accomplishments and the future course of research in ocean ecology and biogeochemistry.Launched in 1987 under the auspices of the Scientific Committee on Oceanic Research (SCOR), JGOFS became the first core project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP) 2 years later as its first field studies were getting underway. Global in scope and multinational and interdisciplinary from its inception, JGOFS adopted two major goals: to understand the processes controlling the cycling of carbon and other biogenic elements in the ocean and their exchange with the atmosphere and the sea floor, and to advance our capacity to predict the response of ocean systems to anthropogenic perturbations.

  19. Modelling Beginning Teachers' Assessment Literacy: The Contribution of Training, Self-Efficacy, and Conceptions of Assessment

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    Levy-Vered, Adi; Alhija, Fadia Nasser-Abu

    2015-01-01

    Teachers devote a substantial amount of their time to assessment-related activities. This study aimed to describe beginning teachers' assessment literacy and to examine a structural model that binds assessment literacy with assessment training, self-efficacy, and conceptions of assessment. Data were collected from 327 Israeli inductee teachers and…

  20. The Contribution of Project Environmental Assessment to Assessing and Managing Cumulative Effects: Individually and Collectively Insignificant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Bram; Liu, Jialang; Hackett, Paul

    2017-04-01

    This paper explores the opportunities and constraints to project-based environmental assessment as a means to support the assessment and management of cumulative environmental effects. A case study of the hydroelectric sector is used to determine whether sufficient information is available over time through project-by-project assessments to support an adequate understanding of cumulative change. Results show inconsistency from one project to the next in terms of the components and indicators assessed, limited transfer of baseline information between project assessments over time, and the same issues and concerns being raised by review panels-even though the projects reviewed are operating in the same watershed and operated by the same proponent. Project environmental assessments must be managed, and coordinated, as part of a larger system of impact assessment, if project-by-project assessments are to provide a meaningful forum for learning and understanding cumulative change. The paper concludes with recommendations for improved project-based assessment practice in support of cumulative effects assessment and management.

  1. Mathematical Modelling of Allelopathy: IV. Assessment of Contributions of Competition and Allelopathy to Interference by Barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, De Li; An, Min; Johnson, I R; Lovett, J V

    2005-04-01

    One of the main challenges to the research on allelopathy is technically the separation of allelopathic effect from competition, and quantitatively, the assessment of the contribution of each component to overall interference. A simple mathematical model is proposed to calculate the contribution of allelopathy and competition to interference. As an example of applying the quantitative model to interference by barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. Triumph), the approach used was an addition of allelopathic effect, by an equivalent amount, to the environment of the test plant (white mustard, Sinapis alba), rather than elimination of competition. Experiments were conducted in glasshouse to determine the magnitude of the contributions of allelopathy and competition to interference by barley. The leachates of living barley roots significantly reduced the total dry weight of white mustard. The model involved the calculation of adjusted densities to an equivalent basis for modelling the contribution of allelopathy and competition to total interference. The results showed that allelopathy contributed 40%, 37% and 43% to interference by barley at 6, 12 and 18 white mustard pot(-1). The consistency in magnitude of the calculated contribution of allelopathic effect by barley across various densities of receiver plant suggested that the adjusted equivalent density is effective and that the model is able to assess the contribution of each component of interference regardless of the density of receiver plant.

  2. The contribution of health technology assessment, health needs assessment, and health impact assessment to the assessment and translation of technologies in the field of public health genomics.

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    Rosenkötter, N; Vondeling, H; Blancquaert, I; Mekel, O C L; Kristensen, F B; Brand, A

    2011-01-01

    The European Union has named genomics as one of the promising research fields for the development of new health technologies. Major concerns with regard to these fields are, on the one hand, the rather slow and limited translation of new knowledge and, on the other hand, missing insights into the impact on public health and health care practice of those technologies that are actually introduced. This paper aims to give an overview of the major assessment instruments in public health [health technology assessment (HTA), health needs assessment (HNA) and health impact assessment (HIA)] which could contribute to the systematic translation and assessment of genomic health applications by focussing at population level and on public health policy making. It is shown to what extent HTA, HNA and HIA contribute to translational research by using the continuum of translational research (T1-T4) in genomic medicine as an analytic framework. The selected assessment methodologies predominantly cover 2 to 4 phases within the T1-T4 system. HTA delivers the most complete set of methodologies when assessing health applications. HNA can be used to prioritize areas where genomic health applications are needed or to identify infrastructural needs. HIA delivers information on the impact of technologies in a wider scope and promotes informed decision making. HTA, HNA and HIA provide a partly overlapping and partly unique set of methodologies and infrastructure for the translation and assessment of genomic health applications. They are broad in scope and go beyond the continuum of T1-T4 translational research regarding policy translation.

  3. The Contributions of Digital Concept Maps to Assessment for Learning Practices

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    Filiz, Mehmet; Trumpower, David; Atas, Sait

    2013-01-01

    We have been developing a digital concept maps website (www.conceptmapsforlearning.com) based on the principles of effective assessment for learning. The purpose of this paper is to reveal its promising contributions to formative evaluation practices. The website reduces the workload of teachers as well as provides immediate and delayed feedback…

  4. Environmental impact and risk assessments and key factors contributing to the overall uncertainties.

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    Salbu, Brit

    2016-01-01

    There is a significant number of nuclear and radiological sources that have contributed, are still contributing, or have the potential to contribute to radioactive contamination of the environment in the future. To protect the environment from radioactive contamination, impact and risk assessments are performed prior to or during a release event, short or long term after deposition or prior and after implementation of countermeasures. When environmental impact and risks are assessed, however, a series of factors will contribute to the overall uncertainties. To provide environmental impact and risk assessments, information on processes, kinetics and a series of input variables is needed. Adding problems such as variability, questionable assumptions, gaps in knowledge, extrapolations and poor conceptual model structures, a series of factors are contributing to large and often unacceptable uncertainties in impact and risk assessments. Information on the source term and the release scenario is an essential starting point in impact and risk models; the source determines activity concentrations and atom ratios of radionuclides released, while the release scenario determine the physico-chemical forms of released radionuclides such as particle size distribution, structure and density. Releases will most often contain other contaminants such as metals, and due to interactions, contaminated sites should be assessed as a multiple stressor scenario. Following deposition, a series of stressors, interactions and processes will influence the ecosystem transfer of radionuclide species and thereby influence biological uptake (toxicokinetics) and responses (toxicodynamics) in exposed organisms. Due to the variety of biological species, extrapolation is frequently needed to fill gaps in knowledge e.g., from effects to no effects, from effects in one organism to others, from one stressor to mixtures. Most toxtests are, however, performed as short term exposure of adult organisms

  5. Mapping causal functional contributions derived from the clinical assessment of brain damage after stroke.

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    Zavaglia, Melissa; Forkert, Nils D; Cheng, Bastian; Gerloff, Christian; Thomalla, Götz; Hilgetag, Claus C

    2015-01-01

    Lesion analysis reveals causal contributions of brain regions to mental functions, aiding the understanding of normal brain function as well as rehabilitation of brain-damaged patients. We applied a novel lesion inference technique based on game theory, Multi-perturbation Shapley value Analysis (MSA), to a large clinical lesion dataset. We used MSA to analyze the lesion patterns of 148 acute stroke patients together with their neurological deficits, as assessed by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). The results revealed regional functional contributions to essential behavioral and cognitive functions as reflected in the NIHSS, particularly by subcortical structures. There were also side specific differences of functional contributions between the right and left hemispheric brain regions which may reflect the dominance of the left hemispheric syndrome aphasia in the NIHSS. Comparison of MSA to established lesion inference methods demonstrated the feasibility of the approach for analyzing clinical data and indicated its capability for objectively inferring functional contributions from multiple injured, potentially interacting sites, at the cost of having to predict the outcome of unknown lesion configurations. The analysis of regional functional contributions to neurological symptoms measured by the NIHSS contributes to the interpretation of this widely used standardized stroke scale in clinical practice as well as clinical trials and provides a first approximation of a 'map of stroke'.

  6. The potential contributions of concept maps for learning website to assessment for learning practices

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    Mehmet Filiz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to examine the promising contributions of the Concept Maps for Learning (CMfL website to assessment for learning practices. The CMfL website generates concept maps from relatedness degree of concepts pairs through the Pathfinder Scaling Algorithm. This website also confirms the established principles of effective assessment for learning, for it is capable of automatically assessing students’ higher order knowledge, simultaneously identifying strengths and weaknesses, immediately providing useful feedback and being user-friendly. According to the default assessment plan, students first create concept maps on a particular subject and then they are given individualized visual feedback followed by associated instructional material (e.g., videos, website links, examples, problems, etc. based on a comparison of their concept map and a subject matter expert’s map. After studying the feedback and instructional material, teachers can monitor their students’ progress by having them create revised concept maps. Therefore, we claim that the CMfL website may reduce the workload of teachers as well as provide immediate and delayed feedback on the weaknesses of students in different forms such as graphical and multimedia. For the following study, we will examine whether these promising contributions to assessment for learning are valid in a variety of subjects.

  7. The contribution of environmental assessment to sustainable development: toward a richer empirical understanding.

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    Cashmore, Matthew; Bond, Alan; Cobb, Dick

    2007-09-01

    It has long been suggested that environmental assessment has the potential to contribute to sustainable development through mechanisms above and beyond informing design and consent decisions, and while theories have been proposed to explain how this might occur, few have been subjected to rigorous empirical validation. This research advances the theoretical debate by building a rich empirical understanding of environmental assessment's practical outcomes, from which its potential to contribute to sustainable development can be gauged. Three case study environmental assessment processes in England were investigated using a combination of data generated from content analysis, in-depth interviews, and a questionnaire survey. Four categories of outcomes are delineated based on the research data: learning outcomes; governance outcomes; attitudinal and value changes; and developmental outcomes. The data provide a robust critique of mainstream theory, with its focus on design and consent decisions. The article concludes with an examination of the consequences of the context-specific nature of environmental assessment practices in terms of developing theory and focusing future research.

  8. Life cycle assessment of urban wastewater systems: Quantifying the relative contribution of sewer systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risch, Eva; Gutierrez, Oriol; Roux, Philippe; Boutin, Catherine; Corominas, Lluís

    2015-06-15

    This study aims to propose a holistic, life cycle assessment (LCA) of urban wastewater systems (UWS) based on a comprehensive inventory including detailed construction and operation of sewer systems and wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). For the first time, the inventory of sewers infrastructure construction includes piping materials and aggregates, manholes, connections, civil works and road rehabilitation. The operation stage comprises energy consumption in pumping stations together with air emissions of methane and hydrogen sulphide, and water emissions from sewer leaks. Using a real case study, this LCA aims to quantify the contributions of sewer systems to the total environmental impacts of the UWS. The results show that the construction of sewer infrastructures has an environmental impact (on half of the 18 studied impact categories) larger than both the construction and operation of the WWTP. This study highlights the importance of including the construction and operation of sewer systems in the environmental assessment of centralised versus decentralised options for UWS.

  9. Assessment of Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Monoamine Oxidase Contribution to Oxidative Stress in Human Diabetic Hearts

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    O. M. Duicu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria-related oxidative stress is a pathomechanism causally linked to coronary heart disease (CHD and diabetes mellitus (DM. Recently, mitochondrial monoamine oxidases (MAOs have emerged as novel sources of oxidative stress in the cardiovascular system and experimental diabetes. The present study was purported to assess the mitochondrial impairment and the contribution of MAOs-related oxidative stress to the cardiovascular dysfunction in coronary patients with/without DM. Right atrial appendages were obtained from 75 patients randomized into 3 groups: (1 Control (CTRL, valvular patients without CHD; (2 CHD, patients with confirmed CHD; and (3 CHD-DM, patients with CHD and DM. Mitochondrial respiration was measured by high-resolution respirometry and MAOs expression was evaluated by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 emission was assessed by confocal microscopy and spectrophotometrically. The impairment of mitochondrial respiration was substrate-independent in CHD-DM group. MAOs expression was comparable among the groups, with the predominance of MAO-B isoform but no significant differences regarding oxidative stress were detected by either method. Incubation of atrial samples with MAOs inhibitors significantly reduced the H2O2 in all groups. In conclusion, abnormal mitochondrial respiration occurs in CHD and is more severe in DM and MAOs contribute to oxidative stress in human diseased hearts with/without DM.

  10. Reliability, Validity, and Significance of Assessment of Sense of Contribution in the Workplace

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    Jiro Takaki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to assess the validity and reliability of the Sense of Contribution Scale (SCS, a newly developed, 7-item questionnaire used to measure sense of contribution in the workplace. Workers at 272 organizations answered questionnaires that included the SCS. Because of non-participation or missing data, the number of subjects included in the analyses for internal consistency and validity varied from 1,675 to 2,462 (response rates 54.6%–80.2%. Fifty-four workers were included in the analysis of test–retest reliability (response rate, 77.1%. The SCS showed high internal consistency (Cronbach’s α coefficients in men and women were 0.85 and 0.86, respectively and test–retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.91. Significant (p < 0.001, positive, moderate correlations were found between the SCS score and scores for organization-based self-esteem and work engagement in both genders, which support the SCS’s convergent and discriminant validity. The criterion validity of the SCS was supported by the finding that in both genders, the SCS scores were significantly (p < 0.05 and inversely associated with psychological distress and sleep disturbance in crude and in multivariable analyses that adjusted for demographics, organization-based self-esteem, work engagement, effort–reward ratio, workplace bullying, and procedural and interactional justice. The SCS is a psychometrically satisfactory measure of sense of contribution in the workplace. The SCS provides a new and useful instrument to measure sense of contribution, which is independently associated with mental health in workers, for studies in organizational science, occupational health psychology and occupational medicine.

  11. A methodology to assess the contribution of biorefineries to a sustainable bio-based economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maga, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Within this thesis for the first time an integrative methodology to assess the sustainability of biorefineries and bio-based products has been developed which is based on a fundamental understanding of sustainability as presented in the Brundtland report. The applied integrative concept of sustainability as developed by the Institute for Technology Assessment and Systems Analysis (ITAS) overcomes the widespread thinking in three pillars of sustainability and opens up new perspectives. The methodology developed addresses innovative life cycle assessment evaluation methods on midpoint level as well as on the area of protection and adopts state-of-the-art assessment procedures e.g. to determine water deprivation. It goes far beyond the scope of conventional LCA studies and examines effects on human health, on the environment, on the development of knowledge and physical capital, and on regional development and acceptance. In order to validate the developed method it was applied to an algae biorefinery currently under development and construction in the south of Spain. For this assessment for the first time extensive process data was collected of a real algae biorefinery which uses municipal waste water as a culture medium for microalgae. The use of waste water allows to reduce the demand for fresh water and avoids additional fertilisation of microalgae. Moreover, the analysed algae biorefinery replaces conventional waste water treatment by a biological purification and produces biogas by an anaerobic pretreatment of waste water as well as by anaerobic digestion of algae. After several purification steps the biogas can be used as automotive fuel and thus contributes to further development and increased use of biofuels. On the one hand the sustainability assessment shows that this way of waste water treatment contributes to climate protection and to the conservation of fossil energy carrier. On the other hand approximately ten times more land is needed and twenty times

  12. The Wada Test: contributions to standardization of the stimulus for language and memory assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mäder Maria Joana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The Wada Test (WT is part of the presurgical evaluation for refractory epilepsy. The WT is not standardized and the protocols differ in important ways, including stimulus type of material presented for memory testing, timing of presentations and methods of assessment. The aim of this study was to contribute to establish parameters for a WT to Brazilian population investigating the performance of 100 normal subjects, without medication. Two parallel models were used based on Montreal Procedure adapted from Gail Risse's (MEG-MN,EUA protocol. The proportions of correct responses of normal subjects submitted to two parallel WT models were investigated and the two models were compared. The results showed that the two models are similar but significant differences among the stimulus type were observed. The results suggest that the stimulus type may influence the results of the WT and should be considered when constructing models and comparing different protocols.

  13. CRITICAL ASSESSMENT OF AUDITING CONTRIBUTIONS TO EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT SECURITY IN DATABASE SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olumuyiwa O. Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Database auditing has become a very crucial aspect of security as organisations increase their adoption of database management systems (DBMS as major asset that keeps, maintain and monitor sensitive information. Database auditing is the group of activities involved in observing a set of stored data in order to be aware of the actions of users. The work presented here outlines the main auditing techniques and methods. Some architectural based auditing systems were also considered to assess the contribution of auditing to database security. Here a framework of several stages to be used in the instigation of auditing is proposed. Some issues relating to handling of audit trails are also discussed in this paper. This paper also itemizes some of the key important impacts of the concept to security and how compliance with government policies and regulations is enforced through auditing. Once the framework is adopted, it will provide support to database auditors and DBAs.

  14. The Contribution of Pin End-Cup Interactions to Clot Strength Assessed with Thrombelastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Vance G

    2016-01-01

    Viscoelastic methods have been developed to assess the contribution of plasma proteins and platelets to coagulation in vitro to guide clinical transfusion therapy. One of the cardinal precepts of determining clot strength is making sure that the viscoelastic technique includes complete exposure of the plastic pin in the testing chamber with the fluid analyzed so as to assure maximal interaction of the cup wall with the pin surface. However, the various contributions of the pin surface area to final clot strength have not been investigated. That is, it is not clear what is more important in the in vitro determination of clot strength, the surface area shared between the cup and pin filled with fluid or the final viscoelastic resistance of the gel matrix formed. Thus, the purpose of this investigation was to determine the clot strength when only the tip of the pin was engaged with plasma thrombus and to compare these values with clot strength values obtained when the pin was completely in plasma. After determining the minimal amount of plasma required to cover a pin tip in a thrombelastographic system (30 μL), clot strength (elastic modulus, G) was determined in plasma samples of 30 or 360 μL final volume (n = 12 per condition) after tissue factor activation. The G value with 30 μL volume was 1057 ± 601 dynes/cm (mean ± SD; 95% confidence interval, 675-1439 dynes/cm), which was (P = 0.0015) smaller than the G value associated with 360-μL sample volumes, that was 1712 ± 48 dynes/cm (confidence interval, 1681-1742 dynes/cm). In conclusion, these data demonstrate that clot strength is not determined by a simple ratio of surface area of pin and cup to volume of sample, but rather strength is importantly influenced by the viscoelastic resistance of the fluid assessed.

  15. Multi-sensory landscape assessment: the contribution of acoustic perception to landscape evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Yonghong; Luo, Tao; Breitung, Werner; Kang, Jian; Zhang, Tianhai

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, the contribution of visual and acoustic preference to multi-sensory landscape evaluation was quantitatively compared. The real landscapes were treated as dual-sensory ambiance and separated into visual landscape and soundscape. Both were evaluated by 63 respondents in laboratory conditions. The analysis of the relationship between respondent's visual and acoustic preference as well as their respective contribution to landscape preference showed that (1) some common attributes are universally identified in assessing visual, aural and audio-visual preference, such as naturalness or degree of human disturbance; (2) with acoustic and visual preferences as variables, a multi-variate linear regression model can satisfactorily predict landscape preference (R(2 )= 0.740), while the coefficients of determination for a unitary linear regression model were 0.345 and 0.720 for visual and acoustic preference as predicting factors, respectively; (3) acoustic preference played a much more important role in landscape evaluation than visual preference in this study (the former is about 4.5 times of the latter), which strongly suggests a rethinking of the role of soundscape in environment perception research and landscape planning practice.

  16. Implementing a Sustainability Balanced Scorecard to Contribute to the Process of Organisational Legitimacy Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Bowrey

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the use of a Sustainability Balanced Scorecard (SBSC as a contributing factor in the process of organisational legitimacy assessment. The methodological approach in this study is supported by the application of content analysis to identify and examine the disclosed sustainability indicators of a major Australian financial institution (Westpac. The theoretical lens of legitimacy theory and the Balanced Scorecard (BSC are used as points of reference to inform and structure the overall theoretical framework of this study. The results indicate that the four perspectives of a traditional BSC correlate with the main sources of influential inputs to Westpac’s sustainability reporting. In addition, the SBSC presented in this article successfully illustrates focal areas of reporting practice, providing a succinct overview of an organisation’s reporting activities. The primary contributions of this research are to the literature on social and environmental disclosures, including the research of Do, Tilt and Tilling (2007, and Baxter, Chua and Strong (2010 and the provision of a practical technique to illustrate the focal activity of an organisation’s social and environmental reporting as part of the legitimisation process.

  17. Risk assessment in stock calf transportation from France to Italy: the contribution of road inspections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Zanasi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the risk associated with the transport of stock calves imported from France to Italy, information obtained from inspections carried out in Piedmont by competent authorities between 2001 and 2010 was considered. The inspections concerned 246 trucks transporting a total of 13,857 fattening calves. Based on the types of infringements recorded, several hazards related to animal welfare, such as overcrowding, tying by the horns and inappropriate mixing, were identified and characterized. The inspection of vehicles revealed hazards concerning partitions, bedding, decks, lighting, drinking and mechanical ventilation systems. A calculation was made of the incidence of these infringements and the consequent exposure of calves to such hazards and risk characterization was performed. The ranking shows overcrowding and the absence of partitions to be major risks in stock calf transportation from France to Italy. A logistic regression was adopted to evaluate the effect on the exposure to hazards of the only two variables recordable during the inspections: number of calves inside each vehicle and distance of the journey. The results showed a direct relationship between the number of calves per vehicle and exposure to overcrowding or to absence of partitions. The journey distance was found weakly and inversely related to exposure to the absence of partitions. The information obtained from the inspections provides not only a basis for evaluating the welfare of calves during transport but also an objective contribution to the assessment of the risks tied to their transportation.

  18. Millon's Contributions to Preadolescent and Adolescent Personality Assessment: Searching Onward and Upward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tringone, Robert; Bockian, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Theodore Millon was one of the most influential personality theorists of the 20th century. His theory was originally rooted in biosocial learning models and later reconceptualized as an evolutionary model. This foundation of Millon's work encompasses the entire life span. He had a genuine concern for humankind, especially children. His theory encompasses a comprehensive understanding of the relationship among childhood experiences, parenting styles, and recurring events throughout the life span in shaping the personality. Notable contributions to child and adolescent assessment are the Millon Adolescent Personality Inventory (Millon, Green, & Meagher, 1982 ), the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (Millon, Millon, & Davis, 1993 ), and the Millon Pre-Adolescent Clinical Inventory (M-PACI; Millon, Tringone, Millon, & Grossman, 2005 ). Given Millon's influence on the personality disorders section of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), the aforementioned instruments have personality constructs tied to familiar DSM categories, and among them, cover the age range of 9 to 18 years old. His development of the Millon Inventories revolutionized personality assessment in the United States and abroad. Millon's legacies will live on through his works and through the respect and compassion he demonstrated toward others.

  19. Evaluating the Contribution of Soil Carbon to Global Climate Change Mitigation in an Integrated Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, A. M.; Izaurralde, R. C.; Clarke, L. E.

    2006-12-01

    Assessing the contribution of terrestrial carbon sequestration to national and international climate change mitigation requires integration across scientific and disciplinary boundaries. In a study for the US Climate Change Technology Program, site based measurements and geographic data were used to develop a three- pool, first-order kinetic model of global agricultural soil carbon (C) stock changes over 14 continental scale regions. This model was then used together with land use scenarios from the MiniCAM integrated assessment model in a global analysis of climate change mitigation options. MiniCAM evaluated mitigation strategies within a set of policy environments aimed at achieving atmospheric CO2 stabilization by 2100 under a suite of technology and development scenarios. Adoption of terrestrial sequestration practices is based on competition for land and economic markets for carbon. In the reference case with no climate policy, conversion of agricultural land from conventional cultivation to no tillage over the next century in the United States results in C sequestration of 7.6 to 59.8 Tg C yr-1, which doubles to 19.0 to 143.4 Tg C yr-1 under the most aggressive climate policy. Globally, with no carbon policy, agricultural C sequestration rates range from 75.2 to 18.2 Tg C yr-1 over the century, with the highest rates occurring in the first fifty years. Under the most aggressive global climate change policy, sequestration in agricultural soils reaches up to 190 Tg C yr-1 in the first 15 years. The contribution of agricultural soil C sequestration is a small fraction of the total global carbon offsets necessary to reach the stabilization targets (9 to 20 Gt C yr-1) by the end of the century. This integrated assessment provides decision makers with science-based estimates of the potential magnitude of terrestrial C sequestration relative to other greenhouse gas mitigation strategies in all sectors of the global economy. It also provides insight into the

  20. Sex Does Not Matter: Gender Bias and Gender Differences in Peer Assessments of Contributions to Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers the possibility of gender bias in peer ratings for contributions to team assignments, as measured by an online self-and-peer assessment tool. The research was conducted to determine whether peer assessment led to reliable and fair marking outcomes. The methodology of Falchikov and Magin was followed in order to test their…

  1. Notorious Cases of Serial Killers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iosub Elena-Cătălina

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of a death scene provides an overall picture of the crime and will indicate the murder as an event or one of a series of events and also the criminal. But when the criminal is declared a serial killer, many questions are raised up. How could a person kill some else without a reason or why people react in such a disorganized way and become so brutal or what made them act like that and so many questions with also so many answers. This project explains the psychology of a murderer, his own way of thinking and acting by presuming that we may accurately discover what is in their minds when they kill. It is about a very complex issue regarding murder investigations, biological factors and psychological profile of a serial killer. Dealing with this problem we will at last reach to the question that could solve finally the puzzle: ―Are serial murderers distorted reflections of society's own values?

  2. Contributions and Concerns of Concentrated Flow Erosion and Assessment Technologies in Watershed Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingner, R. L.; Momm, H. G.; Wells, R. R.; Dabney, S. M.

    2012-04-01

    Concentrated runoff increases erosion and efficiently transfers sediment and associated agrichemicals from upland areas to stream channels. Ephemeral gully erosion on cropland in the U.S. may contribute 40% of the sediment delivered to the edge of the field. Typically, conservation practices developed for sheet and rill erosion are also expected to treat ephemeral gully erosion, but technology and tools do not exist to account for the separate benefits and effects of practices on various sediment sources. Practices specifically developed to treat ephemeral gully erosion need further testing, when used in conjunction with sheet and rill erosion control practices. Without improved research studies, subjective observations will continue to be used to satisfy quality criteria in lieu of scientifically defensible, quantitative methods to estimate the impact of gully erosion. Some of the more important limiting components are the identification of and relationships for: (1) ephemeral gully width; (2) soil resistance to gully erosion including a definition for non-erosive layers; (3) the effect of root mass and above ground vegetation on erosion resistance; (4) ephemeral gully networks; and (5) the effect of subsurface flow on ephemeral gullies. Currently, these components are represented through widely divergent to non-existent algorithms. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's AnnAGNPS pollutant loading model has been developed to determine the effects of conservation management plans and provide sediment tracking from all sources within the watershed, including ephemeral gullies. Enhanced technology is also needed to identify where ephemeral gullies may form in the watershed using remote sensing technology. Developing enhanced technology and research for concentrated flow assessments is critical for developing and testing conservation practices specifically designed for gully erosion control. This study will describe the current state of concentrated flow assessment and

  3. Crowdsourced assessment of common genetic contribution to predicting anti-TNF treatment response in rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieberts, Solveig K.; Zhu, Fan; García-García, Javier; Stahl, Eli; Pratap, Abhishek; Pandey, Gaurav; Pappas, Dimitrios; Aguilar, Daniel; Anton, Bernat; Bonet, Jaume; Eksi, Ridvan; Fornés, Oriol; Guney, Emre; Li, Hongdong; Marín, Manuel Alejandro; Panwar, Bharat; Planas-Iglesias, Joan; Poglayen, Daniel; Cui, Jing; Falcao, Andre O.; Suver, Christine; Hoff, Bruce; Balagurusamy, Venkat S. K.; Dillenberger, Donna; Neto, Elias Chaibub; Norman, Thea; Aittokallio, Tero; Ammad-ud-din, Muhammad; Azencott, Chloe-Agathe; Bellón, Víctor; Boeva, Valentina; Bunte, Kerstin; Chheda, Himanshu; Cheng, Lu; Corander, Jukka; Dumontier, Michel; Goldenberg, Anna; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Hajiloo, Mohsen; Hidru, Daniel; Jaiswal, Alok; Kaski, Samuel; Khalfaoui, Beyrem; Khan, Suleiman Ali; Kramer, Eric R.; Marttinen, Pekka; Mezlini, Aziz M.; Molparia, Bhuvan; Pirinen, Matti; Saarela, Janna; Samwald, Matthias; Stoven, Véronique; Tang, Hao; Tang, Jing; Torkamani, Ali; Vert, Jean-Phillipe; Wang, Bo; Wang, Tao; Wennerberg, Krister; Wineinger, Nathan E.; Xiao, Guanghua; Xie, Yang; Yeung, Rae; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zhao, Cheng; Calaza, Manuel; Elmarakeby, Haitham; Heath, Lenwood S.; Long, Quan; Moore, Jonathan D.; Opiyo, Stephen Obol; Savage, Richard S.; Zhu, Jun; Greenberg, Jeff; Kremer, Joel; Michaud, Kaleb; Barton, Anne; Coenen, Marieke; Mariette, Xavier; Miceli, Corinne; Shadick, Nancy; Weinblatt, Michael; de Vries, Niek; Tak, Paul P.; Gerlag, Danielle; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Kurreeman, Fina; Allaart, Cornelia F.; Louis Bridges Jr., S.; Criswell, Lindsey; Moreland, Larry; Klareskog, Lars; Saevarsdottir, Saedis; Padyukov, Leonid; Gregersen, Peter K.; Friend, Stephen; Plenge, Robert; Stolovitzky, Gustavo; Oliva, Baldo; Guan, Yuanfang; Mangravite, Lara M.

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects millions world-wide. While anti-TNF treatment is widely used to reduce disease progression, treatment fails in ∼one-third of patients. No biomarker currently exists that identifies non-responders before treatment. A rigorous community-based assessment of the utility of SNP data for predicting anti-TNF treatment efficacy in RA patients was performed in the context of a DREAM Challenge (http://www.synapse.org/RA_Challenge). An open challenge framework enabled the comparative evaluation of predictions developed by 73 research groups using the most comprehensive available data and covering a wide range of state-of-the-art modelling methodologies. Despite a significant genetic heritability estimate of treatment non-response trait (h2=0.18, P value=0.02), no significant genetic contribution to prediction accuracy is observed. Results formally confirm the expectations of the rheumatology community that SNP information does not significantly improve predictive performance relative to standard clinical traits, thereby justifying a refocusing of future efforts on collection of other data. PMID:27549343

  4. Contribution of enrichments and resampling for sulfate reducing bacteria diversity assessment by high-throughput cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Yannick; Goñi-Urriza, Marisol; Caumette, Pierre; Guyoneaud, Rémy

    2015-03-01

    The development of new high-throughput cultivation methods aims to increase the isolation efficiency as compared to standard techniques that often require enrichment procedures to compensate the low microbial recovery. In the current study, estuarine sulfate-reducing bacteria were isolated using an anaerobic isolation procedure in 384-well microplates. Ninety-nine strains were recovered from initial sediments. Isolates were identified according to their partial 16S rRNA sequences and clustered into 13 phylotypes. Besides, the increase in species richness obtained through enrichments or resampling was investigated. Forty-four enrichment procedures were conducted and shifts in sulfate-reducing bacterial communities were investigated through dsrAB gene fingerprinting. Despite efforts in conducting numerous enrichment conditions only few of them were statistically different from initial sample. The cultural diversity obtained from 3 of the most divergent enrichments, as well as from resampled sediments equally contributed to raise the sulfate-reducing diversity up to 22 phylotypes. Enrichments (selection of metabolism) or resampling (transient populations and micro-heterogeneity) may still be helpful to assess new microbial phylotypes. Nevertheless, all the newly cultivated strains were all representatives of minor Operational Taxonomic Units and could eventually be recovered by maintaining high-throughput isolation effort from the initial sediments.

  5. Do grain reserves necessarily contribute to prices stability and food security in Sudan? An assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam E. Ahmed

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Most governments in Africa implement policies aiming to stabilize the prices of staple foods, which often include building up grain reserves, besides other trade measures insulating their domestic market from the world market. The mechanism should ideally work as follows, grains should be bought and stored from areas, during the surplus seasons (after harvest so as to assure fair prices to producers and should be distributed during deficit seasons, in deficit areas besides in cases of emergencies. However, ideal approaches are not necessarily followed in many developing countries due to different constraints and situations. The Strategic Reserve Corporation (SRC is an institution that is established ten years ago to play such a role in Sudan. This paper tries to assess the performance of the SRC against the overall goals and to study the related obstacles if any. We use a sample of 112 respondents from the SRC staff, related and grain farmers as our data source. Results of the research revealed numerous financial and administrative constraints that obstruct SRC from playing the intended role, which need to be considered so as to contribute to price stability and food security in Sudan.

  6. Assessing gonadal hormone contributions to affective psychopathologies across humans and animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, S C; Grissom, E M; Dohanich, G P

    2014-08-01

    Despite increasing acknowledgement of hormonal contributions to mood and anxiety disorders, the underlying mechanisms by which gonadal hormones influence psychopathology-related behaviours remain unknown. This review focuses on recent research that examines the influence of gonadal steroid hormones, including androgens, oestrogens, and progesterone, on mood and anxiety-related behaviours in human health and disease. To this aim, the literature was surveyed for studies that assess conditions with suspected underlying hormonal imbalances in otherwise healthy participants (e.g., premenstrual dysphoric disorder, postmenopausal depression) as well as conditions linked to congenital endocrine abnormalities (e.g., Turner Syndrome, Klinefelter Syndrome, polycystic ovary syndrome, congenital adrenal hyperplasia, familial male precocious puberty, androgen insensitivity syndrome). Furthermore, to better inform clinical work and to create a translational bridge, a second goal was to set human psychopathologies and animal models of these conditions side-by-side. In the second part of the review, based on consistencies revealed in the existing literature across conditions, a new model for the impact of gonadal hormones on anxious and depressed behavioural states is proposed. Finally, we conclude by proposing directions for future research, including the development of specific tasks suitable for cross-species comparisons to increase our knowledge of the role of gonadal hormones in mood and anxiety.

  7. Assessment of the contribution from wood burning to the PM10 aerosol in Flanders, Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maenhaut, Willy; Vermeylen, Reinhilde; Claeys, Magda; Vercauteren, Jordy; Matheeussen, Christina; Roekens, Edward

    2012-10-15

    nearby this site. From our levoglucosan/mannosan ratios we derived the relative contributions of softwood and hardwood burning, thereby following the same approach as used by Schmidl et al. (Atmos Environ 2008;38:126-41). It was found that softwood burning accounted, on average, for about 70%, and there was little variation in this percentage with site or with season. The levoglucosan data were used to assess the contribution of wood burning to the OC and to the PM10 mass, again following the approach of Schmidl et al. (2008). The annual average contributions of wood burning OC to the PM10 OC were in the range of 20-25% for 6 of our 7 sites and 36% for Hamme; the averages for summer were 2.0-3.9% for the 6 sites and 14.5% for Hamme; the corresponding data for winter were 36-43% and 60%. As to the contribution from wood burning to the PM10 mass, the annual averages were in the range of 4.8-6.3% for 6 of our 7 sites and 13.3% at Hamme; the averages for summer were 0.51-1.14% for the 6 sites and 5.0% for Hamme; the corresponding data for winter were 8.6-11.3% and 22%. Our finding that wood burning is an important contributor to the OC and the PM10 mass, especially in winter, is in line with published data from various other sites in other European countries.

  8. The Contribution of Health Technology Assessment, Health Needs Assessment, and Health Impact Assessment to the Assessment and Translation of Technologies in the Field of Public Health Genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkotter, N.; Vondeling, H.; Blancquaert, I.

    2011-01-01

    or to identify infrastructural needs. HIA delivers information on the impact of technologies in a wider scope and promotes informed decision making. HTA, HNA and HIA provide a partly overlapping and partly unique set of methodologies and infrastructure for the translation and assessment of genomic health...... into the impact on public health and health care practice of those technologies that are actually introduced. This paper aims to give an overview of the major assessment instruments in public health [ health technology assessment (HTA), health needs assessment (HNA) and health impact assessment (HIA)] which could......The European Union has named genomics as one of the promising research fields for the development of new health technologies. Major concerns with regard to these fields are, on the one hand, the rather slow and limited translation of new knowledge and, on the other hand, missing insights...

  9. Assessment of odor activity value coefficient and odor contribution based on binary interaction effects in waste disposal plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chuandong; Liu, Jiemin; Yan, Luchun; Chen, Haiying; Shao, Huiqi; Meng, Tian

    2015-02-01

    Odor activity value (OAV) has been widely used for the assessment of odor pollution from various sources. However, little attention has been paid to the extreme OAV variation and potential inaccuracies of odor contribution assessment caused by odor interaction effects. The objective of this study is to assess the odor interaction effect for precise assessment of odor contribution. In this paper, samples were collected from a food waste disposal plant, and analyzed by instrumental and olfactory method to conclude odorants' occurrence and OAV. Then odor activity value coefficient (γ) was first proposed to evaluate the type and the level of binary interaction effects based on determination of OAV variation. By multiplying OAV and γ, odor activity factor (OAF) was used to reflect the real OAV. Correlation between the sum of OAF and odor concentration reached 80.0 ± 5.7%, which was 10 times higher than the sum of OAV used before. Results showed that hydrogen sulfide contributed most (annual average 66.4 ± 15.8%) to odor pollution in the waste disposal plant. However, as odor intensity of samples in summer rising, odor contribution of trimethylamine increased to 48.3 ± 3.7% by the strong synergistic interaction effect, while odor contribution of phenol decreased to 0.1 ± 0.02% for the increasing antagonistic interaction effect.

  10. Assessment of major uncertainties in calculating regional contributions to climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzen MGJ den; Schaeffer M; CIM

    2000-01-01

    During the negotiations on the Kyoto Protocol, Brazil proposed a methodology to link the relative contribution of Annex-I Parties to emission reductions with the relative contributions of Parties to the global-mean temperature increase. The proposal was not adopted during the negotiations,but reffer

  11. Predicting Students' Academic Achievement: Contributions of Perceptions of Classroom Assessment Tasks and Motivated Learning Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkharusi, Hussain

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Students are daily exposed to a variety of assessment tasks in the classroom. It has long been recognized that students' perceptions of the assessment tasks may influence student academic achievement. The present study aimed at predicting academic achievement in mathematics from perceptions of the assessment tasks after controlling…

  12. Assessing Cardiff University's Curricula Contribution to Sustainable Development Using the STAUNCH[superscript (RTM)] System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Rodrigo; Peattie, Ken

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the results of the sustainable development curricula assessment undertaken at 19 of the 28 schools of Cardiff University using the Sustainability Tool for Assessing UNiversity's Curricula Holistically (STAUNCH[superscript (RTM)]. STAUNCH[superscript (RTM)] was developed with two objectives: (1) to systematically assess how…

  13. Speech-language pathologists' contribution to the assessment of decision-making capacity in aphasia: a survey of common practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldous, Kerryn; Tolmie, Rhiannon; Worrall, Linda; Ferguson, Alison

    2014-06-01

    Speech-language pathologists' scope of practice is currently unclear in relation to their contribution to the multi-disciplinary assessment of decision-making capacity for clients with aphasia and related neurogenic communication disorders. The primary aim of the current research study was to investigate the common practices of speech-language pathologists involved in assessments of decision-making capacity. The study was completed through the use of an online survey. There were 51 of 59 respondents who indicated involvement in evaluations of decision-making. Involvement in this kind of assessment was most commonly reported by speech-language pathologists working in inpatient acute and rehabilitation settings. Respondents reported using a variety of formal and informal assessment methods in their contributions to capacity assessment. Discussion with multidisciplinary team members was reported to have the greatest influence on their recommendations. Speech-language pathologists reported that they were dissatisfied with current protocols for capacity assessments in their workplace and indicated they would benefit from further education and training in this area. The findings of this study are discussed in light of their implications for speech-language pathology practice.

  14. HIV infection does not contribute to increased cardiovascular risk as assessed by Framingham risk score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Ramsay

    2012-11-01

    significant predictors. The overall mean cfPWV for the HIV cohort (n=47 was 9.09±2.13 m/s compared to 11.95±2.37 m/s in the control group (n=46(p<0.01. HIV infection does not contribute to increased cardiovascular risk as assessed by Framingham risk score or carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity. This may be due to good control of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and a healthy lifestyle in this cohort.

  15. A deep scar in the flank of Tenerife (Canary Islands): Geophysical contribution to tsunami hazard assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppo, Nicolas P.; Schnegg, Pierre-André; Falco, Pierik; Costa, Roberto

    2009-05-01

    -782], potential movable volume is an unavoidable parameter to quantify and constrain tsunamigenic hazard. Numerical modelling of a tsunami generated by the potential La Palma landslide concluded that high amplitude waves threaten North Atlantic shorelines [Ward, S.N., Day, S.J., 2001. Cumbre Vieja volcano — Potential collapse and tsunami at La Palma, Canary Islands. Geophys. Res. Lett. 28, 397-400]. New audiomagnetotelluric results provide for the first time a good estimation of the Icod Valley (Tenerife, Canary Islands) volume, a potential giant landslide threatening the same shorelines. Two profiles image its electrically conductive roots with a characteristic of a U-shaped cross-section thought to be the consequence of previous landslides. By this study, we show that North Atlantic Ocean shorelines might be exposed to a destructive tsunami generated by a subaerial lateral collapse of at least 120 km 3 during the next strong felsic eruptive activity of the Teide-Pico Viejo complex. This article highlights the degree of urgency of carrying out geophysical investigations on the flanks of most volcanic islands prone to potential flank collapse. These investigations will contribute to the understanding of their structure — a key parameter in the sliding process. Finally, all results should be included in model, providing a global map of tsunami hazard assessment.

  16. Assessing The Starburst Contribution to the Gamma-Ray and Neutrino Backgrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, T A; Waxman, E; Loeb, A; Thompson, Todd A.; Quataert, Eliot; Waxman, Eli; Loeb, Abraham

    2006-01-01

    If cosmic ray protons interact with gas at roughly the mean density of the interstellar medium in starburst galaxies, then pion decay in starbursts is likely to contribute significantly to the diffuse extra-galactic background in both gamma-rays and high energy neutrinos. We describe the assumptions that lead to this conclusion and clarify the difference between our estimates and those of Stecker (2006). Detection of a single starburst by GLAST would confirm the significant contribution of starburst galaxies to the extra-galactic neutrino and gamma-ray backgrounds.

  17. Assessing the contribution of aquaculture and restoration to wild oyster populations in Rhode Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    The decline of the eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica) has led to renewed interest in restoration and aquaculture efforts. Recent field surveys suggest that wild populations in Rhode Island are increasing, yet the factors contributing to expansion are unknown. We used molecular tools to determine...

  18. Science panel to study mega-computers to assess potential energy contributions

    CERN Multimedia

    Jones, D

    2003-01-01

    "Energy Department advisers plan to examine high-end computing in the coming year and assess how computing power could be used to further DOE's basic research agenda on combustion, fusion and other topics" (1 page).

  19. Contributions from personality- and psychodynamically oriented assessment to the development of the DSM-5 personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huprich, Steven K

    2011-07-01

    Advances in personality assessment over the past 20 years have notably influenced the proposed assessment and classification of personality disorders in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed. [DSM-5]). However, a considerable body of personality assessment and psychodynamically oriented assessment research has significant relevance to the way in which personality disorders are evaluated that appears to have gone unrecognized in the current proposals for DSM-5. In this article, I discuss the ways in which some of these 2 bodies of literature can and should inform the DSM-5 so that the diagnostic nomenclature can be more scientifically and comprehensively informed and consequently improve the clinical utility of a diagnostic system in need of considerable revision.

  20. CONTRIBUTION OF THE AUDIOLOGICAL AND VESTIBULAR ASSESSMENT TO THE DIFFERENTIAL AND ETIOLOGICAL DIAGNOSIS OF PERIPHERIC VESTIBULAR SYNDROMES

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Scope of the study: Vestibular pathology is a complex one, requiring a minute clinical evaluation, as well as numerous paraclinical investigations. The present study analyzes the contribution of the modern methods of vestibular and auditive investigation to the diagnosis of dizziness. Materials and method: The results of the investigations performed on 84 patients with peripheric vestibular syndrome, on whom a complete audiological and vestibular assessment had been...

  1. Diet Assessment Methods in the Nurses' Health Studies and Contribution to Evidence-Based Nutritional Policies and Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satija, Ambika; Rimm, Eric B.; Spiegelman, Donna; Sampson, Laura; Rosner, Bernard; Camargo, Carlos A.; Stampfer, Meir; Willett, Walter C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To review the contribution of the Nurses’ Health Studies (NHSs) to diet assessment methods and evidence-based nutritional policies and guidelines. Methods. We performed a narrative review of the publications of the NHS and NHS II between 1976 and 2016. Results. Through periodic assessment of diet by validated dietary questionnaires over 40 years, the NHSs have identified dietary determinants of diseases such as breast and other cancers; obesity; type 2 diabetes; cardiovascular, respiratory, and eye diseases; and neurodegenerative and mental health disorders. Nutritional biomarkers were assessed using blood, urine, and toenail samples. Robust findings, from the NHSs, together with evidence from other large cohorts and randomized dietary intervention trials, have contributed to the evidence base for developing dietary guidelines and nutritional policies to reduce intakes of trans fat, saturated fat, sugar-sweetened beverages, red and processed meats, and refined carbohydrates while promoting higher intake of healthy fats and carbohydrates and overall healthful dietary patterns. Conclusions. The long-term, periodically collected dietary data in the NHSs, with documented reliability and validity, have contributed extensively to our understanding of the dietary determinants of various diseases, informing dietary guidelines and shaping nutritional policy. PMID:27459459

  2. Assessment of hydrophobic interactions and their contributions through the analysis of the methane dimer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaniz, Víctor Duarte; Rocha-Rinza, Tomás; Cuevas, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    Hydrophobic Interactions (HIs) are important in many phenomena of molecular recognition in chemistry and biology. Still, the relevance of HIs is sometimes difficult to evaluate particularly in large systems and intramolecular interactions. We put forward a method to estimate the magnitude and the different contributions of a given HI of the C···C, H-C···H, and H···H type through (i) the analysis of the electron density in the intermolecular region for eleven relative orientations of the methane dimer and (ii) the subsequent decomposition of the corresponding interaction energy in physically significant contributions using Symmetry Adapted Perturbation Theory (SAPT). Strong correlations were found between the topological properties of ρ(r) calculated at intermolecular bond critical points and Eint(SAPT) plus its different contributions with the C···C distance of the considered orientations of (CH4 )2 . These correlations were used to construct Mollier-like diagrams of Eint(SAPT) and its components as a function of the separation between two carbons and the orientation of the groups bonded to these atoms. The ethane dimer and tert-butylcyclohexane are used as representative examples of this new approach. Overall, we anticipate that this new method might prove useful in the study of both intramolecular and intermolecular HIs particularly of those within large systems wherein SAPT or electronic structure calculations are computationally expensive or even prohibitive.

  3. The contribution of formative assessment and self-efficacy to inquiry learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolin, Jens; Evans, Robert Harry

    2013-01-01

    of their abilities to use inquiry and ‘give-up’ on it. With the use of formative assessment combined with conscious efforts to increase self-efficacy among students, teachers can help provide students with the confidence and motivation to engage in inquiry methods. Such student engagement can in-turn affirm teachers......This chapter suggests the use of formative assessment in inquiry lessons as a helpful source of positive personal capacity beliefs for both teachers and students. The challenge most commonly experienced when first using inquiry learning methods is that pupils and even teachers become uncertain......’ inquiry teaching efforts and raise the likelihood that they will continue to improve them. We see inquiry methods as the motor for changing teacher practice and formative assessment methods combined with capacity beliefs as the fuel that keeps the motor running. The central position of the chapter is how...

  4. Phased array ultrasonic technology contribution to engineering critical assessment (ECA) of economizer piping welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciorau, P.; Gray, D.; Daks, W. [Ontario Power Generation, Pickering, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: peter.ciorau@opg.com

    2006-09-15

    This paper describes the application of phased array ultrasonic technology for engineering critical assessment of economizer piping welds. The objective is to detect and size fatigue cracks in the counter bore area of carbon steel boiler feedwater piping welds of a thermal station. A size accuracy of {+-} 1 mm for the outer ligament was required.

  5. Making Group Assessment Transparent: What Wikis Can Contribute to Collaborative Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caple, Helen; Bogle, Mike

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of new media technologies, in particular wikis, for the compiling and grading of group assessment tasks. Wikis are open web pages that can be viewed and modified by anyone with internet access and are well known for their collaborative nature. Wikis are also transparent, which means that any edit/modification is…

  6. Assessing the contribution of water to the mass closure of PM10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrino, C.; Catrambone, M.; Farao, C.; Canepari, S.

    2016-09-01

    The data obtained during a number of field studies aimed at determining the chemical composition of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) have shown that the measurement of the main PM components (main elements, ions, elemental carbon, organic carbon) was generally sufficient to obtain a reasonable mass closure. Notwithstanding, a wide gap between PM mass concentration and reconstructed mass was observed in two peculiar environmental conditions: desert dust intrusion and severe atmospheric stability episodes characterized by very high ammonium nitrate concentration. In these two cases, the mass closure improved significantly by adding the concentration of PM-bound water. Water was determined by using a coulometric Karl-Fisher system equipped with a controlled heating device; the method was able to separate different water contributions released in different temperature ranges from 50 to 250 °C. In our field studies the amount of water associated to ammonium salts in winter stability conditions was mostly dependent on ammonium nitrate concentration and constituted up to 22% of the total PM10 mass; the specific water contribution linked to ammonium salts (released in the temperature range 180-250 °C) constituted up to 30% of the ammonium nitrate mass. It was confirmed that in these extreme conditions quartz and Teflon filters behave differently: when measured on quartz filters, PM concentration was lower than on Teflon, the mass closure was satisfactory and the concentration of water was presumably very low. In the case of desert dust episodes, water was up to 10% of total PM10 mass; the specific water contribution linked to desert dust (released in the temperature range 100-180 °C) constituted about 5% of the mass of soil components. In other environmental situations, such as urban environments, marine atmosphere and rural areas, the concentration of PM-bound water was below 2-3 μg/m3.

  7. Assessing the contribution of binaural cues for apparent source width perception via a functional model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Käsbach, Johannes; Hahmann, Manuel; May, Tobias;

    2016-01-01

    differences (ITDs), interaural level differences (ILDs) and the interaural coherence (IC). To quantify their contribution to ASW, a functional model of ASW perception was exploited using the TWO!EARS auditory-front-end (AFE) toolbox. The model determines the leftand right-most boundary of a sound source using...... a statistical representation of ITDs and ILDs based on percentiles integrated over time and frequency. The model’s performance was evaluated against psychoacoustic data obtained with noise, speech and music signals in loudspeakerbased experiments. A robust model prediction of ASW was achieved using a cross...

  8. Quantitative assessment of microbiological contributions to corrosion of candidate nuclear waste-package materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, J.; Jones, D.; Lian, T.; Martin, S.

    1998-10-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy is contributing to the design of a potential nuclear-waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. A system to predict the contribution of Yucca Mountain (YM) bacteria to overall corrosion rates of candidate waste-package (WP) materials was designed and implemented. DC linear polarization resistance techniques were applied to candidate material coupons that had been inoculated with a mixture of YM-derived bacteria with potentially corrosive activities or left sterile. Inoculated bacteria caused a 5- to 6-fold increase in corrosion rate of carbon steel C1020 (to approximately 7Ð8mm/yr) and an almost 100-fold increase in corrosion rate of Alloy 400 (to approximately 1mm/yr). Microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) rates on more resistant materials (CRMs: Alloy 625, Type 304 Stainless Steel, and Alloy C22) were on the order of hundredths of micrometers per year (mm/yr). Bulk chemical and surfacial end-point analyses of spent media and coupon surfaces showed preferential dissolution of nickel from Alloy 400 coupons and depletion of chromium from CRMs after incubation with YM bacteria. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) also showed greater damage to the Alloy 400 surface than that indicated by electrochemical detection methods.

  9. LeRoy Meisinger, Part I: Biographical Tribute with an Assessment of His Contributions to Meteorology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, John M.

    1995-01-01

    LeRoy Meisinger was a U.S. Weather Bureau meteorologist and aeronaut who worked vigorously to bring meteorology to the aid of aviation in the post-World War 1 period. He was killed at the age of 29 in a scientific ballooning accident that has been detailed in a companion paper by Lewis and Moore. Meisinger's personality and scientific profile are reconstructed by examination of his oeuvre, which contains research contributions augmented by popular articles in the magazines of the period.Meisinger's personal characteristics were those of a quiet, scholarly man with strong interests in science, music, and art. His experiences as a Signal Corps weather officer during World War 1 inclined him toward a career in meteorology. While stationed at the Fort Omaha Balloon School, he became intrigued with the possibilities of using the tree balloon as a platform for tracking air currents.As a research meteorologist with the U.S. Weather Bureau after the war, Meisinger melded adventurous scientific ballooning with the more painstaking and arduous task of scrutinizing data from the limited upper-air network of kite stations. His principal research contribution was a form of differential analysis that extrapolated surface data to the 1- and 2-km levels by using climatological statistics from the upper-air network. The impressive line of research he pioneered at the bureau came to an immediate and abrupt end with his accidental death in 1924.

  10. Relative Contribution of Haptic Technology to Assessment and Training in Implantology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The teaching of implant surgery, as in other medical disciplines, is currently undergoing a particular evolution. Aim of the Study. To assess the usefulness of haptic device, a simulator for learning and training to accomplish basic acts in implant surgery. Materials and Methods. A total of 60 people including 40 third-year dental students without knowledge in implantology (divided into 2 groups: 20 beginners and 20 experiencing a simulator training course and 20 experienced practitioners (experience in implantology >15 implants participated in this study. A basic exercise drill was proposed to the three groups to assess their gestural abilities. Results. The results of the group training with the simulator tended to be significantly close to those of the experienced operators. Conclusion. Haptic simulator brings a real benefit in training for implant surgery. Long-term benefit and more complex exercises should be evaluated.

  11. Contributions to spatial landslide assessments in the Bâc tableland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae BOBOC

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available  The article is dedicated to studying landslide distribution patterns and to assessing landslide development using large-scale remote sensing data and GIS technologies. There were obtained digital models of elevation and landforms within key sectors. There were shown up dependency of the process development on morphometric characteristics of the slopes. Also, there were indentified different dependency rates for the conditions within different key sectors.   

  12. Nanomaterials safety assessment: contribution from the Portuguese National Institute of Health (INSA) research

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The National Health Institute Doutor Ricardo Jorge (INSA) is a public organization of the Portuguese Ministry of Health, which develops a triple role as State Laboratory in the health sector, National Reference Laboratory and National Health Observatory. All operative units composing the departments develop multidisciplinary programs in problem areas of Public Health, namely performing R&D, health monitoring, training, laboratory external quality assessment and general health services. INS...

  13. Modelling fate and transport of glyphosate and AMPA in the Meuse catchment to assess the contribution of different pollution sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmet, Nele; Seuntjens, Piet

    2013-04-01

    Large river basins have multiple sources of pesticides and usually the pollution sources are spread over the entire catchment. The cumulative effect of pesticides entering the river system in upstream areas and the formation of persistent degradation products can compromise downstream water use e.g. raw water quality for drinking water abstractions. For assessments at catchment scale pesticide fluxes coming from different sources and sub basins need to be taken into account. To improve management strategies, a sound understanding of the sources, emission routes, transport, environmental fate and conversion of pesticides is needed. In the Netherlands, the Meuse river basin is an important source for drinking water production. The river suffers from elevated concentrations of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA). For AMPA it is rather unclear to what extent the pollution is related to glyphosate degradation and what is the contribution of other sources, especial phosphonates in domestic and industrial waste water. Based on the available monitoring data only it is difficult to distinguish between AMPA sources in such a large river basin. This hampers interpretation and decision making for water quality management in the Meuse catchment. Here, application of water quality models is very useful to obtain complementary information and insights. Modelling allows accounting for temporal and spatial variability in discharge and concentrations as well as distinguishing the contribution from conversion processes. In this study, a model for the river Meuse was developed and applied to assess the contribution of tributary and transnational influxes, glyphosate degradation and other sources to the AMPA pollution.

