WorldWideScience

Sample records for assessing non-chemical weeding

  1. Assessing non-chemical weeding strategies through mechanistic modelling of blackgrass (Alopecurus myosuroides Huds.) dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colbach, N.; Kurstjens, D.A.G.; Munier-Jolain, N.M.; Dalbiès, A.; Doré, T.

    2010-01-01

    Because of environmental and health safety issues, it is necessary to develop strategies that do not rely on herbicides to manage weeds. Introducing temporary grassland into annual crop rotations and mechanical weeding are the two main features that are frequently used in integrated and organic crop

  2. A non-chemical system for online weed control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Ayala, Victor; Peteinatos, Gerassimos; Gerhards, Roland; Andújar, Dionisio

    2015-03-30

    Non-chemical weed control methods need to be directed towards a site-specific weeding approach, in order to be able to compete the conventional herbicide equivalents. A system for online weed control was developed. It automatically adjusts the tine angle of a harrow and creates different levels of intensity: from gentle to aggressive. Two experimental plots in a maize field were harrowed with two consecutive passes. The plots presented from low to high weed infestation levels. Discriminant capabilities of an ultrasonic sensor were used to determine the crop and weed variability of the field. A controlling unit used ultrasonic readings to adjust the tine angle, producing an appropriate harrowing intensity. Thus, areas with high crop and weed densities were more aggressively harrowed, while areas with lower densities were cultivated with a gentler treatment; areas with very low densities or without weeds were not treated. Although the weed development was relatively advanced and the soil surface was hard, the weed control achieved by the system reached an average of 51% (20%-91%), without causing significant crop damage as a result of harrowing. This system is proposed as a relatively low cost, online, and real-time automatic harrow that improves the weed control efficacy, reduces energy consumption, and avoids the usage of herbicide.

  3. Determining treatment frequency for controlling weeds on traffic islands using chemical and non-chemical weed control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Anne Merete; Larsen, S.U.; Andreasen, Christian;

    2013-01-01

    Many public authorities rely on the use of non-chemical weed control methods, due to stringent restrictions on herbicide use in urban areas. However, these methods usually require more repeated treatments than chemical weed management, resulting in increased costs of weed management. In order...... to investigate the efficacy of four non-chemical weed control methods and glyphosate treatment, experiments were carried out on traffic islands in the growing seasons 2005 and 2006. Three trial sites were each divided into six treatment areas, which were either treated with glyphosate, flame, steam, hot air....../flame, hot water or left untreated. The treatments were carried out at regular, predetermined intervals throughout the growing season in 2004, whereas in 2005 and 2006 how many treatments that were required to keep weed cover below a predetermined acceptance level of 2% were investigated. Percentage weed...

  4. Image analysis as a non-destructive method to assess regrowth of weeds after repeated flame weeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rask, Anne Merete; Kristoffersen, Palle; Andreasen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Efficient non-chemical weed control like flame weeding often requires repeated treatments. In weed control experiments the effect of each treatment may be estimated by removing and weighing the remaining weed biomass after the treatment, but the method influences the weed plants ability to regrow......, and therefore it may influence the long-term effect of repeated treatments. Visual assessment of weed cover or image analysis do not affect the remaining parts of the weed plants after treatment, but the methods may have other disadvantages. In order to evaluate and compare three methods we measured changes......, there were significant differences in the estimated effective doses (e.g., ED50 and ED90 values) depending on assessment method and treatment frequency. One reason could be that image analysis and visual assessment did not affect the remaining weed parts after treatment and therefore gave a more realistic...

  5. European Perspectives on the Adoption of Non-Chemical Weed Management in Reduced Tillage Systems for Arable Crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melander, B.; Munier-Jolan, N.; Schwarz, J.

    2012-01-01

    expansion of reduced tillage systems. European agriculture is asked to become less dependent on pesticide use and promote crop protection programmes based on integrated pest management (IPM) principles. Non-inversion tillage systems rely entirely on the availability of glyphosate products and herbicide...... consumption appears to be slightly higher as compared to plough based cropping systems. Annual grass weeds and stickywilly often constitute the principal weed problems when the soil is not inverted because crop rotations concurrently have very high proportions of winter cereals. There is a need to redesign...

  6. Applying a weed risk assessment approach to GM crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keese, Paul K; Robold, Andrea V; Myers, Ruth C; Weisman, Sarah; Smith, Joe

    2014-12-01

    Current approaches to environmental risk assessment of genetically modified (GM) plants are modelled on chemical risk assessment methods, which have a strong focus on toxicity. There are additional types of harms posed by plants that have been extensively studied by weed scientists and incorporated into weed risk assessment methods. Weed risk assessment uses robust, validated methods that are widely applied to regulatory decision-making about potentially problematic plants. They are designed to encompass a broad variety of plant forms and traits in different environments, and can provide reliable conclusions even with limited data. The knowledge and experience that underpin weed risk assessment can be harnessed for environmental risk assessment of GM plants. A case study illustrates the application of the Australian post-border weed risk assessment approach to a representative GM plant. This approach is a valuable tool to identify potential risks from GM plants.

  7. Laboratory tests to assess optimal agricultural residue traits for an abrasive weed control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    One of the biggest challenges to organic agricultural production and herbicide resistant crops in industrialized countries today is the non-chemical control of weed plants. Studies of new tools and methods for weed control have been motivated by an increased consumer demand for organic produce and c...

  8. 76 FR 39811 - International Center for Technology Assessment and the Center for Food Safety; Noxious Weed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-07

    ... Assessment and the Center for Food Safety; Noxious Weed Status of Kentucky Bluegrass Genetically Engineered... engineered for tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate should not be listed as a Federal noxious weed and... noxious weeds. Our decision is based on our analysis of available scientific data, our weed...

  9. Non-chemical stressors and cumulative risk assessment: an overview of current initiatives and potential air pollutant interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Ari S; Sax, Sonja N; Wason, Susan C; Campleman, Sharan L

    2011-06-01

    Regulatory agencies are under increased pressure to consider broader public health concerns that extend to multiple pollutant exposures, multiple exposure pathways, and vulnerable populations. Specifically, cumulative risk assessment initiatives have stressed the importance of considering both chemical and non-chemical stressors, such as socioeconomic status (SES) and related psychosocial stress, in evaluating health risks. The integration of non-chemical stressors into a cumulative risk assessment framework has been largely driven by evidence of health disparities across different segments of society that may also bear a disproportionate risk from chemical exposures. This review will discuss current efforts to advance the field of cumulative risk assessment, highlighting some of the major challenges, discussed within the construct of the traditional risk assessment paradigm. Additionally, we present a summary of studies of potential interactions between social stressors and air pollutants on health as an example of current research that supports the incorporation of non-chemical stressors into risk assessment. The results from these studies, while suggestive of possible interactions, are mixed and hindered by inconsistent application of social stress indicators. Overall, while there have been significant advances, further developments across all of the risk assessment stages (i.e., hazard identification, exposure assessment, dose-response, and risk characterization) are necessary to provide a scientific basis for regulatory actions and effective community interventions, particularly when considering non-chemical stressors. A better understanding of the biological underpinnings of social stress on disease and implications for chemical-based dose-response relationships is needed. Furthermore, when considering non-chemical stressors, an appropriate metric, or series of metrics, for risk characterization is also needed. Cumulative risk assessment research will benefit

  10. Using Physiologically-Based Pharmacokinetic Models to Incorporate Chemical and Non-Chemical Stressors into Cumulative Risk Assessment: A Case Study of Pesticide Exposures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan I. Levy

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Cumulative risk assessment has been proposed as an approach to evaluate the health risks associated with simultaneous exposure to multiple chemical and non-chemical stressors. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PBPK/PD models can allow for the inclusion and evaluation of multiple stressors, including non-chemical stressors, but studies have not leveraged PBPK/PD models to jointly consider these disparate exposures in a cumulative risk context. In this study, we focused on exposures to organophosphate (OP pesticides for children in urban low-income environments, where these children would be simultaneously exposed to other pesticides (including pyrethroids and non-chemical stressors that may modify the effects of these exposures (including diet. We developed a methodological framework to evaluate chemical and non-chemical stressor impacts on OPs, utilizing an existing PBPK/PD model for chlorpyrifos. We evaluated population-specific stressors that would influence OP doses or acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibition, the relevant PD outcome. We incorporated the impact of simultaneous exposure to pyrethroids and dietary factors on OP dose through the compartments of metabolism and PD outcome within the PBPK model, and simulated combinations of stressors across multiple exposure ranges and potential body weights. Our analyses demonstrated that both chemical and non-chemical stressors can influence the health implications of OP exposures, with up to 5-fold variability in AChE inhibition across combinations of stressor values for a given OP dose. We demonstrate an approach for modeling OP risks in the presence of other population-specific environmental stressors, providing insight about co-exposures and variability factors that most impact OP health risks and contribute to children’s cumulative health risk from pesticides. More generally, this framework can be used to inform cumulative risk assessment for any compound impacted by

  11. Taxonomic diversity and distinctness indices in assessment of weed communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Jastrzębska

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper contains an analysis of taxonomic weed biodiversity in the cultivation of spring barley in the period of 1990-2004, grown in crop rotation after potato with a 25% share of this cereal (potato - spring barley - field pea - winter triticale as well as in crop rotation with its 75% share (potato - spring barley - spring barley - spring barley in which barley was grown once and twice after the same barley crop. No weed control was used in the present experiment. Every year in the spring (at full emergence of the cereal crop and before harvest, the species composition and the numbers of individual weed species were determined, as well as weed biomass before harvest. On this basis, the taxonomic diversity and distinctness indices were calculated. Potato/barley crop rotation with a 25% share of this cereal and growing spring barley once and twice after the same barley crop did not differentiate taxonomic weed biodiversity. However, it was positively correlated with rainfall abundance during the growing season and negatively correlated with mean temperature. The taxonomic diversity indices were positively correlated with species richness and species diversity, whereas the taxonomic distinctness indices did not generally show any relationship with these measures. Spring barley grain yield did not depend on taxonomic biodiversity of weed communities.

  12. Assessment of Corn Densities on Ecological Indices of Weed Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Mahmoodi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diversity, dominance, and stability of weeds are the most important ecological properties in agricultural systems, which influenced by management factors such as crop density, abundantly. This experiment was conducted in 2009 at Ferdowsi University of Mashhad Research Field. The experimental design was interval mapping with four levels of corn densities (5, 6, 7 and 9 plant.m-2 and four levels of weed control (full-control, without control, broad-leaves control and grasses control. Weed sampling was done at 3 stages included beginning and end of critical period weed control and harvesting time. The results showed that the effect of plant density on species diversity was significant; some how the amount of Shanon and Simpson Indices were lowest in the 9 plant.m-2 (0.39 and 0.45, respectively and greatest in 5 plant.m-2 (0.84. The results also showed that the maximum amount of dominance index was observed in 9 plant.m-2, that was seen in Echinochloa crus- galli and Convulvulus arvensis at the beginning of growing season, then in Solanum nigrum and Amaranthus retroflexus in the end of growing season. The amount of community dominance index in 9 plant.m-2 was higher than other densities, and it decreased with decline of densities. based on the results of present experiment the linear relationship between plant species and area was found. The calculated amount of Alpha and Beta diversities. in a θ and β scales based on coefficients of this relationship were 0.534 (four species per unit area and 0.29 (two species per unit area, respectively. In conclusion the result of this experiment pointed that the weeds diversity decreased with increasing of corn density, weed diversity decreased and therefore, having appropriate plant density is very efficient for sustainable weed management.

  13. Allelopathic assessment of selected common weeds in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurul Ain, M. B.; Nornasuha, Y.; Ismail, B. S.

    2016-11-01

    A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the allelopathic potential of eight common weed species in Malaysia, namely, Ageratum conyzoides, Tridax procumbens, Cyperus iria, Fimbristylis miliacea, Eleusine indica, Imperata cylindrica, Lygodium flexuosum and Nephrolepis biserrata of different morphological characteristics (broadleaves, sedges, grasses and ferns). The allelopathic study of these weeds was carried out by testing the leaf litter leachate through the Sandwich method and the volatile compounds of these weeds through the Dish pack method with three replicates for each donor species. The results obtained from both methods were statistically analyzed and the means had converted to percentage growth inhibition to determine the inhibition pattern on the radicle and hypocotyl growth of lettuce seedlings. Among the eight weed species tested, Ageratum conyzoides showed the strongest growth inhibition on lettuce radicle elongation (86%) in the sandwich bioassay compared to the control, followed by Tridax procumbens (71%), which both species being broadleaves weeds. In the dish pack bioassay Lygodium flexuosum (fern) demonstrated maximum inhibition on the growth the radicle and hypocotyl for each different distance from the source well. On the other hand, two weed species exhibited enhanced on the growth radicle and hypocotyl when compared to that of the control in dish pack bioassay. Nephrolepis biserrata and Fimbristylis miliacea were the species that showed the highest growth stimulatory effect. The results presented can be utilized as benchmark information for further research on the elucidation of leachates and volatile chemicals involved in allelopathy in nature. The information can also be helpful in the development of new bioactive chemicals from natural products in weed control strategies.

  14. Assessing the Invasion Risk of Eucalyptus in the United States Using the Australian Weed Risk Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doria R. Gordon

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many agricultural species have undergone selection for traits that are consistent with those that increase the probability that a species will become invasive. However, the risk of invasion may be accurately predicted for the majority of plant species tested using the Australian Weed Risk Assessment (WRA. This system has been tested in multiple climates and geographies and, on average, correctly identifies 90% of the major plant invaders as having high invasion risk, and 70% of the noninvaders as having low risk. We used this tool to evaluate the invasion risk of 38 Eucalyptus taxa currently being tested and cultivated in the USA for pulp, biofuel, and other purposes. We predict 15 taxa to have low risk of invasion, 14 taxa to have high risk, and 9 taxa to require further information. In addition to a history of naturalization and invasiveness elsewhere, the traits that significantly contribute to a high invasion risk conclusion include having prolific seed production and a short generation time. Selection against these traits should reduce the probability that eucalypts cultivated in the USA will become invasive threats to natural areas and agricultural systems.

  15. Agronomic Weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Nathan L.

    This agriculture extension service publication from Pennsylvania State University examines agronomic weed problems and control. Contents include a listing of the characteristics of weeds, a section on herbicides, and a section on the important weeds of agronomic crops in Pennsylvania. The herbicide section discusses systemic herbicides, contact…

  16. Assessment of Field-Grown Cucurbit Crops and Weeds within Farms in South-West Nigeria for Viral Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Ibitaiyewa AYO-JOHN

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cucurbits are economic crops in Nigeria which serve as additional nutritional supplements and also good sources of income for farmers. Viral diseases are a worldwide problem of cucurbits and a major limiting factor for cucurbit production. A survey of farmer’s fields where cucurbit crops were grown was carried out to assess the incidence and severity of virus symptoms and viruses associated with the crops and weeds in selected locations in Ogun and Osun, in southwest Nigeria, in June, 2012. In all, 38 leaf samples were collected in Ogun state and 52 in Osun state from cucurbit crops and weeds. Leaf samples were tested against  Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV, Melon necrotic spot virus (MNSV, Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV, Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV,Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV and Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV using Double Antibody Sandwich (DAS enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. All the fields surveyed had virus symptom incidences of 100% except for melon fields in Osun state with incidences of between 10 and 30%. In Ogun state, the occurrence of CMV was 5/31 (16.1% while MNSV was detected in Lagenaria siceraria and T. occidentalis and it occurred in 6.5% of the leaf samples. In Osun state, CMV was detected in watermelon, melon and weeds found in all locations surveyed. The occurrence of CMV was 9/38 (23.7% in the cucurbit crops and in 78.6% (11/14 of the weeds. PRSV and WMV also occurred in mixed infection with CMV in 7.1% respectively. CMV was the most widespread and prevalent virus infecting cucurbit crops and weeds.Cucurbits are economic crops in Nigeria which serve as additional nutritional supplements and also good sources of income for farmers. Viral diseases are a worldwide problem of cucurbits and a major limiting factor for cucurbit production. A survey of farmer’s fields where cucurbit crops were grown was carried out to assess the incidence and severity of virus symptoms and viruses associated with the crops

  17. BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF WEEDS BY MEANS OF PLANT PATHOGENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Ravlić

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Biological control is the use of live beneficial organisms and products of their metabolism in the pests control. Plant pathogens can be used for weed control in three different ways: as classical, conservation and augmentative (inoculative and inundated biological control. Inundated biological control involves the use of bioherbicides (mycoherbicides or artificial breeding of pathogens and application in specific stages of crops and weeds. Biological control of weeds can be used where chemical herbicides are not allowed, if resistant weed species are present or in the integrated pest management against weeds with reduced herbicides doses and other non-chemical measures, but it has certain limitations and disadvantages.

  18. Assessment of weed species composition and species diversity in some fruit orchards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patience Olorunmaiye

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fruits are often perennial crops and therefore can be invaded by weeds at many different times of the year because of their varied life-cycle. Thus a weed survey was conducted in some fruit orchards containing guava/soursop, mango, irvingia and plantain/banana at the National Horticultural Research Institute (NIHORT Ibadan in 2009 cropping season to determine weed species composition and species diversity. Weeds were sampled from each fruit orchard with a 0.5m × 0.5m wooden quadrat, identified to species level, counted and recorded. Data collected were used to calculate relative frequency, relative density and importance relative value for each species. Result shows that 45 weed species were encountered in all the fruit orchards and mango orchard had the highest species diversity (33 species while the least was recorded in guava/soursop orchard (10 species. All these 10 species had their relative frequencies > 5% out of which Ageratum conyzoides > Panicum maximum > Cyperus esculentus > Chromolaena odorata > Commelina erecta are of ecological importance. Three weed species: Ageratum conyzoides, Centrosema pubescens and Panicum maximum associated with all the fruit orchards in all the locations and T. procumbens was the most abundant and most dominant species in guava/soursop, irvingia and plantain/banana orchards while Echinocloa phyllopogon followed the same trend in mango orchard. These weeds are low-growing plants and regular weeding before seed formation will help to reduce their abundance in these orchards so that they do not interfere with harvesting of these fruits.

  19. Weed risk assessment for aquatic plants: modification of a New Zealand system for the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Doria R; Gantz, Crysta A; Jerde, Christopher L; Chadderton, W Lindsay; Keller, Reuben P; Champion, Paul D

    2012-01-01

    We tested the accuracy of an invasive aquatic plant risk assessment system in the United States that we modified from a system originally developed by New Zealand's Biosecurity Program. The US system is comprised of 38 questions that address biological, historical, and environmental tolerance traits. Values associated with each response are summed to produce a total score for each species that indicates its risk of invasion. To calibrate and test this risk assessment, we identified 39 aquatic plant species that are major invaders in the continental US, 31 species that have naturalized but have no documented impacts (minor invaders), and 60 that have been introduced but have not established. These species represent 55 families and span all aquatic plant growth forms. We found sufficient information to assess all but three of these species. When the results are compared to the known invasiveness of the species, major invaders are distinguished from minor and non-invaders with 91% accuracy. Using this approach, the US aquatic weed risk assessment correctly identifies major invaders 85%, and non-invaders 98%, of the time. Model validation using an additional 10 non-invaders and 10 invaders resulted in 100% accuracy for the former, and 80% accuracy for the latter group. Accuracy was further improved to an average of 91% for all groups when the 17% of species with scores of 31-39 required further evaluation prior to risk classification. The high accuracy with which we can distinguish non-invaders from harmful invaders suggests that this tool provides a feasible, pro-active system for pre-import screening of aquatic plants in the US, and may have additional utility for prioritizing management efforts of established species.

  20. Weed risk assessment for aquatic plants: modification of a New Zealand system for the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doria R Gordon

    Full Text Available We tested the accuracy of an invasive aquatic plant risk assessment system in the United States that we modified from a system originally developed by New Zealand's Biosecurity Program. The US system is comprised of 38 questions that address biological, historical, and environmental tolerance traits. Values associated with each response are summed to produce a total score for each species that indicates its risk of invasion. To calibrate and test this risk assessment, we identified 39 aquatic plant species that are major invaders in the continental US, 31 species that have naturalized but have no documented impacts (minor invaders, and 60 that have been introduced but have not established. These species represent 55 families and span all aquatic plant growth forms. We found sufficient information to assess all but three of these species. When the results are compared to the known invasiveness of the species, major invaders are distinguished from minor and non-invaders with 91% accuracy. Using this approach, the US aquatic weed risk assessment correctly identifies major invaders 85%, and non-invaders 98%, of the time. Model validation using an additional 10 non-invaders and 10 invaders resulted in 100% accuracy for the former, and 80% accuracy for the latter group. Accuracy was further improved to an average of 91% for all groups when the 17% of species with scores of 31-39 required further evaluation prior to risk classification. The high accuracy with which we can distinguish non-invaders from harmful invaders suggests that this tool provides a feasible, pro-active system for pre-import screening of aquatic plants in the US, and may have additional utility for prioritizing management efforts of established species.

  1. The future for weed control and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner, Dale L; Beckie, Hugh J

    2014-09-01

    This review is both a retrospective (what have we missed?) and prospective (where are we going?) examination of weed control and technology, particularly as it applies to herbicide-resistant weed management (RWM). Major obstacles to RWM are discussed, including lack of diversity in weed management, unwillingness of many weed researchers to conduct real integrated weed management research or growers to accept recommendations, influence or role of agrichemical marketing and governmental policy and lack of multidisciplinary research. We then look ahead to new technologies that are needed for future weed control in general and RWM in particular, in areas such as non-chemical and chemical weed management, novel herbicides, site-specific weed management, drones for monitoring large areas, wider application of 'omics' and simulation model development. Finally, we discuss implementation strategies for integrated weed management to achieve RWM, development of RWM for developing countries, a new classification of herbicides based on mode of metabolism to facilitate greater stewardship and greater global exchange of information to focus efforts on areas that maximize progress in weed control and RWM. There is little doubt that new or emerging technologies will provide novel tools for RMW in the future, but will they arrive in time?

  2. Assessing the invasive potential of biofuel species proposed for Florida and the United States using the Australian Weed Risk Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, D.R. [The Nature Conservancy, PO Box 118526, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Department of Biology, PO Box 118526, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Tancig, K.J. [PO Box 116455, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Onderdonk, D.A.; Gantz, C.A. [Department of Biology, PO Box 118526, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    Twelve taxa under exploration as bioenergy crops in Florida and the U.S. were evaluated for potential invasiveness using the Australian Weed Risk Assessment system (WRA) modified for separate assessment at the state and national scales. When tested across a range of geographies, this system correctly identifies invaders 90%, and non-invaders 70% of the time, on average. Predictions for Florida were the same as for the U.S. Arundo donax, Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Eucalyptus grandis, Jatropha curcas, Leucaena leucocephala, Pennisetum purpureum, and Ricinus communis were found to have a high probability of becoming invasive, while Miscanthus x giganteus, Saccharum arundinaceum, Saccharum officinarum, and the sweet variety of Sorghum bicolor have a low probability of becoming invasive. Eucalyptus amplifolia requires further evaluation before a prediction is possible. These results are consistent with reports on other tests of these taxa. Given the economic and ecological impacts of invasive species, including the carbon expended for mechanical and chemical control efforts, cultivation of taxa likely to become invasive should be avoided. (author)

  3. Flowers & Weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the topics and teaching strategies employed in an Issues in Biology course. Discusses flowers, plant breeding, potatoes and tomatoes, the chocolate tree, weeds, Arabidopis, gene transfers, and plant genes/human genes. Contains 22 references. (JRH)

  4. Weeding Your Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerby, Ramona

    2002-01-01

    Offers guidelines for weeding as part of school library collection development. Highlights include developing a weeding policy; and the CREW (Continuous Review Evaluation and Weeding) method, including reasons for weeding, scheduling, and guidelines for fiction and for nonfiction. (LRW)

  5. Assessing environmental risks for established invasive weeds: Dalmatian (Linaria dalmatica) and yellow (L. vulgaris) toadflax in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sing, Sharlene E; Peterson, Robert K D

    2011-07-01

    Environmental risk assessments characterizing potential environmental impacts of exotic weeds are more abundant and comprehensive for potential or new invaders than for widespread and well-established species such as Dalmatian (Linaria dalmatica [L.] Mill.) and yellow (L. vulgaris Mill.) toadflax. Specific effects evaluated in our assessment of environmental risks posed by yellow and Dalmatian toadflax included competitive displacement of other plant species, reservoirs of plant disease, animal and insect use, animal toxicity, human toxicity and allergenicity, erosion, and wildfire. Effect and exposure uncertainties for potential impacts of toadflax on human and ecological receptors were rated. Using publicly available information we were able to characterize ecological and human health impacts associated with toadflax, and to identify specific data gaps contributing to a high uncertainty of risk. Evidence supporting perceived negative environmental impacts of invasive toadflax was scarce.

  6. Green Weeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penniman, Sarah; McColl, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Gone are the days of tiptoeing to the dumpsters with boxes of weeded books in tow. Lots of libraries are now taking advantage of the many low-cost services and solutions that promise to help extend the lives of collection discards. Some of these options can be very profitable. Some create goodwill within the local community. Some may seem more…

  7. Robotic weeding and automated weed measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, S.; Søgaard, H.T.; Jørgensen, R.N.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of decreasing herbicide usage has so far focused on reducing the herbicide dosage or replacing chemical weed control by hoeing and harrowing. The conventional weed control strategy is to apply the same dose of herbicide or the same intensity of hoeing and harrowing in the whole field. Th...... the state-of-the-art of automated weed measurement methods and the research projects concerning autonomous platform and information system for crop and weed monitoring and robotic weeding....

  8. Assessing insecticide hazard to bumble bees foraging on flowering weeds in treated lawns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Jonathan L; Redmond, Carl T; Potter, Daniel A

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining bee-friendly habitats in cities and suburbs can help conserve the vital pollination services of declining bee populations. Despite label precautions not to apply them to blooming plants, neonicotinoids and other residual systemic insecticides may be applied for preventive control of lawn insect pests when spring-flowering weeds are present. Dietary exposure to neonicotinoids adversely affects bees, but the extent of hazard from field usage is controversial. We exposed colonies of the bumble bee Bombus impatiens to turf with blooming white clover that had been treated with clothianidin, a neonicotinoid, or with chlorantraniliprole, the first anthranilic diamide labeled for use on lawns. The sprays were applied at label rate and lightly irrigated. After residues had dried, colonies were confined to forage for six days, and then moved to a non-treated rural site to openly forage and develop. Colonies exposed to clothianidin-treated weedy turf had delayed weight gain and produced no new queens whereas those exposed to chlorantraniliprole-treated plots developed normally compared with controls. Neither bumble bees nor honey bees avoided foraging on treated white clover in open plots. Nectar from clover blooms directly contaminated by spray residues contained 171±44 ppb clothianidin. Notably, neither insecticide adversely impacted bee colonies confined on the treated turf after it had been mown to remove clover blooms present at the time of treatment, and new blooms had formed. Our results validate EPA label precautionary statements not to apply neonicotinoids to blooming nectar-producing plants if bees may visit the treatment area. Whatever systemic hazard through lawn weeds they may pose appears transitory, however, and direct hazard can be mitigated by adhering to label precautions, or if blooms inadvertently are contaminated, by mowing to remove them. Chlorantraniliprole usage on lawns appears non-hazardous to bumble bees.

  9. Pre-harvest assessment of perennial weeds in cereals based on images from unmanned aerial systems (UAS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egilsson, Jon; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Olsen, Søren Ingvor

    2015-01-01

    Unmanned aerial systems (UAS) are able to deliver images of agricultural fields of high spatial and temporal resolution. It is, however, not trivial to extract quantitative information about weed infestations from images. This study contributes to weed research by using state-of-the-art computer...

  10. Pre-harvest assessment of perennial weeds in cereals based on images from unmanned aerial systems (UAS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egilsson, Jon; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Olsen, Søren Ingvor;

    2015-01-01

    Unmanned aerial systems (UAS) are able to deliver images of agricultural fields of high spatial and temporal resolution. It is, however, not trivial to extract quantitative information about weed infestations from images. This study contributes to weed research by using state-of-the-art computer ...

  11. Weed seed germination in winter cereals under contrasting tillage systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scherner, Ananda

    2015-01-01

    to accumulate in the top soil layer and timing of herbicide applications sometimes seems to target the emergence pattern of these weeds poorly. In contrast to the management of most diseases and pests, weed management should be considered in a time frame. The abilities to produce above and below ground...... improving the targeting of direct control tactics, whatever they are chemical and non-chemical. This should ensure non-excessive use of herbicides and thus follow the principles of IPM. More specifically, focus should be on the soil layers from which the weed seeds predominantly emerge, their rate...

  12. Dominant species of dicot-weeds and weed biodiversity in spring barley in Latvia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanaga, I; Mintale, Z; Smirnova, O

    2010-01-01

    The composition of weed species in spring barley and weed biodiversity was evaluated in experiments in different growing seasons and with different previous crops. The aim of the experiments was to evaluate the composition of weed species in spring barley during a four year period in weather conditions of different growing seasons and with different previous crop as well as to assess the biodiversity in the experiments where the different groups of herbicides were applied. Over years and previous crops, the dicotyledonous weed community was dominated by Chenopodium album, followed by Viola arvensis. The herbicides from different groups had significant influences on the biodiversity of weeds.

  13. Ambient insect pressure and recipient genotypes determine fecundity of transgenic crop-weed rice hybrid progeny: Implications for environmental biosafety assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hui; Zhang, Hongbin; Wang, Wei; Yang, Xiao; Wang, Feng; Su, Jun; Xia, Hanbing; Xu, Kai; Cai, Xingxing; Lu, Bao-Rong

    2016-08-01

    Transgene introgression into crop weedy/wild relatives can provide natural selective advantages, probably causing undesirable environmental impact. The advantages are likely associated with factors such as transgenes, selective pressure, and genetic background of transgene recipients. To explore the role of the environment and background of transgene recipients in affecting the advantages, we estimated the fitness of crop-weed hybrid lineages derived from crosses between marker-free insect-resistant transgenic (Bt/CpTI) rice with five weedy rice populations under varied insect pressure. Multiway anova indicated the significant effect of both transgenes and weedy rice genotypes on the performance of crop-weed hybrid lineages in the high-insect environment. Increased fecundity was detected in most transgene-present F1 and F2 hybrid lineages under high-insect pressure, but varied among crop-weed hybrid lineages with different weedy rice parents. Increased fecundity of transgenic crop-weed hybrid lineages was associated with the environmental insect pressure and genotypes of their weedy rice parents. The findings suggest that the fitness effects of an insect-resistant transgene introgressed into weedy populations are not uniform across different environments and genotypes of the recipient plants that have acquired the transgene. Therefore, these factors should be considered when assessing the environmental impact of transgene flow to weedy or wild rice relatives.

  14. Organic Weed Control in White Lupin (Lupinus albus L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legumes such as white lupin (Lupinus albus L.) provide a valuable nitrogen source in organic agriculture. With organic farming becoming an increasing sector of US agriculture and white lupin interest increasing in the southeastern USA because winter hardy cultivars are available, non-chemical weed c...

  15. Weed Interference Affects Dry Bean Yield and Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein GHAMARI

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Dry bean is one of the most important pulse crops in Iran. Field study was conducted in 2011 to evaluate effects of weed competition from a natural flora on growth and yield of dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.. The treatments consisted of weed infestation and weed removal periods (10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 days after crop emergence. Control plots kept weed-infested and weed-free throughout growing season. To assess the weed competition effect on crop characteristics, Richards, Gompertz and logistic equations were fitted to the data. The most abundant weed species were Chenopodium album and Amaranthus retroflexus. Increase in duration of weed interference decreased the stem height of dry bean. At the end of the growing season, dry bean was 20 cm taller in season-long weed-free treatment compared to the season-long weed-infested treatment. As the number of days of weed interference increased, a declining trend of LAI and number of pods was observed. The minimum number of pods was obtained in season-long weed-infested treatment (5.01 pods/plant. Weed interference during the whole growing season, caused a 60% reduction in yield. Considering 5% and 10% acceptable yield lost, the critical period of weed competition was determined from 20 to 68 and 23 to 55 days after planting (DAE, respectively.

  16. An Ultrasonic System for Weed Detection in Cereal Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dionisio Andújar

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Site-specific weed management requires sensing of the actual weed infestation levels in agricultural fields to adapt the management accordingly. However, sophisticated sensor systems are not yet in wider practical use, since they are not easily available for the farmers and their handling as well as the management practice requires additional efforts. A new sensor-based weed detection method is presented in this paper and its applicability to cereal crops is evaluated. An ultrasonic distance sensor for the determination of plant heights was used for weed detection. It was hypothesised that the weed infested zones have a higher amount of biomass than non-infested areas and that this can be determined by plant height measurements. Ultrasonic distance measurements were taken in a winter wheat field infested by grass weeds and broad-leaved weeds. A total of 80 and 40 circular-shaped samples of different weed densities and compositions were assessed at two different dates. The sensor was pointed directly to the ground for height determination. In the following, weeds were counted and then removed from the sample locations. Grass weeds and broad-leaved weeds were separately removed. Differences between weed infested and weed-free measurements were determined. Dry-matter of weeds and crop was assessed and evaluated together with the sensor measurements. RGB images were taken prior and after weed removal to determine the coverage percentages of weeds and crop per sampling point. Image processing steps included EGI (excess green index computation and thresholding to separate plants and background. The relationship between ultrasonic readings and the corresponding coverage of the crop and weeds were assessed using multiple regression analysis. Results revealed a height difference between infested and non-infested sample locations. Density and biomass of weeds present in the sample influenced the ultrasonic readings. The possibilities of weed group

  17. An ultrasonic system for weed detection in cereal crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andújar, Dionisio; Weis, Martin; Gerhards, Roland

    2012-12-13

    Site-specific weed management requires sensing of the actual weed infestation levels in agricultural fields to adapt the management accordingly. However, sophisticated sensor systems are not yet in wider practical use, since they are not easily available for the farmers and their handling as well as the management practice requires additional efforts. A new sensor-based weed detection method is presented in this paper and its applicability to cereal crops is evaluated. An ultrasonic distance sensor for the determination of plant heights was used for weed detection. It was hypothesised that the weed infested zones have a higher amount of biomass than non-infested areas and that this can be determined by plant height measurements. Ultrasonic distance measurements were taken in a winter wheat field infested by grass weeds and broad-leaved weeds. A total of 80 and 40 circular-shaped samples of different weed densities and compositions were assessed at two different dates. The sensor was pointed directly to the ground for height determination. In the following, weeds were counted and then removed from the sample locations. Grass weeds and broad-leaved weeds were separately removed. Differences between weed infested and weed-free measurements were determined. Dry-matter of weeds and crop was assessed and evaluated together with the sensor measurements. RGB images were taken prior and after weed removal to determine the coverage percentages of weeds and crop per sampling point. Image processing steps included EGI (excess green index) computation and thresholding to separate plants and background. The relationship between ultrasonic readings and the corresponding coverage of the crop and weeds were assessed using multiple regression analysis. Results revealed a height difference between infested and non-infested sample locations. Density and biomass of weeds present in the sample influenced the ultrasonic readings. The possibilities of weed group discrimination were

  18. Ecologically sustainable weed management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebman, Matt; Baraibar, Bàrbara; Buckley, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    will be effective in various locations. Implementing new approaches for weed management will require multidisciplinary teams comprised of scientists, engineers, economists, sociologists, educators, farmers, land managers, industry personnel, policy makers, and others willing to focus on weeds within whole farming......Weed management is a critically important activity on both agricultural and non-agricultural lands, but it is faced with a daunting set of challenges: environmental damage caused by control practices, weed resistance to herbicides, accelerated rates of weed dispersal through global trade......, and greater weed impacts due to changes in climate and land use. Broad-scale use of new approaches is needed if weed management is to be successful in the coming era. We examine three approaches likely to prove useful for addressing current and future challenges from weeds: diversifying weed management...

  19. Crop–weed competition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallandt, Eric R.; Weiner, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Competition from weeds is the most important of all biological factors that reduce agricultural crop yield. This occurs primarily because weeds use resources that would otherwise be available to the crop. The magnitude of yield loss is affected by numerous agronomic and environmental factors, most...... importantly, weed density and time of emergence relative to the crop. Practices that (1) reduce the density of weeds, (2) maximise occupation of space or uptake of resources by the crop or (3) establish an early-season size advantage of the crop over the weeds will minimise the competitive effects of weeds...... on crops. Longer term management of crop–weed competition can be achieved through crop rotations, specifically crop sequences that reduce the weed seed bank, and therefore seedling density, and prevent proliferation of perennial weeds. Key ConceptsKey Concepts * Plant growth requires sunlight, water...

  20. Evaluation of an autonomous GPS-based system for intra-row weed control by assessing the tilled area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørremark, Michael; Griepentrog, Hans W.; Nielsen, Jon;

    2012-01-01

    -1 and at even plant spacing. A double pass, once on each side of the row in opposite directions, provided higher soil disturbance intensity and resulted in tillage of 31–58% of the intra-row area with highest coverage at a speed of 0.32 m s-1. The intra-row weed control effect was predicted to be up...

  1. Horny Goat Weed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... weed in a commercial product used for sexual enhancement. Research also shows that a specific multi-ingredient commercial product (Enzyte, Berkeley Premium Nutraceuticals) that contains horny goat weed might cause abnormal heart beats when measured by an electrocardiogram. These ...

  2. Eradication of Major Weeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indian Journal of Adult Education, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Strategies for weed control in cropped and non-cropped areas are presented together with an operational plan for implementing a program for weed control at the national level. The program includes training personnel and community education procedures. (EC)

  3. Weed Interference Effects on Leaves, Internode and Harvest Index of Dry Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein GHAMARI

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of appropriate weed management strategies and efficient use of herbicides relies upon understanding weed-crop interactions. A field study was carried out to assess the effect of weed interference on leaves, internode and harvest index of dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.. The experiment was established under a randomized complete block design with two types of weed interference treatments: plots with weeds and plots without weeds at different time intervals (0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 days after crop emergence. The sigmoid Boltzmann model was used to quantify the crop traits as influenced by weed interference. Prolonged delays in weed removal reduced gradually the number of leaves of the crop. Weed interference decreased dry weight of leaves as well, so that the lowest value of it (33.49 g plant-1 was observed in full season during weed-infested treatment. Infestation of weeds affected the length of the crop internodes. While the weed interference duration increased, the length of the internodes decreased. Harvest index was also sensitive to weed competition. As the crop was kept weed-infested from the emergence for increasing periods of time, harvest index decreased to a value of 28.01%. A significant negative correlation between total biomass of weeds and dry bean traits (number of leaves, leaves dry weight, internode length and harvest index was observed. Therefore, weeds are able to adversely affect dry bean growth through constraining environmental resources and impairing leaves as the photosynthetic areas.

  4. Introduction to Weeds and Herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Nathan L.

    This agriculture extension service publication from Pennsylvania State University is an introduction to weed control and herbicide use. An initial discussion of the characteristics of weeds includes scientific naming, weed competition with crops, weed dispersal and dormancy, and conditions affecting weed seed germination. The main body of the…

  5. Changes in weed infestation of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. under conditions of strip intercropping and different weed control methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Głowacka

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted in the years 2004-2006 in a private farm in the village of Frankamionka in Zamość district. There were two experimental factors: I. Cultivation methods - sole cropping and strip intercropping; and II. Tending methods - mechanical, mechanical-chemical, and chemical weed control. The subject of the study was weed infestation of the Mela variety of common bean. Beans were sown between 30 April and 5 May. Weed infestation was assessed in the last week before harvesting by determining its floristic composition and the frequency of occurrence of particular weed species, as well as the air-dry weight of weeds. The dominant weed species were Galinsoga parviflora, Echinochloa crus-galli, Chenopodium album, and Amaranthus retroflexus, which comprised 84.7% of the total number of weeds. Strip intercropping markedly reduced the number of weeds per unit area (by 50%, as well as the dry weight of their aerial parts. The most effective method of weed control was the mechanical-chemical method, which resulted in the lowest occurrence of weeds. It also significantly reduced the weight of weeds.

  6. Flavonoids from leaves of Derris urucu: assessment of potential effects on seed germination and development of weeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EWERTON A.S. DA SILVA

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In some previous studies, we described the isolation of nine compounds from leaves of Derris urucu, a species found widely in the Amazon rainforest, identified as five stilbenes and four dihydroflavonols. In this work, three of these dihydroflavonols [urucuol A (1, urucuol B (2 and isotirumalin (3] were evaluated to identify their potential as allelochemicals, and we are also reporting the isolation and structural determination of a new flavonoid [5,3′-dihydroxy-4′-methoxy-(7,6:5″,6″-2″,2″-dimethylpyranoflavanone (4]. We investigated the effects of the dihydroflavonols 1-3 on seed germination and radicle and hypocotyl growth of the weed Mimosa pudica, using solutions at 150 mg.L–1. Urucuol B, alone, was the substance with the greatest potential to inhibit seed germination (26%, while isotirumalin showed greater ability to reduce the development of the hypocotyl (25%, but none of the three substances showed the potential to inhibit radicle. When combined in pairs, the substances showed synergism for the development of root and hypocotyl and effects on seed germination that could be attributed to antagonism. When tested separately, the trend has become more intense effects on seed germination, while for the substances tested in pairs, the intensity of the effect was greater on development of weed.

  7. Epigenome: A Biomarker or Screening Tool to Evaluate Health Impact of Cumulative Exposure to Chemical and Non-Chemical Stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olden, Kenneth; Lin, Yu-Sheng; Bussard, David

    2016-06-01

    Current risk assessment practices and toxicity information are hard to utilize for assessing the health impact of combined or cumulative exposure to multiple chemical and non-chemical stressors encountered in the "real world" environment. Non-chemical stressors such as heat, radiation, noise, humidity, bacterial and viral agents, and social factors, like stress related to violence and socioeconomic position generally cannot be currently incorporated into the risk assessment paradigm. The Science and Decisions report released by the National Research Council (NRC) in 2009 emphasized the need to characterize the effects of multiple stressors, both chemical and non-chemical exposures. One impediment to developing information relating such non-chemical stressors to health effects and incorporating them into cumulative assessment has been the lack of analytical tools to easily and quantitatively monitor the cumulative exposure to combined effects of stressors over the life course.

  8. Weed suppression and weed tolerance of wheat cultivars - relevant traits for Integrated Pest Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verschwele, Arnd

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available An assortment of 10 winter wheat cultivars was tested for specific effects on weed suppression. Furthermore cultivar specific effects of weed infestation and weed control measures on the crop yield were investigated. Two trial series conducted from 2005 to 2010 demonstrated a wide cultivar specific range of shading capacity and weed suppression. Light penetration and the dry matter of the model weed Sinapis alba were highly correlated (r = 0.87 in trial series A (2005-2007. Consequently, the weed dry matter in the less competitive cultivar Dekan was 5 times higher compared to the weak competitor Cubus. Mechanical weed control by harrowing reduced ears density of all cultivars tested in trial series A. These reductions were significantly higher in the cultivars Bussard and Pegassos compared to the other cultivars. Since the weed infestation was low and negative crop effects by harrowing could be compensated by a higher number of kernels/ear, the yield effects were the same for all cultivars. Contrary to the hypothesis, a cultivar specific yield response by harrowing could not be assessed. Higher competition effects by sowing the model weed Sinapis alba could be realised in trial series B (2008-20120. Consequently, the control measures (a harrowing (b 50% herbicide (c 100% herbicide resulted in significantly higher crop yields ranging from 1.23 t*ha-1 (harrowing to 2.08 t*ha-1 (100% herbicide. The yield reduction caused by the model weed was not the same for all cultivars and was lower for the cultivars Cubus and Limes (6% and 7% compared to Boomer (15%. Thus, weed tolerance could be identified as a cultivar specific trait. There were significant interactions between cultivar and weed control measures: The yield increase (relative to model weed was 5% for Bussard, which was much lower compared to the treatment effects on the cultivar Impression (11%. The hypothesis that yield effects by mechanical and chemical weed control may be affected by the

  9. Ecological Intensification Through Pesticide Reduction: Weed Control, Weed Biodiversity and Sustainability in Arable Farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Sandrine; Munier-Jolain, Nicolas; Bretagnolle, Vincent; Bockstaller, Christian; Gaba, Sabrina; Cordeau, Stéphane; Lechenet, Martin; Mézière, Delphine; Colbach, Nathalie

    2015-11-01

    Amongst the biodiversity components of agriculture, weeds are an interesting model for exploring management options relying on the principle of ecological intensification in arable farming. Weeds can cause severe crop yield losses, contribute to farmland functional biodiversity and are strongly associated with the generic issue of pesticide use. In this paper, we address the impacts of herbicide reduction following a causal framework starting with herbicide reduction and triggering changes in (i) the management options required to control weeds, (ii) the weed communities and functions they provide and (iii) the overall performance and sustainability of the implemented land management options. The three components of this framework were analysed in a multidisciplinary project that was conducted on 55 experimental and farmer's fields that included conventional, integrated and organic cropping systems. Our results indicate that the reduction of herbicide use is not antagonistic with crop production, provided that alternative practices are put into place. Herbicide reduction and associated land management modified the composition of in-field weed communities and thus the functions of weeds related to biodiversity and production. Through a long-term simulation of weed communities based on alternative (?) cropping systems, some specific management pathways were identified that delivered high biodiversity gains and limited the negative impacts of weeds on crop production. Finally, the multi-criteria assessment of the environmental, economic and societal sustainability of the 55 systems suggests that integrated weed management systems fared better than their conventional and organic counterparts. These outcomes suggest that sustainable management could possibly be achieved through changes in weed management, along a pathway starting with herbicide reduction.

  10. Site Specific Weed Control Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Svend; Søgaard, Henning Tangen; Kudsk, Per;

    2009-01-01

    describe the basic parts of site specific weed control technologies, comprising of weed sensing systems, weed management models and precision weed control implements. A review of state-of-the-art technologies shows that several weed sensing systems and precision implements have been developed over the last...... of knowledge about the economic and environmental potential for increasing the resolution of weed control. The integration of site-specific information on weed distribution, weed species composition and density, and the effect on crop yield, is decisive for successful site-specific weed management.   Keywords......Site-specific weed control technologies are defined as machinery or equipment embedded with technologies that detect weeds growing in a crop and, taking into account predefined factors such as economics, takes action to maximise the chances of successfully controlling them. In the article, we...

  11. RoboWeedSupport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyrmann, Mads; Nyholm Jørgensen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    Information about the weed population in fields is important for determining the optimal herbicides for the fields. A system based on images is presented that can provide support in determining the species and density of the weeds. Firstly, plants are segmented from the soil. Plants that after th...

  12. Weeding Library Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slote, Stanley J.

    This work, based on two recent research projects in the weeding of library collections and the identification of core collections, provides a comprehensive summary of the literature and research on these topics. It also presents practical guidance in weeding for the professional librarian or for the library school student. The book is divided into…

  13. A weed suppressive index for spring barley (Hordeum vulgare) varieties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P K; Kristensen, K; Willas, J

    2008-01-01

    A screening programme for crop variety competitiveness would ideally be based on only a few, non-destructive measurements of key growth traits. In this study we measured the weed suppressive ability of 79 varieties of spring barley in two ways: (i) directly, by weed coverage assessments under wee...

  14. Exploring the effects of glyphosate products on weed composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koning, Laurie Anne

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Glyphosate is a non-selective, broad-spectrum, systematic herbicide that is the world’s most widely used herbicide since its introduction in the 1970s as a pre-plant, post-directed and post-harvest herbicide application with further technological developments leading to its use within glyphosate resistant crops (GRCs as of the 1990s. In countries around the world, weed shifts have accompanied weed management systems employing glyphosate products. The farmer actions and weed reactions that have contributed to these weed shifts will be discussed. Evidence of glyphosate-induced weed shifts has not yet been documented in Germany, but through consideration of the conditions that have lead to glyphosate-induced weed shifts elsewhere the outlook for Germany will be assessed. An ongoing research project will be introduced in which weed monitoring is being employed to find out if glyphosate-induced weed shifts can be identified in northeastern German arable farm fields and in which field experiments are also being conducted to further explore the reactions of weed communities and populations under the intensive application of glyphosate products.

  15. The Politics of Weeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillman, Hope N.

    1988-01-01

    Reviews the literature that deals with the political ramifications of weeding material from academic library collections and the need to involve users and other libraries within the institution in the decision process. (14 references) (CLB)

  16. Weeds and Wildlife: Perceptions and Practices of Weed Managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma H Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Negative impacts of invasive plants or weeds on biodiversity have been well established yet their role in providing key habitats and resources for wildlife has been little understood. Weed removal thus has the potential to adversely affect wildlife but whether this is considered during weed management is poorly known. To determine the extent of this knowledge, we examined the perceptions of weed managers regarding wildlife and weed management in Victoria, Australia. We surveyed 81 weed managers of varying levels of experience from different types of organisations, including state and local government, community groups and private companies. We found 90% of managers had observed wildlife-weed interactions and that most (70% adjusted management programmes to accommodate wildlife. Despite this, few (19% had adopted the recommended practice of combining gradual weed removal with re-vegetation. While management programmes included monitoring of native vegetation, consideration of wildlife monitoring in weed management was rare. This highlights the need for management to better understand and respond to wildlife-weed relationships. If the improvement of wildlife habitat is included in the objectives of weed programmes, as it should be, then wildlife should also be incorporated in project monitoring. This would lead to a greater understanding of the role weeds and their management have in each situation and, ultimately, more informed decision making.

  17. Grass and weed killer poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002838.htm Grass and weed killer poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Many weed killers contain dangerous chemicals that are harmful if ...

  18. Intercropping leeks to suppress weeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumann, D.T.; Kropff, M.J.; Bastiaans, L.

    2000-01-01

    Many field vegetables such as leek are weak competitors against weeds, causing high costs for weed management practice. Using celery as a companion cash crop was suggested to improve the weed suppression of leek. Three field experiments were carried out to study the intra- and interspecific competit

  19. Rolled-crimped winter rye cover effects on hand-weeding times and fruit yield and quality of cucurbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruit and vegetables produced without pesticides are in demand by some segments of society. However, weeds often are deleterious in such crops, and managing them without herbicides is difficult. Stale seedbeds and rolled-crimped winter rye cover crops are non-chemical methods that may help manage we...

  20. Biotechnology in weed control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biotechnology can be used to enhance the management of weeds in several ways. Crops have been made resistant to herbicides by inserting transgenes that impart herbicide resistance into the plant genome. Glyphosate and glufosinate-resistant crops are commercialized in North America and crops made res...

  1. Weed Research in Mint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeds present in peppermint and spearmint reduce mint oil yield and quality. Flumioxazin combinations with clomazone and pendimethalin applied to dormant peppermint controlled prickly lettuce and flixweed without significant injury to the crop. Low rates of flumioxazin and sulfentrazone applied imm...

  2. Controlling Landscape Weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, James Robert, Jr.

    This agriculture extension service publication from Pennsylvania State University discusses the control of common grass and broadleaf weeds through the use of mulches and herbicides. The section on mulches discusses the different types of mulching materials, their advantages and disadvantages, herbicide-mulch combinations, and lists source of…

  3. What Price Weeding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettelt, Harold J.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a study conducted at Columbia-Greene Community College's library to determine whether a book's previous non-use is indicative of future non-use; whether books are progressively less likely to be used with time; the circulation costs of weeding previously unused books; and the circulation rates of old and new books. (DMM)

  4. Weed Identification and Control in Vegetable Crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, Peter A., Comp.

    This agriculture extension service publication from Pennsylvania State University examines weed control and identification in vegetable crops. Contents include: (1) Types of weeds; (2) Reducing losses caused by weeds, general control methods and home garden weed control; (3) How herbicides are used; (4) Specific weeds in vegetable plantings; and…

  5. Quantifying temporal isolation: a modelling approach assessing the effect of flowering time differences on crop-to-weed pollen flow in sunflower.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roumet, Marie; Cayre, Adeline; Latreille, Muriel; Muller, Marie-Hélène

    2015-01-01

    Flowering time divergence can be a crucial component of reproductive isolation between sympatric populations, but few studies have quantified its actual contribution to the reduction of gene flow. In this study, we aimed at estimating pollen-mediated gene flow between cultivated sunflower and a weedy conspecific sunflower population growing in the same field and at quantifying, how it is affected by the weeds' flowering time. For that purpose, we extended an existing mating model by including a temporal distance (i.e. flowering time difference between potential parents) effect on mating probabilities. Using phenological and genotypic data gathered on the crop and on a sample of the weedy population and its offspring, we estimated an average hybridization rate of approximately 10%. This rate varied strongly from 30% on average for weeds flowering at the crop flowering peak to 0% when the crop finished flowering and was affected by the local density of weeds. Our result also suggested the occurrence of other factors limiting crop-to-weed gene flow. This level of gene flow and its dependence on flowering time might influence the evolutionary fate of weedy sunflower populations sympatric to their crop relative.

  6. INTEGRATED WEED CONTROL IN MAIZE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latré, J; Dewitte, K; Derycke, V; De Roo, B; Haesaert, G

    2015-01-01

    Integrated pest management has been implemented as a general practice by EU legislation. As weed control actually is the most important crop protection measure in maize for Western Europe, the new legislation will have its impact. The question is of course which systems can be successfully implemented in practice with respect to labour efficiency and economical parameters. During 3 successive growing seasons (2007, 2008, 2009) weed control in maize was evaluated, the main focus was put on different techniques of integrated weed control and was compared with chemical weed control. Additionally, during 4 successive growing seasons (2011, 2012, 2013 and 2014) two objects based on integrated weed control and two objects based on mechanical weed control were compared to about twenty different objects of conventional chemical weed control. One of the objects based on mechanical weed control consisted of treatment with the flex-tine harrow before and after emergence in combination with chemical weed control at a reduced rate in 3-4 leave stage. The second one consisted of broadcast mechanical treatments before and after emergence followed by a final in-row application of herbicides and an inter-row cultivation at 6-7(8) leave stage. All trials were conducted on the Experimental farm of Bottelare HoGent-UGent on a sandy loam soil. Maize was growing in 1/3 crop rotation. The effect on weed growth as well as the economic impact of the different applications was evaluated. Combining chemical and mechanical weed control is a possible option in conventional farming but the disadvantages must be taken into account. A better planned weed control based on the real present weed-population in combination with a carefully thought-out choice of herbicides should also be considered as an IPM--approach.

