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Sample records for assessing meiofaunal variation

  1. Assessing meiofaunal variation among individuals utilising morphological and molecular approaches: an example using the Tardigrada

    OpenAIRE

    Linse Katrin; Convey Peter; Sands Chester J; McInnes Sandra J

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Meiofauna – multicellular animals captured between sieve size 45 μm and 1000 μm – are a fundamental component of terrestrial, and marine benthic ecosystems, forming an integral element of food webs, and playing a critical roll in nutrient recycling. Most phyla have meiofaunal representatives and studies of these taxa impact on a wide variety of sub-disciplines as well as having social and economic implications. However, studies of variation in meiofauna are presented with ...

  2. Assessing meiofaunal variation among individuals utilising morphological and molecular approaches: an example using the Tardigrada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Chester J; Convey, Peter; Linse, Katrin; McInnes, Sandra J

    2008-04-30

    Meiofauna - multicellular animals captured between sieve size 45 mum and 1000 mum - are a fundamental component of terrestrial, and marine benthic ecosystems, forming an integral element of food webs, and playing a critical roll in nutrient recycling. Most phyla have meiofaunal representatives and studies of these taxa impact on a wide variety of sub-disciplines as well as having social and economic implications. However, studies of variation in meiofauna are presented with several important challenges. Isolating individuals from a sample substrate is a time consuming process, and identification requires increasingly scarce taxonomic expertise. Finding suitable morphological characters in many of these organisms is often difficult even for experts. Molecular markers are extremely useful for identifying variation in morphologically conserved organisms. However, for many species markers need to be developed de novo, while DNA can often only be extracted from pooled samples in order to obtain sufficient quantity and quality. Importantly, multiple independent markers are required to reconcile gene evolution with species evolution. In this primarily methodological paper we provide a proof of principle of a novel and effective protocol for the isolation of meiofauna from an environmental sample. We also go on to illustrate examples of the implications arising from subsequent screening for genetic variation at the level of the individual using ribosomal, mitochondrial and single copy nuclear markers. To isolate individual tardigrades from their habitat substrate we used a non-toxic density gradient media that did not interfere with downstream biochemical processes. Using a simple DNA release technique and nested polymerase chain reaction with universal primers we were able amplify multi-copy and, to some extent, single copy genes from individual tardigrades. Maximum likelihood trees from ribosomal 18S, mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit 1, and the single copy

  3. Assessing meiofaunal variation among individuals utilising morphological and molecular approaches: an example using the Tardigrada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linse Katrin

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Meiofauna – multicellular animals captured between sieve size 45 μm and 1000 μm – are a fundamental component of terrestrial, and marine benthic ecosystems, forming an integral element of food webs, and playing a critical roll in nutrient recycling. Most phyla have meiofaunal representatives and studies of these taxa impact on a wide variety of sub-disciplines as well as having social and economic implications. However, studies of variation in meiofauna are presented with several important challenges. Isolating individuals from a sample substrate is a time consuming process, and identification requires increasingly scarce taxonomic expertise. Finding suitable morphological characters in many of these organisms is often difficult even for experts. Molecular markers are extremely useful for identifying variation in morphologically conserved organisms. However, for many species markers need to be developed de novo, while DNA can often only be extracted from pooled samples in order to obtain sufficient quantity and quality. Importantly, multiple independent markers are required to reconcile gene evolution with species evolution. In this primarily methodological paper we provide a proof of principle of a novel and effective protocol for the isolation of meiofauna from an environmental sample. We also go on to illustrate examples of the implications arising from subsequent screening for genetic variation at the level of the individual using ribosomal, mitochondrial and single copy nuclear markers. Results To isolate individual tardigrades from their habitat substrate we used a non-toxic density gradient media that did not interfere with downstream biochemical processes. Using a simple DNA release technique and nested polymerase chain reaction with universal primers we were able amplify multi-copy and, to some extent, single copy genes from individual tardigrades. Maximum likelihood trees from ribosomal 18S, mitochondrial

  4. Spatial and temporal variations of meiofaunal communities from the western sector of the Gulf of Batabanó, Cuba: II. Seagrass systems

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    Maickel Armenteros

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The meiofauna from seagrass meadows in the western sector of the Gulf of Batabanó, Cuba were studied to describe the spatial and temporal variations in community structure. Replicated cores were taken in three locations (arranged in m- and km-scales and in two seasons (dry and wet. The meiofauna (metazoans between 500 and 45 µm were identified to major taxa. Temporal changes in the meiofaunal communities could not be detected and they are not linked to the subtle seasonal changes in the water column. A larger variation in community structure was observed in the spatial m-scale (among cores in a station probably accredited to heterogeneity of microenvironment and biological processes. A second source of variation in the km-scale (among locations was identified relating to physical processes affecting seagrass meadows: marine currents and anthropogenic disturbances. Distribution patterns of meiofauna across locations coincide with one study from 20 years ago in seagrass beds (i.e. higher densities in area closer to break-shelf and diminution of fauna at southern of Pinar del Río; however, cumulative anthropogenic disturbances on seagrass meadows would most likely explain the depletion of communities observed in our survey in comparison with decades ago. Estimates of meiofaunal density and richness of major taxa from our study (and other areas from the Cuban shelf are consistently lower than other temperate and tropical sites; possibly caused by low primary productivity due to narrow tidal amplitude and oligotrophic waters. Rev. Biol. Trop. 56 (1: 55-63. Epub 2008 March 31.La meiofauna asociada a pastos marinos en el sector occidental del Golfo de Batabanó, Cuba se estudió para describir las variaciones espaciales y temporales en la estructura de la comunidad. Se tomaron muestras repetidas, a escala de m- y km, en tres localidades y en dos estaciones (seca y lluvia. La meiofauna (metazoos entre 500 y 45 µm fue identificada hasta grupos taxon

  5. Spatial and temporal variations of meiofaunal communities from the western sector of the Gulf of Batabanó, Cuba: III. Vertical distribution

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    M Armenteros

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The vertical distribution of meiofauna within subtidal sediments was studied in four stations pertaining to mangrove or muddy flats habitats. In 2003, replicated samples were taken in dry (February and wet (July seasons at the Bacunagua Inlet, southwestern coast of Cuba. The abundance and number of meiofaunal taxa exhibited a vertical gradient possibly due to changes in the concentrations of oxygen and hydrogen sulphide, rather than food availability along this gradient. Nematodes are capable of distributing themselves throughout the whole sediment column due to their ability to tolerate reducing conditions; however depletion of communities along depth was evident. Their presence in deeper sediments (6 - 10 cm suggests that certain species are adequately adapted to spend their entire life cycle in these harsh environments (where soluble tannins and decomposing organic matter predominate. Copepods showed a strong limitation to vertical distribution (concentrating in the top 2 cm, possibly in response to a sharp vertical decline in oxygenation within these organically enriched sediments. Rev. Biol. Trop. 56 (3: 1127-1134. Epub 2008 September 30.Se estudió la distribución vertical de la meiofauna dentro de los sedimentos en cuatro estaciones ubicadas en manglares y planos fangosos. En el año 2003, tomamos muestras (con repetición en época de seca (febrero y de lluvia (julio en la ensenada de Bacunagua, costa suroccidental de Cuba. La abundancia y el número de táxones de la meiofauna mostraron un gradiente vertical debido posiblemente a cambios en las concentraciones de oxígeno y sulfuro de hidrógeno, más que a la disponibilidad de alimento a lo largo del gradiente. Los nemátodos son capaces de distribuirse a través de la columna de sedimento debido a su habilidad para tolerar condiciones reducidas; sin embargo, fue evidente la reducción de las comunidades con la profundidad. Su presencia en los sedimentos profundos (6-10 cm sugiere que

  6. Structure of mangrove meiofaunal assemblages associated with local sediment conditions in subtropical eastern australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Maizah M.; Lee, S. Y.

    2017-11-01

    Meiofauna are ubiquitous but poorly-studied components of soft-bottom marine habitats around the world, including mangroves. The dynamic environmental conditions and heterogeneous sediments of mangroves present challenges to understanding the structure of mangrove meiofaunal assemblages at various spatial and temporal scales. In this study, we investigated the meiofaunal assemblage structure of sediments colonised by three mangrove species, namely, Avicennia marina, Rhizophora stylosa and Aegiceras corniculatum, at three locations in subtropical eastern Australia. Spatial and temporal variations were tested by sampling at the three mangrove locations (i.e. Tallebudgera, Currumbin and Terranora) in autumn, with samplings repeated at Tallebudgera at two other times broadly representing during dry/cool winter and wet/hot summer seasons. We examined the variability of the sediment environments within each of the different mangrove species, and investigated how meiofaunal assemblages would respond to the particular changes in their habitats to result in differences in assemblage structure between and within sites. Total meiofaunal density was highest in Tallebudgera and Currumbin and lowest in Terranora (mean density of 424, 393 and 239 ind.10 cm-2, respectively). In Tallebudgera, the density was higher in winter and summer (mean density of 546 and 530 ind.10 cm-2, respectively). The meiofaunal assemblage in this study shows a trend and association with the environmental variables. High availability of food proxies such phaeopigments, Chl a or TOC, with moderate tannin content and appropriate habitat structure (sediment particle size, belowground root biomass and/or moisture content provide the best condition for the meiofauna to achieve the highest density. However, given the complex dynamic habitats and the spatial heterogeneity of the mangrove environments across different locations and seasons, no clear generalization could be made regarding the key environmental

  7. Relationships between meiofaunal biodiversity and prokaryotic heterotrophic production in different tropical habitats and oceanic regions.

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    Antonio Pusceddu

    Full Text Available Tropical marine ecosystems are among the most diverse of the world oceans, so that assessing the linkages between biodiversity and ecosystem functions (BEF is a crucial step to predict consequences of biodiversity loss. Most BEF studies in marine ecosystems have been carried out on macrobenthic diversity, whereas the influence of the meiofauna on ecosystem functioning has received much less attention. We compared meiofaunal and nematode biodiversity and prokaryotic heterotrophic production across seagrass, mangrove and reef sediments in the Caribbean, Celebes and Red Seas. For all variables we report the presence of differences among habitats within the same region, and among regions within the same habitat. In all regions, the richness of meiofaunal taxa in reef and seagrass sediments is higher than in mangrove sediments. The sediments of the Celebes Sea show the highest meiofaunal biodiversity. The composition of meiofaunal assemblages varies significantly among habitats in the same region. The nematode beta diversity among habitats within the same region is higher than the beta diversity among regions. Although one site per habitat was considered in each region, these results suggest that the composition of meiofaunal assemblages varies primarily among biogeographic regions, whereas the composition of nematode assemblages varies more considerably among habitats. Meiofauna and nematode biodiversity and prokaryotic heterotrophic production, even after the removal of covariate effects linked with longitude and the quantity and nutritional quality of organic matter, are positively and linearly linked both across regions and within each habitat type. Our results confirm that meiofauna and nematode biodiversity may influence benthic prokaryotic activity, which, in turn, implies that diversity loss could have negative impacts on ecosystem functioning in these systems.

  8. Meiofaunal Life of Man-Made Wastewater Ponds in Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Elhag, E.A. [الحاج ابو جبر الحاج; Kardousha, M.M.; Al-Thani, R.F.; Abdulfatih, H.A.; Al-Naimi, I.S.; Sweileh, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    The meiofaunal life of two wastewater ponds around Doha City was studied for the period October 2000-October 2001. The substrate nature of the two ponds was found to be similar in mean particle sizes but the densities of occurrence of the different species were variable. Six phyla were encountered. Namely Platyhelminthes, Nematoda, gastrotricha, Rotifera, Annelida and Crustacea ofArthropoda. Generally, the meiofaunal life was richer in Abu-NakhIa pond (treated wastewater) than in Abu-Hamour p...

  9. Patterns of Meiofaunal Colonisation as an Indicator of Reforested ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in litter assemblages as the fallen leaves decay. Meiofaunal particulate food on leaf litter includes the surface biofilm, which comprises bacteria, microalgae, protozoa and fungi. (Skilletter & Warren, 2000; Netto & Galluci,. 2003). Gee and Sommerfield (1997) showed that the climax meiofauna on mangrove leaf litter were not ...

  10. Meiofaunal response to different food type additions to azoic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to identify the sources of organic matter which drive meiofaunal recolonisation of reforested Rhizophora mucronata mangroves in Gazi Bay, replicate azoic and organic free sediments from a natural R. mucronata mangrove were enriched with mangrove and sea grass leaf litter additions in similar amounts as the ...

  11. Barcoding against a paradox? Combined molecular species delineations reveal multiple cryptic lineages in elusive meiofaunal sea slugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Many marine meiofaunal species are reported to have wide distributions, which creates a paradox considering their hypothesized low dispersal abilities. Correlated with this paradox is an especially high taxonomic deficit for meiofauna, partly related to a lower taxonomic effort and partly to a high number of putative cryptic species. Molecular-based species delineation and barcoding approaches have been advocated for meiofaunal biodiversity assessments to speed up description processes and uncover cryptic lineages. However, these approaches show sensitivity to sampling coverage (taxonomic and geographic) and the success rate has never been explored on mesopsammic Mollusca. Results We collected the meiofaunal sea-slug Pontohedyle (Acochlidia, Heterobranchia) from 28 localities worldwide. With a traditional morphological approach, all specimens fall into two morphospecies. However, with a multi-marker genetic approach, we reveal multiple lineages that are reciprocally monophyletic on single and concatenated gene trees in phylogenetic analyses. These lineages are largely concordant with geographical and oceanographic parameters, leading to our primary species hypothesis (PSH). In parallel, we apply four independent methods of molecular based species delineation: General Mixed Yule Coalescent model (GMYC), statistical parsimony, Bayesian Species Delineation (BPP) and Automatic Barcode Gap Discovery (ABGD). The secondary species hypothesis (SSH) is gained by relying only on uncontradicted results of the different approaches (‘minimum consensus approach’), resulting in the discovery of a radiation of (at least) 12 mainly cryptic species, 9 of them new to science, some sympatric and some allopatric with respect to ocean boundaries. However, the meiofaunal paradox still persists in some Pontohedyle species identified here with wide coastal and trans-archipelago distributions. Conclusions Our study confirms extensive, morphologically cryptic diversity among

  12. Meiofaunal Responses to Leaf Litter Added to Azoic Sediments in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Meiofaunal Responses to Leaf Litter Added to Azoic. Sediments in a Kenyan Mangrove Forest. A.K. Mutua1, A. Muthumbi2, M.J. Ntiba2, M. Thoonen3 and A. Vanreusel3. 1School of Water Resources Science and Technology, Department of Fisheries Management and Aquaculture Technology, South Eastern Kenya ...

  13. Effect of the brown shrimp Crangon crangon L. on endobenthic macrofauna, meiofauna and meiofaunal grazing rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Per; Sundbäck, Kristina; Jönsson, Benno

    The effect of natural densities (50 and 100 ind·m -2) of juvenile (Crangon crangon on abundance of endobenthic macrofauna and meiofauna and on meiofaunal grazing rates was investigated in two experiments using an outdoor flow-through system with sandy sediment. The experiments differed in duration (3 wk and 7.5 wk), and in time of the year (August - September and July - August). Macrofaunal biomass differed by a factor of 10 between the experiments, and was depressed by shrimp in both experiments. Neither total meiofaunal biomass, nor the biomass of the dominant taxon (nematodes), was significantly affected by the presence of Crangon in the shorter experiment. However, harpacticoid copepods and other meiofauna taxa (mainly ostracods, foraminiferans and juvenile bivalves) decreased in the presence of Crangon. In the longer experiment, no significant effect of Crangon on meiofauna was seen, and the biomass of most meiofaunal groups increased in all treatments. Meiofaunal grazing rates in microalgae and bacteria, measured with a dual-labelling method, using 14C-bicarbonate and [methyl- 3

  14. Metagenetic tools for the census of marine meiofaunal biodiversity: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carugati, Laura; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Dell'Anno, Antonio; Danovaro, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    Marine organisms belonging to meiofauna (size range: 20-500 μm) are amongst the most abundant and highly diversified metazoans on Earth including 22 over 35 known animal Phyla and accounting for more than 2/3 of the abundance of metazoan organisms. In any marine system, meiofauna play a key role in the functioning of the food webs and sustain important ecological processes. Estimates of meiofaunal biodiversity have been so far almost exclusively based on morphological analyses, but the very small size of these organisms and, in some cases, the insufficient morphological distinctive features limit considerably the census of the biodiversity of this component. Molecular approaches recently applied also to small invertebrates (including meiofauna) can offer a new momentum for the census of meiofaunal biodiversity. Here, we provide an overview on the application of metagenetic approaches based on the use of next generation sequencing platforms to study meiofaunal biodiversity, with a special focus on marine nematodes. Our overview shows that, although such approaches can represent a useful tool for the census of meiofaunal biodiversity, there are still different shortcomings and pitfalls that prevent their extensive use without the support of the classical taxonomic identification. Future investigations are needed to address these problems and to provide a good match between the contrasting findings emerging from classical taxonomic and molecular/bioinformatic tools. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Synoptic patterns of meiofaunal and macrofaunal abundances and specific composition in littoral sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armonies, Werner; Hellwig-Armonies, Monika

    1987-03-01

    During recent years, many investigations on small zoobenthos have been performed at the island of Sylt. As these studies were carried out sporadically over many years and as different extraction methods were used, comparisons of the results have been hampered. Therefore, in August/September 1986, 24 sites were sampled and evaluated using one quantitative method throughout. Sites range from mud to exposed sand and from the sublittoral to the supralittoral. Macrofauna and the taxa Plathelminthes, Polychaeta, and Oligochaeta are determined to species level. Macrofaunal (>0.5 mm) abundance is highest in mud and continuously decreases with increasing exposure to wave action. Meiofaunal (taxa only intermittently. Related to surface area, no correlation between macro-and meiofaunal abundance is apparent. Plathelminthes and Copepoda reach highest abundance per surface area in sand but their per volume density is higher in mud and muddy sand. Related to sediment volume instead of surface area, the meiofaunal abundance pattern is very similar to the macrofaunal pattern. The faunal composition changes gradually along the tidal gradient without general faunal boundaries. On an averange, the faunal similarity of neighbouring sites is highest in Oligochaeta and lowest in Plathelminthes. Presumably, Oligochaeta tolerate wider ranges of environmental factors. This may explain the low number of oligochaete species. On the other hand, Plathelminthes seem to adapt to relatively narrow ranges of factors and their species richness is highest. Because of macrofaunameiofauna interaction it is suggested that the meiofaunal assemblage will be least stable in mud and muddy sand, and most stable in exposed sand.

  16. Orthopedic assessment of young children: developmental variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killam, P E

    1989-07-01

    Parents often seek orthopedic evaluation of their young children because of apparent abnormalities. However, many of these are simply developmental variations that are part of normal growth and development. Pes planus, or flat foot, is one of the earliest and most common concerns. Torsional variations are also often seen; the presenting complaint may be intoeing (metatarsus adductus, tibial torsion and increased femoral anteversion) or out-toeing (pes calcaneovalgus and external rotation contractures of the hips). Angular variations (genu varum and genu valgum) are also seen frequently in young children. In assessing each finding, consideration must be given to the age at which the finding may be considered within normal limits, methods of examination and documentation, the expected course, findings that may signify abnormality, and appropriate follow-up and referral. An understanding of these common developmental variations in the orthopedic assessment of young children will enable the health care provider to respond to parents' concerns with accurate information and counseling.

  17. The combined effects of ocean warming and acidification on shallow-water meiofaunal assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Matthew R; Torres, Rodrigo; Manríquez, Patricio H

    2017-10-01

    Climate change due to increased anthropogenic CO 2 in the atmosphere is causing an increase in seawater temperatures referred to as ocean warming and a decrease in seawater pH, referred to as ocean acidification. The meiofauna play an important role in the ecology of marine ecosystems and the functions they provide. Using microcosms, meiofaunal assemblages were exposed to two temperatures (15 and 19 °C) and two pHs (pCO 2 of 400 and 1000 ppm), both individually and in combination, for a period of 90 days. The hypothesis that increased temperature will increase meiofaunal abundance was not supported. The hypothesis that a reduced pH will reduce meiofaunal abundance and species richness was supported. The combination of future conditions of temperature and pH (19 °C and pCO 2 of 1000 ppm) did not affect overall abundance but the structure of the nematode assemblage changed becoming dominated by a few opportunistic species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Oculomotor Assessment of Diurnal Arousal Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Jeffrey B.; Diaz-Piedra, Carolina; Di Stasi, Leandro L.

    2017-01-01

    Saccadic and pupillary responses are reliable indices of arousal decrement (e.g. fatigue), that might be exploited to improve work schedule guidelines. In this study, we tested the sensitivity of a short 30-s oculomotor test to detect diurnal arousal variations. Twelve participants (5 females, 7 males, 37.7+-11.9 years) volunteered to be assessed every hour (66+-20 min) for three consecutive working days, during their regular office-hours. We used a fully automated testing system, the FIT 2000 Fitness Impairment Tester (Pulse Medical Instruments Inc., Rockville, MD, USA), to measure and record saccadic peak velocity, pupil diameter, and latency and amplitude of the pupillary light reflex. In addition, we collected subjective levels of arousal using the Stanford Sleepiness Scale, and body core temperature. We analyzed the data using a linear mixed model approach for longitudinal data. Both saccadic velocity and subjective alertness decreased over the course of a day, while body core temperature increased (all p-values.05). The data also weakly suggested an increase of the pupil diameter (p 07). The findings support the use of oculomotor indices in the assessment of arousal and fatigue in applied settings.

  19. Large observer variation of clinical assessment of dyspnoeic wheezing children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekhof, Jolita; Reimink, Roelien; Bartels, Ine-Marije; Eggink, Hendriekje; Brand, Paul L. P.

    Background In children with acute dyspnoea, the assessment of severity of dyspnoea and response to treatment is often performed by different professionals, implying that knowledge of the interobserver variation of this clinical assessment is important. Objective To determine intraobserver and

  20. Spatial variation in meiofaunal abundance of some coralline beaches of Mauritius

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ingole, B.S.; Ansari, Z.A.; Parulekar, A.H.

    of meiofauna (in the top 5 cm sediment) ranged from 133 to 1187 individuals 10 cm sup(-2) and was dominated by nematodes (32%), oligochaets (15.7%), harpacticoids (14%) ostracodes (13.5%) and forminiferans (11.0%). Faunal abundance varied greatly between...

  1. Benthic communities in the deep Mediterranean Sea: exploring microbial and meiofaunal patterns in slope and basin ecosystems

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    K. Sevastou

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The long-held perception of the deep sea consisting of monotonous slopes and uniform oceanic basins has over the decades given way to the idea of a complex system with wide habitat heterogeneity. Under the prism of a highly diverse environment, a large dataset was used to describe and compare spatial patterns of the dominant small-size components of deep-sea benthos, metazoan meiofauna and microbes, from Mediterranean basins and slopes. A grid of 73 stations sampled at five geographical areas along the central-eastern Mediterranean Basin (central Mediterranean, northern Aegean Sea, Cretan Sea, Libyan Sea, eastern Levantine spanning over 4 km in depth revealed a high diversity, irrespective of the benthic group or level of taxonomic analysis. A common decreasing bathymetric trend was detected for meiobenthic abundance, major taxa diversity and nematode genera richness, but no differences were found between the two habitats (basin vs slope. In contrast, microbial richness is significantly higher at the basin ecosystem and tends to increase with depth. Multivariate analyses (β- and δ-diversity and ordination analysis complemented these results and underlined the high within-habitat variability of benthic communities. Meiofaunal communities in particular were found to change gradually and vary more towards the abyss. On the other hand, microbial communities were highly variable, even among samples of the same area, habitat and bathymetry. A significant proportion of the variation of benthic communities and their descriptors was explained by depth and proxies of food availability (sedimentary pigments and organic content, but the combination of predictor variables and the strength of the relationship varied depending on the data set used (based on type of habitat, benthic component, taxonomic level. This, along with the observed high within-habitat variability suggests that other factors, which tend to vary at local scale (hydrodynamics, substrate

  2. Assessment of somaclonal variation in sugarcane

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admin

    2012-10-30

    Oct 30, 2012 ... A study was conducted from 2006 to 2008 to assess the variability arising from callus regeneration and its vegetative transmission in a subtropical variety of sugarcane, CoJ 64. Qualitative and quantitative characters were evaluated in the field at maturity in each of the 3 years at the same location. The.

  3. Assessment of somaclonal variation in sugarcane | Sobhakumari ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted from 2006 to 2008 to assess the variability arising from callus regeneration and its vegetative transmission in a subtropical variety of sugarcane, CoJ 64. Qualitative and quantitative characters were evaluated in the field at maturity in each of the 3 years at the same location. The frequencies of variants ...

  4. Variation in Students' Conceptions of Self-Assessment and Standards

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    Heng Kiat Kelvin Tan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of a phenomenographic study on the different ways that secondary students understood and utilized student self-assessment and how various ego types could affect the accuracy of self-assessment. The study sought to contribute to the growing literature which recognizes the critical role that students play in assessment processes, and in particular the different roles that they assume in student self-assessment. The results of the study provide insights into how different students experience self-assessment by articulating the variation in the perception and purposes of assessing one's own learning. This variation is depicted as a hierarchy of logically related students' conceptions of self-assessment.

  5. Molecular regionalization in the compact brain of the meiofaunal annelid Dinophilus gyrociliatus (Dinophilidae

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    Alexandra Kerbl

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Annelida is a morphologically diverse animal group that exhibits a remarkable variety in nervous system architecture (e.g., number and location of longitudinal cords, architecture of the brain. Despite this heterogeneity of neural arrangements, the molecular profiles related to central nervous system patterning seem to be conserved even between distantly related annelids. In particular, comparative molecular studies on brain and anterior neural region patterning genes have focused so far mainly on indirect-developing macrofaunal taxa. Therefore, analyses on microscopic, direct-developing annelids are important to attain a general picture of the evolutionary events underlying the vast diversity of annelid neuroanatomy. Results We have analyzed the expression domains of 11 evolutionarily conserved genes involved in brain and anterior neural patterning in adult females of the direct-developing meiofaunal annelid Dinophilus gyrociliatus. The small, compact brain shows expression of dimmed, foxg, goosecoid, homeobrain, nk2.1, orthodenticle, orthopedia, pax6, six3/6 and synaptotagmin-1. Although most of the studied markers localize to specific brain areas, the genes six3/6 and synaptotagmin-1 are expressed in nearly all perikarya of the brain. All genes except for goosecoid, pax6 and nk2.2 overlap in the anterior brain region, while the respective expression domains are more separated in the posterior brain. Conclusions Our findings reveal that the expression patterns of the genes foxg, orthodenticle, orthopedia and six3/6 correlate with those described in Platynereis dumerilii larvae, and homeobrain, nk2.1, orthodenticle and synaptotagmin-1 resemble the pattern of late larvae of Capitella teleta. Although data on other annelids are limited, molecular similarities between adult Dinophilus and larval Platynereis and Capitella suggest an overall conservation of molecular mechanisms patterning the anterior neural regions, independent

  6. Variation between self- and mutual assessment in animal contests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesterton-Gibbons, Mike; Heap, Stephen M

    2014-02-01

    Limited resources lead animals into conflicts of interest, which are resolved when an individual withdraws from a direct contest. Current theory suggests that the decision to withdraw can be based on a threshold derived from an individual's own state (self-assessment) or on a comparison between their own state and their opponent's (mutual assessment). The observed variation between these assessment strategies in nature does not conform to theory. Thus, we require theoretical developments that explain the functional significance of different assessment strategies. We consider a hawk-dove game with two discrete classes that differ in fighting ability, in which the players strategically decide on their investment toward mutual assessment. Analysis of the model indicates that there are simultaneous trade-offs relating to assessment strategies. First, weak individuals in a population must decide on whether to acquire information about their opponents at the cost of providing opponents with information about themselves. Secondly, all individuals must decide between investing in mutual assessment and being persistent in contests. Our analysis suggests that the potential for individuals to make errors during contests and differences in the consequences of sharing information within a population may serve as fundamental concepts for explaining variation in assessment strategy.

  7. High spatiotemporal variability in meiofaunal assemblages in Blanes Canyon (NW Mediterranean) subject to anthropogenic and natural disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román, Sara; Vanreusel, Ann; Romano, Chiara; Ingels, Jeroen; Puig, Pere; Company, Joan B.; Martin, Daniel

    2016-11-01

    We investigated the natural and anthropogenic drivers controlling the spatiotemporal distribution of the meiofauna in the submarine Blanes Canyon, and its adjacent western slope (NW Mediterranean margin of the Iberian Peninsula). We analyzed the relationships between the main sedimentary environmental variables (i.e. grain size, Chl-a, Chl-a: phaeopigments, CPE, organic carbon and total nitrogen) and the density and structure of the meiofaunal assemblages along a bathymetric gradient (from 500 to 2000 m depth) in spring and autumn of 2012 and 2013. Twenty-one and 16 major taxa were identified for respectively the canyon and slope, where the assemblages were always dominated by nematodes. The gradual decreasing meiofaunal densities with increasing depth at the slope showed little variability among stations and corresponded with a uniform pattern of food availability. The canyon was environmentally much more variable and sediments contained greater amounts of food resources (Chl-a and CPE) throughout, leading not only to increased meiofaunal densities compared to the slope, but also different assemblages in terms of composition and structure. This variability in the canyon is only partly explained by seasonal food inputs. The high densities found at 900 m and 1200 m depth coincided with significant increases in food availability compared to shallower and deeper stations in the canyon. Our results suggest that the disruption in expected bathymetric decrease in densities at 900-1200 m water depth coincided with noticeable changes in the environmental variables typical for disturbance and deposition events (e.g., higher sand content and CPE), evoking the hypothesis of an anthropogenic effect at these depths in the canyon. The increased downward particle fluxes at 900-1200 m depth caused by bottom trawling along canyon flanks, as reported in previous studies, support our hypothesis and allude to a substantial anthropogenic factor influencing benthic assemblages at these

  8. Major consequences of an intense dense shelf water cascading event on deep-sea benthic trophic conditions and meiofaunal biodiversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pusceddu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Numerous submarine canyons around the world are preferential conduits for episodic dense shelf water cascading (DSWC, which quickly modifies physical and chemical ambient conditions while transporting large amounts of material towards the base of slope and basin. Observations conducted during the last 20 yr in the Lacaze-Duthiers and Cap de Creus canyons (Gulf of Lion, NW Mediterranean Sea report several intense DSWC events. The effects of DSWC on deep-sea ecosystems are almost unknown. To investigate the effects of these episodic events, we analysed changes in the meiofaunal biodiversity inside and outside the canyon. Sediment samples were collected at depths varying from ca. 1000 to > 2100 m in May 2004 (before a major event, April 2005 (during a major cascading event and in October 2005, August 2006, April 2008 and April 2009 (after a major event. We report here that the late winter–early spring 2005 cascading led to a reduction of the organic matter contents in canyon floor sediments down to 1800 m depth, whereas surface sediments at about 2200 m depth showed an increase. Our findings suggest that the nutritional material removed from the shallower continental shelf, canyon floor and flanks, and also the adjacent open slope was rapidly transported to the deep margin. During the cascading event the meiofaunal abundance and biodiversity in the studied deep-sea sediments were significantly lower than after the event. Benthic assemblages during the cascading were significantly different from those in all other sampling periods in both the canyon and deep margin. After only six months from the cessation of the cascading, benthic assemblages in the impacted sediments were again similar to those observed in other sampling periods, thus illustrating a quick recovery. Since the present climate change is expected to increase the intensity and frequency of these episodic events, we anticipate that they will increasingly affect benthic bathyal

  9. Major consequences of an intense dense shelf water cascading event on deep-sea benthic trophic conditions and meiofaunal biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusceddu, A.; Mea, M.; Canals, M.; Heussner, S.; Durrieu de Madron, X.; Sanchez-Vidal, A.; Bianchelli, S.; Corinaldesi, C.; Dell'Anno, A.; Thomsen, L.; Danovaro, R.

    2013-04-01

    Numerous submarine canyons around the world are preferential conduits for episodic dense shelf water cascading (DSWC), which quickly modifies physical and chemical ambient conditions while transporting large amounts of material towards the base of slope and basin. Observations conducted during the last 20 yr in the Lacaze-Duthiers and Cap de Creus canyons (Gulf of Lion, NW Mediterranean Sea) report several intense DSWC events. The effects of DSWC on deep-sea ecosystems are almost unknown. To investigate the effects of these episodic events, we analysed changes in the meiofaunal biodiversity inside and outside the canyon. Sediment samples were collected at depths varying from ca. 1000 to > 2100 m in May 2004 (before a major event), April 2005 (during a major cascading event) and in October 2005, August 2006, April 2008 and April 2009 (after a major event). We report here that the late winter-early spring 2005 cascading led to a reduction of the organic matter contents in canyon floor sediments down to 1800 m depth, whereas surface sediments at about 2200 m depth showed an increase. Our findings suggest that the nutritional material removed from the shallower continental shelf, canyon floor and flanks, and also the adjacent open slope was rapidly transported to the deep margin. During the cascading event the meiofaunal abundance and biodiversity in the studied deep-sea sediments were significantly lower than after the event. Benthic assemblages during the cascading were significantly different from those in all other sampling periods in both the canyon and deep margin. After only six months from the cessation of the cascading, benthic assemblages in the impacted sediments were again similar to those observed in other sampling periods, thus illustrating a quick recovery. Since the present climate change is expected to increase the intensity and frequency of these episodic events, we anticipate that they will increasingly affect benthic bathyal ecosystems, which may

  10. Assessment of somaclonal variation for salinity tolerance in sweet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic variation is the source for plant breeding. Somaclonal variation is genetic variation induced during tissue culture and also during ordinary growth in vivo, and occurs rather, often in sweet potato. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the degree of somaclonal variation in regeneration via somatic ...

  11. Human Variome Project Quality Assessment Criteria for Variation Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vihinen, Mauno; Hancock, John M; Maglott, Donna R; Landrum, Melissa J; Schaafsma, Gerard C P; Taschner, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Numerous databases containing information about DNA, RNA, and protein variations are available. Gene-specific variant databases (locus-specific variation databases, LSDBs) are typically curated and maintained for single genes or groups of genes for a certain disease(s). These databases are widely considered as the most reliable information source for a particular gene/protein/disease, but it should also be made clear they may have widely varying contents, infrastructure, and quality. Quality is very important to evaluate because these databases may affect health decision-making, research, and clinical practice. The Human Variome Project (HVP) established a Working Group for Variant Database Quality Assessment. The basic principle was to develop a simple system that nevertheless provides a good overview of the quality of a database. The HVP quality evaluation criteria that resulted are divided into four main components: data quality, technical quality, accessibility, and timeliness. This report elaborates on the developed quality criteria and how implementation of the quality scheme can be achieved. Examples are provided for the current status of the quality items in two different databases, BTKbase, an LSDB, and ClinVar, a central archive of submissions about variants and their clinical significance. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  12. Diversity, variation and fairness: Equivalence in national level language assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Weideman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The post-1994 South African constitution proudly affirms the language diversity of the country, as do subsequent laws, while ministerial policies, both at further and higher education level, similarly promote the use of all 11 official languages in education. However, such recognition of diversity presents several challenges to accommodate potential variation. In language education at secondary school, which is nationally assessed, the variety being promoted immediately raises issues of fairness and equivalence. The final high-stakes examination of learners’ ability in home language at the exit level of their pre-tertiary education is currently contentious in South Africa. It is known, for example, that in certain indigenous languages, the exit level assessments barely discriminate among learners with different abilities, while in other languages they do. For that reason, the Council for Quality Assurance in General and Further Education, Umalusi, has commissioned several reports to attempt to understand the nature of the problem. This article will deal with a discussion of a fourth attempt by Umalusi to solve the problem. That attempt, undertaken by a consortium of four universities, has already delivered six interim reports to this statutory body, and the article will consider some of their content and methodology. In their reconceptualisation of the problem, the applied linguists involved first sought to identify the theoretical roots of the current curriculum in order to articulate more sharply the construct being assessed. That provides the basis for a theoretical justification of the several solutions being proposed, as well as for the preliminary designs of modifications to current, and the introduction of new assessments. The impact of equivalence of measurement as a design requirement will be specifically discussed, with reference to the empirical analyses of results of a number of pilots of equivalent tests in different languages.

  13. NGS-based biodiversity and community structure analysis of meiofaunal eukaryotes in shell sand from Hållö island, Smögen, and soft mud from Gullmarn Fjord, Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quiterie Haenel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to assess the biodiversity and community structure of Swedish meiofaunal eukaryotes using metabarcoding. To validate the reliability of the metabarcoding approach, we compare the taxonomic resolution obtained using the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 (COI ‘mini-barcode’ and nuclear 18S small ribosomal subunit (18S V1-V2 region, with traditional morphology-based identification of Xenacoelomorpha and Nematoda. Location: 30 samples were analysed from two ecologically distinct locations along the west coast of Sweden. 18 replicate samples of coarse shell sand were collected along the north-eastern side of Hållö island near Smögen, while 12 replicate samples of soft mud were collected in the Gullmarn Fjord near Lysekil. Methods: Meiofauna was extracted using flotation and siphoning methods. Both COI and 18S regions were amplified from total DNA samples using Metazoan specific primers and subsequently sequenced using Illumina MiSeq, producing in total 24 132 875 paired-end reads of 300 bp in length, of which 15 883 274 COI reads and 8 249 601 18S reads. These were quality filtered resulting in 7 954 017 COI sequences and 890 370 18S sequences, clustered into 2805 and 1472 representative OTUs respectively, yielding 190 metazoan OTUs for COI and 121 metazoan OTUs for 18S using a 97% sequence similarity threshold. Results: The Metazoan fraction represents 7% of the total dataset for COI (190 OTUs and 8% of sequences for 18S (121 OTUs. Annelida (30% of COI metazoan OTUs and 23.97% of 18S metazoan OTUs and Arthropoda (27.37% of COI metazoan OTUs and 11.57% of 18S metazoan OTUs, were the most OTU rich phyla identified in all samples combined. As well as Annelida and Arthropoda, other OTU rich phyla represented in our samples include Mollusca, Platyhelminthes and Nematoda. In total, 213 COI OTUs and 243 18S OTUs were identified to species using a 97% sequence similarity threshold, revealing some non-native species and

  14. Assessing biological and technical variation in destructively measured data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijskens, L.M.M.; Konopacki, P.J.; Jongbloed, G.; Penchaiya, P.; Schouten, R.E.

    2017-01-01

    The majority of experimental data are obtained by destructive measuring techniques. Inevitably, in all these data variation is present, sometimes small and negligible, sometimes large, preventing proper analysis and extraction of meaningful information by traditional statistical techniques

  15. Variations in Assessment, Variations in Philosophy: Unintended Consequences of Heterogeneous Portfolios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Principe, Ann

    2010-01-01

    Portfolio assessment has become the predominant best practice in writing assessment at the college level. Despite its clear superiority to previous methods of assessment, portfolio assessment has brought its own collection of challenges. Although the stated goal of much portfolio grading is to create an overall, or holistic, judgment of a…

  16. Assessment of salivary flow rate: biologic variation and measure error.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongerius, P.H.; Limbeek, J. van; Rotteveel, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the applicability of the swab method in the measurement of salivary flow rate in multiple-handicap drooling children. To quantify the measurement error of the procedure and the biologic variation in the population. STUDY DESIGN: Cohort study. METHODS: In a repeated

  17. Assessment of Radiation Background Variation for Moving Detection Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, James Christopher [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rennie, John Alan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Toevs, James Waldo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wallace, Darrin J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abhold, Mark Edward [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2015-07-13

    The introduction points out that radiation backgrounds fluctuate across very short distances: factors include geology, soil composition, altitude, building structures, topography, and other manmade structures; and asphalt and concrete can vary significantly over short distances. Brief descriptions are given of the detection system, experimental setup, and background variation measurements. It is concluded that positive and negative gradients can greatly reduce the detection sensitivity of an MDS: negative gradients create opportunities for false negatives (nondetection), and positive gradients create a potentially unacceptable FAR (above 1%); the location of use for mobile detection is important to understand; spectroscopic systems provide more information for screening out false alarms and may be preferred for mobile use; and mobile monitor testing at LANL accounts for expected variations in the background.

  18. Data collection variation in preoperative assessment: a literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmadian, Leila; Cornet, Ronald; van Klei, Wilton A.; de Keizer, Nicolette F.

    2011-01-01

    This study is a systematic literature review to identify data collected in the preoperative assessment. The PubMed and CINAHL databases were searched for articles published from 1997 to 2007. From the included articles, data items that were described as part of the preoperative assessment were

  19. Inter-doctor variations in the assessment of functional incapacities by insurance physicians

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, A.J.; Mulders, H.; Steenbeek, R.; Anema, J.R.; Kroneman, H.; Besseling, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to determine the - largely unexplored - extent of systematic variation in the work disability assessment by Dutch insurance physicians (IPs) of employees on long-term sick leave, and to ascertain whether this variation was associated with the individual

  20. On the Assessment of Global Terrestrial Reference Frame Temporal Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampatzidis, Dimitrios; Koenig, Rolf; Zhu, Shengyuan

    2015-04-01

    Global Terrestrial Reference Frames (GTRFs) as the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) provide reliable 4-D position information (3-D coordinates and their evolution through time). The given 3-D velocities play a significant role in precise position acquisition and are estimated from long term coordinate time series from the space-geodetic techniques DORIS, GNSS, SLR, and VLBI. GTRFs temporal evolution is directly connected with their internal stability: The more intense and inhomogeneous velocity field, the less stable TRF is derived. The assessment of the quality of the GTRF is mainly realized by comparing it to each individual technique's reference frame. E.g the comparison of GTRFs to SLR-only based TRF gives the sense of the ITRF stability with respect to the Geocenter and scale and their associated rates respectively. In addition, the comparison of ITRF to the VLBI-only based TRF can be used for the scale validation. However, till now there is not any specified methodology for the total assessment (in terms of origin, orientation and scale respectively) of the temporal evolution and GTRFs associated accuracy. We present a new alternative diagnostic tool for the assessment of GTRFs temporal evolution based on the well-known time-dependent Helmert type transformation formula (three shifts, three rotations and scale rates respectively). The advantage of the new methodology relies on the fact that it uses the full velocity field of the TRF and therefore all points not just the ones common to different techniques. It also examines simultaneously rates of origin, orientation and scale. The methodology is presented and implemented to the two existing GTRFs on the market (ITRF and DTRF which is computed from DGFI) , the results are discussed. The results also allow to compare directly each GTRF dynamic behavior. Furthermore, the correlations of the estimated parameters can also provide useful information to the proposed GTRFs assessment scheme.

  1. Variation of a Lightning NOx Indicator for National Climate Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, William; Vant-Hull, B.; McCaul, E. W.; Peterson, H. S.

    2014-01-01

    Lightning nitrogen oxides (LNOx) indirectly influences our climate since these molecules are important in controlling the concentration of ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radicals (OH) in the atmosphere [Huntrieser et al., 1998]. In support of the National Climate Assessment (NCA) program, satellite Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS; Christian et al. [1999]; Cecil et al. [2014]) data is used to estimate LNOx production over the southern portion of the conterminous US for the 16 year period 1998-2013.

  2. High Meiofaunal and Nematodes Diversity around Mesophotic Coral Oases in the Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchelli, Silvia; Pusceddu, Antonio; Canese, Simone; Greco, Silvio; Danovaro, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Although the mesophotic zone of the Mediterranean Sea has been poorly investigated, there is an increasing awareness about its ecological importance for its biodiversity, as fish nursery and for the recruitment of shallow water species. Along with coastal rocky cliffs, isolated coralligenous concretions emerging from muddy bottoms are typical structures of the Mediterranean Sea mesophotic zone. Coralligenous concretions at mesophotic depths in the South Tyrrhenian Sea were investigated to assess the role of these coralligenous oases in relation to the biodiversity of surrounding soft sediments. We show here that the complex structures of the coralligenous concretions at ca. 110 m depth influence the trophic conditions, the biodiversity and assemblage composition in the surrounding sediments even at considerable distances. Coral concretions not only represent deep oases of coral biodiversity but they also promote a higher biodiversity of the fauna inhabiting the surrounding soft sediments. Using the biodiversity of nematodes as a proxy of the total benthic biodiversity, a high turnover biodiversity within a 200 m distance from the coralligenous concretions was observed. Such turnover is even more evident when only rare taxa are considered and seems related to specific trophic conditions, which are influenced by the presence of the coralligenous structures. The presence of a high topographic complexity and the trophic enrichment make these habitats highly biodiverse, nowadays endangered by human activities (such as exploitation of commercial species such as Corallium rubrum, or trawling fisheries, which directly causes habitat destruction or indirectly causes modification in the sedimentation and re-suspension rates). We stress that the protection of the coralligenous sea concretions is a priority for future conservation policies at the scale of large marine ecosystems and that a complete census of these mesophotic oases of biodiversity should be a priority for

  3. High Meiofaunal and Nematodes Diversity around Mesophotic Coral Oases in the Mediterranean Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Bianchelli

    Full Text Available Although the mesophotic zone of the Mediterranean Sea has been poorly investigated, there is an increasing awareness about its ecological importance for its biodiversity, as fish nursery and for the recruitment of shallow water species. Along with coastal rocky cliffs, isolated coralligenous concretions emerging from muddy bottoms are typical structures of the Mediterranean Sea mesophotic zone. Coralligenous concretions at mesophotic depths in the South Tyrrhenian Sea were investigated to assess the role of these coralligenous oases in relation to the biodiversity of surrounding soft sediments. We show here that the complex structures of the coralligenous concretions at ca. 110 m depth influence the trophic conditions, the biodiversity and assemblage composition in the surrounding sediments even at considerable distances. Coral concretions not only represent deep oases of coral biodiversity but they also promote a higher biodiversity of the fauna inhabiting the surrounding soft sediments. Using the biodiversity of nematodes as a proxy of the total benthic biodiversity, a high turnover biodiversity within a 200 m distance from the coralligenous concretions was observed. Such turnover is even more evident when only rare taxa are considered and seems related to specific trophic conditions, which are influenced by the presence of the coralligenous structures. The presence of a high topographic complexity and the trophic enrichment make these habitats highly biodiverse, nowadays endangered by human activities (such as exploitation of commercial species such as Corallium rubrum, or trawling fisheries, which directly causes habitat destruction or indirectly causes modification in the sedimentation and re-suspension rates. We stress that the protection of the coralligenous sea concretions is a priority for future conservation policies at the scale of large marine ecosystems and that a complete census of these mesophotic oases of biodiversity should be a

  4. Global assessment of genomic variation in cattle by genome resequencing and high-throughput genotyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhan, Bujie; Fadista, João; Thomsen, Bo

    2011-01-01

    sequence of a single Holstein Friesian bull with data from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) array technologies to determine a comprehensive spectrum of genomic variation. The performance of resequencing SNP detection was assessed by combining SNPs that were...... of split-read and read-pair approaches proved to be complementary in finding different signatures. CNVs were identified on the basis of the depth of sequenced reads, and by using SNP and CGH arrays. Conclusions Our results provide high resolution mapping of diverse classes of genomic variation...

  5. Inter-doctor variations in the assessment of functional incapacities by insurance physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schellart Antonius JM

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to determine the - largely unexplored - extent of systematic variation in the work disability assessment by Dutch insurance physicians (IPs of employees on long-term sick leave, and to ascertain whether this variation was associated with the individual characteristics and opinions of IPs. Methods In March 2008 we conducted a survey among IPs on the basis of the 'Attitude - Social norm - self-Efficacy' (ASE model. We used the ensuing data to form latent variables for the ASE constructs. We then linked the background variables and the measured constructs for IPs (n = 199 working at regional offices (n = 27 to the work disability assessments of clients (n = 83,755 and their characteristics. These assessments were carried out between July 2003 and April 2008. We performed multilevel regression analysis on three important assessment outcomes: No Sustainable Capacity or Restrictions for Working Hours (binominal, Functional Incapacity Score (scale 0-6 and Maximum Work Disability Class (binominal. We calculated Intra Class Correlations (ICCs at IP level and office level and explained variances (R2 for the three outcomes. A higher ICC reflects stronger systematic variation. Results The ICCs at IP level were approximately 6% for No Sustainable Capacity or Restrictions for Working Hours and Maximum Work Disability Class and 12% for Functional Incapacity Score. Background IP variables and the measured ASE constructs for physicians contributed very little to the variation - at most 1%. The ICCs at office level ranged from 0% to around 1%. The R2 was 11% for No Sustainable Capacity or Restrictions for Working Hours, 19% for Functional Incapacity Score and 37% for Maximum Work Disability Class. Conclusion Our study uncovered small to moderate systematic variations in the outcome of disability assessments in the Netherlands. However, the individual characteristics and opinions of insurance physicians have very

  6. Feathers as a Tool to Assess Mercury Contamination in Gentoo Penguins: Variations at the Individual Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Sara; Xavier, José C; Tavares, Sílvia; Trathan, Phil N; Ratcliffe, Norman; Paiva, Vitor H; Medeiros, Renata; Pereira, Eduarda; Pardal, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    Feathers have been widely used to assess mercury contamination in birds as they reflect metal concentrations accumulated between successive moult periods: they are also easy to sample and have minimum impact on the study birds. Moult is considered the major pathway for mercury excretion in seabirds. Penguins are widely believed to undergo a complete, annual moult during which they do not feed. As penguins lose all their feathers, they are expected to have a low individual-variability in feather mercury concentration as all feathers are formed simultaneously from the same somatic reserves. This assumption is central to penguin studies that use feathers to examine the annual or among-individual variation in mercury concentrations in penguins. To test this assumption, we measured the mercury concentrations in 3-5 body feathers of 52 gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua) breeding at Bird Island, South Georgia (54°S 38°W). Twenty-five percent of the penguins studied showed substantial within-individual variation in the amount of mercury in their feathers (Coefficient of Variation: 34.7-96.7%). This variation may be caused by differences in moult patterns among individuals within the population leading to different interpretations in the overall population. Further investigation is now needed to fully understand individual variation in penguins' moult.

  7. Feathers as a Tool to Assess Mercury Contamination in Gentoo Penguins: Variations at the Individual Level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Pedro

    Full Text Available Feathers have been widely used to assess mercury contamination in birds as they reflect metal concentrations accumulated between successive moult periods: they are also easy to sample and have minimum impact on the study birds. Moult is considered the major pathway for mercury excretion in seabirds. Penguins are widely believed to undergo a complete, annual moult during which they do not feed. As penguins lose all their feathers, they are expected to have a low individual-variability in feather mercury concentration as all feathers are formed simultaneously from the same somatic reserves. This assumption is central to penguin studies that use feathers to examine the annual or among-individual variation in mercury concentrations in penguins. To test this assumption, we measured the mercury concentrations in 3-5 body feathers of 52 gentoo penguins (Pygoscelis papua breeding at Bird Island, South Georgia (54°S 38°W. Twenty-five percent of the penguins studied showed substantial within-individual variation in the amount of mercury in their feathers (Coefficient of Variation: 34.7-96.7%. This variation may be caused by differences in moult patterns among individuals within the population leading to different interpretations in the overall population. Further investigation is now needed to fully understand individual variation in penguins' moult.

  8. Spatial variation in lake benthic macroinvertebrate ecological assessment: a synthesis of European case studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandin, Leif Leonard; Solimini, Angelo G.

    2012-01-01

    local invertebrate assemblages. In this issue we provide a contribution towards the understanding of basic sources of spatial variation of invertebrate assemblages in different European lake habitat types and their relationship with major human pressures. All papers have an obvious applied objective...... Baltic, Atlantic, and Mediterranean). The goal of the papers was to assess the main environmental factors and how they affected benthic macroinvertebrate variation at different ecological scales and thus better our basic understanding of how changes in these environmental variables can be tracked using......This paper summarizes eight case studies that were analysed as part of the research theme ``lake benthic macroinvertebrates'' forming part of the EU-funded WISER project ``Water bodies in Europe: Integrative Systems to assess Ecological status and Recovery''. The relationships between lake benthic...

  9. Assessing factors underlying variation of CO2 emissions in boreal lakes vs. reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadonléké, Rémy D; Marty, Jérôme; Planas, Dolors

    2012-02-01

    Reservoirs and lakes were compared to test the hypothesis that they are similar with respect to factors driving the variation in CO(2) emissions to the atmosphere. Understanding this variation is necessary for the assessment of the contribution of these freshwater ecosystems to the global carbon cycle. This study, in contrast to previous ones, included analyses of the relationships between CO(2) emissions and microbial communities. Pooled data (lakes and reservoirs) showed that variations in CO(2) emissions were strongly related to variations in temperature, dissolved organic matter (DOM) quality, and bacterial production (BP). Results also showed that lakes were characterized by higher water temperature, lower DOM quality, larger size of Daphnia, and enriched δ(13) C zooplankton compared to reservoirs. Moreover, interactions within plankton communities and relationships between CO(2) emissions and zooplankton δ(13) C signatures differed in lakes vs. reservoirs, indicating among-system type differences in food web structure and carbon cycling. As a result of these ecosystem-type characteristics, CO(2) emission variation was mainly explained by temperature and BP in lakes, and by DOM quality and the ratio of phytoplankton biomass to microheterotroph biomass in reservoirs. These results showed that differences in temperature and DOM quality between lakes and reservoirs translate into differences in microbial interactions and ultimately in the importance of factors driving CO(2) emissions to the atmosphere. They indicated that considering microbial communities and environmental variables such as temperature and DOM quality can help improve our understanding of the variation in CO(2) emissions from freshwater ecosystems. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Measurement variation across health literacy assessments: implications for assessment selection in research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haun, Jolie; Luther, Stephen; Dodd, Virginia; Donaldson, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    National priorities and recent federal initiatives have brought health literacy to the forefront in providing safe accessible care. Having valid and reliable health literacy measures is a critical factor in meeting patients' health literacy needs. In this study, the authors examined variation across three brief health literacy instruments in categorizing health literacy levels and identifying associated factors. The authors screened 378 veterans using the short form of the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults; the Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine; and a 4-Item Brief Health Literacy Screening Tool (known as the BRIEF). They analyzed data using prevalence estimates, Pearson product moment correlations, and logistic regression. When categorizing individuals' health literacy, agreement among instruments was present for 37% of the sample. There were consistencies; however, categorization and estimated risk factors varied by instrument. Depending on instrument, increased age, low education, minority status, and self-reported poor reading level were associated with low health literacy. Findings suggest that these instruments measure health literacy differently and are likely conceptually different. As the use of health literacy screening gains momentum, alignment between instrument and intended purpose is essential; in some cases, multiple instruments may be appropriate. When selecting an instrument, one should consider style of administration, purpose for measure, and availability of time and resources.

  11. GLASS: assisted and standardized assessment of gene variations from Sanger sequence trace data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Karol; Bystry, Vojtech; Reigl, Tomas; Demko, Martin; Krejci, Adam; Touloumenidou, Tasoula; Stalika, Evangelia; Tichy, Boris; Ghia, Paolo; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Pospisilova, Sarka; Malcikova, Jitka; Darzentas, Nikos

    2017-12-01

    Sanger sequencing is still being employed for sequence variant detection by many laboratories, especially in a clinical setting. However, chromatogram interpretation often requires manual inspection and in some cases, considerable expertise. We present GLASS, a web-based Sanger sequence trace viewer, editor, aligner and variant caller, built to assist with the assessment of variations in 'curated' or user-provided genes. Critically, it produces a standardized variant output as recommended by the Human Genome Variation Society. GLASS is freely available at http://bat.infspire.org/genomepd/glass/ with source code at https://github.com/infspiredBAT/GLASS. nikos.darzentas@gmail.com or malcikova.jitka@fnbrno.cz. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  12. Comprehensive assessment of dam impacts on flow regimes with consideration of interannual variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongyong; Shao, Quanxi; Zhao, Tongtiegang

    2017-09-01

    Assessing the impact of human intervention on flow regimes is important in policy making and resource management. Previous impact assessments of dam regulation on flow regimes have focused on long-term average patterns, but interannual variations, which are important characteristics to be considered, have been ignored. In this study, the entire signatures of hydrograph variations of Miyun Reservoir in northern China were described by forty flow regime metrics that incorporate magnitude, variability and frequency, duration, timing, and rate of change for flow events based on a long-term synchronous observation series of inflow and outflow. Principal component analysis and cluster analysis were used to reduce the multidimensionality of the metrics and time and to determine impact patterns and their interannual shifts. Statistically significant driving factors of impact pattern variations were identified. We found that dam regulation resulted in four main impact classes on the flow regimes and that the regulated capacity was interannually attenuated from 1973 to 2010. The impact patterns alternated between the highly regulated class with extremely decreasing flow magnitude, slight variability, and extreme intermittency and the slightly regulated class with extremely increasing flow magnitude, slight variability, and extreme intermittency from 1973 to 1987 and then stabilized in the latter class from 1988 to 2001. After 2001, the pattern gradually changed from the moderately regulated class with moderately decreasing flow magnitude, extreme variability, and extreme intermittency to the slightly regulated class with slightly decreasing flow magnitude, slight variability, and no intermittency. Decreasing precipitation and increasing drought were the primary drivers for the interannual variations of the impact patterns, and inflow variability was the most significant factor affecting the patterns, followed by flow event frequency and duration, magnitude, and timing. This

  13. Informant Discrepancies in Adult Social Anxiety Disorder Assessments: Links With Contextual Variations in Observed Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Los Reyes, Andres; Bunnell, Brian E.; Beidel, Deborah C.

    2017-01-01

    Multi-informant assessments of adult psychopathology often result in discrepancies among informants’ reports. Among 157 adults meeting criteria for either the generalized (n = 106) or nongeneralized (n = 51) social anxiety disorder (SAD) subtype, we examined whether discrepancies between patients’ and clinicians’ reports of patients’ symptoms related to variations in both SAD subtype and expressions of social skills deficits across multiple social interaction tasks. Latent class analyses revealed two behavioral patterns: (a) context-specific social skills deficits and (b) cross-context social skills deficits. Similarly, patients’ symptom reports could be characterized by concordance or discordance with clinicians’ reports. Patient–clinician concordance on relatively high levels of patients’ symptoms related to an increased likelihood of the patient meeting criteria for the generalized relative to nongeneralized subtype. Further, patient–clinician concordance on relatively high levels of patients’ symptoms related to an increased likelihood of consistently exhibiting social skills deficits across social interaction tasks (relative to context-specific social skills deficits). These relations were robust in accounting for patient age, clinical severity, and Axis I and II comorbidity. Further, clinical severity did not completely explain variability in patients’ behavior on laboratory tasks or discrepancies between patient and clinician reports. Findings provide the first laboratory-based support for the ability of informant discrepancies to indicate cross-contextual variability in clinical adult assessments, and the first of any developmental period to indicate this for SAD assessments. These findings have important implications for clinical assessment and developmental psychopathology research. PMID:23421526

  14. A Control Variate Method for Probabilistic Performance Assessment. Improved Estimates for Mean Performance Quantities of Interest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKinnon, Robert J.; Kuhlman, Kristopher L

    2016-05-01

    We present a method of control variates for calculating improved estimates for mean performance quantities of interest, E(PQI) , computed from Monte Carlo probabilistic simulations. An example of a PQI is the concentration of a contaminant at a particular location in a problem domain computed from simulations of transport in porous media. To simplify the presentation, the method is described in the setting of a one- dimensional elliptical model problem involving a single uncertain parameter represented by a probability distribution. The approach can be easily implemented for more complex problems involving multiple uncertain parameters and in particular for application to probabilistic performance assessment of deep geologic nuclear waste repository systems. Numerical results indicate the method can produce estimates of E(PQI)having superior accuracy on coarser meshes and reduce the required number of simulations needed to achieve an acceptable estimate.

  15. Sensitivity of hydrological performance assessment analysis to variations in material properties, conceptual models, and ventilation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobolik, S.R.; Ho, C.K.; Dunn, E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Robey, T.H. [Spectra Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cruz, W.T. [Univ. del Turabo, Gurabo (Puerto Rico)

    1996-07-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is studying Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada as a potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. Site characterization includes surface- based and underground testing. Analyses have been performed to support the design of an Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) and the design of the tests performed as part of the characterization process, in order to ascertain that they have minimal impact on the natural ability of the site to isolate waste. The information in this report pertains to sensitivity studies evaluating previous hydrological performance assessment analyses to variation in the material properties, conceptual models, and ventilation models, and the implications of this sensitivity on previous recommendations supporting ESF design. This document contains information that has been used in preparing recommendations for Appendix I of the Exploratory Studies Facility Design Requirements document.

  16. Genetic variation of Melia azedarach in community forests of West Java assessed by RAPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YULIANTI

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Yulianti, Siregar IZ, Wijayanto N, Tapa Darma IGK, Syamsuwida D (2011 Genetic variation of Melia azedarach in community forests of West Java assessed by RAPD. Biodiversitas 12: 64-69. Melia azedarach L. or mindi (local name is one of the widely planted exotic species in Indonesia, mostly found in community forests in West Java. However, improving and increasing the productivity of mindi commmunity plantation in West Java requires information on patterns of existing genetic diversity. The present work was aimed at estimating the genetic variation of mindi by using RAPD markers. Outcome of the activities was to propose appropriate conservation and management strategies of genetic resources in order to support the establishment of seed sources. Six populations of mindi plantation in the community forests were chosen for this research, i.e Sukaraja (Bogor-1, Megamendung (Bogor-2, Bandung, Purwakarta, Sumedang and Kuningan. Five primers (OPA-07, OPY-13, OPY-16, OPA-09 and OPO-05 producing reproducible bands were analysed for 120 selected mother trees in total, in which 20 trees per locality were sampled. Data were analysed using Popgene ver 1.31, NTSYS 2.02 and GenAlEx 6.3. Based on the analysis, the observed number of alleles per locus ranging from 1.43 to 1.60, and percentage of polymorphic loci (PPL ranging from 43.33 to 60.00.%. The levels of genetic variation were considered as moderate for all populations (He range from 0.1603 to 0.1956 and the the mean level of genetic diversity between population (Gst was 0.3005. Cluster analysis and Principal Coordinates showed three main groups, the first group consists of 4 populations i.e Bandung, Kuningan, Purwakarta and Megamendung, the second was Sukaraja and the third was Sumedang. Based on Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA, the Percentages of Molecular Variance within population (69% is higher than that of between populations (31%. The moderate level of genetic variation in the community

  17. Office workers' objectively assessed total and prolonged sitting time: Individual-level correlates and worksite variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyssa T. Hadgraft

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sedentary behavior is highly prevalent in office-based workplaces; however, few studies have assessed the attributes associated with this health risk factor in the workplace setting. This study aimed to identify the correlates of office workers' objectively-assessed total and prolonged (≥30 min bouts workplace sitting time. Participants were 231 Australian office workers recruited from 14 sites of a single government employer in 2012–13. Potential socio-demographic, work-related, health-related and cognitive-social correlates were measured through a self-administered survey and anthropometric measurements. Associations with total and prolonged workplace sitting time (measured with the activPAL3 were tested using linear mixed models. Worksites varied significantly in total workplace sitting time (overall mean [SD]: 79% [10%] of work hours and prolonged workplace sitting time (42% [19%], after adjusting for socio-demographic and work-related characteristics. Organisational tenure of 3–5 years (compared to tenure >5 years was associated with more time spent in total and prolonged workplace sitting time, while having a BMI categorised as obese (compared to a healthy BMI was associated with less time spent in total and prolonged workplace sitting time. Significant variations in sitting time were observed across different worksites of the same employer and the variation remained after adjusting for individual-level factors. Only BMI and organisational tenure were identified as correlates of total and prolonged workplace sitting time. Additional studies are needed to confirm the present findings across diverse organisations and occupations.

  18. Anatomical variations: How do surgical and radiology training programs teach and assess them in their training curricula?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raikos, Athanasios; Smith, Janie Dade

    2015-09-01

    Sound knowledge of anatomy and Anatomical variations plays an integral role in surgical and radiology specialties. This study investigated the current teaching and assessment trends on Anatomical variations in various surgical and radiology specialty training curricula in Canada and Australia. A survey was sent to 122 Program Directors and Chairs of specialty committees in Canada and Directors of Training/Education in Australia of selected surgical and radiology specialties. A total of 80.7% of respondents report that their training curricula include Anatomical variations. The highest rated classes of variations included in the curriculum are arterial (76%), venous (68%), followed by organs (64%). All trainees learn about Anatomical variations from surgeons and radiologists (100%) and via suggested textbooks of the specialty (87.1%). A total of 54.8% report that specialty training curricula do not suggest specific anatomical variation classifications for the trainees to learn, and 16.1% are uncertain if the colleges provide such kind of instruction. Trainees typically communicated findings of variations in case presentations and clinic's meetings. About 32.3% of respondents report that Anatomical variations are not assessed in their training curriculum. About 39.3% of experienced clinicians in the study report they encounter variations on a monthly basis and 25 and 21.4% on a weekly and daily basis, respectively. Surgical and radiology colleges need to investigate for hidden curriculum in their specialty training programs to ensure there are no gaps in knowledge and training related to Anatomical variations. Most educational leaders surveyed believe more teaching on Anatomical variations in the first 4 years of training would benefit resident doctors. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Variation in the Profile of Anxiety Disorders in Boys with an ASD According to Method and Source of Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitsika, Vicki; Sharpley, Christopher F.