  14. Assessing species-specific contributions to craniofacial development using quail-duck chimeras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, Jennifer L; Schneider, Richard A

    2014-05-31

    The generation of chimeric embryos is a widespread and powerful approach to study cell fates, tissue interactions, and species-specific contributions to the histological and morphological development of vertebrate embryos. In particular, the use of chimeric embryos has established the importance of neural crest in directing the species-specific morphology of the craniofacial complex. The method described herein utilizes two avian species, duck and quail, with remarkably different craniofacial morphology. This method greatly facilitates the investigation of molecular and cellular regulation of species-specific pattern in the craniofacial complex. Experiments in quail and duck chimeric embryos have already revealed neural crest-mediated tissue interactions and cell-autonomous behaviors that regulate species-specific pattern in the craniofacial skeleton, musculature, and integument. The great diversity of neural crest derivatives suggests significant potential for future applications of the quail-duck chimeric system to understanding vertebrate development, disease, and evolution.

  15. The Contribution of Paleoseismology to Seismic Hazard Assessment in Site Evaluation for Nuclear Installations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Kurt; Guerrieri, Luca; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of site evaluation/re-evaluation procedures for nuclear power plants (NPP), paleoseismology plays an essential role not only for Fault Displacement Hazard Assessment (FDHA) but also for Seismic Hazard Assessment (SHA). The relevance of paleoseismology is recommended in the reference IAEA Safety Guide (IAEA SSG-9) and has been dramatically confirmed in recent time especially after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi NPP caused by the disastrous great Tohoku earthquake and tsunami occurred on 11 March 2011. After this event, the IAEA International Seismic Safety Center promoted a technical document aimed at encouraging and supporting Member States, especially from newcomer countries, to include paleoseismic investigations into the geologic database, highlighting the value of earthquake geology studies and paleoseismology for nuclear safety and providing standard methodologies to perform such investigations. In detail, paleoseismic investigations in the context of site evaluation of nuclear installations have the following main objectives: i) identification of seismogenic structures based on the recognition of effects of past earthquakes in the regional area; ii) improvement of the completeness of earthquake catalogs, through the identification and dating of ancient moderate to large earthquakes, whose trace has been preserved in the geologic records; iii) estimation of the maximum seismic potential associated with an identified seismogenic structure/source, typically on the basis of the amount of displacement per event (evaluable in paleoseismic trenches), as well as of the geomorphic and stratigraphic features interpretable as the cumulative effect of repeated large seismic events (concept of "seismic landscape"); iv) rough calibration of probabilistic seismic hazard assessment (PSHA), by using the recurrence interval of large earthquakes detectable by paleoseismic investigations, and providing a "reality check" based on direct observations of

  16. The Role of SMEs in Assessing the Contribution of Entrepreneurship to GDP in the Romanian Business Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Armeanu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Given the negative effects of the economic crisis on the Romanian economy, entrepreneurship represents one of the main pillars of economic recovery and the authorities need to act in support of private entrepreneurship initiative. Even though entrepreneurship does not equate to the small and medium-sized enterprises, there is strong support in literature regarding the importance of SMEs in national economies due to the authorities` potential of intervention and their contribution to gross value added. The fluctuating evolution of the Romanian business environment has led to a high volatility of its contribution to GDP, which is especially true in the case of SMEs due to their lack of technology and capital and difficult access to financing, as well as limited know-how compared to the large companies that control the Romanian market. Successful entrepreneurial initiative leads to sustainable businesses and ensures a smooth transition from business ideas to the creation of value added, thus supporting economic growth and the narrowing of macroeconomic gaps which have been generated during the economic recession. As a distinctive and dynamic component of Romanian entrepreneurship, the SME segment has a significant contribution to GDP. This study aims at assessing the contribution of entrepreneurship, through its SME segment, to Romania`s GDP in the main economic sectors and, at the same time, the estimation of output gap at sectoral level, thus filling a gap in entrepreneurship-related domestic literature.

  17. Assessing the Contribution of Urban Freight Terminals in Last Mile Operations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathanail Eftihia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a multi-stakeholder multi-criteria evaluation framework, which can be used for the assessment of the last mile distribution performance of urban freight terminals. To this end, a comparative analysis is conducted addressing two Greek urban intermodal freight terminals located at the port of Thessaloniki (ThPA and Kuehne+Nagel (K+N’s premises. The assessment of the terminals’ performance relies on a tailored multi-criteria Key Performance Indicator (KPI-based evaluation framework, whereas the selection and significance of the incorporated criteria and KPIs is predetermined by the relevant responsible stakeholders, who imposed their viewpoint through an analytic hierarchy process. Results showed that ThPA was ranked first according to its performance pertaining to the role of an intermodal interchange; still, K+N’s performance index was only 8.5% lower than ThPA’s, while in specific KPIs it seems that it performs in a better way.

  18. A comprehensive approach for assessing the economic contribution of forage and livestock improvement options to smallholder farming enterprises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Neil MacLeod; Scott Waldron; WEN Shi-lin

    2015-01-01

    The importance of livestock production activities to improving the livelihoods of smal holder farming households and the efifciency of their underlying farming systems is increasingly recognized. A rapid increase in livestock numbers, especial y beef cattle, and special purpose forages is being promoted for smal holder farms which have traditional y undertaken sub-sistence cropping activities or simple livestock rearing activities using low quality feedstuffs. Because limited plantings of specialized forages combined with a poor knowledge of animal nutrition are a chal enge to establishing sustainable livestock enterprises, much public policy and research is now being focused on the use of new forages and improved feeding practices. A number of economic studies have suggested that specialized forage growing and livestock feeding activities can make a positive contribution to smal holder welfare. The studies have typical y compared the total level of farm or household income with and without livestock activities. Little attention is given to how much the new forage or livestock activities actual y contribute to or draw resources from other farm activities to assess their real economic contribution to the enterprise, and the availability of simple tools to assist in making such assessments are limited. This paper describes a simple model ing approach that was developed for an Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR)-supported project to explore the real as opposed to apparent economic impact of integrating improved forages and livestock within smal holder farming systems in the Red Soils region of south-central China. Application of the model is demonstrated using a simple case study of a smal holder enterprise that plans to introduce a new beef cattle rearing activity to its existing farm activity mix. The case study highlights the importance of explicitly valuing transfers of resources between different farm activities to gauge the real

  19. Bibliometric assessment of the contributions of literature on Chagas disease in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Osorio, Nathalia; Vera-Polania, Felipe; Lopez-Isaza, Andres F; Martinez-Pulgarin, Dayron F; Murillo-Abadia, Jonathan; Munoz-Urbano, Marcela; Cardona-Ospina, Jaime A; Bello, Ricardo; Lagos-Grisales, Guillermo J; Villegas-Rojas, Soraya; Rodriguez-Morales, Alfonso J

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease, considered a parasitic neglected disease, is endemic in Latin America. Although, its mortality rate has decreased over time, it still represents a public health problem in the region. A bibliometric evaluation of the Latin American contributions on this disease was done. This study used SCI (1980-2013), MEDLINE/GOPUBMED (1802-2013), Scopus (1959-2013), SCIELO (2004-2013), and LILACS (1980-2013). Different study types have been characterized by years, origin city/country, journals and most productive authors, by country, cites and H-index. 2988 articles were retrieved from SCI (30.85% of total). Brazil was found to be the highest producer (31.22%), followed by Argentina (18.14%) and México (9.57%); the region received 47241 citations, 28.60% for Brazil (H-index=52), 18.26% of Argentina (Hindex= 43), 11.40% Bolivia (H-index=37). 4484 were retrieved from Scopus (30.20% of the total), 38.58% of which were from Brazil, 12.40% from Argentina and 8.90% from Mexico. From Medline, 6647 records were retrieved (45.58% Brazil). From SciELO, 917 articles (47.66% Brazil). From LILACS, 2165 articles (60.05% Brazil). Brazil has the highest output in the region. Despite advances in controlling Chagas disease, scientific production is low, particularly for regional bibliographic databases, which calls for more research on this disease.

  20. An assessment of the capacity for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase to contribute to C4 photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koteyeva, Nuria K; Voznesenskaya, Elena V; Edwards, Gerald E

    2015-06-01

    Three C4 acid decarboxylases, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), NADP-malic enzyme (NADP-ME), and NAD-malic enzyme (NAD-ME) were recruited from C3 plants to support C4 photosynthesis. In Poaceae, there are established lineages having PEPCK type species, and some NADP-ME lineages in which PEPCK contributes to C4. Besides family Poaceae, recently PEPCK has been reported to function in C4 photosynthesis in eudicot species including Cleome gynandra (Cleomaceae), Trianthema portulacastrum and Zaleya pentandra (Aizoaceae). We evaluated PEPCK by enzyme assay and western blots in representatives of Poaceae, Aizoaceae, Cleomaceae, and Chenopodiaceae compared to that in the PEPCK type C4 grass Spartina anglica. Eragrostis nutans was identified as the first NAD-ME type C4 grass having substantial amounts of PEPCK. In the eudicots, including C. gynandra, Cleome angustifolia, T. portulacastrum, Z. pentandra, and nine C4 members of family Chenopodiaceae (which has the most C4 species and diversity in forms among eudicot families), amounts of PEPCK were generally very low (barely detectable up to 4% of that in S. anglica). Based on these results, C4 species can be classified biochemically according to the dominant decarboxylase recruited for C4 function; and, Poaceae remains the only family in which PEPCK is known to have a significant role in C4 photosynthesis.

  1. A joint urban planning and public health framework: contributions to health impact assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northridge, Mary E; Sclar, Elliott

    2003-01-01

    A joint urban planning and public health perspective is articulated here for use, in health impact assessment. Absent a blueprint for a coherent and supportive structure on which to test our thinking, we are bound to fall flat. Such a perspective is made necessary by the sheer number of people living in cities throughout the world, the need for explicit attention to land use and transportation systems as determinants of population health, and the dearth of useful indicators of the built environment for monitoring progress. If explicit attention is not paid to the overarching goals of equality and democracy, they have little if any chance of being realized in projects, programs, and policies that shape the built environment and therefore the public's health.

  2. Contribution to the knowledge of threatened terrestrial fauna of Brazil: data from PETROBRAS environmental impact assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basbaum, Marcos A.; Fonseca, Renata A.A. [SEEBLA - Servicos de Engenharia Emilio Baumgart Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: mbasbaum.seebla@petrobras.com.br, e-mail: renataamorim.seebla@petrobras.com.br; Torggler, Bianca F.; Fernandes, Renato; Guimaraes, Ricardo Z.P. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: torggler@petrobras.com.br, e-mail: renatofer@petrobras.com.br, e-mail: rzaluar@petrobras.com.br

    2009-12-19

    One of the major problems related to the protection of threatened species in Brazil is the current lack of primary data on their occurrence. PETROBRAS, due to the processes of environmental licensing of new pipelines, held numerous studies on the occurrence of several species. Most of these studies took place in Atlantic Forest remnants located in the states of Sao Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, Minas Gerais, Espirito Santo, Bahia, Sergipe, Alagoas and Pernambuco. This study compared primary data from these Environmental Impact Assessments with the Brazilian list of threatened species published by MMA (Brazilian Ministry of Environment). Many threatened species were recorded in areas where native forest fragments are reduced in number and size, such as those in the Northeastern region. (author)

  3. The contribution of pattern recognition of seismic and morphostructural data to seismic hazard assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Peresan, Antonella; Soloviev, Alexander; Panza, Giuliano F

    2014-01-01

    The reliable statistical characterization of the spatial and temporal properties of large earthquakes occurrence is one of the most debated issues in seismic hazard assessment, due to the unavoidably limited observations from past events. We show that pattern recognition techniques, which are designed in a formal and testable way, may provide significant space-time constraints about impending strong earthquakes. This information, when combined with physically sound methods for ground shaking computation, like the neo-deterministic approach (NDSHA), may produce effectively preventive seismic hazard maps. Pattern recognition analysis of morphostructural data provide quantitative and systematic criteria for identifying the areas prone to the largest events, taking into account a wide set of possible geophysical and geological data, whilst the formal identification of precursory seismicity patterns (by means of CN and M8S algorithms), duly validated by prospective testing, provides useful constraints about impend...

  4. A critical assessment of generational accounting and its contribution to the generational equity debate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John B. Williamson

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This article describes generational accounting (GA with a focus on what it brings to the broader literature on generational equity. Our assessment suggests that the GA model has its limitations but is potentially useful in the hands of analysts who are familiar with both the strengths and limitations of the model. It is most useful when the focus is on dealing with intergenerational equity, but it is much less useful when the focus is on issues related to class, race, and other forms intragenerational equity. We conclude that when GA models are used to support calls for retrenchment of public spending on pensions and other social programs that target the older population, it makes sense to recognize that the potential benefits with respect to government debt and deficit reduction and reduced inequality in net tax burdens across age cohorts may come at the cost of increased intragenerational inequality for many workers and retirees.

  5. Assessment of the upper body contribution to multiple-sprint cycling in men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Marie Clare; Watson, Hugh; Baker, Julien S

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of repeated cycling sprints on power profiles while assessing upper body muscle contraction. Eighteen physically active participants performed 8 × 10 s repeated sprints while muscle activity was recorded via surface electromyography (sEMG) from the brachioradialis (BR), biceps brachii (BB), triceps brachii (TB) and upper trapezius (UT). Measurements were obtained at rest, during a functional maximum contraction (FMC) while participants were positioned in a seated position on the cycle ergometer and during the repeated sprint protocol. Results suggest that mainly type I muscle fibres (MFs) are being recruited within the upper body musculature due to the submaximal and intermittent nature of the contractions. Subsequently, there is no evidence of upper body fatigue across the sprints, which is reflected in the lack of changes in the median frequency of the power spectrum (P<0·05).

  6. Contributions of EEG-fMRI to Assessing the Epileptogenicity of Focal Cortical Dysplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittau, Francesca; Ferri, Lorenzo; Fahoum, Firas; Dubeau, François; Gotman, Jean

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the ability of the BOLD response to EEG spikes to assess the epileptogenicity of the lesion in patients with focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). Method: Patients with focal epilepsy and FCD who underwent 3T EEG-fMRI from 2006 to 2010 were included. Diagnosis of FCD was based on neuroradiology (MRI+), or histopathology in MRI-negative cases (MRI−). Patients underwent 120 min EEG-fMRI recording session. Spikes similar to those recorded outside the scanner were marked in the filtered EEG. The lesion (in MRI+) or the removed cortex (in MRI−) was marked on the anatomical T1 sequence, blindly to the BOLD response, after reviewing the FLAIR images. For each BOLD response we assessed the concordance with the spike field and with the lesion in MRI+ or the removed cortex in MRI−. BOLD responses were considered “concordant” if the maximal t-value was inside the marking. Follow-up after resection was used as gold-standard. Results: Twenty patients were included (13 MRI+, 7 MRI−), but in seven the EEG was not active or there were artifacts during acquisition. In all 13 studied patients, at least one BOLD response was concordant with the spike field; in 9/13 (69%) at least one BOLD response was concordant with the lesion: in 6/7 (86%) MRI+ and in 3/6 (50%) MRI− patients. Conclusions: Our study shows a high level of concordance between FCD and BOLD response. This data could provide useful information especially for MRI negative patients. Moreover, it shows in almost all FCD patients, a metabolic involvement of remote cortical or subcortical structures, corroborating the concept of epileptic network.

  7. Assessment of the stromal contribution to Sonic Hedgehog-dependent pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damhofer, Helene; Medema, Jan Paul; Veenstra, Veronique L; Badea, Liviu; Popescu, Irinel; Roelink, Henk; Bijlsma, Maarten F

    2013-12-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains one of the most lethal malignancies. It is typically detected at an advanced stage, at which the therapeutic options are very limited. One remarkable feature of PDAC that contributes to its resilience to treatment is the extreme stromal activation seen in these tumors. Often, the vast majority of tumor bulk consists of non-tumor cells that together provide a tumor-promoting environment. One of the signals that maintains and activates the stroma is the developmental protein Sonic Hedgehog (SHH). As the disease progresses, tumor cells produce increasing amounts of SHH, which activates the surrounding stroma to aid in tumor progression. To better understand this response and identify targets for inhibition, we aimed to elucidate the proteins that mediate the SHH-driven stromal response in PDAC. For this a novel mixed-species coculture model was set up in which the cancer cells are human, and the stroma is modeled by mouse fibroblasts. In conjunction with next-generation sequencing we were able to use the sequence difference between these species to genetically distinguish between the epithelial and stromal responses to SHH. The stromal SHH-dependent genes from this analysis were validated and their relevance for human disease was subsequently determined in two independent patient cohorts. In non-microdissected tissue from PDAC patients, in which a large amount of stroma is present, the targets were confirmed to associate with tumor stroma versus normal pancreatic tissue. Patient survival analysis and immunohistochemistry identified CDA, EDIL3, ITGB4, PLAUR and SPOCK1 as SHH-dependent stromal factors that are associated with poor prognosis in PDAC patients. Summarizing, the presented data provide insight into the role of the activated stroma in PDAC, and how SHH acts to mediate this response. In addition, the study has yielded several candidates that are interesting therapeutic targets for a disease for which treatment

  8. Can assessing for potential contribution of soil organic and inorganic components for butachlor sorption be improved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yan; Liu, Zhongzhen; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Haizhen; Shi, Jiachun; Xu, Jianming

    2011-01-01

    Sorption of butachlor to various types of common soil components was investigated. Six pure minerals (montmorillonite [Mont], kaolinite [Kaol], Ca homoionic montmorillonite [Ca-Mont] and kaolinite [Ca-Kaol], amorphous hydrated Al and Fe oxides [AHOs-Al, AHOs-Fe]), four soil alkali-extractable pure humic acids (HAs), and the four corresponding HAs originated real unmodified and HO-treated soils were selected as the representative sorbents. Results showed that the HAs played a crucial role, and clay minerals (especially Mont) also showed an important effect in butachlor sorption. The AHOs may likely influence only in a mediator way by enhancing the availability of sorption domains of HAs. By removing 78% (on average) of the total organic carbon (TOC) from the soils with HO, the content ratio of clay to TOC (RCO) increased by an average of 367% and became >60. This change simultaneously decreased the sorption capacity of soils (40%, on average). Considering that the surface sorption domain on clay minerals may be highly exposed and more competitive after the partial removal of soil organic matter (SOM), this reaffirmed the potential contribution from clay minerals. It can thus be inferred that in the real soil where SOM and clay minerals are associated, the coating of clay minerals may have weakened the partition function of SOM or blocked some sorption domain within SOM, resulting in a decreased sorption of butachlor. Therefore, clay minerals, especially 2:1 type expanding minerals, may play a dual function vs. SOM content for the sorption of butachlor in soil.

  9. EMPLOYING DECENTRING TO ASSESS QUALITY OF SERVICES AND ITS CONTRIBUTION TOWARDS SATISFACTION

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    Usman YOUSAF

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The higher education scenario in Pakistan has gone through tremendous changes and improvements in the last decade. Competition resulting from a sudden surge in the number of higher education imparting institutions and the active role of Higher Education Commission has increased the pressure on the universities to continuously enhance the quality of educational services being provided by them. The aim of the researchers in this endeavor is to employ decentering in order to assess the quality of services being provided by the universities. The study has used the SERVQUAL tool by Parasuraman, Zeithmal and Berry (1991 on a five point Liker scale in order to gauge the responses of the students. Analysis was conducted on a total of 156 valid questionnaires. The sample included the students of the top five HEC (Higher Education Commission recognized universities in the twin cities of Islamabad and Rawalpindi. Data was analyzed using Pearson correlation and regression. Factor analysis was also carried out so as to classify the most important dimensions for the students with respect to higher education in Pakistan. Statistical analysis disclosed a positive and significant association between service quality and customer satisfaction. The factor analysis revealed that the most significant dimension with respect to the Pakistan’s higher education sector are the level of management support, responsiveness of the service providers and the adequacy of physical facilities. The study highlights the importance of treating students as valued customers as the competition in the industry along with the regulatory requirements of HEC as well. The service providers need to be provided adequate support and backing of the top management. The physical facilities and the infrastructure must also be adequate enough to meet the growing and ever changing demands of the industry. The current study is the first of its kind that covers the higher education imparting

  10. Fertility exposure analysis: A new method for assessing the contribution of proximate determinants to fertility differentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobcraft, J; Little, R J

    1984-03-01

    Summary Several recent papers have dealt with the problem of assessing the impact of the proximate determinants on fertility. All these approaches rely on combining a series of separately estimated aggregate level indicators. This paper proposes an approach which uses individual-level data and thus permits regression analyses as well as analyses for sub-groups. In the course of development it became clear that there are several deficiencies and inconsistencies in the measurement and formation of indices proposed elsewhere, which are overcome. We illustrate our approach with data from the Dominican Republic. The approach used involves attributing exposure to one or more of several states, including pregnancy, lactational and non-lactational components of post-partum amenorrhoea, absence of sexual relations and contraception. Key elements are efficacies of contraception and components of post-partum infecundity and the treatment of overlaps through an explicit hierarchy. We treat both unconditional (or additive) and conditional analyses. Intriguing findings on the age-specific pattern of fertility control emerge. Major advantages of regression analysis, such as simultaneous treatment of several variables and estimation of sampling variation are stressed.

  11. Contribution of natural history collection data to biodiversity assessment in national parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, A.F.; Gilbert, A.T.; Hatfield, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    There has been mounting interest in the use of museum and herbaria collections to assess biodiversity; information is often difficult to locate and access, however, and few recommendations are available for effectively using natural history collections. As part of an effort to inventory vertebrates and vascular plants in U.S. national parks, we searched manually and by computer for specimens originating within or adjacent to 14 parks throughout the northeastern United States. We compared the number of specimens located to collection size to determine whether there was any effect on detection rate of specimens. We evaluated the importance of park characteristics (e.g., age since establishment, size, theme [natural vs. cultural]) for influencing the number of specimens found in a collection. We located >31,000 specimens and compiled associated records (hereafter referred to as specimens) from 78 collections; >9000 specimens were park-significant, originating either within park boundaries or in the local township where the park was located. We found >2000 specimens by means of manual searches, which cost $0.001?0.15 per specimen searched and $0.81?151.95 per specimen found. Collection effort appeared relatively uniform between 1890 and 1980, with low periods corresponding to significant sociopolitical events. Detection rates for specimens were inversely related to collection size. Although specimens were most often located in collections within the region of interest, specimens can be found anywhere, particularly in large collections international in scope, suggesting that global searches will be necessary to evaluate historical biodiversity. Park characteristics indicated that more collecting effort occurred within or adjacent to larger parks established for natural resources than in smaller historical sites. Because many institutions have not yet established electronic databases for collections, manual searches can be useful for retrieving specimens. Our results

  12. Flood-risk mapping: contributions towards an enhanced assessment of extreme events and associated risks

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    B. Büchele

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, a shift from classical flood protection as engineering task towards integrated flood risk management concepts can be observed. In this context, a more consequent consideration of extreme events which exceed the design event of flood protection structures and failure scenarios such as dike breaches have to be investigated. Therefore, this study aims to enhance existing methods for hazard and risk assessment for extreme events and is divided into three parts. In the first part, a regionalization approach for flood peak discharges was further developed and substantiated, especially regarding recurrence intervals of 200 to 10 000 years and a large number of small ungauged catchments. Model comparisons show that more confidence in such flood estimates for ungauged areas and very long recurrence intervals may be given as implied by statistical analysis alone. The hydraulic simulation in the second part is oriented towards hazard mapping and risk analyses covering the whole spectrum of relevant flood events. As the hydrodynamic simulation is directly coupled with a GIS, the results can be easily processed as local inundation depths for spatial risk analyses. For this, a new GIS-based software tool was developed, being presented in the third part, which enables estimations of the direct flood damage to single buildings or areas based on different established stage-damage functions. Furthermore, a new multifactorial approach for damage estimation is presented, aiming at the improvement of damage estimation on local scale by considering factors like building quality, contamination and precautionary measures. The methods and results from this study form the base for comprehensive risk analyses and flood management strategies.

  13. Utility of the clue - From assessing the investigative contribution of forensic science to supporting the decision to use traces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitzer, Sonja; Albertini, Nicola; Lock, Eric; Ribaux, Olivier; Delémont, Olivier

    2015-12-01

    In an attempt to grasp the effectiveness of forensic science in the criminal justice process, a number of studies introduced some form of performance indicator. However, most of these indicators suffer from different weaknesses, from the definition of forensic science itself to problems of reliability and validity. We suggest the introduction of the concept of utility of the clue as an internal evaluation indicator of forensic science in the investigation. Utility of the clue is defined as added value of information, gained by the use of traces. This concept could be used to assess the contribution of the trace in the context of the case. By extension, a second application of this concept is suggested. By formalising and considering, a priori, the perceived utility of using traces, we introduce the notion of expected utility that could be used as decision factor when choosing which traces to use, once they have been collected at the crime scene or from an object in the laboratory. In a case-based approach, utility can be assessed in the light of the available information to evaluate the investigative contribution of forensic science. In the decision-making process, the projection or estimation of the utility of the clue is proposed to be a factor to take into account when triaging the set of traces.

  14. Assessment of the Contribution of BeiDou GEO, IGSO, and MEO Satellites to PPP in Asia—Pacific Region

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    Qile Zhao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to the US Global Positioning System (GPS, the Russian Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS and the European Galileo, the developing Chinese BeiDou satellite navigation system (BDS consists of not only Medium Earth Orbit (MEO, but also Geostationary Orbit (GEO as well as Inclined Geosynchronous Orbit (IGSO satellites. In this study, the Precise Point Positioning (PPP and PPP with Integer Ambiguity Resolution (IAR are obtained. The contributions of these three different types of BDS satellites to PPP in Asia-Pacific region are assessed using data from selected 20 sites over more than four weeks. By using various PPP cases with different satellite combinations, in general, the largest contribution of BDS IGSO among the three kinds of BDS satellites to the reduction of convergence time and the improvement of positioning accuracy, particularly in the east direction, is identified. These PPP cases include static BDS only solutions and static/kinematic ambiguity-float and -fixed PPP with the combination of GPS and BDS. The statistical results demonstrate that the inclusion of BDS GEO and MEO satellites can improve the observation condition and result in better PPP performance as well. When combined with GPS, the contribution of BDS to the reduction of convergence time is, however, not as significant as that of GLONASS. As far as the positioning accuracy is concerned, GLONASS improves the accuracy in vertical component more than BDS does, whereas similar improvement in horizontal component can be achieved by inclusion of BDS IGSO and MEO as GLONASS.

  15. Quality assessment of IDS contribution to ITRF2014 performed by DGFI-TUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloßfeld, Mathis; Seitz, Manuela; Angermann, Detlef; Moreaux, Guilhem

    2016-12-01

    The International DORIS Service (IDS) submitted input data for the most recent realization of the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS), the International Terrestrial Reference Frame 2014 (ITRF2014). As one of the ITRS Combination Centers, DGFI-TUM is in charge to analyze and assess the quality of the submitted data and to compute a combined global TRF solution (called DTRF2014) using observations of the four geodetic space techniques GNSS, VLBI, SLR and DORIS. The combination methodology used at DGFI-TUM is based on the combination of datum-free normal equations. Together with station coordinates and velocities, terrestrial pole coordinates are estimated in one common adjustment. The paper presents the analysis results of the most recent DORIS submission IDS-d09 and evaluates its quality w.r.t. the DTRF2008 (IDS-only) solution. In the most recent version of the analysis, we introduce in total 55 station discontinuities and reduce 15 stations due to a too short time span or too few observations. Time series of weekly IDS solutions are computed and validated w.r.t. DTRF2008. The transformation parameter time series and the station residuals are discussed in detail. Especially the scale parameter time series shows a significant improvement compared to the DTRF2008 input data. The scatter of the x- and y-translation is significantly reduced to 5.7 mm and 7.1 mm compared to 6.6 mm and 8.1 mm for the DTRF2008 (IDS-only) solution. The z-translation time series still shows a high correlation with solar activity. 10% of all station residuals are significantly affected by spectral peaks at draconitic period harmonics of the altimetry satellites Jason and TOPEX/Poseidon and up to 48% of all station residual time series contain significantly determined frequencies with a 14 day period. The multi-year IDS solution is validated w.r.t. DTRF2008 and the consistently estimated terrestrial pole coordinates are analyzed and compared to IERS 08 C04. The x-pole spectra

  16. Further assessment of the protozoal contribution to the nutrition of the ruminant animal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Sarah E; France, James; Dijkstra, Jan

    2017-03-07

    The flow of protozoa from the reticulo-rumen is lower than expected, due to ability of protozoa to prevent washout through sequestration on feed particles and the rumen epithelium. In order to estimate the distribution of protozoa within the reticulo-rumen and passage to the omasum, Czerkawski (1987) developed a model containing pools for the rumen liquid phase, rumen solid phase, and the omasum. This model was used to estimate loss of protozoa in the omasum as well as the amount of protozoal protein available to the animal in the lower gut. A number of assumptions were incorporated into the model, some of which appear unsupported by current research. This paper represents an update, revision, and re-evaluation of Czerkawski's model, where the assumptions that all protozoa in the 'attached' phase are in solid digesta, and that protozoa only leave the rumen in the liquid, have been relaxed. Therefore, the revised model allows for sequestration of protozoa on the rumen epithelium and protozoal passage with particulate outflow. Using experimental observations with inputs within biological limits, the revised model and Czerkawski's original model were verified. The effect of diet on the model was then assessed using inputs from a 100% forage diet and a 35-65% concentrate diet. The extent of sequestration was also varied from complete sequestration, to partial sequestration, and no sequestration. A sensitivity analysis was conducted through a linear regression of perturbed mean inputs versus outputs. The results from the revised model indicate that within the reticulo-rumen, the concentrate diet has a greater fractional flow rate of protozoa from the liquid to solid phase, but a lesser fractional flow rate back to the liquid phase, compared to the forage diet. As well, the concentrate diet has a slower net growth rate of protozoa in the attached phase, compared to the forage diet. In the omasum, the forage diet has a less negative net growth rate, compared to the

  17. CONTRIBUTION OF THE AUDIOLOGICAL AND VESTIBULAR ASSESSMENT TO THE DIFFERENTIAL AND ETIOLOGICAL DIAGNOSIS OF PERIPHERIC VESTIBULAR SYNDROMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loreta Ungureanu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Scope of the study: Vestibular pathology is a complex one, requiring a minute clinical evaluation, as well as numerous paraclinical investigations. The present study analyzes the contribution of the modern methods of vestibular and auditive investigation to the diagnosis of dizziness. Materials and method: The results of the investigations performed on 84 patients with peripheric vestibular syndrome, on whom a complete audiological and vestibular assessment had been also made, have been retrospectively analyzed. Results: Anamnestic data and the results of evaluation permitted classification of peripheric vestibular pathology according to topo-lesional and etiological criteria. The most frequently diagnosed diseases were: benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Ménière syndrome and vestibular neuronitis. Conclusions: Testing of the vestibulo-ocular and vestibulo-spinal reflexes through videonystagmoscopy and, respectively, computerized dynamic posturography, besides tonal vocal audiometry and precocious auditive potentials, is especially important for a positive diagnosis and etiological differentiation of vestibular syndromes.

  18. Contribution made by computed tomography to assessment of space-occupying growths and malformations of the skeletal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenig, R.; van Kaick, G.; Braun, A.

    1983-03-01

    The contribution made by computed tomography to the diagnostics of the skeletal system was studied in the basis of 53 examinations in patients with space-occupying growths and malformations. With reference to clinical final diagnoses the CT findings were graded into I. Correct diagnosis or diagnosis by exclusion, II. Contribution to determining the growth of the process, III. No additional information obtained via CT. The distribution of these grades was as follows: Grad I = 34%, II = 49%, III = 17%. Indications for CT of the skeletal system were based on the following problems: primary malignant bone tumours; bone metastases in the region on the vertebral column; benign and potentially malignant bone tumours and abscesses in the region of the skeleton itself and of the skull; suspected diastematomyelia; assessment of the vertebral canal in case of suspected inflammatory or tumorous changes of the adjacent areas as well as exclusion of osseous changes in the region of the vertebral canal with peripheral neurological symptoms. CT serves to determine the exact dimension of the growth; to prove infiltration of organs and stuctures; for the planning of operations; for controlling the course; and for diagnosing relapses.

  19. Assessment of a relative contribution of terrestrial background radiation in the test field by using RADIAGEMTM 2000 portable survey meter

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    Avdić Senada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is focused on the radiological investigation of terrestrial gamma radiation in the test field with soil samples from different minefields in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Measurements of ambient dose equivalent rate, commonly referred to as “air dose rate”, in the test field located in the Tuzla Canton, were performed by RADIAGEMTM 2000 portable survey meter, based on energy-compensated Geiger-Muller counter. Its performances were tested in the laboratory conditions with gamma point sources. Since all the samples in the test field were exposed to the same cosmic radiation, there was a possibility to assess a relative contribution of terrestrial gamma radiation due to soil samples of different composition. One set of measurements in the test field was performed with RADIAGEMTM 2000, at a height of about one meter above the ground and basic statistical parameters indicated that there was no significant difference of terrestrial gamma radiation from different soil samples. The other set of measurements was carried out with the same device placed on the ground in the test field. Processing of experimental data on terrestrial gamma radiation has shown that it was possible to make a difference between relative contributions of terrestrial gamma radiation from individual soil samples. The results of investigation could be useful for multiple purposes of public interest.

  20. Contributions of acculturation, enculturation, discrimination, and personality traits to social anxiety among Chinese immigrants: A context-specific assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ke; Friedlander, Myrna; Pieterse, Alex L

    2016-01-01

    Based on the diathesis-stress model of anxiety, this study examined the contributions of cultural processes, perceived racial discrimination, and personality traits to social anxiety among Chinese immigrants. Further guided by the theory of intergroup anxiety, this study also adopted a context-specific approach to distinguish between participants' experience of social anxiety when interacting with European Americans versus with other Chinese in the United States. This quantitative and ex post facto study used a convenience sample of 140 first-generation Chinese immigrants. Participants were recruited through e-mails from different university and community groups across the United States. The sample includes 55 men and 82 women (3 did not specify) with an average age of 36 years old. Results showed that more social anxiety was reported in the European American context than in the Chinese ethnic context. The full models accounted for almost half the variance in anxiety in each context. Although personality accounted for the most variance, the cultural variables and discrimination contributed 14% of the unique variance in the European American context. Notably, low acculturation, high neuroticism, and low extraversion were unique contributors to social anxiety with European Americans, whereas in the Chinese ethnic context only low extraversion was a unique contributor; more discrimination was uniquely significant in both contexts. The findings suggest a need to contextualize the research and clinical assessment of social anxiety, and have implications for culturally sensitive counseling with immigrants.

  1. Assessing the contribution of legacy sediment and mill dam storage to sediment budgets in the Piedmont of Maryland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, M.; Miller, A. J.; Baker, M. E.; Gellis, A.

    2013-12-01

    Storage and remobilization of legacy sediment and its net contribution to overall watershed sediment budgets has been an active topic of research in fluvial geomorphology for at least a century. The influence of historic mill dams on storage of legacy sediment and on floodplain morphology in the Piedmont province of the mid-Atlantic region has become a prominent focus of discussion in recent years. The goals of this project are to quantify rates of remobilization of legacy sediment by bank erosion as a contribution to watershed sediment yield in the Piedmont of Baltimore County, Maryland, and to compare contributions from mill-dam deposits with contributions from floodplain sediments not directly attributable to mill dams. The watershed sample will be used to project net remobilization rates for the entire drainage network in select watersheds, and to estimate the component attributable to legacy sediments upstream of mill dams. These results will be compared with regional sediment yields documented in the literature. Through comparison of a 1-m resolution LiDAR DEM from 2005 and 1:2400 scale topographic maps from 1959-1961, we quantify nearly 50 years of channel change along 27 valley reaches from 18 watersheds with drainage areas between 1.8 and 162.9 km2. Sites chosen represent a stratified sample of stream orders and drainage areas including sites in broad alluvial valleys and upstream headwater tributaries at the limit of where floodplains are observed. Particle size and bulk density for floodplain and channel-bar sediments were determined from 182 samples cores, and were classified as Legacy material, Pre-European Settlement, or Channel material. Density and particle size were combined with the volume of gross and net erosion for each valley reach in order to calculate the net mass of sediment remobilized per year for each site. Preliminary results indicate average lateral migration rates of 0.06 - 0.29 m/year, with net erosion ranging between 24 and 171 Mg

  2. Sources of the PM10 aerosol in Flanders, Belgium, and re-assessment of the contribution from wood burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maenhaut, Willy, E-mail: willy.maenhaut@ugent.be [Ghent University (UGent), Department of Analytical Chemistry, Krijgslaan 281, S12, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); University of Antwerp - UA, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610, Antwerpen (Belgium); Vermeylen, Reinhilde; Claeys, Magda [University of Antwerp - UA, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610, Antwerpen (Belgium); Vercauteren, Jordy; Roekens, Edward [Flemish Environment Agency (VMM), Kronenburgstraat 45, B-2000, Antwerpen (Belgium)

    2016-08-15

    From 30 June 2011 to 2 July 2012 PM10 aerosol samples were simultaneously taken every 4th day at four urban background sites in Flanders, Belgium. The sites were in Antwerpen, Gent, Brugge, and Oostende. The PM10 mass concentration was determined by weighing; organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC) were measured by thermal-optical analysis, the wood burning tracers levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan were determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, 8 water-soluble ions were measured by ion chromatography, and 15 elements were determined by a combination of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry. The multi-species dataset was subjected to receptor modeling by PMF. The 10 retained factors (with their overall average percentage contributions to the experimental PM10 mass) were wood burning (9.5%), secondary nitrate (24%), secondary sulfate (12.6%), sea salt (10.0%), aged sea salt (19.2%), crustal matter (9.7%), non-ferrous metals (1.81%), traffic (10.3%), non-exhaust traffic (0.52%), and heavy oil burning (3.0%). The average contributions of wood smoke for the four sites were quite substantial in winter and ranged from 12.5 to 20% for the PM10 mass and from 47 to 64% for PM10 OC. Wood burning appeared to be also a notable source of As, Cd, and Pb. The contribution from wood burning to the PM10 mass and OC was also assessed by making use of levoglucosan as single marker compound and the conversion factors of Schmidl et al. (2008), as done in our previous study on wood burning in Flanders (Maenhaut et al., 2012). However, the apportionments were much lower than those deduced from PMF. It seems that the conversion factors of Schmidl et al. (2008) may not be applicable to wood burning in Flanders. From scatter plots of the PMF-derived wood smoke OC and PM versus levoglucosan, we arrived at conversion factors of 9.7 and 22.6, respectively. - Highlights: • A one-year study with 4 urban background sites and a total of 372

  3. The contribution of PSInSAR interferometry to landslide susceptibility assessment in weak rock-dominated areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Sérgio C.; Zêzere, José L.; Catalão, João; Nico, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    the respective Receiver Operator Characteristic curves and calculating the corresponding Area Under the Curve. Reference: Oliveira, S.C.; Zêzere, J.L.; Catalão, J.; Nico, G. (2014) - The contribution of PSInSAR interferometry to landslide hazard in weak rock-dominated areas. Landslides, DOI 10.1007/s10346-014-0522-9 This work was supported by the FCT - Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology and is within the framework of the Project Pan-European and nation-wide landslide susceptibility assessment, European and Mediterranean Major Hazards Agreement (EUR-OPA). The first author was funded by a postdoctoral grant (SFRH/BPD/85827/2012) from the Portuguese Foundation for Science and Technology (FCT).

  4. The Contribution of Teachers' Peer-and Self-Assessment for the Implementation of Active Learning Strategies: Perceptions of Ethiopia Primary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengistie, Solomon Melesse

    2014-01-01

    The present study tries to investigate the contribution of primary school teachers' peer- and self- assessment for effective implementation of active learning in their actual classrooms. In this study, areas in which self-reflection and peer assessment include three broad categories, such as methods of teaching and learning, instructional resource…

  5. The Contribution of Rubrics to the Validity of Performance Assessment: A Study of the Conservation-Restoration and Design Undergraduate Degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez-Varela, José-Luis; Gregori-Giralt, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Rubrics have attained considerable importance in the authentic and sustainable assessment paradigm; nevertheless, few studies have examined their contribution to validity, especially outside the domain of educational studies. This empirical study used a quantitative approach to analyse the validity of a rubrics-based performance assessment. Raters…

  6. Plant-based assessment of inherent soil productivity and contributions to China's cereal crop yield increase since 1980.

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    Mingsheng Fan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: China's food production has increased 6-fold during the past half-century, thanks to increased yields resulting from the management intensification, accomplished through greater inputs of fertilizer, water, new crop strains, and other Green Revolution's technologies. Yet, changes in underlying quality of soils and their effects on yield increase remain to be determined. Here, we provide a first attempt to quantify historical changes in inherent soil productivity and their contributions to the increase in yield. METHODS: The assessment was conducted based on data-set derived from 7410 on-farm trials, 8 long-term experiments and an inventory of soil organic matter concentrations of arable land. RESULTS: Results show that even without organic and inorganic fertilizer addition crop yield from on-farm trials conducted in the 2000s was significantly higher compared with those in the 1980s - the increase ranged from 0.73 to 1.76 Mg/ha for China's major irrigated cereal-based cropping systems. The increase in on-farm yield in control plot since 1980s was due primarily to the enhancement of soil-related factors, and reflected inherent soil productivity improvement. The latter led to higher and stable yield with adoption of improved management practices, and contributed 43% to the increase in yield for wheat and 22% for maize in the north China, and, 31%, 35% and 22% for early and late rice in south China and for single rice crop in the Yangtze River Basin since 1980. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, without an improvement in inherent soil productivity, the 'Agricultural Miracle in China' would not have happened. A comprehensive strategy of inherent soil productivity improvement in China, accomplished through combining engineering-based measures with biological-approaches, may be an important lesson for the developing world. We propose that advancing food security in 21st century for both China and other parts of world will depend on continuously improving

  7. ASSESSMENT OF LIFESTYLE-RELATED RISK FACTORS CONTRIBUTING FOR CHRONIC NON COMMUNICABLE DISEASE IN PATIENTS VISITING RURAL TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

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    Dahal Prasanna

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Chronic Non-communicable diseases remain an area of high public health concern especially in developing countries where growing middle class and ever changing lifestyle have led to the rapid increase in the burden of non-communicable disease. The study aimed to assess various lifestyle and behavioral risk factors contributing for non-communicable chronic disease in patients visiting rural tertiary care hospital. A total of 152 patients were selected and analyzed in the study out of which 49 (32.22% were female and 102 (67.78% were male. The average age of the male patients were found to be 61.79years (SD±9.28 and females were 57.1years (SD±10.3. Majority of patients were from lower socioeconomic and educational status. Various risk factors contributing for chronic non-communicable disease that are identified in the study were advance age i.e. > 40years 142 (93.42%, genetically risk factor 46 (30.26%, poor income status 120 (78.95%, occupational exposure to dust, smoke and irritants 111 (73.03%, high body mass index (BMI75 (49.34%, stress 110 (72.37%, inadequate sleep 5 (3.29%, smoking habit 69 (45.4%, Alcohol consuming habit 63 (41.48%, lack of physical activity 59 (38.81%, rare fruit consuming habit 72 (47.37% and less vegetable consumption i.e. ≤ 1/day were 32 (21.05%. Study concluded that substantially high levels of the various lifestyle and behavioral related risk factors such as poor socioeconomic status, smoking, alcohol consumption, high BMI or obesity, stress etc, were significantly associated in patients with chronic disease.

  8. Assessing the underlying breast cancer risk of Chinese females contributed by dietary intake of residual DDT from agricultural soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mengling; Zhao, Meirong; Zhou, Shanshan; Chen, Kun; Zhang, Chunlong; Liu, Weiping

    2014-12-01

    The greatest concern over DDT exposure in China arose since the early 1990s for the rising breast cancer incidence, and the cause still remains to be elucidated. An extensive survey of DDT background in agricultural soils, covered the entire region of China, was conducted. DDT at concentrations greater than 100 ng/g (the China's Farmland Environmental Quality Evaluation Standards for Edible Agricultural Products) was found to impact 42.3 million Chinese population. Considering the geographical differences with diverse DDT contributions and different diet products and habits, the average daily dietary intake was modeled and estimated to be 0.34 μg/kg p,p'-DDE (the main bioactive constituent in DDT). Population attributable fraction derived from a case-control study from 78 women with breast cancer and 72 controls was used to assess the DDT exposure risk to breast cancer. Based on the estimated population attributable fraction with a median value of 0.6% (IQR 0.23-2.11%), the excess annual breast cancer incidence rate attributable to p,p'-DDE exposure averaged 0.06×10(-5) with significant spatial variations varying from 0.00021×10(-5) to 11.05×10(-5) in Chinese females. Exposure to DDT is a contributor to breast cancer, but the overall limited relative risk and population attributable fraction imply confounding factors for breast cancer in Chinese females. Exposure risk in a regional scale helps understand the cause and prevention of breast cancer. Our mapping and modeling method could be used to assess other environmental carcinogens and related cancer diseases.

  9. An ensemble approach to assess hydrological models' contribution to uncertainties in the analysis of climate change impact on water resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Velázquez

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Over the recent years, several research efforts investigated the impact of climate change on water resources for different regions of the world. The projection of future river flows is affected by different sources of uncertainty in the hydro-climatic modelling chain. One of the aims of the QBic3 project (Québec-Bavarian International Collaboration on Climate Change is to assess the contribution to uncertainty of hydrological models by using an ensemble of hydrological models presenting a diversity of structural complexity (i.e., lumped, semi distributed and distributed models. The study investigates two humid, mid-latitude catchments with natural flow conditions; one located in Southern Québec (Canada and one in Southern Bavaria (Germany. Daily flow is simulated with four different hydrological models, forced by outputs from regional climate models driven by global climate models over a reference (1971–2000 and a future (2041–2070 period. The results show that, for our hydrological model ensemble, the choice of model strongly affects the climate change response of selected hydrological indicators, especially those related to low flows. Indicators related to high flows seem less sensitive on the choice of the hydrological model.

  10. An ensemble approach to assess hydrological models' contribution to uncertainties in the analysis of climate change impact on water resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Velázquez

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the recent years, several research efforts investigated the impact of climate change on water resources for different regions of the world. The projection of future river flows is affected by different sources of uncertainty in the hydro-climatic modelling chain. One of the aims of the QBic3 project (Québec-Bavarian International Collaboration on Climate Change is to assess the contribution to uncertainty of hydrological models by using an ensemble of hydrological models presenting a diversity of structural complexity (i.e. lumped, semi distributed and distributed models. The study investigates two humid, mid-latitude catchments with natural flow conditions; one located in Southern Québec (Canada and one in Southern Bavaria (Germany. Daily flow is simulated with four different hydrological models, forced by outputs from regional climate models driven by a given number of GCMs' members over a reference (1971–2000 and a future (2041–2070 periods. The results show that the choice of the hydrological model does strongly affect the climate change response of selected hydrological indicators, especially those related to low flows. Indicators related to high flows seem less sensitive on the choice of the hydrological model. Therefore, the computationally less demanding models (usually simple, lumped and conceptual give a significant level of trust for high and overall mean flows.

  11. Assessing traffic and industrial contributions to ambient nitrogen dioxide and volatile organic compounds in a low pollution urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oiamo, Tor H; Johnson, Markey; Tang, Kathy; Luginaah, Isaac N

    2015-10-01

    Land use regression (LUR) modeling is an effective method for estimating fine-scale distributions of ambient air pollutants. The objectives of this study are to advance the methodology for use in urban environments with relatively low levels of industrial activity and provide exposure assessments for research on health effects of air pollution. Intraurban distributions of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) benzene, toluene and m- and p-xylene were characterized based on spatial monitoring and LUR modeling in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Passive samplers were deployed at 50 locations throughout Ottawa for two consecutive weeks in October 2008 and May 2009. Land use variables representing point, area and line sources were tested as predictors of pooled pollutant distributions. LUR models explained 96% of the spatial variability in NO2 and 75-79% of the variability in the VOC species. Proximity to highways, green space, industrial and residential land uses were significant in the final models. More notably, proximity to industrial point sources and road network intersections were significant predictors for all pollutants. The strong contribution of industrial point sources to VOC distributions in Ottawa suggests that facility emission data should be considered whenever possible. The study also suggests that proximity to road network intersections may be an effective proxy in areas where reliable traffic data are not available.

  12. Establishing a Collaborative Effort to Assess The Contribution to High Asian Runoff from Ice and Snow (CHARIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Richard; Barrett, Andrew; Brodzik, Mary Jo; Fetterer, Florence; Horodyskyj, Ulyana; Jodha Khalsa, Siri; Racoviteanu, Adina; Rasmussen, Al; Raup, Bruce; Williams, Mark; Wilson, Alana

    2013-04-01

    The improved understanding of the regional water resources of High Asia is a cross-boundary exercise and in order to achieve this goal, University of Colorado scientists are working directly with researchers at institutions in nine different nations where these ice and snow resources are located across High Asia (Bhutan, Nepal, India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan). These countries contain the headwaters of the Brahmaputra, Ganges, Indus, Syr Darya and Amu Darya rivers. This collaboration includes both joint research and capacity building that will enhance the scientific understanding of the regional hydrology through augmented field programs and technical training. The fundamental objective of this collaborative study is to develop a thorough and systematic assessment of the separate contributions from seasonal snow melt and from glacier ice melt to the water resources originating across the Himalaya, Karakoram, Hindu Kush, Pamir and Tien Shan mountain ranges. While it is generally accepted that the melt from glacier ice and seasonal snow is a significant component of High Asian water resources, the actual water volume available from these two individual sources remains uncertain. To accomplish project objectives, a suite of satellite remote sensing, reanalysis and ground based data are applied as input to specific snow and ice melt models. Gridded maps of snow and glacier area/elevation are used as input to temperature-index melt models to estimate runoff from snow covered grid cells, based on cell area and melt depth. Glacier melt is estimated in the same way, once snow has disappeared from glacierized grid cells. The melt models are driven by daily mean temperature from reanalysis data. We are comparing the melt volume time series generated from temperature-index models with measured river discharge volumes and comparing the regional scale results with local sub-basin studies based on energy balance modeling approaches

  13. A GIS Assessment to Identify and Reduce Nitrate Loads that Contribute to Hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrate leaching has been reported as one of the main pathways contributing to the nitrate flux out of the Mississippi River watershed into the Gulf of Mexico. This out-flux of nitrogen has been identified as one of the factors that contribute to the hypoxia problem in the Gulf of Mexico. The Arkans...

  14. Cognitive representations in raters' assessment of teacher portfolios

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaaf, M.F. van der; Stokking, K.M.; Verloop, M.

    2005-01-01

    Portfolios are frequently used to assess teachers' competences. In portfolio assessment, the issue of rater reliability is a notorious problem. To improve the quality of assessments insight into raters' judgment processes is crucial. Using a mixed quantitative and qualitative approach we studied cog

  15. Transcriptomic-based effects monitoring for endocrine active chemicals: Assessing relative contribution of treated wastewater to downstream pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study investigated whether combining of targeted analytical chemistry methods with unsupervised, data-rich methodologies (i.e. transcriptomics) can be utilized to evaluate relative contributions of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents to biological effects. The...

  16. Barriers to Co-Contribution in Superannuation: a Comparative Assessment of the Financial Benefits of Scheme Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Bruhn

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Voluntary superannuation contributions provide a means for individuals to top-up their savings in a tax advantaged environment. In order to encourage voluntary contributions the government instituted the cocontribution scheme in 2003. Under the existing scheme, within a given financial year the government contributes up to a maximum of $500 when an individual on a low income makes a voluntary contribution of up to $1,000. Despite the apparent financial attractiveness of the scheme, participation among eligible persons is low. Reasons may include competing expenditure needs leading to a lack of sufficient funds for contribution, lack of trust in the system given regular changes to superannuation policy, and behavioural reasons including a short-term rather than long-term focus, procrastination from uncertainty and fear of regret, and loss aversion. In this paper we investigate another possible reason for low participation, namely poor financial opportunity cost. While an immediate 50% investment return may appear to be a ‘no-brainer’, for eligible individuals or families with mortgages, scheme participation may in fact not be optimal. We investigate the relative benefit of scheme participation versus reducing a mortgage, and conclude that while participation is sensible for those with short remaining mortgage terms, for those with longer mortgage terms the decision to participate may not be preferred unless one assumes generous long-term superannuation investment returns, or unless scheme participation is intended year on year for long durations.

  17. Beyond Exclusion: Assessing Palestinian refugees’ struggle for protection and recognition and their potential contribution to a peace settlement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.D. Handmaker (Jeff)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAt a time of constant change in the diplomatic and political debate, Imagining a Shared Future: Perspectives on Law, Conflict and Economic Development in the Middle East contributes to the discussion and development of solutions to the stagnating economic situation in Palestine. All too

  18. Response surface modeling-based source contribution analysis and VOC emission control policy assessment in a typical ozone-polluted urban Shunde, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Yun; Jang, Carey; Wang, Shuxiao; Gao, Jian; Lin, Che-Jen; Li, Minhui; Zhu, Zhenghua; Wei, Hao; Yang, Wenwei

    2017-01-01

    To develop a sound ozone (O3) pollution control strategy, it is important to well understand and characterize the source contribution due to the complex chemical and physical formation processes of O3. Using the "Shunde" city as a pilot summer case study, we apply an innovative response surface modeling (RSM) methodology based on the Community Multi-Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling simulations to identify the O3 regime and provide dynamic analysis of the precursor contributions to effectively assess the O3 impacts of volatile organic compound (VOC) control strategy. Our results show that Shunde is a typical VOC-limited urban O3 polluted city. The "Jiangmen" city, as the main upper wind area during July 2014, its VOCs and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions make up the largest contribution (9.06%). On the contrary, the contribution from local (Shunde) emission is lowest (6.35%) among the seven neighbor regions. The local VOCs industrial source emission has the largest contribution comparing to other precursor emission sectors in Shunde. The results of dynamic source contribution analysis further show that the local NOx control could slightly increase the ground O3 under low (10.00%) and medium (40.00%) reduction ratios, while it could start to turn positive to decrease ground O3 under the high NOx abatement ratio (75.00%). The real-time assessment of O3 impacts from VOCs control strategies in Pearl River Delta (PRD) shows that the joint regional VOCs emission control policy will effectively reduce the ground O3 concentration in Shunde.

  19. Assessment of the unattached fraction of indoor radon progeny and its contribution to dose: a pilot study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiuju; Zhang, Lei; Guo, Lu

    2012-12-01

    The unattached fraction of radon progeny (f(p)) is one of the most important factors for accurate evaluation of the effective dose from a unit of radon exposure, and it may vary greatly in different environments. For precise evaluation of the indoor radon exposure dose and the influence of unattached radon progeny, a pilot survey of f(p) in different environments was carried out in China with a portable and integrating monitor. The dose conversion factors for radon progeny are calculated with LUDEP(®) code, and the dose contributions from the unattached and the attached radon progenies were simultaneously evaluated based on the results of field measurements. The results show that even though the concentrations of radon progeny vary significantly among different indoor environments, the variations of f(p) seem relatively small (9.3-16.9%). The dose contribution from unattached radon progeny is generally larger (30.2-46.2%) in an indoor environment.

  20. Alu insertion polymorphisms and an assessment of the genetic contribution of Central Asia to Anatolia with respect to the Balkans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkman, Ceren Caner; Dinc, Havva; Sekeryapan, Ceran; Togan, Inci

    2008-05-01

    In the evolutionary history of modern humans, Anatolia acted as a bridge between the Caucasus, the Near East, and Europe. Because of its geographical location, Anatolia was subject to migrations from multiple different regions throughout time. The last, well-known migration was the movement of Turkic speaking, nomadic groups from Central Asia. They invaded Anatolia and then the language of the region was gradually replaced by the Turkic language. In the present study, insertion frequencies of 10 Alu loci (A25 = 0.07, APO = 0.96, TPA25 = 0.44, ACE = 0.37, B65 = 0.57, PV92 = 0.18, FXIIIB = 0.52, D1 = 0.40, HS4.32 = 0.66, and HS4.69 = 0.30) have been determined in the Anatolian population. Together with the data compiled from other databases, the similarity of the Anatolian population to that of the Balkans and Central Asia has been visualized by multidimensional scaling method. Analysis suggested that, genetically, Anatolia is more closely related with the Balkan populations than to the Central Asian populations. Central Asian contribution to Anatolia with respect to the Balkans was quantified with an admixture analysis. Furthermore, the association between the Central Asian contribution and the language replacement episode was examined by comparative analysis of the Central Asian contribution to Anatolia, Azerbaijan (another Turkic speaking country) and their neighbors. In the present study, the Central Asian contribution to Anatolia was estimated as 13%. This was the lowest value among the populations analyzed. This observation may be explained by Anatolia having the lowest migrant/resident ratio at the time of migrations.