  7. Combined impact of lead, cadmium, polychlorinated biphenyls and non-chemical risk factors on blood pressure in NHANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Junenette L., E-mail: petersj@bu.edu; Patricia Fabian, M., E-mail: pfabian@bu.edu; Levy, Jonathan I., E-mail: jonlevy@bu.edu

    2014-07-15

    High blood pressure is associated with exposure to multiple chemical and non-chemical risk factors, but epidemiological analyses to date have not assessed the combined effects of both chemical and non-chemical stressors on human populations in the context of cumulative risk assessment. We developed a novel modeling approach to evaluate the combined impact of lead, cadmium, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and multiple non-chemical risk factors on four blood pressure measures using data for adults aged ≥20 years from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1999–2008). We developed predictive models for chemical and other stressors. Structural equation models were applied to account for complex associations among predictors of stressors as well as blood pressure. Models showed that blood lead, serum PCBs, and established non-chemical stressors were significantly associated with blood pressure. Lead was the chemical stressor most predictive of diastolic blood pressure and mean arterial pressure, while PCBs had a greater influence on systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure, and blood cadmium was not a significant predictor of blood pressure. The simultaneously fit exposure models explained 34%, 43% and 52% of the variance for lead, cadmium and PCBs, respectively. The structural equation models were developed using predictors available from public data streams (e.g., U.S. Census), which would allow the models to be applied to any U.S. population exposed to these multiple stressors in order to identify high risk subpopulations, direct intervention strategies, and inform public policy. - Highlights: • We evaluated joint impact of chemical and non-chemical stressors on blood pressure. • We built predictive models for lead, cadmium and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). • Our approach allows joint evaluation of predictors from population-specific data. • Lead, PCBs and established non-chemical stressors were related to blood pressure.

  8. WeedML: a Tool for Collaborative Weed Demographic Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Holst, Niels

    2010-01-01

    WeedML is a proposed standard to formulate models of weed demography, or maybe even complex models in general, that are both transparent and straightforward to re-use as building blocks for new models. The paper describes the design and thoughts behind WeedML which relies on XML and object-oriented systems development. Proof-of-concept software is provided as open-source C++ code and executables that can be downloaded freely.

  9. Robotic weed monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bochtis, Dionysis; Sørensen, Claus Aage Grøn; Jørgensen, R N

    2011-01-01

    Abstract: In this paper, an integrated management system for the planning and activation of thefield monitoring task is presented. The architecture of the system is built around a mobile roboticunit. The internet based architecture of the system includes a station unit that works as a mobileon-fa...... of the weed monitoring operation.Key words: autonomous vehicles, farm management, mission planning, route planning,sampling....

  10. Weeding with transgenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Stephen O

    2003-05-01

    Transgenes promise to reduce insecticide and fungicide use but relatively little has been done to significantly reduce herbicide use through genetic engineering. Recently, three strategies for transgene utilization have been developed that have the potential to change this. These are the improvement of weed-specific biocontrol agents, enhancement of crop competition or allelopathic traits, and production of cover crops that will self-destruct near the time of planting. Failsafe risk mitigation technologies are needed for most of these strategies.

  11. Weeding Library Collections: Library Weeding Methods. Fourth Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slote, Stanly J.

    Weeding is one of the best ways to make long-term improvements to library collections, but it is also a difficult and sometimes painful task. In the tradition of previous editions, this book guides librarians in the process of methodical and efficient weeding. The book shows how to identify core collections versus the weedable items. The approach…

  12. Weed Identification Field Training Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdock, Edward C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reviews efforts undertaken in weed identification field training sessions for agriprofessionals in South Carolina. Data over a four year period (1980-1983) revealed that participants showed significant improvement in their ability to identify weeds. Reaffirms the value of the field demonstration technique. (ML)

  13. Control of aquatic weeds through pollutant reduction and weed utilization: a weed management approach in the lower Kafue River of Zambia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkala, Thomson; Mwase, Enala T.; Mwala, Mick

    The aquatic weed situation in the Kafue River in Zambia continues to be a major challenge to the sustainable utilization of the water resources of the river. The general methods for managing the weeds, especially the water hyacinth, include use of bio-agents, chemicals, mechanical and physical approaches. These have had very little impact. This paper reports on a project that is investigating weed management strategies which involve use of cleaner production (CP) approach and the utilization of the weed for economic purposes. In addition, the ecological implications of these methods are being assessed. Effluent assessments indicated that apart from nitrates and phosphates, other effluent parameters met the Environmental Council of Zambia standards. Results further show that all the 24 areas surveyed for CP have uncontrolled socio-economic activities which generate both point and non-point sources of pollution that enter the water bodies. To minimize pollution, efforts include devising policy and technical strategies with the involvement of the affected riparian community. Production of mushroom by the communities using the water hyacinth substrate has been demonstrated. Up to 2.1 kg of mushroom was harvested from a single flush over a period of 4-5 weeks. Vegetables grown on soils treated with water hyacinth manure performed better than those grown using commercial fertiliser. The economics of the production are however, yet to be confirmed. If weed usage is proven economically and ecologically viable, the riverine community is envisaged to play a big role in aquatic weed management. High numbers of invertebrates known to be sensitive to pollution have been recorded in the weed-infested Kafue River implying that the water is of “good” quality for these aquatic invertebrates. This observed quality of water may be due to water hyacinth playing a role by sieving pollutants from the river.

  14. 7 CFR 201.15 - Weed seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Weed seeds. 201.15 Section 201.15 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.15 Weed seeds. The percentage of weed seeds shall include seeds of plants considered weeds in the State into which the seed is offered for transportation...

  15. Applicator Training Manual for: Aquatic Weed Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, James W.

    The aquatic weeds discussed in this manual include algae, floating weeds, emersed weeds, and submerged weeds. Specific requirements for pesticide application are given for static water, limited flow, and moving water situations. Secondary effects of improper application rates and faulty application are described. Finally, techniques of limited…

  16. 7 CFR 201.50 - Weed seed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Weed seed. 201.50 Section 201.50 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Purity Analysis in the Administration of the Act § 201.50 Weed seed. Seeds (including bulblets or tubers) of plants shall be considered weed seeds when recognized as weed seeds by the law or rules...

  17. A new perspective with weed management

    Science.gov (United States)

    No-till cropping systems are increasing land productivity. Herbicides are a crucial tool for weed management in no-till, but weed resistance is decreasing control efficacy and increasing input costs. Producers are seeking a broader perspective with weed management. One approach is to disrupt weed...

  18. Weeding the School Library Media Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Library Media Quarterly, 1984

    1984-01-01

    This document prepared by Calgary Board of Education, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, discusses a systematic approach to strengthening the library media collection. A statement of principle, what to weed, specific guides to weeding (by Dewey Decimal classification and type of material), what not to weed, procedures, and weeding follow-up are…

  19. Controlling annual weeds in cereals by deploying crop rotation at the landscape scale: Avena sterilis as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Díaz, Lucía; van den Berg, Femke; van den Bosch, Frank; González-Andújar, José Luis

    2012-04-01

    Weed control through crop rotation has mainly been studied in a nonspatial context. However, weed seeds are often spread beyond the crop field by a variety of vectors. For weed control to be successful, weed management should thus be evaluated at the landscape level. In this paper we assess how seed dispersal affects the interactions between crop rotation and landscape heterogeneity schemes with regard to weed control. A spatially explicit landscape model was developed to study both short- and long-term weed population dynamics under different management scenarios. We allowed for both two- and three-crop species rotations and three levels of between-field weed seed dispersal. All rotation scenarios and seed dispersal fractions were analyzed for both completely homogeneous landscapes and heterogeneous landscapes in which more than one crop was present. The potential of implementing new weed control methods was also analyzed. The model results suggest that, like crop rotation at the field level, crop rotation implemented at the landscape level has great potential to control weeds, whereby both the number of crop species and the cropping sequence within the crop rotation have significant effects on both the short- and long-term weed population densities. In the absence of seed dispersal, weed populations became extinct when the fraction of each crop in the landscape was randomized. In general, weed seed densities increased in landscapes with increasing similarity in crop proportions, but in these landscapes the level of seed dispersal affected which three-crop species rotation sequence was most efficient at controlling the weed densities. We show that ignoring seed dispersal between fields might lead to the selection of suboptimal tactics and that homogeneous crop field patches that follow a specific crop rotation sequence might be the most sustainable method of weed control. Effective weed control through crop rotation thus requires coordination between farmers with

  20. Real-time weed detection, decision making and patch spraying in maize, sugarbeet, winter wheat and winter barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerhards, R; Christensen, Svend

    2003-01-01

    online weed detection using digital image analysis, computer-based decision making and global positioning systems (GPS)-controlled patch spraying. In a 4-year study, herbicide use with this map-based approach was reduced in winter cereals by 60% for herbicides against broad-leaved weeds and 90% for grass......Information on temporal and spatial variation in weed seedling populations within agricultural fields is very important for weed population assessment and management. Most of all, it allows a potential reduction in herbicide use, when post-emergence herbicides are only applied to field sections...... with weed infestation levels higher than the economic weed threshold; a review of such work is provided. This paper presents a system for site-specific weed control in sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris L.), maize (Zea mays L.), winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and winter barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), including...

  1. Effect of weed harrowing frequency on plants, beneficial arthropods and crop yield

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navntoft, Søren; Kristensen, Kristian; Johnsen, Ib

    2016-01-01

    * Weed harrowing is an alternative to herbicides but it may have negative effects on epigaeic arthropods. We assessed the effects of frequent (four) versus two harrowings during the growing season on the density and diversity of generalist arthropods and the weed flora. Collection by flooding was...

  2. Potential uses of gut weed Enteromorpha spp. as a feed for herbivorous fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anh, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Hien, Tran Thi Thanh; Hai, Tran Ngoc

    2013-01-01

    Three separate experiments were performed to assess the potential use of gut weeds Enteromorpha spp. as a food source for herbivorous fish. The fresh or dried gut weeds were used as a direct feed to replace commercial feed in an alternative approach for feeding spotted seat (Scatophagus argus), red tilapia (Oreochromis sp.), and giant gourami (Osphronemus goramy) juveniles for 60 days, 45 days, and 56 days, respectively. Four feeding regimes were applied to triplicate tanks and fish was fed daily either commercial feed or gut weed: (1) single commercial feed everyday as a control treatment, (2) single gut weed daily and 2 alternative feeding regimes where (3) 1 day commercial feed and 1 consecutive day gut weed or and (4) 2 consecutive days gut weed. The results indicated that survival of experimental fish was not affected by the feeding treatments. Growth performance of the S. argus fed single gut weed was not significantly different from the control group (P>0.05). Growth rates of Oreochromis sp. and O. goramy in the alternative feeding treatments were comparable to the control treatment. Application of the combined feeding regimes, feed conversion ratio could be reduced from 26.1 to 57.8%. These results indicated that fresh and dried gut weed can be used as a feed to substitute commercial feed for herbivorous fish. Moreover, using gut weeds as a feed could improve water quality in the rearing tanks.

  3. [Alfalfa Planting as weed control

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a letter to farming cooperators regarding the stipulations surrounding alfalfa plantings in lieu of small grain plantings to provide weed control,...

  4. WEED INFESTATION IN DIFFERENT FARMING SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAGDALENA LACKO-BARTOŠOVÁ

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate the influence of ecological and conventional farming systems on weed seedbank and actual weed infestation of winter wheat at agricultural farms Sebechleby, Plavé Vozokany and Dačov Lom. Significant differences between systems were determined only at the co-operative Sebechleby where the higher weed seedbank was in ecological system. Higher number of determined weed species in weed seedstock was in ecological system at Plavé Vozokany and Sebechleby. Dominant weed species in both systems were Chenopodium album L. and Amaranthus retroflexus L.. Higher degree of actual weed infestation was determined in ecological system. Characteristics of systems was the occurrence of perennial species Cirsium arvense and non detection of Amaranthus retroflexus L., weed that had very high weed seedbank in soil.

  5. Levantamento fitossociológico de plantas daninhas em calçadas do município de Paraguaçu Paulista-SP Phytosociological assessment of weeds on Paraguaçu Paulista-SP sidewalks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.D.G. Maciel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de identificar as comunidades de plantas daninhas que ocorrem nas calçadas do município de Paraguaçu Paulista-SP, foi realizado um levantamento fitossociológico considerando três possíveis posicionamentos de ocorrência da infestação em calçadas. As plantas daninhas foram identificadas e quantificadas em todos os principais bairros do município, sendo subdivididos 180 pontos de amostragem em faixas posicionadas nas regiões: guia da calçada, centro da calçada e beiral do muro. No levantamento, foram identificadas 11 famílias e 21 espécies; as famílias Poaceae, Asteraceae, Euphorbiaceae e Amaranthaceae foram as que registraram os maiores números e frequências de espécies, nas três posições das calçadas. Os maiores índices de valor de importância (IVI das espécies identificadas na guia e no centro da calçada foram, respectivamente: Eragrotis pilosa (50,3 e 56,6, Chamaesyce prostrata (48,2 e 57,6 e Chamaesyce hirta (30,3 e 36,4; e para o beiral do muro: C. prostrata (60,6, Phyllanthus tenellus (44,3 e C. hirta (36,2.A phytosociological assessment was carried out to identify weed communities occurring on the sidewalks of Paraguacu Paulista-SP, considering three possible types of weed infestation on sidewalks. Weeds were identified and quantified in all the main neighborhoods of this municipal district, being subdivided into 180 sampling points in strips positioned on the curb line of the sidewalk, the center of the sidewalk and the edge of the wall. Eleven families and 21 species were identified with the Poaceae, Asteraceae, Euphorbiaceae and Amaranthaceae families registering the highest numbers and frequencies of species in the three side walk positions. The highest importance value indices (IVI for the species identified in the curb lineand center of the sidewalk were: Eragrotis pilosa (50.3 and 56.6, Chamaesyce prostrata (48.2 and 57.6 and Chamaesyce hirta (30.3 and 36.4; for the edge of the wall, the

  6. Effects of long-term reduced tillage on weed infestation of pea (Pisum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Woźniak

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The study evaluated weed infestation of pea (Pisum sativum L. cultivated under conditions of conventional (CT, reduced (RT and herbicide tillage (HT. It demonstrated the highest weed density per m2 in plots with the herbicide (HT and reduced (RT systems and significantly lower weed infestation in plots cultivated in the conventional system (CT. In addition, more weeds occurred at the third leaf stage (13/14 in BBCH scale than at the pod development stage (73/74 BBCH of pea. The highest biomass was produced by weeds in the herbicide system (HT, a lower one – in the reduced system (RT, and the lowest one – in the conventional system (CT. The air-dry weight of weeds depended also on pea development stage. At the pod development stage (73/74 BBCH, the air-dry weight of weeds was significantly higher than at the third leaf stage (13/14 BBCH. The tillage system was also observed to influence the species composition of weeds. This trait was also affected by the period of weed infestation assessment. At the third leaf stage of pea (13/14 BBCH, there occurred 26 weed species, including 24 annual ones. The most abundant species included: Chenopodium album L., Stellaria media (L. Vill., Capsella bursa-pastoris (L. Med., Matricaria inodora L., Thlaspi arvense L., and Fallopia convolvulus (L. A. Löve. At the pod development stage (73/74 BBCH, the pea crop was colonized by 24 weed species, including 3 perennial ones. At this stage the predominant species included: Avena fatua L., Amaranthus retroflexus L., Papaver rhoeas L., Echinochloa crus-galli (L. P.B., Matricaria inodora L., and Galeopsis tetrahit L.

  7. Little Pend Oreille - Weeding for Wildlife

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The project builds on previous funding to work with volunteers to manage weeds. Our hope is train volunteers in the use of GPS units, map the extent of specific weed...

  8. Sheldon-Hart - High Desert Weed Management

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — (1)Treat 500 acres of previously mapped invasive weeds on Hart Mountain; followup monitoring and spot treatment where needed, (2)treat 110 acres of invasive weeds...

  9. A new method to evaluate the weed-suppressing effect of mulches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arentoft, B. W.; Ali, A.; Streibig, Jens Carl

    2013-01-01

    To suppress weeds in an apple (Malus sp.) orchard, we placed spruce (Picea spp.) bark mulch and cocoa (Theobroma cacao) husk mulch for 3 months in thicknesses of 0, 2.5, 5, 10 and 15 cm. To assess the development of weed cover, an innovative use of log-logistic dose–response models was applied......, with mulch thickness as the independent variable. Weed cover was measured by non-destructive image analysis by estimating the relationship between the number of green pixels and the total number of pixels in each experimental plot. The thickness of mulch layer required to attain a 50 and 90% weed suppression...... (ED50 and ED90) differed significantly within and between mulch types. In all except one instance, the cocoa mulch was superior in suppressing weeds. This method was useful for the evaluation, but further research is needed to give a more general conclusion about the suppression ability of the two...

  10. Stooped postures are modified by pretask walking in a simulated weed-pulling task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, D S; Copeland, J L; Hepburn, C G; Doan, J B

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal agricultural workers are hired in some sectors for intermittent manual weed removal, a stoop and grasp harvesting task likely similar to those associated with the high prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in agriculture. Evaluation of this task in an experimental situation would be useful for identifying and controlling musculoskeletal injury risks, presuming a valid experimental model of the task can be created. The purpose of the present study was to examine how a relevant work-related task, namely prolonged walking, altered the biomechanics of manual weed removal in a laboratory setting. Preliminary field assessments informed the development and analysis of a simulated manual weed removal with two separate conditions: not primed, where 11 participants (4 female, mean age 21.6 years) manually removed a simulated weed six times, and primed, where 23 participants (13 female, mean age 22.1 years) walked 1600 m prior to manually removing the same simulated weed six successive times. Segment end point markers and experimental motion capture were used to determine hip, knee, and ankle angles, as well as toe-target proximity, during weed removal. Significant differences between primed and not primed participants were found for angular displacement at the ankle (t(32) = 5.08, P weed, leading to decreased trunk flexion during the harvesting task. These findings suggest that priming can positively influence whole-body postures for manual weed removal.

  11. Vermicomposting of toxic weed--Lantana camara biomass: chemical and microbial properties changes and assessment of toxicity of end product using seed bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthar, Surindra; Sharma, Priyanka

    2013-09-01

    This work illustrates the results of vermicomposting trials of noxious weed - Lantana camara (LL) leaf litter spiked with cow dung (CD) in different ratios (0%, 20%, 40%, 60% and 80%) using Eisenia fetida. A total of five treatments were established and changes in chemical and microbial properties of vermibeds have been observed for 60 days. In all treatments, a decrease in pH (19.5-30.7%), total organic carbon (TOC) (12-23%) and C:N ratio (25-35%), but increase in ash content (16-40%), total N(N(tot)) (11-32%), available phosphorous (P(avail)) (445-629%), exchangeable potassium (K(exch)) (63-156%) exchangeable calcium (Ca(exch)) (67-94%),and N-NO3(-) (164-499%) was recorded. Vermibeds with 40-60% LL (T2 and T3) showed better mineralization rate. The number of fungi, bacteria and actinomycetes showed 0.33-1.67-fold, 0.72-2.33-fold and 2.03-2.99-fold increase, respectively after vermicomposting process. The germination index (GI) was between 47% and 83% in all vermicomposts as indicated by seed bioassay test. Results thus suggested that Lantana may be a potential source for vermicompost production for sustainable agriculture.

  12. Prospects for site specific weed management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Svend; Rasmussen, Jesper; Pedersen, Søren Marcus;

    2014-01-01

    Research on Site Specific Weed Management (SSWM) started in the late 80's. Since that moment, considerable research has been conducted on different aspects of SSWM, from fundamental studies on the spatial ecology of weeds to the applied development and testing of new technologies for weed detection...

  13. The Weeding of a Historical Society Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Cindy Steinhoff

    1992-01-01

    Describes a major deaccessioning (weeding) project begun in 1985 at the library of the Nebraska State Historical Society, including a brief history of the Society and the events leading to the decision to weed. Public controversy over the handling of the project, benefits of the weeding, and new acquisitions policies are also discussed. (MES)

  14. What's a Weed? Knowledge, Attitude and Behaviour of Park Visitors about Weeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ansong

    Full Text Available Weeds are a major threat to biodiversity globally degrading natural areas of high conservation value. But what are our attitudes about weeds and their management including weeds in national parks? Do we know what a weed is? Do we consider weeds a problem? Do we support their management? Are we unintentionally spreading weeds in parks? To answer these questions, we surveyed visitors entering a large popular national park near the city of Brisbane, Australia. Park visitors were knowledgeable about weeds; with >75% correctly defining weeds as 'plants that grow where they are not wanted'. About 10% of the visitors, however, provided their own sophisticated definitions. This capacity to define weeds did not vary with people's age, sex or level of education. We constructed a scale measuring visitors' overall concern about weeds in parks using the responses to ten Likert scale statements. Over 85% of visitors were concerned about weeds with older visitors, hikers, and those who could correctly define weeds more concerned than their counterparts. The majority think visitors unintentionally introduce seeds into parks, with many (63% having found seeds on their own clothing. However, over a third disposed of these seeds in ways that could facilitate weed spread. Therefore, although most visitors were knowledgeable and concerned about weeds, and support their control, there is a clear need for more effective communication regarding the risk of visitors unintentionally dispersing weed seeds in parks.

  15. What's a Weed? Knowledge, Attitude and Behaviour of Park Visitors about Weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansong, Michael; Pickering, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Weeds are a major threat to biodiversity globally degrading natural areas of high conservation value. But what are our attitudes about weeds and their management including weeds in national parks? Do we know what a weed is? Do we consider weeds a problem? Do we support their management? Are we unintentionally spreading weeds in parks? To answer these questions, we surveyed visitors entering a large popular national park near the city of Brisbane, Australia. Park visitors were knowledgeable about weeds; with >75% correctly defining weeds as 'plants that grow where they are not wanted'. About 10% of the visitors, however, provided their own sophisticated definitions. This capacity to define weeds did not vary with people's age, sex or level of education. We constructed a scale measuring visitors' overall concern about weeds in parks using the responses to ten Likert scale statements. Over 85% of visitors were concerned about weeds with older visitors, hikers, and those who could correctly define weeds more concerned than their counterparts. The majority think visitors unintentionally introduce seeds into parks, with many (63%) having found seeds on their own clothing. However, over a third disposed of these seeds in ways that could facilitate weed spread. Therefore, although most visitors were knowledgeable and concerned about weeds, and support their control, there is a clear need for more effective communication regarding the risk of visitors unintentionally dispersing weed seeds in parks.

  16. Weed suppression ability of spring barley varieties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Svend

    1995-01-01

    Three years of experiments with spring barley showed significant differences in weed suppression ability among varieties. Weed dry matter in the most suppressive variety, Ida, was 48% lower than the mean weed dry matter of all varieties, whereas it was 31% higher in the least suppressive variety......, Grit. Ranking varietal responses to weed competition in terms of grain yield loss corresponded well to ranking weed dry matter produced in crop weed mixtures. There was no correspondence between the varietal grain yields in pure stands and their competitiveness, suggesting that breeding to optimize...... interception model was developed to describe the light interception profiles of the varieties. A study of the estimated parameters showed significant correlation between weed dry matter, rate of canopy height development and the light interception profile. However, when estimates were standardized to eliminate...

  17. Weed biocontrol in landscape restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed biological control programs in natural areas are often undertaken with the goal of restoring native plant communities and/or ecosystem services to a pre-invasion level. These objectives may be achieved in some areas with biological control alone; however, in other sites integration of biologica...

  18. Rounding Up the Astrophysical Weeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, James P.

    New instruments used for astronomy such as ALMA, Herschel, and SOFIA have greatly increased the quality of available astrophysical data. These improved data contain spectral lines and features which are not accounted for in the quantum mechanical (QM) catalogs. A class of molecules has been identified as being particularly problematic, the so-called "weeds". These molecules have numerous transitions, of non-trivial intensity, which are difficult to model due to highly perturbed low lying vibrational states. The inability to properly describe the complete contribution of these weeds to the astrophysical data has led directly to the misidentification of other target molecules. Ohio State's Microwave Laboratory has developed an alternative approach to this problem. Rather than relying on complex QM calculations, we have developed a temperature dependent approach to laboratory based terahertz spectroscopy. We have developed a set of simple packages, in addition to traditional line list catalogs, that enable astronomers to successfully remove the weed signals from their data. This dissertation will detail my laboratory work and analysis of three keys weeds: methanol, methyl formate and methyl cyanide. Also, discussed will be the analytical technique I used to apply these laboratory results to astrophysical data.

  19. Weed Dynamics during Transition to Conservation Agriculture in Western Kenya Maize Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odhiambo, Judith A; Norton, Urszula; Ashilenje, Dennis; Omondi, Emmanuel C; Norton, Jay B

    2015-01-01

    Weed competition is a significant problem in maize (Zea mays, L.) production in Sub-Saharan Africa. Better understanding of weed management and costs in maize intercropped with beans (Phaseolus vulgaris, L.) during transition to conservation agricultural systems is needed. Changes in weed population and maize growth were assessed for a period of three years at Bungoma where crops are grown twice per year and at Trans-Nzoia where crops are grown once per year. Treatments included three tillage practices: minimum (MT), no-till (NT) and conventional (CT) applied to three cropping systems: continuous maize/bean intercropping (TYPICAL), maize/bean intercropping with relayed mucuna after bean harvest (RELAY) and maize, bean and mucuna planted in a strip intercropping arrangement (STRIP). Herbicides were used in NT, shallow hand hoeing and herbicides were used in MT and deep hoeing with no herbicides were used in CT. Weed and maize performance in the maize phase of each cropping system were assessed at both locations and costs of weed control were estimated at Manor House only. Weed density of grass and forb species declined significantly under MT and NT at Manor House and of grass species only at Mabanga. The greatest declines of more than 50% were observed as early as within one year of the transition to MT and NT in STRIP and TYPICAL cropping systems at Manor House. Transitioning to conservation based systems resulted in a decline of four out of five most dominant weed species. At the same time, no negative impact of MT or NT on maize growth was observed. Corresponding costs of weed management were reduced by $148.40 ha(-1) in MT and $149.60 ha(-1) in NT compared with CT. In conclusion, farmers can benefit from effective and less expensive weed management alternatives early in the process of transitioning to reduced tillage operations.

  20. Weed Dynamics during Transition to Conservation Agriculture in Western Kenya Maize Production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith A Odhiambo

    Full Text Available Weed competition is a significant problem in maize (Zea mays, L. production in Sub-Saharan Africa. Better understanding of weed management and costs in maize intercropped with beans (Phaseolus vulgaris, L. during transition to conservation agricultural systems is needed. Changes in weed population and maize growth were assessed for a period of three years at Bungoma where crops are grown twice per year and at Trans-Nzoia where crops are grown once per year. Treatments included three tillage practices: minimum (MT, no-till (NT and conventional (CT applied to three cropping systems: continuous maize/bean intercropping (TYPICAL, maize/bean intercropping with relayed mucuna after bean harvest (RELAY and maize, bean and mucuna planted in a strip intercropping arrangement (STRIP. Herbicides were used in NT, shallow hand hoeing and herbicides were used in MT and deep hoeing with no herbicides were used in CT. Weed and maize performance in the maize phase of each cropping system were assessed at both locations and costs of weed control were estimated at Manor House only. Weed density of grass and forb species declined significantly under MT and NT at Manor House and of grass species only at Mabanga. The greatest declines of more than 50% were observed as early as within one year of the transition to MT and NT in STRIP and TYPICAL cropping systems at Manor House. Transitioning to conservation based systems resulted in a decline of four out of five most dominant weed species. At the same time, no negative impact of MT or NT on maize growth was observed. Corresponding costs of weed management were reduced by $148.40 ha(-1 in MT and $149.60 ha(-1 in NT compared with CT. In conclusion, farmers can benefit from effective and less expensive weed management alternatives early in the process of transitioning to reduced tillage operations.

  1. A Review on Reasons of Increasing Perennial Weeds and Control Technology of Perennial Weeds in Heilongjiang Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Changshan; HE Fuli; SHI Na; YAN Chunxiu

    2009-01-01

    The main reasons that perennial weeds has becoming the dominant weeds in Heilongjiang Province were summarized.The biological mechanism that explained why it was difficult to control perennial weeds was analyzed. During dormancy course,variation regularity of some inner matters in perennial weeds was researched and new tentative for controlling the perennial weeds was pointed out.

  2. Studies on weed diversity and its associated phytosociology under direct dry seeded rice systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantosh Kumar Sinha

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Chhattisgarh is commonly known as Bowl of rice where rice is grown as monocrop in the entire state whether soil is bhata, matasi, kanhar or black soil. Present study is based on the study of biodiversity of weeds under Direct Dry Seeded Rice Systems in Koria District (C.G. Study was conducted to assess the phytosociological studies of weed species in paddy field at Baikunthpur, Koriya district, Chattisgarh. A total of 43 genera and 9 families of Dicotyledonae and 3 families of monocots and 1 Pteridophytes was also observed and 43 weed species were identified Ratio of Sedges: (Grasses:Broad-leaved weeds was calculated as 9:12:18 Ratio under direct dry seeded rice systems. The results obtained indicated that Echinochloa colona, Cyperus iria and Cynodon dactylon were the most frequent in 2007; E. colona and C. iria were the most frequent in 2008 and 2009. The importance value index (IVI revealed that the most important weeds within the community were Poaceae and Cyperaceae. Out of 12 angiosperm families the predominance was shown by monocot families Cyperaceae and Poaceae having and weed species, respectively. The pteridophyta family Marsileaceae was represented by 1 weed species.

  3. Accuracy and feasibility of optoelectronic sensors for weed mapping in wide row crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andújar, Dionisio; Ribeiro, Ángela; Fernández-Quintanilla, César; Dorado, José

    2011-01-01

    The main objectives of this study were to assess the accuracy of a ground-based weed mapping system that included optoelectronic sensors for weed detection, and to determine the sampling resolution required for accurate weed maps in maize crops. The optoelectronic sensors were located in the inter-row area of maize to distinguish weeds against soil background. The system was evaluated in three maize fields in the early spring. System verification was performed with highly reliable data from digital images obtained in a regular 12 m × 12 m grid throughout the three fields. The comparison in all these sample points showed a good relationship (83% agreement on average) between the data of weed presence/absence obtained from the optoelectronic mapping system and the values derived from image processing software ("ground truth"). Regarding the optimization of sampling resolution, the comparison between the detailed maps (all crop rows with sensors separated 0.75 m) with maps obtained with various simulated distances between sensors (from 1.5 m to 6.0 m) indicated that a 4.5 m distance (equivalent to one in six crop rows) would be acceptable to construct accurate weed maps. This spatial resolution makes the system cheap and robust enough to generate maps of inter-row weeds.

  4. Non-Chemical Distant Cellular Interactions as a potential confounder of Cell Biology Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashkan eFarhadi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Distant cells can communicate with each other through a variety of methods. Two such methods involve electrical and/or chemical mechanisms. Non-chemical, distant cellular interactions may be another method of communication that cells can use to modify the behavior of other cells that are mechanically separated. Moreover, non-chemical, distant cellular interactions may explain some cases of confounding effects in Cell Biology experiments. In this article, we review non-chemical, distant cellular interactions studies to try to shed light on the mechanisms in this highly unconventional field of cell biology. Despite the existence of several theories that try to explain the mechanism of non-chemical, distant cellular interactions, this phenomenon is still speculative. Among candidate mechanisms, electromagnetic waves appear to have the most experimental support. In this brief article, we try to answer a few key questions that may further clarify this mechanism.

  5. Epianthropochory in Mexican weed communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vibrans, H

    1999-04-01

    The diaspores of the 50 most important maize field weed species (agrestals) in a traditional maize-growing area of south-central Mexico (region of Puebla and Tlaxcala) were analyzed for morphological adaptations to long-distance dispersal. Adaptations to wind-dispersal were absent and to endozoochory were minimal. Most species had no visible adaptations and are presumably transported with mud. However, about one-quarter of the taxa, particularly the tall and dominant ones, relied at least partially on burrs with hooks or awns. The possible vectors for these exo- or epizoochorous species are discussed: the most likely regular dispersers are humans (epianthropochory). Interviews with farmers confirm this conclusion. Using humans as vectors allows the plant to transport relatively large seeds to favorable habitats (directed dispersal). The importance of this relatively rare dispersal adaptation in Mexican maize field weeds leads to questions on the origin and evolution of these agrestals.

  6. Effect of stale seedbed preparations and subsequent weed control in lettuce (cv. Iceboll) on weed densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemens, M.M.; Weide, van der R.Y.; Bleeker, P.O.; Lotz, L.A.P.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of stale seedbed preparations and several weed control methods on the emergence of weeds in lettuce were studied. The specific goal was to evaluate the use of a stale seedbed in combination with chemical or mechanical weed control methods in the field. Depending on location and year, sta

  7. About the value of species diversity in arable weeds for weed management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerowitt, Bärbel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Arable weeds accompany arable land use – we define them based on their affiliation to ar able systems. They are adapted to such a degree that most of them cannot exist without arable land use. Weeds are part of the total biodiversity on arable fields, as primary producers they are basic for important functions within the ecosystem. This paper elaborates the relevance of species diversity in arable weeds for their management. Arable systems can be regarded for the number of different methods for preventive and direct weed control which are realized. Historical arable land use is roughly divided into three periods, which differ concerning the diversity of weed management and the occurring diversity in weed species. Obviously divers weed management in arable systems and diversity in weed species depend on each other, this is illustrated with a simple abstract picture. Arable systems, which are characterised by simpleness, favor the domination of few species which ensure an effective use of the resources within the ecosystem. One consequence under continuous pressure of an overused tool in weed management is that the genetic diversity within a dominating weed population is exploited to ensure this resource use. Current herbicides represent this tool – the results are herbicide resistant biotypes within the weed populations. Species diversity in arable weeds as a rationale within arable production can assist to prevent this development.

  8. Combining a weed traits database with a population dynamics model predicts shifts in weed communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Storkey, J.; Holst, N.; Bøjer, Q.; Bigongiali, F.; Bocci, G.; Colbach, N.; Dorner, Z.; Riemens, M.M.; Sartorato, I.; Sønderskov, M.; Verschwele, A.

    2015-01-01

    A functional approach to predicting shifts in weed floras in response to management or environmental change requires the combination of data on weed traits with analytical frameworks that capture the filtering effect of selection pressures on traits. A weed traits database (WTDB) was designed, popul

  9. Integration of herbicides with manual weeding for controlling the weeds in rice under saline environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, M A; Juraimi, Abdul Shukor; Hanafi, M M; Rafii, Mohd Y; Ismail, Mohd Razi; Karim, S M Rezaul; Kausar, H

    2015-11-01

    The pot experiment was conducted to select appropriate integrated weed management method in rice under different salinity levels (0, 4 and 8 dS m(-1)). All the parameters including rice and weed measured were significantly influenced by weed control treatments at all salinity levels. Treatments including weed-free condition, Pretilachlor @0.375 kg ai ha(-1) + hand weeding, Propanil + Thiobencarb @ 0.9 kg ai ha(-1) and 1.8 kg ai ha(-1)+ hand weeding performed better under all salinity levels. Pretilachlor @ 0.375 kg ai ha(-1) with one round of hand weeding and propanil + thiobencarb 0.9 kg ai ha(-1) + 1.8 kg ai ha(-1) with one round of hand weeding were comparable to weed-free yields, and were superior to other treatments under salinity condition. Considering all the parameters, pretilachlor @ 0.375 kg ai ha(-1) + one round of hand weeding (at 65 DAT), propanil + thiobencarb 0.9 kg ai ha(-1) +1.8 kg ai ha(-1) + one round of hand weeding (at 65 DAT) gave the most effective control of weeds in rice under saline environments.

  10. Weeding Is Not Just for Gardeners: A Case Study on Weeding a Reference Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Marta

    2009-01-01

    Weeding a reference collection can be time consuming, a thankless job, and an endless task. It is a dusty job and can add to the librarian's workload. Weeding the collection can add to its currency and usability; plus it removes outdated materials. Periodically weeding allows librarians to remember what is in the collection and what can be removed…

  11. Critical Period of Weed Control in Aerobic Rice

    OpenAIRE

    Anwar, M. P.; A. S. Juraimi; Samedani, B.; Puteh, A.; Man, A.

    2012-01-01

    Critical period of weed control is the foundation of integrated weed management and, hence, can be considered the first step to design weed control strategy. To determine critical period of weed control of aerobic rice, field trials were conducted during 2010/2011 at Universiti Putra Malaysia. A quantitative series of treatments comprising two components, (a) increasing duration of weed interference and (b) increasing length of weed-free period, were imposed. Critical period was determined th...

  12. Nutrient absorbtion of weeds in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehoczky, E; Kismányoky, A; Nagy, P; Németh, T

    2008-01-01

    Our study was carried out in Hungary at Keszthely, in 2007. The effect of different cultivation methods: no-till drill, disk tillage, conventional tillage (ploughing) and five increasing N doses were studied on the weediness. The bi-factorial trial was arranged in split plot design with four replications. Crop rotation: winter wheat-winter wheat-maize-maize. The seeding of maize was 23rd of April in 2007. The weed survey was made with Balázs-Ujvárosi coenological method on the 17th of May. In the experiment were found 21 weed species. We collected all plants of every weed species by plots. The sample area was 1 m2. Furthermore five maize plants per plot were sampled on the 22nd of May. Maize was at 3-4 leaves stage. For reason of competition studies no herbicides were applied on sampling sites. The aerial parts of weeds and maize plants were collected, and the fresh and dry matter weight was measured. We analyzed in detail, the occurrence of weed species, and the biomass production of weeds in comparison with maize. The effect of different cultivation methods markedly demonstrated the weed cover, the number of perennial and annual weeds and the number of occurring weed species.

  13. A STUDY ON WEED CONTROL IN SOYBEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. TJITROSEMITO

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Two field experiments on weed control in soybeans were carried out at BIOTROP, Bogor, Indonesia from February to June, 1989. The critical period for weed control was found to be between 20 - 40 days after planting of soybean (c. v. Wilis grown at a planting distance of 40 x 10 cm. It did not coincide with the fastest growth in terms of trifoliate leaf number. Further studies were suggested to understand the physiological growth of soybean related to weed control. Pendimethalin at 660- 1320 g a.e./ha applied one day after sowing did not cause any phytotoxic effect to soybean and had good weed control performance.

  14. Weed detection in 3D images

    OpenAIRE

    Piron, Alexis; Van der heijden, F.; Destain, Marie-France

    2011-01-01

    Machine vision has been successfully used for mechanical destruction of weeds between rows of crops. Knowledge of the position of the rows where crops should be growing and the assumption that plants growing outside such positions are weeds may be used in such systems. However for many horticultural crops, the automatic removal of weeds from inside a row or bands of crops in which the weeds are mixed with plants in a random manner is not solved. The aim of this study was to verify that plant ...

  15. The effect of sowing strategy, row distance and mechanical weed control on weeds and yield in organic winter wheat

    OpenAIRE

    Rasmussen, Ilse A.

    2002-01-01

    A series of field experiments were carried out in winter wheat grown under organic conditions in Denmark on fields with different weed pressure. The treatments were sowing strategy (normal sowing time, late sowing and false seedbed), row distance (12 cm and 24 cm row distance) and weed control method (untreated, mechanical weed control (weed harrowing at 12 cm supplemented with row hoeing at 24 cm), and herbicide weed control). Weed biomass was largest at the normal sowing time and was reduce...

  16. The value of precision for image-based decision support in weed management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco de los Ríos, Camilo; Pedersen, Søren Marcus; Papaharalampos, Haris

    2017-01-01

    the information for assessing decision makers and farmers in the efficient and sustainable management of the field. Focusing on weed management, the integration of operational aspects for weed spraying is an open challenge for modeling the farmers’ decision problem, identifying satisfactory solutions......Decision support methodologies in precision agriculture should integrate the different dimensions composing the added complexity of operational decision problems. Special attention has to be given to the adequate knowledge extraction techniques for making sense of the collected data, processing...... for the implementation of automatic weed recognition procedures. The objective of this paper is to develop a decision support methodology for detecting the undesired weed from aerial images, building an image-based viewpoint consisting in relevant operational knowledge for applying precision spraying. In this way...

  17. Weeds in a Changing Climate: Vulnerabilities, Consequences, and Implications for Future Weed Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Kulasekaran; Matloob, Amar; Aslam, Farhena; Florentine, Singarayer K.; Chauhan, Bhagirath S.

    2017-01-01

    Whilst it is agreed that climate change will impact on the long-term interactions between crops and weeds, the results of this impact are far from clear. We suggest that a thorough understanding of weed dominance and weed interactions, depending on crop and weed ecosystems and crop sequences in the ecosystem, will be the key determining factor for successful weed management. Indeed, we claim that recent changes observed throughout the world within the weed spectrum in different cropping systems which were ostensibly related to climate change, warrant a deeper examination of weed vulnerabilities before a full understanding is reached. For example, the uncontrolled establishment of weeds in crops leads to a mixed population, in terms of C3 and C4 pathways, and this poses a considerable level of complexity for weed management. There is a need to include all possible combinations of crops and weeds while studying the impact of climate change on crop-weed competitive interactions, since, from a weed management perspective, C4 weeds would flourish in the increased temperature scenario and pose serious yield penalties. This is particularly alarming as a majority of the most competitive weeds are C4 plants. Although CO2 is considered as a main contributing factor for climate change, a few Australian studies have also predicted differing responses of weed species due to shifts in rainfall patterns. Reduced water availability, due to recurrent and unforeseen droughts, would alter the competitive balance between crops and some weed species, intensifying the crop-weed competition pressure. Although it is recognized that the weed pressure associated with climate change is a significant threat to crop production, either through increased temperatures, rainfall shift, and elevated CO2 levels, the current knowledge of this effect is very sparse. A few models that have attempted to predict these interactions are discussed in this paper, since these models could play an integral

  18. Ecological weed management by cover cropping : effects on weed growth in autumn and weed establishment in spring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruidhof, H.M.; Bastiaans, L.; Kropff, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Cover crops grown in the period between two main crops have potential as an important component of a system-oriented ecological weed management strategy. In late summer and autumn, the cover crop can suppress growth and seed production of weeds, whereas the incorporation of cover crop residues in sp

  19. Effects of Planting Date, Time and Methods of Weed Control on Weed Density and Biomass in Cumin Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ghorbani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Two field experiments were carried out in order to evaluate the effect of planting date, method and date of weed control on weed density and biomass in the experimental research field, Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, during 2006 and 2007. Treatments included planting date (30 December, 20 January and 30 February, weeding date (first true leaf, start of branching and beginning of flowering stages and weed control methods (hand weeding, fire treatment and control. The results showed that there were significant differences in the number of weeds between different sowing dates, weeding dates and control methods. The highest mean density and biomass of weeds were obtained on the planting date, 30 February, and when weed was controlled at the first leaf appearance stage with fire treatment. The most appropriate time for weed control was at the beginning of cumin flowering. Fire treatment reduced weed growth in the first half of growing season. However, hand weeding significantly reduced weed density and biomass in the second half of cumin growing season. The first planting date caused the lowest mean weed biomass and the highest cumin yield compared to later planting dates. Hand weeding treatment contained lower mean weed density and biomass compared to fire treatment, however, cumin yield was lower in hand weeding plots than fire treatment. Keywords: Cultural control, Cuminum cyminum, Fire, Hand weeding, Control time

  20. WEED SURVEYING OF PHACELIA (PHACELIA TANACETIFOLIA L.) AND EVALUATING THE EFFICIENCY OF THE WEED CONTROL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, E; Szabó, R

    2014-01-01

    The experiment was set up in an area of 9 ha that was split into 4 plots: in plot 1 the row spacing was 12 cm and the seeding rate was 10 kg; in plot 2 the row spacing was 24 cm and the seeding rate was 10 kg; in plot 3 the row spacing was 24 cm and the seeding rate was 8 kg; in plot 4 the row spacing was 12 cm and the seeding rate was 8 kg. After the weed surveying, the total weed coverage was established as follows: in plot 1 the total weed coverage was 11.34%, in plot 2 it was 12.3%, in plot 3 it was 18%, and in plot 4 the total weed coverage was 15%. Based on the weed survey, on the test area the following dicotyledon weeds belonging to the T4 Raunkiaer plant life-form category occupied the highest percentage: heal-all, black-bindweed, goosefoot. The proportion of the perennial dicotyledons: field bindweed (G3), tuberous pea (G1), white campion (H3) was negligible. In all four cases the weed control was executed using the same herbicide in the same doses and with regard to the weed species it showed the same level of efficiency. The smaller row spacing and higher seeding rate has a beneficial effect on the weed suppressing capacity of the crop, the crop's weed suppressing capacity is better and the development of the weeds becomes worse.

  1. IMPORTANCE OF CRITICAL PERIOD OF WEED COMPETITION FOR CROP GROWING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijana Ivanek-Martinčić

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A concept of critical period of weed competition has been introduced for more than 40 years ago. The concept is based on the assumption that weeds are not equally harmful to a crop during the whole season and that there is a period in crop development in which weeds impact on the yield is the biggest. This period is called critical period of weed competition (CPWC, critical period of weed interference, or critical period of weed control. There is a difference in CPWC between crops, but CPWC for a certain crop can vary a lot because it depends on many factors which can affect the crop or weeds competition ability. The critical period of weed competition identification is essential for integrated weed control and precise planning of a weed control strategy as well as for rationale use of herbicides and other weed control measures.

  2. Effect of sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea L.) cutting date and planting density on weed suppression in Georgia, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J Bradley; Chase, Carlene; Treadwell, Danielle; Koenig, Rosie; Cho, Alyssa; Morales-Payan, Jose Pable; Murphy, Tim; Antonious, George F

    2015-01-01

    A field study was conducted in 2008 and 2009 at the USDA, ARS, Plant Genetic Resources Conservation Unit in Griffin, GA, to investigate weed suppression by sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea L). The objectives were to (1) evaluate the effects of apical meristem removal (AMR) at three dates [5, 6, and 7 wks after planting (WAP) on May 14, 2008 and May 21, 2009] and (2) assess the impact of seeding rates (11, 28, and 45 kg ha(-1)) on weed biomass reduction. Weed species were identified at 4, 8, and 12 wks after sunn hemp planting. Sunn hemp cutting date had no significant effect on weed suppression in 2008 but significant differences for grass weeds at 4, 8, and 12 WAP and for yellow nutsedge at 8 and 12 WAP did occur when compared to the control in 2009. In comparison to the sunn hemp-free control plot in 2009, all three seeding rates had reduced grass weed dry weights at 4, 8, and 12 WAP. The total mass of yellow nutsedge when grown with sunn hemp was reduced compared to the total mass of yellow nutsedge grown in the weedy check for all seeding rates at 8 and 12 WAP. Lower grass weed biomass was observed by 12 WAP for cutting dates and seeding rates during 2008 and 2009. Sunn hemp cutting date and seeding rate reduced branch numbers in both years. The reduction in sunn hemp seeding rates revealed a decrease in weed populations.

  3. Weeds as important vegetables for farmers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruz Garcia, G.S.; Price, L.L.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the multiple uses and cognitive importance of edible weeds in Northeast Thailand. Research methods included focus group discussions and freelistings. A total of 43 weeds consumed as vegetable were reported, including economic, naturalized, agricultural

  4. Weed management strategies for castor bean crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Guerreiro Fontoura Costa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Castor bean crops are agriculturally relevant due to the quality and versatility of their oil, both for the chemical industry and for biodiesel production. Proper weed management is important for both the cultivation and the yield of castor bean crops; therefore, the intention of the present work is to review pertinent information regarding weed management, including the studies regarding weed interference periods, chemical controls for use in different crop production systems and herbicide selectivity, for castor bean crops. Weed science research for castor bean crops is scarce. One of the main weed management challenges for castor bean crops is the absence of herbicides registered with the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Supply (MALFS. Research for viable herbicides for weed control in castor bean crops should be directed by research and/or rural extension institutions, associations and farmers cooperatives, as well as by manufactures, for the registration of these selective herbicides, which would be primarily used to control eudicotyledons in castor bean crops. New studies involving the integration of weed control methods in castor bean also may increase the efficiency of weed management, for both small farmers using traditional crop methods in the Brazilian Northeast region, as well as for areas with the potential for large scale production, using conservation tillage systems, such as the no-tillage crop production system.

  5. Weed Recognition Framework for Robotic Precision Farming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kounalakis, Tsampikos; Triantafyllidis, Georgios; Nalpantidis, Lazaros

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a novel framework which applies known image features combined with advanced linear image representations for weed recognition. Our proposed weed recognition framework, is based on state-of-the-the art object/image categorization methods exploiting enhanced performance ...

  6. Weed detection in 3D images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piron, A.; Heijden, van der F.; Destain, M.F.

    2011-01-01

    Machine vision has been successfully used for mechanical destruction of weeds between rows of crops. Knowledge of the position of the rows where crops should be growing and the assumption that plants growing outside such positions are weeds may be used in such systems. However for many horticultural

  7. An autonomous weeding robot for organic farming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, T.; Asselt, van C.J.; Bontsema, J.; Müller, J.; Straten, van G.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this research is the replacement of hand weeding in organic farming by a device working autonomously at ¯eld level. The autonomous weeding robot was designed using a structured design approach, giving a good overview of the total design. A vehicle was developed with a diesel engine,

  8. Molecular biology approaches to weed management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Global climate change appears to be favorable for invasive weed development and spread because invasive species in general are proficient at succeeding in new environments. To worsen matters, herbicide-resistant weeds have become a severe threat in modern agricultural systems due to the extensive us...

  9. Weeding the Library Media Center Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, Betty Jo

    These guidelines for weeding library media collections are addressed to elementary and secondary school library media centers and to community college and vocational school library resource centers in Iowa. The publication includes some philosophy about weeding, and specific guidelines are summarized in bold-faced type for ease of use. The…

  10. Obsolescence, Weeding, and the Utilization of Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, F. W.

    1988-01-01

    Suggests an objective approach to weeding library materials and discusses ways of measuring obsolescence and of controlling variables to provide a true picture of aging. Weeding is shown to improve space utilization and the quality of a collection. (5 references) (MES)

  11. Weeded Books Inspire Student Art Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Margaret

    2004-01-01

    The rationale behind weeding books is to remove dated, obsolete, erroneous material and worn books in disrepair from the collection to make room for current titles. Students of Lakeview have discovered an innovative idea of creating an altered book from the weeded book by taking a hardcover book and changing the original cover by means of a…

  12. The weed composition in an orchard as a result of long-term foliar herbicide application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Licznar-Małańczuk

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The weed composition and the dominance of individual species occurring in an orchard were assessed at the Research Station of the Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Poland, during the first 10 years after orchard establishment. ‘Ligol’ apple trees were planted in the spring of 2004 (3.5 × 1.2 m. Foliar herbicides were applied in 1 m wide tree rows twice or three times per each vegetation period. In the inter-row spaces, perennial grass was maintained. Ten years of maintenance of herbicide fallow contributed to a change in the weed composition in the orchard. It changed as a result of different responses of the most important weed species to the foliar herbicides. Total suppression of Elymus repens was observed in the first year after planting the trees. Convolvulus arvensis, Cirsium arvense, and other perennial weeds, completely disappeared in the succeeding periods. The maintenance of herbicide fallow did not affect the abundance of Taraxacum officinale. The percentage of the soil surface covered by Trifolium repens and Epilobium adenocaulon, perennial weeds with considerable tolerance to post-emergence herbicides, increased during the fruit-bearing period of the trees. The abundance of these weeds was significantly reduced only in the rows with the stronger growing trees on the semi-dwarf P 2 rootstock. Stellaria media was the dominant annual weed. Senecio vulgaris, Poa annua, Capsella bursa-pastoris, and Lamium spp. were also frequently observed. A significant increase in the abundance of annual and perennial weeds was found in the tree rows as a result of improved water availability after a period of high precipitation.

  13. The diversity of weed species occurring in living mulch in an apple orchard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Licznar-Małańczuk

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In a study conducted at the Research Station of the Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, weed occurrence in living mulches maintained in apple tree rows of ‘Pinova’ cv. was assessed during the first seven years after sowing. The trees were planted in spring 2004 (3.5 × 1.2 m. In the same year, living mulches: colonial bent grass, white clover and French marigold, were sown into 1 m wide tree rows. Blue fescue, the only perennial cover crop with herbicide application against dicot weeds once in the second year after sowing, was introduced in the second year after planting the trees to replace dwarf nasturtium which was sown in the year of orchard establishment. In the inter-row spaces, perennial grass was maintained. During the first seven years, variation in weeds was observed depending on living mulch. Multi-species weed infestation persisted throughout the study period only in the case of annually resown French marigold. Perennial living mulches were significantly suppressed the annual weeds. Significant suppression of Taraxacum officinale Web. was found where the soil surface was covered by perennial grass sod in more than ¾. The maintenance of blue fescue resulted in significantly lower average soil coverage by Elymus repens (L. Gould; the growth of this weed significantly contributed to the reduction of white clover sod and French marigold plants.