    2015-01-01

    To determine any variation that might occur due to the type of assessment and source used to assess them, the prevalence of 7 anxiety disorders were investigated in a sample of 140 boys with an Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and 50 non-ASD (NASD) boys via the Child and Adolescent Symptom Inventory and the KIDSCID Clinical Interview. Boys with an…

  20. Multi-variate flood damage assessment: a tree-based data-mining approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Merz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The usual approach for flood damage assessment consists of stage-damage functions which relate the relative or absolute damage for a certain class of objects to the inundation depth. Other characteristics of the flooding situation and of the flooded object are rarely taken into account, although flood damage is influenced by a variety of factors. We apply a group of data-mining techniques, known as tree-structured models, to flood damage assessment. A very comprehensive data set of more than 1000 records of direct building damage of private households in Germany is used. Each record contains details about a large variety of potential damage-influencing characteristics, such as hydrological and hydraulic aspects of the flooding situation, early warning and emergency measures undertaken, state of precaution of the household, building characteristics and socio-economic status of the household. Regression trees and bagging decision trees are used to select the more important damage-influencing variables and to derive multi-variate flood damage models. It is shown that these models outperform existing models, and that tree-structured models are a promising alternative to traditional damage models.

  1. Variation in severity assessment and initial mesalamine dose selection for ulcerative colitis in community practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, Bruce E; Kilgore, Karl M; Bloomfeld, Richard S; Sandborn, William J

    2006-08-01

    Ulcerative colitis treatment is based largely on anatomic extent of inflammation and severity. Clinical severity is designated by the terms mild, moderate, or severe. The aims of this study are to assess consistency between: (1) community physicians and established treatment guidelines in their respective operational definitions of severity and (2) clinical severity ratings and resulting treatment. Medical records of 411 patients who were successfully treated with mesalamine delayed release tablets without requiring steroids were reviewed. Data recorded included the prescribed dose of mesalamine, clinical symptoms, and physician's global assessment (PGA). Physicians were moderately consistent with the American College of Gastroenterology Guidelines in their assignments of PGA (kappa=0.57, Pmesalamine dose yielded tau statistics of 0.13, 0.16, and 0.14 (all P<0.001), respectively for PGA, number of stools per day and percentage of stools with blood. Ulcerative colitis treatment quality may be enhanced by promoting a more consistent terminology for disease severity and reducing the unexplained variation in treatment dosing.

  2. Assessing intragenomic variation of the internal transcribed spacer two: Adapting the Illumina metagenomics protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanagreh, Lo'ai; Pegg, Caitlin; Harikumar, Amritha; Buchheim, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Primary and secondary structural data from the internal transcribed spacer two (ITS2) have been used extensively for diversity studies of many different eukaryotic organisms, including the green algae. Ease of amplification is due, at least in part, to the fact that ITS2 is part of the tandemly-repeated rRNA array. The potential confounding influence of intragenomic variability has yet to be addressed except in a few organisms. Moreover, few of the assessments of intragenomic variation have taken advantage of the deep sequencing capacity of sequence-by-synthesis protocols. We present results from our adaptation of the 16S Metagenomics Sequencing Library Preparation/Illumina protocol for deep sequencing of the ITS2 genes in selected isolates of the green algal genus, Haematococcus. Deep sequencing yielded from just under 20,000 to more than 500,000 merged reads, outpacing results from recent pyrosequencing efforts. Furthermore, a conservative evaluation of these data revealed a range of three to six ITS2 sequence haplotypes (defined as unique sets of nucleotide polymorphisms) across the taxon sampling. The frequency of the dominant haplotype ranged from 0.35 to 0.98. In all but two cases, the haplotype with the greatest frequency corresponded to a sequence obtained by the Sanger method using PCR templates. Our data also show that results from the sequencing-by-synthesis approach are reproducible. In addition to advancing our understanding of ribosomal RNA variation, the results of this investigation will allow us to begin testing hypotheses regarding the maintenance of homogeneity across multi-copy genes.

  3. Implementation of Speed Variation in the Structural Dynamic Assessment of Turbomachinery Flow-Path Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Andrew M.; Davis, R. Benjamin; DeHaye, Michael

    2013-01-01

    During the design of turbomachinery flow path components, the assessment of possible structural resonant conditions is critical. Higher frequency modes of these structures are frequently found to be subject to resonance, and in these cases, design criteria require a forced response analysis of the structure with the assumption that the excitation speed exactly equals the resonant frequency. The design becomes problematic if the response analysis shows a violation of the HCF criteria. One possible solution is to perform "finite-life" analysis, where Miner's rule is used to calculate the actual life in seconds in comparison to the required life. In this situation, it is beneficial to incorporate the fact that, for a variety of turbomachinery control reasons, the speed of the rotor does not actually dwell at a single value but instead dithers about a nominal mean speed and during the time that the excitation frequency is not equal to the resonant frequency, the damage accumulated by the structure is diminished significantly. Building on previous investigations into this process, we show that a steady-state assumption of the response is extremely accurate for this typical case, resulting in the ability to quickly account for speed variation in the finite-life analysis of a component which has previously had its peak dynamic stress at resonance calculated. A technique using Monte Carlo simulation is also presented which can be used when specific speed time histories are not available. The implementation of these techniques can prove critical for successful turbopump design, as the improvement in life when speed variation is considered is shown to be greater than a factor of two

  4. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging to assess physiologic variations of myometrial perfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomassin-Naggara, Isabelle [Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Radiology, Hopital Tenon, Paris (France); Universite Rene Descartes, Laboratoire de Recherche en Imagerie-INSERM U970, Paris (France); Hopital Tenon, Service de Radiologie, Paris (France); Balvay, Daniel [Universite Rene Descartes, Laboratoire de Recherche en Imagerie-INSERM U970, Paris (France); Cuenod, Charles A. [Universite Rene Descartes, Laboratoire de Recherche en Imagerie-INSERM U970, Paris (France); Hopital Europeen Georges Pompidou (HEGP), Department of Radiology, Paris (France); Darai, Emile [Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Gynaecology-Obstetrics, Hopital Tenon, Paris (France); Marsault, Claude; Bazot, Marc [Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, Department of Radiology, Hopital Tenon, Paris (France)

    2010-04-15

    To prospectively evaluate the ability of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) to assess physiological microvascular states in normal myometrium. Eighty-five women (62 women of reproductive age, 23 postmenopausal) undergoing DCE-MRI of the pelvis were included. Microvascular parameters for the inner and outer myometrium were analysed using a pharmacokinetic model. These parameters were tissue blood flow (F), blood volume fraction (V{sub b}), permeability-surface area product (PS), interstitial volume fraction (V{sub e}) and lag time (Dt). In the women of reproductive age, the inner myometrium displayed higher F and PS, lower V{sub b} and V{sub e}, and longer Dt than the outer myometrium (p = 0.02, p = 0.01, p = 0.005, p = 0.03 and p = 0.01, respectively). The inner myometrium presented microvascular variations during the menstrual cycle with a pre-ovulatory peak followed by a fall reaching a nadir of F and V{sub b} about 4 days after ovulation. Compared with women of reproductive age, in the postmenopausal state, F and V{sub b} decreased in the outer myometrium, while PS, V{sub e} and Dt increased (p < 0.0001, p = 0.001, p = 0.001, p = 0.03 and p = 0.0004, respectively). DCE-MRI is a non-invasive technique that can measure variations of myometrial microcirculation, and thereby be potentially useful to help characterize the role and states of the myometrium in assisted reproductive therapy. (orig.)

  5. A review of land-use regression models to assess spatial variation of outdoor air pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoek, Gerard; Beelen, Rob; de Hoogh, Kees; Vienneau, Danielle; Gulliver, John; Fischer, Paul; Briggs, David

    Studies on the health effects of long-term average exposure to outdoor air pollution have played an important role in recent health impact assessments. Exposure assessment for epidemiological studies of long-term exposure to ambient air pollution remains a difficult challenge because of substantial small-scale spatial variation. Current approaches for assessing intra-urban air pollution contrasts include the use of exposure indicator variables, interpolation methods, dispersion models and land-use regression (LUR) models. LUR models have been increasingly used in the past few years. This paper provides a critical review of the different components of LUR models. We identified 25 land-use regression studies. Land-use regression combines monitoring of air pollution at typically 20-100 locations, spread over the study area, and development of stochastic models using predictor variables usually obtained through geographic information systems (GIS). Monitoring is usually temporally limited: one to four surveys of typically one or two weeks duration. Significant predictor variables include various traffic representations, population density, land use, physical geography (e.g. altitude) and climate. Land-use regression methods have generally been applied successfully to model annual mean concentrations of NO 2, NO x, PM 2.5, the soot content of PM 2.5 and VOCs in different settings, including European and North-American cities. The performance of the method in urban areas is typically better or equivalent to geo-statistical methods, such as kriging, and dispersion models. Further developments of the land-use regression method include more focus on developing models that can be transferred to other areas, inclusion of additional predictor variables such as wind direction or emission data and further exploration of focalsum methods. Models that include a spatial and a temporal component are of interest for (e.g. birth cohort) studies that need exposure variables on a finer

  6. Assessment of spatial variation of ambient volatile organic compound levels at a power station in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Ashraf

    2017-11-01

    Twenty-four-hour integrated ambient air samples were collected in canisters at 10 locations within Kuwait's major power station: Doha West Power Station to assess the spatial distribution of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) within the perimeter of the station. A total of 30 samples, i.e., three samples per location, were collected during February and March. The samples were analyzed using a gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID) system and following the U.S. EPA Method TO-14A with modification. The results reflected the emission activities on the site and the meteorological conditions during sampling. Generally speaking, there was a negative correlation between the ambient temperature and the VOC concentrations, which indicates the sources were local. The halogenated compounds formed the highest proportion (i.e. 50-75 %) of the total VOC concentrations at the ten locations. 1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene and Vinyl Chloride concentrations were the highest amongst the other halogenated compounds. The aromatic compounds formed the least proportion (i.e. 1-4%) of the total VOC levels at all locations with Toluene having the highest concentrations amongst the aromatic compounds at seven locations. Propene, which is a major constituent of the fuel used, was the highest amongst the aliphatic compounds. The findings of this study and other relevant work suggests the measured VOC levels were the highest over the year, nevertheless, further work is required to assess the precisely temporal variation of VOC due to change in meteorological conditions and the emission rates. Assessment of VOC concentrations around a power plant in Kuwait during the peak season showed halogenated compounds to be the dominant group. The calculated indoor concentrations were lower than those reported in a residential area about 12 km away.

  7. Empirical study of ill-supported activities in variation risk identification and assessment in early stage product development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarklev, Kristian; Mortensen, Niels Henrik; Ebro, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present findings from an industrial case study about the support of activities related to identifying and assessing variation-related issues in the design during the concept- and embodiment design stages. The case study investigates a large world-leading mechanical...... and assess the variation risk. Ill-supported activities are found to be: Balancing hardness of requirements and the screening; communicating mechanism understanding; predicting user input and internal component movement; documenting and communicating tolerance analysis; implementing robustness in the early...

  8. Spaceborne Quantitative Assessment of Primary Production Variations in the Arctic Ocean Over the Previous Decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozdnyakov, D.; Petrenko, D.

    2015-04-01

    Spaceborne one month averaged data, predominantly from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and partly from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), were used to investigate changes in primary production (PP) by phytoplankton in the Arctic Ocean from 1998 till 2010. Several PP retrieval algorithms were tested against the collected in situ data, and it was shown that the algorithm by Behrenfeld and Falkowski gave the best results (with the coefficient of correlation, r equal to 0.8 and 0.75, respectively, for the pelagic and shelf zones. Based on the performed test, the Behrenfeld and Falkowski algorithm was further applied for determining both the annual PP in the Arctic and the PP trend over the aforementioned time period. The results of our analysis indicate that PP in the Arctic has increased by ~ 15.9% over 13 years. This finding, as well as the absolute annual values of PP remotely quantified in the present study, is at odds with analogous numerical assessments by other workers. These disagreements are thought to be due to differences in the applied methodologies of satellite data processing, such as cloud masking and determination of phytoplankton concentration within (i) overcast areas, and (ii) areas of massive growth of coccolithophore algae, as well as (iii) in the shelf zone prone to a significant influence of land and river runoff. Hindcast (a decadal long) and forecast projections of PP variations are performed.

  9. Pesticide Residues in Bovine Milk in Punjab, India: Spatial Variation and Risk Assessment to Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedi, J S; Gill, J P S; Aulakh, R S; Kaur, Prabhjit

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, gas chromatographic analysis of pesticide residues in bovine milk (n = 312) from Punjab, India, showed chlorpyrifos, DDT, and γ-HCH as the predominant contaminants. In addition, the presence of β-endosulfan, endosulfan suphate, cypermethrin, cyhalothrin, fenvalerate, deltamethrin, malathion, profenofos, and ethion was reported in milk samples. In this study, it was observed that 12 milk samples exceeded the maximum residue limits (MRLs) for γ-HCH (lindane), 18 for DDT and chlorpyrifos, and 1 sample each for endosulfan, cypermethrin, and profenophos. In India, DDT is still permitted for a malaria control program, which may be the plausible reason for its occurrence in milk samples. The spatial variation for presence of pesticide residues in milk indicated greater levels in cotton-growing areas of Punjab. At current levels of pesticide residues in bovine milk, the human health risk assessment in terms of noncancer and cancer hazard was calculated based on both lower-bound [LB (mean residue levels)] and upper-bound [UP (95th percentile level)] limits. It was noticed that cancer and noncancer risk were within United States Environmental Protection Agency prescribed limits for both adults and children at the LB, but children were being exposed to greater risk for DDT and HCH at the 95th-percentile UB level.

  10. Juglans regia L., phenotypic selection and assessment of genetic variation within a simulated seed orchard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulvio Ducci

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 14 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Noble hardwoods are very important for the Italian furniture industry. Since 1985, approximately 170,000 ha have been planted in Italy with noble hardwoods. Among them, about 50% of species are represented by walnuts. Walnut (Juglans regia L., not native in Italy, has been the focus of a substantial research effort for breeding and improvement programmes. The priority has been to preserve the in situ genetic resource still existing after intensive felling. Phenotypes suitable for timber production showing important traits such as straight stem, nice branch architecture, dominance and adaptation (phenology have needed to be developed and selected. In order to reach this goals, selection of valuable progenies and the evaluation of the interaction genotype x environment, methods based essentially on a multi-trait Selection Index, were developed. Studies have been undertaken also to measure the variation of phenological traits, more correlated to traits valuable for architecture; in addition, neutral markers were used to assess genetic variation among different intensities of the adopted selections. The individual genetic component was found to be higher than at the inter-population level. Results showed that a hypothetical seed orchard made with progenies selected by morphology, phenology and genetic traits could provide material with a good performance and supply a variability similar to larger populations as the total plantation or the pseudo-natural system chosen for comparison. st1\\:*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabella normale"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso

  11. Assessing spatiotemporal variation of drought and its impact on maize yield in Northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Enliang; Liu, Xingpeng; Zhang, Jiquan; Wang, Yongfang; Wang, Cailin; Wang, Rui; Li, Danjun

    2017-10-01

    In the context of global climate change, drought has become an important factor that affects the maize yield in China. To analyse the impact of drought on maize yield loss in Northeast China in current and future climate scenarios, the Composite Meteorological Drought Index (CI) is introduced to reconstruct the following drought indicators: drought accumulative days (DAD), drought accumulative intensity (DAI), and consecutive drought days (CDD). These three drought indicators are used to describe the three-dimensional characteristics of drought in this study. Sen's slope method and three-dimensional copula functions are adopted to analyse the variety of drought features, and Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) is used to analyse the variations in maize yield. A temporal assessment of the standardized yield residuals series (SYRS) of maize from 1961 to 2014 is conducted. A panel regression model is applied to demonstrate the drought impact on maize yield at various growth stages under the RCP4.5 scenario. The results show that the drought risk level for midwest Jilin Province, western Liaoning, and eastern Heilongjiang increase with global warming in the current scenario. The shorter three-dimensional joint return periods, 44-80 yr, were mainly located in western Jilin Province, Liaodong Peninsula, and northwestern Liaoning. Eastern Heilongjiang has a slightly longer joint return period of 80-100 yr. The SYRS shows a strong statistical correlation with drought indicator variations; drought-prone regions exhibit strong positive correlations. In comparison, excess precipitation regions show strong negative correlations with drought indicators in most growth stages. Drought indicators have a relatively strong association with SYRS at the milky-mature maize growth stage, and the occurrence of drought during this period primarily determines the maize yield changes in the future. Maize yield changes are -2.04%, -2.65% and -1.57% for Liaoning, Jilin, and

  12. Sources of variation in assessing left atrial functions by 2D speckle-tracking echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimbaş, Roxana Cristina; Mihăilă, Sorina; Vinereanu, Dragoş

    2016-03-01

    Left atrial (LA) strain and strain rate, determined by speckle-tracking echocardiography (STE), are reproducible indices to assess LA function. Different normal ranges for LA phasic functions have been reported. We investigated the role of the reference point (P- and R-wave), gain, and region of interest (ROI), as the major sources of variation when assessing LA function. 52 subjects were evaluated for LA conventional and STE analysis. 45 of them (46 ± 14 years, 26 men) were feasible for concomitant LA deformation, and LA phasic volumes and ejection fractions (LAEF) evaluation. First, we compared the P- and R-wave methods, for the evaluation of the LA functions. We used diastolic mitral profile to clearly delineate the time intervals for each LA function. For the P-wave method, active function was assessed from negative global strain as a difference between the strain at pre-atrial contraction and strain just before mitral valve closure (GSA-), and late diastolic strain rate (GSRL); passive function from positive strain at MVO (GSA+), and from early negative diastolic strain rate (GSRE); reservoir function from the sum of GSA- and GSA+ (TGSA), and positive strain rate at the beginning of LV systole (GSR+). For the R-wave method we used the same SR parameters. The active function was evaluated by late positive global strain (GSAC), the reservoir by positive peak before the opening of the mitral valve (TGSA), and conduit function by the difference between TGSA and GSAC (GSA+). Then, by using P-wave method, we measured all previously described parameters for different gains-minimum (G0), medium (G12), and maximum (G24), and for different ROIs-minimum (ROI0), step 1 (ROI1), and 2 (ROI2). Feasibility of the LA strain measurements was 87 %. Active LA function was similar in the absolute value (GSAC and GSA-), whereas passive and reservoir functions were significantly higher (GSA+, TGSA) with the R-wave method. Active LAEF correlated with GSA- measured by the P-wave (r

  13. The Influence of deep-sea bed CO2 sequestration on small metazoan (meiofaunal) community structure and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carman, Kevin R. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Fleeger, John W. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Thistle, David [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

    2013-02-17

    We conducted a series of experiments in Monterey Submarine Canyon to examine potential ecological impacts of deep-ocean CO2meiofaunal invertebrates (< 1 mm body length) living within the sediment at depths ranging between 3000-3600 m. Our particular emphasis was on harpacticoid copepods and nematodes. In the first phase of our DOE funding, we reported findings that suggest substantial (~80%) mortality to harpacticoid copepods. In the second phase of our funding we published additional findings from phase one and conducted follow-up experiments in the Monterey Canyon and in the laboratory. In one experiment we looked for evidence that meiofauna seek to escape areas where CO22

  14. Geospatial approach for assessment of biophysical vulnerability to agricultural drought and its intra-seasonal variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehgal, Vinay Kumar; Dhakar, Rajkumar

    2016-03-01

    The study presents a methodology to assess and map agricultural drought vulnerability during main kharif crop season at local scale and compare its intra-seasonal variations. A conceptual model of vulnerability based on variables of exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity was adopted, and spatial datasets of key biophysical factors contributing to vulnerability were generated using remote sensing and GIS for Rajasthan State of India. Hazard exposure was based on frequency and intensity of gridded standardized precipitation index (SPI). Agricultural sensitivity was based on soil water holding capacity as well as on frequency and intensity of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI)-derived trend adjusted vegetation condition index (VCITadj). Percent irrigated area was used as a measure of adaptive capacity. Agricultural drought vulnerability was derived separately for early, mid, late, and whole kharif seasons by composting rating of factors using linear weighting scheme and pairwise comparison of multi-criteria evaluation. The regions showing very low to extreme rating of hazard exposure, drought sensitivity, and agricultural vulnerability were identified at all four time scales. The results indicate that high to extreme vulnerability occurs in more than 50% of net sown area in the state and such areas mostly occur in western, central, and southern parts. The higher vulnerability is on account of non-irrigated croplands, moderate to low water holding capacity of sandy soils, resulting in higher sensitivity, and located in regions with high probability of rainfall deficiency. The mid and late season vulnerability has been found to be much higher than that during early and whole season. Significant correlation of vulnerability rating with food grain productivity, drought recurrence period, crop area damaged in year 2009 and socioeconomic indicator of human development index (HDI) proves the general soundness of methodology. Replication of this methodology

  15. Effect of diurnal and seasonal temperature variation on Cussac cave ventilation using co2 assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyraube, Nicolas; Lastennet, Roland; Villanueva, Jessica Denila; Houillon, Nicolas; Malaurent, Philippe; Denis, Alain

    2017-08-01

    Cussac cave was investigated to assess the cave air temperature variations and to understand its ventilation regime. This cave is located in an active karst system in the south west part of France. It has a single entrance and is considered as a cold air trap. In this study, air mass exchanges were probed. Measurements of temperature and Pco2 with a 30-min frequency were made in several locations close to the cave entrance. Speed of the air flow was also measured at the door of cave entrance. Results show that cave air Pco2 varies from 0.18 to 3.33 %. This cave appears to be a CO2 source with a net mass of 2319 tons blown in 2009. Carbon-stable isotope of CO2 (13Cco2) ranges from -20.6 ‰ in cold season to -23.8 ‰ in warm season. Cave air is interpreted as a result of a mix between external air and an isotopically depleted air, coming from the rock environment. The isotopic value of the light member varies through time, from -23.9 to -22.5 ‰. Furthermore, this study ascertains that the cave never stops in communicating with the external air. The ventilation regime is identified. (1) In cold season, the cave inhales at night and blows a little at the warmest hours. However, in warm season, (2) cave blows at night, but (3) during the day, a convection loop takes place in the entrance area and prevents the external air from entering the cave, confirming the cold air trap.

  16. Assessment of climate-driven variations in malaria incidence in Swaziland: toward malaria elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Ting-Wu; Soble, Adam; Ntshalintshali, Nyasatu; Mkhonta, Nomcebo; Seyama, Eric; Mthethwa, Steven; Pindolia, Deepa; Kunene, Simon

    2017-06-01

    Swaziland aims to eliminate malaria by 2020. However, imported cases from neighbouring endemic countries continue to sustain local parasite reservoirs and initiate transmission. As certain weather and climatic conditions may trigger or intensify malaria outbreaks, identification of areas prone to these conditions may aid decision-makers in deploying targeted malaria interventions more effectively. Malaria case-surveillance data for Swaziland were provided by Swaziland's National Malaria Control Programme. Climate data were derived from local weather stations and remote sensing images. Climate parameters and malaria cases between 2001 and 2015 were then analysed using seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average models and distributed lag non-linear models (DLNM). The incidence of malaria in Swaziland increased between 2005 and 2010, especially in the Lubombo and Hhohho regions. A time-series analysis indicated that warmer temperatures and higher precipitation in the Lubombo and Hhohho administrative regions are conducive to malaria transmission. DLNM showed that the risk of malaria increased in Lubombo when the maximum temperature was above 30 °C or monthly precipitation was above 5 in. In Hhohho, the minimum temperature remaining above 15 °C or precipitation being greater than 10 in. might be associated with malaria transmission. This study provides a preliminary assessment of the impact of short-term climate variations on malaria transmission in Swaziland. The geographic separation of imported and locally acquired malaria, as well as population behaviour, highlight the varying modes of transmission, part of which may be relevant to climate conditions. Thus, the impact of changing climate conditions should be noted as Swaziland moves toward malaria elimination.

  17. Assessing intraspecific variation in effective dispersal along an altitudinal gradient: a test in two Mediterranean high-mountain plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Lara-Romero

    . Our results call for a case-by-case analysis in a wider range of plant taxa and environments to assess the prevalence and magnitude of intraspecific dispersal variation.

  18. Assessment of the biological variation of plasma tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Camilla; Lomholt, A F; Lottenburger, T

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 (TIMP-1) measurements in plasma may be useful for the early detection and prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Data on analytical performance and normal intra- and interindividual biological variation are required in order to interpret...... the utility of TIMP-1 in CRC. The aim of this study was to establish the biological and analytical variation of plasma TIMP-1 in volunteers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three separate studies were undertaken. 1: Plasma was collected from 23 volunteers 6 times within a 3-week period, first in September 2004 (round.......4%, and the intraclass correlation was 46.2%. Comparison between the 3 rounds and time of collection showed that TIMP-1 values decreased by 11% after storage for more than 16 months (p=0.0002). A systematic circadian variation in plasma TIMP-1 levels was not observed (p=0.17). No significant variation of plasma TIMP-1...

  19. Assessment of BeiDou differential code bias variations from multi-GNSS network observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, S. G.; Jin, R.; Li, D.

    2016-02-01

    The differential code bias (DCB) of global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs) affects precise ionospheric modeling and applications. In this paper, daily DCBs of the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) are estimated and investigated from 2-year multi-GNSS network observations (2013-2014) based on global ionospheric maps (GIMs) from the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE), which are compared with Global Positioning System (GPS) results. The DCB of BDS satellites is a little less stable than GPS solutions, especially for geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) satellites. The BDS GEO observations decrease the precision of inclined geosynchronous satellite orbit (IGSO) and medium Earth orbit (MEO) DCB estimations. The RMS of BDS satellites DCB decreases to about 0.2 ns when we remove BDS GEO observations. Zero-mean condition effects are not the dominant factor for the higher RMS of BDS satellites DCB. Although there are no obvious secular variations in the DCB time series, sub-nanosecond variations are visible for both BDS and GPS satellites DCBs during 2013-2014. For satellites in the same orbital plane, their DCB variations have similar characteristics. In addition, variations in receivers DCB in the same region are found with a similar pattern between BDS and GPS. These variations in both GPS and BDS DCBs are mainly related to the estimated error from ionospheric variability, while the BDS DCB intrinsic variation is in sub-nanoseconds.

  20. Phonetic variations and sound changes in Hong Kong Cantonese: diachronic review, synchronic study and implications for speech sound assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Carol K S; Mcleod, Sharynne; Cheung, Pamela S P

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this article was to describe phonetic variations and sound changes in Hong Kong Cantonese (HKC) to provide speech-language pathologists with information about acceptable variants of standard pronunciations for speech sound assessments. Study 1 examined the pattern of variations and changes based on past diachronic research and historical written records. Nine phonetic variations were found. Five in syllable-initial and syllabic contexts: (1) [n-] → [l-], (2) [ŋ-] → Ø-, (3) Ø- → [ŋ-], (4) [k(w)ɔ-] → [kɔ-], (5) syllabic [ŋ̍] → [m̩]; and four in syllable-final contexts: (6) [-ŋ] → [-n], (7) [-n] → [-ŋ], (8) [-k] → [-t], (9) [-t] → [-k]. Historical records demonstrated the pattern of variation and changes in HKC across time. In study 2, a large-scale synchronic study of speakers of differing ages was undertaken to determine acceptable phonetic variations of HKC for speech sound assessments. In the synchronic study, single-words were elicited from 138 children (10;8-12;4) and 112 adults (18-45 years) who spoke Cantonese and lived in Hong Kong. Synchronic evidence demonstrated five acceptable variants in syllable-initial and syllabic contexts: (1) [n-] → [l-], (2) [ŋ-] → Ø-, (3) Ø- → [ŋ-], (4) [k(w)ɔ-] → [kɔ-] and (5) syllabic [ŋ̍] → [m̩] and four incomplete sound changes in syllable-final contexts: (6) [-ŋ] → [-n], (7) [-n] → [-ŋ], (8) [-k] → [-t] and (9) [-t] → [-k]. The incomplete sound changes may still be accepted as variants in speech sound assessments unless related speech problems are indicated.

  1. Roentgenologic assessment of spondylolisthesis. Pt. 1. A study of measurement variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danielson, B.; Frennered, K.; Irstam, L.

    Variations when measuring slip and lumbar index were studied in three lumbar specimens with different degrees of artificially created L5-S1 spondylolysthesis. Lateral radiographs were obtained with the specimens tilted and/or rotated mimicking an every-day examination situation. Slip and lumbar index were measured; slip was estimated according to a measuring method advocated by Boxall et coll. but slightly modified by us. Six radiologistis evaluated each film independently. The magnitude of interobserver and intraobserver errors and variations due to positioning was found to be equally large-about 15 per cent each. Although the total measurement variation was not equal to the sum of errors involved, radiologic evaluation of degree of spondylolisthesis was found to be highly unreliable.

  2. Variation in Teachers' Conceptions of Alternative Assessment in Singapore Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kelvin H. K.

    2013-01-01

    Alternative assessment is an increasingly common and popular discourse in education. The potential value and benefit of alternative assessment practices are premised on significant changes in assessment practices. Many alternative assessment practices seek and promise alternatives to tests and examinations. However, labelling a practice as…

  3. Empirical study of ill-supported activities in variation risk identification and assessment in early stage product development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarklev, Kristian; Mortensen, Niels Henrik; Ebro, Martin

    2017-01-01

    medical device company by interviewing six key employees that work in the variation risk identification and assessment process. It is found that there are several ill-supported activities, and that the project teams rely heavily on tolerance experts’ assistance and experience in order to identify...... definition of the projects; and implementing statistical information in the calculations. It is suggested these areas should be supported further....

  4. Estimating the Robustness of Composite CBA and MCDA Assessments by Variation of Criteria Importance Order

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders Vestergaard; Barfod, Michael Bruhn; Leleur, Steen

    2011-01-01

    Abstract This paper discusses the concept of using rank variation concerning the stakeholder prioritising of importance criteria for exploring the sensitivity of criteria weights in multi-criteria analysis (MCA). Thereby the robustness of the MCA-based decision support can be tested. The analysis...

  5. Incorporating latitudinal and central–marginal trends in assessing genetic variation across species ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qinfeng Guo

    2012-01-01

    The genetic variation across a species’ range is an important factor in speciation and conservation, yet searching for general patterns and underlying causes remains challenging. While the majority of comparisons between central and marginal populations have revealed a general central–marginal (C-M) decline in genetic diversity, others show no clear pattern. Similarly...

  6. Assessment of atmospheric processes driving ozone variations in the subtropical North Atlantic free troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Cuevas

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of the 22-yr ozone (O3 series (1988–2009 at the subtropical high mountain Izaña~station (IZO; 2373 m a.s.l., representative of free troposphere (FT conditions, is presented. Diurnal and seasonal O3 variations as well as the O3 trend (0.19 ± 0.05 % yr−1 or 0.09 ppbv yr−1, are assessed. A climatology of O3 transport pathways using backward trajectories shows that higher O3 values are associated with air masses travelling above 4 km altitude from North America and North Atlantic Ocean, while low O3 is transported from the Saharan continental boundary layer (CBL. O3 data have been compared with PM10, 210Pb, 7Be, potential vorticity (PV and carbon monoxide (CO. A clear negative logarithmic relationship was observed between PM10 and surface O3 for all seasons. A similar relationship was found between O3 and 210Pb. The highest daily O3 values (90th percentile are observed in spring and in the first half of summer time. A positive correlation between O3 and PV, and between O3 and 7Be is found throughout the year, indicating that relatively high surface O3 values at IZO originate from the middle and upper troposphere. We find a good correlation between O3 and CO in winter, supporting the hypothesis of long-range transport of photochemically generated O3 from North America. Aged air masses, in combination with sporadic inputs from the upper troposphere, are observed in spring, summer and autumn. In summer time high O3 values seem to be the result of stratosphere-to-troposphere (STT exchange processes in regions neighbouring the Canary Islands. Since 1995–1996, the North Atlantic Oscillation has changed from a predominantly high positive phase to alternating between negative

  7. Variation in assessment and standard setting practices across UK undergraduate medicine and the need for a benchmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, Margaret

    2015-10-31

    The principal aim of this study is to provide an account of variation in UK undergraduate medical assessment styles and corresponding standard setting approaches with a view to highlighting the importance of a UK national licensing exam in recognizing a common standard. Using a secure online survey system, response data were collected during the period 13 - 30 January 2014 from selected specialists in medical education assessment, who served as representatives for their respective medical schools. Assessment styles and corresponding choices of standard setting methods vary markedly across UK medical schools. While there is considerable consensus on the application of compensatory approaches, individual schools display their own nuances through use of hybrid assessment and standard setting styles, uptake of less popular standard setting techniques and divided views on norm referencing. The extent of variation in assessment and standard setting practices across UK medical schools validates the concern that there is a lack of evidence that UK medical students achieve a common standard on graduation. A national licensing exam is therefore a viable option for benchmarking the performance of all UK undergraduate medical students.

  8. Assessing diel variation of CH4 flux from rice paddies through temperature patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centeno, Caesar Arloo R.; Alberto, Ma Carmelita R.; Wassmann, Reiner; Sander, Bjoern Ole

    2017-10-01

    The diel variation in methane (CH4) flux from irrigated rice was characterized during the dry and wet cropping seasons in 2013 and 2014 using the eddy covariance (EC) technique. The EC technique has the advantage of obtaining measurements of fluxes at an extremely high temporal resolution (10Hz), meaning it records 36,000 measurements per hour. The EC measurements can very well capture the temporal variations of the diel (both diurnal and nocturnal) fluxes of CH4 and the environmental factors (temperature, surface energy flux, and gross ecosystem photosynthesis) at 30-min intervals. The information generated by this technique is important to enhance our mechanistic understanding of the different factors affecting the landscape scale diel CH4 flux. Distinct diel patterns of CH4 flux were observed when the data were partitioned into different cropping periods (pre-planting, growth, and fallow). The temporal variations of the diel CH4 flux during the dry seasons were more pronounced than during the wet seasons because the latter had so much climatic disturbance from heavy monsoon rains and occasional typhoons. Pearson correlation analysis and Granger causality test were used to confirm if the environmental factors evaluated were not only correlated with but also Granger-causing the diel CH4 flux. Soil temperature at 2.5 cm depth (Ts 2.5 cm) can be used as simple proxy for predicting diel variations of CH4 fluxes in rice paddies using simple linear regression during both the dry and wet seasons. This simple site-specific temperature response function can be used for gap-filling CH4 flux data for improving the estimates of CH4 source strength from irrigated rice production.

  9. Using Acoustics to Determine Eelgrass Bed Distribution and to Assess the Seasonal Variation of Ecosystem Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoki, Shiori; Shao, Huamei; Morita, Yuka; Minami, Kenji; Shoji, Jun; Hori, Masakazu; Miyashita, Kazushi

    2016-01-01

    Eelgrass beds are an important source of primary production in coastal ecosystems. Understanding seasonal variation in the abundance and distribution of eelgrass is important for conservation, and the objectives of this study were to 1) monitor seasonal variation in eelgrass beds using an acoustic monitoring method (Quantitative echo sounder) and 2) broadly quantify the carbon circulation function. We obtained acoustic data of eelgrass beds in coastal areas north and east of Ikunojima Island. Surveys were conducted nine times over the 3-year period from 2011 to 2013 in order to monitor seasonal variation. Acoustic data were obtained and used to estimate the spatial distribution of eelgrass by geostatistical methods. To determine supporting services, we determined carbon sink and carbon fixation by eelgrass beds using data from the National Research Institute of Fisheries and Environment of Inland Sea (2011). The height and distribution of eelgrass beds were at a maximum in May and at a minimum in November of each year. Distribution trends were different between the north and east areas. Supporting services showed the same patterns throughout the year. The area of distribution was considered to be coincident with the life history of eelgrass. Distribution differed by area and changed yearly due to the effects of bottom characteristics and wind direction. Quantifying the supporting services of eelgrass beds was shown to be useful for managing the conservation of coastal ecosystems.

  10. Inter-species and intra-annual variations of moss nitrogen utilization: Implications for nitrogen deposition assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yu-Ping; Liu, Xue-Yan; Sun, Xin-Chao; Song, Wei; Zheng, Xu-Dong; Li, Rui; Liu, Cong-Qiang

    2017-11-01

    Moss nitrogen (N) concentrations and natural 15N abundance (δ15N values) have been widely employed to evaluate annual levels and major sources of atmospheric N deposition. However, different moss species and one-off sampling were often used among extant studies, it remains unclear whether moss N parameters differ with species and different samplings, which prevented more accurate assessment of N deposition via moss survey. Here concentrations, isotopic ratios of bulk carbon (C) and bulk N in natural epilithic mosses (Bryum argenteum, Eurohypnum leptothallum, Haplocladium microphyllum and Hypnum plumaeforme) were measured monthly from August 2006 to August 2007 at Guiyang, SW China. The H. plumaeforme had significantly (P < 0.05) lower bulk N concentrations and higher δ13C values than other species. Moss N concentrations were significantly (P < 0.05) lower in warmer months than in cooler months, while moss δ13C values exhibited an opposite pattern. The variance component analyses showed that different species contributed more variations of moss N concentrations and δ13C values than different samplings. Differently, δ15N values did not differ significantly between moss species, and its variance mainly reflected variations of assimilated N sources, with ammonium as the dominant contributor. These results unambiguously reveal the influence of inter-species and intra-annual variations of moss N utilization on N deposition assessment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A review of land-use regression models to assess spatial variation of outdoor air pollution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hoek, Gerard; Beelen, Rob; de Hoogh, Kees; Vienneau, Danielle; Gulliver, John; Fischer, Paul; Briggs, David

    2008-01-01

    .... Current approaches for assessing intra-urban air pollution contrasts include the use of exposure indicator variables, interpolation methods, dispersion models and land-use regression (LUR) models...

  12. Variation in assessment of oxidatively damaged DNA in mononuclear blood cells by the comet assay with visual scoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Lykke; Bräuner, Elvira Vaclavik; Folkmann, Janne Kjaersgaard

    2008-01-01

    The comet assay is popular for assessments of genotoxicity, but the comparison of results between studies is challenging because of differences in experimental procedures and reports of DNA damage in different units. We investigated the variation of DNA damage in mononuclear blood cells (MNBCs......) measured by the comet assay with focus on the variation related to alkaline unwinding and electrophoresis time, number of cells scored, as well as the putative benefits of transforming the primary end points to common units by the use of reference standards and calibration curves. Eight experienced......, our results indicate that inter-investigator difference in scoring is a strong determinant of DNA damage levels measured by the comet assay....

  13. Preliminary Assessment of Methane Concentration Variation Observed by GOSAT in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuchun Qin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric column-averaged methane (XCH4 observations from GOSAT are analyzed to study the spatiotemporal variation of XCH4 in China. Furthermore, we investigate the driving mechanism of XCH4 spatiotemporal variations, especially for high XCH4 values shown over Sichuan Basin, by analyzing both the emission mechanism of rice planting process and the regional atmosphere dynamic transportation. The results indicate that spatially the Sichuan Basin presents a higher XCH4 concentration than other regions in China and is 17 ppb higher than the paddy area in the same latitude zone. Seasonally, XCH4 in Sichuan Basin during rice harvest season is generally higher than that in early cultivation period. However, comparing to paddy area in the same latitude zone, Sichuan Basin shows a relatively higher XCH4 value during the winter of noncultivation period when the emissions from rice paddies are weak and surface air temperature is low. To further investigate the high XCH4 concentration during this low-emission period, we use the HYSPLIT model to simulate the atmosphere dynamic transport process, and the result suggests that the typical closed topography of Sichuan Basin, which may lead to CH4 accumulation and keep it from diffusion, is one possible reason for the high XCH4 value in winter.

  14. Assessment of broiler surface temperature variation when exposed to different air temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GR Nascimento

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the effect of the air temperature variation on the mean surface temperature (MST of 7- to 35-day-old broiler chickens using infrared thermometry to estimate MST, and to study surface temperature variation of the wings, head, legs, back and comb as affected by air temperature and broiler age. One hundred Cobb® broilers were used in the experiment. Starting on day 7, 10 birds were weekly selected at random, housed in an environmental chamber and reared under three distinct temperatures (18, 25 and 32 ºC to record their thermal profile using an infrared thermal camera. The recorded images were processed to estimate MST by selecting the whole area of the bird within the picture and comparing it with the values obtained using selected equations in literature, and to record the surface temperatures of the body parts. The MST estimated by infrared images were not statistically different (p > 0.05 from the values obtained by the equations. MST values significantly increased (p < 0.05 when the air temperature increased, but were not affected by bird age. However, age influenced the difference between MST and air temperature, which was highest on day 14. The technique of infrared thermal image analysis was useful to estimate the mean surface temperature of broiler chickens.

  15. Assessment of micro-mechanical variations in experimental arteriovenous fistulae using atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurito, Tyler; Sueiras, Vivian; Fernandez, Natasha; Escobar, Luis A; Martinez, Laisel; Andreopoulos, Fotios; Salman, Loay H; Vazquez-Padron, Roberto I; Ziebarth, Noël M

    2016-05-07

    This study presents a method to quantify micro-stiffness variations in experimental arteriovenous fistulae (AVF). AVF created by anastomosing the superficial epigastric vein to the femoral artery in Sprague-Dawley rats were allowed to remodel for 21 days before being harvested and preserved in culture medium. A custom atomic force microscope was used to measure microvascular stiffness (Young's modulus) in three areas of the AVF: the inflow artery, the juxta-anastomotic area, and the outflow vein. Morphometric measurements and collagen and elastin contents were also determined. Atomic force microscopy indentation revealed an increased stiffness in the juxta-anastomotic area of the AVF compared to the outflow vein and inflow artery. The juxta-anastomotic area was also significantly stiffer than the contralateral vein. The lack of elasticity (higher Young's modulus) of the juxta-anastomotic region was associated with a thicker vascular wall that was rich in collagen but poor in elastin. This study demonstrates for the first time the feasibility of using atomic force microscopy to measure local stiffness variations in experimental AVF. This technique could be instrumental in advancing our understanding of how micro-spatial organization of the AVF wall determines the overall biomechanical performance of this type of vascular access.

  16. Assessment of genetic variation for pathogen-specific mastitis resistance in Valle del Belice dairy sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolone, Marco; Larrondo, Cristian; Yáñez, José M; Newman, Scott; Sardina, Maria Teresa; Portolano, Baldassare

    2016-07-28

    Mastitis resistance is a complex and multifactorial trait, and its expression depends on both genetic and environmental factors, including infection pressure. The objective of this research was to determine the genetic basis of mastitis resistance to specific pathogens using a repeatability threshold probit animal model. The most prevalent isolated pathogens were coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS); 39 % of records and 77 % of the animals infected at least one time in the whole period of study. There was significant genetic variation only for Streptococci (STR). In addition, there was a positive genetic correlation between STR and all pathogens together (ALL) (0.36 ± 0.22), and CNS and ALL (0.92 ± 0.04). The results of our study support the presence of significant genetic variation for mastitis caused by Streptococci and suggest the importance of discriminating between different pathogens causing mastitis due to the fact that they most likely influence different genetic traits. Low heritabilities for pathogen specific-mastitis resistance may be considered when including bacteriological status as a measure of mastitis presence to implement breeding strategies for improving udder health in dairy ewes.

  17. Assessment of Coral Sr/Ca Variations in Orbicella faveolata Colonies in Veracruz, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLong, K. L.; Cobb, R.; Wagner, A. J.; Hudson, J. H.; Ouellette, G., Jr.; Herrmann, A. D.

    2016-02-01

    Orbicella (formerly Montastraea) faveolata is an Atlantic massive coral species used by paleoclimatologists to reconstruct monthly- and annually-resolved sea surface temperature (SST) variations. Previous studies found discrepancies in coral strontium-to-calcium ratios (Sr/Ca) among colonies separated by meters to kilometers possibly attributed to either biological processes inherent to each colony, environmental differences at each coral site, and/or sampling-analytical methods. Here we examine coral Sr/Ca variations in five O. faveolata colonies offshore from Veracruz, Mexico (19.06ºN, 96.93ºW), two colonies from different water depths (3 and 6 m) in the same local reef environment (Santiaguillo) and three colonies in nearby reefs closer to the mainland (water depth of 4, 6, and 12 m); all colonies were cored in 1993. We control for sampling-analytical methods by using a refined sampling protocol that follows a corallite thecal wall that is parallel to the coral slab surface (i.e., optimal alignment) and we use the same analytical method and instrument for all colonies. Coral annual growth rates decrease by 44% for colonies in deeper water (12 m) with no significant correlation in annual growth rates among the colonies. Monthly coral Sr/Ca determinations co-vary among colonies up to 16 km apart suggesting a common environmental signal. Means in coral Sr/Ca among the colonies is similar until 1986 when a divergence occurs that does not follow the expected differences due to water depth and growth rate. The two colonies farthest from the mainland (Santiaguillo) have similar means and coral Sr/Ca variations from 1986-1993. In the mid-1980s, Veracruz experienced changes in land use with increased river runoff delivering more sediment to the ocean that could shift seawater chemistry in coastal waters causing the observed coral Sr/Ca divergence in the near shore colonies. Increased sedimentation could stress coral colonies causes different biological responses

  18. Diurnal Variation of Pulse Wave Velocity Assessed Non-Invasively by Applanation Tonometry in Young Healthy Men

    OpenAIRE

    Bodlaj, Gerd; Berg, Joerg; Biesenbach, Georg

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is at least partially controlled by vascular tone. Vascular tone and underlying physiological processes such as sympathetic activity, plasma catecholamin, and cortisol levels have been shown to follow diurnal variations. Materials and Methods Carotid-to-radial PWV was non-invasively assessed by applanation tonometry in 21 young (26.5 ? 2.3 years) healthy men at three different time points (8:00hr, 12:00hr, 17:00hr) during a day. Additionally, heart rate, syst...

  19. Comprehensive assessment of geographic variation in heat tolerance and hardening capacity in populations of Drosophila melanogaster from eastern Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sgro, Carla M.; Overgaard, Johannes; Kristensen, Torsten Nygård

    2010-01-01

    We examined latitudinal variation in adult and larval heat tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster from eastern Australia. Adults were assessed using static and ramping assays. Basal and hardened static heat knockdown time showed significant linear clines; heat tolerance increased towards the tropics......, particularly for hardened flies, suggesting that tropical populations have a greater hardening response. A similar pattern was evident for ramping heat knockdown time at 0.06 degrees C min-1 increase. There was no cline for ramping heat knockdown temperature (CTmax) at 0.1 degrees C min-1 increase. Acute...

  20. The importance of spatial variation of benthic invertebrates for the ecological assessment of European lakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solimini, Angelo G.; Sandin, Leif Leonard

    2012-01-01

    variability. However, littoral and profundal invertebrate communities are constrained by different drivers of change and may respond unevenly to distinct human disturbances. How human disturbances determined by different pressures interact in modifying the distribution of benthic invertebrate species......, funded by the European Union under the 7th Framework Programme), we collated several case studies with the aim to increase our understanding of basic sources of spatial variation of invertebrate assemblages. The set of papers includes a variety of different European lakes, habitat types and human...... pressures from the Nordic, Central, Atlantic, Alpine and Mediterranean regions. All papers have an obvious applied objective and suggest which factors need to be considered when designing invertebrate-based classification tools....

  1. A Multi-Variate Predictability Framework to Assess Invasive Cardiac Activity and Interactions During Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaine, Alejandro; Mase, Michela; Cristoforetti, Alessandro; Ravelli, Flavia; Nollo, Giandomenico; Laguna, Pablo; Martinez, Juan Pablo; Faes, Luca

    2017-05-01

    This study introduces a predictability framework based on the concept of Granger causality (GC), in order to analyze the activity and interactions between different intracardiac sites during atrial fibrillation (AF). GC-based interactions were studied using a three-electrode analysis scheme with multi-variate autoregressive models of the involved preprocessed intracardiac signals. The method was evaluated in different scenarios covering simulations of complex atrial activity as well as endocardial signals acquired from patients. The results illustrate the ability of the method to determine atrial rhythm complexity and to track and map propagation during AF. The proposed framework provides information on the underlying activation and regularity, does not require activation detection or postprocessing algorithms and is applicable for the analysis of any multielectrode catheter. The proposed framework can potentially help to guide catheter ablation interventions of AF.

  2. Occurrence, seasonal variation and risk assessment of antibiotics in the reservoirs in North China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Zhang, Xinbo; Wu, Wei; Zhao, Xinhua

    2014-09-01

    The occurrence and seasonal variability of five groups (tetracycline, quinolone, chloramphenicol, macrolide and sulfonamide) of antibiotics were investigated in the surface water of four reservoirs. The dissolved concentrations of 29 antibiotics were in the ngL(-1) level. Trace levels of all target antibiotics were analyzed using solid-phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. All of the antibiotics were detected at all sampling sites, indicating widespread occurrence of antibiotics in the study area. The detection of florfenicol, josamycin, kitasamycin, spiramycin and sulfameter is the first report of these compounds in reservoir samples. The results showed an association between the presence of some antibiotics at Panjiakou reservoir and cage culture of fish. Twenty-three types of antibiotics showed significant seasonal variations (pantibiotics detected could cause very low risk to algae, daphnid and fish. Further health risk need to be investigated because these reservoirs are drinking water sources. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Estimating the robustness of composite CBA & MCA assessments by variation of criteria importance order

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anders Vestergaard; Barfod, Michael Bruhn; Leleur, Steen

    that the outcome of the method is a subset of the total solution space. The paper finishes up with a discussion and considerations about how to present the results. The question whether to present a single decision criterion, such as the benefit-cost rate or the net present value, or instead to present graphs......, the proposed method uses surrogate weights based on rankings of the criteria, by the use of Rank Order Distribution (ROD) weights [3]. This reduces the problem to assigning a rank order value for each criterion. A method for combining the MCA with the cost-benefit analysis (CBA) is applied as described...... there are 40340 (8!) possible combinations of ranking the criteria which have been made use of. The proposed method calculates all combinations and produces a set of rank variation graphs for each alternative and for different values of the trade-off indicator. This information is relatively easy to grasp...

  4. Assessment of Vegetation Variation on Primarily Creation Zones of the Dust Storms Around the Euphrates Using Remote Sensing Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamil Amanollahi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, period frequency and effect domain of the dust storms that enter Iran from Iraq have increased. In this study, in addition to detecting the creation zones of the dust storms, the effect of vegetation cover variation on their creation was investigated using remote sensing. Moderate resolution image Spectroradiometer (MODIS and Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM5 have been utilized to identify the primarily creation zones of the dust storms and to assess the vegetation cover variation, respectively. Vegetation cover variation was studied using Normalized Differences Vegetation Index (NDVI obtained from band 3 and band 4 of the Landsate satellite. The results showed that the surrounding area of the Euphrates in Syria, the desert in the vicinity of this river in Iraq, including the deserts of Alanbar Province, and the north deserts of Saudi Arabia are the primarily creation zones of the dust storms entering west and south west of Iran. The results of NDVI showed that excluding the deserts in the border of Syria and Iraq, the area with very weak vegetation cover have increased between 2.44% and 20.65% from 1991 to 2009. In the meanwhile, the retention pound surface areas in the south deserts of Syria as well as the deserts in its border with Iraq have decreased 6320 and 4397 hectares, respectively. As it can be concluded from the findings, one of the main environmental parameters initiating these dust storms is the decrease in the vegetation cover in their primarily creation zones.

  5. Genetic variation assessed with microsatellites in mass selection lines of the Pacific oyster ( Crassostrea gigas) in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xubo; Li, Qi; Yu, Hong; Kong, Lingfeng

    2016-12-01

    Four successive mass selection lines of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, selected for faster growth in breeding programs in China were examined at ten polymorphic microsatellite loci to assess the level of allelic diversity and estimate the effective population size. These data were compared with those of their base population. The results showed that the genetic variation of the four generations were maintained at high levels with an average allelic richness of 18.8-20.6, and a mean expected heterozygosity of 0.902-0.921. They were not reduced compared with those of their base population. Estimated effective population sizes based on temporal variances in microsatellite frequencies were smaller to that of sex ratio-corrected broodstock count estimates. Using a relatively large number of broodstock and keeping an equal sex ratio in the broodstock each generation may have contributed to retaining the original genetic diversity and maintaining relatively large effective population size. The results obtained in this study showed that the genetic variation was not affected greatly by mass selection progress and high genetic variation still existed in the mass selection lines, suggesting that there is still potential for increasing the gains in future generations of C. gigas. The present study provided important information for future genetic improvement by selective breeding, and for the design of suitable management guidelines for genetic breeding of C. gigas.

  6. In silico assessment of genetic variation in KCNA5 reveals multiple mechanisms of human atrial arrhythmogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colman, Michael A; Ni, Haibo; Liang, Bo

    2017-01-01

    investigated at the cellular level. In tissue, we assessed the effects of the mutations on the vulnerability to unidirectional conduction patterns and dynamics of re-entrant excitation waves. Gain-of-function mutations shortened the action potential duration in single cells, and stabilised and accelerated re...

  7. Assessing and quantifying inter-rater variation for dichotomous ratings using a Rasch model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jørgen Holm; Larsen, Klaus; Kreiner, Svend

    2010-01-01

    of the assessment is to improve the foetus' chance of survival by choosing the optimal time of elective delivery. In the study, data related to 139 perinatal deaths were sent to 32 experts who were asked whether the use of Doppler velocimetry might have prevented each death....

  8. MONTHLY VARIATION IN SPERM MOTILITY IN COMMON CARP ASSESSED USING COMPUTER-ASSISTED SPERM ANALYSIS (CASA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperm motility variables from the milt of the common carp Cyprinus carpio were assessed using a computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) system across several months (March-August 1992) known to encompass the natural spawning period. Two-year-old pond-raised males obtained each mo...

  9. Capturing spatiotemporal variation in wildfires for improving postwildfire debris‐flow hazard assessments [Chapter 20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessica Haas; Matthew Thompson; Anne Tillery; Joe H. Scott

    2017-01-01

    Wildfires can increase the frequency and magnitude of catastrophic debris flows. Integrated, proactive naturalhazard assessment would therefore characterize landscapes based on the potential for the occurrence and interactions of wildfires and postwildfire debris flows. This chapter presents a new modeling effort that can quantify the variability surrounding a key...

  10. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: assessment of point mutations and copy number variations in Brazilian patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Germ line mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) and other susceptibility genes have been identified as genetic causes of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). To identify the disease-causing mutations in a cohort of 120 Brazilian women fulfilling criteria for HBOC, we carried out a comprehensive screening of BRCA1/2, TP53 R337H, CHEK2 1100delC, followed by an analysis of copy number variations in 14 additional breast cancer susceptibility genes (PTEN, ATM, NBN, RAD50, RAD51, BRIP1, PALB2, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, TP53, CDKN2A, CDH1 and CTNNB1). Methods Capillary sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) were used for detecting point mutations and copy number variations (CNVs), respectively, for the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes; capillary sequencing was used for point mutation for both variants TP53 R337H and CHEK2 1100delC, and finally array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) was used for identifying CNVs in the 14 additional genes. Results The positive detection rate in our series was 26%. BRCA1 pathogenic mutations were found in 20 cases, including two cases with CNVs, whereas BRCA2 mutations were found in 7 cases. We also found three patients with the TP53 R337H mutation and one patient with the CHEK2 1100delC mutation. Seven (25%) pathogenic mutations in BRCA1/2 were firstly described, including a splice-site BRCA1 mutation for which pathogenicity was confirmed by the presence of an aberrant transcript showing the loss of the last 62 bp of exon 7. Microdeletions of exon 4 in ATM and exon 2 in PTEN were identified in BRCA2-mutated and BRCA1/2-negative patients, respectively. Conclusions In summary, our results showed a high frequency of BRCA1/2 mutations and a higher prevalence of BRCA1 (64.5%) gene. Moreover, the detection of the TP53 R337H variant in our series and the fact that this variant has a founder effect in our population prompted us to suggest that all female breast cancer patients with clinical criteria

  11. An Exome Sequencing Study to Assess the Role of Rare Genetic Variation in Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovski, Slavé; Todd, Jamie L; Durheim, Michael T; Wang, Quanli; Chien, Jason W; Kelly, Fran L; Frankel, Courtney; Mebane, Caroline M; Ren, Zhong; Bridgers, Joshua; Urban, Thomas J; Malone, Colin D; Finlen Copeland, Ashley; Brinkley, Christie; Allen, Andrew S; O'Riordan, Thomas; McHutchison, John G; Palmer, Scott M; Goldstein, David B

    2017-07-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is an increasingly recognized, often fatal lung disease of unknown etiology. The aim of this study was to use whole-exome sequencing to improve understanding of the genetic architecture of pulmonary fibrosis. We performed a case-control exome-wide collapsing analysis including 262 unrelated individuals with pulmonary fibrosis clinically classified as IPF according to American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society/Japanese Respiratory Society/Latin American Thoracic Association guidelines (81.3%), usual interstitial pneumonia secondary to autoimmune conditions (11.5%), or fibrosing nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (7.2%). The majority (87%) of case subjects reported no family history of pulmonary fibrosis. We searched 18,668 protein-coding genes for an excess of rare deleterious genetic variation using whole-exome sequence data from 262 case subjects with pulmonary fibrosis and 4,141 control subjects drawn from among a set of individuals of European ancestry. Comparing genetic variation across 18,668 protein-coding genes, we found a study-wide significant (P < 4.5 × 10-7) case enrichment of qualifying variants in TERT, RTEL1, and PARN. A model qualifying ultrarare, deleterious, nonsynonymous variants implicated TERT and RTEL1, and a model specifically qualifying loss-of-function variants implicated RTEL1 and PARN. A subanalysis of 186 case subjects with sporadic IPF confirmed TERT, RTEL1, and PARN as study-wide significant contributors to sporadic IPF. Collectively, 11.3% of case subjects with sporadic IPF carried a qualifying variant in one of these three genes compared with the 0.3% carrier rate observed among control subjects (odds ratio, 47.7; 95% confidence interval, 21.5-111.6; P = 5.5 × 10-22). We identified TERT, RTEL1, and PARN-three telomere-related genes previously implicated in familial pulmonary fibrosis-as significant contributors to sporadic IPF. These results support the idea that

  12. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: assessment of point mutations and copy number variations in Brazilian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Felipe C; Lisboa, Bianca Cg; Figueiredo, Marcia Cp; Torrezan, Giovana T; Santos, Erika Mm; Krepischi, Ana C; Rossi, Benedito M; Achatz, Maria I; Carraro, Dirce M

    2014-05-15

    Germ line mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) and other susceptibility genes have been identified as genetic causes of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). To identify the disease-causing mutations in a cohort of 120 Brazilian women fulfilling criteria for HBOC, we carried out a comprehensive screening of BRCA1/2, TP53 R337H, CHEK2 1100delC, followed by an analysis of copy number variations in 14 additional breast cancer susceptibility genes (PTEN, ATM, NBN, RAD50, RAD51, BRIP1, PALB2, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, TP53, CDKN2A, CDH1 and CTNNB1). Capillary sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) were used for detecting point mutations and copy number variations (CNVs), respectively, for the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes; capillary sequencing was used for point mutation for both variants TP53 R337H and CHEK2 1100delC, and finally array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) was used for identifying CNVs in the 14 additional genes. The positive detection rate in our series was 26%. BRCA1 pathogenic mutations were found in 20 cases, including two cases with CNVs, whereas BRCA2 mutations were found in 7 cases. We also found three patients with the TP53 R337H mutation and one patient with the CHEK2 1100delC mutation. Seven (25%) pathogenic mutations in BRCA1/2 were firstly described, including a splice-site BRCA1 mutation for which pathogenicity was confirmed by the presence of an aberrant transcript showing the loss of the last 62 bp of exon 7. Microdeletions of exon 4 in ATM and exon 2 in PTEN were identified in BRCA2-mutated and BRCA1/2-negative patients, respectively. In summary, our results showed a high frequency of BRCA1/2 mutations and a higher prevalence of BRCA1 (64.5%) gene. Moreover, the detection of the TP53 R337H variant in our series and the fact that this variant has a founder effect in our population prompted us to suggest that all female breast cancer patients with clinical criteria for HBOC and negative for BRCA1/2 genes

  13. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water from three estuaries of China: Distribution, seasonal variations and ecological risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jinxia; Liu, Jingling; Shi, Xuan; You, Xiaoguang; Cao, Zhiguo

    2016-08-15

    The distribution, seasonal variations and ecological risk assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water from three estuaries in Hai River Basin of China, which has been suffering from different anthropogenic pressures, were investigated. In three estuaries, the average concentration of ΣPAHs was the lowest in Luan River estuary, followed by Hai River estuary, and the highest in Zhangweixin River estuary. There were significant seasonal variations in ΣPAHs, the concentrations of ΣPAHs were higher in November than in May and August. The composition profiles of PAHs in different sites were significantly different, and illustrated seasonal variations. Generally, 2-ring (Nap) and 3-ring PAHs (Acp, Fl and Phe) were the most abundant components at most sampling sites in three estuaries. The PAHs in three estuaries were mainly originated from pyrogenic sources. A method based on toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) and risk quotient (RQ) was proposed to assess the ecological risk of ΣPAHs, with the ecological risk of individual PAHs being considered separately. The results showed that the ecological risks caused by ΣPAHs were high in Hai River estuary and Zhangweixin River estuary, and moderate in Luan River estuary. The mean values of ecological risk in August were lower than those in November. The contributions of individual PAHs to ecological risk were different in May, August and November. 3-ring and 4-ring PAHs accounted for much more ecological risk than 2-ring, 5-ring and 6-ring, although the contributions of 5-ring and 6-ring to ecological risk were higher than these to PAHs concentrations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Numerical Assessment of Four-Port Through-Flow Wave Rotor Cycles with Passage Height Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxson, D. E.; Lindau, Jules W.

    1997-01-01

    The potential for improved performance of wave rotor cycles through the use of passage height variation is examined. A Quasi-one-dimensional CFD code with experimentally validated loss models is used to determine the flowfield in the wave rotor passages. Results indicate that a carefully chosen passage height profile can produce substantial performance gains. Numerical performance data are presented for a specific profile, in a four-port, through-flow cycle design which yielded a computed 4.6% increase in design point pressure ratio over a comparably sized rotor with constant passage height. In a small gas turbine topping cycle application, this increased pressure ratio would reduce specific fuel consumption to 22% below the un-topped engine; a significant improvement over the already impressive 18% reductions predicted for the constant passage height rotor. The simulation code is briefly described. The method used to obtain rotor passage height profiles with enhanced performance is presented. Design and off-design results are shown using two different computational techniques. The paper concludes with some recommendations for further work.

  15. Satellite-based assessment of yield variation and its determinants in smallholder African systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Marshall; Lobell, David B

    2017-02-28

    The emergence of satellite sensors that can routinely observe millions of individual smallholder farms raises possibilities for monitoring and understanding agricultural productivity in many regions of the world. Here we demonstrate the potential to track smallholder maize yield variation in western Kenya, using a combination of 1-m Terra Bella imagery and intensive field sampling on thousands of fields over 2 y. We find that agreement between satellite-based and traditional field survey-based yield estimates depends significantly on the quality of the field-based measures, with agreement highest ([Formula: see text] up to 0.4) when using precise field measures of plot area and when using larger fields for which rounding errors are smaller. We further show that satellite-based measures are able to detect positive yield responses to fertilizer and hybrid seed inputs and that the inferred responses are statistically indistinguishable from estimates based on survey-based yields. These results suggest that high-resolution satellite imagery can be used to make predictions of smallholder agricultural productivity that are roughly as accurate as the survey-based measures traditionally used in research and policy applications, and they indicate a substantial near-term potential to quickly generate useful datasets on productivity in smallholder systems, even with minimal or no field training data. Such datasets could rapidly accelerate learning about which interventions in smallholder systems have the most positive impact, thus enabling more rapid transformation of rural livelihoods.