  1. Contribution of subsurface chlorophyll maxima to primary production in the coastal Beaufort Sea (Canadian Arctic): A model assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Johannie; Dumont, Dany; Tremblay, Jean-Éric

    2013-11-01

    Previous comprehensive investigations of the Canadian Arctic revealed that subsurface chlorophyll maxima (SCM) are widespread and long-lived structures that can contribute significantly to daily primary production in the water column. However, estimating the annual contribution of SCM to production with in situ or remote-sensing approaches is challenging in the high Arctic. For this reason and to estimate the impacts of fluctuating or changing environmental conditions on SCM, a numerical approach combining a turbulence model and an ecosystem model was implemented for the coastal Beaufort Sea. An ensemble analysis of simulations suggested that SCM contribute 65-90% of total annual primary production and that this proportion is weakly affected by ice regime, winter nitrogen (N) concentration, parameter values determining phytoplankton growth and decay or the physical forcing imposed, all varying within realistic values. Due to the persistent association between the SCM and the shallow nitracline, the pelagic ecosystem of the coastal Beaufort Sea is apparently characterized by a high ratio of new to total production, contrasting with the common assumption that oligotrophic systems are predominantly supported by recycled N and regenerated production. This study demonstrated that the use of a simple model in combination with in situ data leads to novel insights into biogeochemical processes that are otherwise very difficult to measure and track.

  2. Theoretical and empirical bases for dialect-neutral language assessment: contributions from theoretical and applied linguistics to communication disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Barbara Zurer

    2004-02-01

    Three avenues of theoretical research provide insights for discovering abstract properties of language that are subject to disorder and amenable to assessment: (1) the study of universal grammar and its acquisition; (2) descriptions of African American English (AAE) Syntax, Semantics, and Phonology within theoretical linguistics; and (3) the study of specific language impairment (SLI) cross-linguistically. Abstract linguistic concepts were translated into a set of assessment protocols that were used to establish normative data on language acquisition (developmental milestones) in typically developing AAE children ages 4 to 9 years. Testing AAE-speaking language impaired (LI) children and both typically developing (TD) and LI Mainstream American English (MAE)-learning children on these same measures provided the data to select assessments for which (1) TD MAE and AAE children performed the same, and (2) TD performance was reliably different from LI performance in both dialect groups.

  3. Interdependency between Risk Assessments for Self and Other in the Field of Comparative Optimism: The Contribution of Response Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzenstetter, Florence; Schimchowitsch, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    By introducing a response-time measure in the field of comparative optimism, this study was designed to explore how people estimate risk to self and others depending on the evaluation order (self/other or other/self). Our results show the interdependency between self and other answers. Indeed, while response time for risk assessment for the self…

  4. The World Bank's Position on Early Child Education in Brazil: A Critical Assessment of Contributions and Shortcomings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Sabrina

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, the World Bank published a policy study on early child education (ECE) developments in Brazil, entitled "Early Child Education: Making Programs Work for Brazil's Most Important Generation. Development." This paper analyses the report's assessment of ECE policy in Brazil as well as the recommendations it provides. A critical…

  5. Quality assessment of chronologies in Latin American pollen records: a contribution to centennial to millennial scale studies of environmental change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.G.A. Flantua; H. Hooghiemstra; M. Blaauw

    2015-01-01

    The newly updated inventory of the Latin American Pollen Database (LAPD) offers an important overview of data available for multi-proxy and multi-site purposes. However, heterogeneous paleoecological databases are not suitable to be integrated without an uncertainty assessment of existing chronologi

  6. Mammographic density and structural features can individually and jointly contribute to breast cancer risk assessment in mammography screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winkel, Rikke Rass; von Euler-Chelpin, My Catarina; Nielsen, Mads

    2016-01-01

    in Denmark in 2007 (followed until 31 December 2010). Mammograms were assessed using the Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) density classification, Tabár's classification on parenchymal patterns and a fully automated texture quantification technique. The individual and combined association...... to future personalized screening strategies....

  7. The Contribution of Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (fNIRS) to the Presurgical Assessment of Language Function in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Anne; Beland, Renee; Lassonde, Maryse

    2012-01-01

    Before performing neurosurgery, an exhaustive presurgical assessment is required, usually including an investigation of language cerebral lateralization. Among the available procedures, the intracarotid amobarbital test (IAT) was formerly the most widely used. However, this procedure has many limitations: it is invasive and potentially traumatic,…

  8. Investigating sources of ozone over California using AJAX airborne measurements and models: Assessing the contribution from long-range transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryoo, Ju-Mee; Johnson, Matthew S.; Iraci, Laura T.; Yates, Emma L.; Gore, Warren

    2017-04-01

    High ozone (O3) concentrations at low altitudes (1.5-4 km) were detected from airborne Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) measurements on 30 May 2012 off the coast of California (CA). We investigate the causes of those elevated O3 concentrations using airborne measurements and various models. GEOS-Chem simulation shows that the contribution from local sources is likely small. A back-trajectory model was used to determine the air mass origins and how much they contributed to the O3 over CA. Low-level potential vorticity (PV) from Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications 2 (MERRA-2) reanalysis data appears to be a result of the diabatic heating and mixing of airs in the lower altitudes, rather than be a result of direct transport from stratospheric intrusion. The Q diagnostic, which is a measure of the mixing of the air masses, indicates that there is sufficient mixing along the trajectory to indicate that O3 from the different origins is mixed and transported to the western U.S. The back-trajectory model simulation demonstrates the air masses of interest came mostly from the mid troposphere (MT, 76%), but the contribution of the lower troposphere (LT, 19%) is also significant compared to those from the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UT/LS, 5%). Air coming from the LT appears to be mostly originating over Asia. The possible surface impact of the high O3 transported aloft on the surface O3 concentration through vertical and horizontal transport within a few days is substantiated by the influence maps determined from the Weather Research and Forecasting-Stochastic Time Inverted Lagrangian Transport (WRF-STILT) model and the observed increases in surface ozone mixing ratios. Contrasting this complex case with a stratospheric-dominant event emphasizes the contribution of each source to the high O3 concentration in the lower altitudes over CA. Integrated analyses using models, reanalysis, and diagnostic tools, allows high ozone values

  9. First Steps Toward a Quality of Climate Finance Scorecard (QUODA-CF): Creating a Comparative Index to Assess International Climate Finance Contributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra, Katherine; Roberts, Timmons; de Nevers, Michele; Langley, Claire; Smith, Cory

    2013-06-15

    Are climate finance contributor countries, multilateral aid agencies and specialized funds using widely accepted best practices in foreign assistance? How is it possible to measure and compare international climate finance contributions when there are as yet no established metrics or agreed definitions of the quality of climate finance? As a subjective metric, quality can mean different things to different stakeholders, while of donor countries, recipients and institutional actors may place quality across a broad spectrum of objectives. This subjectivity makes the assessment of the quality of climate finance contributions a useful and necessary exercise, but one that has many challenges. This work seeks to enhance the development of common definitions and metrics of the quality of climate finance, to understand what we can about those areas where climate finance information is available and shine a light on the areas where there is a severe dearth of data. Allowing for comparisons of the use of best practices across funding institutions in the climate sector could begin a process of benchmarking performance, fostering learning across institutions and driving improvements when incorporated in internal evaluation protocols of those institutions. In the medium term, this kind of benchmarking and transparency could support fundraising in contributor countries and help build trust with recipient countries. As a feasibility study, this paper attempts to outline the importance of assessing international climate finance contributions while describing the difficulties in arriving at universally agreed measurements and indicators for assessment. In many cases, data are neither readily available nor complete, and there is no consensus on what should be included. A number of indicators are proposed in this study as a starting point with which to analyze voluntary contributions, but in some cases their methodologies are not complete, and further research is required for a

  10. Application of air pollution dispersion modeling for source-contribution assessment and model performance evaluation at integrated industrial estate-Pantnagar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, T., E-mail: tirthankaronline@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Science, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar, U.S. Nagar, Uttarakhand 263 145 (India); Barman, S.C., E-mail: scbarman@yahoo.com [Department of Environmental Monitoring, Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box No. 80, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow-226 001, Uttar Pradesh (India); Srivastava, R.K., E-mail: rajeevsrivastava08@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Science, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar, U.S. Nagar, Uttarakhand 263 145 (India)

    2011-04-15

    Source-contribution assessment of ambient NO{sub 2} concentration was performed at Pantnagar, India through simulation of two urban mathematical dispersive models namely Gaussian Finite Line Source Model (GFLSM) and Industrial Source Complex Model (ISCST-3) and model performances were evaluated. Principal approaches were development of comprehensive emission inventory, monitoring of traffic density and regional air quality and conclusively simulation of urban dispersive models. Initially, 18 industries were found responsible for emission of 39.11 kg/h of NO{sub 2} through 43 elevated stacks. Further, vehicular emission potential in terms of NO{sub 2} was computed as 7.1 kg/h. Air quality monitoring delineates an annual average NO{sub 2} concentration of 32.6 {mu}g/m{sup 3}. Finally, GFLSM and ISCST-3 were simulated in conjunction with developed emission inventories and existing meteorological conditions. Models simulation indicated that contribution of NO{sub 2} from industrial and vehicular source was in a range of 45-70% and 9-39%, respectively. Further, statistical analysis revealed satisfactory model performance with an aggregate accuracy of 61.9%. - Research highlights: > Application of dispersion modeling for source-contribution assessment of ambient NO{sub 2}. > Inventorization revealed emission from industry and vehicles was 39.11 and 7.1 kg/h. > GFLSM revealed that vehicular pollution contributes a range of 9.0-38.6%. > Source-contribution of 45-70% was found for industrial emission through ISCST-3. > Aggregate performance of both models shows good agreement with an accuracy of 61.9%. - Development of industrial and vehicular inventory in terms of ambient NO{sub 2} for model simulation at Pantnagar, India and model validation revealed satisfactory outcome.

  11. Amateur or Professional: Assessing the Expertise of Major Contributors in OpenStreetMap Based on Contributing Behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anran Yang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Volunteered geographic information (VGI projects, such as OpenStreetMap (OSM, provide an alternative way to produce geographic data. Research has proven that the resulting data in some areas are of decent quality, which guarantees their usability in various applications. Though these achievements are normally attributed to the huge heterogeneous community mainly consisting of amateurs, it is in fact a small percentage of major contributors who make nearly all contributions. In this paper, we investigate the contributing behaviors of these contributors to deduce whether they are actually professionals. Various indicators are used to depict the behaviors on three themes: practice, skill and motivation, aiming to identify solid evidence for expertise. Our case studies show that most major contributors in Germany, France and the United Kingdom are hardly amateurs, but are professionals instead. These contributors have rich experiences on geographical data editing, have a decent grasp of professional software and work on the project with enthusiasm and concentration. It is less unexpected that they can create geographic data of high quality.

  12. Lead speciation in indoor dust: a case study to assess old paint contribution in a Canadian urban house

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauchemin, Suzanne; MacLean, Lachlan C.W.; Rasmussen, Pat E. (Health Canada); (NRC)

    2012-10-23

    Residents in older homes may experience increased lead (Pb) exposures due to release of lead from interior paints manufactured in past decades, especially pre-1960s. The objective of the study was to determine the speciation of Pb in settled dust from an urban home built during WWII. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and micro-X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were performed on samples of paint (380-2,920 mg Pb kg{sup -1}) and dust (200-1,000 mg Pb kg{sup -1}) collected prior to renovation. All dust samples exhibited a Pb XANES signature similar to that of Pb found in paint. Bulk XANES and micro-XRD identified Pb species commonly found as white paint pigments (Pb oxide, Pb sulfate, and Pb carbonate) as well as rutile, a titanium-based pigment, in the <150 {micro}m house dust samples. In the dust fraction <36 {micro}m, half of the Pb was associated with the Fe-oxyhydroxides, suggesting additional contribution of outdoor sources to Pb in the finer dust. These results confirm that old paints still contribute to Pb in the settled dust for this 65-year-old home. The Pb speciation also provided a clearer understanding of the Pb bioaccessibility: Pb carbonate > Pb oxide > Pb sulfate. This study underscores the importance of taking precautions to minimize exposures to Pb in house dust, especially in homes where old paint is exposed due to renovations or deterioration of painted surfaces.

  13. Lead Speciation in Indoor Dust: A Case Study to Assess Old Paint Contribution in a Canadian Urban House

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Beauchemin; L MacLean; P Rasmussen

    2011-12-31

    Residents in older homes may experience increased lead (Pb) exposures due to release of lead from interior paints manufactured in past decades, especially pre-1960s. The objective of the study was to determine the speciation of Pb in settled dust from an urban home built during WWII. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and micro-X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were performed on samples of paint (380-2,920 mg Pb kg{sup -1}) and dust (200-1,000 mg Pb kg{sup -1}) collected prior to renovation. All dust samples exhibited a Pb XANES signature similar to that of Pb found in paint. Bulk XANES and micro-XRD identified Pb species commonly found as white paint pigments (Pb oxide, Pb sulfate, and Pb carbonate) as well as rutile, a titanium-based pigment, in the <150 m house dust samples. In the dust fraction <36 {mu}m, half of the Pb was associated with the Fe-oxyhydroxides, suggesting additional contribution of outdoor sources to Pb in the finer dust. These results confirm that old paints still contribute to Pb in the settled dust for this 65-year-old home. The Pb speciation also provided a clearer understanding of the Pb bioaccessibility: Pb carbonate > Pb oxide > Pb sulfate. This study underscores the importance of taking precautions to minimize exposures to Pb in house dust, especially in homes where old paint is exposed due to renovations or deterioration of painted surfaces.

  14. Symposium 20 - PABMB: Teaching biochemistry in a connected world: How Apps-Embedded Assessment can contribute to learning outcomes mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Galembeck

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Symposium 20 - PABMB: Teaching biochemistry in a connected world Chair: Miguel Castanho, Universidade de Lisboa, PortugalAbstract:Apps can be designed to provide usage data, and most of them do. These usage data are usually used to map users interests and to deliver more effective ads that are more likely to result in clicks, and sales. We have applied some of these metrics to understand how it can be used to map students’ behavior using educational software. We tested both Google Analytics, and a system we have developed to map learning outcomes and students engagement. Embedded assessment were implemented in app used to teach: 1 Metabolic Pathways; 2 Protein Synthesis, 3 Cell Structure, and 4 Concepts from techniques used in a Biochemistry Lab course. Our preliminary results show that this approach provides valuable information about class outcomes that can be used for both summative and formative assessments.

  15. An Approach for Assessing Consequences of Potential Supply Chain and Insider Contributed Cyber Attacks on Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Tsong-Lun [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Varuttamaseni, Athi [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Baek, Joo-Seok [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pepper, Susan [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This paper provides an approach for developing potential attacks on I and C systems of NPPs and assessing their consequences. An important concept is that the NPPs were not designed to cope with Stuxnet-type of attacks (and any other cyber attacks). That is, the plants were only designed for design basis accidents. The safety margins and redundancies built in the design are all based on design basis accidents. They may be helpful in mitigating cyberattacks, but may not be adequate.

  16. An Approach for Assessing Consequences of Potential Supply Chain and insider Contributed Cyber Attacks on Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Tsong-Lun [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Varuttamaseni, Athi [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Baek, Joo-Seok [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pepper, Susan [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This paper provides an approach for developing potential attacks on I and C systems of NPPs and assessing their consequences. An important concept is that the NPPs were not designed to cope with Stuxnet-type of attacks (and any other cyber attacks). That is, the plants were only designed for design basis accidents. The safety margins and redundancies built in the design are all based on design basis accidents. They may be helpful in mitigating cyberattacks, but may not be adequate.

  17. Modeling cumulative effects in life cycle assessment: the case of fertilizer in wheat production contributing to the global warming potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laratte, Bertrand; Guillaume, Bertrand; Kim, Junbeum; Birregah, Babiga

    2014-05-15

    This paper aims at presenting a dynamic indicator for life cycle assessment (LCA) measuring cumulative impacts over time of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from fertilizers used for wheat cultivation and production. Our approach offers a dynamic indicator of global warming potential (GWP), one of the most used indicator of environmental impacts (e.g. in the Kyoto Protocol). For a case study, the wheat production in France was selected and considered by using data from official sources about fertilizer consumption and production of wheat. We propose to assess GWP environmental impact based on LCA method. The system boundary is limited to the fertilizer production for 1 ton of wheat produced (functional unit) from 1910 to 2010. As applied to wheat production in France, traditional LCA shows a maximum GWP impact of 500 kg CO2-eq for 1 ton of wheat production, whereas the GWP impact of wheat production over time with our approach to dynamic LCA and its cumulative effects increases to 18,000 kg CO2-eq for 1 ton of wheat production. In this paper, only one substance and one impact assessment indicator are presented. However, the methodology can be generalized and improved by using different substances and indicators.

  18. The Micronesia Challenge: Assessing the Relative Contribution of Stressors on Coral Reefs to Facilitate Science-to-Management Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houk, Peter; Camacho, Rodney; Johnson, Steven; McLean, Matthew; Maxin, Selino; Anson, Jorg; Joseph, Eugene; Nedlic, Osamu; Luckymis, Marston; Adams, Katrina; Hess, Don; Kabua, Emma; Yalon, Anthony; Buthung, Eva; Graham, Curtis; Leberer, Trina; Taylor, Brett; van Woesik, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Fishing and pollution are chronic stressors that can prolong recovery of coral reefs and contribute to ecosystem decline. While this premise is generally accepted, management interventions are complicated because the contributions from individual stressors are difficult to distinguish. The present study examined the extent to which fishing pressure and pollution predicted progress towards the Micronesia Challenge, an international conservation strategy initiated by the political leaders of 6 nations to conserve at least 30% of marine resources by 2020. The analyses were rooted in a defined measure of coral-reef-ecosystem condition, comprised of biological metrics that described functional processes on coral reefs. We report that only 42% of the major reef habitats exceeded the ecosystem-condition threshold established by the Micronesia Challenge. Fishing pressure acting alone on outer reefs, or in combination with pollution in some lagoons, best predicted both the decline and variance in ecosystem condition. High variances among ecosystem-condition scores reflected the large gaps between the best and worst reefs, and suggested that the current scores were unlikely to remain stable through time because of low redundancy. Accounting for the presence of marine protected area (MPA) networks in statistical models did little to improve the models' predictive capabilities, suggesting limited efficacy of MPAs when grouped together across the region. Yet, localized benefits of MPAs existed and are expected to increase over time. Sensitivity analyses suggested that (i) grazing by large herbivores, (ii) high functional diversity of herbivores, and (iii) high predator biomass were most sensitive to fishing pressure, and were required for high ecosystem-condition scores. Linking comprehensive fisheries management policies with these sensitive metrics, and targeting the management of pollution, will strengthen the Micronesia Challenge and preserve ecosystem services that coral

  19. The Micronesia Challenge: Assessing the Relative Contribution of Stressors on Coral Reefs to Facilitate Science-to-Management Feedback.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Houk

    Full Text Available Fishing and pollution are chronic stressors that can prolong recovery of coral reefs and contribute to ecosystem decline. While this premise is generally accepted, management interventions are complicated because the contributions from individual stressors are difficult to distinguish. The present study examined the extent to which fishing pressure and pollution predicted progress towards the Micronesia Challenge, an international conservation strategy initiated by the political leaders of 6 nations to conserve at least 30% of marine resources by 2020. The analyses were rooted in a defined measure of coral-reef-ecosystem condition, comprised of biological metrics that described functional processes on coral reefs. We report that only 42% of the major reef habitats exceeded the ecosystem-condition threshold established by the Micronesia Challenge. Fishing pressure acting alone on outer reefs, or in combination with pollution in some lagoons, best predicted both the decline and variance in ecosystem condition. High variances among ecosystem-condition scores reflected the large gaps between the best and worst reefs, and suggested that the current scores were unlikely to remain stable through time because of low redundancy. Accounting for the presence of marine protected area (MPA networks in statistical models did little to improve the models' predictive capabilities, suggesting limited efficacy of MPAs when grouped together across the region. Yet, localized benefits of MPAs existed and are expected to increase over time. Sensitivity analyses suggested that (i grazing by large herbivores, (ii high functional diversity of herbivores, and (iii high predator biomass were most sensitive to fishing pressure, and were required for high ecosystem-condition scores. Linking comprehensive fisheries management policies with these sensitive metrics, and targeting the management of pollution, will strengthen the Micronesia Challenge and preserve ecosystem

  20. Contributions to the dimensional assessment of personality disorders using Millon's model and the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI9-III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strack, Stephen; Millon, Theodore

    2007-08-01

    For over 35 years, Mllion's (1996) model of personality and the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (Millon, 1977, 1987, 2006) have been useful resources for clinicians to understand and assess personality disorders (PDs) and clinical syndromes in psychiatric patients. In this article, we highlight significant features of the model and test that have proved valuable to personologists in their quest for a more satisfactory taxonomy of PDs based on continuously distributed traits. We also describe Millon's (1996)prototypal domain approach to personality that combines dimensional and categorical elements for the description of PDs and their normal counterparts.

  1. DISEÑO DE UN SISTEMA DIFUSO PARA VALORACIÓN DE APORTES EN SISTEMAS COLABORATIVOS FUZZY SYSTEM DESIGN FOR ASSESSMENT OF CONTRIBUTIONS IN COLLABORATIVE SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Echeverri

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Actualmente los consumidores no son pasivos, están altamente conectados y vinculados con las empresas. Por ello, algunas empresas aprovechan estas características para innovar productos a partir de los aportes de clientes. La co-creación como modelo colaborativo para la innovación se caracteriza por estar dividida en etapas relacionadas entre sí, con el fin de capturar apropiadamente los aportes de los clientes. La capacidad de valorar y clasificar los aportes de los agentes que participan en este proceso colaborativo es una tarea de crucial importancia para las organizaciones. El presente artículo propone un sistema difuso que permite valorar los aportes de los agentes que participan en forma colaborativa en la co-creación de productos y servicios.Now the customers are not passive, they are highly networked and connected with companies. Some companies take advantage of these features to innovate products from customer contributions. Co-creation like collaborative model to the innovation is characterized from being divided into interrelated stages in order to capture client's contributions in an appropriate way. The ability to assess and rank the contributions of the actors involved in this collaborative process is a crucial organizations task. The present paper proposes a fuzzy system that allows valuation for agent's contributions that participate in a collaborative way in products and services co-creation.

  2. Quality assessment of chronologies in Latin American pollen records: a contribution to centennial to millennial scale studies of environmental change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. G. A. Flantua

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The newly updated inventory of the Latin American Pollen Database (LAPD offers an important overview of data available for multi-proxy and multi-site purposes. However, heterogeneous paleoecological databases are not suitable to be integrated without an uncertainty assessment of existing chronologies. Therefore, we collected all chronological control points and age model metadata from the LAPD literature to create a complementary chronological database of 5116 dates from 1097 pollen records. We start with an overview on chronological dating and reporting in Central and South America. Specific problems and recommendations for chronology reporting are discussed. Subsequently, we implement a temporal quality assessment of pollen records from northwest South-America to support research on climate forcers and responses at a centennial-millennial time-scale. New chronologies are generated for 233 pollen records based on updated calibration curves. Different time windows are discussed on sample resolution and temporal uncertainty. Approximately one in four pollen diagrams depicts < 500 years resolution data at the Younger Dryas/Holocene transition. Overall, our analyses suggest that the temporal resolution of multi-site syntheses of late Pleistocene fossil pollen records in the northwest South-America is ca. 240 years, a resolution which allows analysis of ecological responses to centennial-millennial-scale climate change during the last deglaciation.

  3. Tracking Myself: Assessing the Contribution of Mobile Technologies for Self-Trackers of Weight, Diet, or Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abril, Eulàlia Puig

    2016-06-01

    For individuals trying to lose or maintain weight, self-tracking their weight, diet, or exercise is important. In the past, different tracking modes have been examined, like paper and pencil, memory, or personal digital assistants. But the recent advancement and adoption of mobile technologies could also result in easier and simpler self-tracking. However, little is known about self-trackers, their tracking modes, and the absolute or relative contribution of each tracking mode at the population level. This study fills this gap by (a) comparing self-trackers' characteristics across tracking modes and against nontrackers and (b) testing the relationship between mobile self-tracking and tracking outcomes using a representative sample of data from the Pew Internet and American Life Project from 2012. Controls in the model include demographics, technology use, and health indicators. Results suggest that mobile self-trackers are younger and more educated and that mobile self-tracking is a positive contributor and the best tracking mode.

  4. A quantitative assessment approach of feasible optical mechanisms contributing to structural color of golden-like Chrysina aurigans scarab beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azofeifa, D. E.; Hernández-Jiménez, M.; Libby, E.; Solís, A.; Barboza-Aguilar, C.; Vargas, W. E.

    2015-07-01

    Under normal incidence of non-polarized light, reflection spectra from the cuticle of golden-like C. aurigans scarabs shows a broad band displayed from 525 to 950 nm, with a spectral ripple structure that consists of a uniform sequence of peaks superimposed on the main reflection band. Cross sectional Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images of the cuticle initially suggest the presence of a multilayered structure. A radiative transfer matrix formalism is first applied to describe as much as possible the main features of coherent reflection spectra, by assuming optically homogenous layers distributed through the exocuticle, with chitin as the major constituent material. Additional non-coherent multiple reflections due to layers in the endocuticle are also evaluated from this approach. The presence of a pigmented micron sized structure beneath the procuticle requires the evaluation of a diffuse light contribution to the reflection. This was carried out from a four-flux radiative transfer model. Optical anisotropy is introduced by interpreting the SEM images in terms of a twisted Bouligand-type structure, and reflection spectra are evaluated from an implementation of the so-called 4×4 Berreman's formalism. We have been able to approach the main features characterizing the reflection spectra of C. aurigans' elytra following this progressive way.

  5. Assessing the Contribution of the Oscillatory Potentials to the Genesis of the Photopic ERG with the Discrete Wavelet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Gauvin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The electroretinogram (ERG is composed of slow (i.e., a-, b-waves and fast (i.e., oscillatory potentials: OPs components. OPs have been shown to be preferably affected in some diseases (such as diabetic retinopathy, while the a- and b-waves remain relatively intact. The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of OPs to the building of the ERG and to examine whether a signal mostly composed of OPs could also exist. DWT analyses were performed on photopic ERGs (flash intensities: −2.23 to 2.64 log cd·s·m−2 in 21 steps obtained from normal subjects (n=40 and patients (n=21 affected with a retinopathy. In controls, the %OP value (i.e., OPs energy/ERG energy is stimulus- and amplitude-independent (range: 56.6–61.6%; CV = 6.3%. In contrast, the %OPs measured from the ERGs of our patients varied significantly more (range: 35.4%–89.2%; p<0.05 depending on the pathology, some presenting with ERGs that are almost solely composed of OPs. In conclusion, patients may present with a wide range of %OP values. Findings herein also support the hypothesis that, in certain conditions, the photopic ERG can be mostly composed of high-frequency components.

  6. Assessing of the contributions of pod photosynthesis to carbon acquisition of seed in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenxu; Mao, Peisheng; Li, Yuan; Wang, Mingya; Xia, Fangshan; Wang, Hui

    2017-01-01

    The distribution of carbon from a branch setting pod in alfalfa was investigated during the seed development of seeds to determine the relative contribution of pod and leaf photoassimilates to the total C balance and to investigate the partitioning of these photoassimilates to other plant organs. A 13Clabeling procedure was used to label C photoassimilates of pods and leaves in alfalfa, and the Δ13C values of a pod, leaves, a section of stem and roots were measured during seed development on day 10, 15, 20 and 25 after labeling of the pod. The results showed that the alfalfa pod had photosynthetic capacity early in the development of seeds, and that pod photosynthesis could provide carbon to alfalfa organs including seeds, pods, leaves, stems and roots, in addition to leaf photosynthesis. Photosynthesis in the pod affected the total C balance of the alfalfa branch with the redistribution of a portion of pod assimilates to other plant organs. The assimilated 13C of the pod was used for the growth requirements of plant seeds and pods. The requirements for assimilated C came primarily from the young pod in early seed development, with later requirements provided primarily from the leaf. PMID:28169330

  7. Assessing of the contributions of pod photosynthesis to carbon acquisition of seed in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenxu; Mao, Peisheng; Li, Yuan; Wang, Mingya; Xia, Fangshan; Wang, Hui

    2017-02-07

    The distribution of carbon from a branch setting pod in alfalfa was investigated during the seed development of seeds to determine the relative contribution of pod and leaf photoassimilates to the total C balance and to investigate the partitioning of these photoassimilates to other plant organs. A (13)Clabeling procedure was used to label C photoassimilates of pods and leaves in alfalfa, and the Δ(13)C values of a pod, leaves, a section of stem and roots were measured during seed development on day 10, 15, 20 and 25 after labeling of the pod. The results showed that the alfalfa pod had photosynthetic capacity early in the development of seeds, and that pod photosynthesis could provide carbon to alfalfa organs including seeds, pods, leaves, stems and roots, in addition to leaf photosynthesis. Photosynthesis in the pod affected the total C balance of the alfalfa branch with the redistribution of a portion of pod assimilates to other plant organs. The assimilated (13)C of the pod was used for the growth requirements of plant seeds and pods. The requirements for assimilated C came primarily from the young pod in early seed development, with later requirements provided primarily from the leaf.

  8. Animal models for assessment of infection and inflammation: contributions to elucidating the pathophysiology of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane eBlood-Siegfried

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS is still not well understood. It is a diagnosis of exclusion following the sudden and unexpected death of an infant. There are numerous theories about the etiology of SIDS but the exact cause or causes have never been pinpointed.Examination of theoretical pathologies might only be possible in animal models. Development of these models requires consideration of the genetic, developmental and environmental risk factors associated with SIDS, as they need to explain how the risk factors could contribute to the cause of death. These models were initially developed in common laboratory animals to test various hypotheses to explain these infant deaths - guinea pig, piglet, mouse, neonatal rabbit and neonatal rat. Currently there are growing numbers of researchers using genetically altered animals to examine specific areas of interest. This review describes the different systems and models developed to examine the diverse hypotheses for the cause of SIDS and their potential for defining a causal mechanism or mechanisms.

  9. The 10-12 November 2001 Balearic Superstorm: An Assessment of Baroclinic and Diabatic Contributions Through Pv Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, R.; Homar, V.; Ramis, C.; Alonso, S.

    From 10 to 12 November 2001 the western Mediterranean zone was affected by a hazardous cyclone. In the Balearic Islands the storm was particularly strong: wind gusts exceeded 140 km/h, heavy precipitation up to 400 mm in two days was recorded and sea waves up to 12 m reached the shoreline. Four casualties occurred, more than 100.000 trees were uprooted, many boats and coastal infrastructures were severely damaged and some crop fields were flooded. Surface and upper level weather maps suggest that the cyclone was consequence of an initial baroclinic development over north Africa and a further deepening over the western Mediterranean. Quasi- geostrophic diagnosis has been performed to study the baroclinic contribution to the cyclogenesis. A Potential Vorticity (PV) inversion technique has been applied to de- termine the role of three prominent PV positive anomalies over the region (associated with an upper level trough, a low level warm air intrusion over the Mediterranean from Africa and the latent heat release) to the cyclone intensity.

  10. Assessing the Contribution of the Oscillatory Potentials to the Genesis of the Photopic ERG with the Discrete Wavelet Transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Allison L.; Trang, Nataly; Gauthier, Mercedes; Little, John M.; Lina, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    The electroretinogram (ERG) is composed of slow (i.e., a-, b-waves) and fast (i.e., oscillatory potentials: OPs) components. OPs have been shown to be preferably affected in some diseases (such as diabetic retinopathy), while the a- and b-waves remain relatively intact. The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of OPs to the building of the ERG and to examine whether a signal mostly composed of OPs could also exist. DWT analyses were performed on photopic ERGs (flash intensities: −2.23 to 2.64 log cd·s·m−2 in 21 steps) obtained from normal subjects (n = 40) and patients (n = 21) affected with a retinopathy. In controls, the %OP value (i.e., OPs energy/ERG energy) is stimulus- and amplitude-independent (range: 56.6–61.6%; CV = 6.3%). In contrast, the %OPs measured from the ERGs of our patients varied significantly more (range: 35.4%–89.2%; p < 0.05) depending on the pathology, some presenting with ERGs that are almost solely composed of OPs. In conclusion, patients may present with a wide range of %OP values. Findings herein also support the hypothesis that, in certain conditions, the photopic ERG can be mostly composed of high-frequency components. PMID:28101507

  11. A social work contribution to suicide prevention through assertive brief psychotherapy and community linkage: use of the Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life (MANSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrakis, Melissa; Joubert, Lynette

    2013-01-01

    There is a striking absence of literature articulating and evaluating clinical social work contributions to suicide prevention, despite considerable practice in this important field. This article reports on a model of assertive brief psychotherapeutic intervention and facilitated linkage to community services utilized in a prospective cohort study of emergency department suicide attempt aftercare. A key outcome measure, the Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life (MANSA), was used with 65 patients to assess psychosocial domains at initial presentation, 4-weeks, 3-months, and 6-months. There were significant improvements in the domains of work, finance, leisure, social life, living situation, personal safety and health by 3 months. There were highly significant correlations between psychosocial improvements and improved depression scores.

  12. Analogue studies in the Alligator Rivers Region of Australia. Contribution to the scientific basis for the performance assessment of proposed repository sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnett, H.M.; Airey, P.L. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia); Sekine, Keiichi; Hahn, Pil-Soo; Ott, W.R.; Pescatore, C.

    1996-10-01

    The Analogue Studies in the Alligator Rivers Region (ASARR) project is coordinated by the OECD/NEA and involves ANSTO, JAERI, KAERI and the USNRC. Its aim is to contribute to the performance assessment of nuclear waste disposal sites through the building of confidence in predictive transport codes. The project is principally concerned with validating models of sub-surface retardation processes which underpin the codes. This paper will describe recent progress in extending sorption studies from reference minerals to natural materials. The first step in the laboratory program was to investigate uranium uptake on binary systems comprising ferrihydrite and kaolinite. Secondly, the significance of small levels of active minerals such as anatase in a standard kaolinite and iron nodules in geological samples from the Koongarra Uranium deposit is being assessed. Progress towards applying the natural analogue approach to a reference arid site will be reported. The scientific approaches of the individual laboratories are outlined in an annex. (author)

  13. Stakeholder contributions to assessment, monitoring, and conservation of threatened species: black skimmer and red knot as case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Niles, Larry; Tsipoura, Nellie; Mizrahi, David; Dey, Amanda; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn

    2017-02-01

    Stakeholder contributions to conservation projects often occur during the problem formulation stage, yet the role of stakeholders throughout the process is seldom considered. We examine the diversity of state and federal agencies, conservation organizations, other non-governmental organizations, environmental justice communities, consultants, industry, and the general public in the conservation of red knot (Calidris canutus rufa) and black skimmer (Rynchops niger) in New Jersey. We suggest that (1) governmental agencies provide the legal, regulatory, and management framework, but it is often the universities, conservation organizations, consultants, and the public that conduct the research and perform activities that lead to increased research and conservation efforts; (2) departments within agencies may have conflicting mandates, making it difficult to resolve differences in actions; (3) there is often conflict among and within state agencies and conservation organizations about roles and priorities; and (4) the role of the public is critical to ongoing research and conservation efforts. Identification of all the relevant stakeholders is necessary to recognizing competing claims, identifying the threats, deciding how to manage the threats, and enhancing population viability. Conflicts occur even within an agency when one department oversees science and protection of populations and another oversees and fosters an industry (aquaculture or fisheries, or permits for off-road vehicles). Conflicts also occur between resource agencies, industry, and conservation organizations. Recognizing the different stakeholders and their mandates, and encouraging participation in the process, leads to a better understanding of the threats, risks, and possible solutions when conflicts arise. Tracking stakeholder viewpoints and actions can lead to increased involvement and conflict resolution.

  14. Assessment of irrigation performance: contribution to improve water management in a small catchment in the Brazilian savannas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Lineu; Marioti, Juliana; Steenhuis, Tammo; Wallender, Wesley

    2010-05-01

    Irrigated agriculture is the major consumer of surface water in Brazil using over 70% of the total supply. Due to the growing competition for water among different sectors of the economy, sustainable water use can only be achieved by decreasing the portion of water used by the irrigated agriculture. Thus, in order to maintain yield, farmers need to irrigate more efficiently. There is little known on irrigation efficiency in Brazil. Therefore a study was carried out in the Buriti Vermelho basin to assess the irrigation performance of existing system. The experimental basin has a drainage area of 940 hectares and is located in the eastern part of the Federal District, in the Brazilian savanna region. Agriculture is the main activity. There is a dominance of red latosols. Several types of land use and crop cover are encountered in the basin. Conflicts among farmers for water are increasing. As water, in quality and quantity, is crucial to maintain the livelihood of the population in the basin, concern about risk of water lack due to climatic and land use change is in place. Once irrigation is the main water user in the basin, to increase water availability and reduce conflicts a water resource management plan has to be established. For this purpose, irrigation system performance has to be understood. The objective of this work was to assess the performance and the management of irrigation (small and big) that has been carried out by farmers in the Buriti Vermelho experimental watershed. A survey undertaken in 2007 was used to identify the irrigation systems in the basin. It was verified that irrigation is practiced by both small (area up to 6 hectare) and big farmers. Small farmers usually crop limes and vegetables and use micro-irrigation, drip, sprinkler, guns or furrow to irrigate them. Big farmers plant annual crops and use center pivot as irrigation system. In this first assessment 13 irrigation systems were evaluated: five conventional sprinklers, four drip

  15. Comparative risk assessment of tobacco smoke constituents using the margin of exposure approach: the neglected contribution of nicotine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumung, Claudia; Rehm, Jürgen; Franke, Heike; Lachenmeier, Dirk W.

    2016-01-01

    Nicotine was not included in previous efforts to identify the most important toxicants of tobacco smoke. A health risk assessment of nicotine for smokers of cigarettes was conducted using the margin of exposure (MOE) approach and results were compared to literature MOEs of various other tobacco toxicants. The MOE is defined as ratio between toxicological threshold (benchmark dose) and estimated human intake. Dose-response modelling of human and animal data was used to derive the benchmark dose. The MOE was calculated using probabilistic Monte Carlo simulations for daily cigarette smokers. Benchmark dose values ranged from 0.004 mg/kg bodyweight for symptoms of intoxication in children to 3 mg/kg bodyweight for mortality in animals; MOEs ranged from below 1 up to 7.6 indicating a considerable consumer risk. The dimension of the MOEs is similar to those of other tobacco toxicants with high concerns relating to adverse health effects such as acrolein or formaldehyde. Owing to the lack of toxicological data in particular relating to cancer, long term animal testing studies for nicotine are urgently necessary. There is immediate need of action concerning the risk of nicotine also with regard to electronic cigarettes and smokeless tobacco. PMID:27759090

  16. Contribution of spiral artery blood flow changes assessed by transvaginal color Doppler sonography for predicting endometrial pathologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suna Kabil Kucur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ive: To investigate the diagnostic value of blood flow measurements in spiral artery by transvaginal color Doppler sonography (CDS in predicting endometrial pathologies.Methods: Ninety-seven patients presenting with abnormal uterine bleeding and requiring endometrial assessment were included in this prospective observational study. Endometrial thickness, structure and echogenicity were recorded. Pulsatility index (PI and resistive index (RI of the spiral artery were measured by transvaginal CDS. Endometrial sampling was performed for all subjects. Sonographic and hystopathologic findings were compared.Results: The histopathological diagnoses were as follows; 39 cases (40.2% endometrial polyp, 9 cases (9.3% endometrial hyperplasia, 10 cases (10.3 submucous myoma, 7 cases (7.2% endometrium cancer, and 32 cases (33% nonspecific findings. The spiral artery PI in endometrium cancer group was highly significantly lower than other groups (p<0.01. The spiral artery RI was also significantly lower in the patients with malignant histology (p<0.05. Conclusion: Endometrial pathologies are associated significantly with endometrial spiral artery Doppler changes.Key words: Spiral artery, Doppler ultrasonography, endometrium

  17. Hydrological modeling of a watershed affected by acid mine drainage (Odiel River, SW Spain). Assessment of the pollutant contributing areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galván, L.; Olías, M.; Cánovas, C. R.; Sarmiento, A. M.; Nieto, J. M.

    2016-09-01

    The Odiel watershed drains materials belonging to the Iberian Pyrite Belt, where significant massive sulfide deposits have been mined historically. As a result, a huge amount of sulfide-rich wastes are deposited in the watershed, which suffer from oxidation, releasing acidic lixiviates with high sulfate and metal concentrations. In order to reliably estimate the metal loadings along the watershed a complete series of discharge and hydrochemical data are essential. A hydrological model was performed with SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool) to solve the scarcity of gauge stations along the watershed. The model was calibrated and validated from daily discharge data (from 1980 to 2010) at the outlet of the watershed, river inputs into an existent reservoir, and a flow gauge station close to the northern area of the watershed. Discharge data obtained from the hydrological model, together with analytical data, allowed the estimation of the dissolved pollutant load delivered annually by the Odiel River (e.g. 9140 t of Al, 2760 t of Zn). The pollutant load is influenced strongly by the rainfall regime, and can even double during extremely rainy years. Around 50% of total pollution comes from the Riotinto Mining District, so the treatment of Riotinto lixiviates reaching the Odiel watershed would reduce the AMD (Acid Mine Drainages) in a remarkable way, improving the water quality downstream, especially in the reservoir of Alcolea, currently under construction. The information obtained in this study will allow the optimization of remediation efforts in the watershed, in order to improve its water quality.

  18. Predicting Drug Extraction in the Human Gut Wall: Assessing Contributions from Drug Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporter Proteins using Preclinical Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Sheila Annie; Jones, Christopher R; Ungell, Anna-Lena; Hatley, Oliver J D

    2016-06-01

    Intestinal metabolism can limit oral bioavailability of drugs and increase the risk of drug interactions. It is therefore important to be able to predict and quantify it in drug discovery and early development. In recent years, a plethora of models-in vivo, in situ and in vitro-have been discussed in the literature. The primary objective of this review is to summarize the current knowledge in the quantitative prediction of gut-wall metabolism. As well as discussing the successes of current models for intestinal metabolism, the challenges in the establishment of good preclinical models are highlighted, including species differences in the isoforms; regional abundances and activities of drug metabolizing enzymes; the interplay of enzyme-transporter proteins; and lack of knowledge on enzyme abundances and availability of empirical scaling factors. Due to its broad specificity and high abundance in the intestine, CYP3A is the enzyme that is frequently implicated in human gut metabolism and is therefore the major focus of this review. A strategy to assess the impact of gut wall metabolism on oral bioavailability during drug discovery and early development phases is presented. Current gaps in the mechanistic understanding and the prediction of gut metabolism are highlighted, with suggestions on how they can be overcome in the future.

  19. Assessing the contribution of prescribing in primary care by nurses and professionals allied to medicine: a systematic review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhanbhro Sadiq

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Safe and timely access to effective and appropriate medication through primary care settings is a major concern for all countries addressing both acute and chronic disease burdens. Legislation for nurses and other professionals allied to medicine to prescribe exists in a minority of countries, with more considering introducing legislation. Although there is variation in the range of medicines permitted to be prescribed, questions remain as to the contribution prescribing by nurses and professionals allied to medicine makes to the care of patients in primary care and what is the evidence on which clinicians, commissioners of services and policy makers can consider this innovation. Methods A integrative review of literature on non-medical prescribing in primary care was undertaken guided by dimensions of health care quality: effectiveness, acceptability, efficiency and access. Results 19 papers of 17 empirical studies were identified which provided evidence of patient outcome of non medical prescribing in primary care settings. The majority were undertaken in the UK with only one each from the USA, Canada, Botswana and Zimbabwe. Only two studies investigated clinical outcomes of non-medical prescribing. Seven papers reported on qualitative designs and four of these had fewer than ten participants. Most studies reported that non medical prescribing was widely accepted and viewed positively by patients and professionals. Conclusions Primary health care is the setting where timely access to safe and appropriate medicines is most critical for the well-being of any population. The gradual growth over time of legislative authority and in the numbers of non-medical prescribers, particularly nurses, in some countries suggests that the acceptability of non-medical prescribing is based on the perceived value to the health care system as a whole. Our review suggests that there are substantial gaps in the knowledge base to help evidence

  20. Assessing the contribution of marine protected areas to the trophic functioning of ecosystems: a model for the Banc d'Arguin and the Mauritanian shelf.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Guénette

    Full Text Available Most modelling studies addressed the effectiveness of marine protected areas (MPA for fisheries sustainability through single species approach. Only a few models analysed the potential benefits of MPAs at the ecosystem level, estimating the potential export of fish biomass from the reserve or analysing the trophic relationships between organisms inside and outside the MPA. Here, we propose to use food web models to assess the contribution of a MPA to the trophic functioning of a larger ecosystem. This approach is applied to the Banc d'Arguin National Park, a large MPA located on the Mauritanian shelf. The ecosystem was modeled using Ecopath with Ecosim, a model that accounts for fisheries, food web structure, and some aspects of the spatial distribution of species, for the period 1991-2006. Gaps in knowledge and uncertainty were taken into account by building three different models. Results showed that the Banc d'Arguin contributes about 9 to 13% to the total consumption, is supporting about 23% of the total production and 18% of the total catch of the Mauritanian shelf ecosystem, and up to 50% for coastal fish. Of the 29 exploited groups, 15 depend on the Banc for more than 30% of their direct or indirect consumptions. Between 1991 and 2006, the fishing pressure increased leading to a decrease in biomass and the catch of high trophic levels, confirming their overall overexploitation. Ecosim simulations showed that adding a new fleet in the Banc d'Arguin would have large impacts on the species with a high reliance on the Banc for food, resulting in a 23% decrease in the current outside MPA catches. We conclude on the usefulness of food web models to assess MPAs contribution to larger ecosystem functioning.

  1. Patulin and ochratoxin A co-occurrence and their bioaccessibility in processed cereal-based foods: A contribution for Portuguese children risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assunção, Ricardo; Martins, Carla; Dupont, Didier; Alvito, Paula

    2016-10-01

    Patulin (PAT) and ochratoxin A (OTA) are well known enteropathogenic mycotoxins that are present in several foodstuffs. Processed cereal-based foods are among the first solid foods eaten by children, a particularly vulnerable population group. There is a lack of knowledge related to the co-occurrence of PAT and OTA in food intended for children consumption and their potential interactions during the digestion process. The present study aims to evaluate, for the first time, the co-occurrence of PAT and OTA in processed cereal-based foods for children consumption, the bioaccessibility of these two mycotoxins, and the contribution of the bioaccessibility data for human health risk assessment. PAT and OTA incidence were 75% and 50%, respectively. These mycotoxins co-occurred in 40% of analysed samples. Bioaccessibility assays revealed mean values of 52% and 56% for PAT, alone and combined with OTA; and 100% and 106% for OTA, alone and combined with PAT. Considering the human health risk assessment, and taking into account the co-occurrence and the bioaccessibility results, this study indicates a tolerable exposure to these mycotoxins representing a low risk for Portuguese children. The present work reinforces the importance of a holistic approach for risk assessment which gathers data from occurrence, exposure and bioaccessibility.

  2. Assessment of past, present and future health-cost externalities of air pollution in Europe and the contribution from international ship traffic using the EVA model system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, J.; Silver, J. D.; Christensen, J. H.; Andersen, M. S.; Bønløkke, J. H.; Sigsgaard, T.; Geels, C.; Gross, A.; Hansen, A. B.; Hansen, K. M.; Hedegaard, G. B.; Kaas, E.; Frohn, L. M.

    2013-08-01

    An integrated model system, EVA (Economic Valuation of Air pollution), based on the impact-pathway chain has been developed to assess the health-related economic externalities of air pollution resulting from specific emission sources or sectors. The model system can be used to support policy-making with respect to emission control. In this study, we apply the EVA system to Europe, and perform a more detailed assessment of past, present, and future health-cost externalities of the total air pollution levels in Europe (including both natural and anthropogenic sources), represented by the years 2000, 2007, 2011, and 2020. We also assess the contribution to the health-related external costs from international ship traffic with special attention to the international ship traffic in the Baltic and North seas, since special regulatory actions on sulfur emissions, called SECA (sulfur emission control area), have been introduced in these areas. We conclude that, despite efficient regulatory actions in Europe in recent decades, air pollution still constitutes a serious problem for human health. Hence the related external costs are considerable. The total health-related external costs for the whole of Europe are estimated at 803 bn euros yr-1 for the year 2000, decreasing to 537 bn euros yr-1 in the year 2020. We estimate the total number of premature deaths in Europe in the year 2000 due to air pollution to be around 680 000 yr-1, decreasing to approximately 450 000 in the year 2020. The contribution from international ship traffic in the Northern Hemisphere was estimated to 7% of the total health-related external costs in Europe in the year 2000, increasing to 12% in the year 2020. In contrast, the contribution from international ship traffic in the Baltic Sea and the North Sea decreases 36% due to the regulatory efforts of reducing sulfur emissions from ship traffic in SECA. Introducing this regulatory instrument for all international ship traffic in the Northern

  3. Assessment of past, present and future health-cost externalities of air pollution in Europe and the contribution from international ship traffic using the EVA model system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brandt

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available An integrated model system, EVA (Economic Valuation of Air pollution, based on the impact-pathway chain has been developed to assess the health-related economic externalities of air pollution resulting from specific emission sources or sectors. The model system can be used to support policy-making with respect to emission control. In this study, we apply the EVA system to Europe, and perform a more detailed assessment of past, present, and future health-cost externalities of the total air pollution levels in Europe (including both natural and anthropogenic sources, represented by the years 2000, 2007, 2011, and 2020. We also assess the contribution to the health-related external costs from international ship traffic with special attention to the international ship traffic in the Baltic and North seas, since special regulatory actions on sulfur emissions, called SECA (sulfur emission control area, have been introduced in these areas. We conclude that, despite efficient regulatory actions in Europe in recent decades, air pollution still constitutes a serious problem for human health. Hence the related external costs are considerable. The total health-related external costs for the whole of Europe are estimated at 803 bn euros yr−1 for the year 2000, decreasing to 537 bn euros yr−1 in the year 2020. We estimate the total number of premature deaths in Europe in the year 2000 due to air pollution to be around 680 000 yr−1, decreasing to approximately 450 000 in the year 2020. The contribution from international ship traffic in the Northern Hemisphere was estimated to 7% of the total health-related external costs in Europe in the year 2000, increasing to 12% in the year 2020. In contrast, the contribution from international ship traffic in the Baltic Sea and the North Sea decreases 36% due to the regulatory efforts of reducing sulfur emissions from ship traffic in SECA. Introducing this regulatory instrument for all international ship traffic in

  4. Assessment of past, present and future health-cost externalities of air pollution in Europe and the contribution from international ship traffic using the EVA model system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Brandt

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available An integrated model system, EVA (Economic Valuation of Air pollution, based on the impact-pathway chain has been developed, to assess the health-related economic externalities of air pollution resulting from specific emission sources or sectors. The model system can be used to support policy-making with respect to emission control. In this study, we apply the EVA system to Europe, and perform a more detailed assessment of past, present, and future health-cost externalities of the total air pollution levels in Europe (including both natural and anthropogenic sources, represented by the years 2000, 2007, 2011, and 2020. We also assess the contribution to the health-related external costs from international ship traffic with special attention to the international ship traffic in the Baltic and North Seas, since special regulatory actions on sulphur emissions, called SECA (sulphur emission control area, have been introduced in these areas,. We conclude that despite efficient regulatory actions in Europe in recent decades, air pollution still constitutes a serious problem to human health, hence the related external costs are considerable. The total health-related external costs for the whole of Europe is estimated at 803 bn Euro yr−1 for the year 2000, decreasing to 537 bn Euro yr−1 in the year 2020. We estimate the total number of premature deaths in Europe in the year 2000 due to air pollution to be around 680 000 yr−1, decreasing to approximately 450 000 in the year 2020. The contribution from international ship traffic in the Northern Hemisphere was estimated to 7% of the total health-related external costs in Europe in the year 2000, increasing to 12% in the year 2020. In contrast, the contribution from international ship traffic in the Baltic Sea and the North Sea decreases 36% due to the regulatory efforts of reducing sulphur emissions from ship traffic in SECA. Introducing this regulatory instrument for all international ship traffic in

  5. Cognitive representations in raters' assessment of teacher portfolios

    OpenAIRE

    Van der Schaaf, M. F.; Stokking, K.M.; Verloop, M.

    2005-01-01

    Portfolios are frequently used to assess teachers' competences. In portfolio assessment, the issue of rater reliability is a notorious problem. To improve the quality of assessments insight into raters' judgment processes is crucial. Using a mixed quantitative and qualitative approach we studied cognitive processes underlying raters' judgments and the reliability of these judgments. Six raters systematically assessed 18 portfolios. The interrater reliability of 12 portfolios was satisfactory....

  6. Review of SKB's Safety Assessment SR-Can: Contributions in Support of SKI's and SSI's Review by External Consultants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-03-15

    The Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co (SKB) plans to submit a license application for the construction of a repository for spent nuclear fuel in Sweden 2010. In support of this application SKB will present a safety report, SR-Site, on the repository's long-term safety and radiological consequences. As a preparation for SR-Site, SKB published the preliminary safety assessment SR-Can in November 2006. The purposes were to document a first evaluation of long-term safety for the two candidate sites at Forsmark and Laxemar and to provide feedback to SKB's future programme of work. An important objective of the authorities' review of SR-Can is to provide guidance to SKB on the complete safety reporting for the license application. The authorities have engaged external experts for independent modelling, analysis and review, with the aim to provide a range of expert opinions related to the sufficiency and appropriateness of various aspects of SR-Can. The conclusions and judgments in this report are those of the authors and may not necessarily coincide with those of SKI and SSI. The authorities own review will be published separately (SKI Report 2008:23, SSI Report 2008:04 E). This report compiles contributions from several specific research projects. The separate reviews cover topics regarding the engineered barrier system, the quality assurance, the climate evolution and its effects, and the ecosystems and environmental impacts. All contributions are in English apart from the review concerning ecosystems and environmental impacts, which is presented in Swedish

  7. Carbon budgets for catchments across a managed landscape mosaic in southeast Sweden: contributing to the safety assessment of a nuclear waste repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfgren, Anders; Miliander, Sofia; Truvé, Johan; Lindborg, Tobias

    2006-12-01

    Ecosystem budgets of matter contribute to the assessment of transport and accumulation of bioavailable contaminants in a landscape, since flows of matter and energy ultimately determine the rates at which contaminants will be partitioned in the environment. This study compares ecosystem properties, such as net primary production (NPP), sequestration of matter and fluxes to food sources for humans, which are of potential interest to describe fluxes and accumulation of bioavailable radionuclides in 14 catchments within a larger catchment area in southeast Sweden. The carbon budgets, used as a proxy for organic matter, are mainly based on local estimates of pools and fluxes, which have been distributed across a landscape mosaic of different vegetation types and management regimes using a geographical information system (GIS). NPP varied by a factor close to two (432 - 709 g x Cx m(-2)x y(-1)), while net ecosystem production ranged between -124 and 159 gx C x m(-2) x y (-1) for the different catchments. Carbon sequestration mainly occurred in the vegetation while the soil organic carbon pool was mainly a source of carbon. Large herbivores consumed on average 4.5 % of the above-ground green tissue production. When arable land was present in the catchment, the flux of carbon to humans was highest from crops and, in decreasing order, milk and beef, followed by the flux from hunting and berry/fungus picking. The results can be used to estimate the potential assimilation of radionuclides in vegetation and the potential exposure to humans of bioavailable radionuclides.