  14. Effect of Cultural Practices in Night on Weed Density and Weed Dry Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H Rashed Mohasel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to evaluate the response of weed seeds to light, two experiments, at two different locations were conducted at Ferdowsi university of Mashhad in 2009. At the first experiment, field was ploughed in day and night. Weed density was evaluated 70 d after plough, with 1×1 quadrate. At the second experiment, at night treatment, ploughing, potato planting and weeding with cultivator were done at night. Weed sampling was done twice at 43 and 130 days after planting with 1×1 quadrate and weeds were identified and counted. Result showed pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L., sowthistle (Sonchus oleraceus L., crabgrass (Digitaria sanguinalis (L. scop, jimsonweed (Datura stramonium L. and mallow (Hibiscus trionum L. did not observed at night plough, in contrast, night plough has no significance influence on common lambsquarters (Chenopodium album L., and black nightshade (Solanum nigrum L.. Only common lambsquarters had similar appearance in two treatments, indicating insusceptibility of this weed to time of plough. Interestingly, at the second experiment, result was very similar. Potato yield was higher at night treatment, but not significant. This research showed that some cultural practice like plough, planting and weeding with cultivator in night can reduce weed density and weed dry matter. Keywords: Germination, Time of plough, Sustainable weeds management, Light

  15. A rotational framework to reduce weed density in organic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeds are a major obstacle to successful crop production in organic farming. Producers may be able to reduce inputs for weed management by designing rotations to disrupt population dynamics of weeds. Population-based management in conventional farming has reduced herbicide use 50% because weed den...

  16. Adapting weed management in rice to changing climates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, J.; Meinke, H.B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides some of the scientific background on how projected environmental conditions could affect weeds and weed management in rice in Africa. Elevated CO2 levels may have positive effects on rice competitiveness with C4 weeds, but these are generally outnumbered by C3 species in weed pop

  17. Weed Garden: An Effective Tool for Extension Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Leslie; Patton, Aaron J.

    2015-01-01

    A weed garden was constructed to quantify and improve identification skills among clientele. The garden was planted with over 100 weed species based on surveys on problematic weeds. The weed garden proved useful for introducing additional hands-on learning activities into traditional lecture-based seminars. Through seminar and field day attendee…

  18. Biological weed control with soil fungi? Antagonistic effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on the growth of weeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veiga, R.

    2012-01-01

    Excessive weed growth represents one of the major threats to crop production especially when reliance on herbicides is reduced. Biological weed control is an alternative, environmentally-sound method that, combined with other weed control practices, can contribute to an effective weed management in

  19. [Effects of weeding methods on weed community and its diversity in a citrus orchard in southwest Zhejiang].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, He-Jin; Jin, Zong-Lai; Yang, Wei-Bin; Zhao, Jian-Hua; Zhang, Fan

    2010-01-01

    By using the research methods of ecological community, the effects of different weed management strategies including chemical weeding, manual weeding, and their combination on the weed community and its diversity in a citrus chard of main orange producing region in Quzhou City, Zhejiang Province were studied from June 2005 to May 2008. In control plots, there were 75 species and 25 families of weeds; after chemical weeding, manual weeding, and their combination, there were 46 species and 17 families, 59 species and 20 families, and 51 species and 18 families of weeds, respectively. The Margalef's species richness index, Shannon's diversity index, and Shannon's evenness index were the lowest after chemical weeding, but the highest after manual weeding, suggesting that chemical weeding had the greatest effects on the weed diversity in the citrus orchard. It was suggested that to sufficiently control the weeds while to maintain the weed diversity in the orchard weeds in southwest Zhejiang, the combination of chemical and manual weeding would be the best management strategy.

  20. Soil solarization for weed control in carrot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARENCO RICARDO ANTONIO

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil solarization is a technique used for weed and plant disease control in regions with high levels of solar radiation. The effect of solarization (0, 3, 6, and 9 weeks upon weed populations, carrot (Daucus carota L. cv. Brasília yield and nematode infestation in carrot roots was studied in São Luís (2º35' S; 44º10' W, MA, Brazil, using transparent polyethylene films (100 and 150 mm of thickness. The maximum temperature at 5 cm of depth was about 10ºC warmer in solarized soil than in control plots. In the study 20 weed types were recorded. Solarization reduced weed biomass and density in about 50% of weed species, including Cyperus spp., Chamaecrista nictans var. paraguariensis (Chod & Hassl. Irwin & Barneby, Marsypianthes chamaedrys (Vahl O. Kuntze, Mitracarpus sp., Mollugo verticillata L., Sebastiania corniculata M. Arg., and Spigelia anthelmia L. Approximately 40% of species in the weed flora were not affected by soil mulching. Furthermore, seed germination of Commelina benghalensis L. was increased by soil solarization. Marketable yield of carrots was greater in solarized soil than in the unsolarized one. It was concluded that solarization for nine weeks increases carrot yield and is effective for controlling more than half of the weed species recorded. Mulching was not effective for controlling root-knot nematodes in carrot.

  1. Critical period of weed control In cumin (Cuminum cyminum)

    OpenAIRE

    azade hoseyni; alireza koochaki; mehdi nassiri mahalati

    2009-01-01

    In order to evaluate the critical period of weed control in Cumin, an experiment with Complete Randomized Block Design and three replications was conducted in experimental field of Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, During 2004-2005 growing season. Treatments included different combinations of weed free and weed infested periods (20, 30, 40 and 80 days after germination) plus weedy check and weed free check. Critical period weed control was evaluated with Gompertz and Log...

  2. Research on the development of weed-suppressing rice varieties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaochuan ZHOU; Decheng LU; Hong LI; Daoqiang HUANG; Ruowei MIAO

    2009-01-01

    This study was conducted to develop weed-suppressing rice varieties in a weed-suppressing nursery by specific secondary metabolite markers of allelopathic potential. Weed-suppressing rice variety Feng-Hua-Zhan was screened out by a specific secondary metabolite marker of allelopathic potential. Weed-suppressing rice No. 1, a new rice line with good quality, was also developed using this method. The genetic backgrounds and research directions of weed-suppressing rice varieties are discussed in this paper.

  3. A study of weeding policies in eleven TALON resource libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, C H

    1981-07-01

    A study was made of the weeding policies and practices of eleven TALON resource libraries. The results indicated that although weeding, or collection evaluation as it is also known, was performed by most of the libraries, few had a written policy. The reasons for weeding and the types of weeding done by the libraries are described. A discussion of the prevalent means of disposition of withdrawn materials and of the obstacles to cooperative weeding is included.

  4. A study of weeding policies in eleven TALON resource libraries.

    OpenAIRE

    Goldstein, C H

    1981-01-01

    A study was made of the weeding policies and practices of eleven TALON resource libraries. The results indicated that although weeding, or collection evaluation as it is also known, was performed by most of the libraries, few had a written policy. The reasons for weeding and the types of weeding done by the libraries are described. A discussion of the prevalent means of disposition of withdrawn materials and of the obstacles to cooperative weeding is included.

  5. A study of weeding policies in eleven TALON resource libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, C H

    1981-01-01

    A study was made of the weeding policies and practices of eleven TALON resource libraries. The results indicated that although weeding, or collection evaluation as it is also known, was performed by most of the libraries, few had a written policy. The reasons for weeding and the types of weeding done by the libraries are described. A discussion of the prevalent means of disposition of withdrawn materials and of the obstacles to cooperative weeding is included. PMID:7248594

  6. Meta-Analysis of the Chemical and Non-Chemical Stressors Affecting Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worldwide, approximately 42 million children under the age of 5 years are considered overweight or obese. While much research has focused on individual behaviors impacting obesity, little research has emphasized the complex interactions of numerous chemical and non-chemical stres...

  7. Combining a weed traits database with a population dynamics model predicts shifts in weed communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storkey, Jonathan; Holst, Niels; Bøjer, Ole Mission;

    2015-01-01

    A functional approach to predicting shifts in weed floras in response to management or environmental change requires the combination of data on weed traits with analytical frameworks that capture the filtering effect of selection pressures on traits. A weed traits database (WTDB) was designed......, populated and analysed, initially using data for 19 common European weeds, to begin to consolidate trait data in a single repository. The initial choice of traits was driven by the requirements of empirical models of weed population dynamics to identify correlations between traits and model parameters....... These relationships were used to build a generic model, operating at the level of functional traits, to simulate the impact of increasing herbicide and fertiliser use on virtual weeds along gradients of seed weight and maximum height. The model generated ‘fitness contours’ (defined as population growth rates) within...

  8. On the Parable of Weeds and Wheat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Wei

    2013-01-01

    This paper probes on one of the famous parables of Jesus-the Wheat and Weeds, and demonstrates some implied meaning and morals connoted in it. Through an interesting contrast between the calm restraint of the householder and high anxi-ety of his slaves, this parable suggests that people should stay calm and learn from God to be tolerate and lenient religiously to“let wheat and weeds grow together until the harvest”. Meanwhile, God drops a subtle hint to seed wheat positively in stead of sug-gesting people to remove weeds negatively.

  9. The Evaluation and the Comparison of the Effect of Mechanical Weeding Systems on Rice Weed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazlollah Eskandari Cherati

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the influence of different methods of controlling weeds such as mechanical weeding and mechanical weeder efficiency analysis in mechanical cultivation conditions, in farming year of 2011 an experiment was done in a farm in coupling and development of technology center in Haraz, Iran. The treatments consisted of (I control treatment: where no weeding was done, (II use of mechanical weeding without engine and (III power mechanical weeding. Results showed that experimental treatments had significantly different effects (p = 0.05 on yield traits and number of filled grains per panicle, while treatments had the significant effects on grain weight and dry weight of weeds in the first, second and third weeding methods at 1% of confidence level. Treatment (II had its most significant effect on number of filled grains per panicle and yield performance standpoint, which was 3705.97 kg/ha in its highest peak. Treatment (III was ranked as second influential with 3559.8 kg/ha. In addition, under (I treatments, 2364.73 kg/ha of yield produced. The minimum dry weights of weeds in all weeding methods were related to the treatment (II, (III and (I, respectively. The correlation coefficient analysis showed that total yield had a significant positive correlation with the panicle grain yield per plant (r = 0.55* and the number of grains/panicle (r = 0.57* and the number of filled grains (r = 0.63*. Total rice yield also had negative correlation of r = -0.64* with weed dry weight at second weed sampling time (17 DAT. The weed dry weight at third and fourth sampling times (24 and 40 DAT had negative correlations of -0.65** and r = -0.61* with rice yield, respectively.

  10. Effect of mechanical weeding on wild chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.) populations in winter wheat crop (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaunard, D; Bizoux, J P; Monty, A; Henriet, F; De Proft, M; Vancutsem, F; Mahy, G; Bodson, B

    2012-01-01

    Currently, economic, agronomic and environmental concerns lead to reduce the use of herbicides. Mechanical weeding can help to reach this objective. Dynamics and biology of wild chamomile (Matricaria chamomilla L.) populations were assessed as well as dynamic of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) for four level of application of a weeder-harrow (0, 1, 2, 3 treatment(s)). After each treatment, an effect of mechanical weeding on wild chamomile density was observed. Density of wild chamomile decreased significantly with intensification of mechanical weeding. A third treatment allowed eliminating late emerged plants.

  11. WHITE BLISTER SPECIES (Albuginaceae ON WEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Vrandečić

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The obligate fungi inside the family Albuginaceae are widespread world wide and cause white rust or white blister disease. Mycopopulation of weeds has been researched within the project „The role of weeds in epidemiology of row-crop diseases“. The aim of this research was to identify white blister species occurring on weeds in Eastern Croatia. Weed plants with disease symptoms characteristic for white blister species have been collected since 2001 on location Slavonia and Baranja country. Determination of white blister species was based on morphological characters of pathogen and the host. Wilsoniana bliti was determined on Amaranthus retroflexus and Amaranthus hybridus leaves. Capsella bursa pastoris is a host for Albugo candida. Ambrosia artemisiifolia is a host for Pustula sp. and Cirsium arvense was found to be host for Pustula spinulosa. Wilsoniana portulaceae was determined on Portulaca oleracea.

  12. Periods of weed interference in cowpea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria José Pinheiro Corrêa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to determine the periods weed interference in cowpea. The experimental design was randomized blocks, and the treatments consisted of periods of control or coexistence with the culture. The periods of control or weed coexistence after culture emergence were: 0-10, 0-20, 0-30, 0-40, 0-50, 0-60 and 0 – 80 days after crop emergence. The main weed density were: AlternantheratenellaColla,CyperusrotundusL., Digitariaciliaris(Retz. Koeler, Eleusineindica(L.Gaertn,MollugoverticillataL.Considering 5% of tolerance in cowpea yield reduction, the period prior interference was 8 days after emergence (DAE, total period of interference prevention was 53 DAE and critical period of interference prevention between 8 and 53 DAE. Weed interference reduced the grainyield up to 46%.

  13. Using Weeds and Wildflowers to Study Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Nancy

    1984-01-01

    Offers suggestions for activities in which local weeds and wildflowers are used to study a variety of topics. These topics include classification, ecological succession, and mapping. Also lists the types of experiments students can perform with these plants. (JN)

  14. WEEDS IDENTIFICATION USING EVOLUTIONARY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE ALGORITHM

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    In a world reached a population of six billion humans increasingly demand it for food, feed with a water shortage and the decline of agricultural land and the deterioration of the climate needs 1.5 billion hectares of agricultural land and in case of failure to combat pests needs about 4 billion hectares. Weeds represent 34% of the whole pests while insects, diseases and the deterioration of agricultural land present the remaining percentage. Weeds Identification has been one of the most inte...

  15. Global perspective of herbicide-resistant weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Ian

    2014-09-01

    Two hundred and twenty weed species have evolved resistance to one or more herbicides, and there are now 404 unique cases (species × site of action) of herbicide-resistant weeds globally. ALS inhibitor-resistant weeds account for about a third of all cases (133/404) and are particularly troublesome in rice and cereals. Although 71 weed species have been identified with triazine resistance, their importance has dwindled with the shift towards Roundup Ready® crops in the USA and the reduction of triazine usage in Europe. Forty-three grasses have evolved resistance to ACCase inhibitors, with the most serious cases being Avena spp., Lolium spp., Phalaris spp., Setaria spp. and Alopecurus myosuroides, infesting more than 25 million hectares of cereal production globally. Of the 24 weed species with glyphosate resistance, 16 have been found in Roundup Ready® cropping systems. Although Conyza canadensis is the most widespread glyphosate-resistant weed, Amaranthus palmeri and Amaranthus tuberculartus are the two most economically important glyphosate-resistant weeds because of the area they infest and the fact that these species have evolved resistance to numerous other herbicide sites of action, leaving growers with few herbicidal options for their control. The agricultural chemical industry has not brought any new herbicides with novel sites of action to market in over 30 years, making growers reliant on using existing herbicides in new ways. In addition, tougher registration and environmental regulations on herbicides have resulted in a loss of some herbicides, particularly in Europe. The lack of novel herbicide chemistries being brought to market combined with the rapid increase in multiple resistance in weeds threatens crop production worldwide.

  16. Crop diversity prevents serious weed problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melander, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Weed management in organic crop production could benefit from more diversification of today’s cropping systems. However, the potential of diversification needs better documentation and solid suggestions for employment in practise must be identified.......Weed management in organic crop production could benefit from more diversification of today’s cropping systems. However, the potential of diversification needs better documentation and solid suggestions for employment in practise must be identified....

  17. Effect of different integrated weed management methods on weed density and yield of sugar beet crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    alireza koochaki

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to compare different weed management methods in sugar beet, two experiments were conducted at mashhad for two years in 2005-2006 and 2006-2007. Each experiment designed as a Complete Randomized Block with three replication. The treatments include: Metamitron(Goltix plus Phenmedipham (Betanal (Gol+Bet, Goltix plus Cultivation (Gol+Cu, Disk plus Betanal (Di+Bet, Disk plus Cultivation(Di+Cu, Cover Crop plus Betanal (Co+Bet, Cover Crop plus Cultivation (Co+Cu, Weeding (W and Betanal plus Weeding (Bet+W. Samplings were taken at three stages early season, after imposing the treatments and late season. Results showed that at early season in two experiments, density of weeds was lower in cover crop and disk treatment compared with other treats and the second sampling in first experiment, weeding and disk plus cultivation of treatments with 21.5 and 26.6 respectively plants per m2 and in second experiment year, weeding and application betanal plus weeding treatments, with 14 and 17.8 respectively plant in m2 showed the lowest. In the second experiment year, minimum and maximum sugar beet yield were obtained with cover crop plus betanal and weeding with 43 and 104 ton per hectare respectively. The lowest yield was obtained in check plots with 3.5ton per hectare. Maximum sugar contain (19.35% was obtained in betanal herbicide plus cultivation treatment and minimum (14.88% was obtained with hand weeding treatment. However maximum sugar beet yield was obtained with betanal plus weeding (17.85 ton per hectare and the minimum with cover crop plus betanal (7.5 ton per hectare. Key words: integrated weed management, cover crop, herbicide, cultivation, sugar beet.

  18. Weed flora of South Africa 1: major groupings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. J. Wells

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available Whilst attention has been focussed on combating priority weeds we have neglected to obtain an overall picture of our weed flora. To rectify the position a National Weed List has been compiled, the weeds have been classified and an analysis made of the weed flora. Aspects covered in this paper are: major taxa, exotic and indigenous species and kinds of weeds. The presence of imbalances or power shifts between indigenous taxa is indicated by the fact that most weeds are supplied by a few families, and that Monocotyledon species are twice as likely to be weeds as are Dicotyledon species. The preponderance of Monocotyledon weeds is explained by re-invasion of cultivated and abandoned fields in grassland areas rather than by a shift towards Monocotyledon species in the veld. Exotic weeds contribute to imbalances via their greater versatility as well as by re-inforcing some taxa or kind of weed groupings at the expense of others. There is a power shift towards exotic Gymnosperms. Apart from flora weeds, exotics provide most agrestals, lawn weeds and weeds of planted pastures, and nearly as many ruderals as the indigenous species.

  19. Cultivation of Pleurotus ostreatus on weed plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Nirmalendu; Mukherjee, Mina

    2007-10-01

    Oyster mushroom, Pleurotus ostreatus (Jacq.:Fr.) Kumm. ITCC 3308 (collected from Indian Type Culture Collection, IARI, New Delhi, India, 110012) was grown on dry weed plants, Leonotis sp, Sida acuta, Parthenium argentatum, Ageratum conyzoides, Cassia sophera, Tephrosia purpurea and Lantana camara. Leonotis sp. was the best substrate in fruit body production of P. ostreatus when it was mixed with rice straw (1:1, wet wt/wet wt) for mushroom cultivation. The fruiting time for P. ostreatus was also less on Leonotis sp. than on any other weed substrates tested in the present investigation. T. purpurea was the least suited weed for oyster mushroom cultivation. The main problem of oyster mushroom cultivation on weed substrates was found to be low yield in the second flush that could be overcome by blending weed plants with rice straw. The protein contents of the fruit bodies obtained from Cassia sophera, Parthenium argentatum and Leonotis sp. were not only better than rice straw but also from the rice straw supplemented weeds.

  20. 非化学方法在农田杂草防治中的应用%Review of the Development in Non-chemical Weed Management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白勇; 王晓燕; 胡光; 张有度

    2007-01-01

    杂草防治的非化学方法在保证当今粮食安全和食品安全方面的作用引起了越来越多的关注.非化学方法概括起来包括各种能够增强作物竞争力的栽培措施和利用非化学方法对杂草进行直接控制.综述了国内外在这些方面的研究进展,提出了今后研究的方向.

  1. Favorable fragmentation: river reservoirs can impede downstream expansion of riparian weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rood, Stewart B; Braatne, Jeffrey H; Goater, Lori A

    2010-09-01

    River valleys represent biologically rich corridors characterized by natural disturbances that create moist and barren sites suitable for colonization by native riparian plants, and also by weeds. Dams and reservoirs interrupt the longitudinal corridors and we hypothesized that this could restrict downstream weed expansion. To consider this "reservoir impediment" hypothesis we assessed the occurrences and abundances of weeds along a 315-km river valley corridor that commenced with an unimpounded reach of the Snake River and extended through Brownlee, Oxbow, and Hells Canyon reservoirs and dams, and downstream along the Snake River. Sampling along 206 belt transects with 3610 quadrats revealed 16 noxious and four invasive weed species. Ten weeds were upland plants, with Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense) restricted to the upstream reaches, where field morning glory (Convolvulus arvensis) was also more common. In contrast, St. John's wort (Hypericum perforatum) was more abundant below the dams, and medusahead wildrye (Taeniatherum caput-medusae) occurred primarily along the reservoirs. All seven riparian species were abundant in the upstream zones but sparse or absent below the dams. This pattern was observed for the facultative riparian species, poison hemlock (Conium maculatum) and perennial pepperweed (Lepidium latifolium), the obligate riparian, yellow nut sedge (Cyperus esculentus), the invasive perennial, reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), and three invasive riparian trees, Russian olive (Elaeagnus angustifolia), false indigo (Amorpha fruticosa), and tamarisk (Tamarix spp.). The hydrophyte purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) was also restricted to the upstream zone. These longitudinal patterns indicate that the reservoirs have impeded the downstream expansion of riparian weeds, and this may especially result from the repetitive draw-down and refilling of Brownlee Reservoir that imposes a lethal combination of drought and flood stress. The dams and

  2. IMPORTANCE OF CRITICAL PERIOD OF WEED COMPETITION FOR CROP GROWING

    OpenAIRE

    Marijana Ivanek-Martinčić; Zvonimir Ostojić; Klara Barić

    2010-01-01

    A concept of critical period of weed competition has been introduced for more than 40 years ago. The concept is based on the assumption that weeds are not equally harmful to a crop during the whole season and that there is a period in crop development in which weeds impact on the yield is the biggest. This period is called critical period of weed competition (CPWC), critical period of weed interference, or critical period of weed control. There is a difference in CPWC between crops, but CPWC ...

  3. Developments in physical weed control in Northwest Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riemens, Marieen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In North West Europe there is an increasing need for advanced weed control methods. This paper gives an overview of the developments in physical weed control methods. Current innovations in interrow weeding focus on systems that take over the steering function of the driver in order to make them more precise and reduce crop losses. The latest developments in intrarow weeding techniques involve technologies that automatically detect and classify crop and weed plants and use this information to guide a weeding device. Several commercially available examples are presented.

  4. Weed seed production, crop planting pattern, and mechanical weeding in wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, S.K.; Jansen, J.

    2002-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate weed seed production in widely spaced spring wheat crops that received aggressive mechanical weed control (hoeing and harrowing) compared with that in narrowly spaced crops receiving less aggressive mechanical control (harrowing only). Three species (wild

  5. Changes in weed infestation of spring barley depending on variable pluvio-thermal conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Krawczyk

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyze segetal weeds present in spring barley against the background of changes in pluvio-thermal conditions observed over the last 20 years (1993–2012 at the Field Experimental Station of the Institute of Plant Protection – National Research Institute in Winna Góra, Poland. Based on the mean value of the Sielianinov hydrothermal coefficient for the three months of spring vegetation, i.e., April, May, and June, three classes of pluvio-thermal conditions (very dry, moderately dry, humid were distinguished. The phytosociological stability of weed species analyzed during the study period was assessed and the Shannon–Wiener index of species diversity in the communities and the Simpson dominance index were calculated for segetal weeds present in spring barley. In the 20-year period analyzed, Chenopodium album and Viola arvensis exhibited the highest phytosociological stability and the highest abundance in the spring barley crop. Over the years analyzed, the dry spring vegetation periods were characterized by significant precipitation deficiency between late April and mid-June. In the years with favorable meteorological conditions, the weed species diversity measured by the Shannon–Wiener diversity index was higher than in the years with precipitation deficiency. In the very dry years, the species dominance index in the spring vegetation period was higher than in the wet years. The yield loss caused by weed infestation in the very dry years was higher by 6% as compared to moderately dry and wet years.

  6. Studies on weed diversity and its associated phytosociology under direct dry seeded rice systems

    OpenAIRE

    Mantosh Kumar Sinha; Arnab Banerjee

    2016-01-01

    Chhattisgarh is commonly known as Bowl of rice where rice is grown as monocrop in the entire state whether soil is bhata, matasi, kanhar or black soil. Present study is based on the study of biodiversity of weeds under Direct Dry Seeded Rice Systems in Koria District (C.G.) Study was conducted to assess the phytosociological studies of weed species in paddy field at Baikunthpur, Koriya district, Chattisgarh. A total of 43 genera and 9 families of Dicotyledonae and 3 families of monocots and...

  7. Participatory development of weed management technologies in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissoh, P.V.

    2006-01-01

    Keywords: permanent land use, weeds, indigenous knowledge, integrated crop and soil management, participatory learning, co-researchWeeds constitute a major constraint to agricultural production in the Republic of Benin. Agricultural intensification and the evolution towards permanent cropping system

  8. Application of Machine Vision Technique in Weed Identification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhen-heng; ZHANG Chang-li; FANG Jun-long

    2004-01-01

    This paper mainly introduces some foreign research methods and fruits about weed identification by applying machine vision. This facet researches is lack in our country, this paper could be reference for domestic studies about weed identification.

  9. Weeds as important vegetables for farmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisella S. Cruz-Garcia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the multiple uses and cognitive importance of edible weeds in Northeast Thailand. Research methods included focus group discussions and freelistings. A total of 43 weeds consumed as vegetable were reported, including economic, naturalized, agricultural and environmental weeds. The weedy vegetables varied considerably on edible parts, presenting both reproductive (flowers, fruits and seeds and vegetative organs (shoots, leaves, flower stalks, stems or the whole aerial part. The results of this study show that weedy vegetables are an important resource for rice farmers in this region, not only as a food but also because of the multiple additional uses they have, especially as medicine. The fact that the highest Cognitive Salience Index (CSI scores of all wild vegetables freelisted corresponded to weeds, reinforces the assertion that weeds are culturally cognitively important for local farmers as a vegetable source. This is a key finding, given that these species are targets of common pesticides used in this region.

  10. Importance of herbicide resistance in weeds of natural areas

    OpenAIRE

    DiTomaso, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, the majority of the plant species that are developing herbicide resistance are those that occur as weeds in agricultural environments, on roadsides and in other rights-of-way. In contrast, herbicide resistance is not nearly so common in weeds of natural areas or rangelands. A search of the International Survey of Herbicide Resistant Weeds ( weedscience.com ) revealed no herbicide-resistant weeds (i.e., invasive nonnative species) listed for terrestrial natural areas anywhere in the...

  11. PLANT SPACING AND WEED MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES INFLUENCE WEED COMPETITIVENESS OF DRUM SEEDED RICE (Oryza sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B N Sandeep Nayak

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Direct wet seeded-rice sown through drum seeder, a potential wise rice production system in the present-day scenario, is subject to severe weed infestation and, therefore, development of a sustainable weed management strategy is crucial for its wide spread adoption. The present study was conducted in kharif 2012 at department of agronomy division with NLR-33358 (SOMASILA using six planting densities under five weed management conditions. The plant spacing tried were: 20cm x 7cm, 20 cm x 10.5 cm, 20 cm x 14 cm, 20 cm x 17.5 cm and 20 cm x 24.5cm and 20 cm x15cm. with a plant density of 71, 47, 35, 28, 20 and 33 hills m-2, respectively and five weed management practices viz., weedy check (W1, hand weeding at 20 and 40 DAS (W2, cono weeding at 20 and 40 with modified cono weeder (W3, pre-emergence application of anilofos @ 0.375 kg a.i ha-1 followed by post-emergence application of 2, 4 D sodium salt @ 1.0 kg a.i ha-1 20-25 DAS (W4, pre-emergence application of pendimethalin @1.0 kg a.i ha-1 followed by post-emergence application of bispyribac sodium @ 20 g a.i ha-1 30 DAS ( W5. . The experiment was laid out in strip- plot design with three replications assigning weed management techniques in vertical factor and plant spacing in horizontal factor. Direct wet seeded rice field was infested with 12 and 22 weed species, kharif -2012 season having Echinochloa colona, Leptochloa chinensis, Digitaria aescendens, Cyperus iriaand Eleusine indicaas the predominant weeds. Rice spacing exerted significant influence on both weed pressure and yield performance of crop. With the increase in plant spacing weed dry matter decreased but rice yield increased. In this season, among different plant densities, the highest density of 71 hills m-2(D1 resulted in minimum weed density, weed drymatter, and more number of tillers m-2 and maximum drymatter production at all stages of plant growth. closest spacing resulted in maximum weed suppression, but among various rice

  12. The role of arable weed seeds for agroecosystem functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franke, A.C.; Lotz, L.A.P.; Burg, van der W.J.; Overbeek, van L.S.

    2009-01-01

    A literature study was conducted to gather knowledge on the impact of weed seeds on agroecosystem functioning other than effects related to the production of weed seedlings and plants. The results of the review suggested that a larger and more diverse weed seedbank can contribute to the biodiversity

  13. Critical period of weed control In cumin (Cuminum cyminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    azade hoseyni

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the critical period of weed control in Cumin, an experiment with Complete Randomized Block Design and three replications was conducted in experimental field of Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, During 2004-2005 growing season. Treatments included different combinations of weed free and weed infested periods (20, 30, 40 and 80 days after germination plus weedy check and weed free check. Critical period weed control was evaluated with Gompertz and Logestic functions. Traits measured were yield and yield components, harvest index of cumin and also number and weight of weed species. Results showed the critical period was between 24-38 days after germination. With increasing interfereing period at early or late growth stages of cumin, the economic yield was reduced. By extending weeding periods at early stage of growth or during the growth period, dry weight of weeds were reduced, while extending weeding period at the end of growth stage and also weed free during growth period, early or late stages of growth had no significant effects on yield components except on number of umbels per plant. Harvest index was positively affected by early weeding. It appears that early weeding was somehow more effective on yield components for cumin.

  14. CRITICAL PERIOD OF MUNGBEAN (PHASEOLUS RADIATUS L. TO WEED COMPETITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.H. UTOMO*

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was conducted to study the critical period of weed control on the crop of mungbean (Phaseolus radiatus L.. The studies were done in the field of BIOTROP Experimental Station with the natural existing weed population. It was found that the critical period of mungbean to weed competition was from 3-6 weeks after planting.

  15. CRITICAL PERIOD OF MUNGBEAN (PHASEOLUS RADIATUS L.) TO WEED COMPETITION

    OpenAIRE

    I.H. UTOMO*

    1989-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the critical period of weed control on the crop of mungbean (Phaseolus radiatus L.). The studies were done in the field of BIOTROP Experimental Station with the natural existing weed population. It was found that the critical period of mungbean to weed competition was from 3-6 weeks after planting.

  16. Weed control through seedling abrasion with an organic fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many tools exist to control weeds in organic crops, and each has utility in specific situations. Nevertheless, surveys of organic farmers indicate that weed management often is second only to labor supply as their main bottleneck for success. Consequently, new tactics for managing weeds are desirabl...

  17. 7 CFR 201.52 - Noxious-weed seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Noxious-weed seeds. 201.52 Section 201.52 Agriculture... REGULATIONS Purity Analysis in the Administration of the Act § 201.52 Noxious-weed seeds. (a) The determination of the number of seeds, bulblets, or tubers of individual noxious weeds present per unit...

  18. Herbicide-resistant weeds: Management strategies and upcoming technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbicides have contributed to substantial increase in crop yields over the past seven decades. Over reliance on herbicides for weed control has led to rapid evolution of herbicide-resistant (HR) weeds. Increased awareness of herbicide resistance and adoption of diversified weed control tactics by f...

  19. Pest Control in Corn and Soybeans: Weeds - Insects - Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doersch, R. E.; And Others

    This document gives the characteristics and application rates for herbicides used to control annual weeds in corn, annual and perennial broadleaf weeds in corn, quackgrass and yellow nutsedge in corn, and annual weeds in soybeans. It also gives insecticide use information for corn and soybeans. A brief discussion of disease control in corn and…

  20. Onion and weed response to mustard (Sinapis alba) seed meal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed control in organic onion production is often difficult and expensive, requiring numerous cultivations and extensive hand-weeding. Onion safety and weed control with mustard seed meal (MSM) derived from Sinapis alba was evaluated in greenhouse and field trials. MSM applied at 110, 220, and 440 g...

  1. Developments in physical weed control in Northwest Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riemens, M.M.

    2016-01-01

    In North West Europe there is an increasing need for advanced weed control methods. This paper gives an overview of the developments in physical weed control methods. Current innovations in interrow weeding focus on systems that take over the steering function of the driver in order to make them mor

  2. Weed supression by smother crops and selective herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Severino Francisco José

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a smother crop is thought to suppress weed density and to add other beneficial effects in sustainable agricultural systems. Weed suppression ought to be considered an essential component of integrated weed management. However, very little is known about the effects of green manure plants on weeds. This study evaluated the influence of three green manure species on weed suppression and selectivity of herbicides. A field experiment was designed to determine the effect of the green manure species Crotalaria juncea, Arachis pintoi and pigeon pea on the weeds Brachiaria decumbens, guineagrass and hairy beggarticks, and on the natural weed infestation in the inter rows area of an avocado orchard. The weed species were suppressed differently by each green manure species. Soil samples collected from the field experiment presented a residual effect, of at least 30 d, in suppressing weed seed bank recruitment; this residual effect was caused by the residues of the green manure present in the soil. When the green manure was incorporated into the top 5 cm of soil or left on the surface, in a greenhouse experiment, the emergence of weed seeds was significantly inhibited, depending on the species, and on the amount and depth of green manure incorporation. Greenhouse experiments indicate that pre-emergence herbicides cause lower phytotoxicity than post-emergence Arachis pintoi. Smother crops using green manure species, when well established in an area, provide additional weed control to the cropping system and are effective and valuable tools in integrated weed management.

  3. Cover crop-based ecological weed management: exploration and optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruidhof, H.M.

    2008-01-01

    Keywords: organic farming, ecologically-based weed management, cover crops, green manure, allelopathy, Secale cereale, Brassica napus, Medicago sativa Cover crop-based ecological weed management: exploration and optimization. In organic farming systems, weed control is recognized as one of the mai

  4. Checklist for the crop weeds of Paraguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juana De Egea

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Paraguay, a country whose economy is based mainly on agriculture and livestock for export, has experienced a major expansion in mechanized crops during the last few decades. Despite being heavily dependent on agriculture, Paraguay has very limited research on crop weeds, in spite of these having a high economic impact on production. This work aims to update and enhance the knowledgebase on the most common weeds affecting productive fields throughout the different ecoregions of Paraguay. We present here the first checklist of crop weeds for the country, which includes a total of 256 taxa (189 species, 10 subspecies, 54 varieties and 3 forms, with the most species-rich families being Poaceae and Asteraceae followed by Malvaceae, Amaranthaceae, Fabaceae and Solanaceae. The list includes three new records for the country. Synonyms, distribution details within Paraguay, habit and a voucher specimen are provided for each taxon.

  5. Ozonation Systems as a Non-Chemical Alternative for Stored Grain Protection

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    The use of ozone as a non-chemical alternative in stored grain protection was studied by conducting scale-up demonstrations using a fixed bed ozonation system and developing a semi-continuous counterflow and a continuous flow ozonation treatment system. The objectives of this research were to determine the efficacy of ozonation to control insect pests without affecting end-use quality; to prove the concept of the semi-continuous counterflow ozonation system to ozonate grain at a faster rate a...

  6. Mulching and Fertilization Effects on Weed Dynamics under Conservation Agriculture-Based Maize Cropping in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Mtambanengwe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A two-year study was conducted to assess how mulch influences weed dynamics following imposition of different fertilization treatments under three crop establishment options: (i conventional; (ii ripping; and (iii basin, in a two-year maize-legume rotation. Eight treatments were imposed within each crop establishment option and received maize stover mulch applied at 0% or 30% cover before planting  maize (Zea mays or cowpea (Vigna unguiculata as test crops. Maize received nitrogen (N at 35, 90, or 120 kg·ha−1 and phosphorus (P at 14 or 26 kg·ha−1 applied alone or in combination with 4 or 7 t cattle manure·ha−1, while cowpea received 8 or 17 N·kg·ha−1 and similar P rates to maize. Results indicated that both weed biomass and diversity were influenced more by fertilization than method of crop establishment. On treatments under high fertilizer application rates, or previously planted to cowpea weed biomass ranged between 220 and 400 g·m−2 under mulch and 370–510 g·m−2 (no mulch. Here species richness ranged between 7–16 and was dominated by dicotyledons. This was in contrast to biomass ranges of 75–200 g·m−2 in the low fertilized and control plots, where only one or two grass types dominated. Overall, weed densities were 6% to 51% higher under conventional tillage compared to the two conservation agriculture (CA options, although the data indicated that mulch significantly (p < 0.05 depressed weed density by up to 70%. We concluded that mulching could be a potential mechanism for reducing weeding labor costs for smallholders and the general environmental and health concerns associated with the use of herbicides in CA systems.

  7. MULCHES AND OTHER COVER MATERIALS TO REDUCE WEED GROWTH IN CONTAINER-GROWN NURSERY STOCK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rys, F; Van Wesemael, D; Van Haecke, D; Mechant, E; Gobin, B

    2014-01-01

    Due to the recent EU-wide implementation of Integrated Pest Management (IPM), alternative methods to reduce weed growth in container-grown nursery stock are needed to cut back the use of herbicides. Covering the upper layer of the substrate is known as a potential method to prevent or reduce weed growth in plant containers. As a high variety of mulches and other cover materials are on the market, however, it is no longer clear for growers which cover material is most efficient for use in containers. Therefore, we examined the effect on weed growth of different mulches and other cover materials, including Pinus maritima, P. sylvestris, Bio-Top Basic, Bio-Top Excellent, coco chips fine, hemp fibres, straw pellets, coco disk 180LD and jute disk. Cover materials were applied immediately after repotting of Ligustrum ovalifolium or planting of Fagus sylvatica. At regular times, both weed growth and side effects (e.g., plant growth, water status of the substrate, occurrence of mushrooms, foraging of birds, complete cover of the substrate and fixation) were assessed. All examined mulches or other cover materials were able to reduce weed growth on the containers during the whole growing season. Weed suppression was even better than that of a chemical treated control. Although all materials showed some side effects, the impact on plant growth is most important to the grower and depends not only on material characteristics (e.g., biodegradation, nutrient leaching and N-immobilisation) but also on container size and climatic conditions. In conclusion, mulches and other cover materials can be a valuable tool within IPM to lower herbicide use. To enable a deliberate choice of which cover material is best used in a specific situation more research is needed on lifespan and stability as well as on economic characteristics of the materials.

  8. Weed response to herbicides: regional-scale distribution of herbicide resistance alleles in the grass weed Alopecurus myosuroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menchari, Yosra; Camilleri, Christine; Michel, Séverine; Brunel, Dominique; Dessaint, Fabrice; Le Corre, Valérie; Délye, Christophe

    2006-01-01

    Effective herbicide resistance management requires an assessment of the range of spatial dispersion of resistance genes among weed populations and identification of the vectors of this dispersion. In the grass weed Alopecurus myosuroides (black-grass), seven alleles of the acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) gene are known to confer herbicide resistance. Here, we assessed their respective frequencies and spatial distribution on two nested geographical scales (the whole of France and the French administrative district of Côte d'Or) by genotyping 13 151 plants originating from 243 fields. Genetic variation in ACCase was structured in local populations at both geographical scales. No spatial structure in the distribution of resistant ACCase alleles and no isolation by distance were detected at either geographical scale investigated. These data, together with ACCase sequencing and data from the literature, suggest that evolution of A. myosuroides resistance to herbicides occurred at the level of the field or group of adjacent fields by multiple, independent appearances of mutant ACCase alleles that seem to have rather restricted spatial propagation. Seed transportation by farm machinery seems the most likely vector for resistance gene dispersal in A. myosuroides.

  9. Dynamics of Weeds in the Soil Seed Bank: A Hidden Markov Model to Estimate Life History Traits from Standing Plant Time Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgy, Benjamin; Reboud, Xavier; Peyrard, Nathalie; Sabbadin, Régis; Gaba, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the population dynamics of annual plants is a challenge due to their hidden seed banks in the field. However, such predictions are highly valuable for determining management strategies, specifically in agricultural landscapes. In agroecosystems, most weed seeds survive during unfavourable seasons and persist for several years in the seed bank. This causes difficulties in making accurate predictions of weed population dynamics and life history traits (LHT). Consequently, it is very difficult to identify management strategies that limit both weed populations and species diversity. In this article, we present a method of assessing weed population dynamics from both standing plant time series data and an unknown seed bank. We use a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) to obtain estimates of over 3,080 botanical records for three major LHT: seed survival in the soil, plant establishment (including post-emergence mortality), and seed production of 18 common weed species. Maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches were complementarily used to estimate LHT values. The results showed that the LHT provided by the HMM enabled fairly accurate estimates of weed populations in different crops. There was a positive correlation between estimated germination rates and an index of the specialisation to the crop type (IndVal). The relationships between estimated LHTs and that between the estimated LHTs and the ecological characteristics of weeds provided insights into weed strategies. For example, a common strategy to cope with agricultural practices in several weeds was to produce less seeds and increase germination rates. This knowledge, especially of LHT for each type of crop, should provide valuable information for developing sustainable weed management strategies.

  10. Weed hosts of cotton mealybug, Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennila, S; Prasad, Y G; Prabhakar, M; Agarwal, Meenu; Sreedevi, G; Bambawale, O M

    2013-03-01

    The exotic cotton mealybug, Phenacoccus solenopsis Tinsley (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) invaded India during 2006, and caused widespread infestation across all nine cotton growing states. P. solenopsis also infested weeds that aided its faster spread and increased severity across cotton fields. Two year survey carried out to document host plants of P. solenopsis between 2008 and 2010 revealed 27, 83, 59 and 108 weeds belonging to 8, 18, 10 and 32 families serving as alternate hosts at North, Central, South and All India cotton growing zones, respectively. Plant species of four families viz., Asteraceae, Amaranthaceae, Malvaceae and Lamiaceae constituted almost 50% of the weed hosts. While 39 weed species supported P. solenopsis multiplication during the cotton season, 37 were hosts during off season. Higher number of weeds as off season hosts (17) outnumbering cotton season (13) at Central over other zones indicated the strong carryover of the pest aided by weeds between two cotton seasons. Six, two and seven weed hosts had the extreme severity of Grade 4 during cotton, off and cotton + off seasons, respectively. Higher number of weed hosts of P. solenopsis were located at roadside: South (12) > Central (8) > North (3) zones. Commonality of weed hosts was higher between C+S zones, while no weed host was common between N+S zones. Paper furnishes the wide range of weed hosts of P. solenopsis, discusses their significance, and formulated general and specific cultural management strategies for nationwide implementation to prevent its outbreaks.

  11. The Effect of Laser Treatment as a Weed Control Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Thomas; Mathiassen, Solvejg K.; Christensen, Svend

    2006-01-01

    A laser beam directed towards weeds can be an efficient weed control method as an alternative to herbicides. Lasers may deliver high-density energy to selected plant material, raising the temperature of the water in the plant cells and thereby stop or delay the growth. A commercial use of lasers...... for weed control, however, require a systematic investigation of the relationship between energy density and the biological effect on different weed species, growth stages, etc. This paper investigates the effect of laser treatment directed towards the apical meristems of selected weed species...... at the cotyledon stage. Experiments were carried out under controlled conditions, using pot-grown weeds. Two lasers and two spot sizes were tested and different energy doses were applied by varying the exposure time. The biological efficacy was examined on three different weed species: Stellaria media (common...

  12. Weeds optimally grow in peat swamp after burning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.D. Susanti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available After clearing land by burning the peat, then the weeds and undergrowth will flourish. Even sometimes, the weeds are eventually burned again. Weed is known as a destroyer plant that has to be controlled. Through proper treatment, the existing weeds in peatlands can be potentiallly exploited. The purpose of this study was to determine the calorific value of briquettes as one of peatland weeds utilization. The results showed that the calorific value ranged from 2,492 cal/g to 5,230 cal/g. The lowest calorific value was on ‘teki kecil’ grass (Scirpus grossus Lf, while the highest calorific value was observed for ‘bantalaki grass’ (Hymenachne amplexicaulis Nees. The high calorific value of the peat weeds are potential for biomass briquettes raw materials. The utilization and use of peat weed briquettes as a raw materials expected can reduce land degradation due to peat swamp burning

  13. Image-based thresholds for weeds in maize fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asif, Ali; Streibig, Jens Carl; Christensen, Svend

    2015-01-01

    in some parts of the field and if late germinating weeds do not affect yield, it may not be necessary the spray such places from an economic point of view. Consequently, it makes sense to develop weed control thresholds for patch spraying, based on weed cover early in the growing season. In Danish maize...... field experiments conducted from 2010 to 2012, we estimated competitive ability parameters and control thresholds of naturally established weed populations in the context of decision-making for patch spraying. The most frequent weed was Chenopodium album, accompanied by Capsella bursa-pastoris, Cirsium...... arvense, Lamium amplexicaule, Tripleurospermum inodorum, Poa annua, Polygonum aviculare, Polygonum persicaria, Stellaria media and Veronica persica. Relative leaf cover of weeds was estimated using an image analysis method. The relation between relative weed leaf cover and yield loss was analysed...

  14. Acetic acid and weed control in onions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed control is a major challenge in conventional and organic production systems, especially for organically produced sweet onion (Allium cepa L.). Although corn gluten meal shows great promise as an organic preemergent herbicide for onions, research has shown the need for supplemental, postemergen...

  15. WEEDS IDENTIFICATION USING EVOLUTIONARY ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Tobal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In a world reached a population of six billion humans increasingly demand it for food, feed with a water shortage and the decline of agricultural land and the deterioration of the climate needs 1.5 billion hectares of agricultural land and in case of failure to combat pests needs about 4 billion hectares. Weeds represent 34% of the whole pests while insects, diseases and the deterioration of agricultural land present the remaining percentage. Weeds Identification has been one of the most interesting classification problems for Artificial Intelligence (AI and image processing. The most common case is to identify weeds within the field as they reduce the productivity and harm the existing crops. Success in this area results in an increased productivity, profitability and at the same time decreases the cost of operation. On the other hand, when AI algorithms combined with appropriate imagery tools may present the right solution to the weed identification problem. In this study, we introduce an evolutionary artificial neural network to minimize the time of classification training and minimize the error through the optimization of the neuron parameters by means of a genetic algorithm. The genetic algorithm, with its global search capability, finds the optimum histogram vectors used for network training and target testing through a fitness measure that reflects the result accuracy and avoids the trial-and-error process of estimating the network inputs according to the histogram data.

  16. Weed Science and Technology. MP-17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, Harold P.; Lee, Gary A.

    This document is one in a series distributed by the Agricultural Extension Service of the University of Wyoming-Laramie. It presents the principles and methods of weed control especially as it relates to the use of herbicides. The factors influencing the effectiveness of both foliar-applied and soil-applied herbicides are discussed. A listing of…

  17. Bio-gas production from alligator weeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, A.

    1976-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to study the effect of temperature, sample preparation, reducing agents, light intensity and pH of the media, on bio-gas and methane production from the microbial anaerobic decomposition of alligator weeds (Alternanthera philoxeroides. Efforts were also made for the isolation and characterization of the methanogenic bacteria.

  18. Alternathera philoxeroides (Martius) Grisebach - alligator weed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological control of Alternanthera philoxeroides, alligator weed, began when George Vogt, USDA, conducted several surveys by public transport in South America during the 1960s. Three agents were released in USA and two of them, the flea beetle Agasicles hygrophila and the moth Arcola malloi were re...

  19. RNAseq reveals weed-induced PIF3-like as a candidate target to manipulate weed stress response in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, David P; Hansen, Stephanie A; Moriles-Miller, Janet P; Pierik, Ronald; Yan, Changhui; Clay, David E; Scheffler, Brian; Clay, Sharon A

    2015-07-01

    Weeds reduce yield in soybeans (Glycine max) through incompletely defined mechanisms. The effects of weeds on the soybean transcriptome were evaluated in field conditions during four separate growing seasons. RNASeq data were collected from six biological samples of soybeans growing with or without weeds. Weed species and the methods to maintain weed-free controls varied between years to mitigate treatment effects, and to allow detection of general soybean weed responses. Soybean plants were not visibly nutrient- or water-stressed. We identified 55 consistently downregulated genes in weedy plots. Many of the downregulated genes were heat shock genes. Fourteen genes were consistently upregulated. Several transcription factors including a PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 3-like gene (PIF3) were included among the upregulated genes. Gene set enrichment analysis indicated roles for increased oxidative stress and jasmonic acid signaling responses during weed stress. The relationship of this weed-induced PIF3 gene to genes involved in shade avoidance responses in Arabidopsis provide evidence that this gene may be important in the response of soybean to weeds. These results suggest that the weed-induced PIF3 gene will be a target for manipulating weed tolerance in soybean.

  20. [Biological activity of fungi from the phyllosphere of weeds and wild herbaceous plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berestitskiĭ, A O; Gasich, E L; Poluéktova, E V; Nikolaeva, E V; Sokornova, S V; Khlopunova, L B

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial, phytotoxic, and insecticidal activity of 30 fungal isolates obtained from leaves of weeds and wild herbaceous plants was assessed. Antibacterial, antifungal, phytotoxic, and insecticidal activity was found in over 50, 40, 47, and 40% of the isolates, respectively. These findings may be important for toxicological assessment of potential mycoherbicides, as well as provide a basis for investigation of the patterns of development of phyllosphere communities affected by fungal metabolites.

  1. The influence of strip cropping on the state and degree of weed infestation in dent maize (Zea mays L., common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., and spring barley (Hordeum vulgare L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Głowacka

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The experiment was conducted in the years 2008–2010 at the Experimental Station of the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences in Zamość, University of Life Sciences in Lublin. The following factors were analysed in the experiment: I. Cultivation method – sole cropping and strip cropping, which consisted in the cultivation of three plants: dent maize, common bean, and spring barley, in adjacent strips with a width of 3.3 m; II. Weed control methods – mechanical and chemical. The subject of the research was weed infestation of the 'Celio' variety of dent maize, the 'Aura' variety of common bean, and the 'Start' variety of spring barley. Weed infestation of the crops was assessed two weeks before harvesting by determining the species composi- tion as well as the number and dry weight of weeds. The dominant weed species in maize, common bean and spring barley were Echinochloa crus-galli, Chenopodium album and Galinsoga parviflora, constituting from 58% to 70% of the total number of weeds. Strip cropping clearly reduced the number of weeds per unit area in all the cultivated species and dry weight of aboveground parts produced by them in common bean and maize crops. The limiting effect of strip cropping on the weed infestation parameters was particularly clear in combination with the mechanical weed control method.

  2. High residue cultivation timing impact on organic no-till soybean weed management

    Science.gov (United States)

    A cereal rye cover crop mulch can suppress summer annual weeds early in the soybean growing season. However, a multi-tactic weed management approach is required when annual weed seedbanks are large or perennial weeds are present. In such situations, the weed suppression from a cereal rye mulch can b...

  3. The benefits of using quantile regression for analysing the effect of weeds on organic winter wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casagrande, M.; Makowski, D.; Jeuffroy, M.H.; Valantin-Morison, M.; David, C.

    2010-01-01

    P>In organic farming, weeds are one of the threats that limit crop yield. An early prediction of weed effect on yield loss and the size of late weed populations could help farmers and advisors to improve weed management. Numerous studies predicting the effect of weeds on yield have already been c

  4. Weed infestation of onion in soil reduced cultivation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Błażej-Woźniak

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Field experiment was conducted in the years 1998-2000 in GD Felin. The influence of no-tillage cultivation and conventional tillage with spring ploughing on weed infestation of onion was compared. In experiment four cover crop mulches (Sinapis alba L., Vicia sativa L., Phacelia tanacetifolia B., Avena sativa L. were applied. From annual weeds in weed infestation of onion in great number Matricaria chamomilla L., and Senecio vulgaris L. stepped out. and from perennial - Agropyron repens (L.P.B. Reduced soil cultivation system (no-tillage caused the significant growth of primary weed infestation of onion in comparison with conventional tillage. In all years of investigations the executed pre-sowing ploughing limited significantly the annual weeds' number in primary weed infestation. The applied mulches from cover plants limited in considerable degree the number of primary weed infestation. In all years of investigations the most weeds stepped out on control object. Among investigated cover crop mulches Vicia sativa L. and Avena sativa L. had a profitable effect on decrease of onion`s primary weed infestation. Soil cultivation system and cover crop mulches had no signi ficant residual influence on the secondary weed infestation of onion.

  5. Weed Biomass and Weed Species Diversity of Juvenile Citrus Trees Intercrop with some Arable Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patience Mojibade OLORUNMAIYE

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary study was carried out to evaluate the performances of eight crops in the intercrop of citrus with arable crops at the National Horticultural Research Institute (NIHORT Ibadan, Nigeria. Eight arable crops: maize, cucumber, sweet potato, Corchorus olitorius, large green, grain amaranth, Mucuna pruriens var. utilis, and groundnut were intercropped with young citrus trees in the early planting season of 2010 with sole citrus as control. The experiment was laid out in a completely randomized block design with three replicates. Data were collected on weed flora, weed density and weed dry weight. Results showed that the relative frequencies of weeds in all the plots were less than 4% at both 6 and 9WAP. Gomphrena celosoides, Oldenlandia corymbosa and Tridax procumbens were most preponderant in appearing in all the plots. Tridax procumbens had a consistent relative frequency (2.34% in all the plots except in citrus/maize plot (0.78% at 9 WAP. Significantly lower broadleaf weed densities were obtained in citrus/sweet potato, citrus/large green, control plot and citrus/cucumber (28.67, 45.00, 50.00 and 76.33 m-2 respectively than in citrus/groundnut plot (143.00 m-2. Similarly, significantly lower grass weed densities were produced in citrus/Mucuna and citrus/sweet potato (0.33 m-2 each plots than the control plot (11.33 m-2. Whereas citrus/corchorus plot produced significantly lower broadleaf weed dry weight (37.59 g m-2 than citrus/Mucuna plot (126.47 g m-2 at 3WAP, citrus/large green plot (16.15 g m-2 and citrus/groundnut plot (123.25 g m-2 followed the same trend at 6 WAP. Sedges dry weights were less than 7 g m-2 in all the plots compared with control plot.