  16. Assessing endocranial variations in great apes and humans using 3D data from virtual endocasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienvenu, Thibaut; Guy, Franck; Coudyzer, Walter; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Roualdès, Georges; Vignaud, Patrick; Brunet, Michel

    2011-06-01

    Modern humans are characterized by their large, complex, and specialized brain. Human brain evolution can be addressed through direct evidence provided by fossil hominid endocasts (i.e. paleoneurology), or through indirect evidence of extant species comparative neurology. Here we use the second approach, providing an extant comparative framework for hominid paleoneurological studies. We explore endocranial size and shape differences among great apes and humans, as well as between sexes. We virtually extracted 72 endocasts, sampling all extant great ape species and modern humans, and digitized 37 landmarks on each for 3D generalized Procrustes analysis. All species can be differentiated by their endocranial shape. Among great apes, endocranial shapes vary from short (orangutans) to long (gorillas), perhaps in relation to different facial orientations. Endocranial shape differences among African apes are partly allometric. Major endocranial traits distinguishing humans from great apes are endocranial globularity, reflecting neurological reorganization, and features linked to structural responses to posture and bipedal locomotion. Human endocasts are also characterized by posterior location of foramina rotunda relative to optic canals, which could be correlated to lesser subnasal prognathism compared to living great apes. Species with larger brains (gorillas and humans) display greater sexual dimorphism in endocranial size, while sexual dimorphism in endocranial shape is restricted to gorillas, differences between males and females being at least partly due to allometry. Our study of endocranial variations in extant great apes and humans provides a new comparative dataset for studies of fossil hominid endocasts. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Assessment of seasonal variation for air pollutant accumulation by Zizyphus tree under washing treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Mohamed Abdulraheem; El-Nakhlawy, Fathy Saad; Almehmadi, Fahd Mosallam; Ihsan, Muhammad Zahid; Al-Shareef, Abdulmohsin Rajeh

    2016-06-01

    A field study was carried out near Jeddah Industrial Zone to estimate the leaf impairment, physiological disorders, and air pollutant accumulation potential of Ziziphus tree. The experiment was triplicated in RCBD design with factorial arrangement having seasonality as the main plot and washing as subplot treatments along with the control. Accumulation of heavy metals and micronutrients in plant foliage varied significantly under the influence of seasons and washing treatments. The maximum accumulation of cadmium, chromium, nickel, and lead were perceived in summer season while the minimum was observed in winter. Contrarily, a greater acquisition of iron, copper, zinc, and manganese was observed in autumn. Washing significantly reduced the accumulation of Cd, Cr, Ni, and Pb by 58, 90, 80, and 96 %, while Fe, Cu, Zn, and Mn by 89, 37, 60, and 93 %, respectively. Leaf protein and nitrogen content illustrated a greater adjustment for pollutants by presenting a minimum variation (14-18 % and 2-3 %) to seasonality. In contrast, leaf area and stomatal aperture were significantly disturbed and resulted in minimum recovery under washing. Correlation analysis revealed a stronger negative interaction of heavy metal accumulation to leaf features while non-significant interaction was perceived for microelements. In conclusion, planting of Ziziphus trees along industrial areas may impede potential threats of toxic pollutants to human and ecosystem.

  18. An assessment of surface emissivity variation effects on plasma uniformity analysis using IR cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Abigail; Showers, Melissa; Biewer, Theodore

    2017-10-01

    The Prototype-Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX) is a linear plasma device operating at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Its purpose is to test plasma source and heating concepts for the planned Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX), which has the mission to test the plasma-material interactions under fusion reactor conditions. In this device material targets will be exposed to high heat fluxes (>10 MW/m2). To characterize the heat fluxes to the target a IR thermography system is used taking up to 432 frames per second videos. The data is analyzed to determine the surface temperature on the target in specific regions of interest. The IR analysis has indicated a low level of plasma uniformity; the plasma often deposits more heat to the edge of the plate than the center. An essential parameter for IR temperature calculation is the surface emissivity of the plate (stainless steel). A study has been performed to characterize the variation in the surface emissivity of the plate as its temperature changes and its surface finish is modified by plasma exposure.

  19. Posterior shoulder instability in the athletic population: Variations in assessment, clinical outcomes, and return to sport

    OpenAIRE

    DeLong, Jeffrey M; Bradley, James P

    2015-01-01

    Posterior instability of the shoulder is becoming an increasingly recognized shoulder injury in the athletic population. Diagnostic elements, such as etiology, directionality, and degree of instability are essential factors to assess in the unstable athletic shoulder. Concomitant injuries and associated pathologic lesions continue to be a significant challenge in the surgical management of posterior shoulder instability. Return to sport and previous level of play is ultimately the goal for ev...

  20. Cultural Variation in Situation Assessment: Influence of Source Credibility and Rank Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Mlaysia, Philipines ,_Singapore 0% . . . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Assessment Period Figure 5. Confidence ratings by culture cluster. 13 ANCHORING The...The countries Alantra, Beyer, and Chardeaux have a long history as distinct nations. The historical separations, now borders among these nations, are...Recent History : 1 year ago A three-year long drought continues. Alantra, Beyer, and Chardeaux are managing to remain reasonably self-sufficient. This is

  1. Assessing structural variation in a personal genome-towards a human reference diploid genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Adam C; Salerno, William J; Hampton, Oliver A; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Ambreth, Shruthi; Ritter, Deborah I; Beck, Christine R; Davis, Caleb F; Dahdouli, Mahmoud; Ma, Singer; Carroll, Andrew; Veeraraghavan, Narayanan; Bruestle, Jeremy; Drees, Becky; Hastie, Alex; Lam, Ernest T; White, Simon; Mishra, Pamela; Wang, Min; Han, Yi; Zhang, Feng; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Wheeler, David A; Reid, Jeffrey G; Muzny, Donna M; Rogers, Jeffrey; Sabo, Aniko; Worley, Kim C; Lupski, James R; Boerwinkle, Eric; Gibbs, Richard A

    2015-04-11

    Characterizing large genomic variants is essential to expanding the research and clinical applications of genome sequencing. While multiple data types and methods are available to detect these structural variants (SVs), they remain less characterized than smaller variants because of SV diversity, complexity, and size. These challenges are exacerbated by the experimental and computational demands of SV analysis. Here, we characterize the SV content of a personal genome with Parliament, a publicly available consensus SV-calling infrastructure that merges multiple data types and SV detection methods. We demonstrate Parliament's efficacy via integrated analyses of data from whole-genome array comparative genomic hybridization, short-read next-generation sequencing, long-read (Pacific BioSciences RSII), long-insert (Illumina Nextera), and whole-genome architecture (BioNano Irys) data from the personal genome of a single subject (HS1011). From this genome, Parliament identified 31,007 genomic loci between 100 bp and 1 Mbp that are inconsistent with the hg19 reference assembly. Of these loci, 9,777 are supported as putative SVs by hybrid local assembly, long-read PacBio data, or multi-source heuristics. These SVs span 59 Mbp of the reference genome (1.8%) and include 3,801 events identified only with long-read data. The HS1011 data and complete Parliament infrastructure, including a BAM-to-SV workflow, are available on the cloud-based service DNAnexus. HS1011 SV analysis reveals the limits and advantages of multiple sequencing technologies, specifically the impact of long-read SV discovery. With the full Parliament infrastructure, the HS1011 data constitute a public resource for novel SV discovery, software calibration, and personal genome structural variation analysis.

  2. Anatomic Assessment of Variations in Kambin's Triangle: A Surgical and Cadaver Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Ali Fahir; Suzer, Tuncer; Can, Halil; Falsafi, Mani; Aydin, Murat; Sasani, Mehdi; Oktenoglu, Tunc

    2017-04-01

    The relationship of exiting root and Kambin's triangle is discussed in this article. Transforaminal endoscopic surgery as the gold standard of less invasive lumbar disc surgeries is performed through Kambin's triangle. Existing root damage is one of the most important complication for this type of surgery. Anatomic variations in Kambin's triangle may be the main reason for nerve root damage during endoscopic lumbar disc surgery. Kambin's triangle was investigated with surgical views and cadaver studies. Thirty-four patients with far lateral disc herniation were treated with an extraforaminal approach under the microscope. On the other hand, 48 Kambin's triangles were dissected on 8 cadavers. Three main types of triangle were identified, and patients were grouped according to these 3 types of the triangle. Only 6 of the 34 patients had type 3 triangles, which is the wide classical triangle described by Kambin; however, 17 patients had type 2, with a narrow space in the triangle, and 11 patients had type 1, with no space inside the triangle. Cadaver results were similar; only 10 of the 48 specimens had the type 3 classical triangle, whereas 23 specimens had type 2, and 15 specimens had type 1 triangles. Our results disclosed narrowed or no space in 82.4% of the patients and 79.2% of the cadavers. We observed that a wide and safe room of the triangle may not be exist in some patients. Therefore, more care must be taken during endoscopic lumbar disc surgery to avoid nerve damage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Appropriateness criteria to assess variations in surgical procedure use in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Elise H; Gibbons, Melinda Maggard; Ingraham, Angela M; Shekelle, Paul G; Ko, Clifford Y

    2011-12-01

    To systematically describe appropriateness criteria (AC) developed in the United States for surgical procedures and to summarize how these criteria have been applied to identify overuse and underuse of procedures in US populations. MEDLINE literature search performed in February 2010 and May 2011. Studies were included if they addressed the appropriateness of a surgical procedure using the RAND-UCLA Appropriateness Method. Non-US studies were excluded. Information was abstracted on study design, surgical procedure, and reported rates of appropriate use, overuse, and underuse. Identified AC were cross-referenced with lists of common procedures from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample and the State Ambulatory Surgery databases. A total of 1601 titles were identified; 39 met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 17 developed AC and 27 applied AC to US populations. Appropriateness criteria have been developed for 16 surgical procedures. Underuse has only been studied for coronary artery bypass graft surgery, and rates range from 24% to 57%. Overuse has been more broadly studied, with rates ranging from 9% to 53% for carotid endarterectomy, 0% to 14% for coronary artery bypass graft, 11% to 24% for upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopy, and 16% to 70% for hysterectomy. Appropriateness criteria exist for 10 of the 25 most common inpatient procedures and 6 of the 15 top ambulatory procedures in the United States. Most studies are more than 5 years old. Most existing AC are outdated, and AC have never been developed for most common surgical procedures. A broad and coordinated effort to develop and maintain AC would be required to implement this tool to address variation in the use of surgical procedures.

  4. An Assessment of the Effectiveness of Tree-Based Models for Multi-Variate Flood Damage Assessment in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roozbeh Hasanzadeh Nafari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Flood is a frequent natural hazard that has significant financial consequences for Australia. In Australia, physical losses caused by floods are commonly estimated by stage-damage functions. These methods usually consider only the depth of the water and the type of buildings at risk. However, flood damage is a complicated process, and it is dependent on a variety of factors which are rarely taken into account. This study explores the interaction, importance, and influence of water depth, flow velocity, water contamination, precautionary measures, emergency measures, flood experience, floor area, building value, building quality, and socioeconomic status. The study uses tree-based models (regression trees and bagging decision trees and a dataset collected from 2012 to 2013 flood events in Queensland, which includes information on structural damages, impact parameters, and resistance variables. The tree-based approaches show water depth, floor area, precautionary measures, building value, and building quality to be important damage-influencing parameters. Furthermore, the performance of the tree-based models is validated and contrasted with the outcomes of a multi-parameter loss function (FLFArs from Australia. The tree-based models are shown to be more accurate than the stage-damage function. Consequently, considering more parameters and taking advantage of tree-based models is recommended. The outcome is important for improving established Australian flood loss models and assisting decision-makers and insurance companies dealing with flood risk assessment.

  5. Assessment of PD-1 gene variation in patients with multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadmehri AA

    2010-05-01

    -RFLP."n"n Results: No significant association of the mutated alleles with the disease were detected. Because of the ethnic group genetic variation, our data is not like some of Asian population such as Korea and China."n"n Conclusions: Our data suggest that PD-1 polymorphisms are not act as genetic modifiers of the progression of MS, possibly these polymorphisms don't induce a partial defect in PD-1 mediated inhibition of T-cell activation.

  6. Capturing spatiotemporal variation in wildfires for improving postwildfire debris-flow hazard assessments: Chapter 20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Jessica R.; Thompson, Matthew P.; Tillery, Anne C.; Scott, Joe H.

    2017-01-01

    Wildfires can increase the frequency and magnitude of catastrophic debris flows. Integrated, proactive natural hazard assessment would therefore characterize landscapes based on the potential for the occurrence and interactions of wildfires and postwildfire debris flows. This chapter presents a new modeling effort that can quantify the variability surrounding a key input to postwildfire debris-flow modeling, the amount of watershed burned at moderate to high severity, in a prewildfire context. The use of stochastic wildfire simulation captures variability surrounding the timing and location of ignitions, fire weather patterns, and ultimately the spatial patterns of watershed area burned. Model results provide for enhanced estimates of postwildfire debris-flow hazard in a prewildfire context, and multiple hazard metrics are generated to characterize and contrast hazards across watersheds. Results can guide mitigation efforts by allowing planners to identify which factors may be contributing the most to the hazard rankings of watersheds.

  7. Assessment of Geographical Variation in the Respiratory Toxicity of Desert Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and assessment of lactate dehydrogenase leakage. The relative in vitro cytotoxicity of the sand extracts was Taji...before the impact on cell metabolism was evaluated using an MTT [3- (4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide ] assay. This tetrazolium...124.13 0.7 0.4 0.2 0.6 Copper 36.5 26.0 27.33 0.1 15.3 2.8 7.1 Iron 34 275.1 33 550.8 24 414.6 2.8 4.3 5LOD 12.0 Lithium 20.2 24.9 17.9 5LOD 34.0 8.9

  8. Time-dependent Variation in Life Cycle Assessment of Microalgal Biorefinery Co-products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montazeri, Mahdokht

    Microalgae can serve as a highly productive biological feedstock for fuels and chemicals. The lipid fraction of algal seeds has been the primary target of research for biofuel production. However, numerous assessments have found that valorization of co-products is essential to achieve economic and environmental goals. The relative proportion of co-products depends on the biomolecular composition of algae at the time of harvesting. In the present study the productivity of lipid, starch, and protein fractions were shown through growth experiments to vary widely with species, feeding regime, and harvesting time. Four algae species were cultivated under nitrogen-replete and -deplete conditions and analyzed at regular harvesting intervals. Dynamic growth results were then used for life cycle assessment using the U.S. Department of Energy's GREET model to determine optimal growth scenarios that minimize life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, eutrophication, and cumulative energy demand (CED), while aiming for an energy return on investment (EROI) greater than unity. Per kg of biodiesel produced, C. sorokiniana in N-replete conditions harvested at 12 days was most favorable for GHG emissions and CED, despite having a lipid content of <20%. N. oculata under the same conditions had the lowest life cycle eutrophication impacts, driven by efficient nutrient cycling and valorization of microalgal protein and anaerobic digester residue co-products. The results indicate that growth cycle times that maximize a single fraction do not necessarily result in the most favorable environmental performance on a life cycle basis, underscoring the importance of designing biorefinery systems that simultaneously optimize for lipid and non-lipid fractions.

  9. Limitations of early serum creatinine variations for the assessment of kidney injury in neonates and infants with cardiac surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Bojan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Changes in kidney function, as assessed by early and even small variations in serum creatinine (ΔsCr, affect survival in adults following cardiac surgery but such associations have not been reported in infants. This raises the question of the adequate assessment of kidney function by early ΔsCr in infants undergoing cardiac surgery. METHODOLOGY: The ability of ΔsCr within 2 days of surgery to assess the severity of kidney injury, accounted for by the risk of 30-day mortality, was explored retrospectively in 1019 consecutive neonates and infants. Patients aged ≤ 10 days were analyzed separately because of the physiological improvement in glomerular filtration early after birth. The Kml algorithm, an implementation of k-means for longitudinal data, was used to describe creatinine kinetics, and the receiver operating characteristic and the reclassification methodology to assess discrimination and the predictive ability of the risk of death. RESULTS: Three clusters of ΔsCr were identified: in 50% of all patients creatinine decreased, in 41.4% it increased slightly, and in 8.6% it rose abruptly. Mortality rates were not significantly different between the first and second clusters, 1.6% [0.0-4.1] vs 5.9% [1.9-10.9], respectively, in patients aged ≤ 10 days, and 1.6% [0.5-3.0] vs 3.8% [1.9-6.0] in older ones. Mortality rates were significantly higher when creatinine rose abruptly, 30.3% [15.1-46.2] in patients aged ≤ 10 days, and 15.1% [5.9-25.5] in older ones. However, only 41.3% of all patients who died had an abrupt increase in creatinine. ΔsCr improved prediction in survivors, but not in patients who died, and did not improve discrimination over a clinical mortality model. CONCLUSIONS: The present results suggest that a postoperative decrease in creatinine represents the normal course in neonates and infants with cardiac surgery, and that early creatinine variations lack sensitivity for the assessment of the severity of

  10. Assessing Variation in Water Balance Components in Mountainous Inland River Basin Experiencing Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenliang Yin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Quantification of the changes of water balance components is significant for water resource assessment and management. This paper employed the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT model to estimate the water balance in a mountainous watershed in northwest China at different spatial scales over the past half century. The results showed that both Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE and determination coefficient (R2 were over 0.90 for the calibration and validation periods. The water balance components presented rising trends at the watershed scale, and the total runoff increased by 30.5% during 1964 to 2013 period. Rising surface runoff and rising groundwater flow contributed 42.7% and 57.3% of the total rising runoff, respectively. The runoff coefficient was sensitive to increasing precipitation and was not significant to the increase of temperature. The alpine meadow was the main landscape which occupied 51.1% of the watershed and contributed 55.5% of the total runoff. Grass land, forest land, bare land, and glacier covered 14.2%, 18.8%, 15.4%, and 0.5% of the watershed and contributed 8.5%, 16.9%, 15.9%, and 3.2% of the total runoff, respectively. The elevation zone from 3500 to 4500 m occupied 66.5% of the watershed area, and contributed the majority of the total runoff (70.7%. The runoff coefficients in the elevation zone from 1637 to 2800 m, 2800 to 3500 m, 3500 to 4000 m, 4000 to 4500 m, and 4500 to 5062 m were 0.20, 0.27, 0.32, 0.43, and 0.78, respectively, which tend to be larger along with the elevation increase. The quantities and change trends of the water balance components at the watershed scale were calculated by the results of the sub-watersheds. Furthermore, we characterized the spatial distribution of quantities and changes in trends of water balance components at the sub-watershed scale analysis. This study provides some references for water resource management and planning in inland river basins.

  11. Assessment of Urban Infrastructure Impact on New York City Neighborhoods Thermal Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazari, R.; Ghandehari, M.; Karimi, M.; Vant-hull, B.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2013-12-01

    New York City (NYC) is a highly urbanized city with most of the population living in tall buildings. Despite technological improvements and stricter regulations, cities still show increasing signs of environmental stress such as traffic congestion, noise and air quality degradation. Rethinking the current models of city planning could enable to limit these detrimental effects of urbanization. In addition, the built environment creates a new climatic regime which needs a better understanding. Building density, height and emission has a major impact on local temperature and other air quality indicators. Studies have shown that during extreme weather conditions and heat waves the mortality rate in urban areas increases. Cities are comprised of a wide variety of urban settings and various neighborhoods have different physical responses to meteorological events, so it is expected that the temperature and heat stress across a given city to fluctuate sharply. Therefore, this research has focused on neighborhood-scale field campaigns to downscale temperature and air quality predictions from city to neighborhood scale in NYC. In order to assess the temperature variability within the city at street level, during the hottest part of the day, this project used eight mobile units bearing temperature and relative humidity sensors, as well as ten weather stations mounted on light poles in various NYC neighborhoods. This study also looks at fine scale structures in the urban heat island of Manhattan at street level through an infrared camera with the spectral range of 7.5-13 μm in order to relate heat and emissions from building surfaces to land surface characteristics such as building density, vegetation coverage, proximity to water, and albedo. LandSat TM5 images were used (with 30 m resolution) for land surface classification. During the summer and early fall of 2011, 2012 and 2013 extensive field campaigns were performed, the results of which show some persistent patterns

  12. Towards an optimal sampling strategy for assessing genetic variation within and among white clover (Trifolium repens L. cultivars using AFLP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khosro Mehdi Khanlou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cost reduction in plant breeding and conservation programs depends largely on correctly defining the minimal sample size required for the trustworthy assessment of intra- and inter-cultivar genetic variation. White clover, an important pasture legume, was chosen for studying this aspect. In clonal plants, such as the aforementioned, an appropriate sampling scheme eliminates the redundant analysis of identical genotypes. The aim was to define an optimal sampling strategy, i.e., the minimum sample size and appropriate sampling scheme for white clover cultivars, by using AFLP data (283 loci from three popular types. A grid-based sampling scheme, with an interplant distance of at least 40 cm, was sufficient to avoid any excess in replicates. Simulations revealed that the number of samples substantially influenced genetic diversity parameters. When using less than 15 per cultivar, the expected heterozygosity (He and Shannon diversity index (I were greatly underestimated, whereas with 20, more than 95% of total intra-cultivar genetic variation was covered. Based on AMOVA, a 20-cultivar sample was apparently sufficient to accurately quantify individual genetic structuring. The recommended sampling strategy facilitates the efficient characterization of diversity in white clover, for both conservation and exploitation.

  13. Assessing the variation in the predictability of South African seasonal climate with HadRM3P ensemble spreads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiodun Lawal, Kamoru; Stone, Daithi A.; Abiodun, Babatunde J.

    2013-04-01

    This study assesses the existence of trends and inter-annual variations in the predictability of the South African seasonal climate using a quasi-stochastic atmospheric system. The paper analyze the ensemble spread of a 50-year HadRM3P model simulations (ranging from 30 to 1000 simulations per month) with different initial conditions for monthly near surface air temperature and rainfall. It quantifies the ensemble spreads of the simulations using the standard deviation (sensitive to outliers) and the distance between 90th and 10th percentiles (Range of Possibility, less sensitive to outliers). Inter-annual variability and trends of standard deviation and range of possibility are then investigated and compared. Spatial-temporal variabilities of standard deviation and range of possibility indicate significantly negative trends in the ensemble spreads for precipitation majorly over inland provinces, from late austral spring to mid austral summer. Temperature exhibits coastal-inland provinces dichotomy, as both metrics of scale show negative trends over the coastal provinces in austral spring and early periods of austral summer. Negative trends of the spatial-temporal variations of the ensemble width implies narrowing of the range of possible predicted values, reduction in uncertainties within the prediction, and the existence of convergent systems in two or more similar states which may become progressively more similar. There exist some agreements between the standard deviation and range of possibility as 0.55 Africa.

  14. Spatial variation and risk assessment of trace metals in water and sediment of the Mekong Delta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strady, Emilie; Dinh, Quoc Tuc; Némery, Julien; Nguyen, Thanh Nho; Guédron, Stéphane; Nguyen, Nhu Sang; Denis, Hervé; Nguyen, Phuoc Dan

    2017-07-01

    The Mekong Delta, is home to 17 million inhabitants and faces numerous challenges relating to climate change, environmental degradation and water issues. In this study, we assess trace metals concentrations (Al, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Mo, Cd, Hg, Pb) in the water, suspended particulate matter and surface sediments of the Tien River, the Northern branch of the Mekong Delta, during both dry and rainy seasons. Metal concentrations in the dissolved and suspended particle phases remain in the low concentration range of the main Asian Tropical River. During transportation in the riverine part, we evidenced that V, Cr, Co, As and Pb are dominant in the particulate phase while Mo, Ni and Cu dominate in the dissolved fraction. In the salinity gradient, dissolved U, V, Mo exhibit conservative behaviour while Ni, Cu, As, Co and Cd showed additive behaviour suggesting desorption processes. In the surface sediment, metal concentrations are controlled by the particle-size, POC contents and Fe, Al and Mn - oxy(hydr)oxides. Calculated Enrichment Factor and Geoaccumulation Index evidenced As enrichment while the calculated mean effect range median quotients evidenced a low to medium ecotoxicological potential effects range in the surface sediments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Assessing effects of variation in global climate data sets on spatial predictions from climate envelope models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanach, Stephanie; Watling, James I.; Fletcher, Robert J.; Speroterra, Carolina; Bucklin, David N.; Brandt, Laura A.; Pearlstine, Leonard G.; Escribano, Yesenia; Mazzotti, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    Climate change poses new challenges for natural resource managers. Predictive modeling of species–environment relationships using climate envelope models can enhance our understanding of climate change effects on biodiversity, assist in assessment of invasion risk by exotic organisms, and inform life-history understanding of individual species. While increasing interest has focused on the role of uncertainty in future conditions on model predictions, models also may be sensitive to the initial conditions on which they are trained. Although climate envelope models are usually trained using data on contemporary climate, we lack systematic comparisons of model performance and predictions across alternative climate data sets available for model training. Here, we seek to fill that gap by comparing variability in predictions between two contemporary climate data sets to variability in spatial predictions among three alternative projections of future climate. Overall, correlations between monthly temperature and precipitation variables were very high for both contemporary and future data. Model performance varied across algorithms, but not between two alternative contemporary climate data sets. Spatial predictions varied more among alternative general-circulation models describing future climate conditions than between contemporary climate data sets. However, we did find that climate envelope models with low Cohen's kappa scores made more discrepant spatial predictions between climate data sets for the contemporary period than did models with high Cohen's kappa scores. We suggest conservation planners evaluate multiple performance metrics and be aware of the importance of differences in initial conditions for spatial predictions from climate envelope models.

  16. Spatial and temporal variation in radiation exposure of amphibians - Implications for environmental risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stark, K. [Stockholm University (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    Although amphibians are threatened world-wide, many amphibian species are protected in national legislation. Thus, amphibians need special attention in many environmental risk assessments for releases of contaminants such as radionuclides. In fact, amphibians' ecology and physiology (including, for example, a complex life-cycle with both aquatic and terrestrial life stages, and a thin skin) makes them sensitive to radiation exposure. In current dose models for wildlife, homogenous distribution of radionuclides in soil is assumed. However, soils are heterogeneous environments and radionuclide contamination can be very unevenly distributed. As a consequence, bioaccumulation of radionuclides in biota may vary on a local scale. Specifically, organisms' spatial location and movement within habitats may affect both their external and internal exposure pattern to radionuclides. Therefore, measuring the spatial location of individual amphibians within ecosystems and understanding why they use these different locations is essential for predicting potential effects of released radionuclides on these populations. The aim of this study was to investigate amphibians' spatial distribution in a {sup 137}Cs contaminated wetland area and their body content of {sup 137}Cs at the beginning and end of the summer period. The study site was a wetland nature reserve called Bladmyra near Gaevle in the central-eastern part of Sweden. This area received fallout of {sup 137}Cs after the Chernobyl accident in 1986. This study measured the spatial distributions of two amphibian species (Rana arvalis and Bufo bufo) with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags in a mark-and-recapture study during 2012-2014. In addition, {sup 137}Cs body content in the two species was measured by whole body counting in spring and autumn of 2013. The results showed differences between years in how marked animals used the study area: More individuals stayed in a small area during 2012 than in 2013

  17. Variation in internal medicine residency clinic practices: assessing practice environments and quality of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladenovic, Jeanette; Shea, Judy A; Duffy, F Daniel; Lynn, Lorna A; Holmboe, Eric S; Lipner, Rebecca S

    2008-07-01

    Few studies have systematically and rigorously examined the quality of care provided in educational practice sites. The objectives of this study were to (1) describe the patient population cared for by trainees in internal medicine residency clinics; (2) assess the quality of preventive cardiology care provided to these patients; (3) characterize the practice-based systems that currently exist in internal medicine residency clinics; and (4) examine the relationships between quality, practice-based systems, and features of the program: size, type of program, and presence of an electronic medical record. This is a cross-sectional observational study. This study was conducted in 15 Internal Medicine residency programs (23 sites) throughout the USA. The participants included site champions at residency programs and 709 residents. Abstracted charts provided data about patient demographics, coronary heart disease risk factors, processes of care, and clinical outcomes. Patients completed surveys regarding satisfaction. Site teams completed a practice systems survey. Chart abstraction of 4,783 patients showed substantial variability across sites. On average, patients had between 3 and 4 of the 9 potential risk factors for coronary heart disease, and approximately 21% had at least 1 important barrier of care. Patients received an average of 57% (range, 30-77%) of the appropriate interventions. Reported satisfaction with care was high. Sites with an electronic medical record showed better overall information management (81% vs 27%) and better modes of communication (79% vs 43%). This study has provided insight into the current state of practice in residency sites including aspects of the practice environment and quality of preventive cardiology care delivered. Substantial heterogeneity among the training sites exists. Continuous measurement of the quality of care provided and a better understanding of the training environment in which this care is delivered are important

  18. In-depth assessment of within-individual and inter-individual variation in the B cell receptor repertoire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Daniel Galson

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available High-throughput sequencing of the B cell receptor (BCR repertoire can provide rapid characterization of the B cell response in a wide variety of applications in health, after vaccination and in infectious, inflammatory and immune-driven disease, and is starting to yield clinical applications. However, the interpretation of repertoire data is compromised by a lack of studies to assess the intra and inter-individual variation in the BCR repertoire over time in healthy individuals. We applied a standardized isotype-specific BCR repertoire deep sequencing protocol to a single highly sampled participant, and then evaluated the method in 10 further participants to comprehensively describe such variation. We assessed total repertoire metrics of mutation, diversity, VJ gene usage and isotype subclass usage, as well as tracking specific BCR sequence clusters. There was good assay reproducibility (both in PCR amplification and biological replicates, but we detected striking fluctuations in the repertoire over time that we hypothesize may be due to subclinical immune activation. Repertoire properties were unique for each individual, which could partly be explained by a decrease in IgG2 with age, and genetic differences at the immunoglobulin locus. There was a small repertoire of public clusters (0.5, 0.3 and 1.4% of total IgA, IgG and IgM clusters respectively, which was enriched for expanded clusters containing sequences with suspected specificity towards antigens that should have been historically encountered by all participants through prior immunization or infection. We thus provide baseline BCR repertoire information that can be used to inform future study design, and aid in interpretation of results from these studies. Furthermore our results indicate that BCR repertoire studies could be used to track changes in the public repertoire in and between populations that might relate to population immunity against infectious diseases, and identify the

  19. Spatial Variation and Assessment of Heavy Metal and Radioactive Risk in Farmland around a Retired Uranium Mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jie; Shi, Chen-hao; Zeng, Guang-ming; Zhong, Min-zhou; Yuan, Yu-jie

    2017-07-01

    In recent years, heavy metal contamination in the environment has been attracted worldwide attention due to their toxicity, persistence,extensive sources and non-biodegradable properties. We herein investigate variation trend and risk of heavy metal and radiation distribution in the former mine stope, former mineral ore stockyard, and mine road with surface soils of a retired uranium mine in the mid-south of China. The mean concentrations (mg/kg) of Pb,Cd,Cu,Zn,As,Hg,Cr,Mn,Ni,U, and 232Th were analyzed according to the corresponding background values in Hunan, China. The Geo-accumulation index (Igeo ) were used for the assessment of pollution level of heavy metals and the radioactive elements of U and 232Th. Then, Pollution load index (PLI) and GIS techniquewere integrated to assess spatial distribution of heavy metal contamination and radioactive contamination. Results confirmed that three areas in the retired uranium mine was a primary source of pollution, which showed anthropogenic origin mainly from agricultural runoff, hydrometallurgy from chemical industries, radioactive tailings, and electroplating industriesfinally drained into Zishui River and Xiangjiang River. Based on the actual situation, some suggestions were put forward for the treatment of the retired uranium mine in conclusion.

  20. DNA barcoding assessment of genetic variation in two widespread skinks from Madagascar, Trachylepis elegans and T. gravenhorstii (Squamata: Scincidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vences, Miguel; Lima, Alexandra; Miralles, Aurélien; Glaw, Frank

    2014-01-24

    Trachylepis elegans and T. gravenhorstii are two of the most widespread reptiles in Madagascar, inhabiting a wide variety of habitats. Previous studies have indicated a considerable mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation within these species, but the geographic distribution of the major haplotype lineages is poorly known. Herein we analyse the phylogeography of these lizards based on 107 sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit I gene, 101 of which newly determined. As in previous mtDNA assessments, T. elegans and T. gravenhorstii were not reciprocally monophyletic, although recent analyses including nuclear markers indicated their probable monophyly, respectively. The main lineages within T. gravenhorstii were found in strict allopatry and could be divided into a subclade of roughly northern and eastern distribution (lineages 1 and 2) and a subclade of roughly southern and western distribution (lineages 3, 4a, 4b, and 5, plus T. elegans). Our data serve to identify more precisely the probable contact zones among T. gravenhorstii lineages. The two main mtDNA clades (represented by lineages 2 and 3, respectively) can be expected to come into close contact in the area of the upper Mangoro river and Alaotra Lake, and (lineages 2 and 4a) in the Southern Central East between Mananjary and Ranomafana. Future studies intensively sampling these contact zones have the potential to assess hybridization and admixture among these lineages, and to test whether they are deep conspecific lineages of T. gravenhorstii as currently understood, or might represent distinct species.

  1. Assessment of wall elasticity variations on intraluminal haemodynamics in descending aortic dissections using a lumped-parameter model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudenick, Paula A; Bijnens, Bart H; Segers, Patrick; García-Dorado, David; Evangelista, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Descending aortic dissection (DAD) is associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. Aortic wall stiffness is a variable often altered in DAD patients and potentially involved in long-term outcome. However, its relevance is still mostly unknown. To gain more detailed knowledge of how wall elasticity (compliance) might influence intraluminal haemodynamics in DAD, a lumped-parameter model was developed based on experimental data from a pulsatile hydraulic circuit and validated for 8 clinical scenarios. Next, the variations of intraluminal pressures and flows were assessed as a function of wall elasticity. In comparison with the most rigid-wall case, an increase in elasticity to physiological values was associated with a decrease in systolic and increase in diastolic pressures of up to 33% and 63% respectively, with a subsequent decrease in the pressure wave amplitude of up to 86%. Moreover, it was related to an increase in multidirectional intraluminal flows and transition of behaviour as 2 parallel vessels towards a vessel with a side-chamber. The model supports the extremely important role of wall elasticity as determinant of intraluminal pressures and flow patterns for DAD, and thus, the relevance of considering it during clinical assessment and computational modelling of the disease.

  2. Assessing variation in life-history tactics within a population using mixture regression models: a practical guide for evolutionary ecologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Sandra; Yoccoz, Nigel G; Gaillard, Jean-Michel

    2017-05-01

    Mixed models are now well-established methods in ecology and evolution because they allow accounting for and quantifying within- and between-individual variation. However, the required normal distribution of the random effects can often be violated by the presence of clusters among subjects, which leads to multi-modal distributions. In such cases, using what is known as mixture regression models might offer a more appropriate approach. These models are widely used in psychology, sociology, and medicine to describe the diversity of trajectories occurring within a population over time (e.g. psychological development, growth). In ecology and evolution, however, these models are seldom used even though understanding changes in individual trajectories is an active area of research in life-history studies. Our aim is to demonstrate the value of using mixture models to describe variation in individual life-history tactics within a population, and hence to promote the use of these models by ecologists and evolutionary ecologists. We first ran a set of simulations to determine whether and when a mixture model allows teasing apart latent clustering, and to contrast the precision and accuracy of estimates obtained from mixture models versus mixed models under a wide range of ecological contexts. We then used empirical data from long-term studies of large mammals to illustrate the potential of using mixture models for assessing within-population variation in life-history tactics. Mixture models performed well in most cases, except for variables following a Bernoulli distribution and when sample size was small. The four selection criteria we evaluated [Akaike information criterion (AIC), Bayesian information criterion (BIC), and two bootstrap methods] performed similarly well, selecting the right number of clusters in most ecological situations. We then showed that the normality of random effects implicitly assumed by evolutionary ecologists when using mixed models was often

  3. Spatial Variation, Pollution Assessment and Source Identification of Major Nutrients in Surface Sediments of Nansi Lake, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longfeng Wang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Nansi Lake has been seriously affected by intensive anthropogenic activities in recent years. In this study, an extensive survey on spatial variation, pollution assessment as well as the possible sources identification of major nutrients (Total phosphorus: TP, Total nitrogen: TN, and Total organic carbon: TOC in the surface sediments of Nansi Lake was conducted. Results showed that the mean contents of TP, TN and TOC were 1.13-, 5.40- and 2.50- fold higher than their background values respectively. Most of the TN and TOC contents in the surface sediments of Nansi Lake were four times as high or higher and twice as high or higher than the background values except the Zhaoyang sub-lake, and the spatial distribution of TN and TOC contents were remarkably similar over a large area. Nearly all the TP contents in the surface sediments of Nansi Lake were all higher than its background values except most part of the Zhaoyang sub-lake. Based on the enrichment factor (EF and the organic pollution evaluation index (Org-index, TP, TOC and TN showed minor enrichment (1.13, minor enrichment (2.50 and moderately severe enrichment (5.40, respectively, and most part of the Dushan sub-lake and the vicinity of the Weishan island were in moderate or heavy sediments organic pollution, while the other parts were clean. Moreover, according to the results of multivariate statistical analysis, we deduced that anthropogenic TN and TOC were mainly came from industrial sources including enterprises distributed in Jining, Yanzhou and Zoucheng along with iron and steel industries distributed in the southern of the Weishan sub-lake, whereas TP mainly originated from runoff and soil erosion coming from agricultural lands located in Heze city and Weishan island, the local aquacultural activities as well as the domestic sewage discharge of Jining city.

  4. Assessing the ecohydrological separation hypothesis and seasonal variations in water use by Ginkgo biloba L. in a subtropical riparian area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jin; Zheng, Hao; Wang, Peifang; Liao, Xiaolin; Wang, Chao; Hou, Jun; Ao, Yanhui; Shen, Mengmeng; Liu, Jingjing; Li, Kun

    2017-10-01

    In this study we used a dual stable isotope approach (δ18O and δ2H) to assess the ecohydrological separation hypothesis and to identify the seasonal variation in water sources of Ginkgo biloba L. in the riparian zone in the Taihu Lake basin, China. Three study sites located at 5, 10, and 30 m from a river bank were established. From August 2014 to July 2015, samples of rainwater, river water, groundwater, bulk soil water at five soil depths (i.e. 0-30, 30-60, 60-90, 90-120, 120-150 cm), and xylem water of G. biloba, were collected and their δ18O and δ2H values were measured. Generally, the δ18O and δ2H values for xylem water, groundwater, and soil water clustered together and separated from those of river water, suggesting the possible occurrence of ecohydrological separation. However, the line-conditioned excess (lc-excess) values of most xylem water were positive, indicating a mixture of different water sources. Significant correlations were observed between the contributions of precipitation, soil water, and groundwater to water uptake by G. biloba, further supporting ecohydrological connectivity rather than ecohydrological separation. G. biloba switched its major water sources from soil water at 0-60 cm depth and precipitation in the wet summer, to soil water from >90 cm depth and groundwater in the dry winter. The river water was a minor water source for G. biloba, but its contribution was comparatively greater at the site closest to the river bank. Our findings contribute to understanding of plant-soil-water relationships and the water balance, and may provide important information for investigations of nutrient sources and sinks in riparian zones. The present study suggests the need to rethink the application of ecohydrological connectivity and separation in different biomes, especially where river water and groundwater recharge each other over time.

  5. Assessment of genetic variation within a global collection of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) cultivars and landraces using SNP markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Maria; Materne, Michael; Cogan, Noel O I; Rodda, Matthew; Daetwyler, Hans D; Slater, Anthony T; Forster, John W; Kaur, Sukhjiwan

    2014-12-24

    Lentil is a self-pollinated annual diploid (2n = 2× = 14) crop with a restricted history of genetic improvement through breeding, particularly when compared to cereal crops. This limited breeding has probably contributed to the narrow genetic base of local cultivars, and a corresponding potential to continue yield increases and stability. Therefore, knowledge of genetic variation and relationships between populations is important for understanding of available genetic variability and its potential for use in breeding programs. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers provide a method for rapid automated genotyping and subsequent data analysis over large numbers of samples, allowing assessment of genetic relationships between genotypes. In order to investigate levels of genetic diversity within lentil germplasm, 505 cultivars and landraces were genotyped with 384 genome-wide distributed SNP markers, of which 266 (69.2%) obtained successful amplification and detected polymorphisms. Gene diversity and PIC values varied between 0.108-0.5 and 0.102-0.375, with averages of 0.419 and 0.328, respectively. On the basis of clarity and interest to lentil breeders, the genetic structure of the germplasm collection was analysed separately for cultivars and landraces. A neighbour-joining (NJ) dendrogram was constructed for commercial cultivars, in which lentil cultivars were sorted into three major groups (G-I, G-II and G-III). These results were further supported by principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and STRUCTURE, from which three clear clusters were defined based on differences in geographical location. In the case of landraces, a weak correlation between geographical origin and genetic relationships was observed. The landraces from the Mediterranean region, predominantly Greece and Turkey, revealed very high levels of genetic diversity. Lentil cultivars revealed clear clustering based on geographical origin, but much more limited correlation between geographic origin

  6. Assessment of a smartphone app (Capstesia) for measuring pulse pressure variation: agreement between two methods: A Cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrachina, Borja; Cobos, Raquel; Mardones, Noemi; Castañeda, Angel; Vinuesa, Cristina

    2017-02-01

    Less invasive and noninvasive methods are emerging for haemodynamic monitoring. Among them is Capstesia, a smartphone app that, from photographs of a patient monitor showing invasive arterial pressure, estimates advanced haemodynamic variables after digitising and analysing the pressure curves. The aim of this study was to compare the level of agreement between the analysis of the signals obtained from the patient monitor and a photograph of the same images using the Capstesia app. Cross-sectional study. Araba University hospital (Txagorritxu), Vitoria-Gasteiz, Alava, Spain, from January to February 2015. Twenty patients (229 images) who had an arterial catheter (radial or femoral artery) inserted for haemodynamic monitoring. Snapshots obtained from the patient monitor and a photograph of these same snapshots using the Capstesia application were assessed with the same software (MATLAB, Mathworks, Natick, Massachusetats, USA) for evaluating the level of concordance of the following variables: pulse pressure variation (PPV), cardiac output (CO) and maximum slope of the pressure curve (dP/dt). Comparison was made using interclass correlation coefficients with corresponding 95% confidence intervals, and Bland-Altman plots with the corresponding percentages of error. (PPV). Secondary outcome: CO and maximum slope of the pressure curve [dP/dt]. The interclass correlation coefficients for PPV, CO and max dP/dt were 0.991 (95% confidence interval 0.988 to 0.993), 0.966 (95% confidence interval 0.956 to 0.974) and 0.962 (95% confidence interval 0.950 to 0.970), respectively. In the Bland-Altman analysis, bias and limits of agreement of PPV were (0.50% ± 1.42) resulting in a percentage of error of 20% for PPV. For CO they were 0.19 ± 0.341, with a 13.8% of error. Finally bias and limits of agreement for max dP/dt were 1.33 ± 77.71, resulting in an error of 14.20% CONCLUSIONS: Photograph of the screenshots obtained with the Capstesia app show a good concordance

  7. Inertial measurement systems for segments and joints kinematics assessment: towards an understanding of the variations in sensors accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebel, Karina; Boissy, Patrick; Nguyen, Hung; Duval, Christian

    2017-05-15

    Joints kinematics assessment based on inertial measurement systems, which include attitude and heading reference system (AHRS), are quickly gaining in popularity for research and clinical applications. The variety of the tasks and contexts they are used in require a deep understanding of the AHRS accuracy for optimal data interpretation. However, published accuracy studies on AHRS are mostly limited to a single task measured on a limited number of segments and participants. This study assessed AHRS sensors kinematics accuracy at multiple segments and joints through a variety of tasks not only to characterize the system's accuracy in these specific conditions, but also to extrapolate the accuracy results to a broader range of conditions using the characteristics of the movements (i.e. velocity and type of motion). Twenty asymptomatic adults ([Formula: see text] = 49.9) performed multiple 5 m timed up and go. Participants' head, upper trunk, pelvis, thigh, shank and foot were simultaneously tracked using AHRS and an optical motion capture system (gold standard). Each trial was segmented into basic tasks (sit-to-stand, walk, turn). At segment level, results revealed a mean root-mean-squared-difference [Formula: see text] varying between 1.1° and 5.5° according to the segment tracked and the task performed, with a good to excellent agreement between the systems. Relative sensor kinematics accuracy (i.e. joint) varied between 1.6° and 13.6° over the same tasks. On a global scheme, analysis of the effect of velocity on sensor kinematics accuracy showed that AHRS are better adapted to motions performed between 50°/s and 75°/s (roughly thigh and shank while walking). Results confirmed that pairing of modules to obtain joint kinematics affects the accuracy compared to segment kinematics. Overall, AHRS are a suitable solution for clinical evaluation of biomechanics under the multi-segment tasks performed although the variation in accuracy should be taken into

  8. Quantitative label-free proteomics for discovery of biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid: assessment of technical and inter-individual variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Perrin

    Full Text Available Biomarkers are required for pre-symptomatic diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF is a favored source because its proteome reflects the composition of the brain. Ideal biomarkers have low technical and inter-individual variability (subject variance among control subjects to minimize overlaps between clinical groups. This study evaluates a process of multi-affinity fractionation (MAF and quantitative label-free liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS for CSF biomarker discovery by (1 identifying reparable sources of technical variability, (2 assessing subject variance and residual technical variability for numerous CSF proteins, and (3 testing its ability to segregate samples on the basis of desired biomarker characteristics.Fourteen aliquots of pooled CSF and two aliquots from six cognitively normal individuals were randomized, enriched for low-abundance proteins by MAF, digested endoproteolytically, randomized again, and analyzed by nano-LC-MS. Nano-LC-MS data were time and m/z aligned across samples for relative peptide quantification. Among 11,433 aligned charge groups, 1360 relatively abundant ones were annotated by MS2, yielding 823 unique peptides. Analyses, including Pearson correlations of annotated LC-MS ion chromatograms, performed for all pairwise sample comparisons, identified several sources of technical variability: i incomplete MAF and keratins; ii globally- or segmentally-decreased ion current in isolated LC-MS analyses; and iii oxidized methionine-containing peptides. Exclusion of these sources yielded 609 peptides representing 81 proteins. Most of these proteins showed very low coefficients of variation (CV<5% whether they were quantified from the mean of all or only the 2 most-abundant peptides. Unsupervised clustering, using only 24 proteins selected for high subject variance, yielded perfect segregation of pooled and

  9. Seasonal variation in the hip score of dogs as assessed by the New Zealand Veterinary Association hip dysplasia scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worth, A J; Bridges, J P; Cave, N J; Jones, G

    2012-03-01

    To determine whether there is a seasonal variation in the phenotypic hip score of dogs born in New Zealand as assessed by the New Zealand Veterinary Association (NZVA) canine hip dysplasia (CHD) scheme. Data from dogs born in New Zealand between 1988 and 2009 that have been scored for CHD were retrospectively evaluated for the effect of month of birth on radiographic phenotype. Data included both the total score and the subtotal score, comprising Norberg's angle, the subluxation score and changes to the cranial acetabular edge, for each dog. Datasets were created for all breeds combined and for the four most populous breeds using the scheme (German Shepherd dog, Labrador Retriever, Golden Retriever and Rottweiler) and stratified according to month of birth and season. Due to the skewed nature of the data, a Kruskal-Wallis Rank Sum test was used to test for statistical significance. Additionally, χ² analysis was performed using the median of each dataset (proportion above/below the median). The null hypothesis was that there would be no effect of month of birth, and hence seasonality, on hip phenotype for dogs born and scored in New Zealand by the NZVA. For all breeds combined, month of birth had an effect on total and subtotal NZVA CHD scores (phip score in the autumn months of March and April than other months. When individual large breed data were analysed, there was an effect of month of birth on total and subtotal scores for the Labrador Retriever and the Rottweiler (p ≤ 0.05), but not the German Shepherd dog or Golden Retriever breeds. Being born in the autumn was associated with a protective effect on hip phenotype in some breeds. These results suggest that weather and/or another seasonal factor may have a significant environmental effect on the phenotype of the coxofemoral joint. The protective effect of being born in autumn suggests that a decreased level of exercise during subsequent development over winter may positively impact on final coxofemoral

  10. Effects of environmental disturbance on phenotypic variation: an integrated assessment of canalization, developmental stability, modularity, and allometry in lizard head shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazić, Marko M; Carretero, Miguel A; Crnobrnja-Isailović, Jelka; Kaliontzopoulou, Antigoni

    2015-01-01

    When populations experience suboptimal conditions, the mechanisms involved in the regulation of phenotypic variation can be challenged, resulting in increased phenotypic variance. This kind of disturbance can be diagnosed by using morphometric tools to study morphological patterns at different hierarchical levels and evaluate canalization, developmental stability, integration, modularity, and allometry. We assess the effect of urbanization on phenotypic variation in the common wall lizard (Podarcis muralis) by using geometric morphometrics to assess disturbance to head shape development. The head shapes of urban lizards were more variable and less symmetric, suggesting that urban living is more likely to disturb development. Head shape variation was congruent within and across individuals, which indicated that canalization and developmental stability are two related phenomena in these organisms. Furthermore, urban lizards exhibited smaller mean head sizes, divergent size-shape allometries, and increased deviation from within-group allometric lines. This suggests that mechanisms regulating head shape allometry may also be disrupted. The integrated evaluation of several measures of developmental instability at different hierarchical levels, which provided in this case congruent results, can be a powerful methodological guide for future studies, as it enhances the detection of environmental disturbances on phenotypic variation and aids biological interpretation of the results.

  11. Comprehensive assessment of sequence variation within the copy number variable defensin cluster on 8p23 by target enriched in-depth 454 sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xinmin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In highly copy number variable (CNV regions such as the human defensin gene locus, comprehensive assessment of sequence variations is challenging. PCR approaches are practically restricted to tiny fractions, and next-generation sequencing (NGS approaches of whole individual genomes e.g. by the 1000 Genomes Project is confined by an affordable sequence depth. Combining target enrichment with NGS may represent a feasible approach. Results As a proof of principle, we enriched a ~850 kb section comprising the CNV defensin gene cluster DEFB, the invariable DEFA part and 11 control regions from two genomes by sequence capture and sequenced it by 454 technology. 6,651 differences to the human reference genome were found. Comparison to HapMap genotypes revealed sensitivities and specificities in the range of 94% to 99% for the identification of variations. Using error probabilities for rigorous filtering revealed 2,886 unique single nucleotide variations (SNVs including 358 putative novel ones. DEFB CN determinations by haplotype ratios were in agreement with alternative methods. Conclusion Although currently labor extensive and having high costs, target enriched NGS provides a powerful tool for the comprehensive assessment of SNVs in highly polymorphic CNV regions of individual genomes. Furthermore, it reveals considerable amounts of putative novel variations and simultaneously allows CN estimation.

  12. Effect of Variation of Operational Regimes in Building Environment on Results of its Energy and Exergy Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshchuk, Volodymyr

    2017-03-01

    For further development of the dynamic exergy analysis within built environment the work proposes to take into account stochastic nature of variations of operational regimes. Using the probability theory and statistics methods, the set of parameters considered as relevant for uncertainty conditions are presented. It is shown that characteristics of buildings (insulation, window performance, heat recovery, etc.) and type of the heating system have undoubtedly a strong influence not only on the energy/exergy demand and consumption but also on the sensitivity of the energy/exergy parameters to variations of external conditions. According to the results obtained after implementations of energy efficient solutions coefficient of variation of energy/exergy-based parameters can be increased up to two times.

  13. Effect of Variation of Operational Regimes in Building Environment on Results of its Energy and Exergy Assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voloshchuk Volodymyr

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available For further development of the dynamic exergy analysis within built environment the work proposes to take into account stochastic nature of variations of operational regimes. Using the probability theory and statistics methods, the set of parameters considered as relevant for uncertainty conditions are presented. It is shown that characteristics of buildings (insulation, window performance, heat recovery, etc. and type of the heating system have undoubtedly a strong influence not only on the energy/exergy demand and consumption but also on the sensitivity of the energy/exergy parameters to variations of external conditions. According to the results obtained after implementations of energy efficient solutions coefficient of variation of energy/exergy-based parameters can be increased up to two times.

  14. Rice Chloroplast Genome Variation Architecture and Phylogenetic Dissection in Diverse Oryza Species Assessed by Whole-Genome Resequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Wei; Kim, Tae-Sung; Park, Yong-Jin

    2016-12-01

    Chloroplast genome variations have been detected, despite its overall conserved structure, which has been valuable for plant population genetics and evolutionary studies. Here, we described chloroplast variation architecture of 383 rice accessions from diverse regions and different ecotypes, in order to mine the rice chloroplast genome variation architecture and phylogenetic. A total of 3677 variations across the chloroplast genome were identified with an average density of 27.33 per kb, in which wild rice showing a higher variation density than cultivated groups. Chloroplast genome nucleotide diversity investigation indicated a high degree of diversity in wild rice than in cultivated rice. Genetic distance estimation revealed that African rice showed a low level of breeding and connectivity with the Asian rice, suggesting the big distinction of them. Population structure and principal component analysis revealed the existence of clear clustering of African and Asian rice, as well as the indica and japonica in Asian cultivated rice. Phylogenetic analysis based on maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference methods and the population splits test suggested and supported the independent origins of indica and japonica within Asian cultivated rice. In addition, the African cultivated rice was thought to be domesticated differently from Asian cultivated rice. The chloroplast genome variation architecture in Asian and African rice are different, as well as within Asian or African rice. Wild rice and cultivated rice also have distinct nucleotide diversity or genetic distance. In chloroplast level, the independent origins of indica and japonica within Asian cultivated rice were suggested and the African cultivated rice was thought to be domesticated differently from Asian cultivated rice. These results will provide more candidate evidence for the further rice chloroplast genomic and evolution studies.

  15. Within-country variation of salt intake assessed via urinary excretion in Japan: a multilevel analysis in all 47 prefectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uechi, Ken; Asakura, Keiko; Masayasu, Shizuko; Sasaki, Satoshi

    2017-06-01

    Salt intake in Japan remains high; therefore, exploring within-country variation in salt intake and its cause is an important step in the establishment of salt reduction strategies. However, no nationwide evaluation of this variation has been conducted by urinalysis. We aimed to clarify whether within-country variation in salt intake exists in Japan after adjusting for individual characteristics. Healthy men (n=1027) and women (n=1046) aged 20-69 years were recruited from all 47 prefectures of Japan. Twenty-four-hour sodium excretion was estimated using three spot urine samples collected on three nonconsecutive days. The study area was categorized into 12 regions defined by the National Health and Nutrition Survey Japan. Within-country variation in sodium excretion was estimated as a population (region)-level variance using a multilevel model with random intercepts, with adjustment for individual biological, socioeconomic and dietary characteristics. Estimated 24 h sodium excretion was 204.8 mmol per day in men and 155.7 mmol per day in women. Sodium excretion was high in the Northeastern region. However, population-level variance was extremely small after adjusting for individual characteristics (0.8 and 2% of overall variance in men and women, respectively) compared with individual-level variance (99.2 and 98% of overall variance in men and women, respectively). Among individual characteristics, greater body mass index, living with a spouse and high miso-soup intake were associated with high sodium excretion in both sexes. Within-country variation in salt intake in Japan was extremely small compared with individual-level variation. Salt reduction strategies for Japan should be comprehensive and should not address the small within-country differences in intake.

  16. Assessing Heat-to-Heat Variations Affecting Mechanism Based Modeling of Hydrogen Environment Cracking (HEAC) in High Strength Alloys for Marine Applications: Monel K-500

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-28

    shafts, oil-well tools and instruments, surgical blades and scrapers, springs, valve trim, fasteners, and marine propeller shafts. These Ni-based...34Assessing Heat-to-Heat Variations Affecting Mechanism Based Modeling of Hydrogen Environment Cracking (HEAC) in High Strength Alloys for Marine ...Environment Cracking (HEAC) in High Strength Alloys for Marine Applications: Monel K-500 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER N00014-12-1-0506 5b. GRANT NUMBER N/A 5c

  17. Historical range of variation assessment for wetland and riparian ecosystems, U.S. Forest Service Rocky Mountain Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward Gage; David J. Cooper

    2013-01-01

    This document provides an overview of historical range of variation concepts and explores their application to wetland and riparian ecosystems in the US Forest Service Rocky Mountain Region (Region 2), which includes National Forests and National Grasslands occurring in the states of Colorado, Wyoming, Nebraska, Kansas, and South Dakota. For each of five ecosystem...

  18. Assessment and reduction of comet assay variation in relation to DNA damage: studies from the European Comet Assay Validation Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Peter; Möller, Lennart; Godschalk, Roger W L

    2010-01-01

    The alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay has become a widely used method for the detection of DNA damage and repair in cells and tissues. Still, it has been difficult to compare results from different investigators because of differences in assay conditions and because the data...... are reported in different units. The European Comet Assay Validation Group (ECVAG) was established for the purpose of validation of the comet assay with respect to measures of DNA damage formation and its repair. The results from this inter-laboratory validation trail showed a large variation in measured level...... reliability for the measurement of DNA damage by the comet assay but there is still a need for further validation to reduce both assay and inter-laboratory variation....

  19. Assessing slipperiness in fast-food restaurants in the USA using friction variation, friction level and perception rating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Ruey; Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Way Li, Kai; Filiaggi, Alfred; Courtney, Theodore K

    2008-05-01

    Although friction variation is speculated to be a significant contributor to slip and fall incidents, it has not been related to a measurement of slipperiness in the literature. This field study investigated the relationship among multiple friction variations, friction levels and the perception ratings of slipperiness in six major working areas of 10 fast-food restaurants in the USA. The mean perception rating score for each working area was correlated with various friction reduction variables across all the restaurants in comparison with its correlation with the mean friction coefficient of each working area. The results indicated that the absolute and relative reductions in friction over the whole working area, among 12 friction reduction variables evaluated, could have a slightly better correlation with the perception rating score (r=0.34 and 0.37, respectively) than the mean friction coefficient of each working area (0.33). However, in friction measurements, more effort and time are needed to quantify friction variations than to obtain the mean friction coefficient. The results of the multiple regression model on the perception rating indicated that adding friction reduction variables into the regression model, in addition to the mean friction coefficient, did not make a significant impact on the outcomes. The results further indicated a statistically significant correlation between the mean friction coefficient and the maximum relative friction reduction over the whole area in each working area across all the restaurants evaluated (r=0.80). Despite a slightly lower correlation with perception rating than the friction variation, the mean friction coefficient of an area is still a reasonably good indicator of slipperiness.

  20. A pragmatic proposal for permissible limits in external quality assessment schemes with a compromise between biological variation and the state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeckel, Rainer; Wosniok, Werner; Kratochvila, Josef; Carobene, Anna

    2012-01-25

    Permissible limits for internal and external quality assurance are either based on biological variation or on the state of the art (technical feasibility). The former approach has a scientific basis, but, in some cases, leads to limits which are either not achievable under the present technology, or which are not stringent enough. If proficiency testing is mandatory, stringent limits which cannot be fulfilled by the majority of laboratories could lead to juristic consequences. Therefore, most national guidelines were based on the state of the art, however, without providing the underlying reasoning. A simple algorithm for permissible limits in external quality assessment schemes (EQAS) is proposed based on biological variation, technical feasibility and correlated to the rate of false positive results. The proposed limits are compared with some limits from several EQAS (RiliBÄK, SEKK, RCPA, CLIA, PROLARIT). The suggested limits are slightly more stringent than the German RiliBÄK, less stringent than the Australasian guidelines and agreed best with the Czech SEKK and the Italian PROLARIT scheme. The graphical presentation of permissible limits strictly derived of biological variation with the proposed limits led to straight lines with different slopes and a cross-over at the limits for quantities with a medium biological variation (e.g., trijodthyronine). The greatest discordance between the various recommendations was observed for calcium, chloride, hemoglobin A(1c) and sodium.

  1. Examiners and Content and Site: Oh My! a National Organization's Investigation of Score Variation in Large-Scale Performance Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebok, Stefanie S.; Roy, Marguerite; Klinger, Don A.; De Champlain, André F.

    2015-01-01

    Examiner effects and content specificity are two well known sources of construct irrelevant variance that present great challenges in performance-based assessments. National medical organizations that are responsible for large-scale performance based assessments experience an additional challenge as they are responsible for administering…

  2. Some anemonefish lack personality: a comparative assessment of behavioral variation and repeatability in relation to environmental and social factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Marian Y. L.; Beasley, Amanda L.; Douglass, Tasman; Whalan, Steve; Scott, Anna

    2017-12-01

    Determining the extent of repeatable differences in the behavior of animals and the factors that influence behavioral expression is important for understanding individual fitness and population processes, thereby aiding in species conservation. However, little is known about the causes of variation in the repeatability of behavioral differences among species because rarely have comparative studies been undertaken to examine the repeatability of behavioral differences among individuals within their natural ecological settings. Using two species of endemic subtropical anemonefishes, Amphiprion mccullochi and A. latezonatus at Lord Howe and North Solitary Islands, Australia, we conducted an in situ comparative analysis of personality traits, examining the repeatability of boldness, sociability and aggression as well as the potential role of environmental and social factors on behavioral expression. For A. mccullochi, only boldness and aggression were highly repeatable and these behaviors formed a behavioral syndrome. For A. latezonatus, none of the three behaviors were repeatable due to low-inter-individual variation in behavior. We suggest that the harsher and more variable environmental and social conditions experienced by A. latezonatus have resulted in reduced repeatability in behavior, in contrast to A. mccullochi which typically inhabits a more stable lagoonal reef environment. Additionally, group size and size rank, rather than nearest-neighbor distance and anemone size, influenced the expression of these behaviors in both species, suggesting that behavioral variation was more sensitive to social than environmental factors. Overall, differences in repeatability between these closely related species likely reflect adaptations to contrasting environmental and social conditions, although alternative explanations must be considered. The differences in behavioral consistency between these two endemic anemonefishes could lead to disparity in their resilience to

  3. Passenger comfort on high-speed trains: effect of tunnel noise on the subjective assessment of pressure variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanok, Sandra; Mendolia, Franco; Wittkowski, Martin; Rooney, Daniel; Putzke, Matthias; Aeschbach, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    When passing through a tunnel, aerodynamic effects on high-speed trains may impair passenger comfort. These variations in atmospheric pressure are accompanied by transient increases in sound pressure level. To date, it is unclear whether the latter influences the perceived discomfort associated with the variations in atmospheric pressure. In a pressure chamber of the DLR-Institute of Aerospace Medicine, 71 participants (M = 28.3 years ± 8.1 SD) rated randomised pressure changes during two conditions according to a crossover design. The pressure changes were presented together with tunnel noise such that the sound pressure level was transiently elevated by either +6 dB (low noise condition) or +12 dB (high noise condition) above background noise level (65 dB(A)). Data were combined with those of a recent study, in which identical pressure changes were presented without tunnel noise (Schwanitz et al., 2013, 'Pressure Variations on a Train - Where is the Threshold to Railway Passenger Discomfort?' Applied Ergonomics 44 (2): 200-209). Exposure-response relationships for the combined data set comprising all three noise conditions show that pressure discomfort increases with the magnitude and speed of the pressure changes but decreases with increasing tunnel noise. Practitioner Summary: In a pressure chamber, we systematically examined how pressure discomfort, as it may be experienced by railway passengers, is affected by the presence of tunnel noise during pressure changes. It is shown that across three conditions (no noise, low noise (+6 dB), high noise (+12 dB)) pressure discomfort decreases with increasing tunnel noise.

  4. Spring onset variations and trends in the continental United States: past and regional assessment using temperature-based indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Mark D.; Ault, Toby R.; Betancourt, Julio L.