  8. Assessing the Relative Contributions of Active Ankle and Knee Assistance to the Walking Mechanics of Transfemoral Amputees Using a Powered Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingraham, Kimberly A; Fey, Nicholas P; Simon, Ann M; Hargrove, Levi J

    2016-01-01

    Powered knee-ankle prostheses are capable of providing net-positive mechanical energy to amputees. Yet, there are limitless ways to deliver this energy throughout the gait cycle. It remains largely unknown how different combinations of active knee and ankle assistance affect the walking mechanics of transfemoral amputees. This study assessed the relative contributions of stance phase knee swing initiation, increasing ankle stiffness and powered plantarflexion as three unilateral transfemoral amputees walked overground at their self-selected walking speed. Five combinations of knee and ankle conditions were evaluated regarding the kinematics and kinetics of the amputated and intact legs using repeated measures analyses of variance. We found eliminating active knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion was linked to increased compensations of the ipsilateral hip joint during the subsequent swing phase. The elimination of knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion also led to reduced braking ground reaction forces of the amputated and intact legs, and influenced both sagittal and frontal plane loading of the intact knee joint. Gradually increasing prosthetic ankle stiffness influenced the shape of the prosthetic ankle plantarflexion moment, more closely mirroring the intact ankle moment. Increasing ankle stiffness also corresponded to increased prosthetic ankle power generation (despite a similar maximum stiffness value across conditions) and increased braking ground reaction forces of the amputated leg. These findings further our understanding of how to deliver assistance with powered knee-ankle prostheses and the compensations that occur when specific aspects of assistance are added/removed.

  9. Voluntary food fortification with folic acid in Spain: predicted contribution to children's dietary intakes as assessed with new food folate composition data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaniego-Vaesken, M L; Alonso-Aperte, E; Varela-Moreiras, G

    2013-10-01

    The Spanish market offers a significant number of folic acid (FA) voluntarily fortified foods. We analysed FA and (6S)-5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid ((6S)-5-CH3-H4PteGlu) content in ready-to-eat cereals (RTEC) (n=68) and cow's milk (n=25) by a previously validated affinity chromatography-HPLC method. Contribution to potential FA intakes for children aged 2-13years, was assessed using food consumption data from a representative nationwide study, folate Recommended Dietary Intakes (RDI), and Upper Levels (UL). Results showed that at all food fortification levels obtained, fortified products provided more than tenfold FA than (6S)-5-CH3-H4PteGlu. For RTEC, the high fortification level provided 6-21%, per serving, of RDI and ⩽32% of ULs at 90th percentile of RTEC consumption (P90). Milk products fortified at the higher level reached on average 54-136% of RDI per serving and only exceeded UL at P90 of milk consumption in children aged 2-5years.

  10. Assessing the Relative Contributions of Active Ankle and Knee Assistance to the Walking Mechanics of Transfemoral Amputees Using a Powered Prosthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly A Ingraham

    Full Text Available Powered knee-ankle prostheses are capable of providing net-positive mechanical energy to amputees. Yet, there are limitless ways to deliver this energy throughout the gait cycle. It remains largely unknown how different combinations of active knee and ankle assistance affect the walking mechanics of transfemoral amputees. This study assessed the relative contributions of stance phase knee swing initiation, increasing ankle stiffness and powered plantarflexion as three unilateral transfemoral amputees walked overground at their self-selected walking speed. Five combinations of knee and ankle conditions were evaluated regarding the kinematics and kinetics of the amputated and intact legs using repeated measures analyses of variance. We found eliminating active knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion was linked to increased compensations of the ipsilateral hip joint during the subsequent swing phase. The elimination of knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion also led to reduced braking ground reaction forces of the amputated and intact legs, and influenced both sagittal and frontal plane loading of the intact knee joint. Gradually increasing prosthetic ankle stiffness influenced the shape of the prosthetic ankle plantarflexion moment, more closely mirroring the intact ankle moment. Increasing ankle stiffness also corresponded to increased prosthetic ankle power generation (despite a similar maximum stiffness value across conditions and increased braking ground reaction forces of the amputated leg. These findings further our understanding of how to deliver assistance with powered knee-ankle prostheses and the compensations that occur when specific aspects of assistance are added/removed.

  11. Assessing the Relative Contributions of Active Ankle and Knee Assistance to the Walking Mechanics of Transfemoral Amputees Using a Powered Prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Ann M.; Hargrove, Levi J.

    2016-01-01

    Powered knee-ankle prostheses are capable of providing net-positive mechanical energy to amputees. Yet, there are limitless ways to deliver this energy throughout the gait cycle. It remains largely unknown how different combinations of active knee and ankle assistance affect the walking mechanics of transfemoral amputees. This study assessed the relative contributions of stance phase knee swing initiation, increasing ankle stiffness and powered plantarflexion as three unilateral transfemoral amputees walked overground at their self-selected walking speed. Five combinations of knee and ankle conditions were evaluated regarding the kinematics and kinetics of the amputated and intact legs using repeated measures analyses of variance. We found eliminating active knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion was linked to increased compensations of the ipsilateral hip joint during the subsequent swing phase. The elimination of knee swing initiation or powered plantarflexion also led to reduced braking ground reaction forces of the amputated and intact legs, and influenced both sagittal and frontal plane loading of the intact knee joint. Gradually increasing prosthetic ankle stiffness influenced the shape of the prosthetic ankle plantarflexion moment, more closely mirroring the intact ankle moment. Increasing ankle stiffness also corresponded to increased prosthetic ankle power generation (despite a similar maximum stiffness value across conditions) and increased braking ground reaction forces of the amputated leg. These findings further our understanding of how to deliver assistance with powered knee-ankle prostheses and the compensations that occur when specific aspects of assistance are added/removed. PMID:26807889

  12. Contribution of thin slice (1 mm) oblique coronal proton density-weighted MR images for assessment of anteromedial and posterolateral bundle damage in anterior cruciate ligament injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gokalp, Gokhan, E-mail: drgokhangokalp@yahoo.com [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Demirag, Burak, E-mail: bdemirag@uludag.edu.tr [Department of Orthopedy, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Nas, Omer Fatih, E-mail: omerfatihnas@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Aydemir, Mehmet Fatih, E-mail: fatiha@yahoo.com [Department of Orthopedy, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey); Yazici, Zeynep, E-mail: zyazici@uludag.edu.tr [Department of Radiology, Uludag University Medical Faculty, Gorukle, Bursa (Turkey)

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of using additional oblique coronal 1 mm proton density-weighted (PDW) MR imaging of the knee for detection and grading anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), anteromedial bundle (AMB) and posterolateral bundle (PLB) injuries. Materials and methods: We prospectively assessed preoperative MR images of 50 patients (36 men, 14 women; age range, 18–62 years). First, we compared the diagnostic performance of routine sagittal (3 mm) and additional oblique coronal images (1 mm) for ACL tears. Then, we compared the tear types (AMB or PLB) and grade presumed from oblique coronal MR imaging with arthroscopy. Results: Arthroscopy revealed ACL tear in 24 (48%) patients. There was significant difference between sagittal images and arthroscopy results for ACL tear recognition (p < 0.001). No significant difference was detected for oblique coronal images when compared with arthroscopy results (p = 0.180). Sensitivity and specificity values for ACL tear diagnosis were 37.04% and 95.65% for sagittal images; 74.07% and 91.30% for oblique coronal images. There was no significant difference between arthroscopy and oblique coronal MR images in grading AMB and PLB injuries (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Addition of thin slice oblique coronal images to conventional sequences could better contribute to better verifying the presence of ACL tear and in determining its grade.

  13. Community Needs Assessment and Portal Prototype Development for an Arctic Spatial Data Infrastructure (ASDI): A Contribution to an IPY Data Cyberinfrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, H. V.; Warnick, W. K.; Hempel, L. C.; Henk, J.; Sorensen, M.; Tweedie, C. E.; Gaylord, A.; Behr, S.

    2006-12-01

    As the creation and use of geospatial data in research, management, logistics, and education applications has proliferated, there is now a tremendous potential for advancing the IPY initiative through a variety of cyberinfrastructure applications, including Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI) and related technologies. SDIs provide a necessary and common framework of standards, securities, policies, procedures, and technology to support the effective acquisition, coordination, dissemination and use of geospatial data by multiple and distributed stakeholder and user groups. Despite the numerous research activities in the Arctic, there is no established SDI and, because of this lack of a coordinated infrastructure, there is inefficiency, duplication of effort, and reduced data quality and search ability of arctic geospatial data. The urgency for establishing this framework is significant considering the myriad of data that is likely to be collected in celebration of the International Polar Year (IPY) in 2007-2008 and the current international momentum for an improved and integrated circumarctic terrestrial-marine-atmospheric environmental observatories network. The key objective of this project is to lay the foundation for full implementation of an Arctic Spatial Data Infrastructure (ASDI) through two related activities: (1) an assessment - via interviews, questionnaires, a workshop, and other means - of community needs, readiness, and resources, and (2) the development of a prototype web mapping portal to demonstrate the purpose and function on an arctic geospatial one-stop portal technology and to solicit community input on design and function. The results of this project will be compiled into a comprehensive report guiding the research community and funding agencies in the design and implementation of an ASDI to contribute to a robust IPY data cyberinfrastructure.

  14. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor mediated activities in road dust from a metropolitan area, Hanoi-Vietnam: contribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and human risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuyen, Le Huu; Tue, Nguyen Minh; Suzuki, Go; Misaki, Kentaro; Viet, Pham Hung; Takahashi, Shin; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2014-09-01

    Dioxin-Responsive Chemical-Activated LUciferase gene eXpression assay (DR-CALUX) was applied to assess the total toxic activity of the mixture of PAHs and related compounds as well as dioxin-related compounds in road dust from urban areas of Hanoi, Vietnam. Road dust from Hanoi contained significantly higher DR-CALUX activities (3 to 39, mean 20 ng CALUX-TEQ/g dw) than those from a rural site (2 to 13, mean 5 ng CALUX-TEQ/g dw). The total concentrations of 24 major PAHs (Σ24PAHs) in urban road dust (0.1 to 5.5, mean 2.5 μg/g dw) were also 6 times higher than those in rural road dust (0.08 to 1.5, mean 0.4 μg/g dw). Diagnostic ratios of PAHs indicated vehicular engine combustion as the major PAH emission source in both sites. PAHs accounted for 0.8 to 60% (mean 10%) and 2 to 76% (mean 20%) of the measured CALUX-TEQs in road dust for Hanoi the rural site, respectively. Benzo[b]-/benzo[k]fluoranthenes were the major TEQ contributors among PAHs, whereas DRCs contributed hydrocarbon receptor agonists in road dust. Significant PAH concentrations in urban dust indicated high mutagenic and carcinogenic potencies. Estimated results of incremental life time cancer risk (ILCR) indicated that Vietnamese populations, especially those in urban areas such as Hanoi, are potentially exposed to high cancer risk via both dust ingestion and dermal contact. This is the first study on the exposure risk of AhR agonists, including PAHs and DRCs, in urban road dust from a developing country using a combined bio-chemical analytical approach.

  15. A contribution to the hazards assessment at Copahue volcano (Argentina-Chile) by facies analysis of a recent pyroclastic density current deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbis, C.; Petrinovic, I. A.; Guzmán, S.

    2016-11-01

    We recognised and interpreted a recent pyroclastic density current (PDC) deposit at the Copahue volcano (Southern Andes), through a field survey and a sedimentological study. The relationships between the behaviour of the PDCs, the morphology of the Río Agrio valley and the eruptive dynamics were interpreted. We identified two lithofacies in the deposit that indicate variations in the eruptive dynamics: i) the opening of the conduit and the formation of a highly explosive eruption that formed a diluted PDC through the immediate collapse of the eruptive column; ii) a continued eruption which followed immediately and records the widening of the conduit, producing a dense PDC. The eruption occurred in 2000 CE, was phreatomagmatic (VEI ≤ 2), with a vesiculation level above 4000 m depth and fragmentation driven by the interaction of magma with an hydrothermal system at ca. 1500 m depth. As deduced from the comparison between the accessory lithics of this deposit and those of the 2012 CE eruption, the depth of onset of vesiculation and fragmentation level in this volcano is constant in depth. In order to reproduce the distribution pattern of this PDC's deposit and to simulate potential PDC's forming-processes, we made several computational modelling from "denser" to "more diluted" conditions. The latter fairly reproduces the distribution of the studied deposit and represents perhaps one of the most dangerous possible scenarios of the Copahue volcanic activity. PDCs occurrence has been considered in the last volcanic hazards map as a low probability process; evidences found in this contribution suggest instead to include them as more probable and thus very important for the hazards assessment of the Copahue volcano.

  16. Assessing writing ability in primary education: on the evaluation of text quality and text complexity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feenstra, Hiske Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Writing is a complex ability, and measuring writing ability is a notoriously complex task. The assessment of writing ability is complicated by the multi-faceted nature of this productive language ability on one hand, and the difficulty of evaluating writing performances on the other hand. In this di

  17. ETS Contributions to the Quantitative Assessment of Item, Test, and Score Fairness. Research Report. ETS RR-13-27. ETS R&D Scientific and Policy Contributions Series. ETS SPC-13-04

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorans, Neil J.

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative fairness procedures have been developed and modified by ETS staff over the past several decades. ETS has been a leader in fairness assessment, and its efforts are reviewed in this report. The first section deals with differential prediction and differential validity procedures that examine whether test scores predict a criterion, such…

  18. A tag and trace approach to assess the potential contribution of earthworm casts to soil erosion on hillslopes under permanent pasture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Philip; Walling, Desmond; Quine, Timothy

    2015-04-01

    This communication presents preliminary results from a tag and trace experiment to assess the potential contribution of earthworm casts to soil erosion on a gentle (i.e. 4%) hillslope under permanent pasture using artificial radionuclides, caesium-134 (134Cs) and cobalt-60 (60Co). A rapid and repeatable laboratory-based procedure was devised for tagging groups of intact, air-dried casts by immersion into solutions containing a known activity concentration of either 134Cs or 60Co, each mixed in 2 l of water. For the tracing component of the work, fifteen intact casts representing the equivalent of 203 g of sediment were labelled with 216 Bq of 134Cs activity and evenly distributed across the upslope half of a 0.6 m long * 0.5 m wide bounded area of pasture, at a distance of ≥ 0.3 m from a plot outlet. A further fifteen intact casts representing the equivalent of 190.7 g of sediment were labelled with 224 Bq of 60Co activity and evenly distributed across the downslope half of the plot, at a distance of ≤ 0.3 m from the plot outlet. Over the following 76 days, all casts were exposed to natural weather events, during which time, 186.3 mm of rainfall generated 16 separate storm runoff samples. Sediment was recovered from the runoff, assayed by gamma spectrometry and a simple mixing model was used to partition the sediment into labelled material and unlabelled surface material. Provisional results indicate that a total of 26.8 g of 60Co-labelled sediment, equivalent to 14.1% of the total mass deployed, was recovered from a distance of ≤ 0.3 m from their original position. In contrast, 9.1 g of 134Cs-labelled sediment, equivalent to 4.5% of the total mass deployed, was recovered from a distance of ≥ 0.3 m from their original position. This presentation discusses key findings, with a particular focus on the temporal changes in sediment-supply, as well as a number of uncertainties associated with the technique. Despite these uncertainties, however, the essentially

  19. The importance of rare species: a trait-based assessment of rare species contributions to functional diversity and possible ecosystem function in tall-grass prairies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Meha; Flynn, Dan Fb; Prager, Case M; Hart, Georgia M; Devan, Caroline M; Ahrestani, Farshid S; Palmer, Matthew I; Bunker, Daniel E; Knops, Johannes Mh; Jouseau, Claire F; Naeem, Shahid

    2014-01-01

    The majority of species in ecosystems are rare, but the ecosystem consequences of losing rare species are poorly known. To understand how rare species may influence ecosystem functioning, this study quantifies the contribution of species based on their relative level of rarity to community functional diversity using a trait-based approach. Given that rarity can be defined in several different ways, we use four different definitions of rarity: abundance (mean and maximum), geographic range, and habitat specificity. We find that rarer species contribute to functional diversity when rarity is defined by maximum abundance, geographic range, and habitat specificity. However, rarer species are functionally redundant when rarity is defined by mean abundance. Furthermore, when using abundance-weighted analyses, we find that rare species typically contribute significantly less to functional diversity than common species due to their low abundances. These results suggest that rare species have the potential to play an important role in ecosystem functioning, either by offering novel contributions to functional diversity or via functional redundancy depending on how rare species are defined. Yet, these contributions are likely to be greatest if the abundance of rare species increases due to environmental change. We argue that given the paucity of data on rare species, understanding the contribution of rare species to community functional diversity is an important first step to understanding the potential role of rare species in ecosystem functioning.

  20. Estimation of the contribution of gamma-emission of incorporated cesium radioisotopes in interpretation of the results of the public survey to assess the thyroidal iodine content following a radiation accident at the nuclear power plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinkarev S.M.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. A detail consideration has been done to assess an importance of the contribution of gamma-emission of incorporated cesium radioisotopes to the exposure rate measured near the thyroid by the public survey for following the Chernobyl accident. Empirical ratios have been derived to take into account that contribution under interpretation of the results of survey meter monitoring of the public. Materials and methods. Model calculations for typical radionuclide intake by the residents living in contaminated territories after the Chernobyl accident have been carried out in order to assess the contribution of gamma-emission of incorporated cesium radioisotopes to the exposure rate measured near the thyroid by the survey. Under such calculations two the most important modes of intake have been considered: 1 inhalation and 2 ingestion with cow milk. Results. According to the estimates received the contribution of gamma-emission of incorporated cesium radioisotopes to the exposure rate measured near the thyroid during the first 20 days does not exceed 20% for the residents of southern areas of Gomel region and 30% for the residents of Mogil'yov region. During 60 days following the accident that contribution is estimated to be within (50-80 % for the residents of southern areas of Gomel region and (80-95 % for the residents of Mogil'yov region. Conclusion. For the period of intensive thyroid measuring in the southern areas of Gomel region (the second part of May account of the contribution of gamma-emission of incorporated cesium radioisotopes is relatively unimportant, but for Mogil'yov region (the end of May — it is important to account for. For the thyroid measurements conducted in June of 1986 it is important for all residents living in Belarus to take into account the contribution of gamma-emission of incorporated cesium radioisotopes.

  1. Contribution to a quantitative assessment model for reliability-based metrics of electronic and programmable safety-related functions; Contribution a un modele d'evaluation quantitative des performances fiabilistes de fonctions electroniques et programmables dediees a la securite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamidi, K

    2005-10-15

    The use of fault-tolerant EP architectures has induced growing constraints, whose influence on reliability-based performance metrics is no more negligible. To face up the growing influence of simultaneous failure, this thesis proposes, for safety-related functions, a new-trend assessment method of reliability, based on a better taking into account of time-aspect. This report introduces the concept of information and uses it to interpret the failure modes of safety-related function as the direct result of the initiation and propagation of erroneous information until the actuator-level. The main idea is to distinguish the apparition and disappearance of erroneous states, which could be defined as intrinsically dependent of HW-characteristic and maintenance policies, and their possible activation, constrained through architectural choices, leading to the failure of safety-related function. This approach is based on a low level on deterministic SED models of the architecture and use non homogeneous Markov chains to depict the time-evolution of probabilities of errors. (author)

  2. An assessment of uncertainties in using volume-area modelling for computing the twenty-first century glacier contribution to sea-level change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slangen, A.B.A.; van de Wal, R.S.W.

    2011-01-01

    A large part of present-day sea-level change is formed by the melt of glaciers and ice caps (GIC). This study focuses on the uncertainties in the calculation of the GIC contribution on a century timescale. The model used is based on volume-area scaling, 5 combined with the mass balance sensitivity o

  3. Modulating weak interactions for molecular recognition: a dynamic combinatorial analysis for assessing the contribution of electrostatics to the stability of CH-π bonds in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Moreno, Ester; Gómez, Ana M; Bastida, Agatha; Corzana, Francisco; Jiménez-Oses, Gonzalo; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Asensio, Juan Luis

    2015-03-27

    Electrostatic and charge-transfer contributions to CH-π complexes can be modulated by attaching electron-withdrawing substituents to the carbon atom. While clearly stabilizing in the gas phase, the outcome of this chemical modification in water is more difficult to predict. Herein we provide a definitive and quantitative answer to this question employing a simple strategy based on dynamic combinatorial chemistry.

  4. Assessment of Contribution of Contemporary Carbon Sources to Size-Fractionated Particulate Matter and Time-Resolved Bulk Particulate Matter Using the Measurement of Radiocarbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, H M; Young, T M; Buchholz, B A

    2009-04-16

    This study was motivated by a desire to improve understanding of the sources contributing to the carbon that is an important component of airborne particulate matter (PM). The ultimate goal of this project was to lay a ground work for future tools that might be easily implemented with archived or routinely collected samples. A key feature of this study was application of radiocarbon measurement that can be interpreted to indicate the relative contributions from fossil and non-fossil carbon sources of atmospheric PM. Size-resolved PM and time-resolved PM{sub 10} collected from a site in Sacramento, CA in November 2007 (Phase I) and March 2008 (Phase II) were analyzed for radiocarbon and source markers such as levoglucosan, cholesterol, and elemental carbon. Radiocarbon data indicates that the contributions of non-fossil carbon sources were much greater than that from fossil carbon sources in all samples. Radiocarbon and source marker measurements confirm that a greater contribution of non-fossil carbon sources in Phase I samples was highly likely due to residential wood combustion. The present study proves that measurement of radiocarbon and source markers can be readily applied to archived or routinely collected samples for better characterization of PM sources. More accurate source apportionment will support ARB in developing more efficient control strategies.

  5. Poster contributions; Contributions par affiches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allegraud, K.; Gatilova, I.; Guaitella, O.; Ionikh, Y.; Roepcke, J.; Rousseau, A.; Aranchuk, L.E.; Larour, J.; Asad, S.; Tendero, C.; Tixier, C.; Jaoul, C.; Tristant, P.; Boisse-Laporte, C.; Leprince, P.; Leniniven, C.; Assouar, M.B.; Jimenez Rioboo, R.J.; Aubert, X.; Rousseau, A.; Sadeghi, N.; Bekstein, A.; Benhenni, M.; Yousfi, M.; Bousquet, A.; Granier, A.; Cartry, G.; Calafat, M.; Escaich, D.; Raynaud, P.; Clergereaux, R.; Cardoso, R.P.; Belmonte, T.; Henrion, G.; Sadeghi, N.; Cavarroc, M.; Mikikian, M.; Tessier, Y.; Boufendi, I.; Celestin, S.; Guaitella, O.; Bourdon, A.; Rousseau, A.; Cernogora, G.; Szopa, C.; Cavarroc, M.; Boufendi, I.; Commaux, N.; Geraud, A.; Pegourie, B.; Clairet, F.; Gil, C.; Gros, G.; Gunn, J.; Joffrin, E.; Hertout, P.; Costin, C.; Choimet, J.B.; Minea, T.; Couedel, L.; Mikikian, M.; Tessier, Y.; Boufendi, I.; Samarian, A.A.; Cousin, R.; Larour, J.; Gouard, P.; Raymond, P.; Curley, G.A.; Booth, J.P.; Corr, C.S.; Foldes, T.; Guillon, J.; Czarny, O.; Huysmans, G.; Daniel, A.; Belmonte, T.; Poucques, L. de; Imbert, J.C.; Teule-Gay, L.; Boisse-Laporte, C.; Devaux, S.; Manfredi, G.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Grandgirard, V.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X.; Ghendrih, Ph.; Dong, B.; Bauchire, J.M.; Pouvesle, J.M.; Magnier, P.; Hong, D.; Duluard, C.; Tillocher, T.; Mekkakia Maaza, N.; Dussart, R.; Mellhaoui, X.; Lefaucheux, P.; Puech, M.; Ranson, P.; Faudot, E.; Heuraux, S.; Colas, L.; Fubiani, G.; Boilson, D.; Hemsworth, R.S.; Gatilova, L.; Allegraud, K.; Ionikh, Y.; Roepcke, J.; Cartry, G.; Rousseau, A.; Gauthier, J.C.; Fourment, C.; Schurtz, G.; Nicolai, Ph.; Peyrusse, O.; Feugeas, J.L

    2006-07-01

    This document gathers the poster contributions among which 11 are relevant for fusion plasmas or particle acceleration: 1) the spectral study of a micro plasma from an X-pinch explosion; 2) experiments with a plasma density greater than the Greenwald value via the injection of icicles in Tore-Supra; 3) Bezier's surfaces and finite elements method for non-linear MHD; 4) 2-dimensional simulation of the RF casings before the ICRF antennas in tokamaks; 5) negative ion sources for ITER; 6) experimental characterization of electron heat transport on the laser integration line; 7) comparison of fluctuation measurement methods of plasma density via reflectometry in mode-o and mode-x in Tore-Supra; 8) water-bag model applied to kinetics equations of magnetic fusion plasmas; 9) computerized simulation of electron acceleration in plasma waves generated in a capillary pipe through laser wakefield; 10) the slowing-down of an alpha particle in a strongly magnetized dense plasma; and 11) stochastic processes of particle trapping by a wave in a magnetized plasma. (A.C.)

  6. Assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Geoff Brindley

    2005-01-01

    @@ Introduction TERMINOLOGY AND KEY CONCEPTS The term assessment refers to a variety of ways of collecting information on a learner's language ability or achievement. Although testing and assessment are often used interchangeably, the latter is an umbrella term encompassing measurement instruments administered on a ‘one-off’ basis such as tests, as well as qualitative methods of monitoring and recording student learning such as observation, simulations of project work. Assessment is also distinguished from evaluation which is concerned with the overall language programme and not just with what individual students have learnt. Proficiency assessment refers to the assessment of general language abilities acquired by the learner independent of a course of study.This kind of assessment is often done through the administration of standardised commercial language-proficency tests. On the other hand, assessment of achievement aims to establish what a student had learned in relation to a particular course or curriculum (thus frequently carried out by the teacher) .Achievement assesssment may be based either on the specific content of the course or on the course objectives (Hughes 1989).

  7. Process and product in writing--a methodological contribution to the assessment of written narratives in 8-12-year-old Swedish children using ScriptLog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asker-Arnason, Lena; Wengelin, Asa; Sahlén, Birgitta

    2008-01-01

    Twenty-seven children, with typical language development (TLD), 8-10 years old and 10-12 years old, were assessed with keystroke-logging in order to investigate their narrative writing. Measures of the writing process and the written product were used. One purpose was to explore how children produce written narratives in on-line production, and to relate the writing process to the written product. The results showed that those children who produced the final text faster, also wrote stories that comprised of more words. In the group of older children, children with better narrative ability used less pause time than those with worse ability, and the girls were faster writers than the boys. We believe that keystroke-logging gives valuable information for the assessment of young children's writing and that it is a potentially valid assessment tool for children from about 10 years of age.

  8. Assessing the effect of long-range pollutant transportation on air quality in Seoul using the conditional potential source contribution function method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Ukkyo; Kim, Jhoon; Lee, Hanlim; Lee, Yun Gon

    2017-02-01

    It is important to estimate the effects of the long-range transport of atmospheric pollutants for efficient and effective strategies to control air quality. In this study, the contributions of trans-boundary transport to the mean concentrations of SO2, NO2, CO, and PM10 in Seoul, Korea from 2001 to 2014 were estimated based on the conditional potential source contribution function (CPSCF) method. Eastern China was found to be the major source of trans-boundary pollution in Seoul, but moderate sources were also located in northeastern China. The contribution of long-range transport from Japan was negligible. The spatial distributions of the potential source contribution function (PSCF) values of each pollutant showed reasonable consistency with their emission inventory and satellite products. The PSCF values of SO2 and PM10 from eastern China were higher than those of NO2 and CO. The mean concentrations of SO2, NO2, CO, and PM10 in Seoul for the period from 2001 to 2014 were 5.34, 37.0, and 619.1 ppb, and 57.4 4 μg/m3, respectively. The contributions of long-range transport to the mean concentrations of SO2, NO2, CO, and PM10 in Seoul were 0.74, 3.4, and 39.0 ppb, and 12.1 μg/m3, respectively, which are 14%, 9%, 6%, and 21% of the mean concentrations, respectively. The annual mean concentrations of SO2 and NO2 followed statistically significant increasing linear trends (0.5 and 1.6 ppb per decade, respectively), whereas the trends in the annual mean concentrations of CO and PM10 were statistically insignificant. The trends in the ratio of the increased concentrations associated with long-range transport to the annual mean concentrations of the pollutants were statistically insignificant. However, the results indicate that the trans-boundary transport of SO2, NO2, CO, and PM10 from eastern China consistently affected air quality in Seoul over the study period (2001-2014). Regionally, the effects of the long-range transport of pollutants from Beijing and Harbin

  9. A qualitative risk assessment of factors contributing to foot and mouth disease outbreaks in cattle along the western boundary of the Kruger National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jori, F; Vosloo, W; Du Plessis, B; Bengis, R; Brahmbhatt, D; Gummow, B; Thomson, G R

    2009-12-01

    Between November 2000 and the end of 2007, five outbreaks of foot and mouth disease (FMD) occurred in cattle in the area adjacentto the Kruger National Park (KNP) in the north-eastern corner of South Africa. To help understand the factors behind these outbreaks a qualitative risk assessment based on the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) assessment framework was adopted, using available data from published sources and various unpublished South African sources. Risk was assessed on the basis of the following factors: data on South African Territories (SAT) type infections of buffalo and impala in the KNP, permeability of the fence along the western boundary of the KNP, the potential for contact between livestock and wildlife susceptible to FMD in areas adjacent to the KNP, and the level of herd immunity in cattle generated by prophylactic vaccination. Scenario pathways for FMD occurrence outside the KNP are presented as a conceptual framework to qualitatively assess the risk of FMD outbreaks. Factors that are likely to have most influence on the risk were identified: fence permeability, vaccination coverage, or the efficiency of animal movement control measures. The method and results are provided as an approach that may be used as a basis to evaluate the risk of FMD outbreaks occurring in other wildlife/livestock interface areas of southern Africa.

  10. Assessment of the Radiation-Equivalent of Chemotherapy Contributions in 1-Phase Radio-chemotherapy Treatment of Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plataniotis, George A., E-mail: george.plataniotis@nhs.net [Department of Oncology, Queens Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Dale, Roger G. [Department of Surgery and Cancer, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To estimate the radiation equivalent of the chemotherapy contribution to observed complete response rates in published results of 1-phase radio-chemotherapy of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: A standard logistic dose–response curve was fitted to data from radiation therapy-alone trials and then used as the platform from which to quantify the chemotherapy contribution in 1-phase radio-chemotherapy trials. Two possible mechanisms of chemotherapy effect were assumed (1) a fixed radiation-independent contribution to local control; or (2) a fixed degree of chemotherapy-induced radiosensitization. A combination of both mechanisms was also considered. Results: The respective best-fit values of the independent chemotherapy-induced complete response (CCR) and radiosensitization (s) coefficients were 0.40 (95% confidence interval −0.07 to 0.87) and 1.30 (95% confidence interval 0.86-1.70). Independent chemotherapy effect was slightly favored by the analysis, and the derived CCR value was consistent with reports of pathologic complete response rates seen in neoadjuvant chemotherapy-alone treatments of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. The radiation equivalent of the CCR was 36.3 Gy. Conclusion: Although the data points in the analyzed radio-chemotherapy studies are widely dispersed (largely on account of the diverse range of chemotherapy schedules used), it is nonetheless possible to fit plausible-looking response curves. The methodology used here is based on a standard technique for analyzing dose-response in radiation therapy-alone studies and is capable of application to other mixed-modality treatment combinations involving radiation therapy.

  11. Intellectual and non-intellectual determinants of high academic achievement – the contribution of personality traits to the assessment of high performance potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Schubhart

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a study is presented which tries to explain and predict high academic achievement in children or adolescents on the basis of intellectual and non-intellectual determinants – in this case, performance relevant personality traits as well as the social environment of stimulation. The prognosis of high academic achievement is based on a new diagnostic model, the Viennese Diagnostic Model of High Achievement Potential, which undergoes its first empirical validation here. The results show impressive evidence that performance-relevant personality traits and categories of social environment of stimulation contribute to high academic achievement in children and adolescents of above-average intelligence.

  12. Why is firefly oxyluciferin a notoriously labile substance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Oleg V; Nath, Naba K; Naumov, Panče; Hintermann, Lukas

    2014-01-13

    The chemistry of firefly bioluminescence is important for numerous applications in biochemistry and analytical chemistry. The emitter of this bioluminescent system, firefly oxyluciferin, is difficult to handle. The cause of its lability was clarified while its synthesis was reinvestigated. A side product was identified and characterized by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. The reason for the lability of oxyluciferin is now ascribed to autodimerization of the coexisting enol and keto forms in a Mannich-type reaction.

  13. Generic Safety Issue (GSI) 171 -- Engineered Safety Feature (ESF) failure from a loop subsequent to LOCA: Assessment of plant vulnerability and CDF contributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Guridi, G.; Samanta, P.; Chu, L.; Yang, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Generic Safety Issue 171 (GSI-171), Engineered Safety Feature (ESF) from a Loss Of Offsite Power (LOOP) subsequent to a Loss Of Coolant Accident (LOCA), deals with an accident sequence in which a LOCA is followed by a LOOP. This issue was later broadened to include a LOOP followed by a LOCA. Plants are designed to handle a simultaneous LOCA and LOOP. In this paper, the authors address the unique issues that are involved i LOCA with delayed LOOP (LOCA/LOOP) and LOOP with delayed LOCA (LOOP/LOCA) accident sequences. LOCA/LOOP accidents are analyzed further by developing event-tree/fault-tree models to quantify their contributions to core-damage frequency (CDF) in a pressurized water reactor and a boiling water reactor (PWR and a BWR). Engineering evaluation and judgments are used during quantification to estimate the unique conditions that arise in a LOCA/LOOP accident. The results show that the CDF contribution of such an accident can be a dominant contributor to plant risk, although BWRs are less vulnerable than PWRs.

  14. Assessing the Fatty Acid, Carotenoid, and Tocopherol Compositions of Amaranth and Quinoa Seeds Grown in Ontario and Their Overall Contribution to Nutritional Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yao; Li, Xihong; Chen, Peter X; Zhang, Bing; Liu, Ronghua; Hernandez, Marta; Draves, Jamie; Marcone, Massimo F; Tsao, Rong

    2016-02-10

    Various fatty acids, tocopherols, carotenoids, and their respective antioxidant contributions in 7 amaranth seed and 11 quinoa seed samples along with a new evaluation method are reported. The lipid yield was 6.98-7.22% in amaranth seeds and 6.03-6.74% in quinoa seeds, with unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) being the predominant fatty acids, 71.58-72.44% in amaranth seeds and 81.44-84.49% in quinoa seeds, respectively. Carotenoids, mainly lutein and zeaxanthin, are confirmed for the first time in amaranth seeds, while β-carotene is reported first in quinoa seeds. The predominant tocopherols in amaranth seeds are δ- and α-tocopherol, whereas γ- and α-tocopherol are the primary tocopherols in quinoa seeds. UFAs, carotenoids, and tocopherols showed good correlation with antioxidant activity. All of the amaranth seeds demonstrated lower overall lipophilic quality than quinoa seeds, with the AS1 and QS10 cultivars providing the highest scores for amaranth and quinoa seeds, respectively. Results from this study will contribute to developing quinoa seeds and related functional foods with increased benefits.

  15. Assessment of the physiologic contribution of right atrial function to total right heart function in patients with and without pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivak, Joseph A; Raina, Amresh; Forfia, Paul R

    2016-09-01

    Total right heart function requires normal function of both the right ventricle and the right atrium. However, the degree to which right atrial (RA) function and right ventricular (RV) function each contribute to total right heart function has not been quantified. In this study, we aimed to quantify the contribution of RA function to total right heart function in a group of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) patients compared to a cohort of normal controls without cardiovascular disease. The normal cohort comprised 35 subjects with normal clinical echocardiograms, while the PAH cohort included 37 patients, of whom 31 had echocardiograms before and after initiation of PAH-specific therapy. Total right heart function was measured via tricuspid annular plane excursion (TAPSE). TAPSE was broken down into two components, the excursion occurring during RA contraction (TAPSERA) and that occurring before RA contraction (TAPSERV). RA fractional area change (RA-FAC) was also compared between the two groups. In the PAH cohort, more than half of the total TAPSE occurred during atrial systole, compared to less than one-third in the normal cohort (51.0% vs. 32.1%; P right heart function in patients with PAH than in normal subjects.

  16. Quantitative assessment of scattering contributions in high energy cone-beam computed tomography; Quantitative Untersuchung der Streubeitraege in Hochenergie-Roentgencomputertomografie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stritt, Carina; Schuetz, Philipp; Plamondon, Mathieu; Hofmann, Juergen; Sennhauser, Urs [Empa, Duebendorf (Switzerland). Reliability Science and Technology Laboratory; Flisch, Alexander [Empa, Duebendorf (Switzerland). Reliability Science and Technology Laboratory; Empa, Duebendorf (Switzerland). Center for X-Ray Analytics

    2016-02-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is an established method in the fields of failure analysis and quality control. The energy of the X-ray beam determines the penetration length of the radiation and hereby limits the size and the density of the object that is investigated. For the case of large, dense and heavy objects, X-ray energies exceeding one mega electronvolt (MeV) are needed to achieve measureable transmission values. An important factor for the quality of X-ray CT is the contribution of scattered radiation in the radiographies. X-ray photons can be scattered from the object as well as the instrumentation and the environment which leads to a distorted transmission image. Besides scattered radiation, the physical effect of pair production has to be taken into account for radiation in the range of MeV. This work investigates the impact of each of the scattering processes on the radiography. Detailed Monte Carlo simulations help to distinguish the physical interactions as well as scattered radiation from system components. In contrast to previous studies, not only a set of simple geometric objects made of different materials is examined, but also models of the components of a CT scanner are used to estimate the contribution of scattering of various system components.

  17. [Implementation and validation in the Italian context of the HSE management standards: a contribution to provide a practical model for the assessment of work-related stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iavicoli, S; Natali, E; Rondinone, B M; Castaldi, T; Persechino, B

    2010-01-01

    Over the last years, stress has been recognized as a potential work-related risk factor. Unfortunately, work-related stress is a very delicate subject, especially because it is difficult to assess it objectively and in broadly acceptable terms. In fact, work-related stress is a subjective personal response to a specific work environment, ad is of a multifactorial origin. In order to provide a practical tool for the assessment of work-related stress, the authors carried out a thorough benchmarking analysis of the various models to manage work stress problems adopted by EU countries. As a result, the authors have chosen to apply and implement the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) Management Standards approach in the Italian context. In compliance with the European Framework Agreement signed on October 8, 2004, HSE Management Standards ask for the coordinated and integrated involvement of workers and safety personnel and represent a valid assessment approach based on principles widely acknowledged in the scientific literature.

  18. Demand assessment and price-elasticity estimation of quality-improved primary health care in Palestine: a contribution from the contingent valuation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataria, Awad; Luchini, Stéphane; Daoud, Yousef; Moatti, Jean-Paul

    2007-10-01

    This paper proposes a new methodology to assess demand and price-elasticity for health care, based on patients' stated willingness to pay (WTP) values for certain aspects of health care quality improvements. A conceptual analysis of how respondents consider contingent valuation (CV) questions allowed us to specify a probability density function of stated WTP values, and consequently, to model a demand function for quality-improved health care, using a parametric survival approach. The model was empirically estimated using a CV study intended to assess patients' values for improving the quality of primary health care (PHC) services in Palestine. A random sample of 499 individuals was interviewed following medical consultation in four PHC centers. Quality was assessed using a multi-attribute approach; and respondents valued seven specific quality improvements using a decomposed valuation scenario and a payment card elicitation technique. Our results suggest an inelastic demand at low user fees levels, and when the price-increase is accompanied with substantial quality-improvements. Nevertheless, demand becomes more and more elastic if user fees continue to rise. On the other hand, patients' reactions to price-increase turn out to depend on their level of income. Our results can be used to design successful health care financing strategies that include a consideration of patients' preferences and financial capacities.

  19. Criteria for sustainable buildings: Assessment of indoor thermal environment - a contribution to the discussion; Kriterien des nachhaltigen Bauens: Bewertung des thermischen Raumklimas - ein Diskussionsbeitrag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellwig, Runa T.; Steiger, Simone; Hauser, Gerd; Holm, Andreas; Sedlbauer, Klaus [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Bauphysik, Valley (Germany)

    2008-06-15

    The German federal government provides a guide book ''Sustainable Buildings''[5]. The guide book contains principles for the design, construction and operation of buildings. Furthermore it provides procedures to assess economical and ecological but also sociocultural factors. The German Federal Ministry of Transport, Building and Urban Affairs is planning to enhance the guide book. This article discusses criteria for assessing the sociocultural factor ''thermal comfort''. The criteria gained from a review of literature and standards are examined for their suitability as assessment criteria in the guide book. They should be applicable for residential and office buildings as well as for new and existing buildings. For the different building types feasible methods are suggested. So far standards provide several approaches to assess thermal comfort. For some of these criteria there is no simple calculation method available. Several standards exist addressing the same criterion but using different methods. There is a need to harmonize the standards. Further research is required to provide assessment methods for important factors influencing occupant's satisfaction. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Die Bundesregierung hat den Leitfaden ''Nachhaltiges Bauen'' fuer Bundesbauten[5] herausgegeben. Der Leitfaden enthaelt Grundsaetze fuer das Planen, Bauen und Nutzen von Bundesliegenschaften. Der Leitfaden ermoeglicht eine Bewertung von oekonomischen und oekologischen, aber auch soziokulturellen Faktoren. Das Bundesministerium fuer Verkehr, Bau und Stadtentwicklung plant nun den Leitfaden fortzuschreiben. Mit vorliegender Publikation sollen Kriterien zur Bewertung des Raumklimas mit dem Schwerpunkt thermische Behaglichkeit der Nutzer aufgezeigt werden. Hierzu wird der bekannte Stand des Wissens (Literatur, Normen, Richtlinien) herangezogen und bezueglich der Eignung als Kriterium im

  20. Mercury in the mix: An in situ mesocosm approach to assess relative contributions of mercury sources to methylmercury production and bioaccumulation in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, J.; Krabbenhoft, D. P.; Kraus, T. E. C.; Ackerman, J.; Stumpner, E. B.; DeWild, J.; Marvin-DiPasquale, M. C.; Tate, M.; Ogorek, J.

    2014-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) contamination is considered one of the greatest threats to the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and the San Francisco Estuary ecosystems. This threat is driven by the transformation of Hg, deposited in the Delta from erosion of upstream historic mining debris and atmospheric deposition, by native bacteria into the more toxic and biologically available form, methylmercury (MeHg), in the wetlands and sediment of the Delta. To effectively manage this threat, a quantitative understanding of the relative contribution of the different Hg sources to MeHg formation is needed. Mass balance estimates indicate as much as 99% of the Hg entering the Delta arrives via tributary inputs. Of the tributary Hg load, approximately 90% is adsorbed to suspended particles from tributary discharge and 10% is in the dissolved fraction, potentially of atmospheric origin. In comparison, the remaining 1-2% of the Hg entering the Delta arrives through direct atmospheric deposition (wet and dry). The relative importance of these sources to MeHg production within the Delta is not linearly related to the mass inputs because atmospherically-derived Hg is believed to be more reactive than sediment-bound Hg with respect to MeHg formation. We conducted an in situ mesocosm dosing experiment where different Hg sources to the Delta (direct atmospheric, dissolved riverine and suspended sediment) were "labeled" with different stable Hg isotopes and added to mesocosms within four different wetlands. Mercury isotopes added with the streambed sediments were equilibrated in sealed containers for six months; while the Hg isotopes associated with the precipitation and river water were equilibrated for 24 hours prior to use. After adding the isotopes, we sampled the water column, overlying air, bottom sediments and fish (Gambusia) at time intervals up to 30 days. Preliminary results from this experiment suggest that aqueous Hg sources (Hg introduced with precipitation and filtered river water) are 10

  1. Monitoring of reported sudden emission rate changes of major radioxenon emitters in the northern and southern hemispheres in 2008 to assess their contribution to the respective radioxenon backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saey, P. R. J.; Auer, M.; Becker, A.; Colmanet, S.; Hoffmann, E.; Nikkinen, M.; Schlosser, C.; Sonck, M.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric radioxenon monitoring is a key component of the verification of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Radiopharmaceutical production facilities (RPF) have recently been identified of emitting the major part of the environmental radioxenon measured at globally distributed monitoring sites deployed to strengthen the radionuclide part of the CTBT verification regime. Efforts to raise a global radioxenon emission inventory revealed that the global total emission from RPF's is 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than the respective emissions related to maintenance of all nuclear power plants (NPP). Given that situation we have seen in 2008 two peculiar hemisphere-specific situations: 1) In the northern hemisphere, a joint shutdown of the global largest four radiopharmaceutical facilities revealed the contribution of the normally 'masked' NPP related emissions. Due to an incident, the Molybdenum production at the "Institut des Radioéléments" (IRE) in Fleurus, Belgium, was shut down between Monday 25 August and 2 December 2008. IRE is the third largest global producer of medical isotopes. In the same period, but for different reasons, the other three worldwide largest producers (CRL in Canada, HFR in The Netherlands and NTP in South Africa) also had scheduled and unscheduled shutdowns. The activity concentrations of 133Xe measured at the Schauinsland Mountain station near Freiburg in Germany (situated 380 km SW of Fleurus) which have a mean of 4.8 mBq/m3 for the period February 2004 - August 2008, went down to 0.87 mBq/m3 for the period September - November 2008. 2) In the southern hemisphere, after a long break, the only radiopharmaceutical facility in Australia started up test production in late November 2008. In the period before the start-up, the background of radioxenon in Australia (Melbourne and Darwin) was below measurable quantities. During six test runs of the renewed RPF at ANSTO in Lucas Heights, up to 6 mBq/m3 of 133Xe were measured in

  2. Objective assessment of the contribution of the RECOPESCA network to the monitoring of 3D coastal ocean variables in the Bay of Biscay and the English Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamouroux, Julien; Charria, Guillaume; De Mey, Pierre; Raynaud, Stéphane; Heyraud, Catherine; Craneguy, Philippe; Dumas, Franck; Le Hénaff, Matthieu

    2016-04-01

    In the Bay of Biscay and the English Channel, in situ observations represent a key element to monitor and to understand the wide range of processes in the coastal ocean and their direct impacts on human activities. An efficient way to measure the hydrological content of the water column over the main part of the continental shelf is to consider ships of opportunity as the surface to cover is wide and could be far from the coast. In the French observation strategy, the RECOPESCA programme, as a component of the High frequency Observation network for the environment in coastal SEAs (HOSEA), aims to collect environmental observations from sensors attached to fishing nets. In the present study, we assess that network using the Array Modes (ArM) method (a stochastic implementation of Le Hénaff et al. Ocean Dyn 59: 3-20. doi: 10.1007/s10236-008-0144-7, 2009). That model ensemble-based method is used here to compare model and observation errors and to quantitatively evaluate the performance of the observation network at detecting prior (model) uncertainties, based on hypotheses on error sources. A reference network, based on fishing vessel observations in 2008, is assessed using that method. Considering the various seasons, we show the efficiency of the network at detecting the main model uncertainties. Moreover, three scenarios, based on the reference network, a denser network in 2010 and a fictive network aggregated from a pluri-annual collection of profiles, are also analysed. Our sensitivity study shows the importance of the profile positions with respect to the sheer number of profiles for ensuring the ability of the network to describe the main error modes. More generally, we demonstrate the capacity of this method, with a low computational cost, to assess and to design new in situ observation networks.

  3. Defining the role of modern imaging techniques in assessing lymph nodes for metastasis in cancer: evolving contribution of PET in this setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwee, Thomas C. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Basu, Sandip [Tata Memorial Center Annexe, Radiation Medicine Center (Bhabha Atomic Research Center), Bombay (India); Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Torigian, Drew A.; Saboury, Babak; Alavi, Abass [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Accurate characterization of lymph nodes in patients with cancer and in patients who present with unexplained lymphadenopathy is of major importance for appropriate treatment planning and determination of prognosis. Size measurements are still the most frequently used method for discriminating malignant from non-malignant lymph nodes, but are insufficiently accurate. In order to improve evaluation of lymph nodes, there is a need for imaging modalities that go beyond anatomical lymph node assessment and that allow visualization and quantification of physiological and biochemical processes at the cellular level. We review and discuss functional imaging techniques in the evaluation of lymph nodes. (orig.)

  4. O teste de Pfister e sua contribuição para diagnóstico da esquizofrenia The Pfister test's contribution to the assessment of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Elisa de Villemor Amaral

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Procurou-se identificar indicadores no teste das Pirâmides Coloridas de Pfister que pudessem auxiliar nos diagnósticos de pacientes esquizofrênicos. Tal iniciativa justifica-se pela escassez de pesquisas de validade desse teste para diagnóstico em psicopatologia. Os resultados obtidos demonstraram que a execução de tapetes furados e desequilibrados constitui um indicador significativo de esquizofrenia, principalmente quando associado a não execução de formações em camadas multicromáticas e a constância absoluta das cores vermelha e marrom. Não foram identificadas alterações significativas na freqüência da cor branca conforme previsto em outros estudos. Os resultados demonstram que a sensibilidade do Pfister para diagnóstico de esquizofrenia, com base nesses indicadores, é relativa devido à possibilidade de falsos negativos e falsos positivos, podendo, entretanto contribuir positivamente para a avaliação psicológica quando associado com outras técnicas. Esse estudo vem ao encontro da necessidade de verificar os alcances e as limitações do uso de testes psicológicos.The aim of this study is to identify the aspects in the Color Pyramid Test of Pfister that may be useful to the assessment of schizophrenic patients. It is justified due to the scarceness of studies on the validity of Pfister Test for the psychopathological assessment. The results demonstrate that the disorganized forms called holey rugs or unbalanced rugs are significant indicators of schizophrenia, especially when associated with the non execution of stratified forms or the absolute constancy of the colors red and brown. We didn't find significant alterations on the frequency of the white color as found on other studies. Our results indicate that the sensibility of the Pfister test for the diagnosis of schizophrenia is limited due to the possibility of false positives and false negatives, but it could help in the psychological assessment when associated to

  5. Assessment of exposure to atmospheric particles: contribution of individual measurements; Evaluation de l'exposition aux particules atmospheriques: apport des mesures individuelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosqueron, L.; Momas, I. [Universite Rene Descartes, Faculte des Sciences Pharmaceutiques et Biologiques, Lab. d' Hygiene et de Sante Publique, 75 - Paris (France); Le Moullec, Y. [Laboratoire d' Hygiene de la Ville de Paris, 75 (France); Momas, I. [Direction de l' Action Sociale, de l' Enfance et de la Sante, Cellule Epidemiologie, 75 - Paris (France)

    2001-02-01

    There are few studies of individual exposure to atmospheric particles, because of the relatively bulky and noisy sampling devices. These personalized measurements, generally associated with micro-environmental measurements, are aimed at studying the distribution of individual exposure and identifying its main determinants. Methods: A synopsis of the methods implemented in such studies (populations studied, measurements strategies, questionnaires on time-activity patterns, residences and work place) was detailed. The major results are presented and discussed from an epidemiological point of view. Results: The individual exposure measured with portable devices generally were generally found to be higher than the estimations made by combining micro-environmental (outdoor and indoor) measurements and data from time-activity diaries. The difference between results of these two approaches, known as 'personal cloud', remains poorly understood. Correlations between individual measurements and outdoor concentrations are weak; nevertheless, day to day variations of these two series of measurements are better related. The main determinants of individual exposure to particles are identified but a quantification of their contribution remains difficult, except for passive smoking. Conclusion: Personal measurements cannot be used to estimate particle exposure in large scale epidemiological studies. This exposure needs to be modeled. (authors)

  6. Assessment of liver circulation by quantitative scintiangiography: Evaluation of the relative contribution of the hepatic arterial and portal venous blood flows to liver perfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molino, G.; Squadrone, E.; Baccegal, M.; Magnani, C.

    1989-04-01

    Quantitative hepatic scintiangiography was previously used for evaluating the relative contribution of hepatic arterial and portal venous blood flows to the hepatic circulation. The present study compares 3 different procedures (automatic and manual integration, and slope fitting methods) for analyzing the hepatic time activity curves obtained after bolus i.v. injection of 370 MBq /sup 99m/Tc-diethylentriaminopentacetic acid. Twenty five subjects were studied: Five controls, ten cirrhotics, and ten portal hypertensive patients previously submitted to side to side portacaval anastomosis. The correspondence between results given by the different methods was satisfactory only in shunted patients, and the reproducibility of computed parameters was quite poor for all procedures. Accordingly, none of the methods can be considered as supporting reliable quantitative pathophysiological evaluations. However, the hepatic arterial/portal venous flow ratio was found to be increased in liver cirrhosis and in shunted patients and therefore, in spite of the limitations underlined before and of the absence of data on the reproducibility of consecutive injections, hepatic scintiangiography may be of some clinical utility.

  7. A quantitative assessment of source contributions to fine particulate matter (PM2.5)-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their nitrated and hydroxylated derivatives in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yiqiu; Cheng, Yubo; Qiu, Xinghua; Lin, Yan; Cao, Jing; Hu, Di

    2016-12-01

    Atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their derivatives are of great concern due to their adverse health effects. However, source identification and apportionment of these compounds, particularly their nitrated and hydroxylated derivatives (i.e., NPAHs and OHPAHs), in fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in Hong Kong are still lacking. In this study, we conducted a 1-year observation at an urban site in Hong Kong. PM2.5-bound PAHs and their derivatives were measured, with median concentrations of 4590, 44.4 and 31.6 pg m(-3) for ∑21PAHs, ∑13NPAHs, and ∑12OHPAHs, respectively. Higher levels were observed on regional pollution days than on long regional transport (LRT) or local emission days. Based on positive matrix factorization analysis, four sources were determined: marine vessels, vehicle emissions, biomass burning, and a mixed source of coal combustion and NPAHs secondary formation. Coal combustion and biomass burning were the major sources of PAHs, contributing over 85% of PAHs on regional and LRT days. Biomass burning was the predominant source of OHPAHs throughout the year, while NPAHs mainly originated from secondary formation and fuel combustion. For benzo[a]pyrene (BaP)-based PM2.5 toxicity, the mixed source of coal combustion and NPAHs secondary formation was the major contributor, followed by biomass burning and vehicle emissions.

  8. Contributions of root and shoot derived-C to soil organic matter throughout an agricultural soil profile assessed by compound-specific 13C analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez-Millan, Mercedes; Dignac, Marie-France; Rumpel, Cornelia; Rasse, Daniel P.; Derenne, Sylvie

    2010-05-01

    The turnover of soil organic matter (SOM) is generally studied in the topsoil horizons, where the highest concentrations of organic carbon (OC) are found. Subsoils, although containing lower amounts of organic carbon compared to topsoils, greatly contribute to the total carbon stocks within a soil profile. An increase in SOM aliphaticity was observed during SOM degradation, and also down the soil profile, suggesting that the stable pool of SOM is enriched in aliphatic structures. These alkyl-C structures might mainly derive from cutins and suberins, two biomacromolecules, which contain biomarkers specific for shoot and root plant biomass. The aim of this study was to use cutin and suberin structural units to follow the incorporation of plant biomass originating from roots and shoots throughout an agricultural soil profile. We measured the 13C natural abundance of root and shoot biomarkers in samples taken from 15 to 105 cm depth in a C3/C4 chronosequence. After 9 years of maize (C4) cropping, the distribution of root biomarkers (diacids) significantly changed and their concentration increased compared to the wheat (CC3) soil. The largest increase was observed at 60-75 cm where diacids reached up to 134 ?g/gOC compared to 23 ?g/gOC in the wheat soil. Higher inputs from maize root biomass are also suggested by an average 13C enrichment of the root markers in the maize compared to the wheat soil.