  6. Relative influence of chemical and non-chemical stressors on invertebrate communities: a case study in the Danube River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, Andreu; Van den Brink, Paul J; Leitner, Patrick; Graf, Wolfram; Focks, Andreas

    2016-11-15

    A key challenge for the ecological risk assessment of chemicals has been to evaluate the relative contribution of chemical pollution to the variability observed in biological communities, as well as to identify multiple stressor groups. In this study we evaluated the toxic pressure exerted by >200 contaminants to benthic macroinvertebrates in the Danube River using the Toxic Unit approach. Furthermore, we evaluated correlations between several stressors (chemical and non-chemical) and biological indices commonly used for the ecological status assessment of aquatic ecosystems. We also performed several variation partitioning analyses to evaluate the relative contribution of contaminants and other abiotic parameters (i.e. habitat characteristics, hydromorphological alterations, water quality parameters) to the structural and biological trait variation of the invertebrate community. The results of this study show that most biological indices significantly correlate to parameters related to habitat and physico-chemical conditions, but showed limited correlation with the calculated toxic pressure. The calculated toxic pressure, however, showed little variation between sampling sites, which complicates the identification of pollution-induced effects. The results of this study show that the variation in the structure and trait composition of the invertebrate community are mainly explained by habitat and water quality parameters, whereas hydromorphological alterations play a less important role. Among the water quality parameters, physico-chemical parameters such as suspended solids, nutrients or dissolved oxygen explained a larger part of the variation in the invertebrate community as compared to metals or organic contaminants. Significant correlations exist between some physico-chemical measurements (e.g. nutrients) and some chemical classes (i.e. pharmaceuticals, chemicals related to human presence) which constitute important multiple stressor groups. This study

  7. Weed Identification Using An Automated Active Shape Matching (AASM) Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swain, K C; Nørremark, Michael; Jørgensen, R N

    2011-01-01

    Weed identification and control is a challenge for intercultural operations in agriculture. As an alternative to chemical pest control, a smart weed identification technique followed by mechanical weed control system could be developed. The proposed smart identification technique works on the con......Weed identification and control is a challenge for intercultural operations in agriculture. As an alternative to chemical pest control, a smart weed identification technique followed by mechanical weed control system could be developed. The proposed smart identification technique works......-leaf growth stage model for Solanum nigrum L. (nightshade) is generated from 32 segmented training images in Matlab software environment. Using the AASM algorithm, the leaf model was aligned and placed at the centre of the target plant and a model deformation process carried out. The parameters used...

  8. SPECIES COMPOSITION OF WEED VEGETATION IN DIFFERENT APPLE GROWING TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venera TASSEVA

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The investigation was carried out in the period 2001-2003 in an orchard of the Institute of Agriculture, Kyustendil, Bulgaria, created in the spring of 1996 on leached cinnamonic forest soil. The weed populations under four different farming technologies of growing of apple cultivar Florina were investigated. It was established, that the apple growing technologies influence the weed association composition. The highest weed diversity was found in the organic technology - 16 weed species were found. In the application of resource economical and integrated technologies, the development of 13-14 weed species was established. The smallest weed diversity was observed in the conventional technology - eight species, which was due to the twofold herbicide application.

  9. Water management as a key component of integrated weed management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Zanin

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Water management within the cropping system is a key factor for an integrated weed management. Soil moisture affects seed persistence and seed dormancy, thus influencing their germination, the establishment of seedlings as well as the competition at adult stage and the number, vitality and dormancy of the new seeds produced by the weeds. The interactions among water availability and competition are very complex and still not fully understood. A research effort in this sector should the be very relevant for the development of new approaches of weed management, such as “Ecological weed management”, aiming to reduce weed density and competitiveness and, in the medium term, to prevent undesired modifications of the weed flora.

  10. A New Hoe Blade for Inter-Row Weeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, O.; Znova, L.; Melander, Bo

    2016-01-01

    , for example uncontrollable sideward soil movement causing injurious coverage of crop plants. Based on feedbacks from researchers and practioners, a new device has been designed to overcome most of the problems associated with ‘Ducksfoot’ blades. The device consists of a stiff shank mounted on a curved VCO......New camera-based systems for automatic steering of inter-row cultivators have made it possible to conduct inter-row weeding in small inter-row spaces at reasonable work rates. This has motivated organic growers to shift from full-width weed harrowing of small grain cereals to inter-row hoeing....... The aim is mainly to improve weeding effectiveness against tall-growing and tap-rooted weed species. The ‘Ducksfoot’ hoe blade is commonly used for traditional inter-row weeding in row crops such as sugar beets and maize. This blade usually provides satisfactory weed control, if soils are not too wet...

  11. Weeding the Astrophysical Garden: Ethyl Cyanide

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lucia, F. C.; Fortman, S. M.; Medvedev, I. R.; Neese, C. F.

    2009-12-01

    It is well known that many, if not most, of the unidentified features in astrophysical spectra arise from relatively low lying excited vibrational and torsional states of a relatively small number of molecular species— the astrophysical weeds. It is also well known that the traditional quantum mechanical assignment and fitting of these excited state spectra is a formidable task, one that is made harder by the expected perturbations and interactions among these states. We have previously proposed an alternative fitting and analysis approach based on experimental, intensity calibrated spectra taken at many temperatures. In this paper we discuss the implementation of this approach and provide details in the context of one of these weeds, ethyl cyanide.

  12. Controlling weeds with fungi, bacteria and viruses: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Harding, Dylan P.; Raizada, Manish N

    2015-01-01

    Weeds are a nuisance in a variety of land uses. The increasing prevalence of both herbicide resistant weeds and bans on cosmetic pesticide use has created a strong impetus to develop novel strategies for controlling weeds. The application of bacteria, fungi and viruses to achieving this goal has received increasingly great attention over the last three decades. Proposed benefits to this strategy include reduced environmental impact, increased target specificity, reduced development costs comp...

  13. Determination of the critical period of weed control in corn using a thermal basis.

    OpenAIRE

    BEDMAR,FRANCISCO; Manetti,Pablo; MONTERUBBIANESI,GLORIA

    1999-01-01

    Field studies were conducted over 3 years in southeast Buenos Aires, Argentina, to determine the critical period of weed control in maize (Zea mays L.). The treatments consisted of two different periods of weed interference, a critical weed-free period, and a critical time of weed removal. The Gompertz and logistic equations were fitted to relative yields representing the critical weed-free and the critical time of weed removal, respectively. Accumulated thermal units were used to describe ea...

  14. Floristic composition and weed biomass in organic alfalfa crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Olivera M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of floristic composition and weed biomass in organic alfalfa crop in different years of alfalfa growing. The experiment was conducted in experimental plots in Futog, during the vegetation period of 2015. The presence of 60 weed species was noted, 49 of all weeds were noticed in the third, 48 in the fourth and 34 in the fifth year of organic alfalfa growing. Quantitative and qualitative structure of weed community depended on the age of alfalfa crop. By the analysis of cover values and the degree of the presence of weed species, it can be seen that species: Rumex obtusifolius L., Taraxacum officinale Web., Cynodon dactylon Pers. and Artemisia vulgaris L. had the greatest significance on weed infestation of alfalfa. The largest number of weed species belonged to the families Poaceae and Asteraceae. The biological spectrum of weeds species was defined by the terophyta dominance, whose number was reduced due to the age of the crop, while the share of hemicryptophytes and geophytes was more or less constant. Although we found a considerable level of infestation of alfalfa, alfalfa biomass reached acceptable values that were significantly higher than the weed biomass, which was statistically highly significant.

  15. Critical period of weed control in aerobic rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, M P; Juraimi, A S; Samedani, B; Puteh, A; Man, A

    2012-01-01

    Critical period of weed control is the foundation of integrated weed management and, hence, can be considered the first step to design weed control strategy. To determine critical period of weed control of aerobic rice, field trials were conducted during 2010/2011 at Universiti Putra Malaysia. A quantitative series of treatments comprising two components, (a) increasing duration of weed interference and (b) increasing length of weed-free period, were imposed. Critical period was determined through Logistic and Gompertz equations. Critical period varied between seasons; in main season, it started earlier and lasted longer, as compared to off-season. The onset of the critical period was found relatively stable between seasons, while the end was more variable. Critical period was determined as 7-49 days after seeding in off-season and 7-53 days in main season to achieve 95% of weed-free yield, and 23-40 days in off-season and 21-43 days in main season to achieve 90% of weed-free yield. Since 5% yield loss level is not practical from economic view point, a 10% yield loss may be considered excellent from economic view point. Therefore, aerobic rice should be kept weed-free during 21-43 days for better yield and higher economic return.

  16. Critical Period of Weed Control in Aerobic Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Anwar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Critical period of weed control is the foundation of integrated weed management and, hence, can be considered the first step to design weed control strategy. To determine critical period of weed control of aerobic rice, field trials were conducted during 2010/2011 at Universiti Putra Malaysia. A quantitative series of treatments comprising two components, (a increasing duration of weed interference and (b increasing length of weed-free period, were imposed. Critical period was determined through Logistic and Gompertz equations. Critical period varied between seasons; in main season, it started earlier and lasted longer, as compared to off-season. The onset of the critical period was found relatively stable between seasons, while the end was more variable. Critical period was determined as 7–49 days after seeding in off-season and 7–53 days in main season to achieve 95% of weed-free yield, and 23–40 days in off-season and 21–43 days in main season to achieve 90% of weed-free yield. Since 5% yield loss level is not practical from economic view point, a 10% yield loss may be considered excellent from economic view point. Therefore, aerobic rice should be kept weed-free during 21–43 days for better yield and higher economic return.

  17. Chemical and mechanical weed control in soybean (Glycine max

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber, Jonas Felix

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the possibility of chemical and mechanical weed control strategies in soybean. Soybean field experiments were carried out in 2013 and 2014 in Southern Germany. Five treatments including common herbicide mixtures and four mechanical weed control treatments, implementing a harrow and a hoe, were tested at different locations. In the herbicide experiments two treatments were applied by PRE emergence herbicides (metribuzin, clomazone, dimethenamid and metribuzin, flufenacet, clomazone and another two treatments were sprayed with a combination of PRE + POST emergence herbicides (metribuzin, flufenacet, thifensulfuron and pendimethalin, thifensulfuron, bentazone, cycloxydim. Furthermore, a POST herbicide treatment was implemented (thifensulfuron, bentazone, thifensulfuron and fluazifop-P-butyl. In the mechanical weed control experiments, treatments were: three times hoeing, PRE emergence harrowing plus three times hoeing, hoeing and harrowing in rotation or three times harrowing. In both experiments an untreated control was included. A 90% weed control efficacy and 23% yield increase was observed in the POST herbicide treatment. PRE + POST treatments resulted in 92% to 99% weed control efficiency and 15% yield increase compared to the untreated control. In the mechanical weed control experiments the combination of PRE emergence harrowing and POST emergence hoeing resulted in 82% weed control efficiency and 34% higher yield compared to the untreated control. Less weed control efficiency (72% was observed in the harrow treatment, leading to 20% higher yield compared to the control. The suitability of both strategies for implementation in “Integrated Weed Management” has been investigated.

  18. Herbicide-resistant weed management: focus on glyphosate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckie, Hugh J

    2011-09-01

    This review focuses on proactive and reactive management of glyphosate-resistant (GR) weeds. Glyphosate resistance in weeds has evolved under recurrent glyphosate usage, with little or no diversity in weed management practices. The main herbicide strategy for proactively or reactively managing GR weeds is to supplement glyphosate with herbicides of alternative modes of action and with soil-residual activity. These herbicides can be applied in sequences or mixtures. Proactive or reactive GR weed management can be aided by crop cultivars with alternative single or stacked herbicide-resistance traits, which will become increasingly available to growers in the future. Many growers with GR weeds continue to use glyphosate because of its economical broad-spectrum weed control. Government farm policies, pesticide regulatory policies and industry actions should encourage growers to adopt a more proactive approach to GR weed management by providing the best information and training on management practices, information on the benefits of proactive management and voluntary incentives, as appropriate. Results from recent surveys in the United States indicate that such a change in grower attitudes may be occurring because of enhanced awareness of the benefits of proactive management and the relative cost of the reactive management of GR weeds.

  19. The definition of electro impulses used in weed control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judaev I.V.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In modern agriculture the use of chemicals and machines in weed control is not environmental and soil friendly. The use of electro impulses is offered to traditional ways of weed control. The researches done on technical characteristics of such operation and influence of these results on ecology gave picture that the use of electro impulses in weed control is harmless for environment and that is very effective. The basis for the technical project at designing of the electro impulse installation used with standard wheel tractor obtained data about values of electric energy doses that can make damage in various kinds of weeds.

  20. Team-up Crop Diversification and Weed Management: PRODIVA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerowitt, B.; Melander, B.; Krawczyk, R.;

    2015-01-01

    the results. Neither are crop diversification methods restricted to Organic Farming, nor can IWM (Integrated Weed Management) be successfully implemented without respecting the role of weeds in agro-ecosystems. The project “PRODIVA - Crop diversification and weeds“ is supported within the ERA-net CORE Organic......The research-network PRODIVA focuses on a better utilization of crop diversification for weed management in North European arable cropping systems. The goal is to maintain diverse arable weed vegetation that is manageable in the long-term and could fulfil other necessary systemfunctions including...

  1. Estimating Time of Weed Emergence in Cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihat Tursun

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Modelling is carried out for eleven major weeds in cucumber to develop estimated models for weed emergence time. Weed species were grouped according to their emergence patterns. Amaranthus retroflexus, Chenopodium album, Heliotropium europaeum, Polygonum aviculare and Solanum nigrum were early emerging, Convolvulus arvensis, Cyperus rotundus, Cynodon dactylon, Portulaca oleracea and Sorghum halepense were season long emerging Tribulus terrestris was the late emerging weed species. Different non-linear growth curves (Chapman-Richard, Weibull, logistic, Gompertz and cubic spline fitted to the data of cumulative percent emergence for the different species and years. Cubic spline seemed the best model for many species.

  2. Activity of mesotrione on resistant weeds in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Peter; Richards, Claire; Buren, Larry; Glasgow, Les

    2002-09-01

    Mesotrione is a new callistemone herbicide that inhibits the HPPD enzyme (p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase) and introduces a new naturally selective tool into weed-management programmes for use in maize. Mesotrione provides control of the major broad-leaved weeds, and it can be used in integrated weed-management programmes depending on the grower's preferred weed-control strategy. At post-emergence rates of 150 g AI ha-1 or less, mesotrione provides naturally selective control of key species that may show triazine resistance (TR), e.g. Chenopodium album L, Amaranthus species, Solanum nigrum L, as well as species of weed that show resistance to acetolactase synthase (ALS) inhibitors e.g. Xanthium strumarium L, Amaranthus spp and Sonchus spp. The data presented show that resistant and susceptible biotypes of these species with resistance to triazine herbicides, such as atrazine, simazine, terbutylazine and metribuzin, or ALS-inhibitor herbicides, such as imazethepyr, remain susceptible to mesotrione. These results confirm that there is no cross-resistance in biotypes with target site resistance to triazine or ALS-inhibiting herbicides. It is important that herbicide choice and rotation becomes an integral part of planning weed management, so as to minimise the risks of crop losses from weed competition, build-up of weed seed in the soil and the further development of weed resistance across a range of herbicide modes of action.

  3. Prediction of the competitive effects of weeds on crop yields based on the relative leaf area of weeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lotz, L. A. P.; Christensen, Svend; Cloutier, D.

    1996-01-01

    . alba whereas the density model did not. A parameter that allows the maximum yield loss to be smaller than 100% was mostly not needed to describe the effects of weed competition. The parameter that denotes the competitiveness of the weed species with respect to the crop decreased the later the relative......For implementation of simple yield loss models into threshold-based weed management systems, a thorough validation is needed over a great diversity of sites. Yield losses by competition wsth Sinapis alba L. (white mustard) as a model weed, were studied in 12 experiments in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris...... L.) and in 11 experiments in spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). Most data sets were heller described by a model based on the relative leaf area of the weed than by a hyperbolic model based on weed density. This leaf area model accounted for (part of) the effect of different emerging times of the S...

  4. Impact of Parthenium weeds on earthworms (Eudrilus eugeniae) during vermicomposting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajiv, P; Rajeshwari, Sivaraj; Rajendran, Venckatesh

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the effect of Parthenium-mediated compost on Eudrilus eugeniae during the process of vermicomposting. Nine different concentrations of Parthenium hysterophorus and cow dung mixtures were used to assess toxicity. The earthworms' growth, fecundity and antioxidant enzyme levels were analysed every 15 days. The antioxidant activities of enzymes [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx)], considered as biomarkers, indicate the biochemical and oxidative stresses due to the toxin from Parthenium weeds. The earthworms' growth, biomass gain, cocoon production and antioxidant enzymes were in a low level in a high concentration of P. hysterophorus (without cow dung). The results clearly indicated that appropriate mixing of P. hysterophorus quantity is an essential factor for the survival of earthworms without causing any harm.

  5. Optimization of foramsulfuron doses for post-emergence weed control in maize (Zea mays L.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pannacci, E.

    2016-11-01

    Four field experiments were carried out from 2011 to 2014 in order to evaluate the effects of foramsulfuron, applied at the recommended (60.8 g a.i./ha) and reduced doses (1/3 and 2/3), on the efficacy against several of the most important weeds in maize. For each “year-weed” combination, dose-response curves were applied to estimate the dose of foramsulfuron required to obtain 90% and 95% weed control (ED90 and ED95). Foramsulfuron phytotoxicity on maize and crop yield were assessed. Foramsulfuron at 1/3 of the recommended dose (20.3 g a.i./ha) provided 95% efficacy against redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L.), green foxtail (Setaria viridis (L.) Beauv.), wild mustard (Sinapis arvensis L.) and black nightshade (Solanum nigrum L.). Velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti Medik.), common lambsquarters (Chenopodium album L.) and barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli (L.) Beauv.) were satisfactorily controlled (95% weed efficacy) with ED95 ranged from 20 to 50 g/ha of foramsulfuron (about from 1/3 to 5/6 of the recommended dose) depending on growth stage. The recommended dose was effective against pale smartweed (Polygonum lapathifolium L.) at 2-4 true leaves (12-14 BBCH scale), but this dose did not kill plants larger than 2-4 true leaves. The ranking among weed species based on their susceptibility to foramsulfuron was: redroot pigweed = green foxtail = wild mustard = black nightshade > velvetleaf = common lambsquarters = barnyardgrass > pale smartweed. Dose of foramsulfuron can be reduced below recommended dose depending on weed species and growth stage. Foramsulfuron showed a good crop selectivity and had no negative effect on maize yield. (Author)

  6. Optimization of foramsulfuron doses for post-emergence weed control in maize (Zea mays L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Euro Pannacci

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Four field experiments were carried out from 2011 to 2014 in order to evaluate the effects of foramsulfuron, applied at the recommended (60.8 g a.i./ha and reduced doses (1/3 and 2/3, on the efficacy against several of the most important weeds in maize. For each “year-weed” combination, dose-response curves were applied to estimate the dose of foramsulfuron required to obtain 90% and 95% weed control (ED90 and ED95. Foramsulfuron phytotoxicity on maize and crop yield were assessed. Foramsulfuron at 1/3 of the recommended dose (20.3 g a.i./ha provided 95% efficacy against redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus L., green foxtail (Setaria viridis (L. Beauv., wild mustard (Sinapis arvensis L. and black nightshade (Solanum nigrum L.. Velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti Medik., common lambsquarters (Chenopodium album L. and barnyardgrass (Echinochloa crus-galli (L. Beauv. were satisfactorily controlled (95% weed efficacy with ED95 ranged from 20 to 50 g/ha of foramsulfuron (about from 1/3 to 5/6 of the recommended dose depending on growth stage. The recommended dose was effective against pale smartweed (Polygonum lapathifolium L. at 2-4 true leaves (12-14 BBCH scale, but this dose did not kill plants larger than 2-4 true leaves. The ranking among weed species based on their susceptibility to foramsulfuron was: redroot pigweed = green foxtail = wild mustard = black nightshade > velvetleaf = common lambsquarters = barnyardgrass > pale smartweed. Dose of foramsulfuron can be reduced below recommended dose depending on weed species and growth stage. Foramsulfuron showed a good crop selectivity and had no negative effect on maize yield.

  7. Are weeds hitchhiking a ride on your car? A systematic review of seed dispersal on cars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansong, Michael; Pickering, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    When traveling in cars, we can unintentionally carry and disperse weed seed; but which species, and where are they a problem? To answer these questions, we systematically searched the scientific literature to identify all original research studies that assess seed transported by cars and listed the species with seed on/in cars. From the 13 studies that fit these criteria, we found 626 species from 75 families that have seed that can be dispersed by cars. Of these, 599 are listed as weeds in some part of the world, with 439 listed as invasive or naturalized alien species in one or more European countries, 248 are invasive/noxious weeds in North America, 370 are naturalized alien species in Australia, 167 are alien species in India, 77 are invasive species in China and 23 are declared weeds/invaders in South Africa. One hundred and one are classified as internationally important environmental weeds. Although most (487) were only recorded once, some species such as Chenopodium album, Poa pratensis and Trifolium repens were common among studies. Perennial graminoids seem to be favoured over annual graminoids while annual forbs are favoured over perennial forbs. Species characteristics including seed size and morphology and where the plants grew affected the probability that their seed was transported by cars. Seeds can be found in many different places on cars including under the chassis, front and rear bumpers, wheel wells and rims, front and back mudguards, wheel arches, tyres and on interior floor mats. With increasing numbers of cars and expanding road networks in many regions, these results highlight the importance of cars as a dispersal mechanism, and how it may favour invasions by some species over others. Strategies to reduce the risk of seed dispersal by cars include reducing seed on cars by mowing road verges and cleaning cars.

  8. Are weeds hitchhiking a ride on your car? A systematic review of seed dispersal on cars.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ansong

    Full Text Available When traveling in cars, we can unintentionally carry and disperse weed seed; but which species, and where are they a problem? To answer these questions, we systematically searched the scientific literature to identify all original research studies that assess seed transported by cars and listed the species with seed on/in cars. From the 13 studies that fit these criteria, we found 626 species from 75 families that have seed that can be dispersed by cars. Of these, 599 are listed as weeds in some part of the world, with 439 listed as invasive or naturalized alien species in one or more European countries, 248 are invasive/noxious weeds in North America, 370 are naturalized alien species in Australia, 167 are alien species in India, 77 are invasive species in China and 23 are declared weeds/invaders in South Africa. One hundred and one are classified as internationally important environmental weeds. Although most (487 were only recorded once, some species such as Chenopodium album, Poa pratensis and Trifolium repens were common among studies. Perennial graminoids seem to be favoured over annual graminoids while annual forbs are favoured over perennial forbs. Species characteristics including seed size and morphology and where the plants grew affected the probability that their seed was transported by cars. Seeds can be found in many different places on cars including under the chassis, front and rear bumpers, wheel wells and rims, front and back mudguards, wheel arches, tyres and on interior floor mats. With increasing numbers of cars and expanding road networks in many regions, these results highlight the importance of cars as a dispersal mechanism, and how it may favour invasions by some species over others. Strategies to reduce the risk of seed dispersal by cars include reducing seed on cars by mowing road verges and cleaning cars.

  9. Humic substances and its distribution in coffee crop under cover crops and weed control methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Henrique Martins

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Humic substances (HS comprise the passive element in soil organic matter (SOM, and represent one of the soil carbon pools which may be altered by different cover crops and weed control methods. This study aimed to assess HS distribution and characteristics in an experimental coffee crop area subjected to cover crops and cultural, mechanical, and chemical weed control. The study was carried out at Londrina, in the state of Paraná, southern Brazil (23°21’30” S; 51°10’17” W. In 2008, seven weed control/cover crops were established in a randomized block design between two coffee rows as the main-plot factor per plot and soil sampling depths (0-10 cm, 10-20 cm, 20-30 cm and 30-40 cm as a split-plot. HS were extracted through alkaline and acid solutions and analyzed by chromic acid wet oxidation and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Chemical attributes presented variations in the topsoil between the field conditions analyzed. Cover crop cutting and coffee tree pruning residues left on the soil surface may have interfered in nutrient cycling and the humification process. Data showed that humic substances comprised about 50 % of SOM. Although different cover crops and weed control methods did not alter humic and fulvic acid carbon content, a possible incidence of condensed aromatic structures at depth increments in fulvic acids was observed, leading to an average decrease of 53 % in the E4/E6 ratio. Humin carbon content increased 25 % in the topsoil, particularly under crop weed-control methods, probably due to high incorporation of recalcitrant structures from coffee tree pruning residues and cover crops.

  10. Weed-cover versus weed-removal management in olive orchards: influence on the carbon balance at the ecosystem scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamizo, Sonia; Serrano-Ortiz, Penélope; Vicente-Vicente, José Luis; Sánchez-Cañete, Enrique P.; López-Ballesteros, Ana; Kowalski, Andrew S.

    2016-04-01

    Agriculture plays an important role in the C budget at the global scale. Traditional practices based on soil tillage and applying herbicides to remove weeds have caused damage to soils and led to important losses of soil organic C and increased CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. Changing trends from traditional agriculture to conservation agriculture practices may have an important role in both C and water budgets and the transformation of agriculture from C source to C sink. The objective of this study was to analyse the effect of two treatments, weed removal by herbicides versus weed cover conservation, on the C balance in an irrigated olive orchard in SE Spain. Measurements of CO2 exchange were made from October 2014 to September 2015 using two eddy covariance towers, one for each olive crop treatment. Results show that CO2 fluxes at the ecosystem scale were similar in the two treatments during initial conditions, prior to weed growth in the soils without herbicide application (October). During the first week, daily net ecosystem exchange (NEE) was close to zero in both treatments, with values ranging from 1.06 to -0.41 g C m-2 in the weed cover treatment, and from 0.76 to -0.69 g C m-2 in the weed removal treatment. As weed growth increased, higher net CO2 assimilation was found in the treatment with weed cover. In both treatments, maximum net CO2 assimilation was found in March, with a monthly NEE of -72 and -28 g C m-2 in the treatment with and without weed cover, respectively. In May, after the weeds were cut and left on the soil, a strong increase was observed in NEE in the treatment with weed cover due to decreased CO2 assimilation and increased respiration compared to the treatment without weed cover. Therefore, soil chamber measurements showed average respiration rates of 2.57 and 1.57 μmol m-2 s-2 in the weed cover and weed removal treatment, respectively. Finally, the highest monthly NEE was registered during July, with both treatments showing a similar

  11. Modification of tapioca starch by non-chemical route using jet atmospheric argon plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsagonsup, Rungtiwa; Deeyai, Panakamol; Chaiwat, Weerawut; Horrungsiwat, Sawanee; Leejariensuk, Kesini; Suphantharika, Manop; Fuongfuchat, Asira; Dangtip, Somsak

    2014-02-15

    Non-chemical modification of tapioca starch was investigated using jet atmospheric argon plasma treatment. Two forms of starch slurry, i.e. granular starch (G) and cooked starch (C), were jet-treated by argon plasma generated by supplying input power of 50 W (denoted as G50 and C50 samples) and 100 W (denoted as G100 and C100 samples) for 5 min. Physical, rheological, and structural characteristics of the modified starch were investigated. The G50 and C100 samples had lower paste clarity but higher thermal stability and performed stronger gels (G50 only) compared to their control counterparts. On the other hand, the analyzed properties of the G100 and C50 samples showed the opposite trend. FTIR and (1)H NMR results revealed that the relative areas of COC and OH peaks were changed after the treatment. Cross-linking reaction seemed to predominantly take place for the G50 and C100 samples, whereas depolymerization predominated for the G100 and C50 samples.

  12. Bringing science to medicine: an interview with Larry Weed, inventor of the problem-oriented medical record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam; Sittig, Dean F; McGowan, Julie; Ash, Joan S; Weed, Lawrence L

    2014-01-01

    Larry Weed, MD is widely known as the father of the problem-oriented medical record and inventor of the now-ubiquitous SOAP (subjective/objective/assessment/plan) note, for developing an electronic health record system (Problem-Oriented Medical Information System, PROMIS), and for founding a company (since acquired), which developed problem-knowledge couplers. However, Dr Weed's vision for medicine goes far beyond software--over the course of his storied career, he has relentlessly sought to bring the scientific method to medical practice and, where necessary, to point out shortcomings in the system and advocate for change. In this oral history, Dr Weed describes, in his own words, the arcs of his long career and the work that remains to be done.

  13. Changes in dicot-weeds species composition in spring barley in Latvia during the past 20 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanaga, I

    2012-01-01

    Dicot weed populations were assessed in spring barley trials carried out in four three-years periods at 5-year intervals: 1990-1992, 1995-1997; 2001-2003 and 2006-2008. The overall aim of this research was to evaluate the changes in dicot-weed infestations in spring barley in fields of one region (Riga) of Latvia in sod-podzolic loamy sand soil. The results of the trials showed that Galeopsis spp, Stellaoria media, Viola orvensis and Chenopodium album were among the most frequent weed species in the periods of 1990-1992 and 1995-1997. The occurrence of C. album and V. arvensis increased during the periods of 2001-2003 and 2006-2008.

  14. The role of rabbit density and the diversity of weeds in the development of cover crops in olive groves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Guerrero-Casado

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cover crops are an effective means to reduce soil erosion and to provide food and shelter for wildlife. However, in areas of intensive farming, which are characterised by the scarcity of weed communities, wild herbivores may focus their grazing on cover crops, which could make their implementation difficult. In this work, we test whether rabbit grazing can prevent the growth of herbaceous cover crops in olive groves in Southern Spain in addition to assessing the role of rabbit abundance and diversity of weeds in the development of cover crops. This question has been addressed by sowing Bromus rubens between the rows of five olive groves in Cordoba province (Spain. We then monitored the surface covered by B. rubens, along with both diversity of weed communities and rabbit abundance. Two rabbit exclusion areas were also placed in each olive grove in order to assess the impact of rabbits on the development of cover crops. Our results showed that the surface occupied by B. rubens was considerably higher in the rabbit exclusion areas (mean 56.8 ± 5.65 % than in those areas in which they could feed (mean 35.6 ± 4.32 %. The coverage occupied by cover crops was higher in areas with lower rabbit density, although this relationship was modulated by the weed diversity index, since in areas with the same rabbit abundance the coverage was higher in those with a richer weed community. These findings suggest that high rabbit abundances can prevent the development of herbaceous cover crops in olive groves, particularly in areas in which alternative food resources (measured as weed diversity are scarce.

  15. Herbicide Resistant Weeds: Do Economic Thresholds Still Have a Role in Weed Management?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concern over the development of herbicide resistant weeds has prompted a closer look at the validity of using economic thresholds (ET) as a basis for making treatment decisions. In situations where herbicide resistance is suspected, growers are often advised to employ control measures to completely ...

  16. Prevention and control of weeds, pests and diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sukkel, W.; Hommes, M.

    2009-01-01

    Weed control still requires major investments of money and labour in organic arable farming and field vegetable cultivation. For this reason, current research is focused to a large extent on the development of weed control strategies. These incorporate prevention as well as mechanical methods, and c

  17. Cover crop residue management for optimizing weed control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruidhof, H.M.; Bastiaans, L.; Kropff, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Although residue management seems a key factor in residue-mediated weed suppression, very few studies have systematically compared the influence of different residue management strategies on the establishment of crop and weed species. We evaluated the effect of several methods of pre-treatment and p

  18. Weed seed predation in organic and conventional fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navntoft, S; Wratten, S D; Kristensen, K;

    2009-01-01

    Enhanced biological control of weed seeds may improve sustainability of agricultural production. Biological control due to seed predation may be higher in organic fields because organic production generally supports more seed predators. To investigate such a difference, weed seed predation was st...

  19. Managing weeds in organic farming systems: an ecological approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numerous investigators have concluded that improvements in weed management strategies that are minimally reliant on herbicides require the integration of multiple weed suppression tactics. However, the most cost-effective and efficacious ways to choose and combine tactics remain unclear. Here we sug...

  20. Optimal weed management in crop rotations: incorporating economics is crucial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den F.; Gilligan, C.A.; Lemmen-Gerdessen, van J.C.; Gregoire, L.A.H.; Bosch, van den F.

    2010-01-01

    Although the effects of crop rotation sequence and length on weed population dynamics have been studied, it is not clear whether or not the best strategy, from a weed population dynamics point of view, is also the economic optimal strategy. It is also not clear which biological and economic paramete

  1. How to Identify and Control Water Weeds and Algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applied Biochemists, Inc., Mequon, WI.

    Included in this guide to water management are general descriptions of algae, toxic algae, weed problems in lakes, ponds, and canals, and general discussions of mechanical, biological and chemical control methods. In addition, pictures, descriptions, and recommended control methods are given for algae, 6 types of floating weeds, 18 types of…

  2. Working the Educational Soil and Pulling Up Weeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggins-Newby, Cheryl

    2005-01-01

    The job of an instructional leader, according to former Baltimore principal Deborah Wortham, is to be a gardener. School cultures left unattended, she says, sprout weeds that will eventually overwhelm the research-based programs, practices, and best efforts of teachers and administrators. The most aggressive and harmful educational weeds Wortham…

  3. Designing, modeling and controlling a novel autonomous laser weeding system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahrak Nadimi, Esmaeil; Andersson, Kim Johan; Jørgensen, Rasmus Nyholm

    2009-01-01

      Abstract: in this paper, the process of designing and developing a novel laser weeding test setup is explained. The main purpose of designing this system was to simulate the dynamic field conditions of a mobile vehicle capable of targeting weeds. This system consists of a rig containing three...

  4. An Autonomous Robotic System for Mapping Weeds in Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karl Damkjær; Garcia Ruiz, Francisco Jose; Kazmi, Wajahat

    2013-01-01

    The ASETA project develops theory and methods for robotic agricultural systems. In ASETA, unmanned aircraft and unmanned ground vehicles are used to automate the task of identifying and removing weeds in sugar beet fields. The framework for a working automatic robotic weeding system is presented...

  5. Systematic design of an autonomous platform for robotic weeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, T.; Asselt, van C.J.; Bontsema, J.; Müller, J.; Straten, van G.

    2010-01-01

    The systematic design of an autonomous platform for robotic weeding research in arable farming is described. The long term objective of the project is the replacement of hand weeding in organic farming by a device working autonomously at field level. The distinguishing feature of the described desig

  6. Potential components for weed management in organic vegetable production systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organic vegetable production relies on a variety of tactics for preventing losses to crop yield and quality that result from weed interference. These include field selection, long term field management, cultivation practices, mulching, and manual weeding to name a few. The concept of "herbicides" th...

  7. Weeding the Library Media Center Collections. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckingham, Betty Jo; And Others

    This second edition of guidelines for weeding school library media collections is addressed especially to elementary and secondary school library media centers and to community college and vocational school library resource centers in Iowa. This publication is designed for those who want weeding of all formats of materials and equipment (not just…

  8. Letting Go: How One Librarian Weeded a Children's Magazine Collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromann, Jennifer

    2002-01-01

    Describes the weeding process for children's magazines in a public library. Highlights include circulation statistics; cost effectiveness; online availability; shelving magazines by subject to try and increase their use; and a chart that lists reasons to keep and reasons to cancel subscriptions when weeding a periodical collection. (LRW)

  9. Weeding: An Experience at Columbus State Community College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fohl, Claire

    2001-01-01

    Discusses the difficulties inherent in de-selecting (or weeding) a library collection. Examines the issue of making sound judgments regarding what should be weeded and how. Suggests alternatives to discarding books, such as remote storage, selling them back to patrons, and sharing within a consortium. (NB)

  10. Aquatic weed control within an integrated water management framework.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Querner, E.P.

    1993-01-01

    Aquatic weed control, carried out by the water boards in the Netherlands, is required to maintain sufficient discharge capacity of the surface water system. Weed control affects the conditions of both surface water and groundwater. The physically based model MOGROW was developed to simulate the flow

  11. Post-directed weed control in bell peppers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organic pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) producers need appropriate herbicides that can effectively provide post-emergent weed control. Research was conducted in southeast Oklahoma (Atoka County, Lane, OK) to determine the impact of a potential organic herbicide on weed control efficacy, crop injury, an...

  12. Estimation of base temperatures for nine weed species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmaus, S J; Prather, T S; Holt, J S

    2000-02-01

    Experiments were conducted to test several methods for estimating low temperature thresholds for seed germination. Temperature responses of nine weeds common in annual agroecosystems were assessed in temperature gradient experiments. Species included summer annuals (Amaranthus albus, A. palmeri, Digitaria sanguinalis, Echinochloa crus-galli, Portulaca oleracea, and Setaria glauca), winter annuals (Hirschfeldia incana and Sonchus oleraceus), and Conyza canadensis, which is classified as a summer or winter annual. The temperature below which development ceases (Tbase) was estimated as the x-intercept of four conventional germination rate indices regressed on temperature, by repeated probit analysis, and by a mathematical approach. An overall Tbase estimate for each species was the average across indices weighted by the reciprocal of the variance associated with the estimate. Germination rates increased linearly with temperature between 15 degrees C and 30 degrees C for all species. Consistent estimates of Tbase were obtained for most species using several indices. The most statistically robust and biologically relevant method was the reciprocal time to median germination, which can also be used to estimate other biologically meaningful parameters. The mean Tbase for summer annuals (13.8 degrees C) was higher than that for winter annuals (8.3 degrees C). The two germination response characteristics, Tbase and slope (rate), influence a species' germination behaviour in the field since the germination inhibiting effects of a high Tbase may be offset by the germination promoting effects of a rapid germination response to temperature. Estimates of Tbase may be incorporated into predictive thermal time models to assist weed control practitioners in making management decisions.

  13. Spatial and Spectral Methods for Weed Detection and Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truchetet Frédéric

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This study concerns the detection and localization of weed patches in order to improve the knowledge on weed-crop competition. A remote control aircraft provided with a camera allowed to obtain low cost and repetitive information. Different processings were involved to detect weed patches using spatial then spectral methods. First, a shift of colorimetric base allowed to separate the soil and plant pixels. Then, a specific algorithm including Gabor filter was applied to detect crop rows on the vegetation image. Weed patches were then deduced from the comparison of vegetation and crop images. Finally, the development of a multispectral acquisition device is introduced. First results for the discrimination of weeds and crops using the spectral properties are shown from laboratory tests. Application of neural networks were mostly studied.

  14. Spatial correlation between weed species densities and soil properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Mette; Christensen, Svend; Simmelsgaard, Svend Erik

    2002-01-01

    -correlated with the phosphorus content in the soil in all years. The density of Veronica spp. and Poa annua L. was negatively cross-correlated with pH in all three years. Other spatial cross-correlations that were found in this study were inconsistent over time or field site. The densities of some of the weed species were......The spatial cross-correlation between weed species densities and six soil properties within fields was analysed using cross-semivariograms. The survey was carried out in three successive years in two fields. The most consistent relationship between weed species density (numbers m−2) and soil...... spatially cross-correlated with more than one soil property. The results showed that the range of spatial dependence varied not only between fields, but also between weed species and soil properties, as well as between years. This study indicates that the weed pattern is field-specific and that the spatial...

  15. Allelopatic potential of weeds under the minimalization of soil treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail A. Mazirov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The content of water-dispersible phenol substances in rhizosphere both of annual and perennial species of weeds (Cirsium arvense, Sonchus arvensis increases under soil treatment minimalization. The higher content of phenol substances of researched weeds is defined in rhizosphere of Common Couch (Agropyrum repens. The absence of intensive anthropogenic treatment of plowing layer which accumulates the significant mass of weed’s roots in the cause of much more higher allelopathic potential of some species’ of weeds. The high level of saturation by weeds in agrophytocoenosis under non-tillage soil treatment is defines the competitiveness between certain sepsis’ of weeds, especially, at the beginning of the vegetation. In this case, increasing the secretion of phenol substances is one of the physiological screenings of such competitiveness.

  16. Restoring interventions: eco-sustainable weed control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Facciotto G

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The creation and enlargement of ecological networks is paramount to conserve plant biodiversity, to offer refuge to the local fauna and to improve the environment in general. Such networks intend to conserve areas of great natural value, to restore degraded areas and to link them physically through the creation of ecological corridors. The work described was carried out in order to improve and enlarge an ecological corridor within the experimental farm “Mezzi” of CRA-ISP at Casale Monferrato (AL - Italy. One of its bigger problems, weed control, was solved by increasing the planting density, by sowing herbaceous crops and mulching with woody chips.

  17. Benefits of Precision Farming Technologies for Mechanical Weed Control in Soybean and Sugar Beet—Comparison of Precision Hoeing with Conventional Mechanical Weed Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Kunz

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Weed infestations and associated yield losses require effective weed control measures in soybean and sugar beet. Besides chemical weed control, mechanical weeding plays an important role in integrated weed management systems. Field experiments were conducted at three locations for soybean in 2013 and 2014 and at four locations for sugar beet in 2014 to investigate if automatic steering technologies for inter-row weed hoeing using a camera or RTK-GNSS increase weed control efficacy, efficiency and crop yield. Treatments using precision farming technologies were compared with conventional weed control strategies. Weed densities in the experiments ranged from 15 to 154 plants m−2 with Chenopodium album, Polygonum convolvulus, Polygonum aviculare, Matricaria chamomilla and Lamium purpureum being the most abundant species. Weed hoeing using automatic steering technologies reduced weed densities in soybean by 89% and in sugar beet by 87% compared to 85% weed control efficacy in soybean and sugar beet with conventional weeding systems. Speed of weed hoeing could be increased from 4 km h−1 with conventional hoes to 7 and 10 km·h−1, when automatic steering systems were used. Precision hoeing technologies increased soybean yield by 23% and sugar beet yield by 37%. After conventional hoeing and harrowing, soybean yields were increased by 28% and sugar beet yield by 26%.

  18. Weed species diversity in organic and integrated farming systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Jastrzębska

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Phytosociological data were collected in 1994–1996 in plots (relevés at the Research Station for Organic Farming and Conservation Breeding of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Popielno included in a large-area experiment conducted according to the concept and method proposed by Prof. S. Nawrocki. In a four-field crop rotation (root crops – spring barley undersown with red clover and grasses – red clover/grass mixture – winter triticale, each field was divided into two management units, organic and integrated. Data were collected in relevés by the Braun-Blanquet method, each year at the peak of the growing season. Weed abundance (% cover in cultivated fields and the number of weed species (species richness in crops were determined, which provided a basis for calculating the Shannon-Wiener indices of species diversity and evenness, and the Rényi profiles. The qualitative (species and quantitative structure of weed communities was compared using the Sørensen index. A total of 115 weed taxa (species, subspecies and varieties were identified in the examined agro-phytocenoses. Echinochloa crus-galli, Chenopodium album, Matricaria maritima subsp. inodora, Capsella bursa-pastoris, Thlaspi arvense and Stellaria media were the most abundant. Weed infestation was slightly higher in the organic farming system than in the integrated system. Organic farming contributed to higher weed species diversity in root crops, red clover/grass mixtures and winter triticale. Weed species richness was reduced in red clover/grass stands, while root crops and – to a lesser degree – spring barley undersown with red clover and grasses decreased weed species diversity. The species composition and in particular the quantitative structure of weeds were affected by crop species and cultivation regime rather than by the farming system. Weed communities of crops grown under organic and integrated farming systems were more similar with regard to species composition

  19. Weed management in tropical turfgrass areas: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uddin Kamal M.D.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cultural practices promoting vigorous, environmentally friendly dense turf are discussed. These are the most important and least recognized means of preventing weed establishment and encroachment which includes appropriate propagation material selection, sanitation and cultivation, adjustment of planting time, manual weed control (hand pulling, hoeing and rouging, turfgrass selection to better compete with weed populations, applying physiological stresses, fertilizer management, moisture management, mowing, and irrigation with salt water. Cultural management of weed is important because it reduces dependence on synthetic pesticides. A healthy turfgrass stand has been reported to be the best defense against weed colonization, and can be accomplished by proper mowing, watering, and fertilization. Mowing height is the clearest and best-documented cultural factor and a lower mowing height is always associated with more weeds in the turfgrass. Split application of fertilizer at intervals throughout the growing period is recommended for warm season turfgrasses. The application of fertilizer during dormant periods or periods of low growth may encourage weed growth. Hand pulling and hoeing effectively control annual and biennial seedling weeds for small areas. Irrigation by saltwater has been one method used recently to effectively control grassy broadleaved and sedge weeds in salt-tolerant turfgrass species. Cultural weed management practices in turf might provide a first defense: however, relying only on cultural control measures may not be a good idea. An integrated approach of combining cultural practices and chemicals can complement each other and give flexibility to decision making. Research is needed on optimizing the choices of herbicide and/or cultural practices as part of an integrated management system for turfgrass.

  20. Moving integrated weed management from low level to a truly integrated and highly specific weed management system using advanced technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, S.L.; Pitla, S.K.; Evert, Van F.K.; Schueller, J.K.; Pierce, F.J.; Liebman, Matt

    2017-01-01

    Integrated weed management (IWM) is one of the most commonly referred to approaches for sustainable and effective weed control in agriculture, yet it is not widely practiced, likely because current IWM systems fail to meet performance expectations of growers. The effectiveness and value of IWM syste

  1. The Effect of Weeds Interference Time and Plant Density on Weeds Control and Broad Bean (Vicia faba L. Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Dabaghzadeh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Broad bean (Vicia faba L. belongs to the Fabaceae family and is the most important protein plant in the world. Although broad bean used as cover crop is able to deal with weeds, but the evidence show that yield of the plant decreased 32-82% because of competition with weeds. Using crop density is one of the ecological approaches in weed management. Broad bean density can produce biomass, weed competition, seed yield and ultimately influence the economic yield. Many reports show that increasing crop density reduced negative effects of weeds. The aim of this experiment was to evaluate the effect of weeds interference and different densities of broad bean on density and biomass of weeds and broad bean seed yield. Materials and Methods The experiment was carried out as split plot in randomized complete block, with four replications, during 2009-2010 in a field experiment at Ramin Agricultural and Natural Resources University, Ahwaz. Weeds interference was investigated on 5 levels, including V5, V9, V13 broad-bean phonological stages, full season weeding and full season weeds interference selected as main plots, and broad-bean density on 3 levels: including 8, 11 and 14 plants m-2 as subplots. Density, dry weight and diversity of weeds and seed yield of broad bean were evaluated. Results and Discussion The results showed that the weeds including wild beet, field bindweed and mallow had the highest occurrence (26.35, 21.17 and 18.46 plants m-2 respectively in V9 broad-bean phonological stage, where the peak abundance of weeds was observed. The frequency of mallow, clover and yellow alfalfa were high until V5 broad-bean phonological stage, but in the next stages, they were replaced by other weeds and sorrel. It was also observed that the environmental factors can affect composition of weeds, for example, as the temperature increased in the early spring, an increase in the density of field bindweed was recorded. In the treatment of 8 plants

  2. Economics of supplemental weed control applications on spring-transplanted onions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field research conducted to determine the relative benefits among alternative herbicides for weed control in onions (Allium cepa L.) measured weed control efficacy, impact of herbicides on crop injury, and the resulting weed competition on crop yields and marketable bulb size. Weed competition produ...

  3. Competitive suppression of weeds in a leek-celery intercropping system : An exploration of functional biodiversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baumann, D.T.

    2001-01-01

    Late-emerging weeds, although not directly damaging the crop, may cause long-term weed management problems due to excessive seed production. Particularly in weak competitive crops with high quality requirements, such as leek, financial losses due to weed competition or weed management costs can be c

  4. Lawn Weeds and Their Control. North Central Regional Extension Publication No. 26.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN. Cooperative Extension Service.

    This publication discusses lawn weed control for the twelve state north central region of the country. Written for use by homeowners, the publication focuses on weed identification and proper herbicide selection and application. Identification of weeds and safe and appropriate herbicide use are emphasized. Forty-six weed and turf plants are…

  5. Vinegar (20% acetic acid) broadcast application for broadleaf weed control in spring-transplanted onions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organic weed control research was conducted in southeast Oklahoma to determine the effect of broadcast over-the-top applications of acetic acid (vinegar) on weed control efficacy, crop injury and onion yields. The experiment included 6 weed control treatments (2 application volumes, 2 hand-weeding ...

  6. Weeding of Academic Library Reference Collections: A Survey of Current Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engeldinger, Eugene A.

    1986-01-01

    Reports results of survey investigating aspects of weeding of materials in reference collections at 377 U.S. colleges and universities: existence of written policy or unwritten weeding practice; extent of weeding; frequency; what happens to discards; effect of shelf space, staff time, and use of materials on weeding decisions. (5 references) (EJS)

  7. Survival of weed seeds and animal parasites as affected by anaerobic digestion at meso- and thermophilic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Anders; Nielsen, Henrik B; Hansen, Christian M; Andreasen, Christian; Carlsgart, Josefine; Hauggard-Nielsen, Henrik; Roepstorff, Allan

    2013-04-01

    Anaerobic digestion of residual materials from animals and crops offers an opportunity to simultaneously produce bioenergy and plant fertilizers at single farms and in farm communities where input substrate materials and resulting digested residues are shared among member farms. A surplus benefit from this practice may be the suppressing of propagules from harmful biological pests like weeds and animal pathogens (e.g. parasites). In the present work, batch experiments were performed, where survival of seeds of seven species of weeds and non-embryonated eggs of the large roundworm of pigs, Ascaris suum, was assessed under conditions similar to biogas plants managed at meso- (37°C) and thermophilic (55°C) conditions. Cattle manure was used as digestion substrate and experimental units were sampled destructively over time. Regarding weed seeds, the effect of thermophilic conditions (55°C) was very clear as complete mortality, irrespective of weed species, was reached after less than 2 days. At mesophilic conditions, seeds of Avena fatua, Sinapsis arvensis, Solidago canadensis had completely lost germination ability, while Brassica napus, Fallopia convolvulus and Amzinckia micrantha still maintained low levels (~1%) of germination ability after 1 week. Chenopodium album was the only weed species which survived 1 week at substantial levels (7%) although after 11 d germination ability was totally lost. Similarly, at 55°C, no Ascaris eggs survived more than 3h of incubation. Incubation at 37°C did not affect egg survival during the first 48 h and it took up to 10 days before total elimination was reached. In general, anaerobic digestion in biogas plants seems an efficient way (thermophilic more efficient than mesophilic) to treat organic farm wastes in a way that suppresses animal parasites and weeds so that the digestates can be applied without risking spread of these pests.

  8. Evaluation of three manually operated weeding devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, V K; Datta, R K; Murthy, A S

    1991-04-01

    Performance of three manually operated weeders was evaluated from ergonomics and mechanical considerations. Three operators were selected for laboratory and field trials; they represented the 5th, 50th and 95th percentiles of the operator population. Laboratory tests were conducted in a psychometric chamber to study physiological response under varying load and environmental conditions. From the data, relationships between energy expenditure rate and oxygen consumption rate vs heart rate were established. Field tests were carried out with the three weeders in a farm with Arhar crop (Cajannus Cajan L.) during August-September, when the average ambient temperature and relative humidity were 36 degrees C and 82% respectively. The results of this investigation indicated that weeding with the indigenous tools of a 'khurpi' and a spade and with the improved tool (3-tine hoe) could be rated as 'moderately heavy' work. However, a 'khurpi' demanded less energy expenditure than a 3-tine hoe followed by a spade. The squatting posture with a 'khurpi' appeared to be more comfortable than the standing posture with about 145 degrees erect position for the 3-tine hoe, followed by the standing posture with about 108 degrees erect position with the spade. For consideration of higher output, the order was spade, 3-tine hoe and 'khurpi', For weeding efficiency the trend was, however, just the reverse.

  9. Capabilities of unmanned aircraft vehicles for low altitude weed detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflanz, Michael; Nordmeyer, Henning

    2014-05-01

    Sustainable crop production and food security require a consumer and environmental safe plant protection. It is recently known, that precise weed monitoring approaches could help apply pesticides corresponding to field variability. In this regard the site-specific weed management may contribute to an application of herbicides with higher ecologically aware and economical savings. First attempts of precision agriculture date back to the 1980's. Since that time, remote sensing from satellites or manned aircrafts have been investigated and used in agricultural practice, but are currently inadequate for the separation of weeds in an early growth stage from cultivated plants. In contrast, low-cost image capturing at low altitude from unmanned aircraft vehicles (UAV) provides higher spatial resolution and almost real-time processing. Particularly, rotary-wing aircrafts are suitable for precise path or stationary flight. This minimises motion blur and provides better image overlapping for stitching and mapping procedures. Through improved image analyses and the recent increase in the availability of microcontrollers and powerful batteries for UAVs, it can be expected that the spatial mapping of weeds will be enhanced in the future. A six rotors microcopter was equipped with a modified RGB camera taking images from agricultural fields. The hexacopter operates within predefined pathways at adjusted altitudes (from 5 to 10 m) by using GPS navigation. Different scenarios of optical weed detection have been carried out regarding to variable altitude, image resolution, weed and crop growth stages. Our experiences showed high capabilities for site-specific weed control. Image analyses with regard to recognition of weed patches can be used to adapt herbicide application to varying weed occurrence across a field.

  10. Evaluation of biomass of some invasive weed species as substrate for oyster mushroom (Pleurotus spp.) cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintesnot, Birara; Ayalew, Amare; Kebede, Ameha

    2014-01-15

    This study assessed the bioconversion of Agriculture wastes like invasive weeds species (Lantana camara, Prosopis juliflora, Parthenium hysterophorus) as a substrate for oyster mushroom (Pleurotus species) cultivation together with wheat straw as a control. The experiment was laid out in factorial combination of substrates and three edible oyster mushroom species in a Completely Randomized Design (CRD) with three replications. Pleurotus ostreatus gave significantly (p production rate of 3.13 was recorded for P. ostreatus grown on P. hysterophorus. The highest total ash content (13.90%) was recorded for P. florida grown on L. camara. while the lowest (6.92%) was for P. sajor-caju grown on the P. juliflora. Crude protein ranged from 40.51-41.48% for P. florida grown on P. hysterophorus and L. camara. Lowest crude protein content (30.11%) was recorded for P. ostreatus grown on wheat straw. The crude fiber content (12.73%) of P. sajor-caju grown on wheat straw was the highest. The lowest crude fiber (5.19%) was recorded for P. ostreatus on P. juliflora. Total yield had a positive and significant correlation with biological efficiency and production. Utilization of the plant biomass for mushroom cultivation could contribute to alleviating ecological impact of invasive weed species while offering practical option to mitigating hunger and malnutrition in areas where the invasive weeds became dominant.