    2012-01-01

    Phenological data are simple yet sensitive indicators of climate change impacts on ecosystems, but observations have not been made routinely or extensively enough to evaluate spatial and temporal patterns across most continents, including North America. As an alternative, many studies use weather-based algorithms to simulate specific phenological responses. Spring Indices (SI) are a set of complex phenological models that have been successfully applied to evaluate variations and trends in the onset of spring across the Northern Hemisphere’s temperate regions. To date, SI models have been limited by only producing output in locations where both the plants’ chilling and warmth requirements are met. Here, we develop an extended form of the SI (abbreviated SI-x) that expands their application into the subtropics by ignoring chilling requirements while still retaining the utility and accuracy of the original SI (now abbreviated SI-o). The validity of the new indices is tested, and regional SI anomalies are explored across the data-rich continental United States. SI-x variations from 1900 to 2010 show an abrupt and sustained delay in spring onset of about 4–8 d (around 1958) in parts of the Southeast and southern Great Plains, and a comparable advance of 4–8 d (around 1984) in parts of the northern Great Plains and the West. Atmospheric circulation anomalies, linked to large-scale modes of variability, exert modest but significant roles in the timing of spring onset across the United States on interannual and longer timescales. The SI-x are promising metrics for tracking spring onset variations and trends in mid-latitudes, relating them to relevant ecological, hydrological, and socioeconomic phenomena, and exploring connections between atmospheric drivers and seasonal timing.

  5. Genetic variation in wild and hatchery stocks of Suminoe Oyster (Crassostrea ariakensis) assessed by PCR-RFLP and microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Allen, Standish K; Reece, Kimberly S

    2005-01-01

    Genetic variation in wild Asian populations and U.S. hatchery stocks of Crassostrea ariakensis was examined using polymerase chain reactions with restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis of both the mitochondrial COI gene and the nuclear internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1 region and using 3 microsatellite markers. Hierarchical analysis of molecular variance and pairwise comparisons revealed significant differentiation (P gametic incompatibility, differential larval survival, or a difference in timing of sexual maturity. Overall, results suggested that oysters collected as C. ariakensis in this study, and likely in other studies as well, include two different sympatric species with some degree of reproductive isolation.

  6. Assessment and management of interfractional variations in daily diagnostic-quality-CT guided prostate-bed irradiation after prostatectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Feng; Ahunbay, Ergun; Lawton, Colleen; Allen Li, X., E-mail: ali@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify interfractional anatomic variations and limitations of the current practice of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for prostate-bed patients and to study dosimetric benefits of an online adaptive replanning scheme that addresses the interfractional variations. Methods: Contours for the targets and organs at risk (OARs) from daily diagnostic-quality CTs acquired with in-room CT (CTVision, Siemens) were generated by populating the planning contours using an autosegmentation tool based on deformable registration (ABAS, Elekta) with manual editing for ten prostate-bed patients treated with postoperative daily CT-guided IMRT. Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) obtained by maximizing the overlap of contours for a structure between the daily and plan contours was used to quantify the organ deformation between the plan and daily CTs. Three interfractional-variation-correction schemes, the current standard practice of IGRT repositioning, a previously developed online adaptive RT (ART), and the full reoptimization, were applied to these daily CTs and a number of dose-volume quantities for the targets and organs at risk were compared for their effectiveness to account for the interfractional variations. Results: Large interfractional organ deformations in prostate-bed irradiation were seen. The mean DSCs for CTV, rectum, and bladder were 86.6 ± 5.1% (range from 61% to 97%), 77.3% ± 7.4% (range from 55% to 90%), and 75.4% ± 11.2% (range from 46% to 96%), respectively. The fractional and cumulative dose-volume quantities for CTV and PTV: V100 (volume received at least 100% prescription dose), and rectum and bladder: V{sub 45Gy} and V{sub 60Gy} (volume received at least 45 or 60 Gy), were compared for the repositioning, adaptive, reoptimization, and original plans. The fractional and cumulative dosimetric results were nearly the same. The average cumulative CTV V100 were 88.0%, 98.4%, 99.2%, and 99.3% for the IGRT, ART, reoptimization, and original plans

  7. Assessment of variations in taxonomic diversity, forest structure, and aboveground biomass using remote sensing along an altitudinal gradient in tropical montane forest of Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, C. M.; Saatchi, S. S.; Clark, D.; Fricker, G. A.; Wolf, J.; Gillespie, T. W.; Rovzar, C. M.; Andelman, S.

    2012-12-01

    This research sought to understand how alpha and beta diversity of plants vary and relate to the three-dimensional vegetation structure and aboveground biomass along environmental gradients in the tropical montane forests of Braulio Carrillo National Park in Costa Rica. There is growing evidence that ecosystem structure plays an important role in defining patterns of species diversity and along with abiotic factors (climate and edaphic) control the phenotypic and functional variations across landscapes. It is well documented that strong subdivisions at local and regional scales are found mainly on geologic or climate gradients. These general determinants of biodiversity are best demonstrated in regions with natural gradients such as tropical montane forests. Altitudinal gradients provide a landscape scale changes through variations in topography, climate, and edaphic conditions on which we tested several theoretical and biological hypotheses regarding drivers of biodiversity. The study was performed by using forest inventory and botanical data from nine 1-ha plots ranging from 100 m to 2800 m above sea level and remote sensing data from airborne lidar and radar sensors to quantify variations in forest structure. In this study we report on the effectiveness of relating patterns of tree taxonomic alpha diversity to three-dimensional structure of a tropical montane forest using lidar and radar observations of forest structure and biomass. We assessed alpha and beta diversity at the species, genus, and family levels utilizing datasets provided by the Terrestrial Ecology Assessment and Monitoring (TEAM) Network. Through the comparison to active remote sensing imagery, our results show that there is a strong relationship between forest 3D-structure, and alpha and beta diversity controlled by variations in abiotic factors along the altitudinal gradient. Using spatial analysis with the aid of remote sensing data, we find distinct patterns along the environmental gradients

  8. Vitamin D status assessed by a validated HPLC method: within and between variation in subjects supplemented with vitamin D3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jette; Bysted, Anette; Andersen, Rikke

    2009-01-01

    -subject variation of vitamin D status in serum samples from four different dietary intervention studies in which subjects (n=92) were supplemented with different doses of vitamin D3 (5-12 g/day) and for different durations (4-20 months). Results. The HPLC method was applicable for 4.0-200 nmol S-25OHD/L, while...... estimated in each of the four human intervention studies did not differ significantly (p=0.55). Hence, the pooled standard deviation was 15.3 nmol 25OHD3/L. In the studies with 6-8 samplings during 7-20 months of supplementation, the within-subject variation was 3.9-7.2 nmol 25OHD3/L, while vitamin D status...... was in the range 47-120 nmol/L. Conclusions. The validated HPLC method was applied in samples from human intervention studies in which subjects were supplemented with vitamin D3. The estimated standard deviation between and within subjects is useful in the forthcoming decision on setting limits for optimal vitamin...

  9. Recognizing and Reducing Analytical Errors and Sources of Variation in Clinical Pathology Data in Safety Assessment Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultze, A E; Irizarry, A R

    2017-02-01

    Veterinary clinical pathologists are well positioned via education and training to assist in investigations of unexpected results or increased variation in clinical pathology data. Errors in testing and unexpected variability in clinical pathology data are sometimes referred to as "laboratory errors." These alterations may occur in the preanalytical, analytical, or postanalytical phases of studies. Most of the errors or variability in clinical pathology data occur in the preanalytical or postanalytical phases. True analytical errors occur within the laboratory and are usually the result of operator or instrument error. Analytical errors are often ≤10% of all errors in diagnostic testing, and the frequency of these types of errors has decreased in the last decade. Analytical errors and increased data variability may result from instrument malfunctions, inability to follow proper procedures, undetected failures in quality control, sample misidentification, and/or test interference. This article (1) illustrates several different types of analytical errors and situations within laboratories that may result in increased variability in data, (2) provides recommendations regarding prevention of testing errors and techniques to control variation, and (3) provides a list of references that describe and advise how to deal with increased data variability.

  10. Morphological variation of the caudal fossa of domestic cat skulls assessed with computed tomography and geometric morphometrics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Caroline R; Marchant, Thomas W; Lodzinska, Joanna; Schoenebeck, Jeffery J; Schwarz, Tobias

    2017-09-01

    Objectives This study aimed to investigate differences and demonstrate a normal range of morphological variation of the caudal fossa of the cranium of domestic cats. Methods CT scans of 32 domestic cat heads of 11 breeds were included. Isosurfaces from skulls were characterised through three-dimensional geometric morphometrics using geographical landmarks placed on the internal surface of the caudal fossa and foramen magnum. Raw data was transformed with a Procrustes fit and coordinate covariance was analysed by principal components to establish breed- and sex-level differences. Skulls were also classified according to the number of concavities along the mid-sagittal vermiform impression. Differences were investigated between breed groups and sex, and correlation was sought with age. Results Analyses revealed size-independent differences in occipital bone morphology across breeds and sex; however, no clustering was evident. Most variability was observed at the exoccipital bones, ventral portion of the supraoccipital bone, dorsum sellae of the basisphenoid and the osseous tentorium cerebelli. No statistically significant differences were identified via two-sample t-tests between breed groups or sexes. No statistically significant correlation using Spearman rho correlation coefficient was identified with age. Conclusions and relevance The feline caudal fossa displays a wide range of intra- and inter-breed variation, not linked to age or sex. Concavities along the vermiform impression have not previously been described. As advanced imaging modalities are becoming more frequently used for domestic felids, an established range of normality is important for discriminating pathological changes from anatomical variances.

  11. Assessment of spatial variation in drinking water iodine and its implications for dietary intake: A new conceptual model for Denmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voutchkova, Denitza Dimitrova, E-mail: ddv@geo.au.dk [Department of Geoscience, Aarhus University, Høegh-Guldbergs Gade 2, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Lyseng Allé 1, DK-8270 Højbjerg (Denmark); Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Øster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K (Denmark); Ernstsen, Vibeke [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Øster Voldgade 10, DK-1350 Copenhagen K (Denmark); Hansen, Birgitte; Sørensen, Brian Lyngby [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS), Lyseng Allé 1, DK-8270 Højbjerg (Denmark); Zhang, Chaosheng [GIS Centre and School of Geography and Archaeology, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Kristiansen, Søren Munch [Department of Geoscience, Aarhus University, Høegh-Guldbergs Gade 2, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2014-09-15

    Iodine is essential for human health. Many countries have therefore introduced universal salt iodising (USI) programmes to ensure adequate intake for the populations. However, little attention has been paid to subnational differences in iodine intake from drinking water caused by naturally occurring spatial variations. To address this issue, we here present the results of a Danish nationwide study of spatial trends of iodine in drinking water and the relevance of these trends for human dietary iodine intake. The data consist of treated drinking water samples from 144 waterworks, representing approx. 45% of the groundwater abstraction for drinking water supply in Denmark. The samples were analysed for iodide, iodate, total iodine (TI) and other major and trace elements. The spatial patterns were investigated with Local Moran's I. TI ranges from < 0.2 to 126 μg L{sup −1} (mean 14.4 μg L{sup −1}, median 11.9 μg L{sup −1}). Six speciation combinations were found. Half of the samples (n = 71) contain organic iodine; all species were detected in approx. 27% of all samples. The complex spatial variation is attributed both to the geology and the groundwater treatment. TI > 40 μg L{sup −1} originates from postglacial marine and glacial meltwater sand and from Campanian–Maastrichtian chalk aquifers. The estimated drinking water contribution to human intake varies from 0% to > 100% of the WHO recommended daily iodine intake for adults and from 0% to approx. 50% for adolescents. The paper presents a new conceptual model based on the observed clustering of high or low drinking-water iodine concentrations, delimiting zones with potentially deficient, excessive or optimal iodine status. Our findings suggest that the present coarse-scale nationwide programme for monitoring the population's iodine status may not offer a sufficiently accurate picture. Local variations in drinking-water iodine should be mapped and incorporated into future adjustment of the

  12. A comprehensive assessment of geographic variation in heat tolerance and hardening capacity in populations of Drosophila melanogaster from eastern Australia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sgrò, C M; Overgaard, J; Kristensen, T N

    2010-01-01

    We examined latitudinal variation in adult and larval heat tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster from eastern Australia. Adults were assessed using static and ramping assays. Basal and hardened static heat knockdown time showed significant linear clines; heat tolerance increased towards the tropics......, particularly for hardened flies, suggesting that tropical populations have a greater hardening response. A similar pattern was evident for ramping heat knockdown time at 0.06 °C min-1 increase. There was no cline for ramping heat knockdown temperature (CTmax) at 0.1 °C min-1 increase. Acute (static) heat...

  13. Assessment of protein intake during pregnancy using a food frequency questionnaire and the effect on postpartum body weight variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Maria Beatriz Trindade de; Kac, Gilberto; Sichieri, Rosely

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of protein intake during pregnancy on postpartum weight variation. This was a prospective cohort study with 421 women interviewed at 15 days (baseline) and 2, 6, and 9 months postpartum. Data on diet were obtained using the food frequency questionnaire, focusing on the second and third trimesters. Protein intake was considered adequate when women consumed ≥ 1.2g of protein per kg body weight, and inadequate when weight loss of 0.409kg/month (±0.12) (p Women with adequate protein intake during pregnancy lost an additional 0.094kg/month (±0.04) during postpartum (p = 0.03) when compared to women with inadequate intake. The model was adjusted for energy, % body fat, stature, age, schooling, skin color, and smoking. Recommended protein intake during pregnancy favored postpartum weight reduction.

  14. Genetic variation assessment of acid lime accessions collected from south of Iran using SSR and ISSR molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafi, Ata Allah; Abkenar, Asad Asadi; Sharafi, Ali; Masaeli, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Iran has a long history of acid lime cultivation and propagation. In this study, genetic variation in 28 acid lime accessions from five regions of south of Iran, and their relatedness with other 19 citrus cultivars were analyzed using Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) and Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) molecular markers. Nine primers for SSR and nine ISSR primers were used for allele scoring. In total, 49 SSR and 131 ISSR polymorphic alleles were detected. Cluster analysis of SSR and ISSR data showed that most of the acid lime accessions (19 genotypes) have hybrid origin and genetically distance with nucellar of Mexican lime (9 genotypes). As nucellar of Mexican lime are susceptible to phytoplasma, these acid lime genotypes can be used to evaluate their tolerance against biotic constricts like lime "witches' broom disease".

  15. Assessment of the variation of the moisture content in the Pinus pinaster Ait. using the non destructive GPR technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Díez Barra, R.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The moisture content variations in wood have a significant influence in wood’s physicochemical properties, as well as in its electromagnetic properties and to specific effects upon waves’ characteristics. In particular, this paper focuses on the analysis of the Ground-penetrating Radar’s (GPR using an antenna of 1.6GHz central frequency capacity to register the velocity and the amplitude of the electromagnetic waves’ variation during the drying process of Pinus pinaster Ait timber joists. The results showed that when timber MC descends, the propagation velocity and amplitude of both the direct and the reflected wave increased. The high correlation found between the variables studied demonstrates GPR efficiency and the innovative application of this technique as a non-destructive evaluation tool for timber structures, particularly when studying its moisture content.La variación en el contenido de humedad (CH tiene una influencia significativa tanto en las propiedades físico- químicas de la madera, como en sus propiedades electromagnéticas y por tanto afecta a las características de la propagación de las ondas. En concreto, en este trabajo se estudia la capacidad del georradar (GR empleando una antena de 1.6GHz de frecuencia central para registrar las variaciones que se producen en la velocidad y en la amplitud de las ondas electromagnéticas cuando se propagan en unas viguetas de madera de Pinus pinaster Ait de uso estructural cuyo CH va disminuyendo. Se ha comprobado como cuando el CH descendía la velocidad de propagación y las amplitudes, tanto de la onda directa como de la reflejada aumentaba. Los altos factores de correlación encontrados demuestran que el GR es una técnica capaz de evaluar, de forma no destructiva, el CH de la madera de uso estructural.

  16. The Red Sea structural architecture assessment based on yield strength spatial variations and Arabian margin preexisting structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, T.; Furlong, K. P.

    2016-12-01

    Rift initiation and localization might reflect spatial changes in the lithospheric yield strength. However, this does not appear to be the case in the Red Sea extensional system where fission track analysis shows no significant changes in the geothermal gradient prior to the Red Sea rift onset. In contrast, though the whole Red Sea rift initiated 25 Ma ago, its extensional architecture changes dramatically along strike from narrow localized spreading in the south to asymmetrical diffuse extension north of 21° latitude. This onset of diffuse extension has been recorded in the north-western Arabian margin as old as 33 Ma. Such diversity in the extensional style might reflect along strike yield strength variations as a consequence of the geological setting in the Arabian margin. The north-western Arabian basin, which is part of the Arabian margin, bounded by Qiba high from the east, the Arabian shield from the south and the west and Syrian plateau from the north. The basin accommodates part of the Red Sea diffuse extension and has a preexisting structural architecture represented in the Cenozoic failed rift that called Sarhan graben. Our goal is to analyze the current lithospheric yield strength spatial variations along the Red Sea rift and emphasize their relationship with the Arabian margin structural architecture. We hypothesize that the north-western Arabian margin's lithospheric weakness and structural diversity are playing an important role in producing region of diffuse extension by their interaction with the forces applied by far field stresses represented by the New Tethys slab pull. On the other hand, the south-western Arabian margin interacts with the far field stresses as a single strong block in which led to localize the extension in the southern Red Sea. Our work may improve the scientific community understanding for how rifts initiate and evolve over time.

  17. Assessment of intra and interregional genetic variation in the Eastern Red-backed Salamander, Plethodon cinereus, via analysis of novel microsatellite markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander C Cameron

    Full Text Available The red-backed salamander (Plethodon cinereus has long-served as a model system in ecology, evolution, and behavior, and studies surveying molecular variation in this species have become increasingly common over the past decade. However, difficulties are commonly encountered when extending microsatellite markers to populations that are unstudied from a genetic perspective due to high levels of genetic differentiation across this species' range. To ameliorate this issue, we used 454 pyrosequencing to identify hundreds of microsatellite loci. We then screened 40 of our top candidate loci in populations in Virginia, Pennsylvania, and Ohio-including an isolated island population ~ 4.5 km off the shore of Lake Erie (South Bass Island. We identified 25 loci that are polymorphic in a well-studied region of Virginia and 11 of these loci were polymorphic in populations located in the genetically unstudied regions of Ohio and Pennsylvania. Use of these loci to examine patterns of variation within populations revealed that South Bass Island has low diversity in comparison to other sites. However, neither South Bass Island nor isolated populations around Cleveland are inbred. Assessment of variation between populations revealed three well defined genetic clusters corresponding to Virginia, mainland Ohio/Pennsylvania, and South Bass Island. Comparisons of our results to those of others working in various parts of the range are consistent with the idea that differentiation is lower in regions that were once glaciated. However, these comparisons also suggest that well differentiated isolated populations in the formerly glaciated portion of the range are not uncommon. This work provides novel genetic resources that will facilitate population genetic studies in a part of the red-backed salamander's range that has not previously been studied in this manner. Moreover, this work refines our understanding of how neutral variation is distributed in this ecologically

  18. Robustness of life cycle assessment results : influence of data variation and modelling choices on results for beverage packaging materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harst-Wintraecken, van der E.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a well-established method to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of product and service systems throughout their life cycles. However, it can happen that LCAs for the same product have different and even conflicting outcomes. LCA results need to be robust and

  19. Present and past microsatellite variation and assessment of genetic structure in Eurasian badger (Meles meles) in Denmark

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pertoldi, C; Loeschcke, [No Value; Randi, E; Madsen, AB; Hansen, MM; Bijlsma, R; Van De Zande, L

    During the past 50 years the number of badgers (Meles meles) in Denmark has declined by c. 50%. To assess the genetic consequences of the demographic decline, six DNA-microsatellite loci were used to analyse 139 badger tissue-samples, which were collected in 1995-98 from three zones (1, 2 and 3) in

  20. Statistical and Graphical Assessment of Circumferential and Radial Hardness Variation of AISI 4140, AISI 1020 and AA 6082 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khalid, Hamad; Alaskari, Ayman; Oraby, Samy

    2011-01-01

    Hardness homogeneity of the commonly used structural ferrous and nonferrous engineering materials is of vital importance in the design stage, therefore, reliable information regarding material properties homogeneity should be validated and any deviation should be addressed. In the current study the hardness variation, over wide spectrum radial locations of some ferrous and nonferrous structural engineering materials, was investigated. Measurements were performed over both faces (cross-section) of each stock bar according to a pre-specified stratified design, ensuring the coverage of the entire area both in radial and circumferential directions. Additionally the credibility of the apparatus and measuring procedures were examined through a statistically based calibration process of the hardness reference block. Statistical and response surface graphical analysis are used to examine the nature, adequacy and significance of the measured hardness values. Calibration of the apparatus reference block proved the reliability of the measuring system, where no strong evidence was found against the stochastic nature of hardness measures over the various stratified locations. Also, outlier elimination procedures were proved to be beneficial only at fewer measured points. Hardness measurements showed a dispersion domain that is within the acceptable confidence interval. For AISI 4140 and AISI 1020 steels, hardness is found to have a slight decrease trend as the diameter is reduced, while an opposite behavior is observed for AA 6082 aluminum alloy. However, no definite significant behavior was noticed regarding the effect of the sector sequence (circumferential direction). PMID:28817030

  1. Assessment of Genetic Variation within Commercial Iranian Pomegranate (Punica granatum L. Cultivars, Using ISSR and SSR Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam Madadi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Pomegranate is one of the most important horticultural crops in Iran, and has been cultivated for thousands of years in this country. At this period due to selection of superior cultivars from nature or mutation emerged in these cultivars, and their vegetative propagation, substantial genetic variation has occurred within and among the cultivars. Thus, each cultivar may consist of different clones. According to this issue, diversity within four commercial cultivars of pomegranate was analyzed. Two molecular marker systems including ISSR and SSR were used to evaluate variability between 36 samples of four commercial cultivars. ISSR markers produced 114 amplification products, out of which 97 were polymorphic (83.23%. Mean resolving power was 2.96 for ISSR markers. 19 SSR molecular markers were used, 15 of which amplified polymorphic products, while the remaining ones monomorphic., The number of polymorphic alleles per locus ranged from two to four (average 3.6. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.04 to 0.92 and 0.14 to 0.62, respectively. In addition, mean polymorphic information content was 0.45 for SSR loci. Our results showed that commercial Iranian pomegranate have different clones. Therefore, ISSR and SSR markers can be a useful tools for detecting clones of each cultivar.

  2. Assessing cardiac function from total-variation-regularized 4D C-arm CT in the presence of angular undersampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taubmann, O.; Haase, V.; Lauritsch, G.; Zheng, Y.; Krings, G.; Hornegger, J.; Maier, A.

    2017-04-01

    Time-resolved tomographic cardiac imaging using an angiographic C-arm device may support clinicians during minimally invasive therapy by enabling a thorough analysis of the heart function directly in the catheter laboratory. However, clinically feasible acquisition protocols entail a highly challenging reconstruction problem which suffers from sparse angular sampling of the trajectory. Compressed sensing theory promises that useful images can be recovered despite massive undersampling by means of sparsity-based regularization. For a multitude of reasons—most notably the desired reduction of scan time, dose and contrast agent required—it is of great interest to know just how little data is actually sufficient for a certain task. In this work, we apply a convex optimization approach based on primal-dual splitting to 4D cardiac C-arm computed tomography. We examine how the quality of spatially and temporally total-variation-regularized reconstruction degrades when using as few as 6.9+/- 1.2 projection views per heart phase. First, feasible regularization weights are determined in a numerical phantom study, demonstrating the individual benefits of both regularizers. Secondly, a task-based evaluation is performed in eight clinical patients. Semi-automatic segmentation-based volume measurements of the left ventricular blood pool performed on strongly undersampled images show a correlation of close to 99% with measurements obtained from less sparsely sampled data.

  3. Variation of poorly ventilated lung units (silent spaces) measured by electrical impedance tomography to dynamically assess recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadaro, Savino; Mauri, Tommaso; Böhm, Stephan H; Scaramuzzo, Gaetano; Turrini, Cecilia; Waldmann, Andreas D; Ragazzi, Riccardo; Pesenti, Antonio; Volta, Carlo Alberto

    2018-01-31

    Assessing alveolar recruitment at different positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) levels is a major clinical and research interest because protective ventilation implies opening the lung without inducing overdistention. The pressure-volume (P-V) curve is a validated method of assessing recruitment but reflects global characteristics, and changes at the regional level may remain undetected. The aim of the present study was to compare, in intubated patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure (AHRF) and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), lung recruitment measured by P-V curve analysis, with dynamic changes in poorly ventilated units of the dorsal lung (dependent silent spaces [DSSs]) assessed by electrical impedance tomography (EIT). We hypothesized that DSSs might represent a dynamic bedside measure of recruitment. We carried out a prospective interventional study of 14 patients with AHRF and ARDS admitted to the intensive care unit undergoing mechanical ventilation. Each patient underwent an incremental/decremental PEEP trial that included five consecutive phases: PEEP 5 and 10 cmH 2 O, recruitment maneuver + PEEP 15 cmH 2 O, then PEEP 10 and 5 cmH 2 O again. We measured, at the end of each phase, recruitment from previous PEEP using the P-V curve method, and changes in DSS were continuously monitored by EIT. PEEP changes induced alveolar recruitment as assessed by the P-V curve method and changes in the amount of DSS (p Recruited volume measured by the P-V curves significantly correlated with the change in DSS (r s  = 0.734, p recruitment measured using the P-V curve technique. EIT might provide useful information to titrate personalized PEEP. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02907840 . Registered on 20 September 2016.

  4. Observer variation in the histopathologic assessment of extranodal tumor spread in lymph node metastases in the neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brekel, Michiel W M; Lodder, Wouter L; Stel, Herbert V; Bloemena, Elisabeth; Leemans, C René; van der Waal, Isaäc

    2012-06-01

    Extranodal spread (ENS) of tumors is widely used as a prognosticator for patients with head and neck cancer and is used as an indicator for postoperative treatment. However, the histopathologic agreement among pathologists on the assessment of the presence or absence of this criterion has never been studied. The interobserver and intraobserver agreement among 10 pathologists on the diagnosis of ENS in 41 tumor-positive lymph nodes was evaluated. The kappa value of the interobserver agreement among pathologists varied between 0.14 and 0.75, the overall kappa value was 0.42 and 0.49 in the 2 scoring sessions. The intraobserver kappa value varied between 0.49 and 0.95. The intraobserver and interobserver agreement among pathologists in the assessment of the presence of ENS was low in metastatic lymph nodes in the neck. Because of the widely accepted prognostic significance and therapeutic consequences of ENS, there is a need for internationally accepted reproducible criterion for the histopathologic assessment of ENS in metastatic lymph nodes in the neck. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Assessment of carbonaceous aerosols in Shanghai, China – Part 1: long-term evolution, seasonal variations, and meteorological effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Chang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbonaceous aerosols are major chemical components of fine particulate matter (PM2. 5 with major impacts on air quality, climate change, and human health. Gateway to fast-rising China and home of over twenty million people, Shanghai throbs as the nation's largest mega city and the biggest industrial hub. From July 2010 to December 2014, hourly mass concentrations of ambient organic carbon (OC and elemental carbon (EC in the PM2. 5 fraction were quasi-continuously measured in Shanghai's urban center. The annual OC and EC concentrations (mean ±1σ in 2013 (8.9 ± 6.2 and 2.6 ± 2.1 µg m−3, n =  5547 and 2014 (7.8 ± 4.6 and 2.1 ± 1.6 µg m−3, n =  6914 were higher than those of 2011 (6.3 ± 4.2 and 2.4 ± 1.8 µg m−3, n =  8039 and 2012 (5.7 ± 3.8 and 2.0 ± 1.6 µg m−3, n =  4459. We integrated the results from historical field measurements (1999–2012 and satellite observations (2003–2013, concluding that carbonaceous aerosol pollution in Shanghai has gradually reduced since 2006. In terms of monthly variations, average OC and EC concentrations ranged from 4.0 to 15.5 and from 1.4 to 4.7 µg m−3, accounting for 13.2–24.6 and 3.9–6.6 % of the seasonal PM2. 5 mass (38.8–94.1 µg m−3, respectively. The concentrations of EC (2.4, 2.0, 2.2, and 3.0 µg m−3 in spring, summer, fall, and winter, respectively showed little seasonal variation (except in winter and weekend–weekday dependence, indicating EC is a relatively stable constituent of PM2. 5 in the Shanghai urban atmosphere. In contrast to OC (7.3, 6.8, 6.7, and 8.1 µg m−3 in spring, summer, fall, and winter, respectively, EC showed marked diurnal cycles and correlated strongly with CO across all seasons, confirming vehicular emissions as the dominant source of EC at the targeted site. Our data also reveal that both OC and EC showed concentration gradients as a

  6. Assessment of carbonaceous aerosols in Shanghai, China - Part 1: long-term evolution, seasonal variations, and meteorological effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yunhua; Deng, Congrui; Cao, Fang; Cao, Chang; Zou, Zhong; Liu, Shoudong; Lee, Xuhui; Li, Jun; Zhang, Gan; Zhang, Yanlin

    2017-08-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols are major chemical components of fine particulate matter (PM2. 5) with major impacts on air quality, climate change, and human health. Gateway to fast-rising China and home of over twenty million people, Shanghai throbs as the nation's largest mega city and the biggest industrial hub. From July 2010 to December 2014, hourly mass concentrations of ambient organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in the PM2. 5 fraction were quasi-continuously measured in Shanghai's urban center. The annual OC and EC concentrations (mean ±1σ) in 2013 (8.9 ± 6.2 and 2.6 ± 2.1 µg m-3, n = 5547) and 2014 (7.8 ± 4.6 and 2.1 ± 1.6 µg m-3, n = 6914) were higher than those of 2011 (6.3 ± 4.2 and 2.4 ± 1.8 µg m-3, n = 8039) and 2012 (5.7 ± 3.8 and 2.0 ± 1.6 µg m-3, n = 4459). We integrated the results from historical field measurements (1999-2012) and satellite observations (2003-2013), concluding that carbonaceous aerosol pollution in Shanghai has gradually reduced since 2006. In terms of monthly variations, average OC and EC concentrations ranged from 4.0 to 15.5 and from 1.4 to 4.7 µg m-3, accounting for 13.2-24.6 and 3.9-6.6 % of the seasonal PM2. 5 mass (38.8-94.1 µg m-3), respectively. The concentrations of EC (2.4, 2.0, 2.2, and 3.0 µg m-3 in spring, summer, fall, and winter, respectively) showed little seasonal variation (except in winter) and weekend-weekday dependence, indicating EC is a relatively stable constituent of PM2. 5 in the Shanghai urban atmosphere. In contrast to OC (7.3, 6.8, 6.7, and 8.1 µg m-3 in spring, summer, fall, and winter, respectively), EC showed marked diurnal cycles and correlated strongly with CO across all seasons, confirming vehicular emissions as the dominant source of EC at the targeted site. Our data also reveal that both OC and EC showed concentration gradients as a function of wind direction (WD) and wind speed (WS), generally with higher values associated with winds from the southwest, west, and northwest

  7. Assessing linkages between spatial facies changes and dimensional variations of glaciers in the upper Indus Basin, western Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Iram; Shukla, Aparna; Romshoo, Shakil A.

    2017-05-01

    The present study provides an insight into the heterogeneous response of 45 glaciers in the Lidder and Sindh river basins, western Himalaya, and explores the linkages between glacier facies variability and changing glacier parameters. Results show that the region has undergone an overall deglaciation of 12 ± 1.5% (11.9 ± 1.4 km2) from 1996 to 2014. Fluctuations in the temperature and precipitation patterns seem to be the primary factor controlling the changes in glacier dimensions (R2 > 0.82 in all cases). Glacier facies changes suggest depletion in snow-ice cover ( 18 ± 2.3%) and an increase in ice-mixed debris ( 4 ± 1.4%), supraglacial debris ( 6 ± 1.5%), and periglacial debris ( 17 ± 1.2%). These glacier facies transitions are possibly the result of ice-melting; however, its relative rate and elevation decides the nature of facies conversion. An increase in the proportion of supraglacial debris has led to the conversion of 11 clean glaciers to sparsely debris-covered glaciers and 5 sparsely debris-covered glaciers to debris-covered glaciers. The size of the glaciers greatly influenced the rate of conversion of glaciers, and glaciers glaciers also experienced maximum shrinkage. Further, the glaciers with varying supraglacial debris cover respond differently, as sparsely debris-covered glaciers exhibit the highest rates of retreat (25 ± 7.3 m/y), followed by clean (23.7 ± 7.3 m/y) and debris-covered glaciers (13.1 ± 7.3 m/y). Thus, the findings of this work clearly show that the climate change driven dimensional changes of glaciers and variations in the spatial distribution of glacier facies have strong mutual control on each other.

  8. Relative Importance of Modularity and Other Morphological Attributes on Different Types of Lithic Point Weapons: Assessing Functional Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-José, Rolando; Charlin, Judith

    2012-01-01

    The specific using of different prehistoric weapons is mainly determined by its physical properties, which provide a relative advantage or disadvantage to perform a given, particular function. Since these physical properties are integrated to accomplish that function, examining design variables and their pattern of integration or modularity is of interest to estimate the past function of a point. Here we analyze a composite sample of lithic points from southern Patagonia likely formed by arrows, thrown spears and hand-held points to test if they can be viewed as a two-module system formed by the blade and the stem, and to evaluate the degree in which shape, size, asymmetry, blade: stem length ratio, and tip angle explain the observed variance and differentiation among points supposedly aimed to accomplish different functions. To do so we performed a geometric morphometric analysis on 118 lithic points, departing from 24 two-dimensional landmark and semi landmarks placed on the point's contour. Klingenberg's covariational modularity tests were used to evaluate different modularity hypotheses, and a composite PCA including shape, size, asymmetry, blade: stem length ratio, and tip angle was used to estimate the importance of each attribute to explaining variation patterns. Results show that the blade and the stem can be seen as “near decomposable units” in the points integrating the studied sample. However, this modular pattern changes after removing the effects of reduction. Indeed, a resharpened point tends to show a tip/rest of the point modular pattern. The composite PCA analyses evidenced three different patterns of morphometric attributes compatible with arrows, thrown spears, and hand-held tools. Interestingly, when analyzed independently, these groups show differences in their modular organization. Our results indicate that stone tools can be approached as flexible designs, characterized by a composite set of interacting morphometric attributes, and

  9. Accurately Assessing the Risk of Schizophrenia Conferred by Rare Copy-Number Variation Affecting Genes with Brain Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Korn, Joshua M.; McCarroll, Steven A.; Altshuler, David; Sklar, Pamela; Purcell, Shaun; Daly, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Investigators have linked rare copy number variation (CNVs) to neuropsychiatric diseases, such as schizophrenia. One hypothesis is that CNV events cause disease by affecting genes with specific brain functions. Under these circumstances, we expect that CNV events in cases should impact brain-function genes more frequently than those events in controls. Previous publications have applied “pathway” analyses to genes within neuropsychiatric case CNVs to show enrichment for brain-functions. While such analyses have been suggestive, they often have not rigorously compared the rates of CNVs impacting genes with brain function in cases to controls, and therefore do not address important confounders such as the large size of brain genes and overall differences in rates and sizes of CNVs. To demonstrate the potential impact of confounders, we genotyped rare CNV events in 2,415 unaffected controls with Affymetrix 6.0; we then applied standard pathway analyses using four sets of brain-function genes and observed an apparently highly significant enrichment for each set. The enrichment is simply driven by the large size of brain-function genes. Instead, we propose a case-control statistical test, cnv-enrichment-test, to compare the rate of CNVs impacting specific gene sets in cases versus controls. With simulations, we demonstrate that cnv-enrichment-test is robust to case-control differences in CNV size, CNV rate, and systematic differences in gene size. Finally, we apply cnv-enrichment-test to rare CNV events published by the International Schizophrenia Consortium (ISC). This approach reveals nominal evidence of case-association in neuronal-activity and the learning gene sets, but not the other two examined gene sets. The neuronal-activity genes have been associated in a separate set of schizophrenia cases and controls; however, testing in independent samples is necessary to definitively confirm this association. Our method is implemented in the PLINK software package

  10. High Recharge Areas in the Choushui River Alluvial Fan (Taiwan Assessed from Recharge Potential Analysis and Average Storage Variation Indexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Pin Tsai

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available High recharge areas significantly influence the groundwater quality and quantity in regional groundwater systems. Many studies have applied recharge potential analysis (RPA to estimate groundwater recharge potential (GRP and have delineated high recharge areas based on the estimated GRP. However, most of these studies define the RPA parameters with supposition, and this represents a major source of uncertainty for applying RPA. To objectively define the RPA parameter values without supposition, this study proposes a systematic method based on the theory of parameter identification. A surrogate variable, namely the average storage variation (ASV index, is developed to calibrate the RPA parameters, because of the lack of direct GRP observations. The study results show that the correlations between the ASV indexes and computed GRP values improved from 0.67 before calibration to 0.85 after calibration, thus indicating that the calibrated RPA parameters represent the recharge characteristics of the study area well; these data also highlight how defining the RPA parameters with ASV indexes can help to improve the accuracy. The calibrated RPA parameters were used to estimate the GRP distribution of the study area, and the GRP values were graded into five levels. High and excellent level areas are defined as high recharge areas, which composed 7.92% of the study area. Overall, this study demonstrates that the developed approach can objectively define the RPA parameters and high recharge areas of the Choushui River alluvial fan, and the results should serve as valuable references for the Taiwanese government in their efforts to conserve the groundwater quality and quantity of the study area.

  11. Assessment of variation in live donor kidney transplantation across transplant centers in the United States1 - 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Peter P.; Feldman, Harold I.; Bloom, Roy D.; Abt, Peter L.; Thomasson, Arwin; Shults, Justine; Grossman, Robert; Asch, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Transplant centers vary in the proportion of kidney transplants performed using live donors. Clinical innovations that facilitate live donation may drive this variation. Methods We assembled a cohort of renal transplant candidates at 194 US centers using registry data from 1999 – 2005. We measured magnitude of live donor transplant (LDKTx) through development of a standardized live donor transplant ratio (SLDTR) at each center that accounted for center population differences. We examined associations between center characteristics and the likelihood that individual transplant candidates underwent LDKTx. To identify practices through which centers increase LDKTx, we also examined center characteristics associated with consistently being in the upper three quartiles of SLDTR. Results The cohort comprised 148,168 patients, among whom 34,593 (23.3%) underwent LDKTx. In multivariable logistic regression, candidates had an increased likelihood of undergoing LDKTx at centers with greater use of “unrelated donors” (defined as non-spouses and non-first-degree family members of the recipient; OR 1.31 for highest versus lowest use, p=0.02) and at centers with programs to overcome donor-recipient incompatibility (OR 1.33, p=0.01.) Centers consistently in the upper three SLDTR quartiles were also more likely to use “unrelated” donors (OR 8.30 per tertile of higher use, p<0.01), to have incompatibility programs (OR 4.79, p<0.01), and to use laparoscopic nephrectomy (OR 2.53 per tertile of higher use, p=0.02). Conclusion Differences in center population do not fully account for differences in the use of LDKTx. To maximize opportunities for LDKTx, centers may accept more unrelated donors and adopt programs to overcome biological incompatibility. PMID:21562451

  12. Relative importance of modularity and other morphological attributes on different types of lithic point weapons: assessing functional variations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando González-José

    Full Text Available The specific using of different prehistoric weapons is mainly determined by its physical properties, which provide a relative advantage or disadvantage to perform a given, particular function. Since these physical properties are integrated to accomplish that function, examining design variables and their pattern of integration or modularity is of interest to estimate the past function of a point. Here we analyze a composite sample of lithic points from southern Patagonia likely formed by arrows, thrown spears and hand-held points to test if they can be viewed as a two-module system formed by the blade and the stem, and to evaluate the degree in which shape, size, asymmetry, blade: stem length ratio, and tip angle explain the observed variance and differentiation among points supposedly aimed to accomplish different functions. To do so we performed a geometric morphometric analysis on 118 lithic points, departing from 24 two-dimensional landmark and semi landmarks placed on the point's contour. Klingenberg's covariational modularity tests were used to evaluate different modularity hypotheses, and a composite PCA including shape, size, asymmetry, blade: stem length ratio, and tip angle was used to estimate the importance of each attribute to explaining variation patterns. Results show that the blade and the stem can be seen as "near decomposable units" in the points integrating the studied sample. However, this modular pattern changes after removing the effects of reduction. Indeed, a resharpened point tends to show a tip/rest of the point modular pattern. The composite PCA analyses evidenced three different patterns of morphometric attributes compatible with arrows, thrown spears, and hand-held tools. Interestingly, when analyzed independently, these groups show differences in their modular organization. Our results indicate that stone tools can be approached as flexible designs, characterized by a composite set of interacting morphometric

  13. OCT assessment of non-cavitated occlusal carious lesions by variation of incidence angle of probe light and refractive index matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung-Jin; Haak, Rainer; Ziebolz, Dirk; Krause, Felix; Schneider, Hartmut

    2017-07-01

    This study evaluated (1) the detection and assessment of non-cavitated occlusal carious lesions by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and (2) the impact of varying angle of incidence (AI) of probe light and refractive index matching (RIM). Nine extracted human molars with 18 occlusal lesions (ICDAS code 2) were visually selected. 18 regions of interest (ROI) were imaged with SD-OCT under varying AI (0°, ±5°, ±10°, ±15°) and with/without application of glycerine at 0°. X-ray micro computed tomography (μCT) was used as a validation standard. μCT and OCT signals were categorized according to the lesion extent: 1-sound, 2-lesion limited to half of enamel, 3-lesion limited to enamel, 4-lesion into dentin. Agreement between both methods was assessed. Intra- and inter-examiner reproducibility analyses were conducted. Cohen's kappa coefficient (κ), Spearman's rho correlation (rs) and Wilcoxon test (α=0.05). Slight to moderate agreement (κ=0.153) between μCT and OCT was obtained at an AI of 0° (Wilcoxon: p=0.02). With variation of Al a substantial agreement (κ=0.607) was observed (p=0.74). Spearman's correlation between both methods was 0.428 at 0°, 0.75 with varying AI and 0.573 with glycerine. Kappa values for intra-and inter-examiner analysis ranged between 0.81 and 0.88 and between 0.25 and 0.73, respectively. Variation of AI improves the detectability of non-cavitated occlusal carious lesions. RIM can enhance signal-to-noise ratio. OCT could provide additional diagnostic information in single and longitudinal assessments of occlusal carious lesions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Skull-base foramina of the middle cranial fossa : assessment of normal variation with high-resolution CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyae Young [Ewha Woman' s Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Eun Chul [Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Jeong Soo; Choi, Hye Young [Ewha Woman' s Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Eun Joo [Eulgi Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Myung Sook [Samsung Cheil Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-05-01

    To recognize foraminal variants of the foraminae of the skull base in the middle cranial fossa, and to thus understand and distinguish normal and potentially abnormal structures. We analysed 163 patients without intracranial disease who had undergone CT scanning. These comprised 82 men and 81 women with a mean age of 39 years (range, 4-73 years). HRCT was performed, using a GE 9800 scanner. All CT scans were obtained 6-7 slices at the base of the skull, with 1.5mm collimation at 1.5mm intervals parallel to the infraorbital line. We analysed the foraminae by closesly correlating imaging findings and established anatomic knowledge. In 45 cases (27.6%) the foramen ovale was 5-10mm in diameter and asymmetrical. Deficiency of the medial bony wall including persistent foramen lacerum medius was seen in five cases (3.1%). Confluence of the foramen ovale and the foramen spinosum was seen in 13 cases (8%) and confluence of the foramen ovale and the foramen of Vesalius in 23 (14.1%). Posterolateral groove for the accessory meningeal artery was observed in 36 cases (22%). The foramen spinosum was asymmetrical in 42 cases (25.8%). A small or absent foramen spinosum with a larger ipsilateral foramen ovale was observed in 11 cases (6.7%). Medial bony defect was seen in 16 cases (9.8%). The foramen spinosum was absent in four cases (2.5%). In 74 cases (45.4%), the foramen of Vesalius was absent; it was present unilaterally and bilaterally in 55 (33.7%) and 34 cases (20.9%), respectively. Five cases showed duplicated foramina. Canaliculus innominatus was seen in 14 cases (8.9%) and was present bilaterally in three (1.8%). HRCT clearly delineates bony structure and is well able to display the rich spectrum of anatomic variation found in the base of the skull. The recognition of these normal variants will result in a better understanding of skull base neurovascular anatomy and diminish speculation as to their true nature during the interpretation of CT images.

  15. In silico assessment of genetic variation in KCNA5 reveals multiple mechanisms of human atrial arrhythmogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colman, Michael A; Ni, Haibo; Liang, Bo

    2017-01-01

    investigated at the cellular level. In tissue, we assessed the effects of the mutations on the vulnerability to unidirectional conduction patterns and dynamics of re-entrant excitation waves. Gain-of-function mutations shortened the action potential duration in single cells, and stabilised and accelerated re......A recent experimental study investigating patients with lone atrial fibrillation identified six novel mutations in the KCNA5 gene. The mutants exhibited both gain- and loss-of-function of the atrial specific ultra-rapid delayed rectifier K+ current, IKur. The aim of this study is to elucidate...... and quantify the functional impact of these KCNA5 mutations on atrial electrical activity. A multi-scale model of the human atria was updated to incorporate detailed experimental data on IKur from both wild-type and mutants. The effects of the mutations on human atrial action potential and rate dependence were...

  16. Natural Variability of Allergen Levels in Conventional Soybeans: Assessing Variation across North and South America from Five Production Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Tao; Stojšin, Duška; Liu, Kang; Schaalje, Bruce; Postin, Cody; Ward, Jason; Wang, Yongcheng; Liu, Zi Lucy; Li, Bin; Glenn, Kevin

    2017-01-18

    Soybean (Glycine max L. Merrill) is one of eight major allergenic foods with endogenous proteins identified as allergens. To better understand the natural variability of five soybean allergens (Gly m 4, Gly m 5, Gly m 6, Gly m Bd 28k, and Gly m Bd 30k), validated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were developed. These ELISAs measured allergens in 604 soybean samples collected from locations in North and South America over five growing seasons (2009-2013/2014) and including 37 conventional varieties. Levels of these five allergens varied 5-19-fold. Multivariate statistical analyses and pairwise comparisons show that environmental factors have a larger effect on allergen levels than genetic factors. Therefore, from year to year, consumers are exposed to highly variable levels of allergens in soy-based foods, bringing into question whether quantitative comparison of endogenous allergen levels of new genetically modified soybean adds meaningful information to their overall safety risk assessment.

  17. An analytical method for assessing the spatial and temporal variation of juvenile Atlantic salmon habitat in an upland Scottish river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddendorf, B.; Fabris, L.; Malcolm, I.; Lazzaro, G.; Tetzlaff, D.; Botter, G.; Soulsby, C.

    2016-12-01

    Wild Atlantic salmon populations in Scottish rivers constitute an important economic and recreational resource, as well as being a key component of biodiversity. Salmon have specific habitat requirements at different life stages and their distribution is therefore strongly influenced by a complex suite of biological and physical controls. Stream hydrodynamics have a strong influence on habitat quality and affect the distribution and density of juvenile salmon. As stream hydrodynamics directly relate to stream flow variability and channel morphology, the effects of hydroclimatic drivers on the spatial and temporal variability of habitat suitability can be assessed. Critical Displacement Velocity (CDV), which describes the velocity at which fish can no longer hold station, is one potential approach for characterising habitat suitability. CDV is obtained using an empirical formula that depends on fish size and stream temperature. By characterising the proportion of a reach below CDV it is possible to assess the suitable area. We demonstrate that a generic analytical approach based on field survey and hydraulic modelling can provide insights on the interactions between flow regime and average suitable area (SA) for juvenile salmon that could be extended to other aquatic species. Analytical functions are used to model the pdf of stream flow p(q) and the relationship between flow and suitable area SA(q). Theoretically these functions can assume any form. Here we used a gamma distribution to model p(q) and a gamma function to model SA(q). Integrating the product of these functions we obtain an analytical expression of SA. Since parameters of p(q) can be estimated from meteorological and flow measurements, they can be used directly to predict the effect of flow regime on SA. We show the utility of the approach with reference to 6 electrofishing sites in a single river system where long term (50 years) data on spatially distributed juvenile salmon densities are available.

  18. Assessing non-linear variation of temperature and precipitation for different growth periods of maize and their impacts on phenology in the Midwest of Jilin Province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Enliang; Zhang, Jiquan; Wang, Yongfang; Alu, Si; Wang, Rui; Li, Danjun; Ha, Si

    2017-04-01

    In the past two decades, the regional climate in China has undergone significant change, resulting in crop yield reduction and complete failure. The goal of this study is to detect the variation of temperature and precipitation for different growth periods of maize and assess their impact on phenology. The daily meteorological data in the Midwest of Jilin Province during 1960-2014 were used in the study. The ensemble empirical mode decomposition method was adopted to analyze the non-linear trend and fluctuation in temperature and precipitation, and the sensitivity of the length of the maize growth period to temperature and precipitation was analyzed by the wavelet cross-transformation method. The results show that the trends of temperature and precipitation change are non-linear for different growth periods of maize, and the average temperature in the sowing-jointing stage was different from that in the other growth stages, showing a slight decrease trend, while the variation amplitude of maximum temperature is smaller than that of the minimum temperature. This indicates that the temperature difference between day and night shows a gradually decreasing trend. Precipitation in the growth period also showed a decreasing non-linear trend, while the inter-annual variability with period of quasi-3-year and quasi-6-year dominated the variation of temperature and precipitation. The whole growth period was shortened by 10.7 days, and the sowing date was advanced by approximately 11 days. We also found that there was a significant resonance period among temperature, precipitation, and phenology. Overall, a negative correlation between phenology and temperature is evident, while a positive correlation with precipitation is exhibited. The results illustrate that the climate suitability for maize has reduced over the past decades.

  19. Assessment of the Spatial and Temporal Variations of Water Quality for Agricultural Lands with Crop Rotation in China by Using a HYPE Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yunxing; Jiang, Sanyuan; Pers, Charlotta; Yang, Xiaoying; Liu, Qun; Yuan, Jin; Yao, Mingxing; He, Yi; Luo, Xingzhang; Zheng, Zheng

    2016-03-18

    Many water quality models have been successfully used worldwide to predict nutrient losses from anthropogenically impacted catchments, but hydrological and nutrient simulations with limited data are difficult considering the transfer of model parameters and complication of model calibration and validation. This study aims: (i) to assess the performance capabilities of a new and relatively more advantageous model, namely, Hydrological Predictions for the Environment (HYPE), that simulates stream flow and nutrient load in agricultural areas by using a multi-site and multi-objective parameter calibration method and (ii) to investigate the temporal and spatial variations of total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorous (TP) concentrations and loads with crop rotation by using the model for the first time. A parameter estimation tool (PEST) was used to calibrate parameters. Results show that the parameters related to the effective soil porosity were highly sensitive to hydrological modeling. N balance was largely controlled by soil denitrification processes. P balance was influenced by the sedimentation rate and production/decay of P in rivers and lakes. The model reproduced the temporal and spatial variations of discharge and TN/TP relatively well in both calibration (2006-2008) and validation (2009-2010) periods. Among the obtained data, the lowest Nash-Suttclife efficiency of discharge, daily TN load, and daily TP load were 0.74, 0.51, and 0.54, respectively. The seasonal variations of daily TN concentrations in the entire simulation period were insufficient, indicated that crop rotation changed the timing and amount of N output. Monthly TN and TP simulation yields revealed that nutrient outputs were abundant in summer in terms of the corresponding discharge. The area-weighted TN and TP load annual yields in five years showed that nutrient loads were extremely high along Hong and Ru rivers, especially in agricultural lands.

  20. Assessment of the Spatial and Temporal Variations of Water Quality for Agricultural Lands with Crop Rotation in China by Using a HYPE Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunxing Yin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Many water quality models have been successfully used worldwide to predict nutrient losses from anthropogenically impacted catchments, but hydrological and nutrient simulations with limited data are difficult considering the transfer of model parameters and complication of model calibration and validation. This study aims: (i to assess the performance capabilities of a new and relatively more advantageous model, namely, Hydrological Predictions for the Environment (HYPE, that simulates stream flow and nutrient load in agricultural areas by using a multi-site and multi-objective parameter calibration method and (ii to investigate the temporal and spatial variations of total nitrogen (TN and total phosphorous (TP concentrations and loads with crop rotation by using the model for the first time. A parameter estimation tool (PEST was used to calibrate parameters. Results show that the parameters related to the effective soil porosity were highly sensitive to hydrological modeling. N balance was largely controlled by soil denitrification processes. P balance was influenced by the sedimentation rate and production/decay of P in rivers and lakes. The model reproduced the temporal and spatial variations of discharge and TN/TP relatively well in both calibration (2006–2008 and validation (2009–2010 periods. Among the obtained data, the lowest Nash-Suttclife efficiency of discharge, daily TN load, and daily TP load were 0.74, 0.51, and 0.54, respectively. The seasonal variations of daily TN concentrations in the entire simulation period were insufficient, indicated that crop rotation changed the timing and amount of N output. Monthly TN and TP simulation yields revealed that nutrient outputs were abundant in summer in terms of the corresponding discharge. The area-weighted TN and TP load annual yields in five years showed that nutrient loads were extremely high along Hong and Ru rivers, especially in agricultural lands.

  1. Factors to consider when assessing diurnal variation in sports performance: the influence of chronotype and habitual training time-of-day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Dale E; Stephenson, Kim J; Roden, Laura C

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare morning and evening time-trial performance, RPE and mood state of trained swimmers, taking into account chronotype, habitual training time-of-day and PERIOD3 (PER3) variable number tandem repeat genotype. Twenty-six swimmers (18 males, age: 32.6 ± 5.7 years) swam 200 m time trials (TT) at 06h30 and 18h30 in a randomised order. There was no difference between morning and evening performance when the swimmers were considered as a single group (06h30: 158.8 ± 22.7 s, 18h30: 158.5 ± 22.0 s, p = 0.611). However, grouping swimmers by chronotype and habitual training time-of-day allowed us to detect significant diurnal variation in performance, such that morning-type swimmers and those who habitually train in the morning were faster in the 06h30 TT (p = 0.036 and p = 0.011, respectively). This was accompanied by lower ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) scores post-warm-up, higher vigour and lower fatigues scores prior to the 06h30 TT in morning-type swimmers or those who trained in the morning. Similarly, neither types and those who trained in the evenings had lower fatigue and higher vigour prior to the 18h30 TT. It appears that both chronotype and habitual training time-of-day need to be considered when assessing diurnal variation in performance. From a practical point of view, athletes and coaches should be aware of the potentially powerful effect of training time on shifting time-of-day variation in performance.

  2. Variation in Venoms of Polybia Paulista Von Ihering and Polybia Occidentalis Olivier (Hymenoptera: Vespidae), Assessed by the FTIR-PAS Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, A; Paula, M C; Fernandes, W D; Andrade, L H C; Lima, S M; Antonialli-Junior, W F

    2017-02-01

    Wasps are able to synthesize toxic compounds known as venoms, which form a part of a mechanism to overcome prey and also to defend their colonies. Study of the compounds that constitute these substances is essential in order to understand how this defense mechanism evolved, since there is evidence that the venoms can vary both intra- and interspecifically. Some studies have used liquid and gas chromatography as a reliable technique to analyze these compounds. However, the use of Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS) to analyze the variations in venom's chemical profile has been proposed recently. This study evaluated whether the FTIR-PAS technique is effective for assessing the role of environmental factors on intra- and interspecific differences in the venom of the wasps Polybia paulista Von Ihering and Polybia occidentalis Olivier by FTIR-PAS. The colonies were collected in three municipalities of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil, in different types of environments. The results showed that the venoms of P. paulista and P. occidentalis differed significantly in profile. In addition, the intraspecific differences in the venom's chemical profile of P. paulista are related to the type of environment where they nested, regardless of the geographical distance between the nests. The FTIR-PAS technique proved to be reliable and effective to evaluate the variations in the venom's chemical profile in social wasps.

  3. Temporal and spatial variation of nitrogen and phosphorus and eutrophication assessment for a typical arid river - Fuyang River in northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenqiang; Jin, Xin; Liu, Dong; Lang, Chao; Shan, Baoqing

    2017-05-01

    Based on water quality surveys over 2years (July to December, in 2014 and 2015) in a typical arid river in northern China the Xingtai segment of the Fuyang River basin - the variation of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) was analyzed. The extent of water eutrophication of this segment was also assessed using a universal index formula for eutrophic evaluation and a logarithmic power function. The results showed that the average concentration of total N (TN) was 27.2mg/L (NH 3 -N, 63.5%), total P (TP) was 2.0mg/L (solution reactive phosphorus, 68.8%). Temporal and spatial variations of N and P in this segment were observed. Concentrations of N and P in the arid season were higher than those in the rainy season. Spatially, the N and P concentrations followed the same trend; i.e., higher in the city segment than in the suburbs, and decreasing along the river. The water eutrophication in the studied segment reached extremely high levels at all times (eutrophication index ≥76.3). Spatially, its trend was clearly linked with N and P. Water shortage, pollution accumulation and a weak self-purification function are the main reasons for the prominent eutrophication in this segment. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Genetic variation and relationships among Ulex (Fabaceae) species in southern Spain and northern Morocco assessed by chloroplast microsatellite (cpSSR) markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubas, Paloma; Pardo, Cristina; Tahiri, Hikmat

    2005-12-01

    Genetic variation in 27 populations of Ulex species from southern Spain and northern Morocco (Betic-Rif arc) was assessed using 11 chloroplast microsatellite (cpSSR) markers, which revealed 47 different haplotypes. These nonrecombinant, haploid markers allow measurement of genetic variation in closely related species of Ulex where molecular phylogenetic analyses have not provided a clear view of interspecific relationships. Discriminant analysis indicates that the haplotypes are useful to differentiate among species, and analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) shows high levels of differentiation among populations. The minimum spanning tree (MST), that represents the connections between the haplotypes, suggests that the eastern Rifean U. africanus haplotypes are more genetically related than those from southern Spain. The latter may have lost genetic diversity while colonizing new habitats, eventually differentiating into U. baeticus and U. scaber. Hybridization between these populations, followed by polyploidization, may have originated the tetraploids (U. congestus and U. borgiae) that colonized new habitats associated with acidic rocks. Separate groupings of U. scaber populations may indicate multiple origins from different stocks. Diversification in this group of Ulex species could be related to the opening of the Alboran Sea by Middle Miocene, when the populations from Morocco and Spain became isolated from each other.

  5. Quantitative Assessment of Variational Surface Reconstruction from Sparse Point Clouds in Freehand 3D Ultrasound Imaging during Image-Guided Tumor Ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuangcheng Deng

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Surface reconstruction for freehand 3D ultrasound is used to provide 3D visualization of a VOI (volume of interest during image-guided tumor ablation surgery. This is a challenge because the recorded 2D B-scans are not only sparse but also non-parallel. To solve this issue, we established a framework to reconstruct the surface of freehand 3D ultrasound imaging in 2011. The key technique for surface reconstruction in that framework is based on variational interpolation presented by Greg Turk for shape transformation and is named Variational Surface Reconstruction (VSR. The main goal of this paper is to evaluate the quality of surface reconstructions, especially when the input data are extremely sparse point clouds from freehand 3D ultrasound imaging, using four methods: Ball Pivoting, Power Crust, Poisson, and VSR. Four experiments are conducted, and quantitative metrics, such as the Hausdorff distance, are introduced for quantitative assessment. The experiment results show that the performance of the proposed VSR method is the best of the four methods at reconstructing surface from sparse data. The VSR method can produce a close approximation to the original surface from as few as two contours, whereas the other three methods fail to do so. The experiment results also illustrate that the reproducibility of the VSR method is the best of the four methods.

  6. [Temporal and spatial variation of nitrogen and phosphorus and eutrophication assessment in downstream river network areas of North Canal River Watershed].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Bao-Qing; Jian, Yu-Xiang; Tang, Wen-Zhong; Zhan, Hong

    2012-02-01

    Based on the water quality survey for one year in the downstream river network areas of North Canal River Watershed, variation features of inorganic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) were analyzed, and water eutrophication degree of river network areas was also assessed. The results showed that the average concentration of TN was 12.50 mg x L(-1) (NH4(+)-N, 67.41%); TP was 1.45 mg x L(-1) (SRP, 80.81%). The temporal and spatial variations of N and P in the river network areas were obvious. Various forms of TN and NO3(-)-N concentrations almost had a similar change by month; NH4(+)-N was a little different; TP and SRP also had a similar change. The concentrations of N and P all decreased gradually from water coming region to water leaving region, TN, NH4(+)-N and NO3(-)-N decreased from 19.30, 13.22 and 2.19 mg x L(-1) to 7.98, 4.45 and 1.50 mg x L(-1) on average, respectively; TP and SRP were from 1.95 and 1.59 mg x L(-1) to 1.11 and 0.91 mg x L(-1). Water eutrophication degrees of river network areas were all the highest level at both temporal and spatial scale.

  7. Assessment of the effect of the climate variations of coastal surface water and study of Sepia officinalis spawing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giansante, Carla; Conte, Annamaria; Giovannini, Armando; Castriota, Luca; Andaloro, Franco; Ferri, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish whether climate change affected migratory behaviour of Sepia officinalis (Linnaeus, 1758), which is an important resource for small-scale fishermen of Abruzzo region (Italy). Starting at the beginning of March until the end of April, the cuttlefish in this area migrates from deep cold water towards warmer coastal waters, where they spawn. Small-scale fishing of cuttlefish is permitted in costal waters from March to September. During the study period, between March and September 2008, both cuttlefish traps and trammel nets were used in 5 sampling areas along the Abruzzo coast to test their relative efficiency in catching cuttlefish. Trapped specimens were counted, weighed and measured, their gender and sexual maturity were also determined. The data obtained from the sampling were correlated to surface water temperature to assess possible changes in migration behaviours. The obtained data show that during the first months of migration (March and April), a greater percentage of large males was caught, while females and smaller males predominated later in the year. The study also showed that surface water temperature did not reveal any significant shifts from the trend over the last 10 years. As for the efficiency of the fishing methods, traps were found to be more effective than trammel nets.

  8. Assessment of the effect of the climate variations of coastal surface water and study of Sepia officinalis spawing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Giansante

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to establish whether climate change affected migratory behaviour of Sepia officinalis (Linnaeus, 1758, which is an important resource for small-scale fishermen of Abruzzo region (Italy. Starting at the beginning of March until the end of April, the cuttlefish in this area migrates from deep cold water towards warmer coastal waters, where they spawn. Small-scale fishing of cuttlefish is permitted in costal waters from March to September. During the study period, between March and September 2008, both cuttlefish traps and trammel nets were used in 5 sampling areas along the Abruzzo coast to test their relative efficiency in catching cuttlefish. Trapped specimens were counted, weighed and measured, their gender and sexual maturity were also determined. The data obtained from the sampling were correlated to surface water temperature to assess possible changes in migration behaviours. The obtained data show that during the first months of migration (March and April, a greater percentage of large males was caught, while females and smaller males predominated later in the year. The study also showed that surface water temperature did not reveal any significant shifts from the trend over the last 10 years. As for the efficiency of the fishing methods, traps were found to be more effective than trammel nets.

  9. Spatiotemporal Variation and Risk Assessment of Pesticides in Water of the Lower Catchment Basin of Acheloos River, Western Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatis, Nikolaos; Hela, Dimitra; Triantafyllidis, Vassilios; Konstantinou, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    A three-year monitoring survey (March 2005–February 2008) was conducted to investigate, on monthly basis, the presence of thirty pesticides belonging to various categories and metabolites, in Acheloos River (Western Greece), one of the most important water resources in Greece. Six sampling stations along the river were established. Water analyses were performed using solid-phase extraction combined with gas chromatography with flame thermionic detector and mass spectrometry. Statistical analysis using one-way ANOVA and Duncan's multiple range test (P pesticides, seasonal and spatial distribution. In general, the highest mean concentrations of the pesticides were recorded at the three stations downstream. The greatest average concentrations were determined during spring and summer in agreement with the pesticide application period. The observed lower concentrations after 2006 reflect the land-use change because of the elimination of tobacco, the main cultivation of the area for many decades. The compounds most frequently detected were diazinon (78.6%), DEA (69.3%), and fenthion (52.6%). Environmental risk assessment using risk quotient (RQ) approach showed high risk for six insecticides in 2005 and one in 2007. A compliance with the European Environmental Quality Standards (EQS) was observed for the priority pesticides. PMID:24453814

  10. Co-variation of depressive mood and spontaneous physical activity evaluated by ecological momentary assessment in major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinhyuk; Nakamura, Toru; Kikuchi, Hiroe; Yoshiuchi, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu

    2014-01-01

    The objective evaluation of depressive mood is thought to be useful for the diagnosis and treatment of depressive disorders. Thus, we investigated psychobehavioral correlates, particularly the statistical associations between momentary depressive mood and behavioral dynamics measured objectively, in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Patients with MDD (n = 14) wore a watch-type computer device and rated their momentary symptoms using ecological momentary assessment. Spontaneous physical activity in daily life, referred to as locomotor activity, was also continuously measured by an activity monitor built into the device. A multilevel modeling approach was used to model the associations between changes in depressive mood scores and the local statistics of locomotor activity simultaneously measured. The statistical model constructed indicated that worsening of depressive mood was associated with increased intermittency of locomotor activity, as characterized by a lower mean and higher skewness. Our findings suggest the presence of associations between momentary depressive mood and behavioral dynamics in patients with depression, which may lead to the continuous monitoring of the pathological states of MDD.