  9. PARENTING QUALITY IN DRUG-ADDICTED MOTHERS IN A THERAPEUTIC MOTHER-CHILD COMMUNITY: THE CONTRIBUTION OF ATTACHMENT AND PERSONALITY ASSESSMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca eDe Palo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence shows that attachment is a key risk factor for the diagnosis and treatment of clinical diseases in Axis I, such as drug addiction. Recent literature regarding attachment, psychiatric pathology and drug addiction demonstrates that there is a clear prevalence of insecure attachment patterns in clinical and drug addicted subjects. Specifically, some authors emphasize that the anxious-insecure attachment pattern is prevalent among drug-addicted women with double diagnosis (Fonagy et al., 1996. The construct of attachment as a risk factor in clinical samples of drug-addicted mothers needs to be studied more in depth though. The present explorative study focused on the evaluation of parenting quality in a therapeutic mother-child community using attachment and personality assessment tools able to outline drug-addicted mothers’ profiles. This study involved 30 drug addicted mothers, inpatients of a therapeutic community. Attachment representations were assessed via the Adult Attachment Interview; personality diagnosis and symptomatic profiles were performed using the Structured Clinical Interview of the DSM-IV (SCID-II and the Symptom Check List-90-R (SCL-90-R respectively. Both instruments were administered during the first six months of residence in a therapeutic community. Results confirmed the prevalence of insecure attachment representations (90%, with a high presence of U patterns, prevalently scored for dangerous and/or not protective experiences in infanthood. Very high values (>5 were found for some experience scales (i.e. neglect and rejection scales. Data also showed very low values (1-3 in metacognitive monitoring, coherence of transcript and coherence of mind scales. Patients’ different profiles (U vs. E vs. Ds were linked to SCID-II diagnosis, providing insightful indications both for treatment planning and intervention on parenting functions and for deciding if to start foster care or adoption proceedings for

  10. Assessment of selective homing and contribution to vessel formation of cryopreserved peripherally injected bone marrow mononuclear cells following experimental myocardial damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciulla, M M; Ferrero, S; Montelatici, E; Gianelli, U; Braidotti, P; Calderoni, S; Paliotti, R; Annoni, G; De Camilli, E; Busca, G; Magrini, F; Bosari, S; Lazzari, L; Rebulla, P

    2006-09-01

    In view of a potential clinical use we aimed this study to assess the selective homing to the injured myocardium and the definitive fate of peripherally injected labeled and previously cryopreserved Bone Marrow Mononuclear cells (BMMNCs). The myocardial damage (cryoinjury) was produced in 59 rats (45 treated, 14 controls). From 51 donor rats 4.4 x 10(9) BMMNCs were isolated and cryopreserved (slow-cooling protocols); the number of CD34+ and the viability of pooled cells was assessed by flow-cytometry analysis before and after cryopreservation and simulated delivery through a 23G needle. Seven days after injury, BMMNCs were thawed, labeled with PKH26 dye and peripherally injected (20 x 10(6) cells in 500 microl) in recipient rats. Two weeks after experimental injury, the heart, lungs, liver, kidneys, spleen and thymus were harvested to track transplanted cells. Except a small amount in the spleen, PKH26+ cells were found only in the infarcted myocardium of the treated animals. Typical vascular structures CD34+ were found in the infarcted areas of all animals; treated rats showed a significantly higher number of these structures if compared with untreated. Morphological ultra-structural examination of infarcted areas confirmed in treated rats the presence of early-stage PKH26+ vascular structures derived from injected BMMNCs. The estimated mean CD34+ cells loss due to the cryopreservation procedure and to the system of delivery was 0.24% and 0.1%, respectively, confirming the feasibility of the procedure. This study supports the possible therapeutic use of cryopreserved peripherally injecetd BMMNCs as a source of CD34+ independent vascular structures following myocardial damage.

  11. Assessment of Local Control after Laser-Induced Thermotherapy of Liver Metastases from Colorectal Cancer: Contribution of FDG-PET in Patients with Clinical Suspicion of Progressive Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denecke, T.; Steffen, I.; Hildebrandt, B.; Ruehl, R.; Streitparth, F.; Lehmk uhl, L.; Langrehr, J.; Ricke, J.; Amthauer, H.; Lopez Haenninen, E. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Bereiche Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Medizinische Klinik mit Schwerpunkt Haematologie Onkologie, and Klinik fuer Allgemein-, Viszeral-, und T ransplantationschirurgie, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Charite - Universitaetsmedizi n Berlin, (Germany)

    2007-10-15

    Background: Management of patients after locally ablative treatment of liver metastases requires exact information about local control and systemic disease status. To fulfill these requirements, whole-body imaging using positron emission tomography with {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET) is a promising alternative to morphologic imaging modalities such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Purpose: To evaluate FDG-PET for the assessment of local control and systemic disease in patients with clinical suspicion of tumor progression after laser-induced thermotherapy (LITT) of colorectal liver metastases. Material and Methods: In 21 patients with suspicion of progressive disease after LITT, whole-body FDG-PET was performed. The presence of viable tumor within treated lesions, new liver metastases, and extrahepatic disease was evaluated visually and semi quantitatively (maximal standard uptake value [SUVmax], tumor-to-normal ratio [T/N]). The standard of reference was histopathology (n = 25 lesions) and/or clinical follow-up (>12 months) including contrast-enhanced MRI of the liver. Results: Among 54 metastases treated with LITT, 29 had residual tumor. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis of SUVmax (area under the curve (AUC) 0.990) and T/N (AUC 0.968) showed a significant discrimination level of negative or positive lesion status with an equal accuracy of 94% (51/54). The overall accuracy of visual FDG-PET was 96% (52/54), with one false-negative lesion among six examined within 3 days after LITT, and one false-positive lesion examined 54 days after LITT. In the detection of new intra- and extrahepatic lesions, FDG-PET resulted in correct alteration of treatment strategy in 43% of patients (P = 0.007). Conclusion: FDG-PET is a promising tool for the assessment of local control and whole-body restaging in patients with clinical suspicion of tumor progression after locally ablative treatment of colorectal liver metastases with

  12. Bioaccessibility assessment of patulin and ochratoxin A in cereal and fruit based baby foods using a harmonized in vitro digestion model: contribution for the risk assessment of chemical mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Assunção, R.; Martins, C.; Leclerc Duarte, E.; Alvito, P.

    2015-01-01

    People, animals and the environment can be exposed to multiple chemicals at once from a variety of sources, but current risk assessment is usually carried out on one chemical substance at a time. Mycotoxins are fungal natural contaminants commonly found in a variety of foods including baby foods and have been found in cereal and fruit based baby foods. In human health risk assessment, ingestion of food is considered a major route of exposure to many contaminants including mycotoxins, although...

  13. Contribution of (222)Rn-bearing water to indoor radon and indoor air quality assessment in hot spring hotels of Guangdong, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Gang; Wang, Xinming; Chen, Diyun; Chen, Yongheng

    2011-04-01

    This study investigates the contribution of radon ((222)Rn)-bearing water to indoor (222)Rn in thermal baths. The (222)Rn concentrations in air were monitored in the bathroom and the bedroom. Particulate matter (PM, both PM(10) and PM(2.5)) and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) were also monitored with portable analyzers. The bathrooms were supplied with hot spring water containing 66-260 kBq m(-3) of (222)Rn. The results show that the spray of hot spring water from the bath spouts is the dominant mechanism by which (222)Rn is released into the air of the bathroom, and then it diffuses into the bedroom. Average (222)Rn level was 110-410% higher in the bedrooms and 510-1200% higher in the bathrooms compared to the corresponding average levels when there was no use of hot spring water. The indoor (222)Rn levels were influenced by the (222)Rn concentrations in the hot spring water and the bathing times. The average (222)Rn transfer coefficients from water to air were 6.2 × 10(-4)-4.1 × 10(-3). The 24-h average levels of CO(2) and PM(10) in the hotel rooms were 89% and 22% higher than the present Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) standard of China. The main particle pollutant in the hotel rooms was PM(2.5). Radon and PM(10) levels in some hotel rooms were at much higher concentrations than guideline levels, and thus the potential health risks to tourists and especially to the hotel workers should be of great concern, and measures should be taken to lower inhalation exposure to these air pollutants.

  14. Looking beyond fertilizer: Assessing the contribution of nitrogen from hydrologic inputs and organic matter to plant growth in the cranberry agroecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackpoole, S.M.; Kosola, K.R.; Workmaster, B.A.A.; Guldan, N.M.; Browne, B.A.; Jackson, R. D.

    2011-01-01

    Even though nitrogen (N) is a key nutrient for successful cranberry production, N cycling in cranberry agroecosystems is not completely understood. Prior research has focused mainly on timing and uptake of ammonium fertilizer, but the objective of our study was to evaluate the potential for additional N contributions from hydrologic inputs (flooding, irrigation, groundwater, and precipitation) and organic matter (OM). Plant biomass, soil, surface and groundwater samples were collected from five cranberry beds (cranberry production fields) on four different farms, representing both upland and lowland systems. Estimated average annual plant uptake (63.3 ?? 22.5 kg N ha-1 year-1) exceeded total average annual fertilizer inputs (39.5 ?? 11.6 kg N ha-1 year-1). Irrigation, precipitation, and floodwater N summed to an average 23 ?? 0.7 kg N ha-1 year-1, which was about 60% of fertilizer N. Leaf and stem litterfall added 5.2 ?? 1.2 and 24.1 ?? 3.0 kg N ha-1 year-1 respectively. The estimated net N mineralization rate from the buried bag technique was 5 ?? 0.2 kg N ha-1 year-1, which was nearly 15% of fertilizer N. Dissolved organic nitrogen represented a significant portion of the total N pool in both surface water and soil samples. Mixed-ion exchange resin core incubations indicated that 80% of total inorganic N from fertilizer, irrigation, precipitation, and mineralization was nitrate, and approximately 70% of recovered inorganic N from groundwater was nitrate. There was a weak but significant negative relationship between extractable soil ammonium concentrations and ericoid mycorrhizal colonization (ERM) rates (r = -0.22, P fertilizer N in order to maximize the benefits of ERM fungi in actively mediating N cycling in cranberry agroecosystems. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  15. Assessment of nitric oxide (NO) redox reactions contribution to nitrous oxide (N2 O) formation during nitrification using a multispecies metabolic network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Garcia, Octavio; Chandran, Kartik; Villas-Boas, Silas G; Singhal, Naresh

    2016-05-01

    Over the coming decades nitrous oxide (N2O) is expected to become a dominant greenhouse gas and atmospheric ozone depleting substance. In wastewater treatment systems, N2O is majorly produced by nitrifying microbes through biochemical reduction of nitrite (NO2(-)) and nitric oxide (NO). However it is unknown if the amount of N2O formed is affected by alternative NO redox reactions catalyzed by oxidative nitrite oxidoreductase (NirK), cytochromes (i.e., P460 [CytP460] and 554 [Cyt554 ]) and flavohemoglobins (Hmp) in ammonia- and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (AOB and NOB, respectively). In this study, a mathematical model is developed to assess how N2O formation is affected by such alternative nitrogen redox transformations. The developed multispecies metabolic network model captures the nitrogen respiratory pathways inferred from genomes of eight AOB and NOB species. The performance of model variants, obtained as different combinations of active NO redox reactions, was assessed against nine experimental datasets for nitrifying cultures producing N2O at different concentration of electron donor and acceptor. Model predicted metabolic fluxes show that only variants that included NO oxidation to NO2(-) by CytP460 and Hmp in AOB gave statistically similar estimates to observed production rates of N2O, NO, NO2(-) and nitrate (NO3(-)), together with fractions of AOB and NOB species in biomass. Simulations showed that NO oxidation to NO2(-) decreased N2O formation by 60% without changing culture's NO2(-) production rate. Model variants including NO reduction to N2O by Cyt554 and cNor in NOB did not improve the accuracy of experimental datasets estimates, suggesting null N2O production by NOB during nitrification. Finally, the analysis shows that in nitrifying cultures transitioning from dissolved oxygen levels above 3.8 ± 0.38 to <1.5 ± 0.8 mg/L, NOB cells can oxidize the NO produced by AOB through reactions catalyzed by oxidative NirK.

  16. Monitoring of fumarole discharge and CO2 soil degassing in the Azores: contribution to volcanic surveillance and public health risk assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Faria

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Fluid geochemistry monitoring in the Azores involves the regular sampling and analysis of gas discharges from fumaroles and measurements of CO2 diffuse soil gas emissions. Main degassing areas under monitoring are associated with hydrothermal systems of active central volcanoes in S. Miguel, Terceira and Graciosa islands. Fumarole discharge analysis since 1991 show that apart from steam these gas emissions are CO2 dominated with H2S, H2, CH4 and N2 in minor amounts. Mapping of CO2 diffuse soil emissions in S. Miguel Island lead to the conclusion that some inhabited areas are located within hazard-zones. At Furnas village, inside Furnas volcano caldera, about 62% of the 896 houses are within the CO2 anomaly, 5% being in areas of moderate to high risk. At Ribeira Seca, on the north flank of Fogo volcano, few family houses were evacuated when CO2 concentrations in the air reached 8 mol%. To assess and analyse the CO2 soil flux emissions, continuous monitoring stations were installed in S. Miguel (2, Terceira and Graciosa islands. The statistical analysis of the data showed that some meteorological parameters influence the CO2 flux. The average of CO2 flux in S. Miguel stations ranges from 250 g/m2/d at Furnas volcano to 530 g/m2/d at Fogo volcano. At Terceira Island it is about 330 g/m2/d and at Graciosa 4400 g/m2/d.

  17. Mobile phone tracking: in support of modelling traffic-related air pollution contribution to individual exposure and its implications for public health impact assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hai-Ying; Skjetne, Erik; Kobernus, Mike

    2013-11-04

    We propose a new approach to assess the impact of traffic-related air pollution on public health by mapping personal trajectories using mobile phone tracking technology in an urban environment. Although this approach is not based on any empirical studies, we believe that this method has great potential and deserves serious attention. Mobile phone tracking technology makes it feasible to generate millions of personal trajectories and thereby cover a large fraction of an urban population. Through analysis, personal trajectories are not only associated to persons, but it can also be associated with vehicles, vehicle type, vehicle speed, vehicle emission rates, and sources of vehicle emissions. Pollution levels can be estimated by dispersion models from calculated traffic emissions. Traffic pollution exposure to individuals can be estimated based on the exposure along the individual human trajectories in the estimated pollution concentration fields by utilizing modelling tools. By data integration, one may identify trajectory patterns of particularly exposed human groups. The approach of personal trajectories may open a new paradigm in understanding urban dynamics and new perspectives in population-wide empirical public health research. This new approach can be further applied to individual commuter route planning, land use planning, urban traffic network planning, and used by authorities to formulate air pollution mitigation policies and regulations.

  18. Contribution of landscape metrics to the assessment of scenic quality – the example of the landscape structure plan Havelland/Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Herbst

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The scenic quality of a landscape is a natural resource that is to be preserved according to German and international law. One important indicator for the evaluation of this value is the structural diversity of the landscape. Although Landscape Metrics (LM represent a well-known instrument for the quantification of landscape patterns, they are hardly used in applied landscape and environmental planning. This study shows possibilities for the integration of LM into a commonly used method to assess scenic quality by the example of a Landscape Structure Plan. First results indicate that especially Shannon’s Diversity Index and Edge Density are suitable to achieve an objective evaluation of the structural diversity as indicator for scenic quality. The addition of qualitative parameters to the objective structural analysis is discussed. Moreover, the use of landscape scenery units and raster cells as basic geometry has been compared. It shows that LM can support the evaluation of the aesthetic quality in environmental planning, especially when integrated into commonly used evaluation methods.

  19. mTOR-inhibitor treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma: contribution of Choi and modified Choi criteria assessed in 2D or 3D to evaluate tumor response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamuraglia, M. [Laboratoire d' Imagerie Biomedicale, Sorbonne Universites, UPMC Univ Paris 06, INSERM, CNRS, Paris (France); Raslan, S.; Penna, R.R.; Wagner, M. [Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, APHP UPMC, Service de Radiologie Polyvalente et Oncologique, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Elaidi, R.; Oudard, S. [APHP, Oncology Unit, Georges-Pompidou Hospital, Paris (France); Escudier, B. [Gustave-Roussy Institute, Medical Oncology Department, Villejuif (France); Slimane, K. [Novartis Pharma, Rueil-Malmaison (France); Lucidarme, O. [Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, APHP UPMC, Service de Radiologie Polyvalente et Oncologique, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Laboratoire d' Imagerie Biomedicale, Sorbonne Universites, UPMC Univ Paris 06, INSERM, CNRS, Paris (France)

    2016-01-15

    To determine whether 2D or 3D Choi and modified Choi (mChoi) criteria could assess the efficacy of everolimus against metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). RECIST-1.1, Choi, and mChoi criteria were applied retrospectively to analyse baseline and 2-month contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) images in 48 patients with mRCC enrolled in the everolimus arm of the French randomized double-blind multicentre phase III trial comparing everolimus versus placebo (RECORD-1). The primary endpoint was centrally reviewed progression-free survival (PFS) calculated from the initial RECORD-1 analysis. Mean attenuation was determined for 2D target lesion regions of interest drawn on CECT sections whose largest diameters had been measured, and for the 3D whole target lesion. The median PFS was 5.5 months. The median PFS for everolimus responders defined using 3D mChoi criteria was significantly longer than for non-responders (7.6 versus 5.4 months, respectively), corresponding to a hazard ratio for progression of 0.45 (95 % CI: 0.22-0.92), with respective 1-year survival rates of 31 % and 9 %. No other 2D or 3D imaging criteria at 2 months identified patients who would benefit from everolimus. At 2 months, only 3D mChoi criteria were able to identify mRCC patients with a PFS benefit from everolimus. (orig.)

  20. Contributions for the measurement of the impact of the training for work policy: A proposal for the assessment of the apprenticeship contract in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Segura Ortiz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The apprenticeship contract (AC is a training for work strategy that combines training in vocational aspects with a practical phase in a company. This dual training model presents advantages in terms of the improvement of workers’ employability perspectives and income, together with a reduced employee selection risk. Given the formal purpose of this training instrument in Colombia, there is an interest in evaluating its results in order to improve and correct the instrument’s current performance and to optimize its effective impact. Here, the authors offer a proposal for the assessment of the impact of ACs, based on the measurement of differences in levels of income of individuals who, having chosen technical vocational training, chose this contract as an alternative in the process’ practical phase. The text also includes a review of the relevant literature on AC, a description of the type of statistical model that has to be used in the evaluation, and a description of the data necessary to help the company advance.

  1. Contribution to aroma characteristics of mutton process flavor from the enzymatic hydrolysate of sheep bone protein assessed by descriptive sensory analysis and gas chromatography olfactometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Ping; Tian, Honglei; Zhang, Xiaoming; Wang, Liping

    2013-03-15

    Changes in the aroma characteristics of mutton process flavors (MPFs) prepared from sheep bone protein hydrolysates (SBPHs) with different degrees of hydrolysis (DH) were evaluated using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O), and descriptive sensory analysis (DSA). Five attributes (muttony, meaty, roasted, mouthful, and simulate) were selected to assess MPFs. The results of DSA showed a distinct difference among the control sample MPF0 and other MPF samples with added SBPHs for different DHs of almost all sensory attributes. MPF5 (DH 25.92%) was the strongest in the muttony, meaty, and roasted attributes, whereas MPF6 (DH 30.89%) was the strongest in the simulate and roasted attributes. Thirty-six compounds were identified as odor-active compounds for the evaluation of the sensory characteristics of MPFs via GC-MS-O analysis. The results of correlation analysis among odor-active compounds, molecular weight, and DSA further confirmed that the SBPH with a DH range of 25.92-30.89% may be a desirable precursor for the sensory characteristics of MPF.

  2. The burden of drinking water-associated cryptosporidiosis in China: the large contribution of the immunodeficient population identified by quantitative microbial risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shumin; An, Wei; Chen, Zhimin; Zhang, Dongqing; Yu, Jianwei; Yang, Min

    2012-09-01

    A comprehensive quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) of Cryptosporidium infection, considering pathogen removal efficiency, different exposure pathways and different susceptible subpopulations, was performed based on the result of a survey of source water from 66 waterworks in 33 major cities across China. The Cryptosporidium concentrations in source water were 0-6 oocysts/10 L, with a mean value of 0.7 oocysts/10 L. The annual diarrhea morbidity caused by Cryptosporidium in drinking water was estimated to be 2701 (95% confidence interval (CI): 138-9381) cases per 100,000 immunodeficient persons and 148 (95% CI: 1-603) cases per 100,000 immunocompetent persons, giving an overall rate of 149.0 (95% CI: 1.3-606.4) cases per 100,000 population. The cryptosporidiosis burden associated with drinking water treated with the conventional process was calculated to be 8.31 × 10(-6) (95% CI: 0.34-30.93 × 10(-6)) disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) per person per year, which was higher than the reference risk level suggested by the World Health Organization (WHO), but lower than that suggested by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Sixty-six percent of the total health burden due to cryptosporidiosis that occurred in the immunodeficient subpopulation, and 90% of the total DALYs was attributed to adults aged 15-59 years. The sensitivity analysis highlighted the great importance of stability of the treatment process and the importance of watershed protection. The results of this study will be useful in better evaluating and reducing the burden of Cryptosporidium infection.

  3. Radioactive waste management: the contribution of expert assessments to the implementation of safe management channels; La gestion des dechets radioactifs: l'apport de l'expertise a la mise en oeuvre de filieres sures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besnus, F.; Jouve, A.C. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire - IRSN, Service d' evaluation de la surete des irradiateurs, des accelerateurs et des installations de gestion des dechets, 92 - Clamart (France)

    2011-02-15

    The national Radioactive Materials and Waste Management (PNGMDR) sets objectives and defines waste management channels for all radioactive wastes produced in France. Within this framework, IRSN (Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety) expertise aims at assessing the consistency and robustness of the technical solutions set in place by the plan. As a result of this assessment, the main safety issues and priorities for upgrading the safety of the various facilities that will receive and treat waste are identified on the one hand, while possible foreseen weaknesses in terms of storage or treatment capacities are put into light on the other hand. To carry out such assessment, IRSN backs on its 'in depth' knowledge of facilities, acquired through the examination of each major step of waste management facility life (creation, commissioning, re-examination of safety...). This knowledge feeds in turn the examination of the waste management strategies implemented by operators. In addition, special attention is given to the achievement of waste packages of favourable properties as well as to the conditions for their safe disposal, since these two aspects are most often key factors for optimizing the safety of the whole management channel. By its capacity to overlook all steps of waste management channels, from production to final disposal, IRSN intends to contribute to the objective of enhancing the global safety of the management of radioactive waste. (authors)

  4. Assessment of Past, Present and Future Health-Cost Ex-ternalities of Air Pollution in Europe and the contribution from International Ship Traffic using the EVA Model System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Jørgen; Silver, Jeremy D.; Christensen, Jesper H.; Andersen, Mikael S.; Bønløkke, Jakob H.; Sigsgaard, Torben; Geels, Camilla; Gross, Allan; Hansen, Ayoe B.; Hansen, Kaj M.; Hedegaard, Gitte B.; Kaas, Eigil; Frohn, Lise M.

    2013-04-01

    An integrated model system, EVA (Economic Valuation of Air pollution), based on the impact-pathway chain has been developed, to assess the health-related economic externalities of air pollution resulting from specific emission sources or sectors. The model system can be used to support policy-making with respect to emission control. In this study, we apply the EVA system to Europe, and perform a more detailed assessment of past, present, and future health-cost externalities of the total air pollution levels in Europe (including both natural and anthropogenic sources), represented by the years 2000, 2007, 2011, and 2020. We also assess the contribution to the health-related external costs from international ship traffic with special attention to the international ship traffic in the Baltic and North Seas, since special regulatory actions on sulphur emissions, called SECA (sulphur emission control area), have been intro-duced in these areas,. We conclude that despite efficient regulatory actions in Europe in recent decades, air pollution still constitutes a serious problem to human health, hence the related external costs are considerable. The total health-related external costs for the whole of Europe is estimated at 803 bn Euro/year for the year 2000, decreasing to 537 bn Euro/year in the year 2020. We estimate the total number of premature deaths in Europe in the year 2000 due to air pollution to be around 680,000/year, decreasing to approximately 450,000 in the year 2020. The contribution from international ship traffic in the Northern Hemisphere was estimated to 7% of the total health-related external costs in Europe in the year 2000, increasing to 12% in the year 2020. In contrast, the contribution from international ship traffic in the Baltic Sea and the North Sea decreases 36% due to the regulatory efforts of reducing sulphur emissions from ship traffic in SECA. Introducing this regulatory instrument for all international ship traffic in the Northern

  5. Source contribution and risk assessment of airborne toxic metals by neutron activation analysis in Taejeon industrial complex area - Concentration analysis and health risk assessment of airborne toxic metals in Taejeon 1,2 industrial Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. H.; Jang, M. S.; Nam, B. H.; Yun, M. J. [Chungnam National Univ., Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    The study centers on one-year continual concentration analysis using ICP-MS and on health risk assessment of 15 airborne toxic metals in Taejeon 1,2 industrial complex. About 1-year arithmetic mean of human carcinogen, arsenic, hexavalent chromium and nickel subsulfide is 6.05, 2.40 and 2.81 ng/m{sup 3} while the mean of probable human carcinogen, beryllium, cadmium and lead is 0.06, 3.92, 145.99 ng/m{sup 3}, respectively. And the long-term arithmetic mean concentration of non-carcinogenic metal, manganese is 44.60 ng/m{sup 3}. The point risk estimate for the inhalation of carcinogenic metals is 7.0 X10{sup -5}, which is higher than a risk standard of 10{sup -5}. The risk from human carcinogens is 6.2X10{sup -5}, while that from probable human carcinogens is 8.0X10{sup -6}, respectively. About 86 % of the cancer risk is due to the inhalation of human carcinogens, arsenic and hexavalent chromium. Thus, it is necessary to properly manage both arsenic and hexavalent chromium risk in Taejeon 1,2 industrial complex. 37 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs. (Author)

  6. 技术性知识产权出资评估之现有机制与完善--以宁波GQY评估报告为基础%Technical Intellectual Property Contribution Assessment Mechanisms and Its Perfection---Based on Ningbo GQY Assessment Report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李逸竹

    2014-01-01

    Technical intellectual property contribution assessment is vital for that to confirm corporate qualifications,to protect the interests of shareholders and creditors,to maintain social and economic or-der.Because of the particularity of the object and purpose of the evaluation,we should seek assessment methods and evaluation procedures appropriate to it.Assessment methods should be preferred to the in-come approach,with the cost approach and market approach followed.Assessment process should focus on reviewing the state of the patent rights and technical secrets,not only to understand the production and management capacity of funders,but also the situation of the invested enterprises.At present,in the field of intellectual property contribution assessment in China,a mandatory assessment system is implemented. In practice,unlike intellectual property such as copyright,trademark,trade secret and other,there is a big disadvantage in use of mandatory assessment to technical intellectual property.For non-state-owned technical intellectual property,we may try to break the mandatory assessment requirements,to relax the qualification of assessment body appropriately,to introduce a negotiated price mechanism by the promot-ers and the board.We should establish the legal remedies and response system to untrue assessment to strengthen accountability to assessment body.To improve the intellectual property contribution assessment system,we should not only strengthen risk prevention mechanism,but also consider the facilities for en-terprises finance and to set up a small company quickly.%技术性知识产权出资评估,对于确认企业法人资格、保护股东与债权人的利益、维护社会经济秩序至关重要。因其评估对象与评估目的的特殊性,我们应寻求适合其特点的评估方法与评估程序。评估方法应以收益法为首选,成本法与市场法次之。评估程序应重点审查专利与技术秘密之权利状态,不仅

  7. Measuring Neutrons and Gamma Rays on Mars - The Mars Science Laboratory Radiation Assessment Detector MSL/RAD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Martin, C.; Kortmann, O.; Boehm, E.; Kharytonov, A.; Ehresmann, B.; Hassler, D. M.; Zeitlin, C.; Rad Team

    2010-12-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) missions Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) will measure the radiation environment on the Martian surface. One of the difficult measurements is that of the neutral radiation component consisting of neutrons and gamma rays. Different from Earth, this neutral component contributes substantially to the total dose on the planetary surface, principally because the Martian atmosphere is so thin. The RAD instrument is capable of measuring neutral particles through a combination of sensitive anti-coincidence and organic and inorganic scintillator materials. In this work, we will explain how RAD will measure the neutral particle radiation on Mars and compare with calibration results. The problem of inverting measured neutron and gamma data is a non-trivial task. For all inversions, one generally assumes that the measurement process can be described by a system of linear equations, A ěc{f} = ěc{z}, where the matrix A describes the instrument response function (IRF), ěc{f} the underlying, but unknown, ``real'' physical parameters, and ěc{z} the measured data. The inversion of this deceptively simple-looking set of equations is in fact a key example of an ill-posed or inverse problem. Such problems are notoriously difficult to solve.

  8. Contribution to the top-down alert system associated with the upcoming French tsunami warning center (CENALT): tsunami hazard assessment along the French Mediterranean coast for the ALDES project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loevenbruck, A.; Quentel, E.; Hebert, H.

    2011-12-01

    The catastrophic 2004 tsunami drew the international community's attention to tsunami risk in all basins where tsunamis occurred but no warning system exists. Consequently, under the coordination of UNESCO, France decided to create a regional center, called CENALT, for the north-east Atlantic and the western Mediterranean. This warning system, which should be operational by 2012, is set up by the CEA in collaboration with the SHOM and the CNRS. The French authorities are in charge of the top-down alert system including the local alert dissemination. In order to prepare the appropriate means and measures, they initiated the ALDES (Alerte Descendante) project to which the CEA also contributes. It aims at examining along the French Mediterranean coast the tsunami risk related to earthquakes and landslides. In addition to the evaluation at regional scale, it includes the detailed studies of 3 selected sites; the local alert system will be designed for one of them. In this project, our main task at CEA consists in assessing tsunami hazard related to seismic sources using numerical modeling. Tsunamis have already affected the west Mediterranean coast; however past events are too few and poorly documented to provide a suitable database. Thus, a synthesis of earthquakes representative of the tsunamigenic seismic activity and prone to induce the largest impact to the French coast is performed based on historical data, seismotectonics and first order models. The North Africa Margin, the Ligurian and the South Tyrrhenian Seas are considered as the main tsunamigenic zones. In order to forecast the most important plausible effects, the magnitudes are estimated by enhancing to some extent the largest known values. Our hazard estimation is based on the simulation of the induced tsunamis scenarios performed with the CEA code. Models of propagation in the basin and off the French coast allow evaluating the potential threat at regional scale in terms of sources location and

  9. Contributions to industrial statistics

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    This thesis is about statistics' contributions to industry. It is an article compendium comprising four articles divided in two blocks: (i) two contributions for a water supply company, and (ii) significance of the effects in Design of Experiments. In the first block, great emphasis is placed on how the research design and statistics can be applied to various real problems that a water company raises and it aims to convince water management companies that statistics can be very useful to impr...

  10. Modeling Change in Large-Scale Longitudinal Studies of Educational Growth: Four Decades of Contributions to the Assessment of Educational Growth. ETC R&D Scientific and Policy Contributions Series. ETS SPC-12-01. Research Report No. RR-12-04

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Donald A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a history of ETS's role in developing assessment instruments and psychometric procedures for measuring change in large-scale national assessments funded by the Longitudinal Studies branch of the National Center for Education Statistics. It documents the innovations developed during more than 30 years of working with…

  11. Modeling Change in Large-Scale Longitudinal Studies of Educational Growth: Four Decades of Contributions to the Assessment of Educational Growth. Research Report. ETS RR-12-04. ETS R&D Scientific and Policy Contributions Series. ETS SPC-12-01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Donald A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a history of ETS's role in developing assessment instruments and psychometric procedures for measuring change in large-scale national assessments funded by the Longitudinal Studies branch of the National Center for Education Statistics. It documents the innovations developed during more than 30 years of working with…

  12. 2007 status of climate change: Mitigation of Climate Change. Contribution of Working Group III to the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Summary for Policy-makers; Bilan 2007 des changements climatiques: l'attenuation des changements climatiques. Contribution du Groupe de travail 3 au quatrieme rapport d'evaluation du Groupe d'Experts Intergouvernemental sur l'Evolution du Climat (GIEC). Resume a l'attention des decideurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barker, T.; Bashmakov, I.; Bernstein, L.; Bogner, J.; Bosch, P.; Dave, R.; Davidson, O.; Fisher, B.; Grubb, M.; Gupta, S.; Halsnaes, K.; Heij, B.; Kahn Ribeiro, S.; Kobayashi, S.; Levine, M.; Martino, D.; Masera Cerutti, O.; Metz, B.; Meyer, L.; Nabuurs, G.J.; Najam, A.; Nakicenovic, N.; Holger Rogner, H.; Roy, J.; Sathaye, J.; Schock, R.; Shukla, P.; Sims, R.; Smith, P.; Swart, R.; Tirpak, D.; Urge-Vorsatz, D.; Dadi, Z

    2007-07-01

    The Working Group III contribution to the IPCC Fourth Assessment Report (AR4) focuses on new literature on the scientific, technological, environmental, economic and social aspects of mitigation of climate change, published since the IPCC Third Assessment Report (TAR) and the Special Reports on CO{sub 2} Capture and Storage (SRCCS) and on Safeguarding the Ozone Layer and the Global Climate System (SROC).The main aim of this summary report is to assess options for mitigating climate change. Several aspects link climate change with development issues. This report explores these links in detail, and illustrates where climate change and sustainable development are mutually reinforcing. Economic development needs, resource endowments and mitigative and adaptive capacities differ across regions. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to the climate change problem, and solutions need to be regionally differentiated to reflect different socio-economic conditions and, to a lesser extent, geographical differences. Although this report has a global focus, an attempt is made to differentiate the assessment of scientific and technical findings for the various regions. Given that mitigation options vary significantly between economic sectors, it was decided to use the economic sectors to organize the material on short- to medium-term mitigation options. Contrary to what was done in the Third Assessment Report, all relevant aspects of sectoral mitigation options, such as technology, cost, policies etc., are discussed together, to provide the user with a comprehensive discussion of the sectoral mitigation options. The report is organised into six sections after the introduction: - Greenhouse gas (GHG) emission trends; - Mitigation in the short and medium term, across different economic sectors (until 2030); - Mitigation in the long-term (beyond 2030); - Policies, measures and instruments to mitigate climate change; - Sustainable development and climate change mitigation; - Gaps in

  13. Abstracts of contributed papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains 571 abstracts of contributed papers to be presented during the Twelfth US National Congress of Applied Mechanics. Abstracts are arranged in the order in which they fall in the program -- the main sessions are listed chronologically in the Table of Contents. The Author Index is in alphabetical order and lists each paper number (matching the schedule in the Final Program) with its corresponding page number in the book.

  14. Contributions to statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Mahalanobis, P C

    1965-01-01

    Contributions to Statistics focuses on the processes, methodologies, and approaches involved in statistics. The book is presented to Professor P. C. Mahalanobis on the occasion of his 70th birthday. The selection first offers information on the recovery of ancillary information and combinatorial properties of partially balanced designs and association schemes. Discussions focus on combinatorial applications of the algebra of association matrices, sample size analogy, association matrices and the algebra of association schemes, and conceptual statistical experiments. The book then examines latt

  15. Contributions to sampling statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Conti, Pier; Ranalli, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This book contains a selection of the papers presented at the ITACOSM 2013 Conference, held in Milan in June 2013. ITACOSM is the bi-annual meeting of the Survey Sampling Group S2G of the Italian Statistical Society, intended as an international  forum of scientific discussion on the developments of theory and application of survey sampling methodologies and applications in human and natural sciences. The book gathers research papers carefully selected from both invited and contributed sessions of the conference. The whole book appears to be a relevant contribution to various key aspects of sampling methodology and techniques; it deals with some hot topics in sampling theory, such as calibration, quantile-regression and multiple frame surveys, and with innovative methodologies in important topics of both sampling theory and applications. Contributions cut across current sampling methodologies such as interval estimation for complex samples, randomized responses, bootstrap, weighting, modeling, imputati...

  16. Do School Lunches Contribute to Childhood Obesity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanzenbach, Diane Whitmore

    2009-01-01

    This paper assesses whether school lunches contribute to childhood obesity. I employ two methods to isolate the causal impact of school lunches on obesity. First, using panel data, I ?nd that children who consume school lunches are more likely to be obese than those who brown bag their lunches even though they enter kindergarten with the same…

  17. Contribution mapping: a method for mapping the contribution of research to enhance its impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok Maarten O

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At a time of growing emphasis on both the use of research and accountability, it is important for research funders, researchers and other stakeholders to monitor and evaluate the extent to which research contributes to better action for health, and find ways to enhance the likelihood that beneficial contributions are realized. Past attempts to assess research 'impact' struggle with operationalizing 'impact', identifying the users of research and attributing impact to research projects as source. In this article we describe Contribution Mapping, a novel approach to research monitoring and evaluation that aims to assess contributions instead of impacts. The approach focuses on processes and actors and systematically assesses anticipatory efforts that aim to enhance contributions, so-called alignment efforts. The approach is designed to be useful for both accountability purposes and for assisting in better employing research to contribute to better action for health. Methods Contribution Mapping is inspired by a perspective from social studies of science on how research and knowledge utilization processes evolve. For each research project that is assessed, a three-phase process map is developed that includes the main actors, activities and alignment efforts during research formulation, production and knowledge extension (e.g. dissemination and utilization. The approach focuses on the actors involved in, or interacting with, a research project (the linked actors and the most likely influential users, who are referred to as potential key users. In the first stage, the investigators of the assessed project are interviewed to develop a preliminary version of the process map and first estimation of research-related contributions. In the second stage, potential key-users and other informants are interviewed to trace, explore and triangulate possible contributions. In the third stage, the presence and role of alignment efforts is

  18. Contribution mapping: a method for mapping the contribution of research to enhance its impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background At a time of growing emphasis on both the use of research and accountability, it is important for research funders, researchers and other stakeholders to monitor and evaluate the extent to which research contributes to better action for health, and find ways to enhance the likelihood that beneficial contributions are realized. Past attempts to assess research 'impact' struggle with operationalizing 'impact', identifying the users of research and attributing impact to research projects as source. In this article we describe Contribution Mapping, a novel approach to research monitoring and evaluation that aims to assess contributions instead of impacts. The approach focuses on processes and actors and systematically assesses anticipatory efforts that aim to enhance contributions, so-called alignment efforts. The approach is designed to be useful for both accountability purposes and for assisting in better employing research to contribute to better action for health. Methods Contribution Mapping is inspired by a perspective from social studies of science on how research and knowledge utilization processes evolve. For each research project that is assessed, a three-phase process map is developed that includes the main actors, activities and alignment efforts during research formulation, production and knowledge extension (e.g. dissemination and utilization). The approach focuses on the actors involved in, or interacting with, a research project (the linked actors) and the most likely influential users, who are referred to as potential key users. In the first stage, the investigators of the assessed project are interviewed to develop a preliminary version of the process map and first estimation of research-related contributions. In the second stage, potential key-users and other informants are interviewed to trace, explore and triangulate possible contributions. In the third stage, the presence and role of alignment efforts is analyzed and the preliminary

  19. International Expert Review of Sr-Can: Safety Assessment Methodology - External review contribution in support of SSI's and SKI's review of SR-Can

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagar, Budhi (Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (US)); Egan, Michael (Quintessa Limited, Henley-on-Thames (GB)); Roehlig, Klaus-Juergen (Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (DE)); Chapman, Neil (Independent Consultant (XX)); Wilmot, Roger (Galson Sciences Limited, Oakham (GB))

    2008-03-15

    In 2006, SKB published a safety assessment (SR-Can) as part of its work to support a licence application for the construction of a final repository for spent nuclear fuel. The purposes of the SR-Can project were stated in the main project report to be: 1. To make a first assessment of the safety of potential KBS-3 repositories at Forsmark and Laxemar to dispose of canisters as specified in the application for the encapsulation plant. 2. To provide feedback to design development, to SKB's research and development (R and D) programme, to further site investigations and to future safety assessments. 3. To foster a dialogue with the authorities that oversee SKB's activities, i.e. the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, SKI, and the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, SSI, regarding interpretation of applicable regulations, as a preparation for the SR-Site project. To help inform their review of SKB's proposed approach to development of the longterm safety case, the authorities appointed three international expert review teams to carry out a review of SKB's SR-Can safety assessment report. Comments from one of these teams - the Safety Assessment Methodology (SAM) review team - are presented in this document. The SAM review team's scope of work included an examination of SKB's documentation of the assessment ('Long-term safety for KBS-3 Repositories at Forsmark and Laxemar - a first evaluation' and several supporting reports) and hearings with SKB staff and contractors, held in March 2007. As directed by SKI and SSI, the SAM review team focused on methodological aspects and sought to determine whether SKB's proposed safety assessment methodology is likely to be suitable for use in the future SR-Site and to assess its consistency with the Swedish regulatory framework. No specific evaluation of long-term safety or site acceptability was undertaken by any of the review teams. SKI and SSI's Terms of Reference for the SAM

  20. Reading Assessment: Looking Ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afflerbach, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I focus on three areas of reading assessment that I believe to be crucial for students' reading development: developing comprehensive formative assessments, assessing the wide array of factors that contribute to students' reading development, and fostering student independence by helping students learn to use reading assessment on…

  1. Sustainable Assessment Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boud, David; Soler, Rebeca

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable assessment has been proposed as an idea that focused on the contribution of assessment to learning beyond the timescale of a given course. It was identified as an assessment that meets the needs of the present in terms of the demands of formative and summative assessment, but which also prepares students to meet their own future…

  2. Contributing from the margins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chimirri, Niklas Alexander

    /herself as a contributor to an investigated practice, as inextricably entangled with the conducts of life of the others in relation to the conditions in practice. Doing research in the kindergarten thus becomes a mutual and collective endeavor, to which pedagogues, parents, children, and the researcher contribute. Even......To engage in practice research implies taking a range of ethical-political decisions. One of the most critical decisions is to set the analytical focus, which encompasses the questions of who to collaborate with and on what grounds, as well as with which concepts to interpret the findings. In my...... empirical study, I focused on kindergarten children’s first-person perspectives on the electronic media technologies they deemed subjectively relevant for conducting everyday life in the practice of their kindergarten. The concept of the children’s perspectives opens possibilities for transcending...

  3. A Profile of Corporate Contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Hayden W.

    The extent and distribution of charitable contributions by corporations were studied. In addition to a history of giving from 1936 to 1981, information is presented on corporate contributions in 1977 in terms of the distribution of companies (1) by size of contributions, (2) by contributions as percentage of net income, (3) by industry, and (4) by…

  4. A visual analytical approach to rock art panel condition assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Brandon J.

    Rock art is a term for pecked, scratched, or painted symbols found on rock surfaces, most typically joint faces called rock art panels. Because rock art exists on rock at the atmosphere interface, it is highly susceptible to the destructive processes of weathering. Thus, rock weathering scientists, including those that study both natural and cultural surfaces, play a key role towards understanding rock art longevity. The mapping of weathering forms on rock art panels serves as a basis from which to assess overall panel instability. This work examines fissures, case hardened surfaces, crumbly disintegration, and lichen. Knowledge of instability, as measured through these and other weathering forms, provides integral information to land managers and archaeological conservators required to prioritize panels for remedial action. The work is divided into five chapters, three of which are going to be submitted as a peer-reviewed journal manuscript. The second chapter, written as a manuscript for International Newsletter on Rock Art, describes a specific set of criteria that lead to the development of a mapping tool for weathering forms, called 'mapping weathering forms in three dimensions' (MapWeF). The third chapter, written as a manuscript for Remote Sensing of Environment, presents the methodology used to develop MapWeF. The chapter incorporates terrestrial laser scanning, a geographic information system (GIS), geovisualization, image analysis, and exploratory spatial data analysis (ESDA) to identify, map, and quantify weathering features known to cause instability on rock art panels. The methodology implemented in the third chapter satisfies the criteria described in Chapter Two. In the fourth chapter, prepared as a manuscript for Geomorphology, MapWeF is applied to a site management case study, focusing on a region---southeastern Colorado---with notoriously weak and endangered sandstone rock art panels. The final conclusions chapter describes contributions of the

  5. The contribution of single photon emission computed tomography in the clinical assessment of Alzheimer type dementia; Apport de la tomographie d'emission monophonique cerebrale dans l'evaluation des demences de type Alzheimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudousq, V.; Collombier, L.; Kotzki, P.O. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Nimes, 30 (France)

    1999-12-01

    Interest of brain single-photon emission computed tomography to support clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer-type dementia is now established. Numerous studies have reported a decreased perfusion in the association cortex of the parietal lobe and the posterior temporal regions. In patients with mild cognitive complaints, the presence of focal hypoperfusion may increase substantially the probability of the disease. In addition, emission tomography emerges as a helpful tool in situation in which there is diagnostic doubt. In this case, the presence of temporo-parietal perfusion deficit associated with hippocampal atrophy on MRI or X-ray computed tomography contributes to diagnostic accuracy. However, some studies suggest that emission tomography may be useful for preclinical prediction of Alzheimer's disease and to predict cognitive decline. (author)

  6. International Expert Review of Sr-Can: Safety Assessment Methodology - External review contribution in support of SSI's and SKI's review of SR-Can

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagar, Budhi (Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses, Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (US)); Egan, Michael (Quintessa Limited, Henley-on-Thames (GB)); Roehlig, Klaus-Juergen (Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit mbH (DE)); Chapman, Neil (Independent Consultant (XX)); Wilmot, Roger (Galson Sciences Limited, Oakham (GB))

    2008-03-15

    In 2006, SKB published a safety assessment (SR-Can) as part of its work to support a licence application for the construction of a final repository for spent nuclear fuel. The purposes of the SR-Can project were stated in the main project report to be: 1. To make a first assessment of the safety of potential KBS-3 repositories at Forsmark and Laxemar to dispose of canisters as specified in the application for the encapsulation plant. 2. To provide feedback to design development, to SKB's research and development (R and D) programme, to further site investigations and to future safety assessments. 3. To foster a dialogue with the authorities that oversee SKB's activities, i.e. the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, SKI, and the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority, SSI, regarding interpretation of applicable regulations, as a preparation for the SR-Site project. To help inform their review of SKB's proposed approach to development of the longterm safety case, the authorities appointed three international expert review teams to carry out a review of SKB's SR-Can safety assessment report. Comments from one of these teams - the Safety Assessment Methodology (SAM) review team - are presented in this document. The SAM review team's scope of work included an examination of SKB's documentation of the assessment ('Long-term safety for KBS-3 Repositories at Forsmark and Laxemar - a first evaluation' and several supporting reports) and hearings with SKB staff and contractors, held in March 2007. As directed by SKI and SSI, the SAM review team focused on methodological aspects and sought to determine whether SKB's proposed safety assessment methodology is likely to be suitable for use in the future SR-Site and to assess its consistency with the Swedish regulatory framework. No specific evaluation of long-term safety or site acceptability was undertaken by any of the review teams. SKI and SSI's Terms of Reference for the SAM

  7. 动态测验对“数学学习困难”儿童的进一步甄别%The Contribution of Dynamic Assessment to Screening Children with Mathematics Learning Disabilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丽锦; 张臻峰

    2014-01-01

    The commonly used grade-level discrepancy assessment, which relies on achievement test scores to identify children with mathematics learning disabilities (MLD or MD), can be biased and its effectiveness varies across children’s cognitive levels, educational backgrounds of families, school contexts, and children’s learning styles. As a consequence, the identification of children with MD often lacks accuracy. With an integration of interventions and interactive evaluation, dynamic assessment is developed to identify children’s potential for learning which is less influenced by their family and school backgrounds mentioned above. Unlike traditional achievement tests, dynamic assessment applies new criterion on MD that focus on children’s potential for learning mathematics and can reduce above-mentioned unfavorable effect to some extent. The current study attempted to demonstrate that the addition of dynamic assessment to traditional achievement tests can help identify MD children and the subgroups of MD children with increased accuracy and objectivity. Dynamic assessment has a unique effect on rapid and accurate identifying children with mathematics learning disabilities. Following the standard orientation model proposed by Proctor and Prevatt (2003), the treatment group included 30 fourth-grade children with mathematics learning disabilities, while the control group consisted of 30 children who were matched on Raven intelligence test scores. Four subtests (Rhyming Words, Auditory Digit Sequence, Visual Matrix and Mapping and Directions) of the “Swanson Cognitive Processing Test (S-CPT)”were administrated to assess children’s working memory. The assessment included initial score, gain score, maintain score, difference score, stable score, guide score and strategy score, collected in four phases: pretest, intervention, posttest, and delayed posttest. The differences in work memory task scores before and after the dynamic interventions, were used to

  8. [Web of Science production quality indicators of ten professors' at the area of personality, assessment and psychological treatment: additional contributions to Olivas-Ávila y Musi-Lechuga study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluja, Antón; Becoña, Elisardo; Botella, Cristina; Colom, Roberto; Echeburúa, Enrique; Forns, María; Pérez, Miguel; Vila, Jaime

    2011-04-01

    Rankings of scientific productivity are increasingly relevant both from an individual and a collective perspective. Therefore, making sure they are based on reliable and exhaustive information is really important. This study clearly shows that available rankings change dramatically when internationally acknowledged bibliometric indices are considered. Data from the 10 Professors belonging to the 'Personality, Assessment, and Psychological Treatment' Department considered in the recent analysis by Olivas-Ávila y Musi-Lechuga ( Psicothema 2010. Vol. 22, nº 4, pp. 909-916) are revisited here for illustrative purposes.

  9. Contribution to postnonclassical psychopathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quintino-Aires J.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Any psychological paradigm needs a psychopathological system that helps professionals to describe and explain the behavioral expressions that deviate from “normal” (whether this term is used with the semantic property of statistical or ideal adaptations. In this work, I seek to present the system that I have been developing since 1998 among the psychologists at the Instituto Vegotsky de Lisboa (Vygotsky Institute of Lisbon, Portugal, to understand psychopathology with regard to the vygotskian approach. It was conceived and designed according to the work of Rita Mendes Leal and her contribution to socioemotional development theory, AR Luria’s systemic and dynamic theory of the human brain, the theory of Activity (dyatel’nost of AN Leont’ev, and the psychopathological German school of E Kraepelin, presented and disseminated in Portugal in the early twentieth century by Professor Sobral Cid. It is intended to be a proposal to colleagues who are interested in postnonclassical psychology and a request for arguments.

  10. EMSL Contribution Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, Allison A.

    2008-12-01

    This Contribution Plan is EMSL’s template for achieving our vision of simultaneous excellence in all aspects of our mission as a national scientific user facility. It reflects our understanding of the long-term stewardship we must work toward to meet the scientific challenges faced by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nation. During the next decade, we will implement the strategies contained in this Plan, working closely with the scientific community, our advisory committees, DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research, and other key stakeholders. This Plan is fully aligned with the strategic plans of DOE, its Office of Science, and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). We recognize that shifts in science and technology, national priorities, and resources made available through the Federal budget process create planning uncertainties and, ultimately, a highly dynamic planning environment. Accordingly, this Plan should be viewed as a living document and we continually evaluate the changing needs and opportunities posed by our stakeholders (i.e., DOE, users, staff, advisory committees), work closely with them to understand and respond to those changes, and align our strategy accordingly. This Plan is organized around two sections. Section 1 describes our vision and four strategic outcomes: 1) Scientific Innovation, 2) Capabilities that Transform Science, 3) Outstanding Management and Operations, and Engaged and Proactive Users. These outcomes provide the framework for seven critical actions we must take during the next 3 to 5 years: 1) Establishing leadership in EMSL science themes, 2) building and deploying transformational capabilities, 3) integrating computation with experiment, 4) ensuring EMSL’s workforce meets the scientific challenges of the future, 5) creating partnerships, 6) attracting and engaging users in EMSL’s long-term strategy, and 7) building a research infrastructure that meets emerging scientific needs. Section 2

  11. Contribution to the assessment of the salinity of wastewater used for irrigation market gardening: The case of the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP effluent in the scope of market garden Sebkha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdoulaye Demba N’DIAYE

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the wastewater treatment plant (WWTP effluent using the parameters indicators of salinity to assess the suitability of wastewater for irrigation, the sampling campaigns were conducted between February 2008 and December 2009. Temperature, pH, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chlorides, bicarbonates, electrical conductivity, sodium adsorption of ratio, magnesium adsorption ratio and sodium soluble percentage. The test results presented in this work showed that these effluents have temperatures reaching 28.7°C. The pH oscillates between neutrality and basicity. Chlorides, sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium and bicarbonates have median levels of 950.1, 57.3, 29.6, 131.6, 24.9 and 1053.2 mg/L. The mean values of electrical conductivity of the sodium adsorption ratio (SAR of soluble sodium percentage (SSP and the magnesium adsorption ratio (MAR are respectively 2340 μScm-1, 5.4, 52.1 and 36.9%. The sodium adsorption ratio and electrical conductivity showed that wastewater irrigated at the market-garden of Sebkha oscillates between class C3S1 (high salinity and excellent low hazard alkalization and C4S1 (very high salinity and the excellent low hazards alkalization.

  12. Surface topology investigation for ancient coinage assessment using optical interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grynszpan, R. I.; Pastol, J. L.; Lesko, S.; Paris, E.; Raepsaet, C.

    In order to demonstrate the capabilities of white-light interferometry depth profiling (WLI-DP) for ancient coinage assessment, we investigated a series of notorious 1786 gold coins, bearing Louis XVI's `horned' effigy, and allegedly minted in Strasbourg. Scanning electron microscopy as well as WLI-DP observations unambiguously indicate that both previously differentiated `single'- and `double'-horned varieties originated from a unique minting tool. Moreover, from topological measurements, we infer that `single-horned' coins, rather than wearing out into `double-horned' coins, proceeded from the latter variety during minting by progressive failure of an already altered die. Whereas present observations do not exclude initial forgery, they suggest that protrusions resulted from progressive incidental in-service die deterioration.

  13. Assess overall value of performance-related pay systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Boyu

    2015-01-01

    The main concern of human resource management is that people should work as efficiently as possible in the organization. The notorious payment by the result system which does not work very well lasted for many years. So, the organization attempts to achieve their goals by using various systems of payment to encourage and reward them. Performance related pay, as one of reward systems, has a range of advantages to motivate individuals to work harder or more productively. Nevertheless, there is also evidence of weakness and failures, which have some of the unacceptable and undesirable side effects. Sometimes the problem of performance related pay cannot produce the hoped benefits. This essay will focus on the advantages and disadvantages of performance-related pay schemes. Then, it will assess the overall value of performance-related pay systems.

  14. Fast voltage stability assessment and reinforcement in an interconnected power system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Wen-Ta

    1998-12-01

    It is believed that voltage stability analysis will be more difficult due to the full utilization of transmission systems and the growth of inter-utility power transfer. An online voltage stability analyzing system which can be incorporated into the EMS to deal with the threats of suddenly arising voltage collapses is presented. Operating margin prediction, voltage stability assessment and reinforcement are three major functions. Two predicting methods are proposed to calculate the operating margin according to current operating condition and the anticipative system state. A fast risk indicator based on the saddle-node bifurcation theory is designed to predict the proximity of a system to voltage collapse. A novel CPF method which can trace the power flow solution path through the nose point without notorious numerical difficulties is presented. Speed is the advantage of former method, while accuracy is the important feature of latter one. Voltage stability assessment is required to predict steady-state conditions of a system following a large number of anticipated transmission branch or generator outages. An efficient and simple method based on voltage sensitivity changing rates is proposed for quickly identify the weak buses in a large-scale system. An effective contingency selection function relying on search algorithms built into power flow solutions is designed to filter out most of harmless contingencies for system operators who are working with rapidly changing load/generation patterns and a wide variety of operating conditions. A contingency evaluation function having the ability to deal with real-time numerous contingencies in a very short period of time is utilized to find high-severity contingencies. Var compensation and load shedding are two remedial measures of reinforcement function. Suitable var compensation scheme has three contributions: extending operating margin to avoid voltage collapses, fully utilizing the transmission infrastructure to earn

  15. 75 FR 43799 - Employee Contribution Elections and Contribution Allocations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... Part 1600 Employee Contribution Elections and Contribution Allocations AGENCY: Federal Retirement...), which was established by the Federal Employees' Retirement System Act of 1986 (FERSA), Public Law 99-335...-79. The TSP is a tax-deferred retirement savings plan for Federal civilian employees and members...