  11. Phytotoxic effects of aqueous leaf extracts of four Myrtaceae species on three weeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maristela Imatomi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Research on allelopathic interactions can be useful in the search for phytotoxins produced by plants that may be employed as natural herbicides. The aim of this study was to assess the phytotoxic action of aqueous leaf extract of Blepharocalyx salicifolius, Myrcia multiflora, Myrcia splendens and Myrcia tomentosa on the germination and development of three weeds. The working hypothesis was that leaf extracts of Myrtaceae may negatively influence the development of weed species. Aqueous leaf extracts at 5 and 10% (g mL-1 were tested on the germination and growth of Euphorbia heterophylla, Echinochloa crus-galli and Ipomoea grandifolia and compared with the herbicide oxyfluorfen and distilled water (control. The most extracts caused pronounced delays in seed germination and inhibited the growth of seedlings of E. heterophylla; I. grandifolia and E. crus-galli, with the last target species had no growth shoot inhibited by the extracts. In this study, the potential and efficiency of the tested aqueous leaf extracts were evident because they were more phytotoxic to the weeds than the herbicide. Thus, the aqueous extracts of leaves from Myrtaceae species show potential for the isolation of active compounds that can be used for the production of natural herbicides in the future.

  12. Ergonomic interventions in weeding operations for drudgery reduction of hill farm women of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishtwaria, Jatinder; Rana, Aruna

    2012-01-01

    Weeding is an important time consuming and drudgery prone task mainly performed by hill farm women for almost all crops grown. This directs for interventions in terms of improved technologies (weeder, kutla and hoes) to relieve women from high energy demands, time spent and associated drudgery particularly for weeding activity. The study was conducted in two hill states of India viz. Himachal Pradesh (35 villages and 1500 representative samples) and Uttrakhand (10 villages and 500 representative samples). Experimental data were conducted on representative sub sample of 60 hill farm women of both states to assess physiological workload and musculo-skeletal problems both while working with traditional tools along with improved tools by employing selected parameters viz. physical fitness level, physiological parameters etc. The results showed that heart rate values were more than acceptable limits for task performed with the traditional tools as compared with improved tools. Significant reduction in the heart rate was observed while working with improved tools. Analysis of MSDs showed that the postural stress and severity of pain in various body parts was reduced by adopting new technology. Hence, the use of improved weeding tools is recommended over the existing ones for drudgery reduction.

  13. Microbial activity of soil cultivated with corn in association with weeds under different fertility management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Melo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between weeds and soil microorganisms can give them a competitive advantage over crops. This study assessed the biomass and microbial activity of soil cultivated with weeds and corn (Zea mays L. in monoculture and in competition under different fertility management systems. The experiment considered four soil fertility management systems (calcium and magnesium silicate + fertilization; limestone + fertilization; no correction source + fertilization; no correction source + no fertilization and 12 crops (five competition arrangements between corn and weeds Urochloa brizantha (Hochst. ex A. Rich. R.D. Webster, lpomoea grandifolia (Dammer O'Donell, Conyza canadensis (L. Cronquist, Hyptis suaveolens (L. Poit., and Bidens pilosa L. plus the six species in monoculture and bare soil. After 60 d coexisting in a greenhouse, soil samples were collected to determine microbial biomass, respiration rate, and metabolic quotient. Soils cultivated with B. pilosa and Z. mays+U. brizantha showed higher microbial biomass. Cultivation of B. pilosa and Z. mays+H. suaveolens provided greater energy efficiency to maintain microbial cells. Biomass and microbial activity were altered by plant species, coexistence, and soil fertility management. Calcium and magnesium silicate, as well as limestone similarly influenced biomass and respiration rate of soil cultivated with most species. For some crops, the Si source was better than limestone to promote lower specific activity of the edaphic microbiota. The change in the microbial activity of soil can be a strategy used by the species to minimize the effects of competition.

  14. Microbial weeds in hypersaline habitats: the enigma of the weed-like Haloferax mediterranei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Aharon; Hallsworth, John E.

    2014-10-01

    Heterotrophic prokaryotic communities that inhabit saltern crystallizer ponds are typically dominated by two species, the archaeon Haloquadratum walsbyi and the bacterium Salinibacter ruber, regardless of location. These organisms behave as 'microbial weeds' as defined by Cray et al. (Microb Biotechnol6: 453–492, 2013) that possess the biological traits required to dominate the microbiology of these open habitats. Here, we discuss the enigma of the less abundant Haloferax mediterranei, an archaeon that grows faster than any other, comparable extreme halophile. It has a wide window for salt tolerance, can grow on simple as well as on complex substrates and degrade polymeric substances, has different modes of anaerobic growth, can accumulate storage polymers, produces gas vesicles, and excretes halocins capable of killing other Archaea. Therefore, Hfx. mediterranei is apparently more qualified as a 'microbial weed' than Haloquadratum and Salinibacter. However, the former differs because it produces carotenoid pigments only in the lower salinity range and lacks energy-generating retinal-based, light-driven ion pumps such as bacteriorhodopsin and halorhodopsin. We discuss these observations in relation to microbial weed biology in, and the open-habitat ecology of, hypersaline systems.

  15. Soil solarization reduces arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi as a consequence of weed suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, P R; Ivors, K L; Pinkerton, J N

    2001-12-01

    Soil solarization, the process of heating soil by covering fields with clear plastic, is a promising method to reduce populations of soilborne pests and weeds without the use of pesticides. However, the destruction of beneficial organisms such as arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi also may occur, thereby reducing positive effects of solarization. We compared the effects of solarization and chemical fumigants on the survival of indigenous AM fungi in 1995 and 1996. The infectivity of AM fungi was monitored before and after solarization using a greenhouse bioassay with Sorghum bicolor L. for both years. AM colonization of roots was also monitored in the field 8 months after solarization in 1995. Weed densities were measured 8 months after treatment in 1996. Solarization increased the average daily soil temperature 6-10°C and the maximum soil temperature reached by 10-16°C (5-20 cm depth). Solarization did not reduce the infectivity of AM fungi immediately after the solarization period in either year, as determined by the greenhouse bioassay. Infectivity was greatly reduced in solarized plots 8 months after solarization (over winter) in both years as assessed in the field (1995) or with the greenhouse bioassay (1996). Fumigation with metam sodium at 930 l ha(-1) (350 kg active ingredient ha(-1)) reduced the infectivity of AM fungi in both years, and fumigation with methyl bromide at 800 kg ha(-1) eliminated infection by AM fungi. Solarization was as effective as methyl bromide and metam sodium at 930 l ha(-1) in controlling winter annual weeds measured 8 months after treatment. Solarization apparently reduced AM fungi in soil indirectly by reducing weed populations that maintained infective propagules over the winter. Fumigation with metam sodium or methyl bromide directly reduced AM fungi in soil.

  16. Cutting weeds with a CO2 laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heisel, T.; Schou, Jørgen; Christensen, S.

    2001-01-01

    Stems of Chenopodium album. and Sinapis arvensis. and leaves of Lolium perenne. were cut with a CO2 laser or with a pair of scissors. Treatments were carried out on greenhouse-grown pot plants at three different growth stages and at two heights. Plant dry matter was measured 2 to 5 weeks after...... treatment. The relationship between dry weight and laser energy was analysed using a non-linear dose-response regression model. The regression parameters differed significantly between the weed species. At all growth stages and heights S. arvensis was more difficult to cut with a CO2 laser than C. album....... When stems were cut below the meristems, 0.9 and 2.3 J mm(-1) of CO2 laser energy dose was sufficient to reduce by 90% the biomass of C. album and S. arvensis respectively. Regrowth appeared when dicotyledonous plant stems were cut above meristems, indicating that it is important to cut close...

  17. Cultural control of weeds in herbicide-free annual forages

    Science.gov (United States)

    The adoption of zero tillage systems improves soil water conservation, allowing for increased crop intensification and diversification in the semiarid northern Great Plains. Zero tillage systems rely primarily on herbicides for weed management, increasing selection pressure for herbicide resistance...

  18. Weed control and selectivity of flumioxazin in eucalyptus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Augusto Soares Tiburcio

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Flumioxazin is a registered herbicide for agricultural crops what is an important fact concerning integrated management for weeds in eucalyptus plantations. This study evaluated the efficiency of weed control and the phytotoxicity in eucalyptus plants caused by the herbicide flumioxazin applied alone or in tank mixture with sulfentrazone and isoxaflutole. The aim was to extend the use of thisherbicide in eucalyptus. The herbicide was applied to eucalyptus plants using precision backpack sprayer. It was evaluated, visually,the intoxication percentage and measured height and diameter of eucalyptus trees, the control plants and dry mass of weeds. It wasconcluded that flumioxazin is selective to the eucalyptus at the 125 g.ha-1 dosage, and its efficiency in controlling weeds pre-emergencewas better when mixed in the tank with isoxaflutole and sulfentrazone.

  19. Vomiting Disorder on Rise in Weed-Friendly Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fullstory_162895.html Vomiting Disorder on Rise in Weed-Friendly Colorado Doctors say problem may become more ... Jan. 5, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Long-term heavy marijuana use can cause chronic vomiting and abdominal pain ...

  20. Weed Control Sprayers: Calibration and Maintenance. Special Circular 81.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Arthur L.

    This manual covers aspects of calibration and maintenance of weed control sprayers including variables affecting application rate, the pre-calibration check, calculations, band spraying, nozzle tip selection, agitation, and cleaning. (BB)

  1. A Cost Model for Storage and Weeding Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Gary S.

    1981-01-01

    Presents a simple cost model to analyze trade-offs involved in considering storage and weeding as alternatives to new construction for academic libraries. References are provided, and the Palmour cost model is presented as an appendix. (RAA)

  2. Weeding method and pre-sowing tillage effects on weed growth and pearl millet yield in a sandy soil of the West African Sahelian zone.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaij, M.C.; Hoogmoed, W.B.

    1996-01-01

    Weed control for the West African Sahel rainfed crops is done mainly manually, resulting in high labor requirements. Because of the seasonality of rainfed farming, weed control is often late and incomplete, resulting in considerable losses in crop yield. We examined the case of weed control in conti

  3. The biology of habitat dominance; can microbes behave as weeds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cray, Jonathan A; Bell, Andrew N W; Bhaganna, Prashanth; Mswaka, Allen Y; Timson, David J; Hallsworth, John E

    2013-09-01

    Competition between microbial species is a product of, yet can lead to a reduction in, the microbial diversity of specific habitats. Microbial habitats can resemble ecological battlefields where microbial cells struggle to dominate and/or annihilate each other and we explore the hypothesis that (like plant weeds) some microbes are genetically hard-wired to behave in a vigorous and ecologically aggressive manner. These 'microbial weeds' are able to dominate the communities that develop in fertile but uncolonized--or at least partially vacant--habitats via traits enabling them to out-grow competitors; robust tolerances to habitat-relevant stress parameters and highly efficient energy-generation systems; avoidance of or resistance to viral infection, predation and grazers; potent antimicrobial systems; and exceptional abilities to sequester and store resources. In addition, those associated with nutritionally complex habitats are extraordinarily versatile in their utilization of diverse substrates. Weed species typically deploy multiple types of antimicrobial including toxins; volatile organic compounds that act as either hydrophobic or highly chaotropic stressors; biosurfactants; organic acids; and moderately chaotropic solutes that are produced in bulk quantities (e.g. acetone, ethanol). Whereas ability to dominate communities is habitat-specific we suggest that some microbial species are archetypal weeds including generalists such as: Pichia anomala, Acinetobacter spp. and Pseudomonas putida; specialists such as Dunaliella salina, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Lactobacillus spp. and other lactic acid bacteria; freshwater autotrophs Gonyostomum semen and Microcystis aeruginosa; obligate anaerobes such as Clostridium acetobutylicum; facultative pathogens such as Rhodotorula mucilaginosa, Pantoea ananatis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa; and other extremotolerant and extremophilic microbes such as Aspergillus spp., Salinibacter ruber and Haloquadratum walsbyi. Some microbes

  4. FruitGrowth - Gasburning in Orchards - Environment friendly weed control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Keld Kjærhus; Duzel, Jasmin; Nielsen, Søren Hundevadt;

    Gas burning makes treatment of weed organic. The new ENVO-DAN burner saves 40% gas and treats ½ meter in width. It can be mounted on a standard lawn tractor, orchard tractor or a mobile robot.......Gas burning makes treatment of weed organic. The new ENVO-DAN burner saves 40% gas and treats ½ meter in width. It can be mounted on a standard lawn tractor, orchard tractor or a mobile robot....

  5. Weed management practices in natural ecosystems: a critical overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.F. Reinhardt

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Increasing public pressure against the use of pesticides and other agricultural inputs has placed increased emphasis on the development of ecologically based pest management. One distinct reaction of the Weed Science discipline has been the swing away from herbicide research to increased research on the basic biology and ecology of weeds in hopes of reduced reliance on "technological crutches" such as herbicides and other practices that are potentially harmful to the environment. Biological control is the long-standing alternative to the use of herbicides and interest in the former practice has been boosted by the realization that the use of herbicides may lead to the development of herbicide resistance in weed populations, and that herbicide residues occur in surface and groundwater. Supporters of herbicide use would point out that biological control is generally not effective in crop production systems, and is basically slow-acting. Debates between protagonists for the exclusive use of one or the other weed management practice tend to obscure the benefits that integration of different techniques are likely to have. For natural ecosystems it is proposed that integration of the more subtle practice of biological control with the use of herbicides, which relatively quickly overwhelm a biological system with mortality, is likely to be the most effective weed management tool. Different weed management practices that could be considered in natural ecosystems are discussed in terms of three key performance rating criteria, viz. activity, selec- tivity and persistence In this concise review, general discussion is focussed on the fundamentals of weed management practices, with the view to promote concept-based approaches that are critical for the development of effective weed management strate- gies.

  6. [Pseudomonas syringae - the agent of bacterial diseases of weeds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasichnik, L A; Savenko, E A; Butsenko, L N; Shcherbina, T N; Patyka, V F

    2013-01-01

    The symptoms of bacterial diseases of the associated weeds have been identified and described in the wheat crops grown in different farming systems. On the basis of its morphological, biochemical and serological properties the agent isolated from frost-blite, barnyard grass, wild radish, couch grass, bottle-brush, bindweed and sow thistle has been identified as Pseudomonas syringae. Serological affinity between the weed bacteria and the agent of bacterial diseases of cereals has been established.

  7. A Case Study of Allelopathic Effect on Weeds in Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slaveya T. Petrova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Most powerful and effective method of weed control is by chemical substances called herbicides. In recent years, they were published quite data on different side effects of herbicides on humans, animals, crops and the environment as a whole. Therefore, the increased interest for biological weed control lately is reasonable, since its improvement and expansion will contribute to limiting excessive use of herbicides, respectively their harmful effects and will support the successful implementation of complex weed control. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of selected plant species, containing allelopathic active substances, on germination, growth and biomass of some widespread weeds in wheat. Experiments were carried out at laboratory conditions using seeds of wheat (Triticum aestivum L., sort Sadovo 1 and most common weeds therein: Johnson grass (Sorghum halepense (L Pers, white pigweed (Chenopodium album L., twitch (Cynodon dactylon L. and curly dock (Rumex crispus L.. Allelopathic substances were extracted with distilled water from flowers of lavender (Lavandula angustifolia Mill., leaves of basil (Ocimum basilicum L., leaves of spearmint (Mentha longifolia (L Huds., and leaves of peppermint (Mentha piperita L.. Of the tested active allelopathic plants, the most negative impact on germination of all weeds seeds (including wheat, as well as on the development of plants exhibited the water extract of lavender. Lavender and basil had a stronger negative effect on white pigweed and twitch compared with both mint species. A significant inhibitory effect of spearmint even at low concentrations was recorded on the germination of all weed species tested while the wheat was slightly affected, which manifests this plant as a potential effective species in strategies for weed control management.

  8. Cover crops in cereals – better companions than weeds?

    OpenAIRE

    Salonen, Jukka; Zarina, Livija; Melander, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Cover crops have gained popularity in cereal cropping now that they are one of the subsidized options in agri-environmental schemes of the EU. Several studies on cover/catch crops affecting nutrient leaching have been published but less information is available concerning their applicability for weed management. In our opinion, combinations of crop and cover crop types as well as crop sequencing conform IPM principles and optimize weed management. The PRODIVA project (ERA-Net Core Organic Plu...

  9. The critical period of weed control in corn Zea mays at Mashhad, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    majid abaspoor

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the critical period of weed control in corn, an experiment was conducted at Research Station, Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad in year 2000. The experiment consisted of two discrete periods, a weed-free and a weed infested period. The weed-free period consisted of removing all weeds till 4th (19 days after planting, 7th (34 days after planting, 11th (48 days after planting, 13th (52 days after planting, and 17th (59 days after planting, leaf growth stages and weed free check for growing season (123 days after planting, and the critical time of weed infested consisted of removing all weeds from fourth (19 days after planting, 7th (34 days after planting, 11th (48 days after planting, 13th (52 days after planting, and 17th (59 days after planting, leaf growth stages and weedy infested check for growing season. All treatments were compared in a randomized complete block design with four replications. The results showed that by prolonging weed-infested period, dry matter and leaf surface area of weeds per square meter were increased, but by increasing weed-infested period, weed density was decreased. The lowest weed density (23 weed plants per m2 was shown at infested all period of corn growing season. By passing the growing season, C4 weed species such as red root pigweed and barnyard grass were dominant compared with C3 weed species. At weed infested all period of corn growing season, red root pigweed had the highest dry matter (93% of all weeds dry matter and leaf surface area (86% of all weeds leaf surface compared with other weed species. At the first treatment of critical weed-free (19 days after planting the regrowth of weeds were substantial which resulted in decreasing growth of corn. Grain yield of corn were significantly higher at 52, 59 and 123 days after planting in weed free treatments compared with 48, 52, 59 and 123 days after planting in weed infested treatments. However, there were no

  10. Effect of tillage system on yield and weed populations of soybean ( Glycin Max L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Z; Firouzi, Saeed; Aminpanah, Hashem; Sadeghnejhad, Hamid R

    2016-03-01

    Field experiment was conducted at Agricultural and Natural Resources Research Center of Golestan Province, Iran, to determine the effects of tillage system and weed management regime on yield and weed populations in soybean ( Glycin max L.). The experimental design was a split plot where the whole plot portion was a randomized complete block with three replicates. Main plots were tillage system: 1- No-till row crop seeding, 2- No-till seed drilling, 3- Tillage with disc harrow and drill planting, 4- Tillage with chisel packer and drill planting. The subplots were weed management regimes: 1-Weed control with herbicide application, 2- Hand weeding, 3- Herbicide application plus hand weeding, and 4- Non-weeding. Results indicated that the main effects of tillage system and weed management regime were significant for seed yield, pod number per plant, seed number per pod, weed density and biomass, while their interaction were significant only for weed density, weed biomass, and seed number per pod. The highest grain yields (3838 kg ha-1) were recorded for No-till row crop seeding. The highest seed yield (3877 kg ha-1) also was recorded for weed control with herbicide and hand weeding treatment, followed by hand weeding (3379 kg ha-1).

  11. [Spatial and temporal dynamics of the weed community in the Zoysia matrella lawn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia-Qi; Li, You-Han; Zeng, Ying; Xie, Xin-Ming

    2014-02-01

    The heterogeneity of species composition is one of the main attributes in weed community dynamics. Based on species frequency and power law, this paper studied the variations of weed community species composition and spatial heterogeneity in a Zoysia matrella lawn in Guangzhou at different time. The results showed that there were 43 weed species belonging to 19 families in the Z. matrella lawn from 2007 to 2009, in which Gramineae, Compositae, Cyperaceae and Rubiaceae had a comparative advantage. Perennial weeds accounted for the largest proportion of weeds and increased gradually in the three years. Weed communities distributed in higher heterogeneity than in a random model. Dominant weeds varied with season and displayed regularity in the order of 'dicotyledon-monocotyledon-dicotyledon weeds' and 'perennial-annual-perennial weeds'. The spatial heterogeneity of weed community in Z. matrella lawn was higher in summer than in winter. The diversity and evenness of weed community were higher in summer and autumn than in winter and spring. The number of weed species with high heterogeneity in summer was higher than in the other seasons. The spatial heterogeneity and diversity of weed community had no significant change in the three years, while the evenness of weed community had the tendency to decline gradually.

  12. Effect of tillage system on yield and weed populations of soybean ( Glycin Max L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Z. Hosseini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Field experiment was conducted at Agricultural and Natural Resources Research Center of Golestan Province, Iran, to determine the effects of tillage system and weed management regime on yield and weed populations in soybean ( Glycin max L.. The experimental design was a split plot where the whole plot portion was a randomized complete block with three replicates. Main plots were tillage system: 1- No-till row crop seeding, 2- No-till seed drilling, 3- Tillage with disc harrow and drill planting, 4- Tillage with chisel packer and drill planting. The subplots were weed management regimes: 1-Weed control with herbicide application, 2- Hand weeding, 3- Herbicide application plus hand weeding, and 4- Non-weeding. Results indicated that the main effects of tillage system and weed management regime were significant for seed yield, pod number per plant, seed number per pod, weed density and biomass, while their interaction were significant only for weed density, weed biomass, and seed number per pod. The highest grain yields (3838 kg ha-1 were recorded for No-till row crop seeding. The highest seed yield (3877 kg ha-1 also was recorded for weed control with herbicide and hand weeding treatment, followed by hand weeding (3379 kg ha-1.

  13. Robust Crop and Weed Segmentation under Uncontrolled Outdoor Illumination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Y. Jeon

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available An image processing algorithm for detecting individual weeds was developed and evaluated. Weed detection processes included were normalized excessive green conversion, statistical threshold value estimation, adaptive image segmentation, median filter, morphological feature calculation and Artificial Neural Network (ANN. The developed algorithm was validated for its ability to identify and detect weeds and crop plants under uncontrolled outdoor illuminations. A machine vision implementing field robot captured field images under outdoor illuminations and the image processing algorithm automatically processed them without manual adjustment. The errors of the algorithm, when processing 666 field images, ranged from 2.1 to 2.9%. The ANN correctly detected 72.6% of crop plants from the identified plants, and considered the rest as weeds. However, the ANN identification rates for crop plants were improved up to 95.1% by addressing the error sources in the algorithm. The developed weed detection and image processing algorithm provides a novel method to identify plants against soil background under the uncontrolled outdoor illuminations, and to differentiate weeds from crop plants. Thus, the proposed new machine vision and processing algorithm may be useful for outdoor applications including plant specific direct applications (PSDA.

  14. Robust crop and weed segmentation under uncontrolled outdoor illumination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hong Y; Tian, Lei F; Zhu, Heping

    2011-01-01

    An image processing algorithm for detecting individual weeds was developed and evaluated. Weed detection processes included were normalized excessive green conversion, statistical threshold value estimation, adaptive image segmentation, median filter, morphological feature calculation and Artificial Neural Network (ANN). The developed algorithm was validated for its ability to identify and detect weeds and crop plants under uncontrolled outdoor illuminations. A machine vision implementing field robot captured field images under outdoor illuminations and the image processing algorithm automatically processed them without manual adjustment. The errors of the algorithm, when processing 666 field images, ranged from 2.1 to 2.9%. The ANN correctly detected 72.6% of crop plants from the identified plants, and considered the rest as weeds. However, the ANN identification rates for crop plants were improved up to 95.1% by addressing the error sources in the algorithm. The developed weed detection and image processing algorithm provides a novel method to identify plants against soil background under the uncontrolled outdoor illuminations, and to differentiate weeds from crop plants. Thus, the proposed new machine vision and processing algorithm may be useful for outdoor applications including plant specific direct applications (PSDA).

  15. Biodiversity Of Weed Communities In Organic And Conventional Orchards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisek Jerzy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to analyze the occurrence of segetal and ruderal weeds in young apple and cherry organic orchards, where weeds under tree canopies were controlled mechanically with a rototiller, and in conventional orchards, where post-emergence herbicides were used. The research material consisted of phytosociological relevés recorded according to the Braun-Blanquet method, in three organic and three conventional orchards, situated near Skierniewice (central Poland, in 2010-2013. On the basis of the collected source material, species composition for the synanthropic flora, as well as phytosociological stability, the cover factor, and weed infestation rate for the analysed species were determined. The total number of the recorded weeds and the average number of weed species in a single relevé were for each of the three organic orchards greater than for the conventional orchards. The organic orchard situated in the same location as the conventional orchard was characterized by a greater biodiversity of flora. Systematic shallow cultivation of the soil, without herbicide treatments, resulted in the proliferation of perennial weeds.

  16. Weeds Cause Losses in Field Crops through Allelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasawer ABBAS

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A large number of weeds are known to be associated with crops and causing economic losses. Weeds interfere with crops through competition and allelopathy. They produce secondary metabolites known as allelochemicals, which belong to numerous chemical classes such as phenolics, alkaloids, fatty acids, indoles, terpens etc. However, phenolics are the predominant class of allelochemicals. The allelochemicals release from weed plants takes place through leaf leachates, decomposition of plant residues, volatilization and root exudates. Weeds leave huge quantities of their residues in field and affect the associated, as well as succeeding crops, in various cropping systems. Liberation of allelochemicals from weeds affects the germination, stand establishment, growth, yield and physiology of crop plants. They cause substantial reduction in germination and growth of the crop plants by altering various physiological processes such as enzyme activity, protein synthesis, photosynthesis, respiration, cell division and enlargement, which ultimately leads to a significant reduction in crop yield. In crux, allelopathic weeds represent a potential threat for crop plants and cause economic losses.

  17. Interspecific variation in persistence of buried weed seeds follows trade-offs among physiological, chemical and physical seed defences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil seedbanks drive infestations of annual weeds, yet weed management focuses largely on seedling mortality. As weed seedbanks increasingly become reservoirs of herbicide resistance, species-specific seedbank management approaches will be essential. Limited understanding of interspecific variation ...

  18. Socio-economic impacts and determinants of parasitic weed infestation in rainfed rice systems of sub-Saharan Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N'cho, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    Keywords: rice; weed; weed management practices, adoption, impact, parasitic weeds; Rhamphicarpa fistulosa; Striga asiatica; Striga hermonthica, double hurdle model; multivariate probit, productivity, stochastic frontier analysis, data envelopment analy

  19. Yield loss prediction models based on early estimation of weed pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asif, Ali; Streibig, Jens Carl; Andreasen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Weed control thresholds have been used to reduce costs and avoid unacceptable yield loss. Estimation of weed infestation has often been based on counts of weed plants per unit area or measurement of their relative leaf area index. Various linear, hyperbolic, and sigmoidal regression models have...... thresholds are more relevant for site-specific weed management, because weeds are unevenly distributed in fields. Precision of prediction of yield loss is influenced by various factors such as locations, yield potential at the site, variation in competitive ability of mix stands of weed species and emergence...

  20. Weed control based on real time patchy application of herbicides using image analysis as a non-destructive estimation method for weed infestation and herbicide effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asif, Ali

    There is an increasing concern about excessive use of herbicides for weed control in arable lands. Usually the whole field is sprayed uniformly, while the distribution of weeds often is non-uniform. Often there are spots in a field where weed pressure is very low and has no significant effect on ...... to estimate infestation of weeds at early growth stage. The image analysis method was further developed to estimate colour response of applying increasing doses of herbicides in selectivity experiments and to evaluate the weed-suppressing effect of mulches....

  1. Trait-based characterisation of soil exploitation strategies of banana, weeds and cover plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardy, Florence; Damour, Gaëlle; Dorel, Marc; Moreau, Delphine

    2017-01-01

    illustrated that a trait-based approach could be used to identify plant species with potential for competing with weeds, while minimising competition with banana. Six of the 17 studied cover crop species were identified as having this potential. The next step will be to assess them for their weed control performances in banana cropping systems with low reliance on herbicides.

  2. Trait-based characterisation of soil exploitation strategies of banana, weeds and cover plant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardy, Florence; Damour, Gaëlle; Dorel, Marc; Moreau, Delphine

    2017-01-01

    illustrated that a trait-based approach could be used to identify plant species with potential for competing with weeds, while minimising competition with banana. Six of the 17 studied cover crop species were identified as having this potential. The next step will be to assess them for their weed control performances in banana cropping systems with low reliance on herbicides. PMID:28257454

  3. Safety evaluation of chemical mixtures and combinations of chemical and non-chemical stressors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, D.; Freidig, A.P.; Groten, J.P.; Hollander, A.E.M.de; Stierum, R.H.; Woutersen, R.A.; Feron, V.J.

    2004-01-01

    Recent developments in hazard identification and risk assessment of chemical mixtures are reviewed. Empirical, descriptive approaches to study and characterize the toxicity of mixtures have dominated during the past two decades, but an increasing number of mechanistic approaches have made their entr

  4. Tillage and residue burning affects weed populations and seed banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narwal, S; Sindel, B M; Jessop, R S

    2006-01-01

    An integrated weed management approach requires alternative management practices to herbicide use such as tillage, crop rotations and cultural controls to reduce soil weed seed banks. The objective of this study was to examine the value of different tillage practices and stubble burning to exhaust the seed bank of common weeds from the northern grain region of Australia. Five tillage and burning treatments were incorporated in a field experiment, at Armidale (30 degrees 30'S, 151 degrees 40'E), New South Wales, Australia in July 2004 in a randomized block design replicated four times. The trial was continued and treatments repeated in July 2005 with all the mature plants from the first year being allowed to shed seed in their respective treatment plots. The treatments were (i) no tillage (NT), (ii) chisel ploughing (CP), (iii) mould board ploughing (MBP), (iv) wheat straw burning with no tillage (SBNT) and (v) wheat straw burning with chisel ploughing (SBC). Soil samples were collected before applying treatments and before the weeds flowered to establish the seed bank status of the various weeds in the soil. Wheat was sown after the tillage treatments. Burning treatments were only initiated in the second year, one month prior to tillage treatments. The major weeds present in the seed bank before initiating the trial were Polygonum aviculare, Sonchus oleraceus and Avena fatua. Tillage promoted the germination of other weeds like Hibiscus trionum, Medicago sativa, Vicia sp. and Phalaris paradoxa later in the season in 2004 and Convolvulus erubescens emerged as a new weed in 2005. The MBP treatment in 2004 reduced the weed biomass to a significantly lower level of 55 g/m2 than the other treatments of CP (118 g/m2) and NT plots (196 g/m2) (P < 0.05). However, in 2005 SBC and MBP treatments were similar in reducing the weed biomass. In 2004, the grain yield trend of wheat was significantly different between CP and NT, and MBP and NT (P < 0.05) with maximum yield of 5898

  5. Weed Diversity Affects Soybean and Maize Yield in a Long Term Experiment in Michigan, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, Rosana; Lima, Mauricio; Davis, Adam S.; Gonzalez-Andujar, Jose L.

    2017-01-01

    Managing production environments in ways that promote weed community diversity may enhance both crop production and the development of a more sustainable agriculture. This study analyzed data of productivity of maize (corn) and soybean in plots in the Main Cropping System Experiment (MCSE) at the W. K. Kellogg Biological Station Long-Term Ecological Research (KBS-LTER) in Michigan, USA, from 1996 to 2011. We used models derived from population ecology to explore how weed diversity, temperature, and precipitation interact with crop yields. Using three types of models that considered internal and external (climate and weeds) factors, with additive or non-linear variants, we found that changes in weed diversity were associated with changes in rates of crop yield increase over time for both maize and soybeans. The intrinsic capacity for soybean yield increase in response to the environment was greater under more diverse weed communities. Soybean production risks were greatest in the least weed diverse systems, in which each weed species lost was associated with progressively greater crop yield losses. Managing for weed community diversity, while suppressing dominant, highly competitive weeds, may be a helpful strategy for supporting long term increases in soybean productivity. In maize, there was a negative and non-additive response of yields to the interaction between weed diversity and minimum air temperatures. When cold temperatures constrained potential maize productivity through limited resources, negative interactions with weed diversity became more pronounced. We suggest that: (1) maize was less competitive in cold years allowing higher weed diversity and the dominance of some weed species; or (2) that cold years resulted in increased weed richness and prevalence of competitive weeds, thus reducing crop yields. Therefore, we propose to control dominant weed species especially in the years of low yield and extreme minimum temperatures to improve maize yields

  6. Automated weed detection in the field - possibilities and limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pflanz, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV have become omnipresent and adequate tools to generate high-resolution spatial data of agricultural cropland. Their implementation into remote sensing approaches of weeds provides suitable applications for a site-specific herbicide management. In general, an increasingly use of innovative technologies gradually leads from agricultural research into the practical application. This requires an evaluation of possibilities and limits of UAV-based remote sensing procedures. While spectrals from UAVs are being used already for mapping needs of nutrient or water, the image supported weed detection is much more complex and at the moment not relevant in practice. In this regard, there is a lack of weed and crop differentiation through spectral analyses and object-based approaches separate different plants not species-specific or are not adapted to morphologic changes of the growth. Moreover, there is a need for alternative positioning techniques without GPS, as it is required for a precise optical imaging analysis at low altitudes. To evaluate the possibilities and limitations of automated weed identification regarding the optical and sampling requirements, flights were carried out with a hexacopter at an altitude of 5 m over agricultural crop land with variable weed patches. The altitude was controlled by the GPS-autopilot. Images were captured at geo-referenced points and the number of different weed species was simultaneously determined by manually counting. The required optical resolution on the ground was estimated by comparing the number of weeds between image analysis on the PC and with the field rating data.

  7. Natural metabolites for parasitic weed management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vurro, Maurizio; Boari, Angela; Evidente, Antonio; Andolfi, Anna; Zermane, Nadjia

    2009-05-01

    Compounds of natural origin, such as phytotoxins produced by fungi or natural amino acids, could be used in parasitic weed management strategies by interfering with the early growth stages of the parasites. These metabolites could inhibit seed germination or germ tube elongation, so preventing attachment to the host plant, or, conversely, stimulate seed germination in the absence of the host, contributing to a reduction in the parasite seed bank. Some of the fungal metabolites assayed were very active even at very low concentrations, such as some macrocyclic trichothecenes, which at 0.1 microM strongly suppressed the germination of Orobanche ramosa L. seeds. Interesting results were also obtained with some novel toxins, such as phyllostictine A, highly active in reducing germ tube elongation and seed germination both of O. ramosa and of Cuscuta campestris Yuncker. Among the amino acids tested, methionine and arginine were particularly interesting, as they were able to suppress seed germination at concentrations lower than 1 mM. Some of the fungal metabolites tested were also able to stimulate the germination of O. ramosa seeds. The major findings in this research field are described and discussed.

  8. Allelopathic effects of Sonchus oleraceus L. on the germination and seedling growth of crop and weed species

    OpenAIRE

    Nasr Hassan Gomaa; Mahmoud Omar Hassan; Gamal Mohammad Fahmy; Luís González; Ola Hammouda; Atteya Mostafa Atteya

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the allelopathic effects of the aqueous extract of Sonchus oleraceus dry shoots on the germination and seedling growth of Trifolium alexandrinum, three weed species (Brassica nigra, Chenopodium murale and Melilotus indicus) and S. oleraceus itself. We assayed four different concentrations of the aqueous extract (w v-1): 1%, 2%, 3% and 4%. To determine whether the effects of the extract were attributable to the presence of allelopathic compounds, its osmotic potential or both, we p...

  9. Microwave Technologies as Part of an Integrated Weed Management Strategy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Brodie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Interest in controlling weed plants using radio frequency or microwave energy has been growing in recent years because of the growing concerns about herbicide resistance and chemical residues in the environment. This paper reviews the prospects of using microwave energy to manage weeds. Microwave energy effectively kills weed plants and their seeds; however, most studies have focused on applying the microwave energy over a sizable area, which requires about ten times the energy that is embodied in conventional chemical treatments to achieve effective weed control. A closer analysis of the microwave heating phenomenon suggests that thermal runaway can reduce microwave weed treatment time by at least one order of magnitude. If thermal runaway can be induced in weed plants, the energy costs associated with microwave weed management would be comparable with chemical weed control.

  10. PERENNIAL CROP NURSERIES TREATED WITH METHYL BROMIDE AND ALTERNATIVE FUMIGANTS: EFFECTS ON WEED SEED VIABILITY, WEED DENSITIES, AND TIME REQUIRED FOR HAND WEEDING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed control provided by alternative fumigants to methyl bromide (MeBr) needs to be tested in perennial crop nurseries in California because MeBr is being phased out in accordance with the Montreal Protocol, few herbicides are registered for perennial nursery use, and costs of other control measures...

  11. Weed-Suppressing Effect and Mechanism of Allelopathic Rice Accessions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Fei; KONG Chui-hua; XU Xiao-hua; ZHANG Chao-xian; CHEN Xiong-hui

    2004-01-01

    Two allelopathic rice accessions, PI312777 and Allelopathyl, significantly suppressedthe growth of associated weeds in the field. Moreover, their weed-suppressing effectswere correlated with the cultivation patterns. The weed-suppressing effects of throwingand transplanting were more effective than that of direct seeding. Furthermore, theamounts of allelochemicals (resorcinols, flavones and hydroxamic acids) produced andreleased from two allelopathic rice accessions were much higher than that from a non-allelopathic rice variety Hua-Jing-Xian 1, and reached the maximum concentration at the6th leaf stage. Differences in the weed-suppressing effects of rice accessions appear toresult from the accessions producing and releasing different amounts of allelochemicalsin the field. Further research confirmed that in PI312777 plants, allelochemicals weresynthesized by the above-ground parts, and then secreted through the root tissues. Roottissues of PI312777 plants never produced the allelochemicals. Root exudates fromPI312777 could significantly inhibit the growth of E. crus-galli surrounding rice plantsin water culture. However, when activated carbon was added to the culture solution, whichcould absorb allelochemicals from root exudates, the growth of E. crus-galli was nolonger significantly inhibited. Weed-suppressing effects of rice accessions depended onallelopathy, cultivation patterns and other factors in rice fields, while allelopathywas one of important factors. Interestingly, the amounts of allelochemicals produced andreleased from allelopathic rice plants may be induced by the presence of E. crus-galli.This suggests that there is a possible chemical recognition between rice and E. crus-galli.

  12. Controlling weeds with fungi, bacteria and viruses: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan Patrick Harding

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Weeds are a nuisance in a variety of land uses. The increasing prevalence of both herbicide resistant weeds and bans on cosmetic pesticide use has created a strong impetus to develop novel strategies for controlling weeds. The application of bacteria, fungi and viruses to achieving this goal has received increasingly great attention over the last three decades. Proposed benefits to this strategy include reduced environmental impact, increased target specificity, reduced development costs compared to conventional herbicides, and the identification of novel herbicidal mechanisms. This review focuses on examples from North America. Among fungi, the prominent genera to receive attention as bioherbicide candidates include Colletotrichum, Phoma, and Sclerotinia. Among bacteria, Xanthomonas and Pseudomonas share this distinction. The available reports on the application of viruses to controlling weeds are also reviewed. Focus is given to the phytotoxic mechanisms associated with bioherbicide candidates. Achieving consistent suppression of weeds in field conditions is a common challenge to this control strategy, as the efficacy of a bioherbicide candidate is generally more sensitive to environmental variation than a conventional herbicide. Common themes and lessons emerging from the available literature in regard to this challenge are presented. Additionally, future directions for this crop protection strategy are suggested.

  13. Critical Period of Weed Control in Corn (Zea mays L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Alizadeh

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine the critical peroid of weed control (CPWC in grain maize, a field study was conducted in 2008 in Agricultural Research Station of Esfahan province using a randomized complete block design with 12 treatments and three replications. The treatments consisted of two different periods of weed interference, a critical weed-free period and a critical time of weed removal were imposed at V3, V6, V9, V12, and R1 (based on phenological stages of corn development with a weedy check and a weed-free check. The CPWC was determined by fitting non-linear regression models of logistic and gompertz equations to the data in range of 2.5, 5, 10 and 15% of acceptable yield loss levels. The CPWC was from 1- to 13-leaf stage (2-54 DAE, 3- to 11-leaf stage (10-46 DAE, 5- to 8-leaf stage (20-35 DAE and 6-leaf stage (27 DAE in Esfahan condition to prevent yield losses of 2.5%, 5% , 10% and 15% respectively.

  14. The weeding handbook a shelf-by-shelf guide

    CERN Document Server

    Vnuk, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    "No! We can't rid of that!" Vnuk, author of the popular "Weeding Tips" column on Booklist Online, is here to show you that yes, you can. A library is an ever-changing organism; when done the right way, weeding helps a library thrive by focusing its resources on those parts of the collection that are the most useful to its users. Her handbook takes the guesswork out of this delicate but necessary process, giving public and school library staff the knowledge and the confidence to effectively weed any collection, of any size. Going through the proverbial stacks shelf by shelf, Vnuk: Explains why weeding is important for a healthy library, demonstrating that a vibrant collection leads to robust circulation, which in turn affects library budgets Walks readers through a library's shelves by Dewey area, with recommended weeding criteria and call-outs in each area for the different considerations of large collections and smaller collections Features a chapter addressing reference, media, magazines and newspapers, e-b...

  15. Controlling weeds with fungi, bacteria and viruses: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Dylan P; Raizada, Manish N

    2015-01-01

    Weeds are a nuisance in a variety of land uses. The increasing prevalence of both herbicide resistant weeds and bans on cosmetic pesticide use has created a strong impetus to develop novel strategies for controlling weeds. The application of bacteria, fungi and viruses to achieving this goal has received increasingly great attention over the last three decades. Proposed benefits to this strategy include reduced environmental impact, increased target specificity, reduced development costs compared to conventional herbicides and the identification of novel herbicidal mechanisms. This review focuses on examples from North America. Among fungi, the prominent genera to receive attention as bioherbicide candidates include Colletotrichum, Phoma, and Sclerotinia. Among bacteria, Xanthomonas and Pseudomonas share this distinction. The available reports on the application of viruses to controlling weeds are also reviewed. Focus is given to the phytotoxic mechanisms associated with bioherbicide candidates. Achieving consistent suppression of weeds in field conditions is a common challenge to this control strategy, as the efficacy of a bioherbicide candidate is generally more sensitive to environmental variation than a conventional herbicide. Common themes and lessons emerging from the available literature in regard to this challenge are presented. Additionally, future directions for this crop protection strategy are suggested.

  16. Cruciferous weeds in oil seed rape – appearance and control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klingenhagen, Günter

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Different cruciferous weeds were drilled in autumn 2011 and 2012 in a field near Münster. Beside common species like hedge mustard (Sisymbrium officinale Scop., shepherd`s purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris, pennycress (Thlaspiarvense, tall hedge mustard (Sisymbrium loeselii and flixweed (Descurainia sophia, we tried to establish weeds that are not common on arable land in Germany until now. These were: Yellow rocket (Barbarea vulgaris, hoary cress (Lepidium draba and Turkish rocket (Bunias orientalis. In autumn 2011 emergence of the sown weeds was poor. In the second year of experiment we got good emergence of the named weeds excluding hoary cress (Lepidium draba. In autumn 2011 and 2012 different herbicidecombinations were applied across the stripes. The best results were achieved with Colzor Trio (clomazone + dimethachlor + napropamid which was applied in pre-emergence state, a spray sequence Butisan Gold (metazachlor + quinmerac + dimethenamid-P applied in pre-emergence followed by Salsa (ethametsulfuronmethyl + Trend (adjuvant in post-emergence and Clearfield-Vantiga (metazachlor + quinmerac + imazamox + Dash (adjuvant, also applied in post-emergence state of the weeds.

  17. New possibilities for weed control in conventional soybeans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petersen, Jan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In field trials in was investigated, if the use of the in Germany new active ingredient imazamox enlarge the possibilities of post emergence weed control in soybeans. Furthermore new herbicide strategies were tested on efficacy and selectivity in soybeans. The use of imazamox was very selective and showed a relative broad spectrum of controlled weed species. However, efficacy of imazamox must be supported by a pre-emergence treatment and in most cases by a tank mix partner. For example cleavers (Galium aparine can not be controlled by imazamox. Tankmixtures of imazamox and bentazon indicated an antagonism. Efficacy to some weed species was reduced compared to solo application. The low dose concept – three applications of low doses at cotyledon stage of weeds led to some success. However, these strategies must be further investigated, before they can be recommended to commercial farming practice. All herbicide strategies tested showed some surviving weed species. This indicates that choice of herbicides, dose rates and application strategies must be done very careful and site specific.

  18. Weed suppression by green manure in an agroecological system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Maria Garicoix Recalde

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Green manure promotes efficient suppression of weeds, but green manure species can exhibit distinct behaviors, depending on the environmental conditions. This study aimed to evaluate the potential of soil mulching and weed suppression by spring/summer green manure species grown in the spring/summer season, at different growth stages and after management (cut, for 90 days during the cassava crop cycle. The study was carried out in the 2010/2011 season, in a system managed under agroecological principles. The treatments consisted of different green manure species and arrangements: Crotalaria juncea, Cajanus cajan, Canavalia brasiliensis, Canavalia ensiformis, Pennisetum americanum, Crotalaria juncea and Pennisetum americanum intercropped; Mucuna aterrima, Sorghum bicolor, a mixture of all the green manures in study and a control plot under fallow. The experiment was arranged in a randomized block design with four replications. The evaluations of the soil cover either by the green manures or weeds were performed at 45, 90 and 105 days after the emergence of the green manures. The cassava crop was planted under reduced tillage system at 11 days after the cut of the green manures. The percentage of soil covered by weeds and the dry matter produced were evaluated at 30, 60 and 90 days after planting. The results showed that the green manures had a suppressive effect on weeds during their life cycle, as well as during the first months after its management (cut, composing the mulch.

  19. Systems approaches to innovation in pest management; reflections and lessons learned from an integrated research program on parasitic weeds in rice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, J.; Schut, M.; Demont, M.; Klerkx, L.W.A.; Gbehounou, G.; Oude Lansink, A.G.J.M.; Mourits, M.C.M.; Rotteveel, T.; Kayeke, J.; Ast, van A.; Akanvou, L.; Cissoko, M.; Kamanda, J.; Bastiaans, L.

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a retrospective look at a systems-oriented research program, on the increasing occurrence of parasitic weeds in rainfed rice in sub-Saharan Africa, to qualitatively assess merits and identify challenges of such approach. We gained a broad contextual overview of the problem and di

  20. Narrow rows reduce biomass and seed production of weeds and increase maize yield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mashingaidze, A.B.; Werf, van der W.; Lotz, L.A.P.; Chipomho, J.; Kropff, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Smallholder farmers in southern African countries rely primarily on cultural control and hoe weeding to combat weeds, but often times, they are unable to keep up with the weeding requirements of the crop because of its laboriousness, causing them to incur major yield losses. Optimisation of crop pla

  1. Economics of weed suppressive rice cultivars in flood- and furrow-irrigated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeds are a major constraint to rice production. In the U.S, weeds in rice are controlled primarily with synthetic herbicides. Intensive herbicide application in rice also has many potential drawbacks, resulting in environmental pollution, human health concerns, and development of weed resistance. B...

  2. Weed map generation from UAV image mosaics based on crop row detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtiby, Henrik Skov

    To control weed in a field effectively with a minimum of herbicides, knowledge about the weed patches is required. Based on images acquired by Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), a vegetation map of the entire field can be generated. Manual analysis, which is often required, to detect weed patches...

  3. 7 CFR 201.17 - Noxious-weed seeds in the District of Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Noxious-weed seeds in the District of Columbia. 201.17... ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Labeling Agricultural Seeds § 201.17 Noxious-weed seeds in the District of Columbia. (a) Noxious-weed seeds in the District of Columbia are: Quackgrass (Elytrigia...

  4. Airborne hyperspectral and LiDAR data integration for weed detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamás, János; Lehoczky, Éva; Fehér, János; Fórián, Tünde; Nagy, Attila; Bozsik, Éva; Gálya, Bernadett; Riczu, Péter

    2014-05-01

    Agriculture uses 70% of global available fresh water. However, ca. 50-70% of water used by cultivated plants, the rest of water transpirated by the weeds. Thus, to define the distribution of weeds is very important in precision agriculture and horticulture as well. To survey weeds on larger fields by traditional methods is often time consuming. Remote sensing instruments are useful to detect weeds in larger area. In our investigation a 3D airborne laser scanner (RIEGL LMS-Q680i) was used in agricultural field near Sopron to scouting weeds. Beside the airborne LiDAR, hyperspectral imaging system (AISA DUAL) and air photos helped to investigate weed coverage. The LiDAR survey was carried out at early April, 2012, before sprouting of cultivated plants. Thus, there could be detected emerging of weeds and direction of cultivation. However airborne LiDAR system was ideal to detect weeds, identification of weeds at species level was infeasible. Higher point density LiDAR - Terrestrial laser scanning - systems are appropriate to distinguish weed species. Based on the results, laser scanner is an effective tool to scouting of weeds. Appropriate weed detection and mapping systems could contribute to elaborate water and herbicide saving management technique. This publication was supported by the OTKA project K 105789.

  5. 7 CFR 360.300 - General prohibitions and restrictions on the movement of noxious weeds; permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of noxious weeds; permits. 360.300 Section 360.300 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NOXIOUS WEED REGULATIONS § 360.300 General prohibitions and restrictions on the movement of noxious weeds; permits. (a)...

  6. Lawn Weed Control with Herbicides. Home and Garden Bulletin No. 123.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agricultural Research Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Information and diagrams are given for identification and treatment of weed grasses and broadleaf weeds. Herbicides are suggested for use against each weed and instructions are given for proper application. Information is given for buying herbicides, and applying sprays and cleaning sprayers. (BB)

  7. Weed management in transplanted lettuce with Pendimethalin and S-metolachlor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Few herbicides are available for use in lettuce and hand weeding is required for commercially acceptable weed control. More effective herbicides are needed. Here we report field evaluations of pendimethalin and S-metolachlor for weed control in transplanted lettuce. Pendimethalin was evaluated PRE a...

  8. Control of perennial weeds by mechanical methods and anaerobic soil disinfection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huiting, H.F.; Bleeker, P.O.; Riemens, M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Perennial weeds are difficult to control and ask for a specific approach. During the most recent years it has even become a great challenge to control these weeds in conventional farming systems, although in comparison effective perennial weed control in organic farming systems remains more difficul

  9. PHARMACOLOGICAL ACTIVITIES OF SOME COMMON INDIAN WEEDS: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To review the phytoconstituents and pharmacological activities of some common Indian weed plants. Materials and Methods: The information was collected and compiled from scientific literature present in different databases viz., Science Direct, PubMed, MEDLINE, Elsevier and Google Scholar. Results: Literature search revealed that weeds possess diverse group of phytoconstiuents such as phenolics, flavonoids, alkaloids, terpenes, steroids, saponins etc. Weeds have been used for their therapeutic values in Ayurveda and Unani systems of medicine. The phytoconstituents present in them are responsible for the biological activities. Conclusion: Natural products of plant origin have been used for the treatment of various infectious and degenerative diseases. The diversity of phytochemicals present in plants provides drug leads for the development of novel therapeutic agents.

  10. PHARMACOLOGICAL ACTIVITIES OF SOME COMMON INDIAN WEEDS: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available To review the phytoconstituents and pharmacological activities of some common Indian weed plants. Materials and Methods: The information was collected and compiled from scientific literature present in different databases viz., Science Direct, PubMed, MEDLINE, Elsevier and Google Scholar. Results: Literature search revealed that weeds possess diverse group of phytoconstiuents such as phenolics, flavonoids, alkaloids, terpenes, steroids, saponins etc. Weeds have been used for their therapeutic values in Ayurveda and Unani systems of medicine. The phytoconstituents present in them are responsible for the biological activities. Conclusion: Natural products of plant origin have been used for the treatment of various infectious and degenerative diseases. The diversity of phytochemicals present in plants provides drug leads for the development of novel therapeutic agents.

  11. Development of an Autonomous Vehicle for Weed and Crop Registration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Tom Søndergaard; Nielsen, Kirsten Mølgaard; Andersen, Palle

    degree of autonomy. The vehicle is part of an autonomous information system for crop and weed registration in fields which is developed at Aalborg University and The Danish Institute of Agricultural Science. The system consists of the vehicle and a stationary base station as well as a wireless......The extension of information technology and computers on farming tools results in new possibilities for crop/weed handling. In this paper a system using an autonomous field robot (vehicle) able to make images in the field is described. In the recent farming has come to rely on intensive use...... of chemicals for crop protection. A way to reduce the consumption of chemicals is to use precision techniques for placing chemicals where they have an optimal effect with minimal quantity. An important part of this is to locate the weed for automatic selective spraying. A camera placed on a sprayer may...

  12. RESEARCH ON SEGMENTATION OF WEED IMAGES BASED ON COMPUTER VISION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Yajing; Yang Fan; Yang Ruixia; Jia Kejin; Zhang Hongtao

    2007-01-01

    In this letter, a segment algorithm based on color feature of images is proposed. The algorithm separates the weed area from soil background according to the color eigenvalue, which is obtained by analyzing the color difference between the weeds and background in three color spaces RGB, rgb and HSI. The results of the experiment show that it can get notable effect in segmentation according to the color feature, and the possibility of successful segmentation is 87%-93%. This method can also be widely used in other fields which are complicated in the background of the image and facilely influenced in illumination, such as weed identification, tree species discrimination, fruit picking and so on.