  11. Perfluoroalkyl substances in the Daling River with concentrated fluorine industries in China: seasonal variation, mass flow, and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhaoyun; Wang, Tieyu; Meng, Jing; Wang, Pei; Li, Qifeng; Lu, Yonglong

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, we investigated concentrations and composition profiles of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) in surface water from the Daling River in different seasons. The highest concentration of ΣPFASs (9540 ng L(-1)) and dominant homologues were found in surface water collected in summer. Perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA), perfluorobutane sulfonate (PFBS), and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) were the dominant PFASs in four seasons with a total contribution of over 90%. The discharge of two fluorine chemical industry parks was predicted to be the main contamination source of PFASs in the study area. The daily and annual mass flows were calculated according to data of detected PFAS concentrations and water discharge, and the annual mass loading of PFASs into the Bohai Sea from the Daling River reached to 461 kg year(-1). Hazard assessment indicated that concentrations of PFASs in study area had little risk to aquatic organisms and wildlife. However, the multiple health risk would be relatively high if the water was served as drinking water in the study area.

  12. Genetic consequences of population decline in the European otter (Lutra lutra): an assessment of microsatellite DNA variation in Danish otters from 1883 to 1993

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pertoldi, C; Hansen, MM; Loeschcke, V

    2001-01-01

    The European otter (Lutra lutra) was common in Denmark until the 1960s, but its present distribution encompasses only a minor part of the country. The aim of this study was to assess whether the recent population decline has resulted in loss of genetic variability and to gain further insight...... into the dynamics of the population decline. This was done by analysing microsatellite DNA variation in contemporary and historical samples, the latter encompassing DNA samples extracted from museum specimens covering a time-span from the 1880s to the 1960s. Tests for differences in expected heterozygosity...... and the numbers of alleles in contemporary versus historical samples and a test for detecting population bottlenecks provided few indications of a recent bottleneck and loss of variability. However, a procedure for detecting population expansions and declines, based on the genealogical history of microsatellite...

  13. Montreal Cognitive Assessment for screening mild cognitive impairment: variations in test performance and scores by education in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Tze Pin; Feng, Lei; Lim, Wee Shiong; Chong, Mei Sian; Lee, Tih Shih; Yap, Keng Bee; Tsoi, Tung; Liew, Tau Ming; Gao, Qi; Collinson, Simon; Kandiah, Nagaendran; Yap, Philip

    2015-01-01

    The Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) was developed as a screening instrument for mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We evaluated the MoCA's test performance by educational groups among older Singaporean Chinese adults. The MoCA and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) were evaluated in two independent studies (clinic-based sample and community-based sample) of MCI and normal cognition (NC) controls, using receiver operating characteristic curve analyses: area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity (Sn), and specificity (Sp). The MoCA modestly discriminated MCI from NC in both study samples (AUC = 0.63 and 0.65): Sn = 0.64 and Sp = 0.36 at a cut-off of 28/29 in the clinic-based sample, and Sn = 0.65 and Sp = 0.55 at a cut-off of 22/23 in the community-based sample. The MoCA's test performance was least satisfactory in the highest (>6 years) education group: AUC = 0.50 (p = 0.98), Sn = 0.54, and Sp = 0.51 at a cut-off of 27/28. Overall, the MoCA's test performance was not better than that of the MMSE. In multivariate analyses controlling for age and gender, MCI diagnosis was associated with a education was associated with a 3- to 5-point decrement (η(2) = 0.115 and η(2) = 0.162, respectively). The MoCA's ability to discriminate MCI from NC was modest in this Chinese population, because it was far more sensitive to the effect of education than MCI diagnosis. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Use of latent class models to accommodate inter-laboratory variation in assessing genetic polymorphisms associated with disease risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Stephen D

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Researchers wanting to study the association of genetic factors with disease may encounter variability in the laboratory methods used to establish genotypes or other traits. Such variability leads to uncertainty in determining the strength of a genotype as a risk factor. This problem is illustrated using data from a case-control study of cervical cancer in which some subjects were independently assessed by different laboratories for the presence of a genetic polymorphism. Inter-laboratory agreement was only moderate, which led to a very wide range of empirical odds ratios (ORs with the disease, depending on how disagreements were treated. This paper illustrates the use of latent class models (LCMs and to estimate OR while taking laboratory accuracy into account. Possible LCMs are characterised in terms of the number of laboratory measurements available, and if their error rates are assumed to be differential or non-differential by disease status and/or laboratory. Results The LCM results give maximum likelihood estimates of laboratory accuracy rates and the OR of the genetic variable and disease, and avoid the ambiguities of the empirical results. Having allowed for possible measurement error in the expure, the LCM estimates of exposure – disease associations are typically stronger than their empirical equivalents. Also the LCM estimates exploit all the available data, and hence have relatively low standard errors. Conclusion Our approach provides a way to evaluate the association of a polymorphism with disease, while taking laboratory measurement error into account. Ambiguities in the empirical data arising from disagreements between laboratories are avoided, and the estimated polymorphism-disease association is typically enhanced.

  15. Assessing the variation in mercury deposition around the North Atlantic during the Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Morgan; Percival, Lawrence; Frieling, Joost; Mather, Tamsin; Svensen, Henrik

    2017-04-01

    The Palaeocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) is a widely studied extreme global warming event that occurred 55.8 Ma. The PETM is marked by a sharp and sustained negative δ13C excursion, indicating a voluminous and rapid release of isotopically light carbon to the ocean-atmosphere system. The source(s) of carbon that instigated this global warming event remain heavily debated. The PETM is broadly contemporaneous with the second major pulse of activity (56-54 Ma) from the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP), suggesting a possible causal relationship. This may have been driven by direct volcanic degassing of carbon dioxide (CO2) and/or thermogenic volatiles (e.g. CH4 and CO2) through contact metamorphism of organic-rich sedimentary layers affected by igneous intrusions. An emerging field in geochemistry that could shed light on the possible link between large igneous province emplacements and hyperthermal events is the use of mercury (Hg) preserved in the sedimentary record as a far field proxy for periods of major volcanic activity. Significant emissions of Hg could be sourced from both volcanic gases and from contact metamorphism, which are transported globally prior to deposition if released directly to the atmosphere. In marine settings, organic matter and clay minerals scavenge Hg and bury it in sediments; spikes in Hg/TOC (total organic carbon) ratios represent increases in Hg loading. Therefore, this method may be able to differentiate between magmatic and other sources as triggers for the PETM and the general activity through time. Here we present new Hg and C data from selected cores around Europe and North America to assess the variability of Hg deposition across the PETM with geographic location. The results indicate that while there is a slight background increase in Hg deposition during the PETM, there is significant variability between cores and extreme peaks within individual sections. This suggests that the behaviour of the Hg cycle during the PETM

  16. An integrated, indicator framework for assessing large-scale variations and change in seasonal timing and phenology (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, J. L.; Weltzin, J. F.

    2013-12-01

    As part of an effort to develop an Indicator System for the National Climate Assessment (NCA), the Seasonality and Phenology Indicators Technical Team (SPITT) proposed an integrated, continental-scale framework for understanding and tracking seasonal timing in physical and biological systems. The framework shares several metrics with the EPA's National Climate Change Indicators. The SPITT framework includes a comprehensive suite of national indicators to track conditions, anticipate vulnerabilities, and facilitate intervention or adaptation to the extent possible. Observed, modeled, and forecasted seasonal timing metrics can inform a wide spectrum of decisions on federal, state, and private lands in the U.S., and will be pivotal for international efforts to mitigation and adaptation. Humans use calendars both to understand the natural world and to plan their lives. Although the seasons are familiar concepts, we lack a comprehensive understanding of how variability arises in the timing of seasonal transitions in the atmosphere, and how variability and change translate and propagate through hydrological, ecological and human systems. For example, the contributions of greenhouse warming and natural variability to secular trends in seasonal timing are difficult to disentangle, including earlier spring transitions from winter (strong westerlies) to summer (weak easterlies) patterns of atmospheric circulation; shifts in annual phasing of daily temperature means and extremes; advanced timing of snow and ice melt and soil thaw at higher latitudes and elevations; and earlier start and longer duration of the growing and fire seasons. The SPITT framework aims to relate spatiotemporal variability in surface climate to (1) large-scale modes of natural climate variability and greenhouse gas-driven climatic change, and (2) spatiotemporal variability in hydrological, ecological and human responses and impacts. The hierarchical framework relies on ground and satellite observations

  17. Near Real-Time Assessment of Anatomic and Dosimetric Variations for Head and Neck Radiation Therapy via Graphics Processing Unit–based Dose Deformation Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, X. Sharon, E-mail: xqi@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Santhanam, Anand; Neylon, John; Min, Yugang; Armstrong, Tess; Sheng, Ke [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Staton, Robert J.; Pukala, Jason [Department of Radiation Oncology, UF Health Cancer Center - Orlando Health, Orlando, Florida (United States); Pham, Andrew; Low, Daniel A.; Lee, Steve P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Steinberg, Michael; Manon, Rafael [Department of Radiation Oncology, UF Health Cancer Center - Orlando Health, Orlando, Florida (United States); Chen, Allen M.; Kupelian, Patrick [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to systematically monitor anatomic variations and their dosimetric consequences during intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head and neck (H&N) cancer by using a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based deformable image registration (DIR) framework. Methods and Materials: Eleven IMRT H&N patients undergoing IMRT with daily megavoltage computed tomography (CT) and weekly kilovoltage CT (kVCT) scans were included in this analysis. Pretreatment kVCTs were automatically registered with their corresponding planning CTs through a GPU-based DIR framework. The deformation of each contoured structure in the H&N region was computed to account for nonrigid change in the patient setup. The Jacobian determinant of the planning target volumes and the surrounding critical structures were used to quantify anatomical volume changes. The actual delivered dose was calculated accounting for the organ deformation. The dose distribution uncertainties due to registration errors were estimated using a landmark-based gamma evaluation. Results: Dramatic interfractional anatomic changes were observed. During the treatment course of 6 to 7 weeks, the parotid gland volumes changed up to 34.7%, and the center-of-mass displacement of the 2 parotid glands varied in the range of 0.9 to 8.8 mm. For the primary treatment volume, the cumulative minimum and mean and equivalent uniform doses assessed by the weekly kVCTs were lower than the planned doses by up to 14.9% (P=.14), 2% (P=.39), and 7.3% (P=.05), respectively. The cumulative mean doses were significantly higher than the planned dose for the left parotid (P=.03) and right parotid glands (P=.006). The computation including DIR and dose accumulation was ultrafast (∼45 seconds) with registration accuracy at the subvoxel level. Conclusions: A systematic analysis of anatomic variations in the H&N region and their dosimetric consequences is critical in improving treatment efficacy. Nearly real

  18. Assessment of spatiotemporal variations in the fluvial wash-load component in the 21st century with regard to GCM climate change scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouri, Goro, E-mail: mouri@rainbow.iis.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2015-11-15

    For stream water, in which a relationship exists between wash-load concentration and discharge, an estimate of fine-sediment delivery may be obtained from a traditional fluvial wash-load rating curve. Here, we demonstrate that the remaining wash-load material load can be estimated from a traditional empirical principle on a nationwide scale. The traditional technique was applied to stream water for the whole of Japan. Four typical GCMs were selected from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) ensemble to provide the driving fields for the following regional climate models to assess the wash-load component based on rating curves: the Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate (MIROC), the Meteorological Research Institute Atmospheric General Circulation Model (MRI-GCM), the Hadley Centre Global Environment Model (HadGEM) and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) climate model. The simulations consisted of an ensemble, including multiple physics configurations and different Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP2.6, RCP4.5 and RCP8.5), which was used to produce monthly datasets for the whole country of Japan. The impacts of future climate changes on fluvial wash load in Japanese stream water were based on the balance of changes in hydrological factors. The annual and seasonal variations of the fluvial wash load were assessed from the result of the ensemble analysis in consideration of the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission scenarios. The determined results for the amount of wash load increase range from approximately 20 to 110% in the 2040s, especially along part of the Pacific Ocean and the Sea of Japan regions. In the 2090s, the amount of wash load is projected to increase by more than 50% over the whole of Japan. The assessment indicates that seasonal variation is particularly important because the rainy and typhoon seasons, which include extreme events, are the dominant seasons. Because fluvial wash-load-component turbidity

  19. A STUDY TO ASSESS THE PROPORTION AND ASSOCIATION OF APPENDICITIS WITH POSITIONAL VARIATION IN A SOUTH INDIAN RURAL TERTIARY CARE CENTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar David

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT The commonest position of appendix vermiformis according to the literature is retrocaecal. While during surgery there was found to have variation. Several studies done to assess the position of appendix vermiformis in patients with acute appendicitis has given a conflicting results. Depending on the position the symptom complex also changes, producing different problems and differential diagnosis. AIM This study assess the position of appendix vermiformis in patients with inflamed appendix in the patients undergoing surgery for acute appendicitis at Dr. SM CSI Medical College, Karakonam. DESIGN METHOD AND ANALYSIS The study is a retrospective study done over 2 years in 109 patients who underwent appendicectomy at Dr. SMCSI Medical College. The prevalence of appendicitis among different age groups, and the different position were studied. RESULTS Of the 109 patients 71 were females and 38 males. In the study population 21-40 years age group had the highest frequency of appendicitis. Subcaecal position was seen in 49.5 % of the patients followed by 28.4%. In both the sex group sub caecal position is the commonest position with 57.9% and 45.1% respectively in male and female patients. CONCLUSION Among the patients with acute appendicitis subcaecal position was the commonest position

  20. Assessment of spatiotemporal variations in the fluvial wash-load component in the 21st century with regard to GCM climate change scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouri, Goro

    2015-11-15

    For stream water, in which a relationship exists between wash-load concentration and discharge, an estimate of fine-sediment delivery may be obtained from a traditional fluvial wash-load rating curve. Here, we demonstrate that the remaining wash-load material load can be estimated from a traditional empirical principle on a nationwide scale. The traditional technique was applied to stream water for the whole of Japan. Four typical GCMs were selected from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) ensemble to provide the driving fields for the following regional climate models to assess the wash-load component based on rating curves: the Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate (MIROC), the Meteorological Research Institute Atmospheric General Circulation Model (MRI-GCM), the Hadley Centre Global Environment Model (HadGEM) and the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) climate model. The simulations consisted of an ensemble, including multiple physics configurations and different Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP2.6, RCP4.5 and RCP8.5), which was used to produce monthly datasets for the whole country of Japan. The impacts of future climate changes on fluvial wash load in Japanese stream water were based on the balance of changes in hydrological factors. The annual and seasonal variations of the fluvial wash load were assessed from the result of the ensemble analysis in consideration of the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission scenarios. The determined results for the amount of wash load increase range from approximately 20 to 110% in the 2040s, especially along part of the Pacific Ocean and the Sea of Japan regions. In the 2090s, the amount of wash load is projected to increase by more than 50% over the whole of Japan. The assessment indicates that seasonal variation is particularly important because the rainy and typhoon seasons, which include extreme events, are the dominant seasons. Because fluvial wash-load-component turbidity

  1. An Assessment of Uncertainties in the NASA GISS ModelE GCM due to Variations in the Representation of Aerosol/Cloud Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persad, G. G.; Menon, S.; Sednev, I.

    2008-12-01

    Aerosol indirect effects are known to have a significant impact on the evolution of the climate system. However, their representation via cloud/aerosol microphysics remains a major source of uncertainty in climate models. This study assesses uncertainties in the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) ModelE global climate model produced by different representations of the cloud/aerosol interaction scheme. By varying the complexity of the cloud microphysics scheme included in the model and analyzing the range of results against cloud properties obtained from satellite retrievals, we evaluate the effect of the different schemes on climate. We examine four sets of simulations with the GISS ModelE: (1) using a new aerosol/cloud microphysics package implemented in ModelE (based on the two-moment cloud microphysics scheme recently implemented in CCSM), (2) using a version of the microphysics scheme previously included in ModelE, (3) using prescribed aerosol concentrations and fixed cloud droplet number (the main link between aerosols and the cloud microphysics scheme), and (4) varying the environment conditions with which the new aerosol/cloud microphysics package is run. The global mean cloud properties are analyzed and compared to global mean ranges as obtained from satellite retrievals. Results show that important climate parameters, such as total cloud cover, can be underestimated by 8-15% using the new aerosol/cloud microphysics scheme. Liquid water path (LWP) is particularly affected by variations to the aerosol/cloud microphysics representation, exhibiting both global mean variations of ~20% and strong regional differences. Significant variability in LWP between the various simulations may be attributed to differences in the autoconversion scheme used in the differing representations of aerosol/cloud interactions. These LWP differences significantly affect radiative parameters, such as cloud optical depth and net cloud forcing (used to evaluate the

  2. Variation of safety indices during in the learning curve for color Doppler assessment of the fetal heart at 11+0 to 13+6 weeks' gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemescu, Dragos; Berescu, Anca; Rotariu, Cristian

    2015-12-01

    The aim of our study was to analyze the variation of acoustic output, as expressed by the thermal (TI) and mechanical index (MI), during the learning curve for a fetal heart scan at 11-13 gestational weeks, with the introduction of a new ultrasound system. This was a prospective, observational study on 303 normal fetuses. The fetal heart was examined transabdominally using B-Mode and high definition (HD) color Doppler to obtain standard parameters: four-chamber, outflow tracts and three-vessel-trachea views. Data were analyzed in groups of 20 consecutive examinations and the percentage of successful examinations was calculated. TI and MI were retrieved from HD color Doppler examinations of the fetal heart and from pulsed-wave Doppler assessment of the tricuspid flow and ductus venosus. MI values from the color Doppler examination of the fetal heart showed a continuous decrease (0.81 to 0.75, plearning phase. TI and MI indices from pulsed-wave Doppler evaluation of the tricuspid flow increased at the beginning of the learning phase and stabilized afterwards (0.34 to 0.36, pcolor Doppler exam of the heart and indices from ductus venosus assessment were very constant and did not change along the studied periods. The length of Doppler examination of the heart increased after about 80 cases by 25%, to a mean of 4 minutes (plearning curve for fetal heart assessment. Also, the occurrence of constant values suggests the potential for their supplementary active reduction. For a better adaptation to a new ultrasound technology, the sonographer should scan the fetal heart longer in the first trimester and follow displayed safety indices along the first 80 cases.

  3. Experiencing variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, Sofie; Berge, Maria; Grout, Brian William Wilson

    2017-01-01

    This study contributes towards a better understanding of learning dynamics in doctoral supervision by analysing how learning opportunities are created in the interaction between supervisors and PhD students, using the notion of experiencing variation as a key to learning. Empirically, we have bas...... were discussed, created more complex patterns of variation. Both PhD students and supervisors can learn from this. Understanding of this mechanism that creates learning opportunities can help supervisors develop their competences in supervisory pedagogy....

  4. [Interobserver variation in wound assessments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorentzen, H F; Gottrup, F

    1998-05-25

    Agreement in describing a chronic leg ulcer is pivotal in identifying and treating impediments to the healing process. Six nurses and one doctor without special experience with wound healing registered wound related diagnoses for a five month period. On average each patient was seen by three observers yielding 270 registrations. Agreement beyond chance (global kappa) showed poor to moderate agreement. Agreement was best for the yellow or malodorous wound and lowest for cellulitis, hypergranulation and peripheral pulses. This emphasizes the importance of allocating wound treatment to specialist departments with access to paraclinical investigations.

  5. Sources of variation in the design of preclinical studies assessing the effects of amphetamine-type stimulants in pregnancy and lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell-Dowling, Kate; Kelly, John P

    2015-02-15

    The prevalence of drug use during pregnancy has increased in recent years and the amount of drug-exposed babies has therefore increased. In order to assess the risk associated with this there has been an increase in the amount of preclinical studies investigating the effects of prenatal and postnatal drug exposure on the offspring. There are many challenges associated with investigating the developmental and behavioural effects of drugs of abuse in animal models and ensuring that such models are appropriate and clinically relevant. The purpose of this review is to illustrate the variation in the design of preclinical studies investigating the effects of the amphetamine-type stimulants taken during pregnancy and/or lactation in animal models. Methamphetamine, methylendioxymethamphetamine and amphetamine were included in this review. The protocols used for exploring the effects of these drugs when taking during pregnancy and/or lactation were investigated and summarised into maternal experimental variables and offspring experimental variables. Maternal experimental variables include animals used, mating procedures and drug treatment and offspring experimental variables include litter standardisation, cross fostering, weaning and behaviours and parameters assessed. The findings in this paper suggest that there is a large diversity and little consistency among these studies and so the interpretation of these results may not be as clinically relevant as previously thought. For this reason, the importance of steering the preclinical studies in a direction that is most clinically relevant will be an important future recommendation. This will also allow us to be more confident in the results obtained and confident that the human situation is being replicated as closely as possible. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessing regional variation of environmental fluoride concentrations in Western Germany by analysis of antler fluoride content in roe deer (Capreolus capreolus)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kierdorf, U.; Kierdorf, H. [University of Giessen, Giessen (Germany)

    2002-01-01

    To assess regional variation in ambient fluoride levels, the fluoride content of 188 antlers of roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) killed between 1990 and 1999 in 14 areas of the federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany were analyzed. Individual antler fluoride concentrations ranged between 113 and 11,995 mg F{sup -}/kg bone ash, and sample means differed significantly (p {lt} 0.0001) among the study areas. Low average concentrations (geometric means of 262 and 277 mg F{sup -}/kg bone ash, respectively) were found in antler samples from two control areas, located quite remote to major fluoride emission sources. The highest geometric mean fluoride content (1,677 mg F{sup -}/kg bone ash) was recorded for an antler sample from a study area exposed to fluoride emissions from an aluminium smelter and two mineral coal-fired power stations. In eight antlers obtained from roe deer living in the direct vicinity of the aluminium smelter, fluoride values ranged between 2,067 and 11,995 mg F{sup -}/kg bone ash, thereby demonstrating the strong impact of this emission source on its surroundings. The study showed that by analyzing antler fluoride concentrations, large-scale surveys of environmental contamination by fluoride can be performed in a standardized and cost-effective way in areas inhabited by deer. Due to its rather narrow home range, abundance, and high adaptability, the roe deer is particularly suited for such studies.

  7. Evaluation of the seasonal variation on the geochemical parameters and quality assessment of the groundwater in the proximity of River Cooum, Chennai, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giridharan, L; Venugopal, T; Jayaprakash, M

    2008-08-01

    The seasonal variations of the chemical budget of ions were determined from the hydrochemical investigation of the groundwater. Though the effect of monsoon does not change the order of abundance of cations, but it does change the concentration of various ions and it is found that there was a considerable change in the case of all major ions. The unique characteristic of the ground water is the linear relationship among the principal ions. Hydrochemical characteristics of ions in the groundwater were studied using 1:1 equiline diagrams. The nature of the water samples were determined using the piper diagram. The correlation studies and R-mode factor analysis were carried out on the various groundwater parameters. The study of factor scores reveals the extent of influence of each factors on the overall water chemistry at each sampling stations. The trace metal concentration in the water was determined. The quality of the groundwater in the study area has been assessed using Percent sodium, SAR and Wilcox diagrams. The groundwater results of the premonsoon shows the dominance of excessive evaporation, silicate weathering and anthropogenic activities whereas in postmonsoon, dilution predominates over that of other factors.

  8. Variational analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Rockafellar, R Tyrrell

    1998-01-01

    From its origins in the minimization of integral functionals, the notion of 'variations' has evolved greatly in connection with applications in optimization, equilibrium, and control. It refers not only to constrained movement away from a point, but also to modes of perturbation and approximation that are best describable by 'set convergence', variational convergence of functions and the like. This book develops a unified framework and, in finite dimension, provides a detailed exposition of variational geometry and subdifferential calculus in their current forms beyond classical and convex analysis. Also covered are set-convergence, set-valued mappings, epi-convergence, duality, maximal monotone mappings, second-order subderivatives, measurable selections and normal integrands. The changes in this 3rd printing mainly concern various typographical corrections, and reference omissions that came to light in the previous printings. Many of these reached the authors' notice through their own re-reading, that of th...

  9. Variational principles

    CERN Document Server

    Moiseiwitsch, B L

    2004-01-01

    This graduate-level text's primary objective is to demonstrate the expression of the equations of the various branches of mathematical physics in the succinct and elegant form of variational principles (and thereby illuminate their interrelationship). Its related intentions are to show how variational principles may be employed to determine the discrete eigenvalues for stationary state problems and to illustrate how to find the values of quantities (such as the phase shifts) that arise in the theory of scattering. Chapter-by-chapter treatment consists of analytical dynamics; optics, wave mecha

  10. PM₂.₅-bound oxygenated PAHs, nitro-PAHs and parent-PAHs from the atmosphere of a Chinese megacity: seasonal variation, sources and cancer risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandowe, Benjamin A Musa; Meusel, Hannah; Huang, Ru-Jin; Ho, Kinfai; Cao, Junji; Hoffmann, Thorsten; Wilcke, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs) in air particulate matter contribute considerably to the health risk of air pollution. The objectives of this study were to assess the occurrence and variation in concentrations and sources of PM2.5-bound PACs [Oxygenated PAHs (OPAHs), nitro-PAHs and parent-PAHs] sampled from the atmosphere of a typical Chinese megacity (Xi'an), to study the influence of meteorological conditions on PACs and to estimate the lifetime excess cancer risk to the residents of Xi'an (from inhalation of PM2.5-bound PACs). To achieve these objectives, we sampled 24-h PM2.5 aerosols (once in every 6 days, from 5 July 2008 to 8 August 2009) from the atmosphere of Xi'an and measured the concentrations of PACs in them. The PM2.5-bound concentrations of Σcarbonyl-OPAHs, ∑hydroxyl+carboxyl-OPAHs, Σnitro-PAHs and Σalkyl+parent-PAHs ranged between 5-22, 0.2-13, 0.3-7, and 7-387 ng m(-3), respectively, being markedly higher than in most western cities. This represented a range of 0.01-0.4% and 0.002-0.06% of the mass of organic C in PM2.5 and the total mass of PM2.5, respectively. The sums of the concentrations of each compound group had winter-to-summer ratios ranging from 3 to 8 and most individual OPAHs and nitro-PAHs had higher concentrations in winter than in summer, suggesting a dominant influence of emissions from household heating and winter meteorological conditions. Ambient temperature, air pressure, and wind speed explained a large part of the temporal variation in PACs concentrations. The lifetime excess cancer risk from inhalation (attributable to selected PAHs and nitro-PAHs) was six fold higher in winter (averaging 1450 persons per million residents of Xi'an) than in summer. Our results call for the development of emission control measures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Genomic variation in the MMP-1 promoter influences estrogen receptor mediated activity in a mechanically activated environment: potential implications for microgravity risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, John; Myers, Ken; Lu, Ting; Hart, David

    examine the potential impact of the 1G/2G SNP on the cellular response to mechanical loading. HIG-82 cells are estrogen receptor (ER) negative and were transiently transfected with SV40 expression vectors for either ER-α or ER-β isoforms. Cells grown on glass slides were also co-transfected with either a 1G or 2G MMP-1 promoter-luciferase construct. Transfected cells were subjected to dynamic shear stress in a Flexcell Streamer Shear Stress Device. The dynamic loading regime was 0.5 Hz, 10 dyn/cm2 shear for 1 minute followed by 14 minutes rest and repeated for 8 hrs. A Promega Dual Luciferase Reporter Assay System was used to assess MMP-1 promoter activity. Results: Shear stress loading increased both 1G and 2G MMP-1 promoter activity compared to unloaded controls, however the 2G promoter had significantly higher rates of expression than the 1G promoter across all loading regimes and ER co-transfections. Transfection with ER-β resulted in higher MMP-1 promoter activity than that in cells expressing ER-α or in ER-neg cells. Conclusions: Specific genomic variations can lead to differences in cellular responses to changes in mechanical loading environments such as are encountered in microgravity environments or earth-based analogs. These genomic differences may predispose individuals to greater risk of bone loss. It is important to understand the combined effects of mechanical loading, genetic variation and sex hormones on bone maintenance so that risks can be identified for microgravity or analog environments, and specific interventions developed to counteract such risk or even exclude some individuals from prolonged space environments due to the extent of the risk.

  12. PREDICTION OF THE ANTIDEPRESSANT RESPONSE TO TOTAL SLEEP-DEPRIVATION OF DEPRESSED-PATIENTS - LONGITUDINAL VERSUS SINGLE DAY ASSESSMENT OF DIURNAL MOOD VARIATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    REININK, E; BOUHUYS, AL; GORDIJN, MCM; VANDENHOOFDAKKER, RH

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between diurnal variation of mood and the clinical response to total sleep deprivation (TSD) was investigated in 43 depressed patients. The question asked was whether the propensity to produce diurnal variations of mood or the actual mood course on the day before TSD determines the

  13. Developing Integrated Remote Sensing and Geographical Information Sciences Procedures to Assess Impacts of Climate Variations on Spatio-Temporal Distribution of Mangroves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaisar, Maha

    2016-07-01

    Pakistan's periled treasures of mangroves require protection from devastating anthropogenic activities, which can only be achieved through the identification and management of this habitat. The primary objective of this study is to identify the potential habitat of mangroves along the coastline of Pakistan with the help of Remote Sensing (RS) and Geographical Information System (GIS) techniques. Once the mangroves were identified, species of mangroves need to be separated through Object Based Image Analysis (OBIA) which gave the area of mangroves and non mangroves sites. Later other parameters of Sea Surface Temperature, Sea Surface Salinity, chlorophyll-a along with altimetry data were used to assess the climatic variations on the spatio-temporal distribution of mangroves. Since mangroves provide economical, ecological, biological indication of Coastal Change or Sea Level Rise. Therefore, this provides a strong platform to assess the climatic variations which are posing negative impacts on the mangroves ecosystem. The results indicate that mangroves are present throughout along the coastline, proving that Pakistan is rich in these diverse ecosystems. Pakistan being at important geo strategic position can also benefit from its vast mangroves and other coastal resources such as coral reefs and fish varieties. Moreover, coastal zone management through involvement of the local community and establishment of Marine Protected Area (MPA) is the need of the hour to avoid deforestation of mangroves, which can prove to be deadly damaging for the fish populace since it provides habitats to various marine animals. However, the established relationship among SST, SSS, chlorophyll-a and altimetry data assisted to know the suitable sites for mangroves. But due to enhanced climatic impacts these relationships are distorted which has posed devastating effects on the growth and distribution of mangroves. Study area was Karachi Coast, Pakistan. The total area of Karachi is about 70

  14. Use of imaging software for assessment of the associations among zona pellucida thickness variation, assisted hatching, and implantation of day 3 embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Erin I; Farhadifar, Reza; Farland, Leslie V; J Needleman, Daniel; Missmer, Stacey A; Racowsky, Catherine

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if zona pellucida thickness variation (ZPTV) is associated with implantation and if this relationship changes with use of assisted hatching (AH). Day 3 embryos from single or double embryo transfers (DETs) performed between 2014 and 2016 were included. ZPTV was assessed by examining photographs taken before transfer using an automated image processing platform to segment the zona pellucida (ZP) with an active contour technique. One hundred points were obtained of ZP thickness (ZPT) of each embryo to calculate ZPTV ([maximum ZPT-mean ZPT]/mean ZPT). Logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of implantation by tertile of ZPTV. Maternal age and AH were adjusted for a priori. Other cycle and embryo characteristics were adjusted for if they altered the continuous effect estimate by >10%. There was no statistically significant association between ZPTV and implantation across tertiles although embryos with greater ZPTV showed a trend of decreased implantation (Tertile 2 (T2) versus Tertile 1 (T1), OR = 0.80, CI = 0.50-1.28; Tertile 3 (T3) versus Tertile 1 (T3), OR = 0.75, CI = 0.47-1.20). While similar nonsignificant trends for the association between ZPTV and implantation were observed across tertiles after stratification of embryos hatched or not, embryos with the greatest ZPTV had slightly higher odds for implantation when AH was utilized (T3 vs. T1: with AH, OR = 0.89, CI = 0.49-1.62; without AH, OR = 0.61, 0.29-1.27). ZPTV was not associated with implantation after day 3 transfer. This finding did not vary by use of AH.

  15. Comparison of Dissolution Similarity Assessment Methods for Products with Large Variations: f2 Statistics and Model-Independent Multivariate Confidence Region Procedure for Dissolution Profiles of Multiple Oral Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Shibata, Hiroko; Izutsu, Ken-Ichi; Goda, Yukihiro

    2017-01-01

    The current Japanese Ministry of Health Labour and Welfare (MHLW)'s Guideline for Bioequivalence Studies of Generic Products uses averaged dissolution rates for the assessment of dissolution similarity between test and reference formulations. This study clarifies how the application of model-independent multivariate confidence region procedure (Method B), described in the European Medical Agency and U.S. Food and Drug Administration guidelines, affects similarity outcomes obtained empirically from dissolution profiles with large variations in individual dissolution rates. Sixty-one datasets of dissolution profiles for immediate release, oral generic, and corresponding innovator products that showed large variation in individual dissolution rates in generic products were assessed on their similarity by using the f2 statistics defined in the MHLW guidelines (MHLW f2 method) and two different Method B procedures, including a bootstrap method applied with f2 statistics (BS method) and a multivariate analysis method using the Mahalanobis distance (MV method). The MHLW f2 and BS methods provided similar dissolution similarities between reference and generic products. Although a small difference in the similarity assessment may be due to the decrease in the lower confidence interval for expected f2 values derived from the large variation in individual dissolution rates, the MV method provided results different from those obtained through MHLW f2 and BS methods. Analysis of actual dissolution data for products with large individual variations would provide valuable information towards an enhanced understanding of these methods and their possible incorporation in the MHLW guidelines.

  16. The ecological complexity of the Thai-Laos Mekong River: I. Geology, seasonal variation and human impact assessment on river quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udomchoke, Veerasak; Sunthornranun, Patcharee; Songsasen, Apisit; Phanwichien, Kantimanee; Jiwapornkupt, Pongsakorn; Homchan, Unop; Lauhachinda, Nitaya; Sakultantimetha, Arthit; Bangkedphol, Sornnarin; Torrance, Keith; Gibson, Mark D; Gaines, Alec F; Booth, Peter H; Keenan, Helen E

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the variation of pollution in the Thai-Laos Mekong associated with seasonal dynamics concomitant with the natural geological features and human activities that impact on the adverse quality of the river. The complex ecology of the 1500 km stretch of the Thai-Laos Mekong River has been studied in this paper to understand the relationship with the geomorphology, with the sub-tropical monsoonal climate and the impact of human activity. Sub-surface geology controls the nature and extent of the drainage basin and of the river channel. The volume flow of the river varies naturally and dynamically in phase with the rainfall; traditional models based on steady state hydraulics are inappropriate. Continuous erosion of the river banks and bed generates a sediment load of impure silt, mica, quartz and clay minerals that inhibits light penetration and limits the primary productivity of the river. The river separates two countries at different stages of development; it flows through or close to eight non-industrial conurbations (Populations 350,000-2,000,000) but is otherwise sparsely populated. The river is used for subsistence agriculture, village transport, fishing including aquaculture and as a source of domestic water. Hydroelectricity is generated from the Laos tributaries. The river is a depository for partially treated urban waste and untreated village waste, hence populations of E.coli bacteria sometimes render the water unsuitable for drinking unless treated with the highest value of 240/100 ml found at station 7 during the summer season of 2003. Furthermore the river is polluted by trace metals, notably cadmium and mercury, and by Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are particularly concentrated in the sediments. Previous work has shown that cadmium and mercury exceed the Probable Effect Level (PEL) values of Canadian Environmental Quality Guidelines and that the PAH concentrations were also greater than the Interim

  17. Assessment of Morphological Variations and its Specific Location on the Surface of Adult Human Liver in Ethiopian Cadavers University of Gondar, Bahir Dar University, Addis Ababa University, St. Paulos Medical School and Hawassa University, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsegaye Mehare

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Liver is the second largest organ next to skin and located in right hypochondrium, epigastrium and may extend to left hypochondrium in upper abdominal cavity. It accounts 2% to 3% of total body weight of individual. Land marking for interpreting different diagnostic image and localizing lesions in the liver is commonly done by major fissures. Sound knowledge about different morphological variations which are found on the surface of liver is mandatory to have safe surgical outcome. Segments of liver were extensively researched but there are only few studies dealt with the surface variation of the liver. Therefore, this study aims to assess morphological variations and its specific location on the surface of adult human liver in Ethiopian cadaver. Methodology: Institutional based cross sectional descriptive study design was conducted in 33 formalin fixed Ethiopian cadaveric livers in the Anatomy department of University of Gondar, Bahir Dar University, Addis Ababa University, St. Paulos Medical School and Hawassa University. Results: 45.45% of the liver was normal but 54.55% showed one or more variations. Additional fissures and very small left lobe with deep costal impressions were seen 27.27% and 21.21% cases respectively. Pons hepatis connecting left lobe with quadrate lobe and very deep renal impression with corset constriction were noted in 9.09% cases each. Additional lobes and absence of quadrate lobes were found in 6.06% cases each. Conclusion and Recommendation: Morphological variations on the liver surface were accessory fissure, very small left lobe with deep costal impressions, pons hepatis, shape variation and absence of quadrate lobe. The most common one among the variations was accessory fissure on the visceral and diaphragmatic surface.

  18. Assessment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gehan Elassal; Mona Elsheikh; Abdel Gawad Abu Zeid

    2014-01-01

    .... Subjects and methods: 80 COPD patients were assessed using SCID for establishing psychiatric diagnosis, Beck depression inventory for assessment of the severity of depressive symptoms, Hamilton anxiety scale...

  19. Effect of assessment scale on spatial and temporal variations in CH4, C02, and N20 fluxes in a forested wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhaohua Dai; Carl Trettin; Changsheng Li; Harbin Li; Ge Sun; Devendra Amatya

    2011-01-01

    Emissions of methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and nitrous oxide (N2O) from a forested watershed (160 ha) in South Carolina, USA, were estimated with a spatially explicit watershed-scale modeling framework that utilizes the spatial variations in physical and biogeochemical characteristics across watersheds. The target watershed (WS80) consisting of wetland (23%) and...

  20. Development of NIR calibration models to assess year-to-year variation in total non-structural carbohydrates in grasses using PLSR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shetty, Nisha; Gislum, René; Jensen, Anne Mette Dahl

    2012-01-01

    Near- infrared (NIR) spectroscopy was used in combination with chemometrics to quantify total non-structural carbohydrates (TNC) in grass samples in order to overcome year-to-year variation. A total of 1103 above-ground plant and root samples were collected from different field and pot experiments...

  1. Assessment of ADHD Symptoms and the Issue of Cultural Variation: Are Conners 3 Rating Scales Applicable to Children and Parents With Migration Background?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Martin; Reh, Verena; Hirsch, Oliver; Rief, Winfried; Christiansen, Hanna

    2017-05-01

    The objective was to evaluate whether Conners 3 ( Conners 3rd edition) ratings of ADHD symptoms are robust to distortion by cultural variation when applied to children with migration background living in Germany. From 2010 to 2011, Conners 3 data (self-rating, parent rating, and teacher rating) of 243 children with Turkish migration background, aged 6 to 16 years, were collected in various German schools. Allocation of items to latent factors was tested with confirmatory analyses. Reliability and validity of resulting factors was calculated and influence of acculturation, gender, and age on rating-modalities was examined. Confirmatory factor analyses showed high model fits for all rating-modalities. Resulting scales had good reliability and validity. There was a small influence of acculturation on parent ratings of oppositional defiant disorder but not on ADHD core symptoms. Conners 3 ratings seem to be robust against influences of cultural variation. Their German translation can be utilized for children with Turkish migration background without limitation.

  2. Delicious words – Assessing the impact of short storytelling messages on consumer preferences for variations of a new processed meat product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, Morten H. J.; Aschemann-Witzel, Jessica; Hansen, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Continuous food product improvements require communication that induces consumers to test the new products. The paper presents an experiment that investigated the characteristics of consumers who reacted positively to variations of a new meat product, and explores the effect of short storytelling...... messages on choice. 1087 Danish consumers were presented with binary choice sets consisting of conventional and new variations of a cubed ham product; half of the respondents in addition saw short storytelling messages. It was found that while some consumers – especially those characterized by values...... related to stimulation seeking and hedonism and with a tendency towards variety seeking – reacted positively to the new product, others were less interested. The introduction of elements of storytelling, however, had a favorable effect on choice for the segment previously less interested. Thus...

  3. Relative Biological Effectiveness Variation Along Monoenergetic and Modulated Bragg Peaks of a 62-MeV Therapeutic Proton Beam: A Preclinical Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, Pankaj; Marshall, Thomas I. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Perozziello, Francesca M.; Manti, Lorenzo [Department of Physics, University of Naples Federico II and INFN Naples Section University of Naples, Naples (Italy); Currell, Frederick J.; Hanton, Fiona [Centre for Plasma Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); McMahon, Stephen J.; Kavanagh, Joy N. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Cirrone, Giuseppe Antonio Pablo; Romano, Francesco [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, LNS, Catania (Italy); Prise, Kevin M., E-mail: k.prise@qub.ac.uk [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); Schettino, Giuseppe [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast (United Kingdom); National Physical Laboratory, Teddington (United Kingdom)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: The biological optimization of proton therapy can be achieved only through a detailed evaluation of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) variations along the full range of the Bragg curve. The clinically used RBE value of 1.1 represents a broad average, which disregards the steep rise of linear energy transfer (LET) at the distal end of the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP). With particular attention to the key endpoint of cell survival, our work presents a comparative investigation of cell killing RBE variations along monoenergetic (pristine) and modulated (SOBP) beams using human normal and radioresistant cells with the aim to investigate the RBE dependence on LET and intrinsic radiosensitvity. Methods and Materials: Human fibroblasts (AG01522) and glioma (U87) cells were irradiated at 6 depth positions along pristine and modulated 62-MeV proton beams at the INFN-LNS (Catania, Italy). Cell killing RBE variations were measured using standard clonogenic assays and were further validated using Monte Carlo simulations and the local effect model (LEM). Results: We observed significant cell killing RBE variations along the proton beam path, particularly in the distal region showing strong dose dependence. Experimental RBE values were in excellent agreement with the LEM predicted values, indicating dose-averaged LET as a suitable predictor of proton biological effectiveness. Data were also used to validate a parameterized RBE model. Conclusions: The predicted biological dose delivered to a tumor region, based on the variable RBE inferred from the data, varies significantly with respect to the clinically used constant RBE of 1.1. The significant RBE increase at the distal end suggests also a potential to enhance optimization of treatment modalities such as LET painting of hypoxic tumors. The study highlights the limitation of adoption of a constant RBE for proton therapy and suggests approaches for fast implementation of RBE models in treatment planning.

  4. Variation in stable-isotope ratios between fin and muscle tissues can alter assessment of resource use in tropical river fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, B; Tongnunui, S; Beamish, F W H; Nithirojpakdee, P; Cunjak, R A

    2017-08-01

    Carbon and nitrogen stable-isotope ratios were compared of fin and muscle tissue from 15 fish species collected from seven headwater rivers in eastern and western Thailand. In addition, two-source stable-isotope mixing models were used to derive estimates of each fish's reliance on allochthonous and autochthonous energy based on fin and muscle tissues. Across the dataset, fish fin was enriched in 13 C relative to muscle by c. 1·5‰. Variation in δ15 N between tissues was below statistically significant levels. Estimates of autochthonous resource use calculated from fin tissue were on average 15% greater than those calculated from muscle. Linear mixed-effects models indicated that inter-tissue variation in estimates of resource use was predominantly related to inter-tissue variation in δ13 C. Fish fin is a credible and desirable alternative to tissues such as muscle or liver which require destructive sampling of fishes. Care must be taken, however, when estimating resource use or interpreting previous estimates of resource use derived from different tissues. © 2017 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  5. Variación espacio-temporal de la meiofauna submareal en una playa arenosa nororiental de Venezuela Spatio-temporal variation of subtidal meiofauna in a sandy beach from Northeastern Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildefonso Liñero Arana

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available La meiofauna incluye metazoos y foraminíferos bénticos que pasan a través de un tamiz de 500mm y son retenidos en malla de 40-63μm. Se estudió la variación espacial y temporal de la meiofauna en cuatro estaciones submareales a 1m de profundidad, de una playa arenosa situada en la costa nororiental de Venezuela. Mensualmente, durante un año, en cada estación, con un nucleador de 2.5cm de diámetro interno, se tomaron tres réplicas de sedimento hasta 10cm de profundidad y se pasaron a través de un tamiz de 0.063mm de abertura de malla. Se identificaron 14 grupos meiofaunales, excluidos los foraminíferos, siendo los nemátodos, ostrácodos y copépodos harpacticoides los más abundantes. La densidad mensual estuvo comprendida entre 64 y 503ind./10cm², y la densidad media en las estaciones entre 173 y 449ind./10cm². La densidad de la meiofauna en la playa San Luis es baja en comparación con otros estudios realizados en zonas tropicales. En esta playa el control de las comunidades meiofaunísticas es compartido por las condiciones climáticas y la biología de las especies.Meiofauna organisms that play an important role in the trophic ecology of soft bottom benthos, have short life cycles and they respond quickly to disturbance and pollution. The present study shows the spatio-temporal variation of subtidal meiofauna (metazoans passing a 500μm sieve but retained on meshes of 40-63μm in four shallow subtidal stations. Samples were taken in the sandy beach of San Luis, in the Northeastern coast of Venezuela, from October 2005 until September 2006. For this, three replicate sediment core samples (4.91cm², were collected monthly to a depth of 10cm into the sediment, and preserved in 6% formalin stained with rose Bengal. Specimens of 14 meiofaunal groups (Foraminifera excluded were collected, being the nematodes, ostracods and harpacticoid copepods the most abundant. Monthly density was comprised between 64 and 503ind./10cm², and mean

  6. Temporal variation of soil moisture over the Wuding River basin assessed with an eco-hydrological model, in-situ observations and remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S.; Mo, X.; Zhao, W.; Naeimi, V.; Dai, D.; Shu, C.; Mao, L.

    2009-07-01

    The change pattern and trend of soil moisture (SM) in the Wuding River basin, Loess Plateau, China is explored based on the simulated long-term SM data from 1956 to 2004 using an eco-hydrological process-based model, Vegetation Interface Processes model, VIP. In-situ SM observations together with a remotely sensed SM dataset retrieved by the Vienna University of Technology are used to validate the model. In the VIP model, climate-eco-hydrological (CEH) variables such as precipitation, air temperature and runoff observations and also simulated evapotranspiration (ET), leaf area index (LAI), and vegetation production are used to analyze the soil moisture evolution mechanism. The results show that the model is able to capture seasonal SM variations. The seasonal pattern, multi-year variation, standard deviation and coefficient of variation (CV) of SM at the daily, monthly and annual scale are well explained by CEH variables. The annual and inter-annual variability of SM is the lowest compared with that of other CEH variables. The trend analysis shows that SM is in decreasing tendency at α=0.01 level of significance, confirming the Northern Drying phenomenon. This trend can be well explained by the decreasing tendency of precipitation (α=0.1) and increasing tendency of temperature (α=0.01). The decreasing tendency of runoff has higher significance level (α=0.001). Because of SM's decreasing tendency, soil evaporation (ES) is also decreasing (α=0.05). The tendency of net radiation (Rn), evapotranspiration (ET), transpiration (EC), canopy intercept (EI) is not obvious. Net primary productivity (NPP), of which the significance level is lower than α=0.1, and gross primary productivity (GPP) at α=0.01 are in increasing tendency.

  7. Full and sub-waveform retracking to assess the ability of pulse limited altimeter in monitoring water level variations of inland water body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roohi, Shirzad; Sneeuw, Nico; Tseng, Kuo-Hsin; Shum, CK

    2014-05-01

    Pulse-limited-satellite altimetry was originally designed for oceanographic observations but has been extended to monitor inland water bodies. So far, studying water level variations of inland water bodies, e.g. lakes, has been a challenge for this type of altimetry in terms of data quality. The returned altimetry waveforms could be seriously contaminated by topography and environmental error sources. Retracking is an efficacious method against this contamination to improve the accuracy of range measurement and consequently robust water level determination. In addition, the choice of an optimal retracking algorithm appropriate for the specific regional water bodies is very important in this respect. In this study we processed 18 Hz Envisat RA2 altimetry data, i.e. Sensor Geophysical Data records (SGDR), with respective different retrackers and 1 Hz Geophysical Data Records (GDRs) of this mission by on-board retrackers. First, for a given waveform the whole waveform, called full-waveform, was processed to estimate retracked water level variation using OCOG, Threshold and β-parameter retrackers. In the next step we assumed that the reflecting surface inside the radar foot print is a complex surface with different responses. Therefore a given waveform considered as a combination of a number of small waveforms, called sub-waveform. Each sub-waveform was processed by all of the mentioned retrackers to determine water level variations. Finally the result of different retracked heights were compared with on-board retrackers, and with available in-situ gauge data. The largest salt lake in the middle east, Urmia lake, has been selected as a testing area in this study. This lake is drying up due to climate change and human activities, e.g. irrigation and dam construction. Our retracking analysis shows that the sub-waveform retracking outperforms the full-waveform retracking. The minimum RMS, i.e. 18 cm, was obtained by sub-waveform, retracked with Threshold 50% algorithm

  8. Diurnal Variation and Spatial Distribution Effects on Sulfur Speciation in Aerosol Samples as Assessed by X-Ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siwatt Pongpiachan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on providing new results relating to the impacts of Diurnal variation, Vertical distribution, and Emission source on sulfur K-edge XANES spectrum of aerosol samples. All aerosol samples used in the diurnal variation experiment were preserved using anoxic preservation stainless cylinders (APSCs and pressure-controlled glove boxes (PCGBs, which were specially designed to prevent oxidation of the sulfur states in PM10. Further investigation of sulfur K-edge XANES spectra revealed that PM10 samples were dominated by S(VI, even when preserved in anoxic conditions. The “Emission source effect” on the sulfur oxidation state of PM10 was examined by comparing sulfur K-edge XANES spectra collected from various emission sources in southern Thailand, while “Vertical distribution effects” on the sulfur oxidation state of PM10 were made with samples collected from three different altitudes from rooftops of the highest buildings in three major cities in Thailand. The analytical results have demonstrated that neither “Emission source” nor “Vertical distribution” appreciably contribute to the characteristic fingerprint of sulfur K-edge XANES spectrum in PM10.

  9. Temporal variation of soil moisture over the Wuding River basin assessed with an eco-hydrological model, in-situ observations and remote sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Shu

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The change pattern and trend of soil moisture (SM in the Wuding River basin, Loess Plateau, China is explored based on the simulated long-term SM data from 1956 to 2004 using an eco-hydrological process-based model, Vegetation Interface Processes model, VIP. In-situ SM observations together with a remotely sensed SM dataset retrieved by the Vienna University of Technology are used to validate the model. In the VIP model, climate-eco-hydrological (CEH variables such as precipitation, air temperature and runoff observations and also simulated evapotranspiration (ET, leaf area index (LAI, and vegetation production are used to analyze the soil moisture evolution mechanism. The results show that the model is able to capture seasonal SM variations. The seasonal pattern, multi-year variation, standard deviation and coefficient of variation (CV of SM at the daily, monthly and annual scale are well explained by CEH variables. The annual and inter-annual variability of SM is the lowest compared with that of other CEH variables. The trend analysis shows that SM is in decreasing tendency at α=0.01 level of significance, confirming the Northern Drying phenomenon. This trend can be well explained by the decreasing tendency of precipitation (α=0.1 and increasing tendency of temperature (α=0.01. The decreasing tendency of runoff has higher significance level (α=0.001. Because of SM's decreasing tendency, soil evaporation (ES is also decreasing (α=0.05. The tendency of net radiation (Rn, evapotranspiration (ET, transpiration (EC, canopy intercept (EI is not obvious. Net primary productivity (NPP, of which the significance level is lower than α=0.1, and gross primary productivity (GPP at α=0.01 are in increasing tendency.

  10. Assessment of genetic diversity and variation of Robinia pseudoacacia seeds induced by short-term spaceflight based on two molecular marker systems and morphological traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, C Q; Li, Y F; Sun, P; Sun, Y H; Zhang, G J; Yang, M S; Zhang, Y Y; Li, Y; Wang, L

    2012-12-17

    The black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) is a forest legume that is highly valued as a honey plant and for its wood. We explored the effect of short-term spaceflight on development of R. pseudoacacia seedlings derived from seeds that endured a 15-day flight; the genetic diversity and variation of plants sampled from space-mutagenized seeds were compared to plants from parallel ground-based control seeds using molecular markers and morphological traits. In the morphology analysis, the space-mutagenized group had apparent variation compared with the control group in morphological traits, including plant height, basal diameter, number of branches, branch stipular thorn length, branch stipular thorn middle width, leaflet vertex angle, and tippy leaf vertex angle. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) and sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) molecular marker analyses showed a slightly higher levels of genetic diversity in the space-mutagenized group compared to the control group. In the SRAP analysis, the space-mutagenized group had 115 polymorphic bands vs 98 in the controls; 91.27% polymorphic loci vs 77.78% in the controls; 1.9127 ± 0.2834 alleles vs 1.7778 ± 0.4174 in the controls; Nei's genetic diversity (h) was 0.2930 ± 0.1631 vs 0.2688 ± 0.1862 in the controls, and the Shannon's information index (I) was 0.4452 ± 0.2177 vs 0.4031 ± 0.2596 in the controls. The number of alleles was significantly higher in the space-mutagenized group. In the SSR analysis, the space-mutagenized group also had more polymorphic bands (51 vs 46), a greater percentage of polymorphic loci (89.47% vs 80.70%); h was also higher (0.2534 ± 0.1533 vs 0.2240 ± 0.1743), as was I (0.3980 ± 0.2069 vs 0.3501 ± 0.2412). These results demonstrated that the range of genetic variation in the populations of R. pseudoacacia increased after spaceflight. It also suggested that the SSR and SRAP markers are effective markers for studying mutations and genetic diversity in R. pseudoacacia. The data

  11. Spatial variation and toxicity assessment for heavy metals in sediments of intertidal zone in a typical subtropical estuary (Min River) of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhigao; Li, Jiabing; He, Tao; Ren, Peng; Zhu, He; Gao, Hui; Tian, Liping; Hu, Xingyun

    2017-10-01

    Sediment samples were collected in five marshes (C1, Phragmites australis marsh; C2, P. australis and Cyperus malaccensis marsh; C3, C. malaccensis marsh; C4, Spartina alterniflora marsh; and C5, Cyperus compressus marsh) respectively along two typical transects (T1 and T2) extending from the vegetated marsh to the mudflat in a typical subtropical estuary (Min River) of China in July 2015 to investigate the spatial variation and toxicity of heavy metals (Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn, and Ni) in intertidal zone. Results showed that the concentrations of heavy metal in surface sediments of the two transects were in the order of Zn > Cr > Pb > Cu > Ni and slightly decreased from the land to the sea except for Pb and Zn. The levels of the five metals at C5 marsh were generally the lowest, while those of Pb, Cr, and Zn at C2 marsh were the highest. The vertical variations of Pb, Cr, and Zn concentrations in profiles differed among marshes or transects, and in most cases, there was no evidence of sediment organic matter (SOM) contributing to the sorption of significant amount of metals in sediments along the two transects, while grain composition was a primary factor controlling the spatial variations of metals. Both the vertical distributions of Cu and Ni levels among marshes or transects showed little fluctuation, which could be better explained by the effects of sulfur on the solubility and mobility of the two metals in profiles. Heavy metal levels in sediments of the Min River estuary were much higher compared with most estuaries in Asia, Europe, Africa, and South America. The sediments in intertidal zone of the Min River estuary were moderately polluted by the five metals, and particularly, Ni was identified as heavy metal of primary concern. Both Ni and Pb in sediments of the intertidal zone showed high potential toxicity and high contributions to the sum of the toxic units (ΣTUs). In future, the metal pollutions in intertidal zone of the Min River estuary might be more

  12. Genetic consequences of population decline in the European otter ( Lutra lutra ) : an assessment of microsatellite DNA variation in Danish otters from 1883 to 1993

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pertoldi, C.; Hansen, Michael Møller; Loeschcke, V.

    2001-01-01

    into the dynamics of the population decline. This was done by analysing microsatellite DNA variation in contemporary and historical samples, the latter encompassing DNA samples extracted from museum specimens covering a time-span from the 1880s to the 1960s. Tests for differences in expected heterozygosity...... and the numbers of alleles in contemporary versus historical samples and a test for detecting population bottlenecks provided few indications of a recent bottleneck and loss of variability. However, a procedure for detecting population expansions and declines, based on the genealogical history of microsatellite...... alleles, suggested that a drastic long-term population decline has taken place, which could have started more than 2000 years ago, possibly due to ancient anthropogenic pressure. Finally, assignment tests and pairwise F-ST values suggested weak but statistically significant genetic differentiation between...

  13. T1 mapping of the myocardium: Intra-individual assessment of the effect of field strength, cardiac cycle and variation by myocardial region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawel Nadine

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myocardial T1 relaxation time (T1 time and extracellular volume fraction (ECV are altered in the presence of myocardial fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate acquisition factors that may result in variation of measured T1 time and ECV including magnetic field strength, cardiac phase and myocardial region. Methods 31 study subjects were enrolled and underwent one cardiovascular MR exam at 1.5 T and two exams at 3 T, each on separate days. A Modified Look-Locker Inversion Recovery (MOLLI sequence was acquired before and 5, 10, 12, 20, 25 and 30 min after administration of 0.15 mmol/kg gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA; Magnevist at 1.5 T (exam 1. For exam 2, MOLLI sequences were acquired at 3 T both during diastole and systole, before and after administration of Gd-DTPA (0.15 mmol/kg Magnevist.Exam 3 was identical to exam 2 except gadobenate dimeglumine was administered (Gd-BOPTA; 0.1 mmol/kg Multihance. T1 times were measured in myocardium and blood. ECV was calculated by (ΔR1myocardium/ΔR1blood*(1-hematocrit. Results Before gadolinium, T1 times of myocardium and blood were significantly greater at 3 T versus 1.5 T (28% and 31% greater, respectively, p  Conclusion ECV is similar at field strengths of 1.5 T and 3 T. Due to minor variations in T1 time and ECV during the cardiac cycle and in different myocardial regions, T1 measurements should be obtained at the same cardiac phase and myocardial region in order to obtain consistent results.

  14. Assessing acid rain and climate effects on the temporal variation of dissolved organic matter in the unsaturated zone of a karstic system from southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jin; Hu, Chaoyong; Wang, Miao; Li, Xiuli; Ruan, Jiaoyang; Zhu, Ying; Fairchild, Ian J.; Hartland, Adam

    2018-01-01

    variations in the pH of local rainfall suggests that acid rain over the study period (∼pH 5.6 to ∼ 4.5) had no discernable effect on the quantity and quality of DOM in karst soil and soil solution, likely being strongly buffered by soil carbonates. Therefore, despite large increases in anthropogenic acid rain in recent Chinese history, hydrologic forcing is the predominant factor driving variations in DOM in karst aquifers.

  15. A comprehensive assessment of mercury exposure in penguin populations throughout the Southern Hemisphere: Using trophic calculations to identify sources of population-level variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasso, Rebecka L; Chiaradia, André; Polito, Michael J; Raya Rey, Andrea; Emslie, Steven D

    2015-08-15

    The wide geographic distribution of penguins (Order Sphenisciformes) throughout the Southern Hemisphere provided a unique opportunity to use a single taxonomic group as biomonitors of mercury among geographically distinct marine ecosystems. Mercury concentrations were compared among ten species of penguins representing 26 geographically distinct breeding populations. Mercury concentrations were relatively low (⩽2.00ppm) in feathers from 18/26 populations considered. Population-level differences in trophic level explained variation in mercury concentrations among Little, King, and Gentoo penguin populations. However, Southern Rockhopper and Magellanic penguins breeding on Staten Island, Tierra del Fuego, had the highest mercury concentrations relative to their conspecifics despite foraging at a lower trophic level. The concurrent use of stable isotope and mercury data allowed us to document penguin populations at the greatest risk of exposure to harmful concentrations of mercury as a result of foraging at a high trophic level or in geographic 'hot spots' of mercury availability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A Multi-scale Computational Platform to Mechanistically Assess the Effect of Genetic Variation on Drug Responses in Human Erythrocyte Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Mih

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Progress in systems medicine brings promise to addressing patient heterogeneity and individualized therapies. Recently, genome-scale models of metabolism have been shown to provide insight into the mechanistic link between drug therapies and systems-level off-target effects while being expanded to explicitly include the three-dimensional structure of proteins. The integration of these molecular-level details, such as the physical, structural, and dynamical properties of proteins, notably expands the computational description of biochemical network-level properties and the possibility of understanding and predicting whole cell phenotypes. In this study, we present a multi-scale modeling framework that describes biological processes which range in scale from atomistic details to an entire metabolic network. Using this approach, we can understand how genetic variation, which impacts the structure and reactivity of a protein, influences both native and drug-induced metabolic states. As a proof-of-concept, we study three enzymes (catechol-O-methyltransferase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and their respective genetic variants which have clinically relevant associations. Using all-atom molecular dynamic simulations enables the sampling of long timescale conformational dynamics of the proteins (and their mutant variants in complex with their respective native metabolites or drug molecules. We find that changes in a protein's structure due to a mutation influences protein binding affinity to metabolites and/or drug molecules, and inflicts large-scale changes in metabolism.

  17. Growing Season Stem Water Status Assessment of Qinghai Spruce through the Sap Flow and Stem Radial Variations in the Qilian Mountains of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanyan Tian

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Global climate change is likely to change precipitation patterns with consequences for tree water use and growth in semi-arid areas. However, little is known about the effects of variability in precipitation on growth- and water-related physiological processes of native trees in dry areas of northwestern China. In this study, sap flow and stem radial variability in four Qinghai spruce trees (Picea crassifolia were monitored in the Qilian Mountains, China. Tree water deficit (ΔW and basal area increment (BAI were calculated using stem radial variation; water-use efficiency (WUE was then estimated as the ratio of BAI and sap flow (Jt. The results showed that sap flow density (Js increased logarithmically with increasing ΔW when ΔW < 50 μm, and then gradually stabilized. Multiple factor generalized additive models (GAM showed that Js was closely related to all measured environmental variables except for daily mean temperature and relative air humidity. ΔW was related to the minimum daily temperature and soil water content. WUE exhibited higher values in early July. Low WUE was observed under conditions of prolonged dry weather, but it quickly increased during rainy days. WUE decreased after precipitation events due to high transpiration. We concluded that, in these semi-arid areas, precipitation is the most important controlling factor in tree growth and transpiration.

  18. A holistic high-throughput screening framework for biofuel feedstock assessment that characterises variations in soluble sugars and cell wall composition in Sorghum bicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Antony P; Palmer, William M; Byrt, Caitlin S; Furbank, Robert T; Grof, Christopher Pl

    2013-12-23

    A major hindrance to the development of high yielding biofuel feedstocks is the ability to rapidly assess large populations for fermentable sugar yields. Whilst recent advances have outlined methods for the rapid assessment of biomass saccharification efficiency, none take into account the total biomass, or the soluble sugar fraction of the plant. Here we present a holistic high-throughput methodology for assessing sweet Sorghum bicolor feedstocks at 10 days post-anthesis for total fermentable sugar yields including stalk biomass, soluble sugar concentrations, and cell wall saccharification efficiency. A mathematical method for assessing whole S. bicolor stalks using the fourth internode from the base of the plant proved to be an effective high-throughput strategy for assessing stalk biomass, soluble sugar concentrations, and cell wall composition and allowed calculation of total stalk fermentable sugars. A high-throughput method for measuring soluble sucrose, glucose, and fructose using partial least squares (PLS) modelling of juice Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra was developed. The PLS prediction was shown to be highly accurate with each sugar attaining a coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.99 with a root mean squared error of prediction (RMSEP) of 11.93, 5.52, and 3.23 mM for sucrose, glucose, and fructose, respectively, which constitutes an error of <4% in each case. The sugar PLS model correlated well with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and brix measures. Similarly, a high-throughput method for predicting enzymatic cell wall digestibility using PLS modelling of FTIR spectra obtained from S. bicolor bagasse was developed. The PLS prediction was shown to be accurate with an R2 of 0.94 and RMSEP of 0.64 μg.mgDW-1.h-1. This methodology has been demonstrated as an efficient and effective way to screen large biofuel feedstock populations for biomass, soluble sugar concentrations, and cell wall digestibility simultaneously allowing a

  19. Comparing variation across European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lau C; Baixauli-Pérez, Cristobal; Librero-López, Julián

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In geographical studies, population distribution is a key issue. An unequal distribution across units of analysis might entail extra-variation and produce misleading conclusions on healthcare performance variations. This article aims at assessing the impact of building more homogeneous...... units of analysis in the estimation of systematic variation in three countries. METHODS: Hospital discharges for six conditions (congestive heart failure, short-term complications of diabetes, hip fracture, knee replacement, prostatectomy in prostate cancer and percutaneous coronary intervention...... inhabitants vs. 7% in Denmark and 5% in England. Point estimates for Extremal Quotient and Interquartile Interval Ratio were lower in the three countries, particularly in less prevalent conditions. In turn, the Systematic Component of Variation and Empirical Bayes statistic were slightly lower in more...