  16. Rumbula : a war crimes case revives memories of a notorious killing field / Michael Tarm

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tarm, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Nõukogude ajal tingis juutide kannatustest vaikimise Kremli võimude antisemitistlik hoiak. Iseseisvunud lätlased eelistavad rääkida lätlaste küüditamisest. Seetõttu on erakordsed massimõrvad nagu Rumbula metsas Riia lähedal jäänud siiani tähelepanuta

  17. Inhibitory Control in a Notorious Brain Teaser: The Monty Hall Dilemma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenen, Lore; Heyvaert, Mieke; Van Dooren, Wim; Onghena, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The Monty Hall dilemma (MHD) is a counterintuitive probability problem in which participants often use misleading heuristics, such as the equiprobability bias. Finding the optimal solution to the MHD requires inhibition of these heuristics. In the current study, we investigated the relation between participants' equiprobability bias and their MHD…

  18. Bronze solider - chronology when and how he became notorious / Toomas Alatalu

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Alatalu, Toomas, 1942-

    2008-01-01

    Kronoloogiline ülevaade pronkssõduri paigaldamisest Tõnismäele, rahutustele eelnenud sündmusest, tänavarahutustest, pronksõduri teisaldamisest ning sellele järgnenud reaktsioonidest rahvusvahelistes suhetes ja kohalike poliitikute hulgas

  19. 75 FR 32659 - Contributed Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 RIN 1545-BF28 Contributed Property AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service... property to the partnership. In that regard, the anti- abuse rule of Sec. 1.701-2(b) provides that, if a... contribution of property to a partnership should be recast to avoid results that are inconsistent...

  20. Advocacy and technology assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, E. M.

    1975-01-01

    A highly structured treatment is presented of adversarial systems as they apply to technology assessment. One approach to the problem of adequate criteria of assessment focuses upon the internal operations of assessment entities; operations include problem perception, problem formulation, selection, utilization, determination, and evaluation. Potential contributions of advocacy as a mode of inquiry in technology are discussed; advocacy is evaluated by representative sets of criteria of adequate assessment which include participant criteria, perspectives criteria, situations criteria, base values criteria, and strategies criteria.

  1. Adult nutrition assessment tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    This tutorial presents a systematic approach to nutrition assessment based on a modern appreciation for the contributions of inflammation that serve as the foundation for newly proposed consensus definitions for malnutrition syndromes. Practical indicators of malnutrition and inflammation have been ...

  2. Assessing Career Indecision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipow, Samuel H.

    1999-01-01

    Reviews the history of career decision-making measures such as My Vocational Situation, Career Decision Scale, Career Factors Inventory, and others. Assesses Holland's contribution to the accurate measurement of career indecision. (SK)

  3. Assessment of earthquake effects - contribution from online communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, Sebastiano; Agius, Matthew; Galea, Pauline

    2014-05-01

    The rapid increase of social media and online newspapers in the last years have given the opportunity to make a national investigation on macroseismic effects on the Maltese Islands based on felt earthquake reports. A magnitude 4.1 earthquake struck close to Malta on Sunday 24th April 2011 at 13:02 GMT. The earthquake was preceded and followed by a series of smaller magnitude quakes throughout the day, most of which were felt by the locals on the island. The continuous news media coverage during the day and the extensive sharing of the news item on social media resulted in a strong public response to fill in the 'Did you feel it?' online form on the website of the Seismic Monitoring and Research Unit (SMRU) at the University of Malta (http://seismic.research.um.edu.mt/). The results yield interesting information about the demographics of the island, and the different felt experiences possibly relating to geological settings and diverse structural and age-classified buildings. Based on this case study, the SMRU is in the process of developing a mobile phone application dedicated to share earthquake information to the local community. The application will automatically prompt users to fill in a simplified 'Did you feel it?' report to potentially felt earthquakes. Automatic location using Global Positioning Systems can be incorporated to provide a 'real time' intensity map that can be used by the Civil Protection Department.

  4. Contribution to assessment of effects of Rational emotive behaviour therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popov Boris

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Three main problems dealt with in this study are the following: 1. what effects attain REBT in 6 sessions in treating clients with various psychopathology?; 2. Does the level of training and experience of therapists play any role in REBT intervention outcomes?; 3. Does the sex of clients play any role in REBT intervention outcome? ANOVA showed that REBT was effective with most number of clients demonstrating statistically significant improvements on a third measurement comparing with the first one; also, very small number of clients responded negatively to the treatment, showing stagnation or intensifying of symptoms. Thus we conclude that REBT can be effective in treating clients with various psychopathologies. T-test also showed that more experienced therapists were statistically significantly more effective than less experienced in one out of four measures. The treatment was equally effective to clients of both sexes. This study was conducted in naturalistic conditions with certain flaws and limitations; future controlled evaluations are more than welcome.

  5. Relative Contributions of Three Descriptive Methods: Implications for Behavioral Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Sacha T.; Roscoe, Eileen M.; Bourret, Jason C.; Ahearn, William H.

    2009-01-01

    This study compared the outcomes of three descriptive analysis methods--the ABC method, the conditional probability method, and the conditional and background probability method--to each other and to the results obtained from functional analyses. Six individuals who had been diagnosed with developmental delays and exhibited problem behavior…

  6. Assessment of Runoff Contributing Catchment Areas in Rainfall Runoff Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke; Johansen, C.; Schaarup-Jensen, Kjeld

    2005-01-01

    to determine with significant precision the hydrological reduction factor is implemented to account all hydrological losses except the initial loss. This paper presents an inconsistency between calculations of the hydrological reduction factor, based on measurements of rainfall and runoff, and till now...... recommended literary values for residential areas. It is proven by comparing rainfall-runoff measurements from four different residential catchments that the literary values of the hydrological reduction factor are over-estimated for this type of catchments. In addition, different catchment descriptions...... are presented in order to investigate how the hydrological reduction factor depends on the level of detail regarding the catchment description. When applying a total survey of the catchment area, including all possible impervious surfaces, a hydrological reduction factor of approximately 0.5 for residential...

  7. Assessment of runoff contributing catchment areas in rainfall runoff modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorndahl, Søren; Johansen, C.; Schaarup-Jensen, Kjeld

    2006-01-01

    to determine with significant precision the hydrological reduction factor is implemented to account all hydrological losses except the initial loss. This paper presents an inconsistency between calculations of the hydrological reduction factor, based on measurements of rainfall and runoff, and till now...... recommended literature values for residential areas. It is proven by comparing rainfall-runoff measurements from four different residential catchments that the literature values of the hydrological reduction factor are over-estimated for this type of catchment. In addition, different catchment descriptions...... are presented in order to investigate how the hydrological reduction factor depends on the level of detail regarding the catchment description. When applying a total survey of the catchment area, including all possible impervious surfaces, a hydrological reduction factor of approximately 0.5 for residential...

  8. Internationalization Assessment in Schools: Theoretical Contributions and Practical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yemini, Miri

    2012-01-01

    Cosmopolitan, international capital has become an integral ingredient in the set of competencies considered to provide a competitive edge and to be required for affective citizenship in the 21st century. Recently, internationalization of education has become a more common phenomenon in local schools around the world, serving as a tool to provide…

  9. Contribution of conservation genetics in assessing neotropical freshwater fish biodiversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NM. Piorski

    Full Text Available Human activities have a considerable impact on hydrographic systems and fish fauna. The present review on conservation genetics of neotropical freshwater fish reveals that DNA analyses have been promoting increased knowledge on the genetic structure of fish species and their response to environmental changes. This knowledge is fundamental to the management of wild fish populations and the establishment of Evolutionary Significant Units capable of conserving genetic integrity. While population structuring can occur even in long-distance migratory fish, isolated populations can show reduced genetic variation and be at greater risk of extinction. Phylogeography and phylogeny have been powerful tools in understanding the evolution of fish populations, species and communities in distinct neotropic environments. Captive fish can be used to introduce new individuals and genes into the wild and their benefits and disadvantages can be monitored through genetic analysis. Understanding how fish biodiversity in neotropical freshwaters is generated and maintained is highly important, as these habitats are transformed by human development and fish communities are increasingly exploited as food sources to sustain a growing human population.

  10. Contributions to the environmental assessment of road transport

    OpenAIRE

    Moliner Santisteve, Enrique

    2013-01-01

    El objetivo de esta tesis es proporcionar un mayor grado de conocimiento sobre ciertos aspectos medioambientales del transporte por carretera que aún no han sido investigados en profundidad. En concreto, la tesis aborda las siguientes líneas de investigación: análisis del ciclo de vida (ACV) de los pavimentos de carreteras, ACV del ruido del transporte por carretera, y valoración de los costes externos del ruido del transporte por carretera. La evaluación ambiental del transporte rodado se...

  11. Assessing Whether Oil Dependency in Venezuela Contributes to National Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Kott

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The focus of this article is on what role, if any, oil has on Venezuela's instability. When trying to explain why a resource-rich country experiences slow or negative growth, experts often point to the resource curse. The following pages explore the traditional theory behind the resource curse as well as alternative perspectives to this theory such as ownership structure and the correlation between oil prices and democracy. This article also explores the various forms of instability within Venezuela and their causes. Finally, the article looks at President Hugo Chavez's political and economic policies as well as the stagnation of the state oil company, Petroleos de Venezuela (PDVSA. This article dispels the myth that the resource curse is the source of destabilization in many resource dependent countries. Rather than a cause of instability, this phenomenon is a symptom of a much larger problem that is largely structural.

  12. Introducing and modeling inefficiency contributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmild, Mette; Kronborg, Dorte; Matthews, Kent

    2016-01-01

    Whilst Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) is the most commonly used non-parametric benchmarking approach, the interpretation and application of DEA results can be limited by the fact that radial improvement potentials are identified across variables. In contrast, Multi-directional Efficiency Analysis......-called inefficiency contributions, which are defined as the relative contributions from specific variables to the overall levels of inefficiencies. A statistical model for distinguishing the inefficiency contributions between subgroups is proposed and the method is illustrated on a data set on Chinese banks....

  13. Adam Smith’s contribution to secularisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrus Simons

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examined several crucial themes in Adam Smith’s philosophy with the purpose of highlighting and assessing his contribution to the secularisation of Western society. The article, written from the perspective of reformational philosophy, begins with a brief biography and sketch of Adam Smith’s influence on modern society, followed by a summary of Ponti Venter’s view on Smith. This sets the scene for a discussion of Adam Smith’s project, his method of tackling it, and his views on systems, philosophy of history and the concept of philosophy.

  14. ECN contributions to GLOBAL `95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    This report contains the 9 contributions of the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation ECN to the international conference on evaluation of emerging nuclear fuel cycle systems, GLOBAL `95, held in Versailles, France, on September 11-14, 1995. (orig./GL).

  15. Uncapacitated facility location problems: contributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galvão Roberto Diéguez

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present paper is to review my personal contributions in the field of uncapacitated facility location problems. These contributions took place throughout my academic career, from the time I was a Ph.D. student at Imperial College to the present day. They cover approximately 30 years, from 1973 to 2003; they address: algorithms developed for the p-median problem and for a general formulation of uncapacitated location problems; the study of dynamic location models; covering and hierarchical location problems; queuing-based probabilistic location models. The contributions encompass theoretical developments, computational algorithms and practical applications. All work took place in an academic environment, with the invaluable collaboration of colleagues (both in Brazil and abroad and research students at COPPE. Each section in the paper is dedicated to a topic that involves a personal contribution. Every one of them is placed within the context of the existing literature.

  16. Stuart Hall’ Contributions to CCCS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂艳

    2014-01-01

    Hall is the most prominent master of Birmingham school. To some extent, Hall just represents CCCS and makes outstanding contributions to establishment of this school. Hall’s cultural theory is characterized by the interdisciplinary ideology, cultural gaze of race diaspora, collective creation, academic openness, cultural politics, civilization of the talent and so on, so that displays his value and significance as a cultural theorists and critic, in addition demonstrates his contribution to the whole world.

  17. ETS Psychometric Contributions: Focus on Test Scores. Research Report. ETS RR-13-15. ETS R&D Scientific and Policy Contributions Series. ETS SPC-13-03

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to review ETS psychometric contributions that focus on test scores. Two major sections review contributions based on assessing test scores' measurement characteristics and other contributions about using test scores as predictors in correlational and regression relationships. An additional section reviews additional…

  18. Divergence in sink contributions to population persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrichs, Julie A; Lawler, Joshua J; Schumaker, Nathan H; Wilsey, Chad B; Bender, Darren J

    2015-12-01

    Population sinks present unique conservation challenges. The loss of individuals in sinks can compromise persistence; but conversely, sinks can improve viability by improving connectivity and facilitating the recolonization of vacant sources. To assess the contribution of sinks to regional population persistence of declining populations, we simulated source-sink dynamics for 3 very different endangered species: Black-capped Vireos (Vireo atricapilla) at Fort Hood, Texas, Ord's kangaroo rats (Dipodomys ordii) in Alberta, and Northern Spotted Owls (Strix occidentalis caurina) in the northwestern United States. We used empirical data from these case studies to parameterize spatially explicit individual-based models. We then used the models to quantify population abundance and persistence with and without long-term sinks. The contributions of sink habitats varied widely. Sinks were detrimental, particularly when they functioned as strong sinks with few emigrants in declining populations (e.g., Alberta's Ord's kangaroo rat) and benign in robust populations (e.g., Black-capped Vireos) when Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) parasitism was controlled. Sinks, including ecological traps, were also crucial in delaying declines when there were few sources (e.g., in Black-capped Vireo populations with no Cowbird control). Sink contributions were also nuanced. For example, sinks that supported large, variable populations were subject to greater extinction risk (e.g., Northern Spotted Owls). In each of our case studies, new context-dependent sinks emerged, underscoring the dynamic nature of sources and sinks and the need for frequent re-assessment. Our results imply that management actions based on assumptions that sink habitats are generally harmful or helpful risk undermining conservation efforts for declining populations.

  19. 75 FR 34388 - Employee Contribution Elections and Contribution Allocations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ...; ] FEDERAL RETIREMENT THRIFT INVESTMENT BOARD 5 CFR Part 1600 Employee Contribution Elections and... Employees' Retirement System Act of 1986 (FERSA), Public Law 99-335, 100 Stat. 514. The TSP provisions of... retirement savings plan for Federal civilian employees and members of the uniformed services. The TSP...

  20. Stuart Hall’ Contributions to CCCS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂艳

    2014-01-01

    Hall is the most prominent master of Birmingham school.To some extent,Hall just represents CCCS and makes outstanding contributions to establishment of this school.Hall’s cultural theory is characterized by the interdisciplinary ideology,cultural gaze of race diaspora,collective creation,academic openness,cultural politics,civilization of the talent and so on,so that displays his value and significance as a cultural theorists and critic,in addition demonstrates his contribution to the whole world.

  1. Gravitational contribution to fermion masses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiemblo, A.; Tresguerres, R. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Instituto de Matematicas y Fisica Fundamental, Madrid (Spain)

    2005-08-01

    In the context of a non-linear gauge theory of the Poincare group, we show that covariant derivatives of Dirac fields include a coupling to the translational connections, manifesting itself in the matter action as a universal background mass contribution to fermions. (orig.)

  2. Gravitational contribution to fermion masses

    CERN Document Server

    Tiemblo, A; Tiemblo, Alfredo; Tresguerres, Romualdo

    2005-01-01

    In the context of a nonlinear gauge theory of the Poincar\\'e group, we show that covariant derivatives of Dirac fields include a coupling to the translational connections, manifesting itself in the matter action as a universal background mass contribution to fermions.

  3. Processed foods: contributions to nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Connie M; Dwyer, Johanna; Fulgoni, Victor L; King, Janet C; Leveille, Gilbert A; MacDonald, Ruth S; Ordovas, Jose; Schnakenberg, David

    2014-06-01

    Both fresh and processed foods make up vital parts of the food supply. Processed food contributes to both food security (ensuring that sufficient food is available) and nutrition security (ensuring that food quality meets human nutrient needs). This ASN scientific statement focuses on one aspect of processed foods: their nutritional impacts. Specifically, this scientific statement 1) provides an introduction to how processed foods contribute to the health of populations, 2) analyzes the contribution of processed foods to "nutrients to encourage" and "constituents to limit" in the American diet as recommended by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 3) identifies the responsibilities of various stakeholders in improving the American diet, and 4) reviews emerging technologies and the research needed for a better understanding of the role of processed foods in a healthy diet. Analyses of the NHANES 2003-2008 show that processed foods provide both nutrients to encourage and constituents to limit as specified in the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Of the nutrients to encourage, processed foods contributed 55% of dietary fiber, 48% of calcium, 43% of potassium, 34% of vitamin D, 64% of iron, 65% of folate, and 46% of vitamin B-12. Of the constituents to limit, processed foods contributed 57% of energy, 52% of saturated fat, 75% of added sugars, and 57% of sodium. Diets are more likely to meet food guidance recommendations if nutrient-dense foods, either processed or not, are selected. Nutrition and food science professionals, the food industry, and other stakeholders can help to improve the diets of Americans by providing a nutritious food supply that is safe, enjoyable, affordable, and sustainable by communicating effectively and accurately with each other and by working together to improve the overall knowledge of consumers.

  4. Should we ignore U-235 series contribution to dose?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaugelin-Seiller, Karine; Goulet, Richard; Mihok, Steve; Beresford, Nicholas A

    2016-01-01

    Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA) methodology for radioactive substances is an important regulatory tool for assessing the safety of licensed nuclear facilities for wildlife, and the environment as a whole. ERAs are therefore expected to be both fit for purpose and conservative. When uranium isotopes are assessed, there are many radioactive decay products which could be considered. However, risk assessors usually assume (235)U and its daughters contribute negligibly to radiological dose. The validity of this assumption has not been tested: what might the (235)U family contribution be and how does the estimate depend on the assumptions applied? In this paper we address this question by considering aquatic wildlife in Canadian lakes exposed to historic uranium mining practices. A full theoretical approach was used, in parallel to a more realistic assessment based on measurements of several elements of the U decay chains. The (235)U family contribution varied between about 4% and 75% of the total dose rate depending on the assumptions of the equilibrium state of the decay chains. Hence, ignoring the (235)U series will not result in conservative dose assessments for wildlife. These arguments provide a strong case for more in situ measurements of the important members of the (235)U chain and for its consideration in dose assessments.

  5. Individual Meaning and Increasing Complexity: Contributions of Sigmund Freud and Rene Spitz to Developmental Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emde, Robert N.

    1992-01-01

    Considers contributions of Sigmund Freud and Rene Spitz to developmental psychology. Freud's contributions include his observations about play, perspectives on developmental processes, and ideas about unconscious mental activity. Spitz's contributions include his assessments of infants, perspectives on developmental processes, and his concept of…

  6. Feller's Contributions to Mathematical Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Baake, Ellen; Wakolbinger, Anton

    2015-01-01

    This is a review of William Feller's important contributions to mathematical biology. The seminal paper [Feller1951] "Diffusion processes in genetics" was particularly influential on the development of stochastic processes at the interface to evolutionary biology, and interesting ideas in this direction (including a first characterization of what is nowadays known as "Feller's branching diffusion") already shaped up in the paper [Feller 1939] (written in German) "The foundations of a probabis...

  7. Changes in accounting for contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelfrey, S

    1992-03-01

    A proposed accounting change in the timing of income recognition for restricted contributions and pledges can greatly impact a hospital's excess of revenue over expenses (net income). The author addresses steps that administrators can take to lessen its impact. With this knowledge, nurse administrators and other hospital executives can plan alternatives to reduce the income recognition and prepare themselves to answer questions posed by patients and members of the community regarding increased hospital profits.

  8. Scientific contributions of extensive biodiversity monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvet, Denis; Devictor, Vincent; Jiguet, Frédéric; Julliard, Romain

    2011-05-01

    To develop a complete and informative biodiversity observation system, it is necessary to compare the strengths and limits of various monitoring schemes. In this article, we examine the various advantages of extensively monitoring fine-grained spatial variations of biodiversity, where the prominent traits of many species within a community (abundance, phenology, etc.) are regularly recorded at numerous sites over a large territory, usually via human observation networks. Linking these variations with environmental factors sheds lights on the major mechanisms leading to changes in biodiversity, thus increasing our knowledge of macroecology and community ecology. This extensive monitoring allows us to assess diffuse effects, contributing to the sound use of the precautionary principle. Combined with site-focused monitoring, information gathered from extensive monitoring provides the raw material necessary to build biodiversity scenarios.

  9. Assessment factors for human health risk assessment: A discussion paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeire, T.; Stevenson, H.; Pieters, M.N.; Rennen, M.; Slob, W.; Hakkert, B.C.

    1999-01-01

    The general goal of this discussion paper is to contribute toward the further harmonization of human health risk assessment. It first discusses the development of a formal, harmonized set of assessment factors. The status quo with regard to assessment factors is reviewed, that is, the type of factor

  10. Predicting the temporal variation of flow contributing areas using SWAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golmohammadi, Golmar; Rudra, Ramesh; Dickinson, Trevor; Goel, Pradeep; Veliz, Mari

    2017-04-01

    This study assessed the capability of soil and water assessment tool (SWAT) to identify areas contributing to flow in the Gully Creek Watershed in Ontario. The SWAT model predicted the streamflow at the outlet of the watershed, with monthly and daily Nash-Sutcliffe efficiencies of 0.75 and 0.60 during the validation period. In addition to the daily streamflow data, the flow was also observed at 16 monitoring stations during 6 different events. The validated model was then used to simulate flow at the monitoring stations. The effect of watershed delineation on streamflow and events at 16 monitoring station were then examined by SWAT. The delineation of 99 subbasins, with highest efficiency was selected for the purpose of predicting the potential flow contributing areas with the model. Overall, the flow events were overestimated by SWAT. Temporal variations in the potential flow contributing areas during each event were then analyzed. Flow contributing areas during each event was predicted by the model first and the results showed a good agreement with available information. A current precipitation index was used to simulate the continuous change of soil water content during each rainstorm, and the modeling results of the individual events were used to explore the capability of the model to predict the temporal variation of flow contributing areas during each event. The results revealed that the SWAT model over-predicted the areas contributing flow for events with lower rainfall; while for the events with higher rainfall amount the model closely simulated the time-varying contributing area. The results of this study provide some insight into the possible capability of SWAT model to predict the temporal variations in potential contributing area, and therefore provide an important contribution to the modeling of runoff generation in watersheds, a vital aspect in the evaluation and planning of best management practices.

  11. Methanotrophs Contribute to Peatland Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmola, Tuula; Leppänen, Sanna M.; Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina; Aarva, Maija; Merilä, Päivi; Fritze, Hannu; Tiirola, Marja

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N2) fixation is potentially an important N input mechanism to peatland ecosystems, but the extent of this process may have been underestimated because of the methods traditionally used inhibit the activity of methanothrophs. We examined the linkage of methane (CH4) oxidation and N2 fixation using 15N2 technique. Dominant flark and hummock Sphagnum species were collected from twelve pristine peatlands in Siikajoki, Finland, which varied in age from 200 to 2,500 y due to the postglacial rebound. The mosses were incubated in a two-day field 15N2 and 13CH4 pulse labelling experiment and the incorporation of 15N2 and 13CH4 in biomass was measured with Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer. The rates of Sphagnum-associated N2 fixation (0.1-2.9 g N m-2 y-1) were up to 10 times the current N deposition rates. Methane-induced N2 fixation contributed to over 1/3 of moss-associated N2 fixation in younger stages, but was switched off in old successional stages, despite active CH4 oxidation in these stages. Both the N2 fixation rates and the methanotrophic contribution to N2 fixation during peatland succession were primarily constrained by phosphorus availability. Previously overlooked methanotrophic N contribution may explain rapid peat and N accumulation during fen stages of peatland development. Reference. Larmola T., Leppänen S.M., Tuittila E.-S, Aarva M., Merilä P., Fritze H., Tiirola M. (2014) Methanotrophy induces nitrogen fixation during peatland development. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 111 (2): 734-739.

  12. Genes contributing to prion pathogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamgüney, Gültekin; Giles, Kurt; Glidden, David V;

    2008-01-01

    incubation times, indicating that the conversion reaction may be influenced by other gene products. To identify genes that contribute to prion pathogenesis, we analysed incubation times of prions in mice in which the gene product was inactivated, knocked out or overexpressed. We tested 20 candidate genes...... show that many genes previously implicated in prion replication have no discernible effect on the pathogenesis of prion disease. While most genes tested did not significantly affect survival times, ablation of the amyloid beta (A4) precursor protein (App) or interleukin-1 receptor, type I (Il1r1...

  13. IVS contribution to ITRF2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmann, Sabine; Thaller, Daniela; Roggenbuck, Ole; Lösler, Michael; Messerschmitt, Linda

    2016-07-01

    Every few years the International Terrestrial Reference System (ITRS) Center of the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS) decides to generate a new version of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF). For the upcoming ITRF2014 the official contribution of the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry (IVS) comprises 5796 combined sessions in SINEX file format from 1979.6 to 2015.0 containing 158 stations, overall. Nine AC contributions were included in the combination process, using five different software packages. Station coordinate time series of the combined solution show an overall repeatability of 3.3 mm for the north, 4.3 mm for the east and 7.5 mm for the height component over all stations. The minimum repeatabilities are 1.5 mm for north, 2.1 mm for east and 2.9 mm for height. One of the important differences between the IVS contribution to the ITRF2014 and the routine IVS combination is the omission of the correction for non-tidal atmospheric pressure loading (NTAL). Comparisons between the amplitudes of the annual signals derived by the VLBI observations and the annual signals from an NTAL model show that for some stations, NTAL has a high impact on station height variation. For other stations, the effect of NTAL is low. Occasionally other loading effects have a higher influence (e.g. continental water storage loading). External comparisons of the scale parameter between the VTRF2014 (a TRF based on combined VLBI solutions), DTRF2008 (DGFI-TUM realization of ITRS) and ITRF2008 revealed a significant difference in the scale. A scale difference of 0.11 ppb (i.e. 0.7 mm on the Earth's surface) has been detected between the VTRF2014 and the DTRF2008, and a scale difference of 0.44 ppb (i.e. 2.8 mm on the Earth's surface) between the VTRF2014 and ITRF2008. Internal comparisons between the EOP of the combined solution and the individual solutions from the AC contributions show a WRMS in X- and Y-Pole between

  14. Ethnographic Contributions to Method Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leander, Anna

    2016-01-01

    of IR—Critical Security Studies. Ethnographic research works with what has been termed a “strong” understanding of objectivity. When this understanding is taken seriously, it must lead to a refashioning of the processes of gathering, analyzing, and presenting data in ways that reverse many standard......Contrary to common assumptions, there is much to be learned about methods from constructivist/post-structuralist approaches to International Relations (IR) broadly speaking. This article develops this point by unpacking the contributions of one specific method—ethnography—as used in one subfield...

  15. Cuidados paliativos: a avaliação da dor na percepção de enfermeiras Cuidados paliativos: la percepción de enfermeras cerca de la evaluación del dolor Palliative care: the nurses contributions in pain assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Waterkemper

    2010-03-01

    nurses' ideas and contributions on the assessment of cancer patients' pain in palliative care through a proposal of work education based on Paul Freire's problematizing education theory. We used Juan Charles Maguerez's "problematization arc" as a strategy for data collection. The study included six nurses. The results pointed to three categories: (1 the meaning of pain, (2 the way pain assessment is practiced by nurses and (3 contributions to care. Cancer pain is a total pain. It exceeds the physical dimension of disease and extends to psychological and social dimensions. The deployment of systematic pain care routines, enclosed in the systematization of nursing care makes it possible to better redirect the actions, therefore achieving a most complete and effective pain management.

  16. Assessing the Assessment Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaRue, James

    1989-01-01

    Describes the historical use of assessment centers as staff development and promotional tools and their current use in personnel selection. The elements that constitute a true assessment center are outlined, and a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages for employers and applicants focuses on positions in library administration. (10…

  17. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male. PMID:25945466

  18. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Tinoco Mesquita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15% studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16% laureates, and two (6% were women. Fourteen (42% were American, 15 (45% Europeans and four (13% were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  19. Nobel prizes: contributions to cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg

    2015-08-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize's history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  20. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Tinoco Mesquita

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15% studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16% laureates, and two (6% were women. Fourteen (42% were American, 15 (45% Europeans and four (13% were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  1. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg, E-mail: ronaldo@floralia.com.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-08-15

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  2. Potential groundwater contribution to Amazon evapotranspiration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Fan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Climate and land ecosystem models simulate a dry-season vegetation stress in the Amazon forest, but observations do not support these results, indicating adequate water supply. Proposed mechanisms include larger soil water store and deeper roots in nature and the ability of roots to move water up and down (hydraulic redistribution, both absent in the models. Here we provide a first-order assessment of the potential importance of the upward soil water flux from the groundwater driven by capillarity. We present a map of equilibrium water table depth from available observations and a groundwater model simulation constrained by these observations. We then present a map of maximum capillary flux these water table depths, combined with the fine-textured soils in the Amazon, can potentially support. The maps show that the water table beneath the Amazon can be shallow in lowlands and river valleys (<5 m in 36% and <10 m in 60% of Amazonia. These water table depths can potentially accommodate a maximum capillary flux of 2.1 mm day−1 to the land surface averaged over Amazonia, but varies from 0.6 to 3.7 mm day−1 across nine study sites.

    We note that the results presented here are based on limited observations and simple equilibrium model calculations, and as such, have important limitations and must be interpreted accordingly. The potential capillary fluxes are not indicative of their contribution to the actual evapotranspiration, and they are only an assessment of the possible rate at which this flux can occur, to illustrate the power of soil capillary force acting on a shallow water table in fine textured soils. They may over-estimate the actual flux where the surface soils remain moist. Their contribution to the actual evapotranspiration can only be assessed through fully coupled model simulation of the dynamic feedbacks between soil water and groundwater with sub-daily climate forcing. The equilibrium water table

  3. Using multivariate generalizability theory to assess the effect of content stratification on the reliability of a performance assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Lisa A; Clauser, Brian E; Swanson, David B

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, demand for performance assessments has continued to grow. However, performance assessments are notorious for lower reliability, and in particular, low reliability resulting from task specificity. Since reliability analyses typically treat the performance tasks as randomly sampled from an infinite universe of tasks, these estimates of reliability may not be accurate. For tests built according to a table of specifications, tasks are randomly sampled from different strata (content domains, skill areas, etc.). If these strata remain fixed in the test construction process, ignoring this stratification in the reliability analysis results in an underestimate of "parallel forms" reliability, and an overestimate of the person-by-task component. This research explores the effect of representing and misrepresenting the stratification appropriately in estimation of reliability and the standard error of measurement. Both multivariate and univariate generalizability studies are reported. Results indicate that the proper specification of the analytic design is essential in yielding the proper information both about the generalizability of the assessment and the standard error of measurement. Further, illustrative D studies present the effect under a variety of situations and test designs. Additional benefits of multivariate generalizability theory in test design and evaluation are also discussed.

  4. Finding a way in: a review and practical evaluation of fMRI and EEG for detection and assessment in disorders of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Amabilis H; Connolly, John F

    2013-09-01

    Diagnoses and assessments of cognitive function in disorders of consciousness (DOC) are notoriously prone to error due to their reliance on behavioural measures. As a result, researchers have turned to functional neuroimaging and electrophysiological techniques with the goal of developing more effective methods of detecting awareness and assessing cognition in these patients. This article reviews functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroenchphalography (EEG)-based studies of cognition and consciousness in DOC, including assessment of basic sensory, perceptual, language, and emotional processing; studies for detection of conscious awareness; paradigms for the establishment of communication in the absence of behaviour; and functional connectivity studies. The advantages and limitations of fMRI and EEG-based measures are examined as research and clinical tools in this population and an explanation offered for the rediscovery of the unique advantages of EEG in the study of DOC.

  5. Minisuperspace models as infrared contributions

    CERN Document Server

    Bojowald, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A direct correspondence of quantum mechanics as a minisuperspace model for a self-interacting scalar quantum-field theory is established by computing, in several models, the infrared contributions to 1-loop effective potentials of Coleman--Weinberg type. A minisuperspace approximation rather than truncation is thereby obtained. By this approximation, the spatial averaging scale of minisuperspace models is identified with an infrared scale (but not a regulator or cut-off) delimiting the modes included in the minisuperspace model. Some versions of the models studied here have discrete space or modifications of the Hamiltonian expected from proposals of loop quantum gravity. They shed light on the question of how minisuperspace models of quantum cosmology can capture features of full quantum gravity. While it is shown that modifications of the Hamiltonian can well be described by minisuperspace truncations, some related phenomena such as signature change, confirmed and clarified here for modified scalar field th...

  6. Hadron Contribution to Vacuum Polarisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davier, M.; Hoecker, A.; Malaescu, B.; Zhang, Z.

    2016-10-01

    Precision tests of the Standard Theory require theoretical predictions taking into account higher-order quantum corrections. Among these vacuum polarisation plays a predominant role. Vacuum polarisation originates from creation and annihilation of virtual particle-antiparticle states. Leptonic vacuum polarisation can be computed from quantum electrodynamics. Hadronic vacuum polarisation cannot because of the non-perturbative nature of QCD at low energy. The problem is remedied by establishing dispersion relations involving experimental data on the cross section for e+ e- annihilation into hadrons. This chapter sets the theoretical and experimental scene and reviews the progress achieved in the last decades thanks to more precise and complete data sets. Among the various applications of hadronic vacuum polarisation calculations, two are emphasised: the contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, and the running of the fine structure constant α to the Z mass scale. They are fundamental ingredients to high precision tests of the Standard Theory.

  7. Hadron Contribution to Vacuum Polarisation

    CERN Document Server

    Davier, M; Malaescu, B; Zhang, Z

    2016-01-01

    Precision tests of the Standard Theory require theoretical predictions taking into account higher-order quantum corrections. Among these vacuum polarisation plays a predominant role. Vacuum polarisation originates from creation and annihilation of virtual particle–antiparticle states. Leptonic vacuum polarisation can be computed from quantum electrodynamics. Hadronic vacuum polarisation cannot because of the non-perturbative nature of QCD at low energy. The problem is remedied by establishing dispersion relations involving experimental data on the cross section for e+ e− annihilation into hadrons. This chapter sets the theoretical and experimental scene and reviews the progress achieved in the last decades thanks to more precise and complete data sets. Among the various applications of hadronic vacuum polarisation calculations, two are emphasised: the contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, and the running of the fine structure constant α to the Z mass scale. They are fundamental ingre...

  8. Factors contributing to adolescent obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kloub, Manal I; Froelicher, Erika S

    2009-06-01

    Obesity in children is a significant public health concern. The prevalence of overweight and obesity in Jordanian children, and adolescents has increased in the last decade. The consequences of obesity to health in childhood and adulthood have both medical, and economic cost to individuals and society. This paper reviews the factors that contribute to adolescent obesity and emphasizes behavioral and environmental factors. An individual's behaviors such as increased consumption of high caloric foods, increased sedentary activity while decreasing physical activity has been identified as key issues in the development of obesity. Additionally, the current environment in homes, schools, and neighborhoods tend to discourage a healthy lifestyle. A comprehensive approach that involves the whole community is the best strategy for preventing adolescent obesity. Nurses are in a unique position to provide leadership in developing programs for healthier lifestyle choices for adolescents' and adoption of these goals into their daily lives.

  9. Integrated impact assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, A.L.; Rossini, F.A.

    1981-12-01

    Impact assessment studies the effects on society of proposed projects, programs, or policies. It is perhaps best known in the forms of technology assessment and environmental-impact assessment. The institutionalization of impact assessment, the principal features of impact assessment and its performance are discussed here, keynoting interdisciplinarity as a critical factor. Substantial progress in performance has occurred over the past decade, especially in environmental and social analyses, pointing to some critical issues for the decade ahead. Within studies, integration across disciplinary components, between contributions from professionals and parties-at-interest, and between producers and users must be improved. Across studies, practitioners of impact assessment need to intercommunicate to advance the state of their art. 38 references.

  10. Thomas Grisso: Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    The Award for Distinguished Professional Contributions to Applied Research is given to a psychologist whose research has led to important discoveries or developments in the field of applied psychology. To be eligible, this research should have led to innovative applications in an area of psychological practice, including but not limited to assessment, consultation, instruction, or intervention (either direct or indirect). The 2014 recipient is Thomas Grisso. Grisso "has made seminal contributions to the field of forensic psychology and psychiatry through his internationally renowned program of research, which has directly impacted juvenile justice reform worldwide." Grisso's award citation, biography, and a selected bibliography are presented here.

  11. Optimization of the Actuarial Model of Defined Contribution Pension Plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the actuarial models of defined contribution pension plan. Through assumptions and calculations, the expected replacement ratios of three different defined contribution pension plans are compared. Specially, more significant considerable factors are put forward in the further cost and risk analyses. In order to get an assessment of current status, the paper finds a relationship between the replacement ratio and the pension investment rate using econometrics method. Based on an appropriate investment rate of 6%, an expected replacement ratio of 20% is reached.

  12. Avaliação de áreas potenciais ao cultivo de biomassa para produção de energia e uma contribuição de sensoriamento remoto e sistemas de informações geográficas Assessment of potential areas to biomass cultivation for energy production and a contribution of remote sensing and geographic information systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalberto K. Miura

    2011-06-01

    aspects. Thus, this study aims to present important aspects related with regional energy planning as a contribution for proposing better solutions to energy demands and to think about better public policies related to energy production from biomass. Besides, a contribution of Remote Sensing and Geographic Information System in order to assess areas for biomass energy production and a conceptual model are presented as framework which demonstrates how these techniques can constitute support tools to strategic decision making process in bioenergy issues. Some difficult and constraints to territorial and agro-energy planning in Brazil was also presented.

  13. Minisuperspace models as infrared contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojowald, Martin; Brahma, Suddhasattwa

    2016-06-01

    A direct correspondence of quantum mechanics as a minisuperspace model for a self-interacting scalar quantum-field theory is established by computing, in several models, the infrared contributions to 1-loop effective potentials of Coleman-Weinberg type. A minisuperspace approximation rather than truncation is thereby obtained. By this approximation, the spatial averaging scale of minisuperspace models is identified with an infrared scale (but not a regulator or cutoff) delimiting the modes included in the minisuperspace model. Some versions of the models studied here have discrete space or modifications of the Hamiltonian expected from proposals of loop quantum gravity. They shed light on the question of how minisuperspace models of quantum cosmology can capture features of full quantum gravity. While it is shown that modifications of the Hamiltonian can be well described by minisuperspace truncations, some related phenomena such as signature change, confirmed and clarified here for modified scalar field theories, require at least a perturbative treatment of inhomogeneity beyond a strict minisuperspace model. The new methods suggest a systematic extension of minisuperspace models by a canonical effective formulation of perturbative inhomogeneity.

  14. Quarkonium Contribution to Meson Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Cincioglu, E; Ozpineci, A; Yilmazer, A U

    2016-01-01

    Starting from a molecular picture for the X(3872) resonance, this state and its J^{PC}=2++ HQSS partner [X2(4012)] are analyzed within a model which incorporates possible mixings with 2P charmonium states. Since it is reasonable to expect the bare chi_{c1}(2P) to be located above the D\\bar D* threshold, but relatively close to it, the presence of the charmonium state provides an effective attraction that will contribute to bind the X(3872), but it will not appear in the 2++ sector. Indeed in this latter sector, the chi_{c2}(2P) should provide an effective small repulsion, because it is placed well below the D*\\bar D* threshold. We show how the 1++ and 2++ bare charmonium poles are modified due to the D(*)\\bar D(*) loop effects, and the first one is moved to the complex plane. The meson loops produce, besides some shifts in the masses of the charmonia, a finite width for the 1++ dressed charmonium state. On the other hand, the X(3872) and X2(4012) start developing some charmonium content, which is estimated by...

  15. Agrotóxicos em água para consumo humano: uma abordagem de avaliação de risco e contribuição o processo de atualização da legislação brasileira Pesticides in drinking water: a risk assessment approach and contribution to the Brazilian legislation updating process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Fernandes Neto

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available O uso intensivo de agrotóxicos no país tem suscitado a preocupação de profissionais de diversos setores face aos riscos potenciais que essas substâncias trazem ao ambiente e aos seres humanos. Nesse contexto, a água para consumo humano pode ser uma importante forma de exposição. O padrão nacional de potabilidade da água é regulamentado pela Portaria do Ministério da Saúde nº 518/2004 e contempla 22 agrotóxicos. O objetivo deste artigo é apresentar e discutir aspectos vinculados à atualidade do padrão de potabilidade brasileiro com relação à necessidade de inserção de agrotóxicos, e à definição de valores máximos permitidos (VMP. A estratégia da metodologia de avaliação de risco foi utilizada para a sistematização e análise das informações disponíveis na literatura. As discussões e apontamentos do trabalho poderão contribuir para a revisão da legislação nacional, cujo processo deverá se iniciar brevemente.The intensive use of pesticides in the country has addressed the stakeholders concerns regarding the potential risks of these substances to the environment and to the human beings. In this context, the water for human intake can be an important form of exposure. The drinking water national standard is regulated by the Ministry of Health Act 518/2004, which considers 22 pesticides. The objective of this paper is to present and to discuss aspects of the current Brazilian standard of water potability, with regard to the necessity of insertion of pesticides and to the definition of maximum permitted values (VMP. The strategy of the methodology of risk assessment was used for the systematization and analysis of the available information in literature. The discussions and notes of the paper could contribute for the forthcoming national legislation review process.

  16. Contribution Index Based on Green Building Certification Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuting Sun

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Green Building Certification Systems (GBCS are carried out in many countries due to the rising awareness of the importance of sustainability in the building industry. The intention should have motivated participants to construct and operate buildings sustainably, however, there is not yet a method developed to investigate the motivation of the participants. Based on the GBCS, this paper proposes the contribution index as a standard global method to analyze the performance of participants in the green building industry. Three contribution indices, namely Frequency Contribution Index (FCI, Intensity Contribution Index (ICI and Comprehensive Contribution Index (CCI that concern each different category of participant, have been formulated. Three further analyses based on the index were undertaken to investigate some features of the industry. A case study of Singapore was conducted to show how the contribution index could be used to extract industry patterns and trends and assess the participants’ performance in the green building industry. Interviews with experts provide some suggested applications and support for the findings.

  17. Serotonergic contribution to boys' behavioral regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélie Nantel-Vivier

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Animal and human adult studies reveal a contribution of serotonin to behavior regulation. Whether these findings apply to children is unclear. The present study investigated serotonergic functioning in boys with a history of behavior regulation difficulties through a double-blind, acute tryptophan supplementation procedure. METHOD: Participants were 23 boys (age 10 years with a history of elevated physical aggression, recruited from a community sample. Eleven were given a chocolate milkshake supplemented with 500 mg tryptophan, and 12 received a chocolate milkshake without tryptophan. Boys engaged in a competitive reaction time game against a fictitious opponent, which assessed response to provocation, impulsivity, perspective taking, and sharing. Impulsivity was further assessed through a Go/No-Go paradigm. A computerized emotion recognition task and a staged instrumental help incident were also administered. RESULTS: Boys, regardless of group, responded similarly to high provocation by the fictitious opponent. However, boys in the tryptophan group adjusted their level of responding optimally as a function of the level of provocation, whereas boys in the control group significantly decreased their level of responding towards the end of the competition. Boys in the tryptophan group tended to show greater perspective taking, tended to better distinguish facial expressions of fear and happiness, and tended to provide greater instrumental help to the experimenter. CONCLUSIONS: The present study provides initial evidence for the feasibility of acute tryptophan supplementation in children and some effect of tryptophan supplementation on children's behaviors. Further studies are warranted to explore the potential impact of increased serotonergic functioning on boys' dominant and affiliative behaviors.

  18. Contribuições para a construção de uma matriz para avaliação de projetos de educação ambiental Contributions to the construction of an assessment matrix for environmental education projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Guanabara

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Hoje em dia, presenciamos uma grande proliferação de projetos de educação ambiental, mas não se observa esse mesmo desenvolvimento em relação aos métodos para avaliação destes. O presente artigo teve por objetivo colaborar com a construção de uma matriz para avaliação de tais projetos. Foram utilizados, como exemplo de avaliação, dois projetos desenvolvidos no município de Petrópolis (RJ, que apresentam os resíduos sólidos como tema central. A matriz analisou a adequação dos projetos Araras sem lixo e Petrópolis recicla com as principais políticas públicas que regem a região e o tema escolhido. Foram elaboradas 13 questões para avaliar se os projetos estavam ou não de acordo com os propostos pelas políticas públicas escolhidas. No total, cada projeto poderia pontuar um máximo de 39 e um mínimo de 13 pontos, podendo ser avaliados como: (i não de acordo com as políticas públicas analisadas (pontuação entre 13-21; (ii parcialmente de acordo (entre 22 e 30 pontos; e (iii de acordo (entre 31-39 pontos. Segundo a avaliação, o projeto Araras sem lixo tem seus princípios e objetivos parcialmente de acordo com aqueles propostos pelas políticas públicas analisadas. Já o projeto Petrópolis recicla mostrou-se inadequado aos propostos por essas políticas públicas. A matriz de avaliação mostrou ser um instrumento adequado para avaliação e posterior comparação de projetos de educação ambiental, podendo ser adaptada aos mais diferentes temas e realidades.Nowadays we witness a huge proliferation of environmental education projects, but a similar development cannot be observed with respect to the methods employed to evaluate these projects. The present article seeks to contribute to the process by constructing a matrix to evaluate this kind of project. Two projects developed in Petrópolis (RJ having solid waste as their main issue were taken as test cases. The matrix analyzed the adherence of the projects

  19. Peripheral contributions to visceral hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhart, G F

    1999-03-01

    and, along with activated mechanically insensitive receptors, increase the afferent barrage into the spinal cord, contributing to the development of visceral hyperalgesia.

  20. Promoting Well-Being: The Contribution of Emotional Intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fabio, Annamaria; Kenny, Maureen E

    2016-01-01

    Adopting a primary prevention perspective, this study examines competencies with the potential to enhance well-being and performance among future workers. More specifically, the contributions of ability-based and trait models of emotional intelligence (EI), assessed through well-established measures, to indices of hedonic and eudaimonic well-being were examined for a sample of 157 Italian high school students. The Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test was used to assess ability-based EI, the Bar-On Emotional Intelligence Inventory and the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire were used to assess trait EI, the Positive and Negative Affect Scale and the Satisfaction With Life Scale were used to assess hedonic well-being, and the Meaningful Life Measure was used to assess eudaimonic well-being. The results highlight the contributions of trait EI in explaining both hedonic and eudaimonic well-being, after controlling for the effects of fluid intelligence and personality traits. Implications for further research and intervention regarding future workers are discussed.

  1. Promoting well-being: The contribution of emotional intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Di Fabio

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Adopting a primary prevention perspective, this study examines competencies with the potential to enhance well-being and performance among future workers. More specifically, the contributions of ability-based and trait models of emotional intelligence (EI, assessed through well-established measures, to indices of hedonic and eudaimonic well-being were examined for a sample of 157 Italian high school students. The Mayer Salovey Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT was used to assess ability-based EI, the Bar-On Emotional Intelligence Inventory (EQ-i and the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (TeiQue were used to assess trait EI, the Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS and the Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS were used to assess hedonic well-being, and the Meaningful Life Measure (MLM was used to assess eudaimonic well-being. The results highlight the contributions of trait emotional intelligence in explaining both hedonic and eudaimonic well-being, after controlling for the effects of fluid intelligence and personality traits. Implications for further research and intervention regarding future workers are discussed.

  2. The nursing contribution to ethical decision making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Dinten-Schmid

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the neonatal care units of the University Hospitals of Zurich and Bern, the nurse´s role in ethical decision-making is well established. However, nurses often reported uncertainty with regard to introducing the premature infant’s situation from the nursing perspective in ethics rounds. Aims: To empower neonatal nurses in fulfilling their role in the multiprofessional decision-making process, we performed a practice development project. On the basis of the Iowa model we developed a checklist for presenting the nursing history of premature infants in an ethically competent and responsible way. Conclusions: The ‘checklist for nursing assessment in the context of ethical decision-making’, equips nurses for their professional contribution to ethics rounds, making them better prepared to present the nursing perspective in a structured and thorough manner. Implications for practice: The Iowa model supports practice development even with limited data availability The instrument invigorates the neonatal nurse´s role in the multiprofessional ethical decision-making process It is crucial to involve peers in practice development

  3. Some Built Environment Research Contributing to Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devapriya Chitral Wijeyesekera

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Engineering in all forms must address global challenges of sustainability including its dimensions such as poverty, urbanisation, and climate change. The built environment is the dynamic interface between human society as it interacts and influences the ecosystem.  An understanding of this inextricably linked interdependence underpins the sustainability issues relevant to Civil Engineering. Geotechnical engineering outstand the rest of the disciplines in being the most resource intensive and having an early stance in the construction process. Philosophies and definitions of sustainability, as appropriate to geotechnical engineering is punctuated with illustrations through such research studies that contribute to sustainable development. This paper is thus a technical narrative of such innovative geotechnical research focusing on the author’s research career to include the modeling and assessment of the performance of a rectangular hyperbolic paraboloid shell foundation to mimic the “duck’s foot” on very soft mud; innovative research on the development of rocker pipes to arrest the often unnoticed failure of utility services arising from differential settlement; industrial design and sustainable installation of thick compacted London clay surround to protect the Heathrow Express Rail link Tunnel from noxious gases entering the tunnel as it traversed through an old landfill site;  Urban Heat Island studies; Hemp in rammed earth construction,; Quality control and enhancement of geo synthetic clay liners; adoption of lightweight manufactured aggregates; used vegetable oil in asphalt pavements and soil stabilization and sustainable construction through use of enzymes and light geo composites on challenging soils are presented.

  4. The contributions of anthropology and mitochondrial DNA analysis to the identification of the human skeletal remains of the Australian outlaw Edward 'Ned' Kelly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blau, S; Catelli, L; Garrone, F; Hartman, D; Romanini, C; Romero, M; Vullo, C

    2014-07-01

    This paper details the anthropological and genetic analyses that contributed to the identification of the notorious Australian outlaw ('bushranger') Edward ('Ned') Kelly. In 1880 at the age of 25, Kelly was hanged and buried at the former Melbourne Gaol in Victoria, Australia. In 1929, the remains of executed prisoners (including those of Kelly) were haphazardly disinterred following the demolition of parts of the Melbourne Gaol and haphazardly reinterred in three distinct "pits" at the Pentridge Prison. In 1999 the Pentridge Prison was sold for commercial development and subsequently in 2008 and 2009 the human remains of prisoners were recovered. A total of 41 cases of unidentified human skeletal remains from Pentridge were examined using traditional anthropological techniques. At least one representative sample from each of the remains (mostly clavicles) from all three pits was selected for DNA analysis. Comparative ante-mortem reference samples were also located. Given the antiquity and condition of remains recovered from Pentridge, and the 130 years that had passed since Kelly's execution, mitochondrial DNA analysis was chosen as a suitable DNA analysis tool to examine the Pentridge cases to assist in the inclusion or exclusion of remains as being those of Ned Kelly. Only one of the Pentridge cases (Pen14) matched the HV1/HV2 mitochondrial DNA haplotype of the reference sample. Additional anthropological analyses indicated a number of pathological features that provided support that the remains of Pen14 are those of Edward ("Ned") Kelly.

  5. Selective sweeps across twenty millions years of primate evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Kasper; Nam, Kiwoong; Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    2016-01-01

    The contribution from selective sweeps to variation in genetic diversity has proven notoriously difficult to assess, in part because polymorphism data only allows detection of sweeps in the most recent few hundred thousand years. Here we show how linked selection in ancestral species can be quant...

  6. Research And Development Contributions to Aviation Progress (RADCAP): Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    Positive contributions of military aeronautical research and development programs to civil aviation are reviewed and some possible future contributions of those military programs are assessed. A summary is presented of detailed results concerned with: (1) review of the progress that has been made in aviation since 1925 and the significant technological advances that have been made; (2) an examination of current and planned military aeronautical research and technology programs and an assessment of their relevancy to the aeronautical R and D needs of civil aviation; (3) the relationship of the development base generated by military programs to the needs of civil airliner design, development, and production; (4) information on aeronautical R and D funding; and (5) the findings and observations of the RADCAP study.

  7. Trevor W. Robbins: Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Presents Trevor W. Robbins, the 2011 winner of the American Psychological Association Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions."For distinguished theoretical and empirical contributions to basic research in experimental psychology and neuroscience. Trevor W. Robbins has made innovative and landmark contributions to understanding monoaminergic and glutamatergic regulation of cortico-striatal-limbic function and its involvement in psychological processes and pathological states such as addiction, depression, schizophrenia, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. His pioneering accomplishments have included the development of methodologies for parallel sophisticated behavioral assessments in humans, rodents, and monkeys combined with psychopharmacological and imaging studies across species. His vigor and dedication to research, exemplary leadership, scholarship, and stellar productivity have advanced our knowledge of brain function and inspired several generations of cognitive neuroscientists." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. 12 CFR 1291.2 - Required annual AHP contributions; allocation of contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Required annual AHP contributions; allocation... GOALS AND MISSION FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANKS' AFFORDABLE HOUSING PROGRAM § 1291.2 Required annual AHP contributions; allocation of contributions. (a) Annual AHP contributions. Each Bank shall contribute annually...

  9. The GMOS contributions to GEOSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirrone N.

    2013-04-01

    oceans, and in the UTLS will support the validation of regional and global atmospheric mercury models for use in evaluating different policy options for reducing mercury pollution and its impacts on human health and ecosystems. The data sets, the validated models, and the interoperable system that is produced within this program, will support the policymaking process in the framework of UNEP Governing Council activities, and in the UNECE-LRTAP convention. The task builds upon contributions from, among others, the Global Mercury Observation System (GMOS project, the UNEP Mercury Programme, the Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollutants Task Force (TF HTAP, the European Monitoring and Evaluation Program (EMEP, the MercNet/AMNet initiative in the USA, the CAMNet in Canada, and other international monitoring and modelling efforts.

  10. Quarkonium Contribution to Meson Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cincioglu, E.; Yilmazer, A.U. [Ankara University, Department of Physics Engineering, Ankara (Turkey); Nieves, J. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (IFIC) Centro Mixto CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, Institutos de Investigacion de Paterna, Valencia (Spain); Ozpineci, A. [Middle East Technical University, Department of Physics, Ankara (Turkey)

    2016-10-15

    Starting from a molecular picture for the X(3872) resonance, this state and its J{sup PC} = 2{sup ++} heavy-quark spin symmetry partner [X{sub 2}(4012)] are analyzed within a model which incorporates possible mixings with 2P charmonium (c anti c) states. Since it is reasonable to expect the bare χ{sub c1}(2P) to be located above the D anti D{sup *} threshold, but relatively close to it, the presence of the charmonium state provides an effective attraction that will contribute to binding the X(3872), but it will not appear in the 2{sup ++} sector. Indeed in the latter sector, the χ{sub c2}(2P) should provide an effective small repulsion, because it is placed well below the D{sup *} anti D{sup *} threshold. We show how the 1{sup ++} and 2{sup ++} bare charmonium poles are modified due to the D{sup (*)} anti D{sup (*)} loop effects, and the first one is moved to the complex plane. The meson loops produce, besides some shifts in the masses of the charmonia, a finite width for the 1{sup ++} dressed charmonium state. On the other hand, X(3872) and X{sub 2}(4012) start developing some charmonium content, which is estimated by means of the compositeness Weinberg sum rule. It turns out that in the heavy-quark limit, there is only one coupling between the 2P charmonia and the D{sup (*)} anti D{sup (*)} pairs. We also show that, for reasonable values of this coupling, leading to X(3872) molecular probabilities of around 70-90 %, the X{sub 2} resonance destabilizes and disappears from the spectrum, becoming either a virtual state or one being located deep into the complex plane, with decreasing influence in the D{sup *} anti D{sup *} scattering line. Moreover, we also discuss how around 10-30 % charmonium probability in the X(3872) might explain the ratio of radiative decays of this resonance into ψ(2S)γ and J/ψγ. Finally, we qualitatively discuss within this scheme, the hidden bottom flavor sector, paying a special attention to the implications for the X{sub b} and X

  11. Contribution of macrophages to plasmin activity in ewe bulk milk

    OpenAIRE

    Albenzio, M; A. Sevi; A. Marzano; Marino, R; Schena, L.; Caroprese , M

    2010-01-01

    A total of 225 bulk sheep milk samples were collected throughout lactation to assess the contribution of macrophages to the regulation of the plasmin/plasminogen system. Samples were analyzed for composition, milk renneting parameters, and for activities of plasmin (PL), plasminogen (PG) and plasminogen activators (PA). Isolation of macrophages from milk was performed using a magnetic positive separation; separated cells were lysed and activity of urokinase-PA was determined. PL activity in m...

  12. Contribution of fuelwood marketing to sustainable livelihood in Oyo state

    OpenAIRE

    OLUGBIRE O.O.; AREMU F.J.; OPUTE O.H.; OJEDOKUN C.A.; AYOMIDE A.A.; OGUNTOYE T.O.