  13. Development of an Autonomous Vehicle for Weed and Crop Registration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Tom Søndergaard; Nielsen, Kirsten Mølgaard; Andersen, Palle

    The extension of information technology and computers on farming tools results in new possibilities for crop/weed handling. In this paper a system using an autonomous field robot (vehicle) able to make images in the field is described. In the recent farming has come to rely on intensive use...... degree of autonomy. The vehicle is part of an autonomous information system for crop and weed registration in fields which is developed at Aalborg University and The Danish Institute of Agricultural Science. The system consists of the vehicle and a stationary base station as well as a wireless...... be a solution but at present the image analysis technology does not have the capability for online analysis. An alternative way is to construct a weed map prior to the spraying. In order to avoid damage to the soil a light weight vehicle carrying a camera is an obvious choice. To minimize damage to the crop...

  14. Influence of Weed Competition on Potato Growth, Production and Radiation Use Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad MONDANI

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Weed management in potato production is one of the main cost and time consuming practices. Understanding the most effective time of weed control could reduce the costs and increase potato yield. Field study was conducted in the west region of Iran during 2006 to evaluate the effect of weeds damage in potato fields. Twelve treatments used consisted of six initial weed-free periods in which plots were kept free of weeds for 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 days after crop emergence (DAE, and then weeds were allowed to grow until harvest, and six initial weed-infested periods in which, weeds were allowed to grow for 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 DAE, then the plots were kept free of weeds until harvest. Experiment was arranged as a randomized complete block design with three replications. The results showed effect of weed competition on crop dry matter started about 40 DAE and about 90 DAE reached its maximum. The weeds competition decreased dry matter accumulation, leaf area index, crop growth rate, leaf area index duration, light absorption, light extinction coefficient and radiation use efficiency (RUE of potato. Weeds reduced the potato yield 54.8 percent. The beginning and the end of the critical period of weed control in potato (CPWC was based on 5% and 10% tuber yield loss. The onset of the CPWC ranged from 486 to 572 GDD, at 5% and 10% yield loss level corresponding to 11 and 19 days after crop emergence, respectively. The end of the CPWC varied from 1372 to 1164 GDD, at 5% and 10% yield loss level corresponding to 65 and 51 days after crop emergence, respectively. RUE in the weed infestation treatment in comparison to the weed free treatment, reduced 11.8 percent.

  15. [Allelopathy of aqueous extract from Ligularia virgaurea, a dominant weed in psychro-grassland, on pasture plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ruijun; Wang, Mingli; Zhao, Kun; Guo, Shoujun; Zhao, Qingfang; Sun, Kun

    2006-05-01

    Ligularia virgaurea is a noxious weed widely distributed in the alpine grassland of east Qinghai-Tibet Plateau of China. This paper studied the allelopathy of its aqueous extract on the pasture plants Festuca sinensis, Bromus magnus, Elymus nutans, Poa annua, and F. ovina in the region. The mean response index (RI) values of the pasture plants were calculated, and used to quantitatively assess the allelopathic sensitivity of the receptors at three levels, i. e., growth items, development stages, and species. Corresponding values of the weed were also treated in similar way to assess the allelopathic potential of the donor. The results showed that the allelopathic sensitivity was in the order of P. annua > B. magnus > F. sinensis > F. ovina > E. nutans. Both the seed germination and the seedling growth of test pasture plants were inhibited at species level, suggesting that rain eluviation was one of the means by which the weed released allelochemicals. The aqueous extracts from L. virgaurea root and leaf had a significant inhibitory effect at species level, and the effect of root extract was stronger than that of leaf extract, suggesting the competition among species on the underground resources in natural grassland. Allelopathy played an important role in L. virgaurea invasion, and might be responsible to the formation of mono-dominant community and the degeneration of grassland.

  16. Weed sustainable managment in agricultral and non-agricultural areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Arcangeli

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable agriculture is a way to assure the availability of natural resources for future generations.Weed managementin cultivated and not cultivated areas is part of sustainable agriculture as well, and has to face three important challenges:economical (to increase income and competitiveness of farm sector, social (give rural areas opportunity of economicdevelopment and improvement of living conditions, environmental (promote good agricultural practices andpreserve habitats, biodiversity and landscape. The first two challenges involve the in-depth study of models, the economicthreshold of intervention, the management of herbicide resistance phenomena, the study and development ofnew herbicide molecules, or even modern formulations, leading to the optimization of treatments with possible reductionof distributed doses per hectare. Environmental issues must be set in the studies to assess and manage the factorsleading to phenomena of diffuse or point pollution (i.e. water volumes, soil, etc.. However, a sustainable agricultureproduction must take into account consumers’ needs and concerns, especially about food health and safety withrespect to production methods (traditional, integrated and biological. In this context, the results obtained by the developmentof more advanced active principles, the spread of public and private Integrated Production Specifications(Disciplinari di Produzione Integrata and the greater and greater commitment by the institutions in charge of monitoringthe agro-pharmaceutical residues in agro-food products, can be set. The SIRFI SIRFI (Società Italiana per laRicerca sulla Flora Infestante, thanks to the multi-disciplinarity of the structures supporting it, always takes an activepart into innovation especially aimed to the identification of tools implementing farm activity sustainability.

  17. Weed management, training, and irrigation practices for organic production of trailing blackberry: II. Soil and plant nutrient concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organic production of blackberries is increasing, but there is relatively little known about how production practices affect plant and soil nutrient status. The impact of cultivar (‘Black Diamond’ and ‘Marion’), weed management (weed mat, hand weeding, and no weeding), primocane training time (Augus...

  18. The critical period of weed control in corn) Zea mays) at Mashhad, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    majid abaspoor; parviz rezvani moghadam

    2009-01-01

    In order to determine the critical period of weed control in corn, an experiment was conducted at Research Station, Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad in year 2000. The experiment consisted of two discrete periods, a weed-free and a weed infested period. The weed-free period consisted of removing all weeds till 4th (19 days after planting), 7th (34 days after planting), 11th (48 days after planting), 13th (52 days after planting), and 17th (59 days after planting), leaf gr...

  19. Robotic intra-row weed hoeing in maize and sugar beet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhards, Roland

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A prototype of robotic intra-row weed hoeing in maize and sugar beet is presented in this study. Weeds in the crop rows were identified using a bi-spectral image analysis system and shape analysis. Positions of weeds in the images were recorded. Selective weed control in the row was performed with a modified finger weeder driven by electrical motors. Speed of the finger weeder was increased at positions where only weeds were classified. The system was triggered by an encoder and controlled by a micro-controller.

  20. 杂草科学管理——理论基础与实施途径%Scientific Management of Weed:Theory and Implementation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂修亮; 陈英明

    2002-01-01

    Scientific management of weeds is theoretically based on ecology.The implementation methods inclade:Intensifying the weed biology and ecology research, especially those of the heavy weeds;Intensifying the research of developing competition between the crop and the weed;Utilizing a allelopathy the gene engineering and breeding against the weeds;Utilizing allelopathy between the crop and the weed, and utilizing biological and agricultural measurements to control the weeds.

  1. Herbicide-resistant crops: utilities and limitations for herbicide-resistant weed management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jerry M; Owen, Micheal D K

    2011-06-08

    Since 1996, genetically modified herbicide-resistant (HR) crops, particularly glyphosate-resistant (GR) crops, have transformed the tactics that corn, soybean, and cotton growers use to manage weeds. The use of GR crops continues to grow, but weeds are adapting to the common practice of using only glyphosate to control weeds. Growers using only a single mode of action to manage weeds need to change to a more diverse array of herbicidal, mechanical, and cultural practices to maintain the effectiveness of glyphosate. Unfortunately, the introduction of GR crops and the high initial efficacy of glyphosate often lead to a decline in the use of other herbicide options and less investment by industry to discover new herbicide active ingredients. With some exceptions, most growers can still manage their weed problems with currently available selective and HR crop-enabled herbicides. However, current crop management systems are in jeopardy given the pace at which weed populations are evolving glyphosate resistance. New HR crop technologies will expand the utility of currently available herbicides and enable new interim solutions for growers to manage HR weeds, but will not replace the long-term need to diversify weed management tactics and discover herbicides with new modes of action. This paper reviews the strengths and weaknesses of anticipated weed management options and the best management practices that growers need to implement in HR crops to maximize the long-term benefits of current technologies and reduce weed shifts to difficult-to-control and HR weeds.

  2. Biology, ecology and management of the invasive parthenium weed (Parthenium hysterophorus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkins, Steve; Shabbir, Asad

    2014-07-01

    Parthenium weed (Parthenium hysterophorus L.) is one of the most aggressive invasive weeds, threatening natural ecosystems and agroecosystems in over 30 countries worldwide. Parthenium weed causes losses of crops and pastures, degrading the biodiversity of natural plant communities, causing human and animal health hazards and resulting in serious economic losses to people and their interests in many countries around the globe. Several of its biological and ecological attributes contribute towards its invasiveness. Various management approaches (namely cultural, mechanical, chemical and biological control) have been used to minimise losses caused by this weed, but most of these approaches are ineffective and uneconomical and/or have limitations. Although chemical control using herbicides and biological control utilising exotic insects and pathogens have been found to contribute to the management of the weed, the weed nevertheless remains a significant problem. An integrated management approach is proposed here for the effective management of parthenium weed on a sustainable basis.

  3. Alternatives to atrazine for weed management in processing sweet corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atrazine has been the most widely used herbicide in North American processing sweet corn for decades; however, increased restrictions in recent years have reduced or eliminated atrazine use in certain production areas. The objective of this study was to identify the best stakeholder-derived weed man...

  4. Integrated Systems of Weed Management in Organic 'Vidalia' Onion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trials were conducted in southeastern Georgia to develop integrated systems of weed management in organic Vidalia® onion. Treatments were a factorial arrangement of summer solarization, cultivation, and herbicides appropriate for use in certified organic production systems. Plots were solarized wi...

  5. Acetic acid and weed control in onions (Allium cepa L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed control is a major challenge in conventional and organic production systems, especially for organically produced sweet onion (Allium cepa L.). Although corn gluten meal shows great promise as an organic preemergent herbicide for onions, research has shown the need for supplemental, postemergen...

  6. Impact of preceding crop on alfalfa competitiveness with weeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organic producers would like to include no-till practices in their farming systems. We are seeking to develop a continuous no-till system for organic farming, based on a complex rotation that includes a 3-year sequence of alfalfa. In this study, we evaluated impact of preceding crop on weed infest...

  7. Tillage as a driver of change in weed communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Armengot, L.; Blanco-Moreno, J.M.; Bàrberi, P.; Bocci, G.; Carlesi, S.; Aendekerk, R.; Berner, A.; Celette, F.; Grosse, M.; Huiting, H.; Kranzler, A.; Luik, A.; Mäder, P.; Peigné, J.; Stoll, E.; Delfosse, P.; Sukkel, W.; Surböck, A.; Westaway, S.; Sans, F.X.

    2016-01-01

    The adoption of non-inversion tillage practices has been widely promoted due to their potential benefits in reducing energy consumption and greenhouse emissions as well as improving soil fertility. However, the lack of soil inversion usually increases weed infestations and changes the composition

  8. Antioxidant and antibacterial properties of selected Thai weed extracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Narintorn; Rattanata; Sakda; Daduang; Suthep; Phaetchanla; Wandee; Bunyatratchata; Bundit; Promraksa; Ratree; Tavichakorntrakool; phangthip; uthaiwat; Patcharee; Boonsiri; Jureerut; Daduang

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To analyze antioxidant and antibacterial properties of selected weeds commonly found in Northeast Thailand including Ageratum conyzoides L.,Alysicurpus vaginalis L.,Commelina bengalensis L.,Euphorbia hirta L.,Hyptis suaveoleiis L.,Parthenocissus quinquefolia L.,and Trianthema portulacastrum L.Methods:Ferric reducing antioxidant power and radical scavenging activity of the aqueous and ethanol weed extracts were determined.Phytocheniical screening,total phenolic and Havonoid contents were done.Antibacterial activity against Aeromonas hydrophila.Aeromonas caviae,Edwardsiella tarda,Plesiomonas shigelloides,Ralstonia spp.,Xanthomonas campestris pv.Vesicatoria,Salmonella spp.and Shigella spp.was performed by disc diffusion assay.Results:The results showed that Euphorbia hirta extract had the highest total phenolic contents and was the most effective against most of the test organisms compared to the other weed extracts.Hyptis suaveoleiis ethanol extract weakly inhibited Ralstonia spp.and Salmonella spp.(10.42%and 9.84%inhibition,respectively).Trianthema portuiacastrum ethanol extract had20.10%inhibition against Shigella spp.Parthenocissus quinquefolia aqueous extract strongly inhibited Aeromonas caviae and Aeromonas hydrophila with 55.90%and 59.68%inhibition,respectively.Conclusions:These weeds may be serving as a potential source of antibacterial agents.

  9. Antioxidant and antibacterial properties of selected Thai weed extracts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Narintorn Rattanata; Sakda Daduang; Suthep Phaetchanla; Wandee Bunyatratchata; Bundit Promraksa; Ratree Tavichakorntrakool; Phangthip Uthaiwat; Patcharee Boonsiri; Jureerut Daduang

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To analyze antioxidant and antibacterial properties of selected weeds commonly found in Northeast Thailand including Ageratum conyzoides L., Alysicarpus vaginalis L., Commelinabengalensis L., Euphorbia hirta L., Hyptis suaveolens L., Parthenocissus quinquefolia L., and Trianthema portulacastrum L. Methods: Ferric reducing antioxidant power and radical scavenging activity of the aqueous and ethanol weed extracts were determined. Phytochemical screening, total phenolic and flavonoid contents were done. Antibacterial activity against Aeromonas hydrophila, Aeromonas caviae,Edwardsiella tarda, Plesiomonas shigelloides, Ralstonia spp., Xanthomonas campestris pv. Vesicatoria, Salmonella spp. and Shigella spp. was performed by disc diffusion assay.Results:The results showed that Euphorbia hirta extract had the highest total phenolic contents and was the most effective against most of the test organisms compared to the other weed extracts. Hyptis suaveolens ethanol extract weakly inhibited Ralstonia spp. and Salmonella spp. (10.42% and 9.84% inhibition, respectively). Trianthema portulacastrum ethanol extract had 20.10%inhibition against Shigella spp. Parthenocissus quinquefolia aqueous extract strongly inhibitedAeromonas caviae and Aeromonas hydrophila with 55.90% and 59.68% inhibition, respectively. Conclusions: These weeds may be serving as a potential source of antibacterial agents.

  10. Weed competitiveness and yielding ability of aerobic rice genotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, D.L.

    2006-01-01

    Keywords:    Broad-sense heritability; Crop vigour; Genetic correlation; Indirect selection index; Plant erectness; Rice germplasm; Seeding rate; Vegetative growth; Weed-suppressive ability.

    Aerobi

  11. Arachnoid granules: Dandy was Dandy, Cushing and Weed were not.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurizi, Charles P

    2010-08-01

    Errors can be instructive. It seems that Harvey Cushing and Louis Weed provided the medical world with a faulty theory of cerebrospinal fluid absorption. Louis Weed, working in Harvey Cushing's laboratory, initially studied the movement of substances in the cerebrospinal fluid by using low-pressure studies. Results of the low-pressure studies were considered unsatisfactory and high pressure experiments were undertaken and these had results similar to earlier work done by others in human cadavers. High pressure results demonstrating movement of fluid through the arachnoid granules were deemed correct. Because of Cushing's position of authority, the theory became accepted as fact and in time proved to be entrenched dogma. Walter Dandy demonstrated in experiments on hydrocephalus and the surgical removal of the arachnoid granule system that the fluid was produced by the choroid plexuses and not absorbed by the arachnoid granules. His work was dismissed by Weed as unreliable. Examination of the pattern of deposition of corpora amylacea on the surface of the brain provides evidence that cerebrospinal fluid does not pass through arachnoid granules but passes through the choroid fissure and is recycled through choroid plexus portals. The choroid plexus portal theory can explain the findings in the low-pressure experiments of Weed. Bias and pride seem to be the source of the faulty theory. Entrenched dogma is resistant to challenge.

  12. Arable weed flora in the Western Siberian grain belt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kämpf, Immo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Between Ekaterinburg and Nowosibirsk, in the Western Siberian grain belt, spring wheat is grown on fertile Chernozem soils. Field and farm sizes are large but the land-use intensity per area is low compared to Central Europe. Fertilizers and pesticides are applied only in low to moderate quantities and yields range between 10 and 20 dt ha-1. We studied the arable weed flora in the northern forest steppe zone of Tyumen region using a randomized sampling design. Surprisingly, the species richness was only moderate, on average 9.8 ± 3.8 species per 100 m². Compared to weed communities of Bashkiria (Southern Ural and less intensively used arable land of Central Europe these numbers are rather low. Moreover, most of the recorded species were cosmopolitans or widely distributed throughout the temperate zone. We suggest that the land use intensity was high enough to reduce the density of a number of weed species in a way that they were not registered by our random sampling design. The limited conservational value of the weed vegetation of large grain fields in Tyumen leads to the conclusion that if intensification of land use is unavoidable, it should be directed to arable land and not to ex-arable land or ancient grassland, which is of higher conservation value.

  13. Identification of seedling cabbages and weeds using hyperspectral imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Target detectionis one of research focues for precision chemical application. This study developed a method to identify seedling cabbages and weeds using hyperspectral spectral imaging. In processing the image data, with ENVI software, after dimension reduction, noise reduction, de-correlation for h...

  14. Herbicide resistance in weeds: Survey, characterization, and mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this paper is to present a systematic diagnostic approach towards the characterization of herbicide resistance in a given weed population with regards to profile (single, multiple, cross resistance), magnitude (fold level), mechanism, and related bio-physiological aspects. Diagnosing her...

  15. Management of winter weeds affects Frankliniella fusca (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) dispersal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, A L P; Kennedy, G G

    2012-04-01

    Frankliniella fusca (Hinds) naturally disperses from winter weeds to crops in spring, causing direct and indirect damage. Field preparation before planting includes use of herbicides or cultivation to kill unwanted vegetation, which adversely affects F. fusca host plants and potentially influences F. fusca dispersal. Common chickweed, Stellaria media (L.), infested with F. fusca, was used as a model to study effects of timing and type of vegetation management on adult dispersal. Infested weeds were caged and F. fusca weekly dispersal was monitored using sticky traps. Weed management treatments performed at an early (14 April-11 May) or late (2 wk after early treatment) date consisted of glyphosate, paraquat, disking, hoeing, or untreated control. Late glyphosate and hoeing treatments resulted in cumulative dispersal statistically similar to or greater than from control plots. Compared with the control, significantly more F. fusca dispersed from the glyphosate and hoeing plots during the 3 wk after treatment. More thrips dispersed from the late paraquat treatment 1 wk post-application than from the control. Dispersal from the disked treatment and early paraquat treatment was similar to that of the control 1- to 3-wk post-treatment. Early treatments resulted in significantly smaller cumulative dispersal than the control in all but one instance. Late disking and paraquat treatments resulted in cumulative F. fusca captures that were statistically similar or less than that in the control. Winter weed management type and timing affect F. fusca dispersal magnitude and duration.

  16. Weeding, Wine, and Cheese: Enticing Faculty to Cull a Collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Anne Koveleskie

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Remodeling of a building and decreased shelf space motivated faculty and staff to complete a long overdue weeding project in a small university library. Librarians used social media, internal communication, and personal contact to motivate faculty. Every effort was made to reuse and recycle discarded materials. The result was a streamlined collection and a much improved learning space.

  17. Glyphosate resistant weeds - a threat to conservation agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glyphosate-resistant weeds are now present throughout the Southeast. Hundreds of thousands of conservation tillage cotton acres, some currently under USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) conservation program contracts, are at risk of being converted to higher-intensity tillage systems....

  18. Potential of Air-Propelled Abrasives for Selective Weed Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel forms of selective weed control are needed by many types of growers, but especially organic growers who are restricted from using synthetic herbicides. Abrasive grit made from corn cobs was expelled from a sand blaster at 517 kPa pressure and aimed at seedlings of common lambsquarters and corn...

  19. Confused about Fusion? Weed Your Science Collection with a Pro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Charli

    1998-01-01

    Provides guidelines on weeding science collections in junior high/high school libraries. Highlights include checking copyright dates, online sources, 13 science subject areas that deserve special consideration (plate tectonics, fission, fusion, radioactive dating, weather/climate, astronomy/space science, elements, integrated science,…

  20. The Lean Reference Collection: Improving Functionality through Selection and Weeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Christopher W.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses references collections in academic libraries and offers guidelines for placing materials in a reference collection that focus on their suitability for true reference functions and the expected frequency of use. Problems with poorly managed collections are discussed, and the importance of selection policies and weeding are emphasized. (37…

  1. Bio-gas production from alligator weeds semiannual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latif, A.

    1976-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to study the effect of temperature, sample preparation, reducing agents, light intensity and pH of the media, on bio-gas and methane production from the microbial anaerobic decomposition of alligator weeds (Alternanthera philoxeroides). Efforts were also made for the isolation and characterization of the methanogenic bacteria.

  2. THE PERFORMANCE OF SOYBEAN (GLYCINE MAX (L. MERRILL UNDER VARYING WEEDING REGIMES IN SOUTH WESTERN NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. O. ODELEYE

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Two field trials were conducted at the Teaching and Research Farm, the University of Ibadan, Ibadan, in 1999 and 2001, to study the performance of two soybean cultivars subjected to varying weeding regimes, viz: no weeding, weeding at 2 and 4 weeks after sowing (WAS, 2 and 6 WAS and 2 and 8 WAS. The experiments were a factorial combination of variety and weeding regimes in randomized complete block design with four replications. Data were taken at maturity on some vegetative, dry matter and yield parameters. The competing weeds were also identified, sampled, dried and weighed. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and means separated by LSD (P=0.05. Results showed that weeds did not adversely affect the performance of the two soybean varieties at 2 WAS. In addition, two weedings were adequate for the two soybean varieties but the interval of weeding was absolutely important in yield determination. The growth stage when these weeds prove to be harmful competition on soybeans, as evidenced from the results of this study, was between 4 and 6 WAS. The results also showed that plots left unwedded inevitably had the highest yield reduction in both varieties. On the other hand, plots weeded at 2 and 6 WAS showed the best performance in all aspects for both varieties of soybean, than other weeding regimes. It is clear from this study, therefore, that weeding at 2 and 6 WAS ensured that most parts of vegetative and reproductive stages were weed-free, so that in conclusion, weeding soybean crop twice is appropriate using the 2 and 6 WAS sequence, for optimum performance in south west Nigeria.

  3. Floristic and phytosociology of weeds in pastures in Maranhão State, Northeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaílson Penha Costa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Knowledge of weed floristic composition and phytosociology are key factors for improving weed management in pastures. Information on weed species that occur in pastures in Northeast Brazil, particularly in Maranhão State is very limited. It is, therefore, important, to search for information to help farmers to control weeds in livestock farming. This paper describes the weed flora diversity and community structure parameters, including density, frequency, abundance and importance value for each weed species found in five pastures of same age and management in Maranhão State, Northeast Brazil. The weed survey was carried out using a wooden frame (80 cm x 30 cm placed randomly on the soil surface 30 times in each pasture (n = 150. Weeds were pulled out, separated by species and counted. The weed flora was represented by 996 individuals, from nine families, 15 genera and 19 species. Weed density within pastures was of 44.3 plants m-2. The weed flora was dominated by species of the Cyperaceae and Poaceae families. The most important weed species based on Importance Value were Eragrostis ciliaris (IV = 32.97, Cyperus rotundus (IV = 31,95, Cyperus luzulae (IV = 27,50, Cyperus sphacelatus (IV = 27,42, Pycreus lanceolatus (IV = 27,33 Cyperus haspan (IV = 25,72 and Eleusine indica (IV = 23,49. Weed diversity, based on Shannon Diversity Index was very high (H' = 4.37 nats ind-1. Our results could lead to improved weed management in pastures in Maranhão State, Northeast Brazil.

  4. Quantifying the effect of crop spatial arrangement on weed suppression using functional-structural plant modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Jochem B; Bastiaans, Lammert

    2016-05-01

    Suppression of weed growth in a crop canopy can be enhanced by improving crop competitiveness. One way to achieve this is by modifying the crop planting pattern. In this study, we addressed the question to what extent a uniform planting pattern increases the ability of a crop to compete with weed plants for light compared to a random and a row planting pattern, and how this ability relates to crop and weed plant density as well as the relative time of emergence of the weed. To this end, we adopted the functional-structural plant modelling approach which allowed us to explicitly include the 3D spatial configuration of the crop-weed canopy and to simulate intra- and interspecific competition between individual plants for light. Based on results of simulated leaf area development, canopy photosynthesis and biomass growth of the crop, we conclude that differences between planting pattern were small, particularly if compared to the effects of relative time of emergence of the weed, weed density and crop density. Nevertheless, analysis of simulated weed biomass demonstrated that a uniform planting of the crop improved the weed-suppression ability of the crop canopy. Differences in weed suppressiveness between planting patterns were largest with weed emergence before crop emergence, when the suppressive effect of the crop was only marginal. With simultaneous emergence a uniform planting pattern was 8 and 15 % more competitive than a row and a random planting pattern, respectively. When weed emergence occurred after crop emergence, differences between crop planting patterns further decreased as crop canopy closure was reached early on regardless of planting pattern. We furthermore conclude that our modelling approach provides promising avenues to further explore crop-weed interactions and aid in the design of crop management strategies that aim at improving crop competitiveness with weeds.

  5. Weed-Suppressing Effect and Mechanism of Allelopathic Rice Accessions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUFei; KONGChui-hua; XUXiao-hua; ZHANGChao-xian; CHENXiong-hui

    2004-01-01

    Two allelopathic rice accessions, PI312777 and Allelopathy i, significantly suppressed the growth of associated weeds in the field. Moreover, their weed-suppressing effects were correlated with the cultivation patterns. The weed-suppressing effects of throwing and transplanting were more effective than that of direct seeding. Furthermore, the amounts of allelochemicals (resorcinols, flavones and hydroxamic acids) produced and released from two allelopathic rice accessions were much higher than that from a nonallelopathic rice variety Hua-Jing-Xian i, and reached the maximum concentration at the 6th leaf stage. Differences in the weed-suppressing effects of rice accessions appear to result from the accessions producing and releasing different amounts of allelochemicals in the field. Further research confirmed that in PI312777 plants, allelochemicals were synthesized by the above-ground parts, and then secreted through the root tissues. Root tissues of PI312777 plants never produced the allelochemicals. Root exudates from PI312777 could significantly inhibit the growth of E. crus-galli surrounding rice plants in water culture. However, when activated carbon was added to the culture solution, which could absorb allelochemicals from root exudates, the growth of E. crus-galli was no longer significantly inhibited. Weed-suppressing effects of rice accessions depended on allelopathy, cultivation patterns and other factors in rice fields, while allelopathy was one of important factors. Interestingly, the amounts of allelochemicals produced and released from allelopathic rice plants may be induced by the presence of E. crus-galli.This suggests that there is a possible chemical recognition between rice and E. crus-galli.

  6. A Comparative Study of Bioethanol Production from Aquatic Weeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kodichetty Ramaiah Sunil

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A greatest challenge for society in the 21st century is to meet energy demand, where biomass is subjected for pre-treatment and converted into biofuel (alcohol. Aquatic weeds are potential bio resources which are easily available for biofuel production. Aquatic weeds like Alternanthera sessilis, Typha latifolia, Eichhornia crassipes, Baccopa monnieri, Ipomoea aquatica and Pistia stratiotes are estimated for carbohydrates content. Highest content of reducing sugar was observed in Alternanthera sessilis (296.8µg/ml, total sugar in Ipomoea aquatic (880.00mg/ml, starch in Alternanthera sessilis (57.13mg/ml, cellulose in Pistia stratiotes and Typha latifolia (280.00mg/ml, hemicellulose in Typha latifolia (26.85mg/ml; high cellulosic aquatic weeds were subjected to pre-treatment methods like physical, chemical and enzymatic method. Meanwhile different yeast strains from the fruits of Manilkara zapota, Cucumis melo, Musa paradisiaca, Citrullus lanatus, Punica granatum and Ananas comosus were isolated yeast of Citrullus lanatus shows highest amount of alcohol production (307µg/ml, which is inoculated to pre-treated hydrolysate, where Alternanthera sessilis and Typha latifolia shows high amount of alcohol in physical method (160.5 and 115.4µg/ml. In chemical method in acid hydrolysis it shows 387.1 and 69.63µg/ml and in alkali hydrolysis 62 and 170µg/ml, so these two weeds were taken for enzymatic method for alcohol production, on seventh day Alternanthera sessilis shows highest alcohol production (113.33µg/ml, hence among six weeds Alternanthera sessilis and the yeast of Citrullus lanatus produces more amount of alcohol than others and it also shows that enzymatic method of pre-treatment is best in hydrolysis of biomass than physical and chemical method. The study revealed the possibility of producing alcohol from locally available fruits using simple, cheap and adaptable technology with biochemically characterized yeast strains.

  7. Predicting weed problems in maize cropping by species distribution modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bürger, Jana

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Increasing maize cultivation and changed cropping practices promote the selection of typical maize weeds that may also profit strongly from climate change. Predicting potential weed problems is of high interest for plant production. Within the project KLIFF, experiments were combined with species distribution modelling for this task in the region of Lower Saxony, Germany. For our study, we modelled ecological and damage niches of nine weed species that are significant and wide spread in maize cropping in a number of European countries. Species distribution models describe the ecological niche of a species, these are the environmental conditions under which a species can maintain a vital population. It is also possible to estimate a damage niche, i.e. the conditions under which a species causes damage in agricultural crops. For this, we combined occurrence data of European national data bases with high resolution climate, soil and land use data. Models were also projected to simulated climate conditions for the time horizon 2070 - 2100 in order to estimate climate change effects. Modelling results indicate favourable conditions for typical maize weed occurrence virtually all over the study region, but only a few species are important in maize cropping. This is in good accordance with the findings of an earlier maize weed monitoring. Reaction to changing climate conditions is species-specific, for some species neutral (E. crus-galli, other species may gain (Polygonum persicaria or loose (Viola arvensis large areas of suitable habitats. All species with damage potential under present conditions will remain important in maize cropping, some more species will gain regional importance (Calystegia sepium, Setara viridis.

  8. Circadian response of annual weeds to glyphosate and glufosinate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinson, Krishona B; Sothern, Robert B; Koukkari, Willard L; Durgan, Beverly R; Gunsolus, Jeffrey L

    2002-03-01

    Five field experiments were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in Minnesota to examine the influence of time of day efficacy of glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] and glufosinate [2-amino-4-(hydroxymethyl-phosphinyl)butanoic acid] applications on the control of annual weeds. Each experiment was designed to be a randomized complete block with four replications using plot sizes of 3 x 9 m. Glyphosate and glufosinate were applied at rates of 0.421 kg ae/ha and 0.292 kg ai/ha, respectively, with and without an additional adjuvant that consisted of 20% nonionic surfactant and 80% ammonium sulfate. All treatments were applied with water at 94 L/ha. Times of day for the application of herbicide were 06:00h, 09:00h, 12:00h, 15:00h, 18:00h, 21:00h, and 24:00h. Efficacy was evaluated 14 d after application by visual ratings. At 14 d, a circadian response to each herbicide was found, with greatest annual weed control observed with an application occurring between 09:00h and 18:00h and significantly less weed control observed with an application at 06:00h, 21:00h, or 24:00h. The addition of an adjuvant to both herbicides increased overall efficacy, but did not overcome the rhythmic time of day effect. Results of the multiple regression analysis showed that after environmental temperature, time of day was the second most important predictor of percent weed kill. Thus, circadian timing of herbicide application significantly influenced weed control with both glyphosate and glufosinate.

  9. Host status of six major weeds to Meloidogyne chitwoodi and Pratylenchus penetrans, including a preliminary field survey concerning other weeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kutywayo, V.; Been, T.H.

    2006-01-01

    A glasshouse experiment was carried out to investigate the host status of six important weeds in intensive agricultural cropping systems to Meloidogyne chitwoodi and Pratylenchus penetrans. Senecio vulgaris L., Capsella bursa-pastoris (L.) Medic. and Solanum nigrum L. were hosts of M. chitwoodi with

  10. Patterning highly ordered arrays of complex nanofeatures through EUV directed polarity switching of non chemically amplified photoresist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Subrata; Satyanarayana, V. S. V.; Pramanick, Bulti; Sharma, Satinder K.; Pradeep, Chullikkattil P.; Morales-Reyes, Israel; Batina, Nikola; Gonsalves, Kenneth E.

    2016-01-01

    Given the importance of complex nanofeatures in the filed of micro-/nanoelectronics particularly in the area of high-density magnetic recording, photonic crystals, information storage, micro-lens arrays, tissue engineering and catalysis, the present work demonstrates the development of new methodology for patterning complex nanofeatures using a recently developed non-chemically amplified photoresist (n-CARs) poly(4-(methacryloyloxy)phenyl)dimethylsulfoniumtriflate) (polyMAPDST) with the help of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) as patterning tool. The photosensitivity of polyMAPDST is mainly due to the presence of radiation sensitive trifluoromethanesulfonate unit (triflate group) which undergoes photodegradation upon exposure with EUV photons, and thus brings in polarity change in the polymer structure. Integration of such radiation sensitive unit into polymer network avoids the need of chemical amplification which is otherwise needed for polarity switching in the case of chemically amplified photoresists (CARs). Indeed, we successfully patterned highly ordered wide-raging dense nanofeatures that include nanodots, nanowaves, nanoboats, star-elbow etc. All these developed nanopatterns have been well characterized by FESEM and AFM techniques. Finally, the potential of polyMAPDST has been established by successful transfer of patterns into silicon substrate through adaptation of compatible etch recipes. PMID:26975782

  11. Determining the potential of inedible weed biomass for bio-energy and ethanol production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siripong Premjet

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Surveys of indigenous weeds in six provinces located in the low northern part of Thailand were undertaken to determine the potential of weed biomass for bio-energy and bio-ethanol. The results reveal that most of the weed samples had low moisture contents and high lower heating values (LHVs. The LHVs at the highest level, ranging from 17.7 to 18.9 Mg/kg, and at the second highest level, ranging from 16.4 to 17.6 Mg/kg, were obtained from 11 and 31 weed species, respectively. It was found that most of the collected weed samples contained high cellulose and low lignin contents. Additionally, an estimate of the theoretical ethanol yields based on the amount of cellulose and hemicellulose in each weed species indicated that a high ethanol yield resulted from weed biomasses with high cellulose and hemicellulose contents. Among the collected weed species, the highest level of ethanol yield, ranging from 478.9 to 548.5 L/ton (substrate, was achieved from 11 weed species. It was demonstrated that most of the collected weed species tested have the potential for thermal conversion and can be used as substrates for ethanol production.

  12. The role of plant-microbiome interactions in weed establishment and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trognitz, Friederike; Hackl, Evelyn; Widhalm, Siegrid; Sessitsch, Angela

    2016-10-01

    The soil microbiome plays an important role in the establishment of weeds and invasive plants. They associate with microorganisms supporting their growth and health. Weed management strategies, like tillage and herbicide treatments, to control weeds generally alter soil structure going alongside with changes in the microbial community. Once a weed population establishes in the field, the plants build up a close relationship with the available microorganisms. Seeds or vegetative organs overwinter in soil and select early in the season their own microbiome before crop plants start to vegetate. Weed and crop plants compete for light, nutrition and water, but may differently interact with soil microorganisms. The development of new sequencing technologies for analyzing soil microbiomes has opened up the possibility for in depth analysis of the interaction between 'undesired' plants and crop plants under different management systems. These findings will help us to understand the functions of microorganisms involved in crop productivity and plant health, weed establishment and weed prevention. Exploitation of the knowledge offers the possibility to search for new biocontrol methods against weeds based on soil and plant-associated microorganisms. This review discusses the recent advances in understanding the functions of microbial communities for weed/invasive plant establishment and shows new ways to use plant-associated microorganisms to control weeds and invasive plants in different land management systems.

  13. Integrated pest management and weed management in the United States and Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Micheal D K; Beckie, Hugh J; Leeson, Julia Y; Norsworthy, Jason K; Steckel, Larry E

    2015-03-01

    There is interest in more diverse weed management tactics because of evolved herbicide resistance in important weeds in many US and Canadian crop systems. While herbicide resistance in weeds is not new, the issue has become critical because of the adoption of simple, convenient and inexpensive crop systems based on genetically engineered glyphosate-tolerant crop cultivars. Importantly, genetic engineering has not been a factor in rice and wheat, two globally important food crops. There are many tactics that help to mitigate herbicide resistance in weeds and should be widely adopted. Evolved herbicide resistance in key weeds has influenced a limited number of growers to include a more diverse suite of tactics to supplement existing herbicidal tactics. Most growers still emphasize herbicides, often to the exclusion of alternative tactics. Application of integrated pest management for weeds is better characterized as integrated weed management, and more typically integrated herbicide management. However, adoption of diverse weed management tactics is limited. Modifying herbicide use will not solve herbicide resistance in weeds, and the relief provided by different herbicide use practices is generally short-lived at best. More diversity of tactics for weed management must be incorporated in crop systems.

  14. Effect of Establishment Methods and Weed Management Practices on Some Growth Attributes of Rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Safdar BALOCH; Inayat Ullah AWAN; Gul HASSAN; Abdul Aziz KHAKWANI

    2006-01-01

    Studies were carried out for two years to evaluate the effect of methods of sowing and weed control practices on the productivity of transplanted and direct wet-seeded rice in Dera Ismail Khan, NWFP, Pakistan. The experiment was laid out in a randomized complete block design with a split plot arrangement. The planting techniques viz. transplanting and direct seeding were maintained in main plots while weed control practices included the use of granular herbicide Sunstar 15WG (ethoxy sulfuron),Machete 60EC (butachlor), conventional hand weeding, and the weedy check (control) were assigned to the sub-plots. Data were recorded on weed parameters like weed density and dry weed biomass 60 and 90 days after sowing (DAS); agronomic parameters including plant population, number of panicles and paddy yield and physiological parameters like leaf area index and net assimilation rate 45 and 90 DAS. The planting methods and weed management significantly influenced most of the parameters studied. The data revealed that the paddy yield and its components were significantly higher in the transplanted method than that in direct-seeded method, while the weed density and biomass were lower in the transplanted plots than the direct-seeded plots.Among weed management tools, the maximum paddy yield was obtained in hand weeding, closely followed by herbicide application Machete 60EC during both cropping seasons.

  15. INVASIVE WEEDS IN BOGOR BOTANIC GARDENS, INDONESIA AND ITS IMPLICATION ON SURROUNDING LANDSCAPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edi Santosa

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Conservation areas with the objective for collection and exchange plant materials have been speculated as weed bank for surrounding areas. Objective of this study was to identify and characterize ruderal invasive weeds in the Bogor Botanic Gardens (BBG. Observations were conducted in all vak (collection blocks in the BBG in order to identify the weeds species, determine their invasiveness, dominance and distribution. Weeds associations with host plants were observed. Current weed control program and data of dead trees collection were analyzed in relevant to weed. Distribution of weeds outside BBG was observed by transects method following river and road directions. Results showed that there were seven invasive weeds, i.e., Cecropia adenopus (Cecropiaceae, Cissus nodosa Blume (Vitaceae, Cissus sicyoides Blume (Vitaceae, Dioscorea bulbifera L. (Dioscoreaceae, Ficus elastica Roxb. (Moraceae, Mikania micrantha H.B.K. (Asteraceae and Paraserianthes falcataria (L. Nielsen (Fabaceae. These seven weeds species invaded 41 out of 215 plant families in BBG. Six species of weeds, i.e., C. adenopus, C. nodosa Blume., C. sicyoides Blume., D. bulbifera L., M. micrantha H.B.K. and P. falcataria (L. Nielsen, were introduced as BBG collections for the first time while the F. elastica Roxb was considered as native. It is most likely that the weeds dispersal agents are the wind, birds, bats, visitors, and waters. All of these weeds existed in surrounding areas outside BBG. Given the detrimental impact of invasive weeds on the plant collection in BBG, it is necessary to develop long–term comprehensive control measures both inside and neighboring areas by involving other government authorities beyond BBG.

  16. Impact of fertilizing pattern on the biodiversity of a weed community and wheat growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Leilei; Cheng, Chuanpeng; Wan, Kaiyuan; Li, Ruhai; Wang, Daozhong; Tao, Yong; Pan, Junfeng; Xie, Juan; Chen, Fang

    2014-01-01

    Weeding and fertilization are important farming practices. Integrated weed management should protect or improve the biodiversity of farmland weed communities for a better ecological environment with not only increased crop yield, but also reduced use of herbicides. This study hypothesized that appropriate fertilization would benefit both crop growth and the biodiversity of farmland weed communities. To study the effects of different fertilizing patterns on the biodiversity of a farmland weed community and their adaptive mechanisms, indices of species diversity and responses of weed species and wheat were investigated in a 17-year field trial with a winter wheat-soybean rotation. This long term field trial includes six fertilizing treatments with different N, P and K application rates. The results indicated that wheat and the four prevalent weed species (Galium aparine, Vicia sativa, Veronica persica and Geranium carolinianum) showed different responses to fertilizer treatment in terms of density, plant height, shoot biomass, and nutrient accumulations. Each individual weed population exhibited its own adaptive mechanisms, such as increased internode length for growth advantages and increased light interception. The PK treatment had higher density, shoot biomass, Shannon-Wiener and Pielou Indices of weed community than N plus P fertilizer treatments. The N1/2PK treatment showed the same weed species number as the PK treatment. It also showed higher Shannon-Wiener and Pielou Indices of the weed community, although it had a lower wheat yield than the NPK treatment. The negative effects of the N1/2PK treatment on wheat yield could be balanced by the simultaneous positive effects on weed communities, which are intermediate in terms of the effects on wheat and weeds.

  17. Investigation on the Field Performance of Four Weeding Methods for Peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Firouzi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this research, field performance of four weeding methods for peanut crop was investigated in Kiashahr located at Guilan province. The weeding methods were included weeding by two types of motorized weeders (power tiller operated cultivator and power tiller operated rotovator at three forward speeds of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 km/h, weeding by hand-driven wheeled cultivator and hand weeding by trench hoe. A randomized complete block design with three replications was used for the experiment. Weeding index, crop yield, field capacity, energy consumption and the economical index of benefit-cost ratio were measured and determined. Results showed that the highest weeding efficiencies of 98.61 and 97.37% were obtained in hand weeding for the first and second weeding stages, respectively. In all the mechanical treatments, the weeding efficiency of the second stage was greater than that of the first stage. The highest value of field capacity in the first stage (0.1263 km/h and second stage (0.1287 ha/h was recorded for power tiller operated rotovator at travel speed of 2.0 km/h. with amount of field efficiency was achieved in weeding with tiller rotovator at forward speed of 2 km/h (0.1263 and 0.1287 ha/h for first and second stages of weeding operation respectively. Among the methods, the lowest value of energy consumption with the average of 307.8 Mj/ha was registered for hand-driven wheeled cultivator. Results also indicated that power tiller operated rotovator at forward speed of 1.0 km/h had the highest benefit-cost ratio of 2.06 compared to other treatments. Thus, weeding by power tiller operated rotovator at forward speed of 1.0 km/h is advisable for peanut cultivation in the region.

  18. Weed control in distress – can all weeds still be controlled with herbicides in future?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drobny, Hans G.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The introduction and availability of highly active and selective herbicides in all important field crops, in the last decades, enabled the simplification and money saving in crop rotations and agronomic measures. This resulted in respective specialized and adapted weed populations, and consequently an increasing selection of resistant populations. Since the introduction of the ALS-inhibitors (starting 1985 and the 4-HPPD-inhibitors (2001, no new MoA-Classes were registered, and there are none in the registration process. Several established herbicides were not registered or re-registered in the EU, or were severely restricted in their application. The cost and the risk to develop and register a new selective herbicide in the EU are hardly justified, in relation to their market potential. The only solution on problem fields, with resistant populations, is to change the agronomic practices, like crop rotation, soil tillage, seeding time, etc., as a precautionary principle also on still „normal“ fields. The different advising institutions have to integrate these aspects into their recommendations, besides the proper herbicide management.

  19. Soil weed seed bank in situ and ex situ at a smallholder field in Maranhão State, northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Luiz Ribeiro Mesquita

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to assess the density, floristic composition,  phytosociology and diversity of a soil weed seed bank ex situ by germination in a greenhouse and in situ by weed sampling on a smallholder corn field located in Lago Verde County, Maranhão State. Fifteen pairs of 25 m2 plots were designated. In half of these plots, 90 soil samples were collected with an open metal template measuring 25 x 16 x 3 cm and placed in a greenhouse to germinate. In the other half, 90 weed samples were collected using the same metal template. We recorded a total of 1,998 individuals from 40 species, 31 genera and 16 families, from which 659 individuals germinated in situ and 1,339 exsitu. Density was higher ex situ, with 372 plants m-2. The Cyperaceae family had the highest floristic richness with nine species, followed by the Poaceae with six. The dominant species based on the Importance Value Index were Lindernia crustacea (IVI 27.7% in situ and Scleria lithosperma (IVI 37.0% ex situ. Floristic diversity was higher ex situ, with H’ = 2.66 nats ind-1. These results could help predict infestation potential and could lead to improved weed management strategies in corn-growing areas on smallholdings in Maranhão State, northeastern Brazil.

  20. New weed control strategies in maize considering narrow crop rotations with maize, greater ALSresistance in common weeds and application restrictions with regard to active substance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewert, Katrin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Many herbicides with different HRAC-groups are available for weed control in maize. Because of narrow maize crop rotation summer weeds and warmth loving weeds are encouraged. On the other hand the new confirmed cases of an ALS target site resistance in the weed species Echinochloa crus-galli and Amaranthus retroflexus in Brandenburg, Stellaria media in Saxony and Matricaria recutita and Tripleurospermum perforatum in Brandenburg and Thuringia, warn that in the future the sulfonylureas must be used only according to the management of herbicide resistance. In this way the selection of resistant weed biotypes will be prevented. Moreover in protected water areas it may be a requirement to reduce and to substitute the input of some active substances, for example terbuthylazine and bentazon. The control of E. crus-galli and P. convolvulus with non-sulfonylurea or/and non-terbuthylazine herbicides according to management of herbicide resistance will be discussed.

  1. Impact of the timing and duration of weed control on the establishment of a rubber tree plantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAIO D. GUZZO

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Rubber tree production is reduced by weeds that compete for environmental resources; therefore, the timing and duration of weed control influences weed interference. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the growth of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis plants, to determine the critical period for weed control, and to evaluate the growth recovery of rubber trees that coexisted with weeds for different periods of time after planting. Two groups of treatments were established under field conditions in the first year of the investigation: one group contained crescent periods of weed infestation, while the other contained crescent periods of weed control, also including a weed-free check and a total weedy check. In the second year of the investigation, the weeds were totally controlled. Urochloa decumbens was the dominant weed (over 90% groundcover. Crop growth was greatly reduced due to the weed interference. Plant height decreased more rapidly than did any other characteristic. Plant height, leaf dry mass, and leaf area decreased by 99%, 97% and 96%, respectively, and were the most reduced characteristics. Plant height also recovered more rapidly than did any characteristic when the period of weed control was lengthened. However, stem dry mass increased by 750%, making it the most recovered characteristic. The critical period for weed control was between 4 and 9½ months after planting in the first year; however, the rubber trees showed an expressive growth recovery when the weeds were controlled throughout the second year.

  2. Impact of the timing and duration of weed control on the establishment of a rubber tree plantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzzo, Caio D; Carvalho, Leonardo B de; Giancotti, Paulo R F; Alves, Pedro L C A; Gonçalves, Elaine C P; Martins, José V F

    2014-03-01

    Rubber tree production is reduced by weeds that compete for environmental resources; therefore, the timing and duration of weed control influences weed interference. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the growth of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) plants, to determine the critical period for weed control, and to evaluate the growth recovery of rubber trees that coexisted with weeds for different periods of time after planting. Two groups of treatments were established under field conditions in the first year of the investigation: one group contained crescent periods of weed infestation, while the other contained crescent periods of weed control, also including a weed-free check and a total weedy check. In the second year of the investigation, the weeds were totally controlled. Urochloa decumbens was the dominant weed (over 90% groundcover). Crop growth was greatly reduced due to the weed interference. Plant height decreased more rapidly than did any other characteristic. Plant height, leaf dry mass, and leaf area decreased by 99%, 97% and 96%, respectively, and were the most reduced characteristics. Plant height also recovered more rapidly than did any characteristic when the period of weed control was lengthened. However, stem dry mass increased by 750%, making it the most recovered characteristic. The critical period for weed control was between 4 and 9½ months after planting in the first year; however, the rubber trees showed an expressive growth recovery when the weeds were controlled throughout the second year.

  3. Evaluation of yield quality and weed infestation of common valerian (Valeriana officinalis L. in dependence on weed control method and forecrop.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezary Kwiatkowski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment involving the cultivation of common valerian was conducted on loess soil in Abramów (Lublin region in the period 2007-2009. Qualitative parameters of herbal raw material obtained from this plant as well as in-crop weed infestation were evaluated depending on the protection method and forecrop. Hand-weeded plots, in which a hand hoe was used, were the control. In the other treatments, weeds were controlled using various herbicides and a mechanical implement (brush weeder. Potato and winter wheat + field pea cover crop were the forecrops for common valerian crops. A hypothesis was made that the use of a brush weeder and herbicides not registered for application in valerian crops would have a positive effect on this plant's productivity and weed infestation in its crops. It was also assumed that the introduction of a cover crop would allow the elimination of differences in the forecrop value of the crop stands in question. The best quantitative and qualitative parameters of common valerian raw material as well as the largest reduction of incrop weed infestation were recorded after the application of the herbicides which were not type approved. The use of the brush weeder in the interrows also had a beneficial effect on productivity of the plant in question, but secondary weed infestation at the end of the growing season of common valerian turned out to be its disadvantage. Traditional crop protection methods used in common valerian crops were less effective in weed infestation reduction and they resulted in lower plant productivity and raw material quality. Potato proved to be a better forecrop for common valerian than winter wheat + field pea; however, this positive effect was not confirmed statistically. The following annual weeds: Chenopodium album, Galinsoga parviflora, Stellaria media, were predominant in the common valerian crop. Traditional weed control methods resulted in the dominance of some dicotyledonous weeds, such

  4. The intensity of mechanical cultivation measures vs. the amount of weed seeds in the soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Wesołowski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the number of mechanical operations in sugar beets plantation on the amount and species composition of weed seeds in the 0-5 cm deep layer of the loessial soil was studied. It has been proved that reduction in the number of weed seeds depends upon both the frequency of weeding-out operations and the level of agrotechnic. The highest decrease in the number of fruit and weed seeds was caused by eightfold weed removal which took place during the period from emergence phase to the joining of sugar beet rows. Application of increased mineral fertilization, microelements, fungicides, and insecticides caused the number of weed seeds to be reduced by 5,9%, in comparison to extensive agrotechnical level.

  5. Tolerance and selectivity of cereal species and cultivars to postemergence weed harrowing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jesper; Nielsen, Helle Højland; Gundersen, Hanne

    2009-01-01

    for analyzing crop tolerance on the basis of digital image analysis. Crop tolerance is defined as the ability of the crop to avoid yield loss from cultivation in the absence of weeds, and it has two components: resistance and recovery. Resistance is the ability of the crop to resist soil covering and recovery......POST weed harrowing and other cultivation methods to control weeds in early crop growth stages may result in crop damage due to low selectivity between crop and weeds. Crop tolerance to cultivation plays an important role but it has not been clearly defined and analyzed. We introduce a procedure...... abilities to suppress weeds. The order of species' tolerance to weed harrowing was triticale > wheat > barley > oat and the differences were mainly caused by different abilities to recover from soil covering. At 25% soil covering, grain yield loss in triticale was 0.5%, in wheat 2.5%, in barley 3...

  6. [Diversity and classification system of weed community in Harbin City, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Shuang; Liang, Hong; Song, Kun; Da, Liang-Jun

    2014-08-01

    To analyze the causes of weed community diversity and their strategies of adaption to the high heterogeneity of urban habitats, weed communities in the central urban area of Harbin, China were studied, and a classification system was established for the weed communities. There were 175 weed species, belonging to 128 genera and 38 families. The heterogeneous urban habitats and species' temporal niche differentiation resulted in the highly diversified weed communities. The high proportions of mono-species dominance and annual species dominance communities were their response to the unstable urban habitats under human disturbances with high intensities and frequencies. A four-level classification system was established in terms of plant species and habitat conditions. Within this system, the identified 1763 weed communities could be categorized into two types of life form, 5 types of dormancy form, 22 community groups, and 119 dominance communities.

  7. Allergens of weed pollen: an overview on recombinant and natural molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadermaier, Gabriele; Hauser, Michael; Ferreira, Fatima

    2014-03-01

    Weeds represent a botanically unrelated group of plants that usually lack commercial or aesthetical value. Pollen of allergenic weeds are able to trigger type I reactions in allergic patients and can be found in the plant families of Asteraceae, Amaranthaceae, Plantaginaceae, Urticaceae, and Euphorbiaceae. To date, 34 weed pollen allergens are listed in the IUIS allergen nomenclature database, which were physicochemically and immunologically characterized to varying degrees. Relevant allergens of weeds belong to the pectate lyase family, defensin-like family, Ole e 1-like family, non-specific lipid transfer protein 1 family and the pan-allergens profilin and polcalcins. This review provides an overview on weed pollen allergens primarily focusing on the molecular level. In particular, the characteristics and properties of purified recombinant allergens and hypoallergenic derivatives are described and their potential use in diagnosis and therapy of weed pollen allergy is discussed.