  20. Using ecological momentary assessment to investigate short-term variations in sexual functioning in a sample of peri-menopausal women from Iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir H Pakpour

    Full Text Available The investigation of short-term changes in female sexual functioning has received little attention so far. The aims of the study were to gain empirical knowledge on within-subject and within- and across-variable fluctuations in women's sexual functioning over time. More specifically, to investigate the stability of women´s self-reported sexual functioning and the moderating effects of contextual and interpersonal factors. A convenience sample of 206 women, recruited across eight Health care Clinics in Rasht, Iran. Ecological momentary assessment was used to examine fluctuations of sexual functioning over a six week period. A shortened version of the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI was applied to assess sexual functioning. Self-constructed questions were included to assess relationship satisfaction, partner's sexual performance and stress levels. Mixed linear two-level model analyses revealed a link between orgasm and relationship satisfaction (Beta = 0.125, P = 0.074 with this link varying significantly between women. Analyses further revealed a significant negative association between stress and all six domains of women's sexual functioning. Women not only reported differing levels of stress over the course of the assessment period, but further differed from each other in how much stress they experienced and how much this influenced their sexual response. Orgasm and sexual satisfaction were both significantly associated with all other domains of sexual function (P<0.001. And finally, a link between partner performance and all domains of women`s sexual functioning (P<0.001 could be detected. Except for lubrication (P = 0.717, relationship satisfaction had a significant effect on all domains of the sexual response (P<0.001. Overall, our findings support the new group of criteria introduced in the DSM-5, called "associated features" such as partner factors and relationship factors. Consideration of these criteria is important and necessary for

  1. Using Ecological Momentary Assessment to Investigate Short-Term Variations in Sexual Functioning in a Sample of Peri-Menopausal Women from Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakpour, Amir H.; Yekaninejad, Mir Saeed; Pallich, Gianandrea; Burri, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of short-term changes in female sexual functioning has received little attention so far. The aims of the study were to gain empirical knowledge on within-subject and within- and across-variable fluctuations in women’s sexual functioning over time. More specifically, to investigate the stability of women´s self-reported sexual functioning and the moderating effects of contextual and interpersonal factors. A convenience sample of 206 women, recruited across eight Health care Clinics in Rasht, Iran. Ecological momentary assessment was used to examine fluctuations of sexual functioning over a six week period. A shortened version of the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) was applied to assess sexual functioning. Self-constructed questions were included to assess relationship satisfaction, partner’s sexual performance and stress levels. Mixed linear two-level model analyses revealed a link between orgasm and relationship satisfaction (Beta = 0.125, P = 0.074) with this link varying significantly between women. Analyses further revealed a significant negative association between stress and all six domains of women’s sexual functioning. Women not only reported differing levels of stress over the course of the assessment period, but further differed from each other in how much stress they experienced and how much this influenced their sexual response. Orgasm and sexual satisfaction were both significantly associated with all other domains of sexual function (Pwomen`s sexual functioning (P<0.001) could be detected. Except for lubrication (P = 0.717), relationship satisfaction had a significant effect on all domains of the sexual response (P<0.001). Overall, our findings support the new group of criteria introduced in the DSM-5, called “associated features” such as partner factors and relationship factors. Consideration of these criteria is important and necessary for clinicians when diagnosing FSD. PMID:25692787

  2. Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.F. Cortés-Rojas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Spray drying has been successfully employed for the encapsulation of herbal bioactive compounds resulting in stable phytopharmaceutical preparations. Bidens pilosa L. is a South American medicinal plant with proved antimalaric, hepatoprotector and antioxidant activities, generally linked to their secondary metabolites, flavonoids and polyacetylenes. In this work the physicochemical stability of an optimized spray dried composition from a B. pilosa extract was evaluated at three different stress storage conditions in open containers and in sealed sachets. High performance liquid chromatography was employed to monitor the concentration of three marker compounds over 12 months. Color variation of the stored samples was evaluated by using a color spectrophotometer. It was observed that the concentration of the monitored compounds of the plant decreases more drastically in samples stored in open containers. The two flavonoids monitored, rutin and hyperoside, showed lower degradation than the polyacetylene. The concentration of the markers did not change significantly at the lowest temperature. With regard to color, darker hues were observed at higher temperatures and storage times. This study showed that the storage conditions cause significant impact on stability of standardized spray dried B. pilosa extract.

  3. T1 mapping of the myocardium: intra-individual assessment of the effect of field strength, cardiac cycle and variation by myocardial region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawel, Nadine; Nacif, Marcelo; Zavodni, Anna; Jones, Jacquin; Liu, Songtao; Sibley, Christopher T; Bluemke, David A

    2012-05-01

    Myocardial T1 relaxation time (T1 time) and extracellular volume fraction (ECV) are altered in the presence of myocardial fibrosis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate acquisition factors that may result in variation of measured T1 time and ECV including magnetic field strength, cardiac phase and myocardial region. 31 study subjects were enrolled and underwent one cardiovascular MR exam at 1.5 T and two exams at 3 T, each on separate days. A Modified Look-Locker Inversion Recovery (MOLLI) sequence was acquired before and 5, 10, 12, 20, 25 and 30 min after administration of 0.15 mmol/kg gadopentetate dimeglumine (Gd-DTPA; Magnevist) at 1.5 T (exam 1). For exam 2, MOLLI sequences were acquired at 3 T both during diastole and systole, before and after administration of Gd-DTPA (0.15 mmol/kg Magnevist).Exam 3 was identical to exam 2 except gadobenate dimeglumine was administered (Gd-BOPTA; 0.1 mmol/kg Multihance). T1 times were measured in myocardium and blood. ECV was calculated by (ΔR1myocardium/ΔR1blood)*(1-hematocrit). Before gadolinium, T1 times of myocardium and blood were significantly greater at 3 T versus 1.5 T (28% and 31% greater, respectively, p Myocardial T1 time was 1% shorter at systole compared to diastole pre-contrast and 2% shorter at diastole compared to systole post-contrast (p myocardial regions, T1 measurements should be obtained at the same cardiac phase and myocardial region in order to obtain consistent results.

  4. Assessing Seasonal and Inter-Annual Variations of Lake Surface Areas in Mongolia during 2000-2011 Using Minimum Composite MODIS NDVI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sinkyu; Hong, Suk Young

    2016-01-01

    A minimum composite method was applied to produce a 15-day interval normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) dataset from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) daily 250 m reflectance in the red and near-infrared bands. This dataset was applied to determine lake surface areas in Mongolia. A total of 73 lakes greater than 6.25 km2in area were selected, and 28 of these lakes were used to evaluate detection errors. The minimum composite NDVI showed a better detection performance on lake water pixels than did the official MODIS 16-day 250 m NDVI based on a maximum composite method. The overall lake area detection performance based on the 15-day minimum composite NDVI showed -2.5% error relative to the Landsat-derived lake area for the 28 evaluated lakes. The errors increased with increases in the perimeter-to-area ratio but decreased with lake size over 10 km(2). The lake area decreased by -9.3% at an annual rate of -53.7 km(2) yr(-1) during 2000 to 2011 for the 73 lakes. However, considerable spatial variations, such as slight-to-moderate lake area reductions in semi-arid regions and rapid lake area reductions in arid regions, were also detected. This study demonstrated applicability of MODIS 250 m reflectance data for biweekly monitoring of lake area change and diagnosed considerable lake area reduction and its spatial variability in arid and semi-arid regions of Mongolia. Future studies are required for explaining reasons of lake area changes and their spatial variability.

  5. Quantitative assessment of atmospheric emissions of toxic heavy metals from anthropogenic sources in China: historical trend, spatial variation distribution, uncertainties and control policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, H. Z.; Zhu, C. Y.; Gao, J. J.; Cheng, K.; Hao, J. M.; Wang, K.; Hua, S. B.; Wang, Y.; Zhou, J. R.

    2015-04-01

    Anthropogenic atmospheric emissions of typical toxic heavy metals have received worldwide concerns due to their adverse effects on human health and the ecosystem. By determining the best available representation of time-varying emission factors with S-shape curves, we established the multiyear comprehensive atmospheric emission inventories of 12 typical toxic heavy metals (Hg, As, Se, Pb, Cd, Cr, Ni, Sb, Mn, Co, Cu and Zn) from primary anthropogenic activities in China for the period of 1949-2012 for the first time. Further, we allocated the annual emissions of these heavy metals in 2010 at a high spatial resolution of 0.5° × 0.5° grid with ArcGIS methodology and surrogate indexes, such as regional population and gross domestic product (GDP). Our results show that the historical emissions of Hg, As, Se, Cd, Cr, Ni, Sb, Mn, Co, Cu and Zn during the period of 1949-2012, have been increased by about 22-128 times at an annual average growth rate of 5.1-8.0%, amounting to about 79 570 t in 2012. Nonferrous metal smelting, coal combustion of industrial boilers, brake and tyre wear, and ferrous metals smelting represent the dominant sources for Hg / Cd, As / Se / Pb / Cr / Ni / Mn / Co, Sb / Cu, and Zn, respectively. In terms of spatial variation, the majority of emissions were concentrated in relatively developed regions, especially for the northern, eastern and southern coastal regions. In addition, because of the flourishing nonferrous metals smelting industry, several southwestern and central-southern provinces play a prominent role in some specific toxic heavy metals emissions, like Hg in Guizhou and As in Yunnan. Finally, integrated countermeasures are proposed to minimize the final toxic heavy metals discharge on accounting of the current and future demand of energy-saving and pollution reduction in China.

  6. Carbon and nitrogen elemental and isotopic ratios of filter-feeding bivalves along the French coasts: An assessment of specific, geographic, seasonal and multi-decadal variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briant, Nicolas; Savoye, Nicolas; Chouvelon, Tiphaine; David, Valérie; Rodriguez, Samuel; Charlier, Karine; Sonke, Jeroen E; Chiffoleau, Jean François; Brach-Papa, Christophe; Knoery, Joël

    2018-02-01

    Primary consumers play a key role in coastal ecosystems by transferring organic matter from primary producers to predators. Among them, suspension-feeders, like bivalve molluscs are widely used in trophic web studies. The main goal of this study was to investigate variations of C and N elemental and isotopic ratios in common bivalves (M. edulis, M. galloprovincialis, and C. gigas) at large spatial (i.e. among three coastal regions) and different temporal (i.e. from seasonal to multi-decadal) scales in France, in order to identify potential general or specific patterns and speculate on their drivers. The observed spatial variability was related to the trophic status of the coastal regions (oligotrophic Mediterranean Sea versus meso- to eutrophic English Channel and Atlantic ocean), but not to ecosystem typology (estuaries, versus lagoons versus bays versus littoral systems). Furthermore, it highlighted local specificities in terms of the origin of the POM assimilated by bivalves (e.g., mainly continental POM vs. marine phytoplankton vs. microphytobenthic algae). Likewise, seasonal variability was related both to the reproduction cycle for C/N ratios of Mytilus spp. and to changes in trophic resources for δ(13)C of species located close to river mouth. Multi-decadal evolution exhibited shifts and trends for part of the 30-year series with decreases in δ(13)C and δ(15)N. Specifically, shifts appeared in the early 2000's, likely linking bivalve isotopic ratios to a cascade of processes affected by local drivers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Assessing Seasonal and Inter-Annual Variations of Lake Surface Areas in Mongolia during 2000-2011 Using Minimum Composite MODIS NDVI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinkyu Kang

    Full Text Available A minimum composite method was applied to produce a 15-day interval normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI dataset from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS daily 250 m reflectance in the red and near-infrared bands. This dataset was applied to determine lake surface areas in Mongolia. A total of 73 lakes greater than 6.25 km2in area were selected, and 28 of these lakes were used to evaluate detection errors. The minimum composite NDVI showed a better detection performance on lake water pixels than did the official MODIS 16-day 250 m NDVI based on a maximum composite method. The overall lake area detection performance based on the 15-day minimum composite NDVI showed -2.5% error relative to the Landsat-derived lake area for the 28 evaluated lakes. The errors increased with increases in the perimeter-to-area ratio but decreased with lake size over 10 km(2. The lake area decreased by -9.3% at an annual rate of -53.7 km(2 yr(-1 during 2000 to 2011 for the 73 lakes. However, considerable spatial variations, such as slight-to-moderate lake area reductions in semi-arid regions and rapid lake area reductions in arid regions, were also detected. This study demonstrated applicability of MODIS 250 m reflectance data for biweekly monitoring of lake area change and diagnosed considerable lake area reduction and its spatial variability in arid and semi-arid regions of Mongolia. Future studies are required for explaining reasons of lake area changes and their spatial variability.

  8. Assessing the Relevance of Anomie Theory for Explaining Spatial Variation in Lethal Criminal Violence: An Aggregate-Level Analysis of Homicide within the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric P. Baumer

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the most influential statements in the anomie theory tradition has been Merton’s argument that the volume of instrumental property crime should be higher where there is a greater imbalance between the degree of commitment to monetary success goals and the degree of commitment to legitimate means of pursuing such goals. Contemporary anomie theories stimulated by Merton’s perspective, most notably Messner and Rosenfeld’s institutional anomie theory, have expanded the scope conditions by emphasizing lethal criminal violence as an outcome to which anomie theory is highly relevant, and virtually all contemporary empirical studies have focused on applying the perspective to explaining spatial variation in homicide rates. In the present paper, we argue that current explications of Merton’s theory and IAT have not adequately conveyed the relevance of the core features of the anomie perspective to lethal violence. We propose an expanded anomie model in which an unbalanced pecuniary value system – the core causal variable in Merton’s theory and IAT – translates into higher levels of homicide primarily in indirect ways by increasing levels of firearm prevalence, drug market activity, and property crime, and by enhancing the degree to which these factors stimulate lethal outcomes. Using aggregate-level data collected during the mid-to-late 1970s for a sample of relatively large social aggregates within the U.S., we find a significant effect on homicide rates of an interaction term reflecting high levels of commitment to monetary success goals and low levels of commitment to legitimate means. Virtually all of this effect is accounted for by higher levels of property crime and drug market activity that occur in areas with an unbalanced pecuniary value system. Our analysis also reveals that property crime is more apt to lead to homicide under conditions of high levels of structural disadvantage. These and other findings underscore the

  9. The circadian variation of premature atrial contractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bjørn Strøier; Kumarathurai, Preman; Nielsen, Olav W

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: The aim of the study was to assess a possible circadian variation of premature atrial contractions (PACs) in a community-based population and to determine if the daily variation could be used to assess a more vulnerable period of PACs in predicting later incidence of atrial fibrillation (AF...... variation in heart rate. After adjusting for relevant risk factors, the risk of AF was equal in all time intervals throughout the day. CONCLUSION: Premature atrial contractions showed a circadian variation in subjects with frequent PACs. No specific time interval of the day was more predictive of AF than...

  10. Comparative assessment of genetic and epigenetic variation among regenerants of potato (Solanum tuberosum) derived from long-term nodal tissue-culture and cell selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dann, Alison L; Wilson, Calum R

    2011-04-01

    Three long-term nodal tissued cultured Russet Burbank potato clones and nine thaxtomin A-treated regenerant lines, derived from the nodal lines, were assessed for genetic and epigenetic (in the form of DNA methylation) differences by AFLP and MSAP. The treated regenerant lines were originally selected for superior resistance to common scab disease and acceptable tuber yield in pot and field trials. The long-term, tissue culture clone lines exhibited genetic (8.75-15.63% polymorphisms) and epigenetic (12.56-26.13% polymorphisms) differences between them and may represent a stress response induced by normal plant growth disruption. The thaxtomin A-treated regenerant lines exhibited much higher significant (p disease resistance. However, linking phenotypic differences that could be of benefit to potato growers, to single gene sequence polymorphisms in a tetraploid plant such as the potato would be extremely difficult since it is assumed many desirable traits are under polygenic control.

  11. Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.S. Mohamed

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion, salinity and sodicity hazards are serious problems in the northern west coast of Egypt and lead to reducing the soil quality and increasing the degradation of soil resources. Sidi Barrani and Al-Sallum regions are selected as study areas which are located from a longitude of 25°10′00″ to 26°55′00″East and from a latitude of 31°00′0″ to 31°37′30″ North. Erosion hazard was estimated using the ‘Universal Soil Loss Equation’ (USLE, which is a simple empirical model that is widely used for assessing long-term annual soil loss .The salinity and sodicity hazards were estimated based on FAO method as standard reference. The resultant map of annual soil erosion shows a maximum soil loss of 60 t h−1 y−1 with a close relation to foot slopes and wide units on the steep side-slopes (with high LS value and the erodibility value reached to 0.1 t h−1 y−1. Meanwhile sand beaches and sabkha units are characterized by high environmental hazards of both water erosion, salinity and sodicity, while in the overflow basin units are identified as low environmental hazards. The spatial environmental hazards assessment is conducted by using integrated GIS and RS which can serve as effective inputs in deriving strategies for sustainable land use planning and management.

  12. Variations in the ability of general medical practitioners to apply two methods of clinical audit: A five-year study of assessment by peer review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, John; Bowie, Paul; Lough, Murray

    2006-12-01

    Clinical audit has a central role in the NHS clinical governance agenda and the professional appraisal of medical practitioners in the UK. However, concerns have been raised about the poor design and impact of clinical audit studies and the ability of practitioners to apply audit methods. One method of making informed judgements on audit performance is by peer review. In the west of Scotland a voluntary peer review model has been open to general practitioners since 1999, while general practice trainees are compelled to participate as part of summative assessment. The study aimed to compare the outcomes of peer review for two methods of audit undertaken by different professional and academic groups of doctors. Participants submitted a criterion audit or significant event analysis in standard formats for review by two informed general practitioners (GPs) using appropriate instruments. Peer review outcome data and the professional status of doctors participating were generated by computer search. Differences in proportions of those gaining a satisfactory peer review for each group were calculated. Of 1002 criterion audit submissions, 552 (55%) were judged to be satisfactory. GP registrars were significantly more likely than GP trainers (P groups (P peer review. GPs in non-training practices were less likely to achieve a satisfactory review than registrars (P groups gaining a similar proportion of satisfactory assessments, although GP registrars may have outperformed non-training practice GPs (P = 0.05). A significant proportion of GPs may be unable to adequately apply audit methods, potentially raising serious questions about the effectiveness of clinical audit as a health care improvement policy in general medical practice.

  13. Towards a Remote Sensing Based Assessment of Land Susceptibility to Degradation: Examining Seasonal Variation in Land Use-Land Cover for Modelling Land Degradation in a Semi-Arid Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashame, Gofamodimo; Akinyemi, Felicia

    2016-06-01

    Land degradation (LD) is among the major environmental and anthropogenic problems driven by land use-land cover (LULC) and climate change worldwide. For example, poor LULC practises such as deforestation, livestock overstocking, overgrazing and arable land use intensification on steep slopes disturbs the soil structure leaving the land susceptible to water erosion, a type of physical land degradation. Land degradation related problems exist in Sub-Saharan African countries such as Botswana which is semi-arid in nature. LULC and LD linkage information is still missing in many semi-arid regions worldwide.Mapping seasonal LULC is therefore very important in understanding LULC and LD linkages. This study assesses the impact of seasonal LULC variation on LD utilizing Remote Sensing (RS) techniques for Palapye region in Central District, Botswana. LULC classes for the dry and rainy seasons were classified using LANDSAT 8 images at Level I according to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) International Organization of Standardization (ISO) code 19144. Level I consists of 10 LULC classes. The seasonal variations in LULC are further related to LD susceptibility in the semi-arid context. The results suggest that about 985 km² (22%) of the study area is susceptible to LD by water, major LULC types affected include: cropland, paved/rocky material, bare land, built-up area, mining area, and water body. Land degradation by water susceptibility due to seasonal land use-land cover variations is highest in the east of the study area where there is high cropland to bare land conversion.

  14. TOWARDS A REMOTE SENSING BASED ASSESSMENT OF LAND SUSCEPTIBILITY TO DEGRADATION: EXAMINING SEASONAL VARIATION IN LAND USE-LAND COVER FOR MODELLING LAND DEGRADATION IN A SEMI-ARID CONTEXT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Mashame

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Land degradation (LD is among the major environmental and anthropogenic problems driven by land use-land cover (LULC and climate change worldwide. For example, poor LULC practises such as deforestation, livestock overstocking, overgrazing and arable land use intensification on steep slopes disturbs the soil structure leaving the land susceptible to water erosion, a type of physical land degradation. Land degradation related problems exist in Sub-Saharan African countries such as Botswana which is semi-arid in nature. LULC and LD linkage information is still missing in many semi-arid regions worldwide.Mapping seasonal LULC is therefore very important in understanding LULC and LD linkages. This study assesses the impact of seasonal LULC variation on LD utilizing Remote Sensing (RS techniques for Palapye region in Central District, Botswana. LULC classes for the dry and rainy seasons were classified using LANDSAT 8 images at Level I according to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO International Organization of Standardization (ISO code 19144. Level I consists of 10 LULC classes. The seasonal variations in LULC are further related to LD susceptibility in the semi-arid context. The results suggest that about 985 km² (22% of the study area is susceptible to LD by water, major LULC types affected include: cropland, paved/rocky material, bare land, built-up area, mining area, and water body. Land degradation by water susceptibility due to seasonal land use-land cover variations is highest in the east of the study area where there is high cropland to bare land conversion.

  15. Process-Based Modeling to Assess the Effects of Recent Climatic Variation on Site Productivity and Forest Function across Western North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard H. Waring

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A process-based forest growth model, 3-PG (Physiological Principles Predicting Growth, parameterized with values of soil properties constrained by satellite-derived estimates of maximum leaf area index (LAImax, was run for Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii to contrast the extent to which site growth potential might vary across western North America between a cool, wet period (1950–1975 and a more recent, generally warmer and drier one (2000–2009. LAImax represents a surrogate for overall site growth potential, as demonstrated from a strong correlation between the two variables, with the latter based on the culmination of mean annual increment estimates made at 3356 ground-based U.S. Forest Service survey plots across the states of Oregon and Washington. Results indicate that since 2000, predicted LAImax has decreased more than 20% in portions of the Southwest USA and for much of the forested area in western Alberta. Similar percentage increases in LAImax were predicted for parts of British Columbia, Idaho and Montana. The modeling analysis included an assessment of changes in seasonal constraints on gross primary production (GPP. A general reduction in limitations caused by spring frost occurred across the entire study area. This has led to a longer growing season, along with notable increases in summer evaporative demand and soil drought for much of the study area away from the maritime influence of the Pacific Ocean.

  16. Epstein-Barr virus DNAemia in Iranian liver transplant recipients and assessment of its variation in posttransplant lymphproliferative disorder patients by quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamalidoust, Marzieh; Geramizadeh, Bita; Pouladfar, Gholamreza; Namayandeh, Mandana; Asaie, Sadaf; Aliabadi, Nasrin; Nikeghbalian, Saman; Ziyaeyan, Mazyar

    2015-04-01

    Epstein-Barr virus primary infection and/or reactivation may play a major role in the incidence of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder in organ recipients. We assessed Epstein-Barr virus viral load in liver transplant patients suspected of having Epstein-Barr virus/ posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder at specified times after transplant and evaluated the clinical findings and posttransplant complications. In the 696 patients who underwent liver transplant in this retrospective study, Epstein-Barr virus viral load was examined intermittently in 127 liver transplant recipients who were suspected to have Epstein-Barr virus infection/disease. Sampling was performed during 4 years from July 2009 to May 2013 using real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. Clinical and pathologic data were gathered by reviewing medical records. There were 78 of the 127 suspected patients (61%) who exhibited Epstein-Barr virus DNAemia and 19 patients had posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder. The median EBV viral load of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder patients was significantly higher than unaffected patients. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder was diagnosed clinically in 34 subjects (4.9%). Estimated mortality rate of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder patients was 35% during 1.5-year follow-up after transplant. Monitoring Epstein-Barr virus load may enable detection of Epstein-Barr virus infection/disease in liver transplant patients suspected of having the virus, even several weeks before the onset of any clinical manifestations, especially in pediatric patients who have high incidence and mortality from posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder.

  17. Comprehensive Quality Assessment Based Specific Chemical Profiles for Geographic and Tissue Variation in Gentiana rigescens Using HPLC and FTIR Method Combined with Principal Component Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Roots, stems, leaves, and flowers of Longdan (Gentiana rigescens Franch. ex Hemsl were collected from six geographic origins of Yunnan Province (n = 240 to implement the quality assessment based on contents of gentiopicroside, loganic acid, sweroside and swertiamarin and chemical profile using HPLC-DAD and FTIR method combined with principal component analysis (PCA. The content of gentiopicroside (major iridoid glycoside was the highest in G. rigescens, regardless of tissue and geographic origin. The level of swertiamarin was the lowest, even unable to be detected in samples from Kunming and Qujing. Significant correlations (p < 0.05 between gentiopicroside, loganic acid, sweroside, and swertiamarin were found at inter- or intra-tissues, which were highly depended on geographic origins, indicating the influence of environmental conditions on the conversion and transport of secondary metabolites in G. rigescens. Furthermore, samples were reasonably classified as three clusters along large producing areas where have similar climate conditions, characterized by carbohydrates, phenols, benzoates, terpenoids, aliphatic alcohols, aromatic hydrocarbons, and so forth. The present work provided global information on the chemical profile and contents of major iridoid glycosides in G. rigescens originated from six different origins, which is helpful for controlling quality of herbal medicines systematically.

  18. Aflatoxin M1 in processed milk: Occurrence and seasonal variation with an emphasis on risk assessment of human exposure in Serbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milićević, D.; Spirić, D.; Janković, S.; Velebit, B.; Radičević, T.; Petrović, Z.; Stefanović, S.

    2017-09-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess aflatoxin M1 (AFM1) contamination in processed milk and dairy products, and to estimate the mean daily exposure of the adult Serbian population to AFM1 due to milk consumption. A total of 1734 samples, comprising heat treated cow’s milk (n=1233), infant formulae (n=349), milk powder (n=94) and dairy drink (n=58), were analyzed for AFM1 presence using an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) commercial kit. Samples were collected from different regions of Serbia during four seasons each year during 2015 and 2016. The incidences of AFM1 contamination were 77.8% with a mean level of 0.027±0.03 μg/L (range of <0.005-0.278 μg/L) in samples collected in 2015, and 98.4% with a mean level of 0.039±0.02 μg/L (range of <0.005-0.28 μg/L) in samples collected in 2016. The highest AFM1 levels were measured in October 2015 (0.278 μg/L) and September 2016 (0.279 μg/L). Based on EU regulation, 214 (17.3%) milk samples exceeded the maximum residue limit (0.05 μg/L). The estimated daily intake (EDI) of AFM1 during different seasons of year for males and females was in the range of 0.022-0.330 (mean 0.20) ng/kg/bw/day and 0.022-0.30 (mean 0.18) ng/kg/bw/day, respectively. The calculated EDI indicate a public health concern due to the carcinogenic effects of AFM1.

  19. Adjuvant intensity-modulated proton therapy in malignant pleural mesothelioma. A comparison with intensity-modulated radiotherapy and a spot size variation assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorentini, S. [Agenzia Provinciale per la Protonterapia (ATreP), Trento (Italy); Padova Univ. (Italy). Medical Physics School; Amichetti, M.; Fellin, F.; Schwarz, M. [Agenzia Provinciale per la Protonterapia (ATreP), Trento (Italy); Spiazzi, L. [Brescia Hospital (Italy). Medical Physics Dept.; Tonoli, S.; Magrini, S.M. [Brescia Hospital (Italy). Radiation Oncology Dept.

    2012-03-15

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the state-of-the-art treatment for patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). The goal of this work was to assess whether intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) could further improve the dosimetric results allowed by IMRT. We re-planned 7 MPM cases using both photons and protons, by carrying out IMRT and IMPT plans. For both techniques, conventional dose comparisons and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) analysis were performed. In 3 cases, additional IMPT plans were generated with different beam dimensions. IMPT allowed a slight improvement in target coverage and clear advantages in dose conformity (p < 0.001) and dose homogeneity (p = 0.01). Better organ at risk (OAR) sparing was obtained with IMPT, in particular for the liver (D{sub mean} reduction of 9.5 Gy, p = 0.001) and ipsilateral kidney (V{sub 20} reduction of 58%, p = 0.001), together with a very large reduction of mean dose for the contralateral lung (0.2 Gy vs 6.1 Gy, p = 0.0001). NTCP values for the liver showed a systematic superiority of IMPT with respect to IMRT for both the esophagus (average NTCP 14% vs. 30.5%) and the ipsilateral kidney (p = 0.001). Concerning plans obtained with different spot dimensions, a slight loss of target coverage was observed along with sigma increase, while maintaining OAR irradiation always under planning constraints. Results suggest that IMPT allows better OAR sparing with respect to IMRT, mainly for the liver, ipsilateral kidney, and contralateral lung. The use of a spot dimension larger than 3 x 3 mm (up to 9 x 9 mm) does not compromise dosimetric results and allows a shorter delivery time.

  20. Environmental variation partitioned into separate heritable components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsted, Michael; Rohde, Palle Duun; Hoffmann, Ary A

    2018-01-01

    : plasticity across environments, variability in plasticity, variation within environments, and differences in within-environment variation across environments. We assessed these components for cold tolerance across five rearing temperatures using the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP...... functionally validated the effects of a subset of candidate genes affecting each of the four components of environmental variation and also confirmed the genetic and phenotypic correlations obtained from the DGRP in distinct genetic backgrounds. We delineate selection targets associated with environmental...

  1. Education-related differences in physical performance after age 60: a cross-sectional study assessing variation by age, gender and occupation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welmer, Anna-Karin; Kåreholt, Ingemar; Rydwik, Elisabeth; Angleman, Sara; Wang, Hui-Xin

    2013-07-10

    Having a low level of education has been associated with worse physical performance. However, it is unclear whether this association varies by age, gender or the occupational categories of manual and non-manual work. This study examined whether there are education-related differences across four dimensions of physical performance by age, gender or occupational class and to what extent chronic diseases and lifestyle-related factors may explain such differences. Participants were a random sample of 3212 people, 60 years and older, both living in their own homes and in institutions, from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care, in Kungsholmen, Stockholm. Trained nurses assessed physical performance in grip strength, walking speed, balance and chair stands, and gathered data on education, occupation and lifestyle-related factors, such as physical exercise, body mass index, smoking and alcohol consumption. Diagnoses of chronic diseases were made by the examining physician. Censored normal regression analyses showed that persons with university education had better grip strength, balance, chair stand time and walking speed than people with elementary school education. The differences in balance and walking speed remained statistically significant (p < 0.05) after adjustment for chronic diseases and lifestyle. However, age-stratified analyses revealed that the differences were no longer statistically significant in advanced age (80+ years). Gender-stratified analyses revealed that women with university education had significantly better grip strength, balance and walking speed compared to women with elementary school education and men with university education had significantly better chair stands and walking speed compared to men with elementary school education in multivariate adjusted models. Further analyses stratified by gender and occupational class suggested that the education-related difference in grip strength was only evident among female manual workers

  2. Seasonal variation in outdoor, indoor, and personal air pollution exposures of women using wood stoves in the Tibetan Plateau: Baseline assessment for an energy intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Kun; Carter, Ellison; Schauer, James J; Ezzati, Majid; Zhang, Yuanxun; Niu, Hongjiang; Lai, Alexandra M; Shan, Ming; Wang, Yuqin; Yang, Xudong; Baumgartner, Jill

    2016-09-01

    Cooking and heating with coal and biomass is the main source of household air pollution in China and a leading contributor to disease burden. As part of a baseline assessment for a household energy intervention program, we enrolled 205 adult women cooking with biomass fuels in Sichuan, China and measured their 48-h personal exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and carbon monoxide (CO) in winter and summer. We also measured the indoor 48-h PM2.5 concentrations in their homes and conducted outdoor PM2.5 measurements during 101 (74) days in summer (winter). Indoor concentrations of CO and nitrogen oxides (NO, NO2) were measured over 48-h in a subset of ~80 homes. Women's geometric mean 48-h exposure to PM2.5 was 80μg/m(3) (95% CI: 74, 87) in summer and twice as high in winter (169μg/m(3) (95% CI: 150, 190), with similar seasonal trends for indoor PM2.5 concentrations (winter: 252μg/m(3); 95% CI: 215, 295; summer: 101μg/m(3); 95% CI: 91, 112). We found a moderately strong relationship between indoor PM2.5 and CO (r=0.60, 95% CI: 0.46, 0.72), and a weak correlation between personal PM2.5 and CO (r=0.41, 95% CI: -0.02, 0.71). NO2/NO ratios were higher in summer (range: 0.01 to 0.68) than in winter (range: 0 to 0.11), suggesting outdoor formation of NO2 via reaction of NO with ozone is a more important source of NO2 than biomass combustion indoors. The predictors of women's personal exposure to PM2.5 differed by season. In winter, our results show that primary heating with a low-polluting fuel (i.e., electric stove or wood-charcoal) and more frequent kitchen ventilation could reduce personal PM2.5 exposures. In summer, primary use of a gaseous fuel or electricity for cooking and reducing exposure to outdoor PM2.5 would likely have the greatest impacts on personal PM2.5 exposure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Is there much variation in variation? Revisiting statistics of small area variation in health services research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibáñez Berta

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The importance of Small Area Variation Analysis for policy-making contrasts with the scarcity of work on the validity of the statistics used in these studies. Our study aims at 1 determining whether variation in utilization rates between health areas is higher than would be expected by chance, 2 estimating the statistical power of the variation statistics; and 3 evaluating the ability of different statistics to compare the variability among different procedures regardless of their rates. Methods Parametric bootstrap techniques were used to derive the empirical distribution for each statistic under the hypothesis of homogeneity across areas. Non-parametric procedures were used to analyze the empirical distribution for the observed statistics and compare the results in six situations (low/medium/high utilization rates and low/high variability. A small scale simulation study was conducted to assess the capacity of each statistic to discriminate between different scenarios with different degrees of variation. Results Bootstrap techniques proved to be good at quantifying the difference between the null hypothesis and the variation observed in each situation, and to construct reliable tests and confidence intervals for each of the variation statistics analyzed. Although the good performance of Systematic Component of Variation (SCV, Empirical Bayes (EB statistic shows better behaviour under the null hypothesis, it is able to detect variability if present, it is not influenced by the procedure rate and it is best able to discriminate between different degrees of heterogeneity. Conclusion The EB statistics seems to be a good alternative to more conventional statistics used in small-area variation analysis in health service research because of its robustness.

  4. Phenotypic variation among five provenances of Pterocarpus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phenotypic variation among five provenances of Pterocarpus angolensis in Zimbabwe and Zambia. E Chisha-Kasumu, S Woodward, A Price. Abstract. The feasibility of utilising morphological markers for determining existing provenance variation in the African savanna tree Pterocarpus angolensis was assessed.

  5. Macroinvertebrate variation in endorheic depression wetlands in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aquatic macroinvertebrates are rarely used in wetland assessments due to their variation. However, in terms of biodiversity, these invertebrates form an important component of wetland fauna. Spatial and temporal variation of macroinvertebrate assemblages in endorheic depressions (locally referred to as 'pans') in ...

  6. Bilateral renal artery variation

    OpenAIRE

    Üçerler, Hülya; Üzüm, Yusuf; İkiz, Z. Aslı Aktan

    2015-01-01

    Each kidney is supplied by a single renal artery, although renal artery variations are common. Variations of the renal arteryhave become important with the increasing number of renal transplantations. Numerous studies describe variations in renalartery anatomy. Especially the left renal artery is among the most critical arterial variations, because it is the referred side forresecting the donor kidney. During routine dissection in a formalin fixed male cadaver, we have found a bilateral renal...

  7. Studying Variation in Tunes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, B.; van Kranenburg, P.

    2014-01-01

    Variation in music can be caused by different phenomena: conscious, creative manipulation of musical ideas; but also unconscious variation during music recall. It is the latter phenomenon that we wish to study: variation which occurs in oral transmission, in which a melody is taught without the help

  8. Assessment of cytological and morphological variation among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-08-15

    Aug 15, 2011 ... commonly found in gardens and widely used in floral arrangement. Because of their popularity, new varieties of these species are worth developing by the horticulture industry. Wendelbo (1977) reported the occurrence of twenty wild Iris species in Iran which is, highly debated amongst scientists due to the ...

  9. Assessment of cytological and morphological variation among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Correlation of coefficients defined between the date of the first blooming of the flowers and the date of the least blooming of the flowers, flowers surface and diameter had the positive and significant correlation. Factor analysis ... native Iris species. Key words: Iris, karyotype, Iranian native, chromosome analysis, genome.

  10. Assessment of variation between and within speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Ruth Huntley

    2003-10-01

    While few individuals would argue that vocal cues can signal a person's identity, it is difficult to specify exactly which parameter(s) provide the most salient information for speaker identification. Previous literature has suggested that speaking fundamental frequency, long-term spectra, vowel formant frequencies, and speech tempo can provide speaker-specific information. However, investigations focused on automatic speaker identification have provided less than satisfactory results. These findings could be related to how each acoustic parameter is measured or, more probably, to the idea that these acoustic parameters interact in specific ways that may be more obvious in the perceptual realm and may vary across speaking situations. To further complicate matters, individuals may speak more than one language or use multiple dialects. Little is known about the effect of code switching on voice production and identification. The purpose of this presentation is to present some of the relevant literature on voice recognition and factors related to misidentification. The role of intraspeaker variability will be discussed with a special emphasis on bilingualism and bidialectalism. Implications for voice production in augmentative and alternative communication devices will be described.

  11. Seasonal variation of heavy metals in water, sediment, and highly consumed cultured fish (Labeo rohita and Labeo bata) and potential health risk assessment in aquaculture pond of the coal city, Dhanbad (India).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Divya; Maiti, Subodh Kumar

    2018-02-20

    The extent of heavy metal pollution and their impact on the various component of urban aquaculture pond (India) were investigated on the basis of seasonal variation. The water, sediment, and fish samples (Labeo rohita and Labeo bata) were collected and analyzed to assess the metal toxicity. In the sediment, geoaccumulation index (I geo ), contamination factor (CF), pollution load index (PLI), and ecological risk index (ERI) were calculated. The estimated daily dietary intake (EDI) for As, Cd, Cr, Mn, Pb, and Zn was estimated in adult and children on the basis an average amount of fish consumed by the Indian people and its associated health hazard with was also assessed in terms of target hazard quotients (THQs). The concentration of metals in all the analyzed samples was found higher during pre-monsoon season. While, in case of fish, L. bata species has higher metal accumulation rate during both the seasons than the L. rohita because of their bottom dweller feeding habit. The order of metals in L. bata muscles is Zn > Mn > Pb > Cr > As > Cd. The I geo value for Zn (2.66 to 3.68) was found to be highest and followed by Cd (1.65 to 3.52) and Pb (1.52 to 2.55) indicating moderate to highly polluted sediment quality. The values of ERI were significantly high during pre-monsoon period and varied from 319 to 557, representing very high metal contamination. From the human health perspective, present study highlighted that the local inhabitants who rely on this valuable pond for fish consumption are exposed chronically to As and Pb pollution due to higher THQ values, especially from the intake of L. bata.

  12. Gender Perspectives in Self-Assessment of Quality of Life of the Elderly in South-Western Nigeria. Are there variations in quality of life among ageing men and women?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akanni Akinyemi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examined gender variations in self reported quality of life among randomly selectedelderly populations in selected Yoruba communities in three local government areas of Osun StateNigeria. Data was generated through cross-sectional survey of 947 elderly population aged 60 yearsand above. Two internationally tested instruments were used to assess quality of life status amongthe respondents- Activities of Daily Life (with 14 items scales (ADL and Aging Male Symptoms(AMS (with 17 items scales and adapted for both males and females. Findings showed that elderlyfemale fared better than the male counterparts on some of the measures. Also, females were morelikely than their spouse to be able to cope without any assistance. Results from males with a livingspouse showed that majority of the spouse (females were more likely to need assistance for usualdaily activities compared with the male (husband. This trend was also confirmed among femalerespondents as a fewer proportion of spouse (male can cope without any help compared withfemales. The AMS showed that male reported a better health status in the domains of sexual,psychosocial and somatic measures. The study concluded that measures of quality of life were likelyto favour elderly females than males because of many challenges and responsibilities of males. Thestudy raised the need for more in-depth studies to investigate the role of social –cultural factors ofmale dominance and patriarchal system on quality of life of the elderly from the gender lens.

  13. Genome structural variation discovery and genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkan, Can; Coe, Bradley P; Eichler, Evan E

    2011-05-01

    Comparisons of human genomes show that more base pairs are altered as a result of structural variation - including copy number variation - than as a result of point mutations. Here we review advances and challenges in the discovery and genotyping of structural variation. The recent application of massively parallel sequencing methods has complemented microarray-based methods and has led to an exponential increase in the discovery of smaller structural-variation events. Some global discovery biases remain, but the integration of experimental and computational approaches is proving fruitful for accurate characterization of the copy, content and structure of variable regions. We argue that the long-term goal should be routine, cost-effective and high quality de novo assembly of human genomes to comprehensively assess all classes of structural variation.

  14. A land use regression application into assessing spatial variation of intra-urban fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations in City of Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Henderson, Barron H; Wang, Dongfang; Yang, Xinyuan; Peng, Zhong-Ren

    2016-09-15

    Intra-urban assessment of air pollution exposure has become a priority study while international attention was attracted to PM2.5 pollution in China in recent years. Land Use Regression (LUR), which has previously been proved to be a feasible way to describe the relationship between land use and air pollution level in European and American cities, was employed in this paper to explain the correlations and spatial variations in Shanghai, China. PM2.5 and NO2 concentrations at 35-45 monitoring locations were selected as dependent variables, and a total of 44 built environmental factors were extracted as independent variables. Only five factors showed significant explanatory value for both PM2.5 and NO2 models: longitude, distance from monitors to the ocean, highway intensity, waterbody area, and industrial land area for PM2.5 model; residential area, distance to the coast, industrial area, urban district, and highway intensity for NO2 model. Respectively, both PM2.5 and NO2 showed anti-correlation with coastal proximity (an indicator of clean air dilution) and correlation with highway and industrial intensity (source indicators). NO2 also showed significant correlation with local indicators of population density (residential intensity and urban classification), while PM2.5 showed significant correlation with regional dilution (longitude as a indicator of distance from polluted neighbors and local water features). Both adjusted R squared values were strong with PM2.5 (0.88) being higher than NO2 (0.62). The LUR was then used to produce continuous concentration fields for NO2 and PM2.5 to illustrate the features and, potentially, for use by future studies. Comparison to PM2.5 studies in New York and Beijing show that Shanghai PM2.5 pollutant distribution was more sensitive to geographic location and proximity to neighboring regions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Ensembl variation resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin-Garcia Pablo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The maturing field of genomics is rapidly increasing the number of sequenced genomes and producing more information from those previously sequenced. Much of this additional information is variation data derived from sampling multiple individuals of a given species with the goal of discovering new variants and characterising the population frequencies of the variants that are already known. These data have immense value for many studies, including those designed to understand evolution and connect genotype to phenotype. Maximising the utility of the data requires that it be stored in an accessible manner that facilitates the integration of variation data with other genome resources such as gene annotation and comparative genomics. Description The Ensembl project provides comprehensive and integrated variation resources for a wide variety of chordate genomes. This paper provides a detailed description of the sources of data and the methods for creating the Ensembl variation databases. It also explores the utility of the information by explaining the range of query options available, from using interactive web displays, to online data mining tools and connecting directly to the data servers programmatically. It gives a good overview of the variation resources and future plans for expanding the variation data within Ensembl. Conclusions Variation data is an important key to understanding the functional and phenotypic differences between individuals. The development of new sequencing and genotyping technologies is greatly increasing the amount of variation data known for almost all genomes. The Ensembl variation resources are integrated into the Ensembl genome browser and provide a comprehensive way to access this data in the context of a widely used genome bioinformatics system. All Ensembl data is freely available at http://www.ensembl.org and from the public MySQL database server at ensembldb.ensembl.org.

  16. Variational Transition State Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truhlar, Donald G. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2016-09-29

    This is the final report on a project involving the development and applications of variational transition state theory. This project involved the development of variational transition state theory for gas-phase reactions, including optimized multidimensional tunneling contributions and the application of this theory to gas-phase reactions with a special emphasis on developing reaction rate theory in directions that are important for applications to combustion. The development of variational transition state theory with optimized multidimensional tunneling as a useful computational tool for combustion kinetics involved eight objectives.

  17. Assessment of copy number variation in genes related to drug resistance in Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum isolates from the Brazilian Amazon and a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Gabriel Luíz; Amaral, Lara Cotta; Fontes, Cor Jesus Fernandes; Carvalho, Luzia Helena; de Brito, Cristiana Ferreira Alves; de Sousa, Taís Nóbrega

    2017-04-19

    Parasite resistance to anti-malarials represents a great obstacle for malaria elimination. The majority of studies have investigated the association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and drug resistance; however, it is becoming clear that the copy number variation (CNV) is also associated with this parasite phenotype. To provide a baseline for molecular surveillance of anti-malarial drug resistance in the Brazilian Amazon, the present study characterized the genetic profile of both markers in the most common genes associated with drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax isolates. Additionally, these data were compared to data published elsewhere applying a systematic review of the literature published over a 20-year time period. The genomic DNA of 67 patients infected by P. falciparum and P. vivax from three Brazilian States was obtained between 2002 and 2012. CNV in P. falciparum multidrug resistance gene-1 (pfmdr1), GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (pfgch1) and P. vivax multidrug resistance gene-1 (pvmdr1) were assessed by real-time PCR assays. SNPs in the pfmdr1 and pfcrt genes were assessed by PCR-RFLP. A literature search for studies that analysed CNP in the same genes of P. falciparum and P. vivax was conducted between May 2014 and March 2017 across four databases. All analysed samples of P. falciparum carried only one copy of pfmdr1 or pfgch1. Although the pfcrt K76T polymorphism, a determinant of CQ resistance, was present in all samples genotyped, the pfmdr1 N86Y was absent. For P. vivax isolates, an amplification rate of 20% was found for the pvmdr1 gene. The results of the study are in agreement with the low amplification rates for pfmdr1 gene evidenced in the Americas and Africa, while higher rates have been described in Southeast Asia. For P. vivax, very low rates of amplification for pvmdr1 have been described worldwide, with exceptions in French Guiana, Cambodia, Thailand and Brazil. The present study was the first to evaluate

  18. Environmental variation partitioned into separate heritable components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ørsted, Michael; Rohde, Palle Duun; Hoffmann, Ary Anthony; Sørensen, Peter; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard

    2018-01-01

    Trait variation is normally separated into genetic and environmental components, yet genetic factors also control the expression of environmental variation, encompassing plasticity across environmental gradients and within-environment responses. We defined four components of environmental variation: plasticity across environments, variability in plasticity, variation within environments, and differences in within-environment variation across environments. We assessed these components for cold tolerance across five rearing temperatures using the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP). The four components were found to be heritable, and genetically correlated to different extents. By whole genome single marker regression, we detected multiple candidate genes controlling the four components and showed limited overlap in genes affecting them. Using the binary UAS-GAL4 system, we functionally validated the effects of a subset of candidate genes affecting each of the four components of environmental variation and also confirmed the genetic and phenotypic correlations obtained from the DGRP in distinct genetic backgrounds. We delineate selection targets associated with environmental variation and the constraints acting upon them, providing a framework for evolutionary and applied studies on environmental sensitivity. Based on our results we suggest that the traditional quantitative genetic view of environmental variation and genotype-by-environment interactions needs revisiting. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  19. Genetic variation in dieback resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lobo, Albin; Hansen, Jon Kehlet; McKinney, Lea Vig

    2014-01-01

    -eastern Zealand, Denmark, and confirmed the presence of substantial genetic variation in ash dieback susceptibility. The average crown damage increased in the trial from 61% in 2009 to 66% in 2012 and 72% in 2014, while the estimated heritability was 0.42 in both 2009 and 2012 but increased to 0.53 in 2014....... Genetic correlation between assessments was 0.88 between 2009 and 2012 and 0.91 between 2009 and 2014, suggesting fairly good possibilities for early selection of superior genotypes in the presence of high infection levels in the trial. The level of crown damage had strong negative effect on growth...

  20. Saturn chorus latitudinal variations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Menietti, J. D; Hospodarsky, G. B; Shprits, Y. Y; Gurnett, D. A

    2014-01-01

    The variation of propagation properties of whistler mode chorus as a function of latitude is not well known at Saturn but is important for the calculation of pitch angle diffusion and nonlinear growth of chorus...

  1. Variation within categories.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das-Smaal, E.A.; Swart, de J.H.

    1984-01-01

    Two aspects of variation within categories, relating to different models of categorization, were investigated - frequency of dimensional values and typicality differences within values. The influence of range of typicality experienced during learning and of informational value of feedback was also

  2. Variational principles in physics

    CERN Document Server

    Basdevant, Jean-Louis

    2007-01-01

    Optimization under constraints is an essential part of everyday life. Indeed, we routinely solve problems by striking a balance between contradictory interests, individual desires and material contingencies. This notion of equilibrium was dear to thinkers of the enlightenment, as illustrated by Montesquieu’s famous formulation: "In all magistracies, the greatness of the power must be compensated by the brevity of the duration." Astonishingly, natural laws are guided by a similar principle. Variational principles have proven to be surprisingly fertile. For example, Fermat used variational methods to demonstrate that light follows the fastest route from one point to another, an idea which came to be known as Fermat’s principle, a cornerstone of geometrical optics. Variational Principles in Physics explains variational principles and charts their use throughout modern physics. The heart of the book is devoted to the analytical mechanics of Lagrange and Hamilton, the basic tools of any physicist. Prof. Basdev...

  3. Work Experience and Style Explain Variation Among Pediatricians in the Detection of Children With Psychosocial Problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theunissen, Meinou H. C.; Vogels, Antonius G. C.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether variation in the proportion of children identified as having psychosocial problems by individual preventive pediatricians can be explained by pediatrician characteristics, over and above variations in the mix of children. Furthermore, to assess whether the

  4. Work experience and style explain variation among pediatricians in the detection of children with psychosocial problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theunissen, M.H.C.; Vogels, A.G.C.; Reijneveld, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether variation in the proportion of children identified as having psychosocial problems by individual preventive pediatricians can be explained by pediatrician characteristics, over and above variations in the mix of children. Furthermore, to assess whether the

  5. Generalized quasi variational inequalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noor, M.A. [King Saud Univ., Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, we establish the equivalence between the generalized quasi variational inequalities and the generalized implicit Wiener-Hopf equations using essentially the projection technique. This equivalence is used to suggest and analyze a number of new iterative algorithms for solving generalized quasi variational inequalities and the related complementarity problems. The convergence criteria is also considered. The results proved in this paper represent a significant improvement and refinement of the previously known results.

  6. Germanic Verb Particle Variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikner, Sten

    2017-01-01

    This paper has two closely related goals. The more "global" one is to present an overview of the variation conceming verb particles across the Germanic languages (see e.g. den Dikken 1995; Haiden 2005; Mclntyre 2007 and many others), and the more "local" one is to use some of this variation data ...... to argue for Yiddish being an SOV-language like German and Dutch rather than an SVO-language like English and the Scandinavian languages....

  7. Variation in Metaphor Variation in Metaphor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zóltan Kövecses

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Cognitive linguists have so far paid a great deal of attention to the emarkable universality of many conceptual metaphors. However, their theories fail to account for the equally impressive diversity of metaphorical conceptualization both across and within cultures. The present paper is an attempt to lay down the foundations of a theory of metaphor that is capable of simultaneously accounting for both universality and variation in metaphor.

     

    Cognitive linguists have so far paid a great deal of attention to the emarkable universality of many conceptual metaphors. However, their theories fail to account for the equally impressive diversity of metaphorical conceptualization both across and within cultures. The present paper is an attempt to lay down the foundations of a theory of metaphor that is capable of simultaneously accounting for both universality and variation in metaphor.

  8. Managing Cultural Variation in Software Process Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Müller, Sune Dueholm; Mathiassen, Lars

    The scale and complexity of change in software process improvement (SPI) are considerable and managerial attention to organizational culture during SPI can therefore potentially contribute to successful outcomes. However, we know little about the impact of variations in organizational subculture...... CMMI level 2 as planned, ASY struggled to implement even modest improvements. To explain these differences, we analyzed the underlying organizational culture within ISY and ASY using two different methods for subculture assessment. The study demonstrates how variations in culture across software...... organizations can have important implications for SPI outcomes. Furthermore, it provides insights into how software managers can practically assess subcultures to inform decisions about and help prepare plans for SPI initiatives....

  9. Predicting global variation in infectious disease severity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Moestrup; de Fine Licht, Henrik Hjarvard

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives: Understanding the underlying causes for the variation in case-fatality-ratios (CFR) is important for assessing the mechanism governing global disparity in the burden of infectious diseases. Variation in CFR is likely to be driven by factors such as population genetics...... and leptospirosis and assessed these for association with a range of population characteristics, such as crude birth and death rates, median age of the population, mean body mass index, proportion living in urban areas and tuberculosis vaccine coverage. We then tested this predictive model on Danish his- torical...

  10. Structural variations in pig genomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paudel, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Paudel, Y. (2015). Structural variations in pig genomes. PhD thesis, Wageningen University, the Netherlands Structural variations are chromosomal rearrangements such as insertions-deletions (INDELs), duplications, inversions, translocations, and copy number variations

  11. Variation and Synthetic Speech

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, C; Massey, N; Miller, Corey; Karaali, Orhan; Massey, Noel

    1997-01-01

    We describe the approach to linguistic variation taken by the Motorola speech synthesizer. A pan-dialectal pronunciation dictionary is described, which serves as the training data for a neural network based letter-to-sound converter. Subsequent to dictionary retrieval or letter-to-sound generation, pronunciations are submitted a neural network based postlexical module. The postlexical module has been trained on aligned dictionary pronunciations and hand-labeled narrow phonetic transcriptions. This architecture permits the learning of individual postlexical variation, and can be retrained for each speaker whose voice is being modeled for synthesis. Learning variation in this way can result in greater naturalness for the synthetic speech that is produced by the system.

  12. Splines and variational methods

    CERN Document Server

    Prenter, P M

    2008-01-01

    One of the clearest available introductions to variational methods, this text requires only a minimal background in calculus and linear algebra. Its self-contained treatment explains the application of theoretic notions to the kinds of physical problems that engineers regularly encounter. The text's first half concerns approximation theoretic notions, exploring the theory and computation of one- and two-dimensional polynomial and other spline functions. Later chapters examine variational methods in the solution of operator equations, focusing on boundary value problems in one and two dimension

  13. Ladder Variational Autoencoder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderby, Casper Kaae; Raiko, Tapani; Maaløe, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Variational autoencoders are powerful models for unsupervised learning. However deep models with several layers of dependent stochastic variables are difficult to train which limits the improvements obtained using these highly expressive models. We propose a new inference model, the Ladder...... Variational Autoencoder, that recursively corrects the generative distribution by a data dependent approximate likelihood in a process resembling the recently proposed Ladder Network. We show that this model provides state of the art predictive log-likelihood and tighter log-likelihood lower bound compared...

  14. Ladder variational autoencoders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderby, Casper Kaae; Raiko, Tapani; Maaløe, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Variational autoencoders are powerful models for unsupervised learning. However deep models with several layers of dependent stochastic variables are difficult to train which limits the improvements obtained using these highly expressive models. We propose a new inference model, the Ladder...... Variational Autoencoder, that recursively corrects the generative distribution by a data dependent approximate likelihood in a process resembling the recently proposed Ladder Network. We show that this model provides state of the art predictive log-likelihood and tighter log-likelihood lower bound compared...

  15. Porosity variation in chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Ida; Grøn, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Vertical porosity variations in chalk are generally assumed to result from either a vaguely defined combination of primary sedimentary and diagenetic processes or solely to diagenetic processes. In this study, image analysis of backscatter electron images of polished samples and geochemical...

  16. Seasonal Variation in Epidemiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Osvaldo

    2013-01-01

    Seasonality analyses are important in medical research. If the incidence of a disease shows a seasonal pattern, then an environmental factor must be considered in its etiology. We discuss a method for the simultaneous analysis of seasonal variation in multiple groups. The nuts and bolts are explained using simple trigonometry, an elementary…

  17. Bounded variation and around

    CERN Document Server

    Appell, Jürgen; Merentes Díaz, Nelson José

    2013-01-01

    This monographis a self-contained exposition of the definition and properties of functionsof bounded variation and their various generalizations; the analytical properties of nonlinear composition operators in spaces of such functions; applications to Fourier analysis, nonlinear integral equations, and boundary value problems. The book is written for non-specialists. Every chapter closes with a list of exercises and open problems.

  18. Fluency Variation in Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Andrade, Claudia Regina Furquim; Martins, Vanessa De Oliveira

    2007-01-01

    The Speech Fluency Profile of fluent adolescent speakers of Brazilian Portuguese, were examined with respect to gender and neurolinguistic variations. Speech samples of 130 male and female adolescents, aged between 12;0 and 17;11 years were gathered. They were analysed according to type of speech disruption; speech rate; and frequency of speech…

  19. Variation in decision making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dall, Sasha R. X.; Gosling, Samuel; Gordon D.A., Brown,; Dingemanse, Niels; Ido, Erev,; Martin, Kocher,; Laura, Schulz,; Todd, Peter M; Weissing, Franz; Wolf, Max; Hammerstein, Peter; Stevens, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Variation in how organisms allocate their behavior over their lifetimes is key to determining Darwinian fitness., and thus the evolution of human and nonhuman decision making. This chapter explores how decision making varies across biologically and societally significant scales and what role such

  20. Variational transition state theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truhlar, D.G. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research program involves the development of variational transition state theory (VTST) and semiclassical tunneling methods for the calculation of gas-phase reaction rates and selected applications. The applications are selected for their fundamental interest and/or their relevance to combustion.

  1. Intronic variation at the

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trimbos, K.B.; Kentie, R.; van der Velde, M.; Hooijmeijer, J.C.E.W.; Poley, C.; Musters, C.J.M.; de Snoo, G.R.; Piersma, T.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, Schroeder etal. (2010, Ibis 152: 368-377) suggested that intronic variation in the CHD1-Z gene of Black-tailed Godwits breeding in southwest Friesland, The Netherlands, correlated with fitness components. Here we re-examine this surprising result using an expanded dataset (2088 birds

  2. variation in maize tolerance to striga lutea

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uwaifoh

    2012-03-30

    Mar 30, 2012 ... This study was conducted to assess the variation in maize tolerance to Striga lutea and influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Screen house experiment was conducted at the Institute of Agricultural Research and. Training, Ibadan while, Farm settlement and Temidire were striga endemic ...

  3. Managing Cultural Variation in Software Process Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Müller, Sune Dueholm; Mathiassen, Lars

    CMMI level 2 as planned, ASY struggled to implement even modest improvements. To explain these differences, we analyzed the underlying organizational culture within ISY and ASY using two different methods for subculture assessment. The study demonstrates how variations in culture across software...

  4. 680 SPATIAL VARIATION IN GROUNDWATER POLLUTION BY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    This study assessed the spatial pollution of groundwater around Karu abattoir by the abattoir effluents by analysing the ... them into the environment. Keywords: Spatial variation, Groundwater, Pollution, Abattoir, Effluents, Water quality. Introduction ... substances, bones, horns, hairs and aborted fetuses. The liquid waste is ...

  5. Combined use of meio- and macrobenthic indices to assess complex chemical impacts on a stream ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Ursula S.; Sonne, Anne T.; Rasmussen, Jes J.; Traunspurger, Walter; Höss, Sebastian; Bjerg, Poul L.

    2016-04-01

    habitats for overall ecosystem health, many biological indices tend only to reflect the ecological quality of surface water, rather than of the sedimentary zones where the accumulation of pollutants is often highest. To address this issue, we monitored meiobenthic (i.e. nematodes) and macrobenthic invertebrate communities along a pollution gradient in order to assess the impact of multiple stressors on a groundwater-fed stream, and thus quantify the link between chemical and ecological status. The studied stressors included point source pollutants originating from contaminated groundwater and aquaculture, and diffuse source pollutants originating from conventional agriculture and urban areas. The use of macrofauna is now well-accepted for assessing ecological integrity in aquatic ecosystems, but less is known about the application of meiofaunal community indicators. High abundance and ubiquitous distribution are two potential advantages for including meiofaunal indicators, and notably - for the case of groundwater-surface water interactions - they are particularly suitable for identifying changes in environmental conditions over smaller spatial scales. The results indicate a change in community composition for both meio- and macrobenthic fauna, pointing towards the presence of a local impact resulting from the discharging contaminated groundwater, which extends downstream along a dilution gradient of the groundwater contaminants. Ecological impacts could be linked to xenobiotic compounds coming from groundwater (both chlorinated solvents and pharmaceuticals), as well as the presence of trace metals of diffuse and/or biogenic origin.

  6. Genetic analysis of environmental variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hill, W.G.; Mulder, H.A.

    2010-01-01

    Environmental variation (VE) in a quantitative trait – variation in phenotype that cannot be explained by genetic variation or identifiable genetic differences – can be regarded as being under some degree of genetic control. Such variation may be either between repeated expressions of the same trait

  7. Prostate contouring variation: can it be fixed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Eric L H; Schick, Karlissa; Plank, Ashley W; Poulsen, Michael; Wong, Winnie W G; Middleton, Mark; Martin, Jarad M

    2012-04-01

    To assess whether an education program on CT and MRI prostate anatomy would reduce inter- and intraobserver prostate contouring variation among experienced radiation oncologists. Three patient CT and MRI datasets were selected. Five radiation oncologists contoured the prostate for each patient on CT first, then MRI, and again between 2 and 4 weeks later. Three education sessions were then conducted. The same contouring process was then repeated with the same datasets and oncologists. The observer variation was assessed according to changes in the ratio of the encompassing volume to intersecting volume (volume ratio [VR]), across sets of target volumes. For interobserver variation, there was a 15% reduction in mean VR with CT, from 2.74 to 2.33, and a 40% reduction in mean VR with MRI, from 2.38 to 1.41 after education. A similar trend was found for intraobserver variation, with a mean VR reduction for CT and MRI of 9% (from 1.51 to 1.38) and 16% (from 1.37 to 1.15), respectively. A well-structured education program has reduced both inter- and intraobserver prostate contouring variations. The impact was greater on MRI than on CT. With the ongoing incorporation of new technologies into routine practice, education programs for target contouring should be incorporated as part of the continuing medical education of radiation oncologists. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Prostate Contouring Variation: Can It Be Fixed?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoo, Eric L.H., E-mail: eric.khoo@roq.net.au [Radiation Oncology Queensland, St Andrew' s Cancer Care Center, St Andrew' s Hospital, Toowoomba, Queensland (Australia); Schick, Karlissa; Plank, Ashley W.; Poulsen, Michael; Wong, Winnie W.G.; Middleton, Mark; Martin, Jarad M. [Radiation Oncology Queensland, St Andrew' s Cancer Care Center, St Andrew' s Hospital, Toowoomba, Queensland (Australia)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: To assess whether an education program on CT and MRI prostate anatomy would reduce inter- and intraobserver prostate contouring variation among experienced radiation oncologists. Methods and Materials: Three patient CT and MRI datasets were selected. Five radiation oncologists contoured the prostate for each patient on CT first, then MRI, and again between 2 and 4 weeks later. Three education sessions were then conducted. The same contouring process was then repeated with the same datasets and oncologists. The observer variation was assessed according to changes in the ratio of the encompassing volume to intersecting volume (volume ratio [VR]), across sets of target volumes. Results: For interobserver variation, there was a 15% reduction in mean VR with CT, from 2.74 to 2.33, and a 40% reduction in mean VR with MRI, from 2.38 to 1.41 after education. A similar trend was found for intraobserver variation, with a mean VR reduction for CT and MRI of 9% (from 1.51 to 1.38) and 16% (from 1.37 to 1.15), respectively. Conclusion: A well-structured education program has reduced both inter- and intraobserver prostate contouring variations. The impact was greater on MRI than on CT. With the ongoing incorporation of new technologies into routine practice, education programs for target contouring should be incorporated as part of the continuing medical education of radiation oncologists.