    2016-01-01

    Fuel wood is an important source of income and domestic energy for both rural and urban households in Nigeria. The marketing of fuel wood in Ibadan, Oyo state, Nigeria was investigated with a view to assess the profitability and contribution of fuelwood marketing to sustainable livelihood in Oyo state. Data for the study were obtained from a total of 50 randomly selected respondents through interview schedules, structured questionnaires applications and personal observation. Descriptive stati...

  13. Determining the direct upland hydrological contribution area of estuarine wetlands using Arc/GIS tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    The delineation of a polygon layer representing the direct upland runoff contribution to esturine wetland polygons can be a useful tool in estuarine wetland assessment. However, the traditional methods of watershed delineation using pour points and digital elevation models (DEMs)...

  14. Leading by words: A voluntary contribution experiment with one-way communication

    OpenAIRE

    Koukoumelis, Anastasios; Levati, Maria Vittoria; Weisser, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we study a voluntary contribution mechanism with one-way communication. The relevance of one person's words is assessed by assigning exogenously the role of the "communicator" to one group member. Contrary to the view that the mutual exchange of promises is necessary for the cooperation-enhancing effect of communication, we ï¬ nd that, compared to a standard voluntary contribution mechanism with no communication, one-way communication signiï¬ cantly increases contributions and ...

  15. The contribution from psychological, social, and organizational work factors to risk of disability retirement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knardahl, Stein; Johannessen, Håkon A.; Sterud, Tom

    2017-01-01

    Background: Previous studies indicate that psychological, social, and organizational factors at work contribute to health, motivation, absence from work, and functional ability. The objective of the study was to assess the current state of knowledge of the contribution of psychological, social...... social support from ones superior. Conclusions: Psychological and organizational factors at work contribute to disability retirement with the most robust evidence for the role of work control. We recommend the measurement of specific exposure factors in future studies....

  16. A Group Contribution Method for Estimating Cetane and Octane Numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubic, William Louis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Process Modeling and Analysis Group

    2016-07-28

    Much of the research on advanced biofuels is devoted to the study of novel chemical pathways for converting nonfood biomass into liquid fuels that can be blended with existing transportation fuels. Many compounds under consideration are not found in the existing fuel supplies. Often, the physical properties needed to assess the viability of a potential biofuel are not available. The only reliable information available may be the molecular structure. Group contribution methods for estimating physical properties from molecular structure have been used for more than 60 years. The most common application is estimation of thermodynamic properties. More recently, group contribution methods have been developed for estimating rate dependent properties including cetane and octane numbers. Often, published group contribution methods are limited in terms of types of function groups and range of applicability. In this study, a new, broadly-applicable group contribution method based on an artificial neural network was developed to estimate cetane number research octane number, and motor octane numbers of hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons. The new method is more accurate over a greater range molecular weights and structural complexity than existing group contribution methods for estimating cetane and octane numbers.

  17. Dual Diathesis-Stressor Model of Emotional and Linguistic Contributions to Developmental Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walden, Tedra A.; Frankel, Carl B.; Buhr, Anthony P.; Johnson, Kia N.; Conture, Edward G.; Karrass, Jan M.

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed emotional and speech-language contributions to childhood stuttering. A dual diathesis-stressor framework guided this study, in which both linguistic requirements and skills, and emotion and its regulation, are hypothesized to contribute to stuttering. The language diathesis consists of expressive and receptive language skills.…

  18. The Contribution of Executive Functions to Narrative Writing in Fourth Grade Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drijbooms, Elise; Groen, Margriet A.; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the contribution of executive functions to narrative writing in fourth grade children, and evaluated to what extent executive functions contribute differentially to different levels of narrative composition. The written skills of 102 Dutch children in fourth grade were assessed using a narrative picture-elicitation…

  19. The contribution of dairy products to micronutrient intake in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, P.A.J.; Streppel, M.T.; Feskens, E.J.M.; Groot, de C.P.G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To assess the contribution of dairy products to the intake of various vitamins and minerals in several life stages in the Dutch population. Method: Data from 3 Dutch Food Consumption Surveys and the Leiden Longevity Study were used to estimate the contribution of dairy products—as percent

  20. Dynamic balance control in transfemoral amputees: Individual contribution of the prosthesis side

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederhand, M.J.; Asseldonk, van E.H.F.; Kooij, van der H.

    2006-01-01

    1. Summary/conclusions This study explores the use of a new developed method to assess the individual contribution of both legs to postural control. The results imply that the contribution of the prosthetic leg in balance control is not a mere reflection of the weight distribution. 2. Introduction

  1. Spatial differentiated effect assessment for aquatic eutrophication in Life Cycle Assessment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penailillo, Reinaldo

    2005-01-01

    The conventional evaluation of aquatic eutrophication in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) expresses the contribution of nitrogen and/or phosphorus emissions to biomass production in terms of the equivalent emission of a reference substance. This assessment doe

  2. The contribution of tropical cyclones to rainfall in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustín Breña-Naranjo, J.; Pedrozo-Acuña, Adrián; Pozos-Estrada, Oscar; Jiménez-López, Salma A.; López-López, Marco R.

    Investigating the contribution of tropical cyclones to the terrestrial water cycle can help quantify the benefits and hazards caused by the rainfall generated from this type of hydro-meteorological event. Rainfall induced by tropical cyclones can enhance both flood risk and groundwater recharge, and it is therefore important to characterise its minimum, mean and maximum contributions to a region or country's water balance. This work evaluates the rainfall contribution of tropical depressions, storms and hurricanes across Mexico from 1998 to 2013 using the satellite-derived precipitation dataset TMPA 3B42. Additionally, the sensitivity of rainfall to other datasets was assessed: the national rain gauge observation network, real-time satellite rainfall and a merged product that combines rain gauges with non-calibrated space-borne rainfall measurements. The lower Baja California peninsula had the highest contribution from cyclonic rainfall in relative terms (∼40% of its total annual rainfall), whereas the contributions in the rest of the country showed a low-to-medium dependence on tropical cyclones, with mean values ranging from 0% to 20%. In quantitative terms, southern regions of Mexico can receive more than 2400 mm of cyclonic rainfall during years with significant TC activity. Moreover, (a) the number of tropical cyclones impacting Mexico has been significantly increasing since 1998, but cyclonic contributions in relative and quantitative terms have not been increasing, and (b) wind speed and rainfall intensity during cyclones are not highly correlated. Future work should evaluate the impacts of such contributions on surface and groundwater hydrological processes and connect the knowledge gaps between the magnitude of tropical cyclones, flood hazards, and economic losses.

  3. EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on the substantiation of a health claim related to vitamin K2 and contribution to the normal function of the heart and blood vessels (ID 125, further assessment) pursuant to Article 13(1) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    and blood vessels. The food constituent that is the subject of the claim, vitamin K2, is sufficiently characterised. The claimed effect, contribution to the normal function of the heart and blood vessels, is a beneficial physiological effect. The proposed target population is the general population...... for confounders, and that the evidence provided for a proposed mechanism is weak. On the basis of the data presented, the Panel concludes that a cause and effect relationship has not been established between the dietary intake of vitamin K2 and contribution to the normal function of the heart and blood vessels....

  4. IDENTIFYING KEY CONTRIBUTIONS TO INFORMATION SCIENCE,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several alternative approaches were examined to determine how one might identify some of the key (written) contributions to ’ information science ’. The...references. The unclear selective patterns in current bibliographies in the information science field also present problems. It is suggested that in...identifying key contributions we are far from common agreement on the conceptual, methodological or practical contributions to the information science field

  5. [Original contributions of Latin Americans to anesthesiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrete, J A

    1998-10-01

    The original contributions of Latin American physicians to the science of anesthesiology are described. Many contributions have been unfairly ignored mainly because they were never published in English, but others have likewise been passed over even when published in the most prestigious journals in the field. Although many discoveries by Latin Americans have been made in the area of regional anesthesia, a considerable number of contributions have involved other aspects of anesthesia as well.

  6. Animal welfare assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučinić Marijana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with animal welfare definitions and animal welfare assessment. Animal welfare is a prolonged mental state, resulting from how the animal experiences its environment over time. There are different methods for animal welfare assessment. The four basic criteria for animal welfare assessment are feeding, housing, health and appropriate behavior. Therefore, criteria used to assess animal welfare are not direct measures of the mental state but only parameters that need to be interpreted in terms of welfare. The immediate housing environment and feeding may influence animal welfare either positively, when most of the important requirements are respected, or negatively, when animals are exposed to various stress factors and unpleasant emotions that contribute to animal disease, injuries or inappropriate behavior. Therefore, animal welfare is a unique link between housing conditions, feeding and watering on one side, and animal health status and behavior on the other side.

  7. The contribution of observational studies to the knowledge of drug effectiveness in heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobre, Daniela; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; deJongste, Mike J. L.; van Sonderen, Eric; Klungel, Olaf H.; Sanderman, Robbert; Ranchor, Adelita V.; Haaijer-Ruskamp, Flora M.

    2007-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are the golden standard for the assessment of drug efficacy. Little is known about the add-on value of observational studies in heart failure (HF). We aimed to assess the contribution of observational studies to actual knowledge regarding the effectiveness of angi

  8. Endogenously- and Exogenously-Driven Selective Sustained Attention: Contributions to Learning in Kindergarten Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Lucy C.; Thiessen, Erik D.; Godwin, Karrie E.; Dickerson, John P.; Fisher, Anna V.

    2015-01-01

    Selective sustained attention is vital for higher order cognition. Although endogenous and exogenous factors influence selective sustained attention, assessment of the degree to which these factors influence performance and learning is often challenging. We report findings from the Track-It task, a paradigm that aims to assess the contribution of…

  9. Fine Motor Skills and Executive Function Both Contribute to Kindergarten Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Claire E.; Brock, Laura L.; Murrah, William M.; Bell, Lindsay H.; Worzalla, Samantha L.; Grissmer, David; Morrison, Frederick J.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the contribution of executive function (EF) and multiple aspects of fine motor skills to achievement on 6 standardized assessments in a sample of middle-socioeconomic status kindergarteners. Three- and 4-year-olds' (n = 213) fine and gross motor skills were assessed in a home visit before kindergarten, EF was measured at fall…

  10. Mining's seven questions to sustainability: from mitigating impacts to encouraging contribution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.AnthonyHodge

    2004-01-01

    A recent initiative emerging from the mining industry has led to development of a practical, robust, and quite widely applicable way of assessing contribution to sustainability that has come to be known as the Seven Questions to Sustainability (7QS). It is applicable at both the project level and for assessments covering the full mix of human activities within broad regions.

  11. 19 CFR 111.42 - Relations with person who is notoriously disreputable or whose license is under suspension...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS BROKERS Duties and Responsibilities of Customs Brokers § 111.42 Relations with person who... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Relations with person who is...

  12. 75 FR 60854 - 2010 Special 301 Out of Cycle Review of Notorious Markets: Request for Public Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES... highlight the problem of marketplaces that deal in infringing goods and help sustain global piracy and... at http://www.ustr.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: 1. Background Global piracy and...

  13. 76 FR 58854 - 2011 Special 301 Out-of-Cycle Review of Notorious Markets: Request for Public Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES... highlight the problem of marketplaces that deal in infringing goods and which help sustain global piracy and... step up efforts to combat piracy and counterfeiting in these and similar markets. 2. Public Comments...

  14. 78 FR 57924 - 2013 Special 301 Out-Of-Cycle Review of Notorious Markets: Request For Public Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES... responsible authorities to step up efforts to combat copyright piracy and trademark counterfeiting in these... goods and help sustain global piracy and counterfeiting. b. Requirements for Comments Interested...

  15. 77 FR 48583 - 2012 Special 301 Out-of-Cycle Review of Notorious Markets: Request for Public Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office TRADE REPRESENTATIVE 2012... of marketplaces that deal in infringing goods and which help sustain global piracy and counterfeiting... piracy and counterfeiting in these and similar markets. 2. Public Comments a. Written Comments...

  16. 13 CFR 120.912 - Borrowed contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... borrow its cash contribution from the CDC or a third party. If any of the contribution is borrowed, the interest rate must be reasonable. If the loan is secured by any of the Project assets, the loan must be subordinate to the liens securing the 504 Loan, and the loan may not be repaid at a faster rate than the...

  17. Formalized Search Strategies for Human Risk Contributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, J.; Pedersen, O. M.

    risk contributions are described on the basis of general plant design features relevant for risk and accident analysis. With this background, search strategies for human risk contributions are treated: Under the designation "work analysis", procedures for the analysis of familiar, well trained, planned...

  18. Factors Contributing to Institutions Achieving Environmental Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Matthew; Card, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to determine what factors contributed to three universities achieving environmental sustainability. Design/methodology/approach: A case study methodology was used to determine how each factor contributed to the institutions' sustainability. Site visits, fieldwork, document reviews, and interviews with…

  19. Contribution of Renewables to Energy Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The environmental benefits of renewable energy are well known. But the contribution that they can make to energy security is less widely recognised. This report aims to redress the balance, showing how in electricity generation, heat supply, and transport, renewables can enhance energy security and suggesting policies that can optimise this contribution.

  20. Contributions of Psychology to War and Peace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Daniel J.; Montiel, Cristina J.

    2013-01-01

    The contributions of American psychologists to war have been substantial and responsive to changes in U.S. national security threats and interests for nearly 100 years. These contributions are identified and discussed for four periods of armed conflict: World Wars I and II, the Cold War, and the Global War on Terror. In contrast, about 50 years…

  1. HEALTH INSURANCE: FIXED CONTRIBUTION AND REIMBURSEMENT MAXIMA

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2001-01-01

    Affected by the salary adjustments on 1 January 2001 and the evolution of the staff members and fellows population, the average reference salary, which is used as an index for fixed contributions and reimbursement maxima, has changed significantly. An adjustment of the amounts of the reimbursement maxima and the fixed contributions is therefore necessary, as from 1 January 2001. Reimbursement maxima The revised reimbursement maxima will appear on the leaflet summarizing the benefits for the year 2001, which will be sent out with the forthcoming issue of the CHIS Bull'. This leaflet will also be available from the divisional secretariats and from the UNIQA office at CERN. Fixed contributions The fixed contributions, applicable to some categories of voluntarily insured persons, are set as follows (amounts in CHF for monthly contributions) : voluntarily insured member of the personnel, with normal health insurance cover : 910.- (was 815.- in 2000) voluntarily insured member of the personnel, with reduced heal...

  2. Possibility of Large EW Penguin contribution

    CERN Document Server

    Mishima, S; Mishima, Satoshi; Yoshikawa, Tadashi

    2005-01-01

    We discuss a possibility of large electroweak(EW) penguin contribution in B-->K pi and pi pi. The recent experimental data may be still suggesting that there are some discrepancies between the data and theoretical estimations. In B --> K pi decays, to explain several theoretical relations among the branching ratios, a slightly large electroweak penguin contribution and large strong phase differences or quite large color suppressed tree contribution seem to be needed. The contributions should appear also in B --> pi pi. We show, as an example, a solution to solve the discrepancies in both B --> K pi and B --> pi pi. It may be suggesting to need the large electroweak penguin contribution with new weak phases and some SU(3) breaking effects by new physics in both QCD and electroweak penguin type processes.

  3. HEALTH INSURANCE: CONTRIBUTIONS AND REIMBURSEMENT MAXIMAL

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Division

    2000-01-01

    Affected by both the salary adjustment index on 1.1.2000 and the evolution of the staff members and fellows population, the average reference salary, which is used as an index for fixed contributions and reimbursement maximal, has changed significantly. An adjustment of the amounts of the reimbursement maximal and the fixed contributions is therefore necessary, as from 1 January 2000.Reimbursement maximalThe revised reimbursement maximal will appear on the leaflet summarising the benefits for the year 2000, which will soon be available from the divisional secretariats and from the AUSTRIA office at CERN.Fixed contributionsThe fixed contributions, applicable to some categories of voluntarily insured persons, are set as follows (amounts in CHF for monthly contributions):voluntarily insured member of the personnel, with complete coverage:815,- (was 803,- in 1999)voluntarily insured member of the personnel, with reduced coverage:407,- (was 402,- in 1999)voluntarily insured no longer dependent child:326,- (was 321...

  4. NASA's Contributions to the Gulf of Mexico Alliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glorioso, Mark

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the contribution that NASA has made and the plans for future missions that will assist the mission of the Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA). Specific reference to the work of the Stennis Space Center is reviewed. Some of the projects are: Coastal Online Assessment and Synthesis Tool (COAST), Regional Sediment Management, Coral Reef Early Warning System, Harmful Algal Bloom, Hypoxia, Land-Use and Land-Cover (LULC) Change from 1974-2008 around Mobile Bay, AL, Satellite Estimation of Suspended Particulate Loads in and around Mobile Bay, AL, Estimating Relative Nutrient Contributions of Agriculture and Forests Using MODIS Time Series, Coastal Marsh Monitoring for Persistent Saltwater Intrusion, Standardized Remote Sensing PRoduct for Water Clarity estimation within Gulf of Mexico Coastal Waters.

  5. The Contribution of Segmental and Suprasegmental Phonology to Reading Comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenendaal, Nathalie J; Groen, Margriet A; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the relation between decoding and segmental and suprasegmental phonology, and their contribution to reading comprehension, in the upper primary grades. Following a longitudinal design, the performance of 99 Dutch primary school children on phonological awareness (segmental phonology) and text reading prosody (suprasegmental phonology) in fourth-grade and fifth-grade, and reading comprehension in sixth-grade were examined. In addition, decoding efficiency as a general assessment of reading was examined. Structural path modeling firstly showed that the relation between decoding efficiency and both measures of phonology from fourth- to fifth grade was unidirectional. Secondly, the relation between decoding in fourth- and fifth-grade and reading comprehension in sixth-grade became indirect when segmental and suprasegmental phonology were added to the model. Both factors independently exerted influence on later reading comprehension. This leads to the conclusion that not only segmental, but also suprasegmental phonology, contributes substantially to children's reading development.

  6. Theodore Millon's Contributions to Conceptualizing Personality Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincus, Aaron L; Krueger, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    We review Theodore Millon's contributions to conceptualizing personality disorders in contemporary clinical science and practice. Millon worked tirelessly across professional domains and theoretical orientations, developing a rich integrative theory of personality and its pathology, directly and indirectly impacting the evolving iterations of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-III through DSM-5), and advocating for the personality disorders through his contributions to cofounding the International Society for the Study of Personality Disorders and the Journal of Personality Disorders. We conclude with a closer look at Millon's final major contributions to conceptualizing personality disorders as well as the strengths and limitations of his approach.

  7. The economic contribution of tourism in Mozambique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Edward Samuel

    2010-01-01

    How much tourism contributes to the economies of developing countries is controversial and often not measured rigorously. Focusing on Mozambique, this study presents a simple accounting tool – a tourist-focused Social Accounting Matrix – which makes it possible to estimate the economic contribution...... of various tourism sub-types. Multiplier analysis is applied to evaluate the strength of backward linkages from tourism to the domestic economy. The results show the sector is moderate in size but has the potential to contribute significantly to aggregate economic development. However, potential weaknesses...

  8. Site assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Héctor; Gómez Arranz, Paula

    This report describes the site assessment of given position in a given site, for a wind turbine with a well-defined hub height and rotor diameter. The analysis is carried out in accordance to IEC 61400-12-1 [1], and both an obstacle assessment and a terrain assessment are performed....

  9. Environmental assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, M C; Tennant, J

    1997-11-01

    The significance, standard elements, components, and documentation of an environmental assessment in home care are discussed. This assessment is delineated within Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs and from a functional perspective. An Environmental Assessment Form that can be used as a documentation tool is included.

  10. Peer Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, Keith J.

    2009-01-01

    Peer assessment is an arrangement for learners to consider and specify the level, value, or quality of a product or performance of other equal-status learners. Products to be assessed can include writing, oral presentations, portfolios, test performance, or other skilled behaviors. Peer assessment can be summative or formative. A formative view is…

  11. Grouping chemicals for health risk assessment: A text mining-based case study of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Imran; Guo, Yufan; Silins, Ilona; Högberg, Johan; Stenius, Ulla; Korhonen, Anna

    2016-01-22

    As many chemicals act as carcinogens, chemical health risk assessment is critically important. A notoriously time consuming process, risk assessment could be greatly supported by classifying chemicals with similar toxicological profiles so that they can be assessed in groups rather than individually. We have previously developed a text mining (TM)-based tool that can automatically identify the mode of action (MOA) of a carcinogen based on the scientific evidence in literature, and it can measure the MOA similarity between chemicals on the basis of their literature profiles (Korhonen et al., 2009, 2012). A new version of the tool (2.0) was recently released and here we apply this tool for the first time to investigate and identify meaningful groups of chemicals for risk assessment. We used published literature on polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)-persistent, widely spread toxic organic compounds comprising of 209 different congeners. Although chemically similar, these compounds are heterogeneous in terms of MOA. We show that our TM tool, when applied to 1648 PubMed abstracts, produces a MOA profile for a subgroup of dioxin-like PCBs (DL-PCBs) which differs clearly from that for the rest of PCBs. This suggests that the tool could be used to effectively identify homogenous groups of chemicals and, when integrated in real-life risk assessment, could help and significantly improve the efficiency of the process.

  12. The contribution of dynamic visual cues to audiovisual speech perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaekl, Philip; Pesquita, Ana; Alsius, Agnes; Munhall, Kevin; Soto-Faraco, Salvador

    2015-08-01

    Seeing a speaker's facial gestures can significantly improve speech comprehension, especially in noisy environments. However, the nature of the visual information from the speaker's facial movements that is relevant for this enhancement is still unclear. Like auditory speech signals, visual speech signals unfold over time and contain both dynamic configural information and luminance-defined local motion cues; two information sources that are thought to engage anatomically and functionally separate visual systems. Whereas, some past studies have highlighted the importance of local, luminance-defined motion cues in audiovisual speech perception, the contribution of dynamic configural information signalling changes in form over time has not yet been assessed. We therefore attempted to single out the contribution of dynamic configural information to audiovisual speech processing. To this aim, we measured word identification performance in noise using unimodal auditory stimuli, and with audiovisual stimuli. In the audiovisual condition, speaking faces were presented as point light displays achieved via motion capture of the original talker. Point light displays could be isoluminant, to minimise the contribution of effective luminance-defined local motion information, or with added luminance contrast, allowing the combined effect of dynamic configural cues and local motion cues. Audiovisual enhancement was found in both the isoluminant and contrast-based luminance conditions compared to an auditory-only condition, demonstrating, for the first time the specific contribution of dynamic configural cues to audiovisual speech improvement. These findings imply that globally processed changes in a speaker's facial shape contribute significantly towards the perception of articulatory gestures and the analysis of audiovisual speech.

  13. Factors contributing to malnutrition in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung R; Chung, Sun J; Yoo, Sung-Hee

    2016-04-01

    Our objective in this study was to evaluate the nutritional status and to identify clinical, psychosocial, and nutritional factors contributing to malnutrition in Korean patients with Parkinson's disease. We used a descriptive, cross-sectional study design. Of 102 enrolled patients, 26 (25.5%) were malnourished and 27 (26.5%) were at risk of malnutrition based on Mini-Nutritional Assessment scores. Malnutrition was related to activity of daily living score, Hoehn and Yahr stage, duration of levodopa therapy, Beck Depression Inventory and Spielberger's Anxiety Inventory scores, body weight, body weight at onset of Parkinson's disease, and body mass index. On multiple logistic regression analysis, anxiety score, duration of levodopa therapy, body weight at onset of Parkinson's disease, and loss of body weight were significant factors predicting malnutrition in Parkinson's disease patients. Therefore, nutritional assessment, including psychological evaluation, is required for Parkinson's disease patients to facilitate interdisciplinary nutritional intervention for malnourished patients.

  14. Urban metabolism: Measuring the city's contribution to sustainable development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conke, Leonardo S; Ferreira, Tainá L

    2015-07-01

    Urban metabolism refers to the assessment of the amount of resources produced and consumed by urban ecosystems. It has become an important tool to understand how the development of one city causes impacts to the local and regional environment and to support a more sustainable urban design and planning. Therefore, the purpose of this paper was to measure the changes in material and energy use occurred in the city of Curitiba (Brazil) between the years of 2000 and 2010. Results reveal better living conditions and socioeconomic improvements derived from higher resource throughput but without complete disregard to environmental issues. Food intake, water consumption and air emissions remained at similar levels; energy use, construction materials and recycled waste were increased. The paper helps illustrate why it seems more adequate to assess the contribution a city makes to sustainable development than to evaluate if one single city is sustainable or not.

  15. Children's contributions to pediatric outpatient encounters.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dulmen, A.M. van

    1998-01-01

    Objective: Generally, increasing attention is being paid to the quality of doctor-patient communication. However, children's contributions have been, until now, primarily ignored in communication research, although there are indications that considering their views increases satisfaction and complia

  16. Jakob Nielsen and His Contributions to Topology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    1999-01-01

    The Danish mathematician Jakob Nielsen won international recognition as one of the developers of combinatorial group theory and the topology of surfaces. This article describes the life and work of Jakob Nielsen with emphasis on his contributions to topology.......The Danish mathematician Jakob Nielsen won international recognition as one of the developers of combinatorial group theory and the topology of surfaces. This article describes the life and work of Jakob Nielsen with emphasis on his contributions to topology....

  17. What contributes to depression in Parkinson's disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Schrag, A.; M. Jahanshahi; Quinn, N P

    2001-01-01

    Background: Depression is a common problem in patients with Parkinson's disease, but its mechanism is poorly understood. It is thought that neurochemical changes contribute to its occurrence, but it is unclear why some patients develop depression and others do not. Using a community-based sample of patients with Parkinson's disease, we investigated the contributions of impairment, disability and handicap to depression in Parkinson's disease. Methods: Ninety-seven patients seen in a popula...

  18. Psychology's contribution to the well-being of older americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatz, Margaret; Smyer, Michael A; DiGilio, Deborah A

    2016-01-01

    In concert with 6 decennial White House Conferences on Aging, psychologists have considered how developments in psychological science can contribute to the well-being of older Americans. We suggest 5 illustrative areas of psychological research: Advances in neuroscience elucidate ways to promote healthy cognitive aging; associated developments in neuropsychological assessment can help in protecting older Americans with cognitive losses from financial exploitation, abuse, and neglect. Psychological research on decision making and behavioral economics has much to offer to planning for retirement security and reducing vulnerability to financial abuse. Psychological research on self-management and behavior change can contribute importantly to enhancing good health behaviors among older adults; similarly the power of context on behavior can be harnessed in long-term care settings. Psychological research on attitudes and stereotypes gives insight into age bias that can be detrimental to healthy aging. Adaptive technologies and information technologies are beginning to transform assessment in research and clinical settings; technology also holds the promise of improving long-term support for older adults in both institutional and community-based settings. Finally, with 1 in 7 Americans now ages 65 and older, compared with 1 in 11 50 years ago, the psychology workforce-including health services providers and faculty to train those providers-is insufficient to meet the challenge of the aging population. (PsycINFO Database Record

  19. Criteria for environmental noise assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Hadzi-Nikolova, Marija; Mirakovski, Dejan; Doneva, Nikolinka

    2015-01-01

    The noise assessment generally refers to the assessment of noise impact from a specific source, such as noise originating from certain industrial plants, road traffic, and this is not always an easy task. Practically in every surrounding, a number of different sources contribute to the ambiental noise at a certain point. Standardization of noise level includes recommendations for noise level prescribed by legislation, which are enabling stay in the environment without danger to human heal...

  20. Rates versus Developer Contributions as Revenue Sources for Local Government

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Koutifaris

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Population expansion in many New South Wales (NSW local government areas (LGA has resulted in an increase in demand for local infrastructure and services that has far outstripped sources of local government revenue. This paper looks at two important sources of local government revenue in NSW, municipal rates and Section 94 contributions, as a source of funding increased demand and maintenance of infrastructure. It examines some recent and potentially long-term trends of both these revenues within different economic climates. An analysis and comparison of data over the period from June 2006 through to June 2010 against data collected for the period ending June 1993 forms the basis of this research. The research objective is to compare changes in the relativity of these revenue types and assess their application as a source of local government revenue. Data collected from the Department of Local Government NSW is compared with the findings of an earlier study, conducted by Barnes and Dollery (1996, in determining their relativity. The provision and maintenance of infrastructure by local government is essential for growth in the economy and is a valuable asset to be used by the community. Two types of funding for this infrastructure, among others, is sourced from municipal rates and developer charges levied under Section 94 contributions either by the developer providing the infrastructure, or a contribution towards its funding (Barnes and Dollery 1996.

  1. Risk Assessment Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prassinos, Peter G.; Lyver, John W., IV; Bui, Chinh T.

    2011-01-01

    Risk assessment is used in many industries to identify and manage risks. Initially developed for use on aeronautical and nuclear systems, risk assessment has been applied to transportation, chemical, computer, financial, and security systems among others. It is used to gain an understanding of the weaknesses or vulnerabilities in a system so modification can be made to increase operability, efficiency, and safety and to reduce failure and down-time. Risk assessment results are primary inputs to risk-informed decision making; where risk information including uncertainty is used along with other pertinent information to assist management in the decision-making process. Therefore, to be useful, a risk assessment must be directed at specific objectives. As the world embraces the globalization of trade and manufacturing, understanding the associated risk become important to decision making. Applying risk assessment techniques to a global system of development, manufacturing, and transportation can provide insight into how the system can fail, the likelihood of system failure and the consequences of system failure. The risk assessment can identify those elements that contribute most to risk and identify measures to prevent and mitigate failures, disruptions, and damaging outcomes. In addition, risk associated with public and environment impact can be identified. The risk insights gained can be applied to making decisions concerning suitable development and manufacturing locations, supply chains, and transportation strategies. While risk assessment has been mostly applied to mechanical and electrical systems, the concepts and techniques can be applied across other systems and activities. This paper provides a basic overview of the development of a risk assessment.

  2. A Bibliometric Study of John Dunning’s Contribution to International Business Research

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Manuel Anibal Silva Portugal Vasconcelos; Pinto, Cláudia Sofia Frias; SERRA, FERNANDO ANTONIO RIBEIRO; Santos,João Carvalho

    2013-01-01

    This article offers a review of John Dunning’s contribution to international business (IB) research, so as to assess the impact of Dunning and of the Eclectic paradigm on this discipline. The contribution of Dunning and of the Eclectic paradigm – usually referred to as OLI – are a core reference to current international business research, namely for studying location decisions, foreign investment, entry modes and internationalization, and for the multinational enterprise theory. First, we rev...

  3. Incentives to Encourage Scientific Web Contribution (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    We suggest improvements to citation standards and creation of remuneration opportunities to encourage career scientist contributions to Web2.0 and social media science channels. At present, agencies want to accomplish better outreach and engagement with no funding, while scientists sacrifice their personal time to contribute to web and social media sites. Securing active participation by scientists requires career recognition of the value scientists provide to web knowledge bases and to the general public. One primary mechanism to encourage participation is citation standards, which let a contributor improve their reputation in a quantifiable way. But such standards must be recognized by their scientific and workplace communities. Using case studies such as the acceptance of web in the workplace and the growth of open access journals, we examine what agencies and individual can do as well as the time scales needed to secure increased active contribution by scientists. We also discuss ways to jumpstart this process.

  4. The Authorship Dilemma: Alphabetical or Contribution?

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerman, Margareta

    2016-01-01

    Scientific communities have adopted different conventions for ordering authors on publications. Are these choices inconsequential, or do they have significant influence on individual authors, the quality of the projects completed, and research communities at large? What are the trade-offs of using one convention over another? In order to investigate these questions, we formulate a basic two-player game theoretic model, which already illustrates interesting phenomena that can occur in more realistic settings. We find that alphabetical ordering can improve research quality, while contribution-based ordering leads to a denser collaboration network and a greater number of publications. Contrary to the assumption that free riding is a weakness of the alphabetical ordering scheme, this phenomenon can occur under any contribution scheme, and the worst case occurs under contribution-based ordering. Finally, we show how authors working on multiple projects can cooperate to attain optimal research quality and eliminate...

  5. Contribution to encyclopedia of thermal stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taler, Jan; Ocłoń, Pawel

    2015-06-01

    This paper lists the contribution in the international interdisciplinary reference - Encyclopedia of Thermal Stresses (ETS). The ETS, edited by the world famous expert in field of Thermal Stresses - Professor Richard Hetnarski from Rochester Institute of Technology, was published by Springer in 2014. This unique Encyclopedia, subdivided into 11 volumes is the most extensive and comprehensive work related to the Thermal Stresses topic. The entries were carefully prepared by specialists in the field of thermal stresses, elasticity, heat conduction, optimization among others. The Polish authors' contribution within this work is significant; over 70 entries were prepared by them.

  6. Analogies in science education: contributions and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria da Conceição Duarte

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available An analogy is a comparison between domains of knowledge that have similarities at the levels of characteristics and relationships. Several authors highlight the importance of this tool in the teaching and learning of difficult scientific concepts. Nevertheless, some problems associated to the use of analogies have been found. This paper aims at contributing to a better understanding of the use of analogies in science education, by means of a review of the state of art regarding this matter. It will take into account its contribution to science education as well as the challenges to further research

  7. Jakob Nielsen and his Contributions to Topology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    1996-01-01

    The Danish mathematician Jakob Nielsen won international recognitionas one of the developers of combinatiorial group theory and the topologyof surfaces. This article describes the life and work of Jakob Nielsenwith emphasis on his contributions to topology.The biography is to be included in the b......The Danish mathematician Jakob Nielsen won international recognitionas one of the developers of combinatiorial group theory and the topologyof surfaces. This article describes the life and work of Jakob Nielsenwith emphasis on his contributions to topology.The biography is to be included...

  8. DEDUCTIBILITY OF CONTRIBUTIONS TO VOLUNTARY PRIVATE PENSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LILIANA MUNTEAN

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper approaches the notion of public and private pension in Romania. Pension can be seen in terms of a replacement income to individuals whose age no longer affords to operate in the labour market. Pension reform in Romania has allowed besides the public pension system, called Pillar I, which is a distributive system based on solidarity between generations also a private pension system that records the contributions of participants in individual accounts, based on capitalization, investment and accumulation of these contributions.

  9. Canadian contributions studies for the WFIRST instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, J.-F.; Rowlands, N.; Grandmont, F. J.; Lafrenière, D.; Marois, C.; Daigle, O.; Thibault, S.; Schade, D.; Artigau, É.; Brousseau, D.; Maire, J.; Cretot-Richert, G.; Ducharme, M.-È.; Levesque, L. E.; Laurin, D.; Dupuis, J.

    2016-07-01

    WFIRST-AFTA is the NASA's highest ranked astrophysics mission for the next decade that was identified in the New World, New Horizon survey. The mission scientific drivers correspond to some of the deep questions identified in the Canadian LRP2010, and are also of great interest for the Canadian scientists. Given that there is also a great interest in having an international collaboration in this mission, the Canadian Space Agency awarded two contracts to study a Canadian participation in the mission, one related to each instrument. This paper presents a summary of the technical contributions that were considered for a Canadian contribution to the coronagraph and wide field instruments.

  10. SLR Contribution to Investigation of Polar Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Malkin, Zinovy

    2011-01-01

    SLR technique has being used for determination of ERP during over twenty years. Most of results contributed to IERS are based on analysis of observations of Lageos 1&2 satellites collected at the global tracking network of about 40 stations. Now 5 analysis centers submit operative (with 2-15 days delay) solutions and about 10 analysis centers yearly contribute final (up to 23 years) ERP series. Some statistics related to SLR observations and analysis is presented and analyzed. Possible problems in SLR observations and analysis and ways of its solution are discussed.

  11. Contribution of contaminated sites to the global mercury budget.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocman, David; Horvat, Milena; Pirrone, Nicola; Cinnirella, Sergio

    2013-08-01

    Global mercury emission inventories include anthropogenic emissions, contributing via current use or presence of mercury in a variety of products and processes, as well as natural source emissions. These inventories neglect the contribution of areas contaminated with mercury from historical accumulation, which surround mines or production plants associated with mercury production or use. Although recent studies have shown that releases of mercury from these historical sites can be significant, a database of the global distribution of mercury contaminated sites does not exist, nor are there means of scaling up such releases to estimate fluxes on a regional and global basis. Therefore, here we estimated for the first time the contribution of mercury releases from contaminated sites to the global mercury budget. A geo-referenced database was built, comprising over 3000 mercury contaminated sites associated with mercury mining, precious metal processing, non-ferrous metal production and various polluted industrial sites. In the assessment, mercury releases from these sites to both the atmosphere as well as the hydrosphere were considered based on data available for selected case studies, their number, the reported extent of contamination and geographical location. Annual average global emissions of mercury from identified contaminated sites amount to 198 (137-260) Mgyr(-1). Of that, 82 (70-95)Mgyr(-1) contribute to atmospheric releases, while 116 (67-165) Mgyr(-1) is estimated to be transported away from these sites by hydrological processes. Although these estimates are associated with large uncertainties, our current understanding of mercury releases from contaminated sites indicates that these releases can also be of paramount importance on the global perspective. This is especially important as it is known that these sites represent a long-term source of releases if not managed properly. Therefore, the information presented here is needed by governments and NGO

  12. Determining the contribution of the energy systems during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artioli, Guilherme G; Bertuzzi, Rômulo C; Roschel, Hamilton; Mendes, Sandro H; Lancha, Antonio H; Franchini, Emerson

    2012-03-20

    One of the most important aspects of the metabolic demand is the relative contribution of the energy systems to the total energy required for a given physical activity. Although some sports are relatively easy to be reproduced in a laboratory (e.g., running and cycling), a number of sports are much more difficult to be reproduced and studied in controlled situations. This method presents how to assess the differential contribution of the energy systems in sports that are difficult to mimic in controlled laboratory conditions. The concepts shown here can be adapted to virtually any sport. The following physiologic variables will be needed: rest oxygen consumption, exercise oxygen consumption, post-exercise oxygen consumption, rest plasma lactate concentration and post-exercise plasma peak lactate. To calculate the contribution of the aerobic metabolism, you will need the oxygen consumption at rest and during the exercise. By using the trapezoidal method, calculate the area under the curve of oxygen consumption during exercise, subtracting the area corresponding to the rest oxygen consumption. To calculate the contribution of the alactic anaerobic metabolism, the post-exercise oxygen consumption curve has to be adjusted to a mono or a bi-exponential model (chosen by the one that best fits). Then, use the terms of the fitted equation to calculate anaerobic alactic metabolism, as follows: ATP-CP metabolism = A(1;) (mL . s(-1)) x t(1;) (s). Finally, to calculate the contribution of the lactic anaerobic system, multiply peak plasma lactate by 3 and by the athlete's body mass (the result in mL is then converted to L and into kJ). The method can be used for both continuous and intermittent exercise. This is a very interesting approach as it can be adapted to exercises and sports that are difficult to be mimicked in controlled environments. Also, this is the only available method capable of distinguishing the contribution of three different energy systems. Thus, the method

  13. Can more become less? Effects of an intensive assessment environment on students' learning performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawaja, M. Asif; Prusty, Gangadhara B.; Ford, Robin A. J.; Marcus, Nadine; Russell, Carol

    2013-12-01

    Online interactive systems offer the beguiling prospect of an improved environment for learning at minimum extra cost. We have developed online interactive tutorials that adapt the learning environment to the current learning status of each individual student. These Adaptive Tutorials (ATs) modify the tasks given to each student according to their previous responses. Feedback, assessment and remediation are also adapted. Over a three-year period we progressively blended ATs into notoriously challenging courses in introductory Engineering Mechanics. We assessed the impact of this initiative by reviewing three lines of data: (i) the built-in diagnostics of the system, (ii) changes in student grades from year-to-year and (iii) supplementary surveys. Generally, students liked the new blended system and grades improved. Detailed analysis revealed nuances in the measures of student learning, such as differences between high-performing and low-performing students. With these insights we are able to further adapt the system to meet the learning needs of our students.

  14. Estimating the contribution of genetic variants to difference in incidence of disease between population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonesinghe, Ramal; Ioannidis, John P A; Flanders, W Dana; Yang, Quanhe; Truman, Benedict I; Khoury, Muin J

    2012-08-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified multiple genetic susceptibility variants to several complex human diseases. However, risk-genotype frequency at loci showing robust associations might differ substantially among different populations. In this paper, we present methods to assess the contribution of genetic variants to the difference in the incidence of disease between different population groups for different scenarios. We derive expressions for the contribution of a single genetic variant, multiple genetic variants, and the contribution of the joint effect of a genetic variant and an environmental factor to the difference in the incidence of disease. The contribution of genetic variants to the difference in incidence increases with increasing difference in risk-genotype frequency, but declines with increasing difference in incidence between the two populations. The contribution of genetic variants also increases with increasing relative risk and the contribution of joint effect of genetic and environmental factors increases with increasing relative risk of the gene-environmental interaction. The contribution of genetic variants to the difference in incidence between two populations can be expressed as a function of the population attributable risks of the genetic variants in the two populations. The contribution of a group of genetic variants to the disparity in incidence of disease could change considerably by adding one more genetic variant to the group. Any estimate of genetic contribution to the disparity in incidence of disease between two populations at this stage seems to be an elusive goal.

  15. Adult Career Assessment: Personality Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vansickle, Timothy R.; Russell, Mary T.

    1996-01-01

    Provides an overview of five assessment instruments and discusses their contribution to adult career development: (1) California Personality Inventory; (2) Myers-Briggs Type Indicator; (3) Personality Research Form; (4) Occupational Stress Inventory; and (5) Personal Career Development Profile. Includes information about publishers, intended…

  16. Assessment of triton potential energy

    CERN Document Server

    Friar, J L

    1996-01-01

    An assessment is made of the dominant features contributing to the triton potential energy, with the objective of understanding qualitatively their origins and sensitivities. Relativistic effects, short-range repulsion, and OPEP dominance are discussed. A determination of the importance of various regions of nucleon-nucleon separation is made numerically.

  17. Assessment of Triton Potential Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friar, J. L.; Payne, G. L.

    1995-12-01

    An assessment is made of the dominant features contributing to the triton potential energy, with the objective of understanding qualitatively their origins and sensitivities. Relativistic effects, short-range repulsion, and OPEP dominance are discussed. A determination of the importance of various regions of nucleon-nucleon separation is made numerically.

  18. Genetic interest assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughney, Erin

    Genetics is becoming increasingly integrated into peoples' lives. Different measures have been taken to try and better genetics education. This thesis examined undergraduate students at the University of North Texas not majoring in the life sciences interest in genetic concepts through the means of a Likert style survey. ANOVA analysis showed there was variation amongst the interest level in different genetic concepts. In addition age and lecture were also analyzed as contributing factors to students' interest. Both age and lecture were evaluated to see if they contributed to the interest of students in genetic concepts and neither showed statistical significance. The Genetic Interest Assessment (GIA) serves to help mediate the gap between genetic curriculum and students' interest.

  19. Power and environmental assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cashmore, Matthew Asa; Richardson, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The significance of politics and power dynamics has long been recognised in environmental assessment (EA) research, but there has not been sustained attention to power, either theoretically or empirically. The aim of this special issue is to encourage the EA community to engage more consistently...... with the issue of power. The introduction represents a ground-clearing exercise intended to clarify the terms of the debate about power in the EA field, and to contribute to the development of a research agenda. Research trends in the field are outlined, and potential analytic and normative lines of inquiry...... are identified. The contributions to this special issue represent contrasting conceptual and methodological approaches that navigate the analytical and normative terrain of power dynamics in EA. Together, they demonstrate that power cannot be removed from EA policy or practices, and is a necessary research focus...

  20. Risk assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Liselotte; Rasmussen, Kirsten; Elsass, Peter

    2010-01-01

    ). All patients were assessed for risk of future violence utilizing a structured professional judgment model: the Historical-Clinical-Risk Management-20 (HCR-20) violence risk assessment scheme. After a follow-up period of 5.6 years, recidivism outcome were obtained from the Danish National Crime...... predictive of violent recidivism compared to static items. In sum, the findings support the use of structured professional judgment models of risk assessment and in particular the HCR-20 violence risk assessment scheme. Findings regarding the importance of the (clinical) structured final risk judgment......International research suggests that using formalized risk assessment methods may improve the predictive validity of professionals' predictions of risk of future violence. This study presents data on forensic psychiatric patients discharged from a forensic unit in Denmark in year 2001-2002 (n=107...

  1. Gender Differences among Contributing Leadership Development Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Gender differences among contributing student leadership development resources were examined within the context of theory-based perspectives of leadership-related attributes. The findings suggest that students' increased engagement with institutional constituencies cultivates an environment conducive to students' cognitive development toward…

  2. AACSB Standards and Accounting Faculty's Intellectual Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B. Brian; Quddus, Munir

    2008-01-01

    The authors performed a content analysis of intellectual contribution portfolios of accounting faculty at various business schools that Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International recently accredited. The results showed a significant divergence in faculty research (e.g., areas, topics) and their teaching assignments. This…

  3. NASA's contributions to patient monitoring, appendix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, D. M.; Siemens, W. D.

    1971-01-01

    Health care problems, and markets for patient monitoring equipment are discussed along with contributions to all phases of patient monitoring, and technology transfer to nonaerospace problems. Health care medical requirements, and NASA achievements in patient monitoring are described, and a summary of the technology transfer is included.

  4. Molecular Cabal Contributes to Stroke Damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ In the neural train wreck that is stroke, the cutoff of oxygen kills brain cells through a buildup of acid, as well as by overexciting receptors on the surface of brain cells. Now, researchers exploring the detailed mechanism of this excitotoxicity and acidotoxicity have discovered how an insidious chain of molecular events contributes to its damage.

  5. The Contribution of Social Resources To Volunteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John; Musick, Marc

    1998-01-01

    Outlines a theory of how social capital contributes to volunteering, hypothesizing that social capital has a stronger effect on volunteering among people with more human capital and socioeconomic status. Specifies a test (of the effects) of social capital on volunteering and discusses the findings (of the test) in detail. (CMK)

  6. Mapping Academic Library Contributions to Campus Internationalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Steven W.; Kutner, Laurie; Cooper, Liz

    2015-01-01

    This study surveyed academic libraries across the United States to establish baseline data on their contributions to campus internationalization. Supplementing data from the American Council on Education (ACE) on internationalization of higher education, this research measured the level of international activities taking place in academic…

  7. Augustus Matthiessen and His Contributions to Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif-Acherman, Simo´n

    2015-01-01

    The British scientist Augustus Matthiessen (1831-1870) is widely known for his investigations on the influence of temperature on the electric conductivity of metals and alloys. However, his contributions to other areas of science throughout his career are not widely acknowledged. His research on the electrolytic decomposition of metallic salts…

  8. Mode Contributions to the Casimir Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intravaia, F.; Henkel, C.

    2010-04-01

    Applying a sum-over-modes approach to the Casimir interaction between two plates with finite conductivity, we isolate and study the contributions of surface plasmons and Foucault (eddy current) modes. We show in particular that for the TE-polarization eddy currents provide a repulsive force that cancels, at high temperatures, the Casimir free energy calculated with the plasma model.

  9. Contributions of Psychology to Limiting Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Paul C.

    2011-01-01

    Psychology can make a significant contribution to limiting the magnitude of climate change by improving understanding of human behaviors that drive climate change and human reactions to climate-related technologies and policies, and by turning that understanding into effective interventions. This article develops a framework for psychological…

  10. Patients who fall in hospital - Contributing factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Bright

    1983-09-01

    Full Text Available This is a retrospective study of the factors which contributed to accidental injuries sustained by those patients who fell in a White provincial hospital in die period 1 January to 30 June 1982. The research study was undertaken by Diploma in Nursing Administration students during their 3-week hospital practice at a White provincial hospital.

  11. The value contribution of strategic foresight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrbeck, René; Schwarz, Jan Oliver

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on exploring the potential and empirically observable value creation of strategic foresight activities in firms. We first review the literature on strategic foresight, innovation management and strategic management in order to identify the potential value contributions. We use...

  12. ENERGY SYSTEM CONTRIBUTIONS DURING INCREMENTAL EXERCISE TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rômulo Bertuzzi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to determine the relative contributions of the aerobic and glycolytic systems during an incremental exercise test (IET. Ten male recreational long-distance runners performed an IET consisting of three-minute incremental stages on a treadmill. The fractions of the contributions of the aerobic and glycolytic systems were calculated for each stage based on the oxygen uptake and the oxygen energy equivalents derived by blood lactate accumulation, respectively. Total metabolic demand (WTOTAL was considered as the sum of these two energy systems. The aerobic (WAER and glycolytic (WGLYCOL system contributions were expressed as a percentage of the WTOTAL. The results indicated that WAER (86-95% was significantly higher than WGLYCOL (5-14% throughout the IET (p < 0.05. In addition, there was no evidence of the sudden increase in WGLYCOL that has been previously reported to support to the "anaerobic threshold" concept. These data suggest that the aerobic metabolism is predominant throughout the IET and that energy system contributions undergo a slow transition from low to high intensity

  13. Mode contributions to the Casimir effect

    CERN Document Server

    Intravaia, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    Applying a sum-over-modes approach to the Casimir interaction between two plates with finite conductivity, we isolate and study the contributions of surface plasmons and Foucault (eddy current) modes. We show in particular that for the TE-polarization eddy currents provide a repulsive force that cancels, at high temperatures, the Casimir free energy calculated with the plasma model.

  14. Lattice QCD and the Balkan physicists contribution

    CERN Document Server

    Borici, Artan

    2015-01-01

    This is a paper based on the invited talk the author gave at the 9th Balkan Physical Union conference. It contains some of the main achievements of lattice QCD simulations followed by a list of Balkan physicists who have contributed to the project.

  15. Snowmelt contributions to discharge of the Ganges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siderius, C.; Biemans, H.; Wilthshire, A.; Rao, S.; Franssen, W.H.P.; Kumar, P.; Gosain, A.K.; Vliet, van A.; Collins, D.N.

    2013-01-01

    Himalayan headwaters supply large quantities of runoff derived from snowmelt and monsoon rainfall to the Ganges River. Actual snowmelt contribution to discharge in the Ganges remains conjectural under both present and future climatic conditions. As snowmelt is likely to be perturbed through climatic

  16. Vygotsky's Methodological Contribution to Sociocultural Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahn, Holbrook

    1999-01-01

    This article introduces major contributions of educational psychologist, Lev S. Vygotsky, through examination of his dialectical methodological approach. Topics discussed include semiotic mediation, social sources of development, verbal thinking, concept formation, spontaneous and scientific concepts, the zone of proximal development, and higher…

  17. Voluntary Contribution to Multiple Public Projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, M.A.L.; Reijnierse, J.H.; Voorneveld, M.

    1999-01-01

    The problem of financing a set of public goods (facilities, projects) by private contri- butions is studied. The corresponding cooperative game, the realization game, is shown to be convex. For the noncooperative setting we study a realization scheme that induces a strategic game. This contribution

  18. Students' Oral Contributions to Classroom Verbal Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkin, Michael J.

    This review of the literature related to research on oral communication in the classroom pursues two issues: the types of oral contributions students make and whether those types are related to school achievement. In considering research on oral communication in classrooms, the paper looks at information that considers whether the communication…

  19. Contribution of Bilingualism in Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipra, Muhammad Aslam

    2013-01-01

    This study is an investigation into the contribution of the use of bilingualism as an aid in learning/teaching English as a foreign language and bilingualism in EFL classroom does not reduce students' communicative abilities but in effect can assist in teaching and learning process. The study employed a qualitative, interpretive research design…

  20. The Contributions of the American Indians

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余生泽

    2002-01-01

    The potato was unknown to the white man until he came to New World. Spanish explorers(探险者)found out some of the Indians in South America grown potatoes. The potato is one of the things that the South American Indians contributed to the world.

  1. Mechanism Design for Incentivizing Social Media Contributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vivek K.; Jain, Ramesh; Kankanhalli, Mohan

    Despite recent advancements in user-driven social media platforms, tools for studying user behavior patterns and motivations remain primitive. We highlight the voluntary nature of user contributions and that users can choose when (and when not) to contribute to the common media pool. A Game theoretic framework is proposed to study the dynamics of social media networks where contribution costs are individual but gains are common. We model users as rational selfish agents, and consider domain attributes like voluntary participation, virtual reward structure, network effect, and public-sharing to model the dynamics of this interaction. The created model describes the most appropriate contribution strategy from each user's perspective and also highlights issues like 'free-rider' problem and individual rationality leading to irrational (i.e. sub-optimal) group behavior. We also consider the perspective of the system designer who is interested in finding the best incentive mechanisms to influence the selfish end-users so that the overall system utility is maximized. We propose and compare multiple mechanisms (based on optimal bonus payment, social incentive leveraging, and second price auction) to study how a system designer can exploit the selfishness of its users, to design incentive mechanisms which improve the overall task-completion probability and system performance, while possibly still benefiting the individual users.

  2. Can Inferentialism Contribute to Social Epistemology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derry, Jan

    2013-01-01

    This article argues that Robert Brandom's work can be used to develop ideas in the area of social epistemology. It suggests that this work, precisely because it was influenced by Hegel, can make a significant contribution with philosophical anthropology at its centre. The argument is developed using illustrations from education: the first, from…

  3. Intergenerational Practice: Contributing to a Conceptual Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Sacha; Sousa, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    The ageing of the European population is creating a new demographic mix, increasing the relevance of intergenerational practice (IGP). To date, however, this field lacks an appropriate conceptual framework. This study aims to contribute to such a framework through an integrative review of peer-reviewed papers reporting on IGPs. Fifteen papers were…

  4. Elements that contribute to healthy building design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loftness, V.; Hakkinen, B.; Adan, O.; Nevalainen, A.

    2007-01-01

    Background: The elements that contribute to a healthy building are multifactorial and can be discussed from different perspectives. Objectives: We present three viewpoints of designing a healthy building: the importance of sustainable development, the role of occupants for ensuring indoor air qualit

  5. Guillaume Dupuytren: his life and surgical contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Lukas A; de Parades, Vincent; Holzer, Gerold

    2013-10-01

    Guillaume Dupuytren (1777-1835) was one of the most influential surgeons of the past. He described and popularized many conditions, including Dupuytren disease, which continues to carry his name. This article reviews Guillaume Dupuytren's life and his contributions in surgery.

  6. Piaget's Enduring Contribution to Developmental Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilin, Harry

    1992-01-01

    Describes Jean Piaget's transformation of society's conception of childhood thought. Emphasizes the enduring contribution to developmental psychology of Piaget's constructivism, his description of developmental mechanisms, his cognitivism, his explication of structural and functional analysis, and his addressing of epistemological issues and…

  7. Librarian contributions to clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruse, Peggy; Protzko, Shandra

    2014-01-01

    Librarians have become more involved in developing high quality systematic reviews. Evidence-based practice guidelines are an extension of systematic reviews and offer another significant area for librarian involvement. This column highlights opportunities and challenges for the librarian working on guideline panels and provides practical considerations for meaningful contributions to the guideline creation process.

  8. Assessment of Teaching Methods and Critical Thinking in a Course for Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck, Angela; Ruzhitskaya, L.; Whittington, A. G.

    2014-01-01

    Ability to think critically is a key ingredient to the scientific mindset. Students who take science courses may or may not be predisposed to critical thinking - the ability to evaluate information analytically. Regardless of their initial stages, students can significantly improve their critical thinking through learning and practicing their reasoning skills, critical assessments, conducting and reflecting on observations and experiments, building their questioning and communication skills, and through the use of other techniques. While, there are several of teaching methods that may help to improve critical thinking, there are only a few assessment instruments that can help in evaluating the efficacy of these methods. Critical thinking skills and improvement in those skills are notoriously difficult to measure. Assessments that are based on multiple-choice questions demonstrate students’ final decisions but not their thinking processes. In addition, during the course of studies students may develop subject-based critical thinking while not being able to extend the skills to the general critical thinking. As such, we wanted to design and conduct a study on efficacy of several teaching methods in which we would learn how students’ improve their thinking processes within a science discipline as well as in everyday life situations. We conducted a study among 20 astronomy, physics and geology majors-- both graduate and undergraduate students-- enrolled in our Solar System Science course (mostly seniors and early graduate students) at the University of Missouri. We used the Ennis-Weir Critical Thinking Essay test to assess students’ general critical thinking and, in addition, we implemented our own subject-based critical thinking assessment. Here, we present the results of this study and share our experience on designing a subject-based critical thinking assessment instrument.