  8. Deciphering the evolution of herbicide resistance in weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Délye, Christophe; Jasieniuk, Marie; Le Corre, Valérie

    2013-11-01

    Resistance to herbicides in arable weeds is increasing rapidly worldwide and threatening global food security. Resistance has now been reported to all major herbicide modes of action despite the development of resistance management strategies in the 1990s. We review here recent advances in understanding the genetic bases and evolutionary drivers of herbicide resistance that highlight the complex nature of selection for this adaptive trait. Whereas early studied cases of resistance were highly herbicide-specific and largely under monogenic control, cases of greatest concern today generally involve resistance to multiple modes of action, are under polygenic control, and are derived from pre-existing stress response pathways. Although 'omics' approaches should enable unraveling the genetic bases of complex resistances, the appearance, selection, and spread of herbicide resistance in weed populations can only be fully elucidated by focusing on evolutionary dynamics and implementing integrative modeling efforts.

  9. A Hybrid Differential Invasive Weed Algorithm for Congestion Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Aniruddha; Pal, Siddharth; Pandi, V. Ravikumar; Panigrahi, B. K.; Das, Swagatam

    This work is dedicated to solve the problem of congestion management in restructured power systems. Nowadays we have open access market which pushes the power system operation to their limits for maximum economic benefits but at the same time making the system more susceptible to congestion. In this regard congestion management is absolutely vital. In this paper we try to remove congestion by generation rescheduling where the cost involved in the rescheduling process is minimized. The proposed algorithm is a hybrid of Invasive Weed Optimization (IWO) and Differential Evolution (DE). The resultant hybrid algorithm was applied on standard IEEE 30 bus system and observed to beat existing algorithms like Simple Bacterial foraging (SBF), Genetic Algorithm (GA), Invasive Weed Optimization (IWO), Differential Evolution (DE) and hybrid algorithms like Hybrid Bacterial Foraging and Differential Evolution (HBFDE) and Adaptive Bacterial Foraging with Nelder Mead (ABFNM).

  10. Germination traits of three weed species in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mehmeti

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Amaranthus retroflexus, Echinochloa crus-galli and Datura stramonium are the most important weed species in Kosovo. They cause severe yield depression, contaminate fodder and negatively affect growth and reproduction of other weed species. To counteract these problems, specific strategies need to be developed. Such strategies should consider information on species germination traits. In this context, our study provides information on temperature requirements for germination. Seeds of A. retroflexus, E. crus-galli and D. stramonium were harvested in two sub-regions of Kosovo (western and eastern parts differing in climate and land use. They were set for germination experiments in growth chambers at temperatures ranging from 3 to 35 °C and under field conditions. In both experiments, the germination rate differed between species and provenances. In the growth chamber experiment, germination of all three species was negligible below 15 °C and reached the highest rates between 24 and 30 °C. Seeds originating from the western part of Kosovo had higher germination rates and required a lower temperature for germination than seeds originating from the eastern part. In the field experiment, the time-dependent germination behaviour of D. stramonium differed between provenances. In general, germination started when soil temperature was above 18 °C and continued as long as the soil was moist. The results are discussed in the context of the need to develop weed management strategies against these weeds in Kosovo.

  11. Stratification requirements for seed dormancy alleviation in a wetland weed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddy, Louis G; Bradford, Kent J; Fischer, Albert J

    2013-01-01

    Echinochloaoryzicola(syn.E. phyllopogon) is an exotic weed of California rice paddies that has evolved resistance to multiple herbicides. Elimination of seedlingsthroughcertain weed control methods can limit the spread of this weed, but is contingent on accurate predictions of germination and emergence timing, which are influenced by seed dormancy levels.In summer annuals, dormancy can often be relieved through stratification, a period of prolonged exposure to cold and moist conditions.We used population-based threshold models to quantify the effects of stratification on seed germination of four E. Oryzicola populations at a range of water potential (Ψ) and oxygen levels. We also determined how stratification temperatures, moisture levels and durations contributed to dormancy release. Stratification released dormancy by decreasing base Ψ and hydrotimerequired for germination and by eliminating any germination sensitivity to oxygen. Stratification also increased average germination rates (GR), which were used as a proxy for relative dormancy levels. Alternating temperatures nearly doubled GR in all populations, indicating that seeds could be partially dormant despite achieving high final germination percentages. Stratification at Ψ = 0 MPa increased GR compared to stratification at lower water potentials, demonstrating that Ψ contributed to regulating dormancy release. Maximum GR occurred after 2-4 weeks of stratification at 0 MPa; GR were often more rapid for herbicide-resistant than for herbicide-susceptible seeds, implying greater dormancy in the latter. Manipulation of field conditions to promote dormancy alleviation of E. oryzicola seeds might improve the rate and uniformity of germination for seed bank depletion through seedling weed control. Our results suggest field soil saturation in winter would contribute towards E. oryzicola dormancy release and decrease the time to seedling emergence.

  12. Determination of plant height for weed detection in stereoscopic images

    OpenAIRE

    Piron, Alexis; Leemans, Vincent; Kleynen, Olivier; Destain, Marie-France

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was twofold. The first goal was to acquire high accuracy stereoscopic images of small-scale field scenes, the second to examine the potential of plant height as a discriminant factor between crop and weed, within carrot rows. Emphasis was put on how to determine actual plant height taking into account the variable distance from camera to ground and ground irregularities for in-field measurements. Multispectral stereoscopic images were taken over a period o...

  13. Allelopathy in crop/weed interactions--an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belz, Regina G

    2007-04-01

    Since varietal differences in allelopathy of crops against weeds were discovered in the 1970s, much research has documented the potential that allelopathic crops offer for integrated weed management with substantially reduced herbicide rates. Research groups worldwide have identified several crop species possessing potent allelopathic interference mediated by root exudation of allelochemicals. Rice, wheat, barley and sorghum have attracted most attention. Past research focused on germplasm screening for elite allelopathic cultivars and the identification of the allelochemicals involved. Based on this, traditional breeding efforts were initiated in rice and wheat to breed agronomically acceptable, weed-suppressive cultivars with improved allelopathic interference. Promising suppressive crosses are under investigation. Molecular approaches have elucidated the genetics of allelopathy by QTL mapping which associated the trait in rice and wheat with several chromosomes and suggested the involvement of several allelochemicals. Potentially important compounds that are constitutively secreted from roots have been identified in all crop species under investigation. Biosynthesis and exudation of these metabolites follow a distinct temporal pattern and can be induced by biotic and abiotic factors. The current state of knowledge suggests that allelopathy involves fluctuating mixtures of allelochemicals and their metabolites as regulated by genotype and developmental stage of the producing plant, environment, cultivation and signalling effects, as well as the chemical or microbial turnover of compounds in the rhizosphere. Functional genomics is being applied to identify genes involved in biosynthesis of several identified allelochemicals, providing the potential to improve allelopathy by molecular breeding. The dynamics of crop allelopathy, inducible processes and plant signalling is gaining growing attention; however, future research should also consider allelochemical release

  14. Puncturevine (Tribulus terrestris L.): noxious weed or powerful medical herb

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Tribulus terrestris L., an annual dicot species of the family Zygophyllaceae, is a common herb that is often found in disturbed habitats and agricultural areas in many parts of the temperate, tropical and desert regions of the world. T. terrestris is an aggressive species that has the potential to injure livestock, reduce hay and wool values, detour recreationists and reduces plant biodivesity. The species may become troublesome because of its weedy potential. It has been declared a weed in a...

  15. "Would You Move, Please?" Weeding Science Reference Collection

    OpenAIRE

    Tchangalova, Nedelina; Zdravkovska, Nevenka

    2007-01-01

    In the last five years the Engineering & Physical Sciences Library underwent a major staff shortage that resulted in the slowing-down of some services and the abandonment of other vital activities like regular weeding of the reference collection. Many print indexes and abstracts (e.g., Science Citation Index and Chemical Abstracts) were canceled in favor of electronic access but the old print volumes remained in reference. The reference collection occupies a prime location in the library. Thi...

  16. Weed sustainable managment in agricultral and non-agricultural areas

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanni Arcangeli; Cesare Sparacino; Pierluigi Meriggi

    2008-01-01

    Sustainable agriculture is a way to assure the availability of natural resources for future generations.Weed managementin cultivated and not cultivated areas is part of sustainable agriculture as well, and has to face three important challenges:economical (to increase income and competitiveness of farm sector), social (give rural areas opportunity of economicdevelopment and improvement of living conditions), environmental (promote good agricultural practices andpreserve habitats, biodiversity...

  17. Microwave Technologies as Part of an Integrated Weed Management Strategy: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Graham Brodie; Carmel Ryan; Carmel Lancaster

    2012-01-01

    Interest in controlling weed plants using radio frequency or microwave energy has been growing in recent years because of the growing concerns about herbicide resistance and chemical residues in the environment. This paper reviews the prospects of using microwave energy to manage weeds. Microwave energy effectively kills weed plants and their seeds; however, most studies have focused on applying the microwave energy over a sizable area, which requires about ten times the energy that is embodi...

  18. Status of weeds as reservoirs of plant parasitic nematodes in banana fields in Martinique

    OpenAIRE

    Quénéherve, Patrick; Chabrier, C.; Auwerkerken, Annemie; Topart, Patrick; Martiny, Bernard; Marie Luce, S.

    2006-01-01

    During a survey of the nematodes associated with weeds in banana fields in Martinique, 41 weed species in 37 genera from 20 plant families were collected to extract nematodes from the roots. Results of this survey showed that 24 weed species were hosts of Radopholus similis, 23 were hosts of Helicotylenchus spp., 13 were hosts of Pratylenchus spp., 13 were hosts of Hoplolaimus seinhorsti, 29 were hosts of Meloidogyne spp. and 24 were hosts of Rotylenchulus reniformis. The presence of the burr...

  19. Determination of Optimum Weed Control Timing in Maize (Zea mays L.)

    OpenAIRE

    DOĞAN*, M. Nedim; ÜNAY, Aydın; BOZ, Özhan; ALBAY, Filiz

    2014-01-01

    In field experiments conducted in 2001 and 2002, the optimum timing for weed control in maize was investigated. Both experiments were designed according to randomized complete blocks, and Cyperus rotundus L., Amaranthus retroflexus L., Portulaca oleracea L. and Chenopodium album L. were naturally infested on experimental plots in both years. The study in 2001 was conducted to determine the critical period for weed control for maize. With this aim plots were maintained weed-free or weedy for ...

  20. Determination of Optimum Weed Control Timing in Maize (Zea mays L.)

    OpenAIRE

    DOĞAN*, M. Nedim; ÜNAY, Aydın; BOZ, Özhan; ALBAY, Filiz

    2004-01-01

    In field experiments conducted in 2001 and 2002, the optimum timing for weed control in maize was investigated. Both experiments were designed according to randomized complete blocks, and Cyperus rotundus L., Amaranthus retroflexus L., Portulaca oleracea L. and Chenopodium album L. were naturally infested on experimental plots in both years. The study in 2001 was conducted to determine the critical period for weed control for maize. With this aim plots were maintained weed-free or weedy for ...

  1. Taxonomic and life history bias in herbicide resistant weeds: implications for deployment of resistant crops.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodie S Holt

    Full Text Available Evolved herbicide resistance (EHR is an important agronomic problem and consequently a food security problem, as it jeopardizes herbicide effectiveness and increases the difficulty and cost of weed management. EHR in weeds was first reported in 1970 and the number of cases has accelerated dramatically over the last two decades. Despite 40 years of research on EHR, why some weeds evolve resistance and others do not is poorly understood. Here we ask whether weed species that have EHR are different from weeds in general. Comparing taxonomic and life history traits of weeds with EHR to a control group ("the world's worst weeds", we found weeds with EHR significantly over-represented in certain plant families and having certain life history biases. In particular, resistance is overrepresented in Amaranthaceae, Brassicaceae and Poaceae relative to all weeds, and annuality is ca. 1.5 times as frequent in weeds with EHR as in the control group. Also, for perennial EHR weeds, vegetative reproduction is only 60% as frequent as in the control group. We found the same trends for subsets of weeds with EHR to acetolactate synthase (ALS, photosystem II (PSII, and 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP synthase-inhibitor herbicides and with multiple resistance. As herbicide resistant crops (transgenic or not are increasingly deployed in developing countries, the problems of EHR could increase in those countries as it has in the USA if the selecting herbicides are heavily applied and appropriate management strategies are not employed. Given our analysis, we make some predictions about additional species that might evolve resistance.

  2. How weeds emerge: a taxonomic and trait-based examination using United States data

    OpenAIRE

    Kuester, Adam; Conner, Jeffrey K.; Culley, Theresa; Baucom, Regina S

    2014-01-01

    Weeds can cause great economic and ecological harm to ecosystems. Despite their importance, comparisons of the taxonomy and traits of successful weeds often focus on a few specific comparisons – for example, introduced versus native weeds. We used publicly available inventories of US plant species to make comprehensive comparisons of the factors that underlie weediness. We quantitatively examined taxonomy to determine if certain genera are overrepresented by introduced, weedy or herbicide-res...

  3. Taxonomic and life history bias in herbicide resistant weeds: implications for deployment of resistant crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Jodie S; Welles, Shana R; Silvera, Katia; Heap, Ian M; Heredia, Sylvia M; Martinez-Berdeja, Alejandra; Palenscar, Kai T; Sweet, Lynn C; Ellstrand, Norman C

    2013-01-01

    Evolved herbicide resistance (EHR) is an important agronomic problem and consequently a food security problem, as it jeopardizes herbicide effectiveness and increases the difficulty and cost of weed management. EHR in weeds was first reported in 1970 and the number of cases has accelerated dramatically over the last two decades. Despite 40 years of research on EHR, why some weeds evolve resistance and others do not is poorly understood. Here we ask whether weed species that have EHR are different from weeds in general. Comparing taxonomic and life history traits of weeds with EHR to a control group ("the world's worst weeds"), we found weeds with EHR significantly over-represented in certain plant families and having certain life history biases. In particular, resistance is overrepresented in Amaranthaceae, Brassicaceae and Poaceae relative to all weeds, and annuality is ca. 1.5 times as frequent in weeds with EHR as in the control group. Also, for perennial EHR weeds, vegetative reproduction is only 60% as frequent as in the control group. We found the same trends for subsets of weeds with EHR to acetolactate synthase (ALS), photosystem II (PSII), and 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate (EPSP) synthase-inhibitor herbicides and with multiple resistance. As herbicide resistant crops (transgenic or not) are increasingly deployed in developing countries, the problems of EHR could increase in those countries as it has in the USA if the selecting herbicides are heavily applied and appropriate management strategies are not employed. Given our analysis, we make some predictions about additional species that might evolve resistance.

  4. Distribution of the most common weeds from fam. Asteraceae in Srem

    OpenAIRE

    Igić Ružica S.; Konstantinović Branko; Polić Dubravka; Anačkov Goran T.

    2002-01-01

    Weeds fall into a specific ecological group of plants and man should play the key role in controlling the process of their formation and the rate of their spreading. Damage caused by weeds is significant in both the agricultural and natural ecosystems. Therefore, special care should be paid to the current rate of their spreading, ensuring that the caused environmental changes do not become irreversible. The paper summarizes the locations in which the most common weed types of the Asteraceae f...

  5. Identification of weed species with hyperaccumulative characteristics of heavy metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Shuhe; ZHOU Qixing

    2004-01-01

    In order to promote the effective and economic remediation of soils contaminated with single Cd and Cd combined with Ph, Cu and Zn, a field-screening study on weed hyperaccumulators was carried out on the basis of field pot-culture experiments used to determine characteristics of weed plants enduring and accumulating heavy metals. In this study, 54 weed species belonging to 20 families from agricultural fields of the Shengyang suburbs were tested. The results showed that Taraxracum mongolicum, Solanum nigrum and Conyza canadensis could strongly tolerate single Cd and Cd-Pb-Cu-Zn combined pollution, had high Cd-accumulative ability, and generally possessed basic characteristics of hyperaccumulators. Because there are synergic and antagonistic effects among Cd, Pb, Cu and Zn, singlefactor pollution tests should be done as well as combined pollution tests during the identification of hyperaccumulators to ensure the efficiency of phytoremediation and the practical significance of hyperaccumulators identified. The field pot-culture experiment should be a new tentative method to screen out accumulative and tolerant species in view of its obvious advantages such as simple operation, low cost, and easy identification of investigated plants.

  6. Mycorrhizal association in soybean and weeds in competition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cíntia Maria Teixeira Fialho

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of mycorrhizal association on the interference of Bidens pilosa, Urochloa decumbens and Eleusine indica on soybean culture in two conditions: a plants competing without contact with roots of another species; b with contact between roots. At 60 days after planting, growth, nutrient accumulation and mycorrhizal colonization of soybean and weeds were evaluated. The contact between roots of soybean plant and weed species increased the negative interference effects for both species, with less growth and nutrient accumulation. With the individualization of roots, higher competition occurred for soil resources up to 60 days of coexistence between species. In competition with soybean, Bidens pilosa and Urochloa decumbens stood out in accumulation of most nutrients without differing from when cultivated in monocultivation. The increase of the soybean mycorrhizal colonization was 53, 40 and 33% when in competition with Urochloa decumbens, Eleusine indica and Bidens pilosa species, respectively. A positive interaction occurred for soybean mycorrhizal colonization and competing plants irrespective of weed species or root contact.

  7. Evaluating Weeds as Hosts of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Hugh A; Seijo, Teresa E; Vallad, Gary E; Peres, Natalia A; Druffel, Keri L

    2015-08-01

    Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) biotype B transmits Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), which affects tomato production globally. Prompt destruction of virus reservoirs is a key component of virus management. Identification of weed hosts of TYLCV will be useful for reducing such reservoirs. The status of weeds as alternate hosts of TYLCV in Florida remains unclear. In greenhouse studies, B. tabaci adults from a colony reared on TYLCV-infected tomato were established in cages containing one of four weeds common to horticultural fields in central and south Florida. Cages containing tomato and cotton were also infested with viruliferous whiteflies as a positive control and negative control, respectively. Whitefly adults and plant tissue were tested periodically over 10 wk for the presence of TYLCV using PCR. After 10 wk, virus-susceptible tomato plants were placed in each cage to determine if whiteflies descended from the original adults were still infective. Results indicate that Bidens alba, Emilia fosbergii, and Raphanus raphanistrum are not hosts of TYLCV, and that Amaranthus retroflexus is a host.

  8. Protocols for Robust Herbicide Resistance Testing in Different Weed Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panozzo, Silvia; Scarabel, Laura; Collavo, Alberto; Sattin, Maurizio

    2015-07-02

    Robust protocols to test putative herbicide resistant weed populations at whole plant level are essential to confirm the resistance status. The presented protocols, based on whole-plant bioassays performed in a greenhouse, can be readily adapted to a wide range of weed species and herbicides through appropriate variants. Seed samples from plants that survived a field herbicide treatment are collected and stored dry at low temperature until used. Germination methods differ according to weed species and seed dormancy type. Seedlings at similar growth stage are transplanted and maintained in the greenhouse under appropriate conditions until plants have reached the right growth stage for herbicide treatment. Accuracy is required to prepare the herbicide solution to avoid unverifiable mistakes. Other critical steps such as the application volume and spray speed are also evaluated. The advantages of this protocol, compared to others based on whole plant bioassays using one herbicide dose, are related to the higher reliability and the possibility of inferring the resistance level. Quicker and less expensive in vivo or in vitro diagnostic screening tests have been proposed (Petri dish bioassays, spectrophotometric tests), but they provide only qualitative information and their widespread use is hindered by the laborious set-up that some species may require. For routine resistance testing, the proposed whole plant bioassay can be applied at only one herbicide dose, so reducing the costs.

  9. Determination of critical period of weed control in rice (Oryza sativa L. in Lorestan province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    abdolreza ahmadi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Effects of different periods of weed control in paddy rice (Oryza sativa L. were studied in Veysian region of Lorestan province in 2004. The experiment was conducted in a randomized complete block design with four replications and 10 treatments of hand weeding in two series included weed free and weed infested plot up to 14, 28, 42 and 56 days after transplanting, plus weed free and weed infested control. Based on 5 and 10% acceptable yield loses, the critical periods were between 11 to 40 and 14 to 30 days after transplantation, respectively. Weed competition before and/or after these critical periods had negligible effects on grain yield of rice. This period, based on growing degree days (GDD was 198-768 GDD for 5% acceptable yield loss. Increasing periods of weed interference in the early stage of the crop resulted in a steady decline in grain yield. Yield losses equivalent to 47 kg/ha of grain resulted for each day that weed control was delayed between 14 and 28 days after transplanting.

  10. Critical period of weed control in oilseed rape in two Moroccan regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maataoui, A; Bouhache, M; Benbella, M; Talouizte, A

    2003-01-01

    The determination of critical period of weed control in oilseed rape is necessary to know the weed control period. To determine the critical period, two fields experiments were carried out during 1995-96 growth season in Loukkos and Saïs regions at two oilseed densities (D1 = 24 and D2 = 36 plants m(-2)). Ten treatments corresponding to plots left weed free or weeded plots until four leaves, flowers bud, flowering, puds formation, and maturity stages of oilseed rape were tested. Density and biomass of weeds were determined at each oilseed stages. Results showed that weed density and biomass were higher in Saïs than in Loukkos sites. For a 10% yield loss, critical period of weed control in Loukkos was from 458 to 720 degree days after emergence (D degrees AE) and from 480 to 720 D degrees AE in oilseed conducted at densities D1 and D2, respectively. In Saïs, critical period of weed control was from 474 to 738 D degrees AE and from 468 to 675 D degrees AE in oilseed conducted at D1 and D2, respectively. It was concluded that the length of the critical period of weed control in oilseed rape grain yield seems to be dependant of the level of the infestation.

  11. Evaluation and Modeling of Camel Thorn (Alhagi Maurorum Weed Cutting by Water Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Naghipour Zade Mahani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to the importance of weed control and the limitations of mechanical methods in some places, in this research the water jet cutting for weed control was investigated. The cutting tests were performed on camel thorn weed in Shahid Bahonar university of Kerman. The water jet pressure of 90 bars was achieved with the aid of a suitable pump. The cutting time was studied in a completely randomized factorial design experiment (CRD with five replications. Factors of experiments are: stem diameter in 2 levels (smaller and larger than 5 mm, distance of spraying jet from weeds in 3 levels (10, 20 and 30 cm and two types of plant holders: blade and plate. The results showed that stem diameter and jet distance from the weed stem had significant effects on cutting time (at the 1%. The mean comparison of parameters showed that with increase of stem diameter the cutting time increased and any increase in jet distance from the weeds decreased the cutting time linearly with R2=0.96 and R2=0.99 for small and large diameter weeds, respectively. The minimum cutting time was measured at 30 cm of the jet from small diameter of stems. A multivariate linear regression model was also proposed for cutting weed parameters. It can be concluded that due to the flexibility of water jet cutting for restricted places, hydrodynamic control of weeds is proposed as a complementary method and sometimes a competing substitute method.

  12. Upper Limit for Context--based Crop Classification in Robotic Weeding Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtiby, Henrik Skov

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the precise position of crop plants is a prerequisite for effective mechanical weed control in robotic weeding application such as in crops like sugar beets which are sensitive to mechanical stress. Visual detection and recognition of crop plants based on their shapes has been...... described many times in the literature. In this paper the potential of using knowledge about the crop seed pattern is investigated based on simulated output from a perception system. The reliability of position–based crop plant detection is shown to depend on the weed density (ρ, measured in weed plants per...

  13. Upper limit for context-based crop classification in robotic weeding applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midtiby, Henrik Skov; Åstrand, Björn; Jørgensen, Ole;

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the precise position of crop plants is a prerequisite for effective mechanical weed control in robotic weeding application such as in crops like sugar beets which are sensitive to mechanical stress. Visual detection and recognition of crop plants based on their shapes has been...... described many times in the literature. In this paper the potential of using knowledge about the crop seed pattern is investigated based on simulated output from a perception system. The reliability of position–based crop plant detection is shown to depend on the weed density (ρ, measured in weed plants per...

  14. Effect of simplified tillage and mineral fertilization on weed infestation of potato growing on loess soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karol Bujak

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the paper effect of limitation of postharvest measure to single cultivating or disking of soil and mineral fertilization level on number, air-dry matter and botanical composition of weeds in the potato-field is presented. Simplifield postharvest measure was increasing insignificantly and more intensive fertilization was limiting the weed infestation of potato-field. Decteasing of weeds number increasing fertilization was ststistically significant. Dominating species of weeds in the potato-field were Capsella bursa-pastoris, Poa annua, Viola arvensis, Chenopodium album, Elymus repens i Equisetum arvense.

  15. How weeds emerge: a taxonomic and trait-based examination using United States data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuester, Adam; Conner, Jeffrey K; Culley, Theresa; Baucom, Regina S

    2014-05-01

    Weeds can cause great economic and ecological harm to ecosystems. Despite their importance, comparisons of the taxonomy and traits of successful weeds often focus on a few specific comparisons - for example, introduced versus native weeds. We used publicly available inventories of US plant species to make comprehensive comparisons of the factors that underlie weediness. We quantitatively examined taxonomy to determine if certain genera are overrepresented by introduced, weedy or herbicide-resistant species, and we compared phenotypic traits of weeds to those of nonweeds, whether introduced or native. We uncovered genera that have more weeds and introduced species than expected by chance and plant families that have more herbicide-resistant species than expected by chance. Certain traits, generally related to fast reproduction, were more likely to be associated with weedy plants regardless of species' origins. We also found stress tolerance traits associated with either native or introduced weeds compared with native or introduced nonweeds. Weeds and introduced species have significantly smaller genomes than nonweeds and native species. These results support trends for weedy plants reported from other floras, suggest that native and introduced weeds have different stress adaptations, and provide a comprehensive survey of trends across weeds within the USA.

  16. Development of remote sensing based site specific weed management for Midwest mint production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumz, Mary Saumur Paulson

    Peppermint and spearmint are high value essential oil crops in Indiana, Michigan, and Wisconsin. Although the mints are profitable alternatives to corn and soybeans, mint production efficiency must improve in order to allow industry survival against foreign produced oils and synthetic flavorings. Weed control is the major input cost in mint production and tools to increase efficiency are necessary. Remote sensing-based site-specific weed management offers potential for decreasing weed control costs through simplified weed detection and control from accurate site specific weed and herbicide application maps. This research showed the practicability of remote sensing for weed detection in the mints. Research was designed to compare spectral response curves of field grown mint and weeds, and to use these data to develop spectral vegetation indices for automated weed detection. Viability of remote sensing in mint production was established using unsupervised classification, supervised classification, handheld spectroradiometer readings and spectral vegetation indices (SVIs). Unsupervised classification of multispectral images of peppermint production fields generated crop health maps with 92 and 67% accuracy in meadow and row peppermint, respectively. Supervised classification of multispectral images identified weed infestations with 97% and 85% accuracy for meadow and row peppermint, respectively. Supervised classification showed that peppermint was spectrally distinct from weeds, but the accuracy of these measures was dependent on extensive ground referencing which is impractical and too costly for on-farm use. Handheld spectroradiometer measurements of peppermint, spearmint, and several weeds and crop and weed mixtures were taken over three years from greenhouse grown plants, replicated field plots, and production peppermint and spearmint fields. Results showed that mints have greater near infrared (NIR) and lower green reflectance and a steeper red edge slope than

  17. ALLELOPATHIC STUDIES OF UNDERSTOREY WEEDS BY AGROFORESTRY TREES IN HOME GARDENS OF MIZORAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    UK Sahoo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The allelopathic impact of multiple trees was studied on the composition, density and biomass of herbaceous weeds in home gardens of Mizoram,North-East India. The weed density in the control was significantly (PAleurites fordii>Areca catechu>Azadiratcha indica,Gmelina arborea and Toona ciliata > Tectona grandis. No relationship between the light intensity and nutrient status of the soil beneath the tree species with the under storey weed diversity and density depicts less impact of the growth resources on weed vegetation

  18. EFFECT OF HERBICIDES ON WEED CONTROL AND YIELD OF WET SEEDED RICE (ORYZA SATIVA L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MALLIKARJUN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To study effect of herbicides on weed control and yield of wet seeded rice which involves three pre-emergent herbicides viz., butachlor, anilophos and oxyflurofen applied as alone and each these followed by two post emergent herbicides 2, 4- sodium salt, bispyribac sodium and one hand weeding at 25 days. The results revealed that sequential application of butachlor and anilophos fb bispyribac sodium, 2, 4-D sodium salt and one hand weeding at 25 days was recorded significantly lower weed population and dry weight of weeds viz., monocots, dicots and sedges in equal manner which ultimately indicates that higher weed control efficiency over rest of the treatments except weed free check and hand weeding thrice. further, grain and straw yield of rice was followed the same trend as well influenced by yield parameters like number of panicles per sq.m and number of seeds/ panicle ultimately sequential application butachlor and anilophos fb 2, 4-D sodium salt and bispyribac sodium and one hand weeding at 25 DAS resulted higher grain yield and profitable rice production.

  19. Distinct germination response of endangered and common arable weeds to reduced water potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühl, A T; Eckstein, R L; Otte, A; Donath, T W

    2016-01-01

    Arable weeds are one of the most endangered species groups in Europe. Modern agriculture and intensive land-use management are the main causes of their dramatic decline. However, besides the changes in land use, climate change may further challenge the adaptability of arable weeds. Therefore, we investigated the response pattern of arable weeds to different water potential and temperature regimes during the phase of germination. We expected that endangered arable weeds would be more sensitive to differences in water availability and temperature than common arable weeds. To this end, we set up a climate chamber experiment where we exposed seeds of five familial pairs of common and endangered arable weed species to different temperatures (5/15, 10/20 °C) and water potentials (0.0 to -1.2 MPa). The results revealed a significant relationship between the reaction of arable weed species to water availability and their Red List status. The effects of reduced water availability on total germination, mean germination time and synchrony were significantly stronger in endangered than in common arable weeds. Therefore, global climate change may present a further threat to the survival of endangered arable weed species.

  20. Effects of nitrogen application method and weed control on corn yield and yield components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepahvand, Pariya; Sajedi, Nurali; Mousavi, Seyed Karim; Ghiasvand, Mohsen

    2014-04-01

    The effects of nitrogen fertilizer application and different methods for weed control on yield and yield components of corn was evaluated in Khorramabad in 2011. The experiment was conducted as a split plot based on randomized complete block design in 3 replications. Nitrogen application was as main plot in 4 levels (no nitrogen, broadcasting nitrogen, banding nitrogen and sprayed nitrogen) and methods of weed control were in 4 levels (non-control weeds, application Equip herbicide, once hand control of weeds and application Equip herbicide+once time weeding) was as subplots. Result illustrated that effects of nitrogen fertilizer application were significant on grain and forage yield, 100 seeds weight, harvest index, grain number per row and cob weight per plant. Grain yield increased by 91.4 and 3.9% in application banding and broadcasting for nitrogen fertilizer, respectively, compared to the no fertilizer treatment. The results show improved efficiency of nitrogen utilization by banding application. Grain yield, harvest index, seed rows per cob, seeds per row and cob weight were increased by weed control. In the application of Equip herbicide+ hand weeding treatment corn grain yield was increased 126% in comparison to weedy control. It represents of the intense affects of weed competition with corn. The highest corn grain yield (6758 kg h(-1)) was related to the application banding of nitrogen fertilizer and Equip herbicide+once hand weeding.

  1. Integration of agronomic practices with herbicides for sustainable weed management in aerobic rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, M P; Juraimi, A S; Mohamed, M T M; Uddin, M K; Samedani, B; Puteh, A; Man, Azmi

    2013-01-01

    Till now, herbicide seems to be a cost effective tool from an agronomic view point to control weeds. But long term efficacy and sustainability issues are the driving forces behind the reconsideration of herbicide dependent weed management strategy in rice. This demands reappearance of physical and cultural management options combined with judicious herbicide application in a more comprehensive and integrated way. Keeping those in mind, some agronomic tools along with different manual weeding and herbicides combinations were evaluated for their weed control efficacy in rice under aerobic soil conditions. Combination of competitive variety, higher seeding rate, and seed priming resulted in more competitive cropping system in favor of rice, which was reflected in lower weed pressure, higher weed control efficiency, and better yield. Most of the herbicides exhibited excellent weed control efficiency. Treatments comprising only herbicides required less cost involvement but produced higher net benefit. On the contrary, treatments comprising both herbicide and manual weeding required high cost involvement and thus produced lower net benefit. Therefore, adoption of competitive rice variety, higher seed rate, and seed priming along with spraying different early-postemergence herbicides in rotation at 10 days after seeding (DAS) followed by a manual weeding at 30 DAS may be recommended from sustainability view point.

  2. Studies on the species, density, frequency and sociability of sunflower weeds in Erzurum

    OpenAIRE

    ZENGİN, Hüseyin

    1999-01-01

    This study was carried out in order to determine the species, density, frequency and sociability of weeds in sunflower in Pasinler and Köprüköy districts of Erzurum in 1990 and 1995. In the study, 85 different weed species belonging to 27 families were identified with a density of 65.57 weeds per square meter on average. The number of species recorded in Pasinler and Köprüköy was 67 and 60 with a density of 63.35 and 67.78 weeds per meter square respectively. Sinapis arvensis was a predom...

  3. The development of a phosphite-mediated fertilization and weed control system for rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Mrinalini; Achary, V. Mohan M.; Islam, Tahmina; Agrawal, Pawan K.; Reddy, Malireddy K.

    2016-01-01

    Fertilizers and herbicides are two vital components of modern agriculture. The imminent danger of phosphate reserve depletion and multiple herbicide tolerance casts doubt on agricultural sustainability in the future. Phosphite, a reduced form of phosphorus, has been proposed as an alternative fertilizer and herbicide that would address the above problems to a considerable extent. To assess the suitability of a phosphite-based fertilization and weed control system for rice, we engineered rice plants with a codon-optimized ptxD gene from Pseudomonas stutzeri. Ectopic expression of this gene led to improved root growth, physiology and overall phenotype in addition to normal yield in transgenic plants in the presence of phosphite. Phosphite functioned as a translocative, non-selective, pre- and post-emergent herbicide. Phosphite use as a dual fertilizer and herbicide may mitigate the overuse of phosphorus fertilizers and reduce eutrophication and the development of herbicide resistance, which in turn will improve the sustainability of agriculture. PMID:27109389

  4. Closing oil palm yield gaps among Indonesian smallholders through industry schemes, pruning, weeding and improved seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, T; Lim, F K S; Lee, J S H; Carrasco, L R

    2016-08-01

    Oil palm production has led to large losses of valuable habitats for tropical biodiversity. Sparing of land for nature could in theory be attained if oil palm yields increased. The efficiency of oil palm smallholders is below its potential capacity, but the factors determining efficiency are poorly understood. We employed a two-stage data envelopment analysis approach to assess the influence of agronomic, supply chain and management factors on oil palm production efficiency in 190 smallholders in six villages in Indonesia. The results show that, on average, yield increases of 65% were possible and that fertilizer and herbicide use was excessive and inefficient. Adopting industry-supported scheme management practices, use of high-quality seeds and higher pruning and weeding rates were found to improve efficiency. Smallholder oil palm production intensification in Indonesia has the capacity to increase production by 26%, an equivalent of 1.75 million hectares of land.

  5. The consequent influence of crop rotation and six-year-long spring barley monoculture on yields and weed infestation of white mustard and oats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cezary Kwiatkowski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted in the years 2007- 2008, after 6-year-long experiments in the cultivation of spring barley in a crop rotation system and in monoculture. The other experimental factor was the spring barley protection method. Intensive protection involved comprehensive treatment of barley (in-crop harrowing, seed dressing, application of herbicides, fungicides, a retardant and an insecticide. Extensive protection consisted only in in-crop harrowing, without the application of crop protection agents, except for seed dressing. The above mentioned factors formed the background for the study on the cultivation of white mustard and oats, as phytosanitary species, in successive years. In the test plants, no mineral fertilization and crop protection were applied. Such agricultural method enabled an objective assessment of the consequent effect of monoculture, crop rotation and crop treatments. A hypothesis was made that the cultivation of the phytosanitary plants in the stand after 6-year-long barley monoculture would allow obtaining the level of yields and weed infestation similar to those of the crop rotation treatments. It was also assumed that the cultivation of white mustard and oats would eliminate differences in plant productivity caused by the negative influence of extensive protection. It was proved that the cultivation of the phytosanitary plants eliminated the negative influence of monoculture on the level of their yields and weed infestation. However, the test plants did not compensate negative consequences of extensive protection. In spite of this, white mustard and oats effectively competed with weeds, and the number and weight of weeds in a crop canopy did not cause a dramatic decline in yields. In the test plant canopy, the following short-lived weeds were predominant: Chenopodium album, Galinsoga parviflora, Echinochloa crus-galli. The absence of herbicide application resulted in the compensation of perennial species

  6. Study review and analysis of high performance intra-row weeding robot%智能高效株间锄草机器人研究进展与分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈子文; 张春龙; 李南; 孙哲; 李伟; 张宾

    2015-01-01

    To ensure food security and sustainable development of agriculture, it is critically important to develop organic agriculture and pollution-free agricultural products. Non-chemical weed control is important for organic agricultural production. Intra-row weeds are more difficult to be eliminated than inter-row weeds due to their proximity to the crop or seed line. Therefore, techniques for intra-row weed control remain to be one of the biggest challenges today. Efficient weeding robots can differentiate and remove inter-and intra-row weeds simultaneously, while identify and provide species information. The researches of intra-row weed control are more common in Europe because of their political interest and a push from the market. Nowadays, other countries, like the United States, Japan, Canada and China had carried out the researches in this area. This review describes the current state of the art of efficient weeding robots in detail to demonstrate the potential of the technology in the field. Several key technologies of weed control systems have been analyzed and compared. Three core technologies were summarized: guidance, detection and identification, and intra-row device. Row guidance which can use machine vision for crop row detection or GPS is an essential technology for weeding robot. Detection and identification which can identify and locate the crops in real time by three main approaches (computer vision, GPS and proximity sensor) is a critical technology. Furthermore, fusion of computer vision and GPS is seen today as the most promising strategy because advantages and disadvantages of absolute and relative referencing principles compensate each other. Intra-row device divided into rotation-type and swing type according to movements is a foundation of weed control. China is much later than the other developed countries in this area, but it has a booming development and grows rapidly. However, several technical problems exist as follows: 1) Recognition

  7. 4.8%甲氧咪草烟·咪唑乙烟酸水剂防除抗除草剂向日葵品种田杂草效果及安全性评价%Control efficacy and safety assessment of 4.8%Imazamox-Imazethapyr (AS) against weeds in herbicide resistant sunflower fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白全江; 赵存虎; 程玉臣; 云晓鹏; 杜磊; 魏海明

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of weeds in sunflower field brings severe yield loss and quality deterioration to sunflower seeds product. In practice, artificial weeding need more labor and higher cost, and there is no suitable foliar-applied herbicide for annual weeds in sunflower fields. In 2007, we introduced an herbicide resistant sunflower hybrid--Jaguar, and used 4.8%Imazamox-Imazethapyr (AS) as foliar-applied herbicide on it. In this study, the test herbicide was sprayed at the dosage between 66.7 mL/667m2 and 200 mL/667m2.Results showed that the control efficacies of test herbicide were from 88.1% to 99.9% 40 days after spraying. When applying dosage were 83.3 mL/667m2 and 100 mL/667m2, it kept effective and safe to sunflower.%向日葵田杂草危害,严重影响其产量和品质,人工防除费工费时,而且劳动成本高,生产中没有理想的茎叶处理防除向日葵田一年生单双子叶杂草的药剂。2007年引进国外抗咪唑啉铜类除草剂向日葵品种———美洲虎,应用甲氧咪草烟·咪唑乙烟酸4.8%AS 66.7 mL/667m2~200 mL/667m2茎叶喷雾处理。施药后40 d调查,结果表明,该药剂对田间一年生单双子叶杂草综合株防效达88.1%~99.9%,其中83.3 mL/667m2、100 mL/667m2用药量处理对供试向日葵既安全,又具有较好防效。

  8. Avaliação da sensibilidade de diversas espécies de plantas daninhas aquáticas ao carfentrazone-ethyl, em ambiente controlado Assessment of sensitivity of several aquatic weeds to carfentrazone-ethyl under controlled environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.L. Foloni

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Plantas aquáticas, especialmente macrófitas, tornam-se sério problema em hidrelétricas, afetando a múltipla utilização dos corpos d'água, incluindo produção de peixes e atividades de pesca, perdas d'água por evapotranspiração, esportes aquáticos, canoagem, irrigação e produção de energia nas usinas hidrelétricas. Com o objetivo de analisar o potencial de uso do carfentrazone-ethyl no controle das principais plantas daninhas aquáticas no Brasil, foi instalado um experimento em vasos com água. Utilizaram-se os seguintes tratamentos herbicidas (g i.a. ha-1: carfentrazone-ethyl a 15, 30 e 60; glyphosate a 4.536; 2,4-D a 4.690; imazapyr a 1.250; e uma testemunha sem herbicida. Esses tratamentos foram testados nas seguintes espécies: Eichhornia crassipes, Salvinia auriculata, Pistia stratiotes, Myriophyllum aquaticum, Brachiaria arrecta, Hydrocotyle umbellata, Typha sp. e Echinochloa polystachya. As avaliações foram efetuadas aos 7, 14, 21 e 28 dias após os tratamentos. Os resultados mostraram que o carfentrazone-ethyl foi eficiente no controle de E. crassipes (maior dose e P. stratiotes (duas maiores doses, com efeito supressivo sobre S. auriculata. Foi observado que nas outras plantas daninhas estudadas não houve eficiência de controle.Aquatic weeds, especially macrophytes, are a serious problem in hydroelectric plant systems, affecting the multiple use of water, such as fish production and fishing activities, water losses by evapotranspiration, aquatic sports, boating, irrigation and hydroelectric power production. An experiment using boxes filled with water was carried out to analyze the potential use of carfentrazone-ethyl in the control of the main aquatic weeds in Brazil. The following herbicide treatments (g i.a. ha-1 were used: carfentrazone-ethyl at 15, 30 and 60; glyphosate at 4,536; 2,4D at 4,690; imazapyr at 1,250, and no herbicide. These treatments were tested on the species: Eichhornia crassipes, Salvinia

  9. Weed control in dormant alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. with active ingredients’ metribuzin, imazetapyr and pronamide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvonko Pacanoski

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Field trials were conducted during 2008 – 2010 to evaluate weed control in dormant alfalfa (Medicago sativa L. with metribuzin, imazetapyr and pronamide. The weed population in all experimental years was consisted mainly of annual winter and spring grass and broadleaf weeds, and some perennial weeds. The number of weed species and weed density increased with the years of alfalfa growing, from second to the fourth year. Weed density in the untreated control plots was 201.0, 217.2 and 240.5 plants per m2 in 2008, 2009 and 2010, respectively. The most dominant weeds were Anthemis cotula, Capsell bursa-pastoris and Taraxacum officinale in 2008, Alopecurus myosuroides and Poa pratensis in 2009 and Millium vernale and Arabidopsis thaliana in 2010. Efficacy of herbicides in control of weeds was ranged of 91.8% (pronamide to 98.4% (metribuzin 1.0 kg*ha-1 in 2008, 93.1% (imazetapyr to 97.3% (metribuzin 1.0 kg*ha-1 in 2009 and 92.1% (imazetapyr to 97.3% (metribuzin 1.0 kg*ha-1 in 2010, respectively. Efficacy of herbicides in control of prevailing weeds during the 3 years field trial period was ranged of 48.5% to 100.0%. No visual alfalfa injured was determined by any rates during the experimental period, and consequently, none of the applied herbicides reduced first-harvest alfalfa yields. Alfalfa yield was markedly affected by herbicide efficacy in all experimental years, particularly in the second year, where yields of herbicide treatments were similar to that of the weed free control.

  10. Early growth of Quercus castaneifolia (C.A. Meyer) seedlings as affected by weeding, shading and irrigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Javad; Tabari, Masoud; Daroodi, Hadi

    2007-08-01

    The influence of shading, irrigation and weeding on survival, growth and morphology of 1-year Quercus castaneifolia seedlings was studied in north of Iran. The seedlings were grown under eight treatments including full-light versus artificial shading, irrigation versus non-irrigation and weed presence versus weed removing at three replicates. At the end of the first growing season seedling survival in all treatments was 100%. Weed removing had positive effect on height, diameter growth, slenderness coefficient and leaf area of Q. castaneifolia. Irrigation enhanced diameter growth and leaf area and shading increased leaf area. Irrigation had no significant effect on plant growth where the weed was removed. In weed plots seedlings growth and leaf area were greater in shading than in full-light. The results indicated that for 1 year Q. castaneifolia seedlings, weeding, in contrast to irrigation, is an essential factor. Where the weed competition is a difficulty, plantation with higher stem length should be applied.

  11. Row Spacing Determines Critical Period of Weed Control in Crop: Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) as a Case Study

    OpenAIRE

    Omobolanle Adewale Osipitan; Joseph Aremu Adigun; Rauf Olabisi Kolawole

    2016-01-01

    To further understand the importance of row spacing as an agronomic practice, a study was conducted to evaluate how levels of row spacing determines the critical period of weed control (CPWC) in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata). The experiment was laid out as a split-plot design with eight periods of weed interference as the main plots and three row spacing (60, 75 90 cm) as the subplots with three replications of each treatment combination. Period of weed interference consisted of weed removal for...

  12. Interactive Encyclopedia of North American Weeds, DVD v.4.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    An interactive DVD-ROM encyclopedia of North American weeds was developed that includes home pages for 685 weed species descriptions, over 3700 color photos, illustrated collar regions for grasses, distribution maps, habitat information, crops affected, ecological information, and hot-linked illustr...

  13. 7 CFR 201.65 - Noxious weed seeds in interstate commerce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Noxious weed seeds in interstate commerce. 201.65 Section 201.65 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING... ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Tolerances § 201.65 Noxious weed seeds in interstate...

  14. Broadcast applications of Acetic Acid: Weed control in spring-transplanted onions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma producers are interested in sweet onion (Allium cepa L.) as an alternative crop for farm diversification, but weed control continues to be a primary obstacle. The weed control challenges for onion production are even greater for those considering organic crop production. The few organic h...

  15. Controlling herbicide-resistant weeds: consider incorporating alfalfa in a corn/soybean rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbicide resistant weeds (HRW) are a serious problem in the U.S. In 1968, the first confirmed case of herbicide resistance in weeds was reported in Washington state. In the 46 years since, the number of HRW in the U.S. has increased dramatically. A major reason for the recent increase in HRW has be...

  16. 75 FR 23151 - Noxious Weeds; Old World Climbing Fern and Maidenhair Creeper

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-03

    ... Inspection Service 7 CFR Parts 360 and 361 Noxious Weeds; Old World Climbing Fern and Maidenhair Creeper... noxious weed regulations by adding Old World climbing fern (Lygodium microphyllum (Cavanilles) R. Brown... Old World climbing fern (Lygodium microphyllum (Cavanilles) R. Brown) and maidenhair creeper...

  17. Suppressing weed growth after wheat harvest with underseeded red clover in organic farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organic producers are seeking alternative tactics for weed control so that they can reduce their need for tillage. In this study, we examined cover crop strategies for suppressing weed growth after harvest of wheat. Two cover crop treatments, red clover (mammoth type) or a mixture of oat and dry p...

  18. Impacts of organic conservation tillage systems on crops, weeds, and soil quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organic farming has been identified as promoting soil quality even though tillage is used for weed suppression. Adopting conservation tillage practices can enhance soil quality in cropping systems where synthetic agrichemicals are used for crop nutrition and weed control. Attempts have been made t...

  19. Influence of Seeding Rate on Weed Density in Soybean Planting System for Southeastern Coastal Plains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Wiatrak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Increasing seeding rates may help decrease weed pressure in soybean [Glycine max (L. Merr.] wide row spacing. Approach: The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of five glyphosate-resistant soybean Maturity Groups (MG (IV, V, VI, VII and VIII and six seeding rates (68,000,136,000, 204,000, 272,000, 340,000 and 408,000 seeds ha-1 on weed density under dryland conditions on the Southeastern coastal plain in 2007-2009. Results: Weed decrease with increasing seeding rate varied over years. Weed density was generally lower at higher seeding rates for most MG soybeans at 30 and 60 DAP, except MG IV and VIII at 30 DAP in 2007 and MG VI at 30 DAP in 2008. At 60 DAP, soybean leaf area index (LAI and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI were greater with lower weed density. Conclusion: Additionally, negative correlations were observed between weed density and plant LAI/NDVI for all MG in 2008 and MG IV through VI in 2009. These results suggest that increased seeding rates may help decrease weed pressure and improve soybean growth at early growth stages. However the response of weed pressure to seeding rate may vary over years and depend on MG soybean.

  20. Impacts of Organic Zero Tillage Systems on Crops, Weeds, and Soil Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick M. Carr

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Organic farming has been identified as promoting soil quality even though tillage is used for weed suppression. Adopting zero tillage and other conservation tillage practices can enhance soil quality in cropping systems where synthetic agri-chemicals are relied on for crop nutrition and weed control. Attempts have been made to eliminate tillage completely when growing several field crops organically. Vegetative mulch produced by killed cover crops in organic zero tillage systems can suppress annual weeds, but large amounts are needed for adequate early season weed control. Established perennial weeds are not controlled by cover crop mulch. Integrated weed management strategies that include other cultural as well as biological and mechanical controls have potential and need to be incorporated into organic zero tillage research efforts. Market crop performance in organic zero tillage systems has been mixed because of weed, nutrient cycling, and other problems that still must be solved. Soil quality benefits have been demonstrated in comparisons between organic conservation tillage and inversion tillage systems, but studies that include zero tillage treatments are lacking. Research is needed which identifies agronomic strategies for optimum market crop performance, acceptable levels of weed suppression, and soil quality benefits following adoption of organic zero tillage.

  1. Broadcast application of vinegar for broadleaf weed control in spring-transplanted onions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinegar (acetic acid) is a non-selective contact herbicide used in organic crop production. Research was conducted to determine if vinegar could be successfully applied over the top of onion plants to control broadleaf weeds. The experiment included 6 weed control treatments (2 application volumes...

  2. Machine vision-based high-resolution weed mapping and patch-sprayer performance simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tang, L.; Tian, L.F.; Steward, B.L.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental machine vision-based patch-sprayer was developed. This sprayer was primarily designed to do real-time weed density estimation and variable herbicide application rate control. However, the sprayer also had the capability to do high-resolution weed mapping if proper mapping techniques

  3. 76 FR 70954 - Idaho Panhandle National Forests, Idaho; Idaho Panhandle National Forest Noxious Weed Treatment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... method(s); (4) encourage beneficial native vegetation and weed resistant plant communities and; (5... Forest Noxious Weed Treatment Project AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of intent to prepare... counties in Montana; and Pend Oreille County in Washington. The proposal includes both an Integrated...

  4. Annual losses of weed seeds due to predation in organic cereal fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerman, P.R.; Wes, J.S.; Kropff, M.J.; Werf, van der W.

    2003-01-01

    1. Post-dispersal seed losses in annual arable weed species are poorly quantified, but may be of significance for natural population control, especially if they can be manipulated. We hypothesized that weed seed predation on the soil surface was significant, so we measured rates in the field to esti

  5. Using vegetation indices as input into ramdom forest for soybean and weed classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed management is a major component of a soybean (Glycine max L.) production system; thus, managers need tools to help them distinguish soybean from weeds. Vegetation indices derived from light reflectance properties of plants have shown promise as tools to enhance differences among plants. The o...

  6. Weeds as agricultural constraint in Benin: results of a diagnostic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissoh, P.V.; Gbèhounou, G.; Ahanchedé, A.; Kuyper, T.W.; Röling, N.G.

    2004-01-01

    Weeds are an emerging constraint on crop production, as a result of population pressure and more intensive use of cultivated land. A diagnostic study was carried out from June through August 2002 in the five agro-ecological zones of Benin (1) to identify the relative importance of weeds among major

  7. The mechanism for weed suppression by a forage radish cover crop

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the Mid-Atlantic region, forage radish (Raphanus sativus L. var. longipinnatus) winter cover crops planted prior to 1 September suppress winter annual weeds from fall until early April. Little is known about the mechanism of this weed suppression. Published research reports suggest that allelopat...

  8. Response of rice genotypes to weed competition in dry direct-seeded rice in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Gulshan; Ramesha, Mugalodi S; Chauhan, Bhagirath S

    2014-01-01

    The differential weed-competitive abilities of eight rice genotypes and the traits that may confer such attributes were investigated under partial weedy and weed-free conditions in naturally occurring weed flora in dry direct-seeded rice during the rainy seasons of 2011 and 2012 at Ludhiana, Punjab, India. The results showed genotypic differences in competitiveness against weeds. In weed-free plots, grain yield varied from 6.6 to 8.9 t ha(-1) across different genotypes; it was lowest for PR-115 and highest for the hybrid H-97158. In partial weedy plots, grain yield and weed biomass at flowering varied from 3.6 to 6.7 t ha(-1) and from 174 to 419 g m(-2), respectively. In partial weedy plots, grain yield was lowest for PR-115 and highest for PR-120. Average yield loss due to weed competition ranged from 21 to 46% in different rice genotypes. The study showed that early canopy closure, high leaf area index at early stage, and high root biomass and volume correlated positively with competitiveness. This study suggests that some traits (root biomass, leaf area index, and shoot biomass at the early stage) could play an important role in conferring weed competitiveness and these traits can be explored for dry-seeded rice.

  9. The role of climate change and increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide on weed management: Herbicide Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rising concentrations of carbon dioxide [CO2] and a changing climate will almost certainly affect weed biology and demographics with consequences for crop productivity. The extent of such consequences could be minimal if weed management, particularly the widespread and effective use of herbicides, m...