  9. Variation, structure and norms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Peter

    2014-01-01

    After a period when the focus was essentially on mental architecture, the cognitive sciences are increasingly integrating the social dimension. The rise of a cognitive sociolinguistics is part of this trend. The article argues that this process requires a re-evaluation of some entrenched positions...... in the foundations that were the result of suppressing the sociocultural underpinnings of linguistic facts. Structuralism, cognitivism and social constructionism introduced new and necessary distinctions, but in their strong forms they all turned into unnecessary divides. The article tries to show....... Variational patterns should be seen in the context of structural categories without which there would be only ‘differences’ rather than variation. And emergence, individual choice, and flux should be seen in the context of the individual’s dependence on lineages of community practice sustained by collective...

  10. Conformable variational iteration method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Acan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we introduce the conformable variational iteration method based on new defined fractional derivative called conformable fractional derivative. This new method is applied two fractional order ordinary differential equations. To see how the solutions of this method, linear homogeneous and non-linear non-homogeneous fractional ordinary differential equations are selected. Obtained results are compared the exact solutions and their graphics are plotted to demonstrate efficiency and accuracy of the method.

  11. Climate variation based on temperature and solar radiation data ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ckaonga

    City, Malawi for a 29-year period (1985 to 2013) were assessed for the possibility of climate variation. In addition, the concentration of carbon ... Key words: Climate variation, solar radiation, temperature, weather. INTRODUCTION. The world's climate ..... changes and nocturnal global warming. Science 283 (5399):229-231.

  12. Variations in brain DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus eAvila

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available It is assumed that DNA sequences are conserved in the diverse cell types present in a multicellular organism like the human being. Thus, in order to compare the sequences in the genome of DNA from different individuals, nucleic acid is commonly isolated from a single tissue. In this regard, blood cells are widely used for this purpose because of their availability. Thus blood DNA has been used to study genetic familiar diseases that affect other tissues and organs, such as the liver, heart, and brain. While this approach is valid for the identification of familial diseases in which mutations are present in parental germinal cells and, therefore, in all the cells of a given organism, it is not suitable to identify sporadic diseases in which mutations might occur in specific somatic cells. This review addresses somatic DNA variations in different tissues or cells (mainly in the brain of single individuals and discusses whether the dogma of DNA invariance between cell types is indeed correct. We will also discuss how single nucleotide somatic variations arise, focusing on the presence of specific DNA mutations in the brain.

  13. Gauging Variational Inference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ahn, Sungsoo [Korea Advanced Inst. Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jinwoo [Korea Advanced Inst. Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-25

    Computing partition function is the most important statistical inference task arising in applications of Graphical Models (GM). Since it is computationally intractable, approximate methods have been used to resolve the issue in practice, where meanfield (MF) and belief propagation (BP) are arguably the most popular and successful approaches of a variational type. In this paper, we propose two new variational schemes, coined Gauged-MF (G-MF) and Gauged-BP (G-BP), improving MF and BP, respectively. Both provide lower bounds for the partition function by utilizing the so-called gauge transformation which modifies factors of GM while keeping the partition function invariant. Moreover, we prove that both G-MF and G-BP are exact for GMs with a single loop of a special structure, even though the bare MF and BP perform badly in this case. Our extensive experiments, on complete GMs of relatively small size and on large GM (up-to 300 variables) confirm that the newly proposed algorithms outperform and generalize MF and BP.

  14. Pitch and pitch variation in lesbian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Borsel, John; Vandaele, Jana; Corthals, Paul

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate to what extent lesbian women demonstrate pitch and pitch variation that is different from that of heterosexual women. Static group comparison. The average pitch and pitch variation of a group of 34 self-identified lesbian women and an age-matched group of 68 heterosexual women were compared. The speech sample consisted of read speech. Acoustic analysis was performed by means of PRAAT. Mean fundamental frequency in the group of lesbian women was significantly lower than that of the group of heterosexual women. The lesbian woman also showed significantly less pitch variation. Lesbian women tend to demonstrate a lower average pitch and less pitch variation than heterosexual women, but this does not mean a confirmation of the popular stereotype that lesbian women are masculine women. In their assessment of clients with voice disorders, clinicians should reckon with the sociophonetic variation that is associated with sexual orientation. Copyright © 2013 The Voice Foundation. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Lexical Variation in Akokoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fádorò Jacob Oludare

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Language contact among Akokoid, Yoruboid and Edoid has resulted in extensive borrowing from Yoruboid and Edoid to Akokoid. Thus, the speech forms subsumed under Akokoid exhibit lexical items which are similar to Yoruboid and Edoid. To the best of our knowledge, no other scholarly work has addressed the concept ‘lexical variation in these speech forms, hence, the need for this present effort. Twenty lexical items were carefully selected for analysis in this paper. Data were elicited from 34 informants who are competent speakers of Akokoid. Apart from the linguistic data, these informants, including  traditional rulers, supplied us with historical facts about the migration patterns of the progenitors of Akokoid. The historical facts coupled with the linguistic data helped us to arrive at the conclusion that some of the words used in contemporary Akokoid found their way into Akokoid as a result of the contact between Akokoid and their neighbours, Yoruboid and Edoid.

  16. Managing Cultural Variation in Software Process Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Sune Dueholm; Kræmmergaard, Pernille; Mathiassen, Lars

    The scale and complexity of change in software process improvement (SPI) are considerable and managerial attention to organizational culture during SPI can therefore potentially contribute to successful outcomes. However, we know little about the impact of variations in organizational subculture...... organizations can have important implications for SPI outcomes. Furthermore, it provides insights into how software managers can practically assess subcultures to inform decisions about and help prepare plans for SPI initiatives....

  17. Temperamental variation in learned irrelevance in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Gruszka-Gosiewska, Aleksandra; Owen, Adrian M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Learned irrelevance (LIRR) represents one of the mechanisms of attentional set-shifting and refers to the inability to attend to, or to learn about, any aspect of a stimulus previously experienced as irrelevant. Although it has been extensively studied in the context of clinical populations, not much is known about LIRR effects in relation to normal variation in individual differences. The present study was designed to assess how temperamental factors may modulate LIRR. ...

  18. Statistical methods for handling unwanted variation in metabolomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Livera, Alysha M; Sysi-Aho, Marko; Jacob, Laurent; Gagnon-Bartsch, Johann A; Castillo, Sandra; Simpson, Julie A; Speed, Terence P

    2015-04-07

    Metabolomics experiments are inevitably subject to a component of unwanted variation, due to factors such as batch effects, long runs of samples, and confounding biological variation. Although the removal of this unwanted variation is a vital step in the analysis of metabolomics data, it is considered a gray area in which there is a recognized need to develop a better understanding of the procedures and statistical methods required to achieve statistically relevant optimal biological outcomes. In this paper, we discuss the causes of unwanted variation in metabolomics experiments, review commonly used metabolomics approaches for handling this unwanted variation, and present a statistical approach for the removal of unwanted variation to obtain normalized metabolomics data. The advantages and performance of the approach relative to several widely used metabolomics normalization approaches are illustrated through two metabolomics studies, and recommendations are provided for choosing and assessing the most suitable normalization method for a given metabolomics experiment. Software for the approach is made freely available.

  19. Prescribing style and variation in antibiotic prescriptions for sore throat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordoba Currea, Gloria Cristina; Siersma, Volkert Dirk; Lopez-Valcarcel, Beatriz Gonzalez

    2015-01-01

    Background: Variation in prescription of antibiotics in primary care can indicate poor clinical practice that contributes to the increase of resistant strains. General Practitioners (GPs), as a professional group, are expected to have a fairly homogeneous prescribing style. In this paper, we...... describe variation in prescribing style within and across groups of GPs from six countries. Methods: Cross-sectional study with the inclusion of 457 GPs and 6394 sore throat patients. We describe variation in prescribing antibiotics for sore throat patients across six countries and assess whether variation...... in “prescribing style” – understood as a subjective tendency to prescribe – has an important effect on variation in prescription of antibiotics by using the concept of prescribing style as a latent variable in a multivariable model. We report variation as a Median Odds Ratio (MOR) which is the transformation...

  20. FROG - Fingerprinting Genomic Variation Ontology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Abinaya

    Full Text Available Genetic variations play a crucial role in differential phenotypic outcomes. Given the complexity in establishing this correlation and the enormous data available today, it is imperative to design machine-readable, efficient methods to store, label, search and analyze this data. A semantic approach, FROG: "FingeRprinting Ontology of Genomic variations" is implemented to label variation data, based on its location, function and interactions. FROG has six levels to describe the variation annotation, namely, chromosome, DNA, RNA, protein, variations and interactions. Each level is a conceptual aggregation of logically connected attributes each of which comprises of various properties for the variant. For example, in chromosome level, one of the attributes is location of variation and which has two properties, allosomes or autosomes. Another attribute is variation kind which has four properties, namely, indel, deletion, insertion, substitution. Likewise, there are 48 attributes and 278 properties to capture the variation annotation across six levels. Each property is then assigned a bit score which in turn leads to generation of a binary fingerprint based on the combination of these properties (mostly taken from existing variation ontologies. FROG is a novel and unique method designed for the purpose of labeling the entire variation data generated till date for efficient storage, search and analysis. A web-based platform is designed as a test case for users to navigate sample datasets and generate fingerprints. The platform is available at http://ab-openlab.csir.res.in/frog.

  1. Diurnal variation of mountain waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Worthington

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Mountain waves could be modified as the boundary layer varies between stable and convective. However case studies show mountain waves day and night, and above e.g. convective rolls with precipitation lines over mountains. VHF radar measurements of vertical wind (1990–2006 confirm a seasonal variation of mountain-wave amplitude, yet there is little diurnal variation of amplitude. Mountain-wave azimuth shows possible diurnal variation compared to wind rotation across the boundary layer.

  2. Functional characterization of variations on regulatory motifs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Lapidot

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors (TFs regulate gene expression through specific interactions with short promoter elements. The same regulatory protein may recognize a variety of related sequences. Moreover, once they are detected it is hard to predict whether highly similar sequence motifs will be recognized by the same TF and regulate similar gene expression patterns, or serve as binding sites for distinct regulatory factors. We developed computational measures to assess the functional implications of variations on regulatory motifs and to compare the functions of related sites. We have developed computational means for estimating the functional outcome of substituting a single position within a binding site and applied them to a collection of putative regulatory motifs. We predict the effects of nucleotide variations within motifs on gene expression patterns. In cases where such predictions could be compared to suitable published experimental evidence, we found very good agreement. We further accumulated statistics from multiple substitutions across various binding sites in an attempt to deduce general properties that characterize nucleotide substitutions that are more likely to alter expression. We found that substitutions involving Adenine are more likely to retain the expression pattern and that substitutions involving Guanine are more likely to alter expression compared to the rest of the substitutions. Our results should facilitate the prediction of the expression outcomes of binding site variations. One typical important implication is expected to be the ability to predict the phenotypic effect of variation in regulatory motifs in promoters.

  3. Explorations in Regional Variation: A Variational Pragmatic Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The present article introduces the Special Issue entitled "A Variational Pragmatic Approach to Regional Variation in Language," a collection of papers which celebrates the work of Klaus P. Schneider (Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, Germany) on the occasion of his 60th birthday.

  4. Foraging and reproductive behavior of Arizona gray squirrels (Sciurus arizonensis): impacts of climatic variation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nichole L. Cudworth; John L. Koprowski

    2013-01-01

    ...; however, no data are available on diet or reproduction. We investigated annual variation in foraging and reproductive habits of Arizona gray squirrels to assess responses to extreme seasonality...

  5. Spatial and seasonal variations, sources, air-soil exchange, and carcinogenic risk assessment for PAHs and PCBs in air and soil of Kutahya, Turkey, the province of thermal power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumanoglu, Yetkin; Gaga, Eftade O; Gungormus, Elif; Sofuoglu, Sait C; Odabasi, Mustafa

    2017-02-15

    Atmospheric and concurrent soil samples were collected during winter and summer of 2014 at 41 sites in Kutahya, Turkey to investigate spatial and seasonal variations, sources, air-soil exchange, and associated carcinogenic risks of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The highest atmospheric and soil concentrations were observed near power plants and residential areas, and the wintertime concentrations were generally higher than ones measured in summer. Spatial distribution of measured ambient concentrations and results of the factor analysis showed that the major contributing PAH sources in Kutahya region were the coal combustion for power generation and residential heating (48.9%), and diesel and gasoline exhaust emissions (47.3%) while the major PCB sources were the coal (thermal power plants and residential heating) and wood combustion (residential heating) (45.4%), and evaporative emissions from previously used technical PCB mixtures (34.7%). Results of fugacity fraction calculations indicated that the soil and atmosphere were not in equilibrium for most of the PAHs (88.0% in winter, 87.4% in summer) and PCBs (76.8% in winter, 83.8% in summer). For PAHs, deposition to the soil was the dominant mechanism in winter while in summer volatilization was equally important. For PCBs, volatilization dominated in summer while deposition was higher in winter. Cancer risks associated with inhalation and accidental soil ingestion of soil were also estimated. Generally, the estimated carcinogenic risks were below the acceptable risk level of 10-6. The percentage of the population exceeding the acceptable risk level ranged from 10-6. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Recent advances in the use of estuarine meiobenthos to assess contaminated sediment effects in multi-species whole sediment microcosms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, G.T.; Coull, B.C.; Schizas, N.V.; Donelan, T.L. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Many marine meiobenthic taxa (i.e. invertebrates passing a 1-mm sieve but retaining on a 0.063 mm sieve) are ideal for ``whole-sediment`` and porewater bioassay of sedimented pollutants. Annual production of meiobenthos is 5--10 times that of the more commonly studied macrobenthos, and > 95% of all meiobenthos live in the oxic zone of muddy sediments at densities of 4--12 million per M{sup 2}. Most spend their entire lifecycles, burrowing freely and feeding on/within the sediment:porewater matrix, many taxa undergo 10--14 generations per year, most larval/juvenile stages are benthic, and many have easily quantifiable reproductive output. Furthermore, many meiobenthic taxa can be cultured indefinitely over multiple life-cycles within simple sediment microcosms consisting of sealed whole-sediment cores collected intact from intertidal mudflats. The authors describe several recent technical developments exploiting meiofaunal sediment culture for rapid contaminated sediment bioassays of toxicant effects on survival, reproduction and population growth of meiobenthic taxa in whole-sediment microcosms. Currently meiobenthic copepods, nematodes, foraminifers and polychaetes are being continuously cultured to study these parameters under exposure to model sediment-associated toxicants (e.g. cadmium). Bioassays are run for 21-d under flowing seawater. With this approach, fertile benthic copepods (e.g. Amphiascus tenuiremis) can be added to core microcosms to assess survival and growth of a fixed population cohort. All other meiobenthic taxa are enumerated relative to controls and evaluated for toxicant effects on higher order community-level endpoints. This approach exploits meiobenthos` high abundance and rapid reproductive rates to yield on a micro scale better endpoints than much larger sediment mesocosms targeted at macrofaunal endpoints.

  7. Analysis of micro climatic variations in Jimeta-Yola, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analysis of variance technique (ANOVA) was used to assess the variation of temperature within the city. Student t test was employed to assess the difference between the city and rural temperatures while Correlation analysis was used to examine the relationship between temperature, micro relief and population density of ...

  8. On quadratic variation of martingales

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Doob–Meyer decomposition; martingales; quadratic variation. Mathematics Subject Classification. ... t also the predictable quadratic variation of the martingale. M and has subsequently been ...... [3] Karandikar R L, Pathwise solution of stochastic differential equations, Sankhya A 43. (1981) 121–132. [4] Karandikar R L, On ...

  9. Exploring language variation across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovy, Dirk; Johannsen, Anders Trærup

    2016-01-01

    training in both variational linguistics and computational methods, a combination that is still not common. We take a first step here to alleviate the problem by providing an interface to explore large-scale language variation along several socio-demographic factors without programming knowledge. It makes...

  10. Biological variation of cystatin C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhard, Mark; Erlandsen, Erland; Randers, Else

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Cystatin C has been investigated as a marker of the glomerular filtration rate. However, previous studies have reported conflicting results concerning the biological variation of cystatin C. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the biological variation of cystatin C...

  11. HEART-RATE VARIATION DURING FETAL BEHAVIORAL STATE-1 AND STATE-2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VISSER, GHA; MULDER, EJH; STEVENS, H

    Fetal heart rate (FHR) variation was numerically assessed in relation to behavioural states in 34 normal near term fetuses, in order to study the normal ranges of FHR variation during state 1F and 2F and to determine possible factors influencing variation in these states. In all individuals 2-h

  12. Pulse pressure and diurnal blood pressure variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Søren Tang; Poulsen, Per Løgstrup; Hansen, Klavs Würgler

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In nondiabetic subjects pulse pressure (PP) is an independent predictor of cardiovascular disease and microalbuminuria. Reduced circadian blood pressure (BP) variation is a potential risk factor for the development of diabetic complications. We investigated the association between...... retinopathy, nephropathy, macrovascular disease, PP, and diurnal BP variation in a group of type 2 diabetic patients. METHODS: In 80 type 2 diabetic patients we performed 24-h ambulatory BP (AMBP) and fundus photographs. Urinary albumin excretion was evaluated by urinary albumin/creatinine ratio. Presence...... or absence of macrovascular disease was assessed by an independent physician. RESULTS: Forty-nine patients had no detectable retinal changes (grade 1), 13 had grade 2 retinopathy, and 18 had more advanced retinopathy (grades 3-6). Compared to patients without retinopathy (grade 1), patients with grades 2...

  13. Biodiversity patterns, environmental drivers and indicator species on a High-temperature Hydrothermal edifice, mid-Atlantic ridge

    KAUST Repository

    Sarrazin, Jozée

    2015-04-25

    Knowledge on quantitative faunal distribution patterns of hydrothermal communities in slow-spreading vent fields is particularly scarce, despite the importance of these ridges in the global mid-ocean system. This study assessed the composition, abundance and diversity of 12 benthic faunal assemblages from various locations on the Eiffel Tower edifice (Lucky Strike vent field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge) and investigated the role of key environmental conditions (temperature, total dissolved iron (TdFe), sulfide (TdS), copper (TdCu) and pH) on the distribution of macro- and meiofaunal species at small spatial scales (< 1 m). There were differences in macro- and meiofaunal community structure between the different sampling locations, separating the hydrothermal community of the Eiffel Tower edifice into three types of microhabitats: (1) cold microhabitats characterized by low temperatures (<6 °C), high TdCu (up to 2.4±1.37 µmol l−1), high pH (up to 7.34±0.13) but low TdS concentrations (<6.98±5.01 µmol l−1); (2) warm microhabitats characterized by warmer temperatures (>6 °C), low pH (<6.5) and high TdS/TdFe concentrations (>12.8 µmol l−1/>1.1 µmol l−1 respectively); and (3) a third microhabitat characterized by intermediate abiotic conditions. Environmental conditions showed more variation in the warm microhabitats than in the cold microhabitats. In terms of fauna, the warm microhabitats had lower macro- and meiofaunal densities, and lower richness and Shannon diversity than the cold microhabitats. Six macrofaunal species (Branchipolynoe seepensis, Amathys lutzi, Bathymodiolus azoricus, Lepetodrilus fucensis, Protolira valvatoides and Chorocaris chacei) and three meiofaunal taxa (Paracanthonchus, Cephalochaetosoma and Microlaimus) were identified as being significant indicator species/taxa of particular microhabitats. Our results also highlight very specific niche separation for copepod juveniles among the different hydrothermal microhabitats. Some sampling

  14. Constitutive and Operational Variation of Learning in Foraging Predatory Mites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiter, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Learning is widely documented across animal taxa but studies stringently scrutinizing the causes of constitutive or operational variation of learning among populations and individuals are scarce. The ability to learn is genetically determined and subject to constitutive variation while the performance in learning depends on the immediate circumstances and is subject to operational variation. We assessed variation in learning ability and performance of plant-inhabiting predatory mites, Amblyseius swirskii, caused by population origin, rearing diet, and type of experience. Using an early learning foraging paradigm, we determined that homogeneous single prey environments did not select for reduced learning ability, as compared to natural prey-diverse environments, whereas a multi-generational pollen diet resulted in loss of learning, as compared to a diet of live prey. Associative learning produced stronger effects than non-associative learning but both types of experience produced persistent memory. Our study represents a key example of environmentally caused variation in learning ability and performance. PMID:27814380

  15. Solar cycle variations in the ionosphere of Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Cano, B.; Lester, M.; Witasse, Ol; Blelly, P.L.; Cartacci, M.; Radicella, S.M.; Herraiz, M.

    2016-07-01

    Solar cycle variations in solar radiation create notable changes in the Martian ionosphere, which have been analysed with Mars Express plasma datasets in this paper. In general, lower densities and temperatures of the ionosphere are found during the low solar activity phase, while higher densities and temperatures are found during the high solar activity phase. In this paper, we assess the degree of influence of the long term solar flux variations in the ionosphere of Mars. (Author)

  16. Variations in pretransfusion practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padget, B J; Hannon, J L

    2003-01-01

    A variety of pretransfusion tests have been developed to improve the safety and effectiveness of transfusion. Recently, a number of traditional tests have been shown to offer limited clinical benefit and have been eliminated in many facilities. A survey of pretransfusion test practices was distributed to 116 hospital transfusion services. Routine test practices and facility size were analyzed. Ninety-one responses were received. Many smaller laboratories include tests such as anti-A,B, an autocontrol, and DAT, and immediate spin and 37 degrees Celsius microscopic readings. Nine percent never perform an Rh control with anti-D typing on patient samples. Various antibody screening and crossmatch methods are utilized. Individual laboratory test practices should be periodically assessed to ensure that they comply with standards, represent the recognized best practice, and are cost-effective. The survey responses indicate that many laboratories perform tests that are not necessary or cost-effective. These facilities should review their processes to determine which tests contribute to transfusion safety. Smaller facilities may be reluctant to change or lack the expertise necessary for this decision making and often continue to perform tests that have been eliminated in larger facilities. Consultation with larger hospital transfusion services may provide guidance for this change.

  17. Statistics, Uncertainty, and Transmitted Variation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendelberger, Joanne Roth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-11-05

    The field of Statistics provides methods for modeling and understanding data and making decisions in the presence of uncertainty. When examining response functions, variation present in the input variables will be transmitted via the response function to the output variables. This phenomenon can potentially have significant impacts on the uncertainty associated with results from subsequent analysis. This presentation will examine the concept of transmitted variation, its impact on designed experiments, and a method for identifying and estimating sources of transmitted variation in certain settings.

  18. Genetic variation in social influence on mate preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebar, Darren; Rodríguez, Rafael L

    2013-07-22

    Patterns of phenotypic variation arise in part from plasticity owing to social interactions, and these patterns contribute, in turn, to the form of selection that shapes the variation we observe in natural populations. This proximate-ultimate dynamic brings genetic variation in social environments to the forefront of evolutionary theory. However, the extent of this variation remains largely unknown. Here, we use a member of the Enchenopa binotata species complex of treehoppers (Hemiptera: Membracidae) to assess how mate preferences are influenced by genetic variation in the social environment. We used full-sibling split-families as 'treatment' social environments, and reared focal females alongside each treatment family, describing the mate preferences of the focal females. With this method, we detected substantial genetic variation in social influence on mate preferences. The mate preferences of focal females varied according to the treatment families along with which they grew up. We discuss the evolutionary implications of the presence of such genetic variation in social influence on mate preferences, including potential contributions to the maintenance of genetic variation, the promotion of divergence, and the adaptive evolution of social effects on fitness-related traits.

  19. Modeling of Craniofacial Anatomy, Variation, and Growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorup, Signe Strann

    the two images. To elaborate further: a computational atlas of the average anatomy was constructed. Using non-rigid registration, image data from a subject is automatically transformed into the coordinate space of the atlas. In this process, all knowledge built into the atlas is transferred to the subject...... and palate, unicoronal synostosis, and Crouzon syndrome. Using the proposed methods, highly detailed variation was assessed for cleft lip and palate, correspondence between images obtained before and after lip repair was established for cleft lip and palate, the intracranial volume was estimated for infants...

  20. Fractional variational principles with delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleanu, Dumitru; Maaraba Abdeljawad, Thabet; Jarad, Fahd

    2008-08-01

    The fractional variational principles within Riemann-Liouville fractional derivatives in the presence of delay are analyzed. The corresponding Euler-Lagrange equations are obtained and one example is analyzed in detail.

  1. Fractional variational principles with delay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baleanu, Dumitru; Abdeljawad, Thabet Maaraba; Jarad, Fahd [Department of Mathematics and Computer Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Cankaya University, 06530 Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: dumitru@cankaya.edu.tr, E-mail: baleanu@venus.nipne.ro

    2008-08-08

    The fractional variational principles within Riemann-Liouville fractional derivatives in the presence of delay are analyzed. The corresponding Euler-Lagrange equations are obtained and one example is analyzed in detail.

  2. Genetic variation: a laboratory manual

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weiner, Michael P; Gabriel, Stacey B; Stephens, J. Claiborne

    2007-01-01

    ... alterations, including copy number variation. The early sections of the manual are devoted to study design and generating genotype data, the use of resources such as HapMap and dbSNP, as well as experimental, statistical, and bioinformatic...

  3. Sharecropping, interlinkage, and price variation

    OpenAIRE

    Debapriya Sen

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a theory of sharecropping and interlinkage on the basis of seasonal variation of price and imperfectly competitive nature of rural product markets. First, a benchmark model is considered to show the optimality of sharecropping in the presence of price variation. This model is extended by allowing interlinked contracts to show that there are multiple equilibria and both forms of contracts�fixed rental and sharecropping�can be sustained in equilibrium. Finally, incorpora...

  4. Classifying measures of biological variation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Rolf Gregorius

    Full Text Available Biological variation is commonly measured at two basic levels: variation within individual communities, and the distribution of variation over communities or within a metacommunity. We develop a classification for the measurement of biological variation on both levels: Within communities into the categories of dispersion and diversity, and within metacommunities into the categories of compositional differentiation and partitioning of variation. There are essentially two approaches to characterizing the distribution of trait variation over communities in that individuals with the same trait state or type tend to occur in the same community (describes differentiation tendencies, and individuals with different types tend to occur in different communities (describes apportionment tendencies. Both approaches can be viewed from the dual perspectives of trait variation distributed over communities (CT perspective and community membership distributed over trait states (TC perspective. This classification covers most of the relevant descriptors (qualified measures of biological variation, as is demonstrated with the help of major families of descriptors. Moreover, the classification is shown to open ways to develop new descriptors that meet current needs. Yet the classification also reveals the misclassification of some prominent and widely applied descriptors: Dispersion is often misclassified as diversity, particularly in cases where dispersion descriptor allow for the computation of effective numbers; the descriptor GST of population genetics is commonly misclassified as compositional differentiation and confused with partitioning-oriented differentiation, whereas it actually measures partitioning-oriented apportionment; descriptors of β-diversity are ambiguous about the differentiation effects they are supposed to represent and therefore require conceptual reconsideration.

  5. Nematodes as indicators of environmental quality in seagrass (Posidonia oceanica meadows of the NW Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Losi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Meiofauna in sediments colonized by Posidonia oceanica in the Ligurian Sea (NW Mediterranean was investigated to evaluate its use as an early warning indicator of environmental disturbance. Descriptors commonly used in seagrass health assessment are mainly related to the plant (e.g., phenological parameters and/or to the meadow (e.g., structural parameters and are subjected to long-term response times. Conversely, meiofauna is considered a good bioindicator with a rapid response to environmental variations, due to its main features (e.g., short life cycle, scarce mobility, presence/absence of tolerant/sensitive species. Meiofaunal community, sediment characteristics and organic matter descriptors in three meadows located in urbanized coastal areas were contrasted with those observed in three meadows located within Marine Protected Areas. Samplings were carried out in two distinct periods, at the beginning and at the end of the summer season, in order to individuate early changes in the meiofaunal assemblages. The meiofauna and, particularly, the nematode assemblage composition and diversity, highlighted differences among meadows at the end of the summer not detectable by organic matter descriptors and structural parameters of the meadow (e.g. shoot density. Nematodes are, thus, proposed as appropriate biological quality elements (BQEs able to show early responses to environmental disturbance.

  6. Anticipating Central Asian Water Stress: Variation in River Flow Dependency on Melt Waters from Alpine to Plains in the Remote Tien Shan Range, Kyrgyzstan Using a Rapid Hydro Assessment Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, A. F.; Wilson, A. M.; Williams, M. W.

    2016-12-01

    The future of mountain water resources in High Asia is of high interest to water managers, development organizations and policy makers given large populations downstream reliant on snow and ice sourced river flow. Together with historical and cultural divides among ex-Soviet republics, a lack of central water management following the Soviet break-up has led to water stress as trans-boundary waters weave through and along borders. New upstream hydropower development, a thirsty downstream agricultural sector and a shrinking Aral Sea has led to increasing tension in the region. Despite these pressures and in contrast to eastern High Asia's Himalayan basins (Ganges, Brahmaputra), little attention has been given to western High Asia draining the Pamir and Tien Shan ranges (Syr Darya and Amu Darya basins) to better understand the hydrology of this vast and remote area. Difficult access and challenging terrain exacerbate challenges to working in this remote mountain region. As part of the Contributions to High Asia Runoff from Ice and Snow (CHARIS) project, we asked how does river flow source water composition change over an alpine-to-plains domain of Kyrgyzstan's Naryn River in the Syr Darya basin? In addition, what may the future hold for river flow in Central Asia given the differing responses of snow and ice to climate changes? Utilizing a Rapid Hydrologic Assessment methodology including a suite of pre-field mapping techniques we collected in situ water chemistry data at targeted, remote mountain sites over 450km of the Naryn River over an elevation gradient from glacial headwaters to the lower lying areas - places where people, hydropower and agriculture utilize water. Chemical and isotope tracers were used to separate stream flow to understand relative dependency on melt waters as the river moves downstream from glaciers and snow covered areas. This case study demonstrates a technique to acquire field data over large scales in remote regions that facilitates

  7. Variational integrators for electric circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ober-Blöbaum, Sina, E-mail: sinaob@math.upb.de [Computational Dynamics and Optimal Control, University of Paderborn (Germany); Tao, Molei [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University (United States); Cheng, Mulin [Applied and Computational Mathematics, California Institute of Technology (United States); Owhadi, Houman; Marsden, Jerrold E. [Control and Dynamical Systems, California Institute of Technology (United States); Applied and Computational Mathematics, California Institute of Technology (United States)

    2013-06-01

    In this contribution, we develop a variational integrator for the simulation of (stochastic and multiscale) electric circuits. When considering the dynamics of an electric circuit, one is faced with three special situations: 1. The system involves external (control) forcing through external (controlled) voltage sources and resistors. 2. The system is constrained via the Kirchhoff current (KCL) and voltage laws (KVL). 3. The Lagrangian is degenerate. Based on a geometric setting, an appropriate variational formulation is presented to model the circuit from which the equations of motion are derived. A time-discrete variational formulation provides an iteration scheme for the simulation of the electric circuit. Dependent on the discretization, the intrinsic degeneracy of the system can be canceled for the discrete variational scheme. In this way, a variational integrator is constructed that gains several advantages compared to standard integration tools for circuits; in particular, a comparison to BDF methods (which are usually the method of choice for the simulation of electric circuits) shows that even for simple LCR circuits, a better energy behavior and frequency spectrum preservation can be observed using the developed variational integrator.

  8. Separating common from distinctive variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kloet, Frans M; Sebastián-León, Patricia; Conesa, Ana; Smilde, Age K; Westerhuis, Johan A

    2016-06-06

    Joint and individual variation explained (JIVE), distinct and common simultaneous component analysis (DISCO) and O2-PLS, a two-block (X-Y) latent variable regression method with an integral OSC filter can all be used for the integrated analysis of multiple data sets and decompose them in three terms: a low(er)-rank approximation capturing common variation across data sets, low(er)-rank approximations for structured variation distinctive for each data set, and residual noise. In this paper these three methods are compared with respect to their mathematical properties and their respective ways of defining common and distinctive variation. The methods are all applied on simulated data and mRNA and miRNA data-sets from GlioBlastoma Multiform (GBM) brain tumors to examine their overlap and differences. When the common variation is abundant, all methods are able to find the correct solution. With real data however, complexities in the data are treated differently by the three methods. All three methods have their own approach to estimate common and distinctive variation with their specific strength and weaknesses. Due to their orthogonality properties and their used algorithms their view on the data is slightly different. By assuming orthogonality between common and distinctive, true natural or biological phenomena that may not be orthogonal at all might be misinterpreted.

  9. Relating quantitative variation within a behavior to variation in transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benowitz, Kyle M; McKinney, Elizabeth C; Cunningham, Christopher B; Moore, Allen J

    2017-08-01

    Many studies have shown that variation in transcription is associated with changes in behavioral state, or with variation within a state, but little has been done to address if the same genes are involved in both. Here, we investigate the transcriptional basis of variation in parental provisioning using two species of burying beetle, Nicrophorus orbicollis and Nicrophorus vespilloides. We used RNA-seq to compare transcription in parents that provided high amounts of provisioning behavior versus low amounts in males and females of each species. We found no overarching transcriptional patterns distinguishing high from low caring parents, and no informative transcripts that displayed particularly large expression differences in either sex. However, we did find subtler gene expression differences between high and low provisioning parents that are consistent across both sexes and species. Furthermore, we show that transcripts previously implicated in transitioning into parental care in N. vespilloides had high variance in the levels of transcription and were unusually likely to display differential expression between high and low provisioning parents. Thus, quantitative behavioral variation appears to reflect many transcriptional differences of small effect. Furthermore, the same transcripts required for the transition between behavioral states are also related to variation within a behavioral state. © 2017 The Author(s). Evolution © 2017 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  10. Understanding human DNA sequence variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, K K; Pakstis, A J; Speed, W C; Kidd, J R

    2004-01-01

    Over the past century researchers have identified normal genetic variation and studied that variation in diverse human populations to determine the amounts and distributions of that variation. That information is being used to develop an understanding of the demographic histories of the different populations and the species as a whole, among other studies. With the advent of DNA-based markers in the last quarter century, these studies have accelerated. One of the challenges for the next century is to understand that variation. One component of that understanding will be population genetics. We present here examples of many of the ways these new data can be analyzed from a population perspective using results from our laboratory on multiple individual DNA-based polymorphisms, many clustered in haplotypes, studied in multiple populations representing all major geographic regions of the world. These data support an "out of Africa" hypothesis for human dispersal around the world and begin to refine the understanding of population structures and genetic relationships. We are also developing baseline information against which we can compare findings at different loci to aid in the identification of loci subject, now and in the past, to selection (directional or balancing). We do not yet have a comprehensive understanding of the extensive variation in the human genome, but some of that understanding is coming from population genetics.

  11. Seasonal variation in sports participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüttoff, Ute; Pawlowski, Tim

    2018-02-01

    This study explores indicators describing socio-demographics, sports participation characteristics and motives which are associated with variation in sports participation across seasons. Data were drawn from the German Socio-Economic Panel which contains detailed information on the sports behaviour of adults in Germany. Overall, two different measures of seasonal variation are developed and used as dependent variables in our regression models. The first variable measures the coefficient of (seasonal) variation in sport-related energy expenditure per week. The second variable measures whether activity drops below the threshold as defined by the World Health Organization (WHO). Results suggest that the organisational setting, the intensity and number of sports practised, and the motive for participation are strongly correlated with the variation measures used. For example, both, participation in a sports club and a commercial facility, are associated with reduced seasonal variation and a significantly higher probability of participating at a volume above the WHO threshold across all seasons. These findings give some impetus for policymaking and the planning of sports programmes as well as future research directions.

  12. The Role of Variation in Lexicography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Ceil

    2003-01-01

    Explores the relationship between lexicography and variation in both spoken languages and sign languages. Examines the function of dictionaries and discusses the nature of linguistic variation, using an example of lexical variation in American Sign Language. (Author/VWL)

  13. Solid mechanics a variational approach

    CERN Document Server

    Dym, Clive L

    2013-01-01

    Solid Mechanics: A Variational Approach, Augmented Edition presents a lucid and thoroughly developed approach to solid mechanics for students engaged in the study of elastic structures not seen in other texts currently on the market. This work offers a clear and carefully prepared exposition of variational techniques as they are applied to solid mechanics. Unlike other books in this field, Dym and Shames treat all the necessary theory needed for the study of solid mechanics and include extensive applications. Of particular note is the variational approach used in developing consistent structural theories and in obtaining exact and approximate solutions for many problems.  Based on both semester and year-long courses taught to undergraduate seniors and graduate students, this text is geared for programs in aeronautical, civil, and mechanical engineering, and in engineering science. The authors’ objective is two-fold: first, to introduce the student to the theory of structures (one- and two-dimensional) as ...

  14. Variational methods in molecular modeling

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book presents tutorial overviews for many applications of variational methods to molecular modeling. Topics discussed include the Gibbs-Bogoliubov-Feynman variational principle, square-gradient models, classical density functional theories, self-consistent-field theories, phase-field methods, Ginzburg-Landau and Helfrich-type phenomenological models, dynamical density functional theory, and variational Monte Carlo methods. Illustrative examples are given to facilitate understanding of the basic concepts and quantitative prediction of the properties and rich behavior of diverse many-body systems ranging from inhomogeneous fluids, electrolytes and ionic liquids in micropores, colloidal dispersions, liquid crystals, polymer blends, lipid membranes, microemulsions, magnetic materials and high-temperature superconductors. All chapters are written by leading experts in the field and illustrated with tutorial examples for their practical applications to specific subjects. With emphasis placed on physical unders...

  15. Multivariate analysis of seasonal variation in the composition and thermal properties of butterfat with an emphasis on authenticity assessment; Análisis multifactorial de la variable estacional sobre la composición y las propiedades térmicas de la grasa de mantequilla, con énfasis en la evaluación de la autenticidad.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomaszewska-Gras, J.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the seasonal variation in the composition and thermal properties of butterfat (BF) in order to evaluate the applicability of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) for the authenticity assessment of butter. The composition of fatty acids (FA) and triacylglycerols (TAG) and the thermal properties of genuine BF purchased in the summer and in the winter from six producers were determined. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to recognize variation and as a result, all BF samples were classified into two groups: one composed of mixed samples from the summer and winter and the other comprising only summer BF samples. DSC and GC analysis revealed that the group of only summer BF samples was characterized by lower melting temperatures and peak heights of low- and medium melting fractions and the highest proportions of unsaturated FAs (ΣC18:1, ΣC18:2, ΣC18:3). The results indicated that most of the variation in the composition and thermal properties was affected by summer BF samples, which may result from the alternative animal feeding systems employed in the summer season, i.e., pasture vs. indoor. Therefore, seasonal variation should be taken into consideration during the elaboration of the analytical method of authenticity assessment. [Spanish] El objetivo de este estudio fue analizar la variable estacional sobre la composición y las propiedades térmicas de grasa de mantequilla (GM) con el fin de evaluar la aplicabilidad de la calorimetría diferencial de barrido (CDB) en la evaluación de la autenticidad de la mantequilla. Se determinó la composición de ácidos grasos (AG) y triglicéridos (TG) y las propiedades térmicas de GM genuina de seis productores en verano e invierno. Se utilizó el análisis de componentes (ACP) principales para reconocer la variación y, como resultado, todas las muestras de GM se clasificaron en dos grupos: uno compuesto de muestras mixtas de verano e invierno y los otro que comprende

  16. Diurnal variation of von Willebrand factor in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timm, Annette; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Jørgensen, Henrik L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quantitation of von Willebrand factor (VWF) in plasma is a central element in assessing von Willebrand disease (VWD). VWF activity is known to vary, which has partly been ascribed to biological and preanalytical variation. However, a possible diurnal expression of VWF has not been...... of light and 9 h of darkness); the plasma concentration of melatonin was used as an internal control to confirm the normal 24-h rhythms of the individual participants. RESULTS: The data, analyzed by rhythmometric statistics, revealed a significant variation (P = 0.02) and total amplitude of 22.6% in VWF...... and VWF and (ii) VWF propeptide and VWF was determined. Taken together, the data suggest changes in release and not in clearance. CONCLUSIONS: Diurnal variation in von Willebrand antigen and activity in plasma represents an important aspect of the biological variation. Standardized time-of-day plasma...

  17. Storm surge variational assimilation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-li HUANG

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available To eliminate errors caused by uncertainty of parameters and further improve capability of storm surge forecasting, the variational data assimilation method is applied to the storm surge model based on unstructured grid with high spatial resolution. The method can effectively improve the forecasting accuracy of storm surge induced by typhoon through controlling wind drag force coefficient parameter. The model is first theoretically validated with synthetic data. Then, the real storm surge process induced by the TC 0515 typhoon is forecasted by the variational data assimilation model, and results show the feasibility of practical application.

  18. The foraminiferal - bacterial connection: an interdisciplinary study of meiofaunal behaviour in the deeper marine redox zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langezaal, Alexandra Maria

    2003-01-01

    Foraminifera are unicellular organisms that are abundantly present in the marine realm. They inhabit both the water column as well as the sediment; these latter (benthic) foraminifera are the main subject of this thesis research. They have a high fossilisation potential, and for that reason they

  19. Meiofaunal cryptic species challenge species delimitation: the case of the Monocelis lineata (Platyhelminthes: Proseriata) species complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scarpa, F.; Cossu, P.; Lai, T.; Sanna, D.; Curini-Galletti, M.; Casu, M.

    2016-01-01

    Given the pending biodiversity crisis, species delimitation is a critically important task in conservation biology, but its efficacy based on single lines of evidence has been questioned as it may not accurately reflect species limits and relationships. Hence, the use of multiple lines of evidence

  20. Meiofaunal distribution across the oxygen minimum zone of continental margin, North East Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ansari, Z.A.; Badesab, S.; Singh, R.; Kitazato, H.

    of Marine Science, 2017, Vol.7, No.7, 59-66 http://ijms.biopublisher.ca 60 pattern metazoan meiofauna of the OMZ area in the north east Arabian Sea, the west coast of India. The data generated are based on samples collected from a submersible robotic... samples by using the robotic arms. The samples for metazoan meiofauna were collected using the push core device. Only one set of samples were made available due to limited number of samples. The cores collected were then sectioned onboard at an interval...

  1. Distribution of meiofaunal abundances in a marine cave complex with secondary openings and freshwater filtrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riera, Rodrigo; Monterroso, Óscar; Núñez, Jorge

    2018-01-01

    Submerged sea caves are priority areas for conservation according to the Habitat Directive 92/43/CEE because of their unique biodiversity. A limited number of publications exist about communities living on sediments inside caves, mostly focused on the macrofaunal fraction (>0.5-mm body size...

  2. Meiofaunal stratification in relation to microbial food in a tropical mangrove mud flat

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ansari, Z.A; Sreepada, R.A; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Parulekar, A

    The vertical gradients of meiofauna mainly in relation to biochemical changes and microbial abundance in the upper 20 cm of deposit of a mangrove mud flat were studied. Strong vertical gradients in the redox potential (Eh), interstitial water...

  3. Seasonality in meiofaunal distribution on a tropical beach at Balramgari, northeast coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chatterji, A; Ansari, Z.A; Mishra, J.K.; Parulekar, A

    in isopods and patchy or contagious in nematodes, turbellaria, amphipoda and cladocera with salinity, pH, chlorophyll-a and POC respectively. Mean grain size of the sediment was highly correlated with the abundance of cladocerans and harpacticods...

  4. Meiofaunal Responses to Leaf Litter Added to Azoic Sediments in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Rhizophora mucronata, seagrass, leaf litter, meiofauna, nematodes, re-colonisation, mangrove sediment, Gazi Bay, Kenya .... chemical composition of leaves from different mangrove species is responsible for observed ... experimental control and mangrove leaf litter treatments and 1% in the field control.

  5. Redescription of the meiofaunal gastropod Parhedyle cryptophthalma, with focus on nervous system and sensory organs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jörger, Katharina M.; Kristof, Alen; Klussmann-Kolb, Annette

    2010-01-01

    on the visceral nerve cord), we found a putative osphradial ganglion for the first time in the microhedylacean clade. No osphradium, no Hancock’s organ and, in contrast to the original description, no pigmented eyes could be detected. Bundles of sensory cilia were found laterally on the head-foot complex......, integumental spicules, and aberrant radula morphology by light and scanning electron microscopy. Our focus was on the central nervous system and sensory organs, using 3D reconstruction based on serial semi-thin sections and immunocytochemistry (staining of FMRFamide and Tyrosine Hydroxylase) in conjunction...

  6. Macro and meiofaunal abundance in six sandy beaches of Lakshadweep islands

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ansari, Z.A; Ramani, P.; Rivonker, C.U.; Parulekar, A

    stream_size 6 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Indian_J_Mar_Sci_19_159.pdf.txt stream_source_info Indian_J_Mar_Sci_19_159.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  7. High Meiofaunal and Nematodes Diversity around Mesophotic Coral Oases in the Mediterranean Sea: e66553

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Silvia Bianchelli; Antonio Pusceddu; Simone Canese; Silvio Greco; Roberto Danovaro

    2013-01-01

      Although the mesophotic zone of the Mediterranean Sea has been poorly investigated, there is an increasing awareness about its ecological importance for its biodiversity, as fish nursery and for the...

  8. High Meiofaunal and Nematodes Diversity around Mesophotic Coral Oases in the Mediterranean Sea

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bianchelli, Silvia; Pusceddu, Antonio; Canese, Simone; Greco, Silvio; Danovaro, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Although the mesophotic zone of the Mediterranean Sea has been poorly investigated, there is an increasing awareness about its ecological importance for its biodiversity, as fish nursery and for the...

  9. Variation assessment of deformable registration in stereotactic radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C-S; Shih, R; Hwang, J-M; Chuang, K-S

    2018-02-01

    The regular functions of CT-MRI registration include delineation of targets and organs-at-risk (OARs) in radiosurgery planning. The question of whether deformable image registration (DIR) could be applied to stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in its place remains a subject of debate. This study collected data regarding 16 patients who had undergone single-fraction SRS treatment. All lesions were located close to the brainstem. CT and MRI two image sets were registered by both rigid image registration (RIR) and DIR algorithms. The contours of the OARs were drawn individually on the rigid and deformable CT-MRI image sets by qualified radiation oncologists and dosimetrists. The evaluation metrics included volume overlapping (VO), Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), and dose. The modified demons deformable algorithm (VARIAN SmartAdapt) was used for evaluation in this study. The mean range of VO for OARs was 0.84 ± 0.08, and DSC was 0.82 ± 0.07. The maximum average volume difference was at normal brain (17.18 ± 14.48 cm3) and the second highest was at brainstem (2.26 cm3 ± 1.18). Pearson correlation testing showed that all DIRs' OAR volumes were linearly and significantly correlated with RIRs' volume (0.679-0.992, two tailed, P dose was prescribed at gross tumor volume (GTV). The average maximum percent dose difference was observed in brainstem (26.54% ± 27.027), and the average mean dose difference has found at same organ (1.6% ± 1.66). The change in image-registration method definitely produces dose variance, and is significantly more what depending on the target location. The volume size of OARs, however, was not statistical significantly correlated with dose variance. Copyright © 2017 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessment of Genetic Variation Among East African Cercospora ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rapid flagement length polymorphism (RFLP) and amplified flagement length polymorphism (AFLP) analyses were used to study genetic diversity of Cercospora zeae-maydis isolates collected from Uganda, Kenya and Rwanda. For comparative purposes, isolates from Zimbabwe and the United States of America (USA) ...

  11. Assessing genetic variation in growth and development of potato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    Key words: Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), segregating population, canopy cover dynamics, tuber bulking dynamics, beta function, thermal time, components of variance, genotype-by-environment interaction (GE), heritability, QTL mapping, QTL-by-environment (QTLE) interaction, complex traits,

  12. Assessment of genetic variation among some introduced tomato ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The average Polymorphic Information Content (PIC) value was 0.59 ranging from 0.31(SSR2) to 0.77 (SSR9). The most polymorphic primers were SSR9, SSR11, and SSR4 based on PIC values. The Agglomerative hierarchical clustering grouped the tomato varieties into two (A & B). At a coefficient of 0.88, cluster B had ...

  13. Biological Variation and Diagnostic Accuracy of Dehydration Assessment Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    12). Thus, the fundamental principles of body fluid regulation provide the framework for using plasma osmolality (Posm) (2, 10, 13, 14), urine...29) and may even provide the necessary framework (29, 31) for determining the elusive gold standard marker for dehydration (5). Although simple...differences between succes- sive measurements. Ann Clin Biochem 1979;16:169–76. 36. Hamouti N, Coso JD, Avila A, Mora-Rodriguez R. Effects of athletes

  14. Variation of Citrus cultivars in Egypt assessed by RAPDs, cluster ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR-Seham

    2012-11-13

    Nov 13, 2012 ... The four cultivars of sweet common orange and sweet navel orange was linked together in a separate cluster. ... Key words: Abscisic acid, abscission, Citrus, cluster analysis, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) random amplified polymorphic ..... are known to endanger the Citrus industry worldwide. (Hofer, 2007).

  15. Assessment of corneal biomechanical properties and their variation with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsheikh, Ahmed; Wang, Defu; Brown, Michael; Rama, Paolo; Campanelli, Marino; Pye, David

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the stress-strain behavior of corneal tissue and how the behavior was affected by age. Human corneal specimens ranging in age between 50 and 95 years were tested under inflation conditions to determine their stress-strain behavior. The corneas were subjected to two load rates that represent dynamic and static loading conditions. The pressure-deformation results were analyzed using shell theory to derive the stress-strain behavior. The corneas demonstrated clear nonlinear behavior with an initial low stiffness stage and a final high stiffness stage. The transition between the two stages coincided with intraocular pressures between 12 and 20 mmHg. There was a considerable increase in stiffness associated with both age and load rate. Equations were derived to describe the nonlinear stress-strain relationship of corneal tissue for any age between 50 and 95 years, and these equations are presented in a form suitable for use in numerical simulations. The cornea demonstrates considerable stiffening with age with the behavior closely fitting an exponential power function typical of collagenous tissue. The increase in stiffness could be related to the additional age-related nonenzymatic cross-linking affecting the stromal collagen fibrils.

  16. Assessment of Regional Variation in Streamflow Responses ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquatic ecosystems are sensitive to the modification of hydrologic regimes, experiencing declines in stream health as the streamflow regime is altered during urbanization. This study uses streamflow records to quantify the type and magnitude of hydrologic changes across urbanization gradients in nine U.S. cities (Atlanta, GA, Baltimore, MD, Boston, MA, Detroit, MI, Raleigh, NC, St. Paul, MN, Pittsburgh, PA, Phoenix, AZ, and Portland, OR) in two physiographic settings. Results indicate similar development trajectories among urbanization gradients, but heterogeneity in the type and magnitude of hydrologic responses to this apparently uniform urban pattern. Similar urban patterns did not confer similar hydrologic function. Study watersheds in landscapes with level slopes and high soil permeability had less frequent high-flow events, longer high-flow durations, lower flashiness response, and lower flow maxima compared to similarly developed watersheds in landscape with steep slopes and low soil permeability. Our results suggest that physical characteristics associated with level topography and high water-storage capacity buffer the severity of hydrologic changes associated with urbanization. Urbanization overlain upon a diverse set of physical templates creates multiple pathways toward hydrologic impairment; therefore, we caution against the use of the urban homogenization framework in examining geophysically dominated processes. This paper shows cities how to utili

  17. Assessment of genetic variation among four populations of Small ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Username

    2017-11-22

    Nov 22, 2017 ... 1 Tanzania Livestock Research Institute, West Kilimanjaro, P O Box 147, Sanya Juu, Kilimanjaro, Tanzania ... Abstract. The majority of goats in Tanzania belong to the Small East African (SEA) breed, which exhibits large ... Moreover, as a signatory to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD),. Tanzania ...

  18. Assessing streamflow sensitivity to variations in glacier mass balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neel, Shad; Hood, Eran; Arendt, Anthony; Sass, Louis

    2014-01-01

    The mountains ringing the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) receive upwards of 4–8 m yr−1 of precipitation (Simpson et al.2005; Weingartner et al. 2005; O’Neel 2012), much of which runs off into productive coastal waters. The alpine landscape is heavily glacierized, and storage and turnover of water by glaciers substantially influences the regional surface water balance (Neal et al. 2010). In turn, the land-to-ocean flux of freshwater impacts the biogeochemistry, physical oceanography, freshwater and marine ecology of the downstream components of the GOA ecosystem (e.g., Royer et al. 2001; Hood and Scott 2008). In this way, the links between terrestrial and ocean ecosystems along the GOA have widespread impacts on regional socioeconomic issues including water and hydropower resources, fish populations, and sea level change (Dorava and Milner 2000; Royer and Grosch 2006; Cherry et al. 2010; Gardner et al. 2013). Moreover, predicting future changes in physical, chemical and biological processes in near-shore ecosystems along the GOA hinges, in part, on developing a robust understanding of water storage and transfer by glaciers through streams to the ocean.

  19. Early assessment of genotypic variation in growth and nitrogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To enhance the benefits from N2-fixing symbiosis in low nitrogen fixers such as Faidherbia albida, knowledge is needed on how genotypes of both the host and its bacterial partner interact to influence N fixation-related traits of the host legume. A greenhouse experiment was carried out to investigate the variability of several ...

  20. Assessment of Pollution-Induced Dissolved Oxygen Variation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study is aimed at investigating the effect of industrial effluents on the water quality of River Challawa. Chemical analyses of samples of the river water collected at predetermined sampling points along a 10.644 km stretch were undertaken and the observations were subjected to ANOVA and regression analyses.

  1. Assessment and Seasonal Variations of Heavy Metals and Mineral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mal Raji

    The water quality of River Sokoto in North-western Nigeria was monitored from January, April, June, ... Pollution and contamination of natural water bodies by industrial effluents, agricultural practices and domestic activities have emerged as major challenges in developing and .... soaps and detergents used for washing and.

  2. Sequential buckling : a variational analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Peletier (Mark)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractWe examine a variational problem from elastic stability theory: a thin elastic strut on an elastic foundation. The strut has infinite length, and its lateral deflection is represented by $u:RtoR$. Deformation takes place under conditions of prescribed total shortening, leading to the

  3. linking genetic to phenotypic variation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    phenotypic variation. SHAMPA GHOSH and N. SHARMILA BHARATHI. Evolutionary Biology Laboratory, Evolutionary and Organismal Biology Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for. Advanced Scientific Research, P.O. Box 6436, Jakkur, Bangalore 560 064, India. Immunity can be classified into two types, namely innate.

  4. Evolutionary significance of epigenetic variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richards, C.L.; Verhoeven, K.J.F.; Bossdorf, O.; Wendel, J.F.; Greilhuber, J.; Dolezel, J.; Leitch, I.J.

    2012-01-01

    Several chapters in this volume demonstrate how epigenetic work at the molecular level over the last few decades has revolutionized our understanding of genome function and developmental biology. However, epigenetic processes not only further our understanding of variation and regulation at the

  5. On quadratic variation of martingales

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Year Meetings · Discussion Meetings · Public Lectures · Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 124; Issue 3. On Quadratic Variation of Martingales. Rajeeva L Karandikar B V Rao. Volume 124 Issue 3 August 2014 pp 457-469 ...

  6. Sea level and climate variations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.

    1985-01-01

    Review paper, ESA Symposium on Application of Satellite Data to Climate Modelling. Alpbach (Austria) Sea level is an essential component of the climate system, on which many human activities in the coastal zone depend. Climate variations leading to changes in relative sea level are

  7. Separating common from distinctive variation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kloet, F.M.; Sebastián-León, P.; Conesa, A.; Smilde, A.K.; Westerhuis, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Joint and individual variation explained (JIVE), distinct and common simultaneous component analysis (DISCO) and O2-PLS, a two-block (X-Y) latent variable regression method with an integral OSC filter can all be used for the integrated analysis of multiple data sets and decompose them in

  8. Variation in carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios in flight ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bellied Sunbird to assess the value of using stable isotopes of feathers in avian dietary studies. Significant variation in δ13C and δ15N isotope values of flight feathers (range = 3.1‰ and 2.7‰, respectively) indicated that the source of carbon (i.e. ...

  9. Seasonal variation and prevalence of tuberculosis among health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) in Fako health District, to assess the effects of seasonal variation on the incidence of TB in the study area and to use sentinel analysis to predict areas of greatest infection. Design: A prospective cross sectional study based on laboratory investigations.

  10. Effect Of Bulk Density Variation On The Compression Strength Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports a study conducted to assess the influence of variation of bulk density on compression strength of clay-bonded sand. Five sand mixes containing silica sand, sodium silicate gel (1 wt. % to 5 wt. %), potters' clay (2 wt. %), and about 5 wt. % water were produced. Each mix was divided into three portions to ...

  11. Molecular genetic variation in the African wild rice Oryza ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-16

    May 16, 2008 ... Molecular markers, complemented by appropriate Geographical Information System (GIS) software packages are powerful tools in mapping the geographical distribution of genetic variation and assessing its relationship with environmental variables. The objective of the study was therefore to investigate ...

  12. Genetic variation of 12 rice cultivars grown in Brunei Darussalam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dell

    2015-03-25

    Mar 25, 2015 ... Genetic variations of 12 different rice cultivars in Brunei Darussalam were studied using 15 different. SSR markers and their salinity tolerance mechanism was also assessed. Eight SSR markers, RM 151,. 187, 206, 226, 276, 310, 320 and 334, showed polymorphic alleles while the other seven were.

  13. Bone Morphogenetic Protein 3 (BMP3) Gene Variation in some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR BRILLIANT

    Abstract. Variation in Bone Morphogenetic Protein 3 (BMP3) genes in some selected livestock animals was assessed using sequences downloaded from the GenBank. (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genbank/). The analysis was carried out in 36 pair-wise comparisons where averages of 1277.780 sites were analyzed.

  14. Bone Morphogenetic Protein 3 (BMP3) Gene Variation in some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Variation in Bone Morphogenetic Protein 3 (BMP3) genes in some selected livestock animals was assessed using sequences downloaded from the GenBank (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/genbank/). The analysis was carried out in 36 pair-wise comparisons where averages of 1277.780 sites were analyzed. Analysis at ...

  15. Phenotypic and nuclear DNA variation in Tunisian cultivars of date ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to assess the morphological diversity of the five most important and widely consumed Tunisian date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) cultivars and the possible relationship between phenotypic variation and genome size and ploidy, since polyploidy can occur in this species. Five Tunisian palm date ...

  16. Effects of seasonal variation and tidal regimes on macrobenthic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An assessment of the effects of seasonal variation and tidal regimes on the distribution and density of macrobenthic invertebrates of the coastal Warri River, southern Nigeria was carried out from July 2014 to February 2015. Samples were collected from five longitudinal stations from headwater to mouth during high and low ...

  17. Spatial variation of environmental impacts of regional biomass chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilst, van der F.; Lesschen, J.P.; Dam, van J.M.C.; Riksen, M.J.P.M.; Verweij, P.A.; Sanders, J.P.M.; Faaij, A.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the spatial variation of potential environmental impacts of bioenergy crops is quantitatively assessed. The cultivation of sugar beet and Miscanthus for bioethanol production in the North of the Netherlands is used as a case study. The environmental impacts included are greenhouse gas

  18. Spatial variation in environmental impacts of bioenergy supply chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilst, F. van der; Dam, J.M.C. van; Verweij, P.A.; Riksen, M.J.P.M.; Sanders, J.P.M.; Faaij, A.P.C.

    In this study, the spatial variation of potential environmental impacts of bioenergy crops is quantitatively assessed. The cultivation of sugar beet and Miscanthus for bioethanol production in the North of the Netherlands is used as a case study. The environmental impacts included are greenhouse gas

  19. Determining wetland spatial extent and seasonal variations of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study, done in the Witbank Dam Catchment in Mpumalanga Province of South Africa, explores a remote-sensing technique to delineate wetland extent and assesses the seasonal variations of the inundated area. The objective was to monitor the spatio-temporal changes of wetlands over time through remote sensing ...

  20. Variations in Wood Anatomical Characteristics of Nigerian grown ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    obeche) were investigated to assess the variation pattern of fibre, vessel and ray elements. Test samples were obtained axially from butt, 10%, 30%, 50%, 70% and 90% of merchantable height (MH); and radially from inner wood, middle wood and ...

  1. Interobserver variation in interpretation of electrocardiographic signs of atrial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, J H; Nielsen, F E; Falstie-Jensen, N

    1993-01-01

    The electrocardiogram (ECG) is the only means of diagnosing atrial infarction antemortem. Certain ECG changes (PR-segment displacements) have been taken earlier as signs of atrial infarction. The purpose of this study was to assess the interobserver variation on suggested ECG signs of atrial infa...

  2. Insect pests' incidence and variations due to forest landscape ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Group surveys were conducted in five villages in each of the three resource-use zones of the humid forest zone of Southern Cameroon, to assess insect pests' incidence and the variation due to forest landscape degradation in the agricultural production systems. 389 farmers were interviewed. The results show that: (1) In ...

  3. Appendicitis: Trends in incidence, age, sex, and seasonal variations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    allergens in the dust, during the sandstorms of the. Spring months, in the Arabian Peninsula. The aim of this retrospective study is to assess the trends in incidence and patterns of variation with age, sex, and seasons of the year, thus contributing to the world of literature on appendicitis, from this part of Nigeria. Materials and ...

  4. seasonal variation and prevalence of tuberculosis among health

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Damary

    2006-11-11

    Nov 11, 2006 ... Objectives: To determine the prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) in Fako health District, to assess the effects of seasonal variation on the incidence of TB in the study area and to use sentinel analysis to predict areas of greatest infection. Design: A prospective cross sectional study based on laboratory ...

  5. Seasonal variation in the production of secondary metabolites and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Guapira graciliflora and Pseudobombax marginatum are two species used in the treatment of various diseases in traditional medicine of the Brazilian semiarid region, but no studies assessing their phytochemical and pharmacological properties have been reported. This study aimed to evaluate seasonal variation in the ...

  6. Variation in biological parameters of cypermethrin resistant and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this survey was to assess the costs of cypermethrin resistance in Helicoverpa armigera strains by using variation in their biological parameters such as fecundity, number of larval slough, development time, weight and survival at each stage of insect development in comparison with susceptible strains. AGB01 and ...

  7. Spatial variation of volatile organic compounds and carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed variations of ambient volatile organic compounds and carbon monoxide (CO) levels in Blantyre City, Malawi. Volatile organic compounds and carbon monoxide measurement was done using the Multi-Gas Monitor between August and December, 2010. Rapid urbanization and lack of standard ...

  8. VARIATION IN THE FIBRE CHARACTERISTICS OF THE WOOD OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cani

    2000). Since the papermaking characteristic of any given pulp is a function of the chemical and fibre properties of the plant, this study, is therefore, aimed at examining the fibre dimensions, lignin and cellulose. ASSESSMENT OF VARIATION IN THE FIBRE CHARACTERISTICS OF THE WOOD OF VITEX DONIANA SWEET ...

  9. Volume 10 No. 11 November 2010 4320 IONOMIC VARIATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2010-11-11

    Nov 11, 2010 ... ionome grading; (2) Assess variation among accessions based on single element criterion; (3) Characterize ... The single element K discriminator basis was highly significant (p<.001) relative to the other elements but ..... were obtained. The curve passed through the origin and bracketed the concentrations.

  10. Individual diet variation in a marine fish assemblage: Optimal Foraging Theory, Niche Variation Hypothesis and functional identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachera, M.; Ernande, B.; Villanueva, M. C.; Lefebvre, S.