  9. 东亚三国的公共养老金制度改革:名义账户制的应用前景评析%Public Pension Reform in Three East Asian Countries: Assessing the Potential Utility of the Notional Defined Contribution (NDC) Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John B. Williamson; 申策; 房连泉

    2011-01-01

    在人口老龄化形势下,东亚国家的老年人口赡养率迅速攀升。如何改革公共养老金制度,建立与人口、经济社会形势相适应的养老保障体系,是摆在这些国家面前的一个难题。本文将比较中国、韩国和新加坡的公共养老制度,探讨名义账户制(NDC)在三国的应用前景。通过分析名义账户制化解各国现实问题的潜在能力,作者认为中国适用名义账户制的可行性最强,新加坡较低,而韩国介于二者之间。%In East Asia the rate of increase in the major factor behind old-age dependency ratio is particularly rapid and is a search by pension policy experts in many of these nations for new ideas about how to reform their existing public pension schemes so as to make them more suitable for the demographic and economic pressures they are facing. In this article we ask whether or not the notional defined contribution (NDC) model has potential utility and deserves greater attention than it has been getting in current public pension policy debates in three countries in East and South East Asia. We conclude that the NDC model has a great deal to offer China, but much less to offer to Singapore with South Korea located between the other two.

  10. Perspective has a strong effect on the calculation of historical contributions to global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeie, Ragnhild B.; Fuglestvedt, Jan; Berntsen, Terje; Peters, Glen P.; Andrew, Robbie; Allen, Myles; Kallbekken, Steffen

    2017-02-01

    The politically contentious issue of calculating countries’ contributions to climate change is strongly dependent on methodological choices. Different principles can be applied for distributing efforts for reducing human-induced global warming. According to the ‘Brazilian Proposal’, industrialized countries would reduce emissions proportional to their historical contributions to warming. This proposal was based on the assumption that the political process would lead to a global top-down agreement. The Paris Agreement changed the role of historical responsibilities. Whereas the agreement refers to equity principles, differentiation of mitigation efforts is delegated to each country, as countries will submit new national contributions every five years without any international negotiation. It is likely that considerations of historical contributions and distributive fairness will continue to play a key role, but increasingly so in a national setting. Contributions to warming can be used as a background for negotiations to inform and justify positions, and may also be useful for countries’ own assessment of what constitutes reasonable and fair contributions to limiting warming. Despite the fact that the decision from COP21 explicitly rules out compensation in the context of loss and damage, it is likely that considerations of historical responsibility will also play a role in future discussions. However, methodological choices have substantial impacts on calculated contributions to warming, including rank-ordering of contributions, and thus support the view that there is no single correct answer to the question of how much each country has contributed. There are fundamental value-related and ethical questions that cannot be answered through a single set of calculated contributions. Thus, analyses of historical contributions should not present just one set of results, but rather present a spectrum of results showing how the calculated contributions vary with a

  11. Principais instrumentos para avaliação da disfunção temporomandibular, parte II: critérios diagnósticos; uma contribuição para a prática clínica e de pesquisa Main instruments for assessing temporomandibular disorders, part II: diagnostic criteria; a contribution to clinicians and researchers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Cristina Chaves

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Na literatura especializada, encontram-se variados instrumentos para avaliação da disfunção temporomandibular (DTM, sob a forma de índices, questionários, protocolos, escalas e critérios de diagnóstico. Este estudo, dividido em duas partes, visou caracterizar os principais instrumentos de avaliação da DTM disponíveis na literatura, para auxiliar o clínico e o pesquisador na correta escolha da ferramenta apropriada para seus objetivos clínicos ou científicos. Na parte I foram caracterizados dois índices clínicos e três questionários (anamnésicos e funcionais; e, nesta parte II, um questionário funcional e dois conjuntos de critérios diagnósticos. Os índices são ferramentas que organizam a avaliação de sinais e sintomas, pela obtenção de pontuações. Os questionários são melhor aplicados em estudos epidemiológicos. Para avaliação dos eventuais impactos da DTM nas atividades de vida diária, os questionários funcionais são mais adequados. Finalmente, os critérios permitem obter o diagnóstico da disfunção. O RDC/TMD (Research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders, Critérios diagnósticos para pesquisa em DTM é um dos poucos instrumentos que define critérios operacionais para o diagnóstico clínico. O RDC/TMD, disponível em tradução oficial para o português, tem a maior parte de suas propriedades psicométricas e acurácia verificadas, caracterizando-se como uma das ferramentas mais apropriadas para avaliação da DTM.Several instruments for assessing temporomandibular disorders (TMD are available in literature, such as indices, questionnaires, protocols, scales, and diagnostic criteria. The purpose of this study, divided into two parts, was to characterise main tools available for TMD evaluation, so as to offer both researchers and clinicians guiding information on instrument selection according to their clinical or research needs. Two clinical indices and three (anamnestic and functional

  12. Traditional Assessment versus Alternative Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belle, Dana

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a teacher can use one type of assessment to evaluate students' abilities fairly. The question is whether or not alternative assessment strategies are necessary to meet students' individual needs. The research, conducted with 28 fifth-grade students, compared their traditional and alternative…

  13. DIGITAL ASSESSMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen, Kurt Gammelgaard; Petersen, Lise

    2013-01-01

    In accordance with The Danish eGOVERNMENT strategy 2011-2015 digital assessment and exam should be implemented at all Danish universities by the end of 2013. University of Southern Denmark (SDU) decided to start the implementation in May 2010.By the exam term of January 2013, the implementation proved successful, and close to completion. The majority of assessments at all of the 5 faculties and 5 campuses were digital, and students had handed in a total of 17.021 digital assessments.On the ba...

  14. Integrated assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakicenovic, N.; Amann, M.; Fischer, G.

    1995-12-31

    Integrated assessment aims to develop a framework for the analysis of mitigation and adaption strategies to deal with the impacts of global change. It is a recent, rapidly evolving field, IIASA has been an active contributor to its development through in-house research as well as collaborative activities. The latter includes a series of influential conferences on economic aspects and integrated assessment of climate change, as well as the Energy Modeling Forum on integrated assessment models comparison, organized jointly with Stanford University. Various impacts including those of energy use are discussed. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  15. "The Reliability, Validity, and Utility of Self-Assessment"

    OpenAIRE

    Ross, John A

    2006-01-01

    Despite widespread use of self-assessment, teachers have doubts about the value and accuracy of the technique. This article reviews research evidence on student self-assessment, finding that (1) self-assessment produces consistent results across items, tasks, and short time periods; (2) self-assessment provides information about student achievement that corresponds only in part to the information generated by teacher assessments; (3) self-assessment contributes to higher student achievement a...

  16. Methylmercury risk assessment issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipfert, F.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Saroff, L. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1996-07-01

    This paper reviews the general background of health risks associated with mercury (Hg), primarily methylmercury (MeHg), with a view towards application to advanced technologies that could reduce any contributions from coal combustion. The need for accurate assessment of such risks is discussed, since Hg is now widely dispersed in the environment and cannot easily be eliminated. The primary pathway of MeHg intake is through eating contaminated fish. The issues of concern include identification of critical health outcomes (various neurological indices) and their confounding factors, accurate assessment of MeHg intake rates, and appropriate use of dose-response functions. Ultimately, such information will be used to evaluate alternative coal combustion systems.

  17. Assessing Believability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Togelius, Julian; Yannakakis, Georgios N.; Karakovskiy, Sergey

    2012-01-01

    We discuss what it means for a non-player character (NPC) to be believable or human-like, and how we can accurately assess believability. We argue that participatory observation, where the human assessing believability takes part in the game, is prone to distortion effects. For many games, a fairer...... (or at least complementary) assessment might be made by an external observer that does not participate in the game, through comparing and ranking the performance of human and non-human agents playing a game. This assessment philosophy was embodied in the Turing Test Track of the recent Mario AI...... Championship, where non-expert bystanders evaluated the human-likeness of several agents and humans playing a version of Super Mario Bros. We analyze the results of this competition. Finally, we discuss the possibilities for forming models of believability and of maximizing believability through adjusting game...

  18. 77 FR 59238 - Call for Expert Reviewers to the U.S. Government Review of the Working Group I Contribution to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-26

    ... Expert Reviewers to the U.S. Government Review of the Working Group I Contribution to the Fifth... Department of State, request expert review of the Second Order Draft of the Working Group I Contribution to... the Working Group I contribution to the 5th Assessment Report (Working Group I Table of...

  19. Some feminist contributions to community social psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Mayorga

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the contributions of feminist debate about intersectionality of social categories for Community Social Psychology in Brazil. This was set up as dedicated to theoretical analyze the social inequalities that characterize contemporary societies and propose methodological processes of intervention for questioning and processing of these realities. We discuss how the emergence of new actors and demands on public space, as distinct from the 60/70, is required to understand the oppression from various power systems such as gender, race and sexuality. We conclude that intersectional analysis should consider different levels of relationships between categories, the history of the same differential and common aspects of different systems of power as naturalization of inequality, the relationship between public and private relationship between equality and difference. Analyses based on intersectionality can contribute to processes of social intervention that considers the complexity of contemporary societies.

  20. Hadronic Contribution to $(g-2)_{\\mu}$

    CERN Document Server

    Höcker, A

    2001-01-01

    The recent precise measurement of the muon magnetic anomaly (g-2)_{mu} at BNL opens a window into possible new physics, provided the contribution from hadronic vacuum polarization is well understood. This talk summarizes the development in the evaluation of the leading order hadronic contributions. Significant improvement has been achieved in a series of analyses which is presented historically in three steps: (1), use of tau spectral functions in addition to e+e- cross sections, (2), extended use of perturbative QCD and (3), application of QCD sum rule techniques. The uncertainties, in particular concerning the CVC hypothesis used in step (1), and global quark-hadron duality employed in steps (2) and (3) are discussed. No new analysis results are given in these proceedings.

  1. Positronium contribution to the electron g-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fael, M.; Passera, M.

    2014-09-01

    The contribution of positronium to the electron g-2 (ae) has been computed in G. Mishima, arXiv:1311.7109, and found to be of the same order of α as that of five-loop perturbative QED. We confirm this result and correct a few errors in its first derivation. As recently calculated in K. Melnikov, A. Vainshtein, and M. Voloshin, arXiv:1402.5690, a continuum nonperturbative contribution to ae cancels one-half of the positronium one. We show by explicit calculation that the remaining half is already included in the five-loop perturbative result. We also show that it arises from the class I(i) of five-loop diagrams containing only one closed electron loop.

  2. Extraluminal factors contributing to inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arvind Batra; Thorsten Stroh; Britta Siegmund

    2011-01-01

    Many identified and yet unknown factors contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).The genome-wide association studies clearly support the earlier developed concept that IBD occurs in genetically predisposed individuals who are exposed to distinct environmental factors, which together result in dysregulation of the mucosal immune system. Thus, the majority of previous studies have focused on the immune response within the intestinal wall. The present review aims to emphasize the contribution of three extraluminal structures to this inflammatory process, namely the mesenteric fat tissue, the lymphatics and the microvasculature.Broadening our view across the intestinal wall will not only facilitate our understanding of the disease,but will also us to identify future therapeutic targets.

  3. Contribution of Electromagnetic Field to Atomic Spin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Tao; LIANG Wen-Feng; WU Xiao-Hua

    2011-01-01

    We examine the contribution of electromagnetic field to the atomic spin, by adopting two different, both gauge invariant definitions of the electromagnetic angular momentum: →JI≡ ∫ d3x∈0→γ× (→E × →B) and →JII ≡ ∫ d3x(∈0→E × A→⊥ + ∈0Ei→ γ× ▽A⊥i). Notably, at the classical level, J→II gives an exactly null result while →JI gives a finite value.This suggests that JII leads to a simpler and more reasonable picture of the atomic spin, therefore qualifies as a more appropriate definition of the electromagnetic angular momentum. Our observation gives important hint on the delicate issue of gluon contribution to the nucleon spin.

  4. Universal corner contributions to entanglement negativity

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Keun-Young; Pang, Da-Wei

    2016-01-01

    It has been realised that corners in entangling surfaces can induce new universal contributions to the entanglement entropy and R\\'enyi entropy. In this paper we study universal corner contributions to entanglement negativity in three- and four-dimensional CFTs using both field theory and holographic techniques. We focus on the quantity $\\chi$ defined by the ratio of the universal part of the entanglement negativity over that of the entanglement entropy, which may characterise the amount of distillable entanglement. We find that for most of the examples $\\chi$ takes bigger values for singular entangling regions, which may suggest increase in distillable entanglement. However, there also exist counterexamples where distillable entanglement decreases for singular surfaces. We also explore the behaviour of $\\chi$ as the coupling varies and observe that for singular entangling surfaces, the amount of distillable entanglement is mostly largest for free theories, while counterexample exists for free Dirac fermion i...

  5. Forgotten intrauterine device contributing to infertility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel O. Igberase

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to show that long standing forgotten intrauterine device contributes to infertility, reporting three cases presented at Central Hospital Warri, Nigeria, a government tertiary health center. Three cases of forgotten intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD contributing to infertility were seen. Two were inserted for contraceptive reasons while one was inserted while being managed for uterine synechae. Health care providers should ensure proper documentation of all procedures carried out, adequate counseling which should include taking an informed consent and also ensuring both short and long term follow up of their clients. Also all patients being evaluated for infertility and clients with past history of intrauterine device must have a speculum examination and ultrasound scan carried out.

  6. Probing Bino Contribution to Muon g-2

    CERN Document Server

    Endo, Motoi; Kikahara, Teppei; Yoshinaga, Takahiro

    2013-01-01

    We study SUSY models in which Bino contributions solve the muon $g-2$ anomaly. The contributions are enhanced by large left-right mixing of the smuons. However, it is constrained by the vacuum stability condition of the slepton--Higgs potential. Therefore, there are upper bounds on masses of sleptons and Bino. When the slepton soft masses are universal, the upper bound on the smuon mass becomes $330~(460)\\GeV$ in order to solve the $g-2$ anomaly at the $1\\sigma~(2\\sigma)$ level. It is within the reach of LHC and ILC. If the stau is heavier than the smuon, the bound can be as large as $1.4~(1.9)\\TeV$. Such non-universal slepton mass spectrum generically predicts too large LFV/CPV. We show that the models are expected to be probed by LHC/ILC and LFV/CPV complementarily in future.

  7. Strange Quark Contribution to the Nucleon - (Dissertation)

    CERN Document Server

    Darnell, Dean

    2008-01-01

    The strangeness contribution to the electric and magnetic properties of the nucleon has been under investigation experimentally for many years. Lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (LQCD) gives theoretical predictions of these measurements by implementing the continuum gauge theory on a discrete, mathematical Euclidean space-time lattice which provides a cutoff removing the ultra-violet divergences. In this dissertation we will discuss effective methods using LQCD that will lead to a better determination of the strangeness contribution to the nucleon properties. Strangeness calculations are demanding technically and computationally. Sophisticated techniques are required to carry them to completion. In this thesis, new theoretical and computational methods for this calculation such as twisted mass fermions, perturbative subtraction, and General Minimal Residual (GMRES) techniques which have proven useful in the determination of these form factors will be investigated. Numerical results of the scalar form factor usin...

  8. Contributions of Literature to Social Psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasio Ovejero

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available There are two main kind of psychology: a intuitive psychology, and an academic and professional psychology. These two psychologies are different, but they can make important reciprocals contributions. And the best of the intuitive psychology, that in my opinion is in the literature and overall in the romance, can be very useful for professional psychologists. The main end of this paper is to show how the social psychologists can learn from the intuitive psychology of the great romances. This contribution of the romance to the social psychology is, at least, at these two levels. At the level of construction of the subjectivity and the modern subject and the, therefore, of the psychology’s arise, and at the level of some concrete subjects studied by the psychologists (romantic love, jealousy, infidelity, compunction, emotions, vengeance, human relations…

  9. Risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gittus, J.H.

    1986-03-01

    The article deals with the calculation of risks, as applied to living near to a) a nuclear reactor or b) an industrial complex. The application of risk assessment techniques to the pressurised water reactor (PWR) is discussed with respect to: containment, frequencies of degraded core accidents, release of radioisotopes, consequences and risk to society, and uncertainties. The risk assessment for an industrial complex concerns the work of the Safety and Reliability Directorate for the chemical complex on Canvey Island. (U.K.).

  10. CONTRIBUTION OF CULTURAL TOURISM ON TURKISH ECONOMY

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The positive effects of Turkey’s tourism sector on the economy are increasing with each passing day. To increase tourism revenues that have a positive contribution on Turkey’s current account balance year by year, have a great importance. Therefore, the diversification of tourism types and expansion of deseasonalized cultural tourism applications are necessary. For such purposes within this work, cultural tourism has been introduced by mentioning about the place of the tourism in the economy....

  11. Contribution to Asterisk Open Source Project

    OpenAIRE

    González Martín, Sergio

    2009-01-01

    With this final master thesis we are going to contribute to the Asterisk open source project. Asterisk is an open source project that started with the main objective of develop an IP telephony platform, completely based on Software (so not hardware dependent) and under an open license like GPL. This project was started on 1999 by the software engineer Mark Spencer at Digium. The main motivation of that open source project was that the telecommunications sector is lack of open solutions, and m...

  12. A CONTRIBUTION TO SECURE THE ROUTING PROTOCOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed ERRITALI

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a contribution to secure the routing protocol GPSR (Greedy Perimeter StatelessRouting for vehicular ad hoc networks, we examine the possible attacks against GPSR and securitysolutions proposed by different research teams working on ad hoc network security. Then, we propose asolution to secure GPSR packet by adding a digital signature based on symmetric cryptographygenerated using the AES algorithm and the MD5 hash function more suited to a mobile environment

  13. De Finetti's contribution to probability and statistics

    OpenAIRE

    Cifarelli, Donato Michele; Regazzini, Eugenio

    1996-01-01

    This paper summarizes the scientific activity of de Finetti in probability and statistics. It falls into three sections: Section 1 includes an essential biography of de Finetti and a survey of the basic features of the scientific milieu in which he took the first steps of his scientific career; Section 2 concerns de Finetti's work in probability: (a) foundations, (b) processes with independent increments, (c) sequences of exchangeable random variables, and (d) contributions which fall within ...

  14. Contribution of oral habits to dental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, J; Hochman, N; Yaffe, A

    1992-04-01

    Oral habits or parafunction may contribute to dental, periodontal, or neuromuscular damage. Such habits, of which the patient is often unaware, may cause considerable damage. Habits may be occlusal or non-occlusal, and may affect the dentition and/or the oral soft tissues. Drawing a patient's attention to the damage caused by some habits of which he or she is unaware often leads to cessation, whereas with certain conscious habits, such as nail or finger biting, success is much more limited.

  15. Paulo Freire's contributions to critical pedagogy

    OpenAIRE

    Gadotti, Moacir

    2011-01-01

    Los contributions of Paulo Freire pedagogy críticaPaulo a la Freire disliked label pedagogies, but since introducedthe thesis that there is an education aspractice of domestication and educationthe practice of freedom, we can saythat there is a dogmatic teaching, forTherefore, domesticating and dialectical pedagogy, critical questioning. PaulFreire was a critic of the education of theirtime. His "pedagogy of the oppressed" is part of the great movement of "pedagogycritical ", also called" rad...

  16. Anharmonic quantum contribution to vibrational dephasing

    OpenAIRE

    Barik, Debashis; Ray, Deb Shankar

    2004-01-01

    Based on a quantum Langevin equation and its corresponding Hamiltonian within a c-number formalism we calculate the vibrational dephasing rate of a cubic oscillator. It is shown that leading order quantum correction due to anharmonicity of the potential makes a significant contribution to the rate and the frequency shift. We compare our theoretical estimates with those obtained from experiments for small diatomics $N_2$, $O_2$ and $CO$.

  17. Contribution of Services to Economic Development

    OpenAIRE

    Laurentiu Tachiciu

    2012-01-01

    Service activities have become the main engine for sustainable development. The share of services in the global economic output is about 70% and their contribution to global employment is about 40%. There are substantial differences between countries and regions of the world in the development of services sector, the share of tertiary activities in both output and employment being higher in strong industrialized economies, but growing rapidly in developing and transition economies as well. As...

  18. Reductions for Entrepreneurs in Health Insurance Contributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Lenio

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the reductions for entrepreneurs in health insurance contributions. Only entrepreneurs from specific social groups can take advantage of said reductions. They apply only to people retired, on pensions or handicapped. The reductions are also dependent on the potential recipient's income and revenue of the company. Handicapped entrepreneurs can benefit from some additional privileges as well. Author analyzes the legal regulations behind these reductions and exposes their shortcomings which cause the benefits to be rarely used.

  19. Reductions for Entrepreneurs in Health Insurance Contributions

    OpenAIRE

    Paweł Lenio

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the reductions for entrepreneurs in health insurance contributions. Only entrepreneurs from specific social groups can take advantage of said reductions. They apply only to people retired, on pensions or handicapped. The reductions are also dependent on the potential recipient's income and revenue of the company. Handicapped entrepreneurs can benefit from some additional privileges as well. Author analyzes the legal regulations behind these reductions and exposes their sh...

  20. Mitochondrial signaling contributes to disuse muscle atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Powers, Scott K.; Wiggs, Michael P.; Duarte, Jose A.; Zergeroglu, A. Murat; Demirel, Haydar A.

    2012-01-01

    It is well established that long durations of bed rest, limb immobilization, or reduced activity in respiratory muscles during mechanical ventilation results in skeletal muscle atrophy in humans and other animals. The idea that mitochondrial damage/dysfunction contributes to disuse muscle atrophy originated over 40 years ago. These early studies were largely descriptive and did not provide unequivocal evidence that mitochondria play a primary role in disuse muscle atrophy. However, recent exp...

  1. Estimating contributions to ambient concentrations in Fort McKay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-05-15

    The Trace Metal and Air Contaminants (TMAC) Working Group of the Cumulative Effects Environmental Management Association (CEMA) conducts ongoing assessments of the effects of air emissions on people living in the oil sands region of Alberta. An air emissions inventory was recently conducted by the group to identify 41 substances within the region. The inventory was then used to conduct a dispersion modelling assessment that predicted concentrations of substances in the area. Results of the modelling assessment were then used in a health risk assessment for selected community and health receptors. However, a comparison of the dispersion modelling results with available monitoring data showed disagreement, which suggested that predictions of existing and future concentrations may need improvement. This report investigated possible explanations for the differences between dispersion model predictions and monitoring data, with a particular focus on the Fort McKay area. The modelling and monitoring data were compared, and modifications to the dispersion model were recommended. Methods for developing background concentrations for the community of Fort McKay were also discussed. It was noted that emission numbers in the report were consistent with the emission inventory with the exception of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}). Concentrations of sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) in Fort McKay were also accurate. However, the modelling did not include any community emissions of particulate matter and did a poor job at estimating the ambient concentrations at Fort McKay, as well as hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) concentrations. It was suggested that changes in weather during the year and the effect of unusual or upset emissions may have contributed to differences. It was concluded that the use of seasonally variable emissions for compounds released from fugitive sources in dispersion modelling reports should be reconsidered. It was also suggested that

  2. Fundamental physics in space: The French contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léon-Hirtz, Sylvie

    2003-08-01

    This paper outlines the space Fundamental Physics projects developped under CNES responsability together with the french scientific community, either in the national french programme or in the french contribution to the ESA programme, mainly: -the MICROSCOPE project which aims at testing the Equivalence Principle between inertial mass and gravitational mass at a high level of precision, on a microsatellite of the MYRIADE series developped by CNES, -the PHARAO cold-atom clock which is part of the ACES project of ESA, located on an external pallett of the International Space Station, together with a swiss H-MASER and a micro-wave link making comparison with ground clocks, aimed at relativistic tests and measurement of universal constants, -the T2L2 optical link allowing to compare ultra-stable and ultra-precise clocks, -a contribution to the AMS spectrometer which searches for cosmic antimatter, on the external part of the International Space Station, -a contribution to the LISA mission of ESA for direct detection and measurement of gravitational waves by interferometry, -ground-based studies on cold-atom interferometers which could be part of the HYPER project submitted to ESA.

  3. Active and passive contributions to spatial learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrastil, Elizabeth R; Warren, William H

    2012-02-01

    It seems intuitively obvious that active exploration of a new environment will lead to better spatial learning than will passive exposure. However, the literature on this issue is decidedly mixed-in part, because the concept itself is not well defined. We identify five potential components of active spatial learning and review the evidence regarding their role in the acquisition of landmark, route, and survey knowledge. We find that (1) idiothetic information in walking contributes to metric survey knowledge, (2) there is little evidence as yet that decision making during exploration contributes to route or survey knowledge, (3) attention to place-action associations and relevant spatial relations contributes to route and survey knowledge, although landmarks and boundaries appear to be learned without effort, (4) route and survey information are differentially encoded in subunits of working memory, and (5) there is preliminary evidence that mental manipulation of such properties facilitates spatial learning. Idiothetic information appears to be necessary to reveal the influence of attention and, possibly, decision making in survey learning, which may explain the mixed results in desktop virtual reality. Thus, there is indeed an active advantage in spatial learning, which manifests itself in the task-dependent acquisition of route and survey knowledge.

  4. Perturbative QCD contributions to inclusive processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritbergen, T. van

    1996-09-24

    This thesis treats the calculation of quantum corrections to a number of high energy processes that are measured in current and future accelerator experiments. The main objective of these experiments is to accurately verify the generally accepted theory of electro-weak and strong interactions, known as the Standard model, and to look for possible deviations. Most of the processes that are treated in this thesis are of a type for which the final state of of a highly energetic scattering or decay process is measured inclusively. The higher order quantum corrections discussed in this thesis are due to strong interactions. To the inclusive decay rate of Z{sup 0} bosons into all possible final states consisting of hadrons third order QCD contributions have been obtained. Also in the third order QCD an expansion for the inclusive hadronic decay rate of a {tau}-lepton was obtained. Then the top-quark-mass effects on the decay channels of a Higgs boson: Higgs{yields}b-quarks and Higgs{yields}gluons, were investigated. Thereafter the calculation of 3-loop contributions to the deep-inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering process is discussed. Finally the 3-loop contributions to the q{sup 2}-dependence of the lower moments {integral}{sub 0}{sup 1}x{sup N-1}F(x,q{sup 2})dx, N=2,4,6,8 of the structure functions F{sub 2} and F{sub L} were obtained. (orig./HSI).

  5. Group Contribution Methods for Phase Equilibrium Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmehling, Jürgen; Constantinescu, Dana; Schmid, Bastian

    2015-01-01

    The development and design of chemical processes are carried out by solving the balance equations of a mathematical model for sections of or the whole chemical plant with the help of process simulators. For process simulation, besides kinetic data for the chemical reaction, various pure component and mixture properties are required. Because of the great importance of separation processes for a chemical plant in particular, a reliable knowledge of the phase equilibrium behavior is required. The phase equilibrium behavior can be calculated with the help of modern equations of state or g(E)-models using only binary parameters. But unfortunately, only a very small part of the experimental data for fitting the required binary model parameters is available, so very often these models cannot be applied directly. To solve this problem, powerful predictive thermodynamic models have been developed. Group contribution methods allow the prediction of the required phase equilibrium data using only a limited number of group interaction parameters. A prerequisite for fitting the required group interaction parameters is a comprehensive database. That is why for the development of powerful group contribution methods almost all published pure component properties, phase equilibrium data, excess properties, etc., were stored in computerized form in the Dortmund Data Bank. In this review, the present status, weaknesses, advantages and disadvantages, possible applications, and typical results of the different group contribution methods for the calculation of phase equilibria are presented.

  6. Contribution of cardiorespiratory fitness to the obesity paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuley, Paul A; Beavers, Kristen M

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) has been overlooked as a potential modifier of the inverse association between obesity and mortality (the so-called obesity paradox), observed in patients with known or suspected cardiovascular (CV) disease. Evidence from five observational cohort studies of 30,104 patients (87% male) with CV disease indicates that CRF significantly alters the obesity paradox. There is general agreement across studies that the obesity paradox persists among patients with low CRF, regardless of whether adiposity is assessed by body mass index, waist circumference, or percentage body fat. However, among patients with high CRF, risk of all-cause mortality is lowest for the overweight category in some, but not all, studies, suggesting that higher levels of fitness may modify the relationship between body fatness and survival in patients manifesting an obesity paradox. Further study is needed to better characterize the joint contribution of CRF and obesity on mortality in diverse populations.

  7. Value transfer contributes to ambiguous-cue discrimination learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urcuioli, Peter J; Michalek, Sarah

    2007-08-01

    Pigeons learned two concurrent simultaneous discriminations in which the S- for one served as the S+ for the other. When all correct choices were reinforced, accuracy on the former (positive vs. ambiguous-cue or PA) discrimination was lower than on the latter (negative vs. ambiguous-cue or NA) discrimination. When correct choices on the PA discrimination were intermittently reinforced, however, pigeons chose the S- more often than the S+ on those trials. By contrast, intermittently reinforcing correct choices on the NA discrimination did not affect NA-trial accuracy but yielded higher PA-trial accuracy relative to continuous reinforcement. Together with a separate preference assessment, these results indicate that value transfer, in which some of the positive value accrued by an S+ transfers to its companion S-, contributes to ambiguous-cue performances.

  8. Educational Assessment Knowledge and Skills for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookhart, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    The 1990 Standards for Teacher Competence in Educational Assessment of Students (AFT, NCME, & NEA, 1990) made a documentable contribution to the field. However, the Standards have become a bit dated, most notably in two ways: (1) the Standards do not consider current conceptions of formative assessment knowledge and skills, and (2) the Standards…

  9. Promoting Academic Success through Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, T.

    2004-01-01

    Traditional assessment methods, prereferral interventions, referral, eligibility, and special education placement practices are being questioned. This article presents the Assessment of Academic Environments, an intervention technique used to address how the environment contributes to student success in both general and special education. Two case…

  10. Some Architecture for Embedded-Assessment Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Michael T.; Tannenbaum, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    It is one thing to produce an innovative, construct-based assessment task; it's another to produce 10 a year that are comparable in difficulty, measure the same competencies, are free of differential item functioning, and can be scaled and equated. These challenges contributed to the failure of the performance (or authentic) assessment movement of…

  11. Fate of water pumped from underground and contributions to sea-level rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Yoshihide; Lo, Min-Hui; Yeh, Pat J.-F.; Reager, John T.; Famiglietti, James S.; Wu, Ren-Jie; Tseng, Yu-Heng

    2016-08-01

    The contributions from terrestrial water sources to sea-level rise, other than ice caps and glaciers, are highly uncertain and heavily debated. Recent assessments indicate that groundwater depletion (GWD) may become the most important positive terrestrial contribution over the next 50 years, probably equal in magnitude to the current contributions from glaciers and ice caps. However, the existing estimates assume that nearly 100% of groundwater extracted eventually ends up in the oceans. Owing to limited knowledge of the pathways and mechanisms governing the ultimate fate of pumped groundwater, the relative fraction of global GWD that contributes to sea-level rise remains unknown. Here, using a coupled climate-hydrological model simulation, we show that only 80% of GWD ends up in the ocean. An increase in runoff to the ocean accounts for roughly two-thirds, whereas the remainder results from the enhanced net flux of precipitation minus evaporation over the ocean, due to increased atmospheric vapour transport from the land to the ocean. The contribution of GWD to global sea-level rise amounted to 0.02 (+/-0.004) mm yr-1 in 1900 and increased to 0.27 (+/-0.04) mm yr-1 in 2000. This indicates that existing studies have substantially overestimated the contribution of GWD to global sea-level rise by a cumulative amount of at least 10 mm during the twentieth century and early twenty-first century. With other terrestrial water contributions included, we estimate the net terrestrial water contribution during the period 1993-2010 to be +0.12 (+/-0.04) mm yr-1, suggesting that the net terrestrial water contribution reported in the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report report is probably overestimated by a factor of three.

  12. Fate of Water Pumped from Underground and Contributions to Sea Level Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Yoshihide; Lo, Min-Hui; Yeh, Pat J.-F.; Reager, John T.; Famiglietti, James S.; Wu, Ren-Jie; Tseng, Yu-Heng

    2016-01-01

    The contributions from terrestrial water sources to sea-level rise, other than ice caps and glaciers, are highly uncertain and heavily debated1-5. Recent assessments indicate that groundwater depletion (GWD) may become the most important positive terrestrial contribution6-10 over the next 50 years, probably equal in magnitude to the current contributions from glaciers and ice caps6. However, the existing estimates assume that nearly 100% of groundwater extracted eventually ends up in the oceans. Owing to limited knowledge of the pathways and mechanisms governing the ultimate fate of pumped groundwater, the relative fraction of global GWD that contributes to sea-level rise remains unknown. Here, using a coupled climate-hydrological model11,12 simulation, we show that only 80% of GWDends up in the ocean. An increase in runo to the ocean accounts for roughly two-thirds, whereas the remainder results from the enhanced net flux of precipitation minus evaporation over the ocean, due to increased atmospheric vapour transport from the land to the ocean. The contribution of GWD to global sea-level rise amounted to 0.02 (+/- 0.004)mm yr(sup-1) in 1900 and increased to 0.27 (+/- 0.04)mm yr(sup-1) in 2000. This indicates that existing studies have substantially overestimated the contribution of GWD to global sea-level rise by a cumulative amount of at least 10 mm during the twentieth century and early twenty-first century. With other terrestrial water contributions included, we estimate the net terrestrial water contribution during the period 1993-2010 to be +0.12 +/-0.04)mm yr(sup-1), suggesting that the net terrestrialwater contribution reported in the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report report is probably overestimated by a factor of three.

  13. Contributions of the US state park system to nature recreation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siikamäki, Juha

    2011-08-23

    Nature recreation in the United States concentrates in publicly provided natural areas. They are costly to establish and maintain, but their societal contributions are difficult to measure. Here, a unique approach is developed to quantifying nature recreation services generated by the US state park system. The assessment first uses data from five national surveys conducted between 1975 and 2007 to consistently measure the amount of time used for nature recreation. The surveys comprise two official federal surveys and their predecessors. Each survey was designed to elicit nationally representative, detailed data on how people divide their time into different activities. State-level data on time use for nature recreation were then matched with information on the availability of state parks and other potentially important drivers of recreation, so that statistical estimation methods for nonexperimental panel data (difference-in-differences) could be used to examine the net contribution of state parks to nature recreation. The results show that state parks have a robust positive effect on nature recreation. For example, the approximately 2 million acres of state parks established between 1975 and 2007 are estimated to contribute annually 600 million hours of nature recreation (2.7 h per capita, approximately 9% of all nature recreation). All state parks generate annually an estimated 2.2 billion hours of nature recreation (9.7 h per capita; approximately 33% of all nature recreation). Using conventional approaches to valuing time, the estimated time value of nature recreation services generated by the US state park system is approximately $14 billion annually.

  14. Seasonal contributions of vegetation types to suburban evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Emily B.; Hiller, Rebecca V.; McFadden, Joseph P.

    2011-03-01

    Evapotranspiration is an important term of energy and water budgets in urban areas and is responsible for multiple ecosystem services provided by urban vegetation. The spatial heterogeneity of urban surface types with different seasonal water use patterns (e.g., trees and turfgrass lawns) complicates efforts to predict and manage urban evapotranspiration rates, necessitating a surface type, or component-based, approach. In a suburban neighborhood of Minneapolis-Saint Paul, Minnesota, United States, we simultaneously measured ecosystem evapotranspiration and its main component fluxes using eddy covariance and heat dissipation sap flux techniques to assess the relative contribution of plant functional types (evergreen needleleaf tree, deciduous broadleaf tree, cool season turfgrass) to seasonal and spatial variations in evapotranspiration. Component-based evapotranspiration estimates agreed well with measured water vapor fluxes, although the imbalance between methods varied seasonally from a 20% overestimate in spring to an 11% underestimate in summer. Turfgrasses represented the largest contribution to annual evapotranspiration in recreational and residential land use types (87% and 64%, respectively), followed by trees (10% and 31%, respectively), with the relative contribution of plant functional types dependent on their fractional cover and daily water use. Recreational areas had higher annual evapotranspiration than residential areas (467 versus 324 mm yr-1, respectively) and altered seasonal patterns of evapotranspiration due to greater turfgrass cover (74% versus 34%, respectively). Our results suggest that plant functional types capture much of the variability required to predict the seasonal patterns of evapotranspiration among cities, as well as differences in evapotranspiration that could result from changes in climate, land use, or vegetation composition.

  15. Coverage of Russian psychological contributions in American psychology textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrova-Howell, Maria; Abramson, Charles I; Craig, David Philip Arthur

    2012-01-01

    Internationalizing psychology is an important component of current globalization trends. American textbooks on the history of psychology and introductory psychology were surveyed for the presence of historical and contemporary important Russian psychologists to assess the current status of Russian-American crossfertilization. Of a list of 97 important Russian psychologists, as determined by the editors of the Russian journal Methodology and History in Psychology, less than 22% are mentioned in the reviewed texts. The most common names were Pavlov, Luria, and Vygotsky. As the internet is arguably the single most important factor affecting the increase of international communication and dissemination of knowledge, we also searched for these 97 names on various websites, most notably Wikipedia and Google. Forty-one internet sites contained some amount of biographical information about Russian psychologists. On Wikipedia, 14 Russian psychologists had articles documenting biographical information. We also developed a rubric to determine the amount of information available on the internet for these psychologists and compared Wikipedia's mean score with various other websites. Wikipedia pages on average had a significantly higher score than the rest of the internet. Recommendations to improve Russian coverage in America are provided and include: (1) developing pages on Wikipedia and other virtual venues highlighting Russian contributions, (2) soliciting articles for US journals from Russian psychologists, and (3) incorporating Russian contributions in introductory and historical textbooks. We provide a partial bibliography of Russian contributions that can be used by authors of such textbooks. We would like to thank Dr Viktor Fedorovich Petrenko and Dr Igor Nikolaevich Karitsky from the journal Methodology and History of Psychology for supplying the names of the Russian psychologists. We would also like to express our appreciation to Robert García for reviewing and

  16. Factors contributing to individual differences in facial expression categorisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Corinne; Guo, Kun

    2016-12-29

    Individuals vary in perceptual accuracy when categorising facial expressions, yet it is unclear how these individual differences in non-clinical population are related to cognitive processing stages at facial information acquisition and interpretation. We tested 104 healthy adults in a facial expression categorisation task, and correlated their categorisation accuracy with face-viewing gaze allocation and personal traits assessed with Autism Quotient, anxiety inventory and Self-Monitoring Scale. The gaze allocation had limited but emotion-specific impact on categorising expressions. Specifically, longer gaze at the eyes and nose regions were coupled with more accurate categorisation of disgust and sad expressions, respectively. Regarding trait measurements, higher autistic score was coupled with better recognition of sad but worse recognition of anger expressions, and contributed to categorisation bias towards sad expressions; whereas higher anxiety level was associated with greater categorisation accuracy across all expressions and with increased tendency of gazing at the nose region. It seems that both anxiety and autistic-like traits were associated with individual variation in expression categorisation, but this association is not necessarily mediated by variation in gaze allocation at expression-specific local facial regions. The results suggest that both facial information acquisition and interpretation capabilities contribute to individual differences in expression categorisation within non-clinical populations.

  17. Contribution of macrophages to plasmin activity in ewe bulk milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Albenzio

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A total of 225 bulk sheep milk samples were collected throughout lactation to assess the contribution of macrophages to the regulation of the plasmin/plasminogen system. Samples were analyzed for composition, milk renneting parameters, and for activities of plasmin (PL, plasminogen (PG and plasminogen activators (PA. Isolation of macrophages from milk was performed using a magnetic positive separation; separated cells were lysed and activity of urokinase-PA was determined. PL activity in milk decreased during lactation (P < 0.001. The reduction in plasmin activity recorded in the mid and late lactation milk matched with the increase in PG/PL ratio (P < 0.001. The activity of PA increased throughout lactation (P < 0.001, the highest value being recorded in the late lactation milk.The amount of isolated and concentrated macrophages was higher in early and mid lactation milk than in late lactation milk (P < 0.01. Stage of lactation did not influence the activity of u-PA detected in isolated macrophages. The activity of u-PA associated with macrophages was lower than total PA activity detected in milk. Our results lend support to the hypothesis that in ewe bulk milk from healthy flocks macrophages only slightly contributed to the activation of plasmin/plasminogen system.

  18. Contribution of anthocyanin fraction to the antioxidant properties of wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero-Pérez, M D; Muñiz, P; González-Sanjosé, M L

    2008-08-01

    The wine is a beverage with an important antioxidant efficiency which is attributed to their bioactives compounds, especially polyphenols. The anthocyanins are the main phenolic compounds of red wine and its consumption has been partially related with the "French Paradox". The aim of the present work was to evaluate the contribution of the anthocyanins to the antioxidant properties of red wines. So, total antioxidant capacity (TAC), hydroxyl and superoxide scavenger activity and lipid peroxidation of 80 Spanish red wines and their anthocyanins fractions have been assessed for ABTS, DPPH, DMPD, and FRAP methods, hydroxyl radical (HRSA), superoxide radical scavenger activity (SRSA) and ABAP-lipid peroxidation (ABAP-LP). The results showed that free anthocyanins fraction are main responsible of the total antioxidant capacity of red wines correlated with electron transference processes. In similar way, free anthocyanins are the maximum responsible of HRSA scavenger activity of red wines, contributing less extensively to their SRSA capacity or to their protective action on lipid peroxidation. Furthermore, simple anthocyanins exert a low action in TAC process involved with proton transference. Glycosilated and methoxylic anthocyanins as malvidin-3-glucoside, seem to be the type of anthocyanins with higher participation on the antioxidant effect of red wine.

  19. The Contribution of Dynamic Exploration to Virtual Anatomical Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Maarten Luursema

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Virtual Learning Environments are increasingly becoming part of the medical curriculum. In a previous study we (luursema et al., 2006 found that a combination of computer-implemented stereopsis (visual depth through seeing with both eyes and dynamic exploration (being able to continuously change one's viewpoint relative to the studied objects in real time is beneficial to anatomical learning, especially for subjects of low visuo spatial ability (the ability to form, retrieve, and manipulate mental representations of a visuo-spatial nature. A follow-up study (luursema et al., 2008 found the contribution of computer-implemented stereopsis to this effect to be small but significant. The present experiment investigated the contribution of dynamic exploration to anatomical learning by means of a virtual learning environment. Seventy participants were tested for visuo-spatial ability and were grouped in pairs matched for this ability. One individual of the pair actively manipulated a 3D reconstruction of the human abdomen; the other individual passively watched the interactions of the first individual on a separate screen. Learning was assessed by two anatomical learning tests. Dynamic exploration provided a small but significant benefit to anatomical learning.

  20. [Politics: which contribution can ethical expertise give biopolitical decisions?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber-Hassemer, Kristiane

    2008-08-01

    Research in the life sciences is developing at a rapid pace, has profound implications in terms of its effects on human nature and touches upon the self-conceptions of both the individual and society. In order to determine how this research and its application in all phases of human life should be assessed on the moral level, and whether it should be subject to regulation, the involvement of all disciplines--in the natural sciences, medicine, philosophy, law and the social sciences--that can contribute knowledge for the purpose of guidance is indispensable. Political decisions should be preceded by a wide-ranging debate within society encompassing all relevant groups and the media. Alongside discourse confined to specialists and their forums, a particular part can be played by the institution of ethics committees with an interdisciplinary, pluralistic membership. Their work can contribute to the stimulation of social debate and to ensuring that it is conducted on a suitably high level. In our knowledge society, Government and Parliament lack the information necessary to guide their decisions, and therefore require external expertise to provide a solid foundation for them. In the field of bioethics, however, the relationship between advisory activity and parliamentary decision-making proves is not without problems, because, in addition to rational criteria and party-political considerations, personal moral judgements are not only unavoidable but also legitimate, though they are not always made transparent.

  1. Terrestrial organic carbon contributions to sediments on the Washington margin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prahl, F.G.; Sparrow, M.A.; Eversmeyer, B. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)); Ertel, J.R. (Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)); Goni, M.A. (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA (United States))

    1994-07-01

    Elemental and stable carbon isotopic compositions and biomarker concentrations were determined in sediments from the Columbia River basin and the Washington margin in order to evaluate geochemical approaches for quantifying terrestrial organic matter in marine sediments. The biomarkers include: an homologous series of long-chain n-alkanes derived from the surface waxes of higher plants; phenolic and hydroxyalkanoic compounds produced by CuO oxidation of two major vascular plant biopolymers, lignin and cutin. All marine sediments, including samples collected from the most remote sites in Cascadia Basin, showed organic geochemical evidence for the presence of terrestrial organic carbon. Using endmember values for the various biomarkers determined empirically by two independent means, the authors estimate that the terrestrial contribution to the Washington margin is [approximately] 60% for shelf sediments, [approximately] 30% for slope sediments, and decreases further to [le] 15% in basin sediments. Results from the same geochemical measurements made with depth in gravity core 6705-7 from Cascadia Seachannel suggest that this approach to assess terrestrial organic carbon contributions to contemporary deposits on the Washington margin can be applied to the study of sediments depositing in this region since the last glacial period.

  2. Abstract:Location Contributions Determined via GGE Biplot Analysis of Multienvironment Sugarcane Genotype-Performance Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Abstract: Selection for productive sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) cultivars in Florida has been more successful for organic than sand soils. The objectives of this study were to assess the contribution of the location with a sand soil in the final stage of multi-environment testing of sugarca...

  3. Location Contributions Determined via GGE Biplot Analysis of Multievironment Sugarcane Genotype-Performance Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selection for productive sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) cultivars in Florida has been more successful for organic than sand soils. The objectives of this study were to assess the contributions of the location with a sand soil to the final stage of multi-environment testing of sugarcane genotypes in Flor...

  4. The Contribution of Maternal Care and Control to Adolescents' Adjustment Following War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekel, Rachel; Solomon, Dan

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the contribution of maternal bonding to the adjustment of Israeli adolescents following the 2006 Lebanon War. In all, 2,858 seventh and eighth graders who lived in areas that were exposed to missile attacks completed the Parental Bonding Instrument (assessing maternal care and control) and questionnaires evaluating…

  5. Early formula feeding practices and their potential contribution to later obesity risk

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tarrant, R C

    2013-01-02

    Background and Aims: Early feeding practices, including early introduction to solid foods and overfeeding, are known risk factors for childhood obesity. This study aimed to assess maternal formula feeding practices and infant formula feeding patterns, factors that are known to potentially contribute to later obesity risk. \\r\

  6. Contribution of the G20 economies to the global impact of the Paris agreement climate proposals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Elzen, Michel; Admiraal, Annemiek; Roelfsema, Mark; van Soest, Heleen; Hof, Andries F.; Forsell, Nicklas

    2016-01-01

    By 15 December 2015, 187 countries had submitted their Intended Nationally Determined Contributions (INDCs) summarising their climate actions after 2020 in the context of the Paris Agreement. We used a unified framework to assess the mitigation components of INDCs covering 105 countries (representin

  7. Home gardens contribute significantly to dietary diversity in HIV/AIDS afflicted households in rural Ghana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akrofi, S.; Brouwer, I.D.; Price, L.L.; Struik, P.C.

    2010-01-01

    The study assessed the biodiversity in home gardens and evaluated its contribution to dietary diversity among HIV-positive and HIV-negative rural households in Eastern Region, Ghana. A cross-sectional survey of 32 HIV-positive and 48 HIV-negative households was conducted. Plant species cultivated in

  8. On the recent contribution of the Greenland ice sheet to sea level change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Broeke, M.R.; Enderlin, E.M.; Howat, I.M.; Kuipers Munneke, P.; Noël, B.P.Y.; Jan Van De Berg, W.; Van Meijgaard, E.; Wouters, B.

    2016-01-01

    We assess the recent contribution of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) to sea level change. We use the mass budget method, which quantifies ice sheet mass balance (MB) as the difference between surface mass balance (SMB) and solid ice discharge across the grounding line (D). A comparison with independe

  9. Evaluation of The Role and Contribution of UNDP in Environment and Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wells, Michael P.; Marcussen, Henrik Secher; Uitto, Juha I.;

    Evaluation and assessment of UNDP´s positioning and contribution to managing environment and energy for sustainable development. The scope of the evaluation covers all programmatic and operational aspects of the environment and energy area in all UNDP´s geographic regions and at the global...

  10. Educational Disparities in the Burden of Disability : Contributions of Disease Prevalence and Disabling Impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijs, Bart; Nusselder, Wilma J.; Looman, Caspar W.; Mackenbach, Johan P.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We assessed the contributions of the prevalence and disabling impact of specific diseases to educational disparities in the prevalence of disability. Methods. We examined a large representative survey of the Dutch population, the Dutch Permanent Survey of Living Conditions (2001-2007; n

  11. Base cation deposition in Europe - Part II. Acid neutralization capacity and contribution to forest nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draaijers, G.P.J.; Leeuwen, E.P. van; Jong, P.G.H. de; Erisman, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    An assessment was made of the capacity of base cations to neutralize acid deposition and of the contribution of base cation deposition to forest nutrition in Europe. In large parts of southern Europe more than 50% of the potential acid deposition was found counteracted by deposition of non-sea salt

  12. Engineering Self-Efficacy Contributing to the Academic Performance of AMAIUB Engineering Students: A Qualitative Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleta, Beda T.

    2016-01-01

    This research study aims to determine the factors of engineering skills self- efficacy sources contributing on the academic performance of AMAIUB engineering students. Thus, a better measure of engineering self-efficacy is needed to adequately assess engineering students' beliefs in their capabilities to perform tasks in their engineering…

  13. Outlier treatment for improving parameter estimation of group contribution based models for upper flammability limit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frutiger, Jerome; Abildskov, Jens; Sin, Gürkan

    2015-01-01

    Flammability data is needed to assess the risk of fire and explosions. This study presents a new group contribution (GC) model to predict the upper flammability limit UFL oforganic chemicals. Furthermore, it provides a systematic method for outlier treatment inorder to improve the parameter...

  14. Relative contribution ratio: A quantitative metrics for multi-parameter analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changtong Luo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In many applications, the objective function is determined by several parameters simultaneously. Properly assessing the relative contribution of each parameter can give the decision maker a better understanding of the problem. However, widely used assessing methods are qualitative or semi-quantitative. In this paper, a new concept, relative contribution ratio (RCR, is proposed. The concept follows the idea of proof by contradiction, and estimates the impact of absence of each parameter, based on the fact that the absence of a parameter with more contribution will bring more divergence. Based on surrogate models, a statistical method for calculating RCR is also presented. Numerical results indicate that RCR is capable of analyzing multi-parameter problems, regardless of whether they are linear or nonlinear.

  15. Improving invasive species management by integrating priorities and contributions of scientists and decision makers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'Guyen, Anouk; Hirsch, Philipp E; Adrian-Kalchhauser, Irene; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia

    2016-04-01

    Managing invasive species is a major challenge for society. In the case of newly established invaders, rapid action is key for a successful management. Here, we develop, describe and recommend a three-step transdisciplinary process (the "butterfly model") to rapidly initiate action for invasion management. In the framing of a case study, we present results from the first of these steps: assessing priorities and contributions of both scientists and decision makers. Both scientists and decision makers prioritise research on prevention. The available scientific knowledge contributions, however, are publications on impacts rather than prevention of the invasive species. The contribution of scientific knowledge does thus not reflect scientists' perception of what is essentially needed. We argue that a more objective assessment and transparent communication of not only decision makers' but also scientists' priorities is an essential basis for a successful cooperation. Our three-step model can help achieve objectivity via transdisciplinary communication.

  16. Orthographic Contributions to Perceived Word Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Martin H.

    2004-01-01

    We have a surprising tendency to misperceive the center of visually presented words (Fischer, 1996, 2000a, 2000b). To understand the origin of this bias, four experiments assessed the impact of letter font, letter size, and grapheme-phoneme convergences on perceived stimulus center. Fourteen observers indicated the perceived centers of words,…

  17. Contribution of European research to risk analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boenke, A

    2001-12-01

    The European Commission's, Quality of Life Research Programme, Key Action 1-Health, Food & Nutrition is mission-oriented and aims, amongst other things, at providing a healthy, safe and high-quality food supply leading to reinforced consumer confidence in the safety, of European food. Its objectives also include the enhancing of the competitiveness of the European food supply. Key Action 1 is currently supporting a number of different types of European collaborative projects in the area of risk analysis. The objectives of these projects range from the development and validation of prevention strategies including the reduction of consumers risks; development and validation of new modelling approaches, harmonization of risk assessment principles methodologies and terminology; standardization of methods and systems used for the safety evaluation of transgenic food; providing of tools for the evaluation of human viral contamination of shellfish and quality control; new methodologies for assessing the potential of unintended effects of genetically modified (genetically modified) foods; development of a risk assessment model for Cryptosporidium parvum related to the food and water industries, to the development of a communication platform for genetically modified organism, producers, retailers, regulatory authorities and consumer groups to improve safety assessment procedures, risk management strategies and risk communication; development and validation of new methods for safety testing of transgenic food; evaluation of the safety and efficacy of iron supplementation in pregnant women, evaluation of the potential cancer-preventing activity of pro- and pre-biotic ('synbiotic') combinations in human volunteers. An overview of these projects is presented here.

  18. The Contribution of Health Technology Assessment, Health Needs Assessment, and Health Impact Assessment to the Assessment and Translation of Technologies in the Field of Public Health Genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenköttera, N.; Vondeling, H.; Blancquaert, I.; Mekel, O.C.L.; Kristensen, F.B.; Brand, A.

    2011-01-01

    The European Union has named genomics as one of the promising research fields for the development of new health technologies. Major concerns with regard to these fields are, on the one hand, the rather slow and limited translation of new knowledge and, on the other hand, missing insights into the im

  19. The ILRS Contribution to ITRF2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlis, Erricos C.; Luceri, Cinzia; Sciarretta, Cecilia; Evans, Keith

    2014-05-01

    Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) data have contributed to the definition of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) over the past three decades. The development of ITRF2005 ushered a new era with the use of weekly or session contributions, allowing greater flexibility in the editing, relative weighting and the combination of information from the four contributing techniques. The new approach allows each Service to generate a solution based on the rigorous combination of the individual Analysis Centers' contributions that provides an opportunity to verify the intra-technique consistency and a comparison of internal procedures and adopted models. The intra- and inter-technique comparisons that the time series approach facilitates are an extremely powerful diagnostic that highlights differences and inconsistencies at the single station level. Over the past year the ILRS Analysis Working Group (AWG) worked on designing an improved ILRS contribution for the development of ITRF2013. The ILRS approach is based on the current IERS Conventions 2010 and our internal ILRS standards, with a few deviations that are documented. Since the Global Geodetic Observing System - GGOS identified the ITRF as its key project, the ILRS has taken a two-pronged approach in order to meet its stringent goals: modernizing the engineering components (ground and space segments), and revising the modeling standards taking advantage of recent improvements in system Earth modeling. The main concern in the case of SLR is monitoring systematic errors at individual stations, accounting for undocumented discontinuities, and improving the target signature models. The latter has been addressed with the adoption of mm-level models for all of our targets. As far as the station systematics, the AWG had already embarked on a major effort to improve the handling of such errors prior to the development of ITRF2008. The results of that effort formed the foundation for the re-examination of the

  20. Contribution of Journals to Academic Disciplines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee, Hye-Young

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This research uses a new approach to analyze the extent of influence journal papers have on the progress of varied research fields by estimation of subject-based influence on research other than impact factor that relies on citation index. It is initiated with the hypothesis that earlier established citation relations between journal and citing paper, which reveals the research field that contains the highest citation index and hence has received the greatest contribution from a particular journal, would have inconsistent contribution to the research field over the year of journal publication. The target research is primarily 128 journal papers and 4,123 citing papers from Information Systems Research published in the years 2001, 2004, 2007, and 2010. The characteristics of citation history and hallmarks of research field of citing papers were studied and analysis on significant distinction between citing fields based on the year of publication was performed. The analysis results show the order of citation rate to be highest from Computer Science (2,221 cases, Business & Economics (2,191 cases, and Information Science & Library Science (1,901 cases. The citation history of the journal, nonetheless, indicates increase in citation during 2-3 years after the earliest publication till it achieves constant citation. The statistical analysis shows significant variation in citing fields in accordance with the publication year; especially in 2010, journal contribution has increased in the fields of Business & Economics, Operations Research & Management Science, and Health Care Sciences & Services but, however, is reduced in Education & Educational Research and Social Sciences - Other Topics.