  10. [Effects of different rice farming systems on paddy field weed community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dan; Min, Qing-Wen; Cheng, Sheng-Kui; Yang, Hai-Long; He, Lu; Jiao, Wen-Jun; Liu, Shan

    2010-06-01

    Taking the paddy fields planted with glutinous rice and hybrid rice in the traditional agricultural region in Congjiang County of Guizhou Province as the case, and by using semi-experiment combined with random sampling investigation, this paper studied the characteristics of weed community in the paddy fields under rice monoculture (R), rice-fish culture (R-F), and rice-fish-duck culture (R-F-D). Under the three rice farming systems, glutinous rice had higher capability in inhibiting weeds, compared with hybrid rice. Farming system R-F-D decreased the weed density significantly, with the control effect on Monochoia vaginalis and Rotala indica being 100%. The overall weed-inhibiting effect of R-F-D was significantly higher than that of the other farming systems. Under R-F-D, the species richness and Shannon diversity index of weed community decreased markedly, while the Pielou evenness index increased, indicating that the species composition of weed community changed greatly, and the occurrence of native dominant weed species decreased. It was concluded that R-F-D was a feasible farming system for the control of paddy field weed community.

  11. Dicotyledon Weed Quantification Algorithm for Selective Herbicide Application in Maize Crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Morten Stigaard; Jørgensen, Rasmus Nyholm; Midtiby, Henrik Skov

    2016-01-01

    and executed an automated, large-scale field trial supported by the Armadillo autonomous tool carrier robot. The field trial consisted of 299 maize plots. Half of the plots (parcels) were planned with additional seeded weeds; the other half were planned with naturally occurring weeds. The in-situ evaluation...

  12. Real World of Industrial Chemistry: The Challenge of Herbicides for Aquatic Weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Dean F.; Martin, Barbara B.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses problems in selecting the correct herbicide for use in controlling aquatic weeds, considering specificity, size of the market, fear of trace contaminants, and herbicide resistance in weeds. Also summarizes some successful herbicides, providing a table listing mode of action of some herbicides used for control of aquatic plants. (JN)

  13. Using cover crops to alleviate compaction in organic grain farms: effects on weeds and yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organic producers heavily rely on tillage for mechanical weeding, creating compacted areas ideal for weedy species, and forming a vicious cycle of tillage, compaction and increasing weed populations. In an effort to address the concerns of certified organic farmers from Illinois, we explored the eff...

  14. Weed control methods effect on the hydraulic attributes of a Latosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Pires

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Weed management plays a key role in the minimization of soil physical degradation processes such as compaction and hydric erosion. Different weed control managements can induce distinct changes in soil structure. One important soil physical attribute used for the analysis of modifications in soil structure is the soil water retention curve (SWRC. The objective of this work was to verify the use of physico-hydrical attributes to understand the effect of weed control managements on soil structure. Two soil layers (0–0.05 and 0.10–0.15 m and six weed control managements divided into two groups were analyzed: I. no soil disturbance and ground cover (no weed control, post-emergence herbicide, mechanical mower; and II. soil disturbance and no ground cover (hand-hoe weeding, rotary tiller, pre-emergence herbicide. An area of native forest was used as reference. The results showed that the volumetric water capacity derived from the SWRC can be an interesting tool to evaluate the impact of weed control managements on soil structure. Evaluations of the air-filled porosity variation for different pressure heads also presented interesting findings. Distinct results of the weed control managements were found for the different depths analyzed in relation to the forest.

  15. Weed Control Strategies for Organic Peanut Production and Transition: A Lesson in Basic Agronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weed control in organic peanut production is difficult and costly. The only production inputs that consistently improved weed management in organic peanut production were modified production practices and intense cultivation with a tine weeder. Research trials evaluated row patterns, seeding rates...

  16. PAGMan - propelled abrasive grit to manage weeds in soybean and corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    New tools for controlling weeds would be useful for soybean and corn production in organic systems or in systems in which weeds developed resistance to multiple herbicides. Here we report on two developments: (i) the safety to soybean seedlings of using air-propelled abrasive grit (PAG) for managing...

  17. Air-propelled abrasive grit for postemergence in-row weed control in field corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organic growers need additional tools for weed control. A new technique involving abrasive grit propelled by compressed air was tested in field plots. Grit derived from corn cobs was directed at seedlings of summer annual weeds growing at the bases of corn plants when the corn was at differing early...

  18. Weeding the Forest Hill Branch of Toronto Public Library by the Slote Method: A Test Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Penelope

    1981-01-01

    Describes a two-part book circulation use study conducted to find a simple inexpensive and effective method of weeding a public library branch collection, to determine whether weeding increases circulation, and to compare results with Slote's results. Seven tables, one appendix, and 32 references are provided. (RBF)

  19. Comparison of different cover crop mulches and extracts on inhibition of crop and weed growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sturm, Domonic Johannes

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Weed suppression of cover crops is a result of competition for light, space, water and nutrients and the release of allelochemicals in the soil. Two laboratory and greenhouse experiments were conducted to analyse biochemical effects of extracts and mulches of Fagopyrum tataricum (L. Gaertn., Raphanus sativus var. oleiformis Pers. and a cover crop mixture on germination and plant growth of the crop plants maize (Zea mays L. and sugar beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. vulgaris var. altissima Döll. and the weeds Chenopodium album L., Matricaria chamomilla L. and Stellaria media (L. Vill.. In the first experiment, aqueous cover crop extracts were applied on crop and weed seeds in germination assays. Germination rate, mean germination time and root length of crops and weeds were measured. In experiment 2, the influence of cover crop mulch on germination rate and dry weight of the test plants was determined after a period of 21 days. Significant reductions of the root length for all test plants were observed in experiment 1. Additionally, mean germination time was extended for crops and weeds by all cover crops. Germination rate and dry matter of crops and weeds were decreased significantly in experiment 2 compared to the untreated control. Root length, germination rate and mean germination time in germination tests in experiment 1 were found to be correlated with biomass of crops and weeds in experiment 2. This work reveals the important role of biochemical effects on weed suppression by cover crops.

  20. Weed control in sweet bell pepper using sequential postdirected applications of pelargonic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepper (Capsicum annuum) producers would benefit from additional herbicide options that are safe to the crop and provide effective weed control. Research was conducted in southeastern Oklahoma (Atoka County, Lane, OK) during 2010 and 2011 to determine the impact of pelargonic acid on weed control ef...

  1. The evolutionary history of an invasive species: alligator weed, Alternanthera philoxeroides

    Science.gov (United States)

    The eco-evolutionary mechanisms of biological invasions are still not thoroughly understood. Alligator weed, Alternanthera philoxeroides (Martius) Gisebach (Amaranthaceae), is a plant native to South America and a weed in Australia and other countries. To better understand its success as an invader,...

  2. Colour and shape analysis techniques for weed detection in cereal fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pérez, A.J; López, F; Benlloch, J.V.;

    2000-01-01

    Information on weed distribution within the field is necessary to implement spatially variable herbicide application. This paper deals with the development of near-ground image capture and processing techniques in order to detect broad-leaved weeds in cereal crops under actual field conditions. T...

  3. [Effects of different fertilization regimes on weed communities in wheat fields under rice-wheat cropping system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Fang; Li, Yong; Li, Fen-hua; Sun, Guo-jun; Han, Min; Zhang, Hai-yan; Ji, Zhong; Wu, Chen-yu

    2016-01-01

    To reveal the effects of different fertilization regimes on weed communities in wheat fields under a rice-wheat rotation system, a survey was conducted before wheat harvest in 2014 after a 4-year long-term recurrent fertilization scheme. Weed species types, density, height and diversity index under different fertilization and straw-returning schemes in wheat fields were studied and complemented with a canonical correspondence analysis on weed community distribution and soil nutrient factors. Twenty weed species were recorded among 36 wheat fields belonging to 19 genera and 11 families. Beckmannia syzigachne, Hemistepta lyrata, Malachium aquaticum and Cnidium monnieri were widely distributed throughout the sampled area. Long-term fertilization appeared to reduce weed species richness and density, particularly for broadleaf weeds, but increased weed height. Diversity and evenness indices of weed communities were lower and dominance indices were higher in fields where chemical fertilizers were applied alone or combined with organic fertilizers, especially, where organic-inorganic compound fertilizer was used, in which it readily caused the outbreak of a dominant species and severe damage. Conversely, diversity and evenness indices of weed communities were higher and dominance indices were lower when the straw was returned to the field combined with chemical or organic fertilizers, in which weed community structures were complex and stable with lower weed density. Under these conditions weeds only caused slight reduction of wheat growth.

  4. 36 CFR 222.8 - Cooperation in control of estray or unbranded livestock, animal diseases, noxious farm weeds, and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... estray or unbranded livestock, animal diseases, noxious farm weeds, and use of pesticides. 222.8 Section... unbranded livestock, animal diseases, noxious farm weeds, and use of pesticides. (a) Insofar as it involves... farm weeds. (2) The Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service and other Federal or State agencies...

  5. Use of rhizobacteria and endophytes for biological control of weeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trognitz, Friederike

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Weeds cause severe yield losses in agriculture, with a maximum estimate of 34% of yield loss worldwide due to competition between the crops and the weeds for nutrition, light and humidity (OERKE, 2006. Invasive plants contribute partially to other problems. The pollen of common ragweed, Ambrosia artemisiifolia L., for example, is five times more allergenic than grass pollen; already ten pollen grains per m3 air can trigger allergy in sensitized patients, including rhinitis, conjunctivitis and asthma. This neophyte from America has extended the season of allergy in European patients to October. Common ragweed is currently most frequent in Hungary, France and Italy. In Austria, ragweed populations along roads have increased dramatically since 2000. The effective means to control this weed of the Asteraceae family are limited; a single plant can produce up to 6000 seeds which stay in the soil for 40 years. Control using selective herbicides is not possible within stands of the Asteraceae member sunflower. Efforts to use herbivore insects as biological control agents also failed due to the unavailability of insects specializing on this ragweed. The use of plant-associated rhizobacteria and endophytes as bio-herbicides offers a novel alternative to conventional methods. By analogy to experiences from other plant-microbe systems, the chances to find microbes of the desired characteristics are highest when isolating and testing specimens directly from ragweed plants. These organisms often have an extremely narrow host range that permits their use for the control of among several even closely related plant species growing together in a field.

  6. Occupational allergic rhinitis and contact urticaria caused by bishop's weed (Ammi majus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiistala, R; Mäkinen-Kiljunen, S; Heikkinen, K; Rinne, J; Haahtela, T

    1999-06-01

    Bishop's weed (Ammi majus) has been known to induce toxic phytophotodermatitis. We now describe IgE-mediated rhinitis and contact urticaria caused by exposure to bishop's weed in a 31-year-old atopic female florist. A skin prick-prick test with bishop's weed flowers gave an 8-mm wheal, and the bishop's weed-specific IgE level in the patient's serum was 9.7 PRU/ml (RAST class 3). In an immunoblotting experiment with the patient's serum, nine IgE-binding protein bands with the molecular weights 19, 34, 39-41 (doublet), 52-61 (doublet), and >67 (triplet) kDa were detected in bishop's weed extract. The patient became symptomless after she had ceased to work as a florist.

  7. INTEGRATED WEED MANAGEMENT ON THE PROCESSING TOMATO CROP AND TOMATO FOR CONSUMPTION IN NATURA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. O. Castro

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Weeds cause direct and indirect damage to processing tomato and tomato for consumption in natura. The coexistence period is decisive for the intensity of damage, although the economic cost is also considered for decision making when to control the weeds. There are similarities between processing tomato and tomato for consumption in natura cropping system and peculiarities. This causes the management has adopted its common applications and its variables within each system. As control alternative, the farmer has basically the preventive control, mechanical, cultural, biological and chemical. The application of a single method is not recommended. Ideally, the methods needs to be integrated in order to combat weeds, highly evolved populations and resistant to unfavorable conditions. Consider weed management taking only one control measure is to underestimate the evolutionary ability of such species. Therefore, it is necessary to integrate the various methods available to the weed interference not impede the tomato production.

  8. The Use of Weed Control Robot (WCR for Achieve to the Sustainable Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Sani

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Today, weeds control is very difficult because they are resistant to the herbicide due to excessive use of chemical herbicides in agriculture. Many studies have shown that mechanical and biological control of weeds can be much less damage to the environment of chemical herbicides. Develop of biological herbicides in agriculture was slow due to high prices and this subject the researchers to move toward the elimination of agricultural weed mechanically. This work was originally done by a many number of workers because and workers' rights didn’t work was ultimately economic value. Now solve this subject by the use of robotic technology in agriculture has been studied and a many number of agricultural researchers with the help of computer scientists move towards making robots to remove the weeds. Of course this is difficult due to excessive weeds similar to the plants, but the final results will help to increase crop and save the environment by eliminating chemical herbicides.

  9. Complete genome sequences of two begomoviruses infecting weeds in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiallo-Olivé, Elvira; Chirinos, Dorys T; Geraud-Pouey, Francis; Moriones, Enrique; Navas-Castillo, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    The complete sequences of isolates of two new bipartite begomoviruses (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae) found infecting weeds in Venezuela are provided. The names proposed for these new begomoviruses are "Datura leaf distortion virus" (DLDV), isolated from a Datura stramonium L. (family Solanaceae) plant, and "Dalechampia chlorotic mosaic virus" (DCMV), isolated from infected Dalechampia sp. (family Euphorbiaceae) and Boerhavia diffusa L. (family Nyctaginaceae) plants. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these new begomoviruses segregated in two distinct clades of New World begomoviruses. To our knowledge, this is the first record of a begomovirus infecting Dalechampia sp. plants. Also, this is the first report of a begomovirus infecting Boerhavia spp. and Datura spp. in Venezuela.

  10. A special vegetation index for the weed detection in sensor based precision agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langner, Hans-R; Böttger, Hartmut; Schmidt, Helmut

    2006-06-01

    Many technologies in precision agriculture (PA) require image analysis and image- processing with weed and background differentiations. The detection of weeds on mulched cropland is one important image-processing task for sensor based precision herbicide applications. The article introduces a special vegetation index, the Difference Index with Red Threshold (DIRT), for the weed detection on mulched croplands. Experimental investigations in weed detection on mulched areas point out that the DIRT performs better than the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). The result of the evaluation with four different decision criteria indicate, that the new DIRT gives the highest reliability in weed/background differentiation on mulched areas. While using the same spectral bands (infrared and red) as the NDVI, the new DIRT is more suitable for weed detection than the other vegetation indices and requires only a small amount of additional calculation power. The new vegetation index DIRT was tested on mulched areas during automatic ratings with a special weed camera system. The test results compare the new DIRT and three other decision criteria: the difference between infrared and red intensity (Diff), the soil-adjusted quotient between infrared and red intensity (Quotient) and the NDVI. The decision criteria were compared with the definition of a worse case decision quality parameter Q, suitable for mulched croplands. Although this new index DIRT needs further testing, the index seems to be a good decision criterion for the weed detection on mulched areas and should also be useful for other image processing applications in precision agriculture. The weed detection hardware and the PC program for the weed image processing were developed with funds from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF).

  11. A REVIEW OF WEED MANAGEMENT IN INDIA: THE NEED OF NEW DIRECTIONS FOR SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K VERMA

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Weeds are the major deterrent to the development of sustainable crop production. Since weeds dictate most of the crop production practices and causes enormous losses (37 per cent due to their interference. Farmers follow several practices for managing weeds in different crops/cropping systems, of which at present the use of herbicides are on the top due to the scarcity of labors. The sustainability of these systems is being questioned because of environmental, social, and economic concerns caused by global competition, production cost, soil erosion, environmental pollution, and concern over the quality of rural life. Enhancing the crop competitiveness through preventive methods, cultural practices, mechanical methods, plant breeding, biotechnology, biological control and crop diversification will be the central thesis in new paradigms of weed management. Integration of above techniques will be key to sustainable weed management that maintain or enhance the crop productivity, profitability and environmental quality. This article explores the scope of sustainable weed management, growing concerns over herbicide resistance, environmental and health hazards of pesticides including herbicides and declining profitability are the major challenges of ‘high input’ agriculture. The goal of this review is to facilitate the development of ecologically based alternative methods for sustainable weed management that will support crop production systems, which require less tillage, herbicide and other inputs. To accomplish this goal, research efforts must be radically expanded in crop ecology and in the development of ecologically based technologies for weed management. Adoption of sustainable agricultural practices reduces the intensity of soil manipulation thereby creates an unfavorable condition for weed seed germination, reduces the organic matter depletion and soil erosion. Thus, the sustainable approaches could be an option for weed and soil

  12. A NOVEL WRAPPING CURVELET TRANSFORMATION BASED ANGULAR TEXTURE PATTERN (WCTATP EXTRACTION METHOD FOR WEED IDENTIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ashok Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Apparently weed is a major menace in crop production as it competes with crop for nutrients, moisture, space and light which resulting in poor growth and development of the crop and finally yield. Yield loss accounts for even more than 70% when crops are frown under unweeded condition with severe weed infestation. Weed management is the most significant process in the agricultural applications to improve the crop productivity rate and reduce the herbicide application cost. Existing weed detection techniques does not yield better performance due to the complex background, illumination variation and crop and weed overlapping in the agricultural field image. Hence, there arises a need for the development of effective weed identification technique. To overcome this drawback, this paper proposes a novel Wrapping Curvelet Transformation Based Angular Texture Pattern Extraction Method (WCTATP for weed identification. In our proposed work, Global Histogram Equalization (GHE is used improve the quality of the image and Adaptive Median Filter (AMF is used for filtering the impulse noise from the image. Plant image identification is performed using green pixel extraction and k-means clustering. Wrapping Curvelet transform is applied to the plant image. Feature extraction is performed to extract the angular texture pattern of the plant image. Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO based Differential Evolution Feature Selection (DEFS approach is applied to select the optimal features. Then, the selected features are learned and passed through an RVM based classifier to find out the weed. Edge detection and contouring is performed to identify the weed in the plant image. The Fuzzy rule-based approach is applied to detect the low, medium and high levels of the weed patchiness. From the experimental results, it is clearly observed that the accuracy of the proposed approach is higher than the existing Support Vector Machine (SVM based approaches. The proposed approach

  13. Effects of hand weeding strip and nitrogen fertilizer on corn plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, João Renato Vaz; Martins, Dagoberto; Cardoso, Leonildo A; Carbonari, Caio Antonio

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the present research was to evaluate effects of different strip weed control associated with nitrogen fertilizer on corn applied after planting. The experiment was set and conducted in Botucatu, São Paulo State, Brazil, and the hybrid planted was Dekalb 333-B. A completely randomized block design with four replications was used. Experimental plots were disposed as a factorial scheme 2 x 2 x 4, constituted by two types of weeding on row (with or without manual hoeing), two types of weeding on inter-row (with or without manual hoeing), and four nitrogen levels applied after planting (00, 60, 90, and 120 kg ha(-1)). Plots were composed by six rows with 5 m length. Nitrogen fertilizer was applied at 35 days after emergence (d.a.e). For weed community it was evaluated: weed density, dominancy, frequency, and relative importance. The main weed species were: Brachiaria plantiginea, Amaranthus retroflexus, Bidens pilosa, Cyperus rotunds, Brachiaria decumbens, Euphorbia heterofila, Oxalis latifolia, Acanthospermum hispidum, Commelina benghalensis. It was evaluated corn height at 40 and 100 d.a.e., first ear insertion height at 100 d.a.e., and final grain yield at harvesting. Plants and first ear insertion height were affected when nitrogen fertilizer was not applied. Treatments without weed control showed that weed interfered negatively with plants height. There were no correlation between weeds and nitrogen fertilizer for all parameters evaluated. Parcels without weed showed the highest ear weights and final grain production. Treatments that received nitrogen fertilizer, independently of studied arrangement, provided higher yields.

  14. Spatial and temporal patterns of carabid activity-density in cereals do not explain levels of predation on weed seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saska, P; van der Werf, W; de Vries, E; Westerman, P R

    2008-04-01

    Seed predation is an important component of seed mortality of weeds in agro-ecosystems, but the agronomic use and management of this natural weed suppression is hampered by a lack of insight in the underlying ecological processes. In this paper, we investigate whether and how spatial and temporal variation in activity-density of granivorous ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) results in a corresponding pattern of seed predation. Activity-density of carabids was measured by using pitfall traps in two organic winter wheat fields from March to July 2004. Predation of seeds (Capsella bursa-pastoris, Lamium amplexicaule, Poa annua and Stellaria media) was assessed using seed cards at the same sites and times. As measured by pitfall traps, carabids were the dominant group of insects that had access to the seed cards. In the field, predation of the four different species of seed was in the order: C. bursa-pastoris>P. annua>S. media>L. amplexicaule; and this order of preference was confirmed in the laboratory using the dominant species of carabid. On average, seed predation was higher in the field interior compared to the edge, whereas catches of carabids were highest near the edge. Weeks with elevated seed predation did not concur with high activity-density of carabids. Thus, patterns of spatial and temporal variation in seed predation were not matched by similar patterns in the abundance of granivorous carabid beetles. The lack of correspondence is ascribed to effects of confounding factors, such as weather, the background density of seeds, the composition of the carabid community, and the phenology and physiological state of the beetles. Our results show that differences in seed loss among weed species may be predicted from laboratory trials on preference. However, predator activity-density, as measured in pitfall traps, is an insufficient predictor of seed predation over time and space within a field.

  15. EVALUATION OF WHEAT-CHICKPEA INTERCROPS AS INFLUENCED BY NITROGEN AND WEED MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Abdulahi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Wheat and chickpea are most important crops in dryland farming areas of Iran. Weeds have major impact on chickpea grain yield. This experiment was carried out to increase land use efficiency and weed suppression through intercropping in dryland agricultural research station-Sararood, Kermanshah, Iran during 2008-10. The experimental design layout was factorial split plot based on randomized complete block design with three replications. The main plots contained factorial plots of N fertilization with 3 levels (N1: no fertilization, N2: 60 kg.ha-1 urea for wheat and 20 kg.ha-1 for chickpea and N3: Nitragin as a biofertilizer + 30 kg.ha-1 urea for wheat and chickpea no urea; and weed conditions with 2 levels (weed infested and weed free. The third factor as sub-plots arranged in main plots was cropping patterns with 10 levels (1: wheat Sole Crop (wh.SC, 2: chickpea Sole Crop (ch.SC, 3: wh./ch. Mixed Intercropping (wh./ch.MIC in 1:1 ratio, 4: wh./ch. MIC in 2:1 ratio, Row Intercropping (RIC 1row wh.:1row ch., 6: Strip Intercropping (SIC 5wh.1ch.5wh.2ch, 7: SIC 7wh.:2ch., 8: SIC 2wh.:7ch., 9: SIC 9wh.:4ch. and 10: SIC 4wh.:9ch.. Weed and nitrogen factors didn’t have significant effect on wheat yield and patterns number 5, 8 and 10 produced highest wheat grain yield respectively. Chickpea yield was significantly reduced by wheat when intercropped, but high Land Equivalent Ratio (LER derived. Effect of weeds on chickpea Grain Yield (GY was significant and GY in weed infested was nearly half of GY in weed free condition. LER in weed infested condition in both years was higher than weed free condition. Weed dry matter in five intercropping patterns clearly decreased as compare to chickpea sole crop. It is concluded that intercropping can be used as a method to decrease the inputs of wheat and chickpea crops, especially for nitrogen fertilizing and weed control.

  16. Population genetic structure of a colonising, triploid weed, Hieracium lepidulum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, H; Robson, B; Pearson, M L

    2004-03-01

    Understanding the breeding system and population genetic structure of invasive weed species is important for biocontrol, and contributes to our understanding of the evolutionary processes associated with invasions. Hieracium lepidulum is an invasive weed in New Zealand, colonising a diverse range of habitats including native Nothofagus forest, pine plantations, scrubland and tussock grassland. It is competing with native subalpine and alpine grassland and herbfield vegetation. H. lepidulum is a triploid, diplosporous apomict, so theoretically all seed is clonal, and there is limited potential for the creation of variation through recombination. We used intersimple sequence repeats (ISSRs) to determine the population genetic structure of New Zealand populations of H. lepidulum. ISSR analysis of five populations from two regions in the South Island demonstrated high intrapopulation genotypic diversity, and high interpopulation genetic structuring; PhiST = 0.54 over all five populations. No private alleles were found in any of the five populations, and allelic differentiation was correlated to geographic distance. Cladistic compatibility analysis indicated that both recombination and mutation were important in the creation of genotypic diversity. Our data will contribute to any biocontrol program developed for H. lepidulum. It will also be a baseline data set for future comparisons of genetic structure during the course of H. lepidulum invasions.

  17. Evolution of herbicide resistance mechanisms in grass weeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzrafi, Maor; Gadri, Yaron; Frenkel, Eyal; Rubin, Baruch; Peleg, Zvi

    2014-12-01

    Herbicide resistant weeds are becoming increasingly common, threatening global food security. Here, we present BrIFAR: a new model system for the functional study of mechanisms of herbicide resistance in grass weeds. We have developed a large collection of Brachypodium accessions, the BrI collection, representing a wide range of habitats. Wide screening of the responses of the accessions to four major herbicide groups (PSII, ACCase, ALS/AHAS and EPSPS inhibitors) identified 28 herbicide-resistance candidate accessions. Target-site resistance to PSII inhibitors was found in accessions collected from habitats with a known history of herbicide applications. An amino acid substitution in the psbA gene (serine264 to glycine) conferred resistance and also significantly affected the flowering and shoot dry weight of the resistant accession, as compared to the sensitive accession. Non-target site resistance to ACCase inhibitors was found in accessions collected from habitats with a history of herbicide application and from a nature reserve. In-vitro enzyme activity tests and responses following pre-treatment with malathion (a cytochrome-P450 inhibitor) indicated sensitivity at the enzyme level, and give strong support to diclofop-methyl and pinoxaden enhanced detoxification as NTS resistance mechanism. BrIFAR can promote better understanding of the evolution of mechanisms of herbicide resistance and aid the implementation of integrative management approaches for sustainable agriculture.

  18. Weed vegetation ecology of arable land in Salalah, Southern Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sheikh, Mohamed A

    2013-07-01

    This paper applies multivariate statistical methods to a data set of weed relevés from arable fields in two different habitat types of coastal and mountainous escarpments in Southern Oman. The objectives were to test the effect of environmental gradients, crop plants and time on weed species composition, to rank the importance of these particular factors, and to describe the patterns of species composition and diversity associated with these factors. Through the application of TWINSPAN, DCA and CCA programs on data relating to 102 species recorded in 28 plots and farms distributed in the study area, six plant communities were identified: I- Dichanthium micranthum, II- Cynodon dactylon-D. micranthum, III- Convolvulus arvensis, IV- C. dactylon-Sonchus oleraceus, V- Amaranthus viridis and VI- Suaeda aegyptiaca-Achyranthes aspera. The ordination process (CCA) provided a sequence of plant communities and species diversity that correlated with some anthropogenic factors, physiographic variables and crop types. Therefore, length of time since farm construction, disturbance levels and altitude are the most important factors related to the occurrence of the species. The perennial species correlated with the more degraded mountain areas of new farm stands, whereas most of the annuals correlated with old lowland and less disturbed farms.

  19. Weeding and grooming of pathogens in agriculture by ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, C R; Stuart, A E

    2001-05-22

    The ancient mutualism between fungus-growing ants and the fungi they cultivate for food is a textbook example of symbiosis. Fungus-growing ants' ability to cultivate fungi depends on protection of the garden from the aggressive microbes associated with the substrate added to the garden as well as from the specialized virulent garden parasite Escovopsis. We examined ants' ability to remove alien microbes physically by infecting Atta colombica gardens with the generalist pathogen Trichoderma viride and the specialist pathogen Escovopsis. The ants sanitized the garden using two main behaviours: grooming of alien spores from the garden (fungus grooming) and removal of infected garden substrate (weeding). Unlike previously described hygienic behaviours (e.g. licking and self-grooming), fungus-grooming and garden-removal behaviours are specific responses to the presence of fungal pathogens. In the presence of pathogens, they are the primary activities performed by workers, but they are uncommon in uninfected gardens. In fact, workers rapidly eliminate Trichoderma from their gardens by fungus grooming and weeding, suggesting that these behaviours are the primary method of garden defence against generalist pathogens. The same sanitary behaviours were performed in response to the presence of the specialist pathogen Escovopsis. However, the intensity and duration of these behaviours were much greater in this treatment. Despite the increased effort, the ants were unable to eliminate Escovopsis from their gardens, suggesting that this specialized pathogen has evolved counter-adaptations in order to overcome the sanitary defences of the ants.

  20. Allelopathy--a natural alternative for weed control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macías, Francisco A; Molinillo, José M G; Varela, Rosa M; Galindo, Juan C G

    2007-04-01

    Allelopathy studies the interactions among plants, fungi, algae and bacteria with the organisms living in a certain ecosystem, interactions that are mediated by the secondary metabolites produced and exuded into the environment. Consequently, allelopathy is a multidisciplinary science where ecologists, chemists, soil scientists, agronomists, biologists, plant physiologists and molecular biologists offer their skills to give an overall view of the complex interactions occurring in a certain ecosystem. As a result of these studies, applications in weed and pest management are expected in such different fields as development of new agrochemicals, cultural methods, developing of allelopathic crops with increased weed resistance, etc. The present paper will focus on the chemical aspects of allelopathy, pointing out the most recent advances in the chemicals disclosed, their mode of action and their fate in the ecosystem. Also, attention will be paid to achievements in genomics and proteomics, two emerging fields in allelopathy. Rather than being exhaustive, this paper is intended to reflect a critical vision of the current state of allelopathy and to point to future lines of research where in the authors' opinion the main advances and applications could and should be expected.

  1. Puncturevine (Tribulus terrestris L.: noxious weed or powerful medical herb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zvonko Pacanoski

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tribulus terrestris L., an annual dicot species of the family Zygophyllaceae, is a common herb that is often found in disturbed habitats and agricultural areas in many parts of the temperate, tropical and desert regions of the world. T. terrestris is an aggressive species that has the potential to injure livestock, reduce hay and wool values, detour recreationists and reduces plant biodivesity. The species may become troublesome because of its weedy potential. It has been declared a weed in at least 37 countries and in at least 21 crops (cotton, maize, vineyards, orchards, etc.. It is adapted to a wide range of climatic conditions and grows on a wide variety of soil types. The management of T. terrestris can be achieved by herbicide application, mechanical (hand pulling, hoeing, mulching and biological control methods. Beside its invasive potential as a noxious and troublesome weed, T. terrestris is considered highly useful herb which is used for various purposes in folk and modern medicine and sport, as well.

  2. Response of Yield and Yield Components of Tef [Eragrostis tef (Zucc.) Trotter] to Tillage, Nutrient, and Weed Management Practices in Dura Area, Northern Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesfahunegn, Gebreyesus Brhane

    2014-01-01

    The low average grain yield (0.7 ton ha(-1)) of tef in Ethiopia is mainly attributed to low soil fertility, and inappropriate tillage and weeds control practices. Despite this, limited scientific information has been documented so far on their interaction effects on tef crop productivity in northern Ethiopia. The objective of this study was to assess the separate and interaction effects of tillage, fertilizer, and weed control practices on tef yield and yield components in the conditions of northern Ethiopia. A two-year study (2008-2009) was conducted using split-split-plot design with three replications. In the main plot, three tillage treatments: conventional tillage (6 times tillage passes) (T1), four times tillage passes (T2), and reduced tillage (single tillage pass at sowing) (T3) were applied. The fertilizer treatments in the subplots were: no fertilizer (F1); 23 kg N ha(-1) (F2); 23 kg N ha(-1) and 10 kg P ha(-1) (F3); 23 kg N ha(-1) and 2.5 ton manure ha(-1) (F4); and 2.5 ton manure ha(-1) (F5). The sub-subplot weed control treatments included farmer weed control practice or hand weeding (W1); 2,4 D at 0.75 kg ha(-1) at five-leaf stage; 2,4 D at 0.75 kg ha(-1) at six-leaf stage; 2,4 D at 1.5 kg ha(-1) at five-leaf stage; and 2,4 D at 1.5 kg ha(-1) at six-leaf stage. This study showed that the separate and interaction effects of tillage, fertilizer, and weed control practices significantly affected tef crop yield and yield components in both crop seasons. T2 increased tef yield by >42% over the other tillage and F3 increased yield by >21% over the other fertilizer treatments. Grain yield increased by >23% due to W1. This study thus suggested that promising treatments such as T2, F3, and W1 should be demonstrated at on-farm fields in order to evaluate their performance at farmers' conditions.

  3. 外来杂草在我国的危害性及其管理对策%Harmfulness of exotic weeds in China and for their management

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    强胜; 曹学章

    2001-01-01

    外来杂草已对我国的农作物生产、果园、草坪、环境和生物多样性等造成了严重危害。外来杂草之所以能在传入地产生危害,与它们所具有的某些特性和当地缺乏环境阻力密切相关。对外来杂草的管理应从防止外来杂草传入和对现有的外来杂草实施防除两方面采取措施。防止传入的措施包括:(1)加强植物检疫;(2)建立外来植物引种驯化的风险性评价制度;(3)鼓励利用本土植物。对现有外来杂草的防除,则应采取综合性的防除措施:(1)防治生态破坏;(2)开展外来杂草的生物控制;(3)利用经济植物进行生境替代控制;(4)开展对外来杂草的利用。%Exotic weeds have caused serious harm to crop production, orchards, lawns, natural environment and biodiversity in China. This is closely related to certain characteristics of the exotic weeds and to lack of environmental resistance. To manage exotic weeds, measures should be taken in two aspects: one is prevention of introduction of exotic weeds, and the other is control of existing ones. In the former aspect, measures that should be taken include: 1) reinforcing plant quarantine; 2) establishing a risk assessment system for introduction of exotic plants, and 3) encouraging the utilization of native plants. In the latter aspect, the following comprehensive measures should be taken: 1) controlling ecological destruction; 2) conducting biological control of exotic weeds; 3) using economic plants as habitat displacement control agents, and 4) conducting utilization of exotic weeds.

  4. The critical period of weed control in soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) in north of Iran conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keramati, Sara; Pirdashti, Hemmatollah; Esmaili, Mohammad Ali; Abbasian, Arastoo; Habibi, Marjaneh

    2008-02-01

    A field study was conducted in 2006 at Sari Agricultural and Natural Resources University, in order to determine the best time for weed control in soybean promising line, 033. Experiment was arranged in randomized complete block design with 4 replications and two series of treatments. In the first series, weeds were kept in place until crop reached V2 (second trifoliolate), V4 (fourth trifoliolate), V6 (sixth trifoliolate), R1 (beginning bloom, first flower), R3 (beginning pod), R5 (beginning seed) and were then removed and the crop kept weed-free for the rest of the season. In the second series, crops were kept weed-free until the above growth stages after which weeds were allowed to grow in the plots for the rest of the season. Whole season weedy and weed-free plots were included in the experiment for yield comparison. The results showed that among studied traits, grain yield, pod numbers per plant and weed biomass were affected significantly by control and interference treatments. The highest number of pods per plant was obtained from plots which kept weed-free for whole season control. Results showed that weed control should be carried out between V2 (26 day after planting) to R1 (63 day after planting) stages of soybean to provide maximum grain yield. Thus, it is possible to optimize the timing of weed control, which can serve to reduce the costs and side effects of intensive chemical weed control.

  5. Weed infestation of a cereal-legume mixture depending on its concentration and position in a crop rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta K. Kostrzewska

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A field study was carried out in the period 2000-2006 at the Experimental Station in Tomaszkowo belonging to the University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn. Its aim was to compare weed infestation of a mixture of spring barley and field pea grown in a four crop rotation with different crop selection and sequence. Each year during tillering of spring barley and before the harvest of the mixture, weed species composition and density were evaluated, while additionally weed biomass was also estimated before the harvest. These results were used to determine species constancy, Simpson’s dominance index, the Shannon-Wiener diversity and evenness indices as well as the community similarity index based on floristic richness, numbers and biomass of particular weed species. The cropping frequency and the position of the mixture in the crop rotation did not differentiate the species composition and total biomass of weed communities in the cereal-legume mixture crops. The crop rotation in which the mixture constituted 50% and was grown after itself had a reducing effect on weed numbers. Growing field pea in the 4-year crop rotation promoted weed infestation of the mixture and the dominance of weed communities. Capsella bursa-pastoris, Chenopodium album, Echinochloa crus-galli, Elymus repens, Polygonum convolvulus, and Sonchus arvensis were constant components of the agrophytocenoses. The weed communities were more similar in terms of their floristic composition than in terms of weed density and air-dry weight of weeds.

  6. A Novel Approach for Weed Type Classification Based on Shape Descriptors and a Fuzzy Decision-Making Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Javier Herrera

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available An important objective in weed management is the discrimination between grasses (monocots and broad-leaved weeds (dicots, because these two weed groups can be appropriately controlled by specific herbicides. In fact, efficiency is higher if selective treatment is performed for each type of infestation instead of using a broadcast herbicide on the whole surface. This work proposes a strategy where weeds are characterised by a set of shape descriptors (the seven Hu moments and six geometric shape descriptors. Weeds appear in outdoor field images which display real situations obtained from a RGB camera. Thus, images present a mixture of both weed species under varying conditions of lighting. In the presented approach, four decision-making methods were adapted to use the best shape descriptors as attributes and a choice was taken. This proposal establishes a novel methodology with a high success rate in weed species discrimination.

  7. A novel approach for weed type classification based on shape descriptors and a fuzzy decision-making method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Pedro Javier; Dorado, José; Ribeiro, Ángela

    2014-08-19

    An important objective in weed management is the discrimination between grasses (monocots) and broad-leaved weeds (dicots), because these two weed groups can be appropriately controlled by specific herbicides. In fact, efficiency is higher if selective treatment is performed for each type of infestation instead of using a broadcast herbicide on the whole surface. This work proposes a strategy where weeds are characterised by a set of shape descriptors (the seven Hu moments and six geometric shape descriptors). Weeds appear in outdoor field images which display real situations obtained from a RGB camera. Thus, images present a mixture of both weed species under varying conditions of lighting. In the presented approach, four decision-making methods were adapted to use the best shape descriptors as attributes and a choice was taken. This proposal establishes a novel methodology with a high success rate in weed species discrimination.

  8. The competitive ability of pea–barley intercrops against weeds and the interactions with crop productivity and soil N availability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corre-Hellou, G.; Dibet, A.; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik;

    2011-01-01

    Grain legumes, such as peas (Pisum sativum L.), are known to be weak competitors against weeds when grown as the sole crop. In this study, the weed-suppression effect of pea–barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) intercropping compared to the respective sole crops was examined in organic field experiments...... (2003–2005). The weed biomass was three times higher under the pea sole crops than under both the intercrops and barley sole crops at maturity. The inclusion of joint experiments in several countries and various growing conditions showed that intercrops maintain a highly asymmetric competition over...... weeds, regardless of the particular weed infestation (species and productivity), the crop biomass or the soil nitrogen availability. The intercropping weed suppression was highly resilient, whereas the weed suppression in pea sole crops was lower and more variable. The pea–barley intercrops exhibited...

  9. Influence of tillage system on the weed infestation in a long-term field trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarz, Jürgen

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In Germany reduced tillage (without ploughing increased to nearly 40% of arable land. Without using a plough weed infestation generally rises. Simultaneously the use of herbicides increases. In a long-term field trial in Dahnsdorf (federal state of Brandenburg, Germany the impact of reduced tillage on weed occurrence and herbicide use is investigated. The use of glyphosate for seedbed preparation is not always necessary, e.g. in the crop year 2010 glyphosate was not used. The use depends on the rate of weed emergence and the precedent crop. For canola the situation is different, volunteer cereal plants had to be controlled by a graminicide in 6 out of 7 years. In the first years weed emergence is determined by the former crop rotation (cash cropping with 67% cereals vs. forage cropping with 50% cereals and the herbicide strategy. Round about after four years the influence of the reduced tillage appears in case of the dicotyledonous weeds. Emergence of these weeds is promoted by the reduced tillage especially in combination with slightly reduced herbicide amounts (strategy IPS. The species of the dicotyledonous weeds are mainly (about 70% Viola arvensis, Veronica spp., Stellaria media, Matricaria spp. and Centaurea cyanus. For Apera spica-venti the emergence is mainly based on the weather conditions and the germinative terms in autumn.

  10. Weed communities of rain-fed lowland rice vary with infestation by Rhamphicarpa fistulosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houngbédji, Tossimidé; Dessaint, Fabrice; Nicolardot, Bernard; Shykoff, Jacqui A.; Gibot-Leclerc, Stéphanie

    2016-11-01

    The facultative hemiparasitic plant Rhamphicarpa fistulosa (Orobanchaceae) thrives in seasonally wet soils in sub-Saharan Africa, mainly in marginal lowland rice growing environments where weeds are already a major constraint for rice production. Because lowland rice production is increasing in tropical Africa, it is important to ascertain the influence of R. fistulosa on weed plant communities in these rice-growing habitats. We investigated weed plant community richness and composition at four different levels of R. fistulosa infestation across two years of surveys from lowland rice fields in northern Togo (West Africa). Despite a lack of significant differences in community richness among sites with different R. fistulosa infestation levels, there were significant differences in community composition, both when estimated from presence-absence data and from relative abundance data, after controlling statistically for geographic proximity among sites. Rhamphicarpa fistulosa infestation, therefore, may influence the competitive balance between rice and its weeds and shape weed community structure. However, experimental studies are required to elucidate the weed host range of R. fistulosa and the direct and indirect effects of this hemiparasite in rice fields in order to predict its net impact on rice and its weed species.

  11. Effect of Death Mulching Methods to Weed Coverage in Mandarin Orchard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Kolören

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The possible use of three different thickness black geotextile materials (GEO-50, GEO-100 and GEO-150 , the new control methods for our country, compared with weedy check among of the rows and using herbicide (Glyphosate, mowing, black polyethylene with weedy check on the rows have been investigated for controlling of weeds which is a considerable problem of tangerine orchard. Experimental randomly plots were arranged by considering complete block design with five replications on the rows treatment. Mulch materials were applied apart for width of 160 cm on the rows. When weed coverage (% reached 10-15%, herbicide (Glyphosate was applied with 600 cc/da. Mowing was applied when weed lenght and coverage (% reached 10-15 cm and 10-15, respectively. Weed coverage (% and numbers were counted in 15 days intervals at the quadrats for all plots. The results of the studies for tangerine orange 4 years old showed that mulching with black geotextile and polyethylene were more supressed than the other control methods on the row. Average weed coverage (% was found 56.09% in control (weedy, 24.66% in mowing, 11.05% in herbicide, 3.09% in black polyethylene, 2.78% in GEO-50, 0.87% GEO-100 and 0.76% JEO-150, respectively. As observed weed coverage (%, the similar result was found for weed number in black geotextile treatments.

  12. The Arable Weeds of Plešivica Hills (NW Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubravka Dujmović Purgar

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The arable weeds (segetal flora were explored on Plešivica hills (NW Croatia during vegetational seasons 2002 and 2003 at 10 locations. The common methods of plant recording, collecting and identification were applied in the research of the arable weeds. Th e nomenclature of plants was according to Tutin et al. (1964-1980, 1993. The total of 107 taxa of arable weeds that classified to 32 families was noted. The most represented families were Poaceae, Asteraceae and Fabaceae. Therophytes were dominant in the fields that were the subject of this research. Most of the species were the cosmopolites and the Euroasian origin. 78 weed species were noted in dense crop fi elds (wheat, barley. Some of them (Chamomilla recutita (L. Rausch., Cirsium arvense (L.Scop., Galium aparine L., Papaver rhoeas L., Stellaria media(L.Vill. and Veronica persica Poir. are the most harmful weeds of dense crops. 62 weeds were noted in maize fields. Some of them were typically row crop weeds, as for instance: Amaranthus retrofl exus L., Chenopodium album L., Ch. polyspermum L., Cirsium arvense, Convolvulus arvensis L., Digitaria sanguinalis (L. Scop., Echinochloa crus-galli (L. PB., Polygonum lapathifolium L. and Sorghum halepense (L. Pers. Very invasive species Abutilon theophrasti Med. was found on the row crop fields. Very dangerous aeroallergenic species Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. was dispersed in many of the researched fields.

  13. Climate effects and feedback structure determining weed population dynamics in a long-term experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Mauricio; Navarrete, Luis; González-Andujar, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    Pest control is one of the areas in which population dynamic theory has been successfully applied to solve practical problems. However, the links between population dynamic theory and model construction have been less emphasized in the management and control of weed populations. Most management models of weed population dynamics have emphasized the role of the endogenous process, but the role of exogenous variables such as climate have been ignored in the study of weed populations and their management. Here, we use long-term data (22 years) on two annual weed species from a locality in Central Spain to determine the importance of endogenous and exogenous processes (local and large-scale climate factors). Our modeling study determined two different feedback structures and climate effects in the two weed species analyzed. While Descurainia sophia exhibited a second-order feedback and low climate influence, Veronica hederifolia was characterized by a first-order feedback structure and important effects from temperature and rainfall. Our results strongly suggest the importance of theoretical population dynamics in understanding plant population systems. Moreover, the use of this approach, discerning between the effect of exogenous and endogenous factors, can be fundamental to applying weed management practices in agricultural systems and to controlling invasive weedy species. This is a radical change from most approaches currently used to guide weed and invasive weedy species managements.

  14. Investigation of Types and Hazard of Weeds in Coffea arabica Orchads in Nujiang River Basin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] Through the investigation of weeds in Coffea arabica orchads in NuJiang River basin, this study aimed to provide scientific guidance for the weed control and improving the ecological and economic benefits of the plantation of Cof- fea arabica. [Method] The types of weeds and the characteristics of weed occur- rence in Coffea arabica orchads in Nujiang River basin were investigated from July to August in 2012. [Result] The results showed that there were 69 types of weeds belonging to 21 families in Coffea arabica orchads. The predominant harmful types were shown as follows: Commelina nudiflora L. + Leptochloa chinensis, Cyperus ro- tundus L. + Bidens pilosa L. + Eleusine indica, Imperata cylindrical + Ageratum conyzoides L. + Eupatorium odoratum L., Ageratum conyzoides L. + Digitaria san- guinalis (L.) Scop. The preponderant weeds consisted mainly of 10 species, namely, Cyperus rotundus L., Commelina nudiflora L., Leptochloa chinensis, Digitaria san- guinalis (L.) Scop, Imperata cylindrical, Bidens pilosa L., Ageratum conyzoides L, E- upatorium odoratum L., Eleusine indica and Chenopodium serotinum L. [Conclusion] The result from this study is of great significance for the plantation of Coffea arabica in Nujiang River basin, as well as the control of weeds.

  15. The red queen in the corn: agricultural weeds as models of rapid adaptive evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigueira, C C; Olsen, K M; Caicedo, A L

    2013-04-01

    Weeds are among the greatest pests of agriculture, causing billions of dollars in crop losses each year. As crop field management practices have changed over the past 12 000 years, weeds have adapted in turn to evade human removal. This evolutionary change can be startlingly rapid, making weeds an appealing system to study evolutionary processes that occur over short periods of time. An understanding of how weeds originate and adapt is needed for successful management; however, relatively little emphasis has been placed on genetically characterizing these systems. Here, we review the current literature on agricultural weed origins and their mechanisms of adaptation. Where possible, we have included examples that have been genetically well characterized. Evidence for three possible, non-mutually exclusive weed origins (from wild species, crop-wild hybrids or directly from crops) is discussed with respect to what is known about the microevolutionary signatures that result from these processes. We also discuss what is known about the genetic basis of adaptive traits in weeds and the range of genetic mechanisms that are responsible. With a better understanding of genetic mechanisms underlying adaptation in weedy species, we can address the more general process of adaptive evolution and what can be expected as we continue to apply selective pressures in agroecosystems around the world.

  16. Community assembly and biomass production in regularly and never weeded experimental grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscher, Christiane; Temperton, Vicky M.; Buchmann, Nina; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef

    2009-03-01

    We studied the natural colonisation of new species in experimental grasslands varying in plant species richness (from 1 to 60) and plant functional group richness (from 1 to 4) in either regularly or never weeded subplots during the first 3 years after establishment. Sown species established successfully, with no differences in species richness or their relative abundances between the regularly and never weeded subplots during the study period. Aboveground biomass of sown species increased with increasing sown species richness in both treatments. While a positive relationship between sown species richness and total aboveground biomass (including colonising species) existed in the 2nd year after sowing in the regularly and never weeded subplots, this positive relationship decayed in the 3rd year in the never weeded subplots because of a higher biomass of colonising species in species-poor mixtures. Total aboveground biomass varied independently of total species richness 3 years after sowing in both treatments. Jaccard similarity of coloniser species composition between regularly and never weeded subplots decreased from the 2nd to the 3rd year, indicating a divergence in coloniser species composition. Coloniser immigration and turnover rates were higher in regularly weeded subplots, confirming that weeding counteracts species saturation and increases the chance that new colonisers would establish. Although our study shows that low diversity plant communities are unstable and converge to higher levels of biodiversity, the effects of initially sown species on community composition persisted 3 years after sowing even when allowing for succession, suggesting that colonising species mainly filled empty niche space.

  17. Weed management practices affect the diversity and relative abundance of physic nut mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, Althiéris de Sousa; Sarmento, Renato A; Erasmo, Eduardo A L; Pedro-Neto, Marçal; de Souza, Danival José; Teodoro, Adenir V; Silva, Daniella G

    2015-03-01

    Crop management practices determine weed community, which in turn may influence patterns of diversity and abundance of associated arthropods. This study aimed to evaluate whether local weed management practices influence the diversity and relative abundance of phytophagous and predatory mites, as well as mites with undefined feeding habits--of the families Oribatidae and Acaridae--in a physic nut (Jatropha curcas L.) plantation subjected to (1) within-row herbicide spraying and between-row mowing; (2) within-row herbicide spraying and no between-row mowing; (3) within-row weeding and between-row mowing; (4) within-row weeding and no between-row mowing; and (5) unmanaged (control). The herbicide used was glyphosate. Herbicide treatments resulted in higher diversity and relative abundance of predatory mites and mites with undefined feeding habit on physic nut shrubs. This was probably due to the toxic effects of the herbicide on mites or to removal of weeds. Within-row herbicide spraying combined with between-row mowing was the treatment that most contributed to this effect. Our results show that within-row weeds harbor important species of predatory mites and mites with undefined feeding habit. However, the dynamics of such mites in the system can be changed according to the weed management practice applied. Among the predatory mites of the family Phytoseiidae Amblydromalus sp. was the most abundant, whereas Brevipalpus phoenicis was the most frequent phytophagous mite and an unidentified oribatid species was the most frequent mite with undefined feeding habit.

  18. Breeding cereal crops for enhanced weed suppression: optimizing allelopathy and competitive ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Margaret; Reberg-Horton, Chris

    2013-02-01

    Interest in breeding grain crops with improved weed suppressive ability is growing in response to the evolution and rapid expansion of herbicide resistant populations in major weeds of economic importance, environmental concerns, and the unmet needs of organic producers and smallholder farmers without access to herbicides. This review is focused on plant breeding for weed suppression; specifically, field and laboratory screening protocols, genetic studies, and breeding efforts that have been undertaken to improve allelopathy and competition in rice, wheat, and barley. The combined effects of allelopathy and competition determine the weed suppressive potential of a given cultivar, and research groups worldwide have been working to improve both traits simultaneously to achieve maximum gains in weed suppression. Both allelopathy and competitive ability are complex, quantitatively inherited traits that are heavily influenced by environmental factors. Thus, good experimental design and sound breeding procedures are essential to achieve genetic gains. Weed suppressive rice cultivars are now commercially available in the U.S. and China that have resulted from three decades of research. Furthermore, a strong foundation has been laid during the past 10 years for the breeding of weed suppressive wheat and barley cultivars.

  19. Winter Annual Weed Response to Nitrogen Sources and Application Timings prior to a Burndown Corn Herbicide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly A. Nelson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autumn and early preplant N applications, sources, and placement may affect winter annual weed growth. Field research evaluated (1 the effect of different nitrogen sources in autumn and early preplant on total winter annual weed growth (2006–2010, and (2 strip-till and broadcast no-till N applied in autumn and early preplant on henbit (Lamium amplexicaule L. growth (2008–2010 prior to a burndown herbicide application. Total winter annual weed biomass was greater than the nontreated control when applying certain N sources in autumn or early preplant for no-till corn. Anhydrous ammonia had the lowest average weed density (95 weeds m−2, though results were inconsistent over the years. Winter annual weed biomass was lowest (43 g m−2 when applying 32% urea ammonium nitrate in autumn and was similar to applying anhydrous ammonia in autumn or early preplant and the nontreated control. Henbit biomass was 28% greater when applying N in the autumn compared to an early preplant application timing. Nitrogen placement along with associated tillage with strip-till placement was important in reducing henbit biomass. Nitrogen source selection, application timing, and placement affected the impact of N on winter annual weed growth and should be considered when recommending a burndown herbicide application timing.

  20. Weed seed bank response to 12 years of different fertilization systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cauwer, B; Van den Berge, K; Cougnon, M; Bulcke, R; Reheul, D

    2010-01-01

    Fertilizer amendments can impact weed populations in a variety of ways. This study evaluated the effects of 12 year-long applications of different fertilization systems on size and composition of the weed seed bank in a conventionally managed maize monoculture field. Fertilization systems included all factorial combinations of two dairy cattle slurry rates, three vegetable, fruit and garden waste (VFG) compost rates, and three synthetic N fertilizer rates. Soil samples were taken in each subplot in May 2008 after sowing and prior to herbicide application. Residues recovered from soil samples were tested for weed seedling emergence to characterize soil seed banks. Total weed seed bank density was affected by mineral N fertilization but not by compost or animal slurry application. Weed seed bank composition was related to compost amendment and mineral N fertilization. Annual compost amendments reduced seed bank density of some persistent species (e.g., Chenopodium album and Solanum nigrum) irrespective of mineral N fertilization. Compost is a promising tool for incorporation into integrated weed control strategies aimed at reducing weed seed bank persistence.