    2017-02-01

    Individual diet variation (i.e. diet variation among individuals) impacts intra- and inter-specific interactions. Investigating its sources and relationship with species trophic niche organization is important for understanding community structure and dynamics. Individual diet variation may increase with intra-specific phenotypic (or "individual state") variation and habitat variability, according to Optimal Foraging Theory (OFT), and with species trophic niche width, according to the Niche Variation Hypothesis (NVH). OFT proposes "proximate sources" of individual diet variation such as variations in habitat or size whereas NVH relies on "ultimate sources" related to the competitive balance between intra- and inter-specific competitions. The latter implies as a corollary that species trophic niche overlap, taken as inter-specific competition measure, decreases as species niche width and individual niche variation increase. We tested the complementary predictions of OFT and NVH in a marine fish assemblage using stomach content data and associated trophic niche metrics. The NVH predictions were tested between species of the assemblage and decomposed into a between- and a within-functional group component to assess the potential influence of species' ecological function. For most species, individual diet variation and niche overlap were consistently larger than expected. Individual diet variation increased with intra-specific variability in individual state and habitat, as expected from OFT. It also increased with species niche width but in compliance with the null expectation, thus not supporting the NVH. In contrast, species niche overlap increased significantly less than null expectation with both species niche width and individual diet variation, supporting NVH corollary. The between- and within-functional group components of the NVH relationships were consistent with those between species at the assemblage level. Changing the number of prey categories used to

  11. Variation of Parameters in Differential Equations (A Variation in Making Sense of Variation of Parameters)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Terry; Rai, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    The method of variation of parameters can be found in most undergraduate textbooks on differential equations. The method leads to solutions of the non-homogeneous equation of the form y = u[subscript 1]y[subscript 1] + u[subscript 2]y[subscript 2], a sum of function products using solutions to the homogeneous equation y[subscript 1] and…

  12. Adaptive genetic variation, stress and glucose regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriel, Roxanne C; Wiley, Christopher D; Dewey, Michael J; Vrana, Paul B

    2008-01-01

    Elevated glucose levels in the presence of insulin are indicative of type 2 diabetes and the more inclusive metabolic syndrome. Alleles conferring susceptibility to these and other common conditions may be adaptations to past environments. It is possible that other mammals exhibiting environmental diversity harbor similar variants; therefore, we assessed glucose regulation in two species of deer mice (Peromyscus), a diverse endemic North American group. The prairie deer mouse, P. maniculatus bairdii (BW), and the Oldfield mouse, P. polionotus subgriseus (PO) differ in sexual dimorphism, behavior and habitat. PO animals exhibit better regulatory ability than BW animals, particularly among males, although both species display equivalent insulin levels/responses and non-fasted glucose levels. Hybrid males exhibit a PO glucose challenge response and subsequent analysis of consomic animals implicates Y chromosome variation as the genetic cause. Two pieces of evidence indicate that the male glucose regulatory differences are mediated by stress response: (1) fasting and handling alone account for most of the variation; (2) an inhibitor of glucocorticoid (GC) stress hormone synthesis eliminates these differences. PO males have GC levels that are twice those of BW males, indicating the presence of alleles that attenuate the GC response. We hypothesize that the interspecific physiological and behavioral differences are interrelated and that similar human variants exist.

  13. Comparison of Sequential and Variational Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado Montero, Rodolfo; Schwanenberg, Dirk; Weerts, Albrecht

    2017-04-01

    Data assimilation is a valuable tool to improve model state estimates by combining measured observations with model simulations. It has recently gained significant attention due to its potential in using remote sensing products to improve operational hydrological forecasts and for reanalysis purposes. This has been supported by the application of sequential techniques such as the Ensemble Kalman Filter which require no additional features within the modeling process, i.e. it can use arbitrary black-box models. Alternatively, variational techniques rely on optimization algorithms to minimize a pre-defined objective function. This function describes the trade-off between the amount of noise introduced into the system and the mismatch between simulated and observed variables. While sequential techniques have been commonly applied to hydrological processes, variational techniques are seldom used. In our believe, this is mainly attributed to the required computation of first order sensitivities by algorithmic differentiation techniques and related model enhancements, but also to lack of comparison between both techniques. We contribute to filling this gap and present the results from the assimilation of streamflow data in two basins located in Germany and Canada. The assimilation introduces noise to precipitation and temperature to produce better initial estimates of an HBV model. The results are computed for a hindcast period and assessed using lead time performance metrics. The study concludes with a discussion of the main features of each technique and their advantages/disadvantages in hydrological applications.

  14. Methodology for dimensional variation analysis of ITER integrated systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes, F. Javier, E-mail: FranciscoJavier.Fuentes@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon—CS 90046, 13067 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Trouvé, Vincent [Assystem Engineering & Operation Services, rue J-M Jacquard CS 60117, 84120 Pertuis (France); Cordier, Jean-Jacques; Reich, Jens [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon—CS 90046, 13067 St Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Tokamak dimensional management methodology, based on 3D variation analysis, is presented. • Dimensional Variation Model implementation workflow is described. • Methodology phases are described in detail. The application of this methodology to the tolerance analysis of ITER Vacuum Vessel is presented. • Dimensional studies are a valuable tool for the assessment of Tokamak PCR (Project Change Requests), DR (Deviation Requests) and NCR (Non-Conformance Reports). - Abstract: The ITER machine consists of a large number of complex systems highly integrated, with critical functional requirements and reduced design clearances to minimize the impact in cost and performances. Tolerances and assembly accuracies in critical areas could have a serious impact in the final performances, compromising the machine assembly and plasma operation. The management of tolerances allocated to part manufacture and assembly processes, as well as the control of potential deviations and early mitigation of non-compliances with the technical requirements, is a critical activity on the project life cycle. A 3D tolerance simulation analysis of ITER Tokamak machine has been developed based on 3DCS dedicated software. This integrated dimensional variation model is representative of Tokamak manufacturing functional tolerances and assembly processes, predicting accurate values for the amount of variation on critical areas. This paper describes the detailed methodology to implement and update the Tokamak Dimensional Variation Model. The model is managed at system level. The methodology phases are illustrated by its application to the Vacuum Vessel (VV), considering the status of maturity of VV dimensional variation model. The following topics are described in this paper: • Model description and constraints. • Model implementation workflow. • Management of input and output data. • Statistical analysis and risk assessment. The management of the integration studies based on

  15. Coarse Grained Exponential Variational Autoencoders

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Ke

    2017-02-25

    Variational autoencoders (VAE) often use Gaussian or category distribution to model the inference process. This puts a limit on variational learning because this simplified assumption does not match the true posterior distribution, which is usually much more sophisticated. To break this limitation and apply arbitrary parametric distribution during inference, this paper derives a \\\\emph{semi-continuous} latent representation, which approximates a continuous density up to a prescribed precision, and is much easier to analyze than its continuous counterpart because it is fundamentally discrete. We showcase the proposition by applying polynomial exponential family distributions as the posterior, which are universal probability density function generators. Our experimental results show consistent improvements over commonly used VAE models.

  16. Tidal variations of earth rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, C. F.; Williams, J. G.; Parke, M. E.

    1981-01-01

    The periodic variations of the earths' rotation resulting from the tidal deformation of the earth by the sun and moon were rederived including terms with amplitudes of 0.002 millisec and greater. The series applies to the mantle, crust, and oceans which rotate together for characteristic tidal periods; the scaling parameter is the ratio of the fraction of the Love number producing tidal variations in the moment of inertia of the coupled mantle and oceans (k) to the dimensionless polar moment of inertia of the coupled moments (C). The lunar laser ranging data shows that k/C at monthly and fortnightly frequencies equals 0.99 + or - 0.15 and 0.99 + or - 0.20 as compared to the theoretical value of 0.94 + or - 0.04.

  17. Variational approach in transport theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panta Pazos, R. [Nucler Engineering Department, UFRGS, Porto-Alegre (Brazil); Tullio de Vilhena, M. [Institute of Mathematics, UFRGS, Porto-Alegre (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    In this work we present a variational approach to some methods to solve transport problems of neutral particles. We consider a convex domain X (for example the geometry of a slab, or a convex set in the plane, or a convex bounded set in the space) and we use discrete ordinates quadrature to get a system of differential equations derived from the neutron transport equation. The boundary conditions are vacuum for a subset of the boundary, and of specular reflection for the complementary subset of the boundary. Recently some different approximation methods have been presented to solve these transport problems. We introduce in this work the adjoint equations and the conjugate functions obtained by means of the variational approach. First we consider the general formulation, and then some numerical methods such as spherical harmonics and spectral collocation method. (authors)

  18. Bernoulli Variational Problem and Beyond

    KAUST Repository

    Lorz, Alexander

    2013-12-17

    The question of \\'cutting the tail\\' of the solution of an elliptic equation arises naturally in several contexts and leads to a singular perturbation problem under the form of a strong cut-off. We consider both the PDE with a drift and the symmetric case where a variational problem can be stated. It is known that, in both cases, the same critical scale arises for the size of the singular perturbation. More interesting is that in both cases another critical parameter (of order one) arises that decides when the limiting behaviour is non-degenerate. We study both theoretically and numerically the values of this critical parameter and, in the symmetric case, ask if the variational solution leads to the same value as for the maximal solution of the PDE. Finally we propose a weak formulation of the limiting Bernoulli problem which incorporates both Dirichlet and Neumann boundary condition. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  19. Decadal variations in groundwater quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Søren; Postma, Dieke; Thorling, Lærke

    2017-01-01

    Twenty-five years of groundwater quality monitoring in a sandy aquifer beneath agricultural fields showed large temporal and spatial variations in major ion groundwater chemistry, which were linked closely to the nitrate (NO3) content of agricultural recharge. Between 1988 and 2013, the NO3 content...... loading. Agriculture thus is an important determinant of major ion groundwater chemistry. Temporal and spatial variations in the groundwater quality were simulated using a 2D reactive transport model, which combined effects of the historical NO3 leaching and denitrification, with dispersive mixing...... into the pristine groundwater residing deeper in the aquifer. Reactant-to-product ratios across reaction fronts are altered by dispersive mixing and transience in reactant input functions. Modelling therefore allowed a direct comparison of observed and simulated ratios of concentrations of NO3 (reactant...

  20. Phase variations in Bifidobacterium animalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biavati, B; Crociani, F; Mattarelli, P; Scardovi, V

    1992-07-01

    Strains isolated from rabbit, chicken, and rat feces and from sewage and fermented milk products, all identified as Bifidobacterium animalis, were found to show phase variations in colony appearance and in cellular morphology. The rate of transition in a switching system from opaque to transparent colonies and vice versa was determined. Differences in protein components and in penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) of the cells from different colony types are shown.

  1. Quadratic Variation by Markov Chains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Reinhard; Horel, Guillaume

    We introduce a novel estimator of the quadratic variation that is based on the the- ory of Markov chains. The estimator is motivated by some general results concerning filtering contaminated semimartingales. Specifically, we show that filtering can in prin- ciple remove the effects of market......- cal results. The proposed estimator is consistent with a Gaussian limit distribution and we study its properties in simulations and an empirical application....

  2. Variational integrators for reduced magnetohydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, Michael, E-mail: michael.kraus@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Technische Universität München, Zentrum Mathematik, Boltzmannstraße 3, 85748 Garching (Germany); Tassi, Emanuele, E-mail: tassi@cpt.univ-mrs.fr [Aix-Marseille Université, Université de Toulon, CNRS, CPT, UMR 7332, 163 avenue de Luminy, case 907, 13288 cedex 9 Marseille (France); Grasso, Daniela, E-mail: daniela.grasso@infm.polito.it [ISC-CNR and Politecnico di Torino, Dipartimento Energia, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2016-09-15

    Reduced magnetohydrodynamics is a simplified set of magnetohydrodynamics equations with applications to both fusion and astrophysical plasmas, possessing a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure and consequently a number of conserved functionals. We propose a new discretisation strategy for these equations based on a discrete variational principle applied to a formal Lagrangian. The resulting integrator preserves important quantities like the total energy, magnetic helicity and cross helicity exactly (up to machine precision). As the integrator is free of numerical resistivity, spurious reconnection along current sheets is absent in the ideal case. If effects of electron inertia are added, reconnection of magnetic field lines is allowed, although the resulting model still possesses a noncanonical Hamiltonian structure. After reviewing the conservation laws of the model equations, the adopted variational principle with the related conservation laws is described both at the continuous and discrete level. We verify the favourable properties of the variational integrator in particular with respect to the preservation of the invariants of the models under consideration and compare with results from the literature and those of a pseudo-spectral code.

  3. Intraspecific variation in Cryptocaryon irritans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diggles, B K; Adlard, R D

    1997-01-01

    Intraspecific variation in the ciliate Cryptocaryon irritans was examined using sequences of the first internal transcribed spacer region (ITS-1) of ribosomal DNA (rDNA) combined with developmental and morphological characters. Amplified rDNA sequences consisting of 151 bases of the flanking 18 S and 5.8 S regions, and the entire ITS-1 region (169 or 170 bases), were determined and compared for 16 isolates of C. irritans from Australia, Israel and the USA. There was one variable base between isolates in the 18 S region and 11 variable bases in the ITS-1 region. Despite their similar morphology, significant sequence variation (4.1% divergence) and developmental differences indicate that Australian C. irritans isolates from estuarine (Moreton Bay) and coral reef (Heron Island) environments are distinct. The Heron Island isolate was genetically closer to morphologically dissimilar isolates from Israel (1.8% divergence) and the USA (2.3% divergence) than it was to the Moreton Bay isolates. Three isolates maintained in our laboratory since February 1994 differed in sequence from earlier laboratory isolates (2.9% to 3.5% divergence), even though all were similar morphologically and originated from the same source. During this time the sequence of the isolates from wild fish in Moreton Bay remained unchanged. These genetic differences indicate the existence of a founder effect in laboratory populations of C. irritans. The genetic variation found here, combined with known morphological and developmental differences, is used to characterise four strains of C. irritans.

  4. Copy number variation and mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Brian; Weidner, Jacob; Wabick, Kevin

    2009-11-01

    Until very recently, the standard model of DNA included two genes for each trait. This dated model has given way to a model that includes copies of some genes well in excess of the canonical two. Copy number variations in the human genome play critical roles in causing or aggravating a number of syndromes and diseases while providing increased resistance to others. We explore the role of mutation, crossover, inversion, and reproduction in determining copy number variations in a numerical simulation of a population. The numerical model consists of a population of individuals, where each individual is represented by a single strand of DNA with the same number of genes. Each gene is initially assigned to one of two traits. Fitness of the individual is determined by the two most fit genes for trait one, and trait two genetic material is treated as a reservoir of junk DNA. After a sufficient number of generations, during which the genetic distribution is allowed to reach a steady-state, the mean numberof genes per trait and the copy number variation are recorded. Here, we focus on the role of mutation and compare simulation results to theory.

  5. Longitudinal Variations in Jupiter's Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Gierasch, P. J.; Tierney, G.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term studies of Jupiter's zonal wind field revealed temporal variations on the order of 20 to 40 m/s at many latitudes, greater than the typical data uncertainties of 1 to 10 m/s. No definitive periodicities were evident, however, though some latitudinally-confined signals did appear at periods relevant to the Quasi- Quadrennial Oscillation (Simon-Miller & Gierasch, Icarus, in press). As the QQO appears, from vertical temperature profiles, to propagate downward, it is unclear why a signal is not more obvious, unless other processes dominate over possibly weaker forcing from the QQO. An additional complication is that zonal wind profiles represent an average over some particular set of longitudes for an image pair and most data sets do not offer global wind coverage. Lien avoiding known features, such as the large anticyclonic vortices especially prevalent in the south, there can be distinct variations in longitude. We present results on the full wind field from Voyager and Cassini data, showing apparent longitudinal variations of up to 60 m/s or more. These are particularly obvious near disruptions such as the South Equatorial Disturbance, even when the feature itself is not clearly visible. These two dates represent very different states of the planet for comparison: Voyagers 1 & 2 flew by Jupiter shortly after a global upheaval, while many regions were in a disturbed state, while the Cassini view is typical of a more quiescent period present during much of the 1990s and early 2000s.

  6. Cluster-based exposure variation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Static posture, repetitive movements and lack of physical variation are known risk factors for work-related musculoskeletal disorders, and thus needs to be properly assessed in occupational studies. The aims of this study were (i) to investigate the effectiveness of a conventional exposure variation analysis (EVA) in discriminating exposure time lines and (ii) to compare it with a new cluster-based method for analysis of exposure variation. Methods For this purpose, we simulated a repeated cyclic exposure varying within each cycle between “low” and “high” exposure levels in a “near” or “far” range, and with “low” or “high” velocities (exposure change rates). The duration of each cycle was also manipulated by selecting a “small” or “large” standard deviation of the cycle time. Theses parameters reflected three dimensions of exposure variation, i.e. range, frequency and temporal similarity. Each simulation trace included two realizations of 100 concatenated cycles with either low (ρ = 0.1), medium (ρ = 0.5) or high (ρ = 0.9) correlation between the realizations. These traces were analyzed by conventional EVA, and a novel cluster-based EVA (C-EVA). Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied on the marginal distributions of 1) the EVA of each of the realizations (univariate approach), 2) a combination of the EVA of both realizations (multivariate approach) and 3) C-EVA. The least number of principal components describing more than 90% of variability in each case was selected and the projection of marginal distributions along the selected principal component was calculated. A linear classifier was then applied to these projections to discriminate between the simulated exposure patterns, and the accuracy of classified realizations was determined. Results C-EVA classified exposures more correctly than univariate and multivariate EVA approaches; classification accuracy was 49%, 47% and 52% for EVA (univariate

  7. Sublittoral meiobenthic assemblages from disturbed and non-disturbed sediments in the Balearics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Deudero

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative and quantitative differences in species composition of meiobenthic communities illustrate the differences among various taxonomic assemblages in the Balearic Islands (Western Mediterranean analysed by means of multivariate analysis. Average densities ranged between 1000 and 4000 ind?10cm-2, and are in the same range as previously reported from other shallow Mediterranean areas. The dominant meiofaunal taxa were Nematoda (range 40 to 75%, Turbellaria (5-47% and Copepoda (2-14%, while other meiofaunal groups (Tardigrada and Rotifera were only represented by approximately 5% of the total abundance. The dominant nematode families were Desmodoridae, Chromadoridae and Xyalidae. The meiofaunal communities showed little variation among locations. Moreover, small-scale heterogeneity does not seem to affect nematode distribution as shown by the high similarity between replicates in the multivariate analysis.

  8. Sources of Variation in the Age Composition of Sandeel Landings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvist, Trine; Gislason, Hannes; Thyregod, Poul

    2001-01-01

    The variation of the age composition of the landings of lesser sandeel in the Danish industrial fishery in the North Sea over the period From 1984-1993 is analysed by continuation-ratio logits and generalised linear models. The analysis takes the multinomial characteristics of the age composition....... Although the variation between ICES statistical rectangles is substantial there is a significant difference between the age composition in the northern and southern part of the North Sea. However, only one of the three finer geographical stratifications proposed to improve the assessment results...

  9. Genetic variation architecture of mitochondrial genome reveals the differentiation in Korean landrace and weedy rice

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Tong; Qiang He; Yong-Jin Park

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial genome variations have been detected despite the overall conservation of this gene content, which has been valuable for plant population genetics and evolutionary studies. Here, we describe mitochondrial variation architecture and our performance of a phylogenetic dissection of Korean landrace and weedy rice. A total of 4,717 variations across the mitochondrial genome were identified adjunct with 10 wild rice. Genetic diversity assessment revealed that wild rice has higher nucle...

  10. Anatomical variations of paranasal sinuses at multislice computed tomography: what to look for

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miranda, Christiana Maia Nobre Rocha de; Maranhao, Carol Pontes de Miranda [Clinica de Medicina Nuclear e Radiologia de Maceio (Medradius), Maceio, AL (Brazil). Setor de Tomografia Computadorizada; Arraes, Fabiana Maia Nobre Rocha [Clinica Sinus, Maceio, AL (Brazil); Padilha, Igor Gomes; Farias, Lucas de Padua Gomes de; Jatoba, Mayara Stephanie de Araujo; Andrade, Anna Carolina Mendonca de; Padilha, Bruno Gomes [Universidade Federal de Alagoas (UFAL), Maceio, AL (Brazil)

    2011-07-15

    Multislice computed tomography is currently the imaging modality of choice for evaluating paranasal sinuses and adjacent structures. Such a method has been increasingly utilized in the assessment of anatomical variations, allowing their accurate identification with high anatomical details. Some anatomical variations may predispose to sinusal diseases, constituting areas of high risk for injuries and complications during surgical procedures. Therefore, the recognition of such variations is critical in the preoperative evaluation for endoscopic surgery. (author)

  11. Size and shape variation in the proximal femur of Australopithecus africanus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, Elizabeth

    2009-06-01

    Aside from use as estimates of body mass dimorphism and fore to hind limb joint size comparisons, postcranial elements have not often contributed to assessments of variation in Australopithecus africanus. Meanwhile, cranial, facial, and dental size variation is interpreted to be high or moderately high. Further, the cranial base and face express patterns of structural (shape) variation, which are interpreted by some as evidence for the presence of multiple species. Here, the proximal femur is used to consider postcranial size and shape variation in A. africanus. Original fossils from Makapansgat and Sterkfontein, and samples from Homo, Pan, Gorilla, and Pongo were measured. Size variation was assessed by comparing the A. africanus coefficient of variation to bootstrapped distributions of coefficient of variation samples for each taxon. Shape variation was assessed from isometrically adjusted shape variables. First, the A. africanus standard deviation of log transformed shape variables was compared to bootstrapped distributions of logged standard deviations in each taxon. Second, shape variable based Euclidean distances between fossil pairs were compared to pairwise Euclidean distance distributions in each reference taxon. The degree of size variation in the A. africanus proximal femur is consistent with that of a single species, and is most comparable to Homo and Pan, lower than A. afarensis, and lower than some estimates of cranial and dental variation. Some, but not all, shape variables show more variation in A. africanus than in extant taxa. The degree of shape difference between some fossils exceeds the majority of pairwise differences in the reference taxa. Proximal femoral shape, but not size, variation is consistent with high estimates of A. africanus cranial variation.

  12. Variation in Organization of Transient Ischemic Attack Care in The Netherlands. A Nationwide Survey Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Fenna Floortje; de Beer, Frank; Visser, Marieke Christine

    2017-09-01

    Previous research has shown the importance of urgent initiation of antiplatelet therapy after transient ischemic attack (TIA) to reduce the risk of stroke. Many hospitals in the Netherlands have therefore implemented rapid pathways for assessment of patients with TIA. Dutch stroke guidelines lack clear directives for organization of TIA assessment and thus allow for variation. The aim of this study was to investigate variation in organization of TIA assessment in Dutch hospitals. One neurologist per hospital (of 88 Dutch hospitals) with special interest in stroke was invited to participate in a web-based survey addressing the organization, content, and timing of TIA assessment. Seventy (80%) neurologists completed the survey, all of whom reported performing TIA assessment in their hospital. There was considerable variation in the method of application and the location of assessment. In 10% of the hospitals, patients with TIA are always admitted to the ward. The content of diagnostics is fairly similar, but hospitals vary in the extent of cardiological workup. Almost all hospitals aim for a swift start of assessment as directed by guidelines, but access time differs. Eighty-six percent of respondents reported that antiplatelet therapy is usually initiated before assessment, based on history. This study showed variation in organization of TIA assessment in Dutch hospitals, especially regarding location within the hospital, time to assessment after announcement, and cardiological workup. Further research is needed to investigate implications of this variation for quality of care. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Climate-related genetic variation in a threatened tree species, Pinus albicaulis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus V. Warwell; Ruth G. Shaw

    2017-01-01

    PREMISE OF THE STUDY: With ongoing climate change, understanding of intraspecific adaptive variation is critical for conservation and restoration of plant species. Such information is especially scarce for threatened and endangered tree species, such as Pinus albicaulis Engelm. Therefore, our principal aims were to assess adaptive variation and characterize its...

  14. Distribution and functionality of copy number variation across European cattle populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Upadhyay, Maulik; Silva, Da Vinicius Henrique; Megens, Hendrik Jan; Visker, Marleen H.P.W.; Ajmone-Marsan, Paolo; Bâlteanu, Valentin A.; Dunner, Susana; Garcia, Jose F.; Ginja, Catarina; Kantanen, Juha; Groenen, Martien A.M.; Crooijmans, Richard P.M.A.

    2017-01-01

    Copy number variation (CNV), which is characterized by large-scale losses or gains of DNA fragments, contributes significantly to genetic and phenotypic variation. Assessing CNV across different European cattle populations might reveal genetic changes responsible for phenotypic differences, which

  15. Plasma creatinine in dogs: intra- and inter-laboratory variation in 10 European veterinary laborat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mrs. Ulleberg, T.; Robben, J.H.; Nordahl, K.; Mr. Ulleberg, T.; Heiene, R.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND: There is substantial variation in reported reference intervals for canine plasma creatinine among veterinary laboratories, thereby influencing the clinical assessment of analytical results. The aims of the study was to determine the inter- and intra-laboratory variation in

  16. Cleft palate repair and variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agrawal Karoon

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Cleft palate affects almost every function of the face except vision. Today a child born with cleft palate with or without cleft lip should not be considered as unfortunate, because surgical repair of cleft palate has reached a highly satisfactory level. However for an average cleft surgeon palatoplasty remains an enigma. The surgery differs from centre to centre and surgeon to surgeon. However there is general agreement that palatoplasty (soft palate at least should be performed between 6-12 months of age. Basically there are three groups of palatoplasty techniques. One is for hard palate repair, second for soft palate repair and the third based on the surgical schedule. Hard palate repair techniques are Veau-Wardill-Kilner V-Y, von Langenbeck, two-flap, Aleveolar extension palatoplasty, vomer flap, raw area free palatoplasty etc. The soft palate techniques are intravelar veloplasty, double opposing Z-plasty, radical muscle dissection, primary pharyngeal flap etc. And the protocol based techniques are Schweckendiek′s, Malek′s, whole in one, modified schedule with palatoplasty before lip repair etc. One should also know the effect of each technique on maxillofacial growth and speech. The ideal technique of palatoplasty is the one which gives perfect speech without affecting the maxillofacial growth and hearing. The techniques are still evolving because we are yet to design an ideal one. It is always good to know all the techniques and variations so that one can choose whichever gives the best result in one′s hands. A large number of techniques are available in literature, and also every surgeon incorporates his own modification to make it a variation. However there are some basic techniques, which are described in details which are used in various centres. Some of the important variations are also described.

  17. Systematic variations in divergence angle

    CERN Document Server

    Okabe, Takuya

    2012-01-01

    Practical methods for quantitative analysis of radial and angular coordinates of leafy organs of vascular plants are presented and applied to published phyllotactic patterns of various real systems from young leaves on a shoot tip to florets on a flower head. The constancy of divergence angle is borne out with accuracy of less than a degree. It is shown that apparent fluctuations in divergence angle are in large part systematic variations caused by the invalid assumption of a fixed center and/or by secondary deformations, while random fluctuations are of minor importance.

  18. Period Variations of RT Persei

    OpenAIRE

    Chun-Hwey Kim

    1995-01-01

    RT Per has been known as a close binary of which the orbital period has unpredictably varied so far. Although there are no agreements with the working mechanism for the changes of the period, two interpretations have been suggested and waiting for to be tested: 1)light-time effects due to the unseen 3rd and 4th bodies (Panchatsaram 1981), 2)Abrupt period-change due to internal variations of the system(e.q. mass transfer or mass loss) superimposing to the light-times effect by a 3rd body (Frie...

  19. Variational collocation on finite intervals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amore, Paolo [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Colima, Bernal DIaz del Castillo 340, Colima, Colima (Mexico); Cervantes, Mayra [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Colima, Bernal DIaz del Castillo 340, Colima, Colima (Mexico); Fernandez, Francisco M [INIFTA (Conicet, UNLP), Diag. 113 y 64 S/N, Sucursal 4, Casilla de Correo 16, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2007-10-26

    In this paper, we study a set of functions, defined on an interval of finite width, which are orthogonal and which reduce to the sinc functions when the appropriate limit is taken. We show that these functions can be used within a variational approach to obtain accurate results for a variety of problems. We have applied them to the interpolation of functions on finite domains and to the solution of the Schroedinger equation, and we have compared the performance of the present approach with others.

  20. Urbanization Process and Variation of Energy Budget of Land Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciro Gardi

    Full Text Available Urban areas are increasing at a rate much higher than human population growth in many part of the world; actually more than 73 towns in the world are larger than 1000 km2. The European Environmental Agency indicates an urban area average growth rate, over the last 20 years, of 20%. The urbanization process, and the consequent soil sealing, determines not only the losses of the ecological functions of the soil, but also a variation of the energy budget of land surfaces, that affect the microclimatic conditions (heat islands. The alteration of the energy budget are determined by the variations of albedo and roughness of surfaces, but especially by the net losses of evapotranspirating areas. In the present research we have assessed the variation of Parma territory energy budget, induced by the change in land use over the last 122 years. The urban area increase between 1881 and 2003 was 535%.

  1. Spatial and Temporal Variation of Wideband Indoor Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Ndzi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive studies of the impact of temporal variations induced by people on the characteristics of indoor wideband channels are reported. Singular Value Decomposition Prony algorithm has been used to compute the impulse response from measured channel transfer functions. The high multipath resolution of the algorithm has allowed a detailed assessment of the shapes of individual multipath clusters and their variation in time and space in indoor channels. Large- and small-scale analyses show that there is a significant dependency of the channel response on room size. The presence of people in the channel has been found to induce both signal enhancements and fading with short-term dynamic variations of up to 30 dB, depending on the number of people and their positions within the room. A joint amplitude and time of arrival model has been used to successfully model measured impulse response clusters.

  2. A study of weekly and seasonal variation of stroke onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongbing; Sekine, Michikazu; Chen, Xiaoli; Kagamimori, Sadanobu

    2002-10-01

    A registry based study was conducted to assess the variation in first-onset stroke with weekdays and seasons, in relation to the effects of age. Between 1 December 1991 and 30 November 1998, 10,729 first-onset stroke patients aged 25 or more were registered in Toyama Prefecture, Japan. We compared the weekly and seasonal variation in first-onset stroke by a one-way goodness-of-fit χ2-test. The relationship between seasonal variation in stroke onset and age was also evaluated by the method of Kendall's τ-b R × C tables with ordered categories. The frequency of onset of all strokes and cerebral infarctions (CI) was significantly higher on weekdays than at weekends (P lifestyle and physiological condition may be different from those of older people.

  3. Sources of Variation in Sweat Chloride Measurements in Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Scott M.; Raraigh, Karen S.; Corvol, Harriet; Rommens, Johanna M.; Pace, Rhonda G.; Boelle, Pierre-Yves; McGready, John; Sosnay, Patrick R.; Strug, Lisa J.; Knowles, Michael R.; Cutting, Garry R.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Expanding the use of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) potentiators and correctors for the treatment of cystic fibrosis (CF) requires precise and accurate biomarkers. Sweat chloride concentration provides an in vivo assessment of CFTR function, but it is unknown the degree to which CFTR mutations account for sweat chloride variation. Objectives: To estimate potential sources of variation for sweat chloride measurements, including demographic factors, testing variability, recording biases, and CFTR genotype itself. Methods: A total of 2,639 sweat chloride measurements were obtained in 1,761 twins/siblings from the CF Twin-Sibling Study, French CF Modifier Gene Study, and Canadian Consortium for Genetic Studies. Variance component estimation was performed by nested mixed modeling. Measurements and Main Results: Across the tested CF population as a whole, CFTR gene mutations were found to be the primary determinant of sweat chloride variability (56.1% of variation) with contributions from variation over time (e.g., factors related to testing on different days; 13.8%), environmental factors (e.g., climate, family diet; 13.5%), other residual factors (e.g., test variability; 9.9%), and unique individual factors (e.g., modifier genes, unique exposures; 6.8%) (likelihood ratio test, P < 0.001). Twin analysis suggested that modifier genes did not play a significant role because the heritability estimate was negligible (H2 = 0; 95% confidence interval, 0.0–0.35). For an individual with CF, variation in sweat chloride was primarily caused by variation over time (58.1%) with the remainder attributable to residual/random factors (41.9%). Conclusions: Variation in the CFTR gene is the predominant cause of sweat chloride variation; most of the non-CFTR variation is caused by testing variability and unique environmental factors. If test precision and accuracy can be improved, sweat chloride measurement could be a valuable biomarker

  4. World Climates and Food Supply Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, James E.; Pickett, Robert C.

    1974-01-01

    This article contains an outline of the major variations in the world's climates and suggestions for taking these variations into account in any plans made to improve world food production and supply. (PEB)

  5. Variational inference & deep learning: A new synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kingma, D.P.

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, Variational Inference and Deep Learning: A New Synthesis, we propose novel solutions to the problems of variational (Bayesian) inference, generative modeling, representation learning, semi-supervised learning, and stochastic optimization

  6. Variational inference & deep learning : A new synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, D.P.

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, Variational Inference and Deep Learning: A New Synthesis, we propose novel solutions to the problems of variational (Bayesian) inference, generative modeling, representation learning, semi-supervised learning, and stochastic optimization

  7. Nonlinear variational inequalities of semilinear parabolic type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Jong-Yeoul

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The existence of solutions for the nonlinear functional differential equation governed by the variational inequality is studied. The regularity and a variation of solutions of the equation are also given.

  8. Variational inference & deep learning : A new synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kingma, D.P.

    2017-01-01

    In this thesis, Variational Inference and Deep Learning: A New Synthesis, we propose novel solutions to the problems of variational (Bayesian) inference, generative modeling, representation learning, semi-supervised learning, and stochastic optimization.

  9. Biological variation of thromboelastrography variables in 10 clinically healthy horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scruggs, Jennifer L; Flatland, Bente; McCormick, Karen A; Reed, Ann

    2016-01-01

    To assess the utility of population-based reference intervals (PRIs) for interpreting thromboelastography (TEG) variables in horses using biological variation data. Prospective cohort biologic variation study conducted over a 5-week period. Veterinary teaching hospital and research facility. Ten clinically healthy horses randomly selected from a veterinary school research and teaching herd. Horse health was determined using physical examination, CBC, and biochemical and coagulation profiles prior to the start of the study. Subsequently, once weekly blood sampling for TEG testing was performed for 5 weeks. The 4 TEG variables reaction time (R), clot formation time (K), angle, and maximum amplitude (MA) were measured, and coefficient of variation representing within- and between-horse biological variation (CVi and CVg , respectively) and coefficient of variation representing analytical variation (CVa ) were calculated using a nested ANOVA after removing outlier data. The CVi , CVg , and CVa for R were 26.8%, 5.2%, and 5.9%; for K were 31.0%, 0.0%, and 5.9%; for angle were 9.4%, 6.2%, and 21.7%; and for MA were 3.4%, 4.1%, and 4.4%, respectively. Index of individuality (IOI) was then calculated for each variable using the formula {( CVi² + CVa²/CVg²)}¹/². IOI for R was 5.3, for angle was 3.8, and for MA was 1.4; IOI was not assessed for K. PRIs are appropriate for TEG variables, R, angle, and MA when interpreting results from individual horses based on calculated IOI values equal to or greater than 1.4. PRIs are likely appropriate when interpreting K, but IOI could not be calculated for this variable. ©Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2015.

  10. SYSTEMATIC AND STOCHASTIC VARIATIONS IN PULSAR DISPERSION MEASURES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, M. T.; Cordes, J. M.; Chatterjee, S. [Department of Astronomy and Cornell Center for Astrophysics and Planetary Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Jones, M. L.; McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Armstrong, J. W., E-mail: mlam@astro.cornell.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2016-04-10

    We analyze deterministic and random temporal variations in the dispersion measure (DM) from the full three-dimensional velocities of pulsars with respect to the solar system, combined with electron-density variations over a wide range of length scales. Previous treatments have largely ignored pulsars’ changing distances while favoring interpretations involving changes in sky position from transverse motion. Linear trends in pulsar DMs observed over 5–10 year timescales may signify sizable DM gradients in the interstellar medium (ISM) sampled by the changing direction of the line of sight to the pulsar. We show that motions parallel to the line of sight can also account for linear trends, for the apparent excess of DM variance over that extrapolated from scintillation measurements, and for the apparent non-Kolmogorov scalings of DM structure functions inferred in some cases. Pulsar motions through atomic gas may produce bow-shock ionized gas that also contributes to DM variations. We discuss the possible causes of periodic or quasi-periodic changes in DM, including seasonal changes in the ionosphere, annual variations of the solar elongation angle, structure in the heliosphere and ISM boundary, and substructure in the ISM. We assess the solar cycle’s role on the amplitude of ionospheric and solar wind variations. Interstellar refraction can produce cyclic timing variations from the error in transforming arrival times to the solar system barycenter. We apply our methods to DM time series and DM gradient measurements in the literature and assess their consistency with a Kolmogorov medium. Finally, we discuss the implications of DM modeling in precision pulsar timing experiments.

  11. Seasonal variation in pediatric dermatoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banerjee Sabyasachi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The under-five population is a unique and vulnerable component of our society that always demands special attention. Aims: Our present work aimed to study the seasonal variation, age-wise variation and distribution of lesions of common dermatoses of this age group. Materials and Methods: We clinically studied all fresh cases attending the skin OPD of our hospital for one month each from summer, rainy season and winter. Total number of patients was 879. Results: The top six skin diseases in our study were impetigo, miliaria, scabies, furunculosis, seborrheic dermatitis and papular urticaria. On statistical analysis, scabies and seborrheic dermatitis were more prevalent during winter while impetigo, furunculosis and miliaria were more during summer and rainy season. Papular urticaria was more frequent in the rainy season. Seborrheic dermatitis predominantly affected the infants while impetigo, furunculosis, miliaria and popular urticaria were commoner in older age groups. Conclusion: Distribution of lesions of common dermatoses will help diagnose difficult cases and extensive evaluation of the body parts which, by virtue of being commonly affected, are must-examine sites in under-five children.

  12. On polar daily geomagnetic variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola De Michelis

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to investigate the nature of the daily magnetic field perturbations produced by ionospheric and magnetospheric currents at high latitudes. We analyse the hourly means of the X and Y geomagnetic field components recorded by a meridian chain of permanent geomagnetic observatories in the polar region of the Northern Hemisphere during a period of four years (1995-1998 around the solar minimum. We apply a mathematical method, known as natural orthogonal component (NOC, which is capable of characterizing the dominant modes of the geomagnetic field daily variability through a set of empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs. Using the first two modes we reconstruct a two-dimensional equivalent current representation of the ionospheric electric currents, which contribute substantially to the geomagnetic daily variations. The obtained current structures resemble the equivalent current patterns of DP2 and DP1. We characterize these currents by studying their evolution with the geomagnetic activity level and by analysing their dependence on the interplanetary magnetic field. The obtained results support the idea of a coexistence of two main processes during all analysed period although one of them, the directly driven process, represents the dominant component of the geomagnetic daily variation.

  13. Interpretation of biological and mechanical variations between the Lowry versus Bradford method for protein quantification

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lu, Tzong-Shi; Yiao, Szu-Yu; Lim, Kenneth; Jensen, Roderick V; Hsiao, Li-Li

    2010-01-01

    .... We used the Lowry and Bradford methods- two most commonly used methods for protein quantification, to assess whether differential protein expressions are a result of true biological or methodical variations. MATERIAL #ENTITYSTARTX00026...

  14. Genome structural variation discovery and genotyping

    OpenAIRE

    Alkan, Can; Coe, Bradley P.; Eichler, Evan E.

    2011-01-01

    Comparisons of human genomes show that more base pairs are altered as a result of structural variation — including copy number variation — than as a result of point mutations. Here we review advances and challenges in the discovery and genotyping of structural variation. The recent application of massively parallel sequencing methods has complemented microarray-based methods and has led to an exponential increase in the discovery of smaller structural-variation events. Some glo...

  15. Kinetic analysis of several variations of push-ups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebben, William P; Wurm, Bradley; VanderZanden, Tyler L; Spadavecchia, Mark L; Durocher, John J; Bickham, Curtis T; Petushek, Erich J

    2011-10-01

    Push-ups are a common and practical exercise that is used to enhance fitness, including upper body strength or endurance. The kinetic characteristics of push-ups and its variations are yet to be quantified. Kinetic quantification is necessary to accurately evaluate the training load, and thus the nature of the training stimulus, for these exercise variations. This study assessed the peak vertical ground reaction forces (GRFs) of push-up variations including the regular push-up and those performed with flexed knee, feet elevated on a 30.48-cm box, and a 60.96-cm box, and hands elevated on a 30.48-cm box and a 60.96-cm box. Twenty-three recreationally fit individuals (14 men, 9 women) performed each of the 6 push-up variations in a randomized order. Peak GRF and peak GRF expressed as a coefficient of subject body mass were obtained with a force platform. Push-ups with the feet elevated produced a higher GRF than all other push-up variations (p ≤ 0.05). Push-ups with hands elevated and push-ups from the flexed knee position produced a lower GRF than all other push-up variations (p ≤ 0.05). No gender differences in response to these push-up variations were found (p > 0.05). Additionally, subject height was not related to the GRF for any of the push-up conditions (p > 0.05) other than the condition where hands were elevated on a 60.96-cm box (p ≤ 0.05; r = 0.63). These data can be used to progress the intensity of push-ups in a program and to quantify the training load as a percentage of body mass.

  16. Stochastic developmental variation, an epigenetic source of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... strong evidence from experiments with genetically identical organisms performed in narrowly standardized laboratory set-ups that SDV is a source of phenotypic variation in its own right aside from genetic variation and environmental variation. It is obviouslymediated bymolecular and higher-order epigeneticmechanisms.

  17. Seasonal variation of manic and depressive symptoms in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Ahmed; Fiedorowicz, Jess G; Zhang, Tao; Potash, James B; Cavanaugh, Joseph; Solomon, David A; Coryell, William H

    2013-06-01

    Analyses of seasonal variation of manic and depressive symptoms in bipolar disorder in retrospective studies examining admission data have yielded conflicting results. We examined seasonal variation of mood symptoms in a prospective cohort with long-term follow-up: the Collaborative Depression Study (CDS). The CDS included participants from five academic centers with a prospective diagnosis of bipolar I or II disorder. The sample was limited to those who were followed for at least 10 years of annual or semi-annual assessments. Time series analyses and autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models were used to assess seasonal patterns of manic and depressive symptoms. A total of 314 individuals were analyzed (bipolar I disorder, n = 202; bipolar II disorder, n = 112), with both disorders exhibiting the lowest frequency of depressive symptoms in summer and the highest around the winter solstice, though the winter peak in symptoms was statistically significant only with bipolar I disorder. Variation of manic symptoms was more pronounced in bipolar II disorder, with a significant peak in hypomanic symptomatology in the months surrounding the fall equinox. Significant seasonal variation exists in bipolar disorder, with manic/hypomanic symptoms peaking around the fall equinox and depressive symptoms peaking in the months surrounding the winter solstice in bipolar I disorder. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Human performance variation analysis: A process for human performance problem solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anerie Rademeyer

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Problem-solving ability is a much sought-after trait in executives, especially if it includes the ability to solve human performance problems. This paper proposes a systematic root cause analysis process that effectively and consistently uncovers the root causes of human performance problems and controls the causes in a way that prevents the problems from recurring. Applying action research the study brings into being a Human Performance Variation Analysis (HPVA process, which consists of three phases: (1 performance variation assessment, (2 performance variation analysis, and (3 performance variation resolution. The HPVA provides much-needed capability in solving human performance problems in organisations.

  19. Interpretation of biological and mechanical variations between the Lowry versus Bradford method for protein quantification

    OpenAIRE

    Tzong-Shi Lu; Szu-Yu Yiao; Kenneth Lim; Jensen, Roderick V.; Li-Li Hsiao

    2010-01-01

    Background: The identification of differences in protein expression resulting from methodical variations is an essential component to the interpretation of true, biologically significant results. Aims: We used the Lowry and Bradford methods- two most commonly used methods for protein quantification, to assess whether differential protein expressions are a result of true biological or methodical variations. Material & Methods: Differential protein expression patterns was assessed by western bl...

  20. Craniodental variation among Macaques (Macaca, nonhuman primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Ruliang

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In terms of structure and function, the skull is one of the most complicated organs in the body. It is also one of the most important parts in terms of developmental and evolutionary origins. This complexity makes it difficult to obtain evolutionary assessments if, as is usually the case with fossils, only part of the skull is available. For this reason this study involves a set of comparisons whereby the smallest functional units are studied first, and these built up, through a triple-nested hierarchical design, into more complex anatomical regions and eventually into the skull-as-a-whole. This design has been applied to macaques (Macaca in order to reveal patterns of variation at the different levels. The profiles of such variation have been obtained both within and between species. This has lead to a search for the skull parts that have undergone similar selection pressures during evolution and comparable development patterns in both ontogeny and phylogeny. Results Morphometric analysis (Principal Components was used to obtain these profiles of species and sex separations based on 77 cranial variables from 11 species of macaques. The results showed that 7 functional units could be aggregated into three functionally reasonable anatomical regions on the basis of similarities in profiles. These were: the masticatory apparatus containing mandible, lower teeth and upper teeth, the face as a whole combining maxilla (actually lower face and upper face, and the cranium as a whole involving cranium and calvaria. Twenty-six variables were finally selected for analyzing the morphology of the whole skull. This last showed an overall profile similar to that revealed in the masticatory apparatus but also contained additional information pertaining to individual species and species-groups separations. Conclusions The study provides a model for carrying out analysis of species separations and sex variation simultaneously. Through this

  1. Organic carbon pattern and foraminiferal assemblage in the sediments of Gulf of Kutch

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Setty, M.G.A.P.; Ambre, N.V.

    . The foraminiferal number (TFN) and the species diversity (TSN) seem to fluctuate with the variation in the sediment pattern. It is highest in the fine clays chiefly with embryonic or meiofaunal in size, thin-walled and hyaline, whereas it is large, thick...

  2. Community structure and feeding preference of nematodes associated with methane seepage at the Darwin mud volcano (Gulf of Cadiz)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pape, E.; Bezerra, T.N.; Venneste, H.; Heeschen, K.; Moodley, L.; Leroux, F.; Van Breugel, P.; Vanreusel, A.

    2011-01-01

    We sampled the Darwin mud volcano (MV) for meiofaunal community and trophic structure in relation to pore-water geochemistry along a 10 m transect from a seep site on the rim of the crater towards the MV slope. Pore-water profiles indicated considerable variation in upward methane (CH4) flow among

  3. Population variation in skeletal sexual dimorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ubelaker, Douglas H; DeGaglia, Cassandra M

    2017-09-01

    Research has documented considerable population variation in sexual dimorphism related to human growth and development. This variation represents both genetic and environmental factors which impact methodologies used to estimate sex from human skeletal remains. This article provides an overview of known variation in skeletal sexual dimorphism among populations through documented research on samples from around the world. Variation in juvenile growth patterns of populations and differences in adult skeletal size and characteristics are discussed. This recognized variation should be considered by forensic anthropologists when estimating sex from skeletal remains and appropriate population-specific data should be utilized. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Equilibrium models and variational inequalities

    CERN Document Server

    Konnov, Igor

    2007-01-01

    The concept of equilibrium plays a central role in various applied sciences, such as physics (especially, mechanics), economics, engineering, transportation, sociology, chemistry, biology and other fields. If one can formulate the equilibrium problem in the form of a mathematical model, solutions of the corresponding problem can be used for forecasting the future behavior of very complex systems and, also, for correcting the the current state of the system under control. This book presents a unifying look on different equilibrium concepts in economics, including several models from related sciences.- Presents a unifying look on different equilibrium concepts and also the present state of investigations in this field- Describes static and dynamic input-output models, Walras, Cassel-Wald, spatial price, auction market, oligopolistic equilibrium models, transportation and migration equilibrium models- Covers the basics of theory and solution methods both for the complementarity and variational inequality probl...

  5. Variation of the latissimus dorsi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishani P Shah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A typical muscle variation of latissimus dorsi - the axillary arch is represented by the muscular or fibromuscular slip detached from the anteroinferior border of the musculus latissimus dorsi passing over the axilla under the axillary fascia crossing the medial side of the brachial plexus to continue as a septum intermusculare mediale brachii distally to the medial epicondyle of humerus. The full extent of the muscle is rarely present. Slips of muscle extend from the latissimus dorsi at the inferior angle of scapula to insert into pectoralis major (Langer, coracobrachilis, biceps or coracoid process forming what is described as a common variant - the muscular axillary arch. We report three cases of variants of latissimus dorsi, one of which has not been reported in the literature before.

  6. Variational approach and deformed derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weberszpil, J.; Helayël-Neto, J. A.

    2016-05-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that there exists a possible relationship between q-deformed algebras in two different contexts of Statistical Mechanics, namely, the Tsallis' framework and the Kaniadakis' scenario, with a local form of fractional-derivative operators for fractal media, the so-called Hausdorff derivatives, mapped into a continuous medium with a fractal measure. Here, in this paper, we present an extension of the traditional calculus of variations for systems containing deformed-derivatives embedded into the Lagrangian and the Lagrangian densities for classical and field systems. The results extend the classical Euler-Lagrange equations and the Hamiltonian formalism. The resulting dynamical equations seem to be compatible with those found in the literature, specially with mass-dependent and with nonlinear equations for systems in classical and quantum mechanics. Examples are presented to illustrate applications of the formulation. Also, the conserved ​Noether current is worked out.

  7. Period Variations of RT Persei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hwey Kim

    1995-12-01

    Full Text Available RT Per has been known as a close binary of which the orbital period has unpredictably varied so far. Although there are no agreements with the working mechanism for the changes of the period, two interpretations have been suggested and waiting for to be tested: 1light-time effects due to the unseen 3rd and 4th bodies (Panchatsaram 1981, 2Abrupt period-change due to internal variations of the system(e.q. mass transfer or mass loss superimposing to the light-times effect by a 3rd body (Frieboes-Conde & Herczeg 1973. In the point of view that the former interprepation models could predict the behavior of the changes of the orbital period theoretically, we checked whether the recent observed times of minimum lights follow the predictions by the first model or not. We confirmed that the observed times of minimum lights have followed the variations calculated by the light-times effects due to 3rd and 4th bodies suggested by Panchatsaram. In this paper a total of 626 times of minimum lights were reanalyzed in terms of the light-time effects by the 3rd and 4th bodies. We concluded that the eclipsing pair in SV Cam system moves in an elliptic orbit about center of mass of the triple system with a period of about 42.y2, while the mass center of the triplet is in light-time orbit about the center of mass of the quadruple system with a period of 120y. The mean masses deduced for the 3rd and 4th bodies were 0.89m⨀ and 0.82m⨀, respectively.

  8. Variational methods for field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Menahem, S.

    1986-09-01

    Four field theory models are studied: Periodic Quantum Electrodynamics (PQED) in (2 + 1) dimensions, free scalar field theory in (1 + 1) dimensions, the Quantum XY model in (1 + 1) dimensions, and the (1 + 1) dimensional Ising model in a transverse magnetic field. The last three parts deal exclusively with variational methods; the PQED part involves mainly the path-integral approach. The PQED calculation results in a better understanding of the connection between electric confinement through monopole screening, and confinement through tunneling between degenerate vacua. This includes a better quantitative agreement for the string tensions in the two approaches. Free field theory is used as a laboratory for a new variational blocking-truncation approximation, in which the high-frequency modes in a block are truncated to wave functions that depend on the slower background modes (Boron-Oppenheimer approximation). This ''adiabatic truncation'' method gives very accurate results for ground-state energy density and correlation functions. Various adiabatic schemes, with one variable kept per site and then two variables per site, are used. For the XY model, several trial wave functions for the ground state are explored, with an emphasis on the periodic Gaussian. A connection is established with the vortex Coulomb gas of the Euclidean path integral approach. The approximations used are taken from the realms of statistical mechanics (mean field approximation, transfer-matrix methods) and of quantum mechanics (iterative blocking schemes). In developing blocking schemes based on continuous variables, problems due to the periodicity of the model were solved. Our results exhibit an order-disorder phase transition. The transfer-matrix method is used to find a good (non-blocking) trial ground state for the Ising model in a transverse magnetic field in (1 + 1) dimensions.

  9. Importance of Local Structural Variations on Recrystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Jensen, Dorte; Lin, Fengxiang; Zhang, Yubin

    2013-01-01

    Effects of local variations in the deformation microstructure on subsequent recrystallization are discussed and illustrated by three examples. The three examples consider local variations on different length scales and are: 1. Effects of local variations in the deformation microstructure on the f......Effects of local variations in the deformation microstructure on subsequent recrystallization are discussed and illustrated by three examples. The three examples consider local variations on different length scales and are: 1. Effects of local variations in the deformation microstructure...... on the formation of protrusions on migrating boundaries. 2. Effects of an inhomogeneous spatial distribution of second phase particles on growth. 3. Effects of stored energy and orientation variations on recrystallization kinetics. © (2013) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland....

  10. Accommodating variation: dialects, idiolects, and speech processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraljic, Tanya; Brennan, Susan E; Samuel, Arthur G

    2008-04-01

    Listeners are faced with enormous variation in pronunciation, yet they rarely have difficulty understanding speech. Although much research has been devoted to figuring out how listeners deal with variability, virtually none (outside of sociolinguistics) has focused on the source of the variation itself. The current experiments explore whether different kinds of variation lead to different cognitive and behavioral adjustments. Specifically, we compare adjustments to the same acoustic consequence when it is due to context-independent variation (resulting from articulatory properties unique to a speaker) versus context-conditioned variation (resulting from common articulatory properties of speakers who share a dialect). The contrasting results for these two cases show that the source of a particular acoustic-phonetic variation affects how that variation is handled by the perceptual system. We also show that changes in perceptual representations do not necessarily lead to changes in production.

  11. Variation in commercial smoking mixtures containing third-generation synthetic cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frinculescu, Anca; Lyall, Catherine L; Ramsey, John; Miserez, Bram

    2017-02-01

    Variation in ingredients (qualitative variation) and in quantity of active compounds (quantitative variation) in herbal smoking mixtures containing synthetic cannabinoids has been shown for older products. This can be dangerous to the user, as accurate and reproducible dosing is impossible. In this study, 69 packages containing third-generation cannabinoids of seven brands on the UK market in 2014 were analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively for variation. When comparing the labels to actual active ingredients identified in the sample, only one brand was shown to be correctly labelled. The other six brands contained less, more, or ingredients other than those listed on the label. Only two brands were inconsistent, containing different active ingredients in different samples. Quantitative variation was assessed both within one package and between several packages. Within-package variation was within a 10% range for five of the seven brands, but two brands showed larger variation, up to 25% (Relative Standard Deviation). Variation between packages was significantly higher, with variation up to 38% and maximum concentration up to 2.7 times higher than the minimum concentration. Both qualitative and quantitative variation are common in smoking mixtures and endanger the user, as it is impossible to estimate the dose or to know the compound consumed when smoking commercial mixtures. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Epigenetic variation in mangrove plants occurring in contrasting natural environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira-Medeiros, Catarina Fonseca; Parisod, Christian; Fernandes, Ricardo Avancini; Mata, Camila Souza; Cardoso, Monica Aires; Ferreira, Paulo Cavalcanti Gomes

    2010-04-26

    Epigenetic modifications, such as cytosine methylation, are inherited in plant species and may occur in response to biotic or abiotic stress, affecting gene expression without changing genome sequence. Laguncularia racemosa, a mangrove species, occurs in naturally contrasting habitats where it is subjected daily to salinity and nutrient variations leading to morphological differences. This work aims at unraveling how CpG-methylation variation is distributed among individuals from two nearby habitats, at a riverside (RS) or near a salt marsh (SM), with different environmental pressures and how this variation is correlated with the observed morphological variation. Significant differences were observed in morphological traits such as tree height, tree diameter, leaf width and leaf area between plants from RS and SM locations, resulting in smaller plants and smaller leaf size in SM plants. Methyl-Sensitive Amplified Polymorphism (MSAP) was used to assess genetic and epigenetic (CpG-methylation) variation in L. racemosa genomes from these populations. SM plants were hypomethylated (14.6% of loci had methylated samples) in comparison to RS (32.1% of loci had methylated samples). Within-population diversity was significantly greater for epigenetic than genetic data in both locations, but SM also had less epigenetic diversity than RS. Frequency-based (G(ST)) and multivariate (beta(ST)) methods that estimate population structure showed significantly greater differentiation among locations for epigenetic than genetic data. Co-Inertia analysis, exploring jointly the genetic and epigenetic data, showed that individuals with similar genetic profiles presented divergent epigenetic profiles that were characteristic of the population in a particular environment, suggesting that CpG-methylation changes may be associated with environmental heterogeneity. In spite of significant morphological dissimilarities, individuals of L. racemosa from salt marsh and riverside presented little

  13. Variations on the Zilch Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, P.-M.; Tanoue, C. K. S.

    2013-10-01

    Thermo dynamic cycles in introductory physics courses are usually made up from a small number of permutations of isothermal, adiabatic, and constant-pressure and volume quasistatic strokes, with the working fluid usually being an ideal gas. Among them we find the Carnot, Stirling, Otto, Diesel, and Joule-Brayton cycles; in more advanced courses, steam cycles and refrigerators based on real working fluids are often introduced. Any additional cycles made up from the same simple strokes, and any extended analysis of known cycles, are welcome additions to the teaching repertory, as they provide more opportunities for practice and discussion. Our purpose in this note is to extend the analysis of the zilch cycle, introduced in Ref. 1, by presenting its TS diagram and by proposing several variations that do not contain adiabatic strokes, thus allowing a simpler mathematical treatment. As a bonus, we also provide results that make it possible to represent practically any elementary ideal-gas cycle in a TS diagram.

  14. LGBTI Variations in Crime Reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toby Miles-Johnson

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Research shows that people vary in their willingness to report crime to police depending on the type of crime experienced, their gender, age, and their race or ethnicity. Whether or not lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI and heterosexual people vary in their willingness to report crime to the police is not well understood in the extant literature. In this article, I examine variations in LGBTI respondents’ attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control on their intentions to report crimes to the police. Drawing on a survey of LGBTI individuals sampled from a Gay Pride community event and online LGBTI community forums (N = 329, I use quantitative statistical methods to examine whether LGBTI people’s beliefs in police homophobia are also directly associated with the behavioral intention to report crime. Overall, the results indicate that LGBTI and heterosexual people differ significantly in their intention to report crime to the police, and that a belief in police homophobia strongly influences LGBTI people’s intention to underreport crime to the police.

  15. Variation of aircraft noise annoyance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, T. K.

    1980-01-01

    Laboratory and field studies were conducted to determine the basis for increased sensitivity of people to noise during aircraft noise studies. This change in sensitivity could be attributed to either a physiological time-of-day effect (i.e., a circadian rhythm) or simply to the total number of aircraft noise events experienced during a laboratory test period. In order to investigate the time-of-day factor, noise sensitivity measures were obtained from subjects at home with cassette tape recorders/headsets over a 24 hour period. The effect of number of aircraft noise events on noise sensitivity was investigated within a laboratory. In these tests, measures of sensitivity to noise were obtained from subjects before and after their exposure to varying numbers of aircraft noise events. The 24 hour data showed no evidence that noise sensitivity is physiologically cyclical. Consequently, these data can not explain annoyance response variation to aircraft noise tests conducted during the daytime. However, the number of aircraft noise events did influence the subject's noise sensitivity. This effect completely accounts for the systematic increase in noise sensitivity during a laboratory test period.

  16. Temporal Variations in Jupiter's Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon-Miller, Amy A.; Chanover, N. J.; Yanamandra-Fisher, P.; Hammel, H. B.; dePater, I.; Noll, K.; Wong, M.; Clarke, J.; Sanchez-Levega, A.; Orton, G. S.; hide

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, Jupiter has undergone many atmospheric changes from storms turning red to global. cloud upheavals, and most recently, a cornet or asteroid impact. Yet, on top of these seemingly random changes events there are also periodic phenomena, analogous to observed Earth and Saturn atmospheric oscillations. We will present 15 years of Hubble data, from 1994 to 2009, to show how the equatorial tropospheric cloud deck and winds have varied over that time, focusing on the F953N, F41 ON and F255W filters. These filters give leverage on wind speeds plus cloud opacity, cloud height and tropospheric haze thickness, and stratospheric haze, respectively. The wind data consistently show a periodic oscillation near 7-8 S latitude. We will discuss the potential for variations with longitude and cloud height, within the calibration limits of those filters. Finally, we will discuss the role that large atmospheric events, such as the impacts in 1994 and 2009, and the global upheaval of 2007, have on temporal studies, This work was supported by a grant from the NASA Planetary Atmospheres Program. HST observational support was provided by NASA through grants from Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under contract NAS5-26555.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA variation in screwworm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, D B; Szalanski, A L; Peterson, R D

    1996-04-01

    Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis was used to characterize mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation in screwworms, Cochliomyia hominivorax, and secondary screwworm, C.macellaria, from the Caribbean, North America and South America. Four amplicons, totaling 7.1 kb, were analysed with sixteen restriction enzymes. A total of 133 restriction sites was observed in the two species, 104 in C.hominivorax, of which nineteen were variable, and ninety-five in C.macellaria, none of which was variable. Fourteen mtDNA haplotypes were observed among eighteen C.hominivorax examined. Mean divergence between C.hominivorax haplotypes (d) was 0.0064 substitutions per base-pair and genotypic diversity (G) was 0.97. Mean divergence between C.hominivorax and C.macellaria was 0.0824. Cochliomyia hominivorax haplotypes could be divided into three assemblages representing North America, South America and Jamaica, based on UPGMA clustering with d values. The assemblages did not exhibit complete geographic fidelity. These data were discordant with previously published allozyme data indicating little differentiation between screwworm populations. A scenario invoking historically isolated populations coming into contact with the introduction and movement of European livestock is proposed to explain the observed population structure of screwworm.

  18. PLURILINGUAL COMPETENCE, STYLES AND VARIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyrki Kalliokoski

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores plurilingual competence in respect to language proficiency, language education and pluri- and multilingualism. The notion of communicative competence was introduced by Hymes (1972 as a reaction to chomskyan view of language as an autonomous system. Hymes’ notion of communicative competence originally included plurilingualism. The concept of communicative competence was quickly adopted to applied linguistics but the idea of a linguistic repertoire consisting of the competencies of linguistic varieties was not imported to SLA or language testing. The Hymesian perspective to plurilingualism as an essential dimension of communicative competence was revived in the Common European Framework (CEFR. However,the practice of applying the CEFR has mostly neglected the dimension on plurilingualism and plurilingual competence. The focus in the use of the CEFR has been on the different areas of language skills within one single language at a time, while the application of plurilingual practices has gained very little attention. The Hymesian notion of communicative competence has lived on in the sociolinguistic research tradition, especially within interactional sociolinguistics. The present paper relates the notion of plurilingual competence to its hymesian origin, to recent trends in plurilingual and pluricultural education, and to the sociolinguistic study of style and linguistic variation in multilingual communities. The article uses Finnish L2 data to show how plurilingual competence is used as an interactional resource.From the perspective of language learning, plurilingual competence enables speakers with different linguistic backgrounds to use their shared linguistic repertoire in order to ensure smooth interaction and achieve mutual understanding.

  19. Genome size variation in Begonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewitte, Angelo; Leus, Leen; Eeckhaut, Tom; Vanstechelman, Ives; Van Huylenbroeck, Johan; Van Bockstaele, Erik

    2009-10-01

    The genome sizes of a Begonia collection comprising 37 species and 23 hybrids of African, Asiatic, Middle American, and South American origin were screened using flow cytometry. Within the collection, 1C values varied between 0.23 and 1.46 pg DNA. Genome sizes were, in most cases, not positively correlated with chromosome number, but with pollen size. A 12-fold difference in mean chromosome size was found between the genotypes with the largest and smallest chromosomes. In general, chromosomes from South American genotypes were smaller than chromosomes of African, Asian, or Middle American genotypes, except for B. boliviensis and B. pearcei. Cytological chromosome studies in different genotypes showed variable chromosome numbers, length, width, and total chromosome volume, which confirmed the diversity in genome size. Large secondary constrictions were present in several investigated genotypes. These data show that chromosome number and structure exhibit a great deal of variation within the genus Begonia, and likely help to explain the large number of taxa found within the genus.

  20. Assessing Classroom Assessment Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson-Beck, Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Classroom assessment techniques (CATs) are teaching strategies that provide formative assessments of student learning. It has been argued that the use of CATs enhances and improves student learning. Although the various types of CATs have been extensively documented and qualitatively studied, there appears to be little quantitative